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Sample records for stage i-ii lung

  1. Radiotherapy for stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Murakami, Masao; Mizowaki, Takashi; Nakajima, Toshifumi; Kuroda, Yasumasa

    1999-01-01

    Surgery has been regarded as the standard treatment for patients with non-small cell lung cancer in the early stage, while radiotherapy has become an effective alternative for medically inoperable patients and those who refuse surgery. We reviewed the records of 31 patients with stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer treated by radiotherapy between 1980 and 1997. There were 15 patients in stage I and 16 in stage II. The variables analyzed for influence on cause-specific survival and loco-regional control were: age, performance status, clinical stage, tumor size, tumor site, radiation field, radiation dose, and combination with chemotherapy. The overall and cause-specific 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-years survival rates were 71% and 77%; 63% and 73%; 34% and 48%; and 17% and 32%, respectively. Five-year survival rate for patients with peripheral tumor in the lung was 72%, with 70% loco-regional control, while the 5-year survival rate of patients whose tumor originated in the central region was 20%, with 25% loco-regional control. These differences had marginal significance on univariate analysis (P=0.07), but only tumor site (central vs peripheral) showed marginal significant influence on cause-specific survival (P=0.08) and loco-regional control (P=0.07) on multivariate analysis. There were no fatal complications, including radiation-induced myelopathy. The present series showed satisfactory results with definitive radiotherapy for patients with medically inoperable stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer, with results similar to those in recent reports of radiotherapy. The only significant variable was that patients with peripheral tumors had a better prognosis than patients with central tumors. (author)

  2. Preliminary investigation of stereotactic body radiation therapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Jindong; Lu Changxing; Wang Jiaming; Liu Jun; Li Hongxuan; Wang Changlu; Gao Lanting; Zhao Lei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and treatment-related toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: SBRT was applied to 30 patients, including clinically staged T 1 , T 2 (≤5 cm) or T 3 (chest wall primary tumors only), N 0 , M 0 ,biopsy-confirmed NSCLC. All patients were precluded from lobotomy because of physical condition or comorbidity. No patients developed tumors of any T-stage in the proximal zone. SBRT was performed with the total dose of 50 Gy to 70 Gy in 10 - 11 fractions during 12 - 15 days. prescription line was set onthe edge of the PTV. Results: The follow-up rate was 100%. The number of patients who completed the 1-, and 2-year follow-up were 15, and 10, respectively. All 30 patients completed therapy as planned. The complete response (CR), partial response (PR) and stable disease (SD) rates were 37%, 53% and 3%, respectively. With a median follow-up of 16 months (range, 4-36 months), Kaplan-Meier local control at 2 years was 94%. The 2-year overall survival was 84% and the 2-year cancer specific survival was 90%. Seven patients(23%) developed Grade 2 pneumonitis, no grade > 2 acute or late lung toxicity was observed. No one developed chest wall pain. Conclusions: It is feasible to deliver 50 Gy to 70 Gy of SBRT in 10 - 11 fractions for medically inoperable patients with stage I / II NSCLC. It was associated with low incidence of toxicities and provided sustained local tumor control.The preliminary investigation indicated the cancer specific survival probability of SBRT was high. It is necessary to perform similar investigation in a larger number of patients with long-term follow-up. (authors)

  3. Treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Wang Lvhua; Zhang Hongxing; Chen Dongfu; Xiao Zefen; Wang Mei; Feng Qinfu; Liang Jun; Zhou Zongmei; Ou Guangfei; Lv Jima; Yin Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Between Jan. 2000 and Dec. 2005, fifty-eight such patients were enrolled into the database analysis, including 37 with clinical stage I and 21 with stage II disease. Fifty patients received radiotherapy alone and eight with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Forty- three patients were treated with 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and 15 with conventional radiotherapy. Results: The 1-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 85%, 54% and 30%, and the median survival time was 26.2 months for the whole group. The corresponding figures were 88%, 60%, 36% and 30.8 months for cancer-specific survival; 84%, 64%, 31% and 30.8 months for Stage I disease; 81%, 47%, 28% and 18.8 months for Stage II disease; 95%, 57%, 33% and 30.8 months for 3D-CRT group and 53%, 44%, 24% and 15.3 months for conventional radiotherapy group. By logrank test, tumor volume, pneumonitis of Grade II or higher and weight loss more than 5% showed statistically significant impact on overall survival. Tumor volume was the only independent prognostic factor in Cox multivariable regression. Pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade II or higher were 16% and 2%, respectively. Age and lung function before treatment had a significant relationship with pneumonitis. Failure included the local recurrence (33%) and distant metastasis (21%). There was no difference between the treatment modalities and failure sites. Conclusions: For medically inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients, tumor volume is the most important prognostic factor for overall survival. The conformal radiotherapy marginally improves the survival. The age and pulmonary function are related to the incidence of treatment induced pneumonitis. (authors)

  4. Radiation therapy for stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer in patients aged 75 years and older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Masaya; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Katano, Susumu

    1996-01-01

    Between 1976 and 1992, 32 patients aged 75 and older with stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were given definitive radiation therapy. These patients did not undergo surgery because of old age, poor cardiac/pulmonary condition, or refusal to give consent. The mean age was 79 years, and 11 patients were over 80 years old. The histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma in 25 patients and adenocarcinoma in 7. The clinical T and N stage was T1N0 in 4 patients, T2N0 in 9, and T2N0 in 19. The total dose of radiation therapy given to each patient exceeded 60 Gy using 10-MV X-rays. The treatment was completed in all 32 patients without treatment-related complications. The 2- and 5-year overall actuarial survival rates were 40% and 16%, respectively. Eleven intercurrent deaths occurred, including 7 patients who died of heart disease. The 2- and 5-year cause-specific survival rates were 57% and 36%, respectively. None of the patients developed severe pneumonitis requiring hospitalization. All but three patients received radiation therapy on an inpatient basis. The mean duration of the hospital stay for initial treatment was 56 days, and mean ratio to total survival period (mean 739 days) was 8%. Although many elderly patients have concurrent medical complications such as heart disease and chronic pulmonary disease, the present study showed that elderly patients with clinical stage I-II NSCLC can expert a realistic probability of long-term survival with definitive radiation therapy. (author)

  5. Treatment of large stage I-II lung tumors using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT): Planning considerations and early toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Chin Loon; Palma, David; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To study the dosimetric predictors of early clinical toxicity following SBRT in patients with lung tumors and planning target volumes (PTV) exceeding 80 cm 3 . Methods: Eighteen consecutive patients who were treated using volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc TM ) were assessed. All were either unfit or refused to undergo surgery or chemoradiotherapy. PTV planning objectives were as used in the ROSEL study protocol. Clinical toxicity was scored using Common Toxicity Criteria AE4.0. Lung volumes receiving 5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy (V 5 , V 10 , V 15 and V 20 ) and mean lung dose were assessed and correlated to symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP). Results: Median age, age-adjusted Charlson-comorbidity score and PTV size were 74, 7.5 and 137 cm 3 , respectively. At a median follow-up of 12.8 months, 8 deaths were recorded: 5 arising from comorbidity, 2 were potentially treatment-related and 1 had local recurrence. RP was reported in 5 patients (grade 2 in 3 and grade 3 in 2). All RP occurred in plans without a high priority optimization objective on contralateral lung. Acute RP was best predicted by contralateral lung V 5 (p 80 cm 3 , the contralateral lung V 5 best predicts RP. Limiting contralateral lung V 5 to <26% may reduce acute toxicity.

  6. Macrophage Inhibitory Cytokine-1 (MIC-1 as A Biomarker for Diagnosis 
and Prognosis of Stage I-II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuning LIU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Increased macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1, member of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β superfamily, was found in patients serum with epithelial tumors. Therefore, our aim was to delineate the diagnostic and prognostic value of serum MIC-1 in patients with stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods A total of 152 consecutive patients with stage I–II NSCLC were prospectively enrolled and underwent follow up after total resection of tumor. Serum MIC-1 level was detected in lung cancer patients by ELISA, 48 benign pulmonary disease patients and 105 healthy controls, and was correlated with clinical features and prognosis of patients. Results The level of MIC-1 of NSCLC patients was significantly higher than that of controls (P<0.001 and benign pulmonary disease patients (P<0.001. A threshold of 1,000 pg/mL could be used to diagnose early-stage NSCLC with 70.4% sensitivity and 99.0% specificity. The level of MIC-1 was associated with elder age (P=0.001, female (P=0.03 and T2 (P=0.022. A threshold of 1,465 pg/mL could identify patients with early poor outcome with 72.2% sensitivity and 66.1% specificity. The overall 3-year survival rate in patients with high level of MIC-1 (≥1,465 pg/mL was significantly lower than that of patients with low MIC-1 level (77.6% vs 94.8%. Multivariable Cox regression revealed that a high level of MIC-1 was an independent risk factor for compromised overall survival (HR=3.37, 95%CI: 1.09-10.42, P=0.035. Conclusion High level of serum MIC-1 could be served as a potential biomarker for diagnosis and poorer outcome in patients with early-stage NSCLC.

  7. Conservative surgery and radiotherapy for stage I/II breast cancer using lung density correction: 10-year and 15-year results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, Lori J.; Griffith, Kent A.; Hayman, James A.; Douglas, Kathye R.; Lichter, Allen S.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) planning for breast cancer using lung density correction improves dose homogeneity. Its use obviates the need for a medial wedge, thus reducing scatter to the opposite breast. Although lung density correction is used at many centers in planning for early-stage breast cancer, long-term results of local control and survival have not been reported. Since 1984, we have used lung density correction for dose calculations at the University of Michigan. We now present our 10-year and 15-year results. Methods and Materials: The records of 867 patients with Stage I/II breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT with or without systemic therapy were reviewed. Tangential fields delivering 45-50 Gy to the whole breast calculated using lung density correction were used. A boost was added in 96.8% of patients for a total median dose of 61.8 Gy. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.6 years (range, 0.2-18.9 years), 5-, 10-, and 15-year actuarial rates of in-breast tumor recurrence as only first failure were 2.2%, 3.6%, and 5.4%, respectively. With surgical salvage, the 15-year cumulative rate of local control was 99.7%. Factors that significantly predicted for increased rate of local recurrence in multivariate analysis were age ≤ 35 years, hazard ratio 4.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-13.9) p = 0.004; negative progesterone receptor status, hazard ratio 6.8 (95% CI, 2.3-20.3) p = < 0.001; negative estrogen receptor status, hazard ratio 4.0 (95% CI, 1.5-11.1) p = 0.007; and lack of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy, hazard ratio 7.7 (95% CI, 1.7-33.3) p = 0.008. Relapse-free survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 84.6%, 70.8%, and 55.9%, respectively; breast cancer-specific survival rates were 94.4%, 90.5%, and 86.9%, respectively; and corresponding estimates for overall survival were 89.7%, 75.7%, and 61.3%. Conclusions: Use of lung density correction was associated with high rates of local control, relapse-free survival, breast

  8. Staging of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LUNG CANCER MINI-SERIES #2 Staging of Lung Cancer Once your lung cancer is diagnosed, staging tells you and your health care provider about ... at it under a microscope. The stages of lung cancer are listed as I, II, III, and IV ...

  9. Hypofractionated High-Dose Proton Beam Therapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Preliminary Results of A Phase I/II Clinical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Masaharu; Tokuuye, Koichi; Kagei, Kenji; Sugahara, Shinji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Mizumoto, Masashi; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To present treatment outcomes of hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with Stage I NSCLC (11 with Stage IA and 10 with Stage IB) underwent hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy. At the time of irradiation, patient age ranged from 51 to 85 years (median, 74 years). Nine patients were medically inoperable because of comorbidities, and 12 patients refused surgical resection. Histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 6 patients, adenocarcinoma in 14, and large cell carcinoma in 1. Tumor size ranged from 10 to 42 mm (median, 25 mm) in maximum diameter. Three and 18 patients received proton beam irradiation with total doses of 50 Gy and 60 Gy in 10 fractions, respectively, to primary tumor sites. Results: Of 21 patients, 2 died of cancer and 2 died of pneumonia at a median follow-up period of 25 months. The 2-year overall and cause-specific survival rates were 74% and 86%, respectively. All but one of the irradiated tumors were controlled during the follow-up period. Five patients showed recurrences 6-29 months after treatment, including local progression and new lung lesions outside of the irradiated volume in 1 and 4 patients, respectively. The local progression-free and disease-free rates were 95% and 79% at 2 years, respectively. No therapy-related toxicity of Grade ≥3 was observed. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy seems feasible and effective for Stage I NSCLC. Proton beams may contribute to enhanced efficacy and lower toxicity in the treatment of patients with Stage I NSCLC

  10. DART-bid: dose-differentiated accelerated radiation therapy, 1.8 Gy twice daily. High local control in early stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehentmayr, Franz; Wurstbauer, Karl; Deutschmann, Heinz; Sedlmayer, Felix; Fussl, Christoph; Kopp, Peter; Dagn, Karin; Fastner, Gerd; Porsch, Peter; Studnicka, Michael

    2015-01-01

    While surgery is considered standard of care for early stage (I/II), non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radiotherapy is a widely accepted alternative for medically unfit patients or those who refuse surgery. International guidelines recommend several treatment options, comprising stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for small tumors, conventional radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy for larger sized especially centrally located lesions or continuous hyperfractionated accelerated RT (CHART). This study presents clinical outcome and toxicity for patients treated with a dose-differentiated accelerated schedule using 1.8 Gy bid (DART-bid). Between April 2002 and December 2010, 54 patients (median age 71 years, median Karnofsky performance score 70 %) were treated for early stage NSCLC. Total doses were applied according to tumor diameter: 73.8 Gy for 6 cm. The median follow-up was 28.5 months (range 2-108 months); actuarial local control (LC) at 2 and 3 years was 88 %, while regional control was 100 %. There were 10 patients (19 %) who died of the tumor, and 18 patients (33 %) died due to cardiovascular or pulmonary causes. A total of 11 patients (20 %) died intercurrently without evidence of progression or treatment-related toxicity at the last follow-up, while 15 patients (28 %) are alive. Acute esophagitis ≤ grade 2 occurred in 7 cases, 2 patients developed grade 2 chronic pulmonary fibrosis. DART-bid yields high LC without significant toxicity. For centrally located and/or large (> 5 cm) early stage tumors, where SBRT is not feasible, this method might serve as radiotherapeutic alternative to present treatment recommendations, with the need of confirmation in larger cohorts. (orig.) [de

  11. DART-bid: dose-differentiated accelerated radiation therapy, 1.8 Gy twice daily. High local control in early stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer

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    Zehentmayr, Franz; Wurstbauer, Karl; Deutschmann, Heinz; Sedlmayer, Felix [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiotherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria); Paracelsus Medizinische Privatuniversitaet, Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART), Salzburg (Austria); Fussl, Christoph; Kopp, Peter; Dagn, Karin; Fastner, Gerd [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiotherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria); Porsch, Peter; Studnicka, Michael [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Pneumologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria)

    2014-09-23

    While surgery is considered standard of care for early stage (I/II), non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radiotherapy is a widely accepted alternative for medically unfit patients or those who refuse surgery. International guidelines recommend several treatment options, comprising stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for small tumors, conventional radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy for larger sized especially centrally located lesions or continuous hyperfractionated accelerated RT (CHART). This study presents clinical outcome and toxicity for patients treated with a dose-differentiated accelerated schedule using 1.8 Gy bid (DART-bid). Between April 2002 and December 2010, 54 patients (median age 71 years, median Karnofsky performance score 70 %) were treated for early stage NSCLC. Total doses were applied according to tumor diameter: 73.8 Gy for < 2.5 cm, 79.2 Gy for 2.5-4.5 cm, 84.6 Gy for 4.5-6 cm, 90 Gy for > 6 cm. The median follow-up was 28.5 months (range 2-108 months); actuarial local control (LC) at 2 and 3 years was 88 %, while regional control was 100 %. There were 10 patients (19 %) who died of the tumor, and 18 patients (33 %) died due to cardiovascular or pulmonary causes. A total of 11 patients (20 %) died intercurrently without evidence of progression or treatment-related toxicity at the last follow-up, while 15 patients (28 %) are alive. Acute esophagitis ≤ grade 2 occurred in 7 cases, 2 patients developed grade 2 chronic pulmonary fibrosis. DART-bid yields high LC without significant toxicity. For centrally located and/or large (> 5 cm) early stage tumors, where SBRT is not feasible, this method might serve as radiotherapeutic alternative to present treatment recommendations, with the need of confirmation in larger cohorts. (orig.) [German] Die Standardbehandlung fuer nichtkleinzellige Bronchialkarzinome (NSCLC) im Stadium I/II ist die Operation, wobei Radiotherapie fuer Patienten, die nicht operabel sind oder die Operation ablehnen, als Alternative

  12. Stage I/II endometrial carcinomas: preoperative radiotherapy: results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingon, P.; Belichard, C.; Horiot, J.C.; Barillot, I.; Fraisse, J.; Collin, F.

    1996-01-01

    The AIM of this retrospective study is to analyse the indications and the results of treatment of endometrial carcinomas by preoperative radiotherapy. MATERIAL: From 1976 to 1995, 183 patients FIGO stage I or II were treated by preoperative radiotherapy consisting in 95 cases of external radiotherapy (XRT) and brachytherapy (BT) followed by surgery (S) and, in 88 cases of BT alone before surgery, XRT was indicated in cases of grade 2 or 3 and/or cervical involvement. METHODS: XRT was delivered with a 4-fields technique to 40 Gy in 20 fractions with a medial shielding at 30 Gy. BT was done with low dose rate Cs137 and Fletcher-Suit-Delclos applicators with two intra-uterine tubes and vaginal ovoieds. Complications were scored using the French-Italian syllabus. RESULTS: Five-year actuarial survival rates per stage are: Ia=91%, Ib=83%, II=71%, and per grade: G1=80%, G2=79%, G3=90%. Failures were pelvic in 5/183 (2.7%), vaginal in 4 cases (2%) and nodal in 2 cases (1%). Twelve patients developed metastases (6.5%). Complications were analysed during the radiotherapy, after the surgery and with unlimited follow-up. After BT/S, 12 grade 1, 1 grade 2 and 1 grade 3 complications were observed. In the group of patients treated by RT/BT/S, 22 grade 1, 11 grade 2, 4 grade 3 occurred. There is no statistical correlation between complications and parameters of treatment (XRT, hwt, HWT, reference dose to the bladder and rectum, dose rate of brachytherapy). SUMMARY: Preoperative irradiation is an effective and safe treatment of high risk stage I/II endometrial carcinomas. Results seem independent of the pathology grade

  13. Rapidly alternating combination of cisplatin-based chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in split course for Stage IIIA and Stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer: results of a Phase I-II study by the GOTHA group

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    Alberto, P.; Mermillod, B. [Hopital Cantonal Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Mirimanoff, R.O.; Leyvraz, S.; Nagy-Mignotte, H.; Bolla, M.; Wellmann, D.; Moro, D.; Brambilla, E. [Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1995-08-01

    The prognosis of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be improved by a combination of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). In this study, the GOTHA group evaluated the feasibility, tolerance, tumour response, pattern of failure and effect on survival of a combination alternating accelerated hyperfractionated (AH) RT and CT in patients with tumour stage III NSCLC. Toxic effects were leucopenia, nausea and vomiting, mucositis, diarrhoea, alopecia and peripheral neuropathy. Alternating CT and AHRT, as used in this study, were well tolerated and allowed full dose delivery within less than 12 weeks. Initial response was not predictive of survival. The survival curve is encouraging and the 5 year survival is superior to the 5% generally observed with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. (author).

  14. Long-term follow-up of a phase I/II trial of dose escalating three-dimensional conformal thoracic radiation therapy with induction and concurrent carboplatin and paclitaxel in unresectable stage IIIA/B non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Lee, Carrie B; Moore, Dominic T; Rivera, M Patricia; Halle, Jan; Limentani, Steven; Rosenman, Julian G; Socinski, Mark A

    2008-11-01

    We conducted a modified phase I/II trial investigating the incorporation of three-dimensional conformal thoracic radiation therapy (TCRT) into the treatment paradigm of induction and concurrent carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with unresectable stage IIIA/B non-small cell lung cancer. Patients received 2 cycles of induction carboplatin (area under the curve of 6) and paclitaxel (225 mg/m) on days 1, and 22. On day 43 concurrent TCRT and weekly x6 of carboplatin (area under the curve = 2) and paclitaxel (45 mg/m) was initiated. The TCRT dose was escalated from 60 to 74 Gy in 4 cohorts (60, 66, 70, and 74 Gy), and the 74 Gy cohort was expanded into a phase II trial. Sixty-two patients were enrolled; the median age 57 years (range, 36-82), 39 were male (63%), 61 (98%) had a performance status of 0 or 1, 28 (45%) had stage IIIA disease, 21 (34%) had >5% weight loss, and the median forced expiratory volume 1 = 2.10 liters (range, 1.02-3.75). With a median follow-up for survivors of approximately 9 years (range, 7-11 years) the median progression-free survival, time to tumor progression, and overall survival (OS) (with 95% confidence intervals) were 10 (8.5-17), 15 (9-50), and 25 months (18-37), respectively. The 5-year progression-free survival and OS rates were 21% (12-32%) and 27% (17-39%), respectively. The 10-year OS rate was 14% (7-25%). The long term survival rate compares favorably to other treatment approaches for stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

  15. Staging of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Patricia M; Carter, Brett W; Betancourt Cuellar, Sonia L; Erasmus, Jeremy J

    2015-06-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. Thorough clinical staging of patients with lung cancer is important, because therapeutic options and management are to a considerable degree dependent on stage at presentation. Radiologic imaging is an essential component of clinical staging, including chest radiography in some cases, computed tomography, MRI, and PET. Multiplanar imaging modalities allow assessment of features that are important for surgical, oncologic, and radiation therapy planning, including size of the primary tumor, location and relationship to normal anatomic structures in the thorax, and existence of nodal and/or metastatic disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hospital-level Variation in Utilization of Surgery for Clinical Stage I-II Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Douglas S; Mulvihill, Sean J; Skarda, David E; Finlayson, Samuel R G; Stoddard, Gregory J; Ott, Mark J; Firpo, Matthew A; Scaife, Courtney L

    2017-07-11

    To (1) evaluate rates of surgery for clinical stage I-II pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), (2) identify predictors of not undergoing surgery, (3) quantify the degree to which patient- and hospital-level factors explain differences in hospital surgery rates, and (4) evaluate the association between adjusted hospital-specific surgery rates and overall survival (OS) of patients treated at different hospitals. Curative-intent surgery for potentially resectable PDAC is underutilized in the United States. Retrospective cohort study of patients ≤85 years with clinical stage I-II PDAC in the 2004 to 2014 National Cancer Database. Mixed effects multivariable models were used to characterize hospital-level variation across quintiles of hospital surgery rates. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the effect of adjusted hospital surgery rates on OS. Of 58,553 patients without contraindications or refusal of surgery, 63.8% underwent surgery, and the rate decreased from 2299/3528 (65.2%) in 2004 to 4412/7092 (62.2%) in 2014 (P < 0.001). Adjusted hospital rates of surgery varied 6-fold (11.4%-70.9%). Patients treated at hospitals with higher rates of surgery had better unadjusted OS (median OS 10.2, 13.3, 14.2, 16.5, and 18.4 months in quintiles 1-5, respectively, P < 0.001, log-rank). Treatment at hospitals in lower surgery rate quintiles 1-3 was independently associated with mortality [Hazard ratio (HR) 1.10 (1.01, 1.21), HR 1.08 (1.02, 1.15), and HR 1.09 (1.04, 1.14) for quintiles 1-3, respectively, compared with quintile 5] after adjusting for patient factors, hospital type, and hospital volume. Quality improvement efforts are needed to help hospitals with low rates of surgery ensure that their patients have access to appropriate surgery.

  17. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eMeier

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I dose escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation and (III the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent organs, potentially reducing complications. This approach is also more convenient for patients, and is cheaper than intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Several external beam platforms are capable of delivering SBRT for early-stage prostate cancer, although most of the mature reported series have employed a robotic non-coplanar platform (i.e., CyberKnife. Several large studies report 5-year biochemical relapse rates which compare favorably to IMRT. Rates of late GU toxicity are similar to those seen with IMRT, and rates of late rectal toxicity may be less than with IMRT and low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy. Patient-reported quality of life (QOL outcomes appear similar to IMRT in the urinary domain. Bowel QOL may be less adversely affected by SBRT than with other radiation modalities. After five years of follow-up, SBRT delivered on a robotic platform is yielding outcomes at least as favorable as IMRT, and may be considered appropriate therapy for stage I-II prostate cancer.

  18. Stage I-II squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity treated by iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piedbois, P.; Mazeron, J.J.; Haddad, E.; Coste, A.; Martin, M.; Levy, C.; Raynal, M.; Pavlovitch, J.M.; Peynegre, R.; Perquin, B.; Bourgeois, J.P. le

    1991-01-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of 233 evaluable patients with stage I-II squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity treated by definitive brachytherapy. Minimum follow-up is 3 years. Treatment of the neck was chosen by a multidisciplinary team, according to age, medical status and availability for follow-up. One hundred and ten patients (47 percent) underwent elective neck dissection (END), 28 (25 percent) had positive nodes and received neck irradiation post-operatively. One hundred and twenty-three patients (53 percent) were regularly followed up only, with therapeutic neck dissection (TND) reserved for cases of node relapses. In the END group, there were 19 neck relapses (17 percent): 12/60 (20 percent) in patients with mobile tongue carcinoma and 7/50 (14 percent) in patients with floor of the mouth carcinoma. Salvage treatment was successful in 13-21 (62 percent) cases. Ten-year survival is 37 percent for the END-group and 31 percent for the TND group. Tumour stage and infiltration into underlying tissues increased the probability of neck relapse and death. Furthermore, a multivariate analysis showed that patients treated in the TND group had a higher probability of death than patients treated in the END group (p<0.04). (author). 30 refs.; 2 figs.; 7 tabs

  19. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

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    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Rose, Brent S. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McHale, Michael T. [Department of Reproductive Medicine, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Vaida, Florin [Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mell, Loren K., E-mail: lmell@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  20. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D.; Rose, Brent S.; Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal; McHale, Michael T.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Vaida, Florin; Mell, Loren K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification

  1. Breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in stage I-II synchronous bilateral breast cancer (SBBC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gollamudi, Smitha V; Gelman, Rebecca S; Peiro, Gloria; Schneider, Lindsey; Connolly, James L; Schnitt, Stuart; Silver, Barbara; Harris, Jay R

    1995-07-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether patients with early-stage SBBC can be safely and effectively treated with bilateral BCT. MATERIALS and METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed records of 26 patients with clinical Stage I-II SBBC treated between 1968-1989 with bilateral BCT. SBBC was defined as tumors diagnosed no more than one month apart, with both sides demonstrating invasive cancer. Maximum (max) clinical stage was based on the more advanced breast tumor. Median age at diagnosis was 56 years (range, 32-85 years); menopausal status was 6 pre-, 16 post-, 3 peri-, and 1 unknown at diagnosis. Median follow-up for surviving pts is 95 months (range, 68-157). Outcome was compared to 1325 pts with unilateral Stage I or II breast cancer, within the same age range, treated during the same time period. There were no significant differences in median age, median total dose, tumor size, estrogen receptor (ER) status, pathologic nodal status, and use of systemic therapy between the study population and the comparison group. Local recurrence (LR) was evaluated as true recurrence (TR, i.e., in the original tumor bed), marginal miss (MM, at the edge of the boost field), or elsewhere (E). Median total dose to the primary was 6100 cGy (range, 5000-7000). Pathology was available for review in 19 cases. Cytology (nuclear and cytoplasmic features) was similar in (7(19)) evaluable cases, and architecture (growth pattern, ie, papillary, solid) was similar in (5(19)) cases. The presence of either cytologic or architectural similarity was noted in(9(19)) cases. 7 of 19 pts who had axillary lymph node evaluation on at least one side had pathological confirmation of lymph node metastasis. Stage was the same in both breasts in 13 cases (10 Stage I, 3 Stage II); ER status data was complete in 11 pts, and the same in both primaries in 9 cases. Cosmetic results and complications after BCT were scored. Statistical significance was evaluated by use of the Fisher exact test. RESULTS: The 5-yr actuarial

  2. Staging Lung Cancer: Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Girish S; Viswanathan, Chitra; Carter, Brett W; Benveniste, Marcelo F; Truong, Mylene T; Sabloff, Bradley S

    2018-05-01

    The updated eighth edition of the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) classification for lung cancer includes revisions to T and M descriptors. In terms of the M descriptor, the classification of intrathoracic metastatic disease as M1a is unchanged from TNM-7. Extrathoracic metastatic disease, which was classified as M1b in TNM-7, is now subdivided into M1b (single metastasis, single organ) and M1c (multiple metastases in one or multiple organs) descriptors. In this article, the rationale for changes in the M descriptors, the utility of preoperative staging with PET/computed tomography, and the treatment options available for patients with oligometastatic disease are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dilemmas in Lung Cancer Staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahos, Ioannis

    2018-05-01

    The advent of the 8th edition of the lung cancer staging system reflects a further meticulous evidence-based advance in the stratification of the survival of patients with lung cancer. Although addressing many limitations of earlier staging systems, several limitations in staging remain. This article reviews from a radiological perspective the limitations of the current staging system, highlighting the process of TNM restructuring, the residual issues with regards to the assignment of T, N, M descriptors, and their associated stage groupings and how these dilemmas impact guidance of multidisciplinary teams taking care of patients with lung cancer. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Short Course Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy in Treating Patients With Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-17

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Corpus Carcinosarcoma; Uterine Corpus Sarcoma

  5. Treatment outcome, body image, and sexual functioning after orchiectomy and radiotherapy for Stage I-II testicular seminoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incrocci, Luca; Hop, Wim C.J.; Wijnmaalen, Arendjan; Slob, A. Koos

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Orchiectomy followed by infradiaphragmatic irradiation is the standard treatment for Stage I-II testicular seminoma in The Netherlands. Because body image and sexual functioning can be affected by treatment, a retrospective study was carried out to assess treatment outcome, body image, and changes in sexuality after orchiectomy and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The medical charts of 166 patients with Stage I-II testicular seminoma were reviewed. A questionnaire on body image and current sexual functioning regarding the frequency and quality of erections, sexual activity, significance of sex, and changes in sexuality was sent to 157 patients (at a mean of 51 months after treatment). Results: Seventy-eight percent (n=123, mean age 42 years) completed the questionnaire. During irradiation, almost half of patients experienced nausea and 19% nausea and vomiting. Only 3 patients had disease relapse. After treatment, about 20% reported less interest and pleasure in sex and less sexual activity. Interest in sex, erectile difficulties, and satisfaction with sexual life did not differ from age-matched healthy controls. At the time of the survey, 17% of patients had erectile difficulties, a figure that was significantly higher than before treatment, but which correlated also with age. Twenty percent expressed concerns about fertility, and 52% found their body had changed after treatment. Cancer treatment had negatively influenced sexual life in 32% of the patients. Conclusions: Orchiectomy with radiotherapy is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for Stage I-II testicular seminoma. Treatment-induced changes in body image and concerns about fertility were detected, but the sexual problems encountered did not seem to differ from those of healthy controls, although baseline data are lacking

  6. Gemcitabine and paclitaxel associated pneumonitis in non-small cell lung cancer: report of a phase I/II dose-escalating study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, A L; Cox, G; Sharma, R A; Steward, W P; Shields, F; Jeyapalan, K; Muller, S; O'Byrne, K J

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this phase I/II dose escalating study was to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of gemcitabine and paclitaxel given in combination in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 12 patients with stage IIIB and IV NSCLC received paclitaxel administered intravenously over 1 h followed by gemcitabine given over 30 min on days 1, 8 and 15 every 28 days. Pneumonitis was the principal side-effect observed with 4 patients affected. Of these, 1 experienced grade 3 toxicity after one cycle of treatment and the others had grade 2 toxicity. All 4 cases responded to prednisolone. No other significant toxicities were observed. Of the 8 evaluable patients, 3 had a partial response and 2 had minor responses. The study was discontinued due to this dose-limiting toxicity. The combination of paclitaxel and gemcitabine shows promising antitumour activity in NSCLC, however, this treatment schedule may predispose to pneumonitis.

  7. Postoperative radiotherapy for stage I/II seminoma: results for 212 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauman, Glenn S.; Venkatesan, Varagur M.; Ago, C. Tetteh; Radwan, John S.; Dar, A. Rashid; Winquist, Eric W.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective review of patients with Stage I and II seminoma treated at a regional cancer center was performed to assess the long term efficacy and toxicity associated with post operative radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1950 and 1995, 212 patients seen at the London Regional Cancer Centre received adjuvant radiotherapy following orchiectomy for Stage I (169) and II (43) seminoma. Median follow-up for the group was 7.5 years. Results: Progression free, cause specific, and overall survival were 95%, 98%, and 95% at 5 years, and 94%, 98%, and 94% at 10 years respectively. An increased risk of failure was noted among patients with bulky Stage II disease. No other prognostic factors for relapse were identified. Late toxicity was uncommon with only 12/212 (6%) developing any late GI toxicity potentially attributable to radiotherapy. The incidence of second malignancies (excluding second testicular tumors) was 6/212 (actuarial:1%, 1%, 6% at 5,10,15 years respectively). There was a trend toward increased acute complications for patients treated with larger volumes of radiation. No prognostic factors associated with increased risk of late toxicity or second malignancy were identified, likely a consequence of the small number of these events. Conclusion: Survival and toxicity were comparable to that reported in the literature. Post-operative radiotherapy remains a safe and efficacious adjuvant treatment for Stage I and early Stage II seminoma

  8. Result of Radiation Therapy for Stage I, II Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyu Chan; Kim, Chul Yong; Choi, Myung Sun

    1993-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was done for 69 patients with Stage I and II non-Hodgkin lymphoma who were treated from May 1981 to December 1990, in the Department of Radiadtion Oncology, Korea University Hospital. We used Ann Arbor Staging system and Working Formulation for histological classification. Forty-three patients(43/69, 62.3%) were Stage I and 26 patients (26/69, 37.7%) were Stage II, and B symptom was found in 10.1%(7/69). Local control rate for all patients was 88.4%(61/69), with 80% (12/15) for nodal lymphoma and 90.7%(49/54) for extra nodal lymphoma. The total failure rate was 34.8%(24/69). Five of 24 (20.8%) patients who were failed developed local failure only, 12.5%(3/24) local failure with distant failure, and distant failure only were found in 66.7%(16/24). Between nodal lymphoma and extra nodal lymphoma, there was no significant survival difference, but extra nodal lymphoma showed higher incidence

  9. The influence of micrometastases on prognosis and survival in stage I-II colon cancer patients: the Enroute⊕ Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruijt Hans FM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of lymph node metastases remains the most reliable prognostic predictor and the gold indicator for adjuvant treatment in colon cancer (CC. In spite of a potentially curative resection, 20 to 30% of CC patients testing negative for lymph node metastases (i.e. pN0 will subsequently develop locoregional and/or systemic metastases within 5 years. The presence of occult nodal isolated tumor cells (ITCs and/or micrometastases (MMs at the time of resection predisposes CC patients to high risk for disease recurrence. These pN0micro+ patients harbouring occult micrometastases may benefit from adjuvant treatment. The purpose of the present study is to delineate the subset of pN0 patients with micrometastases (pN0micro+ and evaluate the benefits from adjuvant chemotherapy in pN0micro+ CC patients. Methods/design EnRoute+ is an open label, multicenter, randomized controlled clinical trial. All CC patients (age above 18 years without synchronous locoregional lymph node and/or systemic metastases (clinical stage I-II disease and operated upon with curative intent are eligible for inclusion. All resected specimens of patients are subject to an ex vivo sentinel lymph node mapping procedure (SLNM following curative resection. The investigation for micrometastases in pN0 patients is done by extended serial sectioning and immunohistochemistry for pan-cytokeratin in sentinel lymph nodes which are tumour negative upon standard pathological examination. Patients with ITC/MM-positive sentinel lymph nodes (pN0micro+ are randomized for adjuvant chemotherapy following the CAPOX treatment scheme or observation. The primary endpoint is 3-year disease free survival (DFS. Discussion The EnRoute+ study is designed to improve prognosis in high-risk stage I/II pN0 micro+ CC patients by reducing disease recurrence by adjuvant chemotherapy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01097265

  10. Macrophage markers in serum and tumor have prognostic impact in American Joint Committee on Cancer stage I/II melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine O.; Schmidt, Henrik; Møller, Holger John

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic role of soluble CD163 (sCD163) in serum and macrophage infiltration in primary melanomas from patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I/II melanoma. The scavenger receptor CD163 is associated with anti-inflammatory macrophages...... melanomas from 190 patients were available for immunohistochemical analyzes of CD163(+) and CD68(+) macrophage infiltration. They were estimated semiquantitatively in three different tumor compartments: tumor nests, tumor stroma, and at the invasive front of the tumor. RESULTS: Serum sCD163 treated......, HR = 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.8; P = .003). Melanomas with dense CD163(+) macrophage infiltration in tumor stroma and CD68(+) macrophage infiltration at the invasive front were associated with poor overall survival (CD163, HR = 2.7; 95% CI, 0.8 to 9.3; P = .11; and CD68, HR = 2.8; 95% CI, 1.2 to 6.8; P...

  11. The expression of chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CXCR4 in predicting postoperative tumour progression in stages I-II colon cancer: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Changzheng; Yao, Yunfeng; Xue, Weicheng; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Peng, Yifan; Gu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic significance of chemokine receptors in stage I/II colon cancer is unclear. We assessed the prognostic value of chemokine receptor CXCR3 and CXCR4 in stage I/II colon cancer. 145 patients with stage I/II colon cancer who underwent curative surgery alone from 2000 to 2007 were investigated. Chemokine receptor expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The associations between CXCR3, CXCR4 and clinicopathological variables were analysed using the χ2 test, and the relationships between chemokine receptors and a 5-year disease-free survival were analysed by univariate and multivariate analyses. The high-expression rates of CXCR3 and CXCR4 were 17.9% (26/145) and 38.6% (56/145), respectively. There were no significant associations between the expressions of CXCR3, CXCR4 and clinicopathological factors including gender, age, tumour location, histological differentiation, pathological stage, lymphovascular invasion and pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The 5-year disease-free survival was not significantly different between low-expression groups and high-expression groups of CXCR3 and CXCR4. Multivariate analysis revealed that serum CEA and a number of retrieved lymph nodes, rather than chemokine receptors, were independent prognosticators. CXCR3 and CXCR4 are not independent prognosticators for stage I/II colon cancer after curative surgery.

  12. Association of time-to-surgery with outcomes in clinical stage I-II pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with upfront surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Douglas S; Zhang, Chong; Presson, Angela P; Firpo, Matthew A; Mulvihill, Sean J; Scaife, Courtney L

    2018-04-01

    Time-to-surgery from cancer diagnosis has increased in the United States. We aimed to determine the association between time-to-surgery and oncologic outcomes in patients with resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma undergoing upfront surgery. The 2004-2012 National Cancer Database was reviewed for patients undergoing curative-intent surgery without neoadjuvant therapy for clinical stage I-II pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. A multivariable Cox model with restricted cubic splines was used to define time-to-surgery as short (1-14 days), medium (15-42), and long (43-120). Overall survival was examined using Cox shared frailty models. Secondary outcomes were examined using mixed-effects logistic regression models. Of 16,763 patients, time-to-surgery was short in 34.4%, medium in 51.6%, and long in 14.0%. More short time-to-surgery patients were young, privately insured, healthy, and treated at low-volume hospitals. Adjusted hazards of mortality were lower for medium (hazard ratio 0.94, 95% confidence interval, .90, 0.97) and long time-to-surgery (hazard ratio 0.91, 95% confidence interval, 0.86, 0.96) than short. There were no differences in adjusted odds of node positivity, clinical to pathologic upstaging, being unresectable or stage IV at exploration, and positive margins. Medium time-to-surgery patients had higher adjusted odds (odds ratio 1.11, 95% confidence interval, 1.03, 1.20) of receiving an adequate lymphadenectomy than short. Ninety-day mortality was lower in medium (odds ratio 0.75, 95% confidence interval, 0.65, 0.85) and long time-to-surgery (odds ratio 0.72, 95% confidence interval, 0.60, 0.88) than short. In this observational analysis, short time-to-surgery was associated with slightly shorter OS and higher perioperative mortality. These results may suggest that delays for medical optimization and referral to high volume surgeons are safe. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. The Effect of Simvastatin on Breast Cancer Cell Growth in Women With Stage I-II Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-02

    Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage I Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IA Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IB Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIB Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  14. Transesophageal Ultrasonography for Lung Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Annema, Jouke; Vilmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Accurate mediastinal nodal staging is essential for patients with resectable non-small-cell lung cancer and is achieved by combined endobronchial ultrasound and transesophageal endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Training requirements for EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) for lung cancer staging...

  15. Demographics and Outcomes of Stage I-II Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treated with Mohs Micrographic Surgery Compared with Wide Local Excision in the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Babu; Qureshi, Muhammad M; Truong, Minh Tam; Sahni, Debjani

    2018-02-03

    The optimal surgical approach (wide local excision (WLE) vs. Mohs micrographic surgery (MOHS)) for treating Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is yet to be determined. To compare survival outcomes in patients with early stage MCC treated with MOHS versus WLE. A retrospective review of all cases in the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) of MCC of clinical Stage I-II MCC treated with WLE or MOHS was performed. 1,795 cases of Stage I-II MCC were identified who underwent WLE (N=1,685) or MOHS (N=110). There was no difference in residual tumor on surgical margins between the two treatment groups (p=0.588). On multivariate analysis, there was no difference in overall survival between the treatment modalities (adjusted HR 1.02; 95% CI 0.72-1.45, p=0.897). There was no difference in overall survival between the two groups on propensity score matched analysis. Disease specific survival was not reported as this data in not available in the NCDB. MOHS appears to be as effective as WLE in treating early stage MCC. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. The IASLC Lung Cancer Staging Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chansky, Kari; Detterbeck, Frank C; Nicholson, Andrew G

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Revisions to the TNM stage classifications for lung cancer, informed by the international database (N = 94,708) of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) Staging and Prognostic Factors Committee, need external validation. The objective was to externally...... demonstrated consistent ability to discriminate TNM categories and stage groups for clinical and pathologic stage. CONCLUSIONS: The IASLC revisions made for the eighth edition of lung cancer staging are validated by this analysis of the NCDB database by the ordering, statistical differences, and homogeneity...... validate the revisions by using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) of the American College of Surgeons. METHODS: Cases presenting from 2000 through 2012 were drawn from the NCDB and reclassified according to the eighth edition stage classification. Clinically and pathologically staged subsets of NSCLC...

  17. Addition of Rituximab to Involved-Field Radiation Therapy Prolongs Progression-free Survival in Stage I-II Follicular Lymphoma: Results of a Multicenter Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruella, Marco [Division of Haematology and Cell Therapy, Mauriziano Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Center for Cellular Immunotherapies, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States); Filippi, Andrea Riccardo [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Bruna, Riccardo [Division of Haematology and Cell Therapy, Mauriziano Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Di Russo, Anna [Radiation Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Magni, Michele [Division of Medical Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy); Caracciolo, Daniele [Division of Haematology, San Giovanni Battista Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Passera, Roberto [Division of Nuclear Medicine, San Giovanni Battista Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Matteucci, Paola; Di Nicola, Massimo [Division of Medical Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy); Corradini, Paolo [Division of Haematology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy); Parvis, Guido [Division of Haematology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Orbassano, Torino (Italy); Gini, Guido; Olivieri, Attilio [Division of Haematology, Ospedali Riuniti, Ancona (Italy); Ladetto, Marco [Division of Haematology, San Giovanni Battista Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Tarella, Corrado, E-mail: corrado.tarella@gmail.com [Division of Haematology and Cell Therapy, Mauriziano Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Hemato-Oncology Division, European Institute of Oncology, Milano (Italy); Devizzi, Liliana [Division of Medical Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Rituximab (Rit) therapy added to involved-field radiation therapy (RT) has been proposed as an effective treatment for stage I-II follicular lymphoma (FL). The results of an observational multicenter study on the Rit-RT combination in limited-stage FL are here reported. Methods and Materials: Data have been collected from 2 consecutive cohorts of 94 patients with stage I-II FL treated between 1985 and 2011 at 5 Italian institutions. All patients had grade 1-3a FL, a median age of 54 years (range: 25-82). The first 51 patients received RT alone (control group), while the subsequent series of 43 patients received 4 rituximab courses (375 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1, 8, 15, 22) before RT (Rit-RT). Molecular disease was evaluated by nested bcl-2/IgH PCR or clonal IgH rearrangement was available in 33 Rit-RT patients. Results: At a median follow-up of 10.9 years (range: 1.8-22.9), the 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) projections for the whole cohort were 57% and 87.5%, respectively. The 10-year PFS was significantly longer (P<.05) in the Rit-RT group (64.6%) compared to RT alone (50.7%), whereas the 10-year OS projections were not significantly different. On bivariate analysis controlling for stage, there was only a trend toward improved PFS for Rit-RT (HR, 0.55; P=.081). Follicular lymphoma international prognostic index and age were associated with OS but not with PFS on Cox regression analysis. Bone marrow molecular analysis showing PCR positivity at diagnosis was strongly associated with relapse risk upon univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions: This multicenter observational study suggests a potential benefit of adding rituximab to radiation therapy for stage I-II FL. The results of the currently ongoing randomized studies are required to confirm these results. The study underlines the importance of molecular disease monitoring also for patient with limited-stage disease.

  18. Addition of Rituximab to Involved-Field Radiation Therapy Prolongs Progression-free Survival in Stage I-II Follicular Lymphoma: Results of a Multicenter Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruella, Marco; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Bruna, Riccardo; Di Russo, Anna; Magni, Michele; Caracciolo, Daniele; Passera, Roberto; Matteucci, Paola; Di Nicola, Massimo; Corradini, Paolo; Parvis, Guido; Gini, Guido; Olivieri, Attilio; Ladetto, Marco; Ricardi, Umberto; Tarella, Corrado; Devizzi, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Rituximab (Rit) therapy added to involved-field radiation therapy (RT) has been proposed as an effective treatment for stage I-II follicular lymphoma (FL). The results of an observational multicenter study on the Rit-RT combination in limited-stage FL are here reported. Methods and Materials: Data have been collected from 2 consecutive cohorts of 94 patients with stage I-II FL treated between 1985 and 2011 at 5 Italian institutions. All patients had grade 1-3a FL, a median age of 54 years (range: 25-82). The first 51 patients received RT alone (control group), while the subsequent series of 43 patients received 4 rituximab courses (375 mg/m"2, days 1, 8, 15, 22) before RT (Rit-RT). Molecular disease was evaluated by nested bcl-2/IgH PCR or clonal IgH rearrangement was available in 33 Rit-RT patients. Results: At a median follow-up of 10.9 years (range: 1.8-22.9), the 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) projections for the whole cohort were 57% and 87.5%, respectively. The 10-year PFS was significantly longer (P<.05) in the Rit-RT group (64.6%) compared to RT alone (50.7%), whereas the 10-year OS projections were not significantly different. On bivariate analysis controlling for stage, there was only a trend toward improved PFS for Rit-RT (HR, 0.55; P=.081). Follicular lymphoma international prognostic index and age were associated with OS but not with PFS on Cox regression analysis. Bone marrow molecular analysis showing PCR positivity at diagnosis was strongly associated with relapse risk upon univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions: This multicenter observational study suggests a potential benefit of adding rituximab to radiation therapy for stage I-II FL. The results of the currently ongoing randomized studies are required to confirm these results. The study underlines the importance of molecular disease monitoring also for patient with limited-stage disease.

  19. Second cancers after conservative surgery and radiation for stages I-II breast cancer: identifying a subset of women at increased risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowble, Barbara; Hanlon, Alexandra; Freedman, Gary; Nicolaou, Nicos; Anderson, Penny

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the risk and patterns of second malignancy in a group of women treated with conservative surgery and radiation in a relatively contemporary manner for early-stage invasive breast cancer, and to identify a subgroup of these women at increased risk for a second cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1978 to 1994, 1,253 women with unilateral Stage I-II breast cancer underwent wide excision, axillary dissection, and radiation. The median follow-up was 8.9 years, with 446 patients followed for ≥10 years. The median age was 55 years. Sixty-eight percent had T1 tumors and 74% were axillary-node negative. Radiation was directed to the breast only in 78%. Adjuvant therapy consisted of chemotherapy in 19%, tamoxifen in 19%, and both in 8%. Factors analyzed for their association with the cumulative incidence of all second malignancies, contralateral breast cancer, and non-breast cancer malignancy were: age, menopausal status, race, family history, obesity, smoking, tumor size, location, histology, pathologic nodal status, region(s) treated with radiation, and the use and type of adjuvant therapy. Results: One hundred seventy-six women developed a second malignancy (87 contralateral breast cancers at a median interval of 5.8 years, and 98 non-breast cancer malignancies at a median interval of 7.2 years). Nine women had both a contralateral breast cancer and non-breast cancer second malignancy. The 5- and 10-year cumulative incidences of a second malignancy were 5% and 16% for all cancers, 3% and 7% for contralateral breast cancer, 3% and 8%, for all second non-breast cancer malignancies, and 1% and 5%, respectively, for second non-breast cancer malignancies, excluding skin cancers. Patient age was a significant factor for contralateral breast cancer and non-breast cancer second malignancy. Young age was associated with an increased risk of contralateral breast cancer, while older age was associated with an increased the risk of a second non-breast cancer

  20. Clinical outcomes of a phase I/II study of 48 Gy of stereotactic body radiotherapy in 4 fractions for primary lung cancer using a stereotactic body frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yasushi; Takayama, Kenji; Matsuo, Yukinori; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Sakamoto, Takashi; Sakamoto, Masato; Mitsumori, Michihide; Shibuya, Keiko; Araki, Norio; Yano, Shinsuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes of 48 Gy of three-dimensional stereotactic radiotherapy in four fractions for treating Stage I lung cancer using a stereotactic body frame. Methods and Materials: Forty-five patients who were treated between September 1998 and February 2004 were included in this study. Thirty-two patients had Stage IA lung cancer, and the other 13 had Stage IB lung cancer where tumor size was less than 4 cm in diameter. Three-dimensional treatment planning using 6-10 noncoplanar beams was performed to maintain the target dose homogeneity and to decrease the irradiated lung volume >20 Gy. All patients were irradiated using a stereotactic body frame and received four single 12 Gy high doses of radiation at the isocenter over 5-13 (median = 12) days. Results: Seven tumors (16%) completely disappeared after treatment (CR) and 38 tumors (84%) decreased in size by 30% or more (PR). Therefore, all tumors showed local response. During the follow-up of 6-71 (median = 30) months, no pulmonary complications greater than an National Cancer Institute-Common Toxicity Criteria of Grade 3 were noted. No other vascular, cardiac, esophageal, or neurologic toxicities were encountered. Forty-four (98%) of 45 tumors were locally controlled during the follow-up period. However, regional recurrences and distant metastases occurred in 3 and 5 of T1 patients and zero and 4 of T2 patients, respectively. For Stage IA lung cancer, the disease-free survival and overall survival rates after 1 and 3 years were 80% and 72%, and 92% and 83%, respectively, whereas for Stage IB lung cancer, the disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 92% and 71%, and 82% and 72%, respectively. Conclusion: Forty-eight Gy of 3D stereotactic radiotherapy in 4 fractions using a stereotactic body frame is useful for the treatment of Stage I lung tumors

  1. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy followed by GDP chemotherapy for newly diagnosed stage I/II extranodal natural killer/T cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Yang, Jianliang; Liu, Peng; Zhou, Shengyu; Gui, Lin; He, Xiaohui; Qin, Yan; Zhang, Changgong; Yang, Sheng; Xing, Puyuan; Sun, Yan; Shi, Yuankai

    2017-09-01

    Extranodal natural killer (NK)/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma and the majority of ENKTL cases are diagnosed at the localized stage. Radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy has been used for localized ENKTL, but the optimal combination treatment modality and the best first-line chemotherapy regimen have not been defined. In this retrospective study, 44 patients with newly diagnosed, stages I/II ENKTL were enrolled and received intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, 50-56 Gy) followed by GDP (gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin) chemotherapy. The median number of chemotherapy cycles per patient was 4 (range, 2-6 cycles). At the end of treatment, the overall response rate was 95% (42/44), including 39 patients (89%) who attained complete response. Two patients developed systemic progression after IMRT. With a median follow-up of 37.5 months, the 3-year overall survival (OS) rate and progression-free survival (PFS) rate were 85% (95% CI, 74 to 96%) and 77% (95% CI, 64 to 91%), respectively. Locoregional and systemic failure rates for this treatment were 9% (4/44) and 14% (6/44), respectively. The most common grades 3 to 4 adverse events included leukopenia (37%), neutropenia (34%), and mucositis (25%). No treatment-related deaths were observed. This study suggested high efficacy and low toxicity of IMRT followed by GDP regimen chemotherapy for newly diagnosed stage I/II ENKTL patients. These results require further investigation in prospective trials.

  2. Long term results of mantle irradiation(MRT) alone in 261 patients with clinical stage I-II supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, A.; Byram, D.; Chao, M.; Corry, J.; Davis, S.; Kiffer, J.; Laidlaw, C.; Quong, G.; Ryan, G.; Liew, K.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: We report our results using MRT for clinical stage I-II HD and assess the value of published prognostic criteria in our study population. Pts and Methods: Between 1969 and 1994, 261 pts were treated with MRT alone for clinical stage I-II supradiaphragmatic HD. Pt characteristics: median age-30; M-54%/F-46%; stage IA-52%, IB-2%, IIA-37%, IIB-8%; histology LP-21%, NS-51%, MC-23%, other 5%; median ESR 18. CT abdomen and LAG were performed in 61% and 60% respectively. No pt had prior staging laparotomy. No pt received infradiaphragmatic RT. Central axis dose was 32 Gy-36 Gy. Univariate analysis was performed for prognostic factors for progression-free (PFS) and overall survival(OS). Outcome was assessed in favourable subsets as defined by: EORTC (v. favourable: CSIA, LP or NS histology, age < 40, female, no bulk, ESR < 50; favourable: CSI-II, age < 50, < 4 sites, no bulky mediastinal mass, ESR < 50 with no B symptoms or ESR < 30 with B symptoms); Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH) (IA-IIA, LP or NS histology, ESR < 40, age < 50, no large mediastinal mass, no E lesion). Results: 261 pts completed RT, with 5% requiring treatment interruption for toxicity. Significant factors (P<0.05) for PFS were stage, performance status, histology, B symptoms, number of sites, ESR and bulk. Significant factors (P<0.05) for OS were age, performance status, histology and B symptoms. (The results of a multivariate analysis will be presented.) Results in our study population using published prognostic criteria (in %): Thirty-six percent progressed following RT: 8% in-field; 24% out of field only (including 10% in the paraaortic/splenic region alone); 4% marginal; Fifty-seven percent of relapsed pts remain progression free after subsequent salvage treatment. Two cases of acute leukaemia, 8 cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 14 (non-skin) carcinomas occurred, of which 11 were in-field. Seventy pts have died. The cause was: HD 41%; other malignancy 20%; cardiovascular 17%; other 15

  3. Improved Survival With Radiation Therapy in Stage I-II Primary Mediastinal B Cell Lymphoma: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Database Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Matthew W., E-mail: matthew.jackson@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Rusthoven, Chad G.; Jones, Bernard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Kamdar, Manali [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma (PMBCL) is an uncommon lymphoma for which trials are few with small patient numbers. The role of radiation therapy (RT) after standard immunochemotherapy for early-stage disease has never been studied prospectively. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database to evaluate PMBCL and the impact of RT on outcomes. Methods and Materials: We queried the SEER database for patients with stage I-II PMBCL diagnosed from 2001 to 2011. Retrievable data included age, gender, race (white/nonwhite), stage, extranodal disease, year of diagnosis, and use of RT as a component of definitive therapy. Kaplan-Meier overall survival (OS) estimates, univariate (UVA) log-rank and multivariate (MVA) Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were performed. Results: Two hundred fifty patients with stage I-II disease were identified, with a median follow-up time of 39 months (range, 3-125 months). The median age was 36 years (range, 18-89 years); 61% were female; 76% were white; 45% had stage I disease, 60% had extranodal disease, and 55% were given RT. The 5-year OS for the entire cohort was 86%. On UVA, OS was improved with RT (hazard ratio [HR] 0.446, P=.029) and decreased in association with nonwhite race (HR 2.70, P=.006). The 5-year OS was 79% (no RT) and 90% (RT). On MVA, white race and RT remained significantly associated with improved OS (P=.007 and .018, respectively). The use of RT decreased over time: 61% for the 67 patients whose disease was diagnosed from 2001 to 2005 and 53% in the 138 patients treated from 2006 to 2010. Conclusion: This retrospective population-based analysis is the largest PMBCL dataset to date and demonstrates a significant survival benefit associated with RT. Nearly half of patients treated in the United States do not receive RT, and its use appears to be declining. In the absence of phase 3 data, the use of RT should be strongly considered for its survival benefit in early-stage

  4. Role of 10-Gy boost radiation after breast-conserving surgery for stage I-II breast cancer with a 5-mm negative margin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notani, Masafumi; Uchida, Nobue; Kitagaki, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    According to the Guidelines for breast-conserving therapy of the Japanese Breast Cancer Society, the surgical margin is ''negative'' when the minimum distance between the tumor edge and the margin of the resected specimen is more than 5 mm. The value of boost radiation for early breast cancer with a 5-mm negative margin remains unclear. A total of 137 patients with stage I-II breast cancer underwent breast-conserving surgery between July 1987 and August 2002. All of the patients had negative margins according to the Japanese guidelines. Their median age was 50 years and the median follow-up period was 62 months. The entire ipsilateral breast was irradiated to a total dose of 50 Gy (25 fractions). Then an additional 10 Gy (5 fractions) was given to 79 patients, using 6- to 12-MeV electrons (boost group), while 58 patients (no-boost group) received no further radiation. Factors influencing local recurrence were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. For the entire population, the 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, disease-free survival, and local recurrence rates were 96.0%, 96.8%, 94.2%, and 1.67%, respectively. Boost radiation reduced local recurrence, but the improvement was not significant (P=0.070). Univariate and multivariate analyses failed to detect any factors that were significantly associated with local control. There were no severe complications in either group and there were no differences between the groups in the cosmetic outcome. Boost radiation can be performed for stage I-II breast cancer with negative margins (Japanese guidelines), and showed a tendency to decrease local recurrence. A large randomized controlled study is necessary to establish final conclusions. (author)

  5. Expression of vascular endothelial factor protein in the tumor tissues of patients with Stages I-II ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Karapetyan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To define tumor markers is presently the most interesting and promising direction for the diagnosis of malignancies. The expression of the major angiogenesis factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in primary tumor tissue was studied in ovarian cancer (OC patients to define the prognostic value of the marker.The study enrolled 48 patients with OC. The immunohistochemical technique was used to examine VEGF expression in the primary tu- mor tissue. The frequency of VEGF expression, which was associated with lower relapse-free survival rates, was found to be high (85.4% in OC patients (p > 0.05.The tumor expression of the angiogenic factor VEGF was shown to provide prognostic information in early-stage ovarian epithelial cancer.

  6. Preoperative high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging can identify good prognosis stage I, II, and III rectal cancer best managed by surgery alone: a prospective, multicenter, European study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Fiona G M; Quirke, Philip; Heald, Richard J; Moran, Brendan; Blomqvist, Lennart; Swift, Ian; Sebag-Montefiore, David J; Tekkis, Paris; Brown, Gina

    2011-04-01

    To assess local recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-predicted good prognosis tumors treated by surgery alone. The MERCURY study reported that high-resolution MRI can accurately stage rectal cancer. The routine policy in most centers involved in the MERCURY study was primary surgery alone in MRI-predicted stage II or less and in MRI "good prognosis" stage III with selective avoidance of neoadjuvant therapy. Data were collected prospectively on all patients included in the MERCURY study who were staged as MRI-defined "good" prognosis tumors. "Good" prognosis included MRI-predicted safe circumferential resection margins, with MRI-predicted T2/T3a/T3b (less than 5 mm spread from muscularis propria), regardless of MRI N stage. None received preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and local recurrence were calculated. Of 374 patients followed up in the MERCURY study, 122 (33%) were defined as "good prognosis" stage III or less on MRI. Overall and disease-free survival for all patients with MRI "good prognosis" stage I, II and III disease at 5 years was 68% and 85%, respectively. The local recurrence rate for this series of patients predicted to have a good prognosis tumor on MRI was 3%. The preoperative identification of good prognosis tumors using MRI will allow stratification of patients and better targeting of preoperative therapy. This study confirms the ability of MRI to select patients who are likely to have a good outcome with primary surgery alone.

  7. A phase I/II study on stereotactic body radiotherapy with real-time tumor tracking using CyberKnife based on the Monte Carlo algorithm for lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Hiromitsu; Ishikura, Satoshi; Murai, Taro; Iwabuchi, Michio; Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Tatewaki, Koshi; Ohta, Seiji; Yokota, Naoki; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2017-08-01

    In this phase I/II study, we assessed the safety and initial efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors with real-time tumor tracking using CyberKnife based on the Monte Carlo algorithm. Study subjects had histologically confirmed primary non-small-cell lung cancer staged as T1a-T2aN0M0 and pulmonary oligometastasis. The primary endpoint was the incidence of Grade ≥3 radiation pneumonitis (RP) within 180 days of the start of SBRT. The secondary endpoint was local control and overall survival rates. Five patients were initially enrolled at level 1 [50 Gy/4 fractions (Fr)]; during the observation period, level 0 (45 Gy/4 Fr) was opened. The dose was escalated to the next level when grade ≥3 RP was observed in 0 out of 5 or 1 out of 10 patients. Virtual quality assurance planning was performed for 60 Gy/4 Fr; however, dose constraints for the organs at risk did not appear to be within acceptable ranges. Therefore, level 2 (55 Gy/4 Fr) was regarded as the upper limit. After the recommended dose (RD) was established, 15 additional patients were enrolled at the RD. The prescribed dose was normalized at the 95% volume border of the planning target volume based on the Monte Carlo algorithm. Between September 2011 and September 2015, 40 patients (primary 30; metastasis 10) were enrolled. Five patients were enrolled at level 0, 15 at level 1, and 20 at level 2. Only one grade 3 RP was observed at level 1. Two-year local control and overall survival rates were 98 and 81%, respectively. The RD was 55 Gy/4 Fr. SBRT with real-time tumor tracking using CyberKnife based on the Monte Carlo algorithm was tolerated well and appeared to be effective for solitary lung tumors.

  8. Treatment for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (stage I, II) of the elderly : usefulness of local and regional irradiation and brief reduced-dose chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguchi, Masahiko; Izuno, Itaru; Takei, Kazuyoshi; Shikama, Naoto; Sasaki, Shigeru; Gomi, Koutarou; Kiyono, Kunihiro; Takizawa, Masaomi; Sone, Shusuke

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the usefulness and safety of a new treatment regimen consisting of irradiation to the involved area and adjacent lymph-node area, and reduced-dose chemotherapy for elderly patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Materials and Methods: The core of this study was 38 elderly patients older than 65 years old with intermediate or high grade NHL, and concomitantly suffering from some other geriatric disease. They received involved-area irradiation (40 Gy), adjacent lymph-node irradiation (30 Gy), and reduced-dose chemotherapy (50-70 % ACOP 2 cycles or 70 % MACOP-B 4 weeks). Results: The completion rate of the treatment regimen was 100 %. The 5-year local control rate was 98 %. The 5-year disease free survival rate and the 5-year cause-specific survival rate for all patients were 70 % and 82 %, respectively. No treatment deaths were observed, and the rate of serious complications arising from the treatment was 3 %. Conclusion: Chemotherapy with a dose reduced to 50% or 70% of that prescribed in the original ACOP or MACOP-B, and irradiation to both the involved area and the adjacent lymph-node area are useful for treating elderly patients with Stage I, II intermediate B-cell NHL, who are at the same time suffering from some other geriatric disease

  9. Phase I/II study of gefitinib (Iressa(®)) and vorinostat (IVORI) in previously treated patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ji-Youn; Lee, Soo Hyun; Lee, Geon Kook; Yun, Tak; Lee, Young Joo; Hwang, Kum Hui; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Heung Tae

    2015-03-01

    Vorinostat has been shown to overcome resistance to gefitinib. We performed a phase I/II study combining gefitinib with vorinostat in previously treated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A 3 + 3 dose-escalation design was used to determine maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Three dose levels were tested: 250 mg/day gefitinib on days 1-28 and 200, 300 or 400 mg/day vorinostat on days 1-7, and 15-21 out of every 28 days. The primary endpoint was median progression-free survival (PFS). Fifty-two patients were enrolled and treated (43 in phase II). The median age was 59 years, 28 patients were male, 44 had adenocarcinoma, 29 had never smoked, and 36 had undergone one prior treatment. Twenty-two patients exhibited sensitive EGFR mutations. Planned dose escalation was completed without reaching the MTD. The RP2D was 250 mg gefitinib and 400 mg vorinostat. In 43 assessable patients in phase II, the median PFS was 3.2 months; the overall survival (OS) was 19.0 months. There were 16 partial responses and six cases of stable disease. In EGFR-mutant NSCLC, response rate was 77 %, median PFS was 9.1 months, and median OS was 24.1 months. The most common adverse events were anorexia and diarrhea. Treatment with 250 mg gefitinib daily with biweekly 400 mg/day vorinostat was feasible and well tolerated. In an unselected patient population, this combination dose did not improve PFS. However, this combination showed a potential for improving efficacy of gefitinib in EGFR-mutant NSCLC (NCT01027676).

  10. Fluorescence photodiagnosis of early stage lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, H.; Sakai, H.; Konaka, C.; Okunaka, T.; Furukawa, K.; Saito, Y.; Aizawa, K.; Hayata, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Sputum cytology examination is the most effective method to detect early stage central type squamous cell carcinoma. As sputum-positive early stage lung cancer usually does not show any abnormal findings on chest X-ray film, fiberoptic bronchoscopy is subsequently performed for localization. However, sometimes cases do not show any abnormal findings of cancer endoscopically because they are very early stage cases. For the purpose of localization of invisible lesions the photodynamic reaction was employed in this study. Photodynamic reaction is achieved by transfer of energy of an excited photo-sensitizer induced by photoradiation of light. This phenomenon was already recognized in the beginning of this century. Study of tumor localization of the bronchial tree using hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) and a mercury arc lamp was first performed in the Mayo Clinic in 1960s. In 1978, krypton laser was used first as a light source by Profio and Doiron. Authors have been doing research on early localization of such endoscopically occult early lung cancer since 1978. They recently developed an image processing system using an excimer dye laser for early localization of lung cancer. (author). 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  11. Radiation Therapy Administration and Survival in Stage I/II Extranodal Marginal Zone B-Cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, Adam J., E-mail: adam_olszewski@brown.edu; Desai, Amrita

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the factors associated with the use of radiation therapy and associated survival outcomes in early-stage marginal zone lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). Methods and Materials: We extracted data on adult patients with stage I/II MALT lymphoma diagnoses between 1998 and 2010 recorded in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. We studied factors associated with radiation therapy administration in a logistic regression model and described the cumulative incidence of lymphoma-related death (LRD) according to receipt of the treatment. The association of radiation therapy with survival was explored in multivariate models with adjustment for immortal time bias. Results: Of the 7774 identified patients, 36% received radiation therapy as part of the initial course of treatment. Older patients; black or Hispanic men; white, Hispanic, and black women; and socioeconomically disadvantaged and underinsured patients had a significantly lower chance of receiving radiation therapy. Radiation therapy administration was associated with a lower chance of LRD in most sites. In cutaneous, ocular, and salivary MALT lymphomas, the 5-year estimate of LRD after radiation therapy was 0%. The association of radiation therapy with overall survival in different lymphoma sites was heterogeneous, and statistically significant in cutaneous (hazard ratio 0.45, P=.009) and ocular (hazard ratio 0.47, P<.0001) locations after multivariate adjustment. Conclusions: Demographic factors are associated with the use of radiation therapy in MALT lymphoma. Clinicians should be sensitive to those disparities because the administration of radiation therapy may be associated with improved survival, particularly in cutaneous and ocular lymphomas.

  12. Radiation Therapy Administration and Survival in Stage I/II Extranodal Marginal Zone B-Cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszewski, Adam J.; Desai, Amrita

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the factors associated with the use of radiation therapy and associated survival outcomes in early-stage marginal zone lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). Methods and Materials: We extracted data on adult patients with stage I/II MALT lymphoma diagnoses between 1998 and 2010 recorded in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. We studied factors associated with radiation therapy administration in a logistic regression model and described the cumulative incidence of lymphoma-related death (LRD) according to receipt of the treatment. The association of radiation therapy with survival was explored in multivariate models with adjustment for immortal time bias. Results: Of the 7774 identified patients, 36% received radiation therapy as part of the initial course of treatment. Older patients; black or Hispanic men; white, Hispanic, and black women; and socioeconomically disadvantaged and underinsured patients had a significantly lower chance of receiving radiation therapy. Radiation therapy administration was associated with a lower chance of LRD in most sites. In cutaneous, ocular, and salivary MALT lymphomas, the 5-year estimate of LRD after radiation therapy was 0%. The association of radiation therapy with overall survival in different lymphoma sites was heterogeneous, and statistically significant in cutaneous (hazard ratio 0.45, P=.009) and ocular (hazard ratio 0.47, P<.0001) locations after multivariate adjustment. Conclusions: Demographic factors are associated with the use of radiation therapy in MALT lymphoma. Clinicians should be sensitive to those disparities because the administration of radiation therapy may be associated with improved survival, particularly in cutaneous and ocular lymphomas

  13. Isolated lung events following radiation for early stage breast cancer: incidence and predictors for primary lung vs metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Buren, Teresa A; Harris, Jay R; Sugarbaker, David J; Schneider, Lindsey; Healey, Elizabeth A

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: 1) To define the incidence of isolated lung events in a cohort of women treated with conservative surgery (CS) and radiation therapy (RT) for early stage breast cancer. 2) Among such patients, to define the relative distribution of primary lung cancer, metastatic breast cancer, and indeterminate lesions; and to identify any predictors for a diagnosis of lung vs metastatic breast cancer. 3) To examine the cohort with respect to whether a higher than expected incidence of lung cancer is seen following breast irradiation. Materials and Methods: Between 1968 and 1986, 1865 patients with clinical stage I-II breast cancer were treated with CS and RT; the median follow-up for surviving patients is 129 months. The study population was limited to patients who developed a subsequent isolated lung event as the first site of distant disease. Isolated lung event was defined as disease limited to the thoracic cavity, without evidence of either uncontrolled local breast disease or metastatic disease elsewhere. Diagnosis of the lung event as a primary lung cancer, a metastatic breast lesion, or an indeterminate lesion was documented from the viewpoint of 1) the pathologic analysis and 2) the clinical impression at the time of the lung event. Results: Sixty six of the 1865 patients (3.5%) developed an isolated lung event. The relative distribution of the pathologic and clinical diagnoses is shown below: The 66 lung events were characterized either as a solitary pulmonary nodule (27), multiple nodules (23), pleural effusion alone (10), unknown (2), or miscellaneous other findings (4). Among the 47 patients for whom pathology was available, the diagnosis remained indeterminate for 24 (51%). For patients with a definitive pathologic diagnosis, 69% ((9(13))) of smokers had a new lung cancer compared to 20% ((2(10))) of non-smokers (p=0.036), and 67% ((10(15))) of patients with a solitary pulmonary nodule had lung cancer compared to 14% ((1(7))) for other lung presentations (p

  14. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  15. Health-related quality of life in survivors of stage I-II breast cancer: randomized trial of post-operative conventional radiotherapy and hypofractionated tomotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Versmessen Harijati

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health-related quality of life (HRQOL assessment is a key component of clinical oncology trials. However, few breast cancer trials comparing adjuvant conventional radiotherapy (CR and hypofractionated tomotherapy (TT have investigated HRQOL. We compared HRQOL in stage I-II breast cancer patients who were randomized to receive either CR or TT. Tomotherapy uses an integrated computed tomography scanner to improve treatment accuracy, aiming to reduce the adverse effects of radiotherapy. Methods A total of 121 stage I–II breast cancer patients who had undergone breast conserving surgery (BCS or mastectomy (MA were randomly assigned to receive either CR or TT. CR patients received 25 × 2 Gy over 5 weeks, and BCS patients also received a sequential boost of 8 × 2 Gy over 2 weeks. TT patients received 15 × 2.8 Gy over 3 weeks, and BCS patients also received a simultaneous integrated boost of 15 × 0.6 Gy over 3 weeks. Patients completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 and BR23 questionnaires. The mean score (± standard error was calculated at baseline, the end of radiotherapy, and at 3 months and 1, 2, and 3 years post-radiotherapy. Data were analyzed by the 'intention-to-treat' principle. Results On the last day of radiotherapy, patients in both treatment arms had decreased global health status and functioning scores; increased fatigue (clinically meaningful in both treatment arms, nausea and vomiting, and constipation; decreased arm symptoms; clinically meaningful increased breast symptoms in CR patients and systemic side effects in TT patients; and slightly decreased body image and future perspective. At 3 months post-radiotherapy, TT patients had a clinically significant increase in role- and social-functioning scores and a clinically significant decrease in fatigue. The post-radiotherapy physical-, cognitive- and emotional-functioning scores improved faster in TT patients than CR patients. TT patients also had a better

  16. Health-related quality of life in survivors of stage I-II breast cancer: randomized trial of post-operative conventional radiotherapy and hypofractionated tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Versmessen, Harijati; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Van Parijs, Hilde; Miedema, Geertje; Voordeckers, Mia; Adriaenssens, Nele; Storme, Guy; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) assessment is a key component of clinical oncology trials. However, few breast cancer trials comparing adjuvant conventional radiotherapy (CR) and hypofractionated tomotherapy (TT) have investigated HRQOL. We compared HRQOL in stage I-II breast cancer patients who were randomized to receive either CR or TT. Tomotherapy uses an integrated computed tomography scanner to improve treatment accuracy, aiming to reduce the adverse effects of radiotherapy. A total of 121 stage I–II breast cancer patients who had undergone breast conserving surgery (BCS) or mastectomy (MA) were randomly assigned to receive either CR or TT. CR patients received 25 × 2 Gy over 5 weeks, and BCS patients also received a sequential boost of 8 × 2 Gy over 2 weeks. TT patients received 15 × 2.8 Gy over 3 weeks, and BCS patients also received a simultaneous integrated boost of 15 × 0.6 Gy over 3 weeks. Patients completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 and BR23 questionnaires. The mean score (± standard error) was calculated at baseline, the end of radiotherapy, and at 3 months and 1, 2, and 3 years post-radiotherapy. Data were analyzed by the 'intention-to-treat' principle. On the last day of radiotherapy, patients in both treatment arms had decreased global health status and functioning scores; increased fatigue (clinically meaningful in both treatment arms), nausea and vomiting, and constipation; decreased arm symptoms; clinically meaningful increased breast symptoms in CR patients and systemic side effects in TT patients; and slightly decreased body image and future perspective. At 3 months post-radiotherapy, TT patients had a clinically significant increase in role- and social-functioning scores and a clinically significant decrease in fatigue. The post-radiotherapy physical-, cognitive- and emotional-functioning scores improved faster in TT patients than CR patients. TT patients also had a better long-term recovery from fatigue than CR patients. ANOVA

  17. Automated quantification of proliferation with automated hot-spot selection in phosphohistone H3/MART1 dual-stained stage I/II melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Patricia Switten; Riber-Hansen, Rikke; Schmidt, Henrik; Steiniche, Torben

    2016-04-09

    Staging of melanoma includes quantification of a proliferation index, i.e., presumed melanocytic mitoses of H&E stains are counted manually in hot spots. Yet, its reproducibility and prognostic impact increases by immunohistochemical dual staining for phosphohistone H3 (PHH3) and MART1, which also may enable fully automated quantification by image analysis. To ensure manageable workloads and repeatable measurements in modern pathology, the study aimed to present an automated quantification of proliferation with automated hot-spot selection in PHH3/MART1-stained melanomas. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from 153 consecutive stage I/II melanoma patients was immunohistochemically dual-stained for PHH3 and MART1. Whole slide images were captured, and the number of PHH3/MART1-positive cells was manually and automatically counted in the global tumor area and in a manually and automatically selected hot spot, i.e., a fixed 1-mm(2) square. Bland-Altman plots and hypothesis tests compared manual and automated procedures, and the Cox proportional hazards model established their prognostic impact. The mean difference between manual and automated global counts was 2.9 cells/mm(2) (P = 0.0071) and 0.23 cells per hot spot (P = 0.96) for automated counts in manually and automatically selected hot spots. In 77 % of cases, manual and automated hot spots overlapped. Fully manual hot-spot counts yielded the highest prognostic performance with an adjusted hazard ratio of 5.5 (95 % CI, 1.3-24, P = 0.024) as opposed to 1.3 (95 % CI, 0.61-2.9, P = 0.47) for automated counts with automated hot spots. The automated index and automated hot-spot selection were highly correlated to their manual counterpart, but altogether their prognostic impact was noticeably reduced. Because correct recognition of only one PHH3/MART1-positive cell seems important, extremely high sensitivity and specificity of the algorithm is required for prognostic purposes. Thus, automated

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colella, Sara; Vilmann, Peter; Konge, Lars

    2014-01-01

    a good diagnostic accuracy in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. In the future, these techniques in combination with positron emission tomography/computed tomographic may replace surgical staging in patients with suspected and proven lung cancer, but until then surgical staging remains the gold...... standard for adequate preoperative evaluation....

  19. Comparison of outcomes in patients with stage III versus limited stage IV non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheruvu, Praveena; Metcalfe, Su K; Metcalfe, Justin; Chen, Yuhchyau; Okunieff, Paul; Milano, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    Standard therapy for metastatic non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) includes palliative systemic chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Recent studies of patients with limited metastases treated with curative-intent stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) have shown encouraging survival. We hypothesized that patients treated with SBRT for limited metastases have comparable outcomes with those treated with curative-intent radiation for Stage III NSCLC. We retrospectively reviewed the records of NSCLC patients treated with curative-intent radiotherapy at the University of Rochester from 2000-2008. We identified 3 groups of patients with NSCLC: stage III, stage IV, and recurrent stage IV (initial stage I-II). All stage IV NSCLC patients treated with SBRT had ≤ 8 lesions. Of 146 patients, 88% had KPS ≥ 80%, 30% had > 5% weight loss, and 95% were smokers. The 5-year OS from date of NSCLC diagnosis for stage III, initial stage IV and recurrent stage IV was 7%, 14%, and 27% respectively. The 5-year OS from date of metastatic diagnosis was significantly (p < 0.00001) superior among those with limited metastases (≤ 8 lesions) versus stage III patients who developed extensive metastases not amenable to SBRT (14% vs. 0%). Stage IV NSCLC is a heterogeneous patient population, with a selected cohort apparently faring better than Stage III patients. Though patients with limited metastases are favorably selected by virtue of more indolent disease and/or less bulky disease burden, perhaps staging these patients differently is appropriate for prognostic and treatment characterization. Aggressive local therapy may be indicated in these patients, though prospective clinical studies are needed

  20. Pemetrexed combined with paclitaxel in patients with advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: a phase I-II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulos, George P; Dimitroulis, John; Toubis, Michael; Katis, Costas; Karaindros, Dimitris; Stathopoulos, John; Koutandos, John

    2007-07-01

    Pemetrexed, a novel multi-targeted agent established for the treatment of mesothelioma, has been under investigation for other malignancies, and in recent years particularly for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the present trial we investigated pemetrexed in combination with paclitaxel as front-line treatment in advanced or metastatic NSCLC. Our objectives were to determine the response rate, median and overall survival and toxicity. From April 2005 until May 2006, 51 patients with advanced or metastatic NSCLC were enrolled and 48 were considered evaluable. There were 39 males and nine females, median age 62 years (range 37-81 years), one patient stage IIIA N(2), 23 patients, IIIB and 24, stage IV. All patients had a cytologically- or histologically-confirmed diagnosis. Pemetrexed was administered at a standard dose of 500mg/m(2) and paclitaxel at an escalating dose starting at 135mg/m(2), then 150mg/m(2) and ending at a dose of 175mg/m(2); the level was increased every three patients. Both agents were administered on day 1, repeated every 3 weeks for six courses. A 39.6% partial response rate was observed with a median survival of 14 months. Toxicity was mild with 8.3% grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and other very mild hematologic and non-hematologic adverse reactions. The combination of pemetrexed and paclitaxel at doses of 500mg/m(2) and 175mg/m(2), respectively, has been shown to be an effective combination with very limited toxicity.

  1. A comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy and sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy in the treatment of Stage I-II nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xianfeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chongqing Cancer Institute, Chongqing (China); Yang, Yong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Jin, Fu; He, Yanan; Zhong, Mingsong; Luo, Huanli; Qiu, Da; Li, Chao; Yang, Han; He, Guanglei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chongqing Cancer Institute, Chongqing (China); Wang, Ying, E-mail: zjajf@126.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chongqing Cancer Institute, Chongqing (China)

    2016-04-01

    This article is aimed to compare the dosimetric differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for Stage I-II nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NNKTL). Ten patients with Stage I-II NNKTL treated with IMRT were replanned with VMAT (2 arcs). The prescribed dose of the planning target volume (PTV) was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. The VMAT plans with the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (Version 8.6.15) were based on an Eclipse treatment planning system; the monitor units (MUs) and treatment time (T) were scored to measure the expected treatment efficiency. All the 10 patients under the study were subject to comparisons regarding the quality of target coverage, the efficiency of delivery, and the exposure of normal adjacent organs at risk (OARs). The study shows that VMAT was associated with a better conformal index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) (both p < 0.05) but slightly higher dose to OARs than IMRT. The MUs with VMAT (650.80 ± 24.59) were fewer than with IMRT (1300.10 ± 57.12) (relative reduction of 49.94%, p = 0.00) when using 2-Gy dose fractions. The treatment time with VMAT (3.20 ± 0.02 minutes) was shorter than with IMRT (7.38 ± 0.18 minutes) (relative reduction of 56.64%, p = 0.00). We found that VMAT and IMRT both provide satisfactory target dosimetric coverage and OARs sparing clinically. Likely to deliver a bit higher dose to OARs, VMAT in comparison with IMRT, is still a better choice for treatment of patients with Stage I-II NNKTL, thanks to better dose distribution, fewer MUs, and shorter delivery time.

  2. Preoperative staging of lung cancer with combined PET-CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Barbara; Lassen, Ulrik; Mortensen, Jann

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fast and accurate staging is essential for choosing treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this randomized study was to evaluate the clinical effect of combined positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) on preoperative staging of NSCLC...... one of the following: a thoracotomy with the finding of pathologically confirmed mediastinal lymph-node involvement (stage IIIA [N2]), stage IIIB or stage IV disease, or a benign lung lesion; an exploratory thoracotomy; or a thoracotomy in a patient who had recurrent disease or death from any cause...

  3. Molecular profiling identifies prognostic markers of stage IA lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Shao, Jinchen; Zhu, Lei; Zhao, Ruiying; Xing, Jie; Wang, Jun; Guo, Xiaohui; Tu, Shichun; Han, Baohui; Yu, Keke

    2017-09-26

    We previously showed that different pathologic subtypes were associated with different prognostic values in patients with stage IA lung adenocarcinoma (AC). We hypothesize that differential gene expression profiles of different subtypes may be valuable factors for prognosis in stage IA lung adenocarcinoma. We performed microarray gene expression profiling on tumor tissues micro-dissected from patients with acinar and solid predominant subtypes of stage IA lung adenocarcinoma. These patients had undergone a lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection at the Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai, China in 2012. No patient had preoperative treatment. We performed the Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) analysis to look for gene expression signatures associated with tumor subtypes. The histologic subtypes of all patients were classified according to the 2015 WHO lung Adenocarcinoma classification. We found that patients with the solid predominant subtype are enriched for genes involved in RNA polymerase activity as well as inactivation of the p53 pathway. Further, we identified a list of genes that may serve as prognostic markers for stage IA lung adenocarcinoma. Validation in the TCGA database shows that these genes are correlated with survival, suggesting that they are novel prognostic factors for stage IA lung adenocarcinoma. In conclusion, we have uncovered novel prognostic factors for stage IA lung adenocarcinoma using gene expression profiling in combination with histopathology subtyping.

  4. Extended Cancer Education for Longer-Term Survivors in Primary Care for Patients With Stage I-II Breast or Prostate Cancer or Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage II Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  5. New procedures. Comprehensive staging of lung cancer by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintze, C.; Dinkel, J.; Biederer, J.; Heussel, C.P.; Puderbach, M.

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer staging according to the TNM system is based on morphological assessment of the primary cancer, lymph nodes and metastases. All aspects of this important oncological classification are measurable with MRI. Pulmonary nodules can be detected at the clinically relevant size of 4-5 mm in diameter. The extent of mediastinal, hilar and supraclavicular lymph node affection can be assessed at the same time. The predominant metastatic spread to the adrenal glands and spine can be detected in coronal orientation during dedicated MRI of the lungs. Search focused whole body MRI completes the staging. Various additional MR imaging techniques provide further functional and clinically relevant information during a single examination. In the oncological context the most important techniques are imaging of perfusion and tumor motion. Functional MRI of the lungs complements the pure staging and improves surgical approaches and radiotherapy planning. (orig.) [de

  6. Adjuvant whole abdominal intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk stage FIGO III patients with ovarian cancer (OVAR-IMRT-01) – Pilot trial of a phase I/II study: study protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Jensen, Alexandra D; Sterzing, Florian; Munter, Marc W; Eichbaum, Michael H; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite aggressive surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy. More than 60% of patients will develop recurrent disease, principally intraperitoneal, and die within 5 years. The use of whole abdominal irradiation (WAI) as consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy given its ability to sterilize small tumour volumes. Despite the clinically proven efficacy of whole abdominal irradiation, the use of radiotherapy in ovarian cancer has profoundly decreased mainly due to high treatment-related toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) could allow to spare kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. The OVAR-IMRT-01 study is a single center pilot trial of a phase I/II study. Patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III (R1 or R2< 1 cm) after surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy will be treated with whole abdomen irradiation as consolidation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions. A total of 8 patients will be included in this trial. For treatment planning bone marrow, kidneys, liver, spinal cord, vertebral bodies and pelvic bones are defined as organs at risk. The planning target volume includes the entire peritoneal cavity plus pelvic and para-aortic node regions. The primary endpoint of the study is the evaluation of the feasibility of intensity-modulated WAI and the evaluation of the study protocol. Secondary endpoint is evaluation of the toxicity of intensity modulated WAI before continuing with the phase I/II study. The aim is to explore the potential of IMRT as a new method for WAI to decrease the dose to kidneys, liver, bone marrow while covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose, and to implement whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy into the adjuvant multimodal

  7. A phase I/II study of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiation with boost chemotherapy for advanced T-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Faye M.; Garden, Adam S.; Palmer, J. Lynn; Shin, Dong M.; Morrison, William; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki; Khuri, Fadlo; Clayman, Gary; Goepfert, Helmuth; Ang, K. Kian; Hong, Waun K.; Glisson, Bonnie S.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence is the most common site of failure for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with neoadjuvant cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (PF) and definitive radiation at our center. Based on this, we studied the addition of chemotherapy during the boost phase of radiation after neoadjuvant PF for advanced T-stage (T3-T4) NPC. This strategy was based on theoretical radiosensitization with chemotherapy during accelerated repopulation of the tumor with relatively radioresistant clonogens. Methods and Materials: Three cycles of neoadjuvant PF was followed by conventionally fractionated radiation with additional PF during the boost portion of the radiation course. An initial Phase I study was done to establish the maximum tolerated dose of concurrent PF. Results: Forty-four patients were enrolled. Six patients in Phase I defined the MTD for concurrent PF as: cisplatin 10 mg/m 2 /day and PF 320 mg/m 2 /day, on Days 1-5 during Weeks 6 and 7 of radiation therapy based on dose-limiting toxicities of mucositis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia. Forty-one patients were treated with concurrent therapy per protocol: complete, partial, and minor responses were seen in 23, 16, and 2 patients, respectively. Progression-free and overall survival rates at 5 years were 55% (95% CI, 41-75%) and 66% (95% CI, 52-85%), respectively. Seven of 11 tumor-related deaths were due to local recurrence. Nine of 10 patients with local recurrence had T4-stage disease at presentation. Local control of T4 disease was achieved in 74% of patients overall, and in 25% (1/4) with World Health Organization (WHO) type 1, 76% (16/21) with WHO type 2, and 90% (9/10) with WHO type 3 histology. Common toxicities included mucositis, dermatitis, fatigue, vomiting, and weight loss. Conclusions: This regimen was feasible and associated with promising overall survival. Local recurrence remains the major reason for treatment failure in advanced T-stage NPC, especially WHO types 1 and 2

  8. CT-image based conformal high-dose rate brachytherapy boost in the conservative treatment of stage I - II breast cancer - introducing the procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubaszewska, M.; Skowronek, J.; Chichel, A.; Kanikowski, M.; Dymnicka, M.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) followed by radiotherapy (RT) has become the standard treatment for the majority of patients with early breast cancer. With regard to boost technique some disagreements are found between groups that are emphasizing the value of electron boost treatment and groups pointing out the value of interstitial brachytherapy (BT) boost treatment. We present the preliminary results in treating selected patients with early-stage breast cancer using high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HD R-BT) as a boost after breast conservation therapy (BCT). Materials/Methods: Between January 2006 and August 2007, a total of 58 female patients with first and second stage breast cancer underwent BCT. This therapeutic procedure involves BCS, whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) and additional irradiation to the tumour bed (boost) using interstitial HDR-BT via flexible implant tubes. A 10 Gy boost dose was received by all patients. The treatment planning was based on CT-guided 3D (three-dimensional) reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and critical structures localization (skin and ribs). The accuracy of tumour bed localization, the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were analyzed. Results: The evaluations of implant parameters involved the use of: dose volume histogram (DVH), the volume encompassed by the 100% reference isodose surface (V100%), the high dose volumecalculation (V150%, V200%, V300%), the dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR), and the conformity index (COIN). Our results were as follows: the mean PTV volume, the mean high dose volume (V150%; V200%; V300%), the DNR and COIN mean value were estimated at 57.38, 42.98, 21.38, 7.90, 0.52 and 0.83 respectively. Conclusions: CT-guided 3D HDR-BT is most appropriate for planning the boost procedure after BT especially in large breast volume, in cases with a deep seated tumour bed, as well as in patients with high risk for local recurrences. This technique reduces the

  9. Impact of lymph node micrometastasis for the UICC stage in non-small cell lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang Weiwei; Lu Bing; He Chang; Long Yiguo; Wang Ping

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To detect cytokeratin in routine pathology negative regional lymph nodes postoperatively in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). To investigate the relationship of lymph node micrometastasis in P-TNM stages NSCLC and survival rates. Methods: From Jan. 1996 to Dec. 2003, 107 paraffin-embedded specimens of T1-T4N0-N1M0 NSCLC patients were collected. Anti-cytokeratin(CK) antibody AE1/AE3 was applied to detect cytokeratin with Envision TM method in routine pathological negative region lymph nodes in NSCLC, and selected negative control, positive control and blank control. The pulmo- nary hilar lymph node micrometastasis was upward regulated with stage pCK-N1, mediastinal lymph node mi- crometastatsis was upward regulated with stage pCK-N2. The result applied to SPSS11.0 software to process. Results: The CK positive rate was 29.9% in all the patients. The CK positive rate was 27% (21/78), 30% (7/23), 67%(4/6)in stage p- I, p-II and p-III, respectively. All these data showed the tendency by which detectable rate increased and was accompanied by disease progress. Comparing the annual survival rate and median survival time of the non-micrometastasis group with the micrometastasis group in two groups, the survival rate difference was statistically significant. Comparing the armnal survival rate and median sur- vival time in pCK-III A stage with p- I -II stage, pCK-III A stage annual survival rate and median survival time was significantly different(P=0.020). Similarly, comparing the survival rate in pCK-II B stage with p- I B stage, pCK- II B stage survival rate was significantly different( P = 0. 059). Comparing the survival time of pCK-IIIA stage with p-III stage, pCK-II B stage, with p-II B stage, euther survival time difference was statistically significant (P=0.838, 0.518). Conclusions: The rate of positive cytokeratin increase is accompanied by the disease progress in NSCLC. Positive cytokeratin has disadvantageous prognosis. It is showed that pCK-N1 may

  10. Short course radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost for stage I-II breast cancer, early toxicities of a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background TomoBreast is a unicenter, non-blinded randomized trial comparing conventional radiotherapy (CR) vs. hypofractionated Tomotherapy (TT) for post-operative treatment of breast cancer. The purpose of the trial is to compare whether TT can reduce heart and pulmonary toxicity. We evaluate early toxicities. Methods The trial started inclusion in May 2007 and reached its recruitment in August 2011. Women with stage T1-3N0M0 or T1-2N1M0 breast cancer completely resected by tumorectomy (BCS) or by mastectomy (MA) who consented to participate were randomized, according to a prescribed computer-generated randomization schedule, between control arm of CR 25x2 Gy/5 weeks by tangential fields on breast/chest wall, plus supraclavicular-axillary field if node-positive, and sequential boost 8x2 Gy/2 weeks if BCS (cumulative dose 66 Gy/7 weeks), versus experimental TT arm of 15x2.8 Gy/3 weeks, including nodal areas if node-positive and simultaneous integrated boost of 0.6 Gy if BCS (cumulative dose 51 Gy/3 weeks). Outcomes evaluated were the pulmonary and heart function. Comparison of proportions used one-sided Fisher's exact test. Results By May 2010, 70 patients were randomized and had more than 1 year of follow-up. Out of 69 evaluable cases, 32 were assigned to CR (21 BCS, 11 MA), 37 to TT (20 BCS, 17 MA). Skin toxicity of grade ≥1 at 2 years was 60% in CR, vs. 30% in TT arm. Heart function showed no significant difference for left ventricular ejection fraction at 2 years, CR 4.8% vs. TT 4.6%. Pulmonary function tests at 2 years showed grade ≥1 decline of FEV1 in 21% of CR, vs. 15% of TT and decline of DLco in 29% of CR, vs. 7% of TT (P = 0.05). Conclusions There were no unexpected severe toxicities. Short course radiotherapy of the breast with simultaneous integrated boost over 3 weeks proved feasible without excess toxicities. Pulmonary tests showed a slight trend in favor of Tomotherapy, which will need confirmation with longer

  11. Dual modality CT/PET imaging in lung cancer staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Gabriel A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic capability of PET-HCT image fusion and helical computed tomography (HCT) for nodal and distant metastases detection in patients with lung cancer. Material and methods: Between February, 2003 and March, 2004 sixty-six consecutive lung cancer patients (45 men and 21 women, mean ages: 63 years old, range: 38 to 96 years old) who underwent HCT and PET-HCT fusion imaging were evaluated retrospectively. All patients had histological confirmation of lung cancer and a definitive diagnosis established on the basis of pathology results and/or clinical follow-up. Results: For global nodal staging (hilar and mediastinal) HCT showed a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 72%, 47%, 62% and 58% respectively, versus 94%, 77%, 83% and 92% corresponding to PET-HCT examination. For assessment of advanced nodal stage (N3) PET-HCT showed values of 92%, 100%, 100% and 98% respectively. For detection of distant metastasis, HCT alone had values of 67%, 93%, 84% and 83% respectively versus 100%, 98%, 96% and 100% for the PET-HCT fusion imaging. In 20 (30%) patients under-staged or over-staged on the basis of HCT results, PET-HCT allowed accurate staging. Conclusions: PET-HCT fusion imaging was more effective than HCT alone for nodal and distant metastasis detection and oncology staging. (author)

  12. Surgery in limited stage small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Hansen, H H

    1999-01-01

    The role of surgery in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is controversial. Surgery has several potential advantages because it may reduce the frequency of local relapses, it does not impede the intensity of chemotherapy, it does not affect the bone marrow, and surgical staging may be of prognostic...

  13. Mediastinal staging for lung cancer: the influence of biopsy volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Elof; Pape, Christian; Jørgensen, Ole Dan

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mediastinal staging is of paramount importance prior to surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to identify patients with N2-disease. Mediastinoscopy remains the gold standard, and sampling from at least three lymph node stations is generally recommended. It is unknown whether...

  14. Resectable stage III lung cancer: CT, surgical, and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, I.R.; Muller, N.L.; Miller, R.R.; Evans, K.G.; Nelems, B.

    1987-01-01

    Patients with stage IIIa lung cancer have improved survival following surgery. The authors reviewed the CT, surgical, and pathologic findings in 26 patients with completely resected stage IIIa lung cancer. These include examples of the different subsets of stage IIIa disease. CT correctly predicted chest-wall invasion in only two of ten patients, pericardial involvement in one of three, and tumor extension to within 2 cm of the carina in one of three patients. It detected mediastinal nodal disease in eight of 11 patients. CT is of limited value in assessing chest-wall or pericardial extension; however, such extension does not preclude complete resection. Ipsilateral nodal involvement also doses not preclude surgery

  15. A comparison of tumor motion characteristics between early stage and locally advanced stage lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Z. Henry; Lin, Steven H.; Balter, Peter; Zhang Lifei; Dong Lei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: With the increasing use of conformal radiation therapy methods for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), it is necessary to accurately determine respiratory-induced tumor motion. The purpose of this study is to analyze and compare the motion characteristics of early and locally advanced stage NSCLC tumors in a large population and correlate tumor motion with position, volume, and diaphragm motion. Methods and materials: A total of 191 (94 early stage, 97 locally advanced) non-small cell lung tumors were analyzed for this study. Each patient received a four-dimensional CT scan prior to receiving radiation treatment. A soft-tissue-based rigid registration algorithm was used to track the tumor motion. Tumor volumes were determined based on the gross tumor volume delineated by physicians in the end of expiration phase. Tumor motion characteristics were correlated with their standardized tumor locations, lobe location, and clinical staging. Diaphragm motion was calculated by subtracting the diaphragm location between the expiration and the inspiration phases. Results: Median, max, and 95th percentile of tumor motion for early stage tumors were 5.9 mm, 31.0 mm, and 20.0 mm, which were 1.2 mm, 12 mm, and 7 mm more than those in locally advanced NSCLC, respectively. The range of motion at 95th percentile is more than 50% larger in early stage lung cancer group than in the locally advanced lung cancer group. Early stage tumors in the lower lobe showed the largest motion with a median motion of 9.2 mm, while upper/mid-lobe tumors exhibited a median motion of 3.3 mm. Tumor volumes were not correlated with motion. Conclusion: The range of tumor motion differs depending on tumor location and staging of NSCLC. Early stage tumors are more mobile than locally advanced stage NSCLC. These factors should be considered for general motion management strategies when 4D simulation is not performed on individual basis.

  16. Fluid biopsy for circulating tumor cell identification in patients with early-and late-stage non-small cell lung cancer: a glimpse into lung cancer biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendel, Marco; Kolatkar, Anand; Honnatti, Meghana; Cho, Edward H; Marrinucci, Dena; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) counts are an established prognostic marker in metastatic prostate, breast and colorectal cancer, and recent data suggest a similar role in late stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, due to sensitivity constraints in current enrichment-based CTC detection technologies, there are few published data about CTC prevalence rates and morphologic heterogeneity in early-stage NSCLC, or the correlation of CTCs with disease progression and their usability for clinical staging. We investigated CTC counts, morphology and aggregation in early stage, locally advanced and metastatic NSCLC patients by using a fluid-phase biopsy approach that identifies CTCs without relying on surface-receptor-based enrichment and presents them in sufficiently high definition (HD) to satisfy diagnostic pathology image quality requirements. HD-CTCs were analyzed in blood samples from 78 chemotherapy-naïve NSCLC patients. 73% of the total population had a positive HD-CTC count (>0 CTC in 1 mL of blood) with a median of 4.4 HD-CTCs mL −1 (range 0–515.6) and a mean of 44.7 (±95.2) HD-CTCs mL −1 . No significant difference in the medians of HD-CTC counts was detected between stage IV (n = 31, range 0–178.2), stage III (n = 34, range 0–515.6) and stages I/II (n = 13, range 0–442.3). Furthermore, HD-CTCs exhibited a uniformity in terms of molecular and physical characteristics such as fluorescent cytokeratin intensity, nuclear size, frequency of apoptosis and aggregate formation across the spectrum of staging. Our results demonstrate that despite stringent morphologic inclusion criteria for the definition of HD-CTCs, the HD-CTC assay shows high sensitivity in the detection and characterization of both early- and late-stage lung cancer CTCs. Extensive studies are warranted to investigate the prognostic value of CTC profiling in early-stage lung cancer. This finding has implications for the design of extensive studies examining screening, therapy and

  17. Phase I/II Trial of Sequential Chemoradiotherapy Using a Novel Hypoxic Cell Radiosensitizer, Doranidazole (PR-350), in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (WJTOG-0002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yasumasa; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Koji; Tanaka, Masahiro; Segawa, Yoshihiko; Tsujino, Kayoko; Negoro, Shunichi; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Hida, Toyoaki; Kawahara, Masaaki; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Hirokawa, Keiko; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Ariyoshi, Yutaka

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase I/II trial was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of PR-350, a novel hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, when administered with thoracic radiation therapy (RT) after induction chemotherapy (CT) for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Two cycles of cisplatin (80 mg/m 2 ) and paclitaxel (180 mg/m 2 ), or carboplatin (AUC = 6) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m 2 ) were given before RT of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. In the Phase I portion, the starting dosage of PR-350 was 10 daily administrations (2000 mg/m 2 ) in combination with RT, and this number was increased in increments of 10 for successive groups to 30 doses. Results: In total, 37 patients were enrolled. In Phase I (n = 20), PR-350 could be administered 30 times with concurrent thoracic RT. Thus, in Phase II (n = 17), PR-350 was administered 30 times. The major toxicity was radiation pneumonitis, with Grade 3 or more pneumonitis noted in 6 patients (16%) including 2 with treatment-related deaths. However, no Grade 3 or more esophageal toxicity was noted, and only Grade 1 peripheral neuropathy was noted in 9 patients (24%). For all 37 patients, the median survival time (MST) and the 2-year survival rate were 15.9 months and 24%, respectively. For 18 patients receiving 21 to 30 doses of PR-350, the MST and 2-year survival rate were 20.9 months and 33%, respectively. Conclusions: Thoracic RT combined with 30 daily administrations of PR-350 after induction CT was well tolerated and promising for locally advanced NSCLC

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation for Early-Stage Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Hiraki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review examines studies of radiofrequency ablation (RFA of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC and discusses the role of RFA in treatment of early-stage NSCLC. RFA is usually performed under local anesthesia with computed tomography guidance. RFA-associated mortality, while being rare, can result from pulmonary events. RFA causes pneumothorax in up to 63% of cases, although pneumothorax requiring chest drainage occurs in less than 15% of procedures. Other severe complications are rare. After RFA of stage I NSCLC, 31–42% of patients show local progression. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates after RFA of stage I NSCLC were 78% to 100%, 53% to 86%, 36% to 88%, and 25% to 61%, respectively. The median survival time ranged from 29 to 67 months. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year cancer-specific survival rates after RFA of stage I NSCLC were 89% to 100%, 92% to 93%, and 59% to 88%, respectively. RFA has a higher local failure rate than sublobar resection and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT. Therefore, RFA may currently be reserved for early-stage NSCLC patients who are unfit for sublobar resection or SBRT. Various technologies are being developed to improve clinical outcomes of RFA for early-stage NSCLC.

  19. Current Treatments for Surgically Resectable, Limited-Stage, and Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2017-12-01

    The prevalence of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has declined in the U.S. as the prevalence of tobacco use has declined. However, a significant number of people in the U.S. are current or former smokers and are at risk of developing SCLC. Routine histological or cytological evaluation can reliably make the diagnosis of SCLC, and immunohistochemistry stains (thyroid transcription factor-1, chromogranin, synaptophysin, and CD56) can be used if there is uncertainty about the diagnosis. Rarely do patients present with SCLC amendable to surgical resection, and evaluation requires a meticulous workup for extra-thoracic metastases and invasive staging of the mediastinum. Resected patients require adjuvant chemotherapy and/or thoracic radiation therapy (TRT), and prophylactic cranial radiation (PCI) should be considered depending on the stage. For limited-stage disease, concurrent platinum-etoposide and TRT followed by PCI is the standard. Thoracic radiation therapy should be started early in treatment, and can be given twice daily to 45 Gy or once daily to 60-70 Gy. For extensive-stage disease, platinum-etoposide remains the standard first-line therapy, and the standard second-line therapy is topotecan. Preliminary studies have demonstrated the activity of immunotherapy, and the response rate is approximately 10-30% with some durable responses observed. Rovalpituzumab tesirine, an antibody drug conjugate, has shown promising activity in patients with high delta-like protein 3 tumor expression (approximately 70% of patients with SCLC). The emergence of these and other promising agents has rekindled interest in drug development in SCLC. Several ongoing trials are investigating novel agents in the first-line, maintenance, and second-line settings. This review will provide an update on the standard therapies for surgically resected limited-stage small cell lung cancer and extensive-stage small cell lung cancer that have been investigated in recent clinical trials. © Alpha

  20. Treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer and limited-disease small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Sharouni, S.Y.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns the treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and limited disease small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). We described a systematic review on the clinical results of radiotherapy, combined or not with chemotherapy, for inoperable NSCLC stage III with the aim to define the

  1. Treatment of Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Tracey; Gettinger, Scott; Hensing, Thomas A.; VanDam Sequist, Lecia; Ireland, Belinda; Stinchcombe, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a treatable, but not curable, clinical entity in patients given the diagnosis at a time when their performance status (PS) remains good. Methods: A systematic literature review was performed to update the previous edition of the American College of Chest Physicians Lung Cancer Guidelines. Results: The use of pemetrexed should be restricted to patients with nonsquamous histology. Similarly, bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy (and as continuation maintenance) should be restricted to patients with nonsquamous histology and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) PS of 0 to 1; however, the data now suggest it is safe to use in those patients with treated and controlled brain metastases. Data at this time are insufficient regarding the safety of bevacizumab in patients receiving therapeutic anticoagulation who have an ECOG PS of 2. The role of cetuximab added to chemotherapy remains uncertain and its routine use cannot be recommended. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors as first-line therapy are the recommended treatment of those patients identified as having an EGFR mutation. The use of maintenance therapy with either pemetrexed or erlotinib should be considered after four cycles of first-line therapy in those patients without evidence of disease progression. The use of second- and third-line therapy in stage IV NSCLC is recommended in those patients retaining a good PS; however, the benefit of therapy beyond the third-line setting has not been demonstrated. In the elderly and in patients with a poor PS, the use of two-drug, platinum-based regimens is preferred. Palliative care should be initiated early in the course of therapy for stage IV NSCLC. Conclusions: Significant advances continue to be made, and the treatment of stage IV NSCLC has become nuanced and specific for particular histologic subtypes and clinical patient characteristics and according to the

  2. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The Pattern of Failure Is Distant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, Jeffrey D.; El Naqa, Issam; Drzymala, Robert E.; Trovo, Marco; Jones, Griffin; Denning, Mary Dee

    2010-01-01

    Background: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) represents a substantial paradigm shift in the treatment of patients with medically inoperable Stage I/II non-small-cell lung cancer. We reviewed our experience using either three- or five-fraction SBRT for peripheral or central tumors, respectively. Methods and Materials: A total of 91 patients signed an institutional review board-approved consent form, were treated with SBRT, and have had ≥6 months of follow-up. Patients were referred for SBRT because of underlying comorbidities (poor performance status in 31 or poor lung function in 52) or refusal of surgery (8 patients). Of the cancers, 83 were peripheral and eight were central. Peripheral cancers received a mean dose of 18 Gy x three fractions. Cancers within 2 cm of the bronchus, esophagus, or brachial plexus were treated with 9 Gy x five fractions. Results: The median follow-up duration for these patients was 18 months (range, 6-42 months). TNM staging was as follows: 58 patients with T1N0M0, 22 with T2N0M0, 2 with T3N0M0 (chest wall), and 6 with T1N0M1 cancers. The median tumor diameter was 2 cm (range, 1-5 cm). The median forced expiratory volume in 1 s was 46% (range, 17-133%) and the median carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO) was 49% (range, 15-144%). Two-year local tumor control was achieved in 86% of patients. The predominant pattern of failure was the development of distant metastasis or second lung cancer. The development of distant metastasis was the only significant prognostic factor for overall survival on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Local tumor control was shown to be high using SBRT for non-small-cell lung cancer. Overall survival is highly coerrelated with the development of distant metastasis.

  3. PET/CT staging of T1-stage non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salman, K. A.; Steinmann, C. H.; Von Schulthess, G. K.; Steinert, H. C.; Sukumar, V. P.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:Purpose: To evaluate the value of PET/CT in detecting occult metastases in patients with T 1 -stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Method: Patients with proven NSCLC and T 1 -stage ( c m) were retrospectively analyzed. In all patients a whole-body 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan for initial staging was performed. The PET/CT findings were compared with all available clinical information, intra-operative findings and the histopathological results. Results: 95 patients (39 men, 56 women; age range, 19-85 years) were analyzed in our study. PET/CT in 68-95 patients correctly excluded mediastinal and distant metastases. In 17/95 patients (18%) mediastinal lymph-node metastases were proven (N 2 n=15; N 3 n=2). PET/CT correctly detected in 10/17 patients (58.8%) mediastinal nodal disease. The smallest mediastinal lymph-node metastasis detected by PET/CT had a size of 0.7 c m. In 7 patients PET/CT missed N 2 -stage. In three of these patients the SUVmax of the primary was c m. Only in one missed N 2 -stage metastasis was sized > 1.0 c m. The tumor histology (adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma) and location of the primary (central, periphery) did not influence the missed N 2 -stage by PET/CT. PET/CT diagnosed correctly N 3 -stage in 2 patients. 10/95 patients (10.5%) had distant metastases. PET/CT detected unknown M 1 -stage in 4/10 patients. In one patient a metastasis of the parietal pleura was missed by PET/CT. Conclusion: In our study, 28% patients with T 1 -stage NSCLC showed mediastinal or distant metastases. PET/CT was efficient in the detection of occult metastases. However, the sensitivity of PET/CT in mediastinal staging was only 64%.

  4. Palliative Care Intervention in Improving Symptom Control and Quality of Life in Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Their Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Caregiver; Psychological Impact of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  5. Factors Affecting the Risk of Brain Metastasis in Small Cell Lung Cancer With Surgery: Is Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Necessary for Stage I-III Disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Linlin; Wang, Q.I.; Zhao Lujun; Yuan Zhiyong; Li Ruijian; Wang Ping

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with surgical resection has not been fully identified. This study undertook to assess the factors affecting the risk of brain metastases in patients with stage I-III SCLC after surgical resection. The implications of PCI treatment for these patients are discussed. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-six patients treated with surgical resection for stage I-III SCLC from January 1998-December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the risk factors of brain metastases. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to determine the risk factors of brain metastases. Results: The median survival time for this patient population was 34 months, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 34.9%. For the whole group, 23.0% (29/126) of the patients had evidence of metastases to brain. Pathologic stage not only correlated with overall survival but also significantly affected the risk of brain metastases. The 5-year survival rates for patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 54.8%, 35.6%, and 14.1%, respectively (P=.001). The frequency of brain metastases in patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 6.25% (2/32), 28.2% (11/39), and 29.1% (16/55) (P=.026), respectively. A significant difference in brain metastases between patients with complete resection and incomplete resection was also observed (20.5% vs 42.9%, P=.028). The frequency of brain metastases was not found to be correlated with age, sex, pathologic type, induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, or adjuvant radiation therapy. Conclusions: Stage I SCLC patients with complete resection had a low incidence of brain metastases and a favorable survival rate. Stage II-III disease had a higher incidence of brain metastases. Thus, PCI might have a role for stage II-III disease but not for stage I disease.

  6. Emerging Therapies for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameera S. Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The current standard of care for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC includes radiation, chemotherapy, and surgery in certain individualized cases. In unresectable NSCLC, chemoradiation has been the standard of care for the past three decades. Local and distant failure remains high in this group of patients, so dose escalation has been studied in both single institution and national clinical trials. Though initial studies showed a benefit to dose escalation, phase III studies examining dose escalation using standard fractionation or hyperfractionation have failed to show a benefit. Over the last 17 years, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT has shown a high degree of safety and local control for stage I lung cancers and other localized malignancies. More recently, phase I/II studies using SBRT for dose escalation after conventional chemoradiation in locally advanced NSCLC have been promising with good apparent safety. Immunotherapy also offers opportunities to address distant disease and preclinical data suggest immunotherapy in tandem with SBRT may be a rational way to induce an “abscopal effect” although there are little clinical data as yet. By building on the proven concept of conventional chemoradiation for patients with locally advanced NSCLC with a subsequent radiation dose intensification to residual disease with SBRT concurrent with immunotherapy, we hope address the issues of metastatic and local failures. This “quadmodality” approach is still in its infancy but appears to be a safe and rational approach to the improving the outcome of NSCLC therapy.

  7. Regional Lung Function Profiles of Stage I and III Lung Cancer Patients: An Evaluation for Functional Avoidance Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Schubert, Leah; Diot, Quentin; Waxweiller, Timothy; Koo, Phillip; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas; Rusthoven, Chad; Gaspar, Laurie; Kavanagh, Brian; Miften, Moyed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The development of clinical trials is underway to use 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) ventilation imaging to preferentially spare functional lung in patients undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of this work was to generate data to aide with clinical trial design by retrospectively characterizing dosimetric and functional profiles for patients with different stages of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 118 lung cancer patients (36% stage I and 64% stage III) from 2 institutions were used for the study. A 4DCT-ventilation map was calculated using the patient's 4DCT imaging, deformable image registration, and a density-change–based algorithm. To assess each patient's spatial ventilation profile both quantitative and qualitative metrics were developed, including an observer-based defect observation and metrics based on the ventilation in each lung third. For each patient we used the clinical doses to calculate functionally weighted mean lung doses and metrics that assessed the interplay between the spatial location of the dose and high-functioning lung. Results: Both qualitative and quantitative metrics revealed a significant difference in functional profiles between the 2 stage groups (P<.01). We determined that 65% of stage III and 28% of stage I patients had ventilation defects. Average functionally weighted mean lung dose was 19.6 Gy and 5.4 Gy for stage III and I patients, respectively, with both groups containing patients with large spatial overlap between dose and high-function regions. Conclusion: Our 118-patient retrospective study found that 65% of stage III patients have regionally variant ventilation profiles that are suitable for functional avoidance. Our results suggest that regardless of disease stage, it is possible to have unique spatial interplay between dose and high-functional lung, highlighting the importance of evaluating the function of each patient and developing a personalized functional avoidance

  8. Regional Lung Function Profiles of Stage I and III Lung Cancer Patients: An Evaluation for Functional Avoidance Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy, E-mail: yevgeniy.vinogradskiy@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Schubert, Leah; Diot, Quentin; Waxweiller, Timothy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Koo, Phillip [Department of Radiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Castillo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Rusthoven, Chad; Gaspar, Laurie; Kavanagh, Brian; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The development of clinical trials is underway to use 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) ventilation imaging to preferentially spare functional lung in patients undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of this work was to generate data to aide with clinical trial design by retrospectively characterizing dosimetric and functional profiles for patients with different stages of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 118 lung cancer patients (36% stage I and 64% stage III) from 2 institutions were used for the study. A 4DCT-ventilation map was calculated using the patient's 4DCT imaging, deformable image registration, and a density-change–based algorithm. To assess each patient's spatial ventilation profile both quantitative and qualitative metrics were developed, including an observer-based defect observation and metrics based on the ventilation in each lung third. For each patient we used the clinical doses to calculate functionally weighted mean lung doses and metrics that assessed the interplay between the spatial location of the dose and high-functioning lung. Results: Both qualitative and quantitative metrics revealed a significant difference in functional profiles between the 2 stage groups (P<.01). We determined that 65% of stage III and 28% of stage I patients had ventilation defects. Average functionally weighted mean lung dose was 19.6 Gy and 5.4 Gy for stage III and I patients, respectively, with both groups containing patients with large spatial overlap between dose and high-function regions. Conclusion: Our 118-patient retrospective study found that 65% of stage III patients have regionally variant ventilation profiles that are suitable for functional avoidance. Our results suggest that regardless of disease stage, it is possible to have unique spatial interplay between dose and high-functional lung, highlighting the importance of evaluating the function of each patient and developing a personalized functional

  9. Efficacies of 125I seed implantation in advanced stage central lung cancer via fibrobronchoscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianguo; An Liqing; Cheng Jinguang; Zhang Yufen; Guo Xiaokui

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the temporal curative effect of 125 I seed implantation in advanced stage central type lung cancer. Methods: 125 I seed was implanted in 56 patients confirmed advanced stage central type lung cancer via fibrobronchoscope and all cases were fellow up in certain duration to explore their efficacies and the adverse reaction. Results: Total efficient rate was 76.78% in 56 patients. Lung reexpanded rate was 90.90%. Conclusion: The therapy of 125 I seed implantation in advanced stage central type lung cancer is safe and available. (authors)

  10. Non-small cell lung cancer brain metastasis screening in the era of positron emission tomography-CT staging: Current practice and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Mauricio E; Debowski, Maciej; Hukins, Craig; Fielding, David; Fong, Kwun M; Bettington, Catherine S

    2018-05-10

    Several clinical guidelines indicate that brain metastasis screening (BMS) should be guided by disease stage in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We estimate that screening is performed more broadly in practice, and patients undergo brain imaging at considerable cost with questionable benefit. Our aim was to quantify the use and detection rate of BMS in a contemporary cohort staged with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT). We conducted a retrospective review of prospectively collected data from three major lung cancer referral centres in Brisbane between January 2011 and December 2015. Patients included had a new diagnosis of NSCLC and had undergone a PET-CT to stage extra-cranial disease. BMS was defined as dedicated brain imaging with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) or magnetic resonance (MR), in the absence of clinically apparent neurological deficits. A total of 1751 eligible cases were identified and of these 718 (41%) underwent BMS. The majority had CE-CT imaging (n = 703). Asymptomatic brain metastases (BM) were detected in 18 patients (2.5%). Of these patients, 12 had concurrent non-brain metastases. Only six patients (0.8%) had BM alone. The rate of detection increased with N-stage (P = 0.02) and overall stage (P < 0.001). It was 0.5%, 1%, 1.6% and 7.3% for stage I, II, III and IV respectively. The overall screening rate increased with T-stage (P = 0.001), N-Stage (P < 0.001) and overall stage (P < 0.001). Non-small cell lung cancer BMS practices remain at odds with published guidelines. The low number of occult BMs detected supports the existing international recommendations. Rationalising BMS would minimise the burden on patients and the health care system. © 2018 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  11. Definitive radiation therapy for medically inoperable patients with stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, K.; Mitsuhashi, N.; Saito, Y.; Nakayama, Y.; Katano, S.; Furuta, M.; Sakurai, H.; Takahashi, T.; Niibe, H.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of definitive radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment for medically inoperable patients with stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and Methods: From 1976 through 1989, 84 patients with clinical stage I and II NSCLC were treated with definitive RT alone at Gunma University hospital. All patients were treated with 10 MV X-rays using antero-posterior parallel opposed fields. The total dose ranged from 60 Gy to 90 Gy (35 pts; 60-69 Gy, 39 pts; 70-74 Gy, 10 pts; ≥ 80 Gy) with once-daily standard fractionation. Results: The two and five-year survival rates were 74% and 31% for 28 patients with stage I disease, as compared with 40% and 19% for 56 patients with stage II respectively (p<0.05). Although there was no significant difference of survival rates by the histologic subtypes, in the patients with squamous cell carcinoma there were more long-term survivors. Fifty-three patients with tumors less than 5 cm in diameter had an infield progression rate of 14% at two years, in comparison with 38% of 31 patients with tumors greater than 5 cm (p<0.05). Overall distant failure occurred in 57% of the patients with smaller tumors and in 80% of the patients with larger tumors (p<0.05). The difference of survival rates for these two groups was statistically significant (p<0.005). Ten patients given a total dose of 80Gy or over had only 17% local progression at the time of last follow-up, however they had not been alive beyond three years because they developed pulmonary insufficiency due to severe stenosis of the proximal bronchus. For age and sex, there were no significant differences in survival, however, patients with performance status of 0-1 lived longer than those with a status of 2 or more (MST 24 versus 13 months; p=0.06). Conclusion: The tumor size was the most important factor not only for local control but also for distant failure. It was also suggested that the optimal radiation dose for medically inoperable stage I-II

  12. Metallothionein-I+II in neuroprotection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mie Ø; Jensen, Rikke; Pedersen, Dan S

    2009-01-01

    -I+II decrease inflammation and secondary tissue damage (oxidative stress, neurodegeneration, and apoptosis) and promote post-injury repair and regeneration (angiogenesis, neurogenesis, neuronal sprouting and tissue remodelling). Intracellularly the molecular MT-I+II actions involve metal ion control...... encephalomyelitis. (c) 2009 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc....

  13. Survival prognostic value of morphological and metabolic variables in patients with stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domachevsky, L. [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Petah Tikva (Israel); Beilinson Hospital, Petah Tikva (Israel); Groshar, D.; Bernstine, H. [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Petah Tikva (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Galili, R. [Lady Davis-Carmel Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Haifa (Israel); Saute, M. [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Petah Tiqva (Israel)

    2015-11-15

    The prognosis of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is important, as patients with resectable disease and poor prognostic variables might benefit from neoadjuvant therapy. The goal of this study is to evaluate SUVmax, SUVmax ratio, CT volume (CTvol), metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolisis (TLG) as survival prognostic markers. In addition, we defined two variables; MTV x SUVmax (MTVmax) and CTvol x SUVmax (CTvolmax) and assessed whether they can be used as prognostic markers. Patients with stage I-II NSCLC who underwent 18 F FDG PET/CT and surgery were evaluated. Cox proportional-hazard model was used to determine the association between variables and survival. Similar analysis was performed in cases with no lymph node (LN) involvement. One hundred and eighty-one patients were included (at the end of the study, 140 patients were alive). SUVmax with a cut-off value of 8.2 was significant survival prognostic factor regardless of LN involvement (P = 0.012). In cases with no LN involvement, SUVmax and CTvol (≥7.1 ml) were significant survival prognostic factors with P = 0.004 and 0.03, respectively. SUVmax may be a useful prognostic variable in stage I-II NSCLC while morphologic tumour volume might be useful in cases with no lymph node involvement. (orig.)

  14. Phase I/II trial of vorinostat (SAHA) and erlotinib for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations after erlotinib progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguart, Noemi; Rosell, Rafael; Cardenal, Felipe; Cardona, Andres F; Isla, Dolores; Palmero, Ramon; Moran, Teresa; Rolfo, Christian; Pallarès, M Cinta; Insa, Amelia; Carcereny, Enric; Majem, Margarita; De Castro, Javier; Queralt, Cristina; Molina, Miguel A; Taron, Miquel

    2014-05-01

    Vorinostat or suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor with demonstrated antiproliferative effects due to drug-induced accumulation of acetylated proteins, including the heat shock protein 90. We prospectively studied the activity of vorinostat plus erlotinib in EGFR-mutated NSCLC patients with progression to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We conducted this prospective, non-randomized, multicenter, phase I/II trial to evaluate the maximum tolerated dose, toxicity profile and efficacy of erlotinib and vorinostat. Patients with advanced NSCLC harboring EGFR mutations and progressive disease after a minimum of 12 weeks on erlotinib were included. The maximum tolerated dose of vorinostat plus erlotinib was used as recommended dose for the phase II (RDP2) to assess the efficacy of the combination. The primary end point was progression-free-survival rate at 12 weeks (PFSR12w). Pre-treatment plasma samples were required to assess T790M resistant mutation. A total of 33 patients were enrolled in the phase I-II trial. The maximum tolerated dose was erlotinib 150 mg p.o., QD, and 400mg p.o., QD, on days 1-7 and 15-21 in a 28-day cycle. Among the 25 patients treated at the RDP2, the most common toxicities included anemia, fatigue and diarrhea. No responses were observed. PFSR12w was 28% (IC 95%: 18.0-37.2); median progression-free survival (PFS) was 8 weeks (IC 95%: 7.43-8.45) and overall survival (OS) 10.3 months (95% CI: 2.4-18.1). Full dose of continuous erlotinib with vorinostat 400mg p.o., QD on alternative weeks can be safely administered. Still, the combination has no meaningful activity in EGFR-mutated NSCLC patients after TKI progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. New procedures. Comprehensive staging of lung cancer by MRI; Neue Verfahren. Umfassendes Staging des Lungenkarzinoms mit der MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hintze, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Kiel (Germany); Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie (E010), Heidelberg (Germany); Dinkel, J. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie (E010), Heidelberg (Germany); Biederer, J. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Kiel (Germany); Heussel, C.P. [Thoraxklinik Heidelberg, Abteilung Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Puderbach, M. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie (E010), Heidelberg (Germany); Thoraxklinik Heidelberg, Abteilung Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Lung cancer staging according to the TNM system is based on morphological assessment of the primary cancer, lymph nodes and metastases. All aspects of this important oncological classification are measurable with MRI. Pulmonary nodules can be detected at the clinically relevant size of 4-5 mm in diameter. The extent of mediastinal, hilar and supraclavicular lymph node affection can be assessed at the same time. The predominant metastatic spread to the adrenal glands and spine can be detected in coronal orientation during dedicated MRI of the lungs. Search focused whole body MRI completes the staging. Various additional MR imaging techniques provide further functional and clinically relevant information during a single examination. In the oncological context the most important techniques are imaging of perfusion and tumor motion. Functional MRI of the lungs complements the pure staging and improves surgical approaches and radiotherapy planning. (orig.) [German] Das Staging des Lungenkarzinoms nach dem TNM-System basiert auf der morphologischen Einschaetzung des Primarius, der Lymphknoten und Metastasen. Alle Aspekte dieser onkologisch wichtigen Beurteilung lassen sich mit der MRT erfassen. Pulmonale Rundherde sind ab der klinisch relevanten Groesse von 4-5 mm Durchmesser sicher erkennbar. Die Groesse der mediastinalen, hilaeren und supraklavikulaeren Lymphknoten kann in einem Untersuchungsgang bestimmt werden. In der koronaren Schichtfuehrung der dedizierten MRT der Lunge werden die Bereiche der bevorzugten Metastasierung in Nebennieren und weite Teile der Wirbelsaeule miterfasst. Durch eine gezielte Ganzkoerper-MRT als Suchmethode wird der letzte Teil des Stagings erfuellt. Die MRT bietet vielfaeltige Moeglichkeiten, zusaetzliche funktionelle, klinisch relevante Informationen innerhalb einer Untersuchung zu erheben. Im onkologischen Kontext sind die Perfusionsbildgebung der Lunge und die Bewegungsabschaetzung der Tumoren am bedeutendsten. Die funktionelle MRT der

  16. Differential diagnosis and cancer staging of a unique case with multiple nodules in the lung - lung adenocarcinoma, metastasis of colon adenocarcinoma, and colon adenocarcinoma metastasizing to lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yun; Qiu, Jianxing; Shang, Xueqian; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Ying; Xiong, Yan; Li, Ting

    2015-05-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer in the world. Despite this, there have been few cases of simultaneous primary and metastatic cancers in the lung reported, let alone coexisting with tumor-to-tumor metastasis. Herein, we describe an extremely unusual case. A 61-year-old man with a history of colon adenocarcinoma was revealed as having three nodules in the lung 11 months after colectomy. The nodule in the left upper lobe was primary lung adenocarcinoma, the larger one in the right upper lobe was a metastasis of colon adenocarcinoma, and the smaller one in the right upper lobe was colon adenocarcinoma metastasizing to lung adenocarcinoma. Our paper focused on the differential diagnosis and cancer staging of this unique case, and discussed the uncommon phenomenon of the lung acting as a recipient in tumor-to-tumor metastasis.

  17. Staging by tomography: Lung, esophagus, mama and pleural cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gigirey, V.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation shows images of different types of cancer in the lung, esophagus, mama and pleura. The chest radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance and PET CT contribute to detect the morphology, size, location, metastasize, malignant and benign nodules, lymph glands.

  18. A hhase I/II trial to evaluate three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy confined to the region of the lumpectomy cavity for Stage I/II breast carcinoma: Initial report of feasibility and reproducibility of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Study 0319

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank; Winter, Kathryn M.S.; Straube, William; Wong, John; Pass, Helen; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Chafe, Susan; Arthur, Douglas; Petersen, Ivy; McCormick, Beryl

    2005-01-01

    Background: This prospective study (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Study 0319) examines the use of three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Reproducibility, as measured by technical feasibility, was the primary end point with the goal of demonstrating whether the technique is widely applicable in a multicenter setting before a Phase III trial is undertaken. Methods and Materials: This study was designed such that if fewer than 5 cases out of the first 42 patients evaluable were scored as unacceptable, the treatment would be considered reproducible. Patients received 38.5 Gy in 3.85 Gy/fraction delivered twice daily. The clinical target volume included the lumpectomy cavity plus a 10-15-mm margin bounded by 5 mm within the skin surface and the lung-chest wall interface. The planning target volume (PTV) included the clinical target volume plus a 10-mm margin. Treatment plans were judged as follows: (1) No variations (total coverage), 95% isodose surface covers 100% of the PTV and all specified critical normal tissue dose-volume histogram (DVH) limits met. (2) Minor variation (marginal coverage), 95% isodose surface covers between ≥95% and <100% of the PTV. No portion of PTV receives <93% of prescription (isocenter) dose. All specified critical normal tissue DVH limits fall within 5% of the guidelines. (3) Major variation (miss), 95% isodose surface covers <95% of the PTV. Portion of PTV receives <93% of prescription isocenter dose. Any critical normal tissue DVH limit exceeds 5% of the specified value. Results: A total of 58 patients were enrolled on this study between 8/15/03 and 4/30/04, 5 of whom were ineligible or did not receive protocol treatment. Two additional patients were excluded, one because the on-study form was not submitted, and the other because no treatment planning material was submitted. This primary end point analysis is based on the first 42 (out of 51) evaluable patients

  19. Treatment selection of early stage non-small cell lung cancer: the role of the patient in clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhles, S; Nuyttens, J J M E; de Mol, M; Aerts, J G J V; Maat, A P W M; Birim, Ö; Bogers, A J J C; Takkenberg, J J M

    2018-01-15

    The objective of this study is to investigate the role and experience of early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient in decision making process concerning treatment selection in the current clinical practice. Stage I-II NSCLC patients (surgery 55 patients, SBRT 29 patients, median age 68) were included in this prospective study and completed a questionnaire that explored: (1) perceived patient knowledge of the advantages and disadvantages of the treatment options, (2) experience with current clinical decision making, and (3) the information that the patient reported to have received from their treating physician. This was assessed by multiple-choice, 1-5 Likert Scale, and open questions. The Decisional Conflict Scale was used to assess the decisional conflict. Health related quality of life (HRQoL) was measured with SF-36 questionnaire. In 19% of patients, there was self-reported perceived lack of knowledge about the advantages and disadvantages of the treatment options. Seventy-four percent of patients felt that they were sufficiently involved in decision-making by their physician, and 81% found it important to be involved in decision making. Forty percent experienced decisional conflict, and one-in-five patients to such an extent that it made them feel unsure about the decision. Subscores with regard to feeling uninformed and on uncertainty, contributed the most to decisional conflict, as 36% felt uninformed and 17% of patients were not satisfied with their decision. HRQoL was not influenced by patient experience with decision-making or patient preferences for shared decision making. Dutch early-stage NSCLC patients find it important to be involved in treatment decision making. Yet a substantial proportion experiences decisional conflict and feels uninformed. Better patient information and/or involvement in treatment-decision-making is needed in order to improve patient knowledge and hopefully reduce decisional conflict.

  20. Socioeconomic position and surgery for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard Starr, Laila; Osler, Merete; Steding-Jessen, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Register 2001-2008 (date of diagnosis, histology, stage, and treatment), the Central Population Register (vital status), the Integrated Database for Labour Market Research (socioeconomic position), and the Danish Hospital Discharge Register (comorbidity). Logistic regression analyses were performed overall......AIM: To examine possible associations between socioeconomic position and surgical treatment of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS: In a register-based clinical cohort study, patients with early-stage (stages I-IIIa) NSCLC were identified in the Danish Lung Cancer...

  1. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Gender-Age-Physiology Index Stage for Predicting Future Lung Function Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Margaret L; Xia, Meng; Zhou, Yueren; Murray, Susan; Tayob, Nabihah; Brown, Kevin K; Wells, Athol U; Schmidt, Shelley L; Martinez, Fernando J; Flaherty, Kevin R

    2016-02-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive lung disease with variable course. The Gender-Age-Physiology (GAP) Index and staging system uses clinical variables to stage mortality risk. It is unknown whether clinical staging predicts future decline in pulmonary function. We assessed whether the GAP stage predicts future pulmonary function decline and whether interval pulmonary function change predicts mortality after accounting for stage. Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (N = 657) were identified retrospectively at three tertiary referral centers, and baseline GAP stages were assessed. Mixed models were used to describe average trajectories of FVC and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (Dlco). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess whether declines in pulmonary function ≥ 10% in 6 months predict mortality after accounting for GAP stage. Over a 2-year period, GAP stage was not associated with differences in yearly lung function decline. After accounting for stage, a 10% decrease in FVC or Dlco over 6 months independently predicted death or transplantation (FVC hazard ratio, 1.37; Dlco hazard ratio, 1.30; both, P ≤ .03). Patients with GAP stage 2 with declining pulmonary function experienced a survival profile similar to patients with GAP stage 3, with 1-year event-free survival of 59.3% (95% CI, 49.4-67.8) vs 56.9% (95% CI, 42.2-69.1). Baseline GAP stage predicted death or lung transplantation but not the rate of future pulmonary function decline. After accounting for GAP stage, a decline of ≥ 10% over 6 months independently predicted death or lung transplantation. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. CT staging of lung cancer: the role of artificial pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Seong; Im, Jung Gi; Han, Man Chung

    1991-01-01

    To determine the role of artificially induced pneumothorax in the evaluation of the chest wall and mediastinal invasion in patients with peripheral bronchogenic carcinoma. CT scans of 22 patients obtained after induced pneumothorax were evaluated. All patients had peripheral lung mass abutting the pleura on a routine CT scan. Room air of 200-400ml was introduced through intrathoracic negative pressure initially, followed by pressure injection through the 18 gauge long bevelled needle under fluoroscopic control. Conclusively, CT with artificial pneumothorax added more information than conventional CT in the evaluation of the chest wall or mediastinal invasion by lung cancer without notable risk

  3. Circulating Tumor DNA in Predicting Outcomes in Patients With Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer or Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-12

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  4. SU-E-J-87: Ventilation Weighting Effect On Mean Doses of Both Side Lungs for Patients with Advanced Stage Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, H; Xia, P; Yu, N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study ventilation weighting effect on radiation doses to both side lungs for patients with advanced stage lung cancer. Methods: Fourteen patients with advanced stage lung cancer were included in this retrospective study. Proprietary software was developed to calculate the lung ventilation map based on 4DCT images acquired for radiation therapy. Two phases of inhale (0%) and exhale (50%) were used for the lung ventilation calculations. For each patient, the CT images were resampled to the same dose calculation resolution of 3mmx3mmx3mm. The ventilation distribution was then normalized by the mean value of the ventilation. The ventilation weighted dose was calculated by applying linearly weighted ventilation to the dose of each pixel. The lung contours were automatically delineated from patient CT image with lung window, excluding the tumor and high density tissues. For contralateral and ipsilateral lungs, the mean lung doses from the original plan and ventilation weighted mean lung doses were compared using two tail t-Test. Results: The average of mean dose was 6.1 ±3.8Gy for the contralateral lungs, and 26.2 ± 14.0Gy for the ipsilateral lungs. The average of ventilation weighted dose was 6.3± 3.8Gy for the contralateral lungs and 24.6 ± 13.1Gy for the ipsilateral lungs. The statistics analysis shows the significance of the mean dose increase (p<0.015) for the contralateral lungs and decrease (p<0.005) for the ipsilateral lungs. Conclusion: Ventilation weighted doses were greater than the un-weighted doses for contralateral lungs and smaller for ipsilateral lungs. This Result may be helpful to understand the radiation dosimetric effect on the lung function and provide planning guidance for patients with advance stage lung cancer

  5. Outcome of combination chemotherapy in extensive stage small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U N; Hirsch, F R; Osterlind, K

    1998-01-01

    During the past two decades many different treatment regimens of combination chemotherapy have been applied in extensive stage small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). This study was carried out to identify whether these modifications have resulted in an improved overall survival for extensive stage during...

  6. Endoscopic ultrasound guided biopsy performed routinely in lung cancer staging spares futile thoracotomies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Soeren S; Vilmann, Peter; Krasnik, Mark

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Up to 45% of operations with curative intent for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be regarded as futile, apparently because the stage of the disease is more advanced than expected preoperatively. During the past decade several studies have evaluated the usefulness of endoscopic...... ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA) in lung cancer staging with promising results. However, no randomised trials have been performed, in which a staging strategy with EUS-FNA performed in all patients is compared with a conventional workup. METHODS: Before surgery (i.e. mediastinoscopy...

  7. Lung-MAP: Talazoparib in Treating Patients With HRRD Positive Recurrent Stage IV Squamous Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-31

    ATM Gene Mutation; ATR Gene Mutation; BARD1 Gene Mutation; BRCA1 Gene Mutation; BRCA2 Gene Mutation; BRIP1 Gene Mutation; CHEK1 Gene Mutation; CHEK2 Gene Mutation; FANCA Gene Mutation; FANCC Gene Mutation; FANCD2 Gene Mutation; FANCF Gene Mutation; FANCM Gene Mutation; NBN Gene Mutation; PALB2 Gene Mutation; RAD51 Gene Mutation; RAD51B Gene Mutation; RAD54L Gene Mutation; Recurrent Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; RPA1 Gene Mutation; Stage IV Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma AJCC v7

  8. Reminiscences by Dr. I.I. Rabi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabi, I.I.

    1973-01-01

    Dr. I.I. Rabi, Professor of Physics, Columbia University, Nobel Laureate, adviser to presidents and an original member of the scientific advisory committees both of the United Nations and the IAEA, delivered the following address at the Salazar Atomic Centre, Mexico, in October 1972 he spoke on 'reminiscences from scientific advisory services to governments and international organizations'. (author)

  9. Creb1 regulates late stage mammalian lung development via respiratory epithelial and mesenchymal-independent mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, N.; McDougall, A. R.; Mantamadiotis, T.; Cole, T. J.; Bird, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    During mammalian lung development, the morphological transition from respiratory tree branching morphogenesis to a predominantly saccular architecture, capable of air-breathing at birth, is dependent on physical forces as well as molecular signaling by a range of transcription factors including the cAMP response element binding protein 1 (Creb1). Creb1−/− mutant mice exhibit complete neonatal lethality consistent with a lack of lung maturation beyond the branching phase. To further define its role in the developing mouse lung, we deleted Creb1 separately in the respiratory epithelium and mesenchyme. Surprisingly, we found no evidence of a morphological lung defect nor compromised neonatal survival in either conditional Creb1 mutant. Interestingly however, loss of mesenchymal Creb1 on a genetic background lacking the related Crem protein showed normal lung development but poor neonatal survival. To investigate the underlying requirement for Creb1 for normal lung development, Creb1−/− mice were re-examined for defects in both respiratory muscles and glucocorticoid hormone signaling, which are also required for late stage lung maturation. However, these systems appeared normal in Creb1−/− mice. Together our results suggest that the requirement of Creb1 for normal mammalian lung morphogenesis is not dependent upon its expression in lung epithelium or mesenchyme, nor its role in musculoskeletal development. PMID:27150575

  10. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for lung cancer staging: early experience in Brazil*,**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Viviane Rossi; Cardoso, Paulo Francisco Guerreiro; Jacomelli, Márcia; Demarzo, Sérgio Eduardo; Palomino, Addy Lidvina Mejia; Rodrigues, Ascédio José; Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; Pego-Fernandes, Paulo Manoel; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive, safe and accurate method for collecting samples from mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. This study focused on the initial results obtained with EBUS-TBNA for lung cancer and lymph node staging at three teaching hospitals in Brazil. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of patients diagnosed with lung cancer and submitted to EBUS-TBNA for mediastinal lymph node staging. The EBUS-TBNA procedures, which involved the use of an EBUS scope, an ultrasound processor, and a compatible, disposable 22 G needle, were performed while the patients were under general anesthesia. Results: Between January of 2011 and January of 2014, 149 patients underwent EBUS-TBNA for lymph node staging. The mean age was 66 ± 12 years, and 58% were male. A total of 407 lymph nodes were sampled by EBUS-TBNA. The most common types of lung neoplasm were adenocarcinoma (in 67%) and squamous cell carcinoma (in 24%). For lung cancer staging, EBUS-TBNA was found to have a sensitivity of 96%, a specificity of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 85%. Conclusions: We found EBUS-TBNA to be a safe and accurate method for lymph node staging in lung cancer patients. PMID:25750671

  11. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for lung cancer staging: early experience in Brazil,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Rossi Figueiredo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA is a minimally invasive, safe and accurate method for collecting samples from mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. This study focused on the initial results obtained with EBUS-TBNA for lung cancer and lymph node staging at three teaching hospitals in Brazil. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of patients diagnosed with lung cancer and submitted to EBUS-TBNA for mediastinal lymph node staging. The EBUS-TBNA procedures, which involved the use of an EBUS scope, an ultrasound processor, and a compatible, disposable 22 G needle, were performed while the patients were under general anesthesia. Results: Between January of 2011 and January of 2014, 149 patients underwent EBUS-TBNA for lymph node staging. The mean age was 66 ± 12 years, and 58% were male. A total of 407 lymph nodes were sampled by EBUS-TBNA. The most common types of lung neoplasm were adenocarcinoma (in 67% and squamous cell carcinoma (in 24%. For lung cancer staging, EBUS-TBNA was found to have a sensitivity of 96%, a specificity of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 85%. Conclusions: We found EBUS-TBNA to be a safe and accurate method for lymph node staging in lung cancer patients.

  12. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for lung cancer staging: early experience in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Viviane Rossi; Cardoso, Paulo Francisco Guerreiro; Jacomelli, Márcia; Demarzo, Sérgio Eduardo; Palomino, Addy Lidvina Mejia; Rodrigues, Ascédio José; Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; Pego-Fernandes, Paulo Manoel; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive, safe and accurate method for collecting samples from mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. This study focused on the initial results obtained with EBUS-TBNA for lung cancer and lymph node staging at three teaching hospitals in Brazil. This was a retrospective analysis of patients diagnosed with lung cancer and submitted to EBUS-TBNA for mediastinal lymph node staging. The EBUS-TBNA procedures, which involved the use of an EBUS scope, an ultrasound processor, and a compatible, disposable 22 G needle, were performed while the patients were under general anesthesia. Between January of 2011 and January of 2014, 149 patients underwent EBUS-TBNA for lymph node staging. The mean age was 66 ± 12 years, and 58% were male. A total of 407 lymph nodes were sampled by EBUS-TBNA. The most common types of lung neoplasm were adenocarcinoma (in 67%) and squamous cell carcinoma (in 24%). For lung cancer staging, EBUS-TBNA was found to have a sensitivity of 96%, a specificity of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 85%. We found EBUS-TBNA to be a safe and accurate method for lymph node staging in lung cancer patients.

  13. Screening and staging for non-small cell lung cancer by serum laser Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Zhang, Shaohong; Wan, Limei; Sun, Hong; Tan, Jie; Su, Qiucheng

    2018-08-05

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Current clinical screening methods to detect lung cancer are expensive and associated with many complications. Raman spectroscopy is a spectroscopic technique that offers a convenient method to gain molecular information about biological samples. In this study, we measured the serum Raman spectral intensity of healthy volunteers and patients with different stages of non-small cell lung cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the application of serum laser Raman spectroscopy as a low cost alternative method in the screening and staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The Raman spectra of the sera of peripheral venous blood were measured with a LabRAM HR 800 confocal Micro Raman spectrometer for individuals from five groups including 14 healthy volunteers (control group), 23 patients with stage I NSCLC (stage I group), 24 patients with stage II NSCLC (stage II group), 19 patients with stage III NSCLC (stage III group), 11 patients with stage IV NSCLC (stage IV group). Each serum sample was measured 3 times at different spots and the average spectra represented the signal of Raman spectra in each case. The Raman spectrum signal data of the five groups were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA), principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and cross-validation. Raman spectral intensity was sequentially reduced in serum samples from control group, stage I group, stage II group and stage III/IV group. The strongest peak intensity was observed in the control group, and the weakest one was found in the stage III/IV group at bands of 848 cm -1 , 999 cm -1 , 1152 cm -1 , 1446 cm -1 and 1658 cm -1 (P Raman spectroscopy can effectively identify patients with stage I, stage II or stage III/IV Non-Small Cell Lung cancer using patient serum samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Generating a robust prediction model for stage I lung adenocarcinoma recurrence after surgical resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Chung; Wei, Nien-Chih; Hung, Jung-Jyh; Yeh, Yi-Chen; Su, Li-Jen; Hsu, Wen-Hu; Chou, Teh-Ying

    2017-10-03

    Lung cancer mortality remains high even after successful resection. Adjuvant treatment benefits stage II and III patients, but not stage I patients, and most studies fail to predict recurrence in stage I patients. Our study included 211 lung adenocarcinoma patients (stages I-IIIA; 81% stage I) who received curative resections at Taipei Veterans General Hospital between January 2001 and December 2012. We generated a prediction model using 153 samples, with validation using an additional 58 clinical outcome-blinded samples. Gene expression profiles were generated using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples and microarrays. Data analysis was performed using a supervised clustering method. The prediction model generated from mixed stage samples successfully separated patients at high vs. low risk for recurrence. The validation tests hazard ratio (HR = 4.38) was similar to that of the training tests (HR = 4.53), indicating a robust training process. Our prediction model successfully distinguished high- from low-risk stage IA and IB patients, with a difference in 5-year disease-free survival between high- and low-risk patients of 42% for stage IA and 45% for stage IB ( p model for identifying lung adenocarcinoma patients at high risk for recurrence who may benefit from adjuvant therapy. Our prediction performance of the difference in disease free survival between high risk and low risk groups demonstrates more than two fold improvement over earlier published results.

  15. FDG-PET imaging for the staging and follow-up of small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, T.; Brink, I.; Mix, M.; Reinhardt, M.; Moser, E.; Nitzsche, E.; Herget, G.; Digel, W.; Henke, M.

    2001-01-01

    The staging procedures for small cell lung cancer do not differ appreciably from those for other forms of lung cancer. For practical purposes, the TNM stages are usually collapsed into a simple binary classification: limited disease and extensive disease. This study was performed to answer the question of whether fluorine-18 labelled 2-deoxy-2-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging permits appropriate work-up (including both primary and follow-up staging) of patients presenting with small cell lung cancer, as compared with currently recommended staging procedures. Thirty-six FDG-PET examinations were performed in 30 patients with histologically proven small cell lung cancer. Twenty-four patients were examined for primary staging while four were imaged for therapy follow-up only. Two patients underwent both primary staging and up to four examinations for therapy follow-up. Static PET imaging was performed according to a standard protocol. Image reconstruction was based on an ordered subset expectation maximization algorithm including post-injection segmented attenuation correction. Results of FDG-PET were compared with those of the sum of other staging procedures. Identical results from FDG-PET and the sum of the other staging procedures were obtained in 23 of 36 examinations (6 x limited disease, 12 x extensive disease, 5 x no evidence of disease). In contrast to the results of conventional staging, FDG-PET indicated extensive disease resulting in an up-staging in seven patients. In one patient in whom there was no evidence for tumour on conventional investigations following treatment, FDG-PET was suggestive of residual viability of the primary tumour. Furthermore, discordant results were observed in five patients with respect to lung, bone, liver and adrenal gland findings, although in these cases the results did not affect staging as limited or extensive disease. Moreover, FDG-PET appeared to be more sensitive for the detection of metastatic

  16. 18FDG CDET in staging of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahek, D.; Montravers, F.; Kerrou, K.; Talbot, J.N.; Tofighi, M.; Tamgac, F.; Breau, J.L.; Moretti, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    A clinical study, involving two centres, was promoted by AP-HP Paris. It aimed to evaluate feasibility and detection sensitivity of Coincidence Detection Emission Tomography (CDET) using 18 FDG in the stating of pulmonary cancer, with 2 different dual head y cameras (Vertex ADAC and Prism 2000 Picker, without attenuation correction. Forty patients, including 35 men, with a mean age of 58.6 y were explored by CDET and conventional imaging. Lung cancer was assessed by biopsy during bronchoscopy prior to patient's inclusion. CDET-FDG visualized the primitive lesion in 39 patients (sensitivity: 97.5%). The lesion that was not detected was an bronchoalveolar adenocarcinoma. In 26 patients, a histologic evaluation of malignancy invasion of ipsilateral lymph nodes was obtained in 48 lymph node sites. The site-based accuracy of CDET-FDG to detect malignancy in these lymph nodes was 79% versus 65% for CT. The metastatic status in 39 patients (M0 or M1) was evaluated by clinicians and surgeons from the data of conventional imaging and CDET-FDG, before the management of the patient was decided. Then their results were compared to the metastatic status evaluated separately by CDET-FDG and conventional imaging. In this case, the accuracy of CDET-FDG was 95 % versus 90 % for conventional imaging. This clinical study in this indication demonstrated the feasibility of CDET-FDG, with a better performance than conventional imaging and similar to performance of PET-FDG. (authors)

  17. The IASLC Lung Cancer Staging Project: A Renewed Call to Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Dorothy J; Van Schil, Paul; Asamura, Hisao; Rami-Porta, Ramón; Chansky, Kari; Crowley, John J; Rusch, Valerie W; Kernstine, Kemp

    2018-06-01

    Over the past two decades, the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) Staging Project has been a steady source of evidence-based recommendations for the TNM classification for lung cancer published by the Union for International Cancer Control and the American Joint Committee on Cancer. The Staging and Prognostic Factors Committee of the IASLC is now issuing a call for participation in the next phase of the project, which is designed to inform the ninth edition of the TNM classification for lung cancer. Following the case recruitment model for the eighth edition database, volunteer site participants are asked to submit data on patients whose lung cancer was diagnosed between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2019, to the project by means of a secure, electronic data capture system provided by Cancer Research And Biostatistics in Seattle, Washington. Alternatively, participants may transfer existing data sets. The continued success of the IASLC Staging Project in achieving its objectives will depend on the extent of international participation, the degree to which cases are entered directly into the electronic data capture system, and how closely externally submitted cases conform to the data elements for the project. Copyright © 2018 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sublobar resection is equivalent to lobectomy for clinical stage 1A lung cancer in solid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altorki, Nasser K; Yip, Rowena; Hanaoka, Takaomi; Bauer, Thomas; Aye, Ralph; Kohman, Leslie; Sheppard, Barry; Thurer, Richard; Andaz, Shahriyour; Smith, Michael; Mayfield, William; Grannis, Fred; Korst, Robert; Pass, Harvey; Straznicka, Michaela; Flores, Raja; Henschke, Claudia I

    2014-02-01

    A single randomized trial established lobectomy as the standard of care for the surgical treatment of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Recent advances in imaging/staging modalities and detection of smaller tumors have once again rekindled interest in sublobar resection for early-stage disease. The objective of this study was to compare lung cancer survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer with a diameter of 30 mm or less with clinical stage 1 disease who underwent lobectomy or sublobar resection. We identified 347 patients diagnosed with lung cancer who underwent lobectomy (n = 294) or sublobar resection (n = 53) for non-small cell lung cancer manifesting as a solid nodule in the International Early Lung Cancer Action Program from 1993 to 2011. Differences in the distribution of the presurgical covariates between sublobar resection and lobectomy were assessed using unadjusted P values determined by logistic regression analysis. Propensity scoring was performed using the same covariates. Differences in the distribution of the same covariates between sublobar resection and lobectomy were assessed using adjusted P values determined by logistic regression analysis with adjustment for the propensity scores. Lung cancer-specific survival was determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox survival regression analysis was used to compare sublobar resection with lobectomy, adjusted for the propensity scores, surgical, and pathology findings, when adjusted and stratified by propensity quintiles. Among 347 patients, 10-year Kaplan-Meier for 53 patients treated by sublobar resection compared with 294 patients treated by lobectomy was 85% (95% confidence interval, 80-91) versus 86% (confidence interval, 75-96) (P = .86). Cox survival analysis showed no significant difference between sublobar resection and lobectomy when adjusted for propensity scores or when using propensity quintiles (P = .62 and P = .79, respectively). For those with cancers 20 mm or less in

  19. Patient-reported quality of life after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early-stage lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerwaard, F.J.; Aaronson, N.K.; Gundy, C.M.; Haasbeek, C.J.A.; Slotman, B.J.; Senan, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Deterioration in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is frequently observed after surgery for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer. As stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) can result in local control percentages exceeding 90%, we studied baseline and post-treatment HRQOL in SABR

  20. Photodynamic therapy of early stage cancer of lung, esophagus, and stomach with two different photosensitizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chissov, Valery I.; Sokolov, Victor V.; Trakhtenberg, A. K.; Mamontov, A. S.; Vaschakmadze, L. A.; Frank, George A.; Filonenko, E. V.; Telegina, L. V.; Belous, T. A.; Gladunov, V. K.; Aristarkhova, E. I.; Zharkova, Natalia N.; Menenkov, V. D.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents the results of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of early-stage cancer of lung (17 patients), esophagus (8 patients) and stomach (10 patients). Fifteen patients had second primary tumors. New drugs photoheme and photosens were used as photosensitizers. Complete remission was obtained in 87%. The patients are followed up without relapses to 2.5 years.

  1. Effect of informing the diagnosis on depressive state in patients with non-small cell lung cancer of stage

    OpenAIRE

    Wei WANG; Ping CHEN; Xianglin PI; Anlan WANG; Xiaoping WEN; Dong HUANG

    2008-01-01

    Background and objective As other tumors, unresectabe lung cancer can cause many psychological problems to the patients, such as depression and anxiety. The present paper aims to evaluate the status of depression before and after knowing the state of illness in patients with non-small cell lung cancer of stage Ⅲ. Methods 43 casesof newly diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stage Ⅲ were enrolled in the study. All the patients were distributed into three groups and given different...

  2. Proton Beam Therapy of Stage II and III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu, E-mail: hnakayam@tokyo-med.ac.jp [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Satoh, Hiroaki [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sugahara, Shinji [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kurishima, Koichi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ishikawa, Shigemi [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tokuuye, Koichi [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The present retrospective study assessed the role of proton beam therapy (PBT) in the treatment of patients with Stage II or III non-small-cell lung cancer who were inoperable or ineligible for chemotherapy because of co-existing disease or refusal. Patients and Methods: Between November 2001 and July 2008, PBT was given to 35 patients (5 patients with Stage II, 12 with Stage IIIA, and 18 with Stage IIIB) whose median age was 70.3 years (range, 47.4-85.4). The median proton dose given was 78.3 Gy (range, 67.1-91.3) (relative biologic effectiveness). Results: Local progression-free survival for Stage II-III patients was 93.3% at 1 year and 65.9% at 2 years during a median observation period of 16.9 months. Four patients (11.4%) developed local recurrence, 13 (37.1%) developed regional recurrence, and 7 (20.0%) developed distant metastases. The progression-free survival rate for Stage II-III patients was 59.6% at 1 year and 29.2% at 2 years. The overall survival rate of Stage II-III patients was 81.8% at 1 year and 58.9% at 2 years. Grade 3 or greater toxicity was not observed. A total of 15 patients (42.9%) developed Grade 1 and 6 (17.1%) Grade 2 toxicity. Conclusion: PBT for Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer without chemotherapy resulted in good local control and low toxicity. PBT has a definite role in the treatment of patients with Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer who are unsuitable for surgery or chemotherapy.

  3. Proton Beam Therapy of Stage II and III Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Satoh, Hiroaki; Sugahara, Shinji; Kurishima, Koichi; Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Ishikawa, Shigemi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The present retrospective study assessed the role of proton beam therapy (PBT) in the treatment of patients with Stage II or III non–small-cell lung cancer who were inoperable or ineligible for chemotherapy because of co-existing disease or refusal. Patients and Methods: Between November 2001 and July 2008, PBT was given to 35 patients (5 patients with Stage II, 12 with Stage IIIA, and 18 with Stage IIIB) whose median age was 70.3 years (range, 47.4–85.4). The median proton dose given was 78.3 Gy (range, 67.1–91.3) (relative biologic effectiveness). Results: Local progression-free survival for Stage II-III patients was 93.3% at 1 year and 65.9% at 2 years during a median observation period of 16.9 months. Four patients (11.4%) developed local recurrence, 13 (37.1%) developed regional recurrence, and 7 (20.0%) developed distant metastases. The progression-free survival rate for Stage II-III patients was 59.6% at 1 year and 29.2% at 2 years. The overall survival rate of Stage II-III patients was 81.8% at 1 year and 58.9% at 2 years. Grade 3 or greater toxicity was not observed. A total of 15 patients (42.9%) developed Grade 1 and 6 (17.1%) Grade 2 toxicity. Conclusion: PBT for Stage II-III non–small-cell lung cancer without chemotherapy resulted in good local control and low toxicity. PBT has a definite role in the treatment of patients with Stage II-III non–small-cell lung cancer who are unsuitable for surgery or chemotherapy.

  4. Clinical Analysis of stereotactic body radiation therapy using extracranial gamma knife for patients with mainly bulky inoperable early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma

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    Tang Hanjun

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the clinical efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT using extracranial gamma knife in patients with mainly bulky inoperable early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. Materials and methods A total of 43 medically inoperable patients with mainly bulky Stage I/II NSCLC received SBRT using gamma knife were reviewed. The fraction dose and the total dose were determined by the radiation oncologist according to patients' general status, tumor location, tumor size and the relationship between tumor and nearby organ at risk (OAR. The total dose of 34~47.5 Gy was prescribed in 4~12 fractions, 3.5~10 Gy per fraction, one fraction per day or every other day. The therapeutic efficacy and toxicity were evaluated. Results The median follow-up was 22 months (range, 3-102 months. The local tumor response rate was 95.35%, with CR 18.60% (8/43 and PR 76.74% (33/43, respectively. The local control rates at 1, 2, 3, 5 years were 77.54%, 53.02%, 39.77%, and 15.46%, respectively, while the 1- and 2-year local control rates were 75% and 60% for tumor ≤3 cm; 84% and 71% for tumor sized 3~5 cm; 55% and 14.6% for tumor sized 5~7 cm; and 45%, 21% in those with tumor size of >7 cm. The overall survival rate at 1, 2, 3, 5 years were 92.04%, 78.04%, 62.76%, 42.61%, respectively. The toxicity of stereotactic radiation therapy was grade 1-2. Clinical stages were significantly important factor in local control of lung tumors (P = 0.000. Both clinical stages (P = 0.015 and chemotherapy (P = 0.042 were significantly important factors in overall survival of lung tumors. Conclusion SBRT is an effective and safe therapy for medically inoperable patients with early stage NSCLC. Clinical stage was the significant prognostic factors for both local tumor control and overall survival. The toxicity is mild. The overall local control for bulky tumors is poor. Tumor size is a poor prognostic factor, and the patients for

  5. Increased AAA-TOB3 correlates with lymph node metastasis and advanced stage of lung adenocarcinoma.

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    Liu, Yanfeng; Bu, Lina; Li, Wei; Wu, Wei; Wang, Shengyu; Diao, Xin; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Guoan; Yang, Shuanying

    2017-07-24

    This study was to investigate the differential mitochondrial protein expressions in human lung adenocarcinoma and provide preliminary data for further exploration of the carcinogenic mechanism. Total proteins of A549 and 16HBE mitochondria were extracted through 2D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE). The differential mitochondria proteins were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and were further confirmed by Western blot, immunoelectron microscopy and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in A549 cells as well as lung adenocarcinoma tissues. A total of 41 differentially expressed protein spots were found in A549 mitochondria. Of them, 15 proteins were highly expressed and 26 proteins were lowly expressed in the mitochondria of A549 (by more than 1.5 times). Among the 15 more highly expressed proteins, AAA-TOB3 (by more than 3 times) was highly expressed in the mitochondria of A549 compared with the 16HBE, by LC-MS/MS identification. High electron density and clear circular colloidal gold-marked AAA-TOB3 particles were observed in the A549 cells via immunoelectron microscopy. Besides, AAA-TOB3 was confirmed to be elevated in lung adenocarcinoma by Western blot and IHC. Moreover, increased AAA-TOB3 correlated with lymph node metastasis and advanced stage of lung adenocarcinoma (pAAA-TOB3 was highly expressed in lung adenocarcinoma, and the up-regulation of AAA-TOB3 correlated with lymph node metastasis and advanced stage of lung adenocarcinoma, which suggested that it could serve as a potential molecular marker for lung adenocarcinoma.

  6. Comparison between surgery and radiofrequency ablation for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, So Ri; Han, Hyo Jin; Park, Seoung Ju; Min, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Min Hee; Chung, Chi Ryang; Kim, Min Ho; Jin, Gong Yong; Lee, Yong Chul

    2012-01-01

    Surgical resection remains as the treatment of choice for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and provides the best opportunity for cure and long-term survival. Minimally invasive percutaneous ablative therapies, such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for treating lung cancers, are currently being studied as treatment alternatives. But, to date, there is little information on comparison of therapeutic effects between surgery and RFA in patients with early stage lung malignancy. We aimed to investigate the clinical significance of RFA as an alternative curative modality for the early stage lung cancer through analyzing the long-term mortality of both treatment groups; surgery vs. RFA. Twenty-two patients of stage I NSCLC were included for this comparative analysis. To minimize confounding effects, we conducted a matching process. In which patients of RFA group (n = 8) were matched with patients of surgery group (n = 14) on the following variables; gender, age (±3 years), tumor node metastasis stage, and calendar year of surgery or RFA (±2 years). The mean survival duration of RFA group and surgery group were 33.18 ± 7.90 and 45.49 ± 7.21, respectively (months, p = 0.297). Log-rank analysis showed that there was no significant difference in overall survival (p = 0.054) between two groups. These results have shown that RFA can offer the survival comparable to that by surgery to stage I NSCLC patients, especially to the patients impossible for the surgery. This study provides an evidence for the use of RFA as a treatment alternative with low procedural morbidity for inoperable early-stage NSCLC patients.

  7. Patients with end-stage interstitial lung disease may have more problems with dyspnea than end-stage lung cancer patients

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    Ryo Matsunuma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with end-stage interstitial  lung disease (ILD do not appear to receive adequate palliative care despite apparent suffering before death. The aim of this study was to evaluate their signs, symptoms, and treatment received before death. Methods: Patients with ILD and lung cancer (LC who were hospitalized and died in our hospital were enrolled retrospectively. Signs and symptoms and treatments at 7 days, 3 days, and 1 day before death were evaluated and compared between the two groups of patients. Results: A total of 23 patients with ILD and 59 patients with LC group were eligible for participation. Significantly more LC patients had loss of consciousness than ILD patients on 7 days (ILD: LC = 1 [5.6%]:24 [41%], P = 0.013, 3 days (1 [5.6%]:33 [56%], P < 0.001. Significantly more ILD patients had dyspnea than LC patients on 3 days (16 [89%]:38 [64%], P = 0.047 1 day before death (21 [91%]:33 [56%], P = 0.001. On 1 day before death, significantly more LC patients received morphine than ILD patients (2 [8.7%]: 14 [24%], P = 0.015. More ILD patients received sedation (11 [48%]: 11 [19%], P = 0.007. Conclusions: End-stage ILD patients may experience dyspnea more frequently than terminal LC patients, and they need sedation. Morphine should be administered to ILD patients who have dyspnea. Additional prospective studies are needed.

  8. Lung cancer stage at diagnosis: Individual associations in the prospective VITamins and lifestyle (VITAL cohort

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    Au David H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Identifying factors associated with stage of diagnosis can improve our understanding of biologic and behavioral pathways of lung cancer development and detection. We used data from a prospective cohort study to evaluate associations of demographic, health history, and health behaviors with early versus late stage at diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods We calculated odds ratios (ORs for the association of patient-level characteristics with advanced stage of diagnosis for NSCLC. The OR's were then adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, smoking status, income, education, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and a comorbidity index. Results We identified 612 cases of NSCLC among 77,719 adults, aged 50 to 76 years from Washington State recruited in 2000-2002, with followup through December 2007. In univariate analyses, subjects who quit smoking Conclusions Smoking status, education, and a screening activity were associated with stage at diagnosis of NSCLC. These results may guide future studies of the underlying mechanisms that influence how NSCLC is detected and diagnosed.

  9. The role of medical imaging in staging and followup of primary lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragg, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    There has been a significant improvement in the rate of resectability of lung cancers, a situation that has resulted from improved preoperative staging. A large measure of this improvement has resulted from the application of CT and more recently, magnetic resonance imaging in this pre-surgical staging process. The application and evaluation of these imaging procedures has resulted in significant controversy. The size criteria of lymph nodes chosen in defining the abnormal mediastinal lymph node is responsible for part of the controversy. If the lymph node size is set below 2.0 cm, a higher false-positive rate must be accepted. In addition, chest wall extension is often inaccurately assessed with CT as is mediastinal invasion. The status of CT and MRI in staging the patient with lung cancer prior to surgery will be discussed in detail. It should be remembered that the ultimate goal of radiographic procedures in this staging process should be in determining which patients need mediastinoscopy prior to surgery and not in attempting to exclude patients from surgery. The appropriate formula for the application of CT and MRI will also be included. Finally, a recommendation for the post-treatment followup of the patient with lung cancer will also be presented. (Author)

  10. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy by bronchial arterial infusion in patients with unresectable stage III squamous cell lung cancer.

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    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Hai-Ping; Jiang, Sen; Ni, Jian

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy administered via bronchial arterial infusion (BAI) on unresectable stage III lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This was a single-arm retrospective study of chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GP) administered via BAI to patients with unresectable lung SCC. Data regarding the post-treatment response rate, downstage rate, and surgery rate, as well as progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), quality of life, and post-BAI side effects were collected. A total of 36 patients were enrolled in this study between August 2010 and May 2014. The response rate was 72.2%, and the downstage rate was 22.2%. Among the patients who were downstaged, 16 (44.4%) patients were because of their T stage, and 5 (13.9%) patients were downstaged due to to their N stage. The surgery rate was 52.8%, the 1-year survival rate was 75.4%, and the 2-year survival rate was 52.1%. The median PFS was 14.0 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.6-19.4], and the median OS was 25.0 months (95% CI: 19.1-30.9). The quality of life was significantly improved, and the chemotherapy was well tolerated. Compared with intravenous neoadjuvant chemotherapy, BAI chemotherapy significantly improved the surgery rate, prolonged PFS and OS, and improved the quality of life in patients with unresectable stage III lung SCC.

  11. An experimental two-stage rat model of lung carcinoma initiated by radon exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncy, J.L.; Laroque, P.; Fritsch, P.; Monchaux, G.; Masse, R.; Chameaud, J.

    1992-01-01

    We present the results of a two-stage biological model of lung carcinogenesis in rats. The histogenesis of these tumors was examined, and DNA content of lung cells was measured by flow cytometry during the evolving neoplastic stage. Tumors were induced in rat lungs after radon inhalation (1600 WLM) followed by a promoter treatment; six intramuscular injections of 5,6-benzoflavone (25 mg/kg of body weight/injection) every 2 wk. Less than 3 mo after the first injection of benzoflavone, squamous cell carcinoma was observed in the lungs of all rats exposed to radon. The preneoplastic lesions gradually developed as follows: hyperplastic bronchiolar-type cells migrated to the alveoli from cells that proliferated in bronchioles and alveolar ducts; initial lesions were observed in almost all respiratory bronchioles. From some hyperplasias, epidermoid metaplasias arose distally, forming nodular epidermoid lesions in alveoli, which progressed to form squamous papilloma and, finally, epidermoid carcinomas. The histogenesis of these experimentally induced epidermoid carcinomas showed the bronchioloalveolar origin of the tumor. This factor must be considered when comparing these with human lesions; in humans, lung epidermoid carcinomas are thought to arise mainly in the first bronchial generations. The labeling index of pulmonary tissue after incorporation of 3 H-thymidine by the cells was 0.2% in control rats. This index reached a value of 1 to 2% in the hyperplastic area of the bronchioles and 10 to 15% in epidermoid nodules and epidermoid tumors, respectively. DNA cytometric analysis was performed on cell suspensions obtained after enzymatic treatment of paraffin sections of lungs from rats sacrificed during different stags of neoplastic transformations. Data showed the early appearance of a triploid cell population that grew during the evolution of nodular epidermoid lesions to epidermoid carcinomas

  12. [The Clinical Application of Video Mediastinoscopy and CT in the N Staging of Preoperative Lung Cancer.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiheng; Qi, Weibo; Zhu, Yong; Lin, Ruobai

    2009-10-20

    Preoperative lung cancer with mediastinal lymph nodes metastasis can be diagnosed by vedio mediastinoscopy (VM) and CT. This study was to explore the value of VM and CT in the diagnosis of N staging of preoperative lung cancer, and to discuss the difference between the two methods. Forty-eight cases diagnosed of lung cancer by CT or PET-CT were examined by VM. The sensitivity, specificity, validity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of VM and CT were speculated according to the postoperative pathological reports, and the difference between VM and CT in the diagnosis of lung cancer with mediastinal lymph nodes metastasis was discussed. (1)Under the examination of VM, 31 patients with the negative outcome received the direct operation; 14 patients with N2 received 2 courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy before operation; 3 patients with N3 received chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. (2)Forty-one cases with final diagnosis of lung cancer were used as samples to speculate the sensitivity, specificity, validity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of VM. They were 93.3%, 100%, 97.6%, 100%, 96.3%, which of CT were 66.7%, 53.8%, 58.5%, 45.5%, 73.7% (Chi-square=4.083, P=0.039), the difference between VM and CT was statistically significant. (3)In this group, the complications of VM incidence rate was 2.08% (1/48), and the case was pneumothorax. VM is superior to CT in the diagnosis of N staging of preoperative lung cancer; Due to its safety and effectiveness, VM will be wildly used in the field of thoracic surgery.

  13. The Clinical Application of Video Mediastinoscopy and CT in the N Staging of Preoperative Lung Cancer

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    Zhiheng WANG

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Preoperative lung cancer with mediastinal lymph nodes metastasis can be diagnosed by vedio mediastinoscopy (VM and CT. This study was to explore the value of VM and CT in the diagnosis of N staging of preoperative lung cancer, and to discuss the difference between the 2 methods. Methods 48 cases diagnosed of lung cancer by CT or PET-CT were examined by VM. The sensitivity, specificity, validity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of VM and CT were speculated according to the postoperative pathological reports, and the difference between VM and CT in the diagnosis of lung cancer with mediastinal lymph nodes metastasis was discussed. Results ①Under the examination of VM, 31 patients with the negative outcome received the direct operation, 14 patients with N2 received 2 courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy before operation, 3 patients with N3 received chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. ②Forty-one cases with final diagnosis of lung cancer were used as samples to speculate the sensitivity, specificity, validity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of VM. They were 93.3%, 100%, 97.6%, 100%, 96.3%, which of CT were 66.7%, 53.8%, 58.5%, 45.5%, 73.7% (χ2=4.083, P=0.039, the difference between VM and CT was statistically significant. ③In this group, the complications of VM incidence rate is 2.08% (1/48, the case is pneumothorax. Conclusion VM is superior to CT in the diagnosis of N staging of preoperative lung cancer, it is safe and effective, and there will be a wide perspective for VM in thoracic surgery.

  14. Nutrition for Lung Cancer

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    ... Become An Advocate Volunteer Ways To Give Lung Cancer www.lung.org > Lung Health and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > ... Cancer Learn About Lung Cancer What Is Lung Cancer Lung Cancer Basics Causes & Risk Factors Lung Cancer Staging ...

  15. Prospective study on stereotactic radiotherapy of limited-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Hansen, Anders Traberg

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To test the effect of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in       the treatment of medically inoperable patients with limited-stage       non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a Phase II trial. Methods and       Materials: Forty patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated with SBRT...... resulted in a high       probability of local control and a promising survival rate. The toxicity       after SBRT of lung tumors was moderate. However, deterioration in       performance status, respiratory insufficiency, and other side effects were       observed...

  16. Lung transplant in end-staged chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients: a concise review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Fahad; Penupolu, Sudheer; Xu, Xin; He, Jianxing

    2010-06-01

    Lung transplantation is commonly used for patients with end-stage lung disease. However, there is continuing debate on the optimal operation for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and pulmonary fibrosis. Single-lung transplantation (SLT) provides equivalent short- and medium-term results compared with bilateral lung transplantation (BLT), but long-term survival appears slightly better in BLT recipients (especially in patients with COPD). The number of available organs for lung transplantation also influences the choice of operation. Recent developments suggest that the organ donor shortage is not as severe as previously thought, making BLT a possible alternative for more patients. Among the different complications, re-implantation edema, infection, rejection, and bronchial complications predominate. Chronic rejection, also called obliterative bronchiolitis syndrome, is a later complication which can be observed in about half of the patients. Improvement in graft survival depends greatly in improvement in prevention and management of complications. Despite such complications, graft survival in fibrosis patients is greater than spontaneous survival on the waiting list; idiopathic fibrosis is associated with the highest mortality on the waiting list. Patients should be referred early for the pre-transplantation work-up because individual prognosis is very difficult to predict.

  17. A robust prognostic gene expression signature for early stage lung adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krzystanek, Marcin; Moldvay, Judit; Szüts, David

    2016-01-01

    Stage I lung adenocarcinoma is usually not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy; however, around half of these patients do not survive 5 years. Therefore, a reliable prognostic biomarker for early stage patients would be critical to identify those most likely to benefit from early additional treatm...... not given adjuvant therapy. Seven genes consistently obtained statistical significance in Cox regression for overall survival. The combined signature has a weighted mean hazard ratio of 3.2 in all cohorts and 3.0 (C.I. 1.3-7.4, p ...

  18. An initial report of cyberknife radiosurgery treatment in early stage lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Zhiyong; Song Yongchun; Li Fengtong; Dong Yang; Wang Jingsheng; Wang Jun; Wang Changli; Wang Ping

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the efficacy and toxicity of the cyberknife in the treatment of medically inoperable patients with early stage lung cancer. Methods: From September 2006 to July 2007,17 patients with clinical stage I a-I b lung cancer were treated with cyberknife at Tianjin Cancer Hospital. Of the 11 patients receiving CT guided biopsy, 3 were squamous cell cancer and 8 were adenocarcinoma. Six patients refused intrusive operation and were diagnosed by PET-CT scan. All patients were medically inoperable evaluated by a thoracic surgeon. The PTV=GTV + 3-5 mm, and the median volume of PTV was 36 cm 3 (6-82 cm 3 ). The median total prescription dose was 50 Gy(45-60 Gy) at 3-5 fractions. Results: The median follow-up time was 7 months(3-11 months). All the patients finished the treatment and were alive by the last follow-up. Slight fatigue was the most common complain. Evaluated by CT scan, 13 were complete response and 4 were partial response. No recurrence, progression or distant metastasis occurred. There were 3 patients with grade I granulocytopenia, 3 grade I pneumonitis and 1 grade II pneumonitis. Conclusions: The cyberknife radiosurgery treatment in early stage lung cancer shows a high rate of local control and minimal toxicity. Long time follow-up is necessary to evaluate the survival data and late toxicity. (authors)

  19. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase defines critical prognostic genes of stage I lung adenocarcinoma.

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    Mai Yamauchi

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To identify stage I lung adenocarcinoma patients with a poor prognosis who will benefit from adjuvant therapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Whole gene expression profiles were obtained at 19 time points over a 48-hour time course from human primary lung epithelial cells that were stimulated with epidermal growth factor (EGF in the presence or absence of a clinically used EGF receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK-specific inhibitor, gefitinib. The data were subjected to a mathematical simulation using the State Space Model (SSM. "Gefitinib-sensitive" genes, the expressional dynamics of which were altered by addition of gefitinib, were identified. A risk scoring model was constructed to classify high- or low-risk patients based on expression signatures of 139 gefitinib-sensitive genes in lung cancer using a training data set of 253 lung adenocarcinomas of North American cohort. The predictive ability of the risk scoring model was examined in independent cohorts of surgical specimens of lung cancer. RESULTS: The risk scoring model enabled the identification of high-risk stage IA and IB cases in another North American cohort for overall survival (OS with a hazard ratio (HR of 7.16 (P = 0.029 and 3.26 (P = 0.0072, respectively. It also enabled the identification of high-risk stage I cases without bronchioalveolar carcinoma (BAC histology in a Japanese cohort for OS and recurrence-free survival (RFS with HRs of 8.79 (P = 0.001 and 3.72 (P = 0.0049, respectively. CONCLUSION: The set of 139 gefitinib-sensitive genes includes many genes known to be involved in biological aspects of cancer phenotypes, but not known to be involved in EGF signaling. The present result strongly re-emphasizes that EGF signaling status in cancer cells underlies an aggressive phenotype of cancer cells, which is useful for the selection of early-stage lung adenocarcinoma patients with a poor prognosis. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO GSE31210.

  20. A Prospective Randomized Study of the Radiotherapy Volume for Limited-stage Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Preliminary Report

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    Xiao HU

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Controversies exists with regard to target volumes as far as thoracic radiotherapy (TRT is concerned in the multimodality treatment for limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LSCLC. The aim of this study is to prospectively compare the local control rate, toxicity profiles, and overall survival (OS between patients received different target volumes irradiation after induction chemotherapy. Methods LSCLC patients received 2 cycles of etoposide and cisplatin (EP induction chemotherapy and were randomly assigned to receive TRT to either the post- or pre-chemotherapy tumor extent (GTV-T as study arm and control arm, CTV-N included the positive nodal drainage area for both arms. One to 2 weeks after induction chemotherapy, 45 Gy/30 Fx/19 d TRT was administered concurrently with the third cycle of EP regimen. After that, additional 3 cycles of EP consolidation were administered. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI was administered to patients with a complete response. Results Thirty-seven and 40 patients were randomly assigned to study arm and control arm. The local recurrence rates were 32.4% and 28.2% respectively (P=0.80; the isolated nodal failure (INF rate were 3.0% and 2.6% respectively (P=0.91; all INF sites were in the ipsilateral supraclavicular fossa. Medastinal N3 disease was the risk factor for INF (P=0.02, OR=14.13, 95%CI: 1.47-136.13. During radiotherapy, grade I, II weight loss was observed in 29.4%, 5.9% and 56.4%, 7.7% patients respectively (P=0.04. Grade 0-I and II-III late pulmonary injury was developed in 97.1%, 2.9% and 86.4%, 15.4% patients respectively (P=0.07. Median survival time was 22.1 months and 26.9 months respectively. The 1 to 3-year OS were 77.9%, 44.4%, 37.3% and 75.8%, 56.3%, 41.7% respectively (P=0.79. Conclusion The preliminary results of this study indicate that irradiant the post-chemotherapy tumor extent (GTV-T and positive nodal drainage area did not decrease local control and overall

  1. Systematic Compared With Targeted Staging with Endobronchial Ultrasound in Patients with Lung Cancer.

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    Sanz-Santos, José; Serra, Pere; Torky, Mohamed; Andreo, Felipe; Centeno, Carmen; Mendiluce, Leire; Martínez-Barenys, Carlos; López de Castro, Pedro; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan

    2018-04-06

    To evaluate the accuracy of systematic mediastinal staging by endobronchial ultrasound transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) (sampling of all visible nodes measuring ≥5mm from stations N3 to N1 regardless of their positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) features) and compare this staging approach with targeted EBUS-TBNA staging (sampling only 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-avid nodes) in patients with N2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) on PET/CT. Retrospective study of 107 patients who underwent systematic EBUS-TBNA mediastinal staging. The results were compared with those of a hypothetical scenario where only FDG-avid nodes on PET/CT would be sampled. Systematic EBUS-TBNA sampling demonstrated N3 disease in 3 patients, N2 disease in 60 (42 single-station or N2a, 18 multiple-station or N2b) and N0/N1 disease in 44. Of these 44, seven underwent mediastinoscopy, which did not show mediastinal disease; six of the seven proceeded to lung resection, which also showed no mediastinal disease. Thirty-four N0/N1 patients after EBUS-TBNA underwent lung resection directly: N0/N1 was found in 30 and N2 in four (one N2b with a PET/CT showing N2a disease, three N2a). Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and overall accuracy of systematic EBUS-TBNA were 94%, 100%, 90%, 100% and 96%, respectively. Compared to targeted EBUS-TBNA, systematic EBUS-TBNA sampling provided additional important clinical information in 14 cases (13%): three N3 cases would have passed unnoticed, and 11 N2b cases would have been staged as N2a. In clinical practice, systematic sampling of the mediastinum by EBUS-TBNA, regardless of PET/CT features, is to be recommended over targeted sampling. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. INTEGRATED PET-CT SCAN IN THE STAGING OF NON SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

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    I Made Ngurah Agus Surya Negara S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Lung cancer is a common disease and is a leading cause of death in many countries. The most kind of lung cancer was Non Small Cell Lung Cancer. The management of lung cancer is directed by an optimal staging of the tumour. On 1998, integrated positron emission tomography (PET-computed tomography (CT was published. PET-CT is an anatomo-metabolic imaging modality that has recently been introduced to clinical practice and combines two different techniques: CT, which provides very detailed anatomic information; and PET, which provides metabolic information. One of the advantages of PET/CT is the improved image interpretation. There wasbetter results for PET/CT in the staging of non small cell lung cancer in comparison with CT nor PET alone. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  3. [Prognostic factors of advanced stage non-small-cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwas, H; Guermazi, E; Khattab, A; Hrizi, C; Zendah, I; Ghédira, H

    2017-09-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men in the world. Although the introduction of new drugs, new therapeutic strategies and despite therapeutic advances, the prognosis is relatively improved during the last years. To evaluate the prognosis of patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to identify prognostic factors at these stages. A retrospective study, including 140 cases of locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC diagnosed in our department between 2003 and 2013. The average age was 61±10 years (35 to 90 years). Sex ratio was 18. The delays management were 80±25 days for presentation, 45±20 days for the diagnostic, while the treatment delay was 8±2.33 days. The cancer was at stage IIIA in 14%, IIIB in 27% and IV in 59%. Six months and one-year survival was between 50 and 74% and between 9 and 25%, respectively. Better survival was observed in patients with NSCLC on stage III, having better performance status, having comorbid conditions, with prolonged delays management, a short therapeutic delay and patients who received specific antitumor treatment. The prognostic factors in locally advanced and metastatic NSCLC in our patients were: stage of cancer, performance status, comorbid conditions, delay of management and specific antitumoral treatment. These factors should be considered in the management of patients with advanced NSCLC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of a nomogram combining clinical staging with 18F-FDG PET/CT image features in non-small-cell lung cancer stage I-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desseroit, Marie-Charlotte; Visvikis, Dimitris; Majdoub, Mohamed; Hatt, Mathieu; Tixier, Florent; Perdrisot, Remy; Cheze Le Rest, Catherine; Guillevin, Remy

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to develop a nomogram by exploiting intratumour heterogeneity on CT and PET images from routine 18 F-FDG PET/CT acquisitions to identify patients with the poorest prognosis. This retrospective study included 116 patients with NSCLC stage I, II or III and with staging 18 F-FDG PET/CT imaging. Primary tumour volumes were delineated using the FLAB algorithm and 3D Slicer trademark on PET and CT images, respectively. PET and CT heterogeneities were quantified using texture analysis. The reproducibility of the CT features was assessed on a separate test-retest dataset. The stratification power of the PET/CT features was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. The best standard metric (functional volume) was combined with the least redundant and most prognostic PET/CT heterogeneity features to build the nomogram. PET entropy and CT zone percentage had the highest complementary values with clinical stage and functional volume. The nomogram improved stratification amongst patients with stage II and III disease, allowing identification of patients with the poorest prognosis (clinical stage III, large tumour volume, high PET heterogeneity and low CT heterogeneity). Intratumour heterogeneity quantified using textural features on both CT and PET images from routine staging 18 F-FDG PET/CT acquisitions can be used to create a nomogram with higher stratification power than staging alone. (orig.)

  5. The seventh tumour-node-metastasis staging system for lung cancer: Sequel or prequel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meerbeeck, Jan P; Janssens, Annelies

    2013-09-01

    Anatomical cancer extent is an important predictor of prognosis and determines treatment choices. In non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) the tumour-node-metastasis (TNM) classification developed by Pierre Denoix replaced in 1968 the Veterans Administration Lung cancer Group (VALG) classification, which was still in use for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Clifton Mountain suggested several improvements based on a database of mostly surgically treated United States (US) patients from a limited number of centres. This database was pivotal for a uniform reporting of lung cancer extent by the American Joint Committee of Cancer (AJCC) and the International Union against Cancer (IUCC), but it suffered increasingly from obsolete diagnostic and staging procedures and did not reflect new treatment modalities. Moreover, its findings were not externally validated in large Japanese and European databases, resulting in persisting controversies which could not be solved with the available database. The use of different mediastinal lymph-node maps in Japan, the (US) and Europe facilitated neither the exchange nor the comparison of treatment results. Peter Goldstraw, a United Kingdom (UK) thoracic surgeon, started the process of updating the sixth version in 1996 and brought it to a good end 10 years later. His goals were to improve the TNM system in lung cancer by addressing the ongoing controversies, to validate the modifications and additional descriptors, to validate the TNM for use in staging SCLC and carcinoid tumours, to propose a new uniform lymph-node map and to investigate the prognostic value of non-anatomical factors. A staging committee was formed within the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) - which supervised the collection of the retrospective data from >100,000 patients with lung cancer - treated throughout the world between 1990 and 2000, analyse them with the help of solid statistics and validate externally with the Surveillance

  6. American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update on Chemotherapy for Stage IV Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Azzoli, Christopher G.; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Temin, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    ASCO published a guideline on use of chemotherapy in advanced stage non–small-cell lung cancer in 1997. The latest update covers treatment with chemotherapy and biologic agents and reviews literature from 2002 to 2009.

  7. Detection of skeletal muscle metastases on initial staging of lung cancer: a retrospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchino, Marialuisa; Valente, Tullio; Somma, Francesco; de Rosa, Ilaria; Bifulco, Marco; Rea, Gaetano

    2014-03-01

    Estimation of skeletal muscle metastases (SMMs) at the time of diagnosis and/or initial staging of lung cancer. Retrospective evaluation of clinical charts and imaging data suggestive of SMMs of patients with histology-proved lung cancer over a 5-year period. SMMs were identified in 46 out of 1,754 patients. Single and multiple (62.9% of cases) SMMs were detected by total body multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT). They were associated with poorly differentiated (43%) and advanced adenocarcinomas (52%) without clinically relevant symptoms and/or signs. Psoas and buttock muscles were most frequently involved (33.3%). MDCT findings consisted of well-defined homogeneously hyperdense oval masses (31%), lesions with ring-like enhancement and central hypoattenuation (68%), or large abscess-like necrotic lesions (24%). Sonography revealed well-defined hypoechoic masses (41.6%), ill-defined hypoechoic lesions (33.3%), or anechoic areas with a necrotic centre (25%). Positron emission tomography revealed that all SMMs were metabolically active. SMMs are uncommon but not negligible in lung cancer, with an estimated prevalence of 2.62% in our series. Although histology remains the recommended method, use of high-performance imaging techniques and increased clinical suspicion may improve their early detection. Efforts addressing their effect on the natural history of lung cancer are needed.

  8. Novel approaches of chemoradiotherapy in unresectable stage IIIA and stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Bogart, Jeffrey A

    2012-01-01

    Approximately one third of patients with non-small cell lung cancer have unresectable stage IIIA or stage IIIB disease, and appropriate patients are candidates for chemoradiotherapy with curative intent. The optimal treatment paradigm is currently undefined. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy, compared with sequential chemotherapy and thoracic radiation therapy (TRT), results in superior overall survival outcomes as a result of better locoregional control. Recent trials have revealed efficacy for newer chemotherapy combinations similar to that of older chemotherapy combinations with concurrent TRT and a lower rate of some toxicities. Ongoing phase III trials will determine the roles of cisplatin and pemetrexed concurrent with TRT in patients with nonsquamous histology, cetuximab, and the L-BLP25 vaccine. It is unlikely that bevacizumab will have a role in stage III disease because of its toxicity. Erlotinib, gefitinib, and crizotinib have not been evaluated in stage III patients selected based on molecular characteristics. The preliminary results of a phase III trial that compared conventionally fractionated standard-dose TRT (60 Gy) with high-dose TRT (74 Gy) revealed an inferior survival outcome among patients assigned to the high-dose arm. Hyperfractionation was investigated previously with promising results, but adoption has been limited because of logistical considerations. More recent trials have investigated hypofractionated TRT in chemoradiotherapy. Advances in tumor targeting and radiation treatment planning have made this approach more feasible and reduced the risk for normal tissue toxicity. Adaptive radiotherapy uses changes in tumor volume to adjust the TRT treatment plan during therapy, and trials using this strategy are ongoing. Ongoing trials with proton therapy will provide initial efficacy and safety data.

  9. [Effects of hydrogen on the lung damage of mice at early stage of severe burn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, C; Bian, Y X; Feng, T T; Zhang, J H; Yu, Y H

    2017-11-20

    Objective: To investigate the effects of hydrogen on the lung damage of mice at early stage of severe burn. Methods: One hundred and sixty ICR mice were divided into sham injury, hydrogen, pure burn, and burn+ hydrogen groups according to the random number table, with 40 mice in each group. Mice in pure burn group and burn+ hydrogen group were inflicted with 40% total body surface area full-thickness scald (hereafter referred to as burn) on the back, while mice in sham injury group and hydrogen group were sham injured. Mice in hydrogen group and burn+ hydrogen group inhaled 2% hydrogen for 1 h at post injury hour (PIH) 1 and 6, respectively, while mice in sham injury group and pure burn group inhaled air for 1 h. At PIH 24, lung tissue of six mice in each group was harvested, and then pathological changes of lung tissue were observed by HE staining and the lung tissue injury pathological score was calculated. Inferior vena cava blood and lung tissue of other eight mice in each group were obtained, and then content of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum and lung tissue was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in serum and lung tissue was detected by spectrophotometry. After arterial blood of other six mice in each group was collected for detection of arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO(2)), the wet and dry weight of lung tissue were weighted to calculate lung wet to dry weight ratio. The survival rates of the other twenty mice in each group during post injury days 7 were calculated. Data were processed with one-way analysis of variance, LSD test and log-rank test. Results: (1) At PIH 24, lung tissue of mice in sham injury group and hydrogen group showed no abnormality. Mice in pure burn group were with pulmonary interstitial edema, serious rupture of alveolar capillary wall, and infiltration of a large number of inflammatory cells. Mice in burn+ hydrogen group were with mild

  10. [Value of surgery for stage IIIa non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huihui; Wang, Mengzhao; Hu, Ke; Xu, Yan; Ma, Manjiao; Zhong, Wei; Zhao, Jing; Li, Longyun; Wang, Huazhu

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays, comprehensive treatment, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy is advocated for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, many researchers have questioned the effectiveness of surgery. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of surgery for stage III NSCLC. Between March 2002 and October 2012, 310 cases that have completed followed-up data with stage III NSCLC were received in the Peking Union Medical College Hospital. They were divided into surgical and non-surgical groups according to whether received surgery when diagnosed. In TNM staging, stage III NSCLC includes stage IIIa and IIIb, and stage IIIa NSCLC can be grouped into stage T4N0/T3-4N1M0 and T1-3N2M0 according to different N stages. Analyzed the enumeration data by Chi-Square test. Kaplan-Meier survival method was used to calculate the overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS), and to draw the survival curves. A P value less than 0.05 was evaluated as statistically significant. Three hundred and ten stage III NSCLC patients include surgical group 189 cases and non-surgical group 121 cases. One hundred and eighty-eight stage IIIa NSCLC patients include surgical group 152 cases and non-surgical group 36 cases. In stage IIIa, stage T4N0/T3-4N1M0 had 57 patients with 44 surgical and 13 non-surgical patients, and stage T1-3N2M0 had 131 patients with 108 surgical and 23 non-surgical patients. Thirty-seven out of 121 stage IIIb NSCLC patients received surgery. They had 22 stage T4N2M0 cases and 15 stage T1-4N3M0 cases. The patient whose performance status was 0 and staging was stage IIIa was more inclined to undergo surgery. For stage IIIa NSCLC patients, the median OS of surgical and non-surgical groups were 38.9 and 21.8 months, and the median PFS of them were 19.2 and 11.9 months respectively. The difference of OS between the two groups was significant (P=0.041), but the PFS of them had no significant difference (P=0.209). For stage T4N0/T3-4N1M0 which

  11. Treatment of Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Surgery or Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esengül Koçak Uzel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The management of early-stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC has improved recently due to advances in surgical and radiation modalities. Minimally-invasive procedures like Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS lobectomy decreases the morbidity of surgery, while the numerous methods of staging the mediastinum such as endobronchial and endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsies are helping to achieve the objectives much more effectively. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR has become the frontrunner as the standard of care in medically inoperable early stage NSCLC patients, and has also been branded as tolerable and highly effective. Ongoing researches using SABR are continuously validating the optimal dosing and fractionation schemes, while at the same time instituting its role for both inoperable and operable patients.

  12. Preserving Functional Lung Using Perfusion Imaging and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Advanced-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Jang, Si Young; Liu, H. Helen; Guerrero, Thomas; Wang, Xuanmin; Gayed, Isis W.; Erwin, William D.; Liao, Zhongxing; Chang, Joe Y.; Jeter, Melenda; Yaremko, Brian P.; Borghero, Yerko O.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Mohan, Radhe

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess quantitatively the impact of incorporating functional lung imaging into intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients with advanced-stage NSCLC who underwent radiotherapy were included in this study. Before radiotherapy, each patient underwent lung perfusion imaging with single-photon-emission computed tomography and X-ray computed tomography (SPECT-CT). The SPECT-CT was registered with simulation CT and was used to segment the 50- and 90-percentile hyperperfusion lung (F50 lung and F90 lung). Two IMRT plans were designed and compared in each patient: an anatomic plan using simulation CT alone and a functional plan using SPECT-CT in addition to the simulation CT. Dosimetric parameters of the two types of plans were compared in terms of tumor coverage and avoidance of normal tissues. Results: In incorporating perfusion information in IMRT planning, the median reductions in the mean doses to the F50 and F90 lung in the functional plan were 2.2 and 4.2 Gy, respectively, compared with those in the anatomic plans. The median reductions in the percentage of volume irradiated with >5 Gy, >10 Gy, and >20 Gy in the functional plans were 7.1%, 6.0%, and 5.1%, respectively, for F50 lung, and 11.7%, 12.0%, and 6.8%, respectively, for F90 lung. A greater degree of sparing of the functional lung was achieved for patients with large perfusion defects compared with those with relatively uniform perfusion distribution. Conclusion: Function-guided IMRT planning appears to be effective in preserving functional lung in locally advanced-stage NSCLC patients

  13. Postoperative Radiation Therapy in Resected N2 Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Geol

    1993-01-01

    A total of forty patients with resected N2 stage non-small cell lung cancer treated with postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy between Jan. 1975 and Dec. 1990 at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei Cancer Center were retrospectively analysed to evaluate whether postoperative radiation therapy improves survival. Patterns of failure and prognostic factors affecting survival were also analysed. The 5 year overall and disease free survival rate were 26.3%, 27.3% and median survival 23.5 months. The 5 year survival rates by T-stage were T1 66.7%, T2 25.6% and T3 12.5%. Loco-regional failure rate was 14.3% and distant metastasis rate was 42.9% and both 2.9%. Statistically significant factor affecting distant failure rate was number of positive lymph nodes(>= 4). This retrospective study suggests that postoperative radiation therapy in resected N2 stage non-small cell lung cancer can reduce loco-regional recurrence and may improve survival rate as compared with other studies which were treated by surgery alone. Further study of systemic control is also needed due to high rate of distant metastasis

  14. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (S.B.R.T.) for early-stage lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraok, M.; Matsuo, Y.; Nagata, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a new treatment modality for early stage non-small-cell lung cancer, and has been developed in the United States, the European Union, and Japan. We started a feasibility study of this therapy in July 1998, using a stereotactic body frame. The eligibility criteria for primary lung cancer were: 1) solitary tumor less than 4 cm (T1-3NOM); 2) inoperable, or the patient refused operation; 3) no necessity for oxygen support; 4) performance status equal to or less than 2; 5) the peripheral tumor which dose constraints of mediastinal organs are maintained. A total dose of 48 Gy was delivered in four fractions in 2 weeks in most patients. Lung toxicity was minimal. No grade II toxicities for spinal cord, bronchus, pulmonary artery, or esophagus were observed. The 3 years overall survival for 32 patients with stage IA, and 13 patients with stage IB were 83% and 72%, respectively. Only one local recurrence was observed in a follow-up of 6 1 months. We retrospectively analyzed 241 patients from 13 Japanese institutions. The local recurrence rate was 20% when the biological equivalent dose (BED) was less than 100 Gy, and 6.5% when the BED was over 100 Gy. Overall survival at 3 years was 42% when the BED was less than 100 Gy, and 46% when it was over 100 Gy. In tumors, which received a BED of more than 100 Gy, overall survival at 3 years was 91% for operable patients, and 50% for inoperable patients. Long-term results, in terms of local control, regional recurrence, survival, and complications, are not yet evaluated. However, this treatment modality is highly expected to be a standard treatment for inoperable patients, and it may be an alternative to lobectomy for operative patients. A prospective trial, which is now ongoing, will, answer these questions. (author)

  15. SSX2-4 expression in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, K B V; Pøhl, M; Olsen, K E

    2014-01-01

    The expression of cancer/testis antigens SSX2, SSX3, and SSX4 in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) was examined, since they are considered promising targets for cancer immunotherapy due to their immunogenicity and testis-restricted normal tissue expression. We characterized three SSX antibodies...... was only detected in 5 of 143 early-stage NSCLCs, which is rare compared to other cancer/testis antigens (e.g. MAGE-A and GAGE). However, further studies are needed to determine whether SSX can be used as a prognostic or predictive biomarker in NSCLC....

  16. CIMAvax-EGF®: Therapeutic Vaccine Against Non-small Cell Lung Cancer in Advanced Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Rosa Fernández Ruiz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Biotechnology is one of the scientific activities deployed by the Cuban State, which shows greater results and impact on the of the Cuban population health. It has increased the therapeutic repertoire in dealing with oncological diseases with products such as CIMAvax-EGF®, the first therapeutic vaccine of its kind, from the Molecular Immunology Center, against non-small cell lung cancer in advanced stages IIIB IV. The application of this product already extends to Primary Health Care with encouraging results, by prolonging the survival of patients with higher quality of life.

  17. Budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography ? computed tomography for staging lung cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Biz, Aline Navega; Caetano, Ros?ngela

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography (PET) in mediastinal and distant staging of non-small cell lung cancer.METHODS The estimates were calculated by the epidemiological method for years 2014 to 2018. Nation-wide data were used about the incidence; data on distribution of the disease´s prevalence and on the technologies’ accuracy were from the literature; data regarding involved costs were taken from a micro-costing study and from Brazi...

  18. Family Caregiver Palliative Care Intervention in Supporting Caregivers of Patients With Stage II-IV Gastrointestinal, Gynecologic, Urologic and Lung Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-12

    Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Urethral Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Sarcoma; Ureter Cancer; Stage IIA Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Lung Carcinoma

  19. How to choose PET-CT or CT in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. Practical experience in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, T.; Tao, X.; Liu, H.; Liu, S.; Zheng, X.

    2010-01-01

    How to use CT and PET-CT rationally to raise diagnosis, staging and prognostic assessment of lung cancer to a higher level at the best cost-effect ratio is a subject that Chinese clinicians and radiologists should face conscientiously. We review the rational application of CT and PET-CT in four aspects of lung cancer, including screening and detection, morphologic evaluation, haemodynamic or metabolic feature evaluation, and follow-up, staging and prognostic evaluation. As PET-CT is only available in class III-A hospitals today, CT is the most popular equipment in China. PET-CT is more valuable only in cases where CT presentation of lung cancer is atypical or difficult to determine, or in cases where the diagnosis of lung cancer has been initially confirmed, for which clinical staging and decision concerning on therapeutic regimens are needed. We also recommend the current strategies of CT and PET-CT managing of SPN in China. (orig.)

  20. Current Status of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR for Early-stage 
Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anhui SHI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available High level evidence from randomized studies comparing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR to surgery is lacking. Although the results of pooled analysis of two randomized trials for STARS and ROSEL showed that SABR is better tolerated and might lead to better overall survival than surgery for operable clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, SABR, however, is only recommended as a preferred treatment option for early stage NSCLC patients who cannot or will not undergo surgery. We, therefore, are waiting for the results of the ongoing randomized studies [Veterans affairs lung cancer surgery or stereotactic radiotherapy in the US (VALOR and the SABRTooth study in the United Kingdom (SABRTooths]. Many retrospective and case control studies showed that SABR is safe and effective (local control rate higher than 90%, 5 years survival rate reached 70%, but there are considerable variations in the definitions and staging of lung cancer, operability determination, and surgical approaches to operable lung cancer (open vs video-assisted. Therefore, it is difficult to compare the superiority of radiotherapy and surgery in the treatment of early staged lung cancer. Most studies demonstrated that the efficacy of the two modalities for early staged lung cancer is equivalent; however, due to the limited data, the conclusions from those studies are difficult to be evidence based. Therefore, the controversies will be focusing on the safety and invasiveness of the two treatment modalities. This article will review the ongoing debate in light of these goals.

  1. Role of chemotherapy and targeted therapy in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaka, Misako; Gadgeel, Shirish M

    2018-01-01

    Adjuvant platinum based chemotherapy is accepted as standard of care in stage II and III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and is often considered in patients with stage IB disease who have tumors ≥ 4 cm. The survival advantage is modest with approximately 5% at 5 years. Areas covered: This review article presents relevant data regarding chemotherapy use in the perioperative setting for early stage NSCLC. A literature search was performed utilizing PubMed as well as clinical trial.gov. Randomized phase III studies in this setting including adjuvant and neoadjuvant use of chemotherapy as well as ongoing trials on targeted therapy and immunotherapy are also discussed. Expert commentary: With increasing utilization of screening computed tomography scans, it is possible that the percentage of early stage NSCLC patients will increase in the coming years. Benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy in early stage NSCLC patients remain modest. There is a need to better define patients most likely to derive survival benefit from adjuvant therapy and spare patients who do not need adjuvant chemotherapy due to the toxicity of such therapy. Trials for adjuvant targeted therapy, including adjuvant EGFR-TKI trials and trials of immunotherapy drugs are ongoing and will define the role of these agents as adjuvant therapy.

  2. Sapanisertib and Osimertinib in Treating Patients With Stage IV EGFR Mutation Positive Non-small Cell Lung Cancer After Progression on a Previous EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-25

    EGFR Activating Mutation; EGFR Exon 19 Deletion Mutation; EGFR NP_005219.2:p.G719X; EGFR NP_005219.2:p.L858R; EGFR NP_005219.2:p.L861Q; EGFR T790M Mutation Negative; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7

  3. Non small cell lung cancer – Comparison between clinical and pathological staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Fernandes

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer (LC staging remains a clinical challenge as it determines the disease's prognosis and treatment. Surgery is the best option for controlling non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and the only potential cure. In this setting, lung cancer staging helps select patients who will benefit from surgery, excluding inoperable patients and including patients with resectable lesions. The aim of this study is to compare clinical staging (TNMc with pathological staging (TNMp and to evaluate diagnosis, complementary treatment and survival of these patients.This is a retrospective study that included patients with non-small cell lung cancer or with highly sus- picious lesions who had undergone surgery and were followed up in the Hospital de São João lung cancer unit between January 1999 and December 2003. It is based on clinical files and pathology reports.73.3% of this group of 60 patients were male, with median age 59.2 years. The most frequent TNMc stages were 41.7% T1N0M0 and 36.7% T2N0M0. Thoracotomy for therapeutic purpose was performed in 80% and thoracotomy for diagnostic purpose also in the remaining 20%. In 6.7% the resection was incomplete. The most frequent TNMp stages were T2N0p in 33.3%, T2N1p in 15.0% and T2N2p in 13.3%. There was a significant difference between the two staging types, with upstaging in 65.0%, down staging in 67% and only 28.3% keeping the same stage. The most frequent differences were from T1N0c to T2N0p and from T2N0c to T2N1p. The global agreement between both staging methods was 21.7%. Median global survival was 43 months.In conclusion, while clinical staging was less accurate, it did not determine important changes in therapeutic strategy and survival. For the future, we should consider using other diagnostic tools and other biological factors to complement the anatomical information that we currently use. Resumo: O estadiamento do cancro do pulmão (CP permanece um desafio clínico, sendo fundamental para

  4. Role of preoperative PET-CT in assessing mediastinal and hilar lymph node status in early stage lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yang Lin

    2012-05-01

    Conclusion: Integrated PET-CT is a useful tool for predicting the negativity of mediastinal LN status pre-operatively in clinically early stage (Stages I and II lung cancer but may be relatively inaccurate in predicting hilar LN status and largely confounded by false positives caused by inflammatory process.

  5. Observer variation in FDG PET-CT for staging of non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofman, Michael S. [St Thomas' Hospital, PET Imaging Centre, London (United Kingdom)]|[Southern Health, Nuclear Medicine, Melbourne (Australia); Smeeton, Nigel C. [King' s College London, Division of Health and Social Care Research, London (United Kingdom); Rankin, Sheila C.; Nunan, Tom; O' Doherty, Michael J. [St Thomas' Hospital, PET Imaging Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    Error and variation in reporting remains one of the weakest features of clinical imaging despite enormous technological advances in nuclear medicine and radiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate agreement amongst experienced readers in staging non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with PET-CT. A series of {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT scans from 100 consecutive patients were reviewed independently by three experienced readers, with two readers reviewing each scan series a second time. Individual mediastinal lymph node stations were assessed as benign/inflammatory, equivocal or malignant, and AJCC N and M stage were also assigned. Kappa ({kappa}) was used to compare ratings from two categories and weighted kappa ({kappa}{sub w}) for three or more categories, and kappa values were interpreted according to the Landis-Koch benchmarks. Both intra- and interobserver agreement for N and M staging were high. For M staging there was almost perfect intra- and interobserver agreement ({kappa} = 0.90-0.93). For N staging, agreement was either almost perfect or substantial (intraobserver {kappa}{sub w} = 0.79, 0.91; interobserver {kappa}{sub w} = 0.75-0.81). Importantly, there was almost perfect agreement for N0/1 vs N2/3 disease ({kappa} = 0.80-0.97). Agreement for inferior and superior mediastinal nodes (stations 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9) was either almost perfect or substantial ({kappa}{sub w} = 0.71-0.88), but lower for hilar nodes (10; {kappa}{sub w} = 0.56-0.71). Interreporter variability was greatest for aortopulmonary nodes (5, 6; {kappa}{sub w} = 0.48-0.55). Amongst experienced reporters in a single centre, there was a very high level of agreement for both mediastinal nodal stage and detection of distant metastases with PET-CT. This supports the use of PET-CT as a robust imaging modality for staging NSCLC. (orig.)

  6. Observer variation in FDG PET-CT for staging of non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, Michael S.; Smeeton, Nigel C.; Rankin, Sheila C.; Nunan, Tom; O'Doherty, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Error and variation in reporting remains one of the weakest features of clinical imaging despite enormous technological advances in nuclear medicine and radiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate agreement amongst experienced readers in staging non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with PET-CT. A series of 18 F-FDG PET-CT scans from 100 consecutive patients were reviewed independently by three experienced readers, with two readers reviewing each scan series a second time. Individual mediastinal lymph node stations were assessed as benign/inflammatory, equivocal or malignant, and AJCC N and M stage were also assigned. Kappa (κ) was used to compare ratings from two categories and weighted kappa (κ w ) for three or more categories, and kappa values were interpreted according to the Landis-Koch benchmarks. Both intra- and interobserver agreement for N and M staging were high. For M staging there was almost perfect intra- and interobserver agreement (κ = 0.90-0.93). For N staging, agreement was either almost perfect or substantial (intraobserver κ w = 0.79, 0.91; interobserver κ w = 0.75-0.81). Importantly, there was almost perfect agreement for N0/1 vs N2/3 disease (κ = 0.80-0.97). Agreement for inferior and superior mediastinal nodes (stations 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9) was either almost perfect or substantial (κ w = 0.71-0.88), but lower for hilar nodes (10; κ w = 0.56-0.71). Interreporter variability was greatest for aortopulmonary nodes (5, 6; κ w = 0.48-0.55). Amongst experienced reporters in a single centre, there was a very high level of agreement for both mediastinal nodal stage and detection of distant metastases with PET-CT. This supports the use of PET-CT as a robust imaging modality for staging NSCLC. (orig.)

  7. "EXHALE": exercise as a strategy for rehabilitation in advanced stage lung cancer patients: a randomized clinical trial comparing the effects of 12 weeks supervised exercise intervention versus usual care for advanced stage lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quist, Morten; Langer, SW; Rørth, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in North America and Western Europe. Patients with lung cancer in general have reduced physical capacity, functional capacity, poor quality of life and increased levels of anxiety and depression. Intervention studies indicate that physi......BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in North America and Western Europe. Patients with lung cancer in general have reduced physical capacity, functional capacity, poor quality of life and increased levels of anxiety and depression. Intervention studies indicate...... that physical training can address these issues. However, there is a lack of decisive evidence regarding the effect of physical exercise in patients with advanced lung cancer. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of a twelve weeks, twice weekly program consisting of: supervised, structured training...... in a group of advanced lung cancer patients (cardiovascular and strength training, relaxation). METHODS/DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial will test the effects of the exercise intervention in 216 patients with advanced lung cancer (non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stage IIIb-IV and small cell lung...

  8. Radiotherapy alone for elderly patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Kikuo; Hiramoto, Takehiko; Kanehara, Masasi; Doi, Mihoko; Furonaka, Osamu; Miyazu, Yuka; Hada, Yosihiro

    1999-01-01

    We undertook a retrospective study of elderly patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer who had been treated solely with radiotherapy during the period 1986 to 1995. Our study was designed to assess the influence of age on survival and malnutrition in patients aged 75 years or older (elderly group) and patients aged 74 years or younger (younger group). Radiotherapy alone resulted in a median survival period of 11.5 months in the younger group and 6.3 months in the elderly group (p=0.0043). With the Cox multivariate model, good performance status, age less than 75 years, and good response were significant favorable independent predictors. Furthermore, the elderly group patients more frequently died of respiratory infections and had lower prognostic nutritional indexes than the younger group patients before and after radiotherapy. These findings suggested elderly patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer who had been treated with radiotherapy alone had a poor prognosis and that malnutrition caused by radiotherapy was a factor contributing to the risk of death from respiratory infection in such patients. (author)

  9. The clinical results of stereotactic irradiation for stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Kanji; Kodama, Hisayuki; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Wadasaki, Koichi; Ito, Katsuhide; Kimura, Tomoki; Akagi, Yukio

    2006-01-01

    Discussed are the results in the title in authors' hospital. Subjects are 15 patients with the stage IA non-small cell lung cancer (10 males and 5 females; median age, 77 y; 11 cases of adenocarcinoma and 4 of squamous cell carcinoma), whose progress could be followed for 6 months or longer after the stereotactic irradiation during the period of July 1999 to 2006. The 8-9-gated irradiation therapy on the primary cancer alone was conducted with Varian Clinac 2300 (6MV-Xray) with the 3D planning equipment of PHILIPS Pinnacle. For some patients, the spirometer was used to monitor the voluntary breath-hold and body was fixed by vacuum fixer. Doses were 56 (4 Gy x 14) Gy in 3 cases, 60 (7.5 Gy x 8) Gy in 2, 50 (10 Gy x 5) Gy in 1 and 48 (12 Gy x 4) Gy in 9. Kaplan-Meier method was used for calculating the local control and survival rates. The former was 93% and the latter, 86% (1 year), 78% (2 y) and 39% (3 y). Three-year survival rate was 100% in 5 cases without other cancer and 18% in 10 with the cancers. Recurrence was seen in 3 cases and remote metastases, 7. Pneumonitis less than Grade 2 was in 11 cases. The stereotactic irradiation was thus found safe and effective in the stage IA non-small cell lung cancer. (T.I.)

  10. Micrometastasis in non-small-cell lung cancer: Detection and staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Mohajeri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical relevance of bone marrow micrometastasis (BMM in non-small-cell lung cancer is undetermined, and the value of such analyses in advanced stage patients has not been clearly assessed previously. This study was conducted to estimate the accuracy of both polymerase chain reaction (PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC in micrometastases detection and determine the best site for bone marrow biopsy in order to find micrometastasis. Methods: This prospective cross-sectional study was performed in the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Alzahra University Hospital from September 2008 to June 2009. To evaluate the bone marrow, a 3-cm rib segment and an aspirated specimen from the iliac bone prior to tumor resection were taken. PCR and IHC were performed for each specimen to find micrometastasis. Results: Of 41 patients, 14 (34% were positive for BMM by PCR compared with two positive IHC (4.8%. All BMMs were diagnosed in rib segments, and iliac specimens were all free from metastatic lesion. Our data showed no significant association between variables such as age, sex, histology, tumor location, side of tumor, involved lobe, smoking, or weight loss and presence of BMM. Conclusion: PCR could use as a promising method for BMM detection. BMM in a sanctuary site (rib is not associated with advanced stages of lung cancer. In addition, when predictor variables such as age, sex, histology, tumor location, smoking, or weight loss are analyzed, no correlation can be found between micrometastasis prevalence and any of those variables.

  11. Poor Prognosis Indicated by Venous Circulating Tumor Cell Clusters in Early-Stage Lung Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murlidhar, Vasudha; Reddy, Rishindra M; Fouladdel, Shamileh; Zhao, Lili; Ishikawa, Martin K; Grabauskiene, Svetlana; Zhang, Zhuo; Lin, Jules; Chang, Andrew C; Carrott, Philip; Lynch, William R; Orringer, Mark B; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Beer, David G; Wicha, Max S; Ramnath, Nithya; Azizi, Ebrahim; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2017-09-15

    Early detection of metastasis can be aided by circulating tumor cells (CTC), which also show potential to predict early relapse. Because of the limited CTC numbers in peripheral blood in early stages, we investigated CTCs in pulmonary vein blood accessed during surgical resection of tumors. Pulmonary vein (PV) and peripheral vein (Pe) blood specimens from patients with lung cancer were drawn during the perioperative period and assessed for CTC burden using a microfluidic device. From 108 blood samples analyzed from 36 patients, PV had significantly higher number of CTCs compared with preoperative Pe ( P ontology analysis revealed enrichment of cell migration and immune-related pathways in CTC clusters, suggesting survival advantage of clusters in circulation. Clusters display characteristics of therapeutic resistance, indicating the aggressive nature of these cells. Thus, CTCs isolated from early stages of lung cancer are predictive of poor prognosis and can be interrogated to determine biomarkers predictive of recurrence. Cancer Res; 77(18); 5194-206. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Quality of Life After Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voort van Zyp, Noelle C. van der; Prevost, Jean-Briac; Holt, Bronno van der; Braat, Cora; Klaveren, Robertus J. van; Pattynama, Peter M.; Levendag, Peter C.; Nuyttens, Joost J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of stereotactic radiotherapy on the quality of life of patients with inoperable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Overall survival, local tumor control, and toxicity were also evaluated in this prospective study. Methods and Materials: From January 2006 to February 2008, quality of life, overall survival, and local tumor control were assessed in 39 patients with pathologically confirmed T1 to 2N0M0 NSCLC. These patients were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ) C30 and the QLQ LC13 lung cancer-specific questionnaire were used to investigate changes in quality of life. Assessments were done before treatment, at 3 weeks, and at 2, 4, 6, 9, and 12 months after treatment, until death or progressive disease. Toxicity was evaluated using common terminology criteria for adverse events version 3.0. Results: Emotional functioning improved significantly after treatment. Other function scores and QLQ C30 and QLQ LC13 lung symptoms (such as dyspnea and coughing) showed no significant changes. The overall 2-year survival rate was 62%. After a median follow-up of 17 months, 1 patient had a local recurrence (3%). No grade 4 or 5 treatment-related toxicity occurred. Grade 3 toxicity consisted of thoracic pain, which occurred in 1 patient within 4 months of treatment, while it occurred thereafter in 2 patients. Conclusions: Quality of life was maintained, and emotional functioning improved significantly after stereotactic radiotherapy for stage I NSCLC, while survival was acceptable, local tumor control was high, and toxicity was low.

  13. Wedge resection and segmentectomy in patients with stage I non-small cell lung carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Reveliotis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of sublobar resections as definitive management in stage I non-small cell lung carcinoma is a controversial topic in the medical community. We intend to report the latest developments and trends in relative indications for each of the above-mentioned surgical approaches for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung carcinoma as well as the results of studies regarding local recurrence, disease-free survival and five-year survival rates. We reviewed 45 prospective and retrospective studies conducted over the last 25 years listed in the Pubmed and Scopus electronic databases. Trials were identified through bibliographies and a manual search in journals. Authors, citations, objectives and results were extracted. No meta-analysis was performed. Validation of results was discussed. Segmentectomies are superior to wedge resections in terms of local recurrences and cancer-related mortality rates. Sublobar resections are superior to lobectomy in preserving the pulmonary parenchyma. High-risk patients should undergo segmentectomy, whereas lobectomies are superior to segmentectomies only for tumors >2 cm (T2bN0M0 in terms of disease-free and overall 5-year survival. In most studies no significant differences were found in tumors <2 cm. Disease-free surgical margins are crucial to prevent local recurrences. Systematic lymphadenectomy is mandatory regardless of the type of resection used. In sublobar resections with less thorough nodal dissections, adjuvant radiotherapy can be used. This approach is preferable in case of prior resection. In pure bronchoalveolar carcinoma, segmentectomy is recommended. Sublobar resections are associated with a shorter hospital stay. The selection of the type of resection in T1aN0M0 tumors should depend on characteristic of the patient and the tumor. Patient age, cardiopulmonary reserve and tumor size are the most important factors to be considered. However further prospective randomized trials are needed to

  14. Time to Treatment in Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Correa, Candace R.; Hayman, James A.; Zhao Lujun; Cease, Kemp; Brenner, Dean; Arenberg, Doug; Curtis, Jeffery; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Kong, F.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether time to treatment (TTT) has an effect on overall survival (OS) in patients with unresectable or medically inoperable Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and whether patient or treatment factors are associated with TTT. Methods and Materials: Included in the study were 237 consecutive patients with Stage III NSCLC treated at University of Michigan Hospital (UM) or the Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System (VA). Patients were treated with either palliative or definitive radiotherapy and radiotherapy alone (n = 106) or either sequential (n = 69) or concurrent chemoradiation (n = 62). The primary endpoint was OS. Results: Median follow-up was 69 months, and median TTT was 57 days. On univariate analysis, the risk of death did not increase significantly with longer TTT (p = 0.093). However, subset analysis showed that there was a higher risk of death with longer TTT in patients who survived ≥ 5 years (p = 0.029). Younger age (p = 0.027), male sex (p = 0.013), lower Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) (p = 0.002), and treatment at the VA (p = 0.001) were significantly associated with longer TTT. However, on multivariate analysis, only lower KPS remained significantly associated with longer TTT (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Time to treatment is significantly associated with OS in patients with Stage III NSCLC who lived longer than 5 years, although it is not a significant factor in Stage III patients as a whole. Lower KPS is associated with longer TTT.

  15. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy alone for clinical stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Shibamoto, Yuta; Acimovic, Ljubisa; Milisavljevic, Slobodan

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Among patients with Stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), those treated with conventional radiotherapy show poorer prognosis than those treated by surgery. To improve the prognosis of such patients, we have used hyperfractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1988 and 1993, 49 patients were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy with 1.2 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 69.6 Gy. All patients were technically operable, but 29 had medical problems and 20 refused surgery. The median age and Karnofsky Performance Status was 63 years and 90, respectively. No patient received chemotherapy or immunotherapy. Prophylactic mediastinal irradiation was not given. Results: The median survival time was 33 months, and the 5-year survival rate was 30%. The rate at 5 years for freedom from each of relapse, local recurrence, mediastinal lymphnode metastasis, and distant metastasis was 41%, 55%, 89%, and 75%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that higher Karnofsky Performance Status score, absence of weight loss before treatment, and T1 stage were associated with better survival, although the T stage became insignificant on multivariate analysis. There were two Grade 3 acute toxicities and three Grade 3 late toxicities, but there was no Grade 4-5 toxicity. Conclusion: The results of this study compare favorably with those of most previous studies employing conventional fractionation. Further studies on hyperfractionation seem to be warranted for Stage I NSCLC

  16. Value of Surgery for Stage IIIa Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihui LIU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Nowadays, comprehensive treatment, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy is advocated for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. However, many researchers have questioned the effectiveness of surgery. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of surgery for stage III NSCLC. Methods Between March 2002 and October 2012, 310 cases that have completed followed-up data with stage III NSCLC were received in the Peking Union Medical College Hospital. They were divided into surgical and non-surgical groups according to whether received surgery when diagnosed. In TNM staging, stage III NSCLC includes stage IIIa and IIIb, and stage IIIa NSCLC can be grouped into stage T4N0/T3-4N1M0 and T1-3N2M0 according to different N stages. Analyzed the enumeration data by Chi-Square test. Kaplan-Meier survival method was used to calculate the overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS, and to draw the survival curves. A P value less than 0.05 was evaluated as statistically significant. Results Three hundred and ten stage III NSCLC patients include surgical group 189 cases and non-surgical group 121 cases. One hundred and eighty-eight stage IIIa NSCLC patients include surgical group 152 cases and non-surgical group 36 cases. In stage IIIa, stage T4N0/T3-4N1M0 had 57 patients with 44 surgical and 13 non-surgical patients, and stage T1-3N2M0 had 131 patients with 108 surgical and 23 non-surgical patients. Thirty-seven out of 121 stage IIIb NSCLC patients received surgery. They had 22 stage T4N2M0 cases and 15 stage T1-4N3M0 cases. The patient whose performance status was 0 and staging was stage IIIa was more inclined to undergo surgery. For stage IIIa NSCLC patients, the median OS of surgical and non-surgical groups were 38.9 and 21.8 months, and the median PFS of them were 19.2 and 11.9 months respectively. The difference of OS between the two groups was significant (P=0.041, but the PFS of them had no

  17. Concurrent chemoradiation therapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I. A.; Choi, I. B.; Kang, K. M.; Jang, J. Y.; Song, J. S.; Lee, S. H.; Kuak, M. S.; Shinn, K. S.

    1997-01-01

    This study was tried to evaluate the potential benefits of concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Between April 1992 and March 1994, 32 patients who had stage III non-small cell lung cancer were treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Historical control group consisted of 32 patients who had stage III non-small cell lung cancer were received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy alone. Total radiation dose ranged from 5580 cGy to 7000 cGy with median of 5940 cGy. Complete response rate was higher in chemoradiation therapy (CRT) group than radiation therapy (RT) group. In subgroup analyses for patients with good performance status, CRT group showed significantly higher overall survival rate compared with RT group. The prognostic factors affecting survival rate were performance status and pathologic subtype in CRT group. In RT alone group, performance status and stage (IIIa vs IIIb) were identified as a prognostic factors. The incidence of RTOG/EORTC grade 3-4 pulmonary toxicity ahd no significant differences in between CRT group and RT group (16% vs. 6%). The incidence of WHO grade 3-4 pulmonary fibrosis also had no significant differences in both group (38% vs. 25%). In analyses for relationship of field size and pulmonary toxicity, the patients who treated with field size beyond 200 cm 2 had significantly higher rates of pulmonary toxicities. The CRT group showed significantly higher local control rate than RT group. There were no significant differences of survival rate in status showed higher overall survival rate in CRT group than RT group. In spite of higher incidence of acute toxicities with concurrent chemoradiation therapy, the survival gain in subgroup of patients with good performance status were encouraging. CRT group showed higher rate of early death within 1 year, higher 2 year survival rate compared with RT group. Therefore, to evaluate the accurate effect on survival of concurrent chemoradiation therapy, systematic follow-up for long term

  18. A Comparison of Endoscopic Ultrasound Guided Biopsy and Positron Emission Tomography with Integrated Computed Tomography in Lung Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Stine Schmidt; Vilmann, P; Krasnik, K

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Exact staging of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is important to improve selection of resectable and curable patients for surgery. Positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography (PET/CT) and endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle...... aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA) are new and promising methods, but indications in lung cancer staging are controversial. Only few studies have compared the 2 methods. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the diagnostic values of PET/CT and EUS-FNA for diagnosing advanced lung cancer in patients, who...... had both procedures performed. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 27 patients considered to be potential candidates for resection of NSCLC underwent PET/CT and EUS-FNA. Diagnoses were confirmed either by open thoracotomy, mediastinoscopy or clinical follow-up. Advanced lung cancer was defined as tumour...

  19. Radiotherapy alone for medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer: The Duke experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibley, Gregory S.; Jamieson, Timothy A.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To review our experience treating clinical Stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma with radiotherapy alone using modern techniques and staging. The effect of dose and volume on outcome is to be analyzed. Methods: Between January 1980 and December 1995, 156 patients with Stage I medically inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer were irradiated at Duke University Medical Center and the Durham Veterans Administration Medical Center. Fifteen patients were excluded from analysis (7 treated with palliative intent, and 8 lost to follow-up immediately following radiation). Characteristics of the 141 evaluable patients were as follows: Median age 70 years (range 46-95); gender: male 83%, female 17%; institution: DUMC 65%, DVAMC 35%; T1N0 54%, T2N0 46%; median size 3 cm (range 0.5 to 8); pathology: squamous cell carcinoma 52%, adenocarcinoma 18%, large cell carcinoma 19%, not otherwise specified 11%; presenting symptoms: weight loss 26%, cough 23%, none (incidental diagnosis) 57%. All patients underwent simulation prior to radiotherapy using linear accelerators of ≥4 MV. No patients received surgery or chemotherapy as part of their initial treatment. The median dose of radiotherapy (not reflecting lung inhomogeneity corrections) was 64 Gy (50 to 80 Gy) given in 1.2 bid to 3 Gy qid fractionation. The majority of cases included some prophylactic nodal regions (73%). Results: Of the 141 patients, 108 have died; 33% of intercurrent death, 35% of cancer, and 7% of unknown causes. At last follow-up, 33 patients were alive (median 24 months, range 7-132 months). The 2- and 5-year overall survival was 39% and 13%, respectively (median 18 months). The corresponding cause-specific survival was 60%, and 32% (median 30 months). On multivariate analysis, significant factors influencing overall and/or cause-specific survival were age, squamous cell histology, incidental diagnosis, and pack-years of smoking. There was a nonsignificant trend towards improved cause-specific survival

  20. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yupeng; Kardar, Laleh; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Cao, Wenhua; Chang, Joe Y; Liao, Li; Zhu, Ronald X; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D; Lim, Gino; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-02-01

    To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Despite the presence of interplay effect, the

  1. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yupeng; Kardar, Laleh; Liao, Li; Lim, Gino; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong; Cao, Wenhua; Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Methods: Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Results: Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Conclusions: Despite

  2. The diagnostic value of indeterminate lung lesions on staging chest computed tomographies in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette Williaume; Bulut, Orhan; Jess, Per

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Selection of pulmonary staging modality in colorectal cancer surgery is controversial. Computed tomography (CT) clearly outperforms x-ray in terms of sensitivity, but findings of indeterminate lung lesions remain a problem. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the significance...... metastases was significantly related to positive nodal status at operation and elevated carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level at follow-up (p ... tenth into other lung malignancies, which were most often diagnosed in the second year after surgery. The development of lung metastases was significantly related to positive nodal disease and postoperative CEA elevation....

  3. Pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) Non-Small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyu Chan; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil

    1999-01-01

    This is to evaluate the acute complication, resection rate, and tumor down-staging after pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) non-small cell lung cancer. Fifteen patients with non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled in this study from May 1997 to June 1998 in Samsung Medical Center. The median age of the patients was 61 (range, 45-67) years and male to female ratio was 12:3. Pathologic types were squamous cell carcinoma (11) and adenocarcinoma (4). Pre-operative clinical tumor stages were cT1 in 2 patients, cT2 in 12, and cT3 in 1 and all were N2. Ten patients were proved to be N2 with mediastinoscopic biopsy and five had clinically evident mediastinal lymph node metastases on the chest CT scans. Pre-operative radiation therapy field included the primary tumor, the ipsilateral hilum, and the mediastinum. Total radiation dose was 45 Gy over 5 weeks with daily dose of 1.8 Gy. Pre-operative concurrent chemotherapy consisted of two cycles of intraventous cis-Platin (100 mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and oral Etoposide (50 mg/m 2 /day) on days 1 through 14 with 4 weeks' interval. Surgery was followed after the pre-operative re-evaluation including chest CT scan in 3 weeks of the completion of the concurrent chemoradiotherapy if there was no evidence of disease progression. Full dose radiation therapy was administered to all the 15 patients. Planned two cycles of chemotherapy was completed in 11 patients and one cycle was given to four. One treatment related death of acute respiratory distress syndrome occurred in 15 days of surgery. Hospital admission was required in three patients including one with radiation pneumonitis and two with neutropenic fever. Hematologic complications and other acute complications including esophagitis were tolerable. Resection rate was 92.3% (12/13) in 13 patients excluding two patients who refused surgery. Pleural seeding was found in one patient after thoracotomy and tumor resection was not feasible. Post-operative tumor

  4. Pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) Non-Small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyu Chan; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1999-06-01

    This is to evaluate the acute complication, resection rate, and tumor down-staging after pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) non-small cell lung cancer. Fifteen patients with non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled in this study from May 1997 to June 1998 in Samsung Medical Center. The median age of the patients was 61 (range, 45-67) years and male to female ratio was 12:3. Pathologic types were squamous cell carcinoma (11) and adenocarcinoma (4). Pre-operative clinical tumor stages were cT1 in 2 patients, cT2 in 12, and cT3 in 1 and all were N2. Ten patients were proved to be N2 with mediastinoscopic biopsy and five had clinically evident mediastinal lymph node metastases on the chest CT scans. Pre-operative radiation therapy field included the primary tumor, the ipsilateral hilum, and the mediastinum. Total radiation dose was 45 Gy over 5 weeks with daily dose of 1.8 Gy. Pre-operative concurrent chemotherapy consisted of two cycles of intraventous cis-Platin (100 mg/m{sup 2}) on day 1 and oral Etoposide (50 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on days 1 through 14 with 4 weeks' interval. Surgery was followed after the pre-operative re-evaluation including chest CT scan in 3 weeks of the completion of the concurrent chemoradiotherapy if there was no evidence of disease progression. Full dose radiation therapy was administered to all the 15 patients. Planned two cycles of chemotherapy was completed in 11 patients and one cycle was given to four. One treatment related death of acute respiratory distress syndrome occurred in 15 days of surgery. Hospital admission was required in three patients including one with radiation pneumonitis and two with neutropenic fever. Hematologic complications and other acute complications including esophagitis were tolerable. Resection rate was 92.3% (12/13) in 13 patients excluding two patients who refused surgery. Pleural seeding was found in one patient after thoracotomy and tumor resection was not feasible. Post

  5. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for centrally located early-stage non-small cell lung cancer or lung metastases from the RSSearch® patient registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Joanne N.; Medbery, Clinton; Sharma, Sanjeev; Pablo, John; Kimsey, Frank; Perry, David; Muacevic, Alexander; Mahadevan, Anand

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment patterns and outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for centrally located primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or lung metastases from the RSSearch ® Patient Registry, an international, multi-center patient registry dedicated to radiosurgery and SBRT. Eligible patients included those with centrally located lung tumors clinically staged T1-T2 N0, M0, biopsy-confirmed NSCLC or lung metastases treated with SBRT between November 2004 and January 2014. Descriptive analysis was used to report patient demographics and treatment patterns. Overall survival (OS) and local control (LC) were determined using Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was reported using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. In total, 111 patients with 114 centrally located lung tumors (48 T1-T2,N0,M0 NSCLC and 66 lung metastases) were treated with SBRT at 19 academic and community-based radiotherapy centers in the US and Germany. Median follow-up was 17 months (range, 1–72). Median age was 74 years for primary NSCLC patients and 65 years for lung metastases patients (p < 0.001). SBRT dose varied from 16 – 60 Gy (median 48 Gy) delivered in 1–5 fractions (median 4 fractions). Median dose to centrally located primary NSCLC was 48 Gy compared to 37.5 Gy for lung metastases (p = 0.0001) and median BED 10 was 105.6 Gy for primary NSCLC and 93.6 Gy for lung metastases (p = 0.0005). Two-year OS for T1N0M0 and T2N0M0 NSCLC was 79 and 32.1 %, respectively (p = 0.009) and 2-year OS for lung metastases was 49.6 %. Two-year LC was 76.4 and 69.8 % for primary NSCLC and lung metastases, respectively. Toxicity was low with no Grade 3 or higher acute or late toxicities. Overall, patients with centrally located primary NSCLC were older and received higher doses of SBRT than those with lung metastases. Despite these differences, LC and OS was favorable for patients with central lung tumors treated with SBRT. Reported toxicity

  6. Drug Repositioning Discovery for Early- and Late-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hung Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug repositioning is a popular approach in the pharmaceutical industry for identifying potential new uses for existing drugs and accelerating the development time. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. To reduce the biological heterogeneity effects among different individuals, both normal and cancer tissues were taken from the same patient, hence allowing pairwise testing. By comparing early- and late-stage cancer patients, we can identify stage-specific NSCLC genes. Differentially expressed genes are clustered separately to form up- and downregulated communities that are used as queries to perform enrichment analysis. The results suggest that pathways for early- and late-stage cancers are different. Sets of up- and downregulated genes were submitted to the cMap web resource to identify potential drugs. To achieve high confidence drug prediction, multiple microarray experimental results were merged by performing meta-analysis. The results of a few drug findings are supported by MTT assay or clonogenic assay data. In conclusion, we have been able to assess the potential existing drugs to identify novel anticancer drugs, which may be helpful in drug repositioning discovery for NSCLC.

  7. A Phase 1 Trial of an Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor plus Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients with Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    with Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Karen Kelly, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of California...Inhibitor plus Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients with Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-2-0063...immune checkpoint inhibitor MPDL3280A (atezolizumab) in early stage inoperable non-small cell lung cancer . The trial is comprised of a traditional 3 + 3

  8. Value of integrated PET/CT in clinical staging of patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jun; Guan Yihui; Zuo Chuantao; Hua Fengchun; Lin Xiangtong

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the value of combined fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) in patients with lung cancer, and to compare the results of PET/CT with those of FDG PET and CT alone. Methods: Forty-two patients were studied in this group. 3D whole body images were acquired using Siemens Biograph Sensetionl6 PET/CT scanner. Attenuation corrected PET images, CT and fusion images were interpreted. Reports were compared for each patient including identified the number of lesions, their anatomical localization and certainty of diagnosis. Results: PET/CT increased the number of lesions reported as being definitely abnormal or normal (+22%). In 12 patients (28.6%), the PET/CT report positively impacted surgical management when compared to the PET report alone. 6 patients were correctly downstaged negating further treatment or imaging, 3 patient was upstaged to inoperable and in another 3 ones improved localization by PET/CT led to an altered surgical incision with decreased morbidity. Lesion-based evaluation showed sensitivity for regional lymph node involvement of 61% for CT alone, 88% for FDG PET alone, and 96% for integrated PET/CT imaging respectively. In addition, PET/CT could identify some benign disease, including lung tuberculosis, cyst of liver and kidney, calculus etc. Conclusion: PET/CT improves anatomical localization and increases the certainty in reporting abnormal and normal lesions. PET/CT imaging is superior to CT alone and has additional benefit over FDG PET alone, and is accurate in clinical staging for lung cancer. (authors)

  9. Noninvasive staging of lung cancer. Indications and limitations of gallium-67 citrate imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekerman, C.; Caride, V.J.; Hoffer, P.B.; Boles, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    The results of evaluation of the hila and mediastinum with 67Ga scans are contradictory, as are the recommendations by different investigators on the use of 67Ga scintigraphy in the clinical evaluation of patients with primary lung carcinoma. Nevertheless, the economy and logistic simplicity of evaluating local and distant metastases with a single imaging procedure are attractive, especially because the symptoms may not enable the physician to make a correct identification of the organ systems affected by metastases. Neumann and Hoffer state that at present conventional Ga-67 scanning techniques cannot be recommended for preoperative staging of mediastinal lymph node metastases in lung cancer patients. According to Waxman, 67Ga scintigraphy, relative to other imaging modalities, is a sensitive indicator of hilar spread of a tumor. However, because of the normally high background activity within the sternum and spine, mediastinal abnormalities may be poorly detected. Since most pulmonary tumors metastasize via regional nodes to the pulmonary hilum and then to the mediastinum, the high sensitivity for the detection of pulmonary hilar abnormalities and the high specificity for detection of mediastinal lesions suggest that gallium scintigraphy is a valuable adjunctive test when used appropriately. The results obtained locally are probably the best guide for individual physicians in the selection of diagnostic tests for their patients. Gallium scans may thus be helpful in the clinical evaluation of patients with lung cancer. Although gallium scans identify mediastinal node involvement, there is considerable controversy over the relationship between the sensitivity and specificity of the method. By detecting distant extrathoracic metastases, the 67Ga scan may identify a small group of patients who can be spared a needless operation. 92 references

  10. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for lung cancer diagnosis and staging in 179 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Bugalho

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Linear endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (eBUStBNA is an important minimally invasive procedure for non-small cell lung cancer (NScLc staging. It is also a valid method for diagnosing extraluminal lesions adjacent to the tracheobronchial tree. Aim: to evaluate our eBUS-tBNA performance regarding diagnostic yield, safety and learning curve for lung cancer diagnosis and staging. Material and methods: All patients undergoing eBUS-tBNA for lung cancer diagnosis or staging were included. they were divided into three different groups: paratracheal and parabronchial masses sent for diagnosis (Group 1; peripheral lung lesions with abnormal mediastinal lymph nodes sent for diagnosis and staging (Group 2; NScLc patients sent for mediastinal staging (Group 3. the learning curve was assessed for yield, accuracy, procedure time, size and number of lesions punctured per patient Results: A total of 179 patients were included and 372 lesions were punctured. the overall yield and accuracy were 88% and 92.7%, respectively. In Group 1, eBUS-tBNA was performed in 48 patients and sensitivity was 86.1% and accuracy was 87.5%. For the 87 patients included in Group 2, yield was 86.7%, accuracy was 93.1% and cancer prevalence was 51.7%. the diagnostic yield and accuracy in Group 3 was 95% and 97.7% respectively. eBUS-tBNA practice led to an increase number of sites punctured per patient in a shorter time, without complications. Conclusion: eBUS-tBNA is an effective method for diagnosing and staging lung cancer patients. the procedure is clearly safe. Handling and performance improves with the number of procedures executed. Resumo: Introdução: A punção aspirativa transbrônquica guiada por ecoendoscopia brônquica linear (eBUS-tBNA é um importante procedimento minimamente invasivo para o estadiamento do cancro do pulmão de não pequenas células (cPNPc. É, também, um método válido para o diagnóstico de les

  11. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Ryuji; Takada, Yoshiki; Obayashi, Kayoko; Kado, Tetsuji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Saeko; Soejima, Toshinori; Suzuki, Yasushi; Mimura, Fumitoshi [Hyogo Medical Center for Adult Disease, Akashi (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    In patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer, we performed chemotherapy and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. Thirty-five registered patients were intravenously treated with cisplatin (80mg/m{sup 2}) on day 1 and vindesine (3mg/m{sup 2}) on days 1, 3 and were irradiated from days 1 to 10 with single doses of 2.5 Gy up to a total dosage of 20 Gy. Each course lasted 28 days. Patients received 3 courses, and a total dosage of 60 Gy was delivered. Response to this treatment was evaluable in terms of results in 35 patients. Twenty-two patients showed partial response (response rate 62.9%), 10 had no change, and 3 cases had progressive disease. In 7.5 to 37.8 months observation, three PR patients are alive for more than 24 months without recurrence, but eight PR patients died of local relapse, and the median survival time was 15.7 months. Throughout this treatment course, grade 4 leukopenia was noted in 66% and grade 3 thrombocytopenia was observed in 3%. However all were reversible condition and no treatment-related death was observed. However, two cases died due to complications of pulmonary abscess, which occurred in the area of radiation pulmonary fibrosis about one year later after treatment. Although this concurrent chemo-radiotherapy is a tolerable treatment for non-small cell lung cancer and obtained a good response rate, it did not improve the survival rate. (author).

  12. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Ryuji; Takada, Yoshiki; Obayashi, Kayoko; Kado, Tetsuji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Saeko; Soejima, Toshinori; Suzuki, Yasushi; Mimura, Fumitoshi

    1994-01-01

    In patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer, we performed chemotherapy and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. Thirty-five registered patients were intravenously treated with cisplatin (80mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and vindesine (3mg/m 2 ) on days 1, 3 and were irradiated from days 1 to 10 with single doses of 2.5 Gy up to a total dosage of 20 Gy. Each course lasted 28 days. Patients received 3 courses, and a total dosage of 60 Gy was delivered. Response to this treatment was evaluable in terms of results in 35 patients. Twenty-two patients showed partial response (response rate 62.9%), 10 had no change, and 3 cases had progressive disease. In 7.5 to 37.8 months observation, three PR patients are alive for more than 24 months without recurrence, but eight PR patients died of local relapse, and the median survival time was 15.7 months. Throughout this treatment course, grade 4 leukopenia was noted in 66% and grade 3 thrombocytopenia was observed in 3%. However all were reversible condition and no treatment-related death was observed. However, two cases died due to complications of pulmonary abscess, which occurred in the area of radiation pulmonary fibrosis about one year later after treatment. Although this concurrent chemo-radiotherapy is a tolerable treatment for non-small cell lung cancer and obtained a good response rate, it did not improve the survival rate. (author)

  13. Clinical outcome of stage III non-small-cell lung cancer patients after definitive radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Kodaira, Takeshi; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Tomoda, Takuya; Nakahara, Rie; Inokuchi, Haruo

    2008-01-01

    Primarily combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy are used to treat unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer; however, the results are not satisfactory. In this study treatment results were retrospectively analyzed and the prognostic factors related to survival were identified. From March 1999 to January 2004, 102 patients with stage IIIA/IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer received definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Radiotherapy involved a daily dose of 1.8-2.0 Gy five times a week; 60 Gy was set as the total dose. Maximal chemotherapy was given to patients with normal kidney, liver, and bone marrow functions. The 5-year overall survival rate was 22.2%; the median survival was 18 months. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 53 months. The complete or partial response rate was 85%. At the time of the last follow-up, 21 patients were alive and 81 patients had died, including 5 patients who had died due to radiation pneumonitis. There were significant differences in survival and in the fatal radiation pneumonitis rate between patients with superior lobe lesions and those with middle or inferior lobe lesions. Patients whose primary tumor is located in the superior lobe appear to have a better clinical outcome.

  14. Proton-Based Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D. Grant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR, a recent implementation in the practice of radiation oncology, has been shown to confer high rates of local control in the treatment of early stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. This technique, which involves limited invasive procedures and reduced treatment intervals, offers definitive treatment for patients unable or unwilling to undergo an operation. The use of protons in SABR delivery confers the added physical advantage of normal tissue sparing due to the absence of collateral radiation dose delivered to regions distal to the target. This may translate into clinical benefit and a decreased risk of clinical toxicity in patients with nearby critical structures or limited pulmonary reserve. In this review, we present the rationale for proton-based SABR, principles relating to the delivery and planning of this modality, and a summary of published clinical studies.

  15. Peripheral blood stem cell harvest in patients with limited stage small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katakami, Nobuyuki; Takakura, Shunji; Fujii, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Takashi; Umeda, Bunichi [Kobe City General Hospital (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    Chemotherapy plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) induced mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) was performed in patients with limited stage small-cell lung cancer. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin/etoposide or cisplatin/adriamycin/etoposide. The amounts of CD34 positive cells and granulocyte-macrophage colony forming units (CFU-GM) collected during 2-3 courses of apheresis were 3.1{+-}2.9 x 10{sup 6}/kg (n=10) and 3.1{+-}1.5 x 10{sup 5}/kg (n=8) , respectively. Adequate amounts of PBSC were also harvested even in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Eight patients were successfully treated with high-dose chemotherapy consisting of ifosfamide, carboplatin and etoposide with PBSC transfusion. The patients'-bone marrow reconstruction was rapid and no treatment-related death was observed. (author)

  16. Mechanical phenotyping of cells and extracellular matrix as grade and stage markers of lung tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzetta, Valeria; Musella, Ida; Rapa, Ida; Volante, Marco; Netti, Paolo A; Fusco, Sabato

    2017-07-15

    The mechanical cross-talk between cells and the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) regulates the properties, functions and healthiness of the tissues. When this is disturbed it changes the mechanical state of the tissue components, singularly or together, and cancer, along with other diseases, may start and progress. However, the bi-univocal mechanical interplay between cells and the ECM is still not properly understood. In this study we show how a microrheology technique gives us the opportunity to evaluate the mechanics of cells and the ECM at the same time. The mechanical phenotyping was performed on the surgically removed tissues of 10 patients affected by adenocarcinoma of the lung. A correlation between the mechanics and the grade and stage of the tumor was reported and compared to the mechanical characteristics of the healthy tissue. Our findings suggest a sort of asymmetric modification of the mechanical properties of the cells and the extra-cellular matrix in the tumor, being the more compliant cell even though it resides in a stiffer matrix. Overall, the simultaneous mechanical characterization of the tissues constituents (cells and ECM) provided new support for diagnosis and offered alternative points of analysis for cancer mechanobiology. When the integrity of the mechanical cross-talk between cells and the extra-cellular matrix is disturbed cancer, along with other diseases, may initiate and progress. Here, we show how a new technique gives the opportunity to evaluate the mechanics of cells and the ECM at the same time. It was applied on surgically removed tissues of 10 patients affected by adenocarcinoma of the lung and a correlation between the mechanics and the grade and stage of the tumor was reported and compared to the mechanical characteristics of the healthy tissue. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Preoperative Chemotherapy Versus Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Stage III (N2) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, Kristin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Chino, Junzo P [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Marks, Lawrence B [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Ready, Neal [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); D' Amico, Thomas A [Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Clough, Robert W; Kelsey, Chris R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To compare preoperative chemotherapy (ChT) and preoperative chemoradiotherapy (ChT-RT) in operable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed all patients with pathologically confirmed Stage III (N2) non-small-cell lung cancer who initiated preoperative ChT or ChT-RT at Duke University between 1995 and 2006. Mediastinal pathologic complete response (pCR) rates were compared using a chi-square test. The actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was also performed. Results: A total of 101 patients who initiated preoperative therapy with planned resection were identified. The median follow-up was 20 months for all patients and 38 months for survivors. The mediastinal lymph nodes were reassessed after preoperative therapy in 88 patients (87%). Within this group, a mediastinal pCR was achieved in 35% after preoperative ChT vs. 65% after preoperative ChT-RT (p = 0.01). Resection was performed in 69% after ChT and 84% after ChT-RT (p = 0.1). For all patients, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rate at 3 years was 40%, 27%, and 66%, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found in the clinical endpoints between the ChT and ChT-RT subgroups. On multivariate analysis, a mediastinal pCR was associated with improved disease-free survival (p = 0.03) and local control (p = 0.03), but not overall survival (p = 0.86). Conclusion: Preoperative ChT-RT was associated with higher mediastinal pCR rates but not improved survival.

  18. Preoperative Chemotherapy Versus Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Stage III (N2) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, Kristin; Chino, Junzo P.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Ready, Neal; D'Amico, Thomas A.; Clough, Robert W.; Kelsey, Chris R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To compare preoperative chemotherapy (ChT) and preoperative chemoradiotherapy (ChT-RT) in operable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed all patients with pathologically confirmed Stage III (N2) non-small-cell lung cancer who initiated preoperative ChT or ChT-RT at Duke University between 1995 and 2006. Mediastinal pathologic complete response (pCR) rates were compared using a chi-square test. The actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was also performed. Results: A total of 101 patients who initiated preoperative therapy with planned resection were identified. The median follow-up was 20 months for all patients and 38 months for survivors. The mediastinal lymph nodes were reassessed after preoperative therapy in 88 patients (87%). Within this group, a mediastinal pCR was achieved in 35% after preoperative ChT vs. 65% after preoperative ChT-RT (p = 0.01). Resection was performed in 69% after ChT and 84% after ChT-RT (p = 0.1). For all patients, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rate at 3 years was 40%, 27%, and 66%, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found in the clinical endpoints between the ChT and ChT-RT subgroups. On multivariate analysis, a mediastinal pCR was associated with improved disease-free survival (p = 0.03) and local control (p = 0.03), but not overall survival (p = 0.86). Conclusion: Preoperative ChT-RT was associated with higher mediastinal pCR rates but not improved survival.

  19. Impact of low skeletal muscle mass on non-lung cancer mortality after stereotactic body radiotherapy for patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yukinori; Mitsuyoshi, Takamasa; Shintani, Takashi; Iizuka, Yusuke; Mizowaki, Takashi

    2018-05-17

    The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate impact of pre-treatment skeletal muscle mass (SMM) on overall survival and non-lung cancer mortality after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). One-hundred and eighty-six patients whose abdominal CT before the treatment was available were enrolled into this study. The patients were divided into two groups of SMM according to gender-specific thresholds for unilateral psoas area. Operability was judged by the treating physician or thoracic surgeon after discussion in a multi-disciplinary tumor board. Patients with low SMM tended to be elderly and underweight in body mass index compared with the high SMM. Overall survival in patients with the low SMM tended to be worse than that in the high SMM (41.1% and 55.9% at 5 years, P = 0.115). Cumulative incidence of non-lung cancer death was significantly worse in the low SMM (31.3% at 5 years compared with 9.7% in the high SMM, P = 0.006). Multivariate analysis identified SMM and operability as significant factors for non-lung cancer mortality. Impact of SMM on lung cancer death was not significant. No difference in rate of severe treatment-related toxicity was observed between the SMM groups. Low SMM is a significant risk factor for non-lung cancer death, which might lead to worse overall survival, after SBRT for stage I NSCLC. However, the low SMM does not increase lung cancer death or severe treatment-related toxicity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiation therapy alone for early stage non-small cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Ha Chung; Lee, Myung Za

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the outcome of early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients who were treated with radiation therapy along and define the optimal radiotherapeutic regimen for these patients. A retrospective review was performed on patients with sage I or II non-small cell carcinoma of the lung that were treated at our institution between June, 1987 and May, 2000. A total of 21 patients treated definitively with radiation therapy alone were included in this study. The age of the patients ranged from 53 to 81 years with a median of 66 years. All the patients were male. The medical reasons for inoperability were lack of pulmonary reserve, cardiovascular disease, poor performance status, old age, and patient refusal in the decreasing order. Pathological evidence was not adequate to characterize the non-small cell subtype in two patients. Of the remaining 19 patients, 16 had squamous cell carcinoma and 3 had adenocarcinoma. Treatment was given with conventional fractionation, once a day, five times a week. The doses to the primary site ranged from 56 Gy to 69 Gy. No patients were lost to follow-up. The overall survival rates for the entire group at 2, 3 and 5 years were 41, 30 and 21%, respectively. The cause specific survivals at 2, 3 and 5 years were 55, 36 and 25%, respectively. An intercurrent disease was the cause of death in two patients. The cumulative local failure rate at 5 years was 43%. Nine of the 21 patients had treatment failures after the curative radiotherapy was attempted. Local recurrences as the first site of failure were documented in 7 patients. Therefore, local failure alone represented 78% of the total failures. Those patients whose tumor sizes were less than 4 cm had a significantly better 5 year disease free survival than those with tumors greater than 4 cm (0% vs 36%). Those patients with a Karnofsky performance status less than 70 did not differ significantly with respect to actuarial survival when compared to those with a status greater than 70

  1. Podoplanin expression in cancer-associated fibroblasts predicts unfavourable prognosis in patients with pathological stage IA lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubouchi, Yasuaki; Yurugi, Yohei; Wakahara, Makoto; Sakabe, Tomohiko; Haruki, Tomohiro; Nosaka, Kanae; Miwa, Ken; Araki, Kunio; Taniguchi, Yuji; Shiomi, Tatsushi; Nakamura, Hiroshige; Umekita, Yoshihisa

    2018-02-01

    Podoplanin expression in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) has been proposed as an unfavourable indicator in squamous cell carcinoma of the lung, but little is known about its clinical significance in early-stage lung adenocarcinoma. We evaluated the prognostic impact of podoplanin expression in patients with pathological stage (p-stage) IA lung adenocarcinoma as categorised by the 8th edition of the tumour-node-metastasis classification for lung cancer. Immunohistochemical analyses using anti-podoplanin antibody were performed on resected specimens from 158 patients with p-stage IA lung adenocarcinoma. When more than 10% of cancer cells or CAFs showed immunoreactivity with podoplanin, the specimens were classified as podoplanin-positive. Podoplanin-positive status in cancer cells (n = 8) was not correlated with clinicopathological factors or with patient prognosis. Podoplanin-positive status in CAFs (n = 41) was correlated significantly with poorer tumour differentiation (P < 0.001), the presence of lymphatic invasion (P < 0.001) and high-grade (solid and/or micropapillary) components constituting ≥1% of the entire tumour (P < 0.001). The log-rank test showed that podoplanin-positive status in CAFs was associated significantly with shorter disease-free survival (DFS) (P < 0.001) and disease-specific survival (P = 0.015). In Cox's multivariate analysis, podoplanin-positive status in CAFs had the most significant effect on shorter DFS [hazard ratio (HR) = 4.411, P = 0.004], followed by the presence of high-grade components (HR = 3.581, P = 0.013). Podoplanin expression in CAFs could be an independent predictor of increased risk of recurrence in patients with p-stage IA lung adenocarcinoma. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Why do pathological stage IA lung adenocarcinomas vary from prognosis?: a clinicopathologic study of 176 patients with pathological stage IA lung adenocarcinoma based on the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Wu, Jie; Tan, Qiang; Zhu, Lei; Gao, Wen

    2013-09-01

    Patients with pathological stage IA adenocarcinoma (AC) have a variable prognosis, even if treated in the same way. The postoperative treatment of pathological stage IA patients is also controversial. We identified 176 patients with pathological stage IA AC who had undergone a lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection at the Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai, China, between 2000 and 2006. No patient had preoperative treatment. The histologic subtypes of all patients were classified according to the 2011 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) international multidisciplinary lung AC classification. Patients' 5-year overall survival (OS) and 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) were calculated using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. One hundred seventy-six patients with pathological stage IA AC had an 86.6% 5-year OS and 74.6% 5-year DFS. The 10 patients with micropapillary predominant subtype had the lowest 5-year DFS (40.0%).The 12 patients with solid predominant with mucin production subtype had the lowest 5-year OS (66.7%). Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that sex and prognositic groups of the IASLC/ATS/ERS histologic classification were significantly associated with 5-year DFS of pathological stage IA AC. Our study revealed that sex was an independent prognostic factor of pathological stage IA AC. The IASLC/ATS/ERS classification of lung AC identifies histologic categories with prognostic differences that could be helpful in clinical therapy.

  3. Whole-genome analysis of a patient with early-stage small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J-Y; Lee, Y-S; Kim, B C; Lee, G K; Lee, S; Kim, E-H; Kim, H-M; Bhak, J

    2014-12-01

    We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of a case of early-stage small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to analyze the genomic features. WGS revealed a lot of single-nucleotide variations (SNVs), small insertion/deletions and chromosomal abnormality. Chromosomes 4p, 5q, 13q, 15q, 17p and 22q contained many block deletions. Especially, copy loss was observed in tumor suppressor genes RB1 and TP53, and copy gain in oncogene hTERT. Somatic mutations were found in TP53 and CREBBP. Novel nonsynonymous (ns) SNVs in C6ORF103 and SLC5A4 genes were also found. Sanger sequencing of the SLC5A4 gene in 23 independent SCLC samples showed another nsSNV in the SLC5A4 gene, indicating that nsSNVs in the SLC5A4 gene are recurrent in SCLC. WGS of an early-stage SCLC identified novel recurrent mutations and validated known variations, including copy number variations. These findings provide insight into the genomic landscape contributing to SCLC development.

  4. Immune Responses following Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Stage I Primary Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyasu Maehata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Immune responses following stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC were examined from the point of view of lymphocyte subset counts and natural killer cell activity (NKA. Patients and Methods. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 62 patients at 4 time points between pretreatment and 4 weeks post-treatment for analysis of the change of total lymphocyte counts (TLC and lymphocyte subset counts of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD19+, CD56+, and NKA. In addition, the changes of lymphocyte subset counts were compared between patients with or without relapse. Further, the correlations between SBRT-related parameters and immune response were analyzed for the purpose of revealing the mechanisms of the immune response. Results. All lymphocyte subset counts and NKA at post-treatment and 1 week post-treatment were significantly lower than pre-treatment (P<0.01. No significant differences in the changes of lymphocyte subset counts were observed among patients with or without relapse. The volume of the vertebral body receiving radiation doses of 3 Gy or more (VV3 significantly correlated with the changes of nearly all lymphocyte subset counts. Conclusions. SBRT for stage I NSCLC induced significant immune suppression, and the decrease of lymphocyte subset counts may be associated with exposure of the vertebral bone marrow.

  5. Preoperative radiation therapy in regionally localized stage III non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, S.; Faber, L.P.; Baumann, L.M.; Lee, M.S.; Jensik, R.J.; Kittle, C.F.; Bonomi, P.; Taylor, S.; Hendrickson, F.R.

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-four patients seen from January 1975 through December 1982 with clinical stage III M0 non-small-cell carcinoma of the lung were treated with a course of preoperative radiation therapy to be followed by surgical resection. Surgical resection was attempted 4 weeks later. All the patients except two were followed up for a minimum of 5 years or until death. Sixty-four patients (86%) had T3 tumors, while mediastinal nodal involvement was found in 41 (55%). The actuarial 5-year survival and disease-free survival rates for the entire group were 20% and 26%, respectively. Patients with a pathologically complete response had an actuarial disease-free survival rate of 50% at 5 years, compared with only 17% for those with gross residual disease at surgery. One-half of the patients with clinically uninvolved nodes were living disease free at 5 years, compared with only 20% of the patients with N2 disease. The patterns of failure are presented according to the histologic type and stage of the disease

  6. Lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer

  7. (18)F-FDG PET during stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I lung tumours cannot predict outcome : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegman, Erwin M.; Pruim, Jan; Ubbels, Jan F.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Widder, Joachim

    (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) has been used to assess metabolic response several months after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. However, whether a metabolic response can be observed already during treatment and thus

  8. A patient perspective on shared decision making in stage I non-small cell lung cancer: a mixed methods study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopmans, W.; Damman, O.C.; Senan, S.; Hartemink, K.J.; Smit, E.F.; Timmermans, D.R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgery and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) are both curative treatment options for patients with a stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Consequently, there is growing interest in studying the role of patients in treatment decision making. We studied how patients with

  9. Surgery or stereotactic body radiotherapy for elderly stage I lung cancer? A propensity score matching analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takuro; Yamazaki, Takuya; Nakamura, Daisuke; Sato, Shuntaro; Yamasaki, Naoya; Tsuchiya, Tomoshi; Matsumoto, Keitaro; Kamohara, Ryotaro; Hatachi, Go; Nagayasu, Takeshi

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of surgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for elderly clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Patients ≥80 years of age with clinical stage I NSCLC between August 2008 and December 2014 were treated either surgery or SBRT. Propensity score matching was performed to reduce bias in various clinicopathological factors. Surgery was performed in 57 cases and SBRT in 41 cases. In the surgery group, the operations included 34 lobectomies and 23 sublobar resections. In the SBRT group, 27 cases were given 48 Gy in 4 fractions, and 14 were given 60 Gy in 10 fractions. Similar characteristics were identified in age (82 years), gender (male:female ratio 2:1), tumor size (2.2 cm), carcinoembryonic antigen (3.6 ng/ml), Charlson comorbidity index (1), Glasgow prognostic scale (0), and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (1.7 L) after matching. Before matching, the 5-year overall survival (OS) in surgery (68.3%) was significantly better than that in SBRT (47.4%, p = 0.02), and the 5-year disease-specific survival (DSS) (94.1%, 78.2%, p = 0.17) was not significantly different between the groups. The difference in the 5-year OS became non-significant between the matched pairs (57.0%, 49.1%, p = 0.56). The outcomes of surgery and SBRT for elderly patients with the early stage NSCLC were roughly the same.

  10. Comorbidity and KPS are independent prognostic factors in stage I non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firat, Selim; Bousamra, Michael; Gore, Elizabeth; Byhardt, Roger W.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prognostic role of comorbidity in Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with surgery or radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: One hundred sixty-three patients with clinical Stage I NSCLC were analyzed for overall survival (OS) and comorbidity. One hundred thirteen patients underwent surgery (surgical group) and 50 patients received definitive radiotherapy (RT group). Ninety-six percent of the surgical group had lobectomy or pneumonectomy, and negative margins were achieved in 96% of the patients. The median dose to the tumor for the RT group was 61.2 Gy (range 30.8-77.4). The Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics (CIRS-G) and the Charlson scale were used to rate comorbidity. Karnofsky performance scores (KPS) were available in 42 patients; the rest of the scores were determined retrospectively by two physicians independently, with 97% agreement. Results: The OS was 44% for the surgical group and 5% for the RT group at 5 years. Noncancer-related mortality was observed in 31% and 62% of the surgical and RT patients, respectively. On univariate analysis, performed on all patients (n=163), squamous cell histologic type (p 4 cm (p=0.065), >40 pack-year tobacco use (p 2 (p 2 (p=0.004), KPS 40 pack-year tobacco use, KPS <70, and presence of CIRS-G(4) were independently associated with an inferior OS. Treatment modality, T stage, and age did not have any statistically significant effect on OS. Statistically significant differences were found between the surgical and RT groups in Charlson score (p=0.001), CIRS-G total score (p=0.004), severity index (p=0.006), CIRS-G4(+) (p<0.001), KPS (p<0.001), amount of tobacco use (p=0.002), clinical tumor size (p<0.001), clinical T stage (p=0.01), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (p=0.001), and age (p=0.008), in favor of the surgical group. Conclusion: The presence of significant comorbidity and KPS of <70 are both important prognostic factors, but were found to be independent of each

  11. Low doses of prophylactic cranial irradiation effective in limited stage small cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubenstein, James H.; Dosoretz, Daniel E.; Katin, Michael J.; Blitzer, Peter H.; Salenius, Sharon A.; Floody, Patrick A.; Harwin, William N.; Teufel, Thomas E.; Raymond, Michael G.; Reeves, James A.; Hart, Lowell L.; McCleod, Michael J.; Pizarro, Alejandro; Gabarda, Antonio L.; Rana, Van G.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) for the prevention of brain metastasis in small cell lung cancer remains controversial, both in terms of efficacy and the optimal dose-fractionation scheme. We performed this study to evaluate the efficacy of PCI at low doses. Methods and Materials: One hundred and ninety-seven patients were referred to our institution for treatment of limited stage small cell carcinoma of the lung between June 1986 and December 1992. Follow-up ranged from 1.1 to 89.8 months, with a mean of 19 months. Eighty-five patients received PCI. Results: Patients receiving PCI exhibited brain failure in 15%, while 38% of untreated patients developed metastases. This degree of prophylaxis was achieved with a median total dose of 25.20 Gy and a median fraction size of 1.80 Gy. At these doses, acute and late complications were minimal. Patients receiving PCI had significantly better 1-year and 2-year overall survivals (68% and 46% vs. 33% and 13%). However, patients with a complete response (CR) to chemotherapy and better Karnofsky performance status (KPS) were overrepresented in the PCI group. In an attempt to compare similar patients in both groups (PCI vs. no PCI), only patients with KPS ≥ 80, CR or near-CR to chemotherapy, and treatment with attempt to cure, were compared. In this good prognostic group, survival was still better in the PCI group (p = 0.0018). Conclusion: In this patient population, relatively low doses of PCI have accomplished a significant reduction in the incidence of brain metastasis with little toxicity. Whether such treatment truly improves survival awaits the results of additional prospective randomized trials

  12. Predictors of end stage lung disease in a cohort of patients with scleroderma

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, C; Knight, C; Lunt, M; Black, C; Silman, A

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the incidence of severe lung disease in patients with scleroderma and identify the combination(s) of features present at first assessment which would be useful to predict future risk of severe lung disease.

  13. Prospective study of proton-beam radiation therapy for limited-stage small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rwigema, Jean-Claude M; Verma, Vivek; Lin, Liyong; Berman, Abigail T; Levin, William P; Evans, Tracey L; Aggarwal, Charu; Rengan, Ramesh; Langer, Corey; Cohen, Roger B; Simone, Charles B

    2017-11-01

    Existing data supporting the use of proton-beam therapy (PBT) for limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) are limited to a single 6-patient case series. This is the first prospective study to evaluate clinical outcomes and toxicities of PBT for LS-SCLC. This study prospectively analyzed patients with primary, nonrecurrent LS-SCLC definitively treated with PBT and concurrent chemotherapy from 2011 to 2016. Clinical backup intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were generated for each patient and were compared with PBT plans. Outcome measures included local control (LC), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) rates and toxicities. Thirty consecutive patients were enrolled and evaluated. The median dose was 63.9 cobalt gray equivalents (range, 45-66.6 cobalt gray equivalents) in 33 to 37 fractions delivered daily (n = 18 [60.0%]) or twice daily (n = 12 [40.0%]). The concurrent chemotherapy was cisplatin/etoposide (n = 21 [70.0%]) or carboplatin/etoposide (n = 9 [30.0%]). In comparison with the backup IMRT plans, PBT allowed statistically significant reductions in the cord, heart, and lung mean doses and the volume receiving at least 5 Gy but not in the esophagus mean dose or the lung volume receiving at least 20 Gy. At a median follow-up of 14 months, the 1-/2-year LC and RFS rates were 85%/69% and 63%/42%, respectively. The median OS was 28.2 months, and the 1-/2-year OS rates were 72%/58%. There was 1 case each (3.3%) of grade 3 or higher esophagitis, pneumonitis, anorexia, and pericardial effusion. Grade 2 pneumonitis and esophagitis were seen in 10.0% and 43.3% of patients, respectively. In the first prospective registry study and largest analysis to date of PBT for LS-SCLC, PBT was found to be safe with a limited incidence of high-grade toxicities. Cancer 2017;123:4244-4251. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  14. Detection of non-aggressive stage IA lung cancer using chest computed tomography and positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiono, Satoshi; Yanagawa, Naoki; Abiko, Masami; Sato, Toru

    2014-10-01

    In contrast to lung cancer with ground-glass opacity, the radiological investigation of solid lung cancer has not been well examined. The aim of this study was to explore chest computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT findings with regard to outcomes after lung cancer surgery in order to radiologically classify clinical stage IA lung cancers by tumour aggressiveness. Three hundred and fifteen clinical stage IA patients were analysed. Four groups were defined by tumour solidity on CT and by the standardized uptake value (SUV) index on PET-CT (tumour maximum SUV/mean right liver lobe SUV). We analysed the association between radiological findings and both pathological invasiveness and postoperative outcome. Group A (n = 84) had an SUV index <1.0 and non-solid tumours, Group B (n = 24) had an SUV index <1.0 and solid tumours, Group C (n = 54) had an SUV index ≥1.0 and non-solid tumours, while Group D (n = 153) had an SUV index ≥1.0 and solid tumours. Invasive lung cancer was found in 2/84 (2.4%) patients in Group A, 1/24 (4.2%) in Group B, 13/54 (24.1%) in Group C and 58/153 (37.9%) in Group D (P < 0.01). The 5-year recurrence-free rate was 100% in Groups A and B, 90.3% in C and 65.7% in D (P < 0.01). The cancer-specific survival rate was 100% in A and B, 94.6% in C and 81.7% in D (P < 0.01). The present results suggest that preoperative PET/CT and thin-section CT findings provide important information for a selection of surgical procedures for clinical stage IA lung cancers. In clinical stage IA lung cancers displaying solid or non-solid density in thin-section findings, an SUV index <1.0 may be a better criterion for detecting non-aggressive lung cancer even in solid lung cancers. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  15. Prognostic significance of DNA content in stage I adenocarcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Heidi L.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Allen, Pamela; El-Naggar, Adel K.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Up to 30% of lung cancers (Stage I) with the most favorable outcome recur within 5 years after surgery. This study reviews the pattern of failure after surgical resection in early lung cancers and determines whether flow cytometric DNA variables were prognostic indicators for survival, disease-free survival (DFS), or distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS). Methods and Materials: Pathologic specimens from 45 patients at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center who underwent surgical resection and mediastinal nodal dissection for stage I (AJCC) adenocarcinomas of the lung were analyzed by flow cytometry for DNA content. Survival was calculated by the method of Desu and Lee. Chi-square and cross tabulation were used in the analysis. Results: The mean age of the patients was 62 years, and 52.3% were male. All patients were clinical Stage I (T1-2 N0), Karnofsky performance status ≥70, and had a weight loss <10 lbs. Median overall survival (OS) and DFS were 50 months and 33 months, respectively. OS, DFS, and DMFS at 1, 3 and 5 years were 73%, 57%, and 35%; 63%, 53%, and 45%; and 67%, 56%, and 48%, respectively. Analysis of all 45 patients revealed 86% of patients developing brain metastasis had an abnormal DNA content ≥ 30%, whereas 4% of patients with brain metastasis had abnormal DNA content < 30% (p = 0.01). This correlation maintained significance when only pT1/2 lesions were analyzed. There was a significant statistical correlation between abnormal DNA and 5-year OS, with 74% OS for those with abnormal DNA < 30% vs. 42% for ≥ 30% (p = 0.036). The 5-year DFS for pT1/2 patients was significantly correlated with abnormal DNA content: 53% for patients with abnormal DNA < 30% vs. 17% for patients with abnormal DNA ≥ 30%, respectively (p = 0.03). Of those with %S fraction (%S) < 2, 13% failed locally compared to 41% of those with %S ≥ 2. There was a highly significant correlation between DNA index (DNAI) and aneuploid %S: 68% of patients

  16. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the mediastinal nodal staging of non-small cell lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlangieri, S.U.; Scott, A.M.; Knight, S.; Fitt, G.J.; Hess, E.M.; Pathmaraj, K.; Hennessy, O.F.; Tochon-Danguy, H.J.; Chan, J.G.; Egan, G.F.; Sinclair, R.A.; Clarke, C.P.; McKay, W.J.; St Vincents Hospital, Fitzroy, VIC

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Positron emission tomography (PET) using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), as a metabolic tumour marker, has been proposed for staging of oncological disease. To determine its role in the mediastinal staging of lung cancer, a prospective comparison of FDG PET with surgery was performed in patients with suspected non-small cell lung carcinoma. The analysis group consists of 70 patients, 49 men and 21 women, mean age 64 yrs (range 41-83 yrs). The PET study was acquired on a Siemens 951/31R scanner over 3 bed positions, 45 minutes following 400MBq FDG. The emission scan was attenuation corrected using measured transmission data. The FDG PET were interpreted by a nuclear physician blinded to the clinical data and the results of the patients' CT scan. On PET, nodes were graded qualitatively on a 5 point scale with scores 4 or greater, positive for tumour involvement. Surgical specimens were obtained in all patients by thoracotomy or mediastinoscopy. The PET metabolic studies and pathology were mapped according to the American Thoracic Society nodal classification resulting in a total of 277 nodal stations evaluated. The PET studies analysed N2 or N3 tumour involvement by nodal station in comparison to histology of pathological specimens or direct visual assessment of the nodal stations at surgery. All patients had proven non-small cell lung carcinoma, except two, in whom, a tissue confirmation of the suspected diagnosis was not attained. PET excluded tumour in 237 of 246 nodal stations (specificity 96%). PET correctly identified 23 of 31 nodal stations with disease (sensitivity 74%). PET correctly staged 260 of 277 nodal stations (accuracy 94%) for disease. FDG PET is an accurate non-invasive functional imaging modality for the mediastinal staging of non-small cell lung cancer and has an important clinical role in the preoperative staging of lung cancer patients

  17. Adjuvant Chemotherapy Improves the Probability of Freedom From Recurrence in Patients With Resected Stage IB Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jung-Jyh; Wu, Yu-Chung; Chou, Teh-Ying; Jeng, Wen-Juei; Yeh, Yi-Chen; Hsu, Wen-Hu

    2016-04-01

    The benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy remains controversial for patients with stage IB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study investigated the effect of adjuvant chemotherapy and the predictors of benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage IB lung adenocarcinoma. A total of 243 patients with completely resected pathologic stage IB lung adenocarcinoma were included in the study. Predictors of the benefits of improved overall survival (OS) or probability of freedom from recurrence (FFR) from platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with resected stage IB lung adenocarcinoma were investigated. Among the 243 patients, 70 (28.8%) had received platinum-based doublet adjuvant chemotherapy. A micropapillary/solid-predominant pattern (versus an acinar/papillary-predominant pattern) was a significantly worse prognostic factor for probability of FFR (p = 0.033). Although adjuvant chemotherapy (versus surgical intervention alone) was not a significant prognostic factor for OS (p = 0.303), it was a significant prognostic factor for a better probability of FFR (p = 0.029) on multivariate analysis. In propensity-score-matched pairs, there was no significant difference in OS between patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy and those who did not (p = 0.386). Patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy had a significantly better probability of FFR than those who did not (p = 0.043). For patients with a predominantly micropapillary/solid pattern, adjuvant chemotherapy (p = 0.033) was a significant prognostic factor for a better probability of FFR on multivariate analysis. Adjuvant chemotherapy is a favorable prognostic factor for the probability of FFR in patients with stage IB lung adenocarcinoma, particularly in those with a micropapillary/solid-predominant pattern. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. DYNAMICS OF HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN-70 SYNTHESIS IN LUNGS DEPENDS ON THE STAGE OF EXPERIMENTAL RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Prutkina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS was reproduced in a rat model, by means of intratracheal instillation of granulocyte lysates (a method protected by Russian patent. Expression of HSP-70 in lung cells was determined by immunohistochemical technique at each ARDS stage. A significant increase of HSP-70 expression by all cell types was revealed during exudative stage, being more intensive in alveolocytes type 1, and less expressed in endothelium. During proliferative stage of the disorder, a decreased HSP-70 expression was noted in all cell populations. At these terms, it proved to be high in neutrophils and alveveolocytes type 1, whereas lower expression was registered in endothelium. At fibrotic stage, HSP-70 synthesis remained at high levels in neutrophils, macrophages, fibroblasts and alveolocytes type 1. Endothelium and alveolocytes type 2 exhibited a recurrent increase at fibrotic stage of ARDS, however it did not reach the values typical to the initial stage of the syndrome.

  19. Budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography - computed tomography for staging lung cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biz, Aline Navega; Caetano, Rosângela

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography (PET) in mediastinal and distant staging of non-small cell lung cancer. The estimates were calculated by the epidemiological method for years 2014 to 2018. Nation-wide data were used about the incidence; data on distribution of the disease's prevalence and on the technologies' accuracy were from the literature; data regarding involved costs were taken from a micro-costing study and from Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) database. Two strategies for using PET were analyzed: the offer to all newly-diagnosed patients, and the restricted offer to the ones who had negative results in previous computed tomography (CT) exams. Univariate and extreme scenarios sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate the influence from sources of uncertainties in the parameters used. The incorporation of PET-CT in SUS would imply the need for additional resources of 158.1 BRL (98.2 USD) million for the restricted offer and 202.7 BRL (125.9 USD) million for the inclusive offer in five years, with a difference of 44.6 BRL (27.7 USD) million between the two offer strategies within that period. In absolute terms, the total budget impact from its incorporation in SUS, in five years, would be 555 BRL (345 USD) and 600 BRL (372.8 USD) million, respectively. The costs from the PET-CT procedure were the most influential parameter in the results. In the most optimistic scenario, the additional budget impact would be reduced to 86.9 BRL (54 USD) and 103.8 BRL (64.5 USD) million, considering PET-CT for negative CT and PET-CT for all, respectively. The incorporation of PET in the clinical staging of non-small cell lung cancer seems to be financially feasible considering the high budget of the Brazilian Ministry of Health. The potential reduction in the number of unnecessary surgeries may cause the available resources to be more efficiently allocated.

  20. Budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography – computed tomography for staging lung cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Navega Biz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To estimate the budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography (PET in mediastinal and distant staging of non-small cell lung cancer.METHODS The estimates were calculated by the epidemiological method for years 2014 to 2018. Nation-wide data were used about the incidence; data on distribution of the disease´s prevalence and on the technologies’ accuracy were from the literature; data regarding involved costs were taken from a micro-costing study and from Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS database. Two strategies for using PET were analyzed: the offer to all newly-diagnosed patients, and the restricted offer to the ones who had negative results in previous computed tomography (CT exams. Univariate and extreme scenarios sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate the influence from sources of uncertainties in the parameters used.RESULTS The incorporation of PET-CT in SUS would imply the need for additional resources of 158.1 BRL (98.2 USD million for the restricted offer and 202.7 BRL (125.9 USD million for the inclusive offer in five years, with a difference of 44.6 BRL (27.7 USD million between the two offer strategies within that period. In absolute terms, the total budget impact from its incorporation in SUS, in five years, would be 555 BRL (345 USD and 600 BRL (372.8 USD million, respectively. The costs from the PET-CT procedure were the most influential parameter in the results. In the most optimistic scenario, the additional budget impact would be reduced to 86.9 BRL (54 USD and 103.8 BRL (64.5 USD million, considering PET-CT for negative CT and PET-CT for all, respectively.CONCLUSIONS The incorporation of PET in the clinical staging of non-small cell lung cancer seems to be financially feasible considering the high budget of the Brazilian Ministry of Health. The potential reduction in the number of unnecessary surgeries may cause the available resources to be more efficiently allocated.

  1. Health-related quality of life in end-stage COPD and lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habraken, Jolanda M; ter Riet, Gerben; Gore, Justin M; Greenstone, Michael A; Weersink, Els J M; Bindels, Patrick J E; Willems, Dick L

    2009-06-01

    Historically, palliative care has been developed for cancer patients and is not yet generally available for patients suffering from chronic life-limiting illnesses, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To examine whether COPD patients experience similar or worse disease burden in comparison with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, we compared the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) scores of severe COPD patients with those of advanced NSCLC patients. We also formally updated previous evidence in this area provided by a landmark study published by Gore et al. in 2000. In updating this previous evidence, we addressed the methodological limitations of this study and a number of confounding variables. Eighty-two GOLD IV COPD patients and 19 Stage IIIb or IV NSCLC patients completed generic and disease-specific HRQOL questionnaires. We used an individual patient data meta-analysis to integrate the new and existing evidence (total n=201). Finally, to enhance between-group comparability, we performed a sensitivity analysis using a subgroup of patients with a similar degree of "terminality," namely those who had died within one year after study entry. Considerable differences in HRQOL were found for physical functioning, social functioning, mental health, general health perceptions, dyspnea, activities of daily living, and depression. All differences favored the NSCLC patients. The sensitivity analysis, using only terminal NSCLC and COPD patients, confirmed these findings. In conclusion, end-stage COPD patients experience poor HRQOL comparable to or worse than that of advanced NSCLC patients. We discuss these findings in the light of the notion that these COPD patients may have a similar need for palliative care.

  2. Verification of Dose Distribution in Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy for Stage I Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irie, Daisuke; Saitoh, Jun-ichi, E-mail: junsaito@gunma-u.ac.jp; Shirai, Katsuyuki; Abe, Takanori; Kubota, Yoshiki; Sakai, Makoto; Noda, Shin-ei; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate robustness of dose distribution of carbon-ion radiation therapy (C-ion RT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to identify factors affecting the dose distribution by simulated dose distribution. Methods and Materials: Eighty irradiation fields for delivery of C-ion RT were analyzed in 20 patients with stage I NSCLC. Computed tomography images were obtained twice before treatment initiation. Simulated dose distribution was reconstructed on computed tomography for confirmation under the same settings as actual treatment with respiratory gating and bony structure matching. Dose-volume histogram parameters, such as %D95 (percentage of D95 relative to the prescribed dose), were calculated. Patients with any field for which the %D95 of gross tumor volume (GTV) was below 90% were classified as unacceptable for treatment, and the optimal target margin for such cases was examined. Results: Five patients with a total of 8 fields (10% of total number of fields analyzed) were classified as unacceptable according to %D95 of GTV, although most patients showed no remarkable change in the dose-volume histogram parameters. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that tumor displacement and change in water-equivalent pathlength were significant predictive factors of unacceptable cases (P<.001 and P=.002, respectively). The main cause of degradation of the dose distribution was tumor displacement in 7 of the 8 unacceptable fields. A 6-mm planning target volume margin ensured a GTV %D95 of >90%, except in 1 extremely unacceptable field. Conclusions: According to this simulation analysis of C-ion RT for stage I NSCLC, a few fields were reported as unacceptable and required resetting of body position and reconfirmation. In addition, tumor displacement and change in water-equivalent pathlength (bone shift and/or chest wall thickness) were identified as factors influencing the robustness of dose distribution. Such uncertainties should be regarded

  3. Consequences of Late-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cachexia on Muscle Metabolic Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murton, Andrew J; Maddocks, Matthew; Stephens, Francis B; Marimuthu, Kanagaraj; England, Ruth; Wilcock, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The loss of muscle is common in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and contributes to the high morbidity and mortality of this group. The exact mechanisms behind the muscle loss are unclear. To investigate this, 4 patients with stage IV NSCLC who met the clinical definitions for sarcopenia and cachexia were recruited, along with 4 age-matched healthy volunteers. After an overnight fast, biopsy specimens were obtained from the vastus lateralis, and the key components associated with inflammation and the control of muscle protein, carbohydrate, and fat metabolism were assessed. Compared with the healthy volunteers, significant increases in mRNA levels for interleukin-6 and NF-κB signaling and lower intramyocellular lipid content in slow-twitch fibers were observed in NSCLC patients. Although a significant decrease in phosphorylation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling protein 4E-BP1 (Ser 65 ) was observed, along with a trend toward reduced p70 S6K (Thr 389 ) phosphorylation (P = .06), no difference was found between groups for the mRNA levels of MAFbx (muscle atrophy F box) and MuRF1 (muscle ring finger protein 1), chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome, or protein levels of multiple proteasome subunits. Moreover, despite decreases in intramyocellular lipid content, no robust changes in mRNA levels for key proteins involved in insulin signaling, glycolysis, oxidative metabolism, or fat metabolism were observed. These findings suggest that examining the contribution of suppressed mTOR signaling in the loss of muscle mass in late-stage NSCLC patients is warranted and reinforces our need to understand the potential contribution of impaired fat metabolism and muscle protein synthesis in the etiology of cancer cachexia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A case of central type early stage lung cancer receiving 60Co high dose-rate postoperative endobronchial radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamori, Syouji; Kodama, Ken; Kurokawa, Eiji; Doi, Osamu; Terasawa, Toshio; Chatani, Masashi; Inoue, Toshihiko; Tateishi, Ryuhei

    1985-01-01

    Right middle-lower lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection were performed for a case of central type early stage lung cancer. Tumor extended very closely to the line of incision margin of the resected specimen, appearing as carcinoma in situ. To inprove curativity, postoperative radiation therapy was performed with 60 Co high dose-rate endobronchial radiation by a remote afterloading system. A total dose of 40Gy was administered to the target area without any severe side effects. The patient is healthy and has no evidence of metastasis. This procedure is considered to be an effective treatment for postoperative lung cancer with possible residual malignancy. (author)

  5. Preoperative staging of lung cancer with PET/CT: cost-effectiveness evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Fischer, Barbara Malene B; Mortensen, Jann

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Positron emission tomography (PET)/CT has become a widely used technology for preoperative staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two recent randomized controlled trials (RCT) have established its efficacy over conventional staging, but no studies have assessed its cost-effective......PURPOSE: Positron emission tomography (PET)/CT has become a widely used technology for preoperative staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two recent randomized controlled trials (RCT) have established its efficacy over conventional staging, but no studies have assessed its cost......-effectiveness. The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of PET/CT as an adjunct to conventional workup for preoperative staging of NSCLC. METHODS: The study was conducted alongside an RCT in which 189 patients were allocated to conventional staging (n = 91) or conventional staging + PET/CT (n = 98......) and followed for 1 year after which the numbers of futile thoracotomies in each group were monitored. A full health care sector perspective was adapted for costing resource use. The outcome parameter was defined as the number needed to treat (NNT)-here number of PET/CT scans needed-to avoid one futile...

  6. The prognostic effect of subpleural lesions in early stage non-small cell lung cancer: preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ho Jun; Lee, Hyung Sik; Hur, Won Joo; Lee, Ki Nam; Choi, Pill Jo

    1998-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the impact of subpleural lesions of early stage non-small cell lung cancer on the patterns of failure to support selection of postoperative adjuvant therapy. The study included 91 patients who underwent surgery for early stage non-small cell lung cancer at Donga University hospital from Dec 1990 to Sep 1996. Twenty five patients were excluded due to postoperative mortality (four patients, 4.4%) and stage III (21 patients). Of 66 patients, 22 patients were subpleural lesions (15 patients in stage I, and seven patients in stage II). Postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy was given to seven patients with T2N1 disease. The median follow-up duration was 29.5 months (range; 8-84 months). The overall survival rate was 69.5% at 3 years. For all patients who presented with (22 patients) and without (44 patients) subpleural lesions, 3-year overall survival rates were 35.5% and 84.6%, respectively (p=0.0017). For stage I patients who presented with (15 patients) and without (29 patients) subpleural lesions, 3-year overall survival rates were 33.1% and 92.3%, respectively (p=0.001). For stage II patients who presented with (7 patients) and without (15 patients) subpleural lesions, 3-year overall survival rates were 53.3% and 45.7%, respectively (p=0.911). For patients with T2NO disease (34 patients) who presented with (11 patients) and without (23 patients) subpleural lesions, 3-year overall survival rates were 27.3% and 90.3%,respectively (p=0.009).These observations suggest that the subpleural lesion play an important role as a prognostic factor for early stage non-small cell lung cancer. Especially for T2NO disease, patients with subpleural lesions showed significantly lower survival rate than those without that

  7. Caregivers' perceived adequacy of support in end-stage lung disease: results of a population survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Currow David C

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background End-stage lung disease (ESLD is a frequent cause of death. What are the differences in the supports needed by caregivers of individuals with ESLD at end of life versus other life-limiting diagnoses? Methods The South Australian Health Omnibus is an annual, random, face-to-face, cross-sectional survey. In 2002, 2003 and 2005-2007, respondents were asked a range of questions about end-of-life care; there were approximately 3000 survey participants annually (participation rate 77.9%. Responses were standardised for the whole population. The families and friends who cared for someone with ESLD were the focus of this analysis. In addition to describing caring, respondents reported additional support that would have been helpful. Results Of 1504 deaths reported, 145 (9.6% were due to ESLD. The ESLD cohort were older than those with other 'expected' causes of death (> 65 years of age; 92.6% versus 70.6%; p physical care, information provision, and emotional and spiritual support. Conclusions Caregiver needs were similar regardless of the underlying diagnosis although access to palliative care specialist services occurred less often for ESLD patients. This was despite significantly longer periods of time for which care was provided.

  8. Locoregional failures following thoracic irradiation in patients with limited-stage small cell lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuliani, Meredith E.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Sun, Alexander; Bezjak, Andrea; Le, Lisa W.; Brade, Anthony; Cho, John; Leighl, Natasha B.; Shepherd, Frances A.; Hope, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the patterns of loco-regional (LR) and distant failure in patients with limited-stage small cell lung carcinoma (LS-SCLC) treated with curative intent. Methods: From 1997 to 2008, 253 LS-SCLC patients were treated with curative intent chemo-radiation at our institution. A retrospective review identified sites of failure. The cumulative LR failure (LRF) rate was calculated. Distant failure-free survival (FFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Volumetric images of LR failures were delineated and registered with the original radiation treatment plans if available. Dosimetric parameters for the delineated failure volumes were calculated from the original treatment information. Results: The median follow-up was 19 months. The site of first failure was LR in 34, distant in 80 and simultaneous LR and distant in 31 patients. The cumulative LRF rate was 29% and 38% at 2 and 5 years. OS was 44% at 2 years. Seventy patients had electronically archived treatment plans of which there were 16 LR failures (7 local and 39 regional failure volumes). Of the local and regional failure volumes 29% and 31% were in-field, respectively. Conclusions: The predominant pattern of LR failure was marginal or out-of-field. LR failures may be preventable with improved radiotherapy target definition.

  9. Clinical outcome of fiducial-less CyberKnife radiosurgery for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, In Hye; Song, Si Yeol; Cho, Byung Chul; Kwak, Jung Won; Jung, Nuri Hyun; Kim, Su Ssan; Choi, Eun Kyung; Jung, Jin Hong; Je, Hyoung Uk; Choi, Won Sik

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the treatment results in early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients who have undergone fiducial-less CyberKnife radiosurgery (CKRS). From June 2011 to November 2013, 58 patients underwent CKRS at Asan Medical Center for stage I lung cancer. After excluding 14 patients, we retrospectively reviewed the records of the remaining 44 patients. All analyses were performed using SPSS ver. 21. The median age at diagnosis was 75 years. Most patients had inoperable primary lung cancer with a poor pulmonary function test with comorbidity or old age. The clinical stage was IA in 30 patients (68.2%), IB in 14 (31.8%). The mean tumor size was 2.6 cm (range, 1.2 to 4.8 cm), and the tumor was smaller than 2 cm in 12 patients (27.3%). The radiation dose given was 48-60 Gy in 3-4 fractions. In a median follow-up of 23.1 months, local recurrence occurred in three patients (2-year local recurrence-free survival rate, 90.4%) and distant metastasis occurred in 13 patients. All patients tolerated the radiosurgery well, only two patients developing grade 3 dyspnea. The most common complications were radiation-induced fibrosis and pneumonitis. Eight patients died due to cancer progression. The results showed that fiducial-less CKRS shows comparable local tumor control and survival rates to those of LINAC-based SABR or CKRS with a fiducial marker. Thus, fiducial-less CKRS using Xsight lung tracking system can be effectively and safely performed for patients with medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer without any risk of procedure-related complication

  10. Clinical outcome of fiducial-less CyberKnife radiosurgery for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, In Hye; Song, Si Yeol; Cho, Byung Chul; Kwak, Jung Won; Jung, Nuri Hyun; Kim, Su Ssan; Choi, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jin Hong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Je, Hyoung Uk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Sik [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gangneung Asan Hospital, Uiversity of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To evaluate the treatment results in early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients who have undergone fiducial-less CyberKnife radiosurgery (CKRS). From June 2011 to November 2013, 58 patients underwent CKRS at Asan Medical Center for stage I lung cancer. After excluding 14 patients, we retrospectively reviewed the records of the remaining 44 patients. All analyses were performed using SPSS ver. 21. The median age at diagnosis was 75 years. Most patients had inoperable primary lung cancer with a poor pulmonary function test with comorbidity or old age. The clinical stage was IA in 30 patients (68.2%), IB in 14 (31.8%). The mean tumor size was 2.6 cm (range, 1.2 to 4.8 cm), and the tumor was smaller than 2 cm in 12 patients (27.3%). The radiation dose given was 48-60 Gy in 3-4 fractions. In a median follow-up of 23.1 months, local recurrence occurred in three patients (2-year local recurrence-free survival rate, 90.4%) and distant metastasis occurred in 13 patients. All patients tolerated the radiosurgery well, only two patients developing grade 3 dyspnea. The most common complications were radiation-induced fibrosis and pneumonitis. Eight patients died due to cancer progression. The results showed that fiducial-less CKRS shows comparable local tumor control and survival rates to those of LINAC-based SABR or CKRS with a fiducial marker. Thus, fiducial-less CKRS using Xsight lung tracking system can be effectively and safely performed for patients with medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer without any risk of procedure-related complication.

  11. Increased red blood cell distribution width associates with cancer stage and prognosis in patients with lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Koma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Red cell distribution width (RDW, one of many routinely examined parameters, shows the heterogeneity in erythrocyte size. We investigated the association of RDW levels with clinical parameters and prognosis of lung cancer patients. METHODS: Clinical and laboratory data from 332 patients with lung cancer in a single institution were retrospectively studied by univariate analysis. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the effect of RDW on survival. RESULTS: THE RDW LEVELS WERE DIVIDED INTO TWO GROUPS: high RDW (>=15%, n=73 vs. low RDW, n=259 (<15%. Univariate analysis showed that there were significant associations of high RDW values with cancer stage, performance status, presence of other disease, white blood cell count, hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, platelet count, albumin level, C-reactive protein level, and cytokeratin 19 fragment level. Kruskal-Wallis tests revealed an association of RDW values with cancer stage in patients irrespective of comorbidity (patient with/without comorbidity: p<0.0001, patient without comorbidity: p<0.0001. Stages I-IV lung cancer patients with higher RDW values had poorer prognoses than those with lower RDW values (Wilcoxon test: p=0.002. In particular, the survival rates of stage I and II patients (n=141 were lower in the high RDW group (n=19 than in the low RDW group (n=122 (Wilcoxon test: p<0.001. Moreover, multivariate analysis showed higher RDW is a significant prognostic factor (p=0.040. CONCLUSION: RDW is associated with several factors that reflect inflammation and malnutrition in lung cancer patients. Moreover, high levels of RDW are associated with poor survival. RDW might be used as a new and convenient marker to determine a patient's general condition and to predict the mortality risk of lung cancer patients.

  12. Once-Weekly, High-Dose Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer: 6-Year Analysis of 60 Early-Stage, 42 Locally Advanced, and 7 Metastatic Lung Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, Omar M.; Sandhu, Taljit S.; Lattin, Paul B.; Chang, Jung H.; Lee, Choon K.; Groshko, Gayle A.; Lattin, Cheryl J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To explore once-weekly stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in nonoperable patients with localized, locally advanced, or metastatic lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 primary (89 untreated plus 13 recurrent) and 7 metastatic tumors were studied. The median follow-up was 38 months, the average patient age was 75 years. Of the 109 tumors studied, 60 were Stage I (45 IA and 15 IB), 9 were Stage II, 30 were Stage III, 3 were Stage IV, and 7 were metastases. SBRT only was given in 73% (40 Gy in four fractions to the planning target volume to a total dose of 53 Gy to the isocenter for a biologically effective dose of 120 Gy 10 ). SBRT was given as a boost in 27% (22.5 Gy in three fractions once weekly for a dose of 32 Gy at the isocenter) after 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the primary plus the mediastinum. The total biologically effective dose was 120 Gy 10 . Respiration gating was used in 46%. Results: The overall response rate was 75%; 33% had a complete response. The overall response rate was 89% for Stage IA patients (40% had a complete response). The local control rate was 82%; it was 100% and 93% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The failure rate was 37%, with 17% within the planning target volume. No Grade 3-4 acute toxicities developed in any patient; 12% and 7% of patients developed Grade 1 and 2 toxicities, respectively. Late toxicity, all Grade 2, developed in 3% of patients. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate for Stage I was 70% and was 74% and 64% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The 3-year Stage III cause-specific survival rate was 30%. The patients with metastatic lung cancer had a 57% response rate, a 27% complete response rate, an 86% local control rate, a median survival time of 19 months, and 23% 3-year survival rate. Conclusions: SBRT is noninvasive, convenient, fast, and economically attractive; it achieves results similar to surgery for early or metastatic lung cancer patients who are older

  13. Has PET/CT a role in the characterization of indeterminate lung lesions on staging CT in colorectal cancer? A prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jess, P.; Seiersen, M.; Ovesen, H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose CT has been found superior to chest x-ray to detect lung malignances. However, indeterminate lung lesions (ILL) are found in 4-42% by using CT in staging colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Our aim was to examine the frequency of ILL on staging CT and the rate of the ILL being malignant...... CT performed 6, 12, 18 and 24 months postoperatively. Results Twenty percent of the patients had ILL. Four of these patients (8.5%) had lung metastases detected median 9 months postoperatively, while 2 (4.3%) had other lung malignancies. One patient had TB. In patients with normal staging chest CT 10...... of the 185 patients (5.4%) developed lung metastases detected median 16 months postoperatively. This was significantly later than in patients with ILL (p lung metastases no significant difference was found between the groups (p = 0...

  14. Quality of life after curative radiotherapy in Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langendijk, Johannes A.; Aaronson, Neil K.; Jong, Jos M.A. de; Velde, Guul P.M. ten; Muller, Martin J.; Slotman, Ben J.; Wouters, Emiel F.M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate changes in quality of life (QOL) among medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with curative radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: The study sample was composed of 46 patients irradiated for Stage I NSCLC. Quality of life was assessed before, during, and after radiotherapy using the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-LC13. Changes in symptom and QOL scores over time were evaluated with a repeated measurement analysis of variance using the mixed effect modeling procedure, SAS Proc Mixed. Twenty-seven patients were treated only at the primary site, whereas for 19 patients, the regional lymph nodes were included in the target volume as well. Results: The median follow-up time of patients alive was 34 months. The median survival was 19.0 months. None of the locally treated patients developed regional recurrence. A significant, gradual increase over time was observed for dyspnea, fatigue, and appetite loss. A significant, gradual deterioration was observed also for role functioning. No significant changes were noted for the other symptoms or the functioning scales. Significantly higher levels of dysphagia, which persisted up to 12 months, were observed in those in which the regional lymph nodes were treated, as compared to the locally treated patients. Radiation-induced pulmonary changes assessed with chest radiograph were more pronounced in the group treated with locoregional radiotherapy. Conclusions: After curative radiotherapy for Stage I medically inoperable NSCLC, a gradual increase in dyspnea, fatigue, and appetite loss, together with a significant deterioration of role functioning, was observed, possibly because of pre-existing, slowly progressive chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and radiation-induced pulmonary changes. Taking into account the low incidence of regional recurrences after local irradiation, the higher incidence

  15. The Role of Postoperative Radiotherapy on Stage N2 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang DU

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The clinical value of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT in stage N2 nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is controversy. The aim of this study is to analyze the efficacy of PORT in subgroup of stage N2 NSCLC, which can help clinicians to choose proper patients for PORT. Methods Clinical data of 359 patients with stage N2 NSCLC treated with radical surgery between Mar. 2000 and Jul. 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Two hundred and seven patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and one hundred and four patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. First, the group of patients were analyzed to evaluate the factors affecting the overall survival. The all patients were divided based on tumor size and the number of lymph node metastasis station (single station or multiple station so as to evaluate the role of PORT. The endpoint was overall survival (OS and local recurrence-free survival (LRFS. Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the OS, LRFS and Log-rank was used to compare the difference in OS and LRFS between different groups. Results The median duration of follow-up was 2.3 years. 224 patients died. The median survival was 1.5 years and 1, 3, 5-year survival were 78%, 38% and 26%. Univariate analysis showed tumor size, the number of lymph node metastasis station and PORT were correlated with OS. Among patients, 5-year survival rates in PORT and non-PORT were 29% and 24% (P=0.047 respectively. In subgroups, PORT was related with high survival in patients with multiple station N2 compared to non-PORT: 36% vs 20% (P=0.013 and 33% vs 15% (P=0.002 in patients in patients with tumor size > 3 cm. Also, it was related with low local recurrence compared to non-PORT: 65% vs 48% (P=0.006 and 62% vs 48% (P=0.033. Conclusion PORT can improve overall survival for N2 NSCLC, especially the patients with the factors as follows: tumor size > 3 cm and multiple station N2 can benefit from PORT more or less.

  16. Multi-Institutional Experience of Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Stage I Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Simone, Charles B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gajjar, Sameer R. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Zhen, Weining [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Harkenrider, Matthew M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, Illinois (United States); Hallemeier, Christopher L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Matthiesen, Chance L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stephenson Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Braunstein, Steve E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, California (United States); Lee, Percy [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Dilling, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Allen, Bryan G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Nichols, Elizabeth M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); and others

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: For inoperable stage I (T1-T2N0) small cell lung cancer (SCLC), national guidelines recommend chemotherapy with or without conventionally fractionated radiation therapy. The present multi-institutional cohort study investigated the role of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) for this population. Methods and Materials: The clinical and treatment characteristics, toxicities, outcomes, and patterns of failure were assessed in patients with histologically confirmed stage T1-T2N0M0 SCLC. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to evaluate the survival outcomes. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified predictors of outcomes. Results: From 24 institutions, 76 lesions were treated in 74 patients (median follow-up 18 months). The median age and tumor size was 72 years and 2.5 cm, respectively. Chemotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation were delivered in 56% and 23% of cases, respectively. The median SABR dose and fractionation was 50 Gy and 5 fractions. The 1- and 3-year local control rate was 97.4% and 96.1%, respectively. The median disease-free survival (DFS) duration was 49.7 months. The DFS rate was 58.3% and 53.2% at 1 and 3 years, respectively. The median, 1-year, and 3-year disease-specific survival was 52.3 months, 84.5%, and 64.4%, respectively. The median, 1-year, and 3-year overall survival (OS) was 17.8 months, 69.9%, and 34.0% respectively. Patients receiving chemotherapy experienced an increased median DFS (61.3 vs 9.0 months; P=.02) and OS (31.4 vs 14.3 months; P=.02). The receipt of chemotherapy independently predicted better outcomes for DFS/OS on multivariate analysis (P=.01). Toxicities were uncommon; 5.2% experienced grade ≥2 pneumonitis. Post-treatment failure was most commonly distant (45.8% of recurrence), followed by nodal (25.0%) and “elsewhere lung” (20.8%). The median time to each was 5 to 7 months. Conclusions: From the findings of the largest report of SABR for stage T1-T2N0 SCLC to date, SABR (≥50

  17. Preliminary results on the role of PET/CT in initial staging, restaging, and management of lung cancer

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    Malamitsi, J. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens, Hygeia, Athens (Greece): Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Athens (Greece)]. E-mail: j.malamitsi@yahoo.gr; Valotassiou, B. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens, Hygeia, Athens (Greece); Iliadis, K. [Thoracic Surgical Department, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens, Hygeia, Athens (Greece); Kosmidis, P. [2nd Medical Oncology Department, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens, Hygeia, Athens (Greece); Laspas, F. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens, Hygeia, Athens (Greece); Vasilaki, M. [Oncologist, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens, Hygeia, Athens (Greece); Pipini, E. [Thoracic Medicine Clinic, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens, Hygeia, Athens (Greece); Petounis, A. [1st Internal Medicine and Oncology Department, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens, Hygeia, Athens (Greece); Gogou, L. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens, Hygeia, Athens (Greece); Pagou, M. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens, Hygeia, Athens (Greece); Dalianis, K. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens, Hygeia, Athens (Greece); Efthimiadou, R. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens, Hygeia, Athens (Greece); Andreou, J. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens, Hygeia, Athens (Greece)

    2006-12-20

    Aim: To determine true-positive and true-negative rates of PET/CT studies in the staging of lung cancer as compared with conventional imaging (CT and bone scan and occasionally MRI) and the impact of PET/CT on the treatment strategy in patients with lung cancer. Materials and method: Twenty patients (21 studies) with known or suspected lung cancer (14 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), three patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), three patients with solitary pulmonary nodule underwent initial staging (seven studies) or restaging (14 studies) with combined FDG PET and CT scans on a PET/CT tomograph. PET/CT images were evaluated separately by two nuclear medicine physicians and two radiologists specialized on PET, CT, and MRI. Histology results and a more than 6 months follow-up served as the reference standards. Results: Accurate diagnosis was achieved on 16 studies. Site-by-site analysis gave the following results: 16 true-positive sites (seven on histology, nine on >6 months follow-up), six true-negative sites (two on histology, four on >6 months follow-up). On PET/CT, six patients were correctly down-staged, three patients were correctly upstaged and seven patients were diagnosed correctly as being on the same stage (2/7 with increase of extent of disease, 5/7 with the same extent of disease). One patient was falsely upstaged and three patients were falsely down-staged. On the basis of PET/CT results, change of management was induced in six patients, while in 14 patients there was no change induced. In five cases PET/CT was partially accurate: on site-by-site analysis, four sites proved true positive (on histology), one site false positive (on histology), and four sites false negative (one on histology, three on >6 months follow-up). Conclusion: In our early experience, PET/CT contributed significantly to correct staging and management of patients with lung cancer.

  18. Preliminary results on the role of PET/CT in initial staging, restaging, and management of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malamitsi, J.; Valotassiou, B.; Iliadis, K.; Kosmidis, P.; Laspas, F.; Vasilaki, M.; Pipini, E.; Petounis, A.; Gogou, L.; Pagou, M.; Dalianis, K.; Efthimiadou, R.; Andreou, J.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To determine true-positive and true-negative rates of PET/CT studies in the staging of lung cancer as compared with conventional imaging (CT and bone scan and occasionally MRI) and the impact of PET/CT on the treatment strategy in patients with lung cancer. Materials and method: Twenty patients (21 studies) with known or suspected lung cancer (14 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), three patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), three patients with solitary pulmonary nodule underwent initial staging (seven studies) or restaging (14 studies) with combined FDG PET and CT scans on a PET/CT tomograph. PET/CT images were evaluated separately by two nuclear medicine physicians and two radiologists specialized on PET, CT, and MRI. Histology results and a more than 6 months follow-up served as the reference standards. Results: Accurate diagnosis was achieved on 16 studies. Site-by-site analysis gave the following results: 16 true-positive sites (seven on histology, nine on >6 months follow-up), six true-negative sites (two on histology, four on >6 months follow-up). On PET/CT, six patients were correctly down-staged, three patients were correctly upstaged and seven patients were diagnosed correctly as being on the same stage (2/7 with increase of extent of disease, 5/7 with the same extent of disease). One patient was falsely upstaged and three patients were falsely down-staged. On the basis of PET/CT results, change of management was induced in six patients, while in 14 patients there was no change induced. In five cases PET/CT was partially accurate: on site-by-site analysis, four sites proved true positive (on histology), one site false positive (on histology), and four sites false negative (one on histology, three on >6 months follow-up). Conclusion: In our early experience, PET/CT contributed significantly to correct staging and management of patients with lung cancer

  19. Usefulness of FDG PET for nodal staging using a dual head coincidence camera in patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Seok Nam; Park, Chan H.; Lee, Myoung Hoon; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Hwang, Kyung Hoon

    2001-01-01

    Staging of lung cancer requires an accurate evaluation of the mediastinum. Positron imaging with dual head cameras may be not as sensitive as dedicated PET. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to evaluated the usefulness of F-18 FDG coincidence (CoDe) PET using a dual-head gamma camera in the nodal staging of the lung cancer. CoDe-PET studies were performed in 51 patients with histologically proven non small cell lung cancer. CoDe-PET began 60 minutes after the injection of 111-185 MBq of F-18 FDG. CoDe-PET was performed using a dual-head gamma camera equipped with coincidence detection circuitry (Elscints Varicam, Haifa, lsrael). There was no attenuation correction made and reconstruction was done using a filtered back-projection. Surgery was performed in 49 patients CoDe-PET studies were evaluated visually. Any focal increased uptake was considered abnormal. The nodal stating of CoDe-PET studies were evaluated visually. Any focal increased uptake was considered abnormal. The nodal staging of CoDe-PET and of CT were compared with the nodal stating of surgical (49) and mediastinoscopical (2) pathology. All primary lung lesions were hypermetabolic and easily visualized. Compared with surgical nodal staging as a gold standard, false positives occurred in 13 CoDe PET and 17 CT studies and false negative occurred in 5 CoDe-PET and 4 CT studies. Assessment of lymph node involvement by CoDe-PET depicted a sensitivity of 67%, specificity of 64% and accuracy of 65%. CT revealed a sensitivity of 73%, specificity of 53% and accuracy of 59% in the assessment of lymph node involvement. The detection of primary lesions were 100% but nodal staging was suboptimal for routine clinical use. This is mainly due to limited resolution of our system

  20. Systemic Chemotherapy for Progression of Brain Metastases in Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagla Abdel Karim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related mortality in men and women. Approximately 15% of lung cancers are small cell type. Chemotherapy and radiation are the mainstay treatments. Currently, the standard chemotherapy regimen includes platinum/etoposide. For extensive small cell lung cancer, irinotecan and cisplatin have also been used. Patients with relapsed small cell lung cancer have a very poor prognosis, and the morbidity increases with brain metastases. Approximately 10%–14% of small cell lung cancer patients exhibit brain metastases at the time of diagnosis, which increases to 50%–80% as the disease progresses. Mean survival with brain metastases is reported to be less than six months, thus calling for improved regimens. Here we present a case series of patients treated with irinotecan for progressive brain metastases in small cell lung cancer, which serves as a reminder of the role of systemic chemotherapy in this setting.

  1. Current treatments for advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Socinski, Mark A

    2009-04-15

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States, and the majority of patients will have non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and will present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. In the United States, the most common histology is adenocarcinoma, followed by squamous cell, large cell, and not otherwise specified. For patients with a preserved performance status (PS), double agent platinum-based therapy extends survival, improves quality of life (Qol), and reduces disease-related symptoms. The addition of a third cytotoxic agent increases toxicity without any clinical benefit. However, the addition of a targeted agent (bevacizumab, an antiangioegenesis agent, or cetuximab, an antibody against the epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR]) to platinum-based therapy has yielded an improvement in survival compared with platinum-based therapy alone. To receive bevacizumab, patients are required to have nonsquamous histology, a PS of 0 or 1, and no evidence of brain metastases, hemoptysis, uncontrolled hypertension, and no need for therapeutic anticoagulation. The benefits of chemotherapy for patients with a poor performance status are less well defined, and the current recommendations are for treatment with single-agent chemotherapy. Elderly patients (defined as age > or = 70 yr) derive a survival and Qol benefit from chemotherapy treatment, and for the majority of elderly patients single-agent chemotherapy is the standard. However, elderly patients with a good performance status and without co-morbidities can tolerate platinum-based therapy without excessive toxicity and appear to derive a survival benefit similar to that in younger patients. Recently, a separate population of patients defined by a light or never-smoking history has been identified. This patient population appears to have unique clinical and molecular characteristics, and may benefit from initial therapy with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Once patients have

  2. Histologic Subtype in Core Lung Biopsies of Early-Stage Lung Adenocarcinoma is a Prognostic Factor for Treatment Response and Failure Patterns After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeman, Jonathan E.; Rimner, Andreas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Montecalvo, Joseph [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Hsu, Meier; Zhang, Zhigang [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Reibnitz, Donata von; Panchoo, Kelly [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yorke, Ellen [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Adusumilli, Prasad S. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Travis, William [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wu, Abraham J., E-mail: wua@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an effective treatment for early-stage lung cancer. The histologic subtype of surgically resected lung adenocarcinoma is recognized as a prognostic factor, with the presence of solid or micropapillary patterns predicting poor outcomes. We describe the outcomes after SBRT for early-stage lung adenocarcinoma stratified by histologic subtype. Methods and Materials: We identified 119 consecutive patients (124 lesions) with stage I to IIA lung adenocarcinoma who had undergone definitive SBRT at our institution from August 2008 to August 2015 and had undergone core biopsy. Histologic subtyping was performed according to the 2015 World Health Organization classification. Of the 124 tumors, 37 (30%) were a high-risk subtype, defined as containing a component of solid and/or micropapillary pattern. The cumulative incidences of local, nodal, regional, and distant failure were compared between the high-risk and non–high-risk adenocarcinoma subtypes using Gray's test, and multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated from propensity score–weighted Cox regression models. Results: The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 17 months and for surviving patients was 21 months. The 1-year cumulative incidence of and adjusted HR for local, nodal, regional, and distant failure in high-risk versus non–high-risk lesions was 7.3% versus 2.7% (HR 16.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.5-81.4), 14.8% versus 2.6% (HR 3.8; 95% CI 0.95-15.0), 4.0% versus 1.2% (HR 20.9; 95% CI 2.3-192.3), and 22.7% versus 3.6% (HR 6.9; 95% CI 2.2-21.1), respectively. No significant difference was seen with regard to overall survival. Conclusions: The outcomes after SBRT for early-stage adenocarcinoma of the lung correlate highly with histologic subtype, with micropapillary and solid tumors portending significantly higher rates of locoregional and metastatic progression. In this context, the histologic subtype

  3. Prognosis and Treatment Decision Making in Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Mokhles (Sahar)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and it is the largest contributor to new cancer diagnoses (12% of total new cancer cases) and to death from cancer (18% of total cancer deaths). There are two major groups of lung cancer that arise from the cells of the

  4. Changes in clinical presentation and staging of lung cancer over two decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiro-Fernández, Virginia; Mouronte-Roibás, Cecilia; Ramos-Hernández, Cristina; Botana-Rial, Maribel; González-Piñeiro, Ana; García-Rodríguez, Esmeralda; Represas-Represas, Cristina; Fernández-Villar, Alberto

    2014-10-01

    Important clinical and epidemiological changes have been observed in lung cancer (LC) in our healthcare area compared to the previous decade. In the last 10 years, specific LC care circuits have been implemented and the active search for cases has been stepped up. The aim of this study was to analyze the progress of these changes over the last 20 years. This is a retrospective study comparing clinical and epidemiological changes between 2 historical cohorts of LC patients (1992-1994 [group 1, 164 patients] and 2004-2006 [group 2, 250 patients]) and a current group from the period 2011-2012 (group 3, 209 patients) Two hundred and nine (209) LC patients were included in group 3 (2011-2012 period). After comparing groups 3 and 2, a non-significant rise in smoking was observed in women (59% vs 41%, p=.25), while the prevalence of adenocarcinoma was unchanged (45% vs 44%, p=.9). The main changes observed were the increase in cases with previous malignancies (23% vs 16%, p=.04), the rise in patients with no associated LC symptoms (33% vs 16%, p<.001), and an increased number of localized NSCLC (non-small cell LC) diagnoses (42% vs 24% in series 2, p<.001 and 14.2% in series 1, p<.001). The number of LC patients diagnosed in localized stages has increased significantly. Furthermore, the number of patients with no symptoms associated with LC and with a history of previous malignancy were significantly increased. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of early chemoradiotherapy in patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, In Bong; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Jeong, Ho Jin; Choi, Hoon Sik; Chai, Gyu Young; Kang, Myoung Hee; Kim, Hoon Gu; Lee, Gyeong Won; Na, Jae Beom; Kang, Ki Mun [Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    We evaluated the effect of early chemoradiotherapy on the treatment of patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC). Between January 2006 and December 2011, thirty-one patients with histologically proven LS-SCLC who were treated with two cycles of chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy and consolidation chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. The chemotherapy regimen was composed of etoposide and cisplatin. Thoracic radiotherapy consisted of 50 to 60 Gy (median, 54 Gy) given in 5 to 6.5 weeks. The follow-up period ranged from 5 to 53 months (median, 22 months). After chemoradiotherapy, 35.5% of the patients (11 patients) showed complete response, 61.3% (19 patients) showed partial response, 3.2% (one patient) showed progressive disease, resulting in an overall response rate of 96.8% (30 patients). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall survival (OS) rates were 66.5%, 41.0%, and 28.1%, respectively, with a median OS of 21.3 months. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year progression free survival (PFS) rates were 49.8%, 22.8%, and 13.7%, respectively, with median PFS of 12 months. The patterns of failure were: locoregional recurrences in 29.0% (nine patients), distant metastasis in 9.7% (three patients), and both locoregional and distant metastasis in 9.7% (three patients). Grade 3 or 4 toxicities of leukopenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia were observed in 32.2%, 29.0%, and 25.8%, respectively. Grade 3 radiation esophagitis and radiation pneumonitis were shown in 12.9% and 6.4%, respectively. We conclude that early chemoradiotherapy for LS-SCLC provides feasible and acceptable local control and safety.

  6. Limited-stage small cell lung cancer: current chemoradiotherapy treatment paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Gore, Elizabeth M

    2010-01-01

    In the U.S., the prevalence of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is declining, probably reflecting the decreasing prevalence of tobacco use. However, a significant number of patients will receive a diagnosis of SCLC, and approximately 40% of patients with SCLC will have limited-stage (LS) disease, which is potentially curable with the combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The standard therapy for LS-SCLC is concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and the 5-year survival rate observed in clinical trials is approximately 25%. The standard chemotherapy remains cisplatin and etoposide, but carboplatin is frequently used in patients who cannot tolerate or have a contraindication to cisplatin. Substantial improvements in survival have been made through improvements in radiation therapy. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is the preferred therapy for patients who are appropriate candidates. The optimal timing of concurrent chemoradiotherapy is during the first or second cycle, based on data from meta-analyses. The optimal radiation schedule and dose remain topics of debate, but 1.5 Gy twice daily to a total of 45 Gy and 1.8-2.0 Gy daily to a total dose of 60-70 Gy are commonly used treatments. For patients who obtain a near complete or complete response, prophylactic cranial radiation reduces the incidence of brain metastases and improves overall survival. The ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Cancer and Leukemia Group B and the European and Canadian phase III trials will investigate different radiation treatment paradigms for patients with LS-SCLC, and completion of these trials is critical.

  7. Induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouillet, T.; MOrere, J.F.; Piperno-Neuman, S.; Boaziz, C.; Breau, J.L.; Mazeron, J.J.; Haddad, E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose was to determine the efficacy and safety of induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer and whether the response to induction chemotherapy can predict the response to subsequent chemoradiotherapy and survival. In conclusion, there is a statistically significant relationship not only between the response to ICT and the response to CCrt, but also between the response to ICT and the local outcome and survival. (authors)

  8. The possibility of heavy ion radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, Takehiko

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death among malignant tumors in Japan and statisticians predict that the death rate by lung cancer will increase twice or 2.5 times within 10 years. Early detection and early resection are the first task to decrease the death rate, and radiotherapy and chemotherapy should be improved. In this paper, the present status of surgical treatment for lung cancer was summarized and the possibility of heavy ion therapy for lung cancer was discussed in comparison with surgical result. Overall 5-year survival rates in stages I, II, III and IV were 78%, 42% 29% and 16% respectively. The survival rate in stage I was correlated with tumor size and that in lung cancer of tumor size 2 cm or less was about 90%. If lung cancer is found at early stage, lung cancer can be cured. Limitation of detection of lung cancer is 2.3 mm in hilar squamous cell carcinoma by autofluorescence bronchoscopy and 5-10 mm in peripheral adenocarcinoma by high resolution CT. Less invasive surgery by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery was applied to stage I lung cancer and the result was satisfactory. However, most lung cancer patients are heavy smokers with underlying lung diseases including chronic obstructive plumonary disease (COPD) and there are many patients not indicative for less invasive surgery. Preliminary results of heavy ion therapy showed remarkable improvement compared with that with conventional radiation therapy. Three-year survival rate of stage I in Protocol 9802 is 80%, almost the same with that in surgical result, indicating the possibility becoming the established therapeutic modality in stage I lung cancers, in patients with marginal biological function for surgical treatment, in particular. (authors)

  9. Impact of the new international association for the study of lung cancer staging system in non-small cell lung cancer: With comparison to the union for international cancer control 6th tumor, node, metastasis edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Jae; Lee, So Won; Shim, Sung Shine; Ryu, Yon Ju; Kim, Yoo Kyung

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the impact of the proposed International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) system on staging and outcome of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). With a total of 501 NSCLC patients with staging according to Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), 6th TNM (TNM-6) were reclassified according to the IASLC proposed TNM staging (TNM-7). The impact of TNM-7 in comparison with TNM-6 was evaluated at three levels: change in substage, staging, and outcome. The outcome measure was to compare the stage-specific overall survival of NSCLC between the two groups of patients. A total of 214 (42.7%) patients had changed TNM staging, and 101 (20.2%) patients had changed stage groupings in TNM-7 compared to TNM-6. Among 100 patients showing changed stage grouping, 72 (14.4%) showed upstage and 29 (5.8%) demonstrated downstage. The TNM-7 system resulted in better separation of survival curves among stage-specific NSCLC than TNM-6 system, especially in separation of stage IIA vs. IIB (p 0.023) and stage IIIB vs. IV (p < 0.001). TNM-7 for lung cancer appears to be superior in defining stage-specific survival groups than TNM-6, especially between stage IIA vs. stage IIB and stage IIIB vs. stage IV.

  10. Preoperative nodal staging of non-small cell lung cancer using 99mTc-sestamibi spect/ct imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Muniz Miziara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The proper nodal staging of non-small cell lung cancer is important for choosing the best treatment modality. Although computed tomography remains the first-line imaging test for the primary staging of lung cancer, its limitations for mediastinum nodal staging are well known. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of hybrid single-photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography using 99mTc-sestamibi in the nodal staging of patients with non-small cell lung cancer and to identify potential candidates for surgical treatment. METHODS: Prospective data were collected for 41 patients from December 2006 to February 2009. The patients underwent chest computed tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography examinations with 99mTc-sestamibi within a 30-day time period before surgery. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography was considered positive when there was focal uptake of sestamibi in the mediastinum, and computed tomography scan when there was lymph nodes larger than 10 mm in short axis. The results of single-photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography were correlated with pathology findings after surgery. RESULTS: Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography correctly identified six out of 19 cases involving hilar lymph nodes and one out of seven cases involving nodal metastases in the mediastinum. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for 99mTc-sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in the hilum assessment were 31.6%, 95.5%, 85.7%, and 61.8%, respectively. The same values for the mediastinum were 14.3%, 97.1%, 50%, and 84.6%, respectively. For the hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes, chest tomography showed sensitivity values of 47.4% and 57.1%, specificity values of 95.5% and 91.2%, positive predictive values of 90% and 57.1% and negative

  11. Preoperative nodal staging of non-small cell lung cancer using 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miziara, Juliana Muniz; Rocha, Euclides Timoteo da; Miziara, Jose Elias Abrao; Garcia, Gustavo Fabene; Simoes, Maria Izilda Previato; Lopes, Marco Antonio; Kerr, Ligia Maria; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The proper nodal staging of non-small cell lung cancer is important for choosing the best treatment modality. Although computed tomography remains the first-line imaging test for the primary staging of lung cancer, its limitations for mediastinum nodal staging are well known. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of hybrid single-photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography using 99m Tc-sestamibi in the nodal staging of patients with non-small cell lung cancer and to identify potential candidates for surgical treatment. Methods: Prospective data were collected for 41 patients from December 2006 to February 2009. The patients underwent chest computed tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography examinations with 99m Tc-sestamibi within a 30-day time period before surgery. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography was considered positive when there was focal uptake of sestamibi in the mediastinum, and computed tomography scan when there was lymph nodes larger than 10 mm in short axis. The results of single-photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography were correlated with pathology findings after surgery. Results: Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography correctly identified six out of 19 cases involving hilar lymph nodes and one out of seven cases involving nodal metastases in the mediastinum. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for 99m Tc-sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in the hilum assessment were 31.6%, 95.5%, 85.7%, and 61.8%, respectively. The same values for the mediastinum were 14.3%, 97.1%, 50%, and 84.6%, respectively. For the hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes, chest tomography showed sensitivity values of 47.4% and 57.1%, specificity values of 95.5% and 91.2%, positive predictive values of 90% and 57.1% and negative predictive values of 67

  12. Stereotactic body radiation therapy versus conventional radiation therapy in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Stefan Starup; Schytte, Tine; Jensen, Henrik R

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is now an accepted and patient friendly treatment, but still controversy exists about its comparability to conventional radiation therapy (RT). The purpose of this single...... and SBRT predicted improved prognosis. However, staging procedure, confirmation procedure of recurrence and technical improvements of radiation treatment is likely to influence outcomes. However, SBRT seems to be as efficient as conventional RT and is a more convenient treatment for the patients....

  13. The role of radiation therapy for stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer. Impact of clinical nodal stage on survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Kazushige; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Furuta, Masaya; Saito, Yoshihiro; Nakayama, Yuko; Katano, Susumu; Ohno, Tatsuya; Niibe, Hideo

    1996-01-01

    From 1976 through 1989, 46 patients with stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) without malignant effusion were treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT) at Gunma University Hospital. All patients were treated with 10 MV x-rays using antero posterior parallel opposed fields. The total dose ranged from 60 Gy to 70 Gy (mean dose; 66 Gy) with once daily standard fractionation. The actuarial two and five-year survival rates of the entire group were 22% and 10% respectively with a median survival time (MST) of 10 months. The survival of 18 patients with stage N0-2 disease was significantly better than the 28 patients with stage N3 disease (MST 21 versus 9 months; p<0.05). There were no significant differences in survival based on age and sex. However, there was a borderline difference in survival rates between patients with a performance status of 0-1 and those with status of 2-3 (p=0.06). Three patients with squamous cell carcinoma were alive after 5 years and were without disease progression. No patients with non-squamous cell carcinoma were free of disease after 5 years. These results provide support for the use of definitive RT to manage those patients with limited stage IIIB squamous cell carcinoma not extending to N3 stage. (author)

  14. Comparison of treatment outcomes between involved-field and elective nodal irradiation in limited-stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Tae-Jin; Kim, Hak-Jae; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Heo, Dae-Seog; Kim, Young-Whan; Lee, Se-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    The present study was performed to assess the usefulness of involved-field irradiation and the impact of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-based staging on treatment outcomes in limited-stage small cell lung cancer. Eighty patients who received definitive chemoradiotherapy for limited-stage small cell lung cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Fifty patients were treated with involved-field irradiation, which means that the radiotherapy portal includes only clinically identifiable tumors. The other 30 patients were irradiated with a comprehensive portal, including uninvolved mediastinal and/or supraclavicular lymph nodes, so-called elective nodal irradiation. No significant difference was seen in clinical factors between the two groups. At a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 5-75 months), no significant differences were observed in 3 year overall survival (44.6 vs. 54.1%, P=0.220) and 3 year progression-free survival (24.4 vs. 42.8%, P=0.133) between the involved-field irradiation group and the elective nodal irradiation group, respectively. For patients who did not undergo positron emission tomography scans, 3 year overall survival (29.3 vs. 56.3%, P=0.022) and 3 year progression-free survival (11.0 vs. 50.0%, P=0.040) were significantly longer in the elective nodal irradiation group. Crude incidences of isolated nodal failure were 6.0% in the involved-field irradiation group and 0% in the elective nodal irradiation group, respectively. All isolated nodal failures were developed in patients who had not undergone positron emission tomography scans in their initial work-ups. If patients did not undergo positron emission tomography-based staging, the omission of elective nodal irradiation resulted in impaired survival outcomes and raised the risk of isolated nodal failure. Therefore, involved-field irradiation for limited-stage small cell lung cancer might be reasonable only with positron emission tomography scan implementation. (author)

  15. Once vs. twice daily thoracic irradiation in limited stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun Sang; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Ju Ock; Kim, Sun Young; Cho, Moon June

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted comparing single dally fraction (SDF) thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) with twice daily (BID) TRT to determine the potential benefit of BID TRT in limited-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Endpoints of the study were response, survival, pattern of failure, and acute toxicity. Between November 1989 to December 1996, 78 patients with histologically proven limited-stage SCLC were treated at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Chungnam National University Hospital. Of these, 9 were irradiated for palliative intent, and 1 had recurrent disease. Remaining 68 patients were enrolled in this study. There were 26 patients with a median age of 58 years, and 22 (85%) ECOG performance score of less than 1 in SDF TRT. There were 42 patients with a median age of 57 years, and 36 (86%) ECOG performance score of less than 1 in BID TRT. By radiation fractionation regimen, there were 26 in SDF TRT and 42 in BID TRT. SDF TRT consisted of 180 cGy, 5 days a week. BID TRT consisted of 150 cGY BID, 5 days a week in 13 of 42 and 120 cGy BID, in 29 of 42. And the twice daily fractions were separated by at least 4 hours. Total radiotherapy doses were between 5040 and 6940 cGy (median, 5040 cGy) in SDF TRT and was between 4320 and 5100 cGy (median, 4560 cGy) in BID TRT. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) was recommended for patients who achieved a CR. The recommended PCI dose was 2500 cGy/10 fractions. Chemotherapy consisted of CAV (cytoxan 1000 mg/m 2 , adriamycin 40 mg/m 2 , vincristine 1 mg/m 2 ) alternating with VPP (cisplatin 60 mg/m 2 , etoposide 100 mg/m 2 ) every 3 weeks in 25 (96%) of SDF TRT and in 40 (95%) of BID TRT. Median cycle of chemotherapy was six in both group. Timing for chemotherapy was sequential in 23 of SDF TRT and in 3 BID TRT, and concurrent in 3 of SDF TRT and in 39 of BID TRT. Follow-up ranged from 2 of 99 months (median, 14 months) in both groups. Of the 26 SDF TRT, 9 (35%) achieved a complete response (CR) and 14 (54

  16. CBCT-Guided Rapid Arc for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in lung tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fandino, J. M.; Silva, M. C.; Izquierdo, P.; Candal, A.; Diaz, I.; Fernandez, C.; Gesto, C.; Poncet, M.; Soto, M.; Triana, G.; Losada, C.; Marino, A.

    2013-07-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy has emerged as a standard treatment option for stage I non-small cell lung cancer in patients unfit for surgery, or who refuse surgery. An increasing number of prospective phase I/II trials, as well as large single and multicenter studies have reported local control rates to be in excess of 85% for early stage non-small cell lung cancer. Volumetric arc therapy RapidArc with tumor-based image guidance technique will be presented as well as our preliminary observations. (Author)

  17. Stereotactic radiotherapy of histologically proven inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer: Patterns of failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andratschke, Nicolaus; Zimmermann, Frank; Boehm, Eva; Schill, Sabine; Schoenknecht, Christine; Thamm, Reinhard; Molls, Michael; Nieder, Carsten; Geinitz, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: To report patterns of failure of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in inoperable patients with histologically confirmed stage I NSCLC. Materials and methods: Ninety-two inoperable patients (median age: 75 years) with clinically staged, histologically proven T1 (n = 31) or T2 (n = 61), N0, M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were included in this study. Treatment consisted of 3–5 fractions with 7–15 Gy per fraction prescribed to the 60% isodose. Results: Freedom from local recurrence at 1, 3 and 5 years was 89%, 83% and 83%, respectively. All 10 local failures were observed in patients with T2 tumors. Isolated regional recurrence was observed in 7.6%. The crude rate of distant progression was 20.7%. Overall survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 79%, 38% and 17% with a median survival of 29 months. Disease specific survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 93%, 64% and 48%. Karnofsky performance status, T stage, gross tumor volume and tumor location had no significant impact on overall and disease specific survival. SBRT was generally well tolerated and all patients completed therapy as planned. Conclusion: SBRT for stage I lung cancer is very well tolerated in this patient cohort with significant cardiopulmonal comorbidity and results in excellent local control rates, although a considerable portion develops regional and distant metastases.

  18. Type I-II laryngeal cleft: clinical course and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonimsky, Guy; Carmel, Eldar; Drendel, Michael; Lipschitz, Noga; Wolf, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Laryngeal cleft (LC) is a rare congenital anomaly manifesting in a variety of symptoms, including swallowing disorders and aspirations, dyspnea, stridor and hoarseness. The mild forms (types I-II) may be underdiagnosed, leading to protracted symptomatology and morbidity. To evaluate the diagnostic process, clinical course, management and outcome in children with type I-II laryngeal clefts. We conducted a retrospective case analysis for the years 2005-2012 in a tertiary referral center. Seven children were reviewed: five boys and two girls ranging in age from birth to 5 years. The most common presenting symptoms were cough, aspirations and pneumonia. Evaluation procedures included fiber-optic laryngoscopy (FOL), direct laryngoscopy (DL) and videofluoroscopy. Other pathologies were seen in three children. Six children underwent successful endoscopic surgery and one child was treated conservatively. The postoperative clinical course was uneventful in most of the cases. Types I-II LC should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children presenting with protracted cough and aspirations. DL is crucial for establishing the diagnosis. Endoscopic surgery is safe and should be applied promptly when conservative measures fail.

  19. Value of 18F-FDG PET in Clinical Staging of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suwen Liu; Jinming Yu; Ligang Xing

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the feasibility of 18F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) in the staging of non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC).METHODS 105 patients with NSCLC had been examined by 18F-FDG PET before radiotherapy. The results of the 18F-FDG PET examination were compared with those of CT:RESULTS The staging was changed in 38 patients because of 18F-FDG PET findings, with PET resulting in upstaging in 31 patients and downstaging in seven patients. Because of distant metastasis detected by PET, 21 patients received palliative treatment. Six of the seven downstaged patients underwent radical surgery, among which the PET findings were concordant with the pathological findings in five patients. Distant metastasis detected by PET elevated the pre-PET stage: at stage 110.0% (2/20), stage Ⅱ 14.3% (3/21 ) and stage Ⅲ 25.0% (16/64), respectively.CONCLUSION 18F-FDG PET, by changing clinical staging in 36.2% (38/105)of NSCLC patients, has an impact on treatment strategy in NSCLC patients.

  20. Combined therapy for 129 patients with second primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jun; Feng Qinfu; Wang Luhua; Zhang Yaohong; Zhao Hongfa; Weng Xinran

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical characteristics and prognosis of the second primary lung cancer. Methods: The interval between the second primary lung cancer and the previous primary cancer ranged from 10 days to 317 months (median 49 months). Of the 129 patients treated from 1971 to 1997 by surgery only, radiotherapy only and chemotherapy only or combined therapy, 11 (8.5%) patients had stage I, 29 (22.5%) stage II, 75 (58.1%) stage III and 14 (10.9%) stage IV; 30 patients received surgery alone, 54 radiotherapy alone, 8 chemotherapy alone, 12 surgery plus radiotherapy, 20 radiotherapy plus chemotherapy, 4 surgery plus chemotherapy and 1 surgery plus radiotherapy plus chemotherapy. Results: The overall 2-, 3- and 5-year survival rates were 40.2%, 27.2% and 15.3%. The stage I, II, III and IV 2-year survival rates were 71.6%, 60.7%, 32.9% and 0%, respectively (P 49 and ≤49 months of the interval between the second primary lung cancer and the previous primary cancer (P>0.05). Conclusions: Second primary lung cancer are similar to the first primary lung cancer in clinical characteristics and prognosis. The main cause of failure is lung cancer perse. Stage and being able to operation are prognostic factors

  1. Increasing the accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT interpretation of "mildly positive" mediastinal nodes in the staging of non-small cell lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, F

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify radiological factors that may reduce false-positive results and increase diagnostic accuracy when staging the mediastinum of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC).

  2. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I lung cancer and small lung metastasis: evaluation of an immobilization system for suppression of respiratory tumor movement and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayakawa Shiho

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for lung tumors, reducing tumor movement is necessary. In this study, we evaluated changes in tumor movement and percutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2 levels, and preliminary clinical results of SBRT using the BodyFIX immobilization system. Methods Between 2004 and 2006, 53 consecutive patients were treated for 55 lesions; 42 were stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, 10 were metastatic lung cancers, and 3 were local recurrences of NSCLC. Tumor movement was measured with fluoroscopy under breath holding, free breathing on a couch, and free breathing in the BodyFIX system. SpO2 levels were measured with a finger pulseoximeter under each condition. The delivered dose was 44, 48 or 52 Gy, depending on tumor diameter, in 4 fractions over 10 or 11 days. Results By using the BodyFIX system, respiratory tumor movements were significantly reduced compared with the free-breathing condition in both craniocaudal and lateral directions, although the amplitude of reduction in the craniocaudal direction was 3 mm or more in only 27% of the patients. The average SpO2 did not decrease by using the system. At 3 years, the local control rate was 80% for all lesions. Overall survival was 76%, cause-specific survival was 92%, and local progression-free survival was 76% at 3 years in primary NSCLC patients. Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis developed in 7 patients. Conclusion Respiratory tumor movement was modestly suppressed by the BodyFIX system, while the SpO2 level did not decrease. It was considered a simple and effective method for SBRT of lung tumors. Preliminary results were encouraging.

  3. Clinical results of stereotactic body radiotherapy for Stage I small-cell lung cancer. A single institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Asai, Kaori; Terashima, Koutarou; Matsumoto, Keiji; Hirata, Hideki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the treatment outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for Stage I small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). From April 2003 to September 2009, a total of eight patients with Stage I SCLC were treated with SBRT in our institution. In all patients, the lung tumors were proven as SCLC pathologically. The patients' ages were 58-84 years (median: 74). The T-stage of the primary tumor was T1a in two, T1b in two and T2a in four patients. Six of the patients were inoperable because of poor cardiac and/or pulmonary function, and two patients refused surgery. SBRT was given using 7-8 non-coplanar beams with 48 Gy in four fractions. Six of the eight patients received 3-4 cycles of chemotherapy using carboplatin (CBDCA) + etoposide (VP-16) or cisplatin (CDDP) + irinotecan (CPT-11). The follow-up period for all patients was 6-60 months (median: 32). Six patients were still alive without any recurrence. One patient died from this disease and one died from another disease. The overall and disease-specific survival rate at three years was 72% and 86%, respectively. There were no patients with local progression of the lesion targeted by SBRT. Only one patient had nodal recurrence in the mediastinum at 12 months after treatment. The progression-free survival rate was 71%. No Grade 2 or higher SBRT-related toxicities were observed. SBRT plus chemotherapy could be an alternative to surgery with chemotherapy for inoperable patients with Stage I small-cell lung cancer. However, further investigation is needed using a large series of patients. (author)

  4. 18F-FDG imaging with a coincidence dual-headed gamma camera (Co-PET) in the diagnosis, staging and management of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, P.; Chu, J.; Pocock, N.; Quach, T.; Sorensen, B.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: FDG-PET has an established role in the management of lung cancer, while the experience with FDG-Co-PET is limited. Our study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of Co-PET in staging and management of lung cancer. Thirty-nine Co-PET studies were performed on our first 36 patients (pts) with primary lung cancer between November 1997 and October 1998. Tomography of brain and torso with an ADAC Solus MCD gamma camera was performed (60 min after 200 MBq of 18 FFDG and > 6 h fasting). Histology subgroups included squamous (14 pts), small cell (1), adeno-carcinoma (11), broncho-alveolar (1), large cell (8), carcinoid (1). CT/clinical staging subgroups included 18 pts in stage 1, 4 in stage 2, 7 in stage 3a, 2 in stage 3b, 8 in stage 4. Compared with CT/clinical staging, FDG upstaged 5 pts (14%) with regional nodal metastases (mets) and 8 pts (22%) with distant mets (cervical = 2, lung = 1, brain = 3, bone = 3, abdomen = 4). FDG under-staged 2 pts in 3 sites (all < 15 mm). Surgical nodal staging was performed in 14 pts: false-positives occurred in 3 CT and 1 Co-PET studies, and false-negatives in one CT/Co-PET. Site sensitivities for primary (smallest 7 mm) and regional lymph nodes are 100% and 88% respectively. Specificities for primary and regional nodes are 100% and 96% respectively. Co-PET also has impact on management: treatment intent (6 pts), radiotherapy fields (1), diagnosis of lung mets (2) and radiation pneumonitis (1). In conclusion, our initial data demonstrate FDG-Co-PET scanning could provide a valuable addition to conventional imaging studies in diagnosis, staging and management of lung cancer

  5. Evolution and clinical impact of co-occurring genetic alterations in advanced-stage EGFR-mutant lung cancers. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A widespread approach to modern cancer therapy is to identify a single oncogenic driver gene and target its mutant-protein product (for example, EGFR-inhibitor treatment in EGFR-mutant lung cancers). However, genetically driven resistance to targeted therapy limits patient survival. Through genomic analysis of 1,122 EGFR-mutant lung cancer cell-free DNA samples and whole-exome analysis of seven longitudinally collected tumor samples from a patient with EGFR-mutant lung cancer, we identified critical co-occurring oncogenic events present in most advanced-stage EGFR-mutant lung cancers.

  6. Primary lung cancer coexisting with active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varol, Y; Varol, U; Unlu, M; Kayaalp, I; Ayranci, A; Dereli, M S; Guclu, S Z

    2014-09-01

    Lung cancer and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) comorbidity is a clinical problem that presents a challenge for the diagnosis and treatment of both diseases. To clarify the clinical and survival characteristics of cases with both lung cancer and active pulmonary TB. From 2008 to 2013, 3350 TB patients admitted to the TB Department of the Chest Diseases Hospital of Izmir, Turkey, were evaluated. In 38 (1.1%) male patients, lung cancer and TB were found to coexist. Almost all of the patients were diagnosed at Stage III (n = 14, 36.8%) or IV (n = 17, 44.7%) lung cancer, whereas four (10.6%) had Stage II and three (7.9%) had Stage I disease. Squamous cell lung cancer was the predominant histology (n = 23, 60.7%). The median overall survival among patients was 13.4 months (95%CI 8.09-18.8). One-year survival rates for patients with Stages I, II, III and IV were respectively 100%, 75%, 57% and 40%. The present study demonstrates that lung cancer combined with active pulmonary TB most frequently presents as squamous cell carcinoma, with a male predominance. The overall survival of lung cancer patients did not change even with concomitant active TB.

  7. Adjuvant radiotherapy and its role in the treatment of stage II lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, T.J.; Greenberger, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Lung carcinoma remains an enormous clinical challenge for all health care personnel involved in the care of these patients. Those patients with unresected primary lung carcinoma are ultimately referred for radiation therapy in order to control local regional disease. It is important to recognize the great gains in longevity have not materialized with the addition of adjuvant therapy. However, a very real benefit in the quality of life for most patients with carcinoma of the lung can be achieved with the judicious and thoughtful application of sophisticated radiation therapy, for a small but significant portion of the population, a cure will result from this treatment. This chapter reviews the role of radiation therapy as an adjuvant to definitive surgical treatment

  8. Dosimetric selection for helical tomotherapy based stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer or lung metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Chi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: No selection criteria for helical tomotherapy (HT based stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR to treat early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC or solitary lung metastases has been established. In this study, we investigate the dosimetric selection criteria for HT based SABR delivering 70 Gy in 10 fractions to avoid severe toxicity in the treatment of centrally located lesions when adequate target dose coverage is desired. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 78 HT-SABR plans for solitary lung lesions were created to prescribe 70 Gy in 10 fractions to the planning target volume (PTV. The PTV was set to have ≥95% PTV receiving 70 Gy in each case. The cases for which dose constraints for ≥1 OAR could not be met without compromising the target dose coverage were compared with cases for which all target and OAR dose constraints were met. RESULTS: There were 23 central lesions for which OAR dose constraints could not be met without compromising PTV dose coverage. Comparing to cases for which optimal HT-based SABR plans were generated, they were associated with larger tumor size (5.72±1.96 cm vs. 3.74±1.49 cm, p<0.0001, higher lung dose, increased number of immediately adjacent OARs ( 3.45±1.34 vs. 1.66±0.81, p<0.0001, and shorter distance to the closest OARs (GTV: 0.26±0.22 cm vs. 0.88±0.54 cm, p<0.0001; PTV 0.19±0.18 cm vs. 0.48±0.36 cm, p = 0.0001. CONCLUSION: Delivery of 70 Gy in 10 fractions with HT to meet all the given OAR and PTV dose constraints are most likely when the following parameters are met: lung lesions ≤3.78 cm (11.98 cc, ≤2 immediately adjacent OARs which are ≥0.45 cm from the gross lesion and ≥0.21 cm from the PTV.

  9. WE-AB-207B-05: Correlation of Normal Lung Density Changes with Dose After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q; Devpura, S; Feghali, K; Liu, C; Ajlouni, M; Movsas, B; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate correlation of normal lung CT density changes with dose accuracy and outcome after SBRT for patients with early stage lung cancer. Methods: Dose distributions for patients originally planned and treated using a 1-D pencil beam-based (PB-1D) dose algorithm were retrospectively recomputed using algorithms: 3-D pencil beam (PB-3D), and model-based Methods: AAA, Acuros XB (AXB), and Monte Carlo (MC). Prescription dose was 12 Gy × 4 fractions. Planning CT images were rigidly registered to the followup CT datasets at 6–9 months after treatment. Corresponding dose distributions were mapped from the planning to followup CT images. Following the method of Palma et al .(1–2), Hounsfield Unit (HU) changes in lung density in individual, 5 Gy, dose bins from 5–45 Gy were assessed in the peri-tumor region, defined as a uniform, 3 cm expansion around the ITV(1). Results: There is a 10–15% displacement of the high dose region (40–45 Gy) with the model-based algorithms, relative to the PB method, due to the electron scattering of dose away from the tumor into normal lung tissue (Fig.1). Consequently, the high-dose lung region falls within the 40–45 Gy dose range, causing an increase in HU change in this region, as predicted by model-based algorithms (Fig.2). The patient with the highest HU change (∼110) had mild radiation pneumonitis, and the patient with HU change of ∼80–90 had shortness of breath. No evidence of pneumonitis was observed for the 3 patients with smaller CT density changes (<50 HU). Changes in CT densities, and dose-response correlation, as computed with model-based algorithms, are in excellent agreement with the findings of Palma et al. (1–2). Conclusion: Dose computed with PB (1D or 3D) algorithms was poorly correlated with clinically relevant CT density changes, as opposed to model-based algorithms. A larger cohort of patients is needed to confirm these results. This work was supported in part by a grant from Varian

  10. Clinical significance of combined detection of CYFRA21-1, NSE and CEA in classification and staging of patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu He; Li Yanhua; Liang Weida; Zhang Qin

    2011-01-01

    To explore clinical value of combined detection of CYFRA21-1, NSE and CEA in classification and staging of patients with lung cancer, the CYFRA21-1, NSE and CEA levels in pleural effusion in 330 patients with lung cancer and in 43 patients with benign were detected by the electrochemiluminescence. The results showed that CYFRA21-1, NSE and CEA levels in pleural effusion in patients with lung cancer group were significantly higher than that of in benign group (P<0.01). The positive rate of tumor markers in different pathological type lung cancer were different,which CYFRA21-1 positive rate in squamous cell cancer group was highest with 65.5%; CEA positive rate in glands cancer group was supreme with 65.0%; the NSE positive rate in differentiation cancer group was highest with 79.5%. The positive rate in three markers combined detection was higher than that in one item detection. The tumor marker levels in lung cancer were positively related with clinical staging. The higher of tumor marker levels and the more late of clinical staging, and the clinical III∼IV period was obviously higher than that I∼II period (P<0.05). The combined detection of CYFRA21-1, NSE and CEA may enhance the positive rate in lung cancer detection, and may have significant clinical value in the classification and staging of patients with lung cancer. (authors)

  11. Effect of Radiotherapy Planning Complexity on Survival of Elderly Patients With Unresected Localized Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang H.; Bonomi, Marcelo; Cesaretti, Jamie; Neugut, Alfred I.; Wisnivesky, Juan P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether complex radiotherapy (RT) planning was associated with improved outcomes in a cohort of elderly patients with unresected Stage I-II non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry linked to Medicare claims, we identified 1998 patients aged >65 years with histologically confirmed, unresected stage I-II NSCLC. Patients were classified into an intermediate or complex RT planning group using Medicare physician codes. To address potential selection bias, we used propensity score modeling. Survival of patients who received intermediate and complex simulation was compared using Cox regression models adjusting for propensity scores and in a stratified and matched analysis according to propensity scores. Results: Overall, 25% of patients received complex RT planning. Complex RT planning was associated with better overall (hazard ratio 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.95) and lung cancer-specific (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.93) survival after controlling for propensity scores. Similarly, stratified and matched analyses showed better overall and lung cancer-specific survival of patients treated with complex RT planning. Conclusions: The use of complex RT planning is associated with improved survival among elderly patients with unresected Stage I-II NSCLC. These findings should be validated in prospective randomized controlled trials.

  12. Effect of informing the diagnosis on depressive state in patients with non-small cell lung cancer of stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei WANG

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective As other tumors, unresectabe lung cancer can cause many psychological problems to the patients, such as depression and anxiety. The present paper aims to evaluate the status of depression before and after knowing the state of illness in patients with non-small cell lung cancer of stage Ⅲ. Methods 43 casesof newly diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC with stage Ⅲ were enrolled in the study. All the patients were distributed into three groups and given different intervention, that was completely unknowing the state of illness (group A, partly knowing the state of illness (group B and completely knowing the state of illness (group C. Before and after knowing the state of illness, the depression status was assessed with the Hamilton depression rating scale for depression(HAMD. Results The mean total score of HAMD was unchanged both in group A and C, while significantly reduced in group B. The scores of anxiety somatization, cognitive disorder, retardation and feeling of despair were all significant lower in the group B after the patients partly knowing the state of illness, while the scores of sleep disorder was obviously higher in group C after the patients completely knowing the state of illness. The hypochondriasis was much severer in the group A, and in the group C, the score of suicidal idea became significantly higher after the patient knowing the diagnosis.Conclusion Depression is very common in the NSCLC patients with stage Ⅲ. Partly knowing the state of illness can obviously ameliorate the symptoms of depression, while completely knowing or completely unknowing the state of illness have no effect on relieving the patients' depression.

  13. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer. The Japanese experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Masahiro; Nagata, Yasushi

    2004-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a new treatment modality for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer, and is being intensively investigated in the United States, the European Union, and Japan. We started a feasibility study of this therapy in July 1998, using a stereotactic body frame. The eligibility criteria for primary lung cancer were: solitary tumor less than 4 cm; inoperable, or the patient refused operation; histologically confirmed malignancy; no necessity for oxygen support; performance status equal to or less than 2, and the tumor was not close to the spinal cord. A total dose of 48 Gy was delivered in four fractions in 2 weeks in most patients. Lung toxicity was minimal. No grade II toxicities for spinal cord, bronchus, pulmonary artery, or esophagus were observed. Overall survival for 29 patients with stage IA, and 14 patients with stage IB disease was 87% and 80%, respectively. No local recurrence was observed in a follow-up of 3-50 months. Regional lymph node recurrence developed in 1 patient, and distant metastases developed in 4 patients. We retrospectively analyzed 241 patients from 13 Japanese institutions. The local recurrence rate was 20% when the biological equivalent dose (BED) was less than 100 Gy, and 6.5% when the BED was over 100 Gy. Overall survival at 3 years was 42% when the BED was less than 100 Gy, and 46% when it was over 100 Gy. In tumors which received a BED of more than 100 Gy, overall survival at 3 years was 91% for operable patients, and 50% for inoperable patients. Long-term results, in terms of local control, regional recurrence, survival, and complications, are not yet evaluated. However, this treatment modality is highly expected to be a standard treatment for inoperable patients, and it may be an alternative to lobectomy for operative patients. A prospective trial, which is now ongoing, will, answer these questions. (author)

  14. Sarcopenia is a novel poor prognostic factor in male patients with pathological Stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukioka, Takuma; Nishiyama, Noritoshi; Izumi, Nobuhiro; Mizuguchi, Shinjiro; Komatsu, Hiroaki; Okada, Satoshi; Toda, Michihito; Hara, Kantaro; Ito, Ryuichi; Shibata, Toshihiko

    2017-04-01

    Sarcopenia is the progressive loss of muscle mass and strength, and has a risk of adverse outcomes such as disability, poor quality of life and death. As prognosis depends not only on disease aggressiveness, but also on a patient's physical condition, sarcopenia can predict survival in patients with various cancer types. However, its effects on postoperative prognosis in patients with localized non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) have never been reported. We retrospectively investigated 215 male patients with pathological Stage I NSCLC. L3 muscle index is defined as the cross-section area of muscle at the third lumbar vertebra level, normalized for height, and is a clinical measurement of sarcopenia. We then investigated the effect of preoperative sarcopenia on their postoperative prognosis. Our 215 subjects included 30 patients with sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was significantly associated with body mass index, nutritional condition, serum CYFRA 21-1 level and pathological stage, but not with preoperative respiratory function or performance status. Frequency of postoperative complications, length of postoperative hospital stay, thoracic drainage period or causes of death were not correlated with the presence of sarcopenia. The sarcopenia group had a significantly shorter median overall survival (32 months) than the no-sarcopenia group. Sarcopenia might not affect short-term outcomes in patients with early-stage lung cancer. Sarcopenia was a predictor of poor prognosis in male patients with Stage I NSCLC. As sarcopenic patients with NSCLC patients are at risk for significantly worse outcomes, their treatments require careful planning, even for those with Stage I disease. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Early mortality after radical radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer: comparison of PET-staged and conventionally staged cohorts treated at a large tertiary referral center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Manus, Michael P.; Wong, Kevin; Hicks, Rodney J.; Matthews, Jane P.; Wirth, Andrew; Ball, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: At our center, approximately 30% of radical radiotherapy (RRT) candidates become ineligible for RRT for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after positron emission tomography (PET). We hypothesized that early cancer death rates would be lower in patients receiving RRT after PET staging compared with conventionally staged patients. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts were compared. Cohort 1 consisted of all participants in an Australian randomized trial from our center given 60 Gy conventionally fractionated RRT with or without concurrent carboplatin from 1989 to 1995. Eligible patients had Stage I-III, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status 0 or 1, <10% weight loss, and had not undergone PET. Cohort 2 included all RRT candidates between November 1996 and April 1999 who received RRT after PET staging and fulfilled the above criteria for stage, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status, and weight loss. Results: Eighty and 77 eligible patients comprised the PET and non-PET groups, respectively. The PET-selected patients had significantly less weight loss; 73% and 49% of the PET and non-PET patients, respectively, received chemotherapy. The median survival was 31 months for PET patients and 16 months for non-PET patients. Mortality from NSCLC and other causes in the first year was 17% and 8% for PET patients and 32% and 4% for non-PET patients, respectively. The hazard ratio for NSCLC mortality for PET vs. non-PET patients was 0.49 (p=0.0016) on unifactorial analysis and was 0.55 (p = 0.0075) after adjusting for chemotherapy, which significantly improved survival. Conclusion: Patients selected for RRT after PET have lower early cancer mortality than those selected using conventional imaging

  16. Risk-stratifying capacity of PET/CT metabolic tumor volume in stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkle, Joshua H.; Jo, Stephanie Y.; Yuan, Cindy; Pu, Yonglin [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ferguson, Mark K. [University of Chicago, Department of Surgery, Chicago, IL (United States); Liu, Hai-Yan [First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China); Zhang, Chenpeng [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, RenJi Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Xuee [Nanjing Medical University, Department of Radiology, BenQ Medical Center, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2017-08-15

    Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is heterogeneous in tumor burden, and its treatment is variable. Whole-body metabolic tumor volume (MTV{sub WB}) has been shown to be an independent prognostic index for overall survival (OS). However, the potential of MTV{sub WB} to risk-stratify stage IIIA NSCLC has previously been unknown. If we can identify subgroups within the stage exhibiting significant OS differences using MTV{sub WB}, MTV{sub WB} may lead to adjustments in patients' risk profile evaluations and may, therefore, influence clinical decision making regarding treatment. We estimated the risk-stratifying capacity of MTV{sub WB} in stage IIIA by comparing OS of stratified stage IIIA with stage IIB and IIIB NSCLC. We performed a retrospective review of 330 patients with clinical stage IIB, IIIA, and IIIB NSCLC diagnosed between 2004 and 2014. The patients' clinical TNM stage, initial MTV{sub WB}, and long-term survival data were collected. Patients with TNM stage IIIA disease were stratified by MTV{sub WB}. The optimal MTV{sub WB} cutoff value for stage IIIA patients was calculated using sequential log-rank tests. Univariate and multivariate cox regression analyses and Kaplan-Meier OS analysis with log-rank tests were performed. The optimal MTV{sub WB} cut-point was 29.2 mL for the risk-stratification of stage IIIA. We identified statistically significant differences in OS between stage IIB and IIIA patients (p < 0.01), between IIIA and IIIB patients (p < 0.01), and between the stage IIIA patients with low MTV{sub WB} (below 29.2 mL) and the stage IIIA patients with high MTV{sub WB} (above 29.2 mL) (p < 0.01). There was no OS difference between the low MTV{sub WB} stage IIIA and the cohort of stage IIB patients (p = 0.485), or between the high MTV{sub WB} stage IIIA patients and the cohort of stage IIIB patients (p = 0.459). Similar risk-stratification capacity of MTV{sub WB} was observed in a large range of cutoff values from 15 to 55 mL in

  17. Apoptosis and mitosis as prognostic factors in pathologically staged N1 nonsmall cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komaki, Ritsuko; Fujii, Takashi; Perkins, Penny; Ro, Jae Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Mason, Kathryn A.; Mountain, Clifton F.; Milas, Luka

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to establish whether spontaneous apoptosis or mitosis has prognostic value among patients with pathologically staged N1 nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) treated with surgical resection with or without adjuvant therapy. Methods and Materials: Material from 173 patients who had resections between 1970 and 1988 was analyzed for apoptosis and mitosis. There were 128 men and 45 women, with a median age of 61 years. There were 86 squamous cell carcinomas (SQ), 73 adenocarcinomas (AC), 3 large-cell carcinomas (LC), 6 SQ-AC, and 5 unclassified. Patients were observed from 2 to 209 months (median 27). Actuarial methods were used to assess survival and freedom from distant metastasis. Results: In NSCLC, apoptosis was found to range from 0.2% to 2.8% (median 1.0%) and mitosis from 0 to 1.8% (median 0.4%). Tumors having higher levels of apoptosis also had higher levels of mitosis (p = 0.001). The values of neither apoptosis nor mitosis depended on size, location, differentiation of tumors, age, performance status, or weight loss of patients. However, the values of apoptosis depended on tumor histology in that high values (greater than or equal to the median) were more frequent in SQ (49%) than in AC/LC (29%) (p 0.01). The overall survival for NSCLC patients, which was 33% at 5 years, did not depend on the level of either apoptosis or mitosis. The 5-year survival of patients having SQ was higher (43%) than that of patients having AC/LC (21%) (p = 0.03). Patients with high apoptosis showed significantly better 5-year overall (p = 0.008) and DMF (p = 0.0012) survivals in the SQ group compared to the AC/LC group. High mitosis compared to low mitosis was a significantly better predictor for 5-year survival (62% vs. 29%, respectively) (p = 0.035) in the SQ. However, high mitosis was a significantly worse 5-year DMF survival predictor compared to low mitosis: 13% vs. 56%, respectively (p = 0.05) in AC/LC. In the multivariate models for AC/LC, mitosis

  18. Long term observations in combined modality therapy for limited stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colletier, Philip J.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Schea, Randi A.; Allen, Pamela; Cox, James D.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: With the discovery that patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) exhibit a high level of sensitivity to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the treatment of SCLC became a model for the success of combined modality treatment. In this retrospective review, we analyze the outcomes and patterns of failure when patients are treated with chemotherapy and thoracic irradiation. The relative values of sequential and concurrent chemotherapy, in conjunction with chest irradiation, are assessed. The potential benefit of prophylactic cranial irradiation is explored. The impact of prognostic factors for long term survival of SCLC patients are examined to identify pretreatment patient characteristics and treatment parameters which might predict for a favorable outcome. Materials and Methods: We identified 190 patients treated at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center from January 1985 to December 1992 with curative intent for limited stage SCLC. Prognostic factors were determined using univariate and multivariate analysis. The significant covariates for each outcome endpoint were evaluated. Probabilities of local failure, overall survival, relapse-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival were calculated from the time of treatment using actuarial life table analysis. Results: The median age was 61, with 51% males. There were 119 patients treated sequentially, and 71 concurrently. The Karnofsky Performance Status was >= 90 in 48% of patients in the concurrent cohort, vs. 35% of the sequential group. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) was delivered in 117 cases (62%). There were 51 long term survivors, defined as survival >=36 months. The median follow-up in surviving patients was 75 months. At the time of the analysis, 166 patients (87%) had expired. The crude 2 and 3 year survival rate for the entire group was 38.4% and 26.8%, respectively. The actuarial 2-year survival was 39.9%, and at 3 years the actuarial survival was 27.8%. The median actuarial

  19. Outcomes of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients With Potentially Operable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerwaard, Frank J., E-mail: fj.lagerwaard@vumc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verstegen, Naomi E.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Slotman, Ben J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Paul, Marinus A. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Smit, Egbert F. [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-05-01

    Background: Approximately two-thirds of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in The Netherlands currently undergo surgical resection. As an increasing number of fit patients have elected to undergo stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in recent years, we studied outcomes after SABR in patients with potentially operable stage I NSCLC. Methods and Materials: In an institutional prospective database collected since 2003, 25% of lung SABR cases (n = 177 patients) were found to be potentially operable when the following patients were excluded: those with (1) synchronous lung tumors or other malignancy, (2) prior high-dose radiotherapy/pneumonectomy, (3) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a severity score of 3-4 according to the Global initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease classification. (4) a performance score of {>=}3, and (5) other comorbidity precluding surgery. Study patients included 101 males and 76 females, with a median age of 76 years old, 60% of whom were staged as T1 and 40% of whom were T2. Median Charlson comorbidity score was 2 (range, 0-5). A SABR dose of 60 Gy was delivered using a risk-adapted scheme in 3, 5, or 8 fractions, depending on tumor size and location. Follow-up chest computed tomography scans were obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Results: Median follow-up was 31.5 months; and median overall survival (OS) was 61.5 months, with 1- and 3-year survival rates of 94.7% and 84.7%, respectively. OS rates at 3 years in patients with (n = 59) and without (n = 118) histological diagnosis did not differ significantly (96% versus 81%, respectively, p = 0.39). Post-SABR 30-day mortality was 0%, while predicted 30-day mortality for a lobectomy, derived using the Thoracoscore predictive model (Falcoz PE et al. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2007;133:325-332), would have been 2.6%. Local control rates at 1 and 3 years were 98% and 93%, respectively. Regional and distant failure rates at 3 years were each

  20. Phylogenetic ctDNA analysis depicts early stage lung cancer evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbosh, Christopher; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Wilson, Gareth A.

    2017-01-01

    The early detection of relapse following primary surgery for non-small cell lung cancer and the characterization of emerging subclones seeding metastatic sites might offer new therapeutic approaches to limit tumor recurrence. The potential to non-invasively track tumor evolutionary dynamics in ct...

  1. Positron emission tomography in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, B M; Mortensen, J; Højgaard, L

    2001-01-01

    positron emission tomography (PET) and gamma-camera PET in the diagnostic investigation of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A systematic literature search was carried out in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. We identified 55 original works on the diagnostic...

  2. First-Line Nivolumab in Stage IV or Recurrent Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbone, D.P.; Reck, M.; Paz-Ares, L.; Creelan, B.; Horn, L.; Steins, M.; Felip, E.; Heuvel, M. van den; Ciuleanu, T.E.; Badin, F.; Ready, N.; Hiltermann, T.J.N.; Nair, S.; Juergens, R.; Peters, S.; Minenza, E.; Wrangle, J.M.; Rodriguez-Abreu, D.; Borghaei, H.; umenschein GR, J.r. Bl; Villaruz, L.C.; Havel, L.; Krejci, J.; rral Jaime, J. Co; Chang, H.; Geese, W.J.; Bhagavatheeswaran, P.; Chen, A.C.; Socinski, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nivolumab has been associated with longer overall survival than docetaxel among patients with previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In an open-label phase 3 trial, we compared first-line nivolumab with chemotherapy in patients with programmed death ligand 1

  3. First-Line Nivolumab in Stage IV or Recurrent Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbone, D. P.; Reck, M.; Paz-Ares, L.; Creelan, B.; Horn, L.; Steins, M.; Felip, E.; van den Heuvel, M. M.; Ciuleanu, T. -E.; Badin, F.; Ready, N.; Hiltermann, T. J. N.; Nair, S; Juergens, R.; Peters, S.; Minenza, E.; Wrangle, J. M.; Rodriguez-Abreu, D.; Borghaei, H.; Blumenschein, G. R.; Villaruz, L. C.; Havel, L.; Krejci, J.; Corral Jaime, J.; Chang, C. -H.; Geese, W. J.; Bhagavatheeswaran, P.; Chen, Alexander C.; Socinski, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Nivolumab has been associated with longer overall survival than docetaxel among patients with previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In an open-label phase 3 trial, we compared first-line nivolumab with chemotherapy in patients with programmed death ligand 1

  4. Metabolic tumor volume measured by F 18 FDG PET/CT can further stratify the prognosis of patients with stage IV Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Su Woong; Kim, Ja Hae; Chong, Ar I; Kwon, Seong Young; Min, Jung Joon; Song, Ho Chun; Bom, Hee Seung [Chonnam National Univ. Hwasun Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    This study aimed to further stratify prognostic factors in patients with stage IV non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by measuring their metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using F 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). The subjects of this retrospective study were 57 patients with stage IV NSCLC. MTV, total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) were measured on F 18 FDG PET/CT in both the primary lung lesion as well as metastatic lesions in torso. Optimal cutoff values of PET parameters were mea measured by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve anal analysis. Kaplan Meier survival (PET). The univariate and multivariate cox proportional hazards models were used to select the significant prognostic factors. Univariate analysis showed that both MTV and TLG of primary lung lesion (MTV lung and TLG lung) were significant factors for prediction of PFS ( <0.001 =0.038, respectively). Patients showing lower values of MTV lung and TLG lung than the cutoff values had significantly longer mean PFS than those with higher values. hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of MTV lung and TLG lung measured by univariate analysis were 6.4 (2.5 16.3) and 2.4 (1.0 5.5), respectively. multivariate analysis revealed that MTV lung was the only significant factor for prediction of prognosis. Hazard ratio was 13,5 (1.6 111.1, =0,016). patients with stage IV NSCLC could be further stratified into subgroups of significantly better and worse prognosis by MTV of primary lung lesion.

  5. Metabolic tumor volume measured by F 18 FDG PET/CT can further stratify the prognosis of patients with stage IV Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Su Woong; Kim, Ja Hae; Chong, Ar I; Kwon, Seong Young; Min, Jung Joon; Song, Ho Chun; Bom, Hee Seung

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to further stratify prognostic factors in patients with stage IV non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by measuring their metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using F 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). The subjects of this retrospective study were 57 patients with stage IV NSCLC. MTV, total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) were measured on F 18 FDG PET/CT in both the primary lung lesion as well as metastatic lesions in torso. Optimal cutoff values of PET parameters were mea measured by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve anal analysis. Kaplan Meier survival (PET). The univariate and multivariate cox proportional hazards models were used to select the significant prognostic factors. Univariate analysis showed that both MTV and TLG of primary lung lesion (MTV lung and TLG lung) were significant factors for prediction of PFS ( <0.001 =0.038, respectively). Patients showing lower values of MTV lung and TLG lung than the cutoff values had significantly longer mean PFS than those with higher values. hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of MTV lung and TLG lung measured by univariate analysis were 6.4 (2.5 16.3) and 2.4 (1.0 5.5), respectively. multivariate analysis revealed that MTV lung was the only significant factor for prediction of prognosis. Hazard ratio was 13,5 (1.6 111.1, =0,016). patients with stage IV NSCLC could be further stratified into subgroups of significantly better and worse prognosis by MTV of primary lung lesion

  6. Preoperative (3-dimensional) computed tomography lung reconstruction before anatomic segmentectomy or lobectomy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ernest G; Landreneau, James R; Schuchert, Matthew J; Odell, David D; Gu, Suicheng; Pu, Jiantao; Luketich, James D; Landreneau, Rodney J

    2015-09-01

    Accurate cancer localization and negative resection margins are necessary for successful segmentectomy. In this study, we evaluate a newly developed software package that permits automated segmentation of the pulmonary parenchyma, allowing 3-dimensional assessment of tumor size, location, and estimates of surgical margins. A pilot study using a newly developed 3-dimensional computed tomography analytic software package was performed to retrospectively evaluate preoperative computed tomography images of patients who underwent segmentectomy (n = 36) or lobectomy (n = 15) for stage 1 non-small cell lung cancer. The software accomplishes an automated reconstruction of anatomic pulmonary segments of the lung based on bronchial arborization. Estimates of anticipated surgical margins and pulmonary segmental volume were made on the basis of 3-dimensional reconstruction. Autosegmentation was achieved in 72.7% (32/44) of preoperative computed tomography images with slice thicknesses of 3 mm or less. Reasons for segmentation failure included local severe emphysema or pneumonitis, and lower computed tomography resolution. Tumor segmental localization was achieved in all autosegmented studies. The 3-dimensional computed tomography analysis provided a positive predictive value of 87% in predicting a marginal clearance greater than 1 cm and a 75% positive predictive value in predicting a margin to tumor diameter ratio greater than 1 in relation to the surgical pathology assessment. This preoperative 3-dimensional computed tomography analysis of segmental anatomy can confirm the tumor location within an anatomic segment and aid in predicting surgical margins. This 3-dimensional computed tomography information may assist in the preoperative assessment regarding the suitability of segmentectomy for peripheral lung cancers. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Application of serum SELDI proteomic patterns in diagnosis of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Shuan-ying; Xiao, Xue-yuan; Zhang, Wang-gang; Zhang, Li-juan; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Guoan; He, Da-cheng

    2005-01-01

    Currently, no satisfactory biomarkers are available to screen for lung cancer. Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption/ionization Time-of- Flight Mass Spectrometry ProteinChip system (SELDI-TOF-MS) is one of the currently used techniques to identify biomarkers for cancers. The aim of this study is to explore the application of serum SELDI proteomic patterns to distinguish lung cancer patients from healthy individuals. A total of 208 serum samples, including 158 lung cancer patients and 50 healthy individuals, were randomly divided into a training set (including 11 sera from patients with stages I/II lung cancer, 63 from patients with stages III/IV lung cancer and 20 from healthy controls) and a blinded test set (including 43 sera from patients with stages I/II lung cancer, 41 from patients with stages III/IV lung cancer and 30 from healthy controls). All samples were analyzed by SELDI technology. The spectra were generated on weak cation exchange (WCX2) chips, and protein peaks clustering and classification analyses were made using Ciphergen Biomarker Wizard and Biomarker Pattern software, respectively. We additionally determined Cyfra21-1 and NSE in the 208 serum samples included in this study using an electrochemiluminescent immunoassay. Five protein peaks at 11493, 6429, 8245, 5335 and 2538 Da were automatically chosen as a biomarker pattern in the training set. When the SELDI marker pattern was tested with the blinded test set, it yielded a sensitivity of 86.9%, a specificity of 80.0% and a positive predictive value of 92.4%. The sensitivities provided by Cyfra21-1 and NSE used individually or in combination were significantly lower than that of the SELDI marker pattern (P < 0.005 or 0.05, respectively). Based on the results of the test set, we found that the SELDI marker pattern showed a sensitivity of 91.4% in the detection of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), which was significantly higher than that in the detection of small cell lung cancers (P < 0.05); The

  8. Metabolic tumor burden quantified on [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT improves TNM staging of lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapa, Paula; Isidoro, Jorge; Costa, Gracinda [Centro Hospitalar e Universitario de Coimbra, Nuclear Medicine Department, Coimbra (Portugal); Oliveiros, Barbara [University of Coimbra, Laboratory of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); University of Coimbra, Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); Marques, Margarida [University of Coimbra, Laboratory of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); Centro Hospitalar e Universitario de Coimbra, Technology and Information Systems Department, Coimbra (Portugal); Caseiro Alves, Filipe [Centro Hospitalar e Universitario de Coimbra, Radiology Department, Coimbra (Portugal); Nascimento Costa, J.M. [University of Coimbra, University Oncology Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); Lima, Joao Pedroso de [Centro Hospitalar e Universitario de Coimbra, Nuclear Medicine Department, Coimbra (Portugal); University of Coimbra, Institute of Nuclear Sciences Applied to Health-ICNAS, Coimbra (Portugal)

    2017-12-15

    The purpose of our study was to test a new staging algorithm, combining clinical TNM staging (cTNM) with whole-body metabolic active tumor volume (MATV-WB), with the goal of improving prognostic ability and stratification power. Initial staging [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT of 278 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, performed between January/2011 and April/2016, 74(26.6%) women, 204(73.4%) men; aged 34-88 years (mean ± SD:66 ± 10), was retrospectively evaluated, and MATV-WB was quantified. Each patient's follow-up time was recorded: 0.7-83.6 months (mean ± SD:25.1 ± 20.3). MATV-WB was an independent and statistically-significant predictor of overall survival (p < 0.001). The overall survival predictive ability of MATV-WB (C index: mean ± SD = 0.7071 ± 0.0009) was not worse than cTNM (C index: mean ± SD = 0.7031 ± 0.007) (Z = -0.143, p = 0.773). Estimated mean survival times of 56.3 ± 3.0 (95%CI:50.40-62.23) and 21.7 ± 2.2 months (95%CI:17.34-25.98) (Log-Rank = 77.48, p < 0.001), one-year survival rate of 86.8% and of 52.8%, and five-year survival rate of 53.6% and no survivors, were determined, respectively, for patients with MATV-WB < 49.5 and MATV-WB ≥ 49.5. Patients with MATV-WB ≥ 49.5 had a mortality risk 2.9-5.8 times higher than those with MATV-WB < 49.5 (HR = 4.12, p < 0.001). MATV-WB cutoff points were also determined for each cTNM stage: 23.7(I), 49.5(II), 52(III), 48.8(IV) (p = 0.029, p = 0.227, p = 0.025 and p = 0.001, respectively). At stages I, III and IV there was a statistically-significant difference in the estimated mean overall survival time between groups of patients defined by the cutoff points (p = 0.007, p = 0.004 and p < 0.001, respectively). At stage II (p = 0.365), there was a clinically-significant difference of about 12 months between the groups. In all cTNM stages, patients with MATV-WB ≥ cutoff points had lower survival rates. Combined clinical TNM-PET staging (cTNM-P) was then tested: Stage I < 23.7; Stage I

  9. Definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy. Principles and practice for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, M.; Sauer, O.; Andratschke, N.; Alheit, H.; Holy, R.; Moustakis, C.; Nestle, U.

    2014-01-01

    This report from the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO) provides a definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) that agrees with that of other international societies. SBRT is defined as a method of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) that accurately delivers a high irradiation dose to an extracranial target in one or few treatment fractions. Detailed recommendations concerning the principles and practice of SBRT for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are given. These cover the entire treatment process; from patient selection, staging, treatment planning and delivery to follow-up. SBRT was identified as the method of choice when compared to best supportive care (BSC), conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation. Based on current evidence, SBRT appears to be on a par with sublobar resection and is an effective treatment option in operable patients who refuse lobectomy. (orig.) [de

  10. Regional Emphysema Score Predicting Overall Survival, Quality of Life, and Pulmonary Function Recovery in Early-Stage Lung Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jie; Liu, Ming; Swensen, Stephen J; Stoddard, Shawn M; Wampfler, Jason A; Limper, Andrew H; Jiang, Gening; Yang, Ping

    2017-05-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is a frequent comorbidity in lung cancer, but its role in tumor prognosis remains obscure. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of the regional emphysema score (RES) on a patient's overall survival, quality of life (QOL), and recovery of pulmonary function in stage I to II lung cancer. Between 1997 and 2009, a total of 1073 patients were identified and divided into two surgical groups-cancer in the emphysematous (group 1 [n = 565]) and nonemphysematous (group 2 [n = 435]) regions-and one nonsurgical group (group 3 [n = 73]). RES was derived from the emphysematous region and categorized as mild (≤5%), moderate (6%-24%), or severe (25%-60%). In group 1, patients with a moderate or severe RES experienced slight decreases in postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second, but increases in the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity compared with those with a mild RES (p < 0.01); however, this correlation was not observed in group 2. Posttreatment QOL was lower in patients with higher RESs in all groups, mainly owing to dyspnea (p < 0.05). Cox regression analysis revealed that patients with a higher RES had significantly poorer survival in both surgical groups, with adjusted hazard ratios of 1.41 and 1.43 for a moderate RES and 1.63 and 2.04 for a severe RES, respectively; however, this association was insignificant in the nonsurgical group (adjusted hazard ratio of 0.99 for a moderate or severe RES). In surgically treated patients with cancer in the emphysematous region, RES is associated with postoperative changes in lung function. RES is also predictive of posttreatment QOL related to dyspnea in early-stage lung cancer. In both surgical groups, RES is an independent predictor of survival. Copyright © 2017 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Conservative surgery and radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer using a lung density correction: the University of Michigan experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, Lori J.; Strawderman, Myla H.; Douglas, Kathye R.; Lichter, Allen S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Although an abundance of reports detail the successful use of definitive radiotherapy of the breast in the treatment in Stage I or II breast cancer, little data have been published concerning the use of lung density correction and its effect upon long-term outcome. As it has been the practice at the University of Michigan to routinely use lung density correction in the dose calculations to the breast, we retrospectively analyzed our results for local control, relapse-free, and overall survival. Methods and Materials: Clinical records were reviewed of 429 women with Stage I or II breast cancer treated with lumpectomy, axillary dissection, and breast irradiation with or without systemic chemo/hormonal therapy. Tangential radiotherapy fields delivering 45 to 50 Gy were used to treat the entire breast. A boost was delivered in 95% of cases for a total tumor bed dose of 60 to 66 Gy. All treatment plans were calculated using a lung density correction. Results: With a median follow up of 4.4 years, the 5-year actuarial rate of local control with local failure as the only site of first failure was 96% (95% CI 94-98%). Univariate analysis for local failure as only first failure found the following factors to statistically predict for increased risk of breast recurrence: young age (≤35 years old), premenopausal status, tumor size >2 cm, positive family history, and positive microscopic margins. Multivariate analysis revealed young age and margin status to be the only factors remaining significant for local failure. The 5-year actuarial relapse-free survival was 85% (95% CI 81-89%); overall survival at 5 years was 90% (95% CI 87-94%). Conclusions: Lung density correction results in rates of local control, disease-free, and overall survival at 5 years that compare favorably with series using noncorrected unit density calculations. While we will continue to update our results with increasing follow-up, our 5-year data indicate that the use of lung-density correction

  12. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy versus lobectomy for operable stage I non-small-cell lung cancer : a pooled analysis of two randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Joe Y.; Senan, Suresh; Paul, Marinus A.; Mehran, Reza J.; Louie, Alexander V.; Balter, Peter; Groen, Harry; McRae, Stephen E.; Widder, Joachim; Feng, Lei; van den Borne, Ben E. E. M.; Munsell, Mark F.; Hurkmans, Coen; Berry, Donald A.; van Werkhoven, Erik; Kresl, John J.; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Dawood, Omar; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Carpenter, Larry S.; De Jaeger, Katrien; Komaki, Ritsuko; Slotman, Ben J.; Smit, Egbert F.; Roth, Jack A.

    Background The standard of care for operable, stage I, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is lobectomy with mediastinal lymph node dissection or sampling. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for inoperable stage I NSCLC has shown promising results, but two independent, randomised, phase 3

  13. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of endobronchial and endoscopic ultrasound relative to surgical staging in potentially resectable lung cancer: results from the ASTER randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharples, L. D.; Jackson, C.; Wheaton, E.; Griffith, G.; Annema, J. T.; Dooms, C.; Tournoy, K. G.; Deschepper, E.; Hughes, V.; Magee, L.; Buxton, M.; Rintoul, R. C.

    2012-01-01

    To assess the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of endosonography (followed by surgical staging if endosonography was negative), compared with standard surgical staging alone, in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are otherwise candidates for surgery with curative

  14. Preoperative Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs) and Outcomes from Resected Early Stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almquist, Daniel; Khanal, Nabin; Smith, Lynette; Ganti, Apar Kishor

    2018-05-01

    Preoperative pulmonary function tests (PFTs) predict operative morbidity and mortality after resection in lung cancer. However, the impact of preoperative PFTs on overall outcomes in surgically-resected stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been well studied. This is a retrospective study of 149 patients who underwent surgical resection as first-line treatment for stage I and II NSCLC at a single center between 2003 and 2014. PFTs [forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), Diffusing Capacity (DLCO)], both absolute values and percent predicted values were categorized into quartiles. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to determine whether PFTs predicted for overall survival (OS). Logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of postoperative complications and length of stay (LOS) greater than 10 days based on the results of PFTs. The median age of the cohort was 68 years. The cohort was predominantly males (98.6%), current or ex-smokers (98%), with stage I NSCLC (82.76%). The majority of patients underwent a lobectomy (n=121, 81.21%). The predominant tumor histology was adenocarcinoma (n=70, 47%) followed by squamous cell carcinoma (n=61, 41%). The median follow-up of surviving patients was 53.2 months. DLCO was found to be a significant predictor of OS (HR=0.93, 95% CI=0.87-0.99; p=0.03) on univariate analysis. Although PFTs did not predict for postoperative complications, worse PFTs were significant predictors of length of stay >10 days. Preoperative PFTs did not predict for survival from resected early-stage NSCLC, but did predict for prolonged hospital stay following surgery. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  15. Stereotactic radiation therapy: a second gold standard in the treatment of early-stage lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santini B, Alejandro; Valdez C, Cristian; Sepulveda A, Veronica; Baeza L, Ricardo; Bustos, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death in the world. Although in Chile this is not the case, the northern regions of the country show higher incidence and mortality rates than the other Chilean regions. In recent years screening guides for lung cancer with low-dose scanner have begun to be established, and most of the medical societies involved in this subject have already settled the selection criteria. At the same time new techniques of treatment for these patients have developed, with highly sophisticated radiotherapy such as SBRT (Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy) and SBART (Stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy) that are revealing extremely encouraging results and augur significant changes in the coming years. In the present review we analyze the current work, their results, and the future of this treatment modality

  16. Local Control and Survival Following Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy in Inoperable Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campeau, Marie-Pierre; Herschtal, Alan; Wheeler, Greg; Mac Manus, Michael; Wirth, Andrew; Michael, Michael; Hogg, Annette; Drummond, Elizabeth; Ball, David

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) increases survival rates compared with radical radiotherapy alone (RT) in Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as a result of improved local control. The effect of CRT on local control in Stage I NSCLC is less well documented. We retrospectively reviewed local control and survival following CRT or RT for inoperable Stage I NSCLC patients. Methods and materials: Eligible patients had histologically/cytologically proved inoperable Stage I NSCLC and had undergone complete staging investigations including an F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scan. Radiotherapy was planned as (1) 60 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks with or without concomitant chemotherapy or (2) 50-55 Gy in 20 fractions without chemotherapy. Results: Between 2000 and 2005, 73 patients met the eligibility criteria and were treated as follows: CRT (60 Gy)-39; RT (60 Gy)-23; RT (50-55 Gy)-11. The median follow-up time for all patients was 18 months (range, 1-81 months). Survival analysis was based on intent to treat. Local progression-free survival (PFS) at 2 years was 66% with CRT and 55% with RT. The 2-year distant PFS was 60% following CRT and 63% after RT. The 2-year PFS rates were 57% and 50%, respectively. The 2-year survival rate for patients treated with CRT was 57% and 33% in patients receiving RT. Conclusions: Despite the use of CRT and routine staging with FDG-PET, both local and distant recurrences remain important causes of treatment failure in patients with inoperable stage I NSCLC.

  17. SU-E-T-551: Monitor Unit Optimization in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, B-T; Lu, J-Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The study aims to reduce the monitor units (MUs) in the stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment for lung cancer by adjusting the optimizing parameters. Methods: Fourteen patients suffered from stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) were enrolled. Three groups of parameters were adjusted to investigate their effects on MU numbers and organs at risk (OARs) sparing: (1) the upper objective of planning target volume (UOPTV); (2) strength setting in the MU constraining objective; (3) max MU setting in the MU constraining objective. Results: We found that the parameters in the optimizer influenced the MU numbers in a priority, strength and max MU dependent manner. MU numbers showed a decreasing trend with the UOPTV increasing. MU numbers with low, medium and high priority for the UOPTV were 428±54, 312±48 and 258±31 MU/Gy, respectively. High priority for UOPTV also spared the heart, cord and lung while maintaining comparable PTV coverage than the low and medium priority group. It was observed that MU numbers tended to decrease with the strength increasing and max MU setting decreasing. With maximum strength, the MU numbers reached its minimum while maintaining comparable or improved dose to the normal tissues. It was also found that the MU numbers continued to decline at 85% and 75% max MU setting but no longer to decrease at 50% and 25%. Combined with high priority for UOPTV and MU constraining objectives, the MU numbers can be decreased as low as 223±26 MU/Gy. Conclusion:: The priority of UOPTV, MU constraining objective in the optimizer impact on the MU numbers in SBRT treatment for lung cancer. Giving high priority to the UOPTV, setting the strength to maximum value and the max MU to 50% in the MU objective achieves the lowest MU numbers while maintaining comparable or improved OAR sparing

  18. Variations in Oncologist Recommendations for Chemotherapy for Stage IV Lung Cancer: What Is the Role of Performance Status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisnado, Diana; Malin, Jennifer; Kahn, Katherine; Landrum, Mary Beth; Fletcher, Robert; Klabunde, Carrie; Clauser, Steven; Rogers, Selwyn O; Keating, Nancy L

    2016-07-01

    Chemotherapy prolongs survival in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. However, few studies have included patients with poor performance status. This study examined rates of oncologists' recommendations for chemotherapy by patient performance status and symptoms and how physician characteristics influence chemotherapy recommendations. We surveyed medical oncologists involved in the care of a population-based cohort of patients with lung cancer from the CanCORS (Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance) study. Physicians were queried about their likelihood to recommend chemotherapy to patients with stage IV lung cancer with varying performance status (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 [good] v 3 [poor]) and presence or absence of tumor-related pain. Repeated measures logistic regression was used to estimate the independent associations of patients' performance status and symptoms and physicians' demographic and practice characteristics with chemotherapy recommendations. Nearly all physicians (adjusted rate, 97% to 99%) recommended chemotherapy for patients with good performance status, and approximately half (adjusted rate, 38% to 53%) recommended chemotherapy for patients with poor performance status (P factors, physician and practice characteristics were less strongly associated with chemotherapy recommendations in adjusted analyses. Strong consensus among oncologists exists for chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer and good performance status. However, the relatively high rate of chemotherapy recommendations for patients with poor performance status despite the unfavorable risk-benefit profile highlights the need for ongoing work to define high-value care in oncology and to implement and evaluate strategies to align incentives for such care. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Scalpel or SABR for Treatment of Early-Stage Lung Cancer: Clinical Considerations for the Multidisciplinary Team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirvani, Shervin M.; Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Treatment options for early-stage (T1-2 N0) non-small cell lung cancer are often limited by the patient's advanced age, poor performance status, and comorbidities. Despite these challenges, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) provides a highly effective and safe therapy for intrathoracic tumors and has become the standard of care for delivering definitive treatment in medically inoperable patients. High-quality treatment, which includes reliable immobilization, accurate tumor targeting, and precise verification of dose delivery, is essential both to achieve successful cure and to avoid debilitating toxicities. Generally, SABR is well tolerated in patients with peripherally located tumors, but even centrally or superiorly located lesions can be treated if there is adequate conformal avoidance of normal structures and/or modified fractionation to meet dose constraints. While several preliminary studies suggest that SABR is as efficacious as surgery in operable patients, results of randomized data will illuminate whether the indications for SABR can be expanded to include patients who are candidates for surgical resection. Herein, we review the rationale for using SABR and its application in treating different patient populations with early-stage lung cancer.

  20. Scalpel or SABR for Treatment of Early-Stage Lung Cancer: Clinical Considerations for the Multidisciplinary Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Y. Chang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Treatment options for early-stage (T1-2 N0 non-small cell lung cancer are often limited by the patient’s advanced age, poor performance status, and comorbidities. Despite these challenges, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR provides a highly effective and safe therapy for intrathoracic tumors and has become the standard of care for delivering definitive treatment in medically inoperable patients. High-quality treatment, which includes reliable immobilization, accurate tumor targeting, and precise verification of dose delivery, is essential both to achieve successful cure and to avoid debilitating toxicities. Generally, SABR is well tolerated in patients with peripherally located tumors, but even centrally or superiorly located lesions can be treated if there is adequate conformal avoidance of normal structures and/or modified fractionation to meet dose constraints. While several preliminary studies suggest that SABR is as efficacious as surgery in operable patients, results of randomized data will illuminate whether the indications for SABR can be expanded to include patients who are candidates for surgical resection. Herein, we review the rationale for using SABR and its application in treating different patient populations with early-stage lung cancer.

  1. Evaluation of a new HTLV-I/II polymerase chain reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrielink, H.; Zaaijer, H. L.; Cuypers, H. T.; van der Poel, C. L.; Woerdeman, M.; Lelie, P. N.; Winkel, C.; Reesink, H. W.

    1997-01-01

    AIM: Evaluation of a qualitative HTLV-I/II DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for the detection of HTLV-I/II DNA (Roche Diagnostic Systems, Branchburg, N.J., USA) in various panels. METHODS: The panels consisted of fresh EDTA blood samples from blood donors who were anti-HTLV-I/II ELISA

  2. Time to treatment as a quality metric in lung cancer: Staging studies, time to treatment, and patient survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Liao, Kai-Ping; Swisher, Stephen G.; Blumenschein, George R.; Erasmus, Jeremy J.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Prompt staging and treatment are crucial for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We determined if predictors of treatment delay after diagnosis were associated with prognosis. Materials and methods: Medicare claims from 28,732 patients diagnosed with NSCLC in 2004–2007 were used to establish the diagnosis-to-treatment interval (ideally ⩽35 days) and identify staging studies during that interval. Factors associated with delay were identified with multivariate logistic regression, and associations between delay and survival by stage were tested with Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: Median diagnosis-to-treatment interval was 27 days. Receipt of PET was associated with delays (57.4% of patients with PET delayed [n = 6646/11,583] versus 22.8% of those without [n = 3908/17,149]; adjusted OR = 4.48, 95% CI 4.23–4.74, p < 0.001). Median diagnosis-to-PET interval was 15 days; PET-to-clinic, 5 days; and clinic-to-treatment, 12 days. Diagnosis-to-treatment intervals <35 days were associated with improved survival for patients with localized disease and those with distant disease surviving ⩾1 year but not for patients with distant disease surviving <1 year. Conclusion: Delays between diagnosing and treating NSCLC are common and associated with use of PET for staging. Reducing time to treatment may improve survival for patients with manageable disease at diagnosis

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Operable Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Can SBRT Be Comparable to Surgery?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Hiroshi, E-mail: honishi@yamanashi.ac.jp [School of Medicine, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [School of Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Fujino, Masaharu [School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); School of Medicine, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Gomi, Kotaro [Cancer Institute Suwa Red-Cross Hospital, Suwa (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Yuzuru [Kitasato University, Kanagawa (Japan); Takai, Yoshihiro [School of Medicine, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki (Japan); Kimura, Tomoki [School of Medicine, Kagawa University, Hiroshima (Japan); Takeda, Atsuya [Ofuna Chuo Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Ouchi, Atsushi [Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Hareyama, Masato [Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Kozuka, Takuyo [School of Cancer Institute Ariake Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Arimoto, Takuro [Kitami Red Cross Hospital, Kitami (Japan); Hara, Ryusuke [National Institute of Radiological Science, Chiba (Japan); Itami, Jun [National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Araki, Tsutomu [School of Medicine, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To review treatment outcomes for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in medically operable patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), using a Japanese multi-institutional database. Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2004, a total of 87 patients with Stage I NSCLC (median age, 74 years; T1N0M0, n = 65; T2N0M0, n = 22) who were medically operable but refused surgery were treated using SBRT alone in 14 institutions. Stereotactic three-dimensional treatment was performed using noncoplanar dynamic arcs or multiple static ports. Total dose was 45-72.5 Gy at the isocenter, administered in 3-10 fractions. Median calculated biological effective dose was 116 Gy (range, 100-141 Gy). Data were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), cumulative local control rates for T1 and T2 tumors at 5 years after SBRT were 92% and 73%, respectively. Pulmonary complications above Grade 2 arose in 1 patient (1.1%). Five-year overall survival rates for Stage IA and IB subgroups were 72% and 62%, respectively. One patient who developed local recurrences safely underwent salvage surgery. Conclusion: Stereotactic body radiotherapy is safe and promising as a radical treatment for operable Stage I NSCLC. The survival rate for SBRT is potentially comparable to that for surgery.

  4. National Patterns of Care and Outcomes after Combined Modality Therapy for Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Aalok P.; Crabtree, Traves D.; Bell, Jennifer M.; Guthrie, Tracey J.; Robinson, Clifford G.; Morgensztern, Daniel; Colditz, Graham A.; Kreisel, Daniel; Krupnick, A. Sasha; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Patterson, G. Alexander; Meyers, Bryan F.; Puri, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The role of surgery in addition to chemotherapy and radiation for stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains controversial. Since there is limited data on the benefit from surgery in this setting, we evaluated the use of combined modality therapy nationally, and explored the outcomes with and without the addition of surgery. Methods Patient variables and treatment-related outcomes were abstracted for patients with clinical stage IIIA NSCLC from the National Cancer Database. Patients receiving chemotherapy and radiation (CR) were compared to those undergoing chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery in any sequence (CRS). Results Between 1998 and 2010, 61339 patients underwent combined modality treatment for clinical stage IIIA NSCLC. Of these, 51979 (84.7%) received CR while 9360 (15.3%) underwent CRS. Patients in the CRS group were younger, more likely females and Caucasians, had smaller tumors and lower Charlson comorbidity scores. The 30-day surgical mortality was 200/8993 (2.2%). The median overall survival favored the CRS group in both unmatched (32.4 months vs. 15.7 months, p<.001) and matched analysis based on patient characteristics (34.3 months vs. 18.4months, p<.001). Conclusion There is significant heterogeneity in the treatment of stage IIIA NSCLC in the United States. Patients selected for surgery in addition to chemoradiation therapy appear to have better long-term survival. PMID:24722151

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Operable Stage I Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Can SBRT Be Comparable to Surgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Hiroshi; Shirato, Hiroki; Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Fujino, Masaharu; Gomi, Kotaro; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Yuzuru; Takai, Yoshihiro; Kimura, Tomoki; Takeda, Atsuya; Ouchi, Atsushi; Hareyama, Masato; Kokubo, Masaki; Kozuka, Takuyo; Arimoto, Takuro; Hara, Ryusuke; Itami, Jun; Araki, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To review treatment outcomes for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in medically operable patients with Stage I non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), using a Japanese multi-institutional database. Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2004, a total of 87 patients with Stage I NSCLC (median age, 74 years; T1N0M0, n = 65; T2N0M0, n = 22) who were medically operable but refused surgery were treated using SBRT alone in 14 institutions. Stereotactic three-dimensional treatment was performed using noncoplanar dynamic arcs or multiple static ports. Total dose was 45–72.5 Gy at the isocenter, administered in 3–10 fractions. Median calculated biological effective dose was 116 Gy (range, 100–141 Gy). Data were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), cumulative local control rates for T1 and T2 tumors at 5 years after SBRT were 92% and 73%, respectively. Pulmonary complications above Grade 2 arose in 1 patient (1.1%). Five-year overall survival rates for Stage IA and IB subgroups were 72% and 62%, respectively. One patient who developed local recurrences safely underwent salvage surgery. Conclusion: Stereotactic body radiotherapy is safe and promising as a radical treatment for operable Stage I NSCLC. The survival rate for SBRT is potentially comparable to that for surgery.

  6. Study on the relationship between serum concentration of CYFRA21-1 and pathological staging in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Wenjun; Zhou Yaohong; Wang Xiaoli; Wu Yizhi; Li Jun

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between of serum concentrations of CYFRA21-1 and to pathological staging in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Serum concentrations of CYFRA21-1 were determined with IRMA in 224 patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Results: The serum CYFRA21-1 levels in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma increased gradually as the tumor size enlarged. Levels in patients of T2 and T3 stages were significantly higher than those in patients of T1 stage, but the difference between those in patients of T2 stage and T3 stage were not significant. The serum CYFRA21-1 levels also increased as the number of lymph nodes with metastasis increased. Differences of serum levels of CYFRA21-1 in patients of consecutive lymph node stages were all significant. Conclusion: Preoperative detection of the serum concentration of CYFRA21-1 in patient with non-small cell lung cancer has important clinical significance on the judgement of T, N stages. (authors)

  7. A nomogram to predict the survival of stage IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qixing; Xia, Wenjie; Dong, Gaochao; Chen, Shuqi; Wang, Anpeng; Jin, Guangfu; Jiang, Feng; Xu, Lin

    2018-04-01

    Postoperative survival of patients with stage IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is highly heterogeneous. Here, we aimed to identify variables associated with postoperative survival and develop a tool for survival prediction. A retrospective review was performed in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database from January 2004 to December 2009. Significant variables were selected by use of the backward stepwise method. The nomogram was constructed with multivariable Cox regression. The model's performance was evaluated by concordance index and calibration curve. The model was validated via an independent cohort from the Jiangsu Cancer Hospital Lung Cancer Center. A total of 1809 patients with stage IIIA-N2 NSCLC who underwent surgery were included in the training cohort. Age, sex, grade, histology, tumor size, visceral pleural invasion, positive lymph nodes, lymph nodes examined, and surgery type (lobectomy vs pneumonectomy) were identified as significant prognostic variables using backward stepwise method. A nomogram was developed from the training cohort and validated using an independent Chinese cohort. The concordance index of the model was 0.673 (95% confidence interval, 0.654-0.692) in training cohort and 0.664 in validation cohort (95% confidence interval, 0.614-0.714). The calibration plot showed optimal consistency between nomogram predicted survival and observed survival. Survival analyses demonstrated significant differences between different subgroups stratified by prognostic scores. This nomogram provided the individual survival prediction for patients with stage IIIA-N2 NSCLC after surgery, which might benefit survival counseling for patients and clinicians, clinical trial design and follow-up, as well as postoperative strategy-making. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A combination of preoperative CT findings and postoperative serum CEA levels improves recurrence prediction for stage I lung adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Motohiko, E-mail: xackey2001@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences (Japan); Ishikawa, Hiroyuki [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences (Japan); Kunii, Ryosuke [Division of Cellular and Molecular Pathology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences (Japan); Tasaki, Akiko; Sato, Suguru; Ikeda, Yohei; Yoshimura, Norihiko [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences (Japan); Hashimoto, Takehisa; Tsuchida, Masanori [Division of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences (Japan); Aoyama, Hidefumi [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    Objectives: To assess the prognostic value of combined evaluation of preoperative CT findings and pre/postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels for pathological stage I lung adenocarcinoma. Methods: This retrospective study included 250 consecutive patients who underwent complete resection for ≤3-cm pathological stage I (T1–2aN0M0) adenocarcinomas (132 men, 118 women; mean age, 67.8 years). Radiologists evaluated following CT findings: maximum tumor diameter, percentage of solid component (%solid), air bronchogram, spiculation, adjacency of bullae or interstitial pneumonia (IP) around the tumor, notch, and pleural indent. These CT findings, pre/postoperative CEA levels, age, gender, and Brinkman index were assessed by Cox proportional hazards model to determine the best prognostic model. Prognostic accuracy was examined using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: Median follow-up period was 73.2 months. In multivariate analysis, high %solid, adjacency of bullae or IP around the tumor, and high postoperative CEA levels comprised the best combination for predicting recurrence (P < 0.05). A combination of these three findings had a greater accuracy in predicting 5-year disease-free survival than did %solid alone (AUC = 0.853 versus 0.792; P = 0.023), with a sensitivity of 85.7% and a specificity of 74.3% at the optimal threshold. The best cut-off values of %solid and postoperative CEA levels for predicting high-risk patients were ≥48% and ≥3.7 ng/mL, respectively. Conclusion: Compared to %solid alone, combined evaluation of %solid, adjacency of bullae or IP change around the tumor, and postoperative CEA levels improves recurrence prediction for stage I lung adenocarcinoma.

  9. Quality of life during 5 years after stereotactic radiotherapy in stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubels, Rutger J; Mokhles, Sahar; Andrinopoulou, Eleni R; Braat, Cornelia; Voort van Zyp, Noëlle C van der; Aluwini, Shafak; Aerts, Joachim G J V; Nuyttens, Joost J

    2015-01-01

    To determine the long-term impact of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) on the quality of life (QoL) of inoperable patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). From January 2006 to February 2008, 39 patients with pathologically confirmed T1-2N0M0 NSCLC were treated with SRT. QoL, overall survival and local tumor control were assessed. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ)-C30 and the lung cancer-specific questionnaire QLQ-LC13 were used to investigate changes in QoL. Assessments were done before treatment, at 3 weeks, every 2–3 months during the first two years, and then every 6 months until 5 years after the treatment or death or progressive disease. The median follow up was 38 months. During the 5 years after treatment with SRT for stage I NSCLC, the level of QoL was maintained: There was a slow decline (slope: −0.015) of the global health status over the 5 years (p < 0.0001). The physical functioning and the role functioning improved slowly (slope: 0.006 and 0.004, resp.) over the years and this was also significant (p < 0.0001). The emotional functioning (EF) improved significantly at 1 year compared to the baseline. Two years after the treatment dyspnea slowly increased (slope: 0.005, p = 0.006). The actuarial overall survival was 62% at 2 years and 31% at 5-years. QoL was maintained 5 years after SRT for stage I NSCLC and EF improved significantly. Dyspnea slowly increased 2 years after the treatment

  10. Family caregiver burden: the burden of caring for lung cancer patients according to the cancer stage and patient quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Lourenço Borges

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Patients with lung cancer experience different feelings and reactions, based on their family, social, cultural, and religious backgrounds, which are a source of great distress, not only for the patients but also for their family caregivers. This study aimed to evaluate the impact that lung cancer stage and quality of life (QoL of lung cancer patients have on caregiver burden. Methods: This was a prospective cross-sectional study. Consecutive patient-caregiver dyads were selected and asked to complete the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item ShortForm Health Survey (SF-36. Family caregivers also completed the Caregiver Burden Scale. Group-based modeling was used in order to identify patients with early- or advanced-stage cancer (IA to IIIA vs. IIIB to IV plus non-impaired or impaired QoL (SF36 total score > 50 vs. ≤ 50. Patient-caregiver dyads were stratified into four groups: early-stage cancer+non-impaired QoL; advanced-stage cancer+non-impaired QoL; early-stage cancer+impaired QoL; and advanced-stage cancer+impaired QoL. Results: We included 91 patient-caregiver dyads. The majority of the patients were male and heavy smokers. Family caregivers were younger and predominantly female. The burden, QoL, level of anxiety, and level of depression of caregivers were more affected by the QoL of the patients than by their lung cancer stage. The family caregivers of the patients with impaired QoL showed a higher median burden than did those of the patients with non-impaired QoL, regardless of disease stage. Conclusions: Caregiver burden is more affected by patient QoL than by lung cancer stage.

  11. Manda d'hajje I-II : [luuletused] / Uku Masing

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Masing, Uku, 1909-1985

    2001-01-01

    Tekst eesti ja inglise k. U. Masingu lühibiograafia eesti ja inglise k. lk. 75. Sisu: Manda d'hajje I-II ; "Lennata mõtles kord muinasmaa liblikas..." = "Once a fairyland butterfly thought it would fly..." ; "Sa oled mägi, mida kardavad me karjed..." = "You are the mountain that our herds fear..." ; "Ammu tõusnud koopast, sygavalt ja kaugelt..." = "Long since risen from a cave, deep and far away..." ; "Imelik, et Sinu silmad mind ei karda..." ; "Strange that Your eyes do not fear me..." ; "Ööl järveks laiud. Ja siis äkki tõusvad üles..." = "At night You grow into a lake. From its bed..." ; "Sinu keha tõuseb minu käsivartelt..." = "Your body rises from my arms to meet me..."

  12. One-stage surgery in combination with thoracic endovascular grafting and resection of T4 lung cancer invading the thoracic aorta and spine

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Seijiro; Goto, Tatsuya; Koike, Terumoto; Okamoto, Takeshi; Shoji, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Masayuki; Watanabe, Kei; Tsuchida, Masanori

    2017-01-01

    A novel strategy of one-stage surgery in combination with thoracic endovascular grafting and resection for T4 lung cancer invading the thoracic aorta and spine is described. A 56-year-old man with locally advanced lung cancer infiltrating the aortic wall and spine underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and thoracic irradiation, followed by en bloc resection of the aortic wall and spine with thoracic endovascular grafting. He developed postoperative chylothorax, but there were no stent graft-relat...

  13. Increased demyelination and axonal damage in metallothionein I+II-deficient mice during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Espejo, C; Martínez-Cáceres, E M

    2003-01-01

    Metallothioneins I+II (MT-I+II) are antioxidant, neuroprotective factors. We previously showed that MT-I+II deficiency during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) leads to increased disease incidence and clinical symptoms. Moreover, the inflammatory response of macrophages and T cells......, oxidative stress, and apoptotic cell death during EAE were increased by MT-I+II deficiency. We now show for the first time that demyelination and axonal damage are significantly increased in MT-I+II deficient mice during EAE. Furthermore, oligodendroglial regeneration, growth cone formation, and tissue...... repair including expression of trophic factors were significantly reduced in MT-I+II-deficient mice during EAE. Accordingly, MT-I+II have protective and regenerative roles in the brain....

  14. Outcomes of Risk-Adapted Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Smit, Egbert F.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: High local control rates can be achieved using stereotactic radiotherapy in Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but reports have suggested that toxicity may be of concern. We evaluated early clinical outcomes of 'risk-adapted' fractionation schemes in patients treated in a single institution. Methods and Materials: Of 206 patients with Stage I NSCLC, 81% were unfit to undergo surgery and the rest refused surgery. Pathologic confirmation of malignancy was obtained in 31% of patients. All other patients had new or growing 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography positive lesions with radiologic characteristics of malignancy. Planning four-dimensional computed tomography scans were performed and fractionation schemes used (3 x 20 Gy, 5 x 12 Gy, and 8 x 7.5 Gy) were determined by T stage and risk of normal tissue toxicity. Results: Median overall survival was 34 months, with 1- and 2-year survivals of 81% and 64%, respectively. Disease-free survival (DFS) at 1 and 2 years was 83% and 68%, respectively, and DFS correlated with T stage (p = 0.002). Local failure was observed in 7 patients (3%). The crude regional failure rate was 9%; isolated regional recurrence was observed in 4%. The distant progression-free survival at 1 and 2 years was 85% and 77%, respectively. SRT was well tolerated and severe late toxicity was observed in less than 3% of patients. Conclusions: SRT is well tolerated in patients with extensive comorbidity with high local control rates and minimal toxicity. Early outcomes are not inferior to those reported for conventional radiotherapy. In view of patient convenience, such risk-adapted SRT schedules should be considered treatment of choice in patients presenting with medically inoperable Stage I NSCLC

  15. Smoking habits of patients with newly diagnosed stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloan, J.; Bonner, J.A.; McGinnis, W.L.; Stella, P.; Marks, R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to assess the smoking habits and changes in the cigarette smoking habits of patients prior to, at the time of and after the diagnosis of unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Patients with the diagnosis of unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer who had agreed to enter a phase III North Central Cancer Treatment Group Trial comparing twice daily thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) given with chemotherapy to once daily TRT given with chemotherapy were asked to fill out a questionnaire regarding their past and present cigarette smoking habits. This questionnaire included information regarding the number of years of smoking, number of packs of cigarettes smoked per day and the time frame of smoking history. Subsequently, patients were given questionnaires to assess changes in smoking history at the halfway point of treatment, and during follow-up visits. Results: Of the 140 patients who were entered on the above noted trial, 132 filled out baseline questionnaires and were the subject of this study. Of these 132 patients, 126 (95%) had either smoked cigarettes in the past or smoked at the time of study entry. The median pack years of smoking. (years of smoking x packs per day) was 43 with a range of 3-169 pack years. Of the 126 patients with a smoking history, 124 provided information regarding the status of their smoking at the time of entry on the study: 89 (72%) claimed to have quit smoking and, 35 (28%) reported that they continued to smoke an average of one pack per day. Of the 89 patients who had quit smoking, roughly one third had quit within the month before study entry and 45% had quit during the 8 month period prior to entry on the study. Of the 35 patients who continued to smoke at the time of entry on the study, 21 indicated that they stopped smoking during the period following randomization. Hence 10% of the original 140 patients entered on study continued to smoke an average of one

  16. Stages of the recognition and roentgenological semiotics of minimal peripheric lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindenbraten, L.D.

    1987-01-01

    The system of diagnosis of peripheral cancer should be aimed at its detection at stage TI m , i.e. at the detection of a tumor whose shadow on a radiogram 70x70 mm was within 0.5-1.5 cm, and on a plain chest X-ray it was within. Fluorographic and roentgenographic semiotics of minimal peripheral cancer was considered on 40 cases. it was pointed out that the diagnosis of early stages of tumor development could be made only by improving the organizational basis of mass screening by setting up consultative cancer pulmonological commissions. Physicians should be aware of minimum changes in the pulmonary tissue

  17. Cost-benefit of minimally invasive staging of non-small cell lung cancer: a decision tree sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfort, Daniel P; Liew, Danny; Conron, Matthew; Hutchinson, Anastasia F; Irving, Louis B

    2010-10-01

    Accurate staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is critical for optimal management. Minimally invasive pathologic assessment of mediastinal lymphadenopathy is increasingly being performed. The cost-benefit (minimization of health care costs) of such approaches, in comparison with traditional surgical methods, is yet to be established. Decision-tree analysis was applied to compare downstream costs of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA), conventional TBNA, and surgical mediastinoscopy. Calculations were based on real costs derived from actual patient data at a major teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. One- and two-way sensitivity analyses were undertaken to account for potential variation in input parameter values. For the base-case analysis, initial evaluation with EBUS-TBNA (with negative results being surgically confirmed) was the most cost-beneficial approach (AU$2961) in comparison with EBUS-TBNA (negative results not surgically confirmed) ($3344), conventional TBNA ($3754), and mediastinoscopy ($8859). The sensitivity of EBUS-TBNA for detecting disease had the largest impact on cost, whereas the prevalence of mediastinal lymph node metastases determined whether surgical confirmation of negative EBUS-TBNA results remained cost-beneficial. Our study confirms that minimally invasive staging of NSCLC is cost-beneficial in comparison with traditional surgical techniques. EBUS-TBNA was the most cost-beneficial approach for mediastinal staging of patients with NSCLC across all studied parameters.

  18. Frequent silencing of the candidate tumor suppressor TRIM58 by promoter methylation in early-stage lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiura, Koichiro; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Naruto, Takuya; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Watabnabe, Miki; Tsuboi, Mitsuhiro; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Kondo, Kazuya; Tangoku, Akira; Imoto, Issei

    2017-01-10

    In this study, we aimed to identify novel drivers that would be epigenetically altered through aberrant methylation in early-stage lung adenocarcinoma (LADC), regardless of the presence or absence of tobacco smoking-induced epigenetic field defects. Through genome-wide screening for aberrantly methylated CpG islands (CGIs) in 12 clinically uniform, stage-I LADC cases affecting six non-smokers and six smokers, we identified candidate tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs) inactivated by hypermethylation. Through systematic expression analyses of those candidates in panels of additional tumor samples and cell lines treated or not treated with 5-aza-deoxycitidine followed by validation analyses of cancer-specific silencing by CGI hypermethylation using a public database, we identified TRIM58 as the most prominent candidate for TSG. TRIM58 was robustly silenced by hypermethylation even in early-stage primary LADC, and the restoration of TRIM58 expression in LADC cell lines inhibited cell growth in vitro and in vivo in anchorage-dependent and -independent manners. Our findings suggest that aberrant inactivation of TRIM58 consequent to CGI hypermethylation might stimulate the early carcinogenesis of LADC regardless of smoking status; furthermore, TRIM58 methylation might be a possible early diagnostic and epigenetic therapeutic target in LADC.

  19. Prevalence of and risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications after lung cancer surgery in patients with early-stage COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim ES

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Eun Sun Kim,1 Young Tae Kim,2 Chang Hyun Kang,2 In Kyu Park,2 Won Bae,1 Sun Mi Choi,1 Jinwoo Lee,1 Young Sik Park,1 Chang-Hoon Lee,1 Sang-Min Lee,1 Jae-Joon Yim,1 Young Whan Kim,1 Sung Koo Han,1 Chul-Gyu Yoo1 1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Purpose: This study aimed to investigate whether the prevalence of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is even higher in the early stages of COPD than in such patients with normal lung function and to verify the usefulness of symptom- or quality of life (QoL-based scores in predicting risk for PPCs.Patients and methods: Patients undergoing pulmonary resection for NSCLC between July 2012 and October 2014 were prospectively enrolled. Preoperative measurements of lung function, dyspnea, and QoL, operative characteristics, PPCs, duration of postoperative hospitalization, and in-hospital mortality were assessed.Results: Among 351 consecutive patients with NSCLC, 343 patients with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 ≥70% of predicted value were enrolled. At least one PPC occurred in 57 (16.6% patients. Prevalence of PPC was higher in patients with COPD (30.1% than in those with normal spirometry (10.0%; P<0.001. However, in patients with COPD, the prevalence of PPC was not different in patients with FEV1 ≥70% compared to those with FEV1 <70% and between group A (low risk and less symptoms and group B (low risk and more symptoms patients with COPD, based on the new Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease 2011 guidelines. In patients with COPD, body mass index (odds ratio [OR]: 0.80, P=0.007, carbon monoxide diffusing capacity of the lung (DLCO, % predicted value (OR: 0.97, P=0.024, and operation time (OR: 1.01, P=0.003, but not COPD assessment test or St

  20. Modeling Local Control After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Report From the Elekta Collaborative Lung Research Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohri, Nitin, E-mail: ohri.nitin@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grills, Inga S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Belderbos, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hope, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Guckenberger, Matthias [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Sonke, Jan-Jakob [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Xiao, Ying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an effective treatment option for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using data collected by the Elekta Lung Research Group, we generated a tumor control probability (TCP) model that predicts 2-year local control after SBRT as a function of biologically effective dose (BED) and tumor size. Methods and Materials: We formulated our TCP model as follows: TCP = e{sup [BED10-c Asterisk-Operator L-TCD50]/k} Division-Sign (1 + e{sup [BED10-c Asterisk-Operator L-TCD50]/k}), where BED10 is the biologically effective SBRT dose, c is a constant, L is the maximal tumor diameter, and TCD50 and k are parameters that define the shape of the TCP curve. Least-squares optimization with a bootstrap resampling approach was used to identify the values of c, TCD50, and k that provided the best fit with observed actuarial 2-year local control rates. Results: Data from 504 NSCLC tumors treated with a variety of SBRT schedules were available. The mean follow-up time was 18.4 months, and 26 local recurrences were observed. The optimal values for c, TCD50, and k were 10 Gy/cm, 0 Gy, and 31 Gy, respectively. Thus, size-adjusted BED (sBED) may be defined as BED minus 10 times the tumor diameter (in centimeters). Our TCP model indicates that sBED values of 44 Gy, 69 Gy, and 93 Gy provide 80%, 90%, and 95% chances of tumor control at 2 years, respectively. When patients were grouped by sBED, the model accurately characterized the relationship between sBED and actuarial 2-year local control (r=0.847, P=.008). Conclusion: We have developed a TCP model that predicts 2-year local control rate after hypofractionated SBRT for early-stage NSCLC as a function of biologically effective dose and tumor diameter. Further testing of this model with additional datasets is warranted.

  1. Modeling Local Control After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Report From the Elekta Collaborative Lung Research Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohri, Nitin; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Grills, Inga S.; Belderbos, José; Hope, Andrew; Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L.; Guckenberger, Matthias; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Xiao, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an effective treatment option for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using data collected by the Elekta Lung Research Group, we generated a tumor control probability (TCP) model that predicts 2-year local control after SBRT as a function of biologically effective dose (BED) and tumor size. Methods and Materials: We formulated our TCP model as follows: TCP = e [BED10−c∗L−TCD50]/k ÷ (1 + e [BED10−c∗L−TCD50]/k ), where BED10 is the biologically effective SBRT dose, c is a constant, L is the maximal tumor diameter, and TCD50 and k are parameters that define the shape of the TCP curve. Least-squares optimization with a bootstrap resampling approach was used to identify the values of c, TCD50, and k that provided the best fit with observed actuarial 2-year local control rates. Results: Data from 504 NSCLC tumors treated with a variety of SBRT schedules were available. The mean follow-up time was 18.4 months, and 26 local recurrences were observed. The optimal values for c, TCD50, and k were 10 Gy/cm, 0 Gy, and 31 Gy, respectively. Thus, size-adjusted BED (sBED) may be defined as BED minus 10 times the tumor diameter (in centimeters). Our TCP model indicates that sBED values of 44 Gy, 69 Gy, and 93 Gy provide 80%, 90%, and 95% chances of tumor control at 2 years, respectively. When patients were grouped by sBED, the model accurately characterized the relationship between sBED and actuarial 2-year local control (r=0.847, P=.008). Conclusion: We have developed a TCP model that predicts 2-year local control rate after hypofractionated SBRT for early-stage NSCLC as a function of biologically effective dose and tumor diameter. Further testing of this model with additional datasets is warranted.

  2. Treatment of elderly patients with stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jared; Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2012-01-01

    Every thoracic oncologist could be considered a geriatric oncologist as the median age of presentation with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer is 71 years. Subgroup analyses and population-based studies suggest similar benefits to treatment of the fit elderly compared with younger patients. In 2011, a Phase III trial demonstrated the superiority of doublet chemotherapy over single-agent therapy for the elderly. For elderly patients there has been sufficient time to fully express any genetic predispositions, and the cumulative wear and tear, including the effects of cigarette smoke, can degrade performance status and impair organ function, leading some older patients to be less fit. Comprehensive geriatric assessment can augment the standard examination in defining the strengths and weakness of the elderly patient who is considering chemotherapy. In the future, biochemical assessment of physiologic age may further aid this assessment.

  3. Gene Expression Profiling of Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Hou (Jun)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractNSCLC is a highly heterogeneous malignancy with a poor prognosis. Treatment for NSCLC is currently based on a combination of pathological staging and histological classification. Recently, gene expression-based NSCLC profiling is proven a superior approach to stratify cancer cases with

  4. Management of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer using stereotactic ablative radiotherapy: Controversies, insights, and changing horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louie, Alexander V.; Palma, David A.; Dahele, Max; Rodrigues, George B.; Senan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    The use of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer is growing rapidly, particularly since it has become the recommended therapy for unfit patients in current European and North American guidelines. As three randomized trials comparing surgery and SABR closed prematurely because of poor accrual, clinicians are faced with a dilemma in individual patient decision-making. Radiation oncologists, in particular, should be aware of the data from comparative effectiveness studies that suggest similar survival outcomes irrespective of local treatment modality. The necessity of obtaining a pathological diagnosis, particularly in frail patients prior to treatment remains a challenge, and this topic was addressed in recent European recommendations. Awareness of the high incidence of a second primary lung cancer in survivors, as well as other competing causes of mortality, is needed. The challenges in distinguishing focal scarring from recurrence after SABR also need to be appreciated by multidisciplinary tumor boards. With a shift in focus toward patient-centered decision-making, clinicians will need to be aware of these new developments and communicate effectively with patients, to ensure that treatment decisions are reflective of patient preferences. Priorities for additional research in the area are proposed

  5. Detection of EGFR mutations with mutation-specific antibodies in stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viteri Santiago

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunohistochemistry (IHC with mutation-specific antibodies may be an ancillary method of detecting EGFR mutations in lung cancer patients. Methods EGFR mutation status was analyzed by DNA assays, and compared with IHC results in five non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines and tumor samples from 78 stage IV NSCLC patients. Results IHC correctly identified del 19 in the H1650 and PC9 cell lines, L858R in H1975, and wild-type EGFR in H460 and A549, as well as wild-type EGFR in tumor samples from 22 patients. IHC with the mAb against EGFR with del 19 was highly positive for the protein in all 17 patients with a 15-bp (ELREA deletion in exon 19, whereas in patients with other deletions, IHC was weakly positive in 3 cases and negative in 9 cases. IHC with the mAb against the L858R mutation showed high positivity for the protein in 25/27 (93% patients with exon 21 EGFR mutations (all with L858R but did not identify the L861Q mutation in the remaining two patients. Conclusions IHC with mutation-specific mAbs against EGFR is a promising method for detecting EGFR mutations in NSCLC patients. However these mAbs should be validated with additional studies to clarify their possible role in routine clinical practice for screening EGFR mutations in NSCLC patients.

  6. Salvage surgery for local failures after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verstegen, Naomi E.; Maat, Alexander P. W. M.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Paul, Marinus A.; Versteegh, Michel I; Joosten, Joris J.; Lastdrager, Willem; Smit, Egbert F.; Slotman, Ben J.; Nuyttens, Joost J. M. E.; Senan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The literature on surgical salvage, i.e. lung resections in patients who develop a local recurrence following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), is limited. We describe our experience with salvage surgery in nine patients who developed a local recurrence following SABR for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients who underwent surgical salvage for a local recurrence following SABR for NSCLC were identified from two Dutch institutional databases. Complications were scored using the Dindo-Clavien-classification. Nine patients who underwent surgery for a local recurrence were identified. Median time to local recurrence was 22 months. Recurrences were diagnosed with CT- and/or 18FDG-PET-imaging, with four patients also having a pre-surgical pathological diagnosis. Extensive adhesions were observed during two resections, requiring conversion from a thoracoscopic procedure to thoracotomy during one of these procedures. Three patients experienced complications post-surgery; grade 2 (N = 2) and grade 3a (N = 1), respectively. All resection specimens showed viable tumor cells. Median length of hospital stay was 8 days (range 5–15 days) and 30-day mortality was 0 %. Lymph node dissection revealed mediastinal metastases in 3 patients, all of whom received adjuvant therapy. Our experience with nine surgical procedures for local recurrences post-SABR revealed two grade IIIa complications, and a 30-day mortality of 0 %, suggesting that salvage surgery can be safely performed after SABR

  7. Comparison of nodal staging with lean body mass based and with total body weight based in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. Y.; Chung, J. K.; Kang, W. J.; So, Y.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    The standardized uptake (SUV) is semiquantitative evaluation parameter in positron emission tomography (PET). But there is no consensus about the application or process of SUV measurement. In this study, we used measured lean body mass (LBM) and total weight for application in SUV measurement. Also we compared the each nodal staging with SUV between measured LBM, and total weight, in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Total 21 patients with lung cancer were enrolled (M:F=17:4, age 45[+-]8 years). PET-CT was done before operation with Gemini (Philips, Milpitas, U.S.). Each image was reconstructed twice with measured weight and lean body mass. Maximum SUVs of 103 dissected lymph nodes were measured and compared with histological result. For the deciding on the cut off value, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was done. 14 lymph nodes in the 103 dissected lymph nodes were metastatic lesions. From the ROC analysis, the cut off value of SUV was 1.7 with measured LBM and 2.3 with total weight. With measured LBM, Sensitivity and specificity were 92.5%. 78.2% and area under curve was 0.881. With total weight, sensitivity and specificity was 92.5% and 77%, Area under curve was 0.859. The normalization of SUV could be done with measured LBM. With the normalization of SUV with LBM, the nodal staging of NSCLC using SUV could be more accurate than using total weight in the reconstruction and measurement of SUV for lymph node lesions

  8. Phase I study of cisplatin, vinorelbine, and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    To determine the recommended phase II dose of vinorelbine in combination with cisplatin and thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) in patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 18 patients received cisplatin (80 mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and vinorelbine (20 mg/m 2 in level 1, and 25 mg/m 2 in level 2) on days 1 and 8 every 4 weeks for 4 cycles. TRT consisted of a single dose of 2 Gy once daily for 3 weeks followed by a rest of 4 days, and then the same TRT for 3 weeks to a total dose of 60 Gy. Fifteen (83%) patients received 60 Gy of TRT and 14 (78%) patients received 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Ten (77%) of 13 patients at level 1 and all 5 patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 neutropenia. Four (31%) patients at level 1 and 3 (60%) patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 infection. None developed ≥grade 3 esophagitis or lung toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicity was noted in 33% of the patients in level 1 and in 60% of the patients in level 2. The overall response rate (95% confidence interval) was 83% (59-96%) with 15 partial responses. The median survival time was 30.4 months, and the 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year survival rates were 72%, 61%, and 50%, respectively. In conclusion, the recommended dose is the level 1 dose, and this regimen is feasible and promising in patients with stage III NSCLC. (author)

  9. Percutaneous microwave ablation for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the elderly: a promising outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acksteiner, Christian; Steinke, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Microwave ablation (MWA) is a relatively new minimally invasive treatment option for lung cancer with substantially lower morbidity and mortality than surgery. This retrospective study was performed to evaluate the safety, effectiveness and follow-up imaging of MWA in the elderly aged 75 years and above. Eleven percutaneous computed tomography (CT)-guided MWA of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were performed in 10 patients aged 75 years and older. All but one patient were treated with a high-powered MWA system delivering maximally 140 W. Follow-up with CT and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) was carried out over a maximum period of 30 months and a median period of 12 months. There were no peri-procedural deaths or major complications. Seven patients were disease free at the time of manuscript submission. Three patients showed growth of the treated lesions, one patient aged 90 years deceased due to unknown cause after approximately 18 months. One patient presented with local progression and disseminated metastatic disease at 12 months; he is still alive. One patient showed increasing soft tissue at the ablation site 15 months post-treatment. Three consecutive core biopsies over 2 months failed to confirm tumour recurrence. MWA therapy is a promising option of treating early-stage NSCLC in the elderly with good treatment outcome and negligible morbidity. Determining successful treatment outcome may be challenging at times as local tissue increase and PET-CT positivity do not seem to necessarily correlate with recurrence of malignancy.

  10. A randomized trial of chest irradiation alone versus chest irradiation plus Lentinan in squamous cell lung cancer in limited stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Ikuro; Ohnoshi, Taisuke; Konno, Kiyoshi

    1993-01-01

    In an attempt to evaluate the effect of Lentinan, polysaccharides from Lentinusedodes, in combination with chest irradiation for limited-stage squamous cell lung cancer, we conducted a randomized trial between January 1987 and July 1989. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either a definitive chest irradiation of 60 Gy alone (RT) or the chest irradiation plus Lentinan (RT+L). Patients allocated to the RT+L group received iv infusion of Lentinan, 1 mg twice a week or 2 mg once a week, as long as possible. Of 201 patients enrolled, 183 (94 for RT, and 89 for RT+L) were eligible for analysis of survival time, and 169 (86 for RT, and 83 for RT+L) were evaluated for tumor response, survival time and quality of life. The response rate to the treatments showed a trend favoring the RT+L group (65% vs. 51%, p=0.142). The median survival time was 455 days for the RT+L group and 371 days for the RT group. The difference was not statistically significant. In the subset of patients with cancer of hilar origin, however, RT+L group patients lived significantly longer than RT group patients: Progression-free interval from symptoms and quality of life were evaluated for the both groups based on manual records of an individual patient. RT+L group patients had a significantly longer progression-free interval from dyspneic feeling than the RT group patients. The RT+L group tended to have a feeling of well-being. We conclude that Lentinan in combination with chest irradiation is useful for patients with limited-stage squamous cell lung cancer in terms of prolongation of life and maintenance of a favorable quality of life as well. (author)

  11. A prospective phase II trial of EGCG in treatment of acute radiation-induced esophagitis for stage III lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Hanxi; Xie, Peng; Li, Xiaolin; Zhu, Wanqi; Sun, Xindong; Sun, Xiaorong; Chen, Xiaoting; Xing, Ligang; Yu, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute radiation-induced esophagitis (ARIE) is one of main toxicities complicated by thoracic radiotherapy, influencing patients’ quality of life and radiotherapy proceeding seriously. It is difficult to be cured rapidly so far. Our phase I trial preliminarily showed that EGCG may be a promising strategy in the treatment of ARIE. Materials and methods: We prospectively enrolled patients with stage III lung cancer from the Shandong Tumor Hospital & Institute in China from January 2013 to September 2014. All patients received concurrent or sequential chemo-radiotherapy, or radiotherapy only. EGCG was administrated once ARIE appeared. EGCG was given with the concentration of 440 μmol/L during radiotherapy and additionally two weeks after radiotherapy. RTOG score, dysphagia and pain related to esophagitis were recorded every week. Results: Thirty-seven patients with stage IIIA and IIIB lung cancer were enrolled in this trial. In comparison to the original, the RTOG score in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th week after EGCG prescription and the 1st, 2nd week after radiotherapy decreased significantly (P = 0.002, 0.000, 0.000, 0.001, 0.102, 0.000, 0.000, respectively). The pain score of each week was significantly lower than the baseline (P = 0.000, 0.000, 0.000, 0.000, 0.006, 0.000, 0.000, respectively). Conclusion: This trial confirmed that the oral administration of EGCG is an effective and safe method to deal with ARIE. A phase III randomized controlled trial is expected to further corroborate the consequence of EGCG in ARIE treatment

  12. Lung cancer survival in the United States by race and stage (2001-2009): Findings from the CONCORD-2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Thomas B; Henley, S Jane; Puckett, Mary C; Weir, Hannah K; Huang, Bin; Tucker, Thomas C; Allemani, Claudia

    2017-12-15

    Results from the second CONCORD study (CONCORD-2) indicated that 5-year net survival for lung cancer was low (range, 10%-20%) between 1995 and 2009 in most countries, including the United States, which was at the higher end of this range. Data from CONCORD-2 were used to analyze net survival among patients with lung cancer (aged 15-99 years) who were diagnosed in 37 states covering 80% of the US population. Survival was corrected for background mortality using state-specific and race-specific life tables and age-standardized using International Cancer Survival Standard weights. Net survival was estimated for patients diagnosed between 2001 and 2003 and between 2004 and 2009 at 1, 3, and 5 years after diagnosis by race (all races, black, and white); Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Summary Stage 2000; and US state. Five-year net survival increased from 16.4% (95% confidence interval, 16.3%-16.5%) for patients diagnosed 2001-2003 to 19.0% (18.8%-19.1%) for those diagnosed 2004-2009, with increases in most states and among both blacks and whites. Between 2004 and 2009, 5-year survival was lower among blacks (14.9%) than among whites (19.4%) and ranged by state from 14.5% to 25.2%. Lung cancer survival improved slightly between the periods 2001-2003 and 2004-2009 but was still low, with variation between states, and persistently lower survival among blacks than whites. Efforts to control well established risk factors would be expected to have the greatest impact on reducing the burden of lung cancer, and efforts to ensure that all patients receive timely and appropriate treatment should reduce the differences in survival by race and state. Cancer 2017;123:5079-99. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. The chimeric transcript RUNX1-GLRX5: a biomarker for good postoperative prognosis in Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Rie; Amano, Yosuke; Kawakami, Masanori; Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Kousuke; Kage, Hidenori; Ohishi, Nobuya; Yatomi, Yutaka; Nakajima, Jun; Fukayama, Masashi; Nagase, Takahide; Takai, Daiya

    2016-02-01

    Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer cases have been recognized as having a low risk of relapse; however, occasionally, relapse may occur. To predict clinical outcome in Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer patients, we searched for chimeric transcripts that can be used as biomarkers and identified a novel chimeric transcript, RUNX1-GLRX5, comprising RUNX1, a transcription factor, and GLRX5. This chimera was detected in approximately half of the investigated Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer patients (44/104 cases, 42.3%). Although there was no significant difference in the overall survival rate between RUNX1-GLRX5-positive and -negative cases (P = 0.088), a significantly lower relapse rate was observed in the RUNX1-GLRX5-positive cases (P = 0.039), indicating that this chimera can be used as a biomarker for good prognosis in Stage IA patients. Detection of the RUNX1-GLRX5 chimeric transcript may therefore be useful for the determination of a postoperative treatment plan for Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer patients. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. Definitive radiation therapy for clinical stage N0-N1 epidermoid carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Kazushige; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Saito, Yoshihiro; Yamakawa, Michitaka; Nakayama, Yuko; Katano, Susumu; Furuta, Masaya; Niibe, Hideo

    1993-01-01

    From 1976 through 1989, 94 patients with epidermoid carcinoma of the lung without mediastinal nodal involvement were treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT) at Gunma University Hospital. All patients were treated with 10 MV X-rays and the mediastinum was treated in 86% of the patients. The total dose ranged from 60 Gy to 80 Gy with once-daily conventional fractionation. The actuarial two and five-year survival rates of the entire group were 44% and 22%, respectively, with a median survival time (MST) of 17 months. Patients with a performance status of 0-1 lived longer than those with a status of 2 or more (MST 22.5 vs. 12 months). The survival of 60 patients with T2 tumors was better than that of 24 patients with T3 tumors (MST 19 vs. 13.5 months). Forty-seven patients with tumors less than 5 cm in diameter had a two-year progression rate of 25%, in comparison with 39% for 47 patients with tumors greater than 5 cm. The survival difference between these two groups was statistically significant (p<0.01). Patients given a total dose of 80 Gy or over had only 20% local progression at the time of the last follow-up, but they had a lower long-term survival rate than those given a total dose of 60-74 Gy because of the development of pulmonary insufficiency after high-dose irradiation. There was no relapse in the field given 40 Gy or more to the mediastinum for prophylaxis in the patients with no evidence of primary progression. The actuarial five-year survival rates for the patients given 40 Gy or more to the mediastinum, and for the patients given less than 40 Gy were 32% and 9%, respectively. These was a statistically significant difference between these two survival curves, (p<0.05). Differences in survival did not depend on age, sex, or location of the primary tumor. These results should provide support for definitive RT to manage patients with medically inoperable or unresectable epidermoid carcinoma of the lung without mediastinal nodal involvement. (author)

  15. Chest radiotherapy in limited-stage small cell lung cancer: facts, questions, prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Ruysscher, D.; Vansteenkiste, J.

    2000-01-01

    Limited-disease small cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC) is initially very sensitive to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, the 5-year survival is generally only 10-15%, with most patients failing with therapy refractory relapses, both locally and in distant sites. The addition of chest irradiation to chemotherapy increases the absolute survival by approximately 5%. We reviewed the many controversies regarding optimal timing and irradiation technique. No strong data support total radiation doses over 50 Gy. According to one phase III trial and several retrospective studies, increasing the volume of the radiation fields to the pre-chemotherapy turnout volume instead of the post-chemotherapy volume does not improve local control. The total time in which the entire combined-modality treatment is delivered may be important. From seven randomized trials, it can be concluded that the timing of the radiotherapy as such is not very important. Some phase III trials support the use of accelerated chest radiation together with cisplatin-etoposide chemotherapy, delivered from the first day of treatment, although no firm conclusions can be drawn from the available data. The best results are reported in studies in which the time from the start of treatment to the end of the radiotherapy was less than 30 days. This has to be taken into consideration when treatment modalities incorporating new chemotherapeutic agents and radiotherapy are considered. (author)

  16. Steep Dose-Response Relationship for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using Hypofractionated High-Dose Irradiation by Real-Time Tumor-Tracking Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onimaru, Rikiya; Fujino, Masaharu; Yamazaki, Koichi; Onodera, Yuya; Taguchi, Hiroshi; Katoh, Norio; Hommura, Fumihiro; Oizumi, Satoshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Shirato, Hiroki

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical outcomes of patients with pathologically proven, peripherally located, Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer who had undergone stereotactic body radiotherapy using real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy during the developmental period. Methods and Materials: A total of 41 patients (25 with Stage T1 and 16 with Stage T2) were admitted to the study between February 2000 and June 2005. A 5-mm planning target volume margin was added to the clinical target volume determined with computed tomography at the end of the expiratory phase. The gating window ranged from ±2 to 3 mm. The dose fractionation schedule was 40 or 48 Gy in four fractions within 1 week. The dose was prescribed at the center of the planning target volume, giving more than an 80% dose at the planning target volume periphery. Results: For 28 patients treated with 48 Gy in four fractions, the overall actuarial survival rate at 3 years was 82% for those with Stage IA and 32% for those with Stage IB. For patients treated with 40 Gy in four fractions within 1 week, the overall actuarial survival rate at 3 years was 50% for those with Stage IA and 0% for those with Stage IB. A significant difference was found in local control between those with Stage IB who received 40 Gy vs. 48 Gy (p = 0.0015) but not in those with Stage IA (p = 0.5811). No serious radiation morbidity was observed with either dose schedule. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that 48 Gy in four fractions within 1 week is a safe and effective treatment for peripherally located, Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer. A steep dose-response curve between 40 and 48 Gy using a daily dose of 12 Gy delivered within 1 week was identified for Stage IB non-small-cell lung cancer in stereotactic body radiotherapy using real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy

  17. Preoperative staging of lung cancer with PET/CT: cost-effectiveness evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Fischer, Barbara Malene B.; Mortensen, Jann; Hoejgaard, Liselotte; Lassen, Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/CT has become a widely used technology for preoperative staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two recent randomized controlled trials (RCT) have established its efficacy over conventional staging, but no studies have assessed its cost-effectiveness. The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of PET/CT as an adjunct to conventional workup for preoperative staging of NSCLC. The study was conducted alongside an RCT in which 189 patients were allocated to conventional staging (n = 91) or conventional staging + PET/CT (n = 98) and followed for 1 year after which the numbers of futile thoracotomies in each group were monitored. A full health care sector perspective was adapted for costing resource use. The outcome parameter was defined as the number needed to treat (NNT) - here number of PET/CT scans needed - to avoid one futile thoracotomy. All monetary estimates were inflated to 2010 EUR. The incremental cost of the PET/CT-based regimen was estimated at 3,927 EUR [95% confidence interval (CI) -3,331; 10,586] and the NNT at 4.92 (95% CI 3.00; 13.62). These resulted in an average incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 19,314 EUR, which would be cost-effective at a probability of 0.90 given a willingness to pay of 50,000 EUR per avoided futile thoracotomy. When costs of comorbidity-related hospital services were excluded, the PET/CT regimen appeared dominant. Applying a full health care sector perspective, the cost-effectiveness of PET/CT for staging NSCLC seems to depend on the willingness to pay in order to avoid a futile thoracotomy. However, given that four outliers in terms of extreme comorbidity were all randomized to the PET/CT arm, there is uncertainty about the conclusion. When hospital costs of comorbidity were excluded, the PET/CT regimen was found to be both more accurate and cost saving. (orig.)

  18. Cost-effectiveness of FDG-PET in staging non-small cell lung cancer: the PLUS study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verboom, Paul; Grijseels, E.W.M; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A.; Tinteren, Harm van; Diepenhorst, Fred W.; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Smit, Egbert F.; Postmus, Pieter E.; Bergh, Jan H.A.M. van den; Velthoven, Piet C.M. van; Schreurs, Ad J.M.; Stallaert, Roland A.L.M.; Comans, Emile F.I.; Teule, Gerrit J.J.; Mourik, Johan C. van; Boers, Maarten

    2003-01-01

    Currently, up to 50% of the operations in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are futile owing to the presence of locally advanced tumour or distant metastases. More accurate pre-operative staging is required in order to reduce the number of futile operations. The cost-effectiveness of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ( 18 FDG-PET) added to the conventional diagnostic work-up was studied in the PLUS study. Prior to invasive staging and/or thoracotomy, 188 patients with (suspected) NSCLC were randomly assigned to conventional work-up (CWU) and whole-body PET or to CWU alone. CWU was based on prevailing guidelines. Pre-operative staging was followed by 1 year of follow-up. Outcomes are expressed in the percentage of correctly staged patients and the associated costs. The cost price of PET varied between and euro;736 and and euro;1,588 depending on the (hospital) setting and the procurement of 18 FDG commercially or from on-site production. In the CWU group, 41% of the patients underwent a futile thoracotomy, whereas in the PET group 21% of the thoracotomies were considered futile (P=0.003). The average costs per patient in the CWU group were and euro;9,573 and in the PET group, and euro;8,284. The major cost driver was the number of hospital days related to recovery from surgery. Sensitivity analysis on the cost and accuracy of PET showed that the results were robust, i.e. in favour of the PET group. The addition of PET to CWU prevented futile surgery in one out of five patients with suspected NSCLC. Despite the additional PET costs, the total costs were lower in the PET group, mainly due to a reduction in the number of futile operations. The additional use of PET in the staging of patients with NSCLC is feasible, safe and cost saving from a clinical and from an economic perspective. (orig.)

  19. Efficacy of Icotinib treatment in patients with stage IIIb/IV non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Na; Yang, Xinjie; Zhang, Quan; Li, Xi; Zhang, Hui; Lv, Jialin; Wu, Yuhua; Wang, Jinghui; Zhang, Shucai

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Icotinib - an orally administered, highly potent selective inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its active mutations, in the treatment of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 101 patients with stage IIIb/IV NSCLC were treated with 125 mg Icotinib three times a day until disease progression or intolerable toxicity. Response rate was evaluated using response evaluation criteria in solid tumors and progression-free survival (PFS) was collected. The overall response rate (ORR) and disease control rate (DCR) were 37.6% (38/101) and 79.2% (80/101), respectively. The median PFS was 6.5 months. Multivariate analysis showed that female gender (P= 0.048, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.010-6.016) and occurrence of rash (P= 0.002, 95% CI 1.667-9.809) were the independent predictive factors for ORR, while a performance status (PS) score of 0-1 (P= 0.001, 95% CI 0.024-0.402) and rash (P= 0.042, 95% CI 1.089-76.557) were the independent predictive factors for DCR. In addition, PS scores of 0-1 (P Icotinib were rash (35.6%) and diarrhea (17.8%), which was tolerable. Treatment of stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients with Icotinib was effective and tolerable, specifically in patients with EGFR mutation.

  20. Gender difference in treatment outcomes in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo; Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori; Tanai, Chiharu; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ohe, Yuichiro; Tamura, Tomohide

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify any gender differences in the outcomes of concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy and thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A comparative retrospective review of the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes between female and male NSCLC patients receiving chemoradiotherapy. Of a total of 204 patients, 44 (22%) were females and 160 (78%) were males. There was no difference in age, body weight loss, performance status or disease stage between the sexes, whereas never-smokers and adenocarcinoma were more common in female patients (55% vs. 3%, P 80% of the patients, respectively, of both sexes. Grade 3-4 neutropenia was observed in 64% of the female patients and 63% of the male patients. Severe esophagitis was encountered in <10% of the patients, irrespective of the sex. The response rate was higher in the female than in the male patients (93% vs. 79%, P=0.028), but the median progression-free survival did not differ between the sexes. The median survival time in the female and male patients was 22.3 and 24.3 months, respectively (P=0.64). This study failed to show any gender differences in the survival or toxicity among patients treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy. These results contrast with the better survival in female patients undergoing surgery for localized disease or chemotherapy for metastatic disease. (author)

  1. Acute Skin Toxicity Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Who's at Risk?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Laser, Benjamin; Kowalski, Alex V.; Fontenla, Sandra C.; Pena-Greenberg, Elizabeth; Yorke, Ellen D.; Lovelock, D. Michael; Hunt, Margie A.; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the rate of acute skin toxicity within a prospectively managed database of patients treated for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and investigated factors that might predict skin toxicity. Methods: From May 2006 through January 2008, 50 patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center with 60 Gy in three fractions or 44-48 Gy in four fractions. Patients were treated with multiple coplanar beams (3-7, median 4) with a 6 MV linac using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and dynamic multileaf collimation. Toxicity grading was performed and based on the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects. Factors associated with Grade 2 or higher acute skin reactions were calculated by Fisher's exact test. Results: After a minimum 3 months of follow-up, 19 patients (38%) developed Grade 1, 4 patients (8%) Grade 2, 2 patients (4%) Grade 3, and 1 patient Grade 4 acute skin toxicity. Factors associated with Grade 2 or higher acute skin toxicity included using only 3 beams (p = 0.0007), distance from the tumor to the posterior chest wall skin of less than 5 cm (p = 0.006), and a maximum skin dose of 50% or higher of the prescribed dose (p = 0.02). Conclusions: SBRT can be associated with significant skin toxicity. One must consider the skin dose when evaluating the treatment plan and consider the bolus effect of immobilization devices

  2. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III Unascertainable Non Small Cell Lung Cancer : Preliminary Report for Response and Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Chang, Hye Sook

    1995-01-01

    Lung cancer study group at Asan Medical Center has conducted the second prospective study to determine the efficacy and feasibility of MVP chemotherapy with concurrent hyperfractionated radiotherapy for patients with stage III unresectable non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC). All eligible patients with stage III unresectable NSCLC were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy( 120 cGy/fx BID, 6480 cGY/54fx) and concurrent 2 cycles of MVP(Motomycin C 6 mg/m 2 , d2 and d29, Vinblastin 6 mg/m 2 , d2 and d29, Cisplatin 6 mg/m 2 , d1 and d28) chemotherapy. Between Aug. 1993 and Nov. 1994, 62 patients entered this study ; 6(10%) had advanced stage IIIa and 56(90%) had IIIb disease including 1 with pleural effusion and 10 with supraclavicular metastases. Among 62 Patients, 48(77%) completed planned therapy. Fourteen patients refused further treatment during chemoradiotherapy. Of 46 patients evaluable for response, 34(74%) showed major response including 10(22%) with complete and 24(52%) with partial responses. Of 48 patients evaluable for toxicity, 13(27%) showed grade IV hematologic toxicity but treatment delay did not exceed 5 days. Two patients died of sepsis during chemoradiotherapy. Server weight(more than 10%) occurred in 9 patients(19%) during treatment. Nine patients(19%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Six of these patients had grad I(mild) pneumonitis with radiographic changes within the treatment fields. Three other patients had grade II pneumonitis, but none of theses patients had continuous symptoms after steroid treatment. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for patients with advanced NSCLC was well tolerated with acceptable toxicity and achieved higher response rates than the first study, but rather low compliance rate(7%) in this study is worrisome. We need to improve nutritional support during treatment and to use G-CSF to improve leukopenia and if necessary, supportive care will given as in patients. Longer follow-up and larger sample size is needed to

  3. Reliable and valid assessment of competence in endoscopic ultrasonography and fine-needle aspiration for mediastinal staging of non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Vilmann, P; Clementsen, P

    2012-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) guided by endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is important in mediastinal staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Training standards and implementation strategies of this technique are currently under discussion. The aim of this study was to explore the reliabilit...... and validity of a newly developed EUS Assessment Tool (EUSAT) designed to measure competence in EUS - FNA for mediastinal staging of NSCLC....

  4. Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeNardo, G.L.; Blankenship, W.J.; Burdine, J.A. Jr.; DeNardo, S.J.

    1975-01-01

    At present no simple statement can be made relative to the role of radionuclidic lung studies in the pediatric population. It is safe to assume that they will be used with increasing frequency for research and clinical applications because of their sensitivity and ready applicability to the pediatric patient. Methods comparable to those used in adults can be used in children older than 4 years. In younger children, however, a single injection of 133 Xe in solution provides an index of both regional perfusion and ventilation which is easier to accomplish. This method is particularly valuable in infants and neonates because it is rapid, requires no patient cooperation, results in a very low radiation dose, and can be repeated in serial studies. Radionuclidic studies of ventilation and perfusion can be performed in almost all children if the pediatrician and the nuclear medicine specialist have motivation and ingenuity. S []ontaneous pulmonary vascular occlusive disease which occurs in infants and pulmonary emboli in children are easily detected using radionuclides. The pathophysiologic defects of pulmonary agenesis, bronchopulmonary sequestration, and foreign body aspiration may be demonstrated by these techniques. These techniques also appear to be useful in following patients with bronchial asthma, cystic fibrosis, congenital emphysema, and postinfection pulmonary abnormalities. (auth)

  5. SU-F-T-356: DosimetricComparison of VMAT Vs Step and Shoot IMRT Plans for Stage III Lung CancerPatients with Mediastinal Involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, D; Bogue, J [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: For Stage III lung cancers that entail treatment of some or all of the mediastinum, anterior-posterior focused Step and Shoot IMRT (SS-IMRT) and VMAT plans have been clinically used to deliver the prescribed dose while working to minimize lung dose and avoid other critical structures. A comparison between the two planning methods was completed to see which treatment method is superior and minimizes dose to healthy lung tissue. Methods: Ten patients who were recently treated with SS-IMRT or VMAT plans for Stage III lung cancer with mediastinal involvement were selected. All patients received a simulation CT for treatment planning, as well as a 4D CT and PET/CT fusion for target delineation. Plans were prescribed 6250 cGy in 25 fractions and normalized such that 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the PTV. Clinically approved SS-IMRT or VMAT plans were then copied and planned using the alternative modality with identical optimization criteria. SS-IMRT plans utilized seven to nine beams distributed around the patient while the VMAT plans consisted of two full 360 degree arcs. Plans were compared for the lung volume receiving 20 Gy (V20). Results: Both SS-IMRT and VMAT can be used to achieve clinical treatment plans for patients with Stage III Lung cancer with targets encompassing the mediastinum. VMAT plans produced an average V20 of 23.0+/−8.3% and SS-IMRT produced an average of 24.2+/−10.0%. Conclusion: Results indicate that either method can achieve comparable dose distributions, however, VMAT can allow the optimizer to distribute dose over paths of minimal lung tissue and reduce the V20. Therefore, creating a VMAT with constraints identical to an SS-IMRT plan could help to reduce the V20 in clinical treatment plans.

  6. SU-F-T-356: DosimetricComparison of VMAT Vs Step and Shoot IMRT Plans for Stage III Lung CancerPatients with Mediastinal Involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, D; Bogue, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: For Stage III lung cancers that entail treatment of some or all of the mediastinum, anterior-posterior focused Step and Shoot IMRT (SS-IMRT) and VMAT plans have been clinically used to deliver the prescribed dose while working to minimize lung dose and avoid other critical structures. A comparison between the two planning methods was completed to see which treatment method is superior and minimizes dose to healthy lung tissue. Methods: Ten patients who were recently treated with SS-IMRT or VMAT plans for Stage III lung cancer with mediastinal involvement were selected. All patients received a simulation CT for treatment planning, as well as a 4D CT and PET/CT fusion for target delineation. Plans were prescribed 6250 cGy in 25 fractions and normalized such that 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the PTV. Clinically approved SS-IMRT or VMAT plans were then copied and planned using the alternative modality with identical optimization criteria. SS-IMRT plans utilized seven to nine beams distributed around the patient while the VMAT plans consisted of two full 360 degree arcs. Plans were compared for the lung volume receiving 20 Gy (V20). Results: Both SS-IMRT and VMAT can be used to achieve clinical treatment plans for patients with Stage III Lung cancer with targets encompassing the mediastinum. VMAT plans produced an average V20 of 23.0+/−8.3% and SS-IMRT produced an average of 24.2+/−10.0%. Conclusion: Results indicate that either method can achieve comparable dose distributions, however, VMAT can allow the optimizer to distribute dose over paths of minimal lung tissue and reduce the V20. Therefore, creating a VMAT with constraints identical to an SS-IMRT plan could help to reduce the V20 in clinical treatment plans.

  7. Impact of tumor extent and location on treatment outcome in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Kazushige; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Saito, Yoshihiro

    1996-01-01

    The results of treatment of 141 patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received definitive radiation therapy at Gunma University Hospital between 1976 and 1989 were retrospectively analyzed. Radiation was given with standard fractionation for a planned prophylactic dose of 40 Gy over 4 weeks and a definitive dose of 60 Gy over 6 weeks or more. The two- and five-year survival rates were 27% and 12% for stage IIIA, and 18% and 8% for stage IIIB, respectively (P=0.052). By univariate analysis, a primary tumor less than 5 cm in diameter was also an important predictor of survival (P=0.008). As for tumor location, the patients with primary tumors in the upper lobes or the superior segment of the lower lobes of the lung lived longer than those with primary tumors at any other site (P=0.032). Patients with epidermoid carcinoma had a higher survival rate at 5 years than those with other histologic types (14% vs 3%, P=0.074). Multivariate analysis showed that among tumor characteristics, the site of the primary tumor, the pattern of tumor spread and N stage were significantly associated with overall survival. Among the patients with stage III NSCLC, those with stage IIIA epidermoid carcinoma in the upper lobe or the superior segment of the lower lobe of the lung were considered to be the most favorable candidates for definitive radiation therapy. (author)

  8. SPIRIT: A seamless phase I/II randomized design for immunotherapy trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Beibei; Li, Daniel; Yuan, Ying

    2018-06-07

    Immunotherapy-treatments that enlist the immune system to battle tumors-has received widespread attention in cancer research. Due to its unique features and mechanisms for treating cancer, immunotherapy requires novel clinical trial designs. We propose a Bayesian seamless phase I/II randomized design for immunotherapy trials (SPIRIT) to find the optimal biological dose (OBD) defined in terms of the restricted mean survival time. We jointly model progression-free survival and the immune response. Progression-free survival is used as the primary endpoint to determine the OBD, and the immune response is used as an ancillary endpoint to quickly screen out futile doses. Toxicity is monitored throughout the trial. The design consists of two seamlessly connected stages. The first stage identifies a set of safe doses. The second stage adaptively randomizes patients to the safe doses identified and uses their progression-free survival and immune response to find the OBD. The simulation study shows that the SPIRIT has desirable operating characteristics and outperforms the conventional design. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Multidisciplinary management of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in stage III: clinical case description. Recommendations and state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Carnio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in industrialized countries with progressive increase of its mortality rate. Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC is approximately 80-85% of all lung cancers, being adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma the most common histologies. The majority of the patients with stage III clinical stage, presents a mediastinal lymph node involvement described with computed tomography (TC and/or positron emission tomography (PET. The current approach to patients with NSCLC is multidisciplinary, especially for those staged as potentially operable, both for staging and for a correct definition of best treatment strategy. Updated international and national Guidelines and recommendations can provide valuable support to the clinician.The case described concerns the accidental detection of a tumour in the lung in a 58-year-old man with arterial hypertension controlled with ACE inhibitors. The treatments agreed after a multidisciplinary approach are cisplatin and docetaxel, the surgical resection, and the radiotherapy. After three months the patient has neither metastasis nor relapse.

  10. Variation in causes of death in patients with non-small cell lung cancer according to stage and time since diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen-Heijnen, M. L. G.; van Erning, F. N.; De Ruysscher, D. K.; Coebergh, J. W. W.; Groen, H. J. M.

    Background: Many patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) die within the first few years of diagnosis, and considerable excess mortality remains even after 5 years. We investigated the death rate and the distribution of causes of death for NSCLC patients by age and stage at diagnosis during

  11. Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration for Staging of Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer without Mediastinal Involvement at Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naur, Therese Maria Henriette; Konge, Lars; Clementsen, Paul Frost

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staging of lung cancer is essential to the treatment, which is curative only in cases of localized disease. Previous studies have suggested that endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is unnecessary when positron emission tomography-computed tomog...

  12. Limited Impact of Setup and Range Uncertainties, Breathing Motion, and Interplay Effects in Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inoue, Tatsuya; Widder, Joachim; van Dijk, Lisanne V; Takegawa, Hideki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takashina, Masaaki; Usui, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru; Saito, Anneyuko I; Sasai, Keisuke; Van't Veld, Aart A; Langendijk, Johannes A; Korevaar, Erik W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects using scanning pencil beams in robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Three-field IMPT plans

  13. Patient reported outcomes following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy or surgery for stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer : Results from the ROSEL multicenter randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louie, Alexander V.; van Werkhoven, Erik; Chen, Hanbo; Smit, Egbert F.; Paul, Marinus A.; Widder, Joachim; Groen, Harry J. M.; van den Borne, Ben E. E. M.; De Jaeger, Katrien; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    We report quality of life and indirect costs from patient reported outcomes from the ROSEL randomized control trial comparing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR, also known as stereotactic body radiotherapy or SBRT) versus surgical resection for medically operable stage IA non-small cell lung

  14. Residual F-18-FDG-PET Uptake 12 Weeks After Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Predicts Local Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollineni, Vikram Rao; Widder, Joachim; Pruim, Jan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wiegman, Erwin M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) uptake at 12 weeks after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From November 2006 to February 2010, 132 medically

  15. Reliable and valid assessment of competence in endoscopic ultrasonography and fine-needle aspiration for mediastinal staging of non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konge, L.; Vilmann, P.; Clementsen, P.; Annema, J. T.; Ringsted, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background and study aims: Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) guided by endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is important in mediastinal staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Training standards and implementation strategies of this technique are currently under discussion. The aim of this study was

  16. A Population-Based Comparative Effectiveness Study of Radiation Therapy Techniques in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Jeremy P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Science, University of California– San Diego, Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, California (United States); Hanlon, Alexandra L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concerns have been raised about the potential for worse treatment outcomes because of dosimetric inaccuracies related to tumor motion and increased toxicity caused by the spread of low-dose radiation to normal tissues in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We therefore performed a population-based comparative effectiveness analysis of IMRT, conventional 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional radiation therapy (2D-RT) in stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database to identify a cohort of patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC from 2002 to 2009 treated with IMRT, 3D-CRT, or 2D-RT. Using Cox regression and propensity score matching, we compared survival and toxicities of these treatments. Results: The proportion of patients treated with IMRT increased from 2% in 2002 to 25% in 2009, and the use of 2D-RT decreased from 32% to 3%. In univariate analysis, IMRT was associated with improved overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.90, P=.02) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR 0.89, P=.02). After controlling for confounders, IMRT was associated with similar OS (HR 0.94, P=.23) and CSS (HR 0.94, P=.28) compared with 3D-CRT. Both techniques had superior OS compared with 2D-RT. IMRT was associated with similar toxicity risks on multivariate analysis compared with 3D-CRT. Propensity score matched model results were similar to those from adjusted models. Conclusions: In this population-based analysis, IMRT for stage III NSCLC was associated with similar OS and CSS and maintained similar toxicity risks compared with 3D-CRT.

  17. Effect of interfraction interval in hyperfractionated radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy for stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Shibamoto, Yuta

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the influence of interfraction interval in hyperfractionated radiotherapy (HFX RT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy for Stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred sixty-nine patients treated in a randomized study were retrospectively analyzed. Group I patients were treated by HFX RT with 1.2 Gy twice daily with a total dose of 64.8 Gy in 27 treatment days, while Groups II and III patients were treated by the same HFX RT and concurrent chemotherapy with carboplatin and etoposide (every week in Group II and every other week in Group III). Interfraction intervals of either 4.5-5 h or 5.5-6 h were used for each patient. Results: Patients treated with shorter interfraction intervals (4.5-5 h) had a better prognosis than those treated with longer intervals (5.5-6 h) (median survival: 22 vs. 7 months; 5-year survival rate: 27% vs. 0%, p = 0.00000). This phenomenon was observed in all treatment groups. Patients ≥ 60 years of age, with Stage IIIA disease, or with previous weight loss ≤ 5% were treated more often with the shorter intervals than those 5%, respectively, but in all of these subgroups of patients, the shorter intervals were associated with a better prognosis. Multivariate analysis showed that the interfraction interval was an independent prognostic factor, together with sex, age, performance status, and stage. The shorter intervals were associated with an increased incidence of acute high grade toxicity, but not with an increase in late toxicity. Conclusion: Patients treated with shorter interfraction intervals (4.5-5 h) appeared to have a better survival than those treated with longer intervals (5.5-6 h). Prospective randomized studies are warranted to further investigate the influence of interfraction interval in HFX RT

  18. Tumor cavitation in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy: incidence and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phernambucq, Erik C J; Hartemink, Koen J; Smit, Egbert F; Paul, Marinus A; Postmus, Pieter E; Comans, Emile F I; Senan, Suresh

    2012-08-01

    Commonly reported complications after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) include febrile neutropenia, radiation esophagitis, and pneumonitis. We studied the incidence of tumor cavitation and/or "tumor abscess" after CCRT in a single-institutional cohort. Between 2003 and 2010, 87 patients with stage III NSCLC underwent cisplatin-based CCRT and all subsequent follow-up at the VU University Medical Center. Diagnostic and radiotherapy planning computed tomography scans were reviewed for tumor cavitation, which was defined as a nonbronchial air-containing cavity located within the primary tumor. Pulmonary toxicities scored as Common Toxicity Criteria v3.0 of grade III or more, occurring within 90 days after end of radiotherapy, were analyzed. In the entire cohort, tumor cavitation was observed on computed tomography scans of 16 patients (18%). The histology in cavitated tumors was squamous cell (n = 14), large cell (n = 1), or adenocarcinoma (n = 1). Twenty patients (23%) experienced pulmonary toxicity of grade III or more, other than radiation pneumonitis. Eight patients with a tumor cavitation (seven squamous cell carcinoma) developed severe pulmonary complications; tumor abscess (n = 5), fatal hemorrhage (n = 2), and fatal embolism (n = 1). Two patients with a tumor abscess required open-window thoracostomy post-CCRT. The median overall survival for patients with or without tumor cavitation were 9.9 and 16.3 months, respectively (p = 0.09). With CCRT, acute pulmonary toxicity of grade III or more developed in 50% of patients with stage III NSCLC, who also had radiological features of tumor cavitation. The optimal treatment of patients with this presentation is unclear given the high risk of a tumor abscess.

  19. Comparative Effectiveness of 5 Treatment Strategies for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the Elderly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirvani, Shervin M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jiang, Jing [Department of Biostatistics and Applied Mathematics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y.; Welsh, James W.; Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swisher, Stephen [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: bsmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The incidence of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) among older adults is expected to increase because of demographic trends and computed tomography-based screening; yet, optimal treatment in the elderly remains controversial. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare cohort spanning 2001-2007, we compared survival outcomes associated with 5 strategies used in contemporary practice: lobectomy, sublobar resection, conventional radiation therapy, stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), and observation. Methods and Materials: Treatment strategy and covariates were determined in 10,923 patients aged {>=}66 years with stage IA-IB NSCLC. Cox regression, adjusted for patient and tumor factors, compared overall and disease-specific survival for the 5 strategies. In a second exploratory analysis, propensity-score matching was used for comparison of SABR with other options. Results: The median age was 75 years, and 29% had moderate to severe comorbidities. Treatment distribution was lobectomy (59%), sublobar resection (11.7%), conventional radiation (14.8%), observation (12.6%), and SABR (1.1%). In Cox regression analysis with a median follow-up time of 3.2 years, SABR was associated with the lowest risk of death within 6 months of diagnosis (hazard ratio [HR] 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38-0.63; referent is lobectomy). After 6 months, lobectomy was associated with the best overall and disease-specific survival. In the propensity-score matched analysis, survival after SABR was similar to that after lobectomy (HR 0.71; 95% CI 0.45-1.12; referent is SABR). Conventional radiation and observation were associated with poor outcomes in all analyses. Conclusions: In this population-based experience, lobectomy was associated with the best long-term outcomes in fit elderly patients with early-stage NSCLC. Exploratory analysis of SABR early adopters suggests efficacy comparable with that of surgery in select populations

  20. A patient perspective on shared decision making in stage I non-small cell lung cancer: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmans, Wendy; Damman, Olga C; Senan, Suresh; Hartemink, Koen J; Smit, Egbert F; Timmermans, Danielle R M

    2015-12-16

    Surgery and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) are both curative treatment options for patients with a stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Consequently, there is growing interest in studying the role of patients in treatment decision making. We studied how patients with stage I NSCLC perceived shared decision making (SDM) in general, and how they viewed different aspects of SDM. A sequential mixed methods design was used, consisting of qualitative interviews (N=11), as well as a survey study (N=76) focusing on different SDM-related aspects. Participants were interviewed to understand their own experience with treatment decision making. In the survey study, patients rated the importance of 20 aspects of shared decision making that were identified during interviews. Descriptive analysis and explorative factor analysis were performed. We assessed six qualitative themes covering SDM aspects that were determined by patients to be important. The survey identified four SDM-related factors with sufficient internal consistency, namely (1) 'guidance by clinician' (α=.741), (2) 'conduct of clinician' (α=.774); (3) 'preparation for treatment decision making' (α=.864); and (4) 'active role of patient in treatment decision making' (α=.782). Of these, clinician guidance was rated as most important by patients (M=3.61; SD=.44). Only 28.9% of patients in the survey study reported that both treatment options were discussed with them. Patients with a stage I NSCLC found clinician guidance to be important when making treatment decisions. Nevertheless, the majority of patients reported not being offered both treatment options, which might have influenced this finding.

  1. Comparison of systematic mediastinal lymph node dissection versus systematic sampling for lung cancer staging and completeness of surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Yan, Shi; Lv, Chao; Feng, Yuan; Wang, Yuzhao; Zhang, Lijian; Yang, Yue

    2011-12-01

    This self-controlled prospective study was designed to investigate the efficacy of systematic sampling (SS), compared with systematic mediastinal lymph node dissection (SMLD), for pathologic staging and completeness of surgery. Over a period of 11 mo, 110 patients with lung cancer were enlisted and treated by pulmonary resection. Surgeons systematically sampled mediastinal lymph nodes prior to pulmonary resection, and after pulmonary resection SMLD was performed to each patient using Mountain's procedure [1]. After SMLD, pN status was classified as N0 in 57 cases, N1 in 27, and N2 in 26. SS detected 38.3% of pooled nodes and 37.6% of pooled positive nodes collected from SMLD. Pathologic diagnosis after SS was understaged in nine cases (8.2%) compared with staging after SMLD. However, surgery was incomplete in 24 cases (21.8%) if SMLD was not performed after sampling. Negative predictive value for SS was 86.8% on the right side, and 95.0% on the left. Three categories were generated according to pN status: negative nodes in SS and additional negative nodes from SMLD [S(-)D(-)], negative nodes in SS but additional positive nodes from SMLD [S(-)D(+)], and positive nodes in SS [S(+)D(+)]. cN2 (P=0.000) and CEA level (P=0.001) were correlated with pN status. There was significant overall survival difference between non-N2 group and N2 group (P=0.002). SMLD may harvest about three times of mediastinal lymph nodes compared with SS. SS is more likely to affect the completeness of surgery instead of underrating pathologic stage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment Outcomes in Stage I Lung Cancer: A Comparison of Surgery and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Varun; Crabtree, Traves D.; Bell, Jennifer M.; Broderick, Stephen R; Morgensztern, Daniel; Colditz, Graham A.; Kreisel, Daniel; Krupnick, A. Sasha; Patterson, G. Alexander; Meyers, Bryan F.; Patel, Aalok; Robinson, Clifford G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The relative roles of surgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are evolving particularly for marginally operable patients. Since there is limited prospective comparative data for these treatment modalities, we evaluated their relative use and outcomes at the population level using a national database. Methods Patient variables and treatment-related outcomes were abstracted for patients with clinical stage I NSCLC from the National Cancer Database. Patients receiving surgery were compared to those undergoing SBRT in exploratory unmatched and subsequent propensity matched analyses. Results Between 1998 and 2010, 117618 patients underwent surgery or SBRT for clinical stage I NSCLC. Of these, 111731 (95%) received surgery while 5887 (5%) underwent SBRT. Patients in the surgery group were younger, more likely to be males, and had higher Charlson comorbidity scores. SBRT patients were more likely to have T1 (vs.T2) tumors and receive treatment at academic centers. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 2596/109485 (2.4%). Median overall survival favored the surgery group in both unmatched (68.4 months vs. 33.3 months, p<.001) and matched analysis based on patient characteristics (62.3 months vs. 33.1months, p<.001). Disease specific survival was unavailable from the dataset. Conclusion In a propensity matched comparison, patients selected for surgery have improved survival compared with SBRT. In the absence of information on cause of death and with limited variables to characterize comorbidity, it is not possible to assess the relative contribution of patient selection or better cancer control towards the improved survival. Rigorous prospective studies are needed to optimize patient selection for SBRT in the high-risk surgical population. PMID:26334753

  3. Definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy. Principles and practice for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guckenberger, M.; Sauer, O. [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Andratschke, N. [University of Rostock, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Rostock (Germany); Alheit, H. [Distler Radiation Oncology, Bautzen/Pirna (Germany); Holy, R. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany); Moustakis, C. [University of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Nestle, U. [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    This report from the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO) provides a definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) that agrees with that of other international societies. SBRT is defined as a method of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) that accurately delivers a high irradiation dose to an extracranial target in one or few treatment fractions. Detailed recommendations concerning the principles and practice of SBRT for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are given. These cover the entire treatment process; from patient selection, staging, treatment planning and delivery to follow-up. SBRT was identified as the method of choice when compared to best supportive care (BSC), conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation. Based on current evidence, SBRT appears to be on a par with sublobar resection and is an effective treatment option in operable patients who refuse lobectomy. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeitsgruppe ''Stereotaktische Radiotherapie'' der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie (DEGRO) erarbeitete eine Definition der Koerperstereotaxie (SBRT), die sich an vorhandene internationale Definitionen anlehnt: Die SBRT ist eine Form der perkutanen Strahlentherapie, die mit hoher Praezision eine hohe Bestrahlungsdosis in einer oder wenigen Bestrahlungsfraktionen in einem extrakraniellen Zielvolumen appliziert. Zur Praxis der SBRT beim nichtkleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) im fruehen Stadium werden detaillierte Empfehlungen gegeben, die den gesamten Ablauf der Behandlung von der Indikationsstellung, Staging, Behandlungsplanung und Applikation sowie Nachsorge umfassen. Die Koerperstereotaxie wurde als Methode der Wahl im Vergleich zu Best Supportive Care, zur konventionell fraktionierten Strahlentherapie sowie zur Radiofrequenzablation identifiziert. Die Ergebnisse nach SBRT und sublobaerer Resektion

  4. Nodal Stage of Surgically Resected Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Its Effect on Recurrence Patterns and Overall Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varlotto, John M., E-mail: john.varlotto@umassmemorial.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Yao, Aaron N. [Department of Healthcare Policy and Research, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); DeCamp, Malcolm M. [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Northwestern University School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Ramakrishna, Satvik [Northwestern University School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Recht, Abe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Flickinger, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Andrei, Adin [Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Reed, Michael F. [Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); Heart and Vascular Institute, Pennsylvania State University-Hershey, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); Toth, Jennifer W. [Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Pennsylvania State University-Hershey, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); Fizgerald, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Higgins, Kristin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Zheng, Xiao [Department of Healthcare Policy and Research, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Shelkey, Julie [Department of Anesthesiology, Columbia University, New York, New York (United States); and others

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) for patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with N2 involvement. We investigated the relationship between nodal stage and local-regional recurrence (LR), distant recurrence (DR) and overall survival (OS) for patients having an R0 resection. Methods and Materials: A multi-institutional database of consecutive patients undergoing R0 resection for stage I-IIIA NSCLC from 1995 to 2008 was used. Patients receiving any radiation therapy before relapse were excluded. A total of 1241, 202, and 125 patients were identified with N0, N1, and N2 involvement, respectively; 161 patients received chemotherapy. Cumulative incidence rates were calculated for LR and DR as first sites of failure, and Kaplan-Meier estimates were made for OS. Competing risk analysis and proportional hazards models were used to examine LR, DR, and OS. Independent variables included age, sex, surgical procedure, extent of lymph node sampling, histology, lymphatic or vascular invasion, tumor size, tumor grade, chemotherapy, nodal stage, and visceral pleural invasion. Results: The median follow-up time was 28.7 months. Patients with N1 or N2 nodal stage had rates of LR similar to those of patients with N0 disease, but were at significantly increased risk for both DR (N1, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.84, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.30-2.59; P=.001; N2, HR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.55-3.48; P<.001) and death (N1, HR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.18-1.81; P<.001; N2, HR = 2.33, 95% CI: 1.78-3.04; P<.001). LR was associated with squamous histology, visceral pleural involvement, tumor size, age, wedge resection, and segmentectomy. The most frequent site of LR was the mediastinum. Conclusions: Our investigation demonstrated that nodal stage is directly associated with DR and OS but not with LR. Thus, even some patients with, N0-N1 disease are at relatively high risk of local recurrence. Prospective

  5. Integrated PET/CT in non-small cell lung cancer staging—Clinical and pathological agreement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Vaz

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Integrated PET/CT has become a fundamental tool in the preoperative assessment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC providing useful anatomical and metabolic information to characterize tumoral lesions and to detect unsuspected metastatic disease. Aim: To compare the agreement between clinical and pathological staging before and after the use of PET/CT. Material and methods: Retrospective study of patients with NSCLC who underwent potentially curative surgery throughout 10.5 years. Cohen's kappa coefficient was used to evaluate staging agreement. Results: One hundred and fifty patients were evaluated, 78% males, with a mean age of 65 (±9.6 years. Thirteen percent were submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PET/CT was performed in 41%. Global agreement between clinical and pathological staging was 51% (kappa = 0.3639. There was a statistically significant difference between the staging results in patients who underwent PET/CT, when compared to the subgroup who did not (p = 0.003. For those with PET/CT false negatives occurred in less 39%, false positives in more 12% and clinical and pathological staging coincided in more 27%. The overall results reflected an improvement in the agreement between clinical and pathological staging in the PET/CT subgroup (67%, kappa = 0.5737 vs 40%, kappa = 0.2292. PET/CT accuracy was enhanced when patients re-staged after neoadjuvant therapy were excluded and a substantial staging agreement was obtained for those who had the exam only for staging purposes (73%, kappa = 0.6323. Conclusion: Inclusion of PET/CT in NSCLC preoperative assessment improved the accuracy of the clinical staging, with a good level of agreement with pathological staging. Resumo: Introdução: A PET/TC integrada tornou-se num instrumento fundamental na avaliação pré-operatória do cancro do pulmão de não pequenas células (CPNPC, fornecendo informação anatómica e

  6. The incidence of hoarseness after mediastinoscopy and outcome of video-assisted versus conventional mediastinoscopy in lung cancer staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, Adnan; Çitak, Necati; Büyükkale, Songül; Metin, Muzaffer; Kök, Abdulaziz; Çelikten, Alper; Gürses, Atilla

    2016-02-01

    Objectives Theoretically, video-assisted mediastinoscopy (VM) should provide a decrease in the incidence of hoarseness in comparison with conventional mediastinoscopy (CM). Methods An investigation of 448 patients with the NSCLC who underwent mediastinoscopy (n = 261 VM, n = 187 CM) between 2006 and 2010. Results With VM, the mean number of sampled LNs and of stations per case were both significantly higher (n = 7.91 ± 1.97 and n = 4.29 ± 0.81) than they were for CM (n = 6.65 ± 1.79 and n = 4.14 ± 0.84) (p < 0.001 and p = 0.06). Hoarseness was reported in 24 patients (5.4%) with VM procedures resulting in a higher incidence of hoarseness than did CM procedures (6.9% and 3.2%) (p = 0.08). The incidence of hoarseness was observed to be more frequent in patients with left-lung carcinoma who had undergone a mediastinoscopy (p = 0.03). Hoarseness developed in 6% of the patients sampled at station 4L, whereas this ratio was 0% in patients who were not sampled at 4L (p = 0.07). A multivariate analysis showed that the presence of a tumor in the left lung is the only independent risk factor indicating hoarseness (p = 0.09). The sensitivity, NPV, and accuracy of VM were calculated as to be 0.87, 0.95, and 0.96, respectively. The same staging values for CM were 0.83, 0.94, and 0.95, respectively. Conclusion VM, the presence of a tumor in the left-lung, and 4L sampling via mediastinoscopy are risk factors for subsequent hoarseness. Probably due to a wider area of dissection, VM can lead to more frequent hoarseness.

  7. Pipe Overpack Container Fire Testing: Phase I II & III.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, Victor G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ammerman, Douglas J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lopez, Carlos [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gill, Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    The Pipe Overpack Container (POC) was developed at Rocky Flats to transport plutonium residues with higher levels of plutonium than standard transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. In 1996 Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a series of tests to determine the degree of protection POCs provided during storage accident events. One of these tests exposed four of the POCs to a 30-minute engulfing pool fire, resulting in one of the 7A drum overpacks generating sufficient internal pressure to pop off its lid and expose the top of the pipe container (PC) to the fire environment. The initial contents of the POCs were inert materials, which would not generate large internal pressure within the PC if heated. POCs are now being used to store combustible TRU waste at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. At the request of DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), starting in 2015 SNL conducted a series of fire tests to examine whether PCs with combustibles would reach a temperature that would result in (1) decomposition of inner contents and (2) subsequent generation of sufficient gas to cause the PC to over-pressurize and release its inner content. Tests conducted during 2015 and 2016 were done in three phases. The goal of the first phase was to see if the PC would reach high enough temperatures to decompose typical combustible materials inside the PC. The goal of the second test phase was to determine under what heating loads (i.e., incident heat fluxes) the 7A drum lid pops off from the POC drum. The goal of the third phase was to see if surrogate aerosol gets released from the PC when the drum lid is off. This report will describe the various tests conducted in phase I, II, and III, present preliminary results from these tests, and discuss implications for the POCs.

  8. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and CT for N staging of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegar Zubović, Sandra; Kristić, Spomenka; Hadžihasanović, Besima

    2017-08-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to investigate the possibilities of non-invasive diagnostic imaging methods, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and CT, in clinical N staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Retrospective clinical study included 50 patients with diagnosed NSCLC who have undergone PET/CT for the purpose of disease staging. The International association for the study of lung cancer (IASLC) nodal mapping system was used for analysis of nodal disease. Data regarding CT N-staging and PET/CT Nstaging were recorded. Two methods were compared using χ2 test and Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results Statistical analysis showed that although there were some differences in determining the N stage between CT and PET/CT, these methods were in significant correlation. CT and PET/CT findings established the same N stage in 74% of the patients. In five patients based on PET/CT findings the staging was changed from operable to inoperable, while in four patients staging was changed from inoperable to operable. Conclusion PET/CT and CT are noninvasive methods that can be reliably used for N staging of NSCLC. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  9. Evaluation of concomitant use of non-specific immunopotentiator on 172 cases of primary lung cancer (Stage III, IV) treated with radiation combined with chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Shuji; Imajo, Yoshinari; Hamada, Fumio; Miyaji, Chihiro

    1982-01-01

    The clinical effect of concomitant use of non-specific immunopotentiator OK-432 and/or PSK was studied about 172 cases of primary lung cancer (Stage III, IV). In 91 cases in stage III, fifty percent survival period was found to be 11.5 months for 63 cases with OK-432 and/or PSK, and 7.5 months for 28 cases without immunotherapy, respectively. In 81 cases in stage IV, fifty percent survival period was found to be 6.7 months for 45 cases with OK-432 and/or PSK, and 3.3 months for 36 cases without immunotherapy, respectively. (author)

  10. Negative EBUS-TBNA Predicts Very Low Prevalence of Mediastinal Disease in Staging of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverner, John; Cheang, Mun-Yoong; Antippa, Phillip; See, Katharine; Irving, Louis B; Steinfort, Daniel P

    2016-04-01

    Confirmation of mediastinal disease (N2/3) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) generally precludes curative surgical management. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has become a routine first test in mediastinal staging of NSCLC; however, it remains unclear whether a negative EBUS-TBNA should be followed by mediastinoscopy before proceeding to surgery. Understanding the prevalence of metastases in lymph nodes with benign findings on EBUS-TBNA will inform decision making following negative EBUS-TBNA. We examined a retrospective cohort of patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA before resection with mediastinal lymph node sampling for NSCLC between December 2009 and June 2014 in 3 hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. All patients had integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) before EBUS-TBNA. Eighty-two matched mediastinal lymph node stations were sampled in 57 patients by both EBUS-TBNA and surgical resection, 47 nodes in patients staged cN0/1 by PET/CT and 35 nodes in patients staged cN2/3. All patients had a negative EBUS-TBNA. Four malignant nodes were identified surgically (4.9% of lymph nodes). The mean size of malignant deposits was 5.5 mm. Per-node negative predictive value was 78/82=0.95. All malignant nodes were located in patients with moderate-high risk disease (cN2/3), giving a disease prevalence in cN2/3 patients of 11%, and 0% in cN0/1. In patients staged cN2, per-node NVP was 0.89. The prevalence of mediastinal nodal disease following negative EBUS-TBNA is very low, at 4.9%. The per-node NVP of EBUS-TBNA is 0.95, decreasing to 0.89 in moderate-high risk patients. We suggest that a negative EBUS-TBNA of mediastinal nodes does not need to be confirmed by mediastinoscopy of those nodal stations, regardless of PET/CT findings.

  11. Percutaneous thermal ablation for stage IA non-small cell lung cancer: long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narsule, Chaitan K; Sridhar, Praveen; Nair, Divya; Gupta, Avneesh; Oommen, Roy G; Ebright, Michael I; Litle, Virginia R; Fernando, Hiran C

    2017-10-01

    Surgical resection is the most effective curative therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, many patients are unable to tolerate resection secondary to poor reserve or comorbid disease. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and microwave ablation (MWA) are methods of percutaneous thermal ablation that can be used to treat medically inoperable patients with NSCLC. We present long-term outcomes following thermal ablation of stage IA NSCLC from a single center. Patients with stage IA NSCLC and factors precluding resection who underwent RFA or MWA from July 2005 to September 2009 were studied. CT and PET-CT scans were performed at 3 and 6 month intervals, respectively, for first 24 months of follow-up. Factors associated with local progression (LP) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Twenty-one patients underwent 21 RFA and 4 MWA for a total of 25 ablations. Fifteen patients had T1a and six patients had T1b tumors. Mean follow-up was 42 months, median survival was 39 months, and OS at three years was 52%. There was no significant difference in median survival between T1a nodules and T1b nodules (36 vs . 39 months, P=0.29) or for RFA and MWA (36 vs . 50 months, P=0.80). Ten patients had LP (47.6%), at a median time of 35 months. There was no significant difference in LP between T1a and T1b tumors (22 vs . 35 months, P=0.94) or RFA and MWA (35 vs . 17 months, P=0.18). Median OS with LP was 32 months compared to 39 months without LP (P=0.68). Three patients underwent repeat ablations. Mean time to LP following repeat ablation was 14.75 months. One patient had two repeat ablations and was disease free at 40-month follow-up. Thermal ablation effectively treated or controlled stage IA NSCLC in medically inoperable patients. Three-year OS exceeded 50%, and LP did not affect OS. Therefore, thermal ablation is a viable option for medically inoperable patients with early stage NSCLC.

  12. Temporal dynamics of the developing lung transcriptome in three common inbred strains of laboratory mice reveals multiple stages of postnatal alveolar development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle J. Beauchemin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To characterize temporal patterns of transcriptional activity during normal lung development, we generated genome wide gene expression data for 26 pre- and post-natal time points in three common inbred strains of laboratory mice (C57BL/6J, A/J, and C3H/HeJ. Using Principal Component Analysis and least squares regression modeling, we identified both strain-independent and strain-dependent patterns of gene expression. The 4,683 genes contributing to the strain-independent expression patterns were used to define a murine Developing Lung Characteristic Subtranscriptome (mDLCS. Regression modeling of the Principal Components supported the four canonical stages of mammalian embryonic lung development (embryonic, pseudoglandular, canalicular, saccular defined previously by morphology and histology. For postnatal alveolar development, the regression model was consistent with four stages of alveolarization characterized by episodic transcriptional activity of genes related to pulmonary vascularization. Genes expressed in a strain-dependent manner were enriched for annotations related to neurogenesis, extracellular matrix organization, and Wnt signaling. Finally, a comparison of mouse and human transcriptomics from pre-natal stages of lung development revealed conservation of pathways associated with cell cycle, axon guidance, immune function, and metabolism as well as organism-specific expression of genes associated with extracellular matrix organization and protein modification. The mouse lung development transcriptome data generated for this study serves as a unique reference set to identify genes and pathways essential for normal mammalian lung development and for investigations into the developmental origins of respiratory disease and cancer. The gene expression data are available from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO archive (GSE74243. Temporal expression patterns of mouse genes can be investigated using a study specific web resource (http://lungdevelopment.jax.org.

  13. Temporal dynamics of the developing lung transcriptome in three common inbred strains of laboratory mice reveals multiple stages of postnatal alveolar development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchemin, Kyle J; Wells, Julie M; Kho, Alvin T; Philip, Vivek M; Kamir, Daniela; Kohane, Isaac S; Graber, Joel H; Bult, Carol J

    2016-01-01

    To characterize temporal patterns of transcriptional activity during normal lung development, we generated genome wide gene expression data for 26 pre- and post-natal time points in three common inbred strains of laboratory mice (C57BL/6J, A/J, and C3H/HeJ). Using Principal Component Analysis and least squares regression modeling, we identified both strain-independent and strain-dependent patterns of gene expression. The 4,683 genes contributing to the strain-independent expression patterns were used to define a murine Developing Lung Characteristic Subtranscriptome (mDLCS). Regression modeling of the Principal Components supported the four canonical stages of mammalian embryonic lung development (embryonic, pseudoglandular, canalicular, saccular) defined previously by morphology and histology. For postnatal alveolar development, the regression model was consistent with four stages of alveolarization characterized by episodic transcriptional activity of genes related to pulmonary vascularization. Genes expressed in a strain-dependent manner were enriched for annotations related to neurogenesis, extracellular matrix organization, and Wnt signaling. Finally, a comparison of mouse and human transcriptomics from pre-natal stages of lung development revealed conservation of pathways associated with cell cycle, axon guidance, immune function, and metabolism as well as organism-specific expression of genes associated with extracellular matrix organization and protein modification. The mouse lung development transcriptome data generated for this study serves as a unique reference set to identify genes and pathways essential for normal mammalian lung development and for investigations into the developmental origins of respiratory disease and cancer. The gene expression data are available from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) archive (GSE74243). Temporal expression patterns of mouse genes can be investigated using a study specific web resource (http://lungdevelopment.jax.org).

  14. Impact of FDG-PET/CT on Radiotherapy Volume Delineation in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Correlation of Imaging Stage With Pathologic Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Sergio L.; Menard, Sonia; Devic, Slobodan; Sirois, Christian; Souhami, Luis; Lisbona, Robert; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) is more accurate than CT in determining the extent of non-small-cell lung cancer. We performed a study to evaluate the impact of FDG-PET/CT on the radiotherapy volume delineation compared with CT without using any mathematical algorithm and to correlate the findings with the pathologic examination findings. Methods and Materials: A total of 32 patients with proven non-small-cell lung cancer, pathologic specimens from the mediastinum and lung primary, and pretreatment chest CT and FDG-PET/CT scans were studied. For each patient, two data sets of theoretical gross tumor volumes were contoured. One set was determined using the chest CT only, and the second, done separately, was based on the co-registered FDG-PET/CT data. The disease stage of each patient was determined using the TNM staging system for three data sets: the CT scan only, FDG-PET/CT scan, and pathologic findings. Results: Pathologic examination altered the CT-determined stage in 22 (69%) of 32 patients and the PET-determined stage in 16 (50%) of 32 patients. The most significant alterations were related to the N stage. PET altered the TNM stage in 15 (44%) of 32 patients compared with CT alone, but only 7 of these 15 alterations were confirmed by the pathologic findings. With respect to contouring the tumor volume for radiotherapy, PET altered the contour in 18 (56%) of 32 cases compared with CT alone. Conclusion: The contour of the tumor volume of non-small-cell lung cancer patients with co-registered FDG-PET/CT resulted in >50% alterations compared with CT targeting, findings similar to those of other publications. However, the significance of this change is unknown. Furthermore, pathologic examination showed that PET is not always accurate and histologic examination should be obtained to confirm the findings of PET whenever possible

  15. Multiplex zymography captures stage-specific activity profiles of cathepsins K, L, and S in human breast, lung, and cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Binbin; Platt, Manu O

    2011-07-14

    Cathepsins K, L, and S are cysteine proteases upregulated in cancer and proteolyze extracellular matrix to facilitate metastasis, but difficulty distinguishing specific cathepsin activity in complex tissue extracts confounds scientific studies and employing them for use in clinical diagnoses. Here, we have developed multiplex cathepsin zymography to profile cathepsins K, L, and S activity in 10 μg human breast, lung, and cervical tumors by exploiting unique electrophoretic mobility and renaturation properties. Frozen breast, lung, and cervix cancer tissue lysates and normal organ tissue lysates from the same human patients were obtained (28 breast tissues, 23 lung tissues, and 23 cervix tissues), minced and homogenized prior to loading for cathepsin gelatin zymography to determine enzymatic activity. Cleared bands of cathepsin activity were identified and validated in tumor extracts and detected organ- and stage-specific differences in activity. Cathepsin K was unique compared to cathepsins L and S. It was significantly higher for all cancers even at the earliest stage tested (stage I for lung and cervix (n = 6, p zymography, yielded 100% sensitivity and specificity for 20 breast tissue samples tested (10 normal; 10 tumor) in part due to the consistent absence of cathepsin K in normal breast tissue across all patients. To summarize, this sensitive assay provides quantitative outputs of cathepsins K, L, and S activities from mere micrograms of tissue and has potential use as a supplement to histological methods of clinical diagnoses of biopsied human tissue.

  16. CT characteristics and pathological implications of early stage (T1N0M0) lung adenocarcinoma with pure ground-glass opacity

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    Jin, Xin; Zhao, Shao-hong; Wu, Jian; Wu, Chong-chong; Chang, Rui-ping; Ju, Hai-yue [Chinese PLA General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Gao, Jie; Wang, Dian-jun [Chinese PLA General Hospital, Department of Pathology, Beijing (China)

    2015-09-15

    To analyze the CT characteristics and pathological classification of early lung adenocarcinoma (T1N0M0) with pure ground-glass opacity (pGGO). Ninety-four lesions with pGGO on CT in 88 patients with T1N0M0 lung adenocarcinoma were selected from January 2010 to December 2012. All lesions were confirmed by pathology. CT appearances were analyzed including lesion location, size, density, uniformity, shape, margin, tumour-lung interface, internal and surrounding malignant signs. Lesion size and density were compared using analysis of variance, lesion size also assessed using ROC curves. Gender of patients, lesion location and CT appearances were compared using χ2-test. There were no significant differences in gender, lesion location and density with histological invasiveness (P > 0.05). The ROC curve showed that the possibility of invasive lesion was 88.73 % when diameter of lesion was more than 10.5 mm. There was a significant difference between lesion uniformity and histological invasiveness (P = 0.01). There were significant differences in margin, tumour-lung interface, air bronchogram with histological invasiveness (P = 0.02,P = 0.00,P = 0.048). The correlation index of lesion size and uniformity was r = 0.45 (P = 0.00). The lesion size and uniformity, tumour-lung interface and the air bronchogram can help predict invasive extent of early stage lung adenocarcinoma with pGGO. (orig.)

  17. Feasibility of four-arm robotic lobectomy as solo surgery in patients with clinical stage I lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong Yong; Suh, Jee Won; Narm, Kyoung Sik; Lee, Chang Young; Lee, Jin Gu; Paik, Hyo Chae; Chung, Kyoung Young; Kim, Dae Joon

    2017-06-01

    This study was performed to investigate the feasibility of four-arm robotic lobectomy (FARL) as a solo surgical technique in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Early outcome and long-term survival of FARL were compared with those of video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy (VATL). Prospective enrollment of patients with clinical stage I NSCLC undergoing FARL or VATL (20 patients in each group) was planned. Interim analysis for early postoperative outcome was performed after the initial 10 cases in each group. The study was terminated early because of safety issues in the FARL group after enrollment of 12 FARL and 17 VATL patients from 2011 to 2012. There were no differences in clinical characteristics between groups. Lobectomy time and total operation time were significantly longer in the FARL group (P=0.003). There were three life-threatening events in the FARL group (2 bleedings, 1 bronchus tear) that necessitated thoracotomy conversion in 1 patient. There were no differences in other operative outcomes including pain score, complications, or length of hospital stay. Pathologic stage and number of dissected lymph nodes (LNs) were also comparable. During a follow-up of 48.9±9.5 months, recurrence was identified in 2 (16.7%) patients in FARL group and 3 (23.5%) in VATL group. Five-year overall survival (100% vs . 87.5%, P=0.386) and disease-free survival (82.5% vs . 75.6%, P=0.589) were comparable. FARL as solo surgery could not be recommended because of safety issues. It required a longer operation time and had no benefits over VATL in terms of early postoperative outcome or long-term survival.

  18. Accelerated Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Long-Term Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, Hany; Cheung, Patrick; Yeung, Latifa; Poon, Ian; Balogh, Judith; Barbera, Lisa; Spayne, Jacqueline; Danjoux, Cyril; Dahele, Max; Ung, Yee

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of a single-institution series of accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who are medically inoperable or who refuse surgery. Methods and Materials: Peripherally located T1 to T3 N0 M0 tumors were treated with 48 to 60 Gy in 12 to 15 fractions between 1996 and 2007. No elective nodal irradiation was delivered. Patient, tumor, and treatment information was abstracted from the medical records. Results: A total of 124 tumors were treated in 118 patients (56 male and 62 female). Median age at diagnosis was 76.3 years (range, 49-90 years). In all, 113 patients (95.8%) were not surgical candidates because of medical comorbidities. The 2- and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 51.0% and 23.3%, respectively, and the 2- and 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS) rates were 67.6% and 59.8%, respectively. The 2- and 5-year actuarial local control (LC) rates were 76.2% and 70.1%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that tumor size less than 3cm compared with greater than 3 cm resulted in significantly improved OS (40.0% vs. 5.0% at 5 years; p = 0.0002), CSS (69.7% vs. 45.1% at 5 years; p = 0.0461), and a trend toward better LC (82.5% vs. 66.9% at 2 years, 76.6% vs. 60.8% at 5 years; p = 0.0685). Treatment was well tolerated and there were no treatment delays because of acute toxicity. Conclusions: Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy with 48 to 60 Gy using fractions of 4 Gy per day provides very good results for small tumors in medically inoperable patients with early-stage NSCLC.

  19. Risk-adapted robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy for inoperable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temming, Susanne; Kocher, Martin; Baus, Wolfgang W.; Semrau, Robert; Baues, Christian; Marnitz, S. [University of Cologne, Department of Radiation Oncology, Center for Integrated Oncology, Cologne (Germany); Stoelben, Erich [Hospital of Cologne, Lung Clinic Merheim, Cologne (Germany); Hagmeyer, Lars [University of Cologne, Bethanien Hospital, Institute of Pneumology, Solingen (Germany); Chang, De-Hua [University of Cologne, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Center for Integrated Oncology, Cologne (Germany); Frank, Konrad [Heart Centre of the University of Cologne, Department III of Internal Medicine, Cologne (Germany); Hekmat, Khosro [University of Cologne, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Center for Integrated Oncology, Cologne (Germany); Wolf, Juergen [University Hospital of Cologne, First Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Integrated Oncology, Cologne (Germany)

    2018-02-15

    To evaluate efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with CyberKnife {sup registered} (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) in a selected cohort of primary, medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. From 2012 to 2016, 106 patients (median age 74 years, range 50-94 years) with primary NSCLC were treated with SBRT using CyberKnife {sup registered}. Histologic confirmation was available in 87 patients (82%). For mediastinal staging, 92 patients (87%) underwent {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (18-FDG-PET) and/or endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided lymph node biopsy or mediastinoscopy. Tumor stage (UICC8, 2017) was IA/B (T1a-c, 1-3 cm) in 86 patients (81%) and IIA (T2a/b, 3-5 cm) in 20 patients (19%). Depending on tumor localization, three different fractionation schedules were used: 3 fractions of 17Gy, 5 fractions of 11Gy, or 8 fractions of 7.5 Gy. Tracking was based on fiducial implants in 13 patients (12%) and on image guidance without markers in 88%. Median follow-up was 15 months (range 0.5-46 months). Acute side effects were mild (fatigue grade 1-2 in 20% and dyspnea grade 1-2 in 17%). Late effects were observed in 4 patients (4%): 3 patients developed pneumonitis requiring therapy (grade 2) and 1 patient suffered a rib fracture (grade 3). In total, 9/106 patients (8%) experienced a local recurrence, actuarial local control rates were 88% (95% confidence interval, CI, 80-96%) at 2 years and 77% (95%CI 56-98%) at 3 years. The median disease-free survival time was 27 months (95%CI 23-31 months). Overall survival was 77% (95%CI 65-85%) at 2 years and 56% (95%CI 39-73%) at 3 years. CyberKnife {sup registered} lung SBRT which allows for real-time tumor tracking and risk-adapted fractionation achieves satisfactory local control and low toxicity rates in inoperable early-stage primary lung cancer patients. (orig.) [German] Untersuchung von Wirkung und Toxizitaet einer stereotaktischen

  20. Fludeoxyglucose F-18-PET in Planning Lung Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-19

    Stage I Lung Cancer; Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage II Lung Cancer; Stage II Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma AJCC v7

  1. Significance of serum endostatin levels in patients with primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Qunxin; Ling Chunhua; Ji Cheng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the serum level of endostatin and the clinical pathophysiological characteristics in patients with primary lung cancer. Methods: The serum levels of endostatin were detected in 48 patients with primary lung cancer and 50 patients with benign pulmonary diseases by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Results: Serum endostatin level in patients with primary lung cancer was significantly higher than it in patients with benign pulmonary diseases (P<0.01). It was higher in adenocarcinoma group than that in squamous cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma group (P<0.05). The level of serum endostatin in lung cancer with TNM stage III + IV was higher than that in patients in stage I + II (P<0.01). And it was also higher in patients suffering from lung cancer with metastasis than that in patients with no metastasis (P<0.05). However, there was not a significant relation between serum endostatin level the location of the tumor and lymph node metastasis. Conclusion: Serum endostatin level in expressed higher in patients with primary lung cancer. There is significant relationship between serum endostatin level, histological classification, TNM stage and metastasis of lung cancer. (authors)

  2. Hyperfractionated 3D conformal radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, E.K.; Ahn, S.D.; Yi, B.Y.; Chang, H.S.; Lee, J.H.; Suh, C.W.; Lee, J.S.; Kim, S.H.; Koh, Y.S.; Kim, W.S.; Kim, D.S.; Kim, W.D.; Sohn, K.H.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This phase II study has been conducted to determine the feasibility, toxicity, response rate, local control, distant metastasis, and survival of hyperfractionated 3D conformal radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy with mitomycin C, vinblastine, and cisplatin in unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and also to find the most ideal 3D conformal radiotherapy technique. Materials and Methods: From Aug 1993, 173 patients with unresectable stage III NSCLC were entered into this trial and 146 (84%) completed the treatment. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy was given to a total dose of 65-70 Gy (120 cGy/fx, bid) with concurrent 2 cycles of MVP chemotherapy (Mitomycin C 6 mg/m 2 d2 and d29, Vinblastine 6 mg/m 2 d2 and d29, Cisplatin 60 mg/m 2 d1 and d28). Of these 146 patients who completed the treatment, 78 received noncoplanar 3D conformal radiotherapy using 4-6 fields and 17 received coplanar segmented conformal radiotherapy. Clinical tumor response was assessed one month after the completion of radiotherapy by computerized tomography (CT) scan. Toxicity was graded by RTOG and SWOG criteria. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for lung was calculated to find the correlation with radiation pneumonitis. Results: Nineteen (13%) had stage IIIa and 127 (87%) had IIIb disease including 16 with pleural effusion and 20 with supraclavicular lymph node metastases. Response rate was 74%, including 20% complete response and 54% partial response. With a minimum follow up of 12 months, overall survival was 60% at 1 year, 30% at 2 years and median survival was 15 months. Patients achieving a complete response (n=29) had a 2-year overall survival of 46.5% compared to 28.7% for partial responders (n=79) (p=.001). Actuarial local control was 66.7% at 1 year and 43.7% at 2 years. Actuarial distant free survival was 52.3% at 1 year and 39.8% at 2 years. Major hematologic toxicity (Gr 3-4) occurred in 33% of the patients but treatment delay

  3. Complete resection of the primary lesion improves survival of certain patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikaishi, Yasuhiro; Shinohara, Shinji; Kuwata, Taiji; Takenaka, Masaru; Oka, Soichi; Hirai, Ayako; Yoneda, Kazue; Kuroda, Kouji; Imanishi, Naoko; Ichiki, Yoshinobu; Tanaka, Fumihiro

    2017-12-01

    The standard treatment for patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is systemic chemotherapy. However, certain patients, such as those with oligometastasis or M1a disease undergo resection of the primary lesion. We conducted a retrospective review of the records of 1,471 consecutive patients with NSCLC who underwent resection of the primary lesion for between June 2005 and May 2016. The present study included 38 patients with stage IV NSCLC who underwent complete resection of the primary lesion as first-line treatment. The median follow-up duration for the 38 patients (27 men) was 17.7 months (range, 1-82.3 months). The T factors were T1/T2/T3/T4 in 4/16/12/6 patients, respectively. The N factors were N0/N1/N2/N3 in 16/8/12/2 patients, respectively. The M factors were M1a/M1b/M1c in 19/13/6 patients, respectively. Of the 19 M1a patients, 11 were classified as cM0. We introduced the novel classification M-better/M-worse. M-better includes cM0 patients and M1b and M1c patients in whom all lesions have been locally controlled. M-worse includes cM1a patients and M1b and M1c patients in whom lesions cannot be locally controlled. The new M-better/M-worse statuses were 24/14 patients, respectively. The histology of NSCLC was adenocarcinoma/squamous cell carcinoma/others in 30/5/3 patients, respectively. The 5-year overall survival rate was 29%, and the median survival time was 725 days. Squamous cell carcinoma and M-worse were significant factors predicting poor outcomes (P=0.0017, P=0.0007, respectively). Even for stage IV NSCLC patients, resection of the primary lesion may be beneficial, especially for those with M-better status and those not diagnosed with squamous-cell carcinoma (SCC).

  4. [Analysis of Prognostic Factors and Clinical Characteristics for Patients with Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer with Pleural Effusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kunpeng; Wang, Youyou; Qi, Jing; Zhao, Lujun; Wang, Ping

    2018-01-20

    Malignant pleural effusion (PE) was generally defined as pleural effusion containing tumors with poor prognosis. Some kinds of undefined pleural effusions due to too small amount of effusion had poor prognosis too. This study aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics and prognostic factors of patients who suffered from limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) complicated with pleural effusion. A retrospective analysis included 542 patients who were diagnosed with LS-SCLC and had treatment in our hospital from October 2007 to January 2016. We had observed 109 patients who were diagnosed with pleural effusion at their first visit to the doctor. We analyzed the clinical characters, survival time and the prognostic factors of the 109 patients. Our main observation targets were overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS). The median OS and PFS of whole group were 29.4 and 18.2 months. Before treatment, survival time of patients with PE were significantly shorter than patients without PE (median OS: 21.0 vs 31.7 months; median PFS: 14.1 vs 9.1 months; Log-rank, P=0.001, P=0.014). Multi-factor analysis of multivariate Cox shows PE was the independent prognostic factor of LS-SCLC (P=0.04). Single factor analysis showed factors affecting PE patient's survival time included clinical stages, lymph node (LN) stages, KPS scores, pulmonary atelectasis and the state of pleural after treatment. Cox multi-factor analysis reminded that the state of pleural effusion after treatment was the independent prognostic factor of LS-SCLC complicated with pleural effusion (P=0.016). There were three groups was apportioned patients without pleural effusion before treatment (group 1; n=433), patients whose pleural effusion disappeared after treatment (group 2; n=67) and patients whose pleural effusion didn't disappear after treatment (group 3; n=32).The median OS were 31.7, 23.2, 16.8 months in the group 1, 2, 3 and the median PFS were 19.1, 17.9, 11.4 months. Obvious

  5. Normal Lung Quantification in Usual Interstitial Pneumonia Pattern: The Impact of Threshold-based Volumetric CT Analysis for the Staging of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotsugu Ohkubo

    Full Text Available Although several computer-aided computed tomography (CT analysis methods have been reported to objectively assess the disease severity and progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, it is unclear which method is most practical. A universal severity classification system has not yet been adopted for IPF.The purpose of this study was to test the correlation between quantitative-CT indices and lung physiology variables and to determine the ability of such indices to predict disease severity in IPF.A total of 27 IPF patients showing radiological UIP pattern on high-resolution (HR CT were retrospectively enrolled. Staging of IPF was performed according to two classification systems: the Japanese and GAP (gender, age, and physiology staging systems. CT images were assessed using a commercially available CT imaging analysis workstation, and the whole-lung mean CT value (MCT, the normally attenuated lung volume as defined from -950 HU to -701 Hounsfield unit (NL, the volume of the whole lung (WL, and the percentage of NL to WL (NL%, were calculated.CT indices (MCT, WL, and NL closely correlated with lung physiology variables. Among them, NL strongly correlated with forced vital capacity (FVC (r = 0.92, P <0.0001. NL% showed a large area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for detecting patients in the moderate or advanced stages of IPF. Multivariable logistic regression analyses showed that NL% is significantly more useful than the percentages of predicted FVC and predicted diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (Japanese stage II/III/IV [odds ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence intervals (CI, 0.48 to 0.92; P < 0.01]; III/IV [odds ratio. 0.80; 95% CI 0.59 to 0.96; P < 0.01]; GAP stage II/III [odds ratio, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.97; P < 0.05].The measurement of NL% by threshold-based volumetric CT analysis may help improve IPF staging.

  6. Normal Lung Quantification in Usual Interstitial Pneumonia Pattern: The Impact of Threshold-based Volumetric CT Analysis for the Staging of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Hirotsugu; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiro; Uemura, Takehiro; Takakuwa, Osamu; Takemura, Masaya; Maeno, Ken; Ito, Yutaka; Oguri, Tetsuya; Kazawa, Nobutaka; Mikami, Ryuji; Niimi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Although several computer-aided computed tomography (CT) analysis methods have been reported to objectively assess the disease severity and progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), it is unclear which method is most practical. A universal severity classification system has not yet been adopted for IPF. The purpose of this study was to test the correlation between quantitative-CT indices and lung physiology variables and to determine the ability of such indices to predict disease severity in IPF. A total of 27 IPF patients showing radiological UIP pattern on high-resolution (HR) CT were retrospectively enrolled. Staging of IPF was performed according to two classification systems: the Japanese and GAP (gender, age, and physiology) staging systems. CT images were assessed using a commercially available CT imaging analysis workstation, and the whole-lung mean CT value (MCT), the normally attenuated lung volume as defined from -950 HU to -701 Hounsfield unit (NL), the volume of the whole lung (WL), and the percentage of NL to WL (NL%), were calculated. CT indices (MCT, WL, and NL) closely correlated with lung physiology variables. Among them, NL strongly correlated with forced vital capacity (FVC) (r = 0.92, P <0.0001). NL% showed a large area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for detecting patients in the moderate or advanced stages of IPF. Multivariable logistic regression analyses showed that NL% is significantly more useful than the percentages of predicted FVC and predicted diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (Japanese stage II/III/IV [odds ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.48 to 0.92; P < 0.01]; III/IV [odds ratio. 0.80; 95% CI 0.59 to 0.96; P < 0.01]; GAP stage II/III [odds ratio, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.97; P < 0.05]). The measurement of NL% by threshold-based volumetric CT analysis may help improve IPF staging.

  7. Overall survival and clinical characteristics of BRCA mutation carriers with stage I/II pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Talia; Sella, Tal; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Katz, Matthew H G; Epelbaum, Ron; Kelsen, David P; Borgida, Ayelet; Maynard, Hannah; Kindler, Hedy; Friedmen, Eitan; Javle, Milind; Gallinger, Steven

    2017-03-14

    BRCA1/BRCA2 germ line (GL) mutation carriers with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) may have distinct outcomes. We recently described an apparent more favourable prognosis of surgically resected BRCA-associated PDAC patients in a single-arm, uncontrolled, retrospective study. However, the prognostic impact of GL BRCA1/2 mutations in surgically resected PDAC has not been compared with a matched control population. A larger multi-centre, case-control retrospective analysis was performed. Cases were patients with surgically resected, BRCA1/2-associated PDAC from 2004 to 2013. Controls included surgically resected PDAC cases treated during the same time period that were either BRCA non-carriers, or had no family history of breast, ovarian or pancreatic cancers. Cases and controls were matched by: age at diagnosis (within ±5-year period) and institution. Demographics, clinical history, overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were abstracted from patient records. Statistical comparisons were assessed using χ 2 - and Fisher's exact test, and median DFS/OS using Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank testing. Twenty-five patients with BRCA1-(n=4) or BRCA2 (N=21)-associated resectable PDAC were identified. Mean age was 55.7 years (range, 34-78 years), 48% (n=12) were females and 76% (n=19) were Jewish. Cases were compared (1 : 2) with 49 resectable PDAC controls, and were balanced for age, ethnicity and other relevant clinical and pathological features. BRCA-associated PDAC patients received neoadjuvant, or adjuvant platinum-based treatment more frequently than controls (7 out of 8 vs 6 out of 14) and (7 out of 21 vs 3 out of 44), respectively. No significant difference in median OS (37.06 vs 38.77 months, P=0.838) and in DFS (14.3 vs 12.0 months, P=0.303) could be demonstrated between cases and controls. A trend to increased DFS was observed among BRCA-positive cases treated with neoadjuvant/adjuvant platinum-containing regimens (n=10) compared with similarly treated controls (n=7) (39.1 vs 12.4 months, P=0.255). In this retrospective analysis, the prognosis of surgically resectable BRCA-associated PDAC is no different than that of sporadic PDAC from the same institution. The role of platinum-based adjuvant therapy in this setting requires prospective investigation.

  8. Radiotherapeutic aspects of the treatment of adult patients with supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease CS I/II. Pt. 1; Regarding the indications of primary and adjuvant radiotherapy. Fragen und Aspekte zur Radiotherapie bei erwachsenen Patienten mit lokalisierten supradiaphragmalen Stadien (CS I/II) eines Morbus Hodgkin. T. 1; Fragen und Aspekte zu den Indikationen einer primaeren und einer adjuvanten Radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glanzmann, C. (Universitaetsspital, Klinik fuer Radio-Onkologie, Zurich (Switzerland)); Luetolf, U.M. (Universitaetsspital, Klinik fuer Radio-Onkologie, Zurich (Switzerland))

    1993-08-01

    Randomized studies of chemo- vs radiotherapy in patients with PS I/II A and some PS III A have shown conflicting results. Patients with supra-diaphragmatic Hodkin's disease and CS I/II can be subdivided according to radiotherapy as: 1. Patients with a very low or a low recurrence risk of approximately 10 to 20%: Patients less than 40 years old and CS I/II A NS/LP with less than three involved regions and no bulky mediastinal mass and an ESR below 30 mm. In the other patients, primary irradiation of an extended mantle field without a staging laparotomy is an acceptable primary treatment, achieving a recurrence-free survival rate of approximately 80%. Another option is a staging laparotomy with splenectomy and a mantle radiotherapy for PS I/II. Few groups prefer primary chemotherapy alone or some type of a reduced chemotherapy with lesser toxicity combined with localized radiotherapy and long-term observations of a larger group of patients after the last type of treatment have to confirm the excellent early results. 2. Patients with an intermediate recurrence risk of approximately 20 to 40%: Patients, who do not belong to group one or group 3. Patients less than 50 years old with CS I/II and an ESR less than 50 mm and without bulky mediastinal involvement and with one of the following signs: Three involved regions or MC or one B symptom. A patient with more than one of these signs or with two or three B symptoms should be classified in group 3. For these patients, we recommend staging laparotomy and radiotherapy if PS I/II or primary chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy of the involved regions. 3. Patients with a high recurrence risk (40% or higher): (Abstract Truncated)

  9. Clinical outcome and predictors of survival and pneumonitis after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Joe Y

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR can achieve excellent local control rates in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and has emerged as a standard treatment option for patients who cannot undergo surgery or those with isolated recurrences. However, factors that may predict toxicity or survival are largely unknown. We sought here to identify predictors of survival and pneumonitis after SABR for NSCLC in a relatively large single-institution series. Methods Subjects were 130 patients with stage I NSCLC treated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT –planned, on-board volumetric image–guided SABR to 50 Gy in 4 fractions. Disease was staged by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT and scans were obtained again at the second follow-up after SABR. Results At a median follow-up time of 26 months, the 2-year local control rate was 98.5%. The median overall survival (OS time was 60 months, and OS rates were 93.0% at 1 year, 78.2% at 2 years, and 65.3% at 3 years. No patient experienced grade 4–5 toxicity; 15 had radiation pneumonitis (12 [9.3%] grade 2 and 3 [2.3%] grade 3. Performance status, standardized uptake value (SUVmax on staging PET/CT, tumor histology, and disease operability were associated with OS on univariate analysis, but only staging SUVmax was independently predictive on multivariate analysis (P = 0.034. Dosimetric factors were associated with radiation pneumonitis on univariate analysis, but only mean ipsilateral lung dose ≥9.14 Gy was significant on multivariate analysis (P = 0.005. Conclusions OS and radiation pneumonitis after SABR for stage I NSCLC can be predicted by staging PET SUVmax and ipsilateral mean lung dose, respectively.

  10. No Clinically Significant Changes in Pulmonary Function Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early- Stage Peripheral Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Analysis of RTOG 0236

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanic, Sinisa, E-mail: sinisa.stanic@carle.com [Carle Cancer Center and University of Illinois College of Medicine, Urbana, Illinois (United States); Paulus, Rebecca [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Timmerman, Robert D. [University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, Texas (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Barriger, Robert B. [Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Bezjak, Andrea [Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate pulmonary function test (PFT) results and arterial blood gas changes (complete PFT) following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to see whether baseline PFT correlates with lung toxicity and overall survival in medically inoperable patients receiving SBRT for early stage, peripheral, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: During the 2-year follow-up, PFT data were collected for patients with T1-T2N0M0 peripheral NSCLC who received effectively 18 Gy × 3 in a phase 2 North American multicenter study (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] protocol 0236). Pulmonary toxicity was graded by using the RTOG SBRT pulmonary toxicity scale. Paired Wilcoxon signed rank test, logistic regression model, and Kaplan-Meier method were used for statistical analysis. Results: At 2 years, mean percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in the first second and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide declines were 5.8% and 6.3%, respectively, with minimal changes in arterial blood gases and no significant decline in oxygen saturation. Baseline PFT was not predictive of any pulmonary toxicity following SBRT. Whole-lung V5 (the percentage of normal lung tissue receiving 5 Gy), V10, V20, and mean dose to the whole lung were almost identical between patients who developed pneumonitis and patients who were pneumonitis-free. Poor baseline PFT did not predict decreased overall survival. Patients with poor baseline PFT as the reason for medical inoperability had higher median and overall survival rates than patients with normal baseline PFT values but with cardiac morbidity. Conclusions: Poor baseline PFT did not appear to predict pulmonary toxicity or decreased overall survival after SBRT in this medically inoperable population. Poor baseline PFT alone should not be used to exclude patients with early stage lung cancer from treatment with SBRT.

  11. No Clinically Significant Changes in Pulmonary Function Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early- Stage Peripheral Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Analysis of RTOG 0236

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanic, Sinisa; Paulus, Rebecca; Timmerman, Robert D.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Barriger, Robert B.; Bezjak, Andrea; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Bradley, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate pulmonary function test (PFT) results and arterial blood gas changes (complete PFT) following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to see whether baseline PFT correlates with lung toxicity and overall survival in medically inoperable patients receiving SBRT for early stage, peripheral, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: During the 2-year follow-up, PFT data were collected for patients with T1-T2N0M0 peripheral NSCLC who received effectively 18 Gy × 3 in a phase 2 North American multicenter study (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] protocol 0236). Pulmonary toxicity was graded by using the RTOG SBRT pulmonary toxicity scale. Paired Wilcoxon signed rank test, logistic regression model, and Kaplan-Meier method were used for statistical analysis. Results: At 2 years, mean percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in the first second and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide declines were 5.8% and 6.3%, respectively, with minimal changes in arterial blood gases and no significant decline in oxygen saturation. Baseline PFT was not predictive of any pulmonary toxicity following SBRT. Whole-lung V5 (the percentage of normal lung tissue receiving 5 Gy), V10, V20, and mean dose to the whole lung were almost identical between patients who developed pneumonitis and patients who were pneumonitis-free. Poor baseline PFT did not predict decreased overall survival. Patients with poor baseline PFT as the reason for medical inoperability had higher median and overall survival rates than patients with normal baseline PFT values but with cardiac morbidity. Conclusions: Poor baseline PFT did not appear to predict pulmonary toxicity or decreased overall survival after SBRT in this medically inoperable population. Poor baseline PFT alone should not be used to exclude patients with early stage lung cancer from treatment with SBRT

  12. Killing effect of EGFR-TKI combined with 125I seed implantation therapy on ⅢB-Ⅳ stage lung cancer tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Sheng Xiang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the killing effect of EGFR-TKI combined with 125I seed implantation therapy on ⅢB-Ⅳ stage lung cancer tissue. Methods: A total of 78 patients with ⅢB-Ⅳ stage lung cancer were randomly divided into observation group and control group (n=39, control group received EGFR-TKI treatment and observation group received EGFR-TKI combined with 125I seed implantation therapy. Differences in apoptosis gene, invasion gene and autophagy gene expression in lung tissue were compared between two groups after 1 month of treatment. Results: Apoptosis genes PDCD5, bax and bcl-xS mRNA expression levels in lung tissue of observation group after 1 month of treatment were higher than those of control group while Bag-1, survivin and bcl-xL mRNA expression levels were lower than those of control group; invasion genes CD147, EGFR and DDX17 mRNA expression levels were lower than those of control group while Bin1, E-cadherin and Ovol2 mRNA expression levels were higher than those of control group; autophagy genes ARHI, Beclin1, Atg5, LC3B, pULK and PI3KC3 mRNA expression levels were higher than those of control group. Conclusions: EGFR-TKI combined with 125I seed implantation therapy can enhance the tumor killing effect on patients with ⅢB-Ⅳ stage lung cancer, and contribute to the optimization of overall condition and the extension of survival time.

  13. Significant reduction of normal tissue dose by proton radiotherapy compared with three-dimensional conformal or intensity-modulated radiation therapy in Stage I or Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Joe Y.; Zhang Xiaodong; Wang Xiaochun; Kang Yixiu; Riley, Beverly C.; Bilton, Stephen C.; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare dose-volume histograms (DVH) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by photon or proton radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Dose-volume histograms were compared between photon, including three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and proton plans at doses of 66 Gy, 87.5 Gy in Stage I (n = 10) and 60-63 Gy, and 74 Gy in Stage III (n 15). Results: For Stage I, the mean total lung V5, V10, and V20 were 31.8%, 24.6%, and 15.8%, respectively, for photon 3D-CRT with 66 Gy, whereas they were 13.4%, 12.3%, and 10.9%, respectively, with proton with dose escalation to 87.5 cobalt Gray equivalents (CGE) (p = 0.002). For Stage III, the mean total lung V5, V10, and V20 were 54.1%, 46.9%, and 34.8%, respectively, for photon 3D-CRT with 63 Gy, whereas they were 39.7%, 36.6%, and 31.6%, respectively, for proton with dose escalation to 74 CGE (p = 0.002). In all cases, the doses to lung, spinal cord, heart, esophagus, and integral dose were lower with proton therapy even compared with IMRT. Conclusions: Proton treatment appears to reduce dose to normal tissues significantly, even with dose escalation, compared with standard-dose photon therapy, either 3D-CRT or IMRT

  14. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for Stage I lung cancer with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Special reference to survival and radiation-induced pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Toshihiko; Shiomi, Hiroya; Oh, Ryoong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study aimed to evaluate radiation-induced pneumonitis (RIP) and a related condition that we define in this report — prolonged minimal RIP (pmRIP) — after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for Stage I primary lung cancer in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We assessed 136 Stage I lung cancer patients with COPD who underwent SBRT. Airflow limitation on spirometry was classified into four Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) grades, with minor modifications: GOLD 1 (mild), GOLD 2 (moderate), GOLD 3 (severe) and GOLD 4 (very severe). On this basis, we defined two subgroups: COPD-free (COPD -) and COPD-positive (COPD +). There was no significant difference in overall survival or cause-specific–survival between these groups. Of the 136 patients, 44 (32%) had pmRIP. Multivariate analysis showed that COPD and the Brinkman index were statistically significant risk factors for the development of pmRIP. COPD and the Brinkman index were predictive factors for pmRIP, although our findings also indicate that SBRT can be tolerated in early lung cancer patients with COPD. (author)

  15. Dosimetric comparison of flattened and unflattened beams for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrbacek, Jan, E-mail: jan.hrbacek@psi.ch [Klinik für Radio-Onkologie, UniversitätsSpital Zürich, 8091 Zürich, Switzerland and Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Lang, Stephanie; Graydon, Shaun N.; Klöck, Stephan; Riesterer, Oliver [Klinik für Radio-Onkologie, UniversitätsSpital Zürich, 8091 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To compare contribution and accuracy of delivery for two flattening filter free (FFF) beams of the nominal energy 6 and 10 MV and a 6 MV flattened beam for early stage lung cancer. Methods: For each of 11 patients with stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer three volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were prepared utilizing a 6 MV flattened photon beam (X6FF) and two nonflattened beams of nominal energy 6 and 10 MV (X6FFF, X10FFF). Optimization constraints were set to produce dose distributions that meet the criteria of the RTOG-0915 protocol. The radiation schedule used for plan comparison in all patients was 50 Gy in five fractions. Dosimetric parameters of planning target volume (PTV) and organs-at-risk and delivery times were assessed and compared. All plans were subject to verification using Delta{sup 4} unit (Scandidos, Sweden) and absolutely calibrated gafchromic films in a thorax phantom. Results: All plans had a qualitatively comparable outcome. Obtained dose distributions were conformal (CI < 1.17) and exhibited a steep dose fall-off outside the PTV. The ratio of monitor units for FFF versus FF plans in the authors' study ranged from 0.95 to 1.21 and from 0.93 to 1.25 for X6FFF/X6FF and X10FFF/X6FF comparisons, respectively. The ratio systematically increased with increasing size of the PTV (up to +25% for 150 cm{sup 3} PTV). Yet the integral dose to healthy tissue did not follow this trend. Comparison of cumulative dose volume histograms for a patient's body showed that X6FFF plans exhibit improved conformity and reduced the volume of tissue that received more than 50% of the prescription dose. Parameters related to dose gradient showed statistically significant improvement. CI{sub 50%}, CI{sub 60%}, CI{sub 80%}, and CI{sub 100%} were on average reduced by 4.6% (p < 0.001), 4.6% (p = 0.002), 3.1% (p = 0.002), and 1.2% (p = 0.039), respectively. Gradient measure was on average reduced by 4.2% (p < 0.001). Due to dose reduction in the

  16. Site requirements and kinetics of immune-dependent elimination of intravascularly administered lung stage schistosomula in mice immunized with highly irradiated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangold, B.L.; Dean, D.A.; Coulson, P.S.; Wilson, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were performed to compare the migration and survival of 75Se-labeled schistosomes, introduced by percutaneous cercarial exposure or by intravascular administration of 7-day-old lung stage schistosomula, in control and irradiated cercaria-immunized mice. Schistosomula were intravascularly introduced into the lungs, systemic organs and liver by injection via the femoral vein (FV), left ventricle (LV), and superior mesenteric vein (SMV), respectively. The fate of challenge larvae was examined by autoradiography of host tissues and by recovery of adult worms. It was found that both normal and immune elimination were site-dependent. In control mice 45%-60% of cercarial penetrants and lung schistosomula injected into the FV and LV were recoverable as adult worms, while a significantly greater number (70%-85%) were recoverable when lung schistosomula were injected into the SMV. In immunized mice, parasites introduced as either cercariae or FV-injected schistosomula were both highly sensitive to immune elimination. LV-injected schistosomula were also sensitive but to a slightly lesser degree. In contrast, schistosomula placed directly in the liver by SMV injection were totally insensitive to immune elimination. It was concluded that elimination of schistosomula in irradiated cercaria-immunized mice occurs in the lungs and/or in the systemic organs, but not in the liver. Also, it was concluded that immune elimination is not a rapid process, since more than 7 days were required after intravascular challenge for the development of demonstrable differences between control and immunized mice

  17. Long-term Survival of Personalized Surgical Treatment of Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Based on Molecular Staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua ZHOU

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Approximately 35%-40% of patients with newly diagnosed non-small cell Lung cancer have locally advanced disease. The average survival time of these patients only have 6-8 months with chemotherapy. The aim of this study is to explore and summarize the probability of detection of micrometastasis in peripheral blood for molecular staging, and for selection of indication of surgical treatment, and beneficiary of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative adjuvant therapy in locally advanced lung cancer; to summarize the long-time survival result of personalized surgical treatment of 516 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer based on molecular staging methods. Methods CK19 mRNA expression of peripheral blood samples was detected in 516 lung cancer patients by RT-PCR before operation for molecular diagnosis of micrometastasis, personalized molecular staging, and for selection of indication of surgical treatment and the beneficiary of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative adjuvant therapy in patients with locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer invaded heart, great vessels or both. The long-term survival result of personalized surgical treatment was retrospectively analyzed in 516 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer based on molecular staging methods. Results There were 322 patients with squamous cell carcinoma and 194 cases with adenocarcinoma in the series of 516 patients with locally advanced lung cancer involved heart, great vessels or both. There were 112 patients with IIIA disease and 404 cases with IIIB disease according to P-TNM staging. There were 97 patients with M-IIIA disease, 278 cases with M-IIIB disease and 141 cases with III disease according to our personalized molecular staging. Of the 516 patients, bronchoplastic procedures and pulmonary artery reconstruction was carried out in 256 cases; lobectomy combined with resection and reconstruction of partial left

  18. Quantification of regional early stage gas exchange changes using hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe MRI in a rat model of radiation-induced lung injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doganay, Ozkan, E-mail: ozkan.doganay@oncology.ox.ac.uk [Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario N6A5C1 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A5C1 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Stirrat, Elaine [Peter Gilgan Centre for Research and Learning, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G1X8 (Canada); McKenzie, Charles [Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario N6A5C1 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A5C1 (Canada); Schulte, Rolf F. [General Electric Global Research, Munich 85748 (Germany); Santyr, Giles E. [Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario N6A5C1 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A5C1 (Canada); Peter Gilgan Centre for Research and Learning, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G1X8 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G1L7 (Canada)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of hyperpolarized (HP) {sup 129}Xe MRI for detection of early stage radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) in a rat model involving unilateral irradiation by assessing differences in gas exchange dynamics between irradiated and unirradiated lungs. Methods: The dynamics of gas exchange between alveolar air space and pulmonary tissue (PT), PT and red blood cells (RBCs) was measured using single-shot spiral iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation images of the right and left lungs of two age-matched cohorts of Sprague Dawley rats. The first cohort (n = 5) received 18 Gy irradiation to the right lung using a {sup 60}Co source and the second cohort (n = 5) was not irradiated and served as the healthy control. Both groups were imaged two weeks following irradiation when radiation pneumonitis (RP) was expected to be present. The gas exchange data were fit to a theoretical gas exchange model to extract measurements of pulmonary tissue thickness (L{sub PT}) and relative blood volume (V{sub RBC}) from each of the right and left lungs of both cohorts. Following imaging, lung specimens were retrieved and percent tissue area (PTA) was assessed histologically to confirm RP and correlate with MRI measurements. Results: Statistically significant differences in L{sub PT} and V{sub RBC} were observed between the irradiated and non-irradiated cohorts. In particular, L{sub PT} of the right and left lungs was increased approximately 8.2% and 5.0% respectively in the irradiated cohort. Additionally, V{sub RBC} of the right and left lungs was decreased approximately 36.1% and 11.7% respectively for the irradiated cohort compared to the non-irradiated cohort. PTA measurements in both right and left lungs were increased in the irradiated group compared to the non-irradiated cohort for both the left (P < 0.05) and right lungs (P < 0.01) confirming the presence of RP. PTA measurements also correlated with the

  19. Quantification of regional early stage gas exchange changes using hyperpolarized "1"2"9Xe MRI in a rat model of radiation-induced lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doganay, Ozkan; Stirrat, Elaine; McKenzie, Charles; Schulte, Rolf F.; Santyr, Giles E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of hyperpolarized (HP) "1"2"9Xe MRI for detection of early stage radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) in a rat model involving unilateral irradiation by assessing differences in gas exchange dynamics between irradiated and unirradiated lungs. Methods: The dynamics of gas exchange between alveolar air space and pulmonary tissue (PT), PT and red blood cells (RBCs) was measured using single-shot spiral iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation images of the right and left lungs of two age-matched cohorts of Sprague Dawley rats. The first cohort (n = 5) received 18 Gy irradiation to the right lung using a "6"0Co source and the second cohort (n = 5) was not irradiated and served as the healthy control. Both groups were imaged two weeks following irradiation when radiation pneumonitis (RP) was expected to be present. The gas exchange data were fit to a theoretical gas exchange model to extract measurements of pulmonary tissue thickness (L_P_T) and relative blood volume (V_R_B_C) from each of the right and left lungs of both cohorts. Following imaging, lung specimens were retrieved and percent tissue area (PTA) was assessed histologically to confirm RP and correlate with MRI measurements. Results: Statistically significant differences in L_P_T and V_R_B_C were observed between the irradiated and non-irradiated cohorts. In particular, L_P_T of the right and left lungs was increased approximately 8.2% and 5.0% respectively in the irradiated cohort. Additionally, V_R_B_C of the right and left lungs was decreased approximately 36.1% and 11.7% respectively for the irradiated cohort compared to the non-irradiated cohort. PTA measurements in both right and left lungs were increased in the irradiated group compared to the non-irradiated cohort for both the left (P < 0.05) and right lungs (P < 0.01) confirming the presence of RP. PTA measurements also correlated with the MRI measurements for both

  20. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer using Real-Time Tumor Tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.C.M-G. van der Voort van Zyp (Noëlle)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer world-wide (1.61 million; 12.7% of the total) and also the leading cause of cancer death (1.38 million; 18.2% of the total). In the Netherlands, lung cancer was diagnosed in almost 11,000 patients in 2007 (website Netherlands Cancer

  1. Stereotactic radiotherapy using tomotherapy for early-stage non-small cell lung carcinoma: analysis of intrafaction tumour motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boggs, Drexell Hunter; Feigenberg, Steven; Walter, Robert; Wissing, Dennis; Patel, Bijal; Wu, Terry; Rosen, Lane

    2014-01-01

    Intrafraction tumour motion in helical tomotherapy was investigated by comparing pre- and mid-fraction CT scans in patients with early non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) to assess the efficacy of a 7-mm margin around gross tumour volumes (GTVs) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Thirty patients with early-stage NSCLC received SBRT in four or five fractions for a total of 141 treatments. A slow positron emission tomography/CT scan was fused with the simulation CT to determine the GTV. A planning target volume was created by placing an isotropic margin of 7mm around the GTV. Data were retrospectively analyzed to assess translational tumour positional changes along the x, y and z axes and vector changes in millimeters from the pretreatment megavoltage (MV)-CT to the mid-fraction MV-CT. Average movements for all 141 treatment days along the x, y and z axes were 0.5±2.3, −0.3±3.0 and 0.9±3.0mm, respectively. Average movements for each patient along the x, y and z axes were 0.5±1.5, −0.2±2.0 and 0.9±1.9mm, respectively. Average vector displacement was 4.3±2.4mm for all treatment days and 4.2±1.7mm for each patient. Of 141 treatments, 137 (97.2%) fell within 7.0mm in all axes. The addition of a 7-mm margin to the GTV for patients receiving SBRT for NSCLC using tomotherapy is adequate to account for tumour movement. Mid-fraction CT scans proved to be valuable in assessing intrafraction tumour motion.

  2. Role of prophylactic brain irradiation in limited stage small cell lung cancer: clinical, neuropsychologic, and CT sequelae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laukkanen, E.; Klonoff, H.; Allan, B.; Graeb, D.; Murray, N.

    1988-01-01

    Ninety-four patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer treated between 1981 and 1985 with a regimen including prophylactic brain irradiation (PBI) after combination chemotherapy were assessed for compliance with PBI, brain relapse, and neurologic morbidity. Seventy-seven percent of patients had PBI and of these, 22% developed brain metastases after a median time of 11 months post treatment. The brain was the apparent unique initial site of relapse in 10% of PBI cases but more commonly brain relapse was preceded or accompanied by failure at other sites, especially the chest. Brain metastases were the greatest cause of morbidity in 50% of PBI failures. Twelve of 14 PBI patients alive 2 years after treatment had oncologic, neurologic, and neuropsychological evaluation, and brain CT. All long-term survivors were capable of self care and none fulfilled diagnostic criteria for dementia, with three borderline cases. One third had pretreatment neurologic dysfunction and two thirds post treatment neurologic symptoms, most commonly recent memory loss. Fifty percent had subtle motor findings. Intellectual functioning was at the 38th percentile with most patients having an unskilled occupational history. Neuropsychologic impairment ratings were borderline in three cases and definitely impaired in seven cases. CT scans showed brain atrophy in all cases with mild progression in those having a pre-treatment baseline. Periventricular and subcortical low density lesions identical to the CT appearance of subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy were seen in 82% of posttreatment CT studies, and lacunar infarcts in 54%. Neuropsychologic impairment scores and the extent of CT periventricular low density lesions were strongly associated

  3. Prognostic Value and Reproducibility of Pretreatment CT Texture Features in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, David V. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhou, Shouhao [Division of Quantitative Sciences, Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mawlawi, Osama [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Court, Laurence E., E-mail: LECourt@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether pretreatment CT texture features can improve patient risk stratification beyond conventional prognostic factors (CPFs) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 cases with stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy. All patients underwent pretreatment diagnostic contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) followed by 4-dimensional CT (4D-CT) for treatment simulation. We used the average-CT and expiratory (T50-CT) images from the 4D-CT along with the CE-CT for texture extraction. Histogram, gradient, co-occurrence, gray tone difference, and filtration-based techniques were used for texture feature extraction. Penalized Cox regression implementing cross-validation was used for covariate selection and modeling. Models incorporating texture features from the 33 image types and CPFs were compared to those with models incorporating CPFs alone for overall survival (OS), local-regional control (LRC), and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM). Predictive Kaplan-Meier curves were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Patients were stratified based on whether their predicted outcome was above or below the median. Reproducibility of texture features was evaluated using test-retest scans from independent patients and quantified using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). We compared models incorporating the reproducibility seen on test-retest scans to our original models and determined the classification reproducibility. Results: Models incorporating both texture features and CPFs demonstrated a significant improvement in risk stratification compared to models using CPFs alone for OS (P=.046), LRC (P=.01), and FFDM (P=.005). The average CCCs were 0.89, 0.91, and 0.67 for texture features extracted from the average-CT, T50-CT, and CE-CT, respectively. Incorporating reproducibility within our models yielded 80.4% (±3.7% SD), 78.3% (±4.0% SD), and 78

  4. Robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy for elderly medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam SD

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sana D Karam,1 Zachary D Horne,1 Robert L Hong,1,2 Nimrah Baig,1 Gregory J Gagnon,4 Don McRae,2 David Duhamel,3 Nadim M Nasr1,21Department of Radiation Oncology, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Hospital Center, Arlington, VA, USA; 3Department of Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine, Virginia Hospital Center, Arlington, VA, USA; 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Frederick Memorial Hospital, Frederick, MD, USAIntroduction: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is being increasingly applied in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC because of its high local efficacy. This study aims to examine survival outcomes in elderly patients with inoperable stage I NSCLC treated with SBRT.Methods: A total of 31 patients with single lesions treated with fractionated SBRT from 2008 to 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. A median prescribed dose of 48 Gy was delivered to the prescription isodose line, over a median of four treatments. The median biologically effective dose (BED was 105.6 (range 37.50–180, and the median age was 73 (65–90 years. No patient received concurrent chemotherapy.Results: With a median follow up of 13 months (range, 4–40 months, the actuarial median overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS were 32 months, and 19 months, respectively. The actuarial median local control (LC time was not reached. The survival outcomes at median follow up of 13 months were 80%, 68%, and 70% for LC, PFS, and OS, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed a BED of >100 Gy was associated with improved LC rates (P = 0.02, while squamous cell histology predicted for worse LC outcome at median follow up time of 13 months (P = 0.04. Increased tumor volume was a worse prognostic indicator of both LC and OS outcomes (P < 0.05. Finally, female gender was a better prognostic factor for OS than male gender (P = 0.006. There were no prognostic indicators of PFS that reached

  5. Prognostic Value and Reproducibility of Pretreatment CT Texture Features in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fried, David V.; Tucker, Susan L.; Zhou, Shouhao; Liao, Zhongxing; Mawlawi, Osama; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether pretreatment CT texture features can improve patient risk stratification beyond conventional prognostic factors (CPFs) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 cases with stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy. All patients underwent pretreatment diagnostic contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) followed by 4-dimensional CT (4D-CT) for treatment simulation. We used the average-CT and expiratory (T50-CT) images from the 4D-CT along with the CE-CT for texture extraction. Histogram, gradient, co-occurrence, gray tone difference, and filtration-based techniques were used for texture feature extraction. Penalized Cox regression implementing cross-validation was used for covariate selection and modeling. Models incorporating texture features from the 33 image types and CPFs were compared to those with models incorporating CPFs alone for overall survival (OS), local-regional control (LRC), and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM). Predictive Kaplan-Meier curves were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Patients were stratified based on whether their predicted outcome was above or below the median. Reproducibility of texture features was evaluated using test-retest scans from independent patients and quantified using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). We compared models incorporating the reproducibility seen on test-retest scans to our original models and determined the classification reproducibility. Results: Models incorporating both texture features and CPFs demonstrated a significant improvement in risk stratification compared to models using CPFs alone for OS (P=.046), LRC (P=.01), and FFDM (P=.005). The average CCCs were 0.89, 0.91, and 0.67 for texture features extracted from the average-CT, T50-CT, and CE-CT, respectively. Incorporating reproducibility within our models yielded 80.4% (±3.7% SD), 78.3% (±4.0% SD), and 78

  6. Impact of Pretreatment Tumor Growth Rate on Outcome of Early-Stage Lung Cancer Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atallah, Soha; Cho, B.C. John; Allibhai, Zishan; Taremi, Mojgan; Giuliani, Meredith [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Le, Lisa W. [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brade, Anthony; Sun, Alexander; Bezjak, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hope, Andrew J., E-mail: andrew.hope@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of pretreatment tumor growth rate on outcomes in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A review was conducted on 160 patients with T1-T2N0M0 NSCLC treated with SBRT at single institution. The patient's demographic and clinical data, time interval (t) between diagnostic and planning computed tomography (CT), vital status, disease status, and cause of death were extracted from a prospectively kept database. Differences in gross tumor volume between diagnostic CT (GTV1) and planning CT (GTV2) were recorded, and growth rate was calculated by use of specific growth rate (SGR). Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed for overall survival (OS). Differences between groups were compared with a log-rank test. Multivariate analyses were performed by use of the Cox proportional hazard model with SGR and other relevant clinical factors. Cumulative incidence was calculated for local, regional, and distant failures by use of the competing risk approach and was compared with Gray's test. Results: The median time interval between diagnostic and planning CT was 82 days. The patients were divided into 2 groups, and the median SGR was used as a cut-off. The median survival times were 38.6 and 27.7 months for the low and high SGR groups, respectively (P=.03). Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (P=.01), sex (P=.04), SGR (P=.03), and GTV2 (P=.002) were predictive for OS in multivariable Cox regression analysis and, except sex, were similarly predictive for failure-free survival (FFS). The 3-year cumulative incidences of regional failure were 19.2% and 6.0% for the high and low SGR groups, respectively (P=.047). Conclusion: High SGR was correlated with both poorer OS and FFS in patients with early-stage NSCLC treated with SBRT. If validated, this measurement may be useful in identifying patients most likely to benefit from

  7. INTEGRATED METHODOLOGY OF I.I. MECHNIKOV AND MODERN ADDRESS IMMUNOCORRECTION AT MYASTHENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimova E.M.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. There is carried out reconstruction of the past in the field of integrated discoveries of well-known scientist I.I. Mechnikov for research of aspects of phagocytic function of immune cells and infectious factors in etiology and pathogenesis of progressing myasthenia. There are analyzed the leading factors which have generated scientific outlook and integrated analytical methodology of knowledge of I.I. Mechnikov – the native of the Kharkov province, the graduate student of the Kharkov Imperial University of 1864, the Nobel prize winner of 1908 for creation of the theory of phagocytosis and the author of set of works in the field of microbiology, immunology and virology. Material & methods. The work studied the mechanisms of disorder of various stages of barrier phagocytic function of neutrophils and frequency of occurrence and various degree of expression of virus persistence at patients with myasthenia is determined. Phagocytosis disturbance leads to uncontrollable development of infections at myasthenia. Advance of muscular delicacy and morph-functional disturbances in thymus, obviously, depend on the individual mechanisms which affect various stages of immune disbalance. The whole century has passed from the moment of creation of the phagocytic theory. For this time all stages of this process have been studied, methodical approaches are developed for an estimation of specific features of this phenomenon, from light microscopy to flowing cytofluorometry. Possibilities of light microscopy allow to visualize the stages of phagocytosis from chemotaxis and adhesions to completeness of digestion by neutrophils in dynamics. And Nitro Blue Tetrazolium Reduction Test (NBTR is used for an estimation of enzymatic activity of phagocytes for initiation of formation of active forms of oxygen at the phagosoma formation stage. The given method allows to investigate stages of oxygen-dependent metabolism of neutrophils. Along with these methods

  8. Computed Tomography Assessment of Ablation Zone Enhancement in Patients With Early-Stage Lung Cancer After Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, William; Chaya, Yair; Chaudhry, Ammar; Depasquale, Britney; Glass, Samantha; Lee, Susan; Shin, James; Mikhail, George; Bhattacharji, Priya; Kim, Bong; Bilfinger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) offers a curative treatment for lung cancer in patients who are marginal surgical candidates. However, unlike traditional surgery the lung cancer remains in place after treatment. Thus, imaging follow-up for evaluation of recurrence is of paramount importance. In this retrospective designed Institutional Review Board-approved study, follow-up contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) exams were performed on sixty one patients to evaluate enhancement pattern in the ablation zone at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after SABR. Eleven patients had recurrence within the ablation zone after SABR. The postcontrast enhancement in the recurrence group showed a washin and washout phenomenon, whereas the radiation-induced lung injury group showed continuous enhancement suggesting an inflammatory process. The textural feature of the ablation zone of enhancement and perfusion as demonstrated in computed tomography nodule enhancement may allow early differentiation of recurrence from radiation-induced lung injury in patients' status after SABR or primary lung cancer.

  9. Preoperative nodal staging of non-small cell lung cancer using {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT/CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miziara, Juliana Muniz; Rocha, Euclides Timoteo da; Miziara, Jose Elias Abrao; Garcia, Gustavo Fabene; Simoes, Maria Izilda Previato; Lopes, Marco Antonio; Kerr, Ligia Maria [Hospital de Cancer de Barretos, Barretos, SP (Brazil); Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto, E-mail: julimiziara@ig.com.br [Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade da Sao Paulo, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Objectives: The proper nodal staging of non-small cell lung cancer is important for choosing the best treatment modality. Although computed tomography remains the first-line imaging test for the primary staging of lung cancer, its limitations for mediastinum nodal staging are well known. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of hybrid single-photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography using {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi in the nodal staging of patients with non-small cell lung cancer and to identify potential candidates for surgical treatment. Methods: Prospective data were collected for 41 patients from December 2006 to February 2009. The patients underwent chest computed tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography examinations with {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi within a 30-day time period before surgery. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography was considered positive when there was focal uptake of sestamibi in the mediastinum, and computed tomography scan when there was lymph nodes larger than 10 mm in short axis. The results of single-photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography were correlated with pathology findings after surgery. Results: Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography correctly identified six out of 19 cases involving hilar lymph nodes and one out of seven cases involving nodal metastases in the mediastinum. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in the hilum assessment were 31.6%, 95.5%, 85.7%, and 61.8%, respectively. The same values for the mediastinum were 14.3%, 97.1%, 50%, and 84.6%, respectively. For the hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes, chest tomography showed sensitivity values of 47.4% and 57.1%, specificity values of 95.5% and 91.2%, positive predictive values of 90% and 57.1% and negative

  10. The prognostic impact of combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema in patients with clinical stage IA non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Tomoyoshi; Furuya, Kiyomi; Yamazaki, Koji; Miura, Naoko; Tsutsui, Kana; Takeo, Sadanori

    2018-02-01

    We evaluated the long-term outcomes of clinical stage IA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) who underwent lobectomy. We reviewed the chest computed tomography (CT) findings and divided the patients into normal, fibrosis, emphysema and CPFE groups. We evaluated the relationships among the CT findings, the clinicopathological findings and postoperative survival. The patients were classified into the following groups based on the preoperative chest CT findings: normal