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Sample records for stage 1-2 ckd

  1. Prediction of Chronic Kidney Disease Stage 3 by CKD273, a Urinary Proteomic Biomarker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontillo, Claudia; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Schanstra, Joost P

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: CKD273 is a urinary biomarker, which in advanced chronic kidney disease predicts further deterioration. We investigated whether CKD273 can also predict a decline of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to ... threshold (P = 0.086). Discussion: In conclusion, while accounting for baseline eGFR, albuminuria, and covariables, CKD273 adds to the prediction of stage 3 chronic kidney disease, at which point intervention remains an achievable therapeutic target....

  2. Phosphate Metabolism in CKD Stages 3–5: Dietary and Pharmacological Control

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    Markus Ketteler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available When compared to the available information for patients on dialysis (CKD stage 5D, data on the epidemiology and appropriate treatment of calcium and phosphate metabolism in the predialysis stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD are quite limited. Perceptible derangements of calcium and phosphate levels start to become apparent when GFR falls below 30 mL/min in some, but not all, patients. However, hyperphosphatemia may be a significant morbidity and mortality risk predictor in predialysis CKD stages. The RIND study, evaluating progression of coronary artery calcification in incident hemodialysis patients, indirectly demonstrated that vascular calcification processes start to manifest in CKD patients prior to the dialysis stage, which may be closely linked to early and invisible derangements in calcium and phosphate homeostasis. Novel insights into the pathophysiology of calcium and phosphate handling such as the discovery of FGF23 and other phosphatonins suggest that a more complex assessment of phosphate balance is warranted, possibly including measurements of fractional phosphate excretion and phosphatonin levels in order to appropriately evaluate disordered metabolism in earlier stages of kidney disease. As a consequence, early and preventive treatment approaches may have to be developed for patients in CKD stages 3-5 to halt progression of CKD-MBD.

  3. Knowledge deficit of patients with stage 1-4 CKD: a focus group study.

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    Lopez-Vargas, Pamela A; Tong, Allison; Phoon, Richard K S; Chadban, Steven J; Shen, Yvonne; Craig, Jonathan C

    2014-04-01

    Patients with early-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) must make lifestyle modifications and adhere to treatment regimens to prevent their progression to end-stage kidney disease. The aim of this study was to elicit the perspectives of patients with stage 1-4 CKD about their disease, with a specific focus on their information needs in managing and living with CKD and its sequelae. Patients with CKD stages 1-4 were purposively sampled from three major hospitals in Sydney, Australia to participate in focus groups. Transcripts were thematically analysed. From nine focus groups including 38 participants, six major themes were identified: medical attentiveness (shared decision-making, rapport, indifference and insensitivity); learning self-management (diet and nutrition, barriers to physical activity, medication safety); contextualizing comorbidities (prominence of CKD, contradictory treatment); prognostic uncertainty (hopelessness, fear of disease progression, disbelief regarding diagnosis); motivation and coping mechanisms (engage in research, pro-active management, optimism, feeling normal); and knowledge gaps (practical advice, access to information, comprehension of pathology results and CKD diagnosis, education for general practitioners). Patients capacity to slow the progression of CKD may be limited by their lack of knowledge about the disease, its comorbidities, psychosocial influences and their ability to interact and communicate effectively with their health-care provider. Support from a multidisciplinary care team, combined with provision of comprehensive, accessible and practical educational resources may enhance patients' ability and motivation to access and adhere to therapeutic and lifestyle interventions to retard progression of CKD. © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  4. Skin autofluorescence and all-cause mortality in stage 3 CKD.

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    Fraser, Simon D S; Roderick, Paul J; McIntyre, Natasha J; Harris, Scott; McIntyre, Christopher W; Fluck, Richard J; Taal, Maarten W

    2014-08-07

    Novel markers may help to improve risk prediction in CKD. One potential candidate is tissue advanced glycation end product accumulation, a marker of cumulative metabolic stress, which can be assessed by a simple noninvasive measurement of skin autofluorescence. Skin autofluorescence correlates with higher risk of cardiovascular events and mortality in people with diabetes or people requiring RRT, but its role in earlier CKD has not been studied. A prospective cohort of 1741 people with CKD stage 3 was recruited from primary care between August 2008 and March 2010. Participants underwent medical history, clinical assessment, blood and urine sampling for biochemistry, and measurement of skin autofluorescence. Kaplan-Meier plots and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate associations between skin autofluorescence (categorical in quartiles) and all-cause mortality. In total, 1707 participants had skin autofluorescence measured; 170 (10%) participants died after a median of 3.6 years of follow-up. The most common cause of death was cardiovascular disease (41%). Higher skin autofluorescence was associated significantly with poorer survival (all-cause mortality, Pskin autofluorescence was associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 2.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.71 to 4.08; PSkin autofluorescence was not independently associated with all-cause mortality in this study. Additional research is needed to clarify whether it has a role in risk prediction in CKD. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  5. Marijuana and Cannabinoids in ESRD and Earlier Stages of CKD.

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    Rein, Joshua L; Wyatt, Christina M

    2018-02-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used recreational drug in the United States, and legal recreational and medicinal use has gained public acceptance during the last decade. Twenty-nine US states have established medical marijuana programs, 8 of which have also legalized recreational marijuana, and Canada is expected to legalize recreational marijuana in 2018. Advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are chronic conditions with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Patients experience substantial symptom burden that is frequently undertreated due to adverse medication side effects. This article reviews the available evidence for the use of medical marijuana to manage chronic pain, nausea/vomiting, anorexia/cachexia, and pruritus, all of which are frequently reported by patients with advanced CKD or ESRD. Potential adverse health effects of medical and recreational marijuana use are also discussed. Regardless of personal, social, and political beliefs, marijuana use is becoming mainstream, and nephrologists should be aware of the potential impact on our patient population. Further research is warranted to investigate the renal endocannabinoid system, the impact of marijuana use on kidney disease outcomes, and the risks and benefits of medical marijuana use on symptoms of advanced CKD and ESRD. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Comparison of Treating Metabolic Acidosis in CKD Stage 4 Hypertensive Kidney Disease with Fruits and Vegetables or Sodium Bicarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goraya, Nimrit; Simoni, Jan; Jo, Chan-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Current guidelines recommend Na+-based alkali for CKD with metabolic acidosis and plasma total CO2 (PTCO2) fruits and vegetables with oral NaHCO3 (HCO3) regarding the primary outcome of follow-up estimated GFR (eGFR) and secondary outcomes of improved metabolic acidosis and reduced urine indices of kidney injury. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Individuals with stage 4 (eGFR, 15–29 ml/min per 1.73 m2) CKD due to hypertensive nephropathy, had a PTCO2 level fruits and vegetables dosed to reduce dietary acid by half (n=36). Results Plasma cystatin C–calculated eGFR did not differ at baseline and 1 year between groups. One-year PTCO2 was higher than baseline in the HCO3 group (21.2±1.3 versus 19.5±1.5 mM; Pfruits and vegetables group (19.9±1.7 versus 19.3±1.9 mM; Pfruits and vegetable group (Pfruits and vegetables or NaHCO3 in individuals with stage 4 CKD yielded eGFR that was not different, was associated with higher-than-baseline PTCO2, and was associated with lower-than-baseline urine indices of kidney injury. The data indicate that fruits and vegetables improve metabolic acidosis and reduce kidney injury in stage 4 CKD without producing hyperkalemia. PMID:23393104

  7. Should patients with CKD stage 5D and biochemical evidence of secondary hyperparathyroidism be prescribed calcimimetic therapy? An ERA-EDTA position statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldsmith, David; Covic, Adrian; Vervloet, Marc; Cozzolino, Mario; Nistor, Ionut; Vervloet, Mark; Brandenburg, Vincent; Bover, Jordi; Evenepoel, Pieter; Massy, Ziad; Mazzaferro, Sandro; Urena-Torres, Pablo; Abramowicz, D.; Bolignano, D.; Cannata Andia, G.; Cochat, P.; Covic, A.; Delvecchio, L.; Drechsler, C.; Eckardt, K. U.; Fouque, D.; Fox, J.; Haller, M.; Heimburger, O.; Jager, K. J.; Lindley, E.; Marti Monros, A. M.; Nagler, E.; Oberbauer, R.; Spasovski, G.; Tattersall, J.; van Biesen, W.; Vander Veer, S.; Vanholder, R.; Wanner, C.; Wheeler, D.; Whithers, W.; Wiecek, A.; Zoccali, C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reflects the position of the CKD-MBD workgroup, an official working group of ERA-EDTA and of the ERBP advisory board, the official guideline-producing body of ERA-EDTA, on the topic of the use of calcimimetics in patients with CKD stage 5D, as based on two recent meta-analysis

  8. An Analysis of Kohlberg's "Stage 4 1/2" within an Enhanced Framework of Moral Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnameier, Gerhard

    This paper discusses a well-known problem of stage categorization within Kohlberg's theory of moral stages (L. Kohlberg, 1973), that of "Stage 4 1/2." Some subjects previously scored at stage 4 in Kohlberg's framework took on some characteristics of stage 2 reasoning, which suggested the possibility of regression. To reconcile this…

  9. A comparison of treating metabolic acidosis in CKD stage 4 hypertensive kidney disease with fruits and vegetables or sodium bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goraya, Nimrit; Simoni, Jan; Jo, Chan-Hee; Wesson, Donald E

    2013-03-01

    Current guidelines recommend Na(+)-based alkali for CKD with metabolic acidosis and plasma total CO2 (PTCO2) < 22 mM. Because diets in industrialized societies are typically acid-producing, we compared base-producing fruits and vegetables with oral NaHCO3 (HCO3) regarding the primary outcome of follow-up estimated GFR (eGFR) and secondary outcomes of improved metabolic acidosis and reduced urine indices of kidney injury. Individuals with stage 4 (eGFR, 15-29 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) CKD due to hypertensive nephropathy, had a PTCO2 level < 22 mM, and were receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition were randomly assigned to 1 year of daily oral NaHCO3 at 1.0 mEq/kg per day (n=35) or fruits and vegetables dosed to reduce dietary acid by half (n=36). Plasma cystatin C-calculated eGFR did not differ at baseline and 1 year between groups. One-year PTCO2 was higher than baseline in the HCO3 group (21.2±1.3 versus 19.5±1.5 mM; P<0.01) and the fruits and vegetables group (19.9±1.7 versus 19.3±1.9 mM; P<0.01), consistent with improved metabolic acidosis, and was higher in the HCO3 than the fruits and vegetable group (P<0.001). One-year urine indices of kidney injury were lower than baseline in both groups. Plasma [K(+)] did not increase in either group. One year of fruits and vegetables or NaHCO3 in individuals with stage 4 CKD yielded eGFR that was not different, was associated with higher-than-baseline PTCO2, and was associated with lower-than-baseline urine indices of kidney injury. The data indicate that fruits and vegetables improve metabolic acidosis and reduce kidney injury in stage 4 CKD without producing hyperkalemia.

  10. Relationship between Stage of Chronic Kidney Disease and Sarcopenia in Korean Aged 40 Years and Older Using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES IV-2, 3, and V-1, 2), 2008–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Tae Ho; Yoon, Soo Young; Chung, Jae Ho; Hwang, Hee-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background Protein-energy wasting is common in patients with end-stage kidney disease. However, few studies have examined the relationship between early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and sarcopenia. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study based on data in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2008–2011. In total, 11,625 subjects aged 40 years or older who underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry were analyzed. Sarcopenia was defined based on values of appendicular skeletal muscle mass as a percentage of body weight (ASM/Wt) two standard deviations below the gender-specific mean for young adults. Estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) were calculated using the CKD-EPI equation. Results Mean age, body mass index (BMI), and HOMA-IR were higher and caloric intake, physical activity, and vitamin D level were lower in the sarcopenia groups in both men and women. As the stage of CKD increased, the prevalence of sarcopenia increased, even in the early stages of CKD (normal and CKD1, 2, and 3-5: 2.6%, 5.6%, and 18.1% in men and 5.3%, 7.1%, and 12.6% in women, respectively; p sarcopenia with respect to CKD 3–5 was 1.93 (95% CI = 1.02–3.68) in men but was not statistically significant in women. Conclusions The prevalence of sarcopenia was higher in elderly Korean patients with even mildly reduced kidney function. Stage of CKD was associated with an increased prevalence of sarcopenia in men but not women. Thus, we should evaluate the risk of sarcopenia and work to prevent it, even in patients with early CKD. PMID:26083479

  11. Relationship between Stage of Chronic Kidney Disease and Sarcopenia in Korean Aged 40 Years and Older Using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES IV-2, 3, and V-1, 2), 2008-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Tae Ho; Yoon, Soo Young; Chung, Jae Ho; Hwang, Hee-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Protein-energy wasting is common in patients with end-stage kidney disease. However, few studies have examined the relationship between early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and sarcopenia. We conducted a cross-sectional study based on data in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2008-2011. In total, 11,625 subjects aged 40 years or older who underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry were analyzed. Sarcopenia was defined based on values of appendicular skeletal muscle mass as a percentage of body weight (ASM/Wt) two standard deviations below the gender-specific mean for young adults. Estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) were calculated using the CKD-EPI equation. Mean age, body mass index (BMI), and HOMA-IR were higher and caloric intake, physical activity, and vitamin D level were lower in the sarcopenia groups in both men and women. As the stage of CKD increased, the prevalence of sarcopenia increased, even in the early stages of CKD (normal and CKD1, 2, and 3-5: 2.6%, 5.6%, and 18.1% in men and 5.3%, 7.1%, and 12.6% in women, respectively; p sarcopenia with respect to CKD 3-5 was 1.93 (95% CI = 1.02-3.68) in men but was not statistically significant in women. The prevalence of sarcopenia was higher in elderly Korean patients with even mildly reduced kidney function. Stage of CKD was associated with an increased prevalence of sarcopenia in men but not women. Thus, we should evaluate the risk of sarcopenia and work to prevent it, even in patients with early CKD.

  12. Enzymatic creatinine assays allow estimation of glomerular filtration rate in stages 1 and 2 chronic kidney disease using CKD-EPI equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Nils; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Cavalier, Etienne; Bargnoux, Anne-Sophie; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Froissart, Marc; Piéroni, Laurence; Delanaye, Pierre

    2014-01-20

    The National Kidney Disease Education Program group demonstrated that MDRD equation is sensitive to creatinine measurement error, particularly at higher glomerular filtration rates. Thus, MDRD-based eGFR above 60 mL/min/1.73 m² should not be reported numerically. However, little is known about the impact of analytical error on CKD-EPI-based estimates. This study aimed at assessing the impact of analytical characteristics (bias and imprecision) of 12 enzymatic and 4 compensated Jaffe previously characterized creatinine assays on MDRD and CKD-EPI eGFR. In a simulation study, the impact of analytical error was assessed on a hospital population of 24084 patients. Ability using each assay to correctly classify patients according to chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages was evaluated. For eGFR between 60 and 90 mL/min/1.73 m², both equations were sensitive to analytical error. Compensated Jaffe assays displayed high bias in this range and led to poorer sensitivity/specificity for classification according to CKD stages than enzymatic assays. As compared to MDRD equation, CKD-EPI equation decreases impact of analytical error in creatinine measurement above 90 mL/min/1.73 m². Compensated Jaffe creatinine assays lead to important errors in eGFR and should be avoided. Accurate enzymatic assays allow estimation of eGFR until 90 mL/min/1.73 m² with MDRD and 120 mL/min/1.73 m² with CKD-EPI equation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The use of vitamin D analogs is independently associated with the favorable renal prognosis in chronic kidney disease stages 4-5: the CKD-ROUTE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yohei; Kanda, Eiichiro; Iimori, Soichiro; Naito, Shotaro; Noda, Yumi; Kawasaki, Tomoki; Sato, Hidehiko; Ando, Ryoichi; Sasaki, Sei; Sohara, Eisei; Okado, Tomokazu; Rai, Tatemitsu; Uchida, Shinichi

    2017-06-01

    Vitamin D analogs have generally been recommended for treatment of mineral bone disease in chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the association between this treatment and CKD progression has not yet been established. We designed a post hoc propensity score-matched cohort analysis derived from 3-year follow-up data of a prospective cohort. Adult participants with pre-dialysis CKD stages 4-5 who had newly been prescribed active vitamin D analogs during the observation period were eligible as matched cases. Then, matched controls were extracted from participants who had never been prescribed active vitamin D analogs. The primary outcome was a composite of end-stage renal disease or a 50 % reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). A Cox proportional hazards model evaluated the association between the use of vitamin D analogs and the primary outcome. We enrolled 240 patients (males, 65 %). The number of matched cases and controls was 30 and 210, respectively. The primary outcome was observed in 94 patients, whereas 25 patients died. The mean ± standard deviation age and eGFR were 69 ± 12 years and 17 ± 5.7 ml/min/1.73 m 2 , respectively. In a Cox proportional hazard model, the use of vitamin D analogs was independently associated with a lower risk of the primary outcome (crude hazard ratio 0.41; 95 % confidence interval 0.19, 0.89; adjusted hazard ratio 0.38; 95 % confidence interval 0.17, 0.88). The use of vitamin D analogs is independently associated with the preservation of renal function in patients with pre-dialysis CKD stages 4-5.

  14. Hematological profile of chronic kidney disease (CKD patients in Iran, in pre-dialysis stages and after initiation of hemodialysis

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    Afshar Reza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is a common sequealae of chronic kidney disease (CKD, associated with significant morbidity. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 100 CKD patients (54 hemodia-lyzed, 46 pre-dialyzed. Data including, complete blood count, BUN, creatinine, creatinine clea-rance, underlying diseases and hemodialysis duration were collected by a questionnaire. The most frequent morphologic features were normochromic-normocytic (80%, hypochromic-microcytic (15% and macrocytic (5%. The frequency of anemia in hemodialyzed and pre-dialyzed patients (with mean Hgb level of 10.27 and 11.11 g/dL were 85% and 75%. Hemoglobin concentration was positively correlated to calculated creatinine clearance (P < 0.001. The severity of anemia among hemodialyzed patients was mild (Hgb > 10 g/dL in 5%, moderate in 70% and severe (Hgb < 7 g/dL in 25%, while in pre-dialyzed was mild in 45% and moderate in 55%. There was no correlation between the anemia and CKD causes or hemodialysis duration. In conclusion, data shows that anemia in our patients with CKD is a predominant manifestation, with high frequency but of moderate degree. The most likely cause is inadequate erythropoietin production.

  15. Conservative care as a treatment option for patients aged 75 years and older with CKD stage V: a National survey in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanto, Christopher; Kooman, J; Courtens, A M; Konings, C J A M

    2018-01-01

    Conservative care for patients aged 75 years and older with CKD stage 5 as a treatment option besides dialysis was proposed officially in the Netherlands in October 2016. This national survey showed the current implementation of this option in Netherlands nephrology departments. A web-based survey was sent to medical managers of 60 nephrology departments in the Netherlands in August 2016. Twenty-one medical managers (35%) completed the survey. The term "conservative care" is frequently used and well known. The estimated number of patients in whom the decision for maximal conservative care was made in 2015 was 310 of 2249 patients with CKD stage 5 age 75 years and older (range 5-50 patients per department). 164 patients became symptomatic and received no dialysis. There is no official registration for this treatment option and patient category. The practice patterns vary widely. Only one of 21 respondents reported a conservative care outpatient clinic. Formal training or education regarding conservative care is not available in most of departments. 95% of respondents discussed this treatment option with their patients. General practitioners are always being informed about their patient's decision. Their main role is providing or organizing palliative care support at the end of life and discussing advance care planning. Most respondents (86%) considered to include their patients in a prospective multicentre observational study, conservative care versus dialysis. Conservative care as a treatment option for patients with CKD stage 5 aged 75 years and older is well established. The practice patterns are varied in the Netherlands. Follow-up studies are needed to see whether the new multidisciplinary guideline facilitates harmonization of practice pattern. Funding is needed to optimize the implementation of conservative care.

  16. Relationship between Stage of Chronic Kidney Disease and Sarcopenia in Korean Aged 40 Years and Older Using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES IV-2, 3, and V-1, 2, 2008-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Jin Moon

    Full Text Available Protein-energy wasting is common in patients with end-stage kidney disease. However, few studies have examined the relationship between early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD and sarcopenia.We conducted a cross-sectional study based on data in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2008-2011. In total, 11,625 subjects aged 40 years or older who underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry were analyzed. Sarcopenia was defined based on values of appendicular skeletal muscle mass as a percentage of body weight (ASM/Wt two standard deviations below the gender-specific mean for young adults. Estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR were calculated using the CKD-EPI equation.Mean age, body mass index (BMI, and HOMA-IR were higher and caloric intake, physical activity, and vitamin D level were lower in the sarcopenia groups in both men and women. As the stage of CKD increased, the prevalence of sarcopenia increased, even in the early stages of CKD (normal and CKD1, 2, and 3-5: 2.6%, 5.6%, and 18.1% in men and 5.3%, 7.1%, and 12.6% in women, respectively; p < 0.001. In addition, a correlation analysis showed that GFR and ASM/Wt had significant correlations in both men and women. Logistic regression analyses, after adjusting for age, BMI, caloric intake, log(physical activity, vitamin D level, and log(HOMA-IR, showed that the odds ratio for sarcopenia with respect to CKD 3-5 was 1.93 (95% CI = 1.02-3.68 in men but was not statistically significant in women.The prevalence of sarcopenia was higher in elderly Korean patients with even mildly reduced kidney function. Stage of CKD was associated with an increased prevalence of sarcopenia in men but not women. Thus, we should evaluate the risk of sarcopenia and work to prevent it, even in patients with early CKD.

  17. CKD273, a new proteomics classifier assessing CKD and its prognosis.

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    Ángel Argilés

    Full Text Available National Kidney Foundation CKD staging has allowed uniformity in studies on CKD. However, early diagnosis and predicting progression to end stage renal disease are yet to be improved. Seventy six patients with different levels of CKD, including outpatients and dialysed patients were studied for transcriptome, metabolome and proteome description. High resolution urinary proteome analysis was blindly performed in the 53 non-anuric out of the 76 CKD patients. In addition to routine clinical parameters, CKD273, a urinary proteomics-based classifier and its peptides were quantified. The baseline values were analyzed with regard to the clinical parameters and the occurrence of death or renal death during follow-up (3.6 years as the main outcome measurements. None of the patients with CKD2730.55. Unsupervised clustering analysis of the CKD273 peptides separated the patients into two main groups differing in CKD associated parameters. Among the 273 biomarkers, peptides derived from serum proteins were relatively increased in patients with lower glomerular filtration rate, while collagen-derived peptides were relatively decreased (p<0.05; Spearman. CKD273 was different in the groups with different renal function (p<0.003. The CKD273 classifier separated CKD patients according to their renal function and informed on the likelihood of experiencing adverse outcome. Recently defined in a large population, CKD273 is the first proteomic-based classifier successfully tested for prognosis of CKD progression in an independent cohort.

  18. Circulating levels of sclerostin but not DKK1 associate with laboratory parameters of CKD-MBD.

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    Geert J Behets

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence indicates that a disturbed Wnt-β-catenin signaling may be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone and mineral disorder (CKD-MBD. Data on the impact of CKD on circulating levels of the Wnt antagonists sclerostin and Dickkopf related protein 1 (DKK1 and the relationship with laboratory parameters of CKD-MBD are incomplete.We analyzed serum sclerostin and DKK1 in 308 patients across the stages of chronic kidney disease (kDOQI stage 1-2 n = 41; CKD stage 3 n = 54; CKD stage 4-5 n = 54; hemodialysis n = 100; peritoneal dialysis n = 59 as well as in 49 healthy controls. We investigated associations with demographics, renal function, parameters of mineral metabolism including 25(OH vitamin D, 1,25(OH2 vitamin D, biointact fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23, and parathyroid hormone (PTH, and bone turnover markers.Serum sclerostin, but not DKK1, increases in more advanced stages of CKD and associates with PTH, phosphate, and 1,25(OH2 vitamin D concentrations. Bone turnover markers are highest in hemodialysis patients presenting the combination of high PTH with low sclerostin level. Serum DKK1 levels are lower in CKD patients than in controls and are not associated with laboratory parameters of mineral metabolism. Interestingly, a direct association between DKK1 and platelet count was observed.In CKD, serum levels of the Wnt inhibitors DKK1 and sclerostin are unrelated, indicating different sites of origin and/ or different regulatory mechanisms. Sclerostin, as opposed to DKK1, may qualify as a biomarker of CKD-MBD, particularly in dialysis patients. DKK1 serum levels, remarkably, correlate almost uniquely with blood platelet counts.

  19. CKD.QLD: establishment of a chronic kidney disease [CKD] registry in Queensland, Australia.

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    Venuthurupalli, Sree K; Hoy, Wendy E; Healy, Helen G; Cameron, Anne; Fassett, Robert G

    2017-06-07

    Chronic kidney disease [CKD] is recognised as a global public health problem. Until recently, the majority of information informing on CKD has been generated from renal registries reporting on patients with end-stage kidney disease [ESKD] and on renal replacement therapy [RRT]. There has been a paucity of information on pre-dialysis CKD cohorts, and many issues related to these poorly described populations are unresolved. To this end, international organizations have called for CKD surveillance systems across all countries. In Australia, we have responded by developing the Chronic Kidney Disease in Queensland [CKD.QLD] with three main platforms consisting of CKD Registry, clinical trials and development of biobank. This registry which is the core component of CKD surveillance was conceptualized specifically for the pre-dialysis population in the public health system in Queensland, Australia. Recruitment started in May 2011, and to date the Registry has evolved as one of the largest CKD cohorts in the world with recruitment close to 7000 patients. The Registry has had many outcomes, including being the nidus for Australia's first National Health and Medical Research Council [NHMRC] CKD Centre of Research Excellence [CKD.CRE]. The Registry, with its linkage to Queensland Health datasets, is reporting, and is expected to continue generating, significant information on multiple aspects of CKD, its trajectory, management and patient outcomes. Intent of the CKD.CRE is to facilitate an expanded Registry network that has representation from health services, both public and private, across Australia.

  20. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with CKD.

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    Liang, Chih-Chia; Wang, Su-Ming; Kuo, Huey-Liang; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Liu, Jiung-Hsiun; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Wang, I-Kuan; Yang, Ya-Fei; Lu, Yueh-Ju; Chou, Che-Yi; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2014-08-07

    Patients with CKD receiving maintenance dialysis are at risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with early CKD who are not receiving dialysis is unknown. The hypothesis was that their risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding is negatively linked to renal function. To test this hypothesis, the association between eGFR and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with stages 3-5 CKD who were not receiving dialysis was analyzed. Patients with stages 3-5 CKD in the CKD program from 2003 to 2009 were enrolled and prospectively followed until December of 2012 to monitor the development of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding was analyzed using competing-risks regression with time-varying covariates. In total, 2968 patients with stages 3-5 CKD who were not receiving dialysis were followed for a median of 1.9 years. The incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding per 100 patient-years was 3.7 (95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 3.9) in patients with stage 3 CKD, 5.0 (95% confidence interval, 4.8 to 5.3) in patients with stage 4 CKD, and 13.9 (95% confidence interval, 13.1 to 14.8) in patients with stage 5 CKD. Higher eGFR was associated with a lower risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (P=0.03), with a subdistribution hazard ratio of 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.87 to 0.99) for every 5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) higher eGFR. A history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (Pupper gastrointestinal bleeding risk. In patients with CKD who are not receiving dialysis, lower renal function is associated with higher risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk is higher in patients with previous upper gastrointestinal bleeding history and low serum albumin. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  1. The systemic nature of CKD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoccali, Carmine; Vanholder, Raymond; Massy, Ziad A.; Ortiz, Alberto; Sarafidis, Pantelis; Dekker, Friedo W.; Fliser, Danilo; Fouque, Denis; Heine, Gunnar H.; Jager, Kitty J.; Kanbay, Mehmet; Mallamaci, Francesca; Parati, Gianfranco; Rossignol, Patrick; Wiecek, Andrzej; London, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    The accurate definition and staging of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the major achievements of modern nephrology. Intensive research is now being undertaken to unravel the risk factors and pathophysiologic underpinnings of this disease. In particular, the relationships between the kidney

  2. Nutrition and Physical Activity in CKD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamasco Cupisti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD patients are at risk for protein-energy wasting, abnormal body composition and impaired physical capacity. These complications lead to increased risk of hospitalization, morbidity and mortality.In CKD patient as well as in healthy people, there is a close association between nutrition and physical activity. Namely, inadequate nutrient (energy intake impairs physical performance thus favoring a sedentary lifestyle: this further contributes to loss of muscle strength and mass, which limit the quality of life and rehabilitation of CKD patients. In CKD as well as in end-stage-renal-disease patients, regular physical activity coupled with adequate energy and protein intake counteracts protein-energy wasting and related comorbidity and mortality. In summary, exercise training can positively influence nutritional status and the perception of well-being of CKD patients and may facilitate the anabolic effects of nutritional interventions.

  3. Dose control during decommissioning stage 1.2 of decommissioning SGHWR facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, M.J. [AEA Technology (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    Dose control during decommissioning stage 1.2 of the SGHWR facility, i.e preparation for an extended period of care and maintenance, is discussed. The method of control of dose uptake is described and also the systems of dose uptake review, the use of dose restraint objections and other tools for limitation of dose uptake. Dose uptake data are presented for periods of maintenance shutdowns. Finally the option of chemical clearing of the circuit following shutdown is considered. (UK).

  4. CKD in disadvantaged populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Jha, Vivekanand

    2015-02-01

    The increased burden of CKD in disadvantaged populations is due to both global factors and population-specific issues. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to care contribute to health-care disparities and exacerbate the negative effects of genetic or biologic predisposition. Provision of appropriate renal care to these populations requires a two-pronged approach: expansion of the reach of dialysis through development of low-cost alternatives that can be practiced in remote locations, and implementation and evaluation of cost-effective prevention strategies. Kidney transplantation should be promoted by expansion of deceased-donor transplant programs and use of inexpensive, generic immunosuppressive drugs. The message of WKD 2015 is that a concerted attack against the diseases that lead to ESRD, by increased community outreach, better education, improved economic opportunity, and access to preventive medicine for those at highest risk, could end the unacceptable relationship between CKD and disadvantage in these communities.

  5. Validation of the kidney failure risk equation in European CKD patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, M.J.; Zuilen, A.D. van; Brand, A. van den; Bots, M.L.; Blankestijn, P.J.; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Vervoort, G.M.M.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at risk for progression to kidney failure. Using data of Canadian CKD patients, Tangri et al. recently developed models to predict the progression of CKD stages 3-5 to kidney failure within 5 years. We validated this kidney failure risk

  6. Protein Nutrition and Malnutrition in CKD and ESRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Yan; Qian, Qi

    2017-02-27

    Elevated protein catabolism and protein malnutrition are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The underlying etiology includes, but is not limited to, metabolic acidosis intestinal dysbiosis; systemic inflammation with activation of complements, endothelin-1 and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAAS) axis; anabolic hormone resistance; energy expenditure elevation; and uremic toxin accumulation. All of these derangements can further worsen kidney function, leading to poor patient outcomes. Many of these CKD-related derangements can be prevented and substantially reversed, representing an area of great potential to improve CKD and ESRD care. This review integrates known information and recent advances in the area of protein nutrition and malnutrition in CKD and ESRD. Management recommendations are summarized. Thorough understanding the pathogenesis and etiology of protein malnutrition in CKD and ESRD patients will undoubtedly facilitate the design and development of more effective strategies to optimize protein nutrition and improve outcomes.

  7. Role of low protein diet in management of different stages of chronic kidney disease - practical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Bharat V; Patel, Zamurrud M

    2016-10-21

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem and more so in India. With limited availability and high cost of therapy, barely 10 % of patients with incident end stage renal disease (ESRD) cases get treatment in India. Therefore, all possible efforts should be made to retard progression of CKD. This article reviews the role of low protein diet (LPD) in management of CKD subjects and suggests how to apply it in clinical practice. The role of LPD in retarding progression of CKD is well established in animal experimental studies. However, its role in human subjects with CKD is perceived to be controversial based on the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) study. We believe that beneficial effect of LPD could not be appreciated due to shorter duration of follow-up in the MDRD study. Had the study been continued longer, it may have been possible to appreciate beneficial effect of LPD. It is our contention that in all cases of CKD that are slowly progressive, LPD can significantly retard progression of CKD and delay the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT). To be able to apply LPD for a long period, it is important to prescribe LPD at earlier stages (1,2,3) of CKD and not at late stage as recommended by KDIGO guidelines. Many clinicians are concerned about worsening nutritional status and hence reluctant to prescribe LPD. This actually is true for patients with advanced CKD in whom there is spontaneous decrease in calorie and protein intake. In our experience, nutritional status of patients in early stages (1,2,3) of CKD is as good as that of healthy subjects. Prescribing LPD at an early stage is unlikely to worsen status. The role of LPD in retarding progression of CKD is well established in animal experimental studies. Even in human subjects, there is enough evidence to suggest that LPD retards progression of CKD in carefully selected subjects. It should be prescribed to those with good appetite, good nutritional status and a slowly

  8. Relating illness complexity to reimbursement in CKD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessette, Russell W; Carter, Randy L

    2011-01-01

    Despite significant investments of federal and state dollars to transition patient medical records to an all-electronic system, a chasm still exists between health care quality and payment for it. A major reason for this gap is the difficulty in evaluating health care outcomes based on claims data. Since both payers and patients may not appreciate how illness complexity impacts treatment outcomes, it is difficult to determine fair provider compensation. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) typifies these problems and is often associated with comorbidities that impact cost, health, and work productivity. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate an illness complexity score (ICS) based on a linear regression of select blood values that might assist in predicting average monthly reimbursements in CKD patients. A second objective was to compare the results of this ICS prediction to results obtained by prediction of average monthly reimbursement using CKD stage. A third objective was to analyze the relationship between the change in ICS, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and CKD stage over time to average monthly reimbursement. We calculated parsimonious values for select variables associated with CKD patients and compared the ICS to ordinal staging of renal disease. Data from 177 de-identified patients over 13 months was collected, which included 15 blood chemistry observations along with complete claims data for all medical expenses. To test for the relationship between average blood chemistry values, stages of CKD, age, and average monthly reimbursement, we modeled an association through a linear regression function of age, eGFR, and the Z-scores calculated from average monthly values of phosphorus, parathyroid hormone, glucose, hemoglobin, bicarbonate, albumin, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, potassium, calcium, sodium, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, and white blood cells. The results of our study demonstrated that the association

  9. Bisphophonates in CKD Patients with Low Bone Mineral Density

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    Wen-Chih Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD have a high risk of bone fracture because of low bone mineral density and poor bone quality. Osteoporosis also features low bone mass, disarranged microarchitecture, and skeletal fragility, and differentiating between osteoporosis and CKD-MBD in low bone mineral density is a challenge and usually achieved by bone biopsy. Bisphosphonates can be safe and beneficial for patients with a glomerular filtration rate of 30 mL/min or higher, but prescribing bisphosphonates in advanced CKD requires caution because of the increased possibility of low bone turnover disorders such as osteomalacia, mixed uremic osteodystrophy, and adynamic bone, even aggravating hyperparathyroidism. Therefore, bone biopsy in advanced CKD is an important consideration before prescribing bisphosphonates. Treatment also may induce hypocalcemia in CKD patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism, but vitamin D supplementation may ameliorate this effect. Bisphosphonate treatment can improve both bone mineral density and vascular calcification, but the latter becomes more unlikely in patients with stage 3-4 CKD with vascular calcification but no decreased bone mineral density. Using bisphosphonates requires considerable caution in advanced CKD, and the lack of adequate clinical investigation necessitates more studies regarding its effects on these patients.

  10. Self-reported Medication Adherence and CKD Progression

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    Esteban A. Cedillo-Couvert

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the general population, medication nonadherence contributes to poorer outcomes. However, little is known about medication adherence among adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD. We evaluated the association of self-reported medication adherence with CKD progression and all-cause death in patients with CKD. Methods: In this prospective observational study of 3305 adults with mild-to-moderate CKD enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC Study, the baseline self-reported medication adherence was assessed by responses to 3 questions and categorized as high, medium, and low. CKD progression (50% decline in eGFR or incident end-stage renal disease and all-cause death were measured using multivariable Cox proportional hazards. Results: Of the patients, 68% were categorized as high adherence, 17% medium adherence, and 15% low adherence. Over a median follow-up of 6 years, there were 969 CKD progression events and 675 deaths. Compared with the high-adherence group, the low-adherence group experienced increased risk for CKD progression (hazard ratio = 1.27, 95% confidence interval = 1.05, 1.54 after adjustment for sociodemographic and clinical factors, cardiovascular medications, number of medication types, and depressive symptoms. A similar association existed between low adherence and all-cause death, but did not reach standard statistical significance (hazard ratio = 1.14 95% confidence interval = 0.88, 1.47. Conclusion: Baseline self-reported low medication adherence was associated with an increased risk for CKD progression. Future work is needed to better understand the mechanisms underlying this association and to develop interventions to improve adherence. Keywords: CKD, death, medication adherence, progression

  11. CKD.QLD: chronic kidney disease surveillance and research in Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venuthurupalli, Sree K.; Hoy, Wendy E.; Healy, Helen G.; Salisbury, Anne; Fassett, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is recognized as a major public health problem in Australia with significant mortality, morbidity and economic burden. However, there is no comprehensive surveillance programme to collect, collate and analyse data on CKD in a systematic way. Methods We describe an initiative called CKD Queensland (CKD.QLD), which was established in 2009 to address this deficiency, and outline the processes and progress made to date. The foundation is a CKD Registry of all CKD patients attending public health renal services in Queensland, and patient recruitment and data capture have started. Results We have established through early work of CKD.QLD that there are over 11 500 CKD patients attending public renal services in Queensland, and these are the target population for our registry. Progress so far includes conducting two CKD clinic site surveys, consenting over 3000 patients into the registry and initiation of baseline data analysis of the first 600 patients enrolled at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH) site. In addition, research studies in dietary intake and CKD outcomes and in models of care in CKD patient management are underway. Conclusions Through the CKD Registry, we will define the distribution of CKD patients referred to renal practices in the public system in Queensland by region, remoteness, age, gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic status. We will define the clinical characteristics of those patients, and the CKD associations, stages, co-morbidities and current management. We will follow the course and outcomes in individuals over time, as well as group trends over time. Through our activities and outcomes, we are aiming to provide a nidus for other states in Australia to join in a national CKD registry and network. PMID:23115138

  12. Patients' Experiences After CKD Diagnosis: A Meta-ethnographic Study and Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdale, Emma J; Leydon, Geraldine; Fraser, Simon; Roderick, Paul; Taal, Maarten W; Tonkin-Crine, Sarah

    2017-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is often asymptomatic at first diagnosis, and awareness of CKD is low in the general population. Thus, individuals who are unexpectedly identified as having CKD may struggle to adjust to living with this diagnosis. This study aims to synthesize qualitative research exploring patients' views and experiences of a CKD diagnosis and how they adjust to it. Systematic review and meta-ethnography. Adult patients with CKD stages 1 to 5. MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Embase, and Web of Science were searched from the earliest date available to November 2015. Qualitative studies were selected that explored patients' views and experiences of a CKD diagnosis and their adjustment. Meta-ethnography was adopted to synthesize the findings. 10 studies involving 596 patients with CKD from secondary-care settings were included. 7 key themes were identified: a challenging diagnosis, diverse beliefs about causation, anticipated concerns about progression, delaying disease progression, unmet informational needs, psychosocial impact of CKD, and adjustment to life with CKD. Limited to views and experiences of participants in included studies, which were mostly conducted in high-income countries. Studies not written in English were excluded. Transferability of findings to other populations may be limited. This review highlights variation in patients' understanding of CKD, an overall lack of information on the trajectory of CKD, and a need for psychosocial support, especially in later stages, to help patients adjust to living with CKD. Future research that acknowledges CKD as a condition with diverse complicating morbidities and explores how patients' information and psychosocial needs vary according to severity and comorbid conditions would be beneficial. This will support delivery of easily understandable, timely, and targeted information about CKD, as well as practical advice about recommended lifestyle changes. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc

  13. Multiple Pregnancies in CKD Patients: An Explosive Mix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduino, Silvana; Attini, Rossella; Parisi, Silvia; Fassio, Federica; Biolcati, Marlisa; Pagano, Arianna; Bossotti, Carlotta; Vasario, Elena; Borgarello, Valentina; Daidola, Germana; Ferraresi, Martina; Gaglioti, Pietro; Todros, Tullia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives CKD and multiple pregnancies bear important risks for pregnancy outcomes. The aim of the study was to define the risk for adverse pregnancy-related outcomes in multiple pregnancies in CKD patients in comparison with a control group of “low-risk” multiple pregnancies. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The study was performed in the Maternal Hospital of the University of Turin, Italy. Of 314 pregnancies referred in CKD (2000–2011), 20 were multiple (15 twin deliveries). Control groups consisted of 379 low-risk multiple pregnancies (314 twin deliveries) and 19 (15 twin deliveries) cases with hypertension-collagen diseases. Baseline data and outcomes were compared by univariate and logistic regression analyses. Results The prevalence of multiple pregnancies was relatively high in the CKD population (6.4%); all referred cases were in early CKD stages (I-II); both creatinine (0.68 to 0.79 mg/dl; P=0.010) and proteinuria (0.81 to 3.42 g/d; P=0.041) significantly increased from referral to delivery. No significant difference in demographic data at baseline was found between cases and low-risk controls. CKD was associated with higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes versus low-risk twin pregnancies. Statistical significance was reached for preterm delivery (<34 weeks: 60% vs 26.4%; P=0.005; <32 weeks: 53.3% vs 12.7%; P<0.001), small for gestational age babies (28.6% vs 8.1%; P<0.001), need for Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (60% vs 12.7%; P<0.001), weight discordance between twins (40% vs 17.8%; P=0.032), and neonatal and perinatal mortality (6.6% vs 0.8%; P=0.032). Conclusion This study suggests that maternal-fetal risks are increased in multiple pregnancies in the early CKD stages. PMID:23124785

  14. Association of low-protein supplemented diets with fetal growth in pregnant women with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Giorgina B; Leone, Filomena; Attini, Rossella; Parisi, Silvia; Fassio, Federica; Deagostini, Maria Chiara; Ferraresi, Martina; Clari, Roberta; Ghiotto, Sara; Biolcati, Marilisa; Giuffrida, Domenica; Rolfo, Alessandro; Todros, Tullia

    2014-05-01

    Women affected by CKD increasingly choose to get pregnant. Experience with low-protein diets is limited. The aim of this study was to review results obtained from pregnant women with CKD on supplemented vegan-vegetarian low-protein diets. This was a single-arm, open intervention study between 2000-2012 of a low-protein diet in pregnant patients with stages 3-5 CKD or severe proteinuria (>1 g/d in the first trimester or nephrotic at any time). Stages 3-5 CKD patients who were not on low-protein diets for clinical, psychologic, or logistic reasons served as controls. The setting was the Obstetrics-Nephrology Unit dedicated to kidney diseases in pregnancy. The treated group included 24 pregnancies--21 singleton deliveries, 1 twin pregnancy, 1 abortion, and 1 miscarriage. Additionally, there were 21 controls (16 singleton deliveries, 5 miscarriages). The diet was a vegan-vegetarian low-protein diet (0.6-0.8 g/kg per day) with keto-acid supplementation and 1-3 protein-unrestricted meals allowed per week. Treated patients and controls were comparable at baseline for median age (35 versus 34 years), referral week (7 versus 8), eGFR (59 versus 54 ml/min), and hypertension (43.5% versus 33.3%); median proteinuria was higher in patients on the low-protein diet (1.96 [0.1-6.3] versus 0.3 [0.1-2.0] g/d; Pdiet group. Incidence of small for gestational age babies was significantly lower in the diet group (3/21) versus controls (7/16; chi-squared test; P=0.05). Throughout follow-up (6 months to 10 years), hospitalization rates and prevalence of children below the third percentile were similar in both groups. Vegan-vegetarian supplemented low-protein diets in pregnant women with stages 3-5 CKD may reduce the likelihood of small for gestational age babies without detrimental effects on kidney function or proteinuria in the mother.

  15. Poverty, race, and CKD in a racially and socioeconomically diverse urban population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Deidra C; Charles, Raquel F; Evans, Michele K; Zonderman, Alan B; Powe, Neil R

    2010-06-01

    Low socioeconomic status (SES) and African American race are both independently associated with end-stage renal disease and progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, despite their frequent co-occurrence, the effect of low SES independent of race has not been well studied in CKD. Cross-sectional study. 2,375 community-dwelling adults aged 30-64 years residing within 12 neighborhoods selected for both socioeconomic and racial diversity in Baltimore City, MD. Low SES (self-reported household income or =125% of guideline); white and African American race. CKD defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate poverty and CKD, stratified by race. Of 2,375 participants, 955 were white (347 low SES and 608 higher SES) and 1,420 were African American (713 low SES and 707 higher SES). 146 (6.2%) participants had CKD. Overall, race was not associated with CKD (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.57-1.96); however, African Americans had a much greater odds of advanced CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate urban populations. Low SES has a profound relationship with CKD in African Americans, but not whites, in an urban population of adults, and its role in the racial disparities seen in CKD is worthy of further investigation. Copyright 2010 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of the MDRD Study and CKD-EPI Equations for the Estimation of the Glomerular Filtration Rate in the Korean General Population: The Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V-1, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Dong Jeong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: We compared the accuracy of the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD study and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI equations in Korean patients and evaluated the difference in CKD prevalence determined using the two equations in the Korean general population. Methods: The accuracy of the two equations was evaluated in 607 patients who underwent a chromium-51-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid GFR measurement. Additionally, we compared the difference in CKD prevalence determined by the two equations among 5,822 participants in the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2010. Results: Among the 607 subjects, the median bias of the CKD-EPI equation was significantly lower than that of the MDRD study equation (0.9 vs. 2.2, p=0.020. The accuracy of the two equations was not significantly different in patients with mGFR 2; however, the accuracy of the CKD-EPI equation was significantly higher than that of the MDRD study equation in patients with GFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73m2. The prevalences of the CKD stages 1, 2 and 3 in the Korean general population were 47.56, 49.23, and 3.07%, respectively, for the MDRD study equation; and were 68.48, 28.89, and 2.49%, respectively, for the CKD-EPI equation. Conclusions: These data suggest that the CKD-EPI equation might be more useful in clinical practice than the MDRD study equation in Koreans.

  17. Relating illness complexity to reimbursement in CKD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bessette RW

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Russell W Bessette1, Randy L Carter2,3 1Department of Health Sciences, Institute for Healthcare Informatics, 2Department of Biostatistics, 3Population Health Observatory, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA Background: Despite significant investments of federal and state dollars to transition patient medical records to an all-electronic system, a chasm still exists between health care quality and payment for it. A major reason for this gap is the difficulty in evaluating health care outcomes based on claims data. Since both payers and patients may not appreciate how illness complexity impacts treatment outcomes, it is difficult to determine fair provider compensation. Objectives: Chronic kidney disease (CKD typifies these problems and is often associated with comorbidities that impact cost, health, and work productivity. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate an illness complexity score (ICS based on a linear regression of select blood values that might assist in predicting average monthly reimbursements in CKD patients. A second objective was to compare the results of this ICS prediction to results obtained by prediction of average monthly reimbursement using CKD stage. A third objective was to analyze the relationship between the change in ICS, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, and CKD stage over time to average monthly reimbursement. Methods: We calculated parsimonious values for select variables associated with CKD patients and compared the ICS to ordinal staging of renal disease. Data from 177 de-identified patients over 13 months was collected, which included 15 blood chemistry observations along with complete claims data for all medical expenses. To test for the relationship between average blood chemistry values, stages of CKD, age, and average monthly reimbursement, we modeled an association through a linear regression function of age, eGFR, and the Z-scores calculated from average

  18. Risk factors for CKD progression in Japanese patients: findings from the Chronic Kidney Disease Japan Cohort (CKD-JAC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaguma, Daijo; Imai, Enyu; Takeuchi, Ayano; Ohashi, Yasuo; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Nitta, Kosaku; Akizawa, Tadao; Matsuo, Seiichi; Makino, Hirofumi; Hishida, Akira

    2017-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) eventually progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, risk factors associated with CKD progression have not been well characterized in Japanese patients with CKD who are less affected with coronary disease than Westerners. A large-scale, multicenter, prospective, cohort study was conducted in patients with CKD and under nephrology care, who met the eligibility criteria [Japanese; age 20-75 years; and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR): 10-59 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ]. The primary endpoint was a composite of time to a 50 % decline in eGFR from baseline or time to the initiation of renal replacement therapy (RRT). The secondary endpoints were the rate of decline in eGFR from baseline, time to a 50 % decline in eGFR from baseline, time to the initiation of RRT, and time to doubling of serum creatinine (Cre) concentration. 2966 patients (female, 38.9 %; age, 60. 3 ± 11.6 years) were enrolled. The incidence of the primary endpoint increased significantly (P < 0.0001) in concert with CKD stage at baseline. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards models revealed that elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) [hazard ratio (HR) 1.203, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.099-1.318)] and increased albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR ≥ 1000 mg/g Cre; HR: 4.523; 95 % CI 3.098-6.604) at baseline were significantly associated (P < 0.0001, respectively) with the primary endpoint. Elevated SBP and increased UACR were risk factors that were significantly associated with CKD progression to ESRD in Japanese patients under nephrology care. UMIN clinical trial registry number: UMIN000020038.

  19. Baseline characteristics of patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 and stage 4 in spain: the MERENA observational cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montes Rafael

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To obtain information on cardiovascular morbidity, hypertension control, anemia and mineral metabolism based on the analysis of the baseline characteristics of a large cohort of Spanish patients enrolled in an ongoing prospective, observational, multicenter study of patients with stages 3 and 4 chronic kidney diseases (CKD. Methods Multicenter study from Spanish government hospital-based Nephrology outpatient clinics involving 1129 patients with CKD stages 3 (n = 434 and 4 (n = 695 defined by GFR calculated by the MDRD formula. Additional analysis was performed with GFR calculated using the CKD-EPI and Cockcroft-Gault formula. Results In the cohort as a whole, median age 70.9 years, morbidity from all cardiovascular disease (CVD was very high (39.1%. In CKD stage 4, CVD prevalence was higher than in stage 3 (42.2 vs 35.6% p 300 mg/day was present in more than 60% of patients and there was no significant differences between stages 3 and 4 CKD (1.2 ± 1.8 and 1.3 ± 1.8 g/day, respectively. A majority of the patients had hemoglobin levels greater than 11 g/dL (91.1 and 85.5% in stages 3 and 4 CKD respectively p Conclusion This study provides an overview of key clinical parameters in patients with CKD Stages 3 and 4 where delivery or care was largely by nephrologists working in a network of hospital-based clinics of the Spanish National Healthcare System.

  20. Food Insecurity, CKD, and Subsequent ESRD in US Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tanushree; Crews, Deidra C; Wesson, Donald E; Dharmarajan, Sai; Saran, Rajiv; Ríos Burrows, Nilka; Saydah, Sharon; Powe, Neil R

    2017-07-01

    Poor access to food among low-income adults has been recognized as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), but there are no data for the impact of food insecurity on progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We hypothesized that food insecurity would be independently associated with risk for ESRD among persons with and without earlier stages of CKD. Longitudinal cohort study. 2,320 adults (aged ≥ 20 years) with CKD and 10,448 adults with no CKD enrolled in NHANES III (1988-1994) with household income ≤ 400% of the federal poverty level linked to the Medicare ESRD Registry for a median follow-up of 12 years. Food insecurity, defined as an affirmative response to the food-insecurity screening question. Development of ESRD. Demographics, income, diabetes, hypertension, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and albuminuria. Dietary acid load was estimated from 24-hour dietary recall. We used a Fine-Gray competing-risk model to estimate the relative hazard (RH) for ESRD associated with food insecurity after adjusting for covariates. 4.5% of adults with CKD were food insecure. Food-insecure individuals were more likely to be younger and have diabetes (29.9%), hypertension (73.9%), or albuminuria (90.4%) as compared with their counterparts (Pinsecure group was 51.2 mEq/d versus 55.6 mEq/d, respectively (P=0.05). Food-insecure adults were more likely to develop ESRD (RH, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.08-3.10) compared with food-secure adults after adjustment for demographics, income, diabetes, hypertension, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and albuminuria. In the non-CKD group, 5.7% were food insecure. We did not find a significant association between food insecurity and ESRD (RH, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.40-1.49). Use of single 24-hour diet recall; lack of laboratory follow-up data and measure of changes in food insecurity over time; follow-up of cohort ended 10 years ago. Among adults with CKD, food insecurity was independently associated with a higher likelihood of

  1. Nondepressive Psychosocial Factors and CKD Outcomes in Black Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunyera, Joseph; Davenport, Clemontina A; Bhavsar, Nrupen A; Sims, Mario; Scialla, Julia; Pendergast, Jane; Hall, Rasheeda; Tyson, Crystal C; Russell, Jennifer St Clair; Wang, Wei; Correa, Adolfo; Boulware, L Ebony; Diamantidis, Clarissa J

    2018-02-07

    Established risk factors for CKD do not fully account for risk of CKD in black Americans. We studied the association of nondepressive psychosocial factors with risk of CKD in the Jackson Heart Study. We used principal component analysis to identify underlying constructs from 12 psychosocial baseline variables (perceived daily, lifetime, and burden of lifetime discrimination; stress; anger in; anger out; hostility; pessimism; John Henryism; spirituality; perceived social status; and social support). Using multivariable models adjusted for demographics and comorbidity, we examined the association of psychosocial variables with baseline CKD prevalence, eGFR decline, and incident CKD during follow-up. Of 3390 (64%) Jackson Heart Study participants with the required data, 656 (19%) had prevalent CKD. Those with CKD (versus no CKD) had lower perceived daily (mean [SD] score =7.6 [8.5] versus 9.7 [9.0]) and lifetime discrimination (2.5 [2.0] versus 3.1 [2.2]), lower perceived stress (4.2 [4.0] versus 5.2 [4.4]), higher hostility (12.1 [5.2] versus 11.5 [4.8]), higher John Henryism (30.0 [4.8] versus 29.7 [4.4]), and higher pessimism (2.3 [2.2] versus 2.0 [2.1]; all P psychosocial variables: factor 1, life stressors (perceived discrimination, stress); factor 2, moods (anger, hostility); and, factor 3, coping strategies (John Henryism, spirituality, social status, social support). After adjustments, factor 1 (life stressors) was negatively associated with prevalent CKD at baseline among women only: odds ratio, 0.76 (95% confidence interval, 0.65 to 0.89). After a median follow-up of 8 years, identified psychosocial factors were not significantly associated with eGFR decline (life stressors: β =0.08; 95% confidence interval, -0.02 to 0.17; moods: β =0.03; 95% confidence interval, -0.06 to 0.13; coping: β =-0.02; 95% confidence interval, -0.12 to 0.08) or incident CKD (life stressors: odds ratio, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 0.88 to 1.29; moods: odds ratio, 1.02; 95

  2. Effectiveness of Multifaceted Care Approach on Adverse Clinical Outcomes in Nondiabetic CKD: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

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    Aminu K. Bello

    2017-07-01

    Discussion: Multifaceted interventions targeting multiple risk factors tended to reduce the risk of all-cause mortality and reduced the risk to progress to end-stage kidney failure in patients with CKD. There is a need for high-quality studies that can rigorously evaluate a set of interventions targeting multiple domains of CKD management in the population with nondiabetic CKD due to paucity of data in the current published literature.

  3. Chronic Kidney Disease Guideline Implementation in Primary Care: A Qualitative Report from the TRANSLATE CKD Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Bonnie M; York, Trevor R M; Sand, Jessica; Fox, Chester H; Kahn, Linda S

    2015-01-01

    Primary care physicians (PCPs) are optimally situated to identify and manage early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nonetheless, studies have documented suboptimal PCP understanding, awareness, and management of early CKD. The TRANSLATE CKD study is an ongoing national, mixed-methods, cluster randomized control trial that examines the implementation of evidence-based guidelines for CKD into primary care practice. As part of the mixed-methods process evaluation, semistructured interviews were conducted by phone with 27 providers participating in the study. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed. Thematic content analysis was used to identify themes. Themes were categorized according to the 4 domains of Normalization Process Theory (NPT). Identified themes illuminated the complex work undertaken to manage CKD in primary care practices. Barriers to guideline implementation were identified in each of the 4 NPT domains, including (1) lack of knowledge and understanding around CKD (coherence), (2) difficulties engaging providers and patients in CKD management (cognitive participation), (3) limited time and competing demands (collective action), and (4) challenges obtaining and using data to monitor progress (reflexive monitoring). Addressing the barriers to implementation with concrete interventions at the levels at which they occur, informed by NPT, will ultimately improve the quality of CKD patient care. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  4. The significant impact of acute kidney injury on CKD in patients who survived over 10 years after myeloablative allogeneic SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoi, T; Ando, M; Munakata, W; Kobayashi, T; Kakihana, K; Ohashi, K; Akiyama, H; Sakamaki, H

    2013-01-01

    There are no well-defined studies of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among long-term survivors after hematopoietic SCT. A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted to characterize CKD in 77 subjects that had undergone myeloablative allogeneic SCT, all of whom had their serum creatinine (Cr) levels followed-up during the 10-year period after SCT. Their mean (range) survival time was 14.4 (10.5-20.2) years. CKD was defined as a persistent decrease in the Cr-based estimated glomerular filtration rate to below 60 mL/min/1.73 m². Acute kidney injury (AKI) was defined as an increase in Cr within the first 100 days after SCT, and its severity was classified into three stages according to the AKIN criteria. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses evaluated the association between AKI and the incidence of CKD. The cumulative incidence of CKD increased over time and reached 34% at 10 years. After adjusting for known risks for post-SCT CKD, each AKIN stage was strongly associated with the incidence of CKD. The incidence of CKD probably increases over time among subjects who are alive at >10 years after SCT. This study places a new emphasis on AKI as an important risk factor for CKD in post-SCT subjects.

  5. Masked Uncontrolled Hypertension in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Pappas, Maria K; Sinha, Arjun D

    2016-03-01

    Masked uncontrolled hypertension (MUCH) is diagnosed in patients treated for hypertension who are normotensive in the clinic but hypertensive outside. In this study of 333 veterans with CKD, we prospectively evaluated the prevalence of MUCH as determined by ambulatory BP monitoring using three definitions of hypertension (daytime hypertension ≥135/85 mmHg; either nighttime hypertension ≥120/70 mmHg or daytime hypertension; and 24-hour hypertension ≥130/80 mmHg) or by home BP monitoring (hypertension ≥135/85 mmHg). The prevalence of MUCH was 26.7% by daytime ambulatory BP, 32.8% by 24-hour ambulatory BP, 56.1% by daytime or night-time ambulatory BP, and 50.8% by home BP. To assess the reproducibility of the diagnosis, we repeated these measurements after 4 weeks. Agreement in MUCH diagnosis by ambulatory BP was 75-78% (κ coefficient for agreement, 0.44-0.51), depending on the definition used. In contrast, home BP showed an agreement of only 63% and a κ coefficient of 0.25. Prevalence of MUCH increased with increasing clinic systolic BP: 2% in the 90-110 mmHg group, 17% in the 110-119 mmHg group, 34% in the 120-129 mmHg group, and 66% in the 130-139 mmHg group. Clinic BP was a good determinant of MUCH (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve 0.82; 95% confidence interval 0.76-0.87). In diagnosing MUCH, home BP was not different from clinic BP. In conclusion, among people with CKD, MUCH is common and reproducible, and should be suspected when clinic BP is in the prehypertensive range. Confirmation of MUCH diagnosis should rely on ambulatory BP monitoring. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  6. Stage T1-2 prostate cancer with pretreatment PSA 10 ng/ml or less: radiotherapy or surgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyser, Douglas; Kupelian, Patrick; Zippe, Craig; Klein, Eric

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Presently, patients with pretreatment PSA levels ≤10 ng/ml constitute the majority of cases presenting for definitive treatment. Our aim was to determine whether the type of treatment (radiotherapy versus surgery) affected biochemical failure rates in this group of patients. This study is based on 389 patients treated at a single institution. Material and Methods: The charts of all patients treated with either radiotherapy or prostatectomy alone between 1987 and 1993 were reviewed (n=811). Patients with clinical stage T1 or T2 disease, and a pretreatment PSA level (iPSA) of 10.0 or less were analyzed (n=389). Two hundred forty nine (64%) received radical prostatectomy and 140 (36%) received radiotherapy (median dose 66.6 Gy). Pretreatment patient characteristics including clinical stage, biopsy Gleason score (GS) and iPSA level were not significantly different between the radiation and surgery groups (Table 1). The patients treated with radiation were significantly older (median age 70 years vs. 64 years, p<0.05). A total of 37% of the prostatectomy patients had a positive margin. The median follow-up time was 33 months; 1458 follow-up PSA levels were available for analysis. Biochemical failure was defined as a rise in PSA level of 1.0 ng/ml above the nadir PSA level in radiotherapy cases, or any value above 0.2 ng/ml in the prostatectomy cases. Results: The overall 5 year actuarial biochemical relapse free survival (bRFS) rate was 70%. The 5-year bRFS rates for prostatectomy and radiotherapy were identical (70%) (Fig.1). The significant factors affecting bRFS rates were iPSA level (≤4 vs. 4-10 ng/ml) and Gleason score (≤6 vs. ≥7) (Table 2). The 5-year bRFS rates of patients with iPSA ≤4 vs. iPSA 4-10 ng/ml were 92% vs. 61% respectively, p<0.01. The 5-year clinical relapse free survival was 93%. All clinical failures were preceded by biochemical failure. Patients with positive surgical margins did significantly worse than those with negative

  7. Analysis of the prognostic factors for low rectal cancer with the pT1-2NxM0 stage after abdominoperineal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing-mao; Ma, Chao; Sun, Da-yong; Wang, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-xiang

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the factors influencing local recurrence and survival for low rectal cancer with pT1-2NxM0 stage after an abdominoperineal resection (APR). Data of 429 patients confirmed to have pT1-2NxM0 after APR were reviewed. The recurrence rate in patients with intraoperative perforation, less than 12 lymph nodes (LNs) harvested, T2 staging, and positive circumferential resection margin (CRM) was 25.1, 19.9, 9.5, and 26.1% compared with 6.9, 7.0, 0, and 5.8% in patients with no perforation, 12 or more LNs harvested, T1, and negative CRM. The 5-year survival rate in patients with age of at least 70, perforation, less than 12 LNs harvested, T2, and positive CRM was 71.1, 60.8, 58.8, 69.9, and 46.0%, but 73.4, 73.5, 73.8, 89.4, and 75.0% in patients with age less than 70, no perforation, 12 or more LNs harvested, T1, and negative CRM. Meanwhile, patients with N0, N1, and N2 had a survival rate of 90.7, 69.9, and 63.9%. Multivariate analysis showed that perforation (PCRM status (P=0.002) were associated with local recurrence, whereas age of the patients (P=0.023), N staging (PCRM status (P=0.004) were associated with survival. APR was affected by patients' age, operation performer, perforation, number of LNs harvested, T staging, N staging, differentiation, and CRM status. Perforation, number of LNs harvested, T staging, differentiation, and CRM status were independent factors for recurrence; meanwhile, age of the patients, N staging, differentiation, and CRM status were independent factors influencing survival.

  8. Antimalarial Pyrido[1,2-a]benzimidazoles: Lead Optimization, Parasite Life Cycle Stage Profile, Mechanistic Evaluation, Killing Kinetics, and in Vivo Oral Efficacy in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kawaljit; Okombo, John; Brunschwig, Christel; Ndubi, Ferdinand; Barnard, Linley; Wilkinson, Chad; Njogu, Peter M; Njoroge, Mathew; Laing, Lizahn; Machado, Marta; Prudêncio, Miguel; Reader, Janette; Botha, Mariette; Nondaba, Sindisiwe; Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Lauterbach, Sonja; Churchyard, Alisje; Coetzer, Theresa L; Burrows, Jeremy N; Yeates, Clive; Denti, Paolo; Wiesner, Lubbe; Egan, Timothy J; Wittlin, Sergio; Chibale, Kelly

    2017-02-23

    Further structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies on the recently identified pyrido[1,2-a]benzimidazole (PBI) antimalarials have led to the identification of potent, metabolically stable compounds with improved in vivo oral efficacy in the P. berghei mouse model and additional activity against parasite liver and gametocyte stages, making them potential candidates for preclinical development. Inhibition of hemozoin formation possibly contributes to the mechanism of action.

  9. Association of eGFR-Related Loci Identified by GWAS with Incident CKD and ESRD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten A Böger

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Family studies suggest a genetic component to the etiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD and end stage renal disease (ESRD. Previously, we identified 16 loci for eGFR in genome-wide association studies, but the associations of these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for incident CKD or ESRD are unknown. We thus investigated the association of these loci with incident CKD in 26,308 individuals of European ancestry free of CKD at baseline drawn from eight population-based cohorts followed for a median of 7.2 years (including 2,122 incident CKD cases defined as eGFR <60ml/min/1.73m(2 at follow-up and with ESRD in four case-control studies in subjects of European ancestry (3,775 cases, 4,577 controls. SNPs at 11 of the 16 loci (UMOD, PRKAG2, ANXA9, DAB2, SHROOM3, DACH1, STC1, SLC34A1, ALMS1/NAT8, UBE2Q2, and GCKR were associated with incident CKD; p-values ranged from p = 4.1e-9 in UMOD to p = 0.03 in GCKR. After adjusting for baseline eGFR, six of these loci remained significantly associated with incident CKD (UMOD, PRKAG2, ANXA9, DAB2, DACH1, and STC1. SNPs in UMOD (OR = 0.92, p = 0.04 and GCKR (OR = 0.93, p = 0.03 were nominally associated with ESRD. In summary, the majority of eGFR-related loci are either associated or show a strong trend towards association with incident CKD, but have modest associations with ESRD in individuals of European descent. Additional work is required to characterize the association of genetic determinants of CKD and ESRD at different stages of disease progression.

  10. The French Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Bénédicte; Combe, Christian; Jacquelinet, Christian; Briançon, Serge; Fouque, Denis; Laville, Maurice; Frimat, Luc; Pascal, Christophe; Herpe, Yves-Edouard; Deleuze, Jean-François; Schanstra, Joost; Pisoni, Ron L; Robinson, Bruce M; Massy, Ziad A

    2014-08-01

    While much has been learned about the epidemiology and treatment of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the last 30 years, chronic kidney disease (CKD) before the end-stage has been less investigated. Not enough is known about factors associated with CKD progression and complications, as well as its transition to ESRD. We designed the CKD-renal epidemiology and information network (REIN) cohort to provide a research platform to address these key questions and to assess clinical practices and costs in patients with moderate or advanced CKD. A total of 46 clinic sites and 4 renal care networks participate in the cohort. A stratified selection of clinic sites yields a sample that represents a diversity of settings, e.g. geographic region, and public versus for-profit and non-for-profit private clinics. In each site, 60-90 patients with CKD are enrolled at a routine clinic visit during a 12-month enrolment phase: 3600 total, including 1800 with Stage 3 and 1800 with Stage 4 CKD. Follow-up will continue for 5 years, including after initiation of renal replacement therapy. Data will be collected from medical records at inclusion and at yearly intervals, as well as from self-administered patient questionnaires and provider-level questionnaires. Patients will also be interviewed at baseline, and at 1, 3 and 5 years. Healthcare costs will also be determined. Blood and urine samples will be collected and stored for future studies on all patients at enrolment and at study end, and at 1 and 3 years in a subsample of 1200. The CKD-REIN cohort will serve to improve our understanding of the biological, clinical and healthcare system determinants associated with CKD progression and adverse outcomes as well as of international variations in collaboration with the CKD Outcome and Practice Pattern Study (CKDopps). It will foster CKD epidemiology and outcomes research and provide evidence to improve the health and quality of life of patients with CKD and the performances of the

  11. Integrating a Smartphone-Based Self-Management System into Usual Care of Advanced CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Stephanie W; Jassal, Sarbjit V; Miller, Judith A; Porter, Eveline C; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Seto, Emily; Thorpe, Kevin E; Logan, Alexander G

    2016-06-06

    Patient self-management has been shown to improve health outcomes. We developed a smartphone-based system to boost self-care by patients with CKD and integrated its use into usual CKD care. We determined its acceptability and examined changes in several clinical parameters. We recruited patients with stage 4 or 5 CKD attending outpatient renal clinics who responded to a general information newsletter about this 6-month proof-of-principle study. The smartphone application targeted four behavioral elements: monitoring BP, medication management, symptom assessment, and tracking laboratory results. Prebuilt customizable algorithms provided real-time personalized patient feedback and alerts to providers when predefined treatment thresholds were crossed or critical changes occurred. Those who died or started RRT within the first 2 months were replaced. Only participants followed for 6 months after recruitment were included in assessing changes in clinical measures. In total, 47 patients (26 men; mean age =59 years old; 33% were ≥65 years old) were enrolled; 60% had never used a smartphone. User adherence was high (>80% performed ≥80% of recommended assessments) and sustained. The mean reductions in home BP readings between baseline and exit were statistically significant (systolic BP, -3.4 mmHg; 95% confidence interval, -5.0 to -1.8 and diastolic BP, -2.1 mmHg; 95% confidence interval, -2.9 to -1.2); 27% with normal clinic BP readings had newly identified masked hypertension. One hundred twenty-seven medication discrepancies were identified; 59% were medication errors that required an intervention to prevent harm. In exit interviews, patients indicated feeling more confident and in control of their condition; clinicians perceived patients to be better informed and more engaged. Integrating a smartphone-based self-management system into usual care of patients with advanced CKD proved feasible and acceptable, and it appeared to be clinically useful. The results provide

  12. Safety of intravenous ferric carboxymaltose versus oral iron in patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roger, Simon D; Gaillard, Carlo A; Bock, Andreas H

    2017-01-01

    -label, multicenter, prospective study of patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, anemia and iron deficiency randomized (1:1:2) to IV ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), targeting higher (400-600 µg/L) or lower (100-200 µg/L) ferritin, or oral iron. A post hoc analysis of adverse event rates per 100 patient......: These results further support the conclusion that correction of iron deficiency anemia with IV FCM is safe in patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD.......Background: The evidence base regarding the safety of intravenous (IV) iron therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is incomplete and largely based on small studies of relatively short duration. Methods: FIND-CKD (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00994318) was a 1-year, open...

  13. Management of Gout and Hyperuricemia in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Santos, Ana Beatriz; Neogi, Tuhina

    2017-09-01

    Hyperuricemia and gout, the clinical manifestation of monosodium urate crystal deposition, are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although the presence of CKD poses additional challenges in gout management, effective urate lowering is possible for most patients with CKD. Initial doses of urate-lowering therapy are lower than in the non-CKD population, whereas incremental dose escalation is guided by regular monitoring of serum urate levels to reach the target level of gout flares with presently available agents can be more challenging due to potential nephrotoxicity and/or contraindications in the setting of other common comorbid conditions. At present, asymptomatic hyperuricemia is not an indication for urate-lowering therapy, though emerging data may support a potential renoprotective effect. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reliability of CKD-EPI predictive equation in estimating chronic kidney disease prevalence in the Croatian endemic nephropathy area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuček, Mirjana; Dika, Živka; Karanović, Sandra; Vuković Brinar, Ivana; Premužić, Vedran; Kos, Jelena; Cvitković, Ante; Mišić, Maja; Samardžić, Josip; Rogić, Dunja; Jelaković, Bojan

    2018-02-15

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant public health problem and it is not possible to precisely predict its progression to terminal renal failure. According to current guidelines, CKD stages are classified based on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria. Aims of this study were to determine the reliability of predictive equation in estimation of CKD prevalence in Croatian areas with endemic nephropathy (EN), compare the results with non-endemic areas, and to determine if the prevalence of CKD stages 3-5 was increased in subjects with EN. A total of 1573 inhabitants of the Croatian Posavina rural area from 6 endemic and 3 non-endemic villages were enrolled. Participants were classified according to the modified criteria of the World Health Organization for EN. Estimated GFR was calculated using Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation (CKD-EPI). The results showed a very high CKD prevalence in the Croatian rural area (19%). CKD prevalence was significantly higher in EN then in non EN villages with the lowest eGFR value in diseased subgroup. eGFR correlated significantly with the diagnosis of EN. Kidney function assessment using CKD-EPI predictive equation proved to be a good marker in differentiating the study subgroups, remained as one of the diagnostic criteria for EN.

  15. Type 2 Translational Research for CKD

    OpenAIRE

    Tuttle, Katherine R.; Tuot, Delphine S.; Corbett, Cynthia L.; Setter, Stephen M.; Powe, Neil R.

    2013-01-01

    Strategies to effectively treat people with CKD have been identified by conventional clinical research. Despite this evidence, awareness, screening, detection, diagnosis, risk factor control, treatment, and outcomes remain substandard. Translating clinical evidence into actionable measures that reduce the burden of CKD is a pressing need. Expansion from a “bench-to-bedside” paradigm (conventional type 1 translation) to research that encompasses “clinic and community” is the core concept of ty...

  16. Vegan-vegetarian low-protein supplemented diets in pregnant CKD patients: fifteen years of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attini, Rossella; Leone, Filomena; Parisi, Silvia; Fassio, Federica; Capizzi, Irene; Loi, Valentina; Colla, Loredana; Rossetti, Maura; Gerbino, Martina; Maxia, Stefania; Alemanno, Maria Grazia; Minelli, Fosca; Piccoli, Ettore; Versino, Elisabetta; Biolcati, Marilisa; Avagnina, Paolo; Pani, Antonello; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Todros, Tullia; Piccoli, Giorgina B

    2016-09-20

    Pregnancy in women with advanced CKD becoming increasingly common. However, experience with low-protein diets in CKD patients in pregnancy is still limited. Aim of this study is to review the results obtained over the last 15 years with moderately restricted low-protein diets in pregnant CKD women (combining: CKD stages 3-5, proteinuria: nephrotic at any time, or > =1 g/24 at start or referral; nephrotic in previous pregnancy). CKD patients on unrestricted diets were employed for comparison. January, 2000 to September, 2015: 36 on-diet pregnancies (31 singleton deliveries, 3 twin deliveries, 1 pregnancy termination, 1 miscarriage); 47 controls (42 singleton deliveries, 5 miscarriages). The diet is basically vegan; since occasional milk and yoghurt are allowed, we defined it vegan-vegetarian; protein intake (0.6-0.8 g/Kg/day), keto-acid supplementation, protein-unrestricted meals (1-3/week) are prescribed according to CKD stage and nutritional status. Statistical analysis was performed as implemented on SPSS. Patients and controls were similar (p: ns) at baseline with regard to age (33 vs 33.5), referral week (7 vs 9), kidney function (CKD 3-5: 48.4 % vs 64.3 %); prevalence of hypertension (51.6 % vs 40.5 %) and proteinuria >3 g/24 h (16.1 % vs 12.2 %). There were more diabetic nephropathies in on-diet patients (on diet: 31.0 % vs controls 5.3 %; p 0.007 (Fisher)) while lupus nephropathies were non-significantly higher in controls (on diet: 10.3 % vs controls 23.7 %; p 0.28 (Fisher)). The incidence of preterm delivery was similar (vegan-vegetarian supplemented diet is confirmed as a safe option in the management of pregnant CKD patients.

  17. Osteoporosis, bone mineral density and CKD-MBD complex (I): Diagnostic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bover, Jordi; Ureña-Torres, Pablo; Torregrosa, Josep-Vicent; Rodríguez-García, Minerva; Castro-Alonso, Cristina; Górriz, José Luis; Laiz Alonso, Ana María; Cigarrán, Secundino; Benito, Silvia; López-Báez, Víctor; Lloret Cora, María Jesús; daSilva, Iara; Cannata-Andía, Jorge

    2018-04-24

    Osteoporosis (OP) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) independently influence bone and cardiovascular health. A considerable number of patients with CKD, especially those with stages 3a to 5D, have a significantly reduced bone mineral density leading to a high risk of fracture and a significant increase in associated morbidity and mortality. Independently of classic OP related to age and/or gender, the mechanical properties of bone are also affected by inherent risk factors for CKD ("uraemic OP"). In the first part of this review, we will analyse the general concepts regarding bone mineral density, OP and fractures, which have been largely undervalued until now by nephrologists due to the lack of evidence and diagnostic difficulties in the context of CKD. It has now been proven that a reduced bone mineral density is highly predictive of fracture risk in CKD patients, although it does not allow a distinction to be made between the causes which generate it (hyperparathyroidism, adynamic bone disease and/or senile osteoporosis, etc.). Therefore, in the second part, we will analyse the therapeutic indications in different CKD stages. In any case, the individual assessment of factors which represent a higher or lower risk of fracture, the quantification of this risk (i.e. using tools such as FRAX ® ) and the potential indications for densitometry in patients with CKD could represent an important first step pending new clinical guidelines based on randomised studies which do not exclude CKD patients, all the while avoiding therapeutic nihilism in an area of growing importance. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. New perspectives on CKD-induced dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-López, Marcelino; Arroyo, David; Betriu, Àngels; Masana, Luis; Fernández, Elvira; Valdivielso, Jose M

    2017-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a world-wide health concern associated with a significantly higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. One of the principal cardiovascular risk factors is the lipid profile. CKD patients have a more frequent and progressive atheromatous disease that cannot be explained by the classical lipid parameters used in the daily clinical practice. Areas covered: The current review summarizes prevailing knowledge on the role of lipids in atheromathosis in CKD patients, including an overview of lipoprotein metabolism highlighting the CKD-induced alterations. Moreover, to obtain information beyond traditional lipid parameters, new state-of-the-art technologies such as lipoprotein subfraction profiling and lipidomics are also reviewed. Finally, we analyse the potential of new lipoprotein subclasses as therapeutic targets in CKD. Expert opinion: The CKD-induced lipid profile has specific features distinct from the general population. Besides quantitative alterations, renal patients have a plethora of qualitative lipid alterations that cannot be detected by routine determinations and are responsible for the excess of cardiovascular risk. New parameters, such as lipoprotein particle number and size, together with new biomarkers obtained by lipidomics will personalize the management of these patients. Therefore, nephrologists need to be aware of new insights into lipoprotein metabolism to improve cardiovascular risk assessment.

  19. The cost-effectiveness of using chronic kidney disease risk scores to screen for early-stage chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnoff, Benjamin O; Hoerger, Thomas J; Simpson, Siobhan K; Leib, Alyssa; Burrows, Nilka R; Shrestha, Sundar S; Pavkov, Meda E

    2017-03-13

    Better treatment during early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) may slow progression to end-stage renal disease and decrease associated complications and medical costs. Achieving early treatment of CKD is challenging, however, because a large fraction of persons with CKD are unaware of having this disease. Screening for CKD is one important method for increasing awareness. We examined the cost-effectiveness of identifying persons for early-stage CKD screening (i.e., screening for moderate albuminuria) using published CKD risk scores. We used the CKD Health Policy Model, a micro-simulation model, to simulate the cost-effectiveness of using CKD two published risk scores by Bang et al. and Kshirsagar et al. to identify persons in the US for CKD screening with testing for albuminuria. Alternative risk score thresholds were tested (0.20, 0.15, 0.10, 0.05, and 0.02) above which persons were assigned to receive screening at alternative intervals (1-, 2-, and 5-year) for follow-up screening if the first screening was negative. We examined incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs), incremental lifetime costs divided by incremental lifetime QALYs, relative to the next higher screening threshold to assess cost-effectiveness. Cost-effective scenarios were determined as those with ICERs less than $50,000 per QALY. Among the cost-effective scenarios, the optimal scenario was determined as the one that resulted in the highest lifetime QALYs. ICERs ranged from $8,823 per QALY to $124,626 per QALY for the Bang et al. risk score and $6,342 per QALY to $405,861 per QALY for the Kshirsagar et al. risk score. The Bang et al. risk score with a threshold of 0.02 and 2-year follow-up screening was found to be optimal because it had an ICER less than $50,000 per QALY and resulted in the highest lifetime QALYs. This study indicates that using these CKD risk scores may allow clinicians to cost-effectively identify a broader population for CKD screening with testing for albuminuria

  20. Hyperbaric area index calculated from ABPM elucidates the condition of CKD patients: the CKD-JAC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimuro, Satoshi; Imai, Enyu; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Nitta, Kosaku; Akizawa, Tadao; Matsuo, Seiichi; Makino, Hirofumi; Ohashi, Yasuo; Hishida, Akira

    2015-02-01

    High prevalence of masked hypertension as well as persistent hypertension was observed in the Chronic Kidney Disease Japan Cohort (CKD-JAC) study. We proposed a novel indicator of blood pressure (BP) load, hyperbaric area index (HBI), calculated from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) data. The characteristic of this index and its relationship with kidney function were also evaluated. The CKD-JAC study, enrolled 2,977 patients, is a prospective observational study started in September 2007. ABPM was conducted in a sub-group from September 2007 to April 2010 and baseline ABPM data of 1,075 subjects (63.4 % male, 60.7 years old) were analyzed. Mean systolic HBI of male and female patients were 242.3 and 176.5 mmHg×h, respectively. HBI sensitively reflected sex (54.7 mmHg×h higher in males than in females), seasonal effects (51.6 mmHg×h higher in winter than in summer), and advancing CKD stage [(16.5 mmHg×h higher) per -10 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in eGFR]. The HBI was a significant factor to associate with reduced kidney function, after adjusting with nocturnal BP change (NBPC), sex, and other variables (p value <0.001). Our findings suggested that HBI might be a novel sensitive indicator for the reduction of kidney function, independent of patterns of NBPC.

  1. Stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy in stage I (T1-2 N0 M0) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Frank B.; Geinitz, Hans; Schill, Sabine; Thamm, Reinhard; Nieder, Carsten; Schratzenstaller, Ulrich; Molls, Michael [Technical Univ., Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2006-09-15

    Stereotactic Radiotherapy has the potential to produce high local control rates with low risk of severe lung toxicity. From December 2000 to January 2006, 68 inoperable patients (median age 76 years) with stage I NSCLC received definitive hSRT. A mean total dose of 37.5 Gy (24-40 Gy; 60%-isodose) in 3-5 fractions was applied. Immobilisation was carried out by means of a vacuum couch and low pressure foil (Medical Intelligence, Schwab Muenchen, Germany). Staging procedures were thoracic and abdominal CT-scan, FDG-PET and CT or MRI of the brain in all patients. Clinical target volume was the tumor as seen in lung windowing of CT and in FDG-PET. Organ movements (6-22 mm) and patient positioning in the couch (3-12 mm) were added as safety margin for the definition of the planning target volume (PTV), that was enclosed by the 60%-isodose. We observed four (6%) local tumor recurrences, resulting in an actuarial local tumor control rate of 96%, 88% and 88% after 1, 2 and 3 year follow-up. Nineteen patients died, with eight patients due to cancer (12%), two to local tumor progression alone. Cancer-specific survival is 96%, 82% and 73% at 1, 2 and 3 years. Eleven patients died from comorbidities, making a 53% overall 3-year survival. Fifty five percent of the patients were affected by mild acute and subacute side effects, with only 3% experiencing pneumonitis III. Late effects were pneumonitis III in 1%, rib fractures in 3%, and benign pleural effusion in 2 patients. Hypofractionated SRT is safe even in elderly patients with stage I NSCLC and significantly reduced lung capacity. It leads to high local control rates and should be offered to patients not amenable for curative resection.

  2. Predictors of advanced chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease in HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ryom; Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Whilst several antiretroviral drugs have been associated with moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD), their contribution to advanced CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remain unknown.......Whilst several antiretroviral drugs have been associated with moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD), their contribution to advanced CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remain unknown....

  3. What do we know about chronic kidney disease in India: first report of the Indian CKD registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajapurkar Mohan M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are no national data on the magnitude and pattern of chronic kidney disease (CKD in India. The Indian CKD Registry documents the demographics, etiological spectrum, practice patterns, variations and special characteristics. Methods Data was collected for this cross-sectional study in a standardized format according to predetermined criteria. Of the 52,273 adult patients, 35.5%, 27.9%, 25.6% and 11% patients came from South, North, West and East zones respectively. Results The mean age was 50.1 ± 14.6 years, with M:F ratio of 70:30. Patients from North Zone were younger and those from the East Zone older. Diabetic nephropathy was the commonest cause (31%, followed by CKD of undetermined etiology (16%, chronic glomerulonephritis (14% and hypertensive nephrosclerosis (13%. About 48% cases presented in Stage V; they were younger than those in Stages III-IV. Diabetic nephropathy patients were older, more likely to present in earlier stages of CKD and had a higher frequency of males; whereas those with CKD of unexplained etiology were younger, had more females and more frequently presented in Stage V. Patients in lower income groups had more advanced CKD at presentation. Patients presenting to public sector hospitals were poorer, younger, and more frequently had CKD of unknown etiology. Conclusions This report confirms the emergence of diabetic nephropathy as the pre-eminent cause in India. Patients with CKD of unknown etiology are younger, poorer and more likely to present with advanced CKD. There were some geographic variations.

  4. Uric Acid and the Risks of Kidney Failure and Death in Individuals With CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anand; Kaze, Arnaud D; McMullan, Ciaran J; Isakova, Tamara; Waikar, Sushrut S

    2018-03-01

    Serum uric acid concentrations increase in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and may lead to tubular injury, endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and intrarenal inflammation. Whether uric acid concentrations are associated with kidney failure and death in CKD is unknown. Prospective observational cohort study. 3,885 individuals with CKD stages 2 to 4 enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) between June 2003 and September 2008 and followed up through March 2013. Baseline uric acid concentrations. Kidney failure (initiation of dialysis therapy or transplantation) and all-cause mortality. During a median follow-up of 7.9 years, 885 participants progressed to kidney failure and 789 participants died. After adjustment for demographic, cardiovascular, and kidney-specific covariates, higher uric acid concentrations were independently associated with risk for kidney failure in participants with estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) ≥ 45mL/min/1.73m 2 (adjusted HR per 1-standard deviation greater baseline uric acid, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.12-1.75), but not in those with eGFRsuric acid concentration and all-cause mortality was J-shaped (P=0.007). Potential residual confounding through unavailable confounders; lack of follow-up measurements to adjust for changes in uric acid concentrations over time. Uric acid concentration is an independent risk factor for kidney failure in earlier stages of CKD and has a J-shaped relationship with all-cause mortality in CKD. Adequately powered randomized placebo-controlled trials in CKD are needed to test whether urate lowering may prove to be an effective approach to prevent complications and progression of CKD. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Current status of bicarbonate in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobre, Mirela; Rahman, Mahboob; Hostetter, Thomas H

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic acidosis was one of the earliest complications to be recognized and explained pathologically in patients with CKD. Despite the accumulated evidence of deleterious effects of acidosis, treatment of acidosis has been tested very little, especially with respect to standard clinical outcomes. On the basis of fundamental research and small alkali supplementation trials, correcting metabolic acidosis has a strikingly broad array of potential benefits. This review summarizes the published evidence on the association between serum bicarbonate and clinical outcomes. We discuss the role of alkali supplementation in CKD as it relates to retarding kidney disease progression, improving metabolic and musculoskeletal complications. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  6. Safety and effectiveness of rivaroxaban and warfarin in moderate-to-advanced CKD: real world data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lullo, Luca; Tripepi, Giovanni; Ronco, Claudio; De Pascalis, Antonio; Barbera, Vincenzo; Granata, Antonio; Russo, Domenico; Di Iorio, Biagio Raffaele; Paoletti, Ernesto; Ravera, Maura; Fusaro, Maria; Bellasi, Antonio

    2018-06-07

    In recent years, novel anticoagulant drugs have been introduced in the clinical armamentarium and have progressively gained momentum. Although their use is increasing among CKD patients, some skepticism about their risk-benefit ratio still persists. We sought to investigate the safety and effectiveness of rivaroxaban in a cohort of moderate-to-advanced CKD patients. This observational, retrospective, longitudinal study involved 347 consecutive CKD stage 3b-4 (according to NKF-KDOQI guidelines) patients enrolled from 8 cardiac outpatient clinics between March 2015 and October 2017. All patients received anticoagulation (100 warfarin vs. 247 rivaroxaban) as part of their non-valvular atrial fibrillation management at the attending physician's discretion. Clinical effectiveness (defined as the occurrence of ischemic stroke, venous thromboembolism, or transient ischemic attack) and safety (intracranial hemorrhage, gastrointestinal or other bleeding) were assessed separately. Over a mean follow-up period of 16 ± 0.3 months, 25 stroke episodes (15 hemorrhagic, and 10 ischemic) occurred in 24 warfarin treated patients vs. none in the rivaroxaban arm. There were 5 vs. 0 episodes of deep venous thrombosis and 8 vs. 2 major episodes of bleeding in the warfarin and rivaroxaban groups, respectively. In contrast, the proportion of minor episodes of bleeding was similar between groups. Rivaroxaban seems a safe and effective therapeutic option in CKD stage 3b-4 patients. However, future randomized controlled trials are needed to definitively establish the role of rivaroxaban in CKD patients.

  7. Rethinking CKD Evaluation: Should We Be Quantifying Basal or Stimulated GFR to Maximize Precision and Sensitivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molitoris, Bruce A.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains an increasing clinical problem. Although clinical risk factors and biomarkers for development and progression of CKD have been identified, there is no commercial surveillance technology to definitively diagnose and quantify the severity and progressive loss of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in CKD. This has limited the study of potential therapies to late stages of CKD when FDA-registerable events are more likely. Since patient outcomes, including the rate of CKD progression, correlate with disease severity, and effective therapy may require early intervention, being able to diagnose and stratify patients by their level of decreased kidney function early on is key for translational progress. In addition, renal reserve, defined as the increase in GFR following stimulation, may improve the quantification of GFR based solely on basal levels. Various groups are developing and characterizing optical measurement techniques utilizing new minimally invasive or non-invasive approaches for quantifying basal and stimulated kidney function. This development has the potential to allow widespread individualization of therapy at an earlier disease stage. Therefore, the purposes of this review are to suggest why quantifying stimulated GFR, by activating renal reserve, may be advantageous in patients and review fluorescent technologies to deliver patient-specific GFR. PMID:28223001

  8. Community-based study on CKD subjects and the associated risk factors.

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    Chen, Nan; Wang, Weiming; Huang, Yanping; Shen, Pingyan; Pei, Daoling; Yu, Haijin; Shi, Hao; Zhang, Qianying; Xu, Jing; Lv, Yilun; Fan, Qishi

    2009-07-01

    The study was performed to investigate the prevalence, awareness and the risk factors of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the community population in Shanghai, China. A total of 2596 residents were randomly recruited from the community population in Shanghai, China. All were screened for albuminuria, haematuria, morning spot urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio and renal function. Serum creatinine, uric acid, cholesterol, triglyceride and haemoglobin were assessed. A simplified MDRD equation was used to estimate the glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). All studied subjects were screened by kidney ultrasound. Haematuria, if present in the morning spot urine dipstick test, was confirmed by microscopy. The associations among the demographic characteristics, health characteristics and indicators of kidney damage were examined. Two thousand five hundred and fifty-four residents (n = 2554), after giving informed consent and with complete data, were entered into this study. Albuminuria and haematuria were detected in 6.3% and 1.2% of all the studied subjects, respectively, whereas decreased kidney function was found in 5.8% of all studied subjects. Approximately 11.8% of subjects had at least one indicator of kidney damage. The rate of awareness of CKD was 8.2%. The logistic regression model showed that age, central obesity, hypertension, diabetes, anaemia, hyperuricaemia and nephrolithiasis each contributed to the development of CKD. This is the first Shanghai community-based epidemiological study data on Chinese CKD patients. The prevalence of CKD in the community population in Shanghai is 11.8%, and the rate of awareness of CKD is 8.2%. All the factors including age, central obesity, hypertension, diabetes, anaemia, hyperuricaemia and nephrolithiasis are positively correlated with the development of CKD in our studied subjects.

  9. Clinical and Pathological Significance of Autoantibodies to Erythropoietin Receptor in Type 2 Diabetic Patients With CKD

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    Akinori Hara

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Anti-EPOR antibodies might be involved in the progression of renal lesions and in the impaired erythropoiesis in type 2 diabetic patients with CKD. Furthermore, the presence of anti-EPOR antibodies may be an additional predictor for end-stage renal disease in type 2 diabetes.

  10. Curcumin and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD: Major Mode of Action through Stimulating Endogenous Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase

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    Siddhartha S. Ghosh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, an active ingredient in the traditional herbal remedy and dietary spice turmeric (Curcuma longa, has significant anti-inflammatory properties. Chronic kidney disease (CKD, an inflammatory disease, can lead to end stage renal disease resulting in dialysis and transplant. Furthermore, it is frequently associated with other inflammatory disease such as diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. This review will focus on the clinically relevant inflammatory molecules that play a role in CKD and associated diseases. Various enzymes, transcription factors, growth factors modulate production and action of inflammatory molecules; curcumin can blunt the generation and action of these inflammatory molecules and ameliorate CKD as well as associated inflammatory disorders. Recent studies have shown that increased intestinal permeability results in the leakage of pro-inflammatory molecules (cytokines and lipopolysaccharides from gut into the circulation in diseases such as CKD, diabetes and atherosclerosis. This change in intestinal permeability is due to decreased expression of tight junction proteins and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP. Curcumin increases the expression of IAP and tight junction proteins and corrects gut permeability. This action reduces the levels of circulatory inflammatory biomolecules. This effect of curcumin on intestine can explain why, despite poor bioavailability, curcumin has potential anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and beneficial effects on CKD.

  11. Quantification of regional early stage gas exchange changes using hyperpolarized "1"2"9Xe MRI in a rat model of radiation-induced lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doganay, Ozkan; Stirrat, Elaine; McKenzie, Charles; Schulte, Rolf F.; Santyr, Giles E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of hyperpolarized (HP) "1"2"9Xe MRI for detection of early stage radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) in a rat model involving unilateral irradiation by assessing differences in gas exchange dynamics between irradiated and unirradiated lungs. Methods: The dynamics of gas exchange between alveolar air space and pulmonary tissue (PT), PT and red blood cells (RBCs) was measured using single-shot spiral iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation images of the right and left lungs of two age-matched cohorts of Sprague Dawley rats. The first cohort (n = 5) received 18 Gy irradiation to the right lung using a "6"0Co source and the second cohort (n = 5) was not irradiated and served as the healthy control. Both groups were imaged two weeks following irradiation when radiation pneumonitis (RP) was expected to be present. The gas exchange data were fit to a theoretical gas exchange model to extract measurements of pulmonary tissue thickness (L_P_T) and relative blood volume (V_R_B_C) from each of the right and left lungs of both cohorts. Following imaging, lung specimens were retrieved and percent tissue area (PTA) was assessed histologically to confirm RP and correlate with MRI measurements. Results: Statistically significant differences in L_P_T and V_R_B_C were observed between the irradiated and non-irradiated cohorts. In particular, L_P_T of the right and left lungs was increased approximately 8.2% and 5.0% respectively in the irradiated cohort. Additionally, V_R_B_C of the right and left lungs was decreased approximately 36.1% and 11.7% respectively for the irradiated cohort compared to the non-irradiated cohort. PTA measurements in both right and left lungs were increased in the irradiated group compared to the non-irradiated cohort for both the left (P < 0.05) and right lungs (P < 0.01) confirming the presence of RP. PTA measurements also correlated with the MRI measurements for both

  12. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD as a Systemic Disease: Whole Body Autoregulation and Inter-Organ Cross-Talk

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    Carmine Zoccali

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The inter-organ cross-talk and the functional integration of organ systems is an exceedingly complex process which until now has been investigated with a reductionist approach. CKD perturbs the inter-organ cross-talk and demands central resetting of autonomic (nervous control of organ systems. Due to limitations inherent to the reductionist approach, we currently identify CKD-related pseudo-syndromes and largely fail at describing the complex systemic inter-relationships set into motion by renal damage and renal dysfunction. A mature technology for a system-analysis approach to physiology and pathophysiology of CKD now exists. System biology will allow in depth understanding of complex diseases like CKD and will set the stage for predictive, preventive and personalized medicine, a long-standing dream of doctors and patients alike.

  13. Pragmatic Randomized, Controlled Trial of Patient Navigators and Enhanced Personal Health Records in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaneethan, Sankar D; Jolly, Stacey E; Schold, Jesse D; Arrigain, Susana; Nakhoul, Georges; Konig, Victoria; Hyland, Jennifer; Burrucker, Yvette K; Dann, Priscilla Davis; Tucky, Barbara H; Sharp, John; Nally, Joseph V

    2017-09-07

    Patient navigators and enhanced personal health records improve the quality of health care delivered in other disease states. We aimed to develop a navigator program for patients with CKD and an electronic health record-based enhanced personal health record to disseminate CKD stage-specific goals of care and education. We also conducted a pragmatic randomized clinical trial to compare the effect of a navigator program for patients with CKD with enhanced personal health record and compare their combination compared with usual care among patients with CKD stage 3b/4. Two hundred and nine patients from six outpatient clinics (in both primary care and nephrology settings) were randomized in a 2×2 factorial design into four-study groups: ( 1 ) enhanced personal health record only, ( 2 ) patient navigator only, ( 3 ) both, and ( 4 ) usual care (control) group. Primary outcome measure was the change in eGFR over a 2-year follow-up period. Secondary outcome measures included acquisition of appropriate CKD-related laboratory measures, specialty referrals, and hospitalization rates. Median age of the study population was 68 years old, and 75% were white. At study entry, 54% of patients were followed by nephrologists, and 88% were on renin-angiotensin system blockers. After a 2-year follow-up, rate of decline in eGFR was similar across the four groups ( P =0.19). Measurements of CKD-related laboratory parameters were not significantly different among the groups. Furthermore, referral for dialysis education and vascular access placement, emergency room visits, and hospitalization rates were not statistically significant different between the groups. We successfully developed a patient navigator program and an enhanced personal health record for the CKD population. However, there were no differences in eGFR decline and other outcomes among the study groups. Larger and long-term studies along with cost-effectiveness analyses are needed to evaluate the role of patient navigators

  14. Evaluation of Renal Blood Flow and Oxygenation in CKD Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

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    Khatir, Dinah S; Pedersen, Michael; Jespersen, Bente; Buus, Niels H

    2015-09-01

    Animal studies suggest that progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is related to renal hypoxia. With renal blood supply determining oxygen delivery and sodium absorption being the main contributor to oxygen consumption, we describe the relationship between renal oxygenation, renal artery blood flow, and sodium absorption in patients with CKD and healthy controls. Cross-sectional study. 62 stable patients with CKD stages 3 to 4 (mean age, 61±13 [SD] years) and 24 age- and sex-matched controls. CKD versus control status. Renal artery blood flow, tissue oxygenation (relative changes in deoxyhemoglobin concentration of the renal medulla [MR2*] and cortex [CR2*]), and sodium absorption. Renal artery blood flow was determined by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); MR2* and CR2* were determined by blood oxygen level-dependent MRI. Ultrafiltered and reabsorbed sodium were determined from measured glomerular filtration rate (mGFR) and 24-hour urine collections. mGFR in patients was 37% that of controls (36±15 vs 97±23 mL/min/1.73 m(2); P renal artery blood flow was 72% that of controls (319 vs 443 mL/min; P renal artery blood flow or sodium absorption. Increasing arterial blood oxygen tension by breathing 100% oxygen had very small effects on CR2*, but reduced MR2* in both groups. Only renal artery blood flow was determined and thus regional perfusion could not be related to CR2* or MR2*. In CKD, reductions of mGFR and reabsorbed sodium are more than double that of renal artery blood flow, whereas cortical and medullary oxygenation are within the range of healthy persons. Reduction in glomerular filtration fraction may prevent renal hypoxia in CKD. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Beliefs and Attitudes to Bowel Cancer Screening in Patients with CKD: A Semistructured Interview Study.

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    James, Laura J; Wong, Germaine; Craig, Jonathan C; Ju, Angela; Williams, Narelle; Lim, Wai H; Cross, Nicholas; Tong, Allison

    2017-04-03

    Bowel cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death in people with CKD. Shared decision making regarding cancer screening is particularly complex in CKD and requires an understanding of patients' values and priorities, which remain largely unknown. Our study aimed to describe the beliefs and attitudes to bowel cancer screening in patients with CKD. Face to face, semistructured interviews were conducted from April of 2014 to December of 2015 with 38 participants ages 39-78 years old with CKD stages 3-5, on dialysis, or transplant recipients from four renal units in Australia and New Zealand. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the transcripts. Five themes were identified: invisibility of cancer (unspoken stigma, ambiguity of risk, and absence of symptomatic prompting); prioritizing kidney disease (preserving the chance of transplantation, over-riding attention to kidney disease, protecting graft survival, and showing loyalty to the donor); preventing the crisis of cancer (evading severe consequences and cognizant of susceptibility); cognitive resistance (reluctance to perform a repulsive procedure, intensifying disease burden threshold, anxiety of a positive test, and accepting the inevitable); and pragmatic accessibility (negligible financial effect, convenience, and protecting anonymity). Patients with CKD understand the potential health benefits of bowel cancer screening, but they are primarily committed to their kidney health. Their decisions regarding screening revolve around their present health needs, priorities, and concerns. Explicit consideration of the potential practical and psychosocial burdens that bowel cancer screening may impose on patients in addition to kidney disease and current treatment is suggested to minimize decisional conflict and improve patient satisfaction and health care outcomes in CKD. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  16. Australian general practitioners’ current practice for chronic kidney disease (CKD detection and management

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    Marie Ludlow

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Guidelines for early detection of chronic kidney disease (CKD emphasise regular testing of kidney health in high-risk individuals. However, evidence suggests that CKD is not being adequately detected or appropriately managed in primary care. Aims Assess Australian general practitioners’ (GP current practice in relation to CKD detection and management. Methods This was a cross-sectional study utilising a random sample of GPs identified by interrogation of the national online telephone directory, and stratified by geographical location. Data collection occurred between October 2014 and January 2015. Of 2,815 eligible contacts, the final response rate was 23 per cent. Results Of the 656 respondents, over 90 per cent assessed kidney health at least annually in people with diabetes or high blood pressure, and 71 per cent correctly assessed kidney health every 3–6 months in a patient with Stage 3b CKD. The tests most commonly used to assess kidney health were serum creatinine (with eGFR, blood pressure and urine albumin creatinine ratio. The most commonly reported CKD management strategies were ‘blood pressure reduction using pharmacological agents’ (81 per cent and ‘glycaemic control if diabetes present’ (64 per cent. Knowledge testing highlighted that 32 per cent of respondents were not able to correctly identify how to properly assess absolute cardiovascular risk, and this was significantly more common in more experienced GPs (p=0.003. Conclusion The results indicate that Australian GPs are mainly practising in accordance with current guidelines for detection and management of patients with CKD, but with room for improvement in some areas

  17. Dietary and fluid restrictions in CKD: a thematic synthesis of patient views from qualitative studies.

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    Palmer, Suetonia C; Hanson, Camilla S; Craig, Jonathan C; Strippoli, Giovanni F M; Ruospo, Marinella; Campbell, Katrina; Johnson, David W; Tong, Allison

    2015-04-01

    Managing the complex fluid and diet requirements of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is challenging for patients. We aimed to summarize patients' perspectives of dietary and fluid management in CKD to inform clinical practice and research. Systematic review of qualitative studies. Adults with CKD who express opinions about dietary and fluid management. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Google Scholar, reference lists, and PhD dissertations were searched to May 2013. Thematic synthesis. We included 46 studies involving 816 patients living in middle- to high-income countries. Studies involved patients treated with facility-based and home hemodialysis (33 studies; 462 patients), peritoneal dialysis (10 studies; 112 patients), either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis (3 studies; 73 patients), kidney transplant recipients (9 studies; 89 patients), and patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD stages 1 to 5 (5 studies; 80 patients). Five major themes were identified: preserving relationships (interference with roles, social limitations, and being a burden), navigating change (feeling deprived, disrupting held truths, breaking habits and norms, being overwhelmed by information, questioning efficacy, and negotiating priorities), fighting temptation (resisting impositions, experiencing mental invasion, and withstanding physiologic needs), optimizing health (accepting responsibility, valuing self-management, preventing disease progression, and preparing for and protecting a transplant), and becoming empowered (comprehending paradoxes, finding solutions, and mastering change and demands). Limited data in non-English languages and low-income settings and for adults with CKD not treated with hemodialysis. Dietary and fluid restrictions are disorienting and an intense burden for patients with CKD. Patient-prioritized education strategies, harnessing patients' motivation to stay well for a transplant or to avoid dialysis, and viewing adaptation to restrictions as a collaborative

  18. Retarding chronic kidney disease (CKD progression: a practical nutritional approach for non-dialysis CKD

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    Vincenzo Bellizzi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report on a patient with non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD in whom several nutritional issues are briefly discussed from a practical point of view. The article is accompanied by an editorial published in this Journal in relation to the 2nd International Conference of the European Renal Nutrition working group at ERA-EDTA—“Retarding CKD progression: readily available through comprehensive nutritional management?”—and focuses on several practical topics associated with the nutritional approach for the conservative treatment of non-dialysis CKD. The article is divided into 3 sections—basic nutritional assessment, nutritional targets, and nutritional follow-up in non-dialysis CKD—linked to 3 consecutive steps of the clinical follow-up of the patient and the related nutritional concerns and intervention. First visit: Baseline nutritional assessment and basic nutritional considerations in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD • What nutritional assessment/monitoring for protein-energy wasting (PEW should be employed? • Is a body mass index (BMI of 21 kg/m2 adequate? • What phosphate target should be pursued? • What are the nutritional habits in patients with incident CKD? • What protein needs and amount of dietary protein should be pursued? • Does the quality of protein matter? • What amount of dietary salt should be employed? How should this be obtained? • How should normal serum phosphate be achieved? • What diet should be recommended? Is a vegetarian diet an option? Second visit: Major nutritional targets in non-dialysis CKD • Consequences of unintentional weight loss • What is the role of the renal dietitian in helping the patient adhere to a renal diet? Intermediate visits: Nutritional follow-up in non-dialysis CKD • What treatment for calcium/parathyroid hormone (PTH will affect CKD progression? Final visits: • Would a dietary recall/intensive dietary education improve adherence with

  19. CKD of Uncertain Etiology: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunyera, Joseph; Mohottige, Dinushika; Von Isenburg, Megan; Jeuland, Marc; Patel, Uptal D; Stanifer, John W

    2016-03-07

    Epidemics of CKD of uncertain etiology (CKDu) are emerging around the world. Highlighting common risk factors for CKD of uncertain etiology across various regions and populations may be important for health policy and public health responses. We searched PubMed, Embase, Scopus and Web of Science databases to identify published studies on CKDu. The search was generated in January of 2015; no language or date limits were used. We used a vote-counting method to evaluate exposures across all studies. We identified 1607 articles, of which 26 met inclusion criteria. Eighteen (69%) were conducted in known CKDu-endemic countries: Sri Lanka (38%), Nicaragua (19%), and El Salvador (12%). The other studies were from India, Japan, Australia, Mexico, Sweden, Tunisia, Tanzania, and the United States. Heavy metals, heat stress, and dietary exposures were reported across all geographic regions. In south Asia, family history, agrochemical use, and heavy metal exposures were reported most frequently, whereas altitude and temperature were reported only in studies from Central America. Across all regions, CKDu was most frequently associated with a family history of CKDu, agricultural occupation, men, middle age, snake bite, and heavy metal exposure. Studies examining etiologies of CKDu have reported many exposures that are heterogeneous and vary by region. To identify etiologies of CKDu, designing consistent and comparative multisite studies across high-risk populations may help elucidate the importance of region-specific versus global risk factors. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  20. Longitudinal change in estimated GFR among CKD patients: A 10-year follow-up study of an integrated kidney disease care program in Taiwan.

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    Ching-Wei Tsai

    Full Text Available This study examined the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD by using average annual decline in estimated GFR (eGFR and its risk factors in a 10-year follow-up CKD cohort.A prospective, observational cohort study, 4600 individuals fulfilled the definition of CKD, with or without proteinuria, were followed for 10 years. The eGFR was estimated by the MDRD equation. Linear regression was used to estimate participants' annual decline rate in eGFR. We defined subjects with annual eGFR decline rate <1 ml/min/1.73 m2 as non-progression and the decline rate over 3 ml/min/1.73 m2 as rapid progression.During the follow-up period, 2870 (62.4% individuals had annual eGFR decline rate greater than 1 ml/min/1.73 m2. The eGFR decline rate was slower in individuals with CKD diagnosed over the age of 60 years than those with onset at a younger age. Comparing to subjects with decline rate <1 ml/min/1.73 m2/year, the odds ratio (OR of developing rapid CKD progression for diabetes, proteinuria and late onset of CKD was 1.72 (95% CI: 1.48-2.00, 1.89(1.63-2.20 and 0.68 (0.56-0.81, respectively. When the model was adjusted for the latest CKD stage, comparing to those with CKD stage 1, patients with stage 4 and stage 5 have significantly higher risks for rapid progression (OR, 5.17 (2.60-10.25, 19.83 (10.05-39.10, respectively. However, such risk was not observed among patients with the latest CKD stage 2 and 3. The risk for incident ESRD was 17% higher for each 1 ml/min/1.73 m2 increasing in annual decline rate.Not everyone with CKD develops ESRD after a 10-year follow-up. Absolute annual eGFR decline rate can help clinicians to better predict the progression of CKD. Individuals with renal function decline rate over 3 ml/min/1.73 m2/year require intensive CKD care.

  1. International Network of Chronic Kidney Disease cohort studies (iNET-CKD): a global network of chronic kidney disease cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienemann, Thomas; Fujii, Naohiko; Orlandi, Paula; Nessel, Lisa; Furth, Susan L; Hoy, Wendy E; Matsuo, Seiichi; Mayer, Gert; Methven, Shona; Schaefer, Franz; Schaeffner, Elke S; Solá, Laura; Stengel, Bénédicte; Wanner, Christoph; Zhang, Luxia; Levin, Adeera; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Feldman, Harold I

    2016-09-02

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global health burden, yet it is still underrepresented within public health agendas in many countries. Studies focusing on the natural history of CKD are challenging to design and conduct, because of the long time-course of disease progression, a wide variation in etiologies, and a large amount of clinical variability among individuals with CKD. With the difference in health-related behaviors, healthcare delivery, genetics, and environmental exposures, this variability is greater across countries than within one locale and may not be captured effectively in a single study. Studies were invited to join the network. Prerequisites for membership included: 1) observational designs with a priori hypotheses and defined study objectives, patient-level information, prospective data acquisition and collection of bio-samples, all focused on predialysis CKD patients; 2) target sample sizes of 1,000 patients for adult cohorts and 300 for pediatric cohorts; and 3) minimum follow-up of three years. Participating studies were surveyed regarding design, data, and biosample resources. Twelve prospective cohort studies and two registries covering 21 countries were included. Participants age ranges from >2 to >70 years at inclusion, CKD severity ranges from stage 2 to stage 5. Patient data and biosamples (not available in the registry studies) are measured yearly or biennially. Many studies included multiple ethnicities; cohort size ranges from 400 to more than 13,000 participants. Studies' areas of emphasis all include but are not limited to renal outcomes, such as progression to ESRD and death. iNET-CKD (International Network of CKD cohort studies) was established, to promote collaborative research, foster exchange of expertise, and create opportunities for research training. Participating studies have many commonalities that will facilitate comparative research; however, we also observed substantial differences. The diversity we observed across

  2. Benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy after resection of stage II (T1-2N1M0) non-small cell lung cancer in elderly patients.

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    Berry, Mark F; Coleman, Brooke K; Curtis, Lesley H; Worni, Mathias; D'Amico, Thomas A; Akushevich, Igor

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated the use and efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy after resection of T1-2N1M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in elderly patients. Factors associated with the use of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients older than 65 years of age who underwent surgical resection of T1-2N1M0 NSCLC without induction chemotherapy or radiation in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database from 1992 to 2006 were assessed using a multivariable logistic regression model that included treatment, patient, tumor, and census tract characteristics. Overall survival (OS) was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier approach and inverse probability weight-adjusted Cox proportional hazard models. Overall, 2,781 patients who underwent surgical resection as the initial treatment for T1-2N1M0 NSCLC and survived at least 31 days after surgery were identified, with adjuvant chemotherapy given to 784 patients (28.2 %). Factors that predicted adjuvant chemotherapy use were younger age and higher T status. The 5-year OS was significantly better for patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy compared with patients not given adjuvant chemotherapy: 35.8 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 31.9-39.6) vs. 28.0 % (95 % CI 25.9-30.0) (p = 0.008). In the inverse probability weight-adjusted Cox proportional hazard regression model, adjuvant chemotherapy use predicted significantly improved survival (hazard ratio 0.84; 95 % CI 0.76-0.92; p = 0.0002). Adjuvant chemotherapy after resection of T1-2N1M0 NSCLC is associated with significantly improved survival in patients older than 65 years. These data can be used to provide elderly patients with realistic expectations of the potential benefits when considering adjuvant chemotherapy in this setting.

  3. Accuracy and precision of the CKD-EPI and MDRD predictive equations compared with glomerular filtration rate measured by inulin clearance in a Saudi population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wakeel, Jamal Saleh

    2016-01-01

    in the Saudi population and in all subgroups by age, stage of CKD and transplantation status. Small sample size and the study did not include patients with comorbid diseases such as diabetes, hepatitis C virus infection, and other co-morbidities as well as old age ( > 80 years).

  4. The effect of lowering salt intake on ambulatory blood pressure to reduce cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease (LowSALT CKD study: protocol of a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMahon Emma J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite evidence implicating dietary sodium in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD in chronic kidney disease (CKD, quality intervention trials in CKD patients are lacking. This study aims to investigate the effect of reducing sodium intake on blood pressure, risk factors for progression of CKD and other cardiovascular risk factors in CKD. Methods/design The LowSALT CKD study is a six week randomized-crossover trial assessing the effect of a moderate (180 mmol/day compared with a low (60 mmol/day sodium intake on cardiovascular risk factors and risk factors for kidney function decline in mild-moderate CKD (stage III-IV. The primary outcome of interest is 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, with secondary outcomes including arterial stiffness (pulse wave velocity, proteinuria and fluid status. The randomized crossover trial (Phase 1 is supported by an ancillary trial (Phase 2 of longitudinal-observational design to assess the longer term effectiveness of sodium restriction. Phase 2 will continue measurement of outcomes as per Phase 1, with the addition of patient-centered outcomes, such as dietary adherence to sodium restriction (degree of adherence and barriers/enablers, quality of life and taste assessment. Discussion The LowSALT CKD study is an investigator-initiated study specifically designed to assess the proof-of-concept and efficacy of sodium restriction in patients with established CKD. Phase 2 will assess the longer term effectiveness of sodium restriction in the same participants, enhancing the translation of Phase 1 results into practice. This trial will provide much-needed insight into sodium restriction as a treatment option to reduce risk of CVD and CKD progression in CKD patients. Trial registration Universal Trial Number: U1111-1125-2149. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry Number: ACTRN12611001097932

  5. Arterial and Cellular Inflammation in Patients with CKD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernelot Moens, Sophie J.; Verweij, Simone L.; van der Valk, Fleur M.; van Capelleveen, Julian C.; Kroon, Jeffrey; Versloot, Miranda; Verberne, Hein J.; Marquering, Henk A.; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Vogt, Liffert; Stroes, Erik S. G.

    2017-01-01

    CKD associates with a 1.5- to 3.5-fold increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Both diseases are characterized by increased inflammation, and in patients with CKD, elevated C-reactive protein level predicts cardiovascular risk. In addition to systemic inflammation, local arterial inflammation,

  6. Safety of intravenous ferric carboxymaltose versus oral iron in patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD: an analysis of the 1-year FIND-CKD trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Simon D; Gaillard, Carlo A; Bock, Andreas H; Carrera, Fernando; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Van Wyck, David B; Cronin, Maureen; Meier, Yvonne; Larroque, Sylvain; Macdougall, Iain C

    2017-09-01

    The evidence base regarding the safety of intravenous (IV) iron therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is incomplete and largely based on small studies of relatively short duration. FIND-CKD (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00994318) was a 1-year, open-label, multicenter, prospective study of patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, anemia and iron deficiency randomized (1:1:2) to IV ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), targeting higher (400-600 µg/L) or lower (100-200 µg/L) ferritin, or oral iron. A post hoc analysis of adverse event rates per 100 patient-years was performed to assess the safety of FCM versus oral iron over an extended period. The safety population included 616 patients. The incidence of one or more adverse events was 91.0, 100.0 and 105.0 per 100 patient-years in the high ferritin FCM, low ferritin FCM and oral iron groups, respectively. The incidence of adverse events with a suspected relation to study drug was 15.9, 17.8 and 36.7 per 100 patient-years in the three groups; for serious adverse events, the incidence was 28.2, 27.9 and 24.3 per 100 patient-years. The incidence of cardiac disorders and infections was similar between groups. At least one ferritin level ≥800 µg/L occurred in 26.6% of high ferritin FCM patients, with no associated increase in adverse events. No patient with ferritin ≥800 µg/L discontinued the study drug due to adverse events. Estimated glomerular filtration rate remained the stable in all groups. These results further support the conclusion that correction of iron deficiency anemia with IV FCM is safe in patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  7. Association of serum bicarbonate levels with mortality in patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Anderson, John E.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2009-01-01

    Background. Metabolic acidosis, usually manifested by low serum bicarbonate level, is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and appears to be associated with higher mortality in dialysis patients. It is not known whether a similar association is present in patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD (NDD-CKD). Methods. We used multivariable-adjusted Cox models to examine the association between baseline and time-variable serum bicarbonate (measured as total CO2) with the outcomes of all-cause mortality and the composite of pre-dialysis mortality or end-stage renal disease in 1240 male patients with moderate and advanced NDD-CKD. Results. Serum bicarbonate showed a significant U-shaped association with all-cause mortality, with the highest mortality rate observed in patients with baseline serum bicarbonate levels <22 mmol/L [multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) for patients with serum bicarbonate <22 mmol/L versus ≥22 mmol/L: 1.33 (1.05–1.69), P = 0.02] and the lowest mortality observed in patients with baseline serum bicarbonate of 26–29 mmol/L. The associations between lower serum bicarbonate level and mortality were more accentuated in subgroups of patients with better nutritional status and lower inflammation. Conclusions. Both lower and higher serum bicarbonates are associated with increased all-cause mortality in patients with moderate and advanced NDD-CKD. Clinical trials are needed to determine if therapeutic interventions aimed at optimizing serum bicarbonate can result in improved outcomes in this population. PMID:19015169

  8. Disease management programs for CKD patients: the potential and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Michael V

    2009-03-01

    Disease management describes the use of a number of approaches to identify and treat patients with chronic health conditions, especially those that are expensive to treat. Disease management programs have grown rapidly in the United States in the past several years. These programs have been established for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but some have been discontinued because of the high cost of the program. Disease management programs for CKD face unique challenges. Identification of patients with CKD is hampered by incomplete use of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for CKD by physicians and the less than universal use of estimated glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine measurements to identify patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). CKD affects multiple organ systems. Thus, a comprehensive disease management program will need to manage each of these aspects of CKD. These multiple interventions likely will make a CKD disease management program more costly than similar disease management programs designed for patients with diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, or other chronic diseases. The lack of data that can be used to develop effective disease management programs in CKD makes it difficult to determine goals for the management of each organ system affected by CKD. Finally, long periods of observation will be needed to determine whether a particular disease management program is effective in not only improving patient outcomes, but also decreasing both resource use and health care dollars. This long-term observation period is contrary to how most disease management contracts are written, which usually are based on meeting goals during a 1- to 3-year period. Until these challenges are resolved, it likely will be difficult to maintain effective disease management programs for CKD.

  9. CKD Self-management: Phenotypes and Associations With Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrauben, Sarah J; Hsu, Jesse Y; Rosas, Sylvia E; Jaar, Bernard G; Zhang, Xiaoming; Deo, Rajat; Saab, Georges; Chen, Jing; Lederer, Swati; Kanthety, Radhika; Hamm, L Lee; Ricardo, Ana C; Lash, James P; Feldman, Harold I; Anderson, Amanda H

    2018-03-24

    To slow chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and its complications, patients need to engage in self-management behaviors. The objective of this study was to classify CKD self-management behaviors into phenotypes and assess the association of these phenotypes with clinical outcomes. Prospective cohort study. Adults with mild to moderate CKD enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. 3,939 participants in the CRIC Study recruited between 2003 and 2008 served as the derivation cohort and 1,560 participants recruited between 2013 and 2015 served as the validation cohort. CKD self-management behavior phenotypes. CKD progression, atherosclerotic events, heart failure events, death from any cause. Latent class analysis stratified by diabetes was used to identify CKD self-management phenotypes based on measures of body mass index, diet, physical activity, blood pressure, smoking status, and hemoglobin A 1c concentration (if diabetic); Cox proportional hazards models. 3 identified phenotypes varied according to the extent of implementation of recommended CKD self-management behaviors: phenotype I characterized study participants with the most recommended behaviors; phenotype II, participants with a mixture of recommended and not recommended behaviors; and phenotype III, participants with minimal recommended behaviors. In multivariable-adjusted models for those with and without diabetes, phenotype III was strongly associated with CKD progression (HRs of 1.82 and 1.49), death (HRs of 1.95 and 4.14), and atherosclerotic events (HRs of 2.54 and 1.90; each P diabetes. No consensus definition of CKD self-management; limited to baseline behavior data. There are potentially 3 CKD self-management behavior phenotypes that distinguish risk for clinical outcomes. These phenotypes may inform the development of studies and guidelines regarding optimal self-management. Copyright © 2018 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  10. Lethal and sublethal effects of naphthalene and 1,2-dimethylnaphthalene on naupliar and adult stages of the marine cyclopoid copepod Oithona davisae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiz, Enric; Movilla, Juancho; Yebra, Lidia; Barata, Carlos; Calbet, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Short-term (24 h) exposure experiments have been conducted to determine the effects of two environmental relevant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), naphthalene (NAPH) and dimethylnaphthalene (C2-NAPH), on the naupliar and adult stages of the marine cyclopoid copepod Oithona davisae. To resemble more realistic conditions, those exposure experiments were conducted under the presence of food. The naupliar stages evidenced lower tolerance to PAH exposure regarding narcotic and lethal effects than adults. Copepod feeding activity showed to be very sensitive to the presence of the studied PAHs, detrimental effects occurring at toxic concentrations ca. 2-3 fold lower than for narcotic effects. In addition we report PAH-mediated changes in cell size and growth rate of the prey item, the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina, that could indirectly affect copepod feeding and help explain hormesis-like responses in our feeding experiments. - The feeding activity of copepods is very sensitive to the direct and indirect (prey-viability mediated) effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

  11. Lethal and sublethal effects of naphthalene and 1,2-dimethylnaphthalene on naupliar and adult stages of the marine cyclopoid copepod Oithona davisae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz, Enric [Institut de Ciencies del Mar (ICM), CSIC, Ps. Maritim de la Barceloneta 37-49, E-08003 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain)], E-mail: enric@icm.csic.es; Movilla, Juancho; Yebra, Lidia [Institut de Ciencies del Mar (ICM), CSIC, Ps. Maritim de la Barceloneta 37-49, E-08003 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Barata, Carlos [Departament de Quimica Ambiental, Institut de Diagnostic Ambiental i Estudis de l' Aigua (IDAEA), CSIC, C/Jordi Girona 18-26, E-08034 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Calbet, Albert [Institut de Ciencies del Mar (ICM), CSIC, Ps. Maritim de la Barceloneta 37-49, E-08003 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain)

    2009-04-15

    Short-term (24 h) exposure experiments have been conducted to determine the effects of two environmental relevant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), naphthalene (NAPH) and dimethylnaphthalene (C2-NAPH), on the naupliar and adult stages of the marine cyclopoid copepod Oithona davisae. To resemble more realistic conditions, those exposure experiments were conducted under the presence of food. The naupliar stages evidenced lower tolerance to PAH exposure regarding narcotic and lethal effects than adults. Copepod feeding activity showed to be very sensitive to the presence of the studied PAHs, detrimental effects occurring at toxic concentrations ca. 2-3 fold lower than for narcotic effects. In addition we report PAH-mediated changes in cell size and growth rate of the prey item, the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina, that could indirectly affect copepod feeding and help explain hormesis-like responses in our feeding experiments. - The feeding activity of copepods is very sensitive to the direct and indirect (prey-viability mediated) effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  12. Estimation of the glomerular filtration rate in people older than 85: Comparisons between CKD-EPI, MDRD-IDMS and BIS1 equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Bustos-Guadaño

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: The GFR estimations obtained with BS1 equation are not interchangeable with MDRD-IDMS or CKD-EPI equations. BIS1 estimates lower GFR values than MDRD-IDMS and CKD-EPI and tends to classify the patients in a more advanced chronic kidney disease stage, especially for estimated GFR higher than 29 mL/min/1.73 m2.

  13. Risk score for first-screening of prevalent undiagnosed chronic kidney disease in Peru: the CRONICAS-CKD risk score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M; Miranda, J Jaime; Gilman, Robert H; Medina-Lezama, Josefina; Chirinos-Pacheco, Julio A; Muñoz-Retamozo, Paola V; Smeeth, Liam; Checkley, William; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio

    2017-11-29

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) represents a great burden for the patient and the health system, particularly if diagnosed at late stages. Consequently, tools to identify patients at high risk of having CKD are needed, particularly in limited-resources settings where laboratory facilities are scarce. This study aimed to develop a risk score for prevalent undiagnosed CKD using data from four settings in Peru: a complete risk score including all associated risk factors and another excluding laboratory-based variables. Cross-sectional study. We used two population-based studies: one for developing and internal validation (CRONICAS), and another (PREVENCION) for external validation. Risk factors included clinical- and laboratory-based variables, among others: sex, age, hypertension and obesity; and lipid profile, anemia and glucose metabolism. The outcome was undiagnosed CKD: eGFR anemia were strongly associated with undiagnosed CKD. In the external validation, at a cut-off point of 2, the complete and laboratory-free risk scores performed similarly well with a ROC area of 76.2% and 76.0%, respectively (P = 0.784). The best assessment parameter of these risk scores was their negative predictive value: 99.1% and 99.0% for the complete and laboratory-free, respectively. The developed risk scores showed a moderate performance as a screening test. People with a score of ≥ 2 points should undergo further testing to rule out CKD. Using the laboratory-free risk score is a practical approach in developing countries where laboratories are not readily available and undiagnosed CKD has significant morbidity and mortality.

  14. Association between periodontal disease and mortality in people with CKD: a meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Hong; Sun, Min; Chen, Jianghua

    2017-08-16

    Periodontal disease occurs relatively prevalently in people with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but it remains indeterminate whether periodontal disease is an independent risk factor for premature death in this population. Interventions to reduce mortality in CKD population consistently yield to unsatisfactory results and new targets are necessitated. So this meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the association between periodontal disease and mortality in the CKD population. Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus and abstracts from recent relevant meeting were searched by two authors independently. Relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for overall and subgroup meta-analyses. Statistical heterogeneity was explored by chi-square test and quantified by the I 2 statistic. Eight cohort studies comprising 5477 individuals with CKD were incorporated. The overall pooled data demonstrated that periodontal disease was associated with all-cause death in CKD population (RR, 1.254; 95% CI 1.046-1.503; P = 0.005), with a moderate heterogeneity, I 2  = 52.2%. However, no evident association was observed between periodontal disease and cardiovascular mortality (RR, 1.30, 95% CI, 0.82-2.06; P = 0.259). Besides, statistical heterogeneity was substantial (I 2  = 72.5%; P = 0.012). Associations for mortality were similar between subgroups, such as the different stages of CKD, adjustment for confounding factors. Specific to all-cause death, sensitivity and cumulative analyses both suggested that our results were robust. As for cardiovascular mortality, the association with periodontal disease needs to be further strengthened. We demonstrated that periodontal disease was associated with an increased risk of all-cause death in CKD people. Yet no adequate evidence suggested periodontal disease was also at elevated risk for cardiovascular death.

  15. Survival advantage in black versus white men with CKD: effect of estimated GFR and case mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovesdy, Csaba P; Quarles, L Darryl; Lott, Evan H; Lu, Jun Ling; Ma, Jennie Z; Molnar, Miklos Z; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-08-01

    Black dialysis patients have significantly lower mortality compared with white patients, in contradistinction to the higher mortality seen in blacks in the general population. It is unclear whether a similar paradox exists in patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD), and if it does, what its underlying reasons are. Historical cohort. 518,406 white and 52,402 black male US veterans with non-dialysis-dependent CKD stages 3-5. Black race. We examined overall and CKD stage-specific all-cause mortality using parametric survival models. The effect of sociodemographic characteristics, comorbid conditions, and laboratory characteristics on the observed differences was explored in multivariable models. During a median follow-up of 4.7 years, 172,093 patients died (mortality rate, 71.0 [95% CI, 70.6-71.3] per 1,000 patient-years). Black race was associated with significantly lower crude mortality (HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.94-0.97; P case-mix and laboratory characteristics occurring during the course of kidney disease. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.

  16. A2-3: Impact of Mild Chronic Kidney Disease Stage on Outcomes after Total Hip or Knee Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jove; Deegan, Brian; Bowen, Thomas; Richard, Raveesh; Perkins, Robert; Foltzer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Dialysis and kidney transplantation adversely impact outcomes of total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA, TKA), but complication rates have not been reported for patients with less advanced stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Surgeons lack the data necessary to have informed discussions regarding anticipated outcomes of joint replacement for these patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed electronic health records of 779 adults with stages 1, 2, and 3 CKD not requiring dialysis or transplantation who underwent THA or TKA from 2004–2011, to assess infection, revision, 90-day readmission and mortality rates. Patients with less than 12 months follow-up, open fracture, prior joint surgery, pregnancy, or acute kidney injury were excluded. Chi-square analysis and Cox survival analysis compared these outcomes between the stage 1–2 and stage 3 groups, stratified by joint replaced (THA vs TKA). All models adjusted for age, sex and BMI at surgery. Results No statistically different rates of revision or infection between Stage 3 vs. Stages 1–2 were seen, although there was a trend toward increased infections in Stage 3. THA patients with Stage 3 showed a significantly increased mortality rate compared to Stage 1–2 THA patients (HR 3.40, 95% CI = 1.25–9.23, P = 0.02). Conclusions CKD affects nearly 15% of the U.S. population many of whom undergo joint replacement. End stage kidney disease (patients post-transplant or on hemodialysis) has been consistently associated with increased rates of infection and revision in excess of our observed outcomes, but the overall rate of infection/revision in our study population was only slightly higher than reported rates in the general population (2–7% vs. 1–2%, respectively). CKD should not preclude joint replacement, but these data can help clinicians engage in meaningful informed discussions with patients with mild kidney disease regarding risks for infection, revision and death following joint

  17. Modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD study and CKD epidemiology collaboration (CKD-EPI equations for Taiwanese adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-I Chen

    Full Text Available Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD study or the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI equations may not be accurate for Asians; thus, we developed modified eGFR equations for Taiwanese adults.This cross-sectional study compared the Taiwanese eGFR equations, the MDRD study, and the CKD-EPI equations with inulin clearance (Cin. A total of 695 adults including 259 healthy volunteers and 436 CKD patients were recruited. Participants from the Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital were used as the development set (N = 556 to develop the Taiwanese eGFR equations, whereas participants from the National Taiwan University Hospital were used as the validation set (N = 139 for external validation.The Taiwanese eGFR equations were developed by using the extended Bland-Altman plot in the development set. The Taiwanese MDRD equation was 1.309 × MDRD0.912, Taiwanese CKD-EPI was 1.262×CKD-EPI0.914 and Taiwanese four-level CKD-EPI was 1.205 × four-level CKD-EPI0.914. In the validation set, the Taiwanese equations had the lowest bias, the Taiwanese equations and the Japanese CKD-EPI equation had the lowest RMSE, whereas the Taiwanese and the Japanese equations had the best precision and the highest P30 among all equations. However, the Taiwanese MDRD equation had higher concordance correlation than did the Taiwanese CKD-EPI, the Taiwanese four-level CKD-EPI and the Japanese equations. Moreover, only the Taiwanese equations had no proportional bias among all of the equations. Finally, the Taiwanese MDRD equation had the best diagnostic performance in terms of ordinal logistic regression among all of the equations.The Taiwanese MDRD equation is better than the MDRD, CKD-EPI, Japanese, Asian, Thai, Taiwanese CKD-EPI, and Taiwanese four-level CKD-EPI equations for Taiwanese adults.

  18. Pulmonary Hypertension, Mortality, and Cardiovascular Disease in CKD and ESRD Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mengyao; Batty, Jonathan A; Lin, Chiayu; Fan, Xiaohong; Chan, Kevin E; Kalim, Sahir

    2018-02-08

    Pulmonary hypertension is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and may be associated with poor outcomes. The magnitude of the association between pulmonary hypertension and mortality is uncertain due to the small size and variable findings of observational studies. Systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies using subgroup analyses and metaregression. Patients with ESRD or earlier stages of CKD. Observational studies reporting clinical outcomes in patients with co-existing pulmonary hypertension and CKD or ESRD identified using a systematic search of PubMed and Embase. Pulmonary hypertension diagnosed by Doppler echocardiography. All-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and cardiovascular events. 16 studies, with 7,112 patients with an overall pulmonary hypertension prevalence of 23%, were included. Pulmonary hypertension was associated with increased risk for all-cause mortality among patients with CKD (relative risk [RR], 1.44; 95% CI, 1.17-1.76), with ESRD receiving maintenance dialysis (RR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.91-2.83), and with a functioning kidney transplant (RR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.35-3.20). Pulmonary hypertension was associated with increased risk for cardiovascular events in patients with CKD (RR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.07-2.60) and ESRD receiving dialysis (RR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.76-3.08). There was an association between pulmonary hypertension and increased risk for cardiovascular mortality in patients with CKD or ESRD (RR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.53-3.15). Heterogeneity of included studies, possibility of residual confounding, unavailability of individual patient-level data, and possibility of outcome reporting bias. Pulmonary hypertension is associated with a substantially increased risk for death and cardiovascular events in patients with CKD and ESRD. Risk is higher in patients with ESRD receiving dialysis compared with patients with CKD stages 1 to 5. Understanding the effect of interventions to lower

  19. Development and study of a 3.2-mm-diameter, 1.2-m-long two-stage plasma-arc-driven railgun for hypervelocity hydrogen pellet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, D.; Kim, K.

    1988-12-01

    A detailed description of a prototype, fuseless, plasma-arc-driven, two-stage railgun system with a 1.2-m-long railgun barrel and a 3.2-mm-diameter circular bore is presented, along with the preliminary results indicating its capabilities and limitations. A hydrogen pellet generator, which has a straight-tube configuration and which is also operated as a gas gun, is employed as the first stage of the two-stage acceleration system. The design details of this preacceleration system and the results illustrating its performance are first presented. The second-stage accelerator which acts as a booster accelerator, is a fuseless plasma-arc-driven railgun, and constitutes the core of the entire two-stage acceleration scheme. Details of its design, ancillary systems, operation, and performance are described next in this report. The experimental data included herein represent only the preliminary data, and the system modifications that led to the improvements are described in the accompanying two other progress reports that precede this. 19 refs

  20. A Randomized Trial of Vitamin D Supplementation on Vascular Function in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek; Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Lal, Anupam; Kumar, Vinod; Singhal, Manphool; Billot, Laurent; Gupta, Krishan Lal; Banerjee, Debasish; Jha, Vivekanand

    2017-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency associates with mortality in patients with CKD, and vitamin D supplementation might mitigate cardiovascular disease risk in CKD. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we investigated the effect of cholecalciferol supplementation on vascular function in 120 patients of either sex, aged 18-70 years, with nondiabetic CKD stage 3-4 and vitamin D deficiency (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D ≤20 ng/ml). We randomized patients using a 1:1 ratio to receive either two directly observed oral doses of cholecalciferol (300,000 IU) or matching placebo at baseline and 8 weeks. The primary outcome was change in endothelium-dependent brachial artery flow-mediated dilation at 16 weeks. Secondary outcome measures included changes in pulse wave velocity and circulating biomarkers. Cholecalciferol supplementation significantly increased endothelium-dependent brachial artery flow-mediated dilation at 16 weeks, whereas placebo did not (between-group difference in mean change: 5.49%; 95% confidence interval, 4.34% to 6.64%; P vitamin D deficiency, vitamin D supplementation may improve vascular function. This study is registered with the Clinical Trials Registry of India (no.: CTRI/2013/05/003648). Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  1. Phosphate homeostasis in CKD: report of a scientific symposium sponsored by the National Kidney Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Geoffrey A; Ix, Joachim H; Ketteler, Markus; Martin, Kevin J; Thadhani, Ravi I; Tonelli, Marcello; Wolf, Myles; Jüppner, Harald; Hruska, Keith; Wheeler, David C

    2013-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD)-mineral and bone disorder is associated with diverse metabolic and endocrine disturbances that ultimately may contribute to further loss of kidney function, bone demineralization, and fatal or nonfatal cardiovascular events. Recent insights into the pathophysiology of the events that unfold during the development of this disorder suggest that disturbances in phosphate metabolism are pivotal. The consequences of abnormal phosphate homeostasis are evident at estimated glomerular filtration rates <70 mL/min/1.73 m(2), long before serum phosphate levels increase. Healthy individuals with blood phosphate levels in the top quartile of the normal range have an increased risk of developing CKD, reaching end-stage renal disease, and experiencing cardiovascular events. Substantial public health consequences may be related to increased dietary phosphorus exposure from additives that contain phosphate in the food supply and from modest increases in serum phosphate levels; however, it remains to be established whether interventions aimed at these targets can impact on the development of adverse clinical outcomes. Current approaches involving dietary intervention and intestinal phosphate binders are based on principles and assumptions that need to be examined more rigorously. Compelling animal, observational, and clinical data indicate that interventions directed at lowering phosphate exposure and serum phosphate levels should be subject to rigorous clinical trials that use appropriate placebo comparators and focus on key clinical outcomes, such as cardiovascular events, progression of CKD, fractures, quality of life, and mortality. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neck Circumference as a Predictive Indicator of CKD for High Cardiovascular Risk Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Fang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neck circumference (NC is an anthropometric measure of obesity for upper subcutaneous adipose tissue distribution which is associated with cardiometabolic risk. This study investigated whether NC is associated with indicators of chronic kidney disease (CKD for high cardiometabolic risk patients. Methods. A total of 177 consecutive patients who underwent the outpatient departments of cardiology were prospectively enrolled in the study. The patients were aged >20 years with normal renal function or with stages 1–4 CKD. A linear regression was performed using the Enter method to present an unadjusted R2, standardized coefficients, and standard error, and the Durbin-Watson test was used to assess residual independence. Results. Most anthropometric measurements from patients aged ≧65 were lower than those from patients aged <65, except for women’s waist circumference (WC and waist hip ratio. Female NC obtained the highest R2 values for 24 hr CCR, uric acid, microalbuminuria, hsCRP, triglycerides, and HDL compared to BMI, WC, and hip circumference. The significances of female NC with 24 hr CCR and uric acid were improved after adjusted age and serum creatinine. Conclusions. NC is associated with indicators of CKD for high cardiometabolic risk patients and can be routinely measured as easy as WC in the future.

  3. The effect of some medications given to CKD patients on vitamin D levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuste, Claudia; Quiroga, Borja; de Vinuesa, Soledad García; Goicoechea, Maria Angeles; Barraca, Daniel; Verdalles, Ursula; Luño, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency and polypharmacy is a common problem over chronic kidney disease (CKD) population. To assess the clinical and analytical characteristics of CKD patients with 25-OH-D3 deficiency (<15 ng/mL), including the possible role of associated drugs. A single center observational review of 137 incident patients referred to our outpatient clinic with different stages of CKD and 25-OH-D3<15ng/mL (male gender 53.3%, mean age 70.8 [±16.1] years, mean GFR (MDRD-4) 43.6 [±25.5] ml/min/1.73 m²). 25-OH-D3 levels were collected in spring. Clinical and biochemical data and associated medications were recorded. Mean 25-OH-D3 levels were 8.23 [±4.03] ng/ml. Eighty-eight patients (64.7%) had 3 or more concomitant drugs. Only 7 patients (5.1%) were not receiving any medication. Patients were divided in three groups according the therapies into none (n=26), RAS inhibitors or allopurinol (n=81), and RAS inhibitors plus allopurinol (n=30); with the aim to study the influence of statin therapy. Patients under renin angiotensin (RAS) inhibitors or Allopurinol treatment presented significantly higher 25-OH-D3 levels (p=0.001 and p=0.01 respectively), however patients with Statins treatment had lower 25-OH-D3 level (p=0.039). Personal history of diabetes, cardiovascular events or other therapies did not modify 25-OH-D3 levels, adjusted by age and eGFR. CKD patients with vitamin D deficiency who received RAS inhibitors or Allopurinol treatment had higher 25-OH-D3 levels, however those with statins treatment had lower vitamin D levels. Randomized controlled trials are required to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  4. Readability of Written Materials for CKD Patients: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morony, Suzanne; Flynn, Michaela; McCaffery, Kirsten J; Jansen, Jesse; Webster, Angela C

    2015-06-01

    The "average" patient has a literacy level of US grade 8 (age 13-14 years), but this may be lower for people with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Current guidelines suggest that patient education materials should be pitched at a literacy level of around 5th grade (age 10-11 years). This study aims to evaluate the readability of written materials targeted at patients with CKD. Systematic review. Patient information materials aimed at adults with CKD and written in English. Patient education materials designed to be printed and read, sourced from practices in Australia and online at all known websites run by relevant international CKD organizations during March 2014. Quantitative analysis of readability using Lexile Analyzer and Flesch-Kincaid tools. We analyzed 80 materials. Both Lexile Analyzer and Flesch-Kincaid analyses suggested that most materials required a minimum of grade 9 (age 14-15 years) schooling to read them. Only 5% of materials were pitched at the recommended level (grade 5). Readability formulas have inherent limitations and do not account for visual information. We did not consider other media through which patients with CKD may access information. Although the study covered materials from the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia, all non-Internet materials were sourced locally, and it is possible that some international paper-based materials were missed. Generalizability may be limited due to exclusion of non-English materials. These findings suggest that patient information materials aimed at patients with CKD are pitched above the average patient's literacy level. This issue is compounded by cognitive decline in patients with CKD, who may have lower literacy than the average patient. It suggests that information providers need to consider their audience more carefully when preparing patient information materials, including user testing with a low-literacy patient population. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by

  5. CKD Progression and Mortality among Hispanics and Non-Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Michael J; Hsu, Jesse Y; Lora, Claudia M; Ricardo, Ana C; Anderson, Amanda H; Bazzano, Lydia; Cuevas, Magdalena M; Hsu, Chi-Yuan; Kusek, John W; Renteria, Amada; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Raj, Dominic S; Rosas, Sylvia E; Pan, Qiang; Yaffe, Kristine; Go, Alan S; Lash, James P

    2016-11-01

    Although recommended approaches to CKD management are achieved less often in Hispanics than in non-Hispanics, whether long-term outcomes differ between these groups is unclear. In a prospective longitudinal analysis of participants enrolled into the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) and Hispanic-CRIC Studies, we used Cox proportional hazards models to determine the association between race/ethnicity, CKD progression (50% eGFR loss or incident ESRD), incident ESRD, and all-cause mortality, and linear mixed-effects models to assess differences in eGFR slope. Among 3785 participants, 13% were Hispanic, 43% were non-Hispanic white (NHW), and 44% were non-Hispanic black (NHB). Over a median follow-up of 5.1 years for Hispanics and 6.8 years for non-Hispanics, 27.6% of all participants had CKD progression, 21.3% reached incident ESRD, and 18.3% died. Hispanics had significantly higher rates of CKD progression, incident ESRD, and mean annual decline in eGFR than did NHW (P<0.05) but not NHB. Hispanics had a mortality rate similar to that of NHW but lower than that of NHB (P<0.05). In adjusted analyses, the risk of CKD progression did not differ between Hispanics and NHW or NHB. However, among nondiabetic participants, compared with NHB, Hispanics had a lower risk of CKD progression (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.39 to 0.95) and incident ESRD (hazard ratio, 0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.30 to 0.84). At higher levels of urine protein, Hispanics had a significantly lower risk of mortality than did non-Hispanics (P<0.05). Thus, important differences in CKD progression and mortality exist between Hispanics and non-Hispanics and may be affected by proteinuria and diabetes. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  6. Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Anti-HBc (Total Positivity in CKD Patients before Dialysis

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    Fareha Jesmin Rabbi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: CKD patients are associated with HBV infection both as a cause and complication of treatment. CKD patients before starting dialysis therapy are considered as a high risk group because of impaired immune response compared with healthy individuals and also other risk factors related with treatment and management. Only HBsAg marker does not always follow the presence or absence of HBV infection. Anti-HBc (total alone positivity indicates previous exposure to HBV infection, window period and even after reactivation of resolved HBV infection. In some cases only anti-HBc positivity is interpreted as possible chronic low dose HBV infection (chronic carriage. Predialytic CKD patients were tested with three serological markers [HBsAg, anti-HBc (total and anti-HBs] for screening HBV infection. Proper diagnosis before dialysis and knowing the infection status would help both the patient and doctor to choose proper treatment approach. Objective: This cross-sectional study was done in the CKD patients before starting dialysis therapy to find out the HBV infection and to evaluate the infection by minimal serological markers as for screening. Materials and Methods: A total of 211 patients with chronic kidney disease stage five (CKD-V before starting dialysis therapy were included as subjects of this cross-sectional study. Among the CKD patients HBsAg was tested to see the prevalence. Other serological markers, i.e., anti-HBc (total and anti-HBs were tested in combination with HBsAg in 89 randomly selected patients among the subjects. The patients were also tested for anti-HCV to assess co-infection. After collecting all the data of different test results analyses were done by SPSS version 15.0. Results: Among total study population 10 (4.7% patients were found HBsAg positive. No patient was found positive for both HBsAg and anti-HCV. Among the 89 CKD patients only 2 (2.2% patients were HBsAg positive, and only one patient (0.9% was found positive

  7. Effects of the Use of Non-Calcium Phosphate Binders in the Control and Outcome of Vascular Calcifications: A Review of Clinical Trials on CKD Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolasco, Piergiorgio

    2011-01-01

    Vascular calcifications produce a high impact on morbidity and mortality rates in patients affected by chronic kidney disease and mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Effects are manifested from the more advanced stages of CKD (stages 3-4), particularly in patients undergoing dialysis (CKD5D). In recent years, a large number of therapeutic options have been successfully used in the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), despite eliciting less marked effects on nonbone calcifications associated with CKD-MBD. In addition to the use of Vitamin D and analogues, more recently treatment with calcimimetic drugs has also been undertaken. The present paper aims to analyze comparative and efficacy studies undertaken to assess particularly the impact on morbidity and mortality rates of non-calcium phosphate binders. Moreover, the mechanism of action underlying the depositing of calcium and phosphate along blood vessel walls, irrespective of the specific contribution provided in reducing the typical phosphate levels observed in CKD largely at more advanced stages of the disease, will be investigated. The aim of this paper therefore is to evaluate which phosphate binders are characterised by the above action and the mechanisms through which these are manifested.

  8. Effects of the Use of Non-Calcium Phosphate Binders in the Control and Outcome of Vascular Calcifications: A Review of Clinical Trials on CKD Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piergiorgio Bolasco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular calcifications produce a high impact on morbidity and mortality rates in patients affected by chronic kidney disease and mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD. Effects are manifested from the more advanced stages of CKD (stages 3-4, particularly in patients undergoing dialysis (CKD5D. In recent years, a large number of therapeutic options have been successfully used in the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT, despite eliciting less marked effects on nonbone calcifications associated with CKD-MBD. In addition to the use of Vitamin D and analogues, more recently treatment with calcimimetic drugs has also been undertaken. The present paper aims to analyze comparative and efficacy studies undertaken to assess particularly the impact on morbidity and mortality rates of non-calcium phosphate binders. Moreover, the mechanism of action underlying the depositing of calcium and phosphate along blood vessel walls, irrespective of the specific contribution provided in reducing the typical phosphate levels observed in CKD largely at more advanced stages of the disease, will be investigated. The aim of this paper therefore is to evaluate which phosphate binders are characterised by the above action and the mechanisms through which these are manifested.

  9. The Role of Physical Activity in the CKD Setting

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    Filippo Aucella

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A sedentary lifestyle contributes to the development of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes and probably cancer in the general population; this cluster of disease may be defined the diseasome of physical inactivity. Also in CKD/ESRD patients physical activity is strikingly low. As a result of growing evidence suggestive of cardiovascular benefit among the CKD population with exercise, the National Kidney Foundation recommended counseling by nephrologists to increase patients' levels of physical activity in their guideline about management of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, to maintain the well-being and functional capacity of renal patients attention should be directed toward maintaining strength and aerobic fitness as well as focusing on renal function and anemia or other comorbidities. All CKD/ESRD patients should be counseled and regularly encouraged by nephrology and dialysis staff to increase their level of physical activity.

  10. Age and gender differences in the relationship between hepatitis C infection and all stages of Chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W-C; Lee, Y-Y; Chen, I-C; Wang, S-H; Hsiao, C-T; Loke, S-S

    2014-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide health issue with heavy economic burden. Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a common cause of CKD, which can significantly impact the progression and mortality among patients with CKD. The prevalence of both illnesses is high in Taiwan. A multicentre and population-based cross-sectional study including 24 642 subjects was conducted to explore the association of HCV infection with the prevalence and severity of CKD. The measurements of metabolic parameters, eGFR and CKD stages were compared between subjects with HCV seropositivity and seronegativity. The analyses of association between HCV infection with CKD stages and evaluation of potential risk factors of CKD were performed by gender and age (≤ and >45 years). HCV-seropositive subjects accounted for 6.9% and had a significantly older age. The prevalence of CKD increased in those with HCV seropositivity (16.5%). Significantly higher prevalence of CKD stages ≥3 in HCV-seropositive subjects was noticed (7.8%). Age (>45 year), male gender, alcohol drinking, hypertension, creatinine and HCV infection were the significant factors associated with the presence of CKD. HCV seropositivity was an independent risk factor of developing CKD and associated with an increased risk of having CKD of all stages. The higher prevalence of earlier stage of CKD warrants longitudinal studies with frequent testing on renal function and sufficient duration to determine the changes of eGFR over time. Implementation of effective treatment intervention is also required for these subjects to prevent the progression of CKD to late stages. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. CKD in diabetes: diabetic kidney disease versus nondiabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Hans-Joachim; Huber, Tobias B; Isermann, Berend; Schiffer, Mario

    2018-06-01

    The increasing global prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) has prompted research efforts to tackle the growing epidemic of diabetic kidney disease (DKD; also known as diabetic nephropathy). The limited success of much of this research might in part be due to the fact that not all patients diagnosed with DKD have renal dysfunction as a consequence of their diabetes mellitus. Patients who present with CKD and diabetes mellitus (type 1 or type 2) can have true DKD (wherein CKD is a direct consequence of their diabetes status), nondiabetic kidney disease (NDKD) coincident with diabetes mellitus, or a combination of both DKD and NDKD. Preclinical studies using models that more accurately mimic these three entities might improve the ability of animal models to predict clinical trial outcomes. Moreover, improved insights into the pathomechanisms that are shared by these entities - including sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) and renin-angiotensin system-driven glomerular hyperfiltration and tubular hyper-reabsorption - as well as those that are unique to individual entities might lead to the identification of new treatment targets. Acknowledging that the clinical entity of CKD plus diabetes mellitus encompasses NDKD as well as DKD could help solve some of the urgent unmet medical needs of patients affected by these conditions.

  12. Arterial aging and arterial disease : interplay between central hemodynamics, cardiac work, and organ flow-implications for CKD and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    London, Gerard; Covic, Adrian; Goldsmith, David; Wiecek, Andrzej; Suleymanlar, Gultekin; Ortiz, Alberto; Massy, Ziad; Lindholm, Bengt; Martinez-Castelao, Alberto; Fliser, Danilo; Agarwal, Rajiv; Jager, Kitty J.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Zoccali, Carmine

    Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). All epidemiological studies have clearly shown that accelerated arterial and cardiac aging is characteristic of these populations. Arterial

  13. MDRD vs. CKD-EPI in comparison to 51Chromium EDTA: a cross sectional study of Malaysian CKD cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalalonmuhali, Maisarah; Lim, Soo Kun; Md Shah, Mohammad Nazri; Ng, Kok Peng

    2017-12-13

    Accurate measurement of renal function is important: however, radiolabelled gold standard measurement of GFR is highly expensive and can only be used on a very limited scale. We aim to compare the performance of Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations in the multi-ethnic population attending University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC). This is a cross-sectional study recruiting patients, who attend UMMC Nephrology clinics on voluntary basis. 51-Chromium EDTA ( 51 Cr-EDTA) plasma level was used to measure the reference GFR. The serum creatinine was determined by IDMS reference modified Jaffe kinetic assay (Cr Jaffe ). The predictive capabilities of MDRD and CKD-EPI based equations were calculated. Data was analysed using SPSS version 20 and correlation, bias, precision and accuracy were determined. A total of 113 subjects with mean age of 58.12 ± 14.76 years and BMI of 25.99 ± 4.29 kg/m 2 were recruited. The mean reference GFR was 66.98 ± 40.65 ml/min/1.73m 2 , while the estimated GFR based on MDRD and CKD-EPI formula were 62.17 ± 40.40, and 60.44 ± 34.59, respectively. Both MDRD and CKD-EPI were well-correlated with reference GFR (0.806 and 0.867 respectively) and statistically significant with p < 0.001. In the overall cohort, although MDRD had smaller bias than CKD-EPI (4.81 vs. 6.54), CKD-EPI was more precise (25.22 vs. 20.29) with higher accuracy within 30% of measured GFR (79.65 vs. 86.73%). The CKD-EPI equation appeared to be more precise and accurate than the MDRD equation in estimating GFR in our cohort of multi-ethnic populations in Malaysia.

  14. Conservation laws and self-consistent sources for a super-CKdV equation hierarchy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Li

    2011-01-01

    From the super-matrix Lie algebras, we consider a super-extension of the CKdV equation hierarchy in the present Letter, and propose the super-CKdV hierarchy with self-consistent sources. Furthermore, we establish the infinitely many conservation laws for the integrable super-CKdV hierarchy.

  15. Conservation laws and self-consistent sources for a super-CKdV equation hierarchy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Li, E-mail: li07099@163.co [College of Maths and Systematic Science, Shenyang Normal University, Shenyang 110034 (China)

    2011-03-14

    From the super-matrix Lie algebras, we consider a super-extension of the CKdV equation hierarchy in the present Letter, and propose the super-CKdV hierarchy with self-consistent sources. Furthermore, we establish the infinitely many conservation laws for the integrable super-CKdV hierarchy.

  16. Neurocognitive Dysfunction in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults With CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruebner, Rebecca L; Laney, Nina; Kim, Ji Young; Hartung, Erum A; Hooper, Stephen R; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Furth, Susan L

    2016-04-01

    Neurocognitive dysfunction is a known complication in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, less is known about putative mechanisms or modifiable risk factors. The objective of this study was to characterize and determine risk factors for cognitive dysfunction in children, adolescents, and young adults with CKD compared with controls. Cross-sectional study. The Neurocognitive Assessment and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Analysis of Children and Young Adults With Chronic Kidney Disease (NiCK) Study included 90 individuals aged 8 to 25 years with CKD compared with 70 controls. CKD versus control, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), ambulatory blood pressure. Performance on neurocognitive assessment with relevant tests grouped into 11 domains defined a priori by expert opinion. Results of tests were converted to age-normalized z scores. Each neurocognitive domain was analyzed through linear regression, adjusting for eGFR and demographic and clinical variables. For domains defined by multiple tests, the median z score of tests in that domain was used. We found significantly poorer performance in multiple areas of neurocognitive function among individuals with CKD compared with controls. Particular deficits were seen in domains related to attention, memory, and inhibitory control. Adjusted for demographic and clinical factors, we found lower performance in multiple domains with decreasing eGFRs (attention: β=0.053, P=0.02; visual spatial: β=0.062, P=0.02; and visual working memory: β=0.069, P=0.04). Increased diastolic load and decreased diastolic nocturnal dipping on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring were independently associated with impairments in neurocognitive performance. Unable to assess changes in neurocognitive function over time, and neurocognitive tests were grouped into predetermined neurocognitive domains. Lower eGFR in children, adolescents, and young adults is associated with poorer neurocognitive performance, particularly in

  17. EPIC Trial: education programme impact on serum phosphorous control in CKD 5D patients on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Tzanno Branco Martins

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: In stage 5D chronic kidney disease (CKD 5D patients, the encouragement of treatment adherence by health professionals is a significant clinical challenge. Objectives: This study evaluates the impact of a nutritional education programme on hyperphosphatemia, utilizing the transtheoretical model of behavior change (TMBC. Subjects and Methods: A prospective interventional study comprising 179 CKD 5D patients with hypophosphatemia. The 4-month educational programme took place during dialysis sessions. Demographic and laboratory data were evaluated, whilst the TMBC was utilized both pre- and post-intervention. Results: 132 patients showed a positive change and significant reduction in phosphate levels, whilst 47 patients showed a negative change and little reduction in phosphate levels. Positive changes were identified at different levels of literacy. 117/179 participants had ongoing treatment with sevelamer throughout the trial period. 61 patients with intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH 300 pg/ml also showed a decrease in phosphate levels. Conclusions: Nutritional education programmes can achieve excellent results when appropriately applied. An education programme may be effective across different literacy levels.

  18. Genetic African Ancestry and Markers of Mineral Metabolism in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Orlando M; Parsa, Afshin; Isakova, Tamara; Scialla, Julia J; Chen, Jing; Flack, John M; Nessel, Lisa C; Gupta, Jayanta; Bellovich, Keith A; Steigerwalt, Susan; Sondheimer, James H; Wright, Jackson T; Feldman, Harold I; Kusek, John W; Lash, James P; Wolf, Myles

    2016-04-07

    Disorders of mineral metabolism are more common in African Americans with CKD than in European Americans with CKD. Previous studies have focused on the differences in mineral metabolism by self-reported race, making it difficult to delineate the importance of environmental compared with biologic factors. In a cross-sectional analysis of 3013 participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study with complete data, we compared markers of mineral metabolism (phosphorus, calcium, alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23, and urine calcium and phosphorus excretion) in European Americans versus African Americans and separately, across quartiles of genetic African ancestry in African Americans (n=1490). Compared with European Americans, African Americans had higher blood concentrations of phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, fibroblast growth factor 23, and parathyroid hormone, lower 24-hour urinary excretion of calcium and phosphorus, and lower urinary fractional excretion of calcium and phosphorus at baseline (PAfrican Americans, a higher percentage of African ancestry was associated with lower 24-hour urinary excretion of phosphorus (PtrendAfrican ancestry was significantly associated with lower 24-hour urinary phosphorus excretion (each 10% higher African ancestry was associated with 39.6 mg lower 24-hour urinary phosphorus, PAfrican ancestry was associated with an absolute 1.1% lower fractional excretion of phosphorus, P=0.01). A higher percentage of African ancestry was independently associated with lower 24-hour urinary phosphorus excretion and lower fractional excretion of phosphorus among African Americans with CKD. These findings suggest that genetic variability might contribute to racial differences in urinary phosphorus excretion in CKD. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  19. Skin Sodium Concentration Correlates with Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Markus P; Raff, Ulrike; Kopp, Christoph; Scheppach, Johannes B; Toncar, Sebastian; Wanner, Christoph; Schlieper, Georg; Saritas, Turgay; Floege, Jürgen; Schmid, Matthias; Birukov, Anna; Dahlmann, Anke; Linz, Peter; Janka, Rolf; Uder, Michael; Schmieder, Roland E; Titze, Jens M; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe

    2017-06-01

    The pathogenesis of left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with CKD is incompletely understood. Sodium intake, which is usually assessed by measuring urinary sodium excretion, has been inconsistently linked with left ventricular hypertrophy. However, tissues such as skin and muscle may store sodium. Using 23 sodium-magnetic resonance imaging, a technique recently developed for the assessment of tissue sodium content in humans, we determined skin sodium content at the level of the calf in 99 patients with mild to moderate CKD (42 women; median [range] age, 65 [23-78] years). We also assessed total body overhydration (bioimpedance spectroscopy), 24-hour BP, and left ventricular mass (cardiac magnetic resonance imaging). Skin sodium content, but not total body overhydration, correlated with systolic BP ( r =0.33, P =0.002). Moreover, skin sodium content correlated more strongly than total body overhydration did with left ventricular mass ( r =0.56, P skin sodium content is a strong explanatory variable for left ventricular mass, unaffected by BP and total body overhydration. In conclusion, we found skin sodium content to be closely linked to left ventricular mass in patients with CKD. Interventions that reduce skin sodium content might improve cardiovascular outcomes in these patients. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  20. Association of Drug Effects on Serum Parathyroid Hormone, Phosphorus, and Calcium Levels With Mortality in CKD: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Suetonia C; Teixeira-Pinto, Armando; Saglimbene, Valeria; Craig, Jonathan C; Macaskill, Petra; Tonelli, Marcello; de Berardis, Giorgia; Ruospo, Marinella; Strippoli, Giovanni F M

    2015-12-01

    Serum parathyroid hormone (PTH), phosphorus, and calcium levels are surrogate outcomes that are central to the evaluation of drug treatments in chronic kidney disease (CKD). This systematic review evaluates the evidence for the correlation between drug effects on biochemical (PTH, phosphorus, and calcium) and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality end points in adults with CKD. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Adults with CKD. Randomized trials reporting drug effects on biochemical and mortality end points. Drug interventions with effects on serum PTH, phosphorus, and calcium levels, including vitamin D compounds, phosphate binders, cinacalcet, bisphosphonates, and calcitonin. Correlation between drug effects on biochemical and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. 28 studies (6,999 participants) reported both biochemical and mortality outcomes and were eligible for analysis. Associations between drug effects on surrogate biochemical end points and corresponding effects on mortality were weak and imprecise. All correlation coefficients were less than 0.70, and 95% credible intervals were generally wide and overlapped with zero, consistent with the possibility of no association. The exception was an inverse correlation between drug effects on serum PTH levels and all-cause mortality, which was nominally significant (-0.64; 95% credible interval, -0.85 to -0.15), but the strength of this association was very imprecise. Risk of bias within available trials was generally high, further reducing confidence in the summary correlations. Findings were robust to adjustment for age, baseline serum PTH level, allocation concealment, CKD stage, and drug class. Low power in analyses and combining evidence from many different drug comparisons with incomplete data across studies. Drug effects on serum PTH, phosphorus, and calcium levels are weakly and imprecisely correlated with all-cause and cardiovascular death in the setting of CKD. Risks of mortality (patient

  1. How does CKD affect HbA1c?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomgarden, Zachary; Handelsman, Yehuda

    2018-04-01

    HOW DOES CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE AFFECT HBA1C?: A number of factors determine HbA1c other than the level of glucose exposure alone. In an subset analysis of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study of 941 diabetic people with varying degrees of chronic kidney disease (CKD), as well as 724 who did not have CKD, and mean age in the eighth decade, Jung et al. ask whether HbA1c is reliable as an indicator of glycemia in people with kidney disease (CKD) to the same degree as in those not having kidney disease, and, if not, whether measures of glycated serum proteins may be more useful. The only available measure of glycemia for comparison was a single fasting glucose level, and the authors acknowledge that this gives an incomplete measure, particularly in people with relatively mild diabetes, whose mean HbA1c was 6.4%, with most having levels of 7.5% or lower. In patients of this sort, postprandial glucose levels may better explain variations in mean HbA1c. Recognizing that the dataset may be limited, Jung et al. nevertheless give an intriguingly negative answer to the first question, of the reliability of HbA1c with kidney disease. Using Deming regression analysis, Jung et al. showed that the correlation between HbA1c and fasting glucose weakens as renal function worsens, and, moreover, that this appears particularly to be the case in people with anemia (hemoglobin men and women, respectively), confirming earlier observations. Among those diabetic people with neither anemia nor CKD, the correlation coefficient between HbA1c and fasting glucose was r = 0.70, compared with r = 0.35 among those with both anemia and very severe CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] perform SMBG to more adequately interpret HbA1c results. © 2017 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Efficacy of the Essential Amino Acids and Keto-Analogues on the CKD progression rate in real practice in Russia - city nephrology registry data for outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemchenkov, Alexander; Konakova, Irina N

    2016-07-07

    Renal replacement therapy (RRT) is growing by 10 % per year in Russia, but pre-dialysis care which can retard CKD progression and delay the start of RRT remains limited. We evaluate the effect of Essential Amino Acids and Keto-analogues (EAA/KA) on CKD progression. The effect of low protein diet (LPD), supplemented by EAA/KA, on GFR slope changes between first and second treatment period (five sequential visits per period) in 96 patients withs CKD Stage 3B-5 was compared to GFR slope changes in the control group of 96 patients, randomly selected from matched (by gender, age, diagnosis and CKD Stage) cohort of 320 patients from the city Registry. The mean baseline eGFR was 23 ± 9 ml/min/1.73 m2; 29 % had CKD3B, 45 % - CKD4, 26 % - CKD5. The rate of eGFR decline changed from -2.71 ± 2.38 to -2.01 ± 2.26 ml/min/1.73 m2 per year in the treatment group and from -2.18 ± 2.01 to -2.04 ± 2.18 ml/min/1.73 m2 per year in the control group. Only in the treatment group the difference was significant (p = 0.04 and p = 0.6). Standardized effect size for intervention was significant in treatment group: -0.3 (of pooled SD), 95 % CI -0.58 ÷  -0.02 and non-significant in control group: -0.07 (-0.35 ÷ +0.22). The univariate and multivariate analysis of EAA/KA therapy effect demonstrated that it was probably more effective in patients of older age, with higher time-averaged proteinuria (PU), lower phosphate level, in patients with glomerular v. interstitial diseases, and in females. Only the latter factor was significant at pre-specified level (<0.05). LPD combined with EAA/KA supplementation lead to the decrease of the CKD progression both in well-designed clinical study and in real nephrology practice in wide variety diseases and settings. Registry data can be helpful to reveal patients with optimal chances for beneficial effect of LPD supplemented by EAA/KA. ISRCTN28190556 06/05/2016.

  3. Impact of Vitamin D on the Cardiovascular System in Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) and Dialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluba-Brzózka, Anna; Franczyk, Beata; Ciałkowska-Rysz, Aleksandra; Olszewski, Robert; Rysz, Jacek

    2018-06-01

    In patients suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD), the prevalence of cardiovascular disease is much more common than in the general population. The role of vitamin D deficiency had been underestimated until a significant association was found between vitamin D therapy and survival benefit in haemodialysis patients. Vitamin D deficiency is present even in the early stages of chronic kidney disease. The results of experimental studies have revealed the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and impairment of cardiac contractile function, higher cardiac mass and increased myocardial collagen content. Experimental models propose that intermediate end points for the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and higher risk of cardiovascular disease comprise diminished left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), enhanced left ventricular diastolic function, and decreased frequency of heart failure. Multiple observational studies have demonstrated an association between the use of active vitamin D therapy in patients on dialysis and with CKD and improved survival. However, there are also many studies indicating important adverse effects of such treatment. Therefore, large randomized trials are required to analyze whether supplementation of vitamin D may affect outcomes and whether it is safe to be used in CKD patients.

  4. Spectrum of bone marrow changes in patients of chronic kidney disease (stage iii, iv and v)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latif, R.K.; Khan, S.A.; Ahmad, S.Q.; Arshad, U.

    2017-01-01

    To see the various hematological changes in the bone marrow of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage III, IV and V. Study Design: Cross sectional observational study.Place and Duration of Study: Study was conducted in the department of haematology (Pathology), Army Medical College, Rawalpindi and duration was one year, from Mar 2015 to Feb 2016. Material and Methods: Patients of both sexes and all age groups with CKD stage III, IV and V were included in this study. Patients' histories were recorded. Complete blood counts, bone marrow aspiration and trephine biopsy were done and evaluated microscopically. Mean blood counts of the patients in three groups of CKD were compared. Frequencies of various bone marrow (BM) findings in patients of CKD were calculated. Results: Out of 57 patients, 41 (71.9%) were males while 16 (28%) were females. Mean age was 60 years. There was no statistically significant difference between the mean hemoglobin, mean white cell count and mean platelets count of the patients in three groups of CKD. Reactive changes due to underlying CKD and inflammation were the most frequent findings in the BM of the patients. Conclusion: Anaemia of mild to moderate severity and reactive changes in the BM are the most frequent haematological findings encountered in patients suffering from advanced stage CKD. Since CKD is predominantly a disease of the elderly so it is not rare to find the co-morbidities including plasmacytosis, malignancies and their effects on the BM in patients of CKD. (author)

  5. Homocysteine and C-Reactive Protein as Useful Surrogate Markers for Evaluating CKD Risk in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsun Chuang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of homocysteine and C-reactive protein (CRP as potential markers for chronic kidney disease (CKD in adults in Taiwan, and to identify associations between these factors and CKD, stratifying by gender. Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed multi-center data retrospectively. Data were collected from 22,043 adult Taiwanese at Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital from 2005 to 2011. Smoking/drinking history, personal medical/medication history, pregnancy, fasting times as well as laboratory parameters, including homocysteine and CRP were measured and analyzed. Results: Significant differences were observed between four homocysteine and CRP quartiles in eGFR and CKD. For males, only one model showed significant associations between plasma homocysteine and CKD, while in females, all three models showed significant associations with CKD. On the contrary, the gender difference in the case of CRP was opposite. Combined homocysteine and CRP were associated with CKD in males but not in females. Conclusion: Among Taiwanese adults, plasma homocysteine is associated with CKD in females and plasma hsCRP is associated with CKD in males. High hsCRP/high homocysteine is associated with elevated CKD risk in male. Our results suggest that homocysteine and hsCRP may be useful surrogate markers for evaluating CKD risk in adults.

  6. Homocysteine and C-reactive protein as useful surrogate markers for evaluating CKD risk in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chung-Hsun; Lee, Yi-Yen; Sheu, Bor-Fuh; Hsiao, Cheng-Ting; Loke, Song-Seng; Chen, Jih-Chang; Li, Wen-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of homocysteine and C-reactive protein (CRP) as potential markers for chronic kidney disease (CKD) in adults in Taiwan, and to identify associations between these factors and CKD, stratifying by gender. This cross-sectional study analyzed multi-center data retrospectively. Data were collected from 22,043 adult Taiwanese at Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital from 2005 to 2011. Smoking/drinking history, personal medical/medication history, pregnancy, fasting times as well as laboratory parameters, including homocysteine and CRP were measured and analyzed. Significant differences were observed between four homocysteine and CRP quartiles in eGFR and CKD. For males, only one model showed significant associations between plasma homocysteine and CKD, while in females, all three models showed significant associations with CKD. On the contrary, the gender difference in the case of CRP was opposite. Combined homocysteine and CRP were associated with CKD in males but not in females. Among Taiwanese adults, plasma homocysteine is associated with CKD in females and plasma hsCRP is associated with CKD in males. High hsCRP/high homocysteine is associated with elevated CKD risk in male. Our results suggest that homocysteine and hsCRP may be useful surrogate markers for evaluating CKD risk in adults. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. CKD hotspots around the world: where, why and what the lessons are. A CKJ review series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Cleary, Catalina; Ortiz, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the three causes of death that has had the highest increase in the last 20 years. The increasing CKD burden occurs in the context of lack of access of most of the world population to adequate healthcare and an incomplete understanding of the pathogenesis of CKD. However, CKD is not homogeneously distributed. CKD hotspots are defined as countries, region, communities or ethnicities with higher than average incidence of CKD. Analysis of CKD hotspots has the potential to provide valuable insights into the pathogenesis of kidney disease and to improve the life expectancy of the affected communities. Examples include ethnicities such as African Americans in the USA or Aboriginals in Australia, regions such as certain Balkan valleys or Central America and even groups of people sharing common activities or interests such as young women trying to lose weight in Belgium. The study of these CKD hotspots has identified underlying genetic factors, such as ApoL1 gene variants, environmental toxins, such as aristolochic acid and socioeconomic factors leading to nutritional deprivation and inflammation/infection. The CKD hotspots series of CKJ reviews will explore the epidemiology and causes in CKD hotspots, beginning with Australian Aboriginals in this issue. An online map of CKD hotspots around the world will feature the reviewed hotspots, highlighting known or suspected causes as well as ongoing projects to unravel the cause and providing a directory of public health officials, physicians and basic scientists involved in these efforts. Since the high prevalence of CKD in a particular region or population may only be known to local physicians, we encourage readers to propose further CKD hotspots to be reviewed.

  8. Impact of sex and glucose-lowering treatments on hypoglycaemic symptoms in people with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. The French Chronic Kidney Disease - Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkau, B; Metzger, M; Andreelli, F; Frimat, L; Speyer, E; Combe, C; Laville, M; Jacquelinet, C; Briançon, S; Ayav, C; Massy, Z; Pisoni, R L; Stengel, B; Fouque, D

    2018-04-06

    To describe current practices of glucose-lowering treatments in people with diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD), the associated glucose control and hypoglycaemic symptoms, with an emphasis on sex differences. Among the 3033 patients with CKD stages 3-5 recruited into the French CKD-REIN study, 645 men and 288 women had type 2 diabetes and were treated by glucose-lowering drugs. Overall, 31% were treated only with insulin, 28% with combinations of insulin and another drug, 42% with non-insulin glucose-lowering drugs. In CKD stage 3, 40% of patients used metformin, 12% at stages 4&5, similar for men and women; in CKD stage 3, 53% used insulin, similar for men and women, but at stages 4&5, 59% of men and 77% of women used insulin. Patients were reasonably well controlled, with a median HbA1c of 7.1% (54mmol/mol) in men, 7.4% (57mmol/mol) in women (P=0.0003). Hypoglycaemic symptoms were reported by 40% of men and 59% of women; they were not associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate, nor with albuminuria or with HbA1c in multivariable analyses, but they were more frequent in people treated with insulin, particularly with fast-acting and pre-mixed insulins. Glucose-lowering treatment, HbA1c and hypoglycaemic symptoms were sex dependent. Metformin use was similar in men and women, but unexpectedly low in CKD stage 3; its use could be encouraged rather than resorting to insulin. Hypoglycaemic symptoms were frequent and need to be more closely monitored, with appropriate patient-education, especially in women. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Medication Therapy Management after Hospitalization in CKD: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Katherine R; Alicic, Radica Z; Short, Robert A; Neumiller, Joshua J; Gates, Brian J; Daratha, Kenn B; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; McPherson, Sterling M; Chaytor, Naomi S; Dieter, Brad P; Setter, Stephen M; Corbett, Cynthia F

    2018-02-07

    CKD is characterized by remarkably high hospitalization and readmission rates. Our study aim was to test a medication therapy management intervention to reduce subsequent acute care utilization. The CKD Medication Intervention Trial was a single-blind (investigators), randomized clinical trial conducted at Providence Health Care in Spokane, Washington. Patients with CKD stages 3-5 not treated by dialysis who were hospitalized for acute illness were recruited. The intervention was designed to improve posthospitalization care by medication therapy management. A pharmacist delivered the intervention as a single home visit within 7 days of discharge. The intervention included these fundamental elements: comprehensive medication review, medication action plan, and a personal medication list. The primary outcome was a composite of acute care utilization (hospital readmissions and emergency department and urgent care visits) for 90 days after hospitalization. Baseline characteristics of participants ( n =141) included the following: age, 69±11 (mean±SD) years old; women, 48% (67 of 141); diabetes, 56% (79 of 141); hypertension, 83% (117 of 141); eGFR, 41±14 ml/min per 1.73 m 2 (serum creatinine-based Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation); and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio median, 43 mg/g (interquartile range, 8-528) creatinine. The most common primary diagnoses for hospitalization were the following: cardiovascular events, 36% (51 of 141); infections, 18% (26 of 141); and kidney diseases, 12% (17 of 141). The primary outcome occurred in 32 of 72 (44%) of the medication intervention group and 28 of 69 (41%) of those in usual care (log rank P =0.72). For only hospital readmission, the rate was 19 of 72 (26%) in the medication intervention group and 18 of 69 (26%) in the usual care group (log rank P =0.95). There was no between-group difference in achievement of guideline-based goals for use of renin-angiotensin system inhibition or for BP

  10. Assessing physical function and physical activity in patients with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Patricia; Marcus, Robin L

    2013-05-01

    Patients with CKD are characterized by low levels of physical functioning, which, along with low physical activity, predict poor outcomes in those treated with dialysis. The hallmark of clinical care in geriatric practice and geriatric research is the orientation to and assessment of physical function and functional limitations. Although there is increasing interest in physical function and physical activity in patients with CKD, the nephrology field has not focused on this aspect of care. This paper provides an in-depth review of the measurement of physical function and physical activity. It focuses on physiologic impairments and physical performance limitations (impaired mobility and functional limitations). The review is based on established frameworks of physical impairment and functional limitations that have guided research in physical function in the aging population. Definitions and measures for physiologic impairments, physical performance limitations, self-reported function, and physical activity are presented. On the basis of the information presented, recommendations for incorporating routine assessment of physical function and encouragement for physical activity in clinical care are provided.

  11. Calcium as a cardiovascular toxin in CKD-MBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Sharon M

    2017-07-01

    Disordered calcium balance and homeostasis are common in patients with chronic kidney disease. Such alterations are commonly associated with abnormal bone remodeling, directly and indirectly. Similarly, positive calcium balance may also be a factor in the pathogenesis of extra skeletal soft tissue and arterial calcification. Calcium may directly affect cardiac structure and function through direct effects to alter cell signaling due to abnormal intracellular calcium homeostasis 2) extra-skeletal deposition of calcium and phosphate in the myocardium and small cardiac arterioles, 3) inducing cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through calcium and hormone activation of NFAT signaling mechanisms, and 4) increased aorta calcification resulting in chronic increased afterload leading to hypertrophy. Similarly, calcium may alter vascular smooth muscle cell function and affect cell signaling which may predispose to a proliferative phenotype important in arteriosclerosis and arterial calcification. Thus, disorders of calcium balance and homeostasis due to CKD-MBD may play a role in the high cardiovascular burden observed in patients with CKD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Advanced glycation end-products and skin autofluorescence in end-stage renal disease : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arsov, Stefan; Graaff, Reindert; van Oeveren, Wim; Stegmayr, Bernd; Sikole, Aleksandar; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Smit, Andries J.

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), especially in its end stage, is marked by extremely high cardiovascular rates of morbidity and mortality; hemodialysis patients have a five-fold shorter life expectancy than healthy subjects of the same age. In CKD the metabolic products that accumulate in the body are

  13. Health-related quality of life across all stages of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Daniel; Karlsson, Linda; Eklund, Oskar; Dieperink, Hans; Honkanen, Eero; Melin, Jan; Selvig, Kristian; Lundberg, Johan

    2017-12-01

    A limited number of studies have assessed health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Results to date have been conflicting and studies have generally focused on patients with later stages of the disease. This study aimed to assess HRQoL in ADPKD across all stages of the disease, from patients with early chronic kidney disease (CKD) to patients with end-stage renal disease. A study involving cross-sectional patient-reported outcomes and retrospective clinical data was undertaken April-December 2014 in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. Patients were enrolled into four mutually exclusive stages of the disease: CKD stages 1-3; CKD stages 4-5; transplant recipients; and dialysis patients. Overall HRQoL was generally highest in patients with CKD stages 1-3, followed by transplant recipients, patients with CKD stages 4-5 and patients on dialysis. Progressive disease predominately had an impact on physical health, whereas mental health showed less variation between stages of the disease. A substantial loss in quality of life was observed as patients progressed to CKD stages 4-5. Later stages of ADPKD are associated with reduced physical health. The value of early treatment interventions that can delay progression of the disease should be considered. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  14. Hepcidin Response to Iron Therapy in Patients with Non-Dialysis Dependent CKD: An Analysis of the FIND-CKD Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Carlo A; Bock, Andreas H; Carrera, Fernando; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Van Wyck, David B; Bansal, Sukhvinder S; Cronin, Maureen; Meier, Yvonne; Larroque, Sylvain; Roger, Simon D; Macdougall, Iain C

    2016-01-01

    Hepcidin is the key regulator of iron homeostasis but data are limited regarding its temporal response to iron therapy, and response to intravenous versus oral iron. In the 56-week, open-label, multicenter, prospective, randomized FIND-CKD study, 626 anemic patients with non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD) and iron deficiency not receiving an erythropoiesis stimulating agent were randomized (1:1:2) to intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), targeting higher (400-600μg/L) or lower (100-200μg/L) ferritin, or to oral iron. Serum hepcidin levels were measured centrally in a subset of 61 patients. Mean (SD) baseline hepcidin level was 4.0(3.5), 7.3(6.4) and 6.5(5.6) ng/mL in the high ferritin FCM (n = 17), low ferritin FCM (n = 16) and oral iron group (n = 28). The mean (SD) endpoint value (i.e. the last post-baseline value) was 26.0(9.1),15.7(7.7) and 16.3(11.0) ng/mL, respectively. The increase in hepcidin from baseline was significantly smaller with low ferritin FCM or oral iron vs high ferritin FCM at all time points up to week 52. Significant correlations were found between absolute hepcidin and ferritin values (r = 0.65, p<0.001) and between final post-baseline increases in both parameters (r = 0.70, p<0.001). The increase in hepcidin levels over the 12-month study generally mirrored the cumulative iron dose in each group. Hepcidin and transferrin saturation (TSAT) absolute values showed no correlation, although there was an association between final post-baseline increases (r = 0.42, p<0.001). Absolute values (r = 0.36, p = 0.004) and final post-baseline increases of hepcidin and hemoglobin (p = 0.30, p = 0.030) correlated weakly. Baseline hepcidin levels were not predictive of a hematopoietic response to iron therapy. In conclusion, hepcidin levels rose in response to either intravenous or oral iron therapy, but the speed and extent of the rise was greatest with intravenous iron targeting a higher ferritin level. However neither the

  15. Renoprotection and the Bardoxolone Methyl Story - Is This the Right Way Forward A Novel View of Renoprotection in CKD Trials: A New Classification Scheme for Renoprotective Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macaulay Onuigbo

    2013-04-01

    , and many more others yet to be identified, do concurrently and asymmetrically contribute to CKD initiation and propagation to end-stage renal disease (ESRD in our CKD patients. We conclude that current knowledge of CKD initiation and progression to ESRD, the natural history of CKD and the impacts of acute kidney injury on this continuum remain in their infancy and call for more research. Finally, we suggest a new classification scheme for renoprotective agents: (1 the single-pathway blockers that block a single putative pathogenetic pathway involved in CKD progression, as typified by ACE inhibitors and/or ARBs, and (2 the multiple-pathway blockers that are able to block or antagonize the effects of multiple pathogenetic pathways through their ability to simultaneously block, downstream, the effects of several pathways or mechanisms of CKD to ESRD progression and could therefore concurrently interfere with several unrelated upstream pathways or mechanisms. We surmise that maybe the ideal and truly renoprotective agent, clearly a multiple-pathway blocker, is on the horizon. This calls for more research efforts from all.

  16. Older Patients' Perspectives on Managing Complexity in CKD Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, C Barrett; Vandenberg, Ann E; Phillips, Lawrence S; McClellan, William M; Johnson, Theodore M; Echt, Katharina V

    2017-04-03

    Patients with CKD are asked to perform self-management tasks including dietary changes, adhering to medications, avoiding nephrotoxic drugs, and self-monitoring hypertension and diabetes. Given the effect of aging on functional capacity, self-management may be especially challenging for older patients. However, little is known about the specific challenges older adults face maintaining CKD self-management regimens. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study designed to understand the relationship among factors facilitating or impeding CKD self-management in older adults. Six focus groups ( n =30) were held in August and September of 2014 with veterans≥70 years old with moderate-to-severe CKD receiving nephrology care at the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Grounded theory with a constant comparative method was used to collect, code, and analyze data. Participants had a mean age (range) of 75.1 (70.1-90.7) years, 60% were black, and 96.7% were men. The central organizing concept that emerged from these data were managing complexity. Participants typically did not have just one chronic condition, CKD, but a number of commonly co-occurring conditions. Recommendations for CKD self-management therefore occurred within a complex regimen of recommendations for managing other diseases. Participants identified overtly discordant treatment recommendations across chronic conditions ( e.g., arthritis and CKD). Prioritization emerged as one effective strategy for managing complexity ( e.g. , focusing on BP control). Some patients arrived at the conclusion that they could group concordant recommendations to simplify their regimens ( e.g. , protein restriction for both gout and CKD). Among older veterans with moderate-to-severe CKD, multimorbidity presents a major challenge for CKD self-management. Because virtually all older adults with CKD have multimorbidity, an integrated treatment approach that supports self-management across commonly occurring conditions may be

  17. 1, 2, 3 ... FAIR !

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturm, C.; Sharkov, B.; Stoecker, H.

    2010-01-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR at Darmstadt/Germany will provide worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities allowing for a large variety of unprecedented forefront research in hadron, nuclear, atomic and plasma physics and applied sciences. The start version of FAIR, the so called Modularized Start Version includes a basic accelerator as well as three experimental modules - 1, 2, 3 FAIR!

  18. Refusal of dialysis amongst patients of chronic kidney disease (CKD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anees, M.; Khan, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the refusal of dialysis amongst patients of chronic kidney disease presenting for the first time for dialysis in uremic condition. Study Design: Cross sectional Study. Place and Duration of the Study: Outpatient department of Nephrology, Mayo Hospital, Lahore from 1 st Jan 2012 to 31 st December 2012. Patients and Methods: Patients of CKD due to any cause presenting with uremia for the first time for dialysis were included in the study. History and physical examination was done and demographic data was collected in pre designed form. Patients were offered for dialysis while explaining to them the advantages of getting and disadvantages of not getting dialysis. Patient's response on the offer was recorded and the reason for the refusal were noted. Results: According to the criteria 150 patients were included in the study. Most of the patients were male 92 (61.3%) and illiterate 78 (52.0%). Major cause of CKD was diabetes mellitus 58 (38.7%) followed by hypertension 38 (25.3%). Mean age of the patients was 42.59 ± 13.72 year and income of themost of the patients 126 (84%) was less than US$100/-month. Most of the patients 126 (77.0%) were asked about the need of dialysis in less than three months, 61 (41.3%) offered for the first time and amongst them 85 (54.0%) were offered dialysis already. Majority of the patients 101 (67.3%) refused dialysis when it was offered to them for the first time. Major reason of the refusal was fear of dialysis procedure in 76 (76%) patients followed by treatment by spiritual 14 (14%) and alternative ways and others 11 (11 %). Middle age persons refused dialysis significantly. (author)

  19. Validation study of medicare claims to identify older US adults with CKD using the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntner, Paul; Gutiérrez, Orlando M; Zhao, Hong; Fox, Caroline S; Wright, Nicole C; Curtis, Jeffrey R; McClellan, William; Wang, Henry; Kilgore, Meredith; Warnock, David G; Bowling, C Barrett

    2015-02-01

    Health care claims data may provide a cost-efficient approach for studying chronic kidney disease (CKD). Prospective cohort study. We compared characteristics and outcomes for individuals with CKD defined using laboratory measurements versus claims data from 6,982 REGARDS (Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke) Study participants who had Medicare fee-for-service coverage. Presence of CKD as defined by both the REGARDS Study (CKDREGARDS) and Medicare data (CKDMedicare), presence of CKDREGARDS but not CKDMedicare, and presence of CKDMedicare but not CKDREGARDS, and absence of both CKDREGARDS and CKDMedicare. Mortality and incident end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The research study definition of CKD (CKDREGARDS) included estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)  30mg/g at the REGARDS Study visit. CKD in Medicare (CKDMedicare) was identified during the 2 years before each participant's REGARDS visit using a claims-based algorithm. Overall, 32% of participants had CKDREGARDS and 6% had CKDMedicare. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of CKDMedicare for identifying CKDREGARDS were 15.5% (95% CI, 14.0%-17.1%), 97.7% (95% CI, 97.2%-98.1%), 75.6% (95% CI, 71.4%-79.5%), and 71.5% (95% CI, 70.4%-72.6%), respectively. Mortality and ESRD incidence rates, expressed per 1,000 person-years, were higher for participants with versus without CKDMedicare (mortality: 72.5 [95% CI, 61.3-83.7] vs 33.3 [95% CI, 31.5-35.2]; ESRD: 16.4 [95% CI, 11.2-21.6] vs 1.3 [95% CI, 0.9-1.6]) and with versus without CKDREGARDS (mortality: 59.9 [95% CI, 55.4-64.4] vs 25.5 [95% CI, 23.6-27.4]; ESRD: 6.8 [95% CI, 5.4-8.3] vs 0.1 [95% CI, 0.0-0.3]). Among participants with CKDREGARDS, those with abdominal obesity, diabetes, anemia, lower eGFR, more outpatient visits, hospitalization, and a nephrologist visit in the 2 years before their REGARDS visit were more likely to have CKDMedicare. CKDREGARDS relied on eGFR and albuminuria assessed at a single

  20. Vitamin status and needs for people with stages 3-5 chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiber, Alison L; Kopple, Joel D

    2011-09-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often experience a decline in their nutrient intake starting at early stages of CKD. This reduction in intake can affect both energy-producing nutrients, such as carbohydrates, proteins, and fats, as well as vitamins, minerals, and trace elements. Knowledge of the burden and bioactivity of vitamins and their effect on the health of the patients with CKD is very incomplete. However, without sufficient data, the use of nutritional supplements to prevent inadequate intake may result in either excessive or insufficient intake of micronutrients for people with CKD. The purpose of this article is to briefly summarize the current knowledge regarding vitamin requirements for people with stages 3, 4, or 5 CKD who are not receiving dialysis. Copyright © 2011 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Natural History of Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease in Stages ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natural History of Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease in Stages 4 and 5. ... Conclusion: Low serum bicarbonate level and high urinary protein excretion at baseline are independent predictors of progression in stage 4 and 5 CKD. Keywords: Chronic kidney disease; End stage renal disease; Glomerular filtration rate; ...

  2. Increased arterial inflammation in individuals with stage 3 chronic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takx, Richard A.P.; MacNabb, Megan H.; Emami, Hamed; Abdelbaky, Amr; Lavender, Zachary R.; Singh, Parmanand; Di Carli, Marcelo; Taqueti, Viviany; Foster, Courtney; Mann, Jessica; Comley, Robert A.; Weber, Chek Ing Kiu; Tawakol, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    While it is well known that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk for the development and progression of atherosclerosis, it is not known whether arterial inflammation is increased in mild CKD. The aim of this study was to compare arterial inflammation using 18 F-FDG PET/CT in patients with CKD and in matched controls. This retrospective study included 128 patients undergoing FDG PET/CT imaging for clinical indications, comprising 64 patients with stage 3 CKD and 64 control patients matched by age, gender, and cancer history. CKD was defined according to guidelines using a calculated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Arterial inflammation was measured in the ascending aorta as FDG uptake on PET. Background FDG uptake (venous, subcutaneous fat and muscle) were recorded. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) was assessed using the CT images. The impact of CKD on arterial inflammation and CAC was then assessed. Arterial inflammation was higher in patients with CKD than in matched controls (standardized uptake value, SUV: 2.41 ± 0.49 vs. 2.16 ± 0.43; p = 0.002). Arterial SUV correlated inversely with eGFR (r = -0.299, p = 0.001). Venous SUV was also significantly elevated in patients with CKD, while subcutaneous fat and muscle tissue SUVs did not differ between groups. Moreover, arterial SUV remained significantly elevated in patients with CKD compared to controls after correcting for muscle and fat background, and also remained significant after adjusting for clinical risk factors. Further, CKD was associated with arterial inflammation (SUV) independent of the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis (CAC). Moderate CKD is associated with increased arterial inflammation beyond that of controls. Further, the increased arterial inflammation is independent of presence of subclinical atherosclerosis. Current risk stratification tools may underestimate the presence of atherosclerosis in patients with CKD and thereby the risk of cardiovascular

  3. Increased arterial inflammation in individuals with stage 3 chronic kidney disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takx, Richard A.P. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); MacNabb, Megan H.; Emami, Hamed; Abdelbaky, Amr; Lavender, Zachary R. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); Singh, Parmanand [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); New York Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical College, Division of Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Di Carli, Marcelo; Taqueti, Viviany; Foster, Courtney [Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Radiology, Department of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Mann, Jessica; Comley, Robert A.; Weber, Chek Ing Kiu [F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd., Basel (Switzerland); Tawakol, Ahmed [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiology Division, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    While it is well known that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk for the development and progression of atherosclerosis, it is not known whether arterial inflammation is increased in mild CKD. The aim of this study was to compare arterial inflammation using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with CKD and in matched controls. This retrospective study included 128 patients undergoing FDG PET/CT imaging for clinical indications, comprising 64 patients with stage 3 CKD and 64 control patients matched by age, gender, and cancer history. CKD was defined according to guidelines using a calculated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Arterial inflammation was measured in the ascending aorta as FDG uptake on PET. Background FDG uptake (venous, subcutaneous fat and muscle) were recorded. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) was assessed using the CT images. The impact of CKD on arterial inflammation and CAC was then assessed. Arterial inflammation was higher in patients with CKD than in matched controls (standardized uptake value, SUV: 2.41 ± 0.49 vs. 2.16 ± 0.43; p = 0.002). Arterial SUV correlated inversely with eGFR (r = -0.299, p = 0.001). Venous SUV was also significantly elevated in patients with CKD, while subcutaneous fat and muscle tissue SUVs did not differ between groups. Moreover, arterial SUV remained significantly elevated in patients with CKD compared to controls after correcting for muscle and fat background, and also remained significant after adjusting for clinical risk factors. Further, CKD was associated with arterial inflammation (SUV) independent of the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis (CAC). Moderate CKD is associated with increased arterial inflammation beyond that of controls. Further, the increased arterial inflammation is independent of presence of subclinical atherosclerosis. Current risk stratification tools may underestimate the presence of atherosclerosis in patients with CKD and thereby the risk of

  4. The modified CKD-EPI equation may be not more accurate than CKD-EPI equation in determining glomerular filtration rate in Chinese patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Peng; Huang, Jian-Min; Li, Ying; Liu, Huai-Jun; Qu, Yan

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the application of the new modified Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (mCKD-EPI) equation developed by Liu for the measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in Chinese patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and to evaluate whether this modified form is more accurate than the original one in clinical practice. GFR was determined simultaneously by 3 methods: (a) 99m Tc-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid ( 99m Tc-DTPA) dual plasma sample clearance method (mGFR), which was used as the reference standard; (b) CKD-EPI equation (eGFRckdepi); (c) modified CKD-EPI equation (eGFRmodified). Concordance correlation and Passing-Bablok regression were used to compare the validity of eGFRckdepi and eGFRmodified. Bias, precision and accuracy were compared to identify which equation showed the better performance in determining GFR. A total of 170 patients were enrolled. Both eGFRckdepi and eGFRmodified correlated well with mGFR (concordance correlation coefficient 0.90 and 0.74, respectively) and the Passing-Bablok regression equation of eGFRckdepi and eGFRmodified against mGFR was mGFR = 0.37 + 1.04 eGFRckdepi and -49.25 + 1.74 eGFRmodified, respectively. In terms of bias, precision and 30 % accuracy, eGFRmodified showed a worse performance compared to eGFRckdepi, in the whole cohort. The new modified CKD-EPI equation cannot replace the original CKD-EPI equation in determining GFR in Chinese patients with CKD.

  5. Stirring the Pot: Can Dietary Modification Alleviate the Burden of CKD?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Snelson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Diet is one of the largest modifiable risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD-related death and disability. CKD is largely a progressive disease; however, it is increasingly appreciated that hallmarks of chronic kidney disease such as albuminuria can regress over time. The factors driving albuminuria resolution remain elusive. Since albuminuria is a strong risk factor for GFR loss, modifiable lifestyle factors that lead to an improvement in albuminuria would likely reduce the burden of CKD in high-risk individuals, such as patients with diabetes. Dietary therapy such as protein and sodium restriction has historically been used in the management of CKD. Evidence is emerging to indicate that other nutrients may influence kidney health, either through metabolic or haemodynamic pathways or via the modification of gut homeostasis. This review focuses on the role of diet in the pathogenesis and progression of CKD and discusses the latest findings related to the mechanisms of diet-induced kidney disease. It is possible that optimizing diet quality or restricting dietary intake could be harnessed as an adjunct therapy for CKD prevention or progression in susceptible individuals, thereby reducing the burden of CKD.

  6. Dietary Patterns and Risk of Death and Progression to ESRD in Individuals With CKD: A Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Orlando M.; Muntner, Paul; Rizk, Dana V.; McClellan, William M.; Warnock, David G.; Newby, P.K.; Judd, Suzanne E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nutrition is strongly linked with health outcomes in chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, few studies have examined relationships between dietary patterns and health outcomes in persons with CKD. Study Design Observational cohort study. Setting & Participants 3,972 participants with CKD (defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 or an albumin-creatinine ratio ≥30 mg/g at baseline) from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, a prospective cohort study of 30,239 black and white adults at least 45 years of age. Predictors Five empirically derived dietary patterns identified via factor analysis: “Convenience” (Chinese and Mexican foods, pizza, other mixed dishes), “Plant-Based” (fruits, vegetables), “Sweets/Fats” (sugary foods), “Southern” (fried foods, organ meats, sweetened beverages), and “Alcohol/Salads” (alcohol, green-leafy vegetables, salad dressing). Outcomes All-cause mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Results A total of 816 deaths and 141 ESRD events were observed over approximately 6 years of follow-up. There were no statistically significant associations of Convenience, Sweets/Fats or Alcohol/Salads pattern scores with all-cause mortality after multivariable adjustment. In Cox regression models adjusted for sociodemographic factors, energy intake, co-morbidities, and baseline kidney function, higher Plant-Based pattern scores (indicating greater consistency with the pattern) were associated with lower risk of mortality (HR comparing fourth to first quartile, 0.77; 95%CI, 0.61–0.97) whereas higher Southern pattern scores were associated with greater risk of mortality (HR comparing fourth to first quartile, 1.51; 95%CI, 1.19–1.92). There were no associations of dietary patterns with incident ESRD in multivariable-adjusted models. Limitations Missing dietary pattern data, potential residual confounding from lifestyle factors. Conclusions A

  7. Injury survey in Choi Kwang Do (CKD) martial art practitioners around the world: CKD is a safe form of training for adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, Yong-Seok; Eun, Denny

    2018-02-01

    Among the many sports and activities to choose from, martial arts are becoming increasingly popular for health and fitness. Due to the different nature of the various styles of martial arts, injuries are not uncommon. Though there have been studies on the injury rates of several martial art styles, there have been none regarding Choi Kwang Do (CKD), a noncompetitive martial art with relaxed and fluid movements designed to promote health and fitness for people of all ages. The purpose of this study was to examine the rate of injury for adults training in CKD to find out whether this is a safe style of martial art for adults. This study found the prevalence, causes, severity, and types of injuries from CKD practitioners around the world through an online survey targeting adults (n=122), aged 18 or older, with varying years of training experience. The annual rate of injury was 11.73 for every 100 CKD practitioners. There was no correlation between the length of training experience and injury. Training frequency and duration had no significant relationship with injury rates. A significant positive relationship between training intensity and injury existed ( P =0.009). The results of the study found that CKD can be an attractive option for adults of any age who are looking to learn a martial art or choose a physical activity with a low risk of injury, however the training intensity should be kept at a level that is not excessively high.

  8. Zonulin, inflammation and iron status in patients with early stages of chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lukaszyk, Ewelina; Lukaszyk, Mateusz; Koc-Zorawska, Ewa; Bodzenta-Lukaszyk, Anna; Malyszko, Jolanta

    2017-01-01

    Background/aims Zonulin is the only known regulator of intestinal permeability. It is also considered as a potential inflammatory marker in several conditions such as diabetes and inflammatory bowel syndrome. The aim of the study was to investigate zonulin levels in patients with early stages of CKD and its possible correlation with inflammation, anemia and iron status parameters. Methods Eighty-eight patients with early stages of CKD and 23 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. Zonu...

  9. General practitioners' perspectives on management of early-stage chronic kidney disease: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dipten, Carola; van Berkel, Saskia; de Grauw, Wim J C; Scherpbier-de Haan, Nynke D; Brongers, Bouke; van Spaendonck, Karel; Wetzels, Jack F M; Assendelft, Willem J J; Dees, Marianne K

    2018-06-06

    Guideline adherence in chronic kidney disease management is low, despite guideline implementation initiatives. Knowing general practitioners' (GPs') perspectives of management of early-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) and the applicability of the national interdisciplinary guideline could support strategies to improve quality of care. Qualitative focus group study with 27 GPs in the Netherlands. Three analysts open-coded and comparatively analysed the data. Mind-mapping sessions were performed after data-saturation. Five themes emerged: defining CKD, knowledge and awareness, patient-physician interaction, organisation of CKD care and value of the guideline. A key finding was the abstractness of the CKD concept. The GPs expressed various perspectives about defining CKD and interpreting estimated glomerular filtration rates. Views about clinical relevance influenced the decision-making, although factual knowledge seems lacking. Striving to inform well enough without creating anxiety and to explain suitably for the intellectual ability of the patient caused tension in the patient-physician interaction. Integration with cardiovascular disease-management programmes was mentioned as a way of implementing CKD care in the future. The guideline was perceived as a rough guide rather than a leading document. CKD is perceived as an abstract rather than a clinical concept. Abstractness plays a role in all formulated themes. Management of CKD patients in primary care is complex and is influenced by physician-bound considerations related to individual knowledge and perception of the importance of CKD. Strategies are needed to improve GPs' understanding of the concept of CKD by education, a holistic approach to guidelines, and integration of CKD care into cardiovascular programmes. Not applicable.

  10. Vitamins and Microelement Bioavailability in Different Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, Magdalena; Rutkowski, Bolesław; Dębska-Ślizień, Alicja

    2017-03-15

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) predisposes one to either deficiency or toxic excess of different micronutrients. The knowledge on micronutrients-specifically water-soluble vitamins and trace elements-in CKD is very limited. Consequently, current guidelines and recommendations are mostly based on expert opinions or poor-quality evidence. Abnormalities of micronutrient resources in CKD develop for several reasons. Dietary restrictions and anorexia lead to an insufficient micronutrient intake, while diuretics use and renal replacement therapy lead to their excessive losses. Absorption is unpredictable, and metabolism impaired. Better understanding of the micronutrient needs of CKD patients could have an impact on many complications linked to vitamin and trace element disorders, including high mortality, increased risk of atherosclerosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, anemia, polyneuropathy, encephalopathy, weakness and fragility, muscle cramps, bone disease, depression, or insomnia. Here, we summarize the up-to-date knowledge on micronutrient resources in different stages of CKD, and share our experience with the assessment of micronutrient status.

  11. Vitamins and Microelement Bioavailability in Different Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, Magdalena; Rutkowski, Bolesław; Dębska-Ślizień, Alicja

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) predisposes one to either deficiency or toxic excess of different micronutrients. The knowledge on micronutrients—specifically water-soluble vitamins and trace elements—in CKD is very limited. Consequently, current guidelines and recommendations are mostly based on expert opinions or poor-quality evidence. Abnormalities of micronutrient resources in CKD develop for several reasons. Dietary restrictions and anorexia lead to an insufficient micronutrient intake, while diuretics use and renal replacement therapy lead to their excessive losses. Absorption is unpredictable, and metabolism impaired. Better understanding of the micronutrient needs of CKD patients could have an impact on many complications linked to vitamin and trace element disorders, including high mortality, increased risk of atherosclerosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, anemia, polyneuropathy, encephalopathy, weakness and fragility, muscle cramps, bone disease, depression, or insomnia. Here, we summarize the up-to-date knowledge on micronutrient resources in different stages of CKD, and share our experience with the assessment of micronutrient status. PMID:28294976

  12. Differences between office and 24-hour blood pressure control in hypertensive patients with CKD: A 5,693-patient cross-sectional analysis from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorostidi, Manuel; Sarafidis, Pantelis A; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Segura, Julian; de la Cruz, Juan J; Banegas, Jose R; Ruilope, Luis M

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies have examined control rates of office blood pressure (BP) in chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, recent evidence suggests major discrepancies between office and 24-hour BP values in hypertensive populations. This study examined concordance/discordance between office- and ambulatory-based BP control in a large cohort of patients with CKD. Cross-sectional. 5,693 hypertensive individuals with CKD stages 1-5 from the Spanish ABPM (ambulatory BP monitoring) Registry. Thresholds of 140/90 and 130/80 mm Hg for office BP and 24-hour ambulatory BP, respectively. Age, sex, body mass index, waist circumference, hypertension duration, kidney measures, diabetes, dyslipidemia, target-organ damage, and cardiovascular comorbid conditions. Misclassification of BP control as "white-coat" hypertension (office BP ≥140/90 mm Hg, 24-hour BP <130/80 mm Hg) or masked hypertension (office BP <140/90 mm Hg, 24-hour BP ≥130/80 mm Hg). Standardized office-based BP and 24-hour ABPM. Mean age was 61.0 ± 13.9 (SD) years and 52.6% were men. The proportion with white-coat hypertension was 28.8% (36.8% of patients with office BP ≥140/90 mm Hg) and that of masked hypertension was 7.0% (but 32.1% of patients with office BP <140/90 mm Hg). Female sex, aging, obesity, and target-organ damage were associated with white-coat hypertension; aging and obesity were associated with masked hypertension. Only 21.7% and 8.1% of the CKD population had office BP <140/90 and <130/80 mm Hg, respectively. In contrast, 43.5% of individuals had average 24-hour BP <130/80 mm Hg. Cross-sectional design, longitudinal associations cannot be established. Misclassification of BP control at the office was observed in 1 of 3 hypertensive patients with CKD. Ambulatory-based control rates were far better than office-based rates. Nevertheless, the burden of uncontrolled ambulatory BP and misclassification of BP control at the office constitutes a call for wider use of ABPM to evaluate the success of

  13. [Sodium Glucose Co-transporter Type 2 (SGLT2) Inhibitors in CKD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insalaco, Monica; Zanoli, Luca; Rastelli, Stefania; Lentini, Paolo; Rapisarda, Francesco; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Castellino, Pietro; Granata, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Among the new drugs used for the treatment of Diabetes Mellitus type 2, sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors represent a promising therapeutic option. Since their ability to lower glucose is proportional to GFR, their effect is reduced in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The antidiabetic mechanism of these drugs is insulin-independent and, therefore, complimentary to that of others antihyperglicaemic agents. Moreover, SGLT2 inhibitors are able to reduce glomerular hyperfiltration, systemic and intraglomerular pressure and uric acid levels, with consequent beneficial effects on the progression of kidney disease in non diabetic patients as well. Only few studies have been performed to evaluate the effects of SGLT2 inhibitors in patients with CKD. Therefore, safety and efficacy of SGLT2 inhibitors should be better clarified in the setting of CKD. In this paper, we will review the use of SGLT2 inhibitors in diabetic patients, including those with CKD.

  14. Oral Magnesium Supplementation in Chronic Kidney Disease Stages 3 and 4: Efficacy, Safety, and Effect on Serum Calcification Propensity—A Prospective Randomized Double-Blinded Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain Bressendorff

    2017-05-01

    Discussion: Oral Mg supplementation was safe and well tolerated in CKD stages 3 and 4 and improved T50, but did not increase intracellular Mg. Further studies are needed to investigate the long-term effects of Mg supplementation in CKD stage 3 and 4 and whether improvement in calcification propensity is related to clinical endpoints.

  15. Improving CKD Diagnosis and Blood Pressure Control in Primary Care: A Tailored Multifaceted Quality Improvement Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Humphreys

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a worldwide public health issue. From 2009 to 2014, the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care Greater Manchester (NIHR CLAHRC GM in England ran 4 phased, 12-month quality improvement (QI projects with 49 primary care practices in GM. Two measureable aims were set – halve undiagnosed CKD in participating practices using modelled estimates of prevalence; and optimise blood pressure (BP control (<140/90 mm Hg in CKD patients without proteinuria; <130/80 mm Hg in CKD patients with proteinuria for 75% of recorded cases of CKD. The 4 projects ran as follows: P1 = Project 1 with 19 practices (September 2009 to September 2010, P2 = Project 2 with 11 practices (March 2011 to March 2012, P3 = Project 3 with 12 practices (September 2012 to October 2013, and P4 = Project 4 with 7 practices (April 2013 to March 2014. Methods: Multifaceted intervention approaches were tailored based on a contextual analysis of practice support needs. Data were collected from practices by facilitators at baseline and again at project close, with self-reported data regularly requested from practices throughout the projects. Results: Halving undiagnosed CKD as per aim was exceeded in 3 of the 4 projects. The optimising BP aim was met in 2 projects. Total CKD cases after the programme increased by 2,347 (27% from baseline to 10,968 in a total adult population (aged ≥18 years of 231,568. The percentage of patients who managed to appropriate BP targets increased from 34 to 74% (P1, from 60 to 83% (P2, from 68 to 71% (P3, and from 63 to 76% (P4. In nonproteinuric CKD patients, 88, 90, 89, and 91%, respectively, achieved a target BP of <140/90 mm Hg. In proteinuric CKD patients, 69, 46, 48, and 45%, respectively, achieved a tighter target of <130/80 mm Hg. Analysis of national data over similar timeframes indicated that practices participating in the programme achieved

  16. Soluble Flt-1 links microvascular disease with heart failure in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marco, Giovana S; Kentrup, Dominik; Reuter, Stefan; Mayer, Anna B; Golle, Lina; Tiemann, Klaus; Fobker, Manfred; Engelbertz, Christiane; Breithardt, Günter; Brand, Eva; Reinecke, Holger; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Brand, Marcus

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with an increased risk of heart failure (HF). Elevated plasma concentrations of soluble Flt-1 (sFlt-1) have been linked to cardiovascular disease in CKD patients, but whether sFlt-1 contributes to HF in CKD is still unknown. To provide evidence that concludes a pathophysiological role of sFlt-1 in CKD-associated HF, we measured plasma sFlt-1 concentrations in 586 patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease and renal function classified according to estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). sFlt-1 concentrations correlated negatively with eGFR and were associated with signs of heart failure, based on New York Heart Association functional class and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and early mortality. Additionally, rats treated with recombinant sFlt-1 showed a 15 % reduction in LVEF and a 29 % reduction in cardiac output compared with control rats. High sFlt-1 concentrations were associated with a 15 % reduction in heart capillary density (number of vessels/cardiomyocyte) and a 24 % reduction in myocardial blood volume. Electron microscopy and histological analysis revealed mitochondrial damage and interstitial fibrosis in the hearts of sFlt-1-treated, but not control rats. In 5/6-nephrectomised rats, an animal model of CKD, sFlt-1 antagonism with recombinant VEGF121 preserved heart microvasculature and significantly improved heart function. Overall, these findings suggest that a component of cardiovascular risk in CKD patients could be directly attributed to sFlt-1. Assessment of patients with CKD confirmed that sFlt-1 concentrations were inversely correlated with renal function, while studies in rats suggested that sFlt-1 may link microvascular disease with HF in CKD.

  17. The Association Between Unhealthy Lifestyle Behaviors and the Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) in Middle-Aged and Older Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michishita, Ryoma; Matsuda, Takuro; Kawakami, Shotaro; Kiyonaga, Akira; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Morito, Natsumi; Higaki, Yasuki

    2016-07-05

    This cross-sectional study evaluated the association between unhealthy lifestyle behaviors and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in middle-aged and older men. The subjects included 445 men without a history of cardiovascular disease, stroke, or dialysis treatment, who were not taking medications. Unhealthy lifestyle behaviors were evaluated using a standardized self-administered questionnaire and were defined as follows: 1) lack of habitual moderate exercise, 2) lack of daily physical activity, 3) slow walking speed, 4) fast eating speed, 5) late-night dinner, 6) bedtime snacking, and 7) skipping breakfast. The participants were divided into four categories, which were classified into quartile distributions based on the number of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors (0-1, 2, 3, and ≥4 unhealthy behaviors). According to a multivariate analysis, the odds ratio (OR) for CKD (defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] unhealthy lifestyle behaviors, especially those related to lack of habitual moderate exercise and presence of late-night dinner and bedtime snacking may be associated with the prevalence of CKD.

  18. Association between periodontitis and mortality in stages 3-5 chronic kidney disease: NHANES III and linked mortality study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Praveen; Dietrich, Thomas; Ferro, Charles J; Cockwell, Paul; Chapple, Iain L C

    2016-02-01

    Periodontitis may add to the systemic inflammatory burden in individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD), thereby contributing to an increased mortality rate. This study aimed to determine the association between periodontitis and mortality rate (all-cause and cardiovascular disease-related) in individuals with stage 3-5 CKD, hitherto referred to as "CKD". Survival analysis was carried out using the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) and linked mortality data. Cox proportional hazards regression was employed to assess the association between periodontitis and mortality, in individuals with CKD. This association was compared with the association between mortality and traditional risk factors in CKD mortality (diabetes, hypertension and smoking). Of the 13,784 participants eligible for analysis in NHANES III, 861 (6%) had CKD. The median follow-up for this cohort was 14.3 years. Adjusting for confounders, the 10-year all-cause mortality rate for individuals with CKD increased from 32% (95% CI: 29-35%) to 41% (36-47%) with the addition of periodontitis. For diabetes, the 10-year all-cause mortality rate increased to 43% (38-49%). There is a strong, association between periodontitis and increased mortality in individuals with CKD. Sources of chronic systemic inflammation (including periodontitis) may be important contributors to mortality in patients with CKD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The association of alcohol and smoking with CKD in a Japanese nationwide cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Ayako; Nagasawa, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Shinzawa, Maki; Hasuike, Yukiko; Kuragano, Takahiro; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Yoshida, Hideaki; Fujimoto, Shouichi; Asahi, Koichi; Moriyama, Toshiki; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2017-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by a reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and proteinuria. Modifiable lifestyle factors such as smoking and alcohol contribute to CKD. Recent cohort studies have shown that moderate alcohol consumption attenuates the decline of the GFR and smoking has been previously shown to be associated with CKD. However, the association of smoking and alcohol consumption on CKD is not entirely clear. To examine whether there is evidence to assume that smoking is an effective modifier of the association between CKD and alcohol consumption, we conducted a cross-sectional study of a population of people who presented for a health checkup under a program that targets the insured population aged ≧40 years using data from the Specific Health Check and Guidance in Japan between April 2008 and March 2009. Of the 506 807 participants aged ⩾40 years, 292 013 (57.6%) were included in the present analysis. Outcomes were kidney dysfunction, as an eGFR of smoking might have modified the potential benefits of alcohol to prevent CKD.

  20. The Association Between Unhealthy Lifestyle Behaviors and the Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD in Middle-Aged and Older Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoma Michishita

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: This cross-sectional study evaluated the association between unhealthy lifestyle behaviors and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD in middle-aged and older men. Methods: The subjects included 445 men without a history of cardiovascular disease, stroke, or dialysis treatment, who were not taking medications. Unhealthy lifestyle behaviors were evaluated using a standardized selfadministered questionnaire and were defined as follows: 1 lack of habitual moderate exercise, 2 lack of daily physical activity, 3 slow walking speed, 4 fast eating speed, 5 late-night dinner, 6 bedtime snacking, and 7 skipping breakfast. The participants were divided into four categories, which were classified into quartile distributions based on the number of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors (0–1, 2, 3, and ≥4 unhealthy behaviors. Results: According to a multivariate analysis, the odds ratio (OR for CKD (defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and/or proteinuria was found to be significantly higher in the ≥4 group than in the 0–1 group (OR 4.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.51–14.40. Moreover, subjects’ lack of habitual moderate exercise (OR 3.06; 95% CI, 1.13–8.32 and presence of late-night dinner (OR 2.84; 95% CI, 1.40–5.75 and bedtime snacking behaviors (OR 2.87; 95% CI, 1.27–6.45 were found to be significantly associated with the prevalence of CKD. Conclusions: These results suggest that an accumulation of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors, especially those related to lack of habitual moderate exercise and presence of late-night dinner and bedtime snacking may be associated with the prevalence of CKD.

  1. Predictors of Vitamin D Deficiency in Predialysis Patients with Stage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    2017 Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice | Published by Wolters Kluwer ‑ Medknow. Objective: ... Serum 25(OH)D levels of patients in Stage 4 and Stage 5 CKD were lower than ... [Downloaded free from http://www.njcponline.com on Wednesday, February 7, 2018, ... angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin.

  2. Persistent high serum bicarbonate and the risk of heart failure in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD): A report from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobre, Mirela; Yang, Wei; Pan, Qiang; Appel, Lawrence; Bellovich, Keith; Chen, Jing; Feldman, Harold; Fischer, Michael J; Ham, L L; Hostetter, Thomas; Jaar, Bernard G; Kallem, Radhakrishna R; Rosas, Sylvia E; Scialla, Julia J; Wolf, Myles; Rahman, Mahboob

    2015-04-20

    Serum bicarbonate varies over time in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, and this variability may portend poor cardiovascular outcomes. The aim of this study was to conduct a time-updated longitudinal analysis to evaluate the association of serum bicarbonate with long-term clinical outcomes: heart failure, atherosclerotic events, renal events (halving of estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] or end-stage renal disease), and mortality. Serum bicarbonate was measured annually, in 3586 participants with CKD, enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. Marginal structural models were created to allow for integration of all available bicarbonate measurements and proper adjustment for time-dependent confounding. During the 6 years follow-up, 512 participants developed congestive heart failure (26/1000 person-years) and 749 developed renal events (37/1000 person-years). The risk of heart failure and death was significantly higher for participants who maintained serum bicarbonate >26 mmol/L for the entire duration of follow-up (hazard ratio [HR] 1.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23 to 2.23, and HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.82, respectively) compared with participants who kept their bicarbonate 22 to 26 mmol/L, after adjusting for demographics, co-morbidities, medications including diuretics, eGFR, and proteinuria. Participants who maintained serum bicarbonate renal disease progression (HR 1.97; 95% CI, 1.50 to 2.57) compared with participants with bicarbonate 22 to 26 mmol/L. In this large CKD cohort, persistent serum bicarbonate >26 mmol/L was associated with increased risk of heart failure events and mortality. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal range of serum bicarbonate in CKD to prevent adverse clinical outcomes. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  3. Persistent High Serum Bicarbonate and the Risk of Heart Failure in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD): A Report From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobre, Mirela; Yang, Wei; Pan, Qiang; Appel, Lawrence; Bellovich, Keith; Chen, Jing; Feldman, Harold; Fischer, Michael J.; Ham, L. L.; Hostetter, Thomas; Jaar, Bernard G.; Kallem, Radhakrishna R.; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Scialla, Julia J.; Wolf, Myles; Rahman, Mahboob

    2015-01-01

    Background Serum bicarbonate varies over time in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, and this variability may portend poor cardiovascular outcomes. The aim of this study was to conduct a time‐updated longitudinal analysis to evaluate the association of serum bicarbonate with long‐term clinical outcomes: heart failure, atherosclerotic events, renal events (halving of estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] or end‐stage renal disease), and mortality. Methods and Results Serum bicarbonate was measured annually, in 3586 participants with CKD, enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. Marginal structural models were created to allow for integration of all available bicarbonate measurements and proper adjustment for time‐dependent confounding. During the 6 years follow‐up, 512 participants developed congestive heart failure (26/1000 person‐years) and 749 developed renal events (37/1000 person‐years). The risk of heart failure and death was significantly higher for participants who maintained serum bicarbonate >26 mmol/L for the entire duration of follow‐up (hazard ratio [HR] 1.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23 to 2.23, and HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.82, respectively) compared with participants who kept their bicarbonate 22 to 26 mmol/L, after adjusting for demographics, co‐morbidities, medications including diuretics, eGFR, and proteinuria. Participants who maintained serum bicarbonate renal disease progression (HR 1.97; 95% CI, 1.50 to 2.57) compared with participants with bicarbonate 22 to 26 mmol/L. Conclusion In this large CKD cohort, persistent serum bicarbonate >26 mmol/L was associated with increased risk of heart failure events and mortality. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal range of serum bicarbonate in CKD to prevent adverse clinical outcomes. PMID:25896890

  4. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) event rates in HIV-positive persons at high predicted CVD and CKD risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Mark A; Mocroft, Amanda; Ryom, Lene

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study has developed predictive risk scores for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD, defined as confirmed estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≤ 60 ml/min/1.73 m2) events in HIV...

  5. Dietary fiber intake is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and cardiovascular risk, but not protein nutritional status, in adults with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Huang, Yan-Feng; Wang, Ming-Qing; Chen, De-Xiu; Wan, Heng; Wei, Lian-Bo; Xiao, Wei

    Evidence suggests that dietary fiber benefits patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, this conclusion requires further validation. In this study, we examined the effects of dietary fiber on kidney function, inflammation, indoxyl sulfate, nutritional status, and cardiovascular risk in patients with advanced CKD. We performed linear regressions to assess the association between dietary fiber intake and CKD parameters. The aforementioned parameters were compared over an 18-month follow- up period. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to investigate the association between fiber intake and Cardiac vascular disease (CVD). In total, 157 patients were included in this study. Dietary fiber and inflammatory indices were associated (interleukin [IL]-6: β=-0.024, p=0.035). The differential estimated glomerular filtration rate (ΔeGFR) as well as levels of C-reactive protein, IL-6, indoxyl sulfate, and serum cholesterol in the higher fiber intake (>=25 g/day) group were lower than those in the lower fiber intake (patients in the higher protein intake group (pintake may be a protective factor associated with CVD (hazard ratio=0.537 and 0.305- 0.947). The protein nutritional status was not different between the two groups (p>0.05). Our results suggest that increasing fiber intake can retard the decrease in the eGFR; can reduce the levels of proinflammatory factors, indoxyl sulfate, and serum cholesterol; and is negatively associated with cardiovascular risk, but does not disrupt the nutritional status of patients with CKD.

  6. Cardiovascular disease (CVD and chronic kidney disease (CKD event rates in HIV-positive persons at high predicted CVD and CKD risk: A prospective analysis of the D:A:D observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Boyd

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D study has developed predictive risk scores for cardiovascular disease (CVD and chronic kidney disease (CKD, defined as confirmed estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≤ 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 events in HIV-positive people. We hypothesized that participants in D:A:D at high (>5% predicted risk for both CVD and CKD would be at even greater risk for CVD and CKD events.We included all participants with complete risk factor (covariate data, baseline eGFR > 60 ml/min/1.73 m2, and a confirmed (>3 months apart eGFR 1%-5%, >5% and fitted Poisson models to assess whether CVD and CKD risk group effects were multiplicative. A total of 27,215 participants contributed 202,034 person-years of follow-up: 74% male, median (IQR age 42 (36, 49 years, median (IQR baseline year of follow-up 2005 (2004, 2008. D:A:D risk equations predicted 3,560 (13.1% participants at high CVD risk, 4,996 (18.4% participants at high CKD risk, and 1,585 (5.8% participants at both high CKD and high CVD risk. CVD and CKD event rates by predicted risk group were multiplicative. Participants at high CVD risk had a 5.63-fold (95% CI 4.47, 7.09, p < 0.001 increase in CKD events compared to those at low risk; participants at high CKD risk had a 1.31-fold (95% CI 1.09, 1.56, p = 0.005 increase in CVD events compared to those at low risk. Participants' CVD and CKD risk groups had multiplicative predictive effects, with no evidence of an interaction (p = 0.329 and p = 0.291 for CKD and CVD, respectively. The main study limitation is the difference in the ascertainment of the clinically defined CVD endpoints and the laboratory-defined CKD endpoints.We found that people at high predicted risk for both CVD and CKD have substantially greater risks for both CVD and CKD events compared with those at low predicted risk for both outcomes, and compared to those at high predicted risk for only CVD or CKD events. This suggests that CVD and

  7. Prevalence and risk factors of CKD in Chinese patients with periodontal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejin Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Periodontal disease is common among adults and is associated with an increasing risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of CKD in patients with periodontal disease in China. METHODS: In the current cross-sectional study, patients with periodontal disease were included from Guangdong Provincial Stomatological Hospital between March 2011 and August 2011. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2, the presence of albuminuria, or hematuria. All patients with periodontal disease underwent a periodontal examination, including periodontal probing pocket depth, gingival recession, and clinical attachment level by Florida Probe. They completed a questionnaire and had blood and urine samples taken. The adjusted prevalence of indicators of kidney damage was calculated and risk factors associated with CKD were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 1392 patients with periodontal disease were invited to participate this study and 1268 completed the survey and examination. After adjusting for age and sex, the prevalence of reduced eGFR, albuminuria, and hematuria was 2.7% (95% CI 1.7-3.7, 6.7% (95% CI 5.5-8.1 and 10.9% (95% CI 9.2-12.5, respectively. The adjusted prevalence of CKD was 18.2% (95% CI 16.2-20.3. Age, male, diabetes, hypertension, history of CKD, hyperuricemia, and interleukin-6 levels (≥7.54 ng/L were independent risk factors for reduced eGFR. Female, diabetes, hypertension, history of CKD, hyperuricemia, high level of cholesterol, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP (≥ 1.03 mg/L and TNF-α levels (≥ 1.12 ng/L were independently associated with an increased risk of albuminuria. Female, lower education (CKD were independent risk factors for hematuria. CONCLUSIONS: 18.2% of Chinese patients with periodontal disease have proteinuria, hematuria, or reduced eGFR, indicating the presence of kidney damage

  8. Health-related quality of life in different stages of chronic kidney disease and at initiation of dialysis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagels, Agneta A; Söderkvist, Birgitta Klang; Medin, Charlotte; Hylander, Britta; Heiwe, Susanne

    2012-06-18

    To evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients in different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) up to initiation of dialysis treatment and to explore possible correlating and influencing factors. Cross-sectional design with 535 patients in CKD stages 2-5 and 55 controls assessed for HRQoL through SF-36 together with biomarkers. All HRQoL dimensions deteriorated significantly with CKD stages with the lowest scores in CKD 5. The largest differences between the patient groups were seen in 'physical functioning', 'role physical', 'general health' and in physical summary scores (PCS). The smallest disparities were seen in mental health and pain. Patients in CKD stages 2-3 showed significantly decreased HRQoL compared to matched controls, with differences of large magnitude - effect size (ES) ≥ .80 - in 'general health' and PCS. Patients in CDK 4 demonstrated deteriorated scores with a large magnitude in 'physical function', 'general health' and PCS compared to the patients in CKD 2-3. Patients in CKD 5 demonstrated deteriorated scores with a medium sized magnitude (ES 0.5 - 0.79) in 'role emotional' and mental summary scores compared to the patients in CKD 4. Glomerular filtration rate stages of the disease. At the time for dialysis initiation HRQoL is substantially deteriorated. Co-existing conditions, such as inflammation and cardiovascular disease seem to be powerful predictors of impaired HRQoL in patients with CKD. Within routine renal care, strategies to improve function and well-being considering the management of co-existing conditions like inflammation and CVD need to be developed.

  9. Telehealth Applications to Enhance CKD Knowledge and Awareness Among Patients and Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuot, Delphine S; Boulware, L Ebony

    2017-01-01

    CKD affects 13% of the US adult population, causes excess mortality, and is associated with significant sociodemographic disparities. Optimal CKD management slows progression of disease and reduces cardiovascular-related outcomes. Resources for patients and primary care providers, major stakeholders in preventive CKD care, are critically needed to enhance understanding of the disease and to optimize CKD health, particularly because of the asymptomatic nature of kidney disease. Telehealth is defined as the use of electronic communication and telecommunications technology to support long-distance clinical health care, patient and professional health-related education, and public health and health administration. It provides new opportunities to enhance awareness and understanding among these important stakeholders. This review will examine the role of telehealth within existing educational theories, identify telehealth applications that can enhance CKD knowledge and behavior change among patients and primary care providers, and examine the advantages and disadvantages of telehealth vs usual modalities for education. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Understanding the management of early-stage chronic kidney disease in primary care: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeman, Tom; Protheroe, Joanne; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Rogers, Anne; Kennedy, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary care is recognised to have an important role in the delivery of care for people with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, there is evidence that CKD management is currently suboptimal, with a range of practitioner concerns about its management. Aim To explore processes underpinning the implementation of CKD management in primary care. Design and setting Qualitative study in general practices participating in a chronic kidney disease collaborative undertaken as part of the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) for Greater Manchester. Method Semi-structured interviews were conducted with GPs and practice nurses (n = 21). Normalisation Process Theory provided a framework for generation and analysis of the data. Results A predominant theme was anxiety about the disclosure of early-stage CKD with patients. The tensions experienced related to identifying and discussing CKD in older people and patients with stage 3A, embedding early-stage CKD within vascular care, and the distribution of work within the practice team. Participants provided accounts of work undertaken to resolve the difficulties encountered, with efforts having tended to focus on reassuring patients. Analysis also highlighted how anxiety surrounding disclosure influenced, and was shaped by, the organisation of care for people with CKD and associated long-term conditions. Conclusion Offering reassurance alone may be of limited benefit, and current management of early-stage CKD in primary care may miss opportunities to address susceptibility to kidney injury, improve self-management of vascular conditions, and improve the management of multimorbidity. PMID:22520910

  11. Parental perspectives on the financial impact of caring for a child with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medway, Meredith; Tong, Allison; Craig, Jonathan C; Kim, Siah; Mackie, Fiona; McTaggart, Steven; Walker, Amanda; Wong, Germaine

    2015-03-01

    The economic consequences of chronic kidney disease (CKD) are severe for adult patients and their households, but the out-of-pocket expenses and economic burden of CKD and how this affects the caregivers of children with kidney disease are unclear. This study aims to describe parental perspectives on the financial impact of caring for a child with CKD. Face-to-face semistructured interviews. Parents of children with CKD from 3 pediatric nephrology centers in Australia. Transcripts were analyzed thematically. 27 parents of 26 children participated. We identified 5 themes: loss of freedom and control (prioritizing care, limiting occupational opportunities, and appreciating socioeconomic advantage), burden of sole responsibility (inability to rely on others, lack of respite, increased separation of family roles, and self-reliance), adapting for survival (vigilant budgeting, redefining normality and expectations, rechanneling resources to basic needs, and negotiating work flexibility), instability of circumstances (depleted capacity to work, unpredictability of child's health, burden of travel-related costs, imposition of debt, and domestic upheaval), and struggle in seeking support ("falling through the cracks" and unmet information needs). Few participants were fathers (n=5), and results may not be transferable to non-English-speaking caregivers because these participants were excluded. Parents focused their resources and attention on meeting the complex needs of their child. Inability to sustain employment due to focus on their child's care and both medical and nonmedical expenses were major contributors to the financial impact, with financial stress compounded by difficulties accessing government support. As a result, parents experienced profound financial and social instability and physical and psychological fatigue and exercised extreme financial vigilance. Increased access to respite and domestic support and financial and psychosocial interventions are suggested

  12. [The use of systematic review to develop a self-management program for CKD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Chin; Wu, Shu-Fang Vivienne; Lee, Mei-Chen; Chen, Fu-An; Yao, Yen-Hong; Wang, Chin-Ling

    2014-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a public health issue of international concern due to its high prevalence. The concept of self-management has been comprehensively applied in education programs that address chronic diseases. In recent years, many studies have used self-management programs in CKD interventions and have investigated the pre- and post-intervention physiological and psychological effectiveness of this approach. However, a complete clinical application program in the self-management model has yet to be developed for use in clinical renal care settings. A systematic review is used to develop a self-management program for CKD. Three implementation steps were used in this study. These steps include: (1) A systematic literature search and review using databases including CEPS (Chinese Electronic Periodical Services) of Airiti, National Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations in Taiwan, CINAHL, Pubmed, Medline, Cochrane Library, and Joanna Briggs Institute. A total of 22 studies were identified as valid and submitted to rigorous analysis. Of these, 4 were systematic literature reviews, 10 were randomized experimental studies, and 8 were non-randomized experimental studies. (2) Empirical evidence then was used to draft relevant guidelines on clinical application. (3) Finally, expert panels tested the validity of the draft to ensure the final version was valid for application in practice. This study designed a self-management program for CKD based on the findings of empirical studies. The content of this program included: design principles, categories, elements, and the intervention measures used in the self-management program. This program and then was assessed using the content validity index (CVI) and a four-point Liker's scale. The content validity score was .98. The guideline of self-management program to CKD was thus developed. This study developed a self-management program applicable to local care of CKD. It is hoped that the guidelines

  13. Uremic retention solute indoxyl sulfate level is associated with prolonged QTc interval in early CKD patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hua Tang

    Full Text Available Total mortality and sudden cardiac death is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. In CKD patients, the protein-bound uremic retention solute indoxyl sulfate (IS is independently associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanisms of this association have yet to be elucidated. The relationship between IS and cardiac electrocardiographic parameters was investigated in a prospective observational study among early CKD patients. IS arrhythmogenic effect was evaluated by in vitro cardiomyocyte electrophysiological study and mathematical computer simulation. In a cohort of 100 early CKD patients, patients with corrected QT (QTc prolongation had higher IS levels. Furthermore, serum IS level was independently associated with prolonged QTc interval. In vitro, the delay rectifier potassium current (IK was found to be significantly decreased after the treatment of IS in a dose-dependent manner. The modulation of IS to the IK was through the regulation of the major potassium ion channel protein Kv 2.1 phosphorylation. In a computer simulation, the decrease of IK by IS could prolong the action potential duration (APD and induce early afterdepolarization, which is known to be a trigger mechanism of lethal ventricular arrhythmias. In conclusion, serum IS level is independently associated with the prolonged QTc interval in early CKD patients. IS down-regulated IK channel protein phosphorylation and the IK current activity that in turn increased the cardiomyocyte APD and QTc interval in vitro and in the computer ORd model. These findings suggest that IS may play a role in the development of arrhythmogenesis in CKD patients.

  14. Skin denervation and its clinical significance in late-stage chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chi-Chao; Wu, Vin-Cent; Tan, Chun-Hsiang; Wang, Yi-Mei; Tseng, Ming-Tsung; Wu, Pei-Chen; Lin, Yea-Huey; Lin, Whei-Min; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the skin innervation and its clinical significance in late-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). Case series. National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. Forty consecutive nondiabetic patients with late-stage CKD (14 female and 26 male; mean [SD] age, 60.7 [12.3] years), including 2 cases with stage 3 CKD, 6 with stage 4 CKD, and 32 with stage 5 CKD, ie, end-stage kidney disease. Clinical evaluation of neurological deficits, nerve conduction study, autonomic function tests, and a 3-mm-diameter skin biopsy specimen taken from the distal leg. Quantitation of epidermal innervation, parameters of nerve conduction study, R-R interval variability, and sympathetic skin response. Clinically, 21 patients (52.5%) were symptomatic with paresthesia over the limbs or autonomic symptoms. The intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) density was markedly reduced in patients with CKD compared with age- and sex-matched controls (mean [SD], 2.8 [2.0] vs 8.6 [2.8] fibers/mm; P Skin denervation was observed in 27 patients (67.5%). Fifteen patients (37.5%) had abnormalities on nerve conduction studies, and 29 patients (72.5%) had abnormal results on autonomic function tests. By analysis with multiple regression models, the IENF density was negatively correlated with the duration of renal disease (P = .02). Additionally, the R-R interval variability at rest was linearly correlated with the IENF density (P = .02) and the absence of sympathetic skin responses at the soles was associated with reduced IENF density (P = .03). Small-fiber sensory and autonomic neuropathies constitute the major form of neuropathy in late-stage CKD. Furthermore, skin denervation was associated with the duration of renal disease.

  15. Effect of Behavior Modification on Outcome in Early- to Moderate-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease: A Cluster-Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Kunihiro; Makino, Hirofumi; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Ito, Sadayoshi; Kimura, Kenjiro; Kusano, Eiji; Shibata, Takanori; Tomita, Kimio; Narita, Ichiei; Nishino, Tomoya; Fujigaki, Yoshihide; Mitarai, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Takashi; Nakamura, Teiji; Matsuo, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    Owing to recent changes in our understanding of the underlying cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the importance of lifestyle modification for preventing the progression of kidney dysfunction and complications has become obvious. In addition, effective cooperation between general physicians (GPs) and nephrologists is essential to ensure a better care system for CKD treatment. In this cluster-randomized study, we studied the effect of behavior modification on the outcome of early- to moderate-stage CKD. Stratified open cluster-randomized trial. A total of 489 GPs belonging to 49 local medical associations (clusters) in Japan. A total of 2,379 patients (1,195 in group A (standard intervention) and 1,184 in group B (advanced intervention)) aged between 40 and 74 years, who had CKD and were under consultation with GPs. All patients were managed in accordance with the current CKD guidelines. The group B clusters received three additional interventions: patients received both educational intervention for lifestyle modification and a CKD status letter, attempting to prevent their withdrawal from treatment, and the group B GPs received data sheets to facilitate reducing the gap between target and practice. The primary outcome measures were 1) the non-adherence rate of accepting continuous medical follow-up of the patients, 2) the collaboration rate between GPs and nephrologists, and 3) the progression of CKD. The rate of discontinuous clinical visits was significantly lower in group B (16.2% in group A vs. 11.5% in group B, p = 0.01). Significantly higher referral and co-treatment rates were observed in group B (pbehavior modification of CKD patients, namely, significantly lower discontinuous clinical visits, and behavior modification of both GPs and nephrologists, namely significantly higher referral and co-treatment rates, resulting in the retardation of CKD progression, especially in patients with proteinuric Stage 3 CKD. The University Hospital Medical Information

  16. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety of CKD-519, a CETP inhibitor, in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim CO

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Choon Ok Kim,1 Eun Sil Oh,2 Chungam Choi,1 Yeonjoo Kim,3 Sera Lee,4 Semi Kim,4 Min Soo Park1,5 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Medicines and Regulatory Science, Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy, Yonsei University, Incheon, 3Chong Kun Dang Clinical Research, Chong Kun Dang Pharmaceutical Corp., 4Chong Kun Dang Research Institute, Chong Kun Dang Pharmaceutical Corp., 5Department of Pediatrics, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Abstract: CKD-519 is a selective and potent cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP inhibitor being developed for the treatment of dyslipidemia to raise high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. We investigated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of single doses of CKD-519 in healthy adult subjects. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, single ascending dose study was performed. Eight healthy subjects were enrolled in each CKD-519 dose group (25, 50, 100, 200, or 400 mg and randomized to CKD-519 (n=6 or matching placebo (n=2. CKD-519 reached the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax at 5–6 h post-dose, and had a long terminal half-life ranging between 40–70 h. The area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC and Cmax increased with the dose, however, Cmax and AUC normalized by dose decreased with each incremental dose. CETP activity decreased with dose, and the maximum decrease (63%–83% was observed at 6–8 h post-dose. A sigmoid Emax model best described the relationship between CKD-519 plasma concentrations and CETP activity with an EC50 of 17.3 ng/mL. Overall, 11 adverse events (AEs were observed. All AEs were mild or moderate in intensity, and resolved without any complications. There were no clinically significant effects on blood pressure. In conclusion, single doses of CKD-519 up to 400 mg were well tolerated and showed potent

  17. Risk profile, quality of life and care of patients with moderate and advanced CKD : The French CKD-REIN Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Bénédicte; Metzger, Marie; Combe, Christian; Jacquelinet, Christian; Briançon, Serge; Ayav, Carole; Fouque, Denis; Laville, Maurice; Frimat, Luc; Pascal, Christophe; Herpe, Yves-Edouard; Morel, Pascal; Deleuze, Jean-François; Schanstra, Joost P; Lange, Céline; Legrand, Karine; Speyer, Elodie; Liabeuf, Sophie; Robinson, Bruce M; Massy, Ziad A

    2018-04-09

    The French Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort study was designed to investigate the determinants of prognosis and care of patients referred to nephrologists with moderate and advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). We examined their baseline risk profile and experience. We collected bioclinical and patient-reported information from 3033 outpatients with CKD and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) of 15-60 mL/min/1.73 m2 treated at 40 nationally representative public and private facilities. The patients' median age was 69 (60-76) years, 65% were men, their mean eGFR was 33 mL/min/1.73 m2, 43% had diabetes, 24% had a history of acute kidney injury (AKI) and 57% had uncontrolled blood pressure (BP; >140/90 mmHg). Men had worse risk profiles than women and were more likely to be past or current smokers (73% versus 34%) and have cardiovascular disease (59% versus 42%), albuminuria >30 mg/mmol (or proteinuria > 50) (40% versus 30%) (all P REIN study highlights high-risk profiles of cohort members and identifies several priorities, including improving BP control and dietary counselling and increasing doctors' awareness of AKI, polypharmacy and QoL. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT03381950.

  18. Using an electronic self-management tool to support patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD): a CKD clinic self-care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Stephanie W; Jassal, Sarbjit V; Porter, Eveline; Logan, Alexander G; Miller, Judith A

    2013-01-01

    New healthcare delivery models are needed to enhance the patient experience and improve quality of care for individuals with chronic conditions such as kidney disease. One potential avenue is to implement self-management strategies. There is growing evidence that self-management interventions help optimize various aspects of chronic disease management. With the increasing use of information technology (IT) in health care, chronic disease management programs are incorporating IT solutions to support patient self-management practices. IT solutions have the ability to promote key principles of self-management, namely education, empowerment, and collaboration. Positive clinical outcomes have been demonstrated for a number of chronic conditions when IT solutions were incorporated into self-management programs. There is a paucity of evidence for self-management in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Furthermore, IT strategies have not been tested in this patient population to the same extent as other chronic conditions (e.g., diabetes, hypertension). Therefore, it is currently unknown if IT strategies will promote self-management behaviors and lead to improvements in overall patient care. We designed and developed an IT solution called My KidneyCare Centre to support self-management strategies for patients with CKD. In this review, we discuss the rationale and vision of incorporating an electronic self-management tool to support the care of patients with CKD. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Management of Heart Failure in Advancing CKD: Core Curriculum 2018.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Andrew A

    2018-02-23

    Heart failure and chronic kidney disease have increasing incidence and prevalence owing in part to the aging population and increasing rates of hypertension, diabetes, and other cardiovascular and kidney disease risk factors. The presence of one condition also has a strong influence on the other, leading to greater risks for hospitalization, morbidity, and death, as well as very high health care costs. Despite the frequent coexistence of heart failure and chronic kidney disease, many of the pivotal randomized trials that guide the management of heart failure have excluded patients with more advanced stages of chronic kidney disease. In this Core Curriculum article, management of a challenging, yet not unusual, case of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction in a patient with stage 4 chronic kidney disease provides an opportunity to review the relevant literature and highlight gaps in our knowledge. Copyright © 2018 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. High amylose resistant starch diet ameliorates oxidative stress, inflammation, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with advanced CKD exhibit profound changes in the composition and function of the gut microbiome. This is, in part, mediated by: I- heavy influx of urea in the intestinal tract leading to the dominance of urease-possessing bacteria and II- dietary restriction of potassium-rich fruits and ve...

  1. A resistant starch fiber diet ameliorates oxidative stress, inflammation, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inflammation is a constant feature and a major mediator of CKD progression. It is, in part, driven by altered gut microbiome and disruption of intestinal epithelial barrier, events which are primarily caused by: 1- urea influx in the intestine resulting in dominance of urease-possessing bacteria; 2-...

  2. The effect of some medications given to CKD patients on vitamin D levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Yuste

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: CKD patients with vitamin D deficiency who received RAS inhibitors or Allopurinol treatment had higher 25-OH-D3 levels, however those with statins treatment had lower vitamin D levels. Randomized controlled trials are required to confirm these findings.

  3. Comparison of CKD-EPI versus MDRD and Cockcroft-Gault ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-12-15

    Dec 15, 2016 ... being during the management of HbSS patients. Sickle cell anaemia is a ... Uche and Osegbe: CKD-EPI estimated GFR in stable HbSS patients. 817. Nigerian ..... Older age has been identified as a socio‑demographic factor .... S. Effects of posture on creatinine clearance and urinary protein excretion in ...

  4. LDL cholesterol in CKD-to treat or not to treat?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massy, Ziad A.; de Zeeuw, Dick

    In the majority of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) the total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol are usually normal, with the exception of patients with nephrotic-range proteinuria and in peritoneal dialysis patients. Moreover, epidemiological evidence shows that the link

  5. INCREASED FAT INTAKE MAY STABILIZED CKD PROGRESSION IN LOW-FAT INTAKE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Yu Chang

    2012-06-01

    Inadequate calories intake will induce excessive protein catabolism, which can cause accumulation of uremic toxins and acceleration of renal failure. Increasing fats intake is an easy way to achieve adequate calories acquirement and may stabilize the progression of CKD especially in low-fat intake patients.

  6. Age- and sex-tailored serum phosphate thresholds do not improve cardiovascular risk estimation in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Pietro Manuel; Bonello, Monica; Gambaro, Alessia; Sturniolo, Antonio; Gambaro, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Disordered metabolism of phosphorus is one of the hallmarks of chronic kidney disease (CKD), resulting in increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Age and sex may affect the metabolism of phosphorus and subsequently its serum level. We evaluated if age- and sex-specific cutoffs for hyperphosphatemia may define cardiovascular risk better than the current guideline cutoffs. We used data from 16,834 subjects participating in the 1999-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES); the prevalence of self-reported cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality rates were analyzed in CKD patients for both the classic definitions (CH; i.e., NKF-KDOQI and K-DIGO) and a tailored definition (TH) of hyperphosphatemia by means of regression models adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, smoking status and body mass index. The cutoffs for TH were represented by the 95th percentile of an age- and sex-matched non-CKD population. Serum phosphorus levels showed an inverse correlation with age (r = -0.12; pdefinition and CVD was marginally better compared with the CH definition (odds ratio [OR] = 1.49, 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.04-2.13; p=0.030 vs. OR=1.55, 95% CI, 0.98-2.44; p = 0.059), the TH model was not superior in predicting CVD or mortality. Our data suggest that a tailored, age- and sex-specific definition of hyperphosphatemia is not superior to conventional definitions in predicting cardiovascular events in patients with CKD.

  7. Impact of Educational Attainment on Health Outcomes in Moderate to Severe CKD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morton, Rachael L.; Schlackow, Iryna; Staplin, Natalie; Gray, Alastair; Cass, Alan; Haynes, Richard; Emberson, Jonathan; Herrington, William; Landray, Martin J.; Baigent, Colin; Mihaylova, Borislava; de Zeeuw, Dick; Navis, Gerjan

    Background: The inverse association between educational attainment and mortality is well established, but its relevance to vascular events and renal progression in a population with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is less clear. This study aims to determine the association between highest educational

  8. Association of sitting time and physical activity with CKD: a cross-sectional study in family practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharakhada, Nilesh; Yates, Thomas; Davies, Melanie J; Wilmot, Emma G; Edwardson, Charlotte; Henson, Joe; Webb, David; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2012-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) represents a significant and growing health care burden globally. Lifestyle factors, such as physical activity and sitting-related sedentary behavior, have been hypothesized to be directly associated with CKD; however, epidemiologic research is limited. Cross-sectional analysis. A population-level diabetes screening program conducted across 20 family practices in Leicester, United Kingdom, August 2004 to December 2007. Self-reported sitting time and physical activity, obtained using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. CKD, defined using NKF-KDOQI (National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative) criteria. 6,379 (52% women) individuals were included. Lower levels of sitting time were associated with lower risk of CKD after controlling for physical activity, body mass index, and other potential confounding variables (OR, 0.74 [95% CI, 0.62-0.92] for lowest vs highest tertile). Interaction analysis showed that women trended toward a significantly higher risk of CKD with higher levels of sitting time compared with men. Participating in levels of physical activity that were at least consistent with the minimum recommendations for health was associated with lower risk of CKD. A significant interaction with sex was observed, with men showing a lower risk of CKD with high levels of physical activity compared with women. Cross-sectional design, self-reported lifestyle data, CKD defined at a single time, and estimated glomerular filtration rate and microalbuminuria were the only measures used to define CKD. This study suggests that higher levels of physical activity and lower levels of sitting time are associated with a lower prevalence of CKD independently of each other and other risk factors. However, results may vary by sex, with sitting time being the more important factor in women and physical activity the more important factor in men. These results have important implications for future research

  9. Predictors of Vitamin D Deficiency in Predialysis Patients with Stage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... Objective: Vitamin D status and risk factors of Vitamin D deficiency in chronic kidney disease ... common in patients with chronic kidney diseases (CKD), especially in Stage 3–5 ... METHODS ... The blood pressure and laboratory data measured within ... sphygmomanometer three times after the participant.

  10. Predictors of Vitamin D Deficiency in Predialysis Patients with Stage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Vitamin D status and risk factors of Vitamin D deficiency in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients in China have been seldom reported before. In this study, we aim to investigate serum 25‑hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] status and find the predictors of Vitamin D deficiency in predialysis patients with Stage 3–5 CKDs ...

  11. Hypocalcemia post denosumab in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 4-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Vatsa; Chiang, Cherie Y; Booth, Jane; Mount, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Denosumab, a RANK-ligand inhibitor, is an effective treatment for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and men. Unlike the bisphosphonates, it is not excreted by the kidney. Little is known, however, about its efficacy and safety in patients with severe chronic kidney disease (CKD). A retrospective study was performed in CKD 4-5D patients from a tertiary referral hospital who were treated with denosumab between 1st January 2011 and 31st March 2014. Data collected included information about the following: CKD stage, fracture history, bone mineral density, serum calcium levels pre and post denosumab treatment, episodes of hypocalcemia, relevant medications and adverse events. Eight patients with CKD-5 and 6 patients with CKD-4 were identified (all female, mean age 77.1 ± 9.9). The mean pre-denosumab calcium value was 2.42 ± 0.12 mmol/l, PTH 20.2 ± 14.7 pmol/l and 25-OH vitamin D 69.1 ± 30.1 nmol/l. After denosumab treatment, 6/8 patients with CKD-5/5D, and 2/5 patients with CKD-4 developed severe hypocalcemia. Two patients developed direct adverse complications of hypocalcemia (seizure, laryngospasm, prolonged QTc). Among the patients who developed hypocalcemia, the median time to serum calcium nadir was 21 days and the median time to correction of hypocalcemia was 71 days. Treatment of hypocalcemia required large doses of oral calcium and calcitriol, and increases in dialysate calcium concentration. A high rate of severe hypocalcemia was observed in patients with advanced CKD treated with denosumab. If denosumab is used in patients with severe CKD, close monitoring and aggressive replacement of calcium and calcitriol is required to avoid the development of hypocalcemia.

  12. Usability of a CKD Educational Website Targeted to Patients and Their Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Marni; Fink, Wanda; Hu, Peter; Yang, Shiming; Fink, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Web-based technology is critical to the future of healthcare. As part of the Safe Kidney Care cohort study evaluating patient safety in CKD, this study determined how effectively a representative sample of patients with CKD or family members could interpret and use the Safe Kidney Care website (www.safekidneycare.org), an informational website on safety in CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Between November of 2011 and January of 2012, persons with CKD or their family members underwent formal usability testing administered by a single interviewer with a second recording observer. Each participant was independently provided a list of 21 tasks to complete, with each task rated as either easily completed/noncritical error or critical error (user cannot complete the task without significant interviewer intervention). Results Twelve participants completed formal usability testing. Median completion time for all tasks was 17.5 minutes (range=10–44 minutes). In total, 10 participants had greater than or equal to one critical error. There were 55 critical errors in 252 tasks (22%), with the highest proportion of critical errors occurring when participants were asked to find information on treatments that may damage kidneys, find the website on the internet, increase font size, and scroll to the bottom of the webpage. Participants were generally satisfied with the content and usability of the website. Conclusions Web-based educational materials for patients with CKD should target a wide range of computer literacy levels and anticipate variability in competency in use of the computer and internet. PMID:22798537

  13. Plant Protein Intake Is Associated with Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Serum Bicarbonate in Patients with CKD: The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialla, Julia J.; Appel, Lawrence J; Wolf, Myles; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Sozio, Stephen M.; Miller, Edgar R.; Bazzano, Lydia A.; Cuevas, Magdalena; Glenn, Melanie J.; Lustigova, Eva; Kallem, Radhakrishna R.; Porter, Anna C.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Weir, Matthew R.; Anderson, Cheryl A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein from plant, as opposed to animal, sources may be preferred in chronic kidney disease (CKD), due to lower bioavailability of phosphate and lower nonvolatile acid load. Study Design Observational cross-sectional study. Setting & Participants 2938 participants with chronic kidney disease and information on dietary intake at the baseline visit in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study. Predictors Percentage of total protein from plant sources (% plant protein) was determined by scoring individual food items from the National Cancer Institute Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ). Outcomes Metabolic parameters, including serum phosphate, bicarbonate (HCO3), potassium, and albumin, plasma fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), and parathyroid hormone (PTH), and hemoglobin. Measurements We modeled the association between % plant protein and metabolic parameters using linear regression. Models were adjusted for age, sex, race, diabetes, body mass index, eGFR, income, smoking, total energy intake, total protein intake, 24 hour urinary sodium, use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers and use of diuretics. Results Higher % plant protein was associated with lower FGF23 (p=0.05) and higher HCO3 (p=0.01), but not with serum phosphate or PTH (p=0.9 and 0.5, respectively). Higher % plant protein was not associated with higher serum potassium (p=0.2), lower serum albumin (p=0.2) or lower hemoglobin (p=0.3). The associations of % plant protein with FGF23 and HCO3 did not differ by diabetes status, sex, race, CKD stage (2/3 vs. 4/5) or total protein intake (≤ 0.8 g/kg/d vs. >0.8 g/kg/d) (p-interaction > 0.10 for each). Limitations Cross-sectional study; Determination of % plant protein using the DHQ has not been validated. Conclusions Consumption of a higher percentage of protein from plant sources may lower FGF23 and raise HCO3 in patients with CKD. PMID:22480598

  14. RHM 1(2).indb

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mike

    Research in Hospitality Management 2012, 1(2): 53–63 ... Strategies used to incorporate source materials also remained largely unchanged, with learners ..... score (as is the case in IELTS). ...... Introduction: situating the concept of practice.

  15. Canadians Seeking Solutions and Innovations to Overcome Chronic Kidney Disease (Can-SOLVE CKD): Form and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Adeera; Adams, Evan; Barrett, Brendan J.; Beanlands, Heather; Burns, Kevin D.; Chiu, Helen Hoi-Lun; Chong, Kate; Dart, Allison; Ferera, Jack; Fernandez, Nicolas; Fowler, Elisabeth; Garg, Amit X.; Gilbert, Richard; Harris, Heather; Harvey, Rebecca; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; James, Matthew; Johnson, Jeffrey; Kappel, Joanne; Komenda, Paul; McCormick, Michael; McIntyre, Christopher; Mahmud, Farid; Pei, York; Pollock, Graham; Reich, Heather; Rosenblum, Norman D.; Scholey, James; Sochett, Etienne; Tang, Mila; Tangri, Navdeep; Tonelli, Marcello; Turner, Catherine; Walsh, Michael; Woods, Cathy; Manns, Braden

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of review This article serves to describe the Can-SOLVE CKD network, a program of research projects and infrastructure that has excited patients and given them hope that we can truly transform the care they receive. Issue Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disorder that affects more than 4 million Canadians and costs the Canadian health care system more than $40 billion per year. The evidence base for guiding care in CKD is small, and even in areas where evidence exists, uptake of evidence into clinical practice has been slow. Compounding these complexities are the variations in outcomes for patients with CKD and difficulties predicting who is most likely to develop complications over time. Clearly these gaps in our knowledge and understanding of CKD need to be filled, but the current state of CKD research is not where it needs to be. A culture of clinical trials and inquiry into the disease is lacking, and much of the existing evidence base addresses the concerns of the researchers but not necessarily those of the patients. Program overview The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) has launched the national Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR), a coalition of federal, provincial, and territorial partners dedicated to integrating research into care. Canadians Seeking Solutions and Innovations to Overcome Chronic Kidney Disease (Can-SOLVE CKD) is one of five pan-Canadian chronic kidney disease networks supported through the SPOR. The vision of Can-SOLVE CKD is that by 2020 every Canadian with or at high risk for CKD will receive the best recommended care, experience optimal outcomes, and have the opportunity to participate in studies with novel therapies, regardless of age, sex, gender, location, or ethnicity. Program objective The overarching objective of Can-SOLVE CKD is to accelerate the translation of knowledge about CKD into clinical research and practice. By focusing on the patient’s voice and implementing relevant findings in

  16. Risks of Adverse Events in Advanced CKD: The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grams, Morgan E; Yang, Wei; Rebholz, Casey M; Wang, Xue; Porter, Anna C; Inker, Lesley A; Horwitz, Edward; Sondheimer, James H; Hamm, L Lee; He, Jiang; Weir, Matthew R; Jaar, Bernard G; Shafi, Tariq; Appel, Lawrence J; Hsu, Chi-Yuan

    2017-09-01

    People with advanced chronic kidney disease are at risk for the development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but also many other adverse outcomes, including cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and death. Determination of risk factors that explain the variability in prognosis and timing of these adverse outcomes can aid patient counseling and medical decision making. Prospective research cohort. 1,798 participants with estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs)Study were followed up for a median of 5.5 years. Age, race, sex, eGFR, proteinuria, diabetes mellitus, body mass index, ejection fraction, systolic blood pressure, history of CVD, and smoking history. ESRD, CVD (congestive heart failure, stroke, myocardial infarction, and peripheral artery disease), and death. Baseline age of the cohort was 60 years, 46% were women, and 46% were African American. Although 52.3% of participants progressed to ESRD during follow-up, the path by which this occurred was variable. For example, predicted 1-year probabilities for a hypothetical 60-year-old white woman with eGFR of 30mL/min/1.73m 2 , urine protein excretion of 1.8g/d, and no diabetes or CVD (risk characteristics similar to the average participant) were 3.3%, 4.1%, and 0.3%, for first developing CVD, ESRD, and death, respectively. For a 40-year-old African American man with similar characteristics but higher systolic blood pressure, the corresponding 1-year probabilities were 2.4%, 13.2%, and 0.1%. For all participants, the development of ESRD or CVD increased the risk for subsequent mortality, with no differences by patient race or body mass index. The CRIC population was specifically recruited for kidney disease, and the vast majority had seen a nephrologist. The prognosis and timing of adverse outcomes in chronic kidney disease vary by patient characteristics. These results may help guide the development of personalized approaches for managing patients with advanced CKD. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney

  17. MDRD or CKD-EPI for glomerular filtration rate estimation in living kidney donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Burballa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The evaluation of the measured Glomerular Filtration Rate (mGFR or estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR is key in the proper assessment of the renal function of potential kidney donors. We aim to study the correlation between glomerular filtration rate estimation equations and the measured methods for determining renal function. Material and methods: We analyzed the relationship between baseline GFR values measured by Tc-99m-DTPA (diethylene-triamine-pentaacetate and those estimated by the four-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD4 and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI equations in a series of living donors at our institution. Results: We included 64 donors (70.6% females; mean age 48.3 ± 11 years. Baseline creatinine was 0.8 ± 0.1 mg/dl and it was 1.1 ± 0.2 mg/dl one year after donation. The equations underestimated GFR when measured by Tc99m-DTPA (MDRD4 – 9.4 ± 25 ml/min, P < .05, and CKD-EPI – 4.4 ± 21 ml/min. The correlation between estimation equations and the measured method was superior for CKD-EPI (r = .41; P < .004 than for MDRD4 (r = .27; P < .05. eGFR decreased to 59.6 ± 11 (MDRD4 and 66.2 ± 14 ml/min (CKD-EPI one year after donation. This means a mean eGFR reduction of 28.2 ± 16.7 ml/min (MDRD4 and 27.31 ± 14.4 ml/min (CKD-EPI at one year. Conclusions: In our experience, CKD-EPI is the equation that better correlates with mGFR-Tc99m-DTPA when assessing renal function for donor screening purposes. Resumen: Introducción: El estudio del filtrado glomerular medido (FGm o del estimado (FGe es el eje de la evaluación adecuada de la función renal en la valoración de un potencial donante vivo renal. Nos planteamos estudiar la correlación entre las fórmulas de estimación del FG y los métodos de medición para

  18. Association between Urine Creatinine Excretion and Arterial Stiffness in Chronic Kidney Disease: Data from the KNOW-CKD Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Youl Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Previous studies have shown that low muscle mass is associated with arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV, in a population without chronic kidney disease (CKD. This link between low muscle mass and arterial stiffness may explain why patients with CKD have poor cardiovascular outcomes. However, the association between muscle mass and arterial stiffness in CKD patients is not well known. Methods: Between 2011 and 2013, 1,529 CKD patients were enrolled in the prospective Korean Cohort Study for Outcome in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD. We analyzed 888 participants from this cohort who underwent measurements of 24-hr urinary creatinine excretion (UCr and brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV at baseline examination. The mean of the right and left baPWV (mPWV was used as a marker of arterial stiffness. Results: The baPWV values varied according to the UCr quartile (1,630±412, 1,544±387, 1,527±282 and 1,406±246 for the 1st to 4th quartiles of UCr, respectively, PConclusion: Low muscle mass estimated by low UCr was associated high baPWV in pre-dialysis CKD patients in Korea. Further studies are needed to confirm the causal relationship between UCR and baPWV, and the role of muscle mass in the development of cardiovascular disease in CKD.

  19. The impact of kidney foundations in alleviating the burden of CKD in India - an example, Tamilnad Kidney Research Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Georgi; Vijayan, Madhusudan; Ravi, Rajalakshmi; Kumaraswami, Latha; Venkatesan, Malathy

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem in India. The CKD registry of India has been formed to understand the epidemiology of CKD in India. Due to health economics in India, the majority of CKD-affected patients cannot afford renal replacement therapy (RRT) services. There is an unmet need to improve the awareness of kidney disease in India, and the focus should be on prevention and early detection of CKD by screening high risk populations. The Tamilnad Kidney Research (TANKER) Foundation is a charitable trust established in 1993 with the aim to improve awareness and provide quality affordable treatment to underprivileged patients. TANKER is supported by contributions from well-wishers. It has three arms: i) treatment arm, ii) research arm, and iii) awareness and screening arm. TANKER Foundation offers free and subsidized dialysis twice weekly to 227 underprivileged patients. TANKER dialysis has been supported by state government funding schemes. TANKER actively supports and conducts research in nephrology. More than 100,000 people have benefitted from TANKER's kidney awareness programs. The screening programs have provided for early detection of CKD in both urban and rural areas. TANKER award functions are held annually to recognize research and exemplary service to society. The TANKER Foundation can be used as a model for developing countries to address the unmet needs in CKD management.

  20. Bench-scale study of active mine water treatment using cement kiln dust (CKD) as a neutralization agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Allison L; Walsh, Margaret E

    2012-02-01

    The overall objective of this study was to investigate the potential impact on settled water quality of using cement kiln dust (CKD), a waste by-product, to replace quicklime in the active treatment of acidic mine water. Bench-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the treatment performance of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)(2)) slurries generated using four different CKD samples compared to a control treatment with quicklime (CaO) in terms of reducing acidity and metals concentrations in acid mine drainage (AMD) samples taken from the effluent of a lead/zinc mine in Atlantic Canada. Results of the study showed that all of the CKD samples evaluated were capable of achieving greater than 97% removal of total zinc and iron. The amount of solid alkaline material required to achieve pH targets required for neutralization of the AMD was found to be higher for treatment with the CKD slurries compared to the quicklime slurry control experiments, and varied linearly with the free lime content of the CKD. The results of this study also showed that a potential benefit of treating mine water with CKD could be reduced settled sludge volumes generated in the active treatment process, and further research into the characteristics of the sludge generated from the use of CKD-generated calcium hydroxide slurries is recommended. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nonapnea Sleep Disorders in Patients Younger than 65 Years Are Significantly Associated with CKD: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo You-Hsien Lin

    Full Text Available Nonapnea sleep disorders (NASD and sleep-related problems are associated with poor health outcomes. However, the association between NASD and the development and prognosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD has not been investigated thoroughly. We explored the association between CKD and NASD in Taiwan.We conducted a population-based study using the Taiwan National Health Insurance database with1,000,000 representative data for the period from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2009. We investigated the incidence and risk of CKD in 7,006 newly diagnosed NASD cases compared with 21,018 people without NASD matched according to age, sex, index year, urbanization, region, and monthly income at a 1:3 ratio.The subsequent risk of CKD was 1.48-foldhigher in the NASD cohort than in the control cohort (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.26-1.73, p< 0.001. Men, older age, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and gout were significant factors associated with the increased risk of CKD (p< 0.001. Among different types of NASDs, patients with insomnia had a 52% increased risk of developing CKD (95%CI = 1.23-1.84; P<0.01, whereas patients with sleep disturbance had a 49%increased risk of subsequent CKD (95% CI = 1.19-1.87; P<0.001. Younger women (aged < 65 years were at a high risk of CKD with NASD (adjusted hazard ratio, [HR] = 1.81; 95% CI = 1.35-2.40, p< 0.001.In this nationwide population-based cohort study, patients with NASD, particularly men of all ages and women aged younger than 65 years, were at high risk of CKD.

  2. Nighttime BP in Elderly Individuals with Prediabetes/Diabetes with and without CKD: The HEIJO-KYO Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obayashi, Kenji; Saeki, Keigo; Kurumatani, Norio

    2016-05-06

    and objectives Although previous studies suggested that nighttime BP is elevated in diabetes mellitus, the association between prediabetes and nighttime BP remains unclear. In addition, the relationship between diabetic status, renal function, and nighttime BP has not been evaluated in large populations. In this cross-sectional study, we assessed diabetic status, renal function, and ambulatory BP parameters among 1081 community-dwelling elderly individuals (mean age, 71.8±7.0 years). Participants were classified into six categories based on diabetic status (normoglycemia, prediabetes, or diabetes mellitus) and renal function (normal function or CKD). BP was measured at 30-minute intervals for 48 hours using a validated ambulatory recorder. The mean nighttime systolic BP (SBP) was 115.7±16.1 mmHg. The multivariable analysis, adjusted for age, sex, smoking status, and daytime SBP, revealed that, compared with participants with normoglycemia but without CKD (n=378), mean nighttime SBP was significantly higher in participants with both prediabetes and CKD (n=93) by 2.9 mmHg (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.2 to 5.6; P=0.03) and in patients with both diabetes mellitus and CKD (n=30) by 7.8 mmHg (95% CI, 3.5 to 12.2; Pprediabetes without CKD (n=374), or patients with diabetes mellitus without CKD (n=131). Notably, the multivariable analysis indicated that the interaction terms of diabetic status and renal function were significantly associated with nighttime SBP (P=0.03). Nighttime SBP was significantly higher in participants with prediabetes and CKD but not in participants with prediabetes without CKD, compared with participants with normoglycemia and without CKD. In addition, a significant interaction effect of diabetic status and renal function on nighttime SBP was detected in a general elderly population. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  3. C1-2 arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevrot, A [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, 75 - Paris (France); Cermakova, E [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, 75 - Paris (France); Vallee, C [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, 75 - Paris (France); Chancelier, M D [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, 75 - Paris (France); Chemla, N [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, 75 - Paris (France); Rousselin, B [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, 75 - Paris (France); Langer-Cherbit, A [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, 75 - Paris (France)

    1995-08-01

    One hundred patients with the following conditions were studied: cervical pain or neuralgia without radiographic changes, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylarthritis and diverse conditions. The technique consists of lateral puncture of the posterior aspect of the C1-2 joint with a 20-gauge needle under fluoroscopic control, arthrography using 1 ml contrast medium, and a 1-ml long-acting steroid injection subsequently. The articular cavity has an anterior and a posterior recess. Sometimes the posterior recess is large. In 18% of cases the contralateral joint also opacifies. C1-2 arthrography appears to be an efficient and safe technique for the treatment of upper cervical pain due to C1-2 articular disorders. (orig.)

  4. C1-2 arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevrot, A.; Cermakova, E.; Vallee, C.; Chancelier, M.D.; Chemla, N.; Rousselin, B.; Langer-Cherbit, A.

    1995-01-01

    One hundred patients with the following conditions were studied: cervical pain or neuralgia without radiographic changes, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylarthritis and diverse conditions. The technique consists of lateral puncture of the posterior aspect of the C1-2 joint with a 20-gauge needle under fluoroscopic control, arthrography using 1 ml contrast medium, and a 1-ml long-acting steroid injection subsequently. The articular cavity has an anterior and a posterior recess. Sometimes the posterior recess is large. In 18% of cases the contralateral joint also opacifies. C1-2 arthrography appears to be an efficient and safe technique for the treatment of upper cervical pain due to C1-2 articular disorders. (orig.)

  5. Depolarization temperature and piezoelectric properties of Na1/2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1/2Bi1/2(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O3, was synthesized using the two-stage calcination method and depolarization temperatures and piezoelectric properties were also investigated. The XRD analysis showed that the ceramics system had a morphotropic ...

  6. Confidence and quality in managing CKD compared with other cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus: a linked study of questionnaire and routine primary care data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahir Mohammad A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much of chronic disease is managed in primary care and chronic kidney disease (CKD is a recent addition. We are conducting a cluster randomised study of quality improvement interventions in CKD (QICKD - Clinical Trials Registration: ISRCTN56023731. CKD registers have a lower than expected prevalence and an initial focus group study suggested variable levels of confidence in managing CKD. Our objective is to compare practitioner confidence and achievement of quality indicators for CKD with hypertension and diabetes. Method We validated a new questionnaire to test confidence. We compared confidence with achievement of pay-for-performance indicators (P4P and implementation of evidence-based guidance. We achieved a 74% (148/201 response rate. Results 87% (n = 128 of respondents are confident in managing hypertension (HT compared with 59% (n = 87 in managing HT in CKD (HT+CKD; and with 61% (n = 90 in HT, CKD and diabetes (CKD+HT+DM. 85.2% (P4P and 62.5% (National targets of patients with hypertension are at target; in patients with HT and CKD 65.1% and 53.3%; in patients with HT, CKD and DM 67.8% and 29.6%. Confidence in managing proteinuria in CKD is low (42%, n = 62. 87% of respondents knew BP treatment thresholds in CKD, but only 53% when proteinuria is factored in. Male GPs, younger ( 54 yrs clinicians are more confident than females and 35 to 54 year olds in managing CKD. 84% of patients with hypertension treated with angiotensin modulating drugs achieve achieved P4P targets compared to 67% of patients with CKD. Conclusions Practitioners are less likely to achieve management targets where their confidence is low.

  7. Contemporary Management of Coronary Artery Disease and Acute Coronary Syndrome in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chin-Chou; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have emerged as a worldwide public health problem. Due to the remarkably higher incidence and prevalence of this chronic disease in Taiwan than in other countries, CKD/ESRD has contributed to a significant health burden in Taiwan. Patients with CKD/ESRD have an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) compared to the normal population. Patients with ACS alone can present differently than patients with ACS and CKD/ESRD. Also, due to the lower prevalence of chest pain and ST-segment elevation, CKD/ESRD patients were more difficult to diagnose than other patients. Furthermore, whether advances in ACS management with medical therapy and an early invasive approach could improve patient outcomes with CKD/ESRD is not known. The use of antiplatelets such as aspirin and other antithrombotic agents might reduce the incidence of ACS or stroke in CKD patients. However, such use could also increase bleeding risk and even increase the likelihood of mortality, especially in dialysis patients. While recent clinical data suggest the potential benefit of aggressive management with coronary intervention for CAD and ACS in this category of patients, further clinical studies are still indicated for the proper medical strategy and revascularization therapy to improve the outcomes of CAD and ACS in CKD/ESRD patients, both in Taiwan and worldwide. PMID:27122697

  8. Phytoextraction of chloride from a cement kiln dust (CKD) contaminated landfill with Phragmites australis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSorley, Kaitlin; Rutter, Allison; Cumming, Robert; Zeeb, Barbara A

    2016-05-01

    Cement kiln dust (CKD) is a globally produced by-product from cement manufacturing that is stockpiled or landfilled. Elevated concentrations of chloride pose toxic threats to plants and aquatic communities, as the anion is highly mobile in water and can leach into surrounding water sources. Re-vegetation and in situ phytoextraction of chloride from a CKD landfill in Bath, ON, Canada, was investigated with the resident invasive species Phragmites australis (haplotype M). Existing stands of P. australis were transplanted from the perimeter of the site into the highest areas of contamination (5.9×10(3)μg/g). Accumulation in the shoots of P. australis was quantified over one growing season by collecting samples from the site on a bi-weekly basis and analyzing for chloride. Concentrations decreased significantly from early May (24±2.2×10(3)μg/g) until mid-June (15±2.5×10(3)μg/g), and then remained stable from June to August. Shoot chloride accumulation was not significantly affected by water level fluctuations at the site, however elevated potassium concentrations in the soil may have contributed to uptake. Based on shoot chloride accumulation and total biomass, it was determined that phytoextraction from the CKD landfill can remove 65±4kg/km(2) of chloride per season. Based on this extraction rate, removal of chloride present in the highly contaminated top 10cm of soil can be achieved in 3-9years. This is the first study to apply phytotechnologies at a CKD landfill, and to successfully demonstrate in situ phytoextraction of chloride. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Medication burden in CKD-5D: impact of dialysis modality and setting

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Kathrine; Nikam, Milind; Jayanti, Anuradha; Mitra, Sandip

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication adherence is thought to be around 50% in the general and dialysis population. Reducing the pill burden (PB) reduces regime complexity and can improve adherence. Increased adherence should lead to improvement in treatment outcomes and patient quality of life. There is currently little published data on PB in CKD-5D across dialysis modalities. Methods This is a retrospective, single renal network study. All in-centre HD (MHD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home HD (HHD) pat...

  10. COMPARISON OF BODY COMPOSITION ACCORDING TO AGE AND GENDER IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE (CKD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Rymarz

    2012-06-01

    In hemodialysis patients no significant differences was observed in females and males in all BCMI, LTI, FTI and BMI. BCMI, LTI were significantly lower in older pts whereas BMI did not differ significantly (for all p < 0,05. In both groups BCMI and LTI decline in patients over 60 years whereas only in hemodialysis patients they do not differ in females and males. Analysis of body composition in patients with CKD is worth to be studied in large group of patients.

  11. Phosphate attenuates the anti-proteinuric effect of very low-protein diet in CKD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iorio, Biagio R; Bellizzi, Vincenzo; Bellasi, Antonio; Torraca, Serena; D'Arrigo, Graziella; Tripepi, Giovanni; Zoccali, Carmine

    2013-03-01

    High phosphate levels attenuate nephroprotection through angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition in patients with proteinuric chronic kidney disease (CKD). Whether this phenomenon holds true for other nephroprotective interventions like very-low-protein diet (VLPD) is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that phosphate interferes with the anti-proteinuric response to VLPD in a non-randomized, sequential study in 99 proteinuric CKD patients who sequentially underwent low-protein diet (LPD; 0.6 g/kg) and VLPD (0.3 g/kg) supplemented with keto-analogues, each for periods longer than 1 year. Serum phosphate significantly reduced during VLPD (3.2 ± 0.6 mg/dL) when compared with LPD (3.7 ± 0.6 mg/dL, P diet periods. In linear mixed models including the diagnosis of renal disease, eGFR, 24-h urine sodium and urea and other potential confounders, there was a strong interaction between serum phosphate (P = 0.04) and phosphaturia (P < 0.001) with the anti-proteinuric response to VLPD. Accordingly, 24-h proteinuria reduced modestly in patients who maintained relatively higher serum phosphate levels or relatively higher phosphaturia to be maximal in those who achieved the lowest level of serum and urine phosphate. Phosphate is an important modifier of the anti-proteinuric response to VLPD. Reducing phosphate burden may decrease proteinuria and slow the progression of renal disease in CKD patients, an issue that remains to be tested in specific clinical trials.

  12. [The French Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort study: To better understand chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Bénédicte; Combe, Christian; Jacquelinet, Christian; Briançon, Serge; Fouque, Denis; Laville, Maurice; Frimat, Luc; Pascal, Christophe; Herpe, Yves-Édouard; Morel, Pascal; Deleuze, Jean-François; Schanstra, Joost P; Pisoni, Ron L; Robinson, Bruce M; Massy, Ziad A

    2016-04-01

    Preserving kidney function and improving the transition from chronic kidney disease to end stage is a research and healthcare challenge. The national Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort was established to identify the determinants, biomarkers and practice patterns associated with chronic kidney disease outcomes. The study will include more than 3000 adult patients with moderate to advanced chronic kidney disease from a representative sample of 40 nephrology clinics with respect to regions and legal status, public or private. Patients are recruited during a routine visit and followed for 5 years, before and after starting renal replacement therapy. Patient-level clinical, biological, and lifestyle data are collected annually, as well as provider-level data on clinical practices, coordinated with the International Chronic Kidney Disease Outcomes and Practice Pattern Study. Blood and urine samples are stored in a biobank. Major studied outcomes include survival, patient-reported outcomes, disease progression and hospitalizations. More than 13,000 eligible patients with chronic kidney disease were identified, 60% with stage 3 and 40% with stage 4. Their median age is 72 years [interquartile range, 62-80 years], 60% are men and 38% have diabetes. By the end of December 2015, 2885 patients were included. The CKD-REIN cohort will serve to improve our understanding of chronic kidney disease and provide evidence to improve patient survival and quality of life as well as health care system performances. Copyright © 2016 Association Société de néphrologie. All rights reserved.

  13. High-performance information search filters for CKD content in PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, and EMBASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iansavichus, Arthur V; Hildebrand, Ainslie M; Haynes, R Brian; Wilczynski, Nancy L; Levin, Adeera; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Tu, Karen; Nesrallah, Gihad E; Nash, Danielle M; Garg, Amit X

    2015-01-01

    Finding relevant articles in large bibliographic databases such as PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, and EMBASE to inform care and future research is challenging. Articles relevant to chronic kidney disease (CKD) are particularly difficult to find because they are often published under different terminology and are found across a wide range of journal types. We used computer automation within a diagnostic test assessment framework to develop and validate information search filters to identify CKD articles in large bibliographic databases. 22,992 full-text articles in PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, or EMBASE. 1,374,148 unique search filters. We established the reference standard of article relevance to CKD by manual review of all full-text articles using prespecified criteria to determine whether each article contained CKD content or not. We then assessed filter performance by calculating sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value for the retrieval of CKD articles. Filters with high sensitivity and specificity for the identification of CKD articles in the development phase (two-thirds of the sample) were then retested in the validation phase (remaining one-third of the sample). We developed and validated high-performance CKD search filters for each bibliographic database. Filters optimized for sensitivity reached at least 99% sensitivity, and filters optimized for specificity reached at least 97% specificity. The filters were complex; for example, one PubMed filter included more than 89 terms used in combination, including "chronic kidney disease," "renal insufficiency," and "renal fibrosis." In proof-of-concept searches, physicians found more articles relevant to the topic of CKD with the use of these filters. As knowledge of the pathogenesis of CKD grows and definitions change, these filters will need to be updated to incorporate new terminology used to index relevant articles. PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, and EMBASE can be filtered reliably for articles relevant to CKD. These

  14. A 3-marker index improves the identification of iron disorders in CKD anaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucile Mercadal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Iron disorders are common and complex in chronic kidney disease (CKD. We sought to determine whether a 3-marker index would improve the classification of iron disorders in CKD anaemia. METHODS: We studied the association between Hb level and iron indexes combining 2 or 3 of the following markers: serum ferritin (<40 ng/mL, transferrin saturation (TSAT<20% and total iron binding capacity (TIBC<50 µmol/L in 1011 outpatients with non-dialysis CKD participating in the Nephrotest study. All had glomerular filtration rates measured (mGFR by (51Cr-EDTA renal clearance; 199 also had hepcidin measures. RESULTS: The TSAT-TIBC-ferritin index explained Hb variation better than indexes combining TSAT-TIBC or ferritin-TSAT. It showed hypotransferrinaemia and non-inflammatory functional iron deficiency (ID to be more common than either absolute or inflammatory ID: 20%, 19%, 6%, and 2%, respectively. Hb was lower in all abnormal, compared with normal, iron profiles, and decreased more when mGFR was below 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2 (interaction p<0.0001. In patients with mGFR<30 mL/min/1.73 m(2, the Hb decreases associated with hypotransferrinaemia, non-inflammatory functional ID, and absolute ID were 0.83±0.16 g/dL, 0.51±0.18 and 0.89±0.29, respectively. Compared with normal iron profiles, hepcidin was severely depressed in absolute ID but higher in hypotransferrinaemia. CONCLUSIONS: The combined TSAT-TIBC-ferritin index identifies hypotransferrinaemia and non-inflammatory functional ID as the major mechanisms of iron disorders in CKD anaemia. Both disorders were associated with a greater decrease in Hb when mGFR was <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2. Taking these iron profiles into account may be useful in stratifying patients in clinical trials of CKD anaemia and might improve the management of iron therapy.

  15. 1,2-bridged quadricyclanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, H.; Cheng-Tai Peng

    1982-01-01

    The readily available benzodihydropentalene 6 and dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate react to give norbornadiene diester 8, with a three-carbon bridge from C 1 to C 2 . Irradiation of 8 gives the corresponding C 1 -C 2 bridged quadricyclane diester 9, a new ring system. Diester 9 is quite stable, reverting to 8 with a tsub(1/2) of 30 min at 170 0 C. The corresponding diacid 11, also prepared, reverts to its norbornadiene precursor at a considerably lower temperature, possibly as a consequence of acid catalysis. (author)

  16. Estimated Visceral Adipose Tissue, but Not Body Mass Index, Is Associated with Reductions in Glomerular Filtration Rate Based on Cystatin C in the Early Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Karina Teixeira da Cunha França

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Information on the association between obesity and initial phases of chronic kidney disease (CKD is still limited, principally those regarding the influence of visceral adipose tissue. We investigated whether the visceral adipose tissue is more associated with reductions in glomerular filtration rate (GFR than total and abdominal obesity in hypertensive individuals with stage 1-2 CKD. A cross-sectional study was implemented which involved 241 hypertensive patients undergoing treatment at a primary health care facility. GFR was estimated using equations based on creatinine and cystatin C levels. Explanatory variables included body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, and estimated visceral adipose tissue (eVAT. The mean age was 59.6±9.2 years old and 75.9% were female. According to BMI, 28.2% of subjects were obese. Prevalence of increased WC and eVAT was 63.9% and 58.5%, respectively. Results from the assessment of GFR by BMI, WC, and eVAT categories showed that only women with increased eVAT (≥150 cm2 had a lower mean GFR by Larsson (P=0.016, Levey 2 (P=0.005, and Levey 3 (P=0.008 equations. The same result was not observed when the MDRD equation was employed. No association was found between BMI, WC, eVAT, and GFR using only serum creatinine. In the early stages of CKD, increased eVAT in hypertensive women was associated with decreased GFR based on cystatin C.

  17. eGFRs from Asian-modified CKD-EPI and Chinese-modified CKD-EPI equations were associated better with hypertensive target organ damage in the community-dwelling elderly Chinese: the Northern Shanghai Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji H

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hongwei Ji,1,* Han Zhang,1,* Jing Xiong,1 Shikai Yu,1 Chen Chi,1 Bin Bai,1 Jue Li,2 Jacques Blacher,3 Yi Zhang,1,* Yawei Xu1,* 1Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, 2Department of Prevention, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Paris Descartes University, AP-HP, Diagnosis and Therapeutic Center, Hôtel-Dieu, Paris, France *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: With increasing age, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR decline is a frequent manifestation and is strongly associated with other preclinical target organ damage (TOD. In literature, many equations exist in assessing patients’ eGFR. However, these equations were mainly derived and validated in the population from Western countries, which equation should be used for risk stratification in the Chinese population remains unclear, as well as their comparison. Considering that TOD is a good marker for risk stratification in the elderly, in this analysis, we aimed to investigate whether the recent eGFR equations derived from Asian and Chinese are better associated with preclinical TOD than the other equations in elderly Chinese.Methods: A total of 1,599 community-dwelling elderly participants (age >65 years in northern Shanghai were prospectively recruited from June 2014 to August 2015. Conventional cardiovascular risk factors were assessed, and hypertensive TOD including left ventricular mass index (LVMI, carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT, ankle–brachial index (ABI and urine albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR was evaluated for each participant. Participant’s eGFR was calculated from the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD, Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI, Chinese-abbreviated MDRD (c-aMDRD, Asian-modified CKD-EPI (aCKD-EPI equation and Chinese-modified CKD-EPI (cCKD-EPI equation.Results: In multivariate

  18. Effect of Behavior Modification on Outcome in Early- to Moderate-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease: A Cluster-Randomized Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiro Yamagata

    Full Text Available Owing to recent changes in our understanding of the underlying cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD, the importance of lifestyle modification for preventing the progression of kidney dysfunction and complications has become obvious. In addition, effective cooperation between general physicians (GPs and nephrologists is essential to ensure a better care system for CKD treatment. In this cluster-randomized study, we studied the effect of behavior modification on the outcome of early- to moderate-stage CKD.Stratified open cluster-randomized trial.A total of 489 GPs belonging to 49 local medical associations (clusters in Japan.A total of 2,379 patients (1,195 in group A (standard intervention and 1,184 in group B (advanced intervention aged between 40 and 74 years, who had CKD and were under consultation with GPs.All patients were managed in accordance with the current CKD guidelines. The group B clusters received three additional interventions: patients received both educational intervention for lifestyle modification and a CKD status letter, attempting to prevent their withdrawal from treatment, and the group B GPs received data sheets to facilitate reducing the gap between target and practice.The primary outcome measures were 1 the non-adherence rate of accepting continuous medical follow-up of the patients, 2 the collaboration rate between GPs and nephrologists, and 3 the progression of CKD.The rate of discontinuous clinical visits was significantly lower in group B (16.2% in group A vs. 11.5% in group B, p = 0.01. Significantly higher referral and co-treatment rates were observed in group B (p<0.01. The average eGFR deterioration rate tended to be lower in group B (group A: 2.6±5.8 ml/min/1.73 m2/year, group B: 2.4±5.1 ml/min/1.73 m2/year, p = 0.07. A significant difference in eGFR deterioration rate was observed in subjects with Stage 3 CKD (group A: 2.4±5.9 ml/min/1.73 m2/year, group B: 1.9±4.4 ml/min/1.73 m2/year, p = 0.03.Our care

  19. Safety and Efficacy of Incretin-Based Therapies in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and CKD: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howse, Patricia M; Chibrikova, Lyudmila N; Twells, Laurie K; Barrett, Brendan J; Gamble, John-Michael

    2016-11-01

    The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antidiabetic therapies for patients with type 2 diabetes are often altered in the context of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Systematic review and meta-analysis. Patients with type 2 diabetes and CKD. 2 reviewers independently screened studies identified through bibliographic databases (Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts), clinical trial registries, and references from pertinent articles and clinical practice guidelines. Eligible studies included randomized controlled trials evaluating incretin-based therapy in adults with type 2 diabetes and estimated glomerular filtration rates 1.73m 2 . Incretin-based therapies (dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists) compared to placebo or active antidiabetic therapies. Changes in glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ), hypoglycemia, mortality, change in fasting plasma glucose, cardiovascular events, and end-stage renal disease. Of 1,619 nonduplicate records screened, 13 studies were included. Compared to placebo, incretin-based therapies significantly reduced HbA 1c levels (n = 9; weighted mean difference, -0.64; 95% CI, -0.79 to -0.48; I 2  = 43%); however, compared with active comparators, they did not (n = 4; weighted mean difference, -0.07; 95% CI, -0.25 to 0.12; I 2  = 38%). Incretin-based therapies significantly increased the risk for hypoglycemia compared to placebo (n = 7; relative risk [RR], 1.38; 95% CI, 1.01-1.89; I 2  = 0%) but no effect was observed versus active comparators (n = 4; RR, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.03-1.94; I 2  = 52%). Limited evidence exists for all-cause mortality (placebo: n = 7 [RR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.64-2.29; I 2  = 0%]; active comparators: n = 3 [RR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.32-1.54; I 2  = 0%]). Variation among interventions, small number of studies, heterogeneity between studies, and high risk for attrition bias in 7 of the selected studies. In patients with moderate or severe CKD

  20. Impact of surgical parathyroidectomy on chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD - A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugurel Apetrii

    Full Text Available For more than 6 decades, many patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD have undergone surgical parathyroidectomy (sPTX for severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT mainly based historical clinical practice patterns, but not on evidence of outcome.We aimed in this meta-analysis to evaluate the benefits and harms of sPTX in patients with SHPT. We searched MEDLINE (inception to October 2016, EMBASE and Cochrane Library (through Issue 10 of 12, October 2016 and website clinicaltrials.gov (October 2016 without language restriction. Eligible studies evaluated patients reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR, below 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 (CKD 3-5 stages with hyperparathyroidism who underwent sPTX. Reviewers working independently and in duplicate extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The final analysis included 15 cohort studies, comprising 24,048 participants. Compared with standard treatment, sPTX significantly decreased all-cause mortality (RR 0.74 [95% CI, 0.66 to 0.83] in End Stage Kidney Disease (ESKD patients with biochemical and / or clinical evidence of SHPT. sPTX was also associated with decreased cardiovascular mortality (RR 0.59 [95% CI, 0.46 to 0.76] in 6 observational studies that included almost 10,000 patients. The available evidence, mostly observational, is at moderate risk of bias, and limited by indirect comparisons and inconsistency in reporting for some outcomes (eg. short term adverse events, including documented voice change or episodes of severe hypocalcaemia needing admission or long-term adverse events, including undetectable PTH levels, risk of fractures etc.. Taken together, the results of this meta-analysis would suggest a clinically significant beneficial effect of sPTX on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in CKD patients with SHPT. However, given the observational nature of the included studies, the case for a properly conducted, independent randomised controlled trial comparing surgery with medical

  1. What is the impact of chronic kidney disease stage and cardiovascular disease on the annual cost of hospital care in moderate-to-severe kidney disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Seamus; Schlackow, Iryna; Lozano-Kühne, Jingky

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reliable estimates of the impacts of chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage, with and without cardiovascular disease, on hospital costs are needed to inform health policy. METHODS: The Study of Heart and Renal Protection (SHARP) randomized trial prospectively collected information on kidney...... disease progression, serious adverse events and hospital care use in a cohort of patients with moderate-to-severe CKD. In a secondary analysis of SHARP data, the impact of participants' CKD stage, non-fatal cardiovascular events and deaths on annual hospital costs (i.e. all hospital admissions, routine...... dialysis treatments and recorded outpatient/day-case attendances in United Kingdom 2011 prices) were estimated using linear regression. RESULTS: 7,246 SHARP patients (2,498 on dialysis at baseline) from Europe, North America, and Australasia contributed 28,261 years of data. CKD patients without diabetes...

  2. Self-rated appetite as a predictor of mortality in patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama-Axelsson, Thiane; Lindholm, Bengt; Bárány, Peter; Heimbürger, Olof; Stenvinkel, Peter; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the level of anorexia and its correlation with mortality in chronic kidney disease stage 5 patients not yet on dialysis (CKD5-ND) and in those with stage 5 chronic kidney disease undergoing dialysis (CKD5-D). In an observational study, self-rated appetite (as part of a subjective global assessment of nutritional status), along with anthropometrics and biochemical markers of nutritional status, was analyzed in relation to survival. In a subgroup of patients, appetite change after start of dialysis was studied prospectively. Two hundred eighty CKD5-ND (40% female; age 54 ± 12 years; glomerular filtration rate 7 ± 2 mL/minute) and 243 CKD5-D patients (116 hemodialysis and 127 peritoneal dialysis [PD]; 44% female; age 54 ± 12 years; dialysis vintage time 12 ± 2 months) who had been on dialysis for about 1 year were studied. CKD5-ND patients with poor appetite (50%) had a higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease, lower body weight and serum creatinine level, and higher C-reactive protein. CKD5-D patients with poor appetite (33%) had impaired subjective global assessment of nutritional status and lower body weight, fat body mass, handgrip strength, hemoglobin, and serum albumin level. In a Kaplan-Meier analysis, appetite was not associated with survival difference, whereas in the Cox proportional hazards model with competing risk analysis, poor appetite increased mortality risk in PD patients but not in hemodialysis and CKD5-ND patients. In CKD5-ND patients, self-rated appetite was not an independent predictor of 48-months survival, whereas there was a significant increase in mortality risk in PD patients with poor appetite. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of cement kiln dust (CKD) for stabilization/solidification (S/S) of arsenic contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Wazne, Mahmoud; Yoon, In-Ho; Grubb, Dennis G

    2008-11-30

    A stabilization/solidification (S/S) process for arsenic (As) contaminated soils was evaluated using cement kiln dust (CKD). Laboratory-prepared slurries, made of either kaolinite or montmorillonite, and field soils spiked with either As(3+) or As(5+) were prepared and treated with CKD ranging from 10 to 25 wt%. Sodium arsenite and sodium arsenate at 0.1 wt% were used to simulate arsenite (As(3+)) and arsenate (As(5+)) source contamination in soils, respectively. The effectiveness of treatment was evaluated at curing periods of 1- and 7-days based on the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). As-CKD and As-clay-CKD slurries were also spiked at 10 wt% to evaluate As immobilization mechanism using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analyses. Overall, the TCLP results showed that only the As(5+) concentrations in kaolinite amended with 25 wt% CKD after 1 day of curing were less than the TCLP regulatory limit of 5mg/L. Moreover, at 7 days of curing, all As(3+) and As(5+) concentrations obtained from kaolinite soils were less than the TCLP criteria. However, none of the CKD-amended montmorillonite samples satisfied the TCLP-As criteria at 7 days. Only field soil samples amended with 20 wt% CKD complied with the TCLP criteria within 1 day of curing, where the source contamination was As(5+). XRPD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) results showed that Ca-As-O and NaCaAsO(4).7.5H(2)O were the primary phases responsible for As(3+) and As(5+) immobilization in the soils, respectively.

  4. Assessment of cement kiln dust (CKD) for stabilization/solidification (S/S) of arsenic contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Wazne, Mahmoud; Yoon, In-Ho; Grubb, Dennis G.

    2008-01-01

    A stabilization/solidification (S/S) process for arsenic (As) contaminated soils was evaluated using cement kiln dust (CKD). Laboratory-prepared slurries, made of either kaolinite or montmorillonite, and field soils spiked with either As 3+ or As 5+ were prepared and treated with CKD ranging from 10 to 25 wt%. Sodium arsenite and sodium arsenate at 0.1 wt% were used to simulate arsenite (As 3+ ) and arsenate (As 5+ ) source contamination in soils, respectively. The effectiveness of treatment was evaluated at curing periods of 1- and 7-days based on the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). As-CKD and As-clay-CKD slurries were also spiked at 10 wt% to evaluate As immobilization mechanism using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analyses. Overall, the TCLP results showed that only the As 5+ concentrations in kaolinite amended with 25 wt% CKD after 1 day of curing were less than the TCLP regulatory limit of 5 mg/L. Moreover, at 7 days of curing, all As 3+ and As 5+ concentrations obtained from kaolinite soils were less than the TCLP criteria. However, none of the CKD-amended montmorillonite samples satisfied the TCLP-As criteria at 7 days. Only field soil samples amended with 20 wt% CKD complied with the TCLP criteria within 1 day of curing, where the source contamination was As 5+ . XRPD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) results showed that Ca-As-O and NaCaAsO 4 .7.5H 2 O were the primary phases responsible for As 3+ and As 5+ immobilization in the soils, respectively

  5. Effectiveness of Quality Improvement Strategies for the Management of CKD: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Samuel A; Bell, Chaim M; Chertow, Glenn M; Shah, Prakesh S; Shojania, Kaveh; Wald, Ron; Harel, Ziv

    2017-10-06

    Quality improvement interventions have enhanced care for other chronic illnesses, but their effectiveness for patients with CKD is unknown. We sought to determine the effects of quality improvement strategies on clinical outcomes in adult patients with nondialysis-requiring CKD. We conducted a systematic review of randomized trials, searching Medline and the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organization of Care database from January of 2003 to April of 2015. Eligible studies evaluated one or more of 11 prespecified quality improvement strategies, and prespecified study outcomes included at least one process of care measure, surrogate outcome, or hard clinical outcome. We used a random effects model to estimate the pooled risk ratio (RR; dichotomous data) or the mean difference (continuous data). We reviewed 15 patient-level randomized trials ( n =3298 patients), and six cluster-randomized trials ( n =30,042 patients). Quality improvement strategies reduced dialysis incidence (seven trials; RR, 0.85; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.74 to 0.97) and LDL cholesterol concentrations (four trials; mean difference, -17.6 mg/dl; 95% CI, -28.7 to -6.5), and increased the likelihood that patients received renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors (nine trials; RR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.27). We did not observe statistically significant effects on mortality, cardiovascular events, eGFR, glycated hemoglobin, and systolic or diastolic BP. Quality improvement interventions yielded significant beneficial effects on three elements of CKD care. Estimates of the effectiveness of quality improvement strategies were limited by study number and adherence to quality improvement principles. This article contains a podcast at https://www.asn-online.org/media/podcast/CJASN/2017_09_06_CJASNPodcast_17_10.mp3. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  6. [Etiological analysis of 264 cases with chronic kidney disease stage 2 to 5 in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Qianfan; Shen, Qian; Xu, Hong; Sun, Li; Tang, Xiaoshan; Fang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Haimei; Zhai, Yihui; Bi, Yunli; Wang, Xiang; Chen, Hong

    2015-09-01

    To study and summarize the etiology of children patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 2 to 5 seen in Children's Hospital of Fudan University from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2013. By complying with the NKF-K/DOQI guidelines, we collected data of 264 cases of children patients with CKD stage 2-5 from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2013 in the medical record system of Children's Hospital of Fudan University. And we retrospectively analyzed their age and CKD stage at first diagnosis, primary diseases, complications, etc. In the collected 264 cases, 52 cases (19.7%) were diagnosed at stage 2, 67 (25.4%) at stage 3, 52 (19.7%) at stage 4 and 93 (35.2%) at stage 5. For disease causes, 116 cases (43.9%) had congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT), 61 cases (23.1%) had glomerular disease, 15 (5.7%) had hereditary kidney disease, 14 (5.3%) had other diseases and in 58 cases (22.0%) the causes of disease were unknown. In the group with age between 0 and 3.0 and 3.1 and 6.0 years, 57.1% (24 cases) and 60.0% (30 cases) had primary disease with CAKUT. In the group with age older than 10 years, 49.2% (30 cases) had primary disease with glomerular disease and 32.0% (32 cases) with unknown causes. The major cause of CKD stage 2-5 in children in our hospital during the last ten years was CAKUT (43.9%), followed by glomerular disease (23.1%). The primary diseases of CKD were significantly different between the 2 age groups. CAKUT was more common in infants and preschool children while for adolescents, glomerular disease was the major cause.

  7. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index in chronic kidney disease stage 2-5. Reproducibility and relationship with pulse wave parameters and kidney function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesby, Lene; Thijs, Lutgarde; Elung-Jensen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Arterial stiffness contributes to the increased cardiovascular risk in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Reproducible and easily obtainable indices of arterial stiffness are needed in order to monitor therapeutic strategies. The ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) has been propos...... as such a marker. The present study investigated the day-to-day reproducibility of AASI in CKD stage 2-5 and its relationship with other markers of arterial stiffness as well as with kidney function....

  8. KDIGO 2012 Clinical Practice Guideline CKD classification rules out creatinine clearance 24 hour urine collection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ognibene, A; Grandi, G; Lorubbio, M; Rapi, S; Salvadori, B; Terreni, A; Veroni, F

    2016-01-01

    The recent guideline for the evaluation and management of Chronic Kidney Disease recommends assessing GFR employing equations based on serum creatinine; despite this, creatinine clearance 24-hour urine collection is used routinely in many settings. In this study we compared the classification assessed from CrCl (creatinine clearance 24h urine collection) and e-GFR calculated with CKD-EPI or MDRD formulas. In this retrospective study we analyze consecutive laboratory data: creatinine clearance 24h urine collection, serum creatinine and demographic data such as sex and age from 15,777 patients >18 years of age collected from 2011 to 2013 in our laboratory at Careggi Hospital. The results were then compared to the estimated GFR calculated with the equations according to the recent treatment guidelines. Consecutive and retrospective laboratory data (creatinine clearance 24h urine collection, serum creatinine and, demographic data such as sex and age) from 15,777 patients >18 years of age seen at Careggi Hospital were collected. Comparison between e-GFR calculated with CKD-EPI or MDRD formulas and GFR according CrCl determinations and bias [95% CI] were 11.34 [-47,4/70.1] and 11.4 [-50.2/73] respectively. The concordance for 18/65 years aged group when compared with e-GFR classification between MDRD vs CKDEPI, MDRD vs CrCl and CKD-EPI vs CrCl were 0.78, 0.34, and 0.41 respectively, while in the 65/110years aged group the concordance Kappas were 0.84, 0.38, and 0.36 respectively. The use of CrCl provides a different classification than the estimation of GFR using a prediction equation. The CrCl is unreliable when it is necessary to identify CKD subjects with decrease of GFR of 5ml/min/1.73m(2)/year. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Relative risks of Chronic Kidney Disease for mortality and End Stage Renal Disease across races is similar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chi-Pang; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Coresh, Josef; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Islam, Muhammad; Katz, Ronit; McClellan, William; Peralta, Carmen A; Wang, HaiYan; de Zeeuw, Dick; Astor, Brad C; Gansevoort, Ron T; Levey, Andrew S; Levin, Adeera

    2014-01-01

    Some suggest race-specific cutpoints for kidney measures to define and stage chronic kidney disease (CKD), but evidence for race-specific clinical impact is limited. To address this issue, we compared hazard ratios of estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) and albuminuria across races using meta-regression in 1.1 million adults (75% Asians, 21% whites, and 4% blacks) from 45 cohorts. Results came mainly from 25 general population cohorts comprising 0.9 million individuals. The associations of lower eGFR and higher albuminuria with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were largely similar across races. For example, in Asians, whites, and blacks, the adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for eGFR 45–59 vs. 90–104 ml/min/1.73m2 were 1.3 (1.2–1.3), 1.1 (1.0–1.2) and 1.3 (1.1–1.7) for all-cause mortality, 1.6 (1.5–1.8), 1.4 (1.2–1.7), and 1.4 (0.7–2.9) for cardiovascular mortality, and 27.6 (11.1–68.7), 11.2 (6.0–20.9), and 4.1 (2.2–7.5) for ESRD, respectively. The corresponding hazard ratios for urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio 30–299 mg/g or dipstick 1-positive vs. an albumin-to-creatinine ratio under 10 or dipstick negative were 1.6 (1.4–1.8), 1.7 (1.5–1.9) and 1.8 (1.7–2.1) for all-cause mortality, 1.7 (1.4–2.0), 1.8 (1.5–2.1), and 2.8 (2.2–3.6) for cardiovascular mortality, and 7.4 (2.0–27.6), 4.0 (2.8–5.9), and 5.6 (3.4–9.2) for ESRD, respectively. Thus, the relative mortality or ESRD risks of lower eGFR and higher albuminuria were largely similar among three major races, supporting similar clinical approach to CKD definition and staging, across races. PMID:24522492

  10. Zonulin, inflammation and iron status in patients with early stages of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukaszyk, Ewelina; Lukaszyk, Mateusz; Koc-Zorawska, Ewa; Bodzenta-Lukaszyk, Anna; Malyszko, Jolanta

    2018-01-01

    Zonulin is the only known regulator of intestinal permeability. It is also considered as a potential inflammatory marker in several conditions such as diabetes and inflammatory bowel syndrome. The aim of the study was to investigate zonulin levels in patients with early stages of CKD and its possible correlation with inflammation, anemia and iron status parameters. Eighty-eight patients with early stages of CKD and 23 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. Zonulin, hepcidin-25, soluble transferrin receptor, interleukin-6 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were measured using commercially available assays. Zonulin was significantly lower among patients with CKD in comparison with healthy volunteers. There were no statistically significant differences in zonulin concentration between patients with and without inflammation. Zonulin was significantly correlated with hepcidin only in patients with inflammation. Zonulin was neither related to iron nor related to ferritin. Zonulin cannot be considered as an inflammatory marker in CKD. It does not play a role in the disturbances of iron metabolism in CKD. Its physiological role remains to be elucidated.

  11. Perceived barriers and facilitators of using dietary modification for CKD prevention among African Americans of low socioeconomic status: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Amber E; Boulware, L Ebony; Anderson, Cheryl A M; Chit-ua-aree, Tatpong; Kahan, Kimberly; Boyér, LaPricia Lewis; Liu, Yang; Crews, Deidra C

    2014-12-06

    Factors influencing the use of dietary interventions for modification of CKD risk among African Americans have not been well-explored. We assessed perceived barriers and facilitators of CKD prevention through dietary modifications among African Americans with low socioeconomic status (SES) and at high risk for CKD. We conducted a qualitative study involving three 90 minute focus groups of low SES (limited education, unemployed, uninsured, or incomehabits. They identified vouchers for healthy foods, family-based interventions, nutritional counseling and group gatherings for persons interested in making dietary changes as acceptable facilitators of dietary CKD prevention efforts. Low SES African Americans at high risk for CKD had limited perception of their risk but they identified multiple barriers and potential facilitators of CKD prevention via dietary modifications which can inform future studies and public health interventions.

  12. FIND-CKD: a randomized trial of intravenous ferric carboxymaltose versus oral iron in patients with chronic kidney disease and iron deficiency anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdougall, Iain C; Bock, Andreas H; Carrera, Fernando; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gaillard, Carlo; Van Wyck, David; Roubert, Bernard; Nolen, Jacqueline G; Roger, Simon D

    2014-11-01

    The optimal iron therapy regimen in patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD) is unknown. Ferinject® assessment in patients with Iron deficiency anaemia and Non-Dialysis-dependent Chronic Kidney Disease (FIND-CKD) was a 56-week, open-label, multicentre, prospective and randomized study of 626 patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD, anaemia and iron deficiency not receiving erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). Patients were randomized (1:1:2) to intravenous (IV) ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), targeting a higher (400-600 µg/L) or lower (100-200 µg/L) ferritin or oral iron therapy. The primary end point was time to initiation of other anaemia management (ESA, other iron therapy or blood transfusion) or haemoglobin (Hb) trigger of two consecutive values <10 g/dL during Weeks 8-52. The primary end point occurred in 36 patients (23.5%), 49 patients (32.2%) and 98 patients (31.8%) in the high-ferritin FCM, low-ferritin FCM and oral iron groups, respectively [hazard ratio (HR): 0.65; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.44-0.95; P = 0.026 for high-ferritin FCM versus oral iron]. The increase in Hb was greater with high-ferritin FCM versus oral iron (P = 0.014) and a greater proportion of patients achieved an Hb increase ≥1 g/dL with high-ferritin FCM versus oral iron (HR: 2.04; 95% CI: 1.52-2.72; P < 0.001). Rates of adverse events and serious adverse events were similar in all groups. Compared with oral iron, IV FCM targeting a ferritin of 400-600 µg/L quickly reached and maintained Hb level, and delayed and/or reduced the need for other anaemia management including ESAs. Within the limitations of this trial, no renal toxicity was observed, with no difference in cardiovascular or infectious events. NCT00994318. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  13. Estimating glomerular filtration rate using the new CKD-EPI equation and other equations in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orskov, Bjarne; Borresen, Malene L; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    (CKD-EPI) equation, the Cockcroft-Gault equation adjusted for body surface area and the MDRD equation with cystatin C. Performance was evaluated by mean bias, precision and accuracy. RESULTS: The MDRD equation with cystatin C had 97% of GFR estimates within 30% of measured GFR (accuracy). Both the CKD-EPI....... The CKD-EPI or the Cockcroft-Gault equations showed better performance compared to the 4-variable MDRD equation....

  14. Awareness and knowledge among internal medicine house-staff for dose adjustment of commonly used medications in patients with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surana, Sikander; Kumar, Neeru; Vasudeva, Amita; Shaikh, Gulvahid; Jhaveri, Kenar D; Shah, Hitesh; Malieckal, Deepa; Fogel, Joshua; Sidhu, Gurwinder; Rubinstein, Sofia

    2017-01-17

    Drug dosing errors result in adverse patient outcomes and are more common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). As internists treat the majority of patients with CKD, we study if Internal Medicine house-staff have awareness and knowledge about the correct dosage of commonly used medications for those with CKD. A cross-sectional survey was performed and included 341 participants. The outcomes were the awareness of whether a medication needs dose adjustment in patients with CKD and whether there was knowledge for the level of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) a medication needs to be adjusted. The overall pattern for all post-graduate year (PGY) groups in all medication classes was a lack of awareness and knowledge. For awareness, there were statistically significant increased mean differences for PGY2 and PGY3 as compared to PGY1 for allergy, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and rheumatologic medication classes but not for analgesic, cardiovascular, and neuropsychotropic medication classes. For knowledge, there were statistically significant increased mean differences for PGY2 and PGY3 as compared to PGY1 for allergy, cardiovascular, endocrine, and gastrointestinal, medication classes but not for analgesic, neuropsychotropic, and rheumatologic medication classes. Internal Medicine house-staff across all levels of training demonstrated poor awareness and knowledge for many medication classes in CKD patients. Internal Medicine house-staff should receive more nephrology exposure and formal didactic educational training during residency to better manage complex treatment regimens and prevent medication dosing errors.

  15. End Stage and Chronic Kidney Disease: Associations with Renal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, Paul

    2012-01-01

    There is a well known association between end stage renal disease and the development of kidney cancer in the native kidney of patients requiring renal replacement therapy. There is now emerging evidence that lesser degrees of renal insufficiency (chronic kidney disease, CKD) are also associated with an increased likelihood of cancer in general and kidney cancer in particular. Nephropathological changes are commonly observed in the non-tumor bearing portions of kidney resected at the time of partial and radical nephrectomy (RN). In addition, patients with renal cancer are more likely to have CKD at the time of diagnosis and treatment than the general population. The exact mechanism by which renal insufficiency transforms normal kidney cells into tumor cells is not known. Possible mechanisms include uremic immune inhibition or increased exposure to circulating toxins not adequately cleared by the kidneys. Surgeons managing kidney tumors must have an increased awareness of their patient’s renal functional status as they plan their resection. Kidney sparing approaches, including partial nephrectomy (PN) or active surveillance in older and morbidly ill patients, can prevent CKD or delay the further decline in renal function which is well documented with RN. Despite emerging evidence that PN provides equivalent local tumor control to RN while at the same time preventing CKD, this operation remains under utilized in the United States and abroad. Increased awareness of the bi directional relationship between kidney function and kidney cancer is essential in the contemporary management of kidney cancer.

  16. Circulating FGF21 levels are progressively increased from the early to end stages of chronic kidney diseases and are associated with renal function in Chinese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuofeng Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 is a hepatic hormone involved in the regulation of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. This study aims to test the hypothesis that elevated FGF21 concentrations are associated with the change of renal function and the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH in the different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD progression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 240 subjects including 200 CKD patients (146 outpatients and 54 long-term hemodialytic patients and 40 healthy control subjects were recruited. All CKD subjects underwent echocardiograms to assess left ventricular mass index. Plasma FGF21 levels and other clinical and biochemical parameters in all subjects were obtained based on standard clinical examination methods. Plasma FGF21 levels were significantly increased with the development of CKD from early- and end-stage (P<0.001 for trend, and significantly higher in CKD subjects than those in healthy subjects (P<0.001. Plasma FGF21 levels in CKD patients with LVH were higher than those in patients without LVH (P = 0.001. Furthermore, plasma FGF21 level correlated positively with creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, β2 microglobulin, systolic pressure, adiponectin, phosphate, proteinuria, CRP and triglyceride, but negatively with creatinine clearance rate (CCR, estimated glomerular filtrate rate (eGFR, HDL-c, LDL-c, albumin and LVH after adjusting for BMI, gender, age and the presence of diabetes mellitus. Multiple stepwise regression analyses indicated that FGF21 was independently associated with BUN, Phosphate, LVMI and β2 microglobulin (all P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Plasma FGF21 levels are significantly increased with the development of early- to end-stage CKD and are independently associated with renal function and adverse lipid profiles in Chinese population. Understanding whether increased FGF21 is associated with myocardial hypertrophy in CKD requires further study.

  17. Association of serum adiponectin concentration with aortic arterial stiffness in chronic kidney disease: from the KNOW-CKD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Seong; Bae, Eun Hui; Ma, Seong Kwon; Park, Sue K; Lee, Ju Yeon; Chung, Wookyung; Lee, Kyubeck; Kim, Yeong Hoon; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Ahn, Curie; Kim, Soo Wan

    2017-08-01

    High serum adiponectin levels predict all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the relationship between serum adiponectin concentration and arterial stiffness in CKD is not well established. The aim of this study was to assess this relationship by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV) in CKD patients. Serum adiponectin concentration was measured in 716 CKD patients in the prospective KoreaN cohort study for Outcome in patients With Chronic Kidney Disease. The study group consisted of 415 men and 301 women; mean age was 53.1 years, and baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 51 ± 29 ml/min per 1.73 m 2 . Heart to femoral PWV (hfPWV) and mean brachial to ankle PWV (baPWV) served as indicators of aortic artery stiffness and arterial stiffness, respectively. Increasing quartiles of serum adiponectin levels were associated with women, lower eGFRs and body mass indices, and higher urinary albumin-creatinine ratios. Serum adiponectin concentration also correlated with hfPWV and mean baPWV, even after adjusting for age and sex. It independently associated with hfPWV (B 0.028; 95 % confidence interval, 0.004-0.051; P = 0.020) but not mean baPWV in a multivariable linear regression analysis. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, it correlated significantly with the highest quartile of hfPWVs but not mean baPWVs. The independent and significant correlation of serum adiponectin concentration with hfPWV in CKD patients implicates adiponectin in CKD-associated aortic stiffness.

  18. Muscle atrophy in patients wirh ckd results from fgf23/klotho-mediated supression of insulin/igf-i signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsuke Kido

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscle atrophy is a significant consequence of chronic kidney disease (CKD that increases a patient’s risk of mortality and decrease their quality of life. In CKD patients, the circulation levels of FGF23 are significantly increased, but the exact pathological significance of the increase and relationship between FGF23 and muscle atrophy are not clear. Because of Klohto, acts as a co-receptor of FGF23 is detectable in limited tissues including in kidney and brain, but not in skeletal muscles. In contrast, recently reports indicated that the extracellular domain of klohto is cleavage for some reason on the cell surface and detected in the blood in animals. In this study, we attempted to identify the causative factors responsible for the shedding of Klotho, and whether both FGF23 and Klohto induced muscle atrophy via reduction of insulin/IGF-I signaling. We first investigated by treating kidney cells with various factors related in pathological factors in CKD. As a result, we found that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs, an accumulated in patients with CKD and diabetes mellitus, increases shedding of Klohto in kidney cells. It is common knowledge that insulin/IGF-I signaling is necessary for normal skeletal growth. As a result, we showed that both FGF23 and Klohto inhibited differentiation of cultured skeletal muscle cells through down-regulation of insulin/IGF-I signaling. These observations suggested a divergent role of FGF23 and soluble klohto in the regulation of skeletal muscle differentiation and thereby muscle atrophy under pathological conditioned in CKD patients. Our results further imply that FGF23/Klohto may serve a new therapeutic target for CKD-induced muscle atrophy.

  19. Lactulose efficacy in reduction of nitrogen products, blood potassium and fluid overload in patients with end-stage renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Aleagha

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a major public health problem that often goes unrecognized until its late-stage. Patients with chronic kidney disease face uremic toxins and hyperkalemia. Also, fluid overload in CKD patients is associated with rapid decline in kidney function. Lactulose is a hyperosmotic agent and as a prebiotic, it plays an important role in regulating serum urea and potassium levels and has some effects on fluid overload. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lactulose on serum levels of biochemical products in patients with CKD. Materials and Methods: In this interventional study, 17 patients with end stage of CKD ( 76.47 % men; mean age 65.88 ± 13.4 were evaluated.All patients received lactulose, 10 ml, 3 times per day for 3 months. Blood samples from all participants were collected before and at the end of intervention to examine changes in biochemical parameters, including potassium, urea, creatinine and uric acid. Results: Lactulose significantly decreased urea levels (p=0.001, blood potassium (0.001 and fluid overload(considering the patient’s weight p=0.001 in patients with end-stage renal failure. The decrease in serum creatinine and uric acid were not significant. Conclusion: Lactulose administration in CKD patients could decrease levels of various deleterious elements, especially urea and blood potassium and its daily use can be recommended in these patients.

  20. Vitamin D and Stage 5 Chronic Kidney Disease: A New Paradigm?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James Goya; Joffe, Preben; Marckmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D receptor agonists (VDRA) are currently recommended for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in stage 5 CKD. They are considered to be contraindicated in the presence of low or normal (for a dialysis patient) levels of PTH due to the risk of developing adynamic bone disease...

  1. Cholecalciferol, Calcitriol, and Vascular Function in CKD: A Randomized, Double-Blind Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jessica; Andrews, Emily; You, Zhiying; Moreau, Kerrie; Nowak, Kristen L; Farmer-Bailey, Heather; Seals, Douglas R; Chonchol, Michel

    2017-09-07

    High circulating vitamin D levels are associated with lower cardiovascular mortality in CKD, possibly by modifying endothelial function. We examined the effect of calcitriol versus cholecalciferol supplementation on vascular endothelial function in patients with CKD. We performed a prospective, double-blind, randomized trial of 128 adult patients with eGFR=15-44 ml/min per 1.73 m 2 and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level Colorado. Participants were randomly assigned to oral cholecalciferol (2000 IU daily) or calcitriol (0.5 μ g) daily for 6 months. The primary end point was change in brachial artery flow-mediated dilation. Secondary end points included changes in circulating markers of mineral metabolism and circulating and cellular markers of inflammation. One hundred and fifteen patients completed the study. The mean (SD) age and eGFR of participants were 58±12 years old and 33.0±10.2 ml/min per 1.73 m 2 , respectively. There were no significant differences between groups at baseline. After 6 months, neither calcitriol nor cholecalciferol treatment resulted in a significant improvement in flow-mediated dilation (mean±SD percentage flow-mediated dilation; calcitriol: baseline 4.8±3.1%, end of study 5.1±3.6%; cholecalciferol: baseline 5.2±5.2%, end of study 4.7±3.6%); 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels increased significantly in the cholecalciferol group compared with the calcitriol group (cholecalciferol: 11.0±9.5 ng/ml; calcitriol: -0.8±4.8 ng/ml; P <0.001). Parathyroid hormone levels decreased significantly in the calcitriol group compared with the cholecalciferol group (median [interquartile range]; calcitriol: -22.1 [-48.7-3.5] pg/ml; cholecalciferol: -0.3 [-22.6-16.9] pg/ml; P =0.004). Six months of therapy with calcitriol or cholecalciferol did not improve vascular endothelial function or improve inflammation in patients with CKD. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  2. Intermittent hemodialysis in dogs with chronic kidney disease stage III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Melchert

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Intermittent hemodialysis (IHD is a form of renal replacement that is used in veterinary medicine for cases involving drug removal, electrolyte imbalance, acute kidney injury, and chronic kidney disease (CKD. The aim of the present study was to verify the efficacy of IHD in dogs with CKD staged at grade III and to evaluate the effect of IHD on quality of life. Twelve dogs with CKD at stage III met the inclusion criteria and were divided equally into two groups. The control group (n=6 received only clinical treatment and intravenous fluid therapy, and the hemodialysis group (n=6 received clinical and IHD treatments. Blood samples were collected before and after treatments in both groups. We evaluated complications and clinical parameters of IHD every 30 minutes. Hemodialysis decreased serum urea, creatinine, and phosphorus. Despite the evident removal of nitrogen compounds, dialysis treatment did not increase survival time in these patients. The results of this study do not support the early use of dialysis in dogs with chronic kidney disease stage III.

  3. Vitamins and Microelement Bioavailability in Different Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Magdalena Jankowska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD predisposes one to either deficiency or toxic excess of different micronutrients. The knowledge on micronutrients—specifically water-soluble vitamins and trace elements—in CKD is very limited. Consequently, current guidelines and recommendations are mostly based on expert opinions or poor-quality evidence. Abnormalities of micronutrient resources in CKD develop for several reasons. Dietary restrictions and anorexia lead to an insufficient micronutrient intake, while diuretics use and renal replacement therapy lead to their excessive losses. Absorption is unpredictable, and metabolism impaired. Better understanding of the micronutrient needs of CKD patients could have an impact on many complications linked to vitamin and trace element disorders, including high mortality, increased risk of atherosclerosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, anemia, polyneuropathy, encephalopathy, weakness and fragility, muscle cramps, bone disease, depression, or insomnia. Here, we summarize the up-to-date knowledge on micronutrient resources in different stages of CKD, and share our experience with the assessment of micronutrient status.

  4. The epidemiology of end-stage renal disease in Nigeria: the way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odubanjo, M O; Oluwasola, A O; Kadiri, S

    2011-09-01

    The incidence of CKD (Chronic kidney disease) in Nigeria has been shown by various studies to range between 1.6 and 12.4%. We have shown that the burden of renal disease in Nigeria is probably significantly higher than any previous study on end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has documented, as most studies are hospital-based and fail to include the many patients who do not have access to hospital care. The increased prevalence of ESRD among blacks in the United States and South Africa compared with other races also suggests that ESRD may be more prevalent in Africa than in the United States and other developed nations. Common causes of CKD in Nigerian adults are glomerulonephritis and hypertension, while common causes in children are glomerulonephritis and posterior urethral valves. In the United States, diabetes and hypertension are the commonest causes of CKD and glomerulonephritis plays a less important role. Access to renal replacement therapy (RRT) in Nigeria is limited, and mortality rates are very high, ranging between 40 and 50%. Important steps towards improving the situation are the development of prevention programmes and increased funding to ensure increased availability of RRT. To achieve this, health policies concerning CKD must be formulated, and the lack of a renal registry makes it difficult for this to be done. There is need for the development of a functional organizational structure for the reporting of CKD in Nigeria, the Nigerian Renal Registry.

  5. Efficacy of dietary interventions in end-stage renal disease patients; a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazar Chaudhary Muhamamd Juniad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD and chronic kidney disease (CKD are common comorbid conditions. Life style, particularly diet is a critical component of treatment for these conditions. Register dietitians play a key role in bridging the gap between the science of nutrition and the empowerment of individuals to alter their lifestyles in a healthy manner. A range of dietary manipulations has been reported to reduce risk factors and decrease risk of CVD and CKD outcomes. However, many studies provided food to participants or were limited to adjustment of few specific nutrients. Diet intervention in relation with end-stage renal disease (ESRD is really complicated topic. As multiple co morbid conditions such as hypertension, CVD, CKD, and diabetes mellitus (DM are associated with ESRD, which made the scenario really worse while fixing the dose of any diet. Still a lot of research work is required to understand this topic.

  6. [Estimating glomerular filtration rate in 2012: which adding value for the CKD-EPI equation?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanaye, Pierre; Mariat, Christophe; Moranne, Olivier; Cavalier, Etienne; Flamant, Martin

    2012-07-01

    Measuring or estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is still considered as the best way to apprehend global renal function. In 2009, the new Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology (CKD-EPI) equation has been proposed as a better estimator of GFR than the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study equation. This new equation is supposed to underestimate GFR to a lesser degree in higher GFR levels. In this review, we will present and deeply discuss the performances of this equation. Based on articles published between 2009 and 2012, this review will underline advantages, notably the better knowledge of chronic kidney disease prevalence, but also limitations of this new equation, especially in some specific populations. We eventually insist on the fact that all these equations are estimations and nephrologists should remain cautious in their interpretation. Copyright © 2012 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. CKD screening and management in the Veterans Health Administration: the impact of system organization and an innovative electronic record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Thakor G; Pogach, Leonard M; Barth, Robert H

    2009-03-01

    At the beginning of this decade, Healthy People 2010 issued a series of objectives to "reduce the incidence, morbidity, mortality and health care costs of chronic kidney disease." A necessary feature of any program to reduce the burden of kidney disease in the US population must include mechanisms to screen populations at risk and institute early the aspects of management, such as control of blood pressure, management of diabetes, and, in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), preparation for dialysis therapy and proper vascular access management, that can retard CKD progression and improve long-term outcome. The Department of Veterans Affairs and the Veterans Health Administration is a broad-based national health care system that is almost uniquely situated to address these issues and has developed a number of effective approaches using evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, performance measures, innovative use of a robust electronic medical record system, and system oversight during the past decade. In this report, we describe the application of this systems approach to the prevention of CKD in veterans through the treatment of risk factors, identification of CKD in veterans, and oversight of predialysis and dialysis care. The lessons learned and applicability to the private sector are discussed.

  8. Association between cardiac biomarkers and the development of ESRD in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, anemia, and CKD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desai, Akshay S; Toto, Robert; Jarolim, Petr

    2011-01-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), as in other populations, elevations in cardiac biomarker levels predict increased risk of cardiovascular events. We examined the value of troponin T (TnT) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) in assessing the risk of developing e...

  9. Evaluation of insulin like growth factor-1 (If-1) in children with different stages of chronicle renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derakshan, A.; Karamifar, H.; Razavi, N.S.M.; Fallahzadeh, M.H.; Hashemi, G.H.

    2007-01-01

    Growth retardation in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is multifactorial that include inadequate protein and calorie intake, persistent metabolic acidosis, calcitriol deficiency, renal osteodystrophy, drug toxicity, uremic toxins and growth factor abnormalities such as insulin- like growth factor (IGF) and IGF binding proteins. In this study, we compare the IGF-1 levels in normal and growth retarded CKD children. Serum IGF-1 levels were determined in 22 children with end-stage renal disease, 26 children, with CKD at different stages, 23 children with normal height and weight for age, and 23 children with constitutionally short stature. Mean serum levels of IGF-1 were 209+- ng/m1 in the ESRD group (group1), 159+-163 ng/m1 in the CKD group (group2), 420+-182 ng/ml in normal children (group3), and 360+-183 ng/ml in children with constitutional short stature (group4). The differences in the levels of IGF-1 in groups 1 and 2 were statistically significant when compared to groups 3 and 4(p<0.0001 and p< 0.02, respectively), while the levels of IGF-1 were not statistically different between groups 1 and 2. No correlation was found between IGF-1levels and glomerular filtrations are height or weight in groups 1 and 2. In conclusion, serum levels of IGF-1 in children with CKD are significantly lower than healthy children. (author)

  10. Effect of Different Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease and Renal Replacement Therapies on Oxidant-Antioxidant Balance in Uremic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadja Fatima Tbahriti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress seems to be involved in the path physiology of cardiovascular complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD. In this study, we determined the effect of different stages of CKD and substitutive therapies on oxidative stress. One hundred sixty-seven patients (age: 44±06 years; male/female: 76/91 with CKD were divided into 6 groups according to the National Kidney Foundation classification. Prooxidant status was assessed by assaying thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, hydroperoxides, and protein carbonyls. Antioxidant defence was performed by analysis of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, vitamin E, Iron, and bilirubin. TBARS and LPO were higher in HD patients compared to other groups (P<0.001, while protein carbonyls were more increased in PD patients. The antioxidant enzymes were declined already at severe stage of CKD and they were declined notably in HD patients (P<0.001. Similar observation was found for vitamin E, Fe, and bilirubin where we observed a significant decrease in the majority of study groups, especially in HD patients (P<0.001. The evolution of CKD was associated with elevated OS. HD accentuates lipid, while PD aggravates protein oxidation. However, the activity of antioxidant enzymes was altered by impaired renal function and by both dialysis treatments.

  11. Influence of late-stage chronic kidney disease on overall survival in patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma following radical nephroureterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Chen Wen

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Patients with late-stage CKD had a higher risk of having poor OS. Patients with concomitant bladder tumor had a greater risk of having bladder cancer recurrence despite primary tumor stage. Concomitant bladder tumor, however, had no effect on OS and CSS in this study.

  12. Health-related quality of life across all stages of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Daniel; Karlsson, Linda; Eklund, Oskar

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A limited number of studies have assessed health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Results to date have been conflicting and studies have generally focused on patients with later stages of the disease. This study aimed to assess...... stages 4-5 and patients on dialysis. Progressive disease predominately had an impact on physical health, whereas mental health showed less variation between stages of the disease. A substantial loss in quality of life was observed as patients progressed to CKD stages 4-5. CONCLUSIONS: Later stages...

  13. Prevalence of osteoporosis in patients with chronic kidney disease (stages 3-5) in comparison with age- and sex-matched controls: A study from Kashmir Valley Tertiary Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najar, M Saleem; Mir, Mohamad Muzzafer; Muzamil, Mudasir

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with a range of metabolic bone diseases. Fracture rates are higher in CKD patients than age-matched controls throughout all the five stages of CKD. Dialysis patients have 4 times as many hip fractures as expected for their age. CKD forms an independent risk factor for osteoporosis, even in the absence of traditional risk factors. This study was carried out at the nephrology unit in a tertiary care center of Kashmir to know the prevalence of osteoporosis in CKD patients having glomerular filtration rate (GFR) stages 3-5). Among the 151 cases studied, the average estimated GFR was 16.78 ± 10.714 mL/min. There were 98 males (64.9%) and 53 females (35.1%). Their mean age was 51.01 ± 14.138 years. Osteoporosis based on femoral neck T-Score was seen in 31 patients (31.6%) while 43 patients (28.5%) had osteoporosis at L1, L2 lumbar vertebrae. The prevalence of osteoporosis based on femoral neck T-Score as well as osteopenia was highest in stage-5 CKD. In our study, the body mass index (BMI) had a positive correlation with osteoporosis; low BMI patients were at higher risk for osteoporosis (P = 0.014). In the Kashmir valley, the prevalence of osteoporosis was 31.8% in CKD patients against 22% in controls. Thus, CKD forms an important risk factor for osteoporosis even in the absence of traditional risk factors. We recommend early screening, detection, and management of osteoporosis to reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality in this subset of patients.

  14. Use of Erythropoietin-Stimulating Agents (ESA) in Patients With End-Stage Renal Failure Decided to Forego Dialysis: Palliative Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hon Wai Benjamin; Chan, Kwok Ying; Lau, Hoi To; Man, Ching Wah; Cheng, Suk Ching; Lam, Carman

    2017-05-01

    Normochromic normocytic anemia is a common complication in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with many adverse clinical consequences. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) act to replace endogenous erythropoietin for patients with end-stage renal disease having anemia. Today, ESAs remain the main tool for treating anemia associated with CKD. In current practice, the use of ESA is not limited to the patients on renal replacement therapy but has extended to nondialysis patients under palliative care (PC). Current evidence on ESA usage in patients with CKD decided to forego dialysis often have to take reference from studies conducted in other groups of patients with CKD, including pre-dialysis patients and those on renal replacement therapy. There is paucity of studies targeting use of ESAs in renal PC patients. Small-scale retrospective study in renal PC patients had suggested clinical advantage of ESAs in terms of hemoglobin improvement, reduction in fatigue, and hospitalization rate. With the expected growth in elderly patients with CKD decided to forego dialysis and manage conservatively, there remains an urgent need to call for large-scale prospective trial in exploring efficacy of ESAs in this population, targeting on quality of life and symptoms improvement outcome. This article also reviews the mechanism of action, pharmacology, adverse effects, and clinical trial evidence for ESA in patients with CKD under renal PC.

  15. Stage progression and need for renal replacement therapy in a renal protection programme in Colombia. A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes Delgado, Carlos Enrique; Pérez Dávila, Sara; Montoya Jaramillo, Marcela; Orrego Orozco, Beatriz Elena

    Due to the global burden represented by chronic kidney disease (CKD), the World Health Organization encouraged the implementation of renal protection programmes (RPP) to affect its incidence through prevention and control measures. To assess the effectiveness of a Colombian RPP in terms of its effect on the stage progression of CKD and the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT). An analytical study that monitored 2cohorts of patients diagnosed with CKD. The study compares the behaviour of clinical and renal impairment indicators from patients exposed to a RPP with that of patients following conventional treatment (CT). The population of both intervention groups was considered when determining the sample size. The incidence rate was calculated as well as patient survival (Kaplan Meier). In addition, a multivariate analysis (Cox) was used to calculate the influence that exposure to the RPP had on the outcomes of the patients following the RPP and those following CT. The patients exposed to the RPP took longer to advance to the next CKD stage and require RRT. The incidence rate for progression is higher for the patients following CT (0.050, IC 95%: 0.040-0.064) compared to those in the RPP (0.034, IC 95%: 0.030-0.039). The ratio of incidence rates was 1.480 (IC 95% 1.21-1.90). The hazard of progression was lower for the RPP (HR: 0.855, IC 95%: 0.74- 0.98), as was the hazard of requiring RRT (HR: 0.797, IC 95%: 0.606-1.049). The RPP is a secondary prevention strategy against CKD which has an effect on the stage progression of CKD and the need for RRT. Early patient detection has a positive effect on the outcomes studied. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Stage design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shacter, J.

    1975-01-01

    A method is described of cycling gases through a plurality of diffusion stages comprising the steps of admitting the diffused gases from a first diffusion stage into an axial compressor, simultaneously admitting the undiffused gases from a second diffusion stage into an intermediate pressure zone of said compressor corresponding in pressure to the pressure of said undiffused gases, and then admitting the resulting compressed mixture of diffused and undiffused gases into a third diffusion stage

  17. Five-year incidence of chronic kidney disease (stage 3-5 and associated risk factors in a Spanish cohort: the MADIABETES Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A Salinero-Fort

    Full Text Available To evaluate the incidence rate of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD stage 3-5 (persistent decreased kidney function under 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2 among patients with type 2 diabetes over five years, to identify the risk factors associated with CKD, and develop a risk table to predict five-year CKD stage 3-5 risk stratification for clinical use.The MADIABETES Study is a prospective cohort study of 3,443 outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, sampled from 56 primary health care centers (131 general practitioners in Madrid (Spain.The cumulative incidence of CKD stage 3-5 at five-years was 10.23% (95% CI = 9.12-11.44 and the incidence density was 2.07 (95% CI = 1.83-2.33 cases per 1,000 patient-months or 2.48 (95% CI = 2.19-2.79 cases per 100 patient-years. The highest hazard ratio (HR for developing CKD stage 3-5 was albuminuria ≥ 300 mg/g (HR = 4.57; 95% CI= 2.46-8.48. Furthermore, other variables with a high HR were age over 74 years (HR = 3.20; 95% CI = 2.13-4.81, a history of Hypertension (HR = 2.02; 95% CI = 1.42-2.89, Myocardial Infarction (HR= 1.72; 95% IC= 1.25-2.37, Dyslipidemia (HR = 1.68; 95% CI 1.30-2.17, duration of diabetes mellitus ≥ 10 years (HR = 1.46; 95% CI = 1.14-1.88 and Systolic Blood Pressure >149 mmHg (HR = 1.52; 95% CI = 1.02-2.24.After a five-year follow-up, the cumulative incidence of CKD is concordant with rates described in Spain and other countries. Albuminuria ≥ 300 mg/g and age over 74 years were the risk factors more strongly associated with developing CKD (Stage 3-5. Blood Pressure, lipid and albuminuria control could reduce CKD incidence of CKD in patients with T2DM.

  18. Five-Year Incidence of Chronic Kidney Disease (Stage 3-5) and Associated Risk Factors in a Spanish Cohort: The MADIABETES Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinero-Fort, Miguel A.; San Andrés-Rebollo, Francisco J.; de Burgos-Lunar, Carmen; Gómez-Campelo, Paloma; Chico-Moraleja, Rosa M.; López de Andrés, Ana; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the incidence rate of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) stage 3-5 (persistent decreased kidney function under 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2) among patients with type 2 diabetes over five years, to identify the risk factors associated with CKD, and develop a risk table to predict five-year CKD stage 3-5 risk stratification for clinical use. Design The MADIABETES Study is a prospective cohort study of 3,443 outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, sampled from 56 primary health care centers (131 general practitioners) in Madrid (Spain). Results The cumulative incidence of CKD stage 3-5 at five-years was 10.23% (95% CI = 9.12–11.44) and the incidence density was 2.07 (95% CI = 1.83–2.33) cases per 1,000 patient-months or 2.48 (95% CI = 2.19–2.79) cases per 100 patient-years. The highest hazard ratio (HR) for developing CKD stage 3-5 was albuminuria ≥300 mg/g (HR = 4.57; 95% CI= 2.46-8.48). Furthermore, other variables with a high HR were age over 74 years (HR = 3.20; 95% CI = 2.13–4.81), a history of Hypertension (HR = 2.02; 95% CI = 1.42–2.89), Myocardial Infarction (HR= 1.72; 95% IC= 1.25–2.37), Dyslipidemia (HR = 1.68; 95% CI 1.30–2.17), duration of diabetes mellitus ≥ 10 years (HR = 1.46; 95% CI = 1.14-1.88) and Systolic Blood Pressure >149 mmHg (HR = 1.52; 95% CI = 1.02–2.24). Conclusions After a five-year follow-up, the cumulative incidence of CKD is concordant with rates described in Spain and other countries. Albuminuria ≥ 300 mg/g and age over 74 years were the risk factors more strongly associated with developing CKD (Stage 3-5). Blood Pressure, lipid and albuminuria control could reduce CKD incidence of CKD in patients with T2DM. PMID:25856231

  19. Staging Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    and lived as people are “staging themselves” (from below). Staging mobilities is a dynamic process between “being staged” (for example, being stopped at traffic lights) and the “mobile staging” of interacting individuals (negotiating a passage on the pavement). Staging Mobilities is about the fact...

  20. Estimated GFR (eGFR by prediction equation in staging of chronic kidney disease compared to gamma camera GFR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Masum Alam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glomerular filtration rate is an effective tool for diagnosis and staging of chronic kidney disease. The effect ofrenal insufficiency by different method of this tool among patients with CKD is controversial.Objective: The objec­tive of this study was to evaluate the performance of eGFR in staging of CKD compared to gamma camera based GFR.Methods: This cross sectional analytical study was conducted in the Department of Biochemistry Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU with the collaboration with National Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, BSMMU during the period of January 2011 to December 2012. Gama camera based GFR was estimated from DTP A reno gram and eGFR was estimated by three prediction equations. Comparison was done by Bland Altman agree­ment test to see the agreement on the measurement of GFR between three equation based eGFR method and gama camera based GFR method. Staging comparison was done by Kappa analysis to see the agreement between the stages identified by those different methods.Results: Bland-Altman agreement analysis between GFR measured by gamma camera, CG equation ,CG equation corrected by BSA and MDRD equation shows statistically significant. CKD stages determined by CG GFR, CG GFR corrected by BSA , MDRD GFR and gamma camera based GFR was compared by Kappa statistical analysis .The kappa value was 0.66, 0.77 and 0.79 respectively.Conclusions: This study findings suggest that GFR estimation by MDRD equation in CKD patients shows good agreement with gamma camera based GFR and for staging of CKD patients, eGFR by MDRD formula may be used as very effective tool in Bangladeshi population.

  1. Erythropoietic response to oral iron in patients with nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease in the FIND-CKD trial
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdougall, Iain C; Bock, Andreas H; Carrera, Fernando; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gaillard, Carlo; Wyck, David Van; Meier, Yvonne; Larroque, Sylvain; Perrin, Amandine; Roger, Simon D

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate erythropoietic response rates to oral iron over time in iron-deficient anemic patients with nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD). FIND-CKD was a 1-year, randomized, multicenter trial of iron therapy in patients with ND-CKD, anemia, and iron deficiency, without erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) therapy. Patients with active infection or C-reactive protein > 20 mg/L were excluded. In this post-hoc analysis, response was defined as ≥ 1 g/dL increase in hemoglobin (Hb) from baseline, before initiation of alternative anemia therapy (i.e., ESA, transfusion, or intravenous iron). 308 patients received oral iron (200 mg elemental iron/day). Mean (SD) Hb at baseline was 10.4 (0.7) g/dL. At week 4, Hb data were available from 292 patients without alternative anemia therapy: 63/292 (21.6%) showed a response. Among the 229 nonresponders at week 4, 48.8% showed a cumulative response on ≥ 1 occasion by week 52 (11.1%, 19.9%, 25.9%, and 28.7% had a response at weeks 8, 12, 24, and 52, respectively), and 27.9% had received alternative iron therapy by week 52. Baseline levels of Hb, ferritin, and transferrin saturation were lower in responders than in nonresponders. Neither concomitant medication nor adherence (as assessed by medication count) was substantially different between early responders and nonresponders. Four weeks after starting oral iron therapy, only 21.6% of anemic patients with ND-CKD and iron deficiency showed an Hb increase of at least 1 g/dL. Among early nonresponders, < 30% responded at any subsequent time point. Earlier consideration of alternative therapy could improve anemia management in this population.
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  2. Validation of Indonesian Version of FACIT Fatigue Scale Questionnaire in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD Patients with Routine Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhonson P. Sihombing

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is common in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD. One of anemia consequences is fatigue which can lead to decrease in quality of life. Functional Assessment Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT Fatigue Scale is an instrument to measure patient’s score of fatigue. This questionnaire is not validated yet in Indonesia. The aim of this study is to validate Indonesian version of Functional Assessment Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT Fatigue Scale as an instrument for patient’s quality of life. FACIT Fatigue Scale was translated into Indonesian and administrated to CKD patients with routine homodialysis in an academic hospital in Yogyakarta on May until October 2015. The validity was evaluated by Pearson correlation test and the reliability was evaluated by Cronbach’s alpha test. Validity test showed that all of the questions were valid because r count was bigger than r table=0,279 and reliable because r11=0,646>0,6. In conclusion, Indonesian version of FACIT Fatigue Scale was a brief and valid to monitor important symptom and its effect on CKD patients with routine hemodialysis.

  3. Cognitive remediation in pediatric chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease: rationale, candidate interventions, and applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javalkar, Karina; Ferris, Maria E; Cuttance, Jessica; Hooper, Stephen R

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address the potential use of cognitive remediation interventions for children and adolescents with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). The prevalence and risk for neurocognitive dysfunction in children with this condition remains high, but, to date, interventions targeting these challenges have not been attempted either individually or as part of a larger treatment program. This is the next logical step in addressing the neurocognitive dysfunction that can be present in pediatric CKD/ESKD, with the field needing to determine the efficacy of cognitive remediation approaches for this population. To our knowledge, this paper is the first to raise this possibility by identifying candidate treatments addressing the neurocognitive challenges observed in children and adolescents with CKD/ESKD. Initially, we present the rationale for the importance of addressing the cognitive difficulties in this population, including an overview of the literature documenting the neurocognitive deficits associated with pediatric-onset CKD/ESKD. This is followed by a review of five candidate cognitive remediation programs that may be applicable to patients with this condition, and associated factors that could affect such treatment. The paper concludes with suggestions for both clinical and research initiatives that could be implemented to examine cognitive remediation as potential components of a larger treatment program for children and adolescents with CKD/ESKD.

  4. Pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence study of a telmisartan/S-amlodipine fixed-dose combination (CKD-828 formulation and coadministered telmisartan and S-amlodipine in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang WY

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Woo Youl Kang,1,2,* Sook Jin Seong,1,* Boram Ohk,1,2 Mi-Ri Gwon,1,3 Bo Kyung Kim,1,2 Sookie La,4 Hyun-Ju Kim,3 Seungil Cho,1 Young-Ran Yoon,1,2 Dong Heon Yang,5 Hae Won Lee1 1Clinical Trial Center, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Biomedical Science, BK21 Plus KNU Bio-Medical Convergence Program for Creative Talent, Kyungpook National University Graduate School, Daegu, Republic of Korea; 3Department of Molecular Medicine, Cell and Matrix Research Institute, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu, Republic of Korea; 4Analytical Research Division, Biocore Co Ltd, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 5Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine & Hospital, Daegu, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: A new fixed-dose combination (FDC formulation of telmisartan 80 mg and S-amlodipine 5 mg (CKD-828 has been developed to increase convenience (as only one tablet is required per day and improve treatment compliance.Methods: The pharmacokinetic characteristics and tolerability of an FDC of telmisartan and S-amlodipine were compared to those after coadministration of the individual agents in this randomized, open-label, single-dose, two-way, four-period, crossover study. To analyze the telmisartan and S-amlodipine plasma concentrations using a validated liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry method, serial blood samples were collected up to 48 hours post-dose for telmisartan and 144 hours post-dose for S-amlodipine, in each period.Results: Forty-eight healthy subjects were enrolled, and 43 completed the study. The mean peak plasma concentration (Cmax and the area under the plasma concentration–time curve from time 0 to the last measurement (AUC0–t values of telmisartan were 522.29 ng/mL and 2,475.16 ng⋅h/mL for the FDC, and 540.45 ng/mL and 2,559.57 ng⋅h/mL for the individual agents

  5. Comparison of Appetite-regulating Hormones and Body Composition in Pediatric Patients in Predialysis Stage of Chronic Kidney Disease and Healthy Control Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hassan Eftekhari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM is a common complication in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Components incorporated in the regulation of appetite and body composition appear to be of the focus in renal insufficiency and may influence the CKD-associated PEM. The purpose of this study was to investigate plasma levels of appetite-regulating hormones and their correlation with the body composition variables in a pediatric in predialysis stage of CKD. Methods: Thirty children with CKD in predialysis stage were selected and compared with 30 healthy sex- and age-matched controls. Blood samples were collected in fasting. Serum total ghrelin, leptin, and obestatin levels were measured using enzyme immunometric assay methods. Anthropometric parameters measurement and body composition analysis were done using the bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA method. Results: Patients showed insignificant elevated total ghrelin (105.40±30.83 ng/l, leptin (5.32±1.17 ng/ml and obestatin (5.07±1.09 ng/ml levels in comparison with healthy participants. By using BIA, patients had significantly different Dry Lean Weight (P=0.048, Extra Cellular Water (P=0.045, Body Cell Mass (BCM (P=0.021, Basal Metabolic Rate (P=0.033 and Body Mass Index (P=0.029 compared with controls. Furthermore, the total body water was slightly and the ECW was significantly higher in CKD participants. There were significant negative correlation between obestatin and BCM (r=-0.40, P=0.03 and fat free mass index (FFMI (r=-0.40, P=0.029 in patients. Conclusion: It seems that our results are insufficient to clarify the role of appetite-regulating hormones in PEM in CKD patients. It is apparent that there are still many unknown parameters related to both appetite regulating and CKD-associated PEM.

  6. Lipid metabolism and levels of proinflammatory cytokines in patients with type 2 diabetes with diabetic nephropathy depending on the stage of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the role and relationship of lipid metabolism and levels of proinflammatory cytokines in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2 with diabetic nephropathy (DN, depending on the stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Materials and Methods: a total of 240 patients with type 2 diabetes in the early stages of DN and CKD were studied. Results: in patients with type 2 diabetes development of DN was associated with an increased level of proinflammatory cytokines and lipid abnormalities (hypertriglyceridemia. We found a negative correlation between the level of triglycerides (TG and glomerular filtration rate (GFR (r = -0,43 and a direct correlation between the level of IL-6 and TG (r = 0,48. Conclusions: increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and triglycerides increase the risk of development and progression of DN and CKD.

  7. Trading stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Coulson, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Interest in stage-and age structured models has recently increased because they can describe quantitative traits such as size that are left out of age-only demography. Available methods for the analysis of effects of vital rates on lifespan in stage-structured models have not been widely applied ...... examples. Much of our approach relies on trading of time and mortality risk in one stage for time and risk in others. Our approach contributes to the new framework of the study of age- and stage-structured biodemography....

  8. Medication burden in CKD-5D: impact of dialysis modality and setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Kathrine; Nikam, Milind; Jayanti, Anuradha; Mitra, Sandip

    2014-12-01

    Medication adherence is thought to be around 50% in the general and dialysis population. Reducing the pill burden (PB) reduces regime complexity and can improve adherence. Increased adherence should lead to improvement in treatment outcomes and patient quality of life. There is currently little published data on PB in CKD-5D across dialysis modalities. This is a retrospective, single renal network study. All in-centre HD (MHD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home HD (HHD) patients were identified in the Greater Manchester East sector renal network. Information collected included age, sex, comorbidities, daily PB, dialysis vintage and adequacy. Data were retrieved from a customized renal database, clinic and discharge letters with cross validation from the general practitioner when needed. Two hundred and thirty-six prevalent dialysis patients were studied. HHD patients had a significantly lower PB (11 ± 7 pills/day) compared with PD and MHD (16 ± 7 pills/day). The HHD patients required fewer BP medications to meet the recommended target. HD setting was the only significant factor for reducing PB. For home therapies (HHD versus PD), weekly Kt/v and serum phosphate were significant factors influencing PB. When comparing all modalities, OR of PB ≥ 15/day for MHD versus HHD was 3.9 and PD versus HHD was 4.9. The influence of HHD is dominant above factors such as comorbidities or clinical variables in reducing PB for MHD. Higher clearances achieved by HHD could explain differences in PB with PD. This is the first comparative study of PB across all dialysis modalities and factors that influence it. The PB advantage in HHD may result in greater adherence and might contribute to the outcome benefit often seen with this modality. Higher clearances achieved by HHD could explain differences in PB with PD but the precise reasons for lower PB remain speculative and deserve further research in larger settings.

  9. Cardiovascular Disease and Chronic Inflammation in End Stage Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Zyga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD is one of the most severe diseases worldwide. In patients affected by CKD, a progressive destruction of the nephrons is observed not only in structuralbut also in functional level. Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease of large and medium-sized arteries. It is characterized by the deposition of lipids and fibrous elements and is a common complication of the uremic syndrome because of the coexistence of a wide range of risk factors. High blood pressure, anaemia, insulin resistance, inflammation, high oxidative stress are some of the most common factors that cause cardiovascular disease and atherogenesis in patients suffering from End Stage Kidney Disease (ESRD. At the same time, the inflammatory process constitutes a common element in the apparition and development of CKD. A wide range of possible causes can justify the development of inflammation under uremic conditions. Such causes are oxidative stress, oxidation, coexistentpathological conditions as well as factors that are due to renal clearance techniques. Patients in ESRD and coronary disease usually show increased acute phase products. Pre-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-a, and acute phase reactants, such as CRP and fibrinogen, are closely related. The treatment of chronic inflammation in CKD is of high importance for the development ofthe disease as well as for the treatment of cardiovascular morbidity.Conclusions: The treatment factors focus on the use of renin-angiotensic system inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid, statins and anti-oxidant treatment in order to prevent the action of inflammatorycytokines that have the ability to activate the mechanisms of inflammation.

  10. Nitrone Cycloadditions of 1,2-Cyclohexadiene

    OpenAIRE

    Barber, Joyann S.; Styduhar, Evan D.; Pham, Hung V.; McMahon, Travis C.; Houk, K. N.; Garg, Neil K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the first 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions of 1,2-cyclohexadiene, a rarely exploited strained allene. 1,2-Cyclohexadiene is generated in situ under mild conditions and trapped with nitrones to give isoxazolidine products in synthetically useful yields. The reactions occur regioselectively and exhibit a notable endo preference, thus resulting in the controlled formation of two new bonds and two stereogenic centers. DFT calculations of stepwise and concerted reaction pathways are used to ra...

  11. Quality of life in children and adolescents with chronic kidney disease: a comparative study between different disease stages and treatment modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kul, Müslüm; Cengel Kültür, Ebru; Senses Dinç, Gülser; Bilginer, Yelda; Uluç, Sait; Baykan, Hayriye

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the quality of life of children and adolescents in various stages of their chronic kidney disease (CKD) who were managed with different treatment modalities to that of children and adolescents without any chronic disease. The study included 18 renal transplant and 21 dialysis patients (8 on hemodialysis, 13 on peritoneal dialysis) and 16 patients who did not yet require renal replacement therapy. The control group consisted of 37 children without any chronic disease. Psychosocial Health Summary scores, Physical Health Summary scores, and Total Scale scores of Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory scores were estimated for the groups. CKD patients had lower scores in all scales of Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory than the control group. There were no differences in self-reported scores on the Pediatric Quality of Life scale scores between treatment groups; however, parents of the transplant patients had reported higher (more favorable) Physical Health Summary scores than those of the dialysis patients. Reports of parents and their children differed only in Physical Health Summary scores in the dialysis group; self-reports of the children were more favorable. These findings show that children and adolescents with CKD experience impaired quality of life on the physical and psychosocial functioning domains in comparison with healthy controls. The study findings implicate the need for further studies to investigate the quality of life in CKD patients at different stages as well as the perceptional differences between pediatric and adolescent CKD patients and caregiver proxy-reports about their quality of life.

  12. Automating and estimating glomerular filtration rate for dosing medications and staging chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinkley KE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Katy E Trinkley,1 S Michelle Nikels,2 Robert L Page II,1 Melanie S Joy11Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA Objective: The purpose of this paper is to serve as a review for primary care providers on the bedside methods for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR for dosing and chronic kidney disease (CKD staging and to discuss how automated health information technologies (HIT can enhance clinical documentation of staging and reduce medication errors in patients with CKD.Methods: A nonsystematic search of PubMed (through March 2013 was conducted to determine the optimal approach to estimate GFR for dosing and CKD staging and to identify examples of how automated HITs can improve health outcomes in patients with CKD. Papers known to the authors were included, as were scientific statements. Articles were chosen based on the judgment of the authors.Results: Drug-dosing decisions should be based on the method used in the published studies and package labeling that have been determined to be safe, which is most often the Cockcroft–Gault formula unadjusted for body weight. Although Modification of Diet in Renal Disease is more commonly used in practice for staging, the CKD–Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD–EPI equation is the most accurate formula for estimating the CKD staging, especially at higher GFR values. Automated HITs offer a solution to the complexity of determining which equation to use for a given clinical scenario. HITs can educate providers on which formula to use and how to apply the formula in a given clinical situation, ultimately improving appropriate medication and medical management in CKD patients.Conclusion: Appropriate estimation of GFR is key to optimal health outcomes. HITs assist clinicians in both choosing the most appropriate GFR estimation formula and in applying the results of the GFR estimation in practice. Key limitations of the

  13. The QICKD study protocol: a cluster randomised trial to compare quality improvement interventions to lower systolic BP in chronic kidney disease (CKD in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    du Bois Elizabeth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a relatively newly recognised but common long-term condition affecting 5 to 10% of the population. Effective management of CKD, with emphasis on strict blood pressure (BP control, reduces cardiovascular risk and slows the progression of CKD. There is currently an unprecedented rise in referral to specialist renal services, which are often located in tertiary centres, inconvenient for patients, and wasteful of resources. National and international CKD guidelines include quality targets for primary care. However, there have been no rigorous evaluations of strategies to implement these guidelines. This study aims to test whether quality improvement interventions improve primary care management of elevated BP in CKD, reduce cardiovascular risk, and slow renal disease progression Design Cluster randomised controlled trial (CRT Methods This three-armed CRT compares two well-established quality improvement interventions with usual practice. The two interventions comprise: provision of clinical practice guidelines with prompts and audit-based education. The study population will be all individuals with CKD from general practices in eight localities across England. Randomisation will take place at the level of the general practices. The intended sample (three arms of 25 practices powers the study to detect a 3 mmHg difference in systolic BP between the different quality improvement interventions. An additional 10 practices per arm will receive a questionnaire to measure any change in confidence in managing CKD. Follow up will take place over two years. Outcomes will be measured using anonymised routinely collected data extracted from practice computer systems. Our primary outcome measure will be reduction of systolic BP in people with CKD and hypertension at two years. Secondary outcomes will include biomedical outcomes and markers of quality, including practitioner confidence in managing CKD. A small

  14. Influence of the Method of Definition on the Prevalence of Left-Ventricular Hypertrophy in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease: Data from the Know-Ped CKD Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Heeyeon; Choi, Hyun Jin; Kang, Hee Gyung; Ha, Il-Soo; Cheong, Hae Il; Han, Kyung Hee; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Min Hyun; Shin, Jae Il; Lee, Joo Hoon; Park, Young Seo

    2017-01-01

    Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a high risk of cardiovascular disease. Left-ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (LVH) is an early marker of cardiovascular disease in pediatric CKD, and the prevalence of LVH in pediatric CKD is approximately 20-30% in pre-dialysis CKD patients. However, there is no consensus on the ideal method of defining LVH in pediatric CKD patients. Previous studies have typically used the LV mass index (LVMI), which is calculated as LV mass in grams divided by height in meters to the 2.7th power ≥ 38 g/m2.7, to diagnose LVH in children with CKD. Recently, age-specific reference values for LVMI ≥ 95th percentile and LV wall-thickness z-score > 1.64 in children were addressed. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and contributing factors of LVH in pediatric CKD patients according to each measurement and evaluate the concordance between each measurement. We used the baseline data of the KoreaN cohort study for Outcome in patients With Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-Ped CKD), which is a nationwide, 10-year, prospective, observational cohort study of pediatric CKD. A total of 469 patients were enrolled, and 458 patients were included in the final analysis. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate the association of the variables with LVH. Kappa statistics were used to analyze the concordance. According to an LVH diagnosis of LVMI ≥ 38 g/m2.7, 188 patients (41.0%) were diagnosed with LVH, and the prevalence of LVH was high in younger patients ( 1.64. There is poor concordance between the diagnosis of LVH using the LV wall-thickness z-score and the LVMI method. The results of this study show that there is poor concordance between the diagnosis of LVH using the wall-thickness z-score and the LVMI2.7 criteria. Further investigation is needed to estimate the correlation between LVH and cardiac dysfunction and to find a better method for defining LVH in the pediatric CKD cohort

  15. End Stage and Chronic Kidney Disease:Associations with Renal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eRusso

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a well known association between end stage renal disease and the development of kidney cancer in the native kidney of patients requiring renal replacement therapy. There is now emerging evidence that lesser degrees of renal insufficiency (chronic kidney disease, CKD are also associated with an increased likelihood of cancer in general and kidney cancer in particular. Nephro pathological changes are commonly observed in the non tumor bearing portions of kidney resected at the time of partial and radical nephrectomy. In addition, patients with renal cancer are more likely to have CKD at the time of diagnosis and treatment than the general population. The exact mechanism by which renal insufficiency transforms normal kidney cells into tumor cells is not known. Possible mechanisms include uremic immune inhibition or increased exposure to circulating toxins not adequately cleared by the kidneys. Surgeons managing kidney tumors must have an increased awareness of their patient’s renal functional status as they plan their resection. Kidney sparing approaches, including partial nephrectomy or active surveillance in older and morbidly ill patients, can prevent CKD or delay the further decline in renal function which is well documented with radical nephrectomy. Despite emerging evidence that partial nephrectomy provides equivalent local tumor control to radical nephrectomy while at the same time preventing CKD, this operation remains under utilized in the United States and abroad. Increased awareness of the bi directional relationship between kidney function and kidney cancer is essential in the contemporary management of kidney cancer.

  16. Object Permanence in 3 1/2- and 4 1/2-Month-Old Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillargeon, Renee

    1987-01-01

    Three experiments test object permanenece in 3 1/2- and 4 1/2-month-old infants, and use an impossible-possible-habituation event format. The 4 1/2-month-olds, and the 3 1/2-month-olds who were fast habituators, look reliably longer at the impossible than at the possible event. Results seriously question Piaget's (1954) claims regarding the age at…

  17. Study of hypercharge exchange processes 0-1/2+→1- 1/2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albajar Molera, M. c.; Aguilar Beniter de Lugo, M.

    1981-01-01

    In this work we present a formalism for the reconstruction of the transitivity amplitudes governing the processes of the type 0-1/2+→1-1/2+. The formalism uses the information contained in the decay angular correlations and takes into account the existence of mixed spin configurations in the final state 0-1/2+→(0↓, 1-)1/2+ (Author) 10 refs

  18. Comparative performance of the CKD Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) and the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study equations for estimating GFR levels above 60 mL/min/1.73 m2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Lesley A; Schmid, Christopher H; Greene, Tom; Zhang, Yaping Lucy; Beck, Gerald J; Froissart, Marc; Hamm, Lee L; Lewis, Julia B; Mauer, Michael; Navis, Gerjan J; Steffes, Michael W; Eggers, Paul W; Coresh, Josef; Levey, Andrew S

    2010-09-01

    The Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study equation underestimates measured glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at levels>60 mL/min/1.73 m2, with variable accuracy among subgroups; consequently, estimated GFR (eGFR)>or=60 mL/min/1.73 m2 is not reported by clinical laboratories. Here, performance of a more accurate GFR-estimating equation, the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation, is reported by level of GFR and clinical characteristics. Test of diagnostic accuracy. Pooled data set of 3,896 people from 16 studies with measured GFR (not used for the development of either equation). Subgroups were defined by eGFR, age, sex, race, diabetes, prior solid-organ transplant, and body mass index. eGFR from the CKD-EPI and MDRD Study equations and standardized serum creatinine. Measured GFR using urinary or plasma clearance of exogenous filtration markers. Mean measured GFR was 68+/-36 (SD) mL/min/1.73 m2. For eGFR73 m2, both equations have similar bias (median difference compared with measured GFR). For eGFR of 30-59 mL/min/1.73 m2, bias was decreased from 4.9 to 2.1 mL/min/1.73 m2 (57% improvement). For eGFR of 60-89 mL/min/1.73 m2, bias was decreased from 11.9 to 4.2 mL/min/1.73 m2 (61% improvement). For eGFR of 90-119 mL/min/1.73 m2, bias was decreased from 10.0 to 1.9 mL/min/1.73 m2 (75% improvement). Similar or improved performance was noted for most subgroups with eGFR73 m2, other than body mass indexor=90 mL/min/1.73 m2. Limited number of elderly people and racial and ethnic minorities with measured GFR. The CKD-EPI equation is more accurate than the MDRD Study equation overall and across most subgroups. In contrast to the MDRD Study equation, eGFR>or=60 mL/min/1.73 m2 can be reported using the CKD-EPI equation. Copyright (c) 2010 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue on staging atmospheres by surveying the philosophical, political and anthropological literature on atmosphere, and explores the relationship between atmosphere, material culture, subjectivity and affect. Atmosphere seems to occupy one of the classic...

  20. Hepcidin-25 in diabetic chronic kidney disease is predictive for mortality and progression to end stage renal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wagner

    Full Text Available Anemia is common and is associated with impaired clinical outcomes in diabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD. It may be explained by reduced erythropoietin (EPO synthesis, but recent data suggest that EPO-resistance and diminished iron availability due to inflammation contribute significantly. In this cohort study, we evaluated the impact of hepcidin-25--the key hormone of iron-metabolism--on clinical outcomes in diabetic patients with CKD along with endogenous EPO levels.249 diabetic patients with CKD of any stage, excluding end-stage renal disease (ESRD, were enrolled (2003-2005, if they were not on EPO-stimulating agent and iron therapy. Hepcidin-25 levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. The association of hepcidin-25 at baseline with clinical variables was investigated using linear regression models. All-cause mortality and a composite endpoint of CKD progression (ESRD or doubling of serum creatinine were analyzed by Cox proportional hazards models.Patients (age 67 yrs, 53% male, GFR 51 ml/min, hemoglobin 131 g/L, EPO 13.5 U/L, hepcidin-25 62.0 ng/ml were followed for a median time of 4.2 yrs. Forty-nine patients died (19.7% and forty (16.1% patients reached the composite endpoint. Elevated hepcidin levels were independently associated with higher ferritin-levels, lower EPO-levels and impaired kidney function (all p<0.05. Hepcidin was related to mortality, along with its interaction with EPO, older age, greater proteinuria and elevated CRP (all p<0.05. Hepcidin was also predictive for progression of CKD, aside from baseline GFR, proteinuria, low albumin- and hemoglobin-levels and a history of CVD (all p<0.05.We found hepcidin-25 to be associated with EPO and impaired kidney function in diabetic CKD. Elevated hepcidin-25 and EPO-levels were independent predictors of mortality, while hepcidin-25 was also predictive for progression of CKD. Both hepcidin-25 and EPO may represent important prognostic factors of clinical outcome and have the

  1. Skin blood flow in patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Binh; Rongey, Christine; Hiscox, Bryan; Rendell, Marc; Woodley, David; Smogorzewski, Miroslaw

    2010-09-01

    We have shown previously that skin perfusion is reduced in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Patients with diabetes and with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 5 were having advanced microangiopathy. In this cross-sectional study, we measured skin blood flow in DM and non-DM patients on dialysis to assess whether any differences exist in skin perfusion in those 2 groups of patients. A total of 25 patients with DM (aged 59.9 +/- 2.2 years) and 24 patients with non-DM CKD stage 5 (44.6 +/- 2.9 years) on hemodialysis (HD) were studied. Ten healthy subjects (37 +/- 4.3 years) were used as a control group. Skin blood flow (SBF) was measured using Vasamedic Model 403B laser Doppler device (Vasamedics Inc., St. Paul, MN) in a standardized way at the plantar and dorsal surface of the finger and toe and at the pretibial surface of the leg at 2 different local skin temperatures of 35 degrees C and 44 degrees C. Laboratory biochemical data were collected at the time of SBF study. The SBF measured at 35 degrees C was lower in the patients with DM on dialysis as compared with healthy subjects and non-DM dialysis patients. The SBF response to the increase in temperature of the probe to 44 degrees C was 70% to 80% lower in DM patients as compared with healthy subjects and non-DM patients. However, non-DM subjects who displayed SBF similar to control subjects at 35 degrees C, had impaired response in SBF at 44 degrees C as well. Patients with lower serum albumin exhibited lower SBF even after adjustment for age. SBF is impaired in patients with stage 5 CKD on HD, particularly in those with DM as a cause of CKD. SBF negatively correlated with age and albumin (nutritional status) in DM and non-DM patients with stage 5 CKD on HD. Measurement of SBF can be useful in the evaluation of vasculopathy in CKD population and can potentially be used for assessment of vascular response during specific clinical intervention. Copyright 2010 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by

  2. Comparison of renal dynamic imaging and modified MDRD equation in determining the stage of chronic kidney disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Peng; Liu Xiaomei; Huang Jianmin; Zhang Fang; Pan Liping; Wu Weijie; Gao Jianqing

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of 99 Tc m -diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid ( 99 Tc m -DTPA) renal dynamic imaging and modified modification of diet in renal disease trail (MDRD) equation in determining the stage of the chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients in clinical practice. Methods: A total of 169 patients were enrolled whose glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were determined simultaneously by 3 methods: dual plasma sample clearance method, renal dynamic imaging and modified MDRD equation. The dual plasma sample clearance method was employed as the reference method. The accuracy of the other methods in determining the stage of CKD patients was compared and the comparison was repeated based on the different stages. Results: The accuracy of renal dynamic imaging and modified MDRD equation was 56.80% and 68.64%, respectively (P=0.019<0.05). And only in the stage of uremia, the difference of the above-mentioned two method reached statistical significance (P=0.012<0.05), while in other stages they showed similar performance (P=0.180, 0.424, 0.629 and 0.754, all P>0.05). Conclusion: Modified MDRD equation showed better performance than renal dynamic imaging or as good as the second one in determining the stage of CKD patients and the former one should be the first choice in clinical practice because of its simplicity and economy. (authors)

  3. Renin-angiotensin II-aldosterone system blockers and time to renal replacement therapy in children with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Alison G; Betoko, Aisha; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J; Pierce, Christopher; Furth, Susan L; Warady, Bradley A; Muñoz, Alvaro

    2017-04-01

    Clinical care decisions to treat chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a growing child must often be made without the benefit of evidence from clinical trials. We used observational data from the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children cohort to estimate the effectiveness of renin-angiotensin II-aldosterone system blockade (RAAS) to delay renal replacement therapy (RRT) in children with CKD. A total of 851 participants (median age: 11 years, median glomerular filtration rate [GFR]: 52 ml/min/1.73 m 2 , median urine protein to creatinine ratio: 0.35 mg/mg) were included. RAAS use was reported at annual study visits. Both Cox proportional hazards models with time-varying RAAS exposure and Cox marginal structural models (MSM) were used to evaluate the effect of RAAS use on time to RRT. Analyses were adjusted or weighted to control for age, male sex, glomerular diagnosis, GFR, nephrotic range proteinuria, anemia, elevated blood pressure, acidosis, elevated phosphate and elevated potassium. There were 217 RRT events over a 4.1-year median follow-up. At baseline, 472 children (55 %) were prevalent RAAS users, who were more likely to be older, have a glomerular etiology, have higher urine protein, be anemic, have elevated serum phosphate and potassium, take more medications, but less likely to have elevated blood pressure, compared with non-users. RAAS use was found to reduce the risk of RRT by 21 % (hazard ratio: 0.79) to 37 % (hazard ratio: 0.63) from standard regression adjustment and MSM models, respectively. These results support inferences from adult studies of a substantial benefit of RAAS use in pediatric CKD patients.

  4. The impact of pre-intervention rate of kidney function change on the assessment of CKD progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, Robert G; Geraghty, Dominic P; Coombes, Jeff S

    2014-10-01

    Without a run-in phase, chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients enrolled in clinical trials may not be identified as having progressive disease. The aim of this analysis was to quantify the effects of a run-in phase on kidney function outcome in CKD patients enrolled in the Lipid Lowering and Onset of Renal Disease (LORD) trial. The LORD trial assessed the effects of atorvastatin on the rate of change in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and included patients with serum creatinine 120 μmol/l. In this post hoc analysis, we assessed eGFR change during the 12-month period prior to enrolment, the 3-month run-in phase and the first 12-month period of the trial. Eighty of the original 132 patients (where retrospective data were available) were included. The rate of eGFR change during each period was compared. Overall kidney function decreased during the 12 months prior to enrolment by (mean, SD) 0.39 ± 0.98 ml/min/1.73 m(2)/month, improved during the 3-month run-in phase by 0.48 ± 2.90 ml/min/1.73 m(2)/month and decreased during the first 12 months of the trial by 0.15 ± 0.57 ml/min/1.73 m(2)/month. However, only 39 % of patients had declining eGFR during the 12 months prior, 19 % in the 3-month run-in and 42 % during the first 12-month study phase. Most patients (>60 %) entering this clinical trial had stable or improving kidney function. Enrolment was associated with further improved kidney function, which may have been due to 'regression to the mean' or to the Hawthorne effect. Investigators should include a run-in period to establish the presence of eGFR decline to use as an inclusion criterion in clinical trials assessing this measure of CKD progression.

  5. 30 CFR 1.2 - Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OFFICIAL EMBLEM AND OMB CONTROL NUMBERS FOR RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION; ESTABLISHMENT AND USE OF OFFICIAL EMBLEM § 1.2 Description. The emblem of the Mine Safety and Health Administration is of contemporary design...

  6. Increased rho kinase activity in mononuclear cells of dialysis and stage 3-4 chronic kidney disease patients with left ventricular hypertrophy: Cardiovascular risk implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calò, Lorenzo A; Vertolli, Ugo; Pagnin, Elisa; Ravarotto, Verdiana; Davis, Paul A; Lupia, Mario; Naso, Elena; Maiolino, Giuseppe; Naso, Agostino

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of excess mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and dialysis patients (DP) who have higher prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), the strongest predictor of CV events. Rho kinase (ROCK) activation is linked in hypertensive patients to cardiac remodeling while ROCK inhibition suppresses cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and, in a human clinical condition opposite to hypertension, its downregulation associates with lack of CV remodeling. Information on ROCK activation-LVH link in CKD and DP is lacking. Mononuclear cells (PBMCs) MYPT-1 phosphorylation, a marker of ROCK activity, and the effect of fasudil, a ROCK inhibitor, on MYPT-1 phosphorylation were assessed in 23 DPs, 13 stage 3-4 CKD and 36 healthy subjects (HS) by Western blot. LV mass was assessed by M-mode echocardiography. DP and CKD had higher MYPT-1 phosphorylation compared to HS (p<0.001 and p=0.003). Fasudil (500 and 1000μM) dose dependently reduced MYPT-1 phosphorylation in DP (p<0.01). DP had higher LV mass than CKD (p<0.001). MYPT-1 phosphorylation was higher in patients with LVH (p=0.009) and correlated with LV mass both in DP and CKD with LVH (p<0.001 and p=0.006). In DP and CKD, ROCK activity tracks with LVH. This ROCK activation-LVH link provided in these CVD high-risk patients along with similar findings in hypertensive patients and added to opposite findings in a human model opposite to hypertension and in type 2 diabetic patients, identify ROCK activation as a potential LVH marker and provide further rationale for ROCK activation inhibition as target of therapy in CVD high-risk patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. What is the impact of chronic kidney disease stage and cardiovascular disease on the annual cost of hospital care in moderate-to-severe kidney disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kent, Seamus; Schlackow, Iryna; Lozano-Kuehne, Jingky; Reith, Christina; Emberson, Jonathan; Haynes, Richard; Gray, Alastair; Cass, Alan; Baigent, Colin; Landray, Martin J.; Herrington, William; Mihaylova, Borislava; de Zeeuw, Dick; Navis, Gerjan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reliable estimates of the impacts of chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage, with and without cardiovascular disease, on hospital costs are needed to inform health policy. Methods: The Study of Heart and Renal Protection (SHARP) randomized trial prospectively collected information on kidney

  8. Lower estimated glomerular filtration rate and higher albuminuria are associated with mortality and end-stage renal disease. A collaborative meta-analysis of kidney disease population cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astor, Brad C; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Gansevoort, Ron T

    2011-01-01

    We studied here the independent associations of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We performed a collaborative meta-analysis of 13 studies totaling 21,688 patients selected...

  9. Relation of Aortic Valve and Coronary Artery Calcium in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease to the Stage and Etiology of the Renal Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piers, Lieuwe H.; Touw, Hugo R. W.; Gansevoort, Ron; Franssen, Casper F. M.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Zijlstra, Felix; Tio, Rene A.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure have increased cardiac calcium loads. Previous studies have investigated the prevalence and quantitative extent of aortic valve calcium (AVC) and coronary artery calcium (CAC) in patients with various stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the impact of

  10. Relationship between symptom clusters and quality of life in patients at stages 2 to 4 chronic kidney disease in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suk Jeong; Jeon, JaeHee

    2015-11-01

    This study was conducted to identify the relationship between symptom clusters and quality of life (QOL) in patients with stages 2 to 4 chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Korea. Using self-reported questionnaires, data were collected from 143 patients who underwent treatment for CKD at one hospital in Korea. The 17-item Patient Outcome Scale was used to measure symptoms, and the 36-item Short Form Health Survey Instrument Version 2 (SF-36v2) was used to measure the QOL. Data were analyzed using factor analysis to draw symptom clusters. Among five symptom clusters, the energy insufficiency and pain cluster was found to have the highest prevalence and greatest severity. The severity of symptom clusters showed negative correlations with both physical and mental component summary (PCS and MCS) scores. Elderly patients scored low on PCS, whereas younger patients in their 30s and 40s scored low on MCS. Negative correlations were found between symptom clusters and PCS as well as MCS. The severity of symptoms and QOL had stronger relationships with subjective perception of symptoms and psychological factors than with objective clinical indicators. As the effects of physical and psychological symptoms on the QOL in patients with stages 2 to 4 CKD were identified in this study, nurses should develop strategic nursing plans focused on symptom clusters and patients' subjective perception of symptoms rather than objective clinical indicators in order to improve the QOL in patients with CKD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Etiology and management of dyslipidemia in children with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Mona; Silverstein, Douglas M

    2015-12-01

    Lipids are essential components of cell membranes, contributing to cell fuel, myelin formation, subcellular organelle function, and steroid hormone synthesis. Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) exhibit various co-morbidities, including dyslipidemia. The prevalence of dyslipidemias in children with CKD and ESRD is high, being present in 39-65% of patients. Elevated lipid levels in children without renal disease are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), while the risk for CVD in pediatric CKD/ESRD is unclear. The pathogenesis of dyslipidemia in CKD features various factors, including increased levels of triglycerides, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC-III), decreased levels of cholesterylester transfer protein and high-density lipoproteins, and aberrations in serum very low-density and intermediate-density lipoproteins. If initial risk assessment indicates that a child with advanced CKD has 2 or more co-morbidities for CVD, first-line treatment should consist of non-pharmacologic management such as therapeutic lifestyle changes and dietary counseling. Pharmacologic treatment of dyslipidemia may reduce the incidence of CVD in children with CKD/ESRD, but randomized trials are lacking. Statins are the only class of lipid-lowering drugs currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the pediatric population. FDA-approved pediatric labeling for these drugs is based on results from placebo-controlled trial results, showing 30-50% reductions in baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Although statins are generally well tolerated in adults, a spectrum of adverse events has been reported with their use in both the clinical trial and post-marketing settings.

  12. Progression of autosomal dominant kidney disease: measurement of the stage transitions of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Blanchette

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is a progressive genetic disorder characterized by the development of numerous kidney cysts that result in kidney failure. Little is known regarding the key patient characteristics and utilization of healthcare resources for ADPKD patients along the continuum of disease progression. This observational study was designed to describe the characteristics of ADPKD patients and compare them with those of patients with other chronic kidney diseases. Methods: This retrospective cohort study involved patients with a claim for ADPKD or PKD unspecified from 1/1/2000–2/28/2013 and ≥6 months of previous continuous enrollment (baseline within a large database of administrative claims in the USA. A random sample of chronic kidney disease (CKD patients served as comparators. For a subset of ADPKD patients who had only a diagnosis code of unspecified PKD, abstraction of medical records was undertaken to estimate the proportion of patients who had medical chart-confirmed ADPKD. In patients with linked electronic laboratory data, the estimated glomerular filtration rate was calculated via serum creatinine values to determine CKD stage at baseline and during follow-up. Proportions of patients transitioning to another stage and the mean age at transition were calculated. Results: ADPKD patients were, in general, younger and had fewer physician visits, but had more specific comorbidities at observation start compared with CKD patients. ADPKD patients had a longer time in the milder stages and longer duration before recorded transition to a more severe stage compared with CKD patients. Patients with ADPKD at risk of rapid progression had a shorter time-to-end-stage renal disease than patients with CKD and ADPKD patients not at risk, but stage duration was similar between ADPKD patients at risk and those not at risk. Conclusions: These results suggest that distribution of patients by age at transition

  13. Psychometric evaluation of a new instrument to measure disease self-management of the early stage chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiu-Chu; Wu, Chia-Chen; Wu, Li-Min; Chen, Hsing-Mei; Chang, Shu-Chen

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to develop a valid and reliable chronic kidney disease self-management instrument (CKD-SM) for assessing early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours. Enhancing early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management plays a key role in delaying the progression of chronic kidney disease. Healthcare provider understanding of early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours can help develop effective interventions. A valid and reliable instrument for measuring chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours is needed. A cross-sectional descriptive study collected data for principal components analysis with oblique rotation. Mandarin- or Taiwanese-speaking adults with chronic kidney disease (n=252) from two medical centres and one regional hospital in Southern Taiwan completed the CKD-SM. Construct validity was evaluated by exploratory factor analysis. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were estimated by Cronbach's alpha and Pearson correlation coefficients. Four factors were extracted and labelled self-integration, problem-solving, seeking social support and adherence to recommended regimen. The four factors accounted for 60.51% of the total variance. Each factor showed acceptable internal reliability with Cronbach's alpha from 0.77-0.92. The test-retest correlations for the CKD-SM was 0.72. The psychometric quality of the CKD-SM instrument was satisfactory. Research to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis to further validate this new instrument's construct validity is recommended. The CKD-SM instrument is useful for clinicians who wish to identify the problems with self-management among chronic kidney disease patients early. Self-management assessment will be helpful to develop intervention tailored to the needs of the chronic kidney disease population. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. The FIND-CKD study--a randomized controlled trial of intravenous iron versus oral iron in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients: background and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdougall, Iain C; Bock, Andreas; Carrera, Fernando; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gaillard, Carlo; Van Wyck, David; Roubert, Bernard; Cushway, Timothy; Roger, Simon D

    2014-04-01

    Rigorous data are sparse concerning the optimal route of administration and dosing strategy for iron therapy with or without concomitant erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) therapy for the management of iron deficiency anaemia in patients with non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD). FIND-CKD was a 56-week, open-label, multicentre, prospective, randomized three-arm study (NCT00994318) of 626 patients with ND-CKD and iron deficiency anaemia randomized to (i) intravenous (IV) ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) at an initial dose of 1000 mg iron with subsequent dosing as necessary to target a serum ferritin level of 400-600 µg/L (ii) IV FCM at an initial dose of 200 mg with subsequent dosing as necessary to target serum ferritin 100-200 µg/L or (iii) oral ferrous sulphate 200 mg iron/day. The primary end point was time to initiation of other anaemia management (ESA therapy, iron therapy other than study drug or blood transfusion) or a haemoglobin (Hb) trigger (two consecutive Hb values FIND-CKD was the longest randomized trial of IV iron therapy to date. Its findings will address several unanswered questions regarding iron therapy to treat iron deficiency anaemia in patients with ND-CKD. It was also the first randomized trial to utilize both a high and low serum ferritin target range to adjust IV iron dosing, and the first not to employ Hb response as its primary end point.

  15. Health-related quality of life in different stages of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, H K; Jain, D; Pawar, S; Yadav, R K

    2016-11-01

    Improved survival of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients has led to an increased focus on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) for evaluating treatment effectiveness and assessing health outcomes of these patients. To evaluate HRQoL in patients in different stages of CKD and to explore possible correlating and influencing factors. Cross-sectional design with 200 patients from India in CKD stages 1-5 assessed for HRQoL through 36-item short-form together with biomarkers. Patients were divided into four groups according to their estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR); group A with GFR range > 90 ml/min/1.73 m 2 , group B with GFR range 30-59 ml/min/1.73 m 2 , group C with GFR range 15-29 ml/min/1.73 m 2 and group D with GFR stages. A statistically significant decreasing trend in physical composite summary and mental composite summary scores was found in patients from group A to D (Plife. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Nitrone Cycloadditions of 1,2-Cyclohexadiene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Joyann S.; Styduhar, Evan D.; Pham, Hung V.; McMahon, Travis C.; Houk, K. N.; Garg, Neil K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the first 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions of 1,2-cyclohexadiene, a rarely exploited strained allene. 1,2-Cyclohexadiene is generated in situ under mild conditions and trapped with nitrones to give isoxazolidine products in synthetically useful yields. The reactions occur regioselectively and exhibit a notable endo preference, thus resulting in the controlled formation of two new bonds and two stereogenic centers. DFT calculations of stepwise and concerted reaction pathways are used to rationalize the observed selectivities. Moreover, the strategic manipulation of nitrone cycloadducts demonstrates the utility of this methodology for the assembly of compounds bearing multiple heterocyclic units. These studies showcase the exploitation of a traditionally avoided reactive intermediate in chemical synthesis. PMID:26854652

  17. Syndrome of rapid onset end stage renal disease in incident Mayo Clinic chronic hemodialysis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. C. Onuigbo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research, a full understanding of chronic kidney disease (CKD-end stage renal disease (ESRD progression remains elusive. The common consensus is a predictable, linear, progressive and time-dependent decline of CKD to ESRD. Acute kidney injury (AKI on CKD is usually assumed to be transient, with recovery as the expected outcome. AKI-ESRD association in current nephrology literature is blamed on the so-called "residual confounding." We had previously described a relationship between AKI events and rapid onset yet irreversible ESRD happening in a continuum in a high-risk CKD cohort. However, the contribution of the syndrome of rapid onset-ESRD (SORO-ESRD to incident United States ESRD population remained conjectural. In this retrospective analysis, we analyzed serum creatinine trajectories of the last 100 consecutive ESRD patients in 4 Mayo Clinic chronic hemodialysis units to determine the incidence of SORO-ESRD. Excluding 9 patients, 31 (34% patients, including two renal transplant recipients, had SORO-ESRD: 18 males and 13 females age 72 (range 50-92 years. Precipitating AKI followed pneumonia (8, acutely decompensated heart failure (7, pyelonephritis (4, post-operative (5, sepsis (3, contrast-induced nephropathy (2, and others (2. Time to dialysis was shortest following surgical procedures. Concurrent renin angiotensin aldosterone system blockade was higher with SORO-ESRD - 23% versus 5%, P = 0.0113. In conclusion, SORO-ESRD is not uncommon among the incident general US ESRD population. The implications for ESRD care planning, AV-fistula-first programs, general CKD care and any associations with renal ageing/senescence warrant further study.

  18. End-Stage Renal Disease Outcomes among the Kaiser Permanente Southern California Creatinine Safety Program (Creatinine SureNet): Opportunities to Reflect and Improve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, John J; Batech, Michael; Danforth, Kim N; Rutkowski, Mark P; Jacobsen, Steven J; Kanter, Michael H

    2017-01-01

    The Kaiser Permanente Southern California (KPSC) creatinine safety program (Creatinine SureNet) identifies and outreaches to thousands of people annually who may have had a missed diagnosis for chronic kidney disease (CKD). We sought to determine the value of this outpatient program and evaluate opportunities for improvement. Longitudinal cohort study (February 2010 through December 2015) of KPSC members captured into the creatinine safety program who were characterized using demographics, laboratory results, and different estimations of glomerular filtration rate. Age- and sex-adjusted rates of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were compared with those in the overall KPSC population. Among 12,394 individuals, 83 (0.7%) reached ESRD. The age- and sex-adjusted relative risk of ESRD was 2.7 times higher compared with the KPSC general population during the same period (94.7 vs 35.4 per 100,000 person-years; p creatinine measurements, only 13% had a urine study performed (32% among patients with confirmed CKD). Our study found a higher incidence of ESRD among individuals captured into the KPSC creatinine safety program. If the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation were used, fewer people would have been captured while improving the accuracy for diagnosing CKD. Urine testing was low even among patients with confirmed CKD. Our findings demonstrate the importance of a creatinine safety net program in an integrated health system but also suggest opportunities to improve CKD care and screening.

  19. No independent association of serum phosphorus with risk for death or progression to end-stage renal disease in a large screen for chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Rajnish; Peralta, Carmen A.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Li, Suying; Sachs, Michael; Shah, Anuja; Norris, Keith; Saab, Georges; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Kestenbaum, Bryan; McCullough, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Whether higher serum phosphorus levels are associated with a higher risk for death and/or progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is not well established, and whether the association is confounded by access and barriers to care is unknown. To answer these questions, data of 10,672 individuals identified to have CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate disease (ESRD) (unadjusted hazards ratio, 6.72 (4.16–10.85)); however, the risk became nonsignificant on adjustment for potential confounders. There was no appreciable change in hazards ratio with inclusion of variables related to access and barriers to care. Additional analyses in subgroups based on 12 different variables yielded similar negative associations. Thus, in the largest cohort of individuals with early-stage CKD to date, we could not validate an independent association of serum phosphorus with risk for death or progression to ESRD. PMID:23615501

  20. Internal rotation for predicting conformational population of 1,2-difluorethane and 1,2-dichloroethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venâncio, Mateus F. [Laboratório de Química Computacional e Modelagem Molecular, Departamento de Química, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Campus Universitário, 31.270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Dos Santos, Hélio F. [Núcleo de Estudos em Química Computacional (NEQC), Departamento de Química, ICE, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Campus Universitário, Martelos, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-330 (Brazil); De Almeida, Wagner B., E-mail: wbdealmeida@gmail.com [Laboratório de Química Computacional (LQC), Departamento de Química Inorgânica, Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Campus do Valonguinho, Centro, Niterói, RJ CEP: 24020-141 (Brazil)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Contribution of internal rotation to Gibbs free energy estimated using the quantum pendulum model. • Theoretical prediction of conformational population of 1,2-difluorethane and 1,2-dichloroethane. • The predicted populations are in excellent agreement with experimental gas phase data available. • QPM model account for low vibrational frequency modes effect on thermodynamic calculation. • Caution is needed when the RR–HO approach has to be used in conformational analysis studies. - Abstract: The contribution of internal rotation to the thermal correction of Gibbs free energy (ΔG) is estimated using the quantum pendulum model (QPM) to solve the characteristic Schrödinger equation. The procedure is applied to theoretical prediction of conformational population of 1,2-difluorethane (1,2-DFE) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCE) molecules. The predicted population for the anti form was 37% and 75%, for 1,2-DFE and 1,2-DCE respectively, in excellent agreement with experimental gas phase data available, 37 ± 5% and 78 ± 5%. These results provide great support to the use of the QPM model to account for the low vibrational frequency modes effect on the calculation of thermodynamic properties.

  1. Early quantification of the therapeutic efficacy of the vascular disrupting agent, CKD-516, using dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in rabbit VX2 liver tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Ijin; Kim, Jung Hoon; Lee, Jeong Min; Choi, Jin Woo; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (DCE-US) in the early quantification of hemodynamic change following administration of the vascular disrupting agent (VDA) CKD-516 using a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. This study was approved by our institutional animal care and use committee. Eight VX2 liver-tumor-bearing rabbits were treated with intravenous CKD-516, and all underwent DCE-US using SonoVue before and again 2, 4, 6, and 24 hours following their treatment. The tumor perfusion parameters were obtained from the time-intensity curve of the DCE-US data. Repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to assess any significant change in tumor perfusion over time. Relative changes in the DCE-US parameters between the baseline and follow-up assessments were correlated with the relative changes in tumor size over the course of seven days using Pearson correlation. CKD-516 treatment resulted in significant changes in the DCE-US parameters, including the peak intensity, total area under the time-intensity curve (AUCtotal), and AUC during wash-out (AUCout) over time (P<0.05). Pairwise comparison tests revealed that the AUCtotal and AUC during wash-in (AUCin) seen on the two-hour follow-up were significantly lower than the baseline values (P<0.05). However, none of early changes in the DCE-US parameters until 24-hour follow-up showed a significant correlation with the relative changes in tumor size during seven days after CKD-516 treatment. Our results suggest that a novel VDA (CKD-516) can cause disruption of tumor perfusion as early as two hours after treatment and that the therapeutic effect of CKD-516 treatment can be effectively quantified using DCE-US.

  2. Cadmium complexes with 1,2-dimethylbenzimidazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slyusarenko, K F; Artemenko, M V; Pokhodnya, G A [Kievskij Tekhnologicheskij Inst. Pishchevoj Promyshlennosti (Ukrainian SSR)

    1982-02-01

    New coordination complexes of Cd(2) with 1, 2 - dimethylbenzimidazole (DMBI) of the composition DMBIxCdX/sub 2/, where X=Cl, Br, I and 2DMBIxCdX/sub 2/, where X=NO/sub 3/, CH/sub 3/COO, SCN as well as acido-complexes of the composition (DMBIH)xCdX/sub 4/ (X=Cl, Br) are synthesized. IR-spectra, diffraction diagrams and curves of radial distribution of atomic density for coordination halides and for the rhodanide complex are investigated. Conclusions on individuality and structure of the compounds obtained are made.

  3. Dipropyl 3,6-diphenyl-1,2-dihydro-1,2,4,5-tetrazine-1,2-dicarboxylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Guo-Wu; Hu, Wei-Xiao

    2003-05-01

    The title compound, C(22)H(24)N(4)O(4), was prepared from propyl chloroformate and 3,6-diphenyl-1,2-dihydro-s-tetrazine. This reaction yields the title compound rather than dipropyl 3,6-diphenyl-1,4-dihydro-s-tetrazine-1,4-dicarboxylate. The 2,3-diazabutadiene group in the central six-membered ring is not planar; the C=N double-bond length is 1.285 (2) A, and the average N-N single-bond length is 1.401 (3) A, indicating a lack of conjugation. The ring has a twist conformation, in which adjacent N atoms lie +/- 0.3268 (17) A from the plane of the ring. The molecule has twofold crystallographic symmetry.

  4. The effect of magnesium supplementation on vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease-a randomised clinical trial (MAGiCAL-CKD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bressendorff, Iain; Hansen, Ditte; Schou, Morten

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality, which is thought to be caused by increased propensity towards vascular calcification (VC). Magnesium (Mg) inhibits phosphate-induced VC in vitro and in animal models and serum Mg...... the progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC) in subjects with predialysis CKD. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will randomise 250 subjects with estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 45 mL/min/1.73 m2 to 12 months treatment with either slow-release Mg hydroxide 30 mmol/day or matching placebo in a 1...

  5. Multinational observational study on clinical practices and therapeutic management of mineral and bone disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease stages 4, 5, and 5D: The OCEANOS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faissal A. M. Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to assess the current clinical practices in monitoring and treatment patterns of chronic kidney disease (CKD-mineral bone disorder and the degree to which these practices met the kidney disease improving global outcome (KDIGO guidelines. This was an international, multi-center, cross-sectional, observational study in adult patients diagnosed with CKD Stages 4, 5, and 5D. Patients were enrolled from Middle East, South Asia, Eurasia, and Africa; patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥30 mL/min/1.73 m 2 or with any medical/surgical conditions precluding their participation were excluded. Frequency of measurements, levels of serum calcium (Ca, phosphorus and parathormone (parathyroid hormone [PTH], and presence vascular/valvular calcification were recorded. Of the 2250 patients enrolled, data on 2247 patients were evaluated. Overall, only a small percentage of patients met all three target KDIGO ranges of serum Ca, phosphorus, and PTH (13.7% [95% confidence interval: 12.0; 15.4], with a higher proportion among CKD Stage 5D patients (14.8% than CKD Stage 4 and 5 (5.6% patients. Majority (84.3% of the patients received treatment with phosphorous binders, of whom 85.5% received Ca-based phosphate binders. Overall, 57.0% of patients received Vitamin D treatment with a similar frequency among patients with CKD Stages 4, 5, and 5D. Over half (65.7% of the patients were screened for vascular/valvular calcification; of these, 58.8% had ≥1 calcification. Diabetes status, P, PTH, and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol had significant impact on the prescription pattern of phosphorous binders. The current practices for the management of bone and mineral metabolism in CKD patients in the study region fall far short of meeting the KDIGO target range.

  6. Cognitive Impairment in Non-Dialysis-Dependent CKD and the Transition to Dialysis: Findings From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harhay, Meera N; Xie, Dawei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Hsu, Chi-Yuan; Vittinghoff, Eric; Go, Alan S; Sozio, Stephen M; Blumenthal, Jacob; Seliger, Stephen; Chen, Jing; Deo, Rajat; Dobre, Mirela; Akkina, Sanjeev; Reese, Peter P; Lash, James P; Yaffe, Kristine; Tamura, Manjula Kurella

    2018-05-02

    Advanced chronic kidney disease is associated with elevated risk for cognitive impairment. However, it is not known whether and how cognitive impairment is associated with planning and preparation for end-stage renal disease. Retrospective observational study. 630 adults participating in the CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study who had cognitive assessments in late-stage CKD, defined as estimated glome-rular filtration rate ≤ 20mL/min/1.73m 2 , and subsequently initiated maintenance dialysis therapy. Predialysis cognitive impairment, defined as a score on the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination lower than previously derived age-based threshold scores. Covariates included age, race/ethnicity, educational attainment, comorbid conditions, and health literacy. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) as first dialysis modality, preemptive permanent access placement, venous catheter avoidance at dialysis therapy initiation, and preemptive wait-listing for a kidney transplant. Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. Predialysis cognitive impairment was present in 117 (19%) participants. PD was the first dialysis modality among 16% of participants (n=100), 75% had preemptive access placed (n=473), 45% avoided using a venous catheter at dialysis therapy initiation (n=279), and 20% were preemptively wait-listed (n=126). Predialysis cognitive impairment was independently associated with 78% lower odds of PD as the first dialysis modality (adjusted OR [aOR], 0.22; 95% CI, 0.06-0.74; P=0.02) and 42% lower odds of venous catheter avoidance at dialysis therapy initiation (aOR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.34-0.98; P=0.04). Predialysis cognitive impairment was not independently associated with preemptive permanent access placement or wait-listing. Potential unmeasured confounders; single measure of cognitive function. Predialysis cognitive impairment is associated with a lower likelihood of PD as a first dialysis modality and of venous catheter avoidance at dialysis therapy

  7. PRIze{sup TM} 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    PRIze{sup TM} 1.2 is a computer program that evaluates the improved oil recovery (IOR) potential of petroleum reservoirs including the use of horizontal wells. It was created in 1992 and has since been used in over 800 reservoir evaluations. The tool provides information on the feasibility of IOR processes based on reservoir parameters. PRIze{sup TM} makes predictions for chemical, gas injection and thermal IOR processes based on both vertical and horizontal wells. The program provides a uniform data entry screen that allows the user to input 42 average values of geological parameters, fluid properties and oil production mechanism information into a data file. The data can be used to provide a production forecast, and enable the user to establish, to a first order approximation, the economic viability of a given process.

  8. Word Criticality Analysis. MOS: 44B. Skill Levels 1 & 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    IILh2- 51,1 2- 96,1 2- 40.A a- sv;t t. 94.1 2- Soil 2- 12,2 2- list 2-Z5,1 2- 170i 1. 10,1 2- 95.) 2- 19.1 Z- 50.1 1- 411 * 3 Slits 2- 57j,1 0 3...46.1 2- 44,1 2- 43,1 2- 411J 2- . , 1 2- 53,1 2- .2. 2- 51,1 2- Soil 2- 49,1 2- 68.1 2- 47.1 4 APIII’l~if 2-.2 , SATTERIFS Z- 25,1 2 1 6 PIJ$1| " 2...9s1 2 9 1 2 lt 2 71 2 6 o -63,1 2- 94𔃻 2- 00 2- 0,1 2- 95,1 2- 96,1 2-10001 2- 96.1 A USL 2, 91.1 2 59,1 2- 16.1 2- 51 -1- 40,1 2’ 401 2- 31,2 2- 30#2

  9. On a directed variation of the 1-2-3 and 1-2 Conjectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barme, Emma; Bensmail, Julien; Przybyło, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the following question, which stands as a directed analogue of the well-known 1-2-3 Conjecture: Given any digraph D with no arc uv verifying d+(u) = d¯(v) = 1, is it possible to weight the arcs of D with weights among ⟨1; 2; 3⟩ so that, for every arc uv of D, the sum of...

  10. Bubbling 1/2 BPS geometries and Penrose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Yastoshi; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2005-01-01

    We discuss how to take a Penrose limit in bubbling 1/2 Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield geometries at the stage of a single function z(x 1 ,x 2 ,y). By starting from the z of the AdS 5 xS 5 , we can directly derive that of the pp wave via the Penrose limit. In the course of the calculation, the function z for the pp wave with 1/R 2 corrections is obtained. We see that it surely reproduces the pp wave with 1/R 2 terms. We also investigate the pp wave with higher-order 1/R 2 corrections. In addition, the Penrose limit in the configuration of the concentric rings is considered

  11. Oral calcium carbonate affects calcium but not phosphorus balance in stage 3–4 chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kathleen M.; Martin, Berdine R.; Wastney, Meryl; McCabe, George P.; Moe, Sharon M.; Weaver, Connie M.; Peacock, Munro

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are given calcium carbonate to bind dietary phosphorus and reduce phosphorus retention, and to prevent negative calcium balance. Data are limited on calcium and phosphorus balance in CKD to support this. The aim of this study was to determine calcium and phosphorus balance and calcium kinetics with and without calcium carbonate in CKD patients. Eight stage 3/4 CKD patients, eGFR 36 mL/min, participated in two 3-week balances in a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over study of calcium carbonate (1500 mg/d calcium). Calcium and phosphorus balance were determined on a controlled diet. Oral and intravenous 45calcium with blood sampling and urine and fecal collections were used for calcium kinetics. Fasting blood and urine were collected at baseline and end of each week of each balance period for biochemical analyses. Results showed that patients were in neutral calcium and phosphorus balance while on placebo. Calcium carbonate produced positive calcium balance, did not affect phosphorus balance, and produced only a modest reduction in urine phosphorus excretion compared with placebo. Calcium kinetics demonstrated positive net bone balance but less than overall calcium balance suggesting tissue deposition. Fasting biochemistries of calcium and phosphate homeostasis were unaffected by calcium carbonate. If they can be extrapolated to effects of chronic therapy, these data caution against the use of calcium carbonate as a phosphate binder. PMID:23254903

  12. Enriched uranium processing with 7-1/2% TBP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orth, D.A.; Martin, W.H.; Pickett, C.E.

    1983-01-01

    The 7-1/2% TBP flowsheet gives adequate recovery of uranium and neptunium or plutonium, with reduced waste volume as compared to the prior aluminum-salted 3-1/2% TBP flowsheet. Decontamination from fission products is sensitive to numerous variables, including aluminum nitrate concentration in the feed, impeller speeds, and prior treatment of the fuel solution in head end operations. The impeller speed in the 1A bank also influences uranium losses as well as the fission product decontamination. The magnitudes of these effects suggest that stage efficiency is poor with this flowsheet in this mixer settler unit. The existing continuous solvent washers give evidence of low washing efficiency that limits permissible feed activity and that may be related to low contact time between the solvent and the carbonate wash solution. The most general conclusion is that satisfactory operation can be obtained with all projected domestic and foreign fuels under consideration for processing, by suitable adjustment of operating conditions. Also, possible flowsheet and equipment changes are known that could improve operations with these fuels further. 7 references

  13. What is the role of nephrologists and nurses of the dialysis department in providing fertility care to CKD patients? : A questionnaire study among care providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ek, Gaby F.; Krouwel, Esmée M.; Nicolai, Melianthe P. J.; den Oudsten, B.L.; Den Ouden, Marjolein E. M.; Dieben, Sandra W. M.; Putter, Hein; Pelger, Rob C. M.; Elzevier, Henk W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated current fertility care for CKD patients by assessing the perspectives of nephrologists and nurses in the dialysis department. Methods Two different surveys were distributed for this cross-sectional study among Dutch nephrologists (N = 312) and dialysis nurses (N = 1211).

  14. Synthesis of fused 1,2,4-dithiazines and 1,2,3,5-trithiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyioni, Maria; Manoli, Maria; Koutentis, Panayiotis A

    2014-10-17

    Reacting (Z)-N-(4-chloro-5H-1,2,3-dithiazol-5-ylidene)-1H-pyrazol-5-amines 5 with Et2NH and then with concd H2SO4 gives 5H-pyrazolo[3,4-e][1,2,4]dithiazine-3-carbonitriles 7 in good yields (74-85%) and 6H-pyrazolo[3,4-f][1,2,3,5]trithiazepine-4-carbonitriles 9 as minor products (0-6%). Furthermore, the 1,3-dimethylpyrazole analogue 5a was transformed into the dithiazine 7a in two discrete steps, allowing the isolation of a disulfide intermediate (Z)-2-[(diethylamino)disulfan-yl]-2-[(1H-pyrazol-5-yl)imino]acetonitrile (8a). The one-pot, two-step reaction also worked with electron-rich hydroxy- and methoxy-substituted anilines. Thermolysis of the pyrazolo[3,4-e][1,2,4]dithiazines 7 gave the ring-contracted 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]thiazole-5-carbonitriles 6 (94-100%). With active sulfur, 1,3-dimethyl-5H-pyrazolo[3,4-e][1,2,4]dithiazine-3-carbonitrile (7a) gave 1,3-dimethyl-6H-pyrazolo[3,4-f][1,2,3,5]trithiazepine-4-carbonitrile (9a), but on prolonged reaction times, it gave 5,7-dimethyl-5H-[1,2,3]dithiazolo[4,5-b]pyrazolo[3,4-e][1,4]thiazine (13). Finally, in the absence of acid, heating a solution of (Z)-2-[(diethylamino)disulfanyl]-2-[(1,3-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)imino]acetonitrile (8a) gave 4,6,10,12-tetramethyl-6H-pyrazolo[3,4-f]pyrazolo[3',4':4,5]pyrimido[6,1-d][1,2,3,5]trithiazepine-8,12b(10H)-dicarbonitrile (19) (67%).

  15. Effects of atorvastatin on renal function in patients with dyslipidemia and chronic kidney disease: assessment of clinical usefulness in CKD patients with atorvastatin (ASUCA) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Genjiro; Kasahara, Masato; Ueshima, Kenji; Tanaka, Sachiko; Yasuno, Shinji; Fujimoto, Akira; Sato, Toshiya; Imamoto, Miyuki; Kosugi, Shinji; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2017-06-01

    Dyslipidemia is a risk factor for the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). While conventional lipid lowering therapy provides a benefit to CKD management, the effect of statins on eGFR remains unclear. A prospective, multi-center, open-labeled, randomized trial. Total of 349 CKD patients with hyperlipidemia were randomized into 2 groups, and followed for 2 years. Group A included patients who were treated with atorvastatin. Group C were treated with conventional lipid lowering drugs other than statin. Primary endpoint was changes in eGFR. Secondary endpoints included changes in urinary albumin excretion, serum LDL-C, serum triglyceride, cardio-vascular events and all-cause mortality. As the primary endpoint, eGFR decreased by 2.3 ml/min/1.73 m 2 in Group A and by 2.6 ml/min/1.73 m 2 in Group C, indicating that there was no difference in change of eGFR between the two groups. As secondary endpoints, atorvastatin succeeded to reduce serum LDL-C level significantly and rapidly, but conventional therapy did not. In fact, mean LDL-C level did not reach the target level of 100 mg/dl in Group C. Serum triglyceride was lowered only by atorvastatin, but not conventional drugs. The number of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality did not differ between in two groups. The ASUCA (Assessment of Clinical Usefulness in CKD Patients with Atorvastatin) trial demonstrated that atorvastatin failed to exhibit reno-protections compared to conventional therapy in Japanese patients with dyslipidemia and CKD. It would be due in part to the ability of atorvastatin to more potently reduce serum LDL and triglycerides compared to conventional therapy.

  16. Correlation of glomerular filtration rate measurement using Tc-99m DTPA with cystatin-C levels and creatinine clearance for staging of chronic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliyanti, A.; Iskandar, Azmi S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The presence of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) was established based on kidney damage presence and the level of kidney function through Glomerular filtration rate (GFR). It was also recognized that renal scintigraphy (renogram) using TC-99m DTPA (diethylenetriamine pentacetic acid) has advantages in the measurement of GFR. Recently, serum Cystatin-C is proposed as the new marker of GFR. The aim of this study is to find out the correlation of GFR, derived from renogram, with Cystatin- C levels and Creatinine Clearance (CC) in CKD. Material and Methods: A total of 30 subjects (age mean is 60.8 years, 21 males and 9 females) were enrolled in this study with diagnosis stage 2 of CKD. CKD staging was determined by Cockroft-Gault (CG) equation, taking into account the serum creatinine. Renogram was performed using a single head camera with IV administration of 5 mCi DTPA. Cystatin-C and creatinine clearance (24-hours urine samples) were include in this study. Results: The mean GFR of renogram, Cystatin-C, CC and CG are 64.96 ml/min/1.73m2 (SD 28.047), 53.37 ml/min/1.73m2 (SD 21.29), 58.09 ml/min/1.73m2 (SD 35.45), 46.00 ml/min/1.73m2 (SD 12.06) respectively. There is better correlation between renogram and Cystatin-C (r=0.585, p0.0007) compared renogram and CC (r=0.388, p=0.03) or renogram and CG (r=-0.029, p=0.87). Conclusion: Cystatin-C shows better indicator of GFR than CC and CG. Serum creatinine concentration alone should not be used to assess the level of kidney function in the staging of CKD. (author)

  17. Cost-effectiveness of home telemonitoring in chronic kidney disease patients at different stages by a pragmatic randomized controlled trial (eNephro): rationale and study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilly, Nathalie; Chanliau, Jacques; Frimat, Luc; Combe, Christian; Merville, Pierre; Chauveau, Philippe; Bataille, Pierre; Azar, Raymond; Laplaud, David; Noël, Christian; Kessler, Michèle

    2017-04-05

    Home telemonitoring has developed considerably over recent years in chronic diseases in order to improve communication between healthcare professionals and patients and to promote early detection of deteriorating health status. In the nephrology setting, home telemonitoring has been evaluated in home dialysis patients but data are scarce concerning chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients before and after renal replacement therapy. The eNephro study is designed to assess the cost effectiveness, clinical/biological impact, and patient perception of a home telemonitoring for CKD patients. Our purpose is to present the rationale, design and organisational aspects of this study. eNephro is a pragmatic randomised controlled trial, comparing home telemonitoring versus usual care in three populations of CKD patients: stage 3B/4 (n = 320); stage 5D CKD on dialysis (n = 260); stage 5 T CKD treated with transplantation (n= 260). Five hospitals and three not-for-profit providers managing self-care dialysis situated in three administrative regions in France are participating. The trial began in December 2015, with a scheduled 12-month inclusion period and 12 months follow-up. Outcomes include clinical and biological data (e.g. blood pressure, haemoglobin) collected from patient records, perceived health status (e.g. health related quality of life) collected from self-administered questionnaires, and health expenditure data retrieved from the French health insurance database (SNIIRAM) using a probabilistic matching procedure. The hypothesis is that home telemonitoring enables better control of clinical and biological parameters as well as improved perceived health status. This better control should limit emergency consultations and hospitalisations leading to decreased healthcare expenditure, compensating for the financial investment due to the telemedicine system. This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under NCT02082093 (date of registration: February 14

  18. New Organ Allocation System for Combined Liver-Kidney Transplants and the Availability of Kidneys for Transplant to Patients with Stage 4-5 CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, William S; Bia, Margaret J

    2017-05-08

    A new proposal has been created for establishing medical criteria for organ allocation in recipients receiving simultaneous liver-kidney transplants. In this article, we describe the new policy, elaborate on the points of greatest controversy, and offer a perspective on the policy going forward. Although we applaud the fact that simultaneous liver-kidney transplant activity will now be monitored and appreciate the creation of medical criteria for allocation in simultaneous liver-kidney transplants, we argue that some of the criteria proposed, especially those for allocating a kidney to a liver recipient with AKI, are too liberal. We call on the nephrology community to follow the consequences of this new policy and push for a re-examination of the longstanding policy of allocating kidneys to multiorgan transplant recipients before all other candidates. The charge to protect our system of equitable organ allocation is very challenging, but it is a challenge that we must embrace. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  19. The effect of regular hemodialysis on the nutritional status of children with end-stage renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala M Lotfy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth failure is one of the most common and profound clinical manifestation of chronic kidney disease (CKD in infants, children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional status of Egyptian children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD on regular hemodialysis (HD. The study included 50 Egyptian children with ESRD on regular HD, following-up at the Pediatric Nephrology unit, Cairo University. History, including dietary history, was taken for all patients and clinical examination was performed on all of them. Body weight, standing height, height or length SD score, the skin fold thickness, mid-arm circumference, mid-arm muscle circumference and mid-arm muscle circumference area were also assessed. The height of the patients was the most affected anthropometric parameter, as 78% of the patients were shorter (height SDS below -3. Body weight is less affected than height, as body weight SDS of 34% of patients was less than -3 SDS. In addition, the body mass index of 16% of the patients was 97 th percentile. Although most ESRD patients received adequate protein and caloric intake, their growth was markedly affected, especially with longer period on HD. We suggest that assessment of growth parameters should be performed at a minimum period of every six months in children with CKD stages 2-3. For children with more advanced CKD (stages 4-5 and 5D, more frequent evaluation may be warranted due to the greater risk of abnormalities.

  20. Hydro-epidemiology of Chronic Kidney Disease(CKD) in Sri Lanka and Its Similarities to the CKD Epidemic in Meso-America.Sarath Gunatilake M.D, Dr. P.H, Professor, California State University, Long Beach California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illangasekera, T.; Gunatilake, S.

    2015-12-01

    Over 2000 years ago Sri Lanka was known as the granary of the east. This distinction was achieved with a massive rice production aided by an efficient irrigation system. The basic structural unit of this irrigation system -with thousands of man-made lakes- was a large reservoir collecting rain water from tributaries and redistributing it to a cascade of rice paddy farms. The rice cultivation used organic fertilizer and natural pesticides made from ancient Ayurvedic recipes. The sociopolitical changes initiated in the county in 1977 resulted in a modernized agricultural economy with the renovation of the old irrigation system. Heavy use of pesticides, mostly Glyphosate (brand name "Round Up") with government subsidized cheap synthetic fertilizer (mostly triple phosphate) contaminated with heavy metals, including Arsenic and Cadmium, became a common practice. As a result, the shallow aquifers in the lowest lying areas, recharged by the irrigation water, was contaminated with Calcium, Magnesium phosphates, and the heavy metals, rendering the drinking water from shallow wells in these areas, extremely hard and unpalatable. The practice of drinking water from the shallow wells in low lying areas, most of which are abandoned now, and the use and spraying of pesticides particularly Glyphosate (often without proper personal protective equipment) have been identified in a case control study, as the main risk factors responsible for a massive epidemic of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) affecting 450,000 young farmers, resulting in 23,000 deaths. It is hypothesized that the Glyphosate chelates heavy metals delivering it to the kidney, with contaminated drinking water and food, causing progressive kidney damage. The same irrigation system that contributed to past prosperity has now become a scourge within the realm of a modernized agriculture. Climatic variations, global warming and severe dehydration also have been identified as contributory factors. Similar CKD epidemic killing

  1. Substrate interactions in dehalogenation of 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, and 1,1,2-trichloroethane mixtures by Dehalogenimonas spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillehay, Jacob L; Bowman, Kimberly S; Yan, Jun; Rainey, Fred A; Moe, William M

    2014-04-01

    When chlorinated alkanes are present as soil or groundwater pollutants, they often occur in mixtures. This study evaluated substrate interactions during the anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of chlorinated alkanes by the type strains of two Dehalogenimonas species, D. lykanthroporepellens and D. alkenigignens. Four contaminant mixtures comprised of combinations of the chlorinated solvents 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), 1,2-dichloropropane (1,2-DCP), and 1,1,2-trichloroethane (1,1,2-TCA) were assessed for each species. Chlorinated solvent depletion and daughter product formation determined as a function of time following inoculation into anaerobic media revealed preferential dechlorination of 1,1,2-TCA over both 1,2-DCA and 1,2-DCP for both species. 1,2-DCA in particular was not dechlorinated until 1,1,2-TCA reached low concentrations. In contrast, both species concurrently dechlorinated 1,2-DCA and 1,2-DCP over a comparably large concentration range. This is the first report of substrate interactions during chlorinated alkane dehalogenation by pure cultures, and the results provide insights into the chlorinated alkane transformation processes that may be expected for contaminant mixtures in environments where Dehalogenimonas spp. are present.

  2. Influence of Diet Balanced with Essential Amino Acids / Keto Acid Analogs and High-Nutrient Blend on the Progression of Renal Failure in Patients in the Pre-Dialysis Stage of Chronic Kidney Disease Caused by Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.I. Aleksandrova

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of a low protein diet (LPD balanced with essential amino acids (EAA / keto acid analogs (KAA and protein “SUPRO-XT 219D” in the composition of the high-energy nutrient blend (HENB for slow down of renal failure in patients in the pre-dialysis stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD induced by systemic autoimmune diseases (SAD.Material and Methods: In this study, 46 patients (35 with systemic lupus erythematosus and 15 with various forms of systemic vasculitis with CKD in stages 3-4 were randomized into three groups. Group 1 (18 patients: 10 with CKD stage 3 and 8 with CKD stage 4 was given LPD (0.6 g protein per kg of body weight per day comprising 0.3 g of vegetable protein and 0.3 g of animal protein balanced with EAA/KAA (Diet #1; Group 2 (18 patients: 9 with CKD stage 3 and 9 with CKD stage 4 was given the same LPD, but with an increased vegetable protein content (purified soy protein SUPRO-XT 219D up to 0.4 g/kg/day in the composition of HENB (Diet #2; Group 3, comparison group, (10 patients: 7 with CKD stage 3 and 3 with CKD stage 4 was given a free diet (Diet #3 based on the patient’s personal preferences. Both options of LPD were offered to all the patients of Groups 1 and 2 regardless of their baseline nutritional status (NS. The duration of the observation was 24-48 months. The NS was evaluated based on the bioelectrical impedance analysis. The protein and calorie intake was calculated from the 3-day food diary.Results: Among the 46 patients with CKD stages 3-4, NS impairment was detected in almost half the patients (45.7%. Both forms of LPD were well tolerated. The correction of the nutritive impairment was achieved in patients with baseline impaired NS; the remaining patients of Groups 1 and 2 demonstrated the safety of NS against LPD. At the same time, among Group 3 patients, during the progression of renal disorders, the NS rate was observed to increase by 1.5 times (from 40% to 60

  3. Renal function trajectory is more important than chronic kidney disease stage for managing patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosansky, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Management of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) emphasizes a current level of function as calculated from the modification of diet in renal disease glomerulofiltration rate equations (eGFR) and proteinuria for staging of CKD. Change in a patient's eGFR over time (renal function trajectory) is an additional and potentially more important consideration in deciding which patients will progress to the point where they will require renal replacement therapy (RRT). Many patients with CKD 3-5 have stable renal function for years. Proteinuria/albuminuria is a primary determinant of renal trajectory which may be slowed by medications that decrease proteinuria and/or aggressively lower blood pressure. A renal trajectory of >3 ml/min/1.73 m(2)/year may relate to a need for closer renal follow-up and increased morbidity and mortality. Additional CKD population-based studies need to examine the relationship of renal trajectory to: baseline renal function; acute kidney injury episodes; age, race, sex and primary etiologies of renal disease; blood pressure control and therapies; dietary protein intake; blood glucose control in diabetics and the competitive risk of death versus the requirement for renal replacement therapy. In the elderly CKD 4 population with significant comorbidities and slow decline in renal function, the likelihood of death prior to the need for RRT should be considered before placing AV access for dialysis. Prediction models of renal progression must account for the competitive risk of death as well as stable or improved renal function to be clinically useful. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Study of Red Cell Fragility in Different Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease in Relation to Parathyroid Hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Suchismita; Mishra, Anuva; Jena, Manoranjan; Rout, Sashi Bhusan; Mohapatra, Srikrushna

    2017-08-01

    Anaemia is one of the common complications associated with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) responsible for the increase in the morbidity and mortality in such patients. Several factors have been attributed to cause renal anaemia, amongst which hyperparathyroidism is one of the less recognised reasons. Most studies have been conducted in this regard in CKD patients undergoing haemodialysis. The level of PTH in early stages of chronic kidney disease has not been much studied. The excess amount of Parathyroid Hormone (PTH) secondary to CKD has been suggested to be a causative factor for anaemia. To evaluate the serum PTH level in CKD patients before haemodialysis and to study the association of the haemoglobin status with the parathyroid hormone. Forty CKD patients above 18 years of age before haemodialysis and 25 age and sex matched healthy controls were included in the study. Routine biochemical and haematological parameters such as Routine Blood Sugar (RBS), urea, creatinine, Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , PTH and Hb% were perfomed. Red cell osmotic fragility was measured by serial dilutions of whole blood with varying concentrations of sodium chloride ranging from 0.1% to 0.9%. The study revealed a significant fall in Hb%, along with a rise in Median Osmotic Fragility (MOF) and PTH in the CKD patients when compared to the control group. Linear regression of PTH with Hb% revealed significant negative association between both the parameters with a R 2 value of 0.677. Multilinear regression analysis of MOF and other independent variables such as Hb%, Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , urea, PTH and creatinine highlighted the variance of MOF by 72%, maximal variance contributed by PTH. Receiver Operating Curve (ROC) analysis revealed an area under the curve of 0.980 with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 87% in detecting osmotic fragility at a cut off value of PTH ≥100 pg/ml. The underlying cause of anaemia should be identified early in the CKD patients before haemodialysis. Secondary

  5. The effectiveness of preplant seed bio-invigoration techniques using Bacillus sp. CKD061 to improving seed viability and vigor of several local upland rice cultivars of Southeast Sulawesi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutariati, G. A. K.; Bande, L. O. S.; Khaeruni, A.; Muhidin; Mudi, L.; Savitri, R. M.

    2018-02-01

    Research was aimed to evaluate the bio-invigoration techniques using Bacillus sp. CKD061 in improving seed viability and vigor of local upland rice. The research is arranged in factorial with completely randomized design (CRD). The different upland rice cultivars as first factor that consists of 11 cultivars, namely: Pae Tinangge, Pae Rowu, Pae Uwa, Pae Tanta, Pae Waburi-Buri, Pae Mornene, Pae Indalibana, Pae Lawarangka, Pae Huko, Pae Wagamba and Pae Momea. The second factor is the seed bio-invigoration technique, consists of 5 treatments, namely: without seed bio-invigoration (B0), NaCl + Bacillus sp. CKD061 (B1), KNO3 + Bacillus sp. CKD061 (B2), Ground burned-rice husk + Bacillus sp. CKD061 (B3), and Ground brick + Bacillus sp. CKD061 (B4). The results showed that seed bio-invigoration using Bacillus sp. CKD061 gave effect on the seed viability and vigor. Interaction of the seed bio-invigoration and upland rice cultivars were able to improve seed viability and vigor. Seed bio-invigoration ttreatment using ground brick + Bacillus sp. CKD061 was the best treatment, which could improve the viability and vigor of Pae Waburi-Buri, Pae Mornene and Pae Indalibana. The treatment increased vigor index by 133% in Pae Waburi-Buri and 127% in Pae Mornene, and Pae Indalibana compared with control.

  6. Vibrational, electronic and quantum chemical studies of 1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylic-1,2-anhydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Raj, Arushma; Subramanian, S; Mohan, S

    2013-06-01

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylic-1,2-anhydride (BTCA) have been recorded in the range 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm(-1), respectively. The complete vibrational assignments and analysis of BTCA have been performed. More support on the experimental findings was added from the quantum chemical studies performed with DFT (B3LYP, MP2, B3PW91) method using 6-311++G(**), 6-31G(**) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The structural parameters, energies, thermodynamic parameters, vibrational frequencies and the NBO charges of BTCA were determined by the DFT method. The (1)H and (13)C isotropic chemical shifts (δ ppm) of BTCA with respect to TMS were also calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with the experimental data. The delocalization energies of different types of interactions were determined. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Low-protein diets in CKD: how can we achieve them? A narrative, pragmatic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara; Vigotti, Federica Neve; Leone, Filomena; Capizzi, Irene; Daidola, Germana; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Avagnina, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Low-protein diets (LPDs) have encountered various fortunes, and several questions remain open. No single study, including the famous Modification of Diet in Renal Disease, was conclusive and even if systematic reviews are in favour of protein restriction, at least in non-diabetic adults, implementation is lagging. LPDs are considered difficult, malnutrition is a threat and compliance is poor. LPDs have been reappraised in this era of reconsideration of dialysis indications and timing. The definition of a normal-adequate protein diet has shifted in the overall population from 1 to 1.2 to 0.8 g/kg/day. Vegan–vegetarian diets are increasingly widespread, thus setting the groundwork for easier integration of moderate protein restriction in Chronic Kidney Disease. There are four main moderately restricted LPDs (0.6 g/kg/day). Two of them require careful planning of quantity and quality of food: a ‘traditional’ one, with mixed proteins that works on the quantity and quality of food and a vegan one, which integrates grains and legumes. Two further options may be seen as a way to simplify LPDs while being on the safe side for malnutrition: adding supplements of essential amino and keto acids (various doses) allows an easier shift from omnivorous to vegan diets, while protein-free food intake allows for an increase in calories. Very-low-protein diets (vLPDs: 0.3 g/kg/day) combine both approaches and usually require higher doses of supplements. Moderately restricted LPDs may be adapted to virtually any cuisine and should be tailored to the patients' preferences, while vLPDs usually require trained, compliant patients; a broader offer of diet options may lead to more widespread use of LPDs, without competition among the various schemas. PMID:25713712

  8. Stage II Seminoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagerman, R.H.; Kotlove, D.J.; Regine, W.; Chung, C.T.; King, G.A.; Dalai, P.S.

    1988-01-01

    Between 1966 and 1985, 32 patients with stage II (21 A,11 B) testicular seminoma were treated with postorchiectomy irradiation to the retroperitoneal and ipsilateral iliac nodes; 28 received elective mediastinal-supraclavicular irradiation. The median follow-up was 8 1/2 years; 29 patients were followed up for over 3 years and 24 for over 5 years. Twenty-eight patients remain alive and well and four have die, two of a second primary cancer. Two patients developed recurrent seminoma in the mediastinum; these patients showed a variant lymphangiographic pattern. Both remain well after further irradiation or irradiation plus chemotherapy. A third patient developed nonseminomatous ''recurrence'' in the radiation field and is well after chemotherapy

  9. Preliminary site description Simpevarp subarea - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winberg, Anders [ed.

    2005-04-01

    domains, the thermal conductivity varies within a relatively narrow interval (2.6-2.8 W/(m.K)). The hydraulic properties of the Hydraulic Rock Domains are described in terms of a network of discrete fractures (DFN) with a geometrical description taken from the geological DFN model. A fracture transmissivity distribution is superimposed, and calibrated against existing hydraulic borehole data. Numerical modelling shows that groundwater flow is controlled by topography and the geometry of the system of modelled deformation zones. The modelling also identifies the Simpevarp subarea as an area of groundwater discharge (upward directed flow) at repository depth. Suggested porosities for intact fresh rock (in terms mean values in vol-%) on lithological domain level vary from 0.17 (Fine-grained dioritoid) to 0.40 (Aevroegranite). Suggested formation factors for intact fresh (reflecting diffusion characteristics, mean values) on lithological domain level vary from about 1.0x10{sup -4} (Fine-grained dioritoid) to 2.9x10{sup -4} (Aevroe granite). Important modelling steps have been taken in Simpevarp 1.2 and the main uncertainties are identified, in some cases quantified, or explored as model alternatives. Notwithstanding, some uncertainties still remain unquantified at this stage, and alternative hypotheses are retained only as hypotheses. Additional data, collected in the Simpevarp subarea following the Simpevarp 1.2 data freeze, may allow additional quantification, and may help further reduce the observed uncertainties. For the geological model various possible alternative descriptions are inherent in uncertainties related to geometry, uncertainties in characteristics/properties and confidence of existence of modelled lithological domains and deformations zones. It is obvious that changes to the lithological model have a strong impact on most disciplines (e.g. rock mechanics, thermal and transport properties). The deformation zone model in particular influences the

  10. Preliminary site description Simpevarp subarea - version 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winberg, Anders

    2005-04-01

    thermal conductivity varies within a relatively narrow interval (2.6-2.8 W/(m.K)). The hydraulic properties of the Hydraulic Rock Domains are described in terms of a network of discrete fractures (DFN) with a geometrical description taken from the geological DFN model. A fracture transmissivity distribution is superimposed, and calibrated against existing hydraulic borehole data. Numerical modelling shows that groundwater flow is controlled by topography and the geometry of the system of modelled deformation zones. The modelling also identifies the Simpevarp subarea as an area of groundwater discharge (upward directed flow) at repository depth. Suggested porosities for intact fresh rock (in terms mean values in vol-%) on lithological domain level vary from 0.17 (Fine-grained dioritoid) to 0.40 (Aevroegranite). Suggested formation factors for intact fresh (reflecting diffusion characteristics, mean values) on lithological domain level vary from about 1.0x10 -4 (Fine-grained dioritoid) to 2.9x10 -4 (Aevroe granite). Important modelling steps have been taken in Simpevarp 1.2 and the main uncertainties are identified, in some cases quantified, or explored as model alternatives. Notwithstanding, some uncertainties still remain unquantified at this stage, and alternative hypotheses are retained only as hypotheses. Additional data, collected in the Simpevarp subarea following the Simpevarp 1.2 data freeze, may allow additional quantification, and may help further reduce the observed uncertainties. For the geological model various possible alternative descriptions are inherent in uncertainties related to geometry, uncertainties in characteristics/properties and confidence of existence of modelled lithological domains and deformations zones. It is obvious that changes to the lithological model have a strong impact on most disciplines (e.g. rock mechanics, thermal and transport properties). The deformation zone model in particular influences the hydrogeological and rock mechanics

  11. No efficacy of annual gynaecological screening in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers; an observational follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermsen, B. B. J.; Olivier, R. I.; Verheijen, R. H. M.; van Beurden, M.; de Hullu, J. A.; Massuger, L. F.; Burger, C. W.; Brekelmans, C. T.; Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.; Gaarenstroom, K. N.; van Boven, H. H.; Mooij, T. M.; Rookus, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    BRCA1/ 2 mutation carriers are offered gynaecological screening with the intention to reduce mortality by detecting ovarian cancer at an early stage. We examined compliance and efficacy of gynaecological screening in BRCA1/ 2 mutation carriers. In this multicentre, observational, follow-up study we

  12. Metabolism of 1,2,3,4-, 1,2,3,5-, and 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene in the squirrel monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, H.; Chu, I.; Villeneuve, D.C.; Benoit, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    The metabolism of three tetrachlorobenzene isomers (TeCB) was investigated in the squirrel monkey. The animals were administered orally 6 single doses of 14 C-labeled 1,2,3,4-, 1,2,4,5-, or 1,2,3,5-tetrachlorobenzene over a 3-wk period at levels ranging from 50 to 100 mg/kg body weight (b.w) and kept in individual metabolism cages to collect urine and feces for radioassay. Approximately 38% (1,2,3,4-TeCB), 36% (1,2,3,5-TeCB), and 18% (1,2,4,5-TeCB) of the doses were excreted respectively in the feces 48 h post administration. In monkeys dosed with 1,2,3,4-TeCB, unchanged compound accounted for 50% of the fecal radioactivity. Unchanged compound accounted for more than 50% of the fecal radioactivity found in the monkeys dosed with 1,2,3,5-TeCB. The fecal metabolites were identified in both groups. No metabolites were detected in the feces of monkeys dosed with 1,2,4,5-TeCB. While the fecal route represented the major route of excretion for 1,2,3,4-TeCB, the other two isomers were eliminated exclusively in the feces. The above data in the squirrel monkey are different from those obtained with the rat and the rabbit, and demonstrate the different metabolic pathways for the isomers

  13. The association between changes in lifestyle behaviors and the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in middle-aged and older?men

    OpenAIRE

    Michishita, Ryoma; Matsuda, Takuro; Kawakami, Shotaro; Tanaka, Satoshi; Kiyonaga, Akira; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Morito, Natsumi; Higaki, Yasuki

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to evaluate whether changes in lifestyle behaviors are correlated with the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: The subjects consisted of 316 men without a history of cardiovascular disease, stroke, or renal dysfunction or dialysis treatment. The following lifestyle behaviors were evaluated using a standardized self-administered questionnaire: habitual moderate exercise, daily physical activity, walking speed, eating speed, late-night din...

  14. The association between changes in lifestyle behaviors and the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in middle-aged and older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michishita, Ryoma; Matsuda, Takuro; Kawakami, Shotaro; Tanaka, Satoshi; Kiyonaga, Akira; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Morito, Natsumi; Higaki, Yasuki

    2017-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate whether changes in lifestyle behaviors are correlated with the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The subjects consisted of 316 men without a history of cardiovascular disease, stroke, or renal dysfunction or dialysis treatment. The following lifestyle behaviors were evaluated using a standardized self-administered questionnaire: habitual moderate exercise, daily physical activity, walking speed, eating speed, late-night dinner, bedtime snacking, skipping breakfast, and drinking and smoking habits. The subjects were divided into four categories according to the change in each lifestyle behavior from baseline to the end of follow-up (healthy-healthy, unhealthy-healthy, healthy-unhealthy and unhealthy-unhealthy). A multivariate analysis showed that, with respect to habitual moderate exercise and late-night dinner, maintaining an unhealthy lifestyle resulted in a significantly higher odds ratio (OR) for the incidence of CKD than maintaining a lifestyle (OR 8.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-15.40 for habitual moderate exercise and OR 4.00; 95% CI, 1.38-11.57 for late-night dinner). In addition, with respect to bedtime snacking, the change from a healthy to an unhealthy lifestyle and maintaining an unhealthy lifestyle resulted in significantly higher OR for incidence of CKD than maintaining a healthy lifestyle (OR 4.44; 95% CI, 1.05-13.93 for healthy-unhealthy group and OR 11.02; 95% CI, 2.83-26.69 for unhealthy-unhealthy group). The results of the present study suggest that the lack of habitual moderate exercise, late-night dinner, and bedtime snacking may increase the risk of CKD. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A Genetic Biomarker of Oxidative Stress, the Paraoxonase-1 Q192R Gene Variant, Associates with Cardiomyopathy in CKD: A Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dounousi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oxidative stress is a hallmark of CKD and this alteration is strongly implicated in LV hypertrophy and in LV dysfunction. Methods and Patients. We resorted to the strongest genetic biomarker of paraoxonase-1 (PON1 activity, the Q192R variant in the PON1 gene, to unbiasedly assess (Mendelian randomization the cross-sectional and longitudinal association of this gene-variant with LV mass and function in 206 CKD patients with a 3-year follow-up. Results. The R allele of Q192R polymorphism associated with oxidative stress as assessed by plasma 8-isoPGF2α (P=0.03 and was dose-dependently related in a direct fashion to LVMI (QQ: 131.4 ± 42.6 g/m2; RQ: 147.7 ± 51.1 g/m2; RR: 167.3 ± 41.9 g/m2; P=0.001 and in an inverse fashion to systolic function (LV Ejection Fraction (QQ: 79 ± 12%; RQ: 69 ± 9%; RR: 65 ± 10% P=0.002. On longitudinal observation, this gene variant associated with the evolution of the same echocardiographic indicators [LVMI: 13.40 g/m2 per risk allele, P=0.005; LVEF: −2.96% per risk allele, P=0.001]. Multivariate analyses did not modify these associations. Conclusion. In CKD patients, the R allele of the Q192R variant in the PON1 gene is dose-dependently related to the severity of LVH and LV dysfunction and associates with the longitudinal evolution of these cardiac alterations. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that oxidative stress is implicated in cardiomyopathy in CKD patients.

  16. Multiferroicity in La1/2Nd1/2FeO3 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Sadhan; Saha, Sujoy; Dutta, Alo; Mahapatra, A. S.; Chakrabarti, P. K.; Kumar, Uday; Sinha, T. P.

    2014-11-01

    Nano-sized La1/2Nd1/2FeO3 (LNF) powder is synthesized by the sol-gel citrate method. The Rietveld refinement of the X-ray diffraction profile of the sample at room temperature (303 K) shows the orthorhombic phase with Pbnm symmetry. The particle size is obtained by transmission electron microscope. The antiferromagnetic nature of the sample is explained using zero field cooled and field cooled magnetisation and the corresponding hysteresis loop. A signature of weak ferromagnetic phase is observed in LNF at low temperature which is explained on the basis of spin glass like behaviour of surface spins. The dielectric relaxation of the sample has been investigated using impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range from 42 Hz to 1 MHz and in the temperature range from 303 K to 513 K. The Cole-Cole model is used to analyse the dielectric relaxation of LNF. The frequency dependent conductivity spectra follow the power law. The magneto capacitance measurement of the sample confirms its multiferroic behaviour.

  17. Emissions in potassium vapour under 4S1/2-7S1/2 two-photon nsec excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentaris, D.; Chatzikyriakos, G.; Armyras, A.; Efthimiopoulos, T.

    2010-01-01

    The two-photon excitation of 4S 1/2 -7S 1/2 transition of potassium atoms is studied. Several coherent emissions and processes are possible, such as parametric four-wave (PFWM), parametric six-wave (PSWM) mixing and competition with the stimulated hyper Raman (SHRS) and the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). The radiations at the transitions 6P 3/2,1/2 -4S 1/2 , 6S 1/2 -4P 3/2,1/2 and 5P 3/2,1/2 -4S 1/2 are emitted only in the forward direction (indicating a parametric process), while the radiation at the transition 4P 3/2,1/2 -4S 1/2 is emitted in the forward and in the backward direction, indicating an ASE process.

  18. The joint impact of habitual exercise and glycemic control on the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in middle-aged and older males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michishita, Ryoma; Matsuda, Takuro; Kawakami, Shotaro; Tanaka, Satoshi; Kiyonaga, Akira; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Morito, Natsumi; Higaki, Yasuki

    2017-11-06

    This retrospective study evaluated the influence of the joint impact of habitual exercise and glycemic control on the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) during a 6-year follow-up period in middle-aged and older males. The study population included 303 males without a history of cardiovascular disease, stroke, renal dysfunction, or dialysis treatment. Their lifestyle behaviors regarding exercise and physical activity were evaluated using a standardized self-administered questionnaire. The participants were divided into four categories according to the performance or non-performance of habitual exercise and the presence or absence of hyperglycemia. After 6 years, 32 subjects (10.6%) developed CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate exercise and hyperglycemic subjects (log-rank test: p exercise (HR = 2.82, 95% confidence of interval (CI) = 1.07-7.36, p = 0.034) and that in hyperglycemic subjects who did not perform habitual exercise (HR = 5.89, 95% CI = 1.87-16.63, p = 0.003) were significantly higher in comparison to the subjects with a NGT who performed habitual exercise. These results suggest that the habitual exercise and good glycemic control and their combination were associated with the incidence of CKD.

  19. High Intensity Interval Training Favourably Affects Angiotensinogen mRNA Expression and Markers of Cardiorenal Health in a Rat Model of Early-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Patrick S; Scanlan, Aaron T; Dalbo, Vincent J

    2015-01-01

    The majority of CKD-related complications stem from cardiovascular pathologies such as hypertension. To help reduce cardiovascular complications, aerobic exercise is often prescribed. Emerging evidence suggests high intensity interval training (HIIT) may be more beneficial than traditional aerobic exercise. However, appraisals of varying forms of aerobic exercise, along with descriptions of mechanisms responsible for health-related improvements, are lacking. This study examined the effects of 8 weeks of HIIT (85% VO2max), versus low intensity aerobic exercise (LIT; 45-50% VO2max) and sedentary behaviour (SED), in an animal model of early-stage CKD. Tissue-specific mRNA expression of RAAS-related genes and CKD-related clinical markers were examined. Compared to SED, HIIT resulted in increased plasma albumin (p = 0.001), reduced remnant kidney weight (p = 0.028), and reduced kidney weight-body weight ratios (p = 0.045). Compared to LIT, HIIT resulted in reduced Agt mRNA expression (p = 0.035), reduced plasma LDL (p = 0.001), triglycerides (p = 0.029), and total cholesterol (p = 0.002), increased plasma albumin (p = 0.047), reduced remnant kidney weight (p = 0.005), and reduced kidney weight-body weight ratios (p = 0.048). These results suggest HIIT is a more potent regulator of several markers that describe and influence health in CKD.

  20. High Intensity Interval Training Favourably Affects Angiotensinogen mRNA Expression and Markers of Cardiorenal Health in a Rat Model of Early-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick S. Tucker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of CKD-related complications stem from cardiovascular pathologies such as hypertension. To help reduce cardiovascular complications, aerobic exercise is often prescribed. Emerging evidence suggests high intensity interval training (HIIT may be more beneficial than traditional aerobic exercise. However, appraisals of varying forms of aerobic exercise, along with descriptions of mechanisms responsible for health-related improvements, are lacking. This study examined the effects of 8 weeks of HIIT (85% VO2max, versus low intensity aerobic exercise (LIT; 45–50% VO2max and sedentary behaviour (SED, in an animal model of early-stage CKD. Tissue-specific mRNA expression of RAAS-related genes and CKD-related clinical markers were examined. Compared to SED, HIIT resulted in increased plasma albumin (p=0.001, reduced remnant kidney weight (p=0.028, and reduced kidney weight-body weight ratios (p=0.045. Compared to LIT, HIIT resulted in reduced Agt mRNA expression (p=0.035, reduced plasma LDL (p=0.001, triglycerides (p=0.029, and total cholesterol (p=0.002, increased plasma albumin (p=0.047, reduced remnant kidney weight (p=0.005, and reduced kidney weight-body weight ratios (p=0.048. These results suggest HIIT is a more potent regulator of several markers that describe and influence health in CKD.

  1. A CROSS-SECTIONAL SURVEY ON LIPID ABNORMALITIES ASSOCIATED WITH NONDIABETIC SUBJECTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE, STAGE III-V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibi N. S

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic kidney disease is a worldwide public health problem. The adverse outcomes of chronic kidney disease, such as kidney failure, cardiovascular disease and premature death can be prevented or delayed. Chronic renal disease is accompanied by characteristic abnormalities of lipid metabolism. High cholesterol and triglyceride plasma levels have been demonstrated to be independent risk factors for progression of renal disease in humans. The pattern of lipid abnormalities in chronic renal disease patients in Kerala, India, has not been studied. The primary aim of the study is to describe the pattern of lipid profile in nondiabetic chronic kidney disease patients. The secondary objective is to determine the proportion of patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease who have lipid abnormalities. MATERIALS AND METHODS Our study is a cross-sectional study conducted in Department of Internal Medicine, Government Medical College, Trivandrum, during the time period of 22-08-2014 to 22-08-2015. The study was conducted after clearance from Institutional Ethics Committee and written informed consent was obtained from all study participants. 134 nondiabetic patients who were diagnosed to have Chronic Kidney disease (CKD according to KDOQI and NKF criteria with a GFR 70 years showed significantly higher serum creatinine value and lower EGFR. Significantly, higher values of Total Cholesterol (TC, Low-Density Lipoproteins (LDL, Triglycerides (TG and Very Low-Density Lipoproteins (VLDL were seen in the age group >70 years and in stage V CKD compared to other groups. CONCLUSION Dyslipidaemia is common in nondiabetic CKD patients (67.91%. Higher stages of CKD were associated with more dyslipidaemia.

  2. Use of Extended-Release Calcifediol to Treat Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in Stages 3 and 4 Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Stuart M; Crawford, Paul W; Melnick, Joel Z; Strugnell, Stephen A; Ali, Shaukat; Mangoo-Karim, Roberto; Lee, Sungchun; Petkovich, P Martin; Bishop, Charles W

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are poorly addressed by current treatments. The present clinical studies evaluated extended-release (ER) calcifediol, a novel vitamin D prohormone repletion therapy designed to gradually correct low serum total 25-hydroxyvitamin D, improve SHPT control and minimize the induction of CYP24A1 and FGF23. Two identical multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies enrolled subjects from 89 US sites. A total of 429 subjects, balanced between studies, with stage 3 or 4 CKD, SHPT and vitamin D insufficiency were randomized 2:1 to receive oral ER calcifediol (30 or 60 µg) or placebo once daily at bedtime for 26 weeks. Most subjects (354 or 83%) completed dosing, and 298 (69%) entered a subsequent open-label extension study wherein ER calcifediol was administered without interruption for another 26 weeks. ER calcifediol normalized serum total 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations (>30 ng/ml) in >95% of per-protocol subjects and reduced plasma intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) by at least 10% in 72%. The proportion of subjects receiving ER calcifediol who achieved iPTH reductions of ≥30% increased progressively with treatment duration, reaching 22, 40 and 50% at 12, 26 and 52 weeks, respectively. iPTH lowering with ER calcifediol was independent of CKD stage and significantly greater than with placebo. ER calcifediol had inconsequential impact on serum calcium, phosphorus, FGF23 and adverse events. Oral ER calcifediol is safe and effective in treating SHPT and vitamin D insufficiency in CKD. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. iConnect CKD - Virtual Medical Consulting: a web-based Chronic Kidney Disease, Hypertension and Diabetes Integrated Care Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ivor J; Pirabhahar, Saiyini; Williamson, Paula; Raghunath, Vishwas; Brennan, Frank; O'Sullivan, Anthony; Youssef, George; Lane, Cathie; Jacobson, Gary; Feldman, Peter; Kelly, John

    2017-05-04

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients overwhelm specialist services and can potentially be managed in the primary care (PC). Opportunistic screening of high risk (HR) patients and follow-up in PC is the most sustainable model of care. A 'virtual consultation' (VC) model instead of traditional face to face (F2F) consultations was used, aiming to assess efficacy and safety of the model. Seventy patients were recruited from PC sites and hospital clinics, and followed for one year. The HR patients (eGFR 30 mg/mmol/L) were randomised to either VC or F2F. Patients were monitored 6 monthly by a Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS). The specialist team provided virtual or clinical support and included a Nephrologist, Endocrinologist, Cardiologist and Renal 'Palliative' Supportive Care. Sixty one (87%) patients were virtually tracked or consulted with 14 (23%) being HR. At 12 months there was no difference in outcomes between VC and F2F patients. All patients were successfully monitored. GPs reported high level of satisfaction and supported the model, but found software integration challenging. Patients found the system attractive and felt well managed. Specialist consults occurred within a week and if a second specialist opinion was required it took another two weeks. The program demonstrated safe, expedited and efficient follow up with a clinical and web based program. Support from the GPs and patients was encouraging, despite logistical issues. Ongoing evaluation of VC services will continue and feasibility to larger networks and more chronic diseases remains the long term goal. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Study of hypercharge exchange processes 0{sup -}1/2+{yields}1{sup -} 1/2+; Estudio de procesos 0-1/2+{yields}1-1/2+ con intercambio de hipercarga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albajar Molera, M c; Aguilar Beniter de Lugo, M.

    1981-07-01

    In this work we present a formalism for the reconstruction of the transitivity amplitudes governing the processes of the type 0-1/2+{yields}1-1/2+. The formalism uses the information contained in the decay angular correlations and takes into account the existence of mixed spin configurations in the final state 0-1/2+{yields}(0{down_arrow}, 1-)1/2+ (Author) 10 refs.

  5. Dihydroxylation of 4-substituted 1,2-dioxines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Tony V; Pedersen, Daniel Sejer; Taylor, Dennis K

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of 2-C-branched erythritol derivatives, including the plant sugar (+/-)-2-C-methylerythritol 2, was achieved through a dihydroxylation/reduction sequence on a series of 4-substituted 1,2-dioxines 3. The asymmetric dihydroxylation of 1,2-dioxines was examined, providing access...... to optically enriched dihydroxy 1,2-dioxanes 4. The synthesized 1,2-dioxanes were converted to other erythro sugar analogues and tetrahydrofurans through controlled cleavage of the endoperoxide linkage....

  6. Arsenic Exposure From Drinking Water and the Incidence of CKD in Low to Moderate Exposed Areas of Taiwan: A 14-Year Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ling-I; Hsieh, Fang-I; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Lai, Tai-Shuan; Wu, Meei-Maan; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Hsu, Kuang-Hung

    2017-12-01

    Arsenic exposure is associated with decreased kidney function. The association between low to moderate arsenic exposure and kidney disease has not been fully clarified. The association between arsenic exposure from drinking water and chronic kidney disease (CKD) was examined in a long-term prospective observational study. 6,093 participants 40 years and older were recruited from arseniasis-endemic areas in northeastern Taiwan. Arsenic levels were 28.0, 92.8, and 295.7μg/L at the 50th, 75th, and 90th percentiles, respectively. Well-water arsenic and urinary total arsenic (inorganic plus methylated arsenic species) concentrations, adjusted for urinary creatinine concentration. Kidney diseases (ICD-9 codes: 250.4, 274.1, 283.11, 403.*1, 404.*2, 404.*3, 440.1, 442.1, 447.3, or 580-589) and CKD (ICD-9 code: 585) ascertained using Taiwan's National Health Insurance database 1998 to 2011. HRs contrasting CKD risk across arsenic exposure levels were estimated using Cox regression. Prevalence ORs for proteinuria (protein excretion ≥ 200mg/g) comparing quartiles of total urinary arsenic concentrations were estimated using logistic regression. We identified 1,104 incident kidney disease cases, including 447 CKD cases (incidence rates, 166.5 and 67.4 per 10 4 person-years, respectively). A dose-dependent association between well-water arsenic concentrations and kidney diseases was observed after adjusting for age, sex, education, body mass index, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and analgesic use. Using arsenic concentration ≤ 10.0μg/L as reference, multivariable-adjusted HRs for incident CKD were 1.12 (95% CI, 0.88-1.42), 1.33 (95% CI, 1.03-1.72), and 1.33 (95% CI, 1.00-1.77) for arsenic concentrations of 10.1 to 49.9, 50.0 to 149.9, and ≥150.0μg/L, respectively (P for trend=0.02). The association between arsenic concentration and kidney diseases was stronger for women (P for interaction=0.06). Arsenic values in the range of 50th to 75th and 75th to 100th

  7. Weak decays of doubly heavy baryons. The 1/21/2 case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Zhen-Xing [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, INPAC, Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology, School of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai (China); Yu, Fu-Sheng [Lanzhou University, School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou (China)

    2017-11-15

    Very recently, the LHCb collaboration has observed in the final state Λ{sub c}{sup +}K{sup -}π{sup +}π{sup +} a resonant structure that is identified as the doubly charmed baryon Ξ{sub cc}{sup ++}. Inspired by this observation, we investigate the weak decays of doubly heavy baryons Ξ{sub cc}{sup ++}, Ξ{sub cc}{sup +}, Ω{sub cc}{sup +}, Ξ{sub bc}{sup (')+}, Ξ{sub bc}{sup (')0}, Ω{sub bc}{sup (')0}, Ξ{sub bb}{sup 0}, Ξ{sub bb}{sup -} and Ω{sub bb}{sup -} and focus on the decays into spin 1/2 baryons in this paper. At the quark level these decay processes are induced by the c → d/s or b → u/c transitions, and the two spectator quarks can be viewed as a scalar or axial vector diquark. We first derive the hadronic form factors for these transitions in the light-front approach and then apply them to predict the partial widths for the semileptonic and nonleptonic decays of doubly heavy baryons. We find that the number of decay channels is sizable and can be examined in future measurements at experimental facilities like LHC, Belle II and CEPC. (orig.)

  8. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors Diabetes High blood pressure Family history Obesity Race/ethnicity Full list of causes and risk factors ... give Give monthly Memorials and tributes Donate a car Donate gently used items Stock donation Workplace giving ...

  9. Effects of Different Administration Protocols on the Plasma Concentration of Donepezil Hydrochloride in Dementia Patients with Stage 5 Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika Amano

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD as well as Alzheimer's disease (AD increases with age. With the aging of the population in Japan, there is an increasing likelihood that patients with CKD will receive donepezil hydrochloride (DPZ, an antidementia drug, in the near future. Nevertheless, there have been few reports on how to use DPZ in patients with severe CKD. We report on 2 CKD stage 5 patients who received DPZ under different prescriptions. In case 1, 3 mg/day of DPZ was initially administered for 4 months, after which the dose was increased to 5 mg/day. In case 2, 5 mg was administered twice a week. The plasma concentration of DPZ was measured and the effectiveness was assessed using the Mini-Mental Health State Examination and the Hasegawa Dementia Rating Scale. We found that (1 only a slight increase in the plasma concentration of DPZ was observed with a dose of 3 mg daily, (2 there was a significant increase in the plasma concentration with a dose of 5 mg daily, and (3 when 5 mg of DPZ was administered twice a week, the plasma concentration did not differ significantly from healthy controls who had received 5 mg daily. Although cognitive function was improved best when the 5-mg dose was administered daily with no apparent side effects, the plasma concentration came close to reaching a toxic level at this dose. Careful follow-up may be essential when DPZ is used at 5 mg/day or greater in severe CKD patients.

  10. Stroke and Risks of Development and Progression of Kidney Diseases and End-Stage Renal Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Lin Wu

    Full Text Available There is little information about the association between stroke and kidney diseases. We aimed to investigate the impact of stroke on long-term renal outcomes.In this large population-based retrospective cohort study, we identified 100,353 subjects registered in the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2012, including 33,451 stroke patients and 66,902 age-, sex- and Charlson's comorbidity index score-matched controls.The incidence rate of chronic kidney disease (CKD was higher in the stroke than in the control cohort (17.5 vs. 9.06 per 1000 person-years. After multivariate adjustment, the risk of developing CKD was significantly higher in patients with stroke (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.43, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36-1.50, P<0.001. Subgroup analysis showed that stroke patients <50 years (aHR 1.61, P<0.001 and those with concomitant diabetes mellitus (aHR 2.12, P<0.001, hyperlipidemia (aHR 1.53, P<0.001 or gout (aHR 1.84, P<0.001 were at higher risk of incident CKD. Additionally, the risks of progression to advanced CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD were significantly higher for stroke patients (aHRs, 1.22 and 1.30; P = 0.04 and P = 0.008, respectively, independent of age, sex, comorbidities and long-term medications.Stroke is associated with higher risks for incident CKD, decline in renal function and ESRD. Younger stroke patients, as well as those with concomitant diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia or gout are at greater risk for kidney diseases.

  11. Prostate cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000397.htm Prostate cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... trials you may be able to join How Prostate Cancer Staging is Done Initial staging is based on ...

  12. A new 1-2 GeV/c separated beam for BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pile, P.H.; Beavis, D.; Brown, R.L.; Chrien, R.; Danby, G.; Jackson, J.; Lazarus, D.M.; Leonhardt, W.; Pearson, C.; Pendzick, A.; Montemurro, P.; Russo, T.; Sandberg, J.; Sawafta, R.; Spataro, C.; Walker, J. (Brookhaven National Lab. Associated Universities, Inc., Upton, NY (United States)); Enge, H.A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States))

    1992-09-15

    A 1-2 GeV/c beam line has been constructed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory alternating gradient synchrotron (BNL AGS). The beam line is optimized to deliver an intense clean beam of 1.8 GeV/c negative kaons for an H particle search experiment and incorporates two stages of velocity selection with the magnetic optics corrected to third order. Details of the beam line design as well as results of the commissioning will be discussed. (orig.).

  13. Telomerase activity in patients with stage 2–5D chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veysel Kidir

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular mechanisms of increased cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD associated with biological age are not well understood. Recent studies support the hypothesis that common factors responsible for this phenomenon are cellular aging and telomere dysfunction. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between telomerase activity and CKD stages. Methods: The study included 120 patients who were followed-up for CKD stage 2–5D, composed of 30 patients of each stage and 30 healthy volunteers without any known disease who were admitted to our hospital for routine check-ups. Telomerase activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC was measured using the TRAP assay. Results: A significant difference was observed for telomerase activity in PBMC between groups. The detected levels were lowest in the healthy control group (0.15 ± 0.02, and highest in CKD stage 5D patients (0.23 ± 0.04. In CKD patients, telomerase activity in PBMC was positively correlated with the CKD stage, serum creatinine, potassium and parathormone levels, and negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, body mass index (BMI, platelet count and serum calcium levels. According to the linear regression analysis, independent predictors for high telomerase activity in CKD patients were eGFR and BMI. Conclusion: Telomerase activity in PBMC increases with advancing CKD stage in CKD patients. Increased telomerase activity in PBMC is associated with eGFR and BMI. Resumen: Antecedentes: Los mecanismos moleculares responsables del aumento de la mortalidad cardiovascular en la enfermedad renal crónica (ERC asociada a la edad biológica no se conocen bien. Los estudios recientes apoyan la hipótesis de que los factores comunes responsables de este fenómeno son el envejecimiento celular y la disfunción telomérica. Objetivos: El objetivo de este estudio fue investigar

  14. 1,2-Propanediol. Comprehensive experimental and theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verevkin, Sergey P.; Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N.; Nell, Gernot

    2009-01-01

    The standard (p 0 =0.1MPa) molar enthalpy of formation at the temperature 298.15 K of the liquid 1,2-propanediol was measured using combustion calorimetry. Molar enthalpies of vaporization of isomeric 1,2-propanediols were obtained from the temperature dependence of the vapor pressure measured by the transpiration method. Thermochemical investigations of 1,2-ethanediol and 1,2-propanediol available in the literature were collected and combined with own experimental results. This collection together with the new experimental results reported here has helped to resolve contradictions in the available sublimation enthalpies data and to recommend consistent and reliable set of vaporization and formation enthalpies for both diols under study. Ab initio calculations of gaseous molar enthalpy of formation of 1,2-ethanediol and 1,2-propanediol have been performed using the G3MP2 method and results are in excellent agreement with the selected experimental data.

  15. Prognostic significance of endothelial dysfunctional markers of the first stage of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Mnuskina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-adaptive remodeling of cardiovascular system and progressive kidney damage at chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with the development of endothelial dysfunction (ED and apoptosis. The aim of this research was to study the changes of indicators of apoptosis and ED in patients with CKD 1 stage throughout 12 months. Complex biochemical, immunoferment and tool methods were applied at patient examinations. Arterial pressure of all observed patients was resolved on target values in 12 months. However, the indicators of endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDV increased in 55 patients (1st group, and the peak of circulating blood volume in skin microvessels in 22 patients (2nd group wasn't changed: 134±4 % и 136±4 %, p>0.1. The level of the annexin A5 reduced from 3.5±0.47 to 1.27±0.31 ng/ml (p0.1 in 2nd group. Diurnal excretion of sodium chloride decreased from 6.8±0.57 g/d to 2.8±0.39 g/d (p<0.05 in patients of 1st group. Dynamics of these indicators was not marked in patients of 2nd group: accordingly from 7.39±0.63 g/d to 7.01±0.65 g/d. Diurnal excretion of sodium chloride reflected the salt intake in patients with CKD 1 stage is associated with disturbance of endothelial-dependent vasodilation and apoptosis.

  16. Thermal decomposition of rhenium (5) complexes with 1,2,4-triazole. Termicheskoe razlozhenie kompleksov reniya (5) s 1,2,4-triazolom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amindzhanov, A A; Gagieva, S Ch; Kotegov, K V [Tadzhikskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Dushanbe (Tajikistan)

    1991-01-01

    Processes of thermal decomposition of rhenium (5) complexes with 1,2,4-triazole were studied. Thermolysis products were identified on the basis of data of the element analysis, IR spectra, conductometry and other methods. It is ascertained that at the first stage of thermolysis of hydroxyl-containing monomer complexes removal of water molecules occurs, and at the second one - dimerization process with formation of Re-O-Re group. It is shown that the nature of halide ion practically does not affect the temperature of the start of intensive thermal decomposition of the complexes.

  17. Carbon dioxide (CO2) angiography as an option for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Chiara; Sardanelli, Francesco; Perego, Matteo; Alì, Marco; Casilli, Francesco; Inglese, Luigi; Mauri, Giovanni

    2017-11-01

    To assess feasibility, efficacy and safety of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) digital subtraction angiography (DSA) to guide endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in a cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). After Ethical Committee approval, the records of 13 patients (all male, mean age 74.6 ± 8.0 years) with CKD, who underwent EVAR to exclude an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) under CO 2 angiography guidance, were reviewed. The AAA to be excluded had a mean diameter of 52.0 ± 8.0 mm. CO 2 angiography was performed by automatic (n = 7) or hand (n = 6) injection. The endograft was correctly placed and the AAA was excluded in all cases, without any surgical conversions. Two patients (15.4%) had an endoleak: one type-Ia, detected by CO 2 -DSA and effectively treated with prosthesis dilatation; one type-III, detected by CO 2 -DSA, confirmed using 10 ml of ICM, and conservatively managed. In one patient, CO 2 angiograms were considered of too low quality for guiding the procedure and 200 ml of ICM were administered. Overall, 11 patients (84.6%) underwent a successful EVAR under the guidance of the sole CO 2 angiography. No patients suffered from major complications, including those typically CO 2 -related. Two patients suffered from abdominal pain during the procedure secondary to a transient splanchnic perfusion's reduction due to CO 2 , and one patient had a worsening of renal function probably caused by a cholesterol embolization during the procedure. In patients with CKD, EVAR under CO 2 angiography guidance is feasible, effective, and safe.

  18. What drives quality improvement in chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary care: process evaluation of the Quality Improvement in Chronic Kidney Disease (QICKD) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihat, Akin; de Lusignan, Simon; Thomas, Nicola; Tahir, Mohammad Aumran; Gallagher, Hugh

    2016-04-06

    This study is a process evaluation of the Quality Improvement in Chronic Kidney Disease (QICKD) study, comparing audit-based education (ABE) and sending clinical guidelines and prompts (G&P) with usual practice, in improving systolic blood pressure control in primary care. This evaluation aimed to explore how far clinical staff in participating practices were aware of the intervention, and why change in practice might have taken place. 4 primary care practices in England: 2 received ABE, and 2 G&P. We purposively selected 1 northern/southern/city and rural practice from each study arm (from a larger pool of 132 practices as part of the QICKD trial). The 4 study practices were purposively sampled, and focus groups conducted with staff from each. All staff members were invited to attend. Focus groups in each of 4 practices, at the mid-study point and at the end. 4 additional trial practices not originally selected for in-depth process evaluation took part in end of trial focus groups, to a total of 12 focus groups. These were recorded, transcribed and analysed using the framework approach. 5 themes emerged: (1) involvement in the study made participants more positive about the CKD register; (2) clinicians did not always explain to patients that they had CKD; (3) while practitioners improved their monitoring of CKD, many were sceptical that it improved care and were more motivated by pay-for-performance measures; (4) the impact of study interventions on practice was generally positive, particularly the interaction with specialists, included in ABE; (5) the study stimulated ideas for future clinical practice. Improving quality in CKD is complex. Lack of awareness of clinical guidelines and scepticism about their validity are barriers to change. While pay-for-performance incentives are the main driver for change, quality improvement interventions can have a complementary influence. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  19. Accurate Laser Measurements of the Water Vapor Self-Continuum Absorption in Four Near Infrared Atmospheric Windows. a Test of the MT_CKD Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campargue, Alain; Kassi, Samir; Mondelain, Didier; Romanini, Daniele; Lechevallier, Loïc; Vasilchenko, Semyon

    2017-06-01

    The semi empirical MT_CKD model of the absorption continuum of water vapor is widely used in atmospheric radiative transfer codes of the atmosphere of Earth and exoplanets but lacks of experimental validation in the atmospheric windows. Recent laboratory measurements by Fourier transform Spectroscopy have led to self-continuum cross-sections much larger than the MT_CKD values in the near infrared transparency windows. In the present work, we report on accurate water vapor absorption continuum measurements by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and Optical-Feedback-Cavity Enhanced Laser Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) at selected spectral points of the transparency windows centered around 4.0, 2.1 and 1.25 μm. The temperature dependence of the absorption continuum at 4.38 μm and 3.32 μm is measured in the 23-39 °C range. The self-continuum water vapor absorption is derived either from the baseline variation of spectra recorded for a series of pressure values over a small spectral interval or from baseline monitoring at fixed laser frequency, during pressure ramps. In order to avoid possible bias approaching the water saturation pressure, the maximum pressure value was limited to about 16 Torr, corresponding to a 75% humidity rate. After subtraction of the local water monomer lines contribution, self-continuum cross-sections, C_{S}, were determined with a few % accuracy from the pressure squared dependence of the spectra base line level. Together with our previous CRDS and OF-CEAS measurements in the 2.1 and 1.6 μm windows, the derived water vapor self-continuum provides a unique set of water vapor self-continuum cross-sections for a test of the MT_CKD model in four transparency windows. Although showing some important deviations of the absolute values (up to a factor of 4 at the center of the 2.1 μm window), our accurate measurements validate the overall frequency dependence of the MT_CKD2.8 model.

  20. Hemoglobin stability in patients with anemia, CKD, and type 2 diabetes: an analysis of the TREAT (Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events With Aranesp Therapy) placebo arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skali, Hicham; Lin, Julie; Pfeffer, Marc A; Chen, Chao-Yin; Cooper, Mark E; McMurray, John J V; Nissenson, Allen R; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Rossert, Jerome; Parfrey, Patrick S; Scott-Douglas, Nairne W; Singh, Ajay K; Toto, Robert; Uno, Hajime; Ivanovich, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Sparse data are available about the natural history of hemoglobin (Hb) level trends in contemporary patients with anemia, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and type 2 diabetes mellitus. We intended to describe Hb level trends over time with no or minimal administration of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Prospective clinical trial cohort. 2,019 individuals with type 2 diabetes, moderate anemia, and CKD from the placebo arm of the Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events With Aranesp Therapy (TREAT) followed up for 2.3 years with an average of 32 monthly Hb level determinations per patient. Darbepoetin alfa was administered only if Hb level decreased to protocol-directed doses of darbepoetin alfa received due to an Hb level decrease to protocol-directed darbepoetin alfa. The other patients received 1 (16%), 2-4 (16%), or 5 or more (13%) doses of darbepoetin alfa. Those who received no darbepoetin alfa doses had higher baseline Hb levels, higher estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs), less proteinuria, and lower ferritin and transferrin saturation values. On average, Hb levels were stable or increased in all groups. Compared with individuals who received no darbepoetin alfa, those who received 5 or more doses were more likely to receive intravenous iron therapy and blood transfusions and progress to renal replacement therapy, but were not at higher risk of death. The strongest predictors of requiring 5 or more doses of darbepoetin alfa were lower baseline Hb level, lower eGFR, and higher proteinuria level. Post hoc analysis of a clinical trial of a specific population with diabetes, anemia, and non-dialysis-dependent CKD. In the TREAT placebo arm, Hb levels were stable with no or minimal protocol-directed darbepoetin alfa during 2.3 years of follow-up. Most patients with moderate anemia, non-dialysis-dependent CKD, and type 2 diabetes are able to maintain a stable Hb level without implementing long-term erythropoiesis-stimulating agent therapy. Copyright © 2013

  1. 55-mW, 1.2-V, 12-bit, 100-MSPS Pipeline ADCs for Wireless Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tomohiko; Kurose, Daisuke; Ueno, Takeshi; Yamaji, Takafumi; Itakura, Tetsuro

    For wireless receivers, low-power 1.2-V 12-bit 100-MSPS pipeline ADCs are fabricated in 90-nm CMOS technology. To achieve low-power dissipation at 1.2V without the degradation of SNR, the configuration of 2.5bit/stage is employed with an I/Q amplifier sharing technique. Furthermore, single-stage pseudo-differential amplifiers are used in a Sample-and-Hold (S/H) circuit and a 1st Multiplying Digital-to-Analog Converter (MDAC). The pseudo-differential amplifier with two-gain-stage transimpedance gain-boosting amplifiers realizes high DC gain of more than 90dB with low power. The measured SNR of the 100-MSPS ADC is 66.7dB at 1.2-V supply. Under that condition, each ADC dissipates only 55mW.

  2. Between Stage and Screen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tornqvist, Egil

    1996-01-01

    Ingmar Bergman is worldwide known as a film and stage director. Yet no-one has attempted to compare his stage and screen activities. In Between stage and screen Egil Tornqvist examines formal and thematical correspondences and differences between a number of Bergman's stage, screen, and radio

  3. Summary Stage 2018 - SEER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Access this manual of codes and coding instructions for the summary stage field for cases diagnosed January 1, 2018 and forward. 2018 version applies to every site and/or histology combination, including lymphomas and leukemias. Historically, also called General Staging, California Staging, and SEER Staging.

  4. Synthesis of 9H-Indeno [1, 2-b] Pyrazine and 11H-Indeno [1, 2-b ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    Synthesis of 9H-Indeno [1, 2-b] Pyrazine and. 11H-Indeno [1, 2-b] Quinoxaline Derivatives in. One-step Reaction from 2-Bromo-4-chloro-1-indanone. S. Jasouri1,2, J. Khalafy1,*, M. Badali2 and R.H. Prager3. 1Department of Chemistry, Urmia University, Urmia 57154, Iran. 2Daana Pharmaceutical Co., P.O. Box 5181, Tabriz ...

  5. A Convenient and Direct Route to 1,2-Dichlorovinylphosphine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    additions of P(O)H compounds to alkynes, but relatively few papers on the synthesis of 1,2-dichloro vinylphosphine oxide derivatives have been reported. There is only Ismailov's report on the synthesis of 1,2-dichlorovinylphosphonates from. 1,1-dichloro-2-oxoethylphosphonate and triphenylphosphine.14. This sparked our ...

  6. SIRT1, 2, 3 protect mouse oocytes from postovulatory aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Zhou, Yang; Li, Li; Wang, Hong-Hui; Ma, Xue-Shan; Qian, Wei-Ping; Shen, Wei; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    The quality of metaphase II oocytes will undergo a time-dependent deterioration following ovulation as the result of the oocyte aging process. In this study, we determined that the expression of sirtuin family members (SIRT1, 2, 3) was dramatically reduced in mouse oocytes aged in vivo or in vitro. Increased intracellular ROS was observed when SIRT1, 2, 3 activity was inhibited. Increased frequency of spindle defects and disturbed distribution of mitochondria were also observed in MII oocytes aged in vitro after treatment with Nicotinamide (NAM), indicating that inhibition of SIRT1, 2, 3 may accelerate postovulatory oocyte aging. Interestingly, when MII oocytes were exposed to caffeine, the decline of SIRT1, 2, 3 mRNA levels was delayed and the aging-associated defective phenotypes could be improved. The results suggest that the SIRT1, 2, 3 pathway may play a potential protective role against postovulatory oocyte aging by controlling ROS generation.

  7. The Prevalence of CKD in Rural Canadian Indigenous Peoples: Results From the First Nations Community Based Screening to Improve Kidney Health and Prevent Dialysis (FINISHED) Screen, Triage, and Treat Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komenda, Paul; Lavallee, Barry; Ferguson, Thomas W; Tangri, Navdeep; Chartrand, Caroline; McLeod, Lorraine; Gordon, Audrey; Dart, Allison; Rigatto, Claudio

    2016-10-01

    Indigenous Canadians have high rates of risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD), in particular diabetes. Furthermore, they have increased rates of complications associated with CKD, such as kidney failure and vascular disease. Our objective was to describe the prevalence of CKD in this population. Cross-sectional cohort. Indigenous (First Nations) Canadians 18 years or older screened as part of the First Nations Community Based Screening to Improve Kidney Health and Prevent Dialysis (FINISHED) project, an initiative completed in 2015 that accomplished community-wide screening in 11 rural communities in Manitoba, Canada. Indigenous ethnicity and geographic location (communities accessible by road compared with those accessible only by air). Prevalence of CKD, presumed based on a single ascertainment of urine albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR) ≥ 30mg/g and/or estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)indigenous Canadians in comparison to the general population and a prevalence of severely increased albuminuria that was 5-fold higher. This is comparable to patients with diabetes and/or hypertension. Public health strategies to screen, triage, and treat all Canadian indigenous peoples with CKD should be considered. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Complete knock down (CKD) house made of wood from waste biomass and plastic for disaster struck areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foong, Winson

    2010-01-01

    people living for months if not years in tents provided as temporary shelter. Fibersit, has come up with the idea to build Complete Knock Down (CKD) houses of wood made from waste material as describes above. The initial project will involve building 3 houses with basic facilities with a size of 20 ft x 20 ft (400 sqft) at the current factory site in Banting, Selangor. It is proposed to get the local youths (about 5 volunteers - from the World Youth Foundation) to be trained in putting up and knocking down the houses. After, this training, a new site will be chosen for the house to be located and the youths can be the agents to put up these houses in the new locations (preferably in Rural Sarawak or Sabah). It is suggested to get the involvement of MERCY Malaysia, UNDP and UN Habitat into this project as it will be easier to promote the project to the Nation and International arena upon its success. (author)

  9. Creatinine Clearance Is Not Equal to Glomerular Filtration Rate and Cockcroft-Gault Equation Is Not Equal to CKD-EPI Collaboration Equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Prado, Raul; Castillo-Rodriguez, Esmeralda; Velez-Arribas, Fernando Javier; Gracia-Iguacel, Carolina; Ortiz, Alberto

    2016-12-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) may require dose reduction or avoidance when glomerular filtration rate is low. However, glomerular filtration rate is not usually measured in routine clinical practice. Rather, equations that incorporate different variables use serum creatinine to estimate either creatinine clearance in mL/min or glomerular filtration rate in mL/min/1.73 m 2 . The Cockcroft-Gault equation estimates creatinine clearance and incorporates weight into the equation. By contrast, the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations estimate glomerular filtration rate and incorporate ethnicity but not weight. As a result, an individual patient may have very different renal function estimates, depending on the equation used. We now highlight these differences and discuss the impact on routine clinical care for anticoagulation to prevent embolization in atrial fibrillation. Pivotal DOAC clinical trials used creatinine clearance as a criterion for patient enrollment, and dose adjustment and Federal Drug Administration recommendations are based on creatinine clearance. However, clinical biochemistry laboratories provide CKD-EPI glomerular filtration rate estimations, resulting in discrepancies between clinical trial and routine use of the drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiation-Initiated Chlorination of 1, 2-Dichloroethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danno, A.; Abe, T.; Washino, M.; Souda, T.; Shimada, K. [Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Watanuki-machi, Takasaki-shi, Gunma-ken (Japan)

    1969-12-15

    Radiation-initiated chlorination of 1,2-dichloroethane was carried out with a batch system to study the chlorination reaction in the laboratory and also with a flow system to obtain information on its scale-up. It was found that the direct chlorination of 1,2-dichloroethane in the presence of gamma radiation takes place by a free-radical chain reaction with a high G-value of the order of 10{sup 5}. Successive chlorination of 1,2-dichloroethane gives 1,1, 2-trichloroethane, 1,1,1, 2- and 1,1, 2, 2-tetrachloroethane, pentachloroethane and hexachloroethane. No products other than these polychloro ethanes were detected. The composition of the reaction products depends on the degree of chlorination; it is independent of the dose rate and the chlorine feed rate. A promising application of this process is to produce trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene by thermal dehydrochlorination of a mixture of tetrachloroethane and pentachloroethane. The optimum conditions of producing these compounds with high yields depend on the feed rate of 1, 2-dichloroethane and chlorine gas, the dose rate and the reaction temperature. A pilot experimental facility with a 2-litre reaction vessel has been completed and is now in operation. (author)

  11. Letter regarding the article “The impact of hypomagnesemia on erectile dysfunction in elderly, non-diabetic, stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease patients: a prospective cross-sectional study”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatuzzo P

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Pasquale Fatuzzo,* Luca Zanoli,* Viviana Scollo Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Nephrology, University of Catania, Catania, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work In an article published in a recent issue of Clinical Interventions in Aging, Toprak et al1 found that, among patients with stage 3–4 chronic kidney disease (CKD, the prevalence of erectile dysfunction was higher in patients with hypomagnesemia. This finding is clinically relevant because it supports the hypothesis that hypomagnesemia may lead to inflammation2 and endothelial dysfunction, two causes of erectile dysfunction. Toprak et al1 concluded that the detection of the serum magnesium level in non-diabetic elderly men with CKD could be useful to assess the risk of erectile dysfunction. Consequently, it is important to assess the causes of hypomagnesemia in patients with CKD, in particular the causes that are potentially reversible. With this in mind, hypomagnesemia could be caused by the long-term use of proton pump inhibitors,2,3 widely used in patients with CKD but not reported in the study of Toprak et al,1 alone or in combination with diuretics2 or cyclosporine.4 View the original paper by Toprak and colleagues 

  12. Impedance and ac conductivity studies of Ba (Pr1/2Nb1/2) O3 ceramic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 36; Issue 4. Impedance and a.c. conductivity studies of ... Abstract. Impedance and electrical conduction studies of Ba(Pr1/2Nb1/2)O3 ceramic prepared through conventional ceramic fabrication technique are presented. The crystal symmetry, space group and unit cell ...

  13. Novel 1H-1,2,3-, 2H-1,2,3-, 1H-1,2,4- and 4H-1,2,4-triazole derivatives: a patent review (2008 - 2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Vitor F; da Rocha, David R; da Silva, Fernando C; Ferreira, Patrícia G; Boechat, Núbia A; Magalhães, Jorge L

    2013-03-01

    The triazoles represent a class of five-membered heterocyclic compounds of great importance for the preparation of new drugs with diverse biological activities because they may present several structural variations with the same numbers of carbon and nitrogen atoms. Due to the success of various triazoles that entered the pharmaceutical market and are still being used in medicines, many companies and research groups have shown interest in developing new methods of synthesis and biological evaluation of potential uses for these compounds. In this review, the authors explored aspects of patents for the 1H-1,2,3-, 2H-1,2,3-, 1H-1,2,4- and 4H-1,2,4-triazole families, including prototypes being considered in clinical studies between 2008 and 2011. The triazoles have been studied for over a century as an important class of heterocyclic compounds and still attract considerable attention due to their broad range of biological activities. More recently, there has been considerable interest in the development of novel triazoles with anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet, antimicrobial, antimycobacterial, antitumoral and antiviral properties and activity against several neglected diseases. This review emphasizes recent perspective and advances in the therapeutically active 1H-1,2,3-, 2H-1,2,3-, 1H-1,2,4- and 4H-1,2,4-triazole derivative patents between 2008 and 2011, covering the development of new chemical entities and new pharmaceuticals. Many studies have focused on these compounds as target structures and evaluated them in several biological targets. The preparation of 1H-1,2,3-, 2H-1,2,3-, 1H-1,2,4- and 4H-1,2,4-triazole derivatives brings to light several issues. There is a need to find new, more efficient preparations for these triazoles that take into consideration current issues in green chemistry, energy saving and sustainability. New diseases are discovered and new viruses and bacteria continue to challenge mankind, so it is imperative to find new prototypes for these

  14. Neutron investigation of Ru-doped Nd1/2Ca1/2MnO3. Comparison with Cr-doped Nd1/2Ca1/2MnO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moritomo, Yutaka; Nonobe, Toshihiko; Machida, Akihiko; Ohoyama, Kenji

    2002-01-01

    Lattice and magnetic properties are investigated for 3% Ru- and Cr-doped Nd 1/2 Ca 1/2 MnO 3 . The parent Nd 1/2 Ca 1/2 MnO 3 is a charge-ordered insulator (T CO =250K). With decreasing temperature below ≅210K, these compounds are separated into two perovskite phases, that is, the long-c and short-c phases. The long-c region shows a ferromagnetic transition at T C ≅210K for the Ru-doped compound and ≅130K for the Cr-doped compound, while the short-c region shows antiferromagnetic transition at T N ≅150K for Ru and ≅110K for Cr. We discuss the origin of the enhanced T C for the Ru-doped compound in terms of the effective one-electron bandwidth W of the e g -band. (author)

  15. 1,2-Oxathiolane - A Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, F. S.; Carlsen, Lars

    1983-01-01

    Der cyclische Sulfensureester 1,2-Oxathiolan (1) wurde durch milde Thermolyse von 3-(Phthalimidothio)-1-propanol (2) gewonnen und durch Photoelektronen-Spektroskopie identifiziert.- Die Möglichkeiten zur photoelektronenspektroskopischen Bestimmung der Konformation von Sulfensureestern werden...

  16. Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) - Daily, Version 1.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) comprises a total of 27 products. The Version 1.2 Daily product covers the period October 1998 to the present,...

  17. REACTIONS OF 5-[1-(2-PHENYL)METHYLIDENE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4-DIONES WITH SOME ORGANOMETALLIC REAGENTS. ... KEY WORDS: Imidazolidine-2,4-diones, a,b-Unsaturated carbonyl compounds, 1,2-Addition, conjugate addition, Grignard reagents, Lithium dibutylcuprate. Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop.

  18. Regridded Harmonized World Soil Database v1.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set describes select global soil parameters from the Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD) v1.2, including additional calculated parameters such as area...

  19. Ion chemistry of 1H-1,2,3-triazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichino, Takatoshi; Andrews, Django H; Rathbone, G Jeffery; Misaizu, Fuminori; Calvi, Ryan M D; Wren, Scott W; Kato, Shuji; Bierbaum, Veronica M; Lineberger, W Carl

    2008-01-17

    A combination of experimental methods, photoelectron-imaging spectroscopy, flowing afterglow-photoelectron spectroscopy and the flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube technique, and electronic structure calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of density functional theory (DFT) have been employed to study the mechanism of the reaction of the hydroxide ion (HO-) with 1H-1,2,3-triazole. Four different product ion species have been identified experimentally, and the DFT calculations suggest that deprotonation by HO- at all sites of the triazole takes place to yield these products. Deprotonation of 1H-1,2,3-triazole at the N1-H site gives the major product ion, the 1,2,3-triazolide ion. The 335 nm photoelectron-imaging spectrum of the ion has been measured. The electron affinity (EA) of the 1,2,3-triazolyl radical has been determined to be 3.447 +/- 0.004 eV. This EA and the gas-phase acidity of 2H-1,2,3-triazole are combined in a negative ion thermochemical cycle to determine the N-H bond dissociation energy of 2H-1,2,3-triazole to be 112.2 +/- 0.6 kcal mol-1. The 363.8 nm photoelectron spectroscopic measurements have identified the other three product ions. Deprotonation of 1H-1,2,3-triazole at the C5 position initiates fragmentation of the ring structure to yield a minor product, the ketenimine anion. Another minor product, the iminodiazomethyl anion, is generated by deprotonation of 1H-1,2,3-triazole at the C4 position, followed by N1-N2 bond fission. Formation of the other minor product, the 2H-1,2,3-triazol-4-ide ion, can be rationalized by initial deprotonation of 1H-1,2,3-triazole at the N1-H site and subsequent proton exchanges within the ion-molecule complex. The EA of the 2H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl radical is 1.865 +/- 0.004 eV.

  20. Symmetric coupling of four spin-1/2 systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Jun; Englert, Berthold-Georg

    2012-06-01

    We address the non-binary coupling of identical angular momenta based upon the representation theory for the symmetric group. A correspondence is pointed out between the complete set of commuting operators and the reference-frame-free subsystems. We provide a detailed analysis of the coupling of three and four spin-1/2 systems and discuss a symmetric coupling of four spin-1/2 systems.

  1. SU(1,2) invariance in two-dimensional oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivonos, Sergey [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics,Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Nersessian, Armen [Yerevan State University,1 Alex Manoogian St., Yerevan, 0025 (Armenia); Tomsk Polytechnic University,Lenin Ave. 30, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-01

    Performing the Hamiltonian analysis we explicitly established the canonical equivalence of the deformed oscillator, constructed in arXiv:1607.03756, with the ordinary one. As an immediate consequence, we proved that the SU(1,2) symmetry is the dynamical symmetry of the ordinary two-dimensional oscillator. The characteristic feature of this SU(1,2) symmetry is a non-polynomial structure of its generators written in terms of the oscillator variables.

  2. 1,2-Bis(2-methoxy-6-formylphenoxyethane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongqi Li

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound [systematic name: 3,3′-dimethoxy-2,2′-(ethane-1,2-diyldioxydibenzaldehyde], C18H18O6, prepared from 1,2-dibromoethane and ortho-vanillin in the presence of sodium carbonate, the two vanillin units are linked via a CH2–CH2 bridge. The two benzene rings are inclined at a dihedral angle of 41.6 (5°.

  3. Oral Magnesium Supplementation in Chronic Kidney Disease Stages 3 and 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bressendorff, Iain; Hansen, Ditte; Schou, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence suggests that increases in both serum and intracellular magnesium (Mg) can slow or even prevent the development of vascular calcification seen in CKD. Serum calcification...

  4. Seven Stages of Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease > Stages Overview What Is Dementia? What Is Alzheimer's? Younger/Early Onset Facts and Figures Know the 10 Signs Stages Inside the Brain: An Interactive Tour Risk Factors Diagnosis Treatments Myths Clinical Studies Research Brain Donation ...

  5. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peritoneal cancer; the first panel (stage IIA) shows cancer inside both ovaries that has spread to the uterus and fallopian tube. The second panel (stage IIB) shows cancer inside both ovaries that has spread to the colon. The third ...

  6. Late-Stage Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiving Middle-Stage Caregiving Late-Stage Caregiving Behaviors Aggression & Anger Anxiety & Agitation Depression Hallucinations Memory Loss & Confusion Repetition Sleep Issues & Sundowning Suspicion & Delusions Wandering Abuse Start Here What You Need to Know Online ...

  7. Stages and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiving Middle-Stage Caregiving Late-Stage Caregiving Behaviors Aggression & Anger Anxiety & Agitation Depression Hallucinations Memory Loss & Confusion Repetition Sleep Issues & Sundowning Suspicion & Delusions Wandering Abuse Start Here What You Need to Know Online ...

  8. Early-Stage Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiving Middle-Stage Caregiving Late-Stage Caregiving Behaviors Aggression & Anger Anxiety & Agitation Depression Hallucinations Memory Loss & Confusion Repetition Sleep Issues & Sundowning Suspicion & Delusions Wandering Abuse Start Here What You Need to Know Online ...

  9. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by the cancer. This blockage can cause the kidney to enlarge or stop working. Stage IIIB cervical cancer. Topics/Categories: Anatomy -- Gynecologic Cancer Types -- Cervical Cancer Staging Type: Color, ...

  10. Breast cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  11. Staging of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LUNG CANCER MINI-SERIES #2 Staging of Lung Cancer Once your lung cancer is diagnosed, staging tells you and your health care provider about ... at it under a microscope. The stages of lung cancer are listed as I, II, III, and IV ...

  12. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IA Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 cervical cancer; drawing ...

  13. Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage IIIC Description: Drawing of stage IIIC shows cancer inside both ovaries that has spread to the omentum. The cancer ... lymph nodes behind the peritoneum. In stage IIIC, cancer is found in one or both ovaries or fallopian tubes and has spread to the ...

  14. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1275x1275 View Download Large: 2550x2550 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  15. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1575x1200 View Download Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  16. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1305 View Download Large: 2400x2610 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Description: Stage IVB cervical cancer; drawing ...

  17. Cervical Cancer Stage IB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1613x1200 View Download Large: 3225x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IB Description: Stage IB1 and IB2 cervical ...

  18. The 2s1/2 → 2p1/2 + one photon transition in hydrogen and hydrogenlike ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsey, E.J.

    1977-01-01

    The 2s 1 / 2 → 2p 1 / 2 + one photon transition rate is calculated and discussed for hydrogen and hydrogenlike ions. It is noted that the induced transition rather than the spontaneous transition is of primary importance since it is the basis of many of the precision Lamb-shift measurements. The lack of a calculation of the transition rate other than a heuristic nonrelativistic derivation which requires a nontrivial assumption motivates the calculation presented here based on the external field approximation to quantum electrodynamics. It is found that the heuristic answer is correct in lowest order. In this derivation we see that the 2s 1 / 2 → 2p 1 / 2 + one photon transition gives an apparent contradiction to the often-stated remark that for the electric dipole matrix element there exist three equivalent representations, the ''length,'' ''velocity,'' and ''acceleration'' forms. The difficulties of an experimental determination of this transition rate using induced transitions in hydrogenlike ions are briefly noted as well as the somewhat different case of heavy muonic atoms where the spontaneous 2s 1 / 2 → 2p 1 / 2 + one photon transition has been observed

  19. Radiation-induced crosslinking of syndiotactic 1,2-polybutadiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Tadashi; Hoshino, Sadao; Yamamoto, Rokuro; Okamoto, Hidemasa; Obana, Kazuyoshi.

    1978-01-01

    Crystalline syndiotactic 1, 2-polybutadiene (hereafter abbreviated as 1, 2-PB) developed in Ube Industries, Ltd. by its own technology is a new thermoplastic resin belonging to the intermediate region between rubber and plastics in its flexibility. By selecting appropriate catalyst composition, 1, 2-PB having the melting point of 90 to 200 deg. C and crystallization of 10 to 65% can be obtained. These 1, 2-PBs can be worked to formed products by general thermoplastic forming methods such as injection molding, extrusion forming and blow forming. Radiation-crosslinked 1, 2-PB changed to very hard polymers through heat treatment. This change has been found to be radical chain reaction of cyclic polymerization. The relation of radiation-induced crosslinking and thermal expansion behavior, and the changes of appearance and structural and physical properties with heat treatment of these polymers are described. That is, specific gravity has increased, tensile strength has been enhanced, and elongation has decreased. While dielectric strength and arc resistivity have been upgraded. Therefore, these polymers can be used for the following applications: food wrapping film, molded notions, molded low foaming material for the soles of footwears, highly foaming moldings such as sponges, electric insulation material such as cable coating and adhesives for many materials. It is considered that crosslinking contributes to the application to electric insulation materials and heat curing to heat-resistant materials and parts. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  20. Word Criticality Analysis. MOS: 16B. Skill Levels 1 & 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    43* 2 UI3L, 29.1 2 §CT;:It’:iLL 1.12 2 ACCA 97.1 55.1 43.1 2 2 4,CITUI L 1.1 521 21l 9i 9 P ~ 1.2 2 hA~T)U h 24.1 10-.2 58.1 2.1. 2 A.;aifl U95. 2591...02#3 05.1 3 ’,I 73 # 7.1,I 65,1 6501 .,] 4?,0. .S,I 3 f), , 32, Z 3C91 ;*,t. 1.4, 2. 1 ) 9,,- 9..1 10,o. 44 09- 141 P2 4 Ar.v’%ss 9091 57 9. 4 C .7.2...9801! 72,1 419! 5 COMSJ ITrq 86. 1 21.1 5 C- 2.L1 ±. 691 5.3 Is$1 !49? !. ., 1. C9. t,4 79 9,* ie,7 17,4 16,2 Z2) Z #7 2U .2 1;l i64.8 62. p2 71#1 1

  1. sl(2)-1/2 and the triplet model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridout, David

    2010-01-01

    Conformal field theories with sl(2) -1/2 symmetry are studied with a view to investigating logarithmic structures. Applying the parafermionic coset construction to the non-logarithmic theory, a part of the structure of the triplet model is uncovered. In particular, the coset theory is shown to admit the triplet W-algebra as a chiral algebra. This motivates the introduction of an augmented sl(2) -1/2 -theory for which the corresponding coset theory is precisely the triplet model. This augmentation is envisaged to lead to a precise characterisation of the 'logarithmic lift' of the non-logarithmic sl(2) -1/2 -theory that has been proposed by Lesage et al.

  2. BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-song TENG; Yi ZHENG; Hao-hao WANG

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death in women today. Some of the patients are hereditary, with a large proportion characterized by mutation in BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 genes. In this review, we provide an overview of these two genes,focusing on their relationship with hereditary breast cancers. BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancers have unique features that differ from the general breast cancers, including alterations in cellular molecules, pathological bases, biological behavior, and a different prevention strategy. But the outcome of BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancers still remains controversial;further studies are needed to elucidate the nature of BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancers.

  3. Spinal instrumentation for unstable C1-2 injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, J; Nakagawa, H

    1999-06-01

    Seventeen patients with unstable C1-2 injuries were treated between 1990 and 1997. Various methods of instrumentation surgery were performed in 16 patients, excluding a case of atlantoaxial rotatory fixation. Posterior stabilization was carried out in 14 cases using Halifax interlaminar clamp, Sof'wire or Danek cable, or more recently, transarticular screws. Transodontoid anterior screw fixation was performed in four cases of odontoid process fractures, with posterior instrumentation in two cases because of malunion. Rigid internal fixation by instrumentation surgery for the unstable C1-2 injury avoids long-term application of a Halo brace and facilitates early rehabilitation. However, the procedure is technically demanding with the risk of neural and vascular injuries, particularly with posterior screw fixation. Sagittal reconstruction of thin-sliced computed tomography scans at the C1-2 region, neuronavigator, and intraoperative fluoroscopy are essential to allow preoperative surgical planning and intraoperative guidance.

  4. Thermal decomposition of rhenium (5) complexes with 1,2,4-triazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amindzhanov, A.A.; Gagieva, S.Ch.; Kotegov, K.V.

    1991-01-01

    Processes of thermal decomposition of rhenium (5) complexes with 1,2,4-triazole were studied. Thermolysis products were identified on the basis of data of the element analysis, IR spectra, conductometry and other methods. It is ascertained that at the first stage of thermolysis of hydroxyl-containing monomer complexes removal of water molecules occurs, and at the second one - dimerization process with formation of Re-O-Re group. It is shown that the nature of halide ion practically does not affect the temperature of the start of intensive thermal decomposition of the complexes

  5. Clinical pharmacy activities in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease patients: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stemer Gunar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD represent worldwide health problems with an epidemic extent. Therefore, attention must be given to the optimisation of patient care, as gaps in the care of CKD and ESRD patients are well documented. As part of a multidisciplinary patient care strategy, clinical pharmacy services have led to improvements in patient care. The purpose of this study was to summarise the available evidence regarding the role and impact of clinical pharmacy services for these patient populations. Methods A literature search was conducted using the Medline, Embase and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts databases to identify relevant studies on the impact of clinical pharmacists on CKD and ESRD patients, regarding disease-oriented and patient-oriented outcomes, and clinical pharmacist interventions on drug-related problems. Results Among a total of 21 studies, only four (19% were controlled trials. The majority of studies were descriptive (67% and before-after studies (14%. Interventions comprised general clinical pharmacy services with a focus on detecting, resolving and preventing drug-related problems, clinical pharmacy services with a focus on disease management, or clinical pharmacy services with a focus on patient education in order to increase medication knowledge. Anaemia was the most common comorbidity managed by clinical pharmacists, and their involvement led to significant improvement in investigated disease-oriented outcomes, for example, haemoglobin levels. Only four of the studies (including three controlled trials presented data on patient-oriented outcomes, for example, quality of life and length of hospitalisation. Studies investigating the number and type of clinical pharmacist interventions and physician acceptance rates reported a mean acceptance rate of 79%. The most common reported drug-related problems were incorrect dosing, the need for additional

  6. [Hydrogen bis(1,2,4-triazole] 1,2,4-triazolium bis(3-carboxy-4-hydroxybenzenesulfonate 1,2,4-triazole disolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-qiang Qiu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C2H4N3+·[H(C2H3N32]+·2C7H5O6S−·2C2H3N3, consists of two types of 1,2,4-triazole monocation, one protonated at the 2-site lying across a twofold axis and the other protonated at the 4-site with the H atom disordered over a center of symmetry, a 5-sulfosalicylate anion and a neutral 1,2,4-triazole molecule. The component ions are linked into a three-dimensional network by a combination of N—H...O, N—H...N, O—H...O, O—H...N, C—H...O and C—H...N hydrogen bonds. In addition, benzene–benzene π–π interactions of 3.942 (2 Å [interplanar spacing = 3.390 (2 Å] and C—O...π (3.331 Å interactions are observed.

  7. Vitamin B(12) Immunoassay on Roche Elecsys 2010: Effects of High Excess Concentration of Serum Vitamin B(12) in CKD Patients on Parenteral Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Surupa; Chaudhuri, Subimal

    2011-10-01

    Vitamin B(12) being water soluble is excreted in the urine when administered in excess. The probability of finding an abnormally excess serum concentration would be almost surreal. We report a peculiar clinical situation that may impact the vitamin B(12) immunoassay on the Roche Elecsys 2010 due to excess analyte concentration. In separate episodes (Feb and June 2010), the Biochemistry laboratory of a tertiary-care hospital, Kolkata, India, encountered two critically ill patients with background chronic kidney disease (CKD), low urine output, and on cyanocoabalamin supplementation, who had serum vitamin B(12) concentrations far exceeding expected values; even post dialysis. The B(12) assays (pmol/l) were performed using electrochemiluminiscence immunoassay on Roche Elecsys 2010, the assay validity confirmed by concomitant quality control runs. The immunoassays failed to deliver results, flagged with "signal level below limit". Biotin therapy was ruled out as a possible interferent. In the first episode, re-assay of a repeat draw yielded same outcome; outsourcing on Immulite provided concentration of >738 pmol/l. Serial dilution gave result of >29520 pmol/l on Elecsys 2010. In the second, we gained from past experience. Vitamin B(12) concentration >59040 pmol/l was conveyed to the treating nephrologist the very day. The B(12) immunoassay on the Elecsys 2010 employs sequential incubation steps for competitive binding that is compromised in the event of abnormally excess B(12) concentration in patient sera akin to the prozone effect. This knowledge may be beneficial while assaying sera of CKD patients to avoid financial loss due unnecessary repeats and delay in turnaround time.

  8. Abundances of the planetary nebula Hu 1-2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pottasch, [No Value; Hyung, S; Aller, LH; Beintema, DA; Bernard-Salas, J; Feibelman, WA; Klockner, HR

    The ISO and IUE spectra of the "elliptical" nebula Hu 1-2 are presented. These spectra are combined with new, high resolution spectra in the visual wavelength region to obtain a complete, extinction corrected, spectrum. The chemical composition of the nebula is then calculated and compared to

  9. Efficient Synthesis of 1-Sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raushel, Jessica; Fokin, Valery V.

    2010-01-01

    An efficient room temperature method for the synthesis of 1-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles from in situ generated copper(I) acetylides and sulfonyl azides is described. Copper(I) thiophene-2-carboxylate (CuTC) catalyst produces the title compounds under both non-basic anhydrous and aqueous conditions in good yields. PMID:20931987

  10. SAFT 4{1/2} inch nickel hydrogen battery cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duquesne, D.; Lacout, B.; Sennet, A. [SAFT Advanced Batteries, Poitiers (France)

    1995-12-31

    SAFT Advanced Batteries has now produced over 400 high capacity 4{1/2} inch Nickel Hydrogen Battery Cells for flight programs. The 4.5 inch diameter, rabbit-ear cell design is designed to provide the anticipated energy required at the lowest practical weight. SAFT has incorporated into the design of the dry-powder nickel electrode, truly hermetic ceramic to metal seals, qualified terminal feedthroughs, high reliability mechanical design, composite pure platinum negative electrode, and zircar separator, plus more than 25 years experience in aerospace nickel cell technology, resulting in a 4{1/2} inch configuration with the 3{1/2} inch cell design carryover heritage. General performance requirements for GEO missions that SAFT cells meet are 15 years in orbit lifetime, 80% DOD, low mass to energy ratios, and flexible capacity by modifying number of electrodes in the stack. This design is qualified for geostationary orbits based on SAFT`s 3{1/2} inch qualification heritage, design verification, and cycling performed by customer Space Systems/LORAL in support of the INTELSAT VIIA and N-STAR flight programs.

  11. Game-Review: Trilogie Mass Effect 1, 2 und 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl H. Stingeder

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Karl Stingeder hat als Spieletester die Science Fiction Trilogie Mass Effect (1,2 und 3 rezensiert. Er berichtet von der inneren Vielfalt und dem spannenden Gameplay. Tauchen Sie ein in eine Welt, die ihnen eine lange Spielzeit garantiert und genießen Sie die Pracht dieser Kunstwerke.

  12. Tydskrif vir letterkunde - Vol 36, No 1-2 (2002)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluating the role of Adult Based Education and Training (ABET), in terms of fulfilling the need for literacy in English, in the private sector · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. B Vivian. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/tvl.v36i1-2.53818 ...

  13. Electronographic calibration of UK 1.2-m Schmidt plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, M.R.S.

    1979-01-01

    Two electronographic sequences are given in the South Galactic Pole region down to msub(B) = approximately 23 +- 0.3 mag. These sequences are used to obtain a calibration for COSMOS measures of UK 1.2-m Schmidt plates and evaluate their photometric transfer properties. (author)

  14. Nigerian Hospital Practice - Vol 6, No 1-2 (2010)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation and Management of The Child with Failure to Thrive · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. A.N Onyiriuka. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/nhp.v6i1-2.62334 ...

  15. Acid-base strengths in 1,2-dichloroethane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.; Dahmen, E.A.M.F.

    1973-01-01

    The pKa value of hydriodic acid in 1,2-dichloroethane was determined from conductivity measurements. A glass electrode was calibrated for dichloroethane in the potentiometric titration of hydriodic acid with tetramethylguanidine. From potentiometric titrations, the pKa values in dichloroethane of

  16. Tropical Veterinarian - Vol 24, No 1-2 (2006)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effectiveness of levamisole® in the treatment of natural multiple helminth infection of ruminants in Zaria: A case report. EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. J S Neils, J P Nzalak, J B George, 23-31. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/tv.v24i1-2.4583 ...

  17. 26 CFR 302.1-2 - Application of regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION TAXES UNDER THE INTERNATIONAL CLAIMS SETTLEMENT ACT, AS AMENDED AUGUST 9, 1955 § 302.1-2... (40 Stat. 411). (b) Taxes covered. The regulations in this part are applicable to any internal revenue tax with respect to (1) property vested in the Attorney General or any action or transaction...

  18. pyridines and imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hongli Fan

    2018-05-07

    May 7, 2018 ... School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Heze University, 2269 Daxue ... approach to the synthesis of 3-substituted imidazo[1,2- ...... and Sharratt A P 1991 Chemistry of amidines. Part. 1. Determination of the site of ...

  19. Quark sea and the. delta. I=1/2 rule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoghue, J F [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA). Dept. of Physics; Golowich, E [Massachusetts Univ., Amherst (USA)

    1977-08-29

    The effect on nonleptonic processes of quark-antiquark pairs due to quantum chromodynamics is studied. Their presence improves agreement between theory and experiment for hyperon decays. In kaon decays a new ..delta..I=1/2 contribution is found, but ..delta..I=3/2 effects are still too large to be in agreement.

  20. Synthesis of Poly(m-pyridylene-1,2-diphenylvinylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana S. Montani

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis by dehalogenating polycondensation and characterization of a new soluble conjugated polymer, poly(m-pyridylene-1,2-diphenylvinylene, DP-PPyV, is reported here. It shows good mechanical properties and a λmax = 330 nm. The maximum intensity peak of MALDI-TOF corresponds to 1.800 Da.

  1. Substituted 4-hydroxy-1,2,3-triazoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pippione, Agnese C.; Dosio, Franco; Ducime, Alex

    2015-01-01

    the distal (S)-glutamic acid carboxyl group using the 4-hydroxy-1,2,3-triazole moiety is applied, to obtain two promising glutamate analogs. In the second example, a scaffold hopping approach is applied, replacing the phenolic moiety present in MDG-1-33A, a potent inhibitor of Onchocerca volvulus chitinase...

  2. Photosynthesis-Inhibiting Activity of 1-[(2-Chlorophenylcarbamoyl]- and 1-[(2-Nitrophenylcarbamoyl]naphthalen-2-yl Alkylcarbamates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Gonec

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Eight 1-[(2-chlorophenylcarbamoyl]naphthalen-2-yl alkylcarbamates and eight 1-[(2-nitrophenylcarbamoyl]naphthalen-2-yl alkylcarbamates were tested for their activity related to the inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport (PET in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. chloroplasts. The PET-inhibiting activity of the compounds was relatively low; the corresponding IC50 values ranged from 0.05 to 0.664 mmol/L; and the highest activity within the series of compounds was observed for 1-[(2-chlorophenyl-carbamoyl]naphthalen-2-yl propylcarbamate. It has been proven that the compounds are PET-inhibitors in photosystem II. Despite rather low PET-inhibiting activities, primary structure-activity trends can be discussed.

  3. The integrable quantum group invariant A2n-1(2) and Dn+1(2) open spin chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepomechie, Rafael I.; Pimenta, Rodrigo A.; Retore, Ana L.

    2017-11-01

    A family of A2n(2) integrable open spin chains with Uq (Cn) symmetry was recently identified in arxiv:arXiv:1702.01482. We identify here in a similar way a family of A2n-1(2) integrable open spin chains with Uq (Dn) symmetry, and two families of Dn+1(2) integrable open spin chains with Uq (Bn) symmetry. We discuss the consequences of these symmetries for the degeneracies and multiplicities of the spectrum. We propose Bethe ansatz solutions for two of these models, whose completeness we check numerically for small values of n and chain length N. We find formulas for the Dynkin labels in terms of the numbers of Bethe roots of each type, which are useful for determining the corresponding degeneracies. In an appendix, we briefly consider Dn+1(2) chains with other integrable boundary conditions, which do not have quantum group symmetry.

  4. The integrable quantum group invariant A2n−1(2 and Dn+1(2 open spin chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael I. Nepomechie

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A family of A2n(2 integrable open spin chains with Uq(Cn symmetry was recently identified in arXiv:1702.01482. We identify here in a similar way a family of A2n−1(2 integrable open spin chains with Uq(Dn symmetry, and two families of Dn+1(2 integrable open spin chains with Uq(Bn symmetry. We discuss the consequences of these symmetries for the degeneracies and multiplicities of the spectrum. We propose Bethe ansatz solutions for two of these models, whose completeness we check numerically for small values of n and chain length N. We find formulas for the Dynkin labels in terms of the numbers of Bethe roots of each type, which are useful for determining the corresponding degeneracies. In an appendix, we briefly consider Dn+1(2 chains with other integrable boundary conditions, which do not have quantum group symmetry.

  5. Multiple stage railgun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaland, K.; Hawke, R.S.; Scudder, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    A multiple stage magnetic railgun accelerator for accelerating a projectile by movement of a plasma arc along the rails. The railgun is divided into a plurality of successive rail stages which are sequentially energized by separate energy sources as the projectile moves through the bore of the railgun. Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end of the railgun can be prevented by connection of the energy sources to the rails through isolation diodes. Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end of the railgun can also be prevented by dividing the rails into electrically isolated rail sections. In such case means are used to extinguish the arc at the end of each energized stage and a fuse or laser device is used to initiate a new plasma arc in the next energized rail stage

  6. Interplay between intramolecular and intermolecular structures of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloro-1,2-difluoroethane

    OpenAIRE

    Rovira Esteva, M.; Murugan, N.A.; Pardo, L.C.; Busch, S.; Tamarit, J.Ll.; Pothoczki, Sz.; Cuello, G. J.; Bermejo, Francisco Javier

    2011-01-01

    We report on the interplay between the short-range order of molecules in the liquid phase of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloro-1,2-difluoroethane and the possible molecular conformations, trans and gauche. Two complementary approaches have been used to get a comprehensive picture: analysis of neutron-diffraction data by a Bayesian fit algorithm and a molecular dynamics simulation. The results of both show that the population of trans and gauche conformers in the liquid state can only correspond to the gauc...

  7. Low-frequency dielectric dispersion and magnetic properties of La, Gd modified Pb(Fe1/2Ta1/2)O3 multiferroics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, R.N.P.; Rodriguez, C.; Bhattacharya, P.; Katiyar, R.S.; Rinaldi, C.

    2007-01-01

    Pb(Fe 1/2 Ta 1/2 )O 3 (PFT) modified by rare-earth (La and Gd) ions has been synthesized in a single phase using a double-stage synthesis (i.e., Columbite) technique. Scanning electron micrographs (SEM) of the pellet samples have shown a significant change in their grain size and uniform distribution of Gd/La at the Fe-sites. The room temperature X-ray structural analysis shows that the reported cubic (or tetragonal) structure of PFT has been distorted to a monoclinic system on substitution of La/Gd at the Fe-site. Detailed studies of dielectric properties of the above compound on La/Gd substitution have shown strong dielectric dispersion at low frequency (i.e. relaxor behavior) with drastic change in transition temperature. Magnetic characterization shows that though the PFT sample displays an antiferromagnetic transition at ∼150 K, the rare-earth ions-substituted samples do not. Furthermore, temperature dependence of magnetization measurements shows that spin glass transition observed in PFT at low temperatures (5-20 K) does not exist in the La and Gd substituted PFT. Doping of Gd in PFT increases the sample magnetization, especially at low temperature

  8. Comparison of renal function assessment by cystatin c and creatinine based equations for e-gfr in type 2 diabetics in different stages of albuminuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qamar, A.; Ahmad, T.M.; Hayat, A.; Khan, M.A.; Rehman, S. Z.

    2017-01-01

    To compare e-GFR estimated by creatinine or cystatin C based and combined creatinine and cystatin C based equations in type 2 diabetics in different stages of albuminuria. Study Design: Comparative cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Chemical Pathology, Army Medical College Rawalpindi in collaboration with endocrinology outpatient department Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from Nov 2015 to Nov 2016. Material and Methods: A total of 119 type 2 diabetic subjects of either gender, aged 30- 60 years were enrolled in the study with duration of diabetes less than 15 years and were divided into further sub groups on the basis of degree of albuminuria determined by spot urine albumin to creatinine ratio (uACR). Fifty age matched disease free controls with no history of any systemic disease were also included in the study. Known patients of type 1 diabetes, chronic inflammatory disorders, uncontrolled hypertension, thyroid disease, chronic kidney disease, on lipid lowering drugs, steroids, ACE inhibitors and pregnant ladies were excluded from the study. Serum creatinine serum cystatin C were assessed on fully automated chemistry analyzer selectra. E-GFR was calculated by online GFR calculator by National Kidney Foundation. Comparison of means of e-GFR calculated by various equations was carried out by one way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey tests. Degree of agreement between various equations for the estimation of GFR was assessed by kappa statistics. A p-value less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Mean e-GFR (ml/min/1.73m2) was lowest in cystatin C based CKD-EPI equation (89.56 +- 39.84) followed by combined cystatin C and creatinine based CKD-EPI (92.34 +- 37.88). Values of e-GFR by creatinine based CKD-EPI equation (95.84 +- 27.24), and by creatinine based MDRD equation (105.37 +- 64.98) were both higher. In creatinine based MDRD, equation normo albuminuria and micro albuminuria groups did not show statistically

  9. Turbine stage model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazantsev, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    A model of turbine stage for calculations of NPP turbine department dynamics in real time was developed. The simulation results were compared with manufacturer calculations for NPP low-speed and fast turbines. The comparison results have shown that the model is valid for real time simulation of all modes of turbines operation. The model allows calculating turbine stage parameters with 1% accuracy. It was shown that the developed turbine stage model meets the accuracy requirements if the data of turbine blades setting angles for all turbine stages are available [ru

  10. Design of a 4 1/2 stage turbine with a stage loading factor of 4.66 and high specific work output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, P. F.

    1976-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of a highly loaded multistage fan drive turbine is discussed. Turbine flowpath and airfoil sections are presented along with respective pressure and velocity distributions. Vibrational modes are identified in the expected turbine operating range.

  11. Magnesium modifies the association between serum phosphate and the risk of progression to end-stage kidney disease in patients with non-diabetic chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Yusuke; Iwatani, Hirotsugu; Hamano, Takayuki; Tomida, Kodo; Kawabata, Hiroaki; Kusunoki, Yasuo; Shimomura, Akihiro; Matsui, Isao; Hayashi, Terumasa; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2015-10-01

    It is known that magnesium antagonizes phosphate-induced apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells and prevents vascular calcification. Here we tested whether magnesium can also counteract other pathological conditions where phosphate toxicity is involved, such as progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We explored how the link between the risk of CKD progression and hyperphosphatemia is modified by magnesium status. A post hoc analysis was run in 311 non-diabetic CKD patients who were divided into four groups according to the median values of serum magnesium and phosphate. During a median follow-up of 44 months, 135 patients developed end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). After adjustment for relevant clinical factors, patients in the lower magnesium-higher phosphate group were at a 2.07-fold (95% CI: 1.23-3.48) risk for incident ESKD and had a significantly faster decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate compared with those in the higher magnesium-higher phosphate group. There were no significant differences in the risk of these renal outcomes among the higher magnesium-higher phosphate group and both lower phosphate groups. Incubation of tubular epithelial cells in high phosphate and low magnesium medium in vitro increased apoptosis and the expression levels of profibrotic and proinflammatory cytokine; these changes were significantly suppressed by increasing magnesium concentration. Thus, magnesium may act protectively against phosphate-induced kidney injury.

  12. Prognostic value of myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography for major adverse cardiac cerebrovascular and renal events in patients with chronic kidney disease: results from first year of follow-up of the Gunma-CKD SPECT multicenter study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasama, Shu [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine and Biological Science (Cardiovascular Medicine), Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Cardiovascular Hospital of Central Japan (Kitakanto Cardiovascular Hospital), Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Toyama, Takuji [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Gunma Prefectural Cardiovascular Center, Maebashi (Japan); Sato, Makito [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine and Biological Science (Cardiovascular Medicine), Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Tatebayashi Kosei Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Sano, Hirokazu [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine and Biological Science (Cardiovascular Medicine), Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Isesaki Municipal Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Isesaki (Japan); Ueda, Tetsuya [Fujioka General Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Fujioka (Japan); Sasaki, Toyoshi [Takasaki General Medical Center, Division of Cardiology, Takasaki (Japan); Nakahara, Takehiro; Kurabayashi, Masahiko [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine and Biological Science (Cardiovascular Medicine), Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Higuchi, Tetsuya; Tsushima, Yoshito [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Maebashi (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of adverse cardio-cerebrovascular events. We examined whether stress myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides reliable prognostic markers for these patients. In this multicenter, prospective cohort trial from the Gunma-CKD SPECT study protocol, patients with CKD [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) < 60 min/ml per 1.73 m{sup 2}] undergoing stress {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin SPECT for suspected or possible ischemic heart disease were initially followed for 1 year, with the following study endpoints: primary, the occurrence of cardiac deaths (CDs), and secondary, major adverse cardiac, cerebrovascular, and renal events (MACCREs). The summed stress score (SSS), summed rest score, and summed difference score (SDS) were estimated with the standard 17-segment, 5-point scoring model. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume (ESV), and ejection fraction were measured using electrocardiogram-gated SPECT. During the first year of follow-up, 69 of 299 patients experienced MACCREs (CD, n = 7; non-fatal myocardial infarction, n = 3; hospitalization for heart failure, n = 13; cerebrovascular accident, n = 1; need for revascularization, n = 38; and renal failure, i.e., hemodialysis initiation, n = 7). ESV and SSS were associated with CDs (p < 0.05), and eGFR and SDS were associated with MACCREs (p < 0.05), in multivariate logistic analysis. Patients with high ESV and high SSS had a significantly higher CD rate during the first year than the other CKD patient subgroups (p < 0.05). Patients with low eGFR and high SDS had a significantly higher MACCRE rate than the other subgroups (p < 0.05). Myocardial perfusion SPECT can provide reliable prognostic markers for patients with CKD. (orig.)

  13. Prognostic value of myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography for major adverse cardiac cerebrovascular and renal events in patients with chronic kidney disease: results from first year of follow-up of the Gunma-CKD SPECT multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasama, Shu; Toyama, Takuji; Sato, Makito; Sano, Hirokazu; Ueda, Tetsuya; Sasaki, Toyoshi; Nakahara, Takehiro; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Higuchi, Tetsuya; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of adverse cardio-cerebrovascular events. We examined whether stress myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides reliable prognostic markers for these patients. In this multicenter, prospective cohort trial from the Gunma-CKD SPECT study protocol, patients with CKD [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) < 60 min/ml per 1.73 m 2 ] undergoing stress 99m Tc-tetrofosmin SPECT for suspected or possible ischemic heart disease were initially followed for 1 year, with the following study endpoints: primary, the occurrence of cardiac deaths (CDs), and secondary, major adverse cardiac, cerebrovascular, and renal events (MACCREs). The summed stress score (SSS), summed rest score, and summed difference score (SDS) were estimated with the standard 17-segment, 5-point scoring model. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume (ESV), and ejection fraction were measured using electrocardiogram-gated SPECT. During the first year of follow-up, 69 of 299 patients experienced MACCREs (CD, n = 7; non-fatal myocardial infarction, n = 3; hospitalization for heart failure, n = 13; cerebrovascular accident, n = 1; need for revascularization, n = 38; and renal failure, i.e., hemodialysis initiation, n = 7). ESV and SSS were associated with CDs (p < 0.05), and eGFR and SDS were associated with MACCREs (p < 0.05), in multivariate logistic analysis. Patients with high ESV and high SSS had a significantly higher CD rate during the first year than the other CKD patient subgroups (p < 0.05). Patients with low eGFR and high SDS had a significantly higher MACCRE rate than the other subgroups (p < 0.05). Myocardial perfusion SPECT can provide reliable prognostic markers for patients with CKD. (orig.)

  14. Phase transition in Li{sub 1/2}Bi{sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, Subrat K; Choudhary, R N.P. [Dept. of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur (India); Mahapatra, P K [Dept. of Physics and Technophysics, Vidyasagar Univ., Midnapur (India)

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Recent advancements in the electronics in this miniaturization age are found in many ferroelectric based materials of different structural families. Among them, perovskites are being used for the possible forefront applications in the areas of research as well as in industrial applications. Though a lot of lead-based compounds like PZT, PMN etc. have been investigated for device applications, the manufacturing companies are now heading towards the environmental friendly lead-free compounds. Li{sub 1/2}Bi{sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3} comes under this group. Here we report the studies of phase transition of Li{sub 1/2}Bi{sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3} (LBT) ceramic which was prepared by a mixed-oxide technique. The formation of the compound was confirmed by XRD studies. The dielectric permittivity, the loss tangent and polarization of the sample were studied in a wide frequency and temperature range. Detailed analysis of impedance spectrum obtained at different temperatures and frequencies suggested that the electrical properties of the material are strongly temperature dependant. The Nequist plots clearly showed the presence of both bulk and grain boundary effect in the compound. The frequency dependent ac conductivity at different temperatures indicated the conduction process is thermally activated. The activation energy was calculated from the temperature variation of d.c. conductivity.

  15. ABIOTIC DEHALOGENATION OF 1,2-DICHLOROETHANE AND 1,2-DIBROMETHANE IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION CONTAINING HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The detection of significant levels of halogenated ali- phatic contaminants in groundwater resources in the U- nited States (1, 2) has spurred a considerable effort to understand the various mechanisms-both microbiological and abiotic-by which these compounds may be trans- formed...

  16. Relationship of associated secondary hyperparathyroidism to serum fibroblast growth factor-23 in end stage renal disease: A case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliem, Hamdy; Tawfik, Gamal; Moustafa, Fadia; Zaki, Heba

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is an insidious disease that develops early in the course of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and increases in severity as the glomerular filtration rate deteriorates. Recent studies have identified fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) as a new protein with phosphaturic activity. It is mainly secreted by osteoblasts and is now considered the most important factor for regulation of phosphorus homeostasis. It is not yet proven if there is any direct relation between parathyroid hormone (PTH) and FGF23. The present study aims to evaluate the relation between serum FGF23, phosphorus, and PTH in end-stage renal disease in patients with SHPT on regular hemodialysis. Materials and Methods: Forty-six consecutive CKD adult patients (case group) and 20 healthy adults (control group) were included in the study. All patients had SHPT and were on regular hemodialysis. Both groups were subjected to full medical history, clinical examination and biochemical studies. Serum phosphorus, calcium, ferritin, hemoglobin level, blood urea, creatinine, PTH, and FGF23 were analyzed. Results: Levels of FGF23 were significantly higher in the case group in comparison with those in the control group, viz., 4-fold, and positively correlated with PTH. Phosphorus levels in the case group were significantly high in spite of the increasing levels of FGF23. Both PTH and FGF23 were positively correlated with phosphorus and negatively with hemoglobin levels. Conclusion: SHPT and FGF23 may have a partial role in the development of anemia in patients with CKD. FGF23 could be a central factor in the pathogenesis of SHPT. Its role in controlling hyperphosphatemia in CKD is vague. PMID:21731867

  17. Relationship of associated secondary hyperparathyroidism to serum fibroblast growth factor-23 in end stage renal disease: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy Sliem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT is an insidious disease that develops early in the course of chronic kidney disease (CKD and increases in severity as the glomerular filtration rate deteriorates. Recent studies have identified fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23 as a new protein with phosphaturic activity. It is mainly secreted by osteoblasts and is now considered the most important factor for regulation of phosphorus homeostasis. It is not yet proven if there is any direct relation between parathyroid hormone (PTH and FGF23. The present study aims to evaluate the relation between serum FGF23, phosphorus, and PTH in end-stage renal disease in patients with SHPT on regular hemodialysis. Materials and Methods: Forty-six consecutive CKD adult patients (case group and 20 healthy adults (control group were included in the study. All patients had SHPT and were on regular hemodialysis. Both groups were subjected to full medical history, clinical examination and biochemical studies. Serum phosphorus, calcium, ferritin, hemoglobin level, blood urea, creatinine, PTH, and FGF23 were analyzed. Results: Levels of FGF23 were significantly higher in the case group in comparison with those in the control group, viz., 4-fold, and positively correlated with PTH. Phosphorus levels in the case group were significantly high in spite of the increasing levels of FGF23. Both PTH and FGF23 were positively correlated with phosphorus and negatively with hemoglobin levels. Conclusion: SHPT and FGF23 may have a partial role in the development of anemia in patients with CKD. FGF23 could be a central factor in the pathogenesis of SHPT. Its role in controlling hyperphosphatemia in CKD is vague.

  18. Stage-to-stage progression of chronic kidney disease in renal transplantation with chronic allograft dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalkhali H

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Although the short-term results of kidney transplantation have improved greatly during the past decades, the long-term results have not improved according. Graft loss due to chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD is a major concern in renal transplant recipients (RTRs. There is little data about disease progression in this patient population. In this paper, we investigated history of kidney function as the pattern, waiting time and rate of pass from intermediate stages in RTR with CAD."n"nMethods: In a single-center retrospective study, 214 RTRs with CAD investigated at the Urmia University Hospital urmia, Iran from 1997 to 2005. Kidney function at each visit assessed with GFR. We apply NKF and K/DOQI classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD staging system to determine pattern of disease progression per stage in this group of patients. "n"nResults: The pure death-censored graft loss was 26% with mean waiting time 81.7 months. 100% of RTRs passed from stage I to II in mean waiting time 26.3 months. The probability of prognostic factors transition from stage II to III was 88.9% with mean waiting time 25.5 months, transition from III to IV was 55.7% with mean waiting time of 24.9 months and transition for

  19. Beam current transformer (BCT) for experiment WA1/2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    In experiment WA1/2, a 400 GeV proton beam from the SPS was directed at a target, downstream of which a hadron line selected, in several narrow momentum bands, a beam of either pi+ and K+ or pi- and K-. These neutrino-parent particles, before entering a 292 m long decay tunnel, passed through a set of 2 BCTs of a design seen here. They measured the hadron intensity (10^10 to 10^11 particles/pulse) with a precision of the order of 1%. There were 2 of them, for enhanced precision and confidence. After the discovery of neutral currents in the Gargamelle-experiment, WA1/2 was the first follow-up, high-precision experiment (Z.Phys.C35, 443-452, 1987 and Z.Phys.C45, 361-379, 1990). See also 7706516X.

  20. Stages of Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... under a microscope . Stage II In stage II , cancer has spread: to connective tissue just under the skin of the penis . Also, ... spread to one lymph node in the groin . Cancer has also spread: to connective tissue just under the skin of the penis . Also, ...

  1. Einstein-Cartan-Dirac theory in (1+2)-dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dereli, Tekin [Koc University, Department of Physics, Istanbul (Turkey); Oezdemir, Nese [Istanbul Technical University, Department of Physics Engineering, Istanbul (Turkey); Sert, Oezcan [Pamukkale University, Department of Physics, Denizli (Turkey)

    2013-01-15

    Einstein-Cartan theory is formulated in (1+2) dimensions using the algebra of exterior differential forms. A Dirac spinor is coupled to gravity and the field equations are obtained by a variational principle. The space-time torsion is found to be given algebraically in terms of a quadratic spinor condensate field. Circularly symmetric, exact solutions that collapse to AdS{sub 3} geometry in the absence of the Dirac condensate are found. (orig.)

  2. CMMI (registered trademark) for Services, Version 1.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    background in information technology, especially those familiar with disciplines like service - oriented architecture (SOA) or software as a service ( SaaS ). In... services , the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) has found several dimensions that an organization can focus on to improve its business. Figure...International Business Machines) and the SEI [Humphrey 1989]. Humphrey’s book, Managing the Software Process, provides a CMMI for Services Version 1.2

  3. James Lee Byars 1/2 an autobiography, sourcebook

    CERN Document Server

    Byars, James Lee; Eleey, Peter

    2014-01-01

    "I see my autobiography as an arbitrary segment of so many pages of time, of things that I have paid attention to at this point in my life," wrote James Lee Byars (1932-1997) in 1969. He was then 37, about half the average male lifespan at the time, and accordingly thought it appropriate to write his "1/2 autobiography." Byars' art ranged from highly refined objects to extremely minimal performance and events, and books, ephemera and correspondence that he distributed widely among friends and colleagues. Today, more than 15 years after his death, assessments of his art must negotiate Byars' performance of his charismatic self in his life and art. For his first major posthumous survey in the US, exhibition curators Magalí Arriola and Peter Eleey decided to produce a catalogue in two "halves," playing on his "1/2 autobiography": a catalogue of the exhibition itself, including new scholarship, and a sourcebook of primary documents. 1/2 an Autobiography, Sourcebook constitutes the latter volume--a reference guid...

  4. ESRD After Heart Failure, Myocardial Infarction, or Stroke in Type 2 Diabetic Patients With CKD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charytan, David M; Solomon, Scott D; Ivanovich, Peter

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: How cardiovascular (CV) events affect progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), particularly in the setting of type 2 diabetes, remains uncertain. STUDY DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING & PARTICIPANTS: 4,022 patients with type 2 diabetes, anemia, and chronic kidney disease from......, are strongly associated with risk for ESRD. These findings underscore the need for kidney-specific therapies in addition to treatment of CV risk factors to lower ESRD incidence in diabetes....... and during overall follow-up after an intercurrent CV event. LIMITATIONS: Population limited to clinical trial participants with diabetes and anemia. RESULTS: 155 of 652 (23.8%) ESRD cases occurred after an intercurrent CV event; 110 (16.9%) cases followed heart failure, 28 (4.3%) followed myocardial...

  5. Decrease in Urinary Creatinine Excretion in Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynkevich, Elena; Flamant, Martin; Haymann, Jean-Philippe; Metzger, Marie; Thervet, Eric; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Vrtovsnik, François; Houillier, Pascal; Froissart, Marc; Stengel, Bénédicte

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about muscle mass loss in early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). We used 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion rate to assess determinants of muscle mass and its evolution with kidney function decline. We also described the range of urinary creatinine concentration in this population. Methods We included 1072 men and 537 women with non-dialysis CKD stages 1 to 5, all of them with repeated measurements of glomerular filtration rate (mGFR) by 51Cr-EDTA renal clearance and several nutritional markers. In those with stage 1 to 4 at baseline, we used a mixed model to study factors associated with urinary creatinine excretion rate and its change over time. Results Baseline mean urinary creatinine excretion decreased from 15.3±3.1 to 12.1±3.3 mmol/24 h (0.20±0.03 to 0.15±0.04 mmol/kg/24 h) in men, with mGFR falling from ≥60 to creatinine excretion at baseline. Mean annual decline in mGFR was 1.53±0.12 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year and that of urinary creatinine excretion rate, 0.28±0.02 mmol/24 h per year. Patients with fast annual decline in mGFR of 5 mL/min/1.73 m2 had a decrease in urinary creatinine excretion more than twice as big as in those with stable mGFR, independent of changes in urinary urea as well as of other determinants of low muscle mass. Conclusions Decrease in 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion rate may appear early in CKD patients, and is greater the more mGFR declines independent of lowering protein intake assessed by 24-hour urinary urea. Normalizing urine analytes for creatininuria may overestimate their concentration in patients with reduced kidney function and low muscle mass. PMID:25401694

  6. Decrease in urinary creatinine excretion in early stage chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tynkevich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about muscle mass loss in early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD. We used 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion rate to assess determinants of muscle mass and its evolution with kidney function decline. We also described the range of urinary creatinine concentration in this population. METHODS: We included 1072 men and 537 women with non-dialysis CKD stages 1 to 5, all of them with repeated measurements of glomerular filtration rate (mGFR by (51Cr-EDTA renal clearance and several nutritional markers. In those with stage 1 to 4 at baseline, we used a mixed model to study factors associated with urinary creatinine excretion rate and its change over time. RESULTS: Baseline mean urinary creatinine excretion decreased from 15.3 ± 3.1 to 12.1 ± 3.3 mmol/24 h (0.20 ± 0.03 to 0.15 ± 0.04 mmol/kg/24 h in men, with mGFR falling from ≥ 60 to <15 mL/min/1.73 m(2, and from 9.6 ± 1.9 to 7.6 ± 2.5 (0.16 ± 0.03 to 0.12 ± 0.03 in women. In addition to mGFR, an older age, diabetes, and lower levels of body mass index, proteinuria, and protein intake assessed by urinary urea were associated with lower mean urinary creatinine excretion at baseline. Mean annual decline in mGFR was 1.53 ± 0.12 mL/min/1.73 m(2 per year and that of urinary creatinine excretion rate, 0.28 ± 0.02 mmol/24 h per year. Patients with fast annual decline in mGFR of 5 mL/min/1.73 m(2 had a decrease in urinary creatinine excretion more than twice as big as in those with stable mGFR, independent of changes in urinary urea as well as of other determinants of low muscle mass. CONCLUSIONS: Decrease in 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion rate may appear early in CKD patients, and is greater the more mGFR declines independent of lowering protein intake assessed by 24-hour urinary urea. Normalizing urine analytes for creatininuria may overestimate their concentration in patients with reduced kidney function and low muscle mass.

  7. Early stages of universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrovandi, R.

    1975-04-01

    In a very simplified, descriptive way, the main trends of phenomenological cosmology are reviewed. A sketchy view of the fashionable Standard Model(1,2) is considered preliminarly its most pretentious variant, the Symmetric Model, is then introduced [pt

  8. Assessment of skeletal maturation using mandibular second molar maturation stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, S; Goyal, S; Gugnani, N

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between cervical vertebrae maturation and mandibular second molar calcification stages. The study was designed as a retrospective, descriptive and crosssectional research project. Pre-treatment lateral cephalograms and panoramic radiographs of 99 males and 110 females in the age range of 7 to 18 years 7 months were evaluated with Demirjian Index (DI) and cervical vertebrae maturation indicators (CVMI) of Hassel and Farman. A null hypothesis was proposed that there is no relation between CVMI and DI. A highly significant association (Pearson's contingency coefficient 0.713 for males and 0.863 for females) was found between DI and CVMI. In males, the DI stage E corresponded to stage 2 of CVMI (pre-peak of pubertal growth spurt) and DI stages F and G corresponded to stages 3 and 4 of CVMI (peak of pubertal growth spurt). DI stage H was associated with stages 5 and 6 of CVMI (end of pubertal growth spurt). In females, the DI stages C, D corresponded to CVMI stages 1, 2; DI stages E, F with CVMI stages 3, 4; DI stages G, H with CVMI stages 5, 6. Mandibular second molar calcification stages can be used as indicators for assessment of skeletal maturity.

  9. Staging for vulvar cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Neville F; Barlow, Ellen L

    2015-08-01

    Vulvar cancer has been staged by the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) since 1969, and the original staging system was based on clinical findings only. This system provided a very good spread of prognostic groupings. Because vulvar cancer is virtually always treated surgically, the status of the lymph nodes is the most important prognostic factor and this can only be determined with certainty by histological examination of resected lymph nodes, FIGO introduced a surgical staging system in 1988. This was modified in 1994 to include a category of microinvasive vulvar cancer (stage IA), because such patients have virtually no risk of lymph node metastases. This system did not give a reasonably even spread of prognostic groupings. In addition, patients with stage III disease were shown to be a heterogeneous group prognostically, and the number of positive nodes and the morphology of those nodes were not taken into account. A new surgical staging system for vulvar cancer was introduced by FIGO in 2009. Initial retrospective analyses have suggested that this new staging system has overcome the major deficiencies in the 1994 system. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Interplay between intramolecular and intermolecular structures of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloro-1,2-difluoroethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira-Esteva, M.; Murugan, N. A.; Pardo, L. C.; Busch, S.; Tamarit, J. Ll.; Pothoczki, Sz.; Cuello, G. J.; Bermejo, F. J.

    2011-08-01

    We report on the interplay between the short-range order of molecules in the liquid phase of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloro-1,2-difluoroethane and the possible molecular conformations, trans and gauche. Two complementary approaches have been used to get a comprehensive picture: analysis of neutron-diffraction data by a Bayesian fit algorithm and a molecular dynamics simulation. The results of both show that the population of trans and gauche conformers in the liquid state can only correspond to the gauche conformer being more stable than the trans conformer. Distinct conformer geometries induce distinct molecular short-range orders around them, suggesting that a deep intra- and intermolecular interaction coupling is energetically favoring one of the conformers by reducing the total molecular free energy.

  11. [N,N-Bis(2-aminoethylethane-1,2-diamine](ethane-1,2-diaminenickel(II thiosulfate trihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrix Seidlhofer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Ni(C2H8N2(C6H18N4]S2O3·3H2O, was accidentally synthesized under solvothermal conditions applying [Ni(en3]Cl2 (en is ethane-1,2-diamine as the Ni source. The asymmetric unit consists of one discrete [Ni(tren(en]2+ complex [tren is N,N-bis(2-aminoethylethane-1,2-diamine] in which the Ni2+ cation is sixfold coordinated within a slightly distorted octahedron, one thiosulfate anion and three water molecules. In the crystal, the complex cations, anions and water molecules are linked by an intricate hydrogen-bonding network. One C atom of the tren ligand, as well as one O atom of a water molecule, are disordered over two sites and were refined using a split model (occupancy ratios = 0.85:15 and 0.60:0.40, respectively.

  12. Altered expression of hyaluronan, HAS1-2, and HYAL1-2 in oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siponen, Maria; Kullaa, Arja; Nieminen, Pentti; Salo, Tuula; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna

    2015-07-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is an immune-mediated mucosal disease of unclear etiology and of unresolved pathogenesis. Hyaluronan (HA) is an extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan involved in inflammation and tumor progression. However, its presence in OLP has not been reported. We therefore aimed to study the immunohistochemical expression of HA, its receptor CD44, hyaluronan synthases (HAS1-3), and hyaluronidases (HYAL1-2) in OLP. The presence of HA, CD44, HAS1-3, and HYAL1-2 was studied by immunohistochemical methods in 55 OLP and 23 control oral mucosal specimens (CTR). The localization, intensity, and differences of the epithelial expression between OLP and CTRs were analyzed. HA and CD44 were found on cell membranes in the epithelial basal and intermediate layers in CTR and OLP specimens. The HA staining intensity was stronger in the basal layer of the epithelium in OLP than in CTRs (P < 0.001). HAS1 (P = 0.001) and HAS2 (P < 0.001) showed stronger staining in the basal and weaker staining in the superficial (P < 0.001) epithelial layers in OLP than in CTRs. The immunostaining of HAS3 was low in both OLP and CTRs. Positive HYAL1 and HYAL2 staining were mainly found in the basal and intermediate epithelial layers, and their intensities were significantly increased in OLP, except HYAL 2 in the intermediate epithelial layer. HA, HAS1-2, and HYAL1-2 have altered expression in OLP compared to CTRs and may therefore have a role in OLP pathogenesis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Staged bilateral carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H; Engell, Hans Christian

    1986-01-01

    In a series of 56 staged bilateral carotid endarterectomies, new neurologic symptoms developed in 5% and 20% following the first and second procedure, respectively. All complications were transient or minor. The incidence of postendarterectomy hypertension was significantly higher following...... the second procedure, when operations were staged less than 3 weeks apart. A correlation between these hypertensive episodes and the occurrence of new neurologic symptoms could not be shown. However, as this correlation has been proved in several other reports, bilateral carotid endarterectomy is advised...... to be staged at least 3 weeks apart. In addition, a conservative attitude towards contralateral asymptomatic lesions is proposed....

  14. Staging of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Patricia M; Carter, Brett W; Betancourt Cuellar, Sonia L; Erasmus, Jeremy J

    2015-06-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. Thorough clinical staging of patients with lung cancer is important, because therapeutic options and management are to a considerable degree dependent on stage at presentation. Radiologic imaging is an essential component of clinical staging, including chest radiography in some cases, computed tomography, MRI, and PET. Multiplanar imaging modalities allow assessment of features that are important for surgical, oncologic, and radiation therapy planning, including size of the primary tumor, location and relationship to normal anatomic structures in the thorax, and existence of nodal and/or metastatic disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Transformation and biodegradation of 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP)

    OpenAIRE

    Samin, Ghufrana; Janssen, Dick B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose 1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a persistent groundwater pollutant and a suspected human carcinogen. It is also is an industrial chemical waste that has been formed in large amounts during epichlorohydrin manufacture. In view of the spread of TCP via groundwater and its toxicity, there is a need for cheap and efficient technologies for the cleanup of TCP-contaminated sites. In situ or on-site bioremediation of TCP is an option if biodegradation can be achieved and stimulated. This pap...

  16. Ethane-1,1,2-trisphosphonic acid hemihydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delain-Bioton, Lise; Lohier, Jean François; Villemin, Didier; Sopková-de Oliveira Santos, Jana; Hix, Gary; Jaffrès, Paul Alain

    2008-02-01

    Ethane-1,1,2-trisphosphonic acid crystallizes as a hemihydrate, C(2)H(9)O(9)P(3).0.5H(2)O, in which the water O atom lies on an inversion centre in the space group P2(1)/c. The acid component, which contains a short but noncentred O-H...O hydrogen bond, adopts a gauche conformation. The acid components are linked by an extensive series of O-H...O hydrogen bonds to form layers, which are linked into pairs by the water molecules.

  17. Weak value distributions for spin 1/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M. V.; Dennis, M. R.; McRoberts, B.; Shukla, P.

    2011-05-01

    The simplest weak measurement is of a component of spin 1/2. For this observable, the probability distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the weak value, and their joint probability distribution, are calculated exactly for pre- and postselected states uniformly distributed over the surface of the Poincaré-Bloch sphere. The superweak probability, that the real part of the weak value lies outside the spectral range, is 1/3. This case, with just two eigenvalues, complements our previous calculation (Berry and Shukla 2010 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43 354024) of the universal form of the weak value probability distribution for an operator with many eigenvalues.

  18. Weak value distributions for spin 1/2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, M V; Dennis, M R; McRoberts, B; Shukla, P

    2011-01-01

    The simplest weak measurement is of a component of spin 1/2. For this observable, the probability distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the weak value, and their joint probability distribution, are calculated exactly for pre- and postselected states uniformly distributed over the surface of the Poincare-Bloch sphere. The superweak probability, that the real part of the weak value lies outside the spectral range, is 1/3. This case, with just two eigenvalues, complements our previous calculation (Berry and Shukla 2010 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43 354024) of the universal form of the weak value probability distribution for an operator with many eigenvalues.

  19. Survey of 1 1/2D transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grad, H.

    1978-10-01

    A survey is given of a family of classical transport codes, recently termed ''1 1/2D'', which efficiently and accurately follow the evolution of plasma configurations on a long time scale, following coupled changes in plasma shape and topology with transport (but not wave motion). Codes have been constructed and operated (since 1974) which include various combinations of finite beta, general plasma cross-section and aspect, various topologies (Doublet, tearing, reversed-field mirror) including time dependent transitions in topology resulting from external coil variation and plasma transport, with models including (classical) tensor resistivity and heat flow as well as the adiabatic limiting case

  20. Properties of the Λ(1670) (1/2)- resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manley, D.M.; Olmsted, J.; Abaev, V.V.; Bekrenev, V.; Kulbardis, A.A.; Kozlenko, N.G.; Kruglov, S.; Lopatin, I.V.; Allgower, C.E.; Spinka, H.; Briscoe, W.J.; Shafi, A.; Strakovsky, I.I.; Clajus, M.; Marusic, A.; McDonald, S.; Nefkens, B.M.K.; Phaisangittisakul, N.; Prakhov, S.; Price, J.W.

    2002-01-01

    Recently the Crystal Ball Collaboration measured precise new data for the near-threshold reaction K - p→ηΛ , which is dominated by formation of the Λ(1670)(1/ 2) - . In this Letter, we present results of a unitary, multichannel analysis that incorporates the new Crystal Ball data. For our preferred fit, we obtain mass M=1673±2 MeV , width Γ=23±6 MeV , and elasticity x=0.37±0.07 . This elasticity is significantly larger than previously recognized. Resonance parameters of our preferred fit are in striking agreement with the quark-model predictions of Koniuk and Isgur

  1. Reuse of discharged fuel in Bohunice-1,2 units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrapciak, V.; Majercik, J.; Kacmar, M.

    2003-01-01

    During the reconstruction of Bohunice-1,2 units (1997 - 2001), their cycle lengths dropped to very short values. Because of 4-year limit to fuel residence time, refuelling with fresh 2.4 % enriched assemblies seemed to be a solution of the problem. The paper describes the implementation of a final decision to reuse 3.6 % enriched fuel discharged after 3-year irradiation in previous cycles. This decision led to a large-scale moving of discharged assemblies from spent fuel pools back to reactors (Authors)

  2. A study of the impact of disease burden in quality of life of people with pre-End-Stage and End-Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Georgiadou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes Mellitus (DM is a common chronic disease accompanied by severe complications. It is the leading cause of End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD requiring management either by haemodialysis (HD or peritoneal dialysis (PD. The chronicity of the disease, and its complications, affects the psychological, family and social life of the patients and their Quality of Life (QoL. Aim: of the present study was to estimate the disease burden of patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN during pre-ESRD and during End-Stage Renal Disease. Methods: A sample of 103 patients with DN treated at the General Hospital of Veria were studied during May and June 2016. The study was conducted using the Dialysis Symptoms Index (DSI for the assessment of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD symptom load and the European Quality of Life (EuroQol questionnaire for assessing the QoL of patients in the Renal Outpatient Clinic, Haemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis Unit. Results: It was found that the Renal Replacement Method (HD or PD, the presence of DM and CKD’s stage affect significantly the patients’ self-assessment regarding painful symptoms of DN. Furthermore, the above factors have major impact on some aspects of patients’ QoL, such as mobility and self-care. Conclusions: Pre-End Stage patients experience more severe painful symptoms of DN compared to patients on Renal Replacement Therapies.

  3. Pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence study of a telmisartan/S-amlodipine fixed-dose combination (CKD-828) formulation and coadministered telmisartan and S-amlodipine in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Woo Youl; Seong, Sook Jin; Ohk, Boram; Gwon, Mi-Ri; Kim, Bo Kyung; La, Sookie; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Cho, Seungil; Yoon, Young-Ran; Yang, Dong Heon; Lee, Hae Won

    2018-01-01

    A new fixed-dose combination (FDC) formulation of telmisartan 80 mg and S-amlodipine 5 mg (CKD-828) has been developed to increase convenience (as only one tablet is required per day) and improve treatment compliance. The pharmacokinetic characteristics and tolerability of an FDC of telmisartan and S-amlodipine were compared to those after coadministration of the individual agents in this randomized, open-label, single-dose, two-way, four-period, crossover study. To analyze the telmisartan and S-amlodipine plasma concentrations using a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method, serial blood samples were collected up to 48 hours post-dose for telmisartan and 144 hours post-dose for S-amlodipine, in each period. Forty-eight healthy subjects were enrolled, and 43 completed the study. The mean peak plasma concentration (C max ) and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to the last measurement (AUC 0-t ) values of telmisartan were 522.29 ng/mL and 2,475.16 ng·h/mL for the FDC, and 540.45 ng/mL and 2,559.57 ng·h/mL for the individual agents concomitantly administered, respectively. The mean C max and AUC 0-t values of S-amlodipine were 2.71 ng/mL and 130.69 ng·h/mL for the FDC, and 2.74 ng/mL and 129.81 ng·h/mL for the individual agents concomitantly administered, respectively. The geometric mean ratio (GMR) and 90% confidence interval (CI) for the telmisartan C max and AUC 0-t (FDC of telmisartan and S-amlodipine/concomitant administration) were 0.8509 (0.7353-0.9846) and 0.9431 (0.8698-1.0226), respectively. The GMR and 90% CI for the S-amlodipine C max and AUC 0-t (FDC/concomitant administration) were 0.9829 (0.9143-1.0567) and 0.9632 (0.8798-1.0546), respectively. As the intrasubject variability of the C max for telmisartan administered individually was 42.94%, all 90% CIs of the GMRs fell within the predetermined acceptance range. Both treatments were well tolerated in this study. CKD-828 FDC tablets were shown to

  4. Unimolecular HCl and HF elimination reactions of 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-difluoroethane, and 1,2-chlorofluoroethane: assignment of threshold energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Juliana R; Solaka, Sarah A; Setser, D W; Holmes, Bert E

    2010-01-21

    The recombination of CH(2)Cl and CH(2)F radicals generates vibrationally excited CH(2)ClCH(2)Cl, CH(2)FCH(2)F, and CH(2)ClCH(2)F molecules with about 90 kcal mol(-1) of energy in a room temperature bath gas. New experimental data for CH(2)ClCH(2)F have been obtained that are combined with previously published studies for C(2)H(4)Cl(2) and C(2)H(4)F(2) to define reliable rate constants of 3.0 x 10(8) (C(2)H(4)F(2)), 2.4 x 10(8) (C(2)H(4)Cl(2)), and 1.9 x 10(8) (CH(2)ClCH(2)F) s(-1) for HCl and HF elimination. The product branching ratio for CH(2)ClCH(2)F is approximately 1. These experimental rate constants are compared to calculated statistical rate constants (RRKM) to assign threshold energies for HF and HCl elimination. The calculated rate constants are based on transition-state models obtained from calculations of electronic structures; the energy levels of the asymmetric, hindered, internal rotation were directly included in the state counting to obtain a more realistic measure for the density of internal states for the molecules. The assigned threshold energies for C(2)H(4)F(2) and C(2)H(4)Cl(2) are both 63 +/- 2 kcal mol(-1). The threshold energies for CH(2)ClCH(2)F are 65 +/- 2 (HCl) and 63 +/- 2 (HF) kcal mol(-1). These threshold energies are 5-7 kcal mol(-1) higher than the corresponding values for C(2)H(5)Cl or C(2)H(5)F, and beta-substitution of F or Cl atoms raises threshold energies for HF or HCl elimination reactions. The treatment presented here for obtaining the densities of states and the entropy of activation from models with asymmetric internal rotations with high barriers can be used to judge the validity of using a symmetric internal-rotor approximation for other cases. Finally, threshold energies for the 1,2-fluorochloroethanes are compared to those of the 1,1-fluorochloroethanes to illustrate substituent effects on the relative energies of the isomeric transition states.

  5. Stages of Retinoblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the ultrasound monitor . The picture can be printed to be looked at later. MRI (magnetic resonance ... procedures may be used in the staging process: Bone scan : A procedure to check if there are ...

  6. Multiple Stages 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, John

    Multiple stages 2: theatrical futures, set design, community plays, cultural capitals, democracy & drama, WWII dramas, performance on adoption, promenade about emigration, qualities in political theatre, performance analysis, dramaturgical education, Toulmin Variations...

  7. Stages of ores formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanov, A.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    Deposit formation (especially endogenous) is the complicated, multi-stage and long process. Establishment of deposit formation succession, age-specific correlations of minerals and aggregates have a high importance at solving genetic questions. Studying of minerals correlations and mineral aggregates, succession of their crystallization and other observations let restore the history of deposit formation, pick up in it different on duration and physical and chemical conditions stages

  8. Normalization: A Preprocessing Stage

    OpenAIRE

    Patro, S. Gopal Krishna; Sahu, Kishore Kumar

    2015-01-01

    As we know that the normalization is a pre-processing stage of any type problem statement. Especially normalization takes important role in the field of soft computing, cloud computing etc. for manipulation of data like scale down or scale up the range of data before it becomes used for further stage. There are so many normalization techniques are there namely Min-Max normalization, Z-score normalization and Decimal scaling normalization. So by referring these normalization techniques we are ...

  9. Staging with spatial filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaze, J.

    1974-01-01

    It is known that small scale beam instabilities limit the focusable energy that can be achieved from a terawatt laser chain. Spatial filters are currently being used on CYCLOPS to ameliorate this problem. Realizing the full advantage of such a filter, however, may require certain staging modifications. A staging methodology is discussed that should be applicable to the CYCLOPS, 381, and SHIVA systems. Experiments are in progress on CYCLOPS that will address directly the utility of the proposed approach

  10. First Stage Acceptance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-01-01

    This photograph shows the intense smoke and fire created by the five F-1 engines from a test firing of the Saturn V first stage (S-1C) in the S-1C test stand at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multi-stage, multi-engine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.

  11. Albuminuria as a Risk Factor for Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease: Result from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Suk Han

    Full Text Available Anemia is a common complication among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, and it is associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes in patients with CKD independent of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. We assessed the association of the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR and eGFR with anemia in CKD patients.We conducted a cross-sectional study using baseline data from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcome in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify the independent association of albuminuria with anemia. Furthermore, odds ratios for anemia were calculated by cross-categorization of ACR and eGFR.Among 1,456 patients, the mean age was 53.5 ± 12.4 years, and the mean eGFR and ACR were 51.9 ± 30.5 mL/min per 1.73 m2 and 853.2 ± 1,330.3 mg/g, respectively. Anemia was present in 644 patients (40.5%. Multivariate analysis showed that the odds ratio of anemia increased according to ACR levels, after adjusting for age, sex, eGFR, body mass index, pulse pressure, cause of CKD, use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents, serum calcium and ferritin (ACR < 30 mg/g as a reference group; 30-299 mg/g, adjusted odds ratio (OR = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.88-2.33; ≥300 mg/g, adjusted OR = 1.86, 95% CI = 1.12-3.10. In addition, graded associations were observed in cross-categorized groups of a higher ACR and eGFR compared to the reference group with an ACR <30 mg/g and eGFR ≥60 mL/min per 1.73 m2.The present study demonstrated that albuminuria was a significant risk factor for anemia in CKD patients independent of the eGFR.

  12. LBNF 1.2 MW TARGET: CONCEPTUAL DESIGN & FABRICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowley, Cory F. [Fermilab; Ammigan, K. [Fermilab; Anderson, K. [Fermilab; Hartsell, B. [Fermilab; Hurh, P. [Fermilab; Hylen, J. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. [Fermilab

    2015-06-29

    Fermilab’s Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) will utilize a modified design based on the NuMI low energy target that is reconfigured to accommodate beam operation at 1.2 MW. Achieving this power with a graphite target material and ancillary systems originally rated for 400 kW requires several design changes and R&D efforts related to material bonding and electrical isolation. Target cooling, structural design, and fabrication techniques must address higher stresses and heat loads that will be present during 1.2 MW operation, as the assembly will be subject to cyclic loads and thermal expansion. Mitigations must be balanced against compromises in neutrino yield. Beam monitoring and subsystem instrumentation will be updated and added to ensure confidence in target positioning and monitoring. Remote connection to the target hall support structure must provide for the eventual upgrade to a 2.4 MW target design, without producing excessive radioactive waste or unreasonable exposure to technicians during reconfiguration. Current designs and assembly layouts will be presented, in addition to current findings on processes and possibilities for prototype and final assembly fabrication.

  13. LBNF 1.2 MW Target: Conceptual Design & Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowley, C. [Fermilab; Ammigan, K. [Fermilab; Anderson, K. [Fermilab; Hartsell, B. [Fermilab; Hurh, P. [Fermilab; Hylen, J. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    Fermilab’s Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) will utilize a modified design based on the NuMI low energy target that is reconfigured to accommodate beam operation at 1.2 MW. Achieving this power with a graphite target material and ancillary systems originally rated for 400 kW requires several design changes and R&D efforts related to material bonding and electrical isolation. Target cooling, structural design, and fabrication techniques must address higher stresses and heat loads that will be present during 1.2 MW operation, as the assembly will be subject to cyclic loads and thermal expansion. Mitigations must be balanced against compromises in neutrino yield. Beam monitoring and subsystem instrumentation will be updated and added to ensure confidence in target positioning and monitoring. Remote connection to the target hall support structure must provide for the eventual upgrade to a 2.4 MW target design, without producing excessive radioactive waste or unreasonable exposure to technicians during reconfiguration. Current designs and assembly layouts will be presented, in addition to current findings on processes and possibilities for prototype and final assembly fabrication.

  14. Antimalarial pyrido[1,2-a]benzimidazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndakala, Albert J; Gessner, Richard K; Gitari, Patricia W; October, Natasha; White, Karen L; Hudson, Alan; Fakorede, Foluke; Shackleford, David M; Kaiser, Marcel; Yeates, Clive; Charman, Susan A; Chibale, Kelly

    2011-07-14

    A novel class of antimalarial pyrido[1,2-a]benzimidazoles were synthesized and evaluated for antiplasmodial activity and cytotoxicity following hits identified from screening commercially available compound collections. The most active of these, TDR86919 (4c), showed improved in vitro activity vs the drug-resistant K1 strain of Plasmodium falciparum relative to chloroquine (IC(50) = 0.047 μM v 0.17 μM); potency was retained against a range of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains, with negligible cytotoxicity against the mammalian (L-6) cell line (selectivity index of >600). 4c and several close analogues (as HCl or mesylate salts) showed significant efficacy in P. berghei infected mice following both intraperitoneal (ip) and oral (po) administration, with >90% inhibition of parasitemia, accompanied by an increase in the mean survival time (MSD). The pyrido[1,2-a]benzimidazoles appeared to be relatively slow acting in vivo compared to chloroquine, and metabolic stability of the alkylamino side chain was identified as a key issue in influencing in vivo activity.

  15. Keto-supplemented Low Protein Diet: A Valid Therapeutic Approach for Patients with Steroid-resistant Proteinuria during Early-stage Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Xie, H; Fang, M; Wang, K; Chen, J; Sun, W; Yang, L; Lin, H

    2016-04-01

    Low protein diets supplemented with keto acid (sLPD) are recommended for patients with stage 3-5 chronic kidney disease (CKD). This study assessed whether sLPD is beneficial for patients with steroid-resistant proteinuria during early-stage CKD. A 1-year randomized controlled trial was conducted from 2010 to 2012. In this study, 108 proteinuric patients who were steroid-resistant were assigned to a sLPD group (0.6 g/kg/d with 0.09 g/kg/d keto acids) or a normal protein diet group (NPD, 1.0 g/kg/d). Estimated dietary protein intake, urinary protein excretion, remission rate, renal function, nutritional status, and blood pressure were measured. Baseline characteristics were comparable between the sLPD group (47 patients) and the NPD group (49 patients). Urinary protein excretion significantly decreased in sLPD compared to NPD in months 6, 9, and 12 (P<0.05). Proteinuria reduction was higher in sLPD than in NPD (P<0.001) at the end of the study. Complete remission and partial remission rates were higher in sLPD than in NPD. Serum albumin and pre-albumin levels were higher in sLPD than in NPD in months 9 and 12 (P<0.05). Serum total cholesterol and triglyceride levels declined more significantly in sLPD than in NPD (P<0.01) at the end of the study. There were no differences in nutritional status, renal function, hemoglobin, or blood pressure between the two groups. sLPD is both nutritionally safe and beneficial, providing nephroprotective effects for early-stage CKD patients with steroid-resistant proteinuria.

  16. Eplerenone attenuates pulse wave reflection in chronic kidney disease stage 3-4--a randomized controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesby, Lene; Elung-Jensen, Thomas; Strandgaard, Svend

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity associated with increased arterial stiffness. Plasma aldosterone levels are increased in CKD, and aldosterone has been found to increase vascular inflammation and fibrosis. It was hypothesized...

  17. Pharmacist-perceived barriers to pharmaceutical care of chronic and end-stage kidney disease patients in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal K Suleiman

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The contribution of pharmacists in CKD and ESRD will continue to grow as their clinical knowledge improves. Saudi pharmacists believe that the pharmaceutical care is an essential component of managing CKD and ESRD patients.

  18. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  19. Butane-1,2,3,4-tetracarboxylic acid–1,10-phenanthroline–water (1/2/2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-lin Zhu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, 2C12H8N2·C8H10O8·2H2O, contains one 1,10-phenanthroline molecule, one half-molecule of butane-1,2,3,4-tetracarboxylic acid (H4BTC and a water molecule, with the complete tetra-acid generated by crystallographic inversion symmetry. Intermolecular O—H...O hydrogen bonds and π–π stacking interactions [centroid–centroid distances = 3.672 (2 and 3.708 (2 Å form an extensive three-dimensional network, which consolidates the crystal packing.

  20. Skin autofluorescence and the association with renal and cardiovascular risk factors in chronic kidney disease stage 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Natasha J; Fluck, Richard J; McIntyre, Christopher W; Taal, Maarten W

    2011-10-01

    Tissue advanced glycation end products (AGE) accumulation is a measure of cumulative metabolic stress. Assessment of tissue AGE by skin autofluorescence (SAF) correlates well with cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in diabetic, transplant, and dialysis patients, and may be a useful marker of CV risk in earlier stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). 1707 patients with estimated GFR 59 to 30 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) were recruited from primary care practices for the Renal Risk In Derby (RRID) study. Detailed medical history was obtained, and each participant underwent clinical assessment as well as urine and serum biochemistry tests. SAF was assessed (mean of three readings) as a measure of skin AGE deposition using a cutaneous AF device (AGE Reader™, DiagnOptics, Groningen, The Netherlands). Univariate analysis revealed significant correlations between AF readings and several potential risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and progression of CKD. SAF readings (arbitrary units) were also significantly higher among males (2.8 ± 0.7 versus 2.7 ± 0.6), diabetics (3.0 ± 0.7 versus 2.7 ± 0.6), patients with evidence of self-reported CVD (2.9 ± 0.7 versus 2.7 ± 0.6), and those with no formal educational qualifications (2.8 ± 0.6 versus 2.6 ± 0.6; P < 0.01 for all). Multivariable linear regression analysis identified hemoglobin, diabetes, age, and eGFR as the most significant independent determinants of higher SAF (standardized coefficients -0.16, 0.13, 0.12, and -0.10, respectively; R(2) = 0.17 for equation). Increased SAF is independently associated with multiple CV and renal risk factors in CKD 3. Long-term follow-up will assess the value of SAF as a predictor of CV and renal risk in this population.

  1. Alterations of retinol-binding protein 4 species in patients with different stages of chronic kidney disease and their relation to lipid parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henze, Andrea; Frey, Simone K; Raila, Jens

    2010-01-01

    ) was assessed in serum of 45 healthy controls and 52 patients with stage 2-5 of CKD using ELISA and RBP4 immunoprecipitation with subsequent MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. A reduction of glomerular filtration rate was accompanied by a gradual elevation of RBP4 serum levels and relative amounts of RBP4-LL. Correlation...... analysis revealed a strong association of the RBP4-TTR ratio with parameters of lipid metabolism and with diabetes-related factors. In conclusion, RBP4 serum concentration and the appearance of RBP4-LL seem to be influenced by kidney function. Furthermore, the RBP4-TTR ratio may provide diagnostic...

  2. Psychopathology 8 1/2 years post parasuicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, S; Fitzgerald, M; Greene, V T

    1999-01-01

    There are few long-term follow-up studies of parasuicides incorporating face-to-face interviews. To date no study has evaluated the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity at long-term follow-up of parasuicides using diagnostic rating scales, nor has any study examined parental bonding issues in this population. We attempted a prospective follow-up of 85 parasuicide cases an average of 8 1/2 years later. Psychiatric morbidity, social functioning, and recollections of the parenting style of their parents were assessed using the Clinical Interview Schedule, the Social Maladjustment Scale, and the Parental Bonding Instrument, respectively. Thirty-nine persons in total were interviewed, 19 of whom were well and 20 of whom had psychiatric morbidity. Five and died during the follow-up period, 3 by suicide. Migration, refusals, and untraceability were common. Parasuicide was associated with parental overprotection during childhood. Long-term outcome is poor, especially among those who engaged in repeated parasuicides.

  3. sl(1|2) Super-Toda Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhan-Ying; Xue, Pan-Pan; Zhao, Liu; Shi, Kang-Jie

    2008-11-01

    Explicit exact solution of supersymmetric Toda fields associated with the Lie superalgebra sl(2|1) is constructed. The approach used is a super extension of Leznov Saveliev algebraic analysis, which is based on a pair of chiral and antichiral Drienfeld Sokolov systems. Though such approach is well understood for Toda field theories associated with ordinary Lie algebras, its super analogue was only successful in the super Liouville case with the underlying Lie superalgebra osp(1|2). The problem lies in that a key step in the construction makes use of the tensor product decomposition of the highest weight representations of the underlying Lie superalgebra, which is not clear until recently. So our construction made in this paper presents a first explicit example of Leznov Saveliev analysis for super Toda systems associated with underlying Lie superalgebras of the rank higher than 1.

  4. sl(1|2) Super-Toda Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhanying; Xue Panpan; Zhao Liu; Shi Kangjie

    2008-01-01

    Explicit exact solution of supersymmetric Toda fields associated with the Lie superalgebra sl(2|1) is constructed. The approach used is a super extension of Leznov-Saveliev algebraic analysis, which is based on a pair of chiral and antichiral Drienfeld-Sokolov systems. Though such approach is well understood for Toda field theories associated with ordinary Lie algebras, its super analogue was only successful in the super Liouville case with the underlying Lie superalgebra osp(1|2). The problem lies in that a key step in the construction makes use of the tensor product decomposition of the highest weight representations of the underlying Lie superalgebra, which is not clear until recently. So our construction made in this paper presents a first explicit example of Leznov-Saveliev analysis for super Toda systems associated with underlying Lie superalgebras of the rank higher than 1