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Sample records for staffing emergency department

  1. [Danish emergency departments are not staffed by consultants 24/7].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenhauer, Julie; Møller, Cecilie; Fjældstad, Alexander; Østervig, Rebecca; Kole, Ayhan Al; Folkestad, Lars; Hallas, Peter; Brabrand, Mikkel; Møllekær, Anders; Kirkegaard, Hans

    2013-02-18

    The Danish health care system is undergoing a major reorganisation, resulting in fewer emergency departments (ED) with consultants in attendance 24/7. This questionnaire-based study evaluates the status of the reorganisation with emphasis on physician attendance and recruitment. 76% of the EDs are not staffed by consultants 24/7, 51% report difficulties in recruiting qualified personnel and 33% report problems connected to retaining them. 71% believe that a specialty in emergency medicine could help solve these problems. Danish EDs do not comply with the visions of the reorganisation plan.

  2. Implementation of a Team-based Physician Staffing Model at an Academic Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose V. Nable

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is scant literature regarding the optimal resident physician staffing model of academic emergency departments (ED that maximizes learning opportunities. A department of emergency medicine at a large inner-city academic hospital initiated a team-based staffing model. Its pre-interventional staffing model consisted of residents and attending physicians being separately assigned patients, resulting in residents working with two different faculty providers in the same shift. This study aimed to determine if the post-interventional team-based system, in which residents were paired with a single attending on each shift, would result in improved residents’ learning and clinical experiences as manifested by resident evaluations and the number of patients seen. Methods: This retrospective before-and-after study at an academic ED with an annual volume of 52,000 patients examined the mean differences in five-point Likert-scale evaluations completed by residents assessing their ED rotation experiences in both the original and team-based staffing models. The residents were queried on their perceptions of feeling part of the team, decision-making autonomy, clinical experience, amount of supervision, quality of teaching, and overall rotational experience. We also analyzed the number of patients seen per hour by residents. Paired sample t-tests were performed. Residents who were in the program in the year preceding and proceeding the intervention were eligible for inclusion. Results: 34 of 38 eligible residents were included (4 excluded for lack of evaluations in either the pre- or post-intervention period. There was a statistically significant improvement in resident perception of the quality and amount of teaching, 4.03 to 4.27 (mean difference=0.24, p=0.03. There were non-statistically significant trends toward improved mean scores for all other queries. Residents also saw more patients following the initiation of the team-based model

  3. Emergency teams in Danish emergency departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafrenz, Thomas; Lindberg, Søren Østergaard; La Cour, Jeppe Lerche

    2012-01-01

    The use of designated emergency teams for cardiac arrest and trauma patients is widely implemented. However, the use of designated teams in Danish emergency departments (EDs) has not been investigated. Our aim was to investigate the use and staffing of emergency teams in Danish EDs.......The use of designated emergency teams for cardiac arrest and trauma patients is widely implemented. However, the use of designated teams in Danish emergency departments (EDs) has not been investigated. Our aim was to investigate the use and staffing of emergency teams in Danish EDs....

  4. Emergency teams in Danish emergency departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafrenz, Thomas; Lindberg, Søren Østergaard; La Cour, Jeppe Lerche

    2012-01-01

    The use of designated emergency teams for cardiac arrest and trauma patients is widely implemented. However, the use of designated teams in Danish emergency departments (EDs) has not been investigated. Our aim was to investigate the use and staffing of emergency teams in Danish EDs....

  5. The 2014 Academic College of Emergency Experts in India′s Education Development Committee (EDC White Paper on establishing an academic department of Emergency Medicine in India - Guidelines for Staffing, Infrastructure, Resources, Curriculum and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Aggarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency medicine services and training in Emergency Medicine (EM has developed to a large extent in developed countries but its establishment is far from optimal in developing countries. In India, Medical Council of India (MCI has taken great steps by notifying EM as a separate specialty and so far 20 medical colleges have already initiated 3-year training program in EM. However, there has been shortage of trained faculty, and ambiguity regarding curriculum, rotation policy, infrastructure, teachers′ eligibility qualifications and scheme of examination. Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (ACEE-India has been a powerful advocate for developing Academic EM in India. The ACEE′s Education Development Committee (EDC was created to chalk out guidelines for staffing, infrastructure, resources, curriculum, and training which may be of help to the MCI and the National Board of Examinations (NBE to set standards for starting 3-year training program in EM and develop the departments of EM as centers of quality education, research, and treatment across India. This paper has made an attempt to give recommendations so as to provide a uniform framework to the institutions, thus guiding them towards establishing an academic Department of EM for starting the 3-year training program in the specialty of EM.

  6. Physician staffing needs in critical care departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Tello, V; Ruiz Moreno, J; Weiss, M; González Marín, E; Merino de Cos, P; Franco Garrobo, N; Alonso Ovies, A; Montejo González, J C; Iber, T; Marx, G; Córcoles González, V; Gordo Vidal, F; Palencia Herrejón, E; Roca Guiseris, J

    Departments of Critical Care Medicine are characterized by high medical assistance costs and great complexity. Published recommendations on determining the needs of medical staff in the DCCM are based on low levels of evidence and attribute excessive significance to the structural/welfare approach (physician-to-beds ratio), thus generating incomplete and minimalistic information. The Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units established a Technical Committee of experts, the purpose of which was to draft recommendations regarding requirements for medical professionals in the ICU. The Technical Committee defined the following categories: 1) Patient care-related aspects; 2) Activities outside the ICU; 3) Patient safety and clinical management aspects; 4) Teaching; and 5) Research. A subcommittee was established with experts pertaining to each activity category, defining criteria for quantifying the percentage time of the intensivists dedicated to each task, and taking into account occupational category. A quantitative method was applied, the parameters of which were the number of procedures or tasks and the respective estimated indicative times for patient care-related activities within or outside the context of the DCCM, as well as for teaching and research activities. Regarding non-instrumental activities, which are more difficult to evaluate in real time, a matrix of range versus productivity was applied, defining approximate percentages according to occupational category. All activities and indicative times were tabulated, and a spreadsheet was created that modified a previously designed model in order to perform calculations according to the total sum of hours worked and the hours stipulated in the respective work contract. The competencies needed and the tasks which a Department of Critical Care Medicine professional must perform far exceed those of a purely patient care-related character, and cannot be quantified using structural criteria

  7. Violence in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, Keith R; Hughes, Nolan P; Rozel, John S

    2016-12-01

    Violence is common in the emergency department (ED). The ED setting has numerous environmental risk factors for violence, including poor staffing, lack of privacy, overcrowding, and ready availability of nonsecured equipment that can be used as weapons. Strategies can be taken to mitigate the risk of violence toward health care workers, including staff training, changes to the ED layout, appropriate use of security, and policy-level changes. Health care providers in the ED should be familiar with local case law and standards related to the duty to warn third parties when a violent threat is made by a patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Emergency teams in Danish emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafrenz, Thomas; Lindberg, Søren Østergaard; La Cour, Jeppe Lerche; Folkestad, Lars; Hallas, Peter; Brabrand, Mikkel

    2012-06-01

    The use of designated emergency teams for cardiac arrest and trauma patients is widely implemented. However, the use of designated teams in Danish emergency departments (EDs) has not been investigated. Our aim was to investigate the use and staffing of emergency teams in Danish EDs. A cross-sectional questionnaire study was sent to all 20 Danish EDs designated for emergency care. The response rate was 95% (n = 19). Three EDs were excluded due to incomplete data. All EDs (n = 16) received critically ill patients, cardiac arrests and trauma patients. In all EDs, a designated team responded to cardiac arrest (CAT) and trauma patients (TT). Only 31% of EDs had access to a designated medical emergency team (MET). CAT consisted of a median of six (range 5-10) different personnel groups. Of these, three (1-6) were physicians and only one (0-2) was a senior physician. TTs consisted of a median of nine (7-11) different personnel groups. Of these, four (2-6) were physicians, and three (2-4) were senior physicians. In 25% of the EDs, there was no access to a MET. In 31% of the EDs, an ad hoc-team was created. In 14%, a team was created by the attending emergency physician. The staffing of ad hoc-teams relied on diagnosis, symptoms and triage scores. Designated teams for patients in cardiac arrest and trauma patients are available in all Danish EDs. More senior staff form part of trauma teams than cardiac arrest teams. There is limited access to designated teams caring for critically ill medical patients in Danish EDs.

  9. How Does Rurality Influence the Staffing of Social Service Departments in Nursing Homes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Amy Restorick; Bowblis, John R

    2017-01-09

    Social service departments in nursing homes (NHs) are staffed by qualified social workers (QSWs) and paraprofessionals. Due to greater workforce challenges in rural areas, this article aims to describe the staffing levels and composition of these departments by rurality. Certification and Survey Provider Enhanced Reports data from 2009 to 2015 are used to examine the effect of rurality on social service staffing using random-effects linear panel regressions. The average NH employed 1.8 full-time equivalents (FTEs), with approximately two thirds of social services staffed by QSWs. Large NHs had more staff, but employed fewer staff hours per resident day. Staffing levels were lower and QSWs made up a smaller percentage of staff in rural areas. National trends indicate variability in staffing by NH size and degree of rurality. Very low staffing within rural NHs is a concern, as staff may have less time to respond to residents' needs and these NHs may utilize fewer QSWs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. [Improving emergency department organisation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanov, Youri; Beltramini, Alexandra; Debuc, Erwan; Pateron, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Emergency departments use has been constantly increasing over the world. Overcrowding is defined as a situation which compromises patient safety because of delayed cares. This situation is often reached. Emergency departments have to continuously improve their organization to be able to ensure the same quality of care to a higher number of patients. Thus a good organization is essential: it doesn't always avoid overcrowding. The rest of the hospital has to be involved in this process to ensure efficiency. We examine the various interventions and procedures that can be found in medical literature for improving patients flow and management in emergency departments.

  11. Optimizing Fire Department Operations Through Work Schedule Analysis, Alternative Staffing, and Nonproductive Time Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    fatigue attributed to work-related stressors .19 On the other hand, research has shown that the 48/96 schedule exacerbates sleep deprivation issues...health and wellness initiatives, brown-out, fire department funding, peak-usage staffing, four-person staffing, schedule modification, sleep deprivation ...to a significant sleep deprivation risk that impacts the employee’s ability to function at peak levels.7 The 10/14-hour schedule produces better

  12. Hypoglycemia in Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jang Su

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: When hypoglycemic patients present in the emergency department, physicians should pay attention to the presence of infection, malignancy, liver diseases (liver cirrhosis and biliary tract infection, and acute renal failure.

  13. [Emergency departments and psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambon, Amandine; Very, Étienne; Schmitt, Laurent

    2014-12-01

    Psychiatric care is becoming an increasingly important part of general emergency departments. Historically incorporated into the psychiatric hospital, emergency mental health care has since been moved to the general hospital. This move was intended to boost the accessibility and deinstitutionalisation of psychiatry. The end of the "asylum" opened up new dialogue with the somatic care network.

  14. Fire Department Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services.

  15. Managing emergency department overcrowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshaker, Jonathan S

    2009-11-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding and ambulance diversion has been an increasingly significant national problem for more than a decade. More than 90% of hospital ED directors reported overcrowding as a problem resulting in patients in hallways, full occupancy of ED beds, and long waits, occurring several times a week. Overcrowding has many other potential detrimental effects including diversion of ambulances, frustration for patients and ED personnel, lesser patient satisfaction, and most importantly, greater risk for poor outcomes. This article gives a basic blueprint for successfully making hospital-wide changes using principles of operational management. It briefly covers the causes, significance, and dangers of overcrowding, and then focuses primarily on specific solutions.

  16. A scientific model to determine the optimal radiographer staffing component in a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipanga, A.N.; Ellmann, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Nuclear medicine in South Africa is developing fast. Much has changed since the constitution of a scientific model for determining an optimum number of radiographer posts in a Nuclear Medicine department in the late 1980's. Aim: The aim of this study was to ascertain whether the number of radiographers required by a Nuclear Medicine department can still be determined according to the norms established in 1988. Methods: A quantitative study using non-experimental evaluation design was conducted to determine the ratios between current radiographer workload and staffing norms. The workload ratios were analysed using the procedures statistics of the Nuclear Medicine department at Tygerberg Hospital. Radiographers provided data about their activities related to patient procedures, including information about the condition of the patients, activities in the radiopharmaceutical laboratory, and patient related administrative tasks. These were factored into an equation relating this data to working hours, including vacation and sick leave. The calculation of Activity Standards and an annual Standard Workload was used to finally calculate the staffing requirements for a Nuclear Medicine department. Results: Preliminary data confirmed that old staffing norms cannot be used in a modern Nuclear Medicine department. Protocols for several types of study have changed, including the additional acquisition of tomographic studies. Interest in the use of time-consuming non-imaging studies has been revived and should be factored Into the equation. Conclusions: All Nuclear Medicine departments In South Africa, where the types of studies performed have changed over the past years, should look carefully at their radiographer staffing ratio to ascertain whether the number of radiographers needed is adequate for the current workload. (author)

  17. Critical care in the emergency department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Gabrielle

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The volume and duration of stay of the critically ill in the emergency department (ED) is increasing and is affected by factors including case-mix, overcrowding, lack of available and staffed intensive care beds and an ageing population. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical activity associated with these high-acuity patients and to quantify resource utilization by this patient group. METHODS: The study was a retrospective review of ED notes from all patients referred directly to the intensive care team over a 6-month period from April to September 2004. We applied a workload measurement tool, Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System (TISS)-28, which has been validated as a surrogate marker of nursing resource input in the intensive care setting. A nurse is considered capable of delivering nursing activities equal to 46 TISS-28 points in each 8-h shift. RESULTS: The median score from our 69 patients was 19 points per patient. Applying TISS-28 methodology, we estimated that 3 h 13 min nursing time would be spent on a single critically ill ED patient, with a TISS score of 19. This is an indicator of the high levels of personnel resources required for these patients in the ED. ED-validated models to quantify nursing and medical staff resources used across the spectrum of ED care is needed, so that staffing resources can be planned and allocated to match service demands.

  18. Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners in Rural Washington Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Scott C; Hooker, Roderick S

    2016-06-01

    One role of physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) is to meet the growing demand for access to rural health care. Critical Access Hospitals, those with less than 25 beds, are usually located in rural communities, often providing continuity of care that clinics cannot deliver. Because little is known about staffing in these small hospital emergency departments, an exploratory study was undertaken using a mixed-methods approach. In Washington State, 18 of the 39 Critical Access Hospitals staff their emergency departments with PAs and NPs. Utilization data were collected through structured interviews by phone or in person on site. Most PAs and NPs lived within the community and staffing tended to be either 24 hours in-house or short notice if they lived or worked nearby. Emergency department visits ranged from 200 to 25,000 per year. All sites were designated level V or IV trauma centers and often managed cardiac events, significant injuries and, in some larger settings, obstetrics. In most instances, PAs were the sole providers in the emergency departments, albeit with physician backup and emergency medical technician support if a surge of emergency cases arose. Two-thirds of the PAs had graduated within the last 5 years. Most preferred the autonomy of the emergency department role and all expressed job satisfaction. Geographically, the more remote a Washington State Critical Access Hospital is, the more likely it will be staffed by PAs/NPs. The diverse utilization of semiautonomous PAs and NPs and their rise in rural hospital employment is a new workforce observation that requires broader investigation.

  19. Presentation and analysis of work at the emergency department – of the University children’s Hospital Ljubljana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Bregant

    2013-05-01

    Conclusions: Since 2010, the paediatric emergency department of the University Children’s Hospital Ljubljana has functioned in compliance wtih the guidelines used in similar international tertiary centres. However, there is still room for improvement in organization and staffing.

  20. Emergency Department Management of Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Colin; Lippert, Freddy

    1999-01-01

    services (EMS) response times and advanced prehospital care increase the number of critically injured patients surviving sufficiently long to reach a hospital “in extremis.” Both scenarios provide challenges in the management of traumatized patients. This article addresses the management of severely......Initial assessment and management of severely injured patients may occur in a specialized area of an emergency department or in a specialized area of a trauma center. The time from injury until definitive management is of essence for survival of life-threatening trauma. The initial care delivered...... injured patients after these patients reach a hospital emergency department or a trauma center....

  1. The emergency department medical director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, T A

    1987-02-01

    This article has presented an overview of the duties, responsibilities, and management roles of the emergency department Medical Director, a position that can be among the most challenging, stimulating, and exciting in medicine. However, prior to accepting a position as an Emergency Department medical director, one should have a clear understanding of what the job entails. Careful discussions with the hospital administration, medical staff, nursing personnel, and staff emergency physicians should be undertaken to learn the perceptions of these people and expectations of the position. Once the job has been accepted, using the roles, responsibilities, and duties detailed herein may be of benefit--but should always be applied with good judgment, tactful cooperation, and common sense. Finally, it should not be surprising to a medical director to find, as Spinoza did many years ago, that the excellent thing he aspires to are as difficult as they are rare.

  2. Electronic Emergency-Department Whiteboards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Many emergency departments (EDs) are in a process of transitioning from dry-erase to electronic whiteboards. This study investigates differences in ED clinicians’ perception and assessment of their electronic whiteboards across departments and staff groups and at two points in time. Method....... We conducted a survey consisting of a questionnaire administered when electronic whiteboards were introduced and another questionnaire administered when they had been in use for 8-9 months. The survey involved two EDs and, for reasons of comparison, a paediatric department. Results. The ED...... respondents consider the whiteboard information important to their overview, and they approve of the introduction of electronic whiteboards. With the electronic whiteboards, the ED respondents experience a better overall overview of their work than with dry-erase whiteboards. They also experience...

  3. Advertising Emergency Department Wait Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Scott G.

    2013-01-01

    Advertising emergency department (ED) wait times has become a common practice in the United States. Proponents of this practice state that it is a powerful marketing strategy that can help steer patients to the ED. Opponents worry about the risk to the public health that arises from a patient with an emergent condition self-triaging to a further hospital, problems with inaccuracy and lack of standard definition of the reported time, and directing lower acuity patients to the higher cost ED setting instead to primary care. Three sample cases demonstrating the pitfalls of advertising ED wait times are discussed. Given the lack of rigorous evidence supporting the practice and potential adverse effects to the public health, caution about its use is advised. PMID:23599836

  4. Emergency Department Management of Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Colin; Lippert, Freddy

    1999-01-01

    Initial assessment and management of severely injured patients may occur in a specialized area of an emergency department or in a specialized area of a trauma center. The time from injury until definitive management is of essence for survival of life-threatening trauma. The initial care delivered...... services (EMS) response times and advanced prehospital care increase the number of critically injured patients surviving sufficiently long to reach a hospital “in extremis.” Both scenarios provide challenges in the management of traumatized patients. This article addresses the management of severely...

  5. Analysis of patients with decompression illness transported via physician-staffed emergency helicopters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasumasa Oode

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: There have been few reports investigating the effects of air transportation on patients with decompression illness (DCI. Aims: To investigate the influence of air transportation on patients with DCI transported via physician-staffed emergency helicopters (HEMS: Emergency medical system of physician-staffed emergency helicopters. Settings and Design: A retrospective medical chart review in a single hospital. Materials and Methods: A medical chart review was retrospectively performed in all patients with DCI transported via HEMS between July 2009 and June 2013. The exclusion criteria included cardiopulmonary arrest on surfacing. Statistical analysis used: The paired Student′s t-test. Results: A total of 28 patients were treated as subjects. Male and middle-aged subjects were predominant. The number of patients who suddenly surfaced was 15/28. All patients underwent oxygen therapy during flight, and all but one patient received the administration of lactate Ringer fluid. The subjective symptoms of eight of 28 subjects improved after the flight. The range of all flights under 300 m above sea level. There were no significant differences between the values obtained before and after the flight for Glasgow coma scale, blood pressure, and heart rate. Concerning the SpO 2 , statistically significant improvements were noted after the flight (96.2 ± 0.9% versus 97.3 ± 0.7%. There were no relationships between an improvement in subjective symptoms and the SpO 2 . Conclusion: Improvements in the subjective symptoms and/or SpO 2 of patients with DCI may be observed when the patient is transported via HEMS under flights less than 300 m in height with the administration of oxygen and fluids.

  6. Emergency department overcrowding and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetler, Mark A; Mace, Sharon; Brown, Kathleen; Finkler, Joseph; Hernandez, Dennis; Krug, Steven E; Schamban, Neil

    2007-07-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding has been a serious issue on the national agenda for the past 2 decades and is rapidly becoming an increasingly significant problem for children. The goal of this report is to focus on the issues of overcrowding that directly impact children. Our findings reveal that although overcrowding seems to affect children in ways similar to those of adults, there are several important ways in which they differ. Recent reports document that more than 90% of academic emergency medicine EDs are overcrowded. Although inner-city, urban, and university hospitals have historically been the first to feel the brunt of overcrowding, community and suburban EDs are now also being affected. The overwhelming majority of children (92%) are seen in general community EDs, with only a minority (less than 10%) treated in dedicated pediatric EDs. With the exception of patients older than 65 years, children have higher visit rates than any other age group. Children may be at particularly increased risk for medical errors because of their inherent variability in size and the need for age-specific and weight-based dosing. We strongly recommend that pediatric issues be actively included in all future aspects of research and policy planning issues related to ED overcrowding. These include the development of triage protocols, clinical guidelines, research proposals, and computerized data monitoring systems.

  7. Pre-hospital severe traumatic brain injury - comparison of outcome in paramedic versus physician staffed emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakkanen, Toni; Virkkunen, Ilkka; Kämäräinen, Antti; Huhtala, Heini; Silfvast, Tom; Virta, Janne; Randell, Tarja; Yli-Hankala, Arvi

    2016-04-29

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of death and permanent disability. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel are often the first healthcare providers attending patients with TBI. The level of available care varies, which may have an impact on the patient's outcome. The aim of this study was to evaluate mortality and neurological outcome of TBI patients in two regions with differently structured EMS systems. A 6-year period (2005 - 2010) observational data on pre-hospital TBI management in paramedic-staffed EMS and physician-staffed EMS systems were retrospectively analysed. Inclusion criteria for the study were severe isolated TBI presenting with unconsciousness defined as Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score ≤ 8 occurring either on-scene, during transportation or verified by an on-call neurosurgeon at admission to the hospital. For assessment of one-year neurological outcome, a modified Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) was used. During the 6-year study period a total of 458 patients met the inclusion criteria. One-year mortality was higher in the paramedic-staffed EMS group: 57 % vs. 42 %. Also good neurological outcome was less common in patients treated in the paramedic-staffed EMS group. We found no significant difference between the study groups when considering the secondary brain injury associated vital signs on-scene. Also on arrival to ED, the proportion of hypotensive patients was similar in both groups. However, hypoxia was common in the patients treated by the paramedic-staffed EMS on arrival to the ED, while in the physician-staffed EMS almost none of the patients were hypoxic. Pre-hospital intubation by EMS physicians probably explains this finding. The results suggest to an outcome benefit from physician-staffed EMS treating TBI patients. ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01454648.

  8. Priorities for emergency department syncope research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Benjamin C.; Costantino, Giorgio; Barbic, Franca; Bossi, Ilaria; Casazza, Giovanni; Dipaola, Franca; McDermott, Daniel; Quinn, James; Reed, Matthew; Sheldon, Robert S.; Solbiati, Monica; Thiruganasambandamoorthy, Venkatesh; Krahn, Andrew D.; Beach, Daniel; Bodemer, Nicolai; Brignole, Michele; Casagranda, Ivo; Duca, Piergiorgio; Falavigna, Greta; Ippoliti, Roberto; Montano, Nicola; Olshansky, Brian; Raj, Satish R.; Ruwald, Martin H.; Shen, Win-Kuang; Stiell, Ian; Ungar, Andrea; van Dijk, J. Gert; van Dijk, Nynke; Wieling, Wouter; Furlan, Raffaello

    2014-01-01

    There is limited evidence to guide the emergency department (ED) evaluation and management of syncope. The First International Workshop on Syncope Risk Stratification in the Emergency Department identified key research questions and methodological standards essential to advancing the science of

  9. Pharmaceutical advertising in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Catherine A

    2004-04-01

    Promotion of prescription drugs represents a growing source of pharmaceutical marketing expenditures. This study was undertaken to identify the frequency of items containing pharmaceutical advertising in clinical emergency departments (EDs). In this observational study, emergency physician on-site investigators quantified a variety of items containing pharmaceutical advertising present at specified representative times and days, in clinical EDs. Measurements were obtained by 65 on-site investigators, representing 22 states. Most EDs in this study were community EDs (87% community and 14% university or university affiliate), and most were in urban settings (50% urban, 38% suburban, and 13% rural). Investigators measured 42 items per ED (mean = 42; median = 31; interquartile range of 14-55) containing pharmaceutical advertising in the clinical area. The most commonly observed items included pens (mean 15 per ED; median 10), product brochures (mean 5; median 3), stethoscope labels (mean 4; median 2), drug samples (mean 3; median 0), books (mean 3.4), mugs (mean 2.4), and published literature (mean 3.1). EDs with a policy restricting pharmaceutical representatives in the ED had significantly fewer items containing pharmaceutical advertising (median 7.5; 95% CI = 0 to 27) than EDs without such a policy (median 35; 95% CI = 27 to 47, p = 0.005, nonparametric Wilcoxon two-sample test). There were no differences in quantities of pharmaceutical advertising for EDs in community compared with university settings (p = 0.5), rural compared with urban settings (p = 0.3), or annual ED volumes (p = 0.9). Numerous items containing pharmaceutical advertising are frequently observed in EDs. Policies restricting pharmaceutical representatives in the ED are associated with reduced pharmaceutical advertising.

  10. Analysis of patients with bodyboarding injuries transported by physician-staffed emergency helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Omori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: There have been no reports that have studied the characteristics specific to bodyboard injuries. Aims: To clarify characteristics to bodyboard injuries. Settings and Design: A retrospective medical chart review. Materials and Methods: A medical chart review was retrospectively performed for all patients with spinal cord injuries transported via physician-staffed emergency helicopters between January 2009 and October 2013. The subjects were divided into two groups based on whether they had a spinal cord injury induced by bodyboarding (Bodyboard group, n = 14 or not (Control group, n = 14. Statistical Analysis Used: Using a χ2 -test, Mann-Whitney U-test and non-paired Student′s t-test. Results: All but one of the subjects had spinal canal stenosis. The age of the patients in the Bodyboard group was younger than that of the Control group. The ratio of males and Glasgow Coma Scale of the Bodyboard group were higher than those on the Control group. The spinal cord injury induced by bodyboarding typically occurred after impacts of the head or face with the sea bottom while the subject was being buffeted by the waves. The severity of the spinal cord injury in the Bodyboard group was lower than that in the Control group. Conclusion: Bodyboarding tended to induce spinal cord injuries after the head or face collided with the sea bottom, and was more common in middle-aged males during the summer season, and was associated with a favorable outcome.

  11. Indications and results of emergency surgical airways performed by a physician-staffed helicopter emergency service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.; Bruijstens, L.; Ploeg, J. van der; Tan, E.; Hoogerwerf, N.; Edwards, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Airway management is essential in critically ill or injured patients. In a "can't intubate, can't oxygenate" scenario, an emergency surgical airway (ESA), similar to a cricothyroidotomy, is the final step in airway management. This procedure is infrequently performed in the prehospital

  12. Emergency department coding and billing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelberg, Caral

    2004-02-01

    ED coding and billing are challenging additions to the responsibilities of emergency physicians. Assurances that each is performed in the most efficient and accurate manner possible is an essential component of today's emergency medicine practice. Minimizing the risk for submitting fraudulent claims is critical, because it assures the efficient and timely billing of all ED services. For the practice to thrive, each is necessary.

  13. Modeling Hourly Resident Productivity in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Joshua W; Henning, Daniel J; Strouse, Connie S; Chiu, David T; Nathanson, Larry A; Sanchez, Leon D

    2017-08-01

    Resident productivity, defined as new patients per hour, carries important implications for emergency department operations. In high-volume academic centers, essential staffing decisions can be made on the assumption that residents see patients at a static rate. However, it is unclear whether this model mirrors reality; previous studies have not rigorously examined whether productivity changes over time. We examine residents' productivity across shifts to determine whether it remained consistent. This was a retrospective cohort study conducted in an urban academic hospital with a 3-year emergency medicine training program in which residents acquire patients ad libitum throughout their shift. Time stamps of all patient encounters were automatically logged. A linear mixed model was constructed to predict productivity per shift hour. A total of 14,364 8- and 9-hour shifts were worked by 75 residents between July 1, 2010, and June 20, 2015. This comprised 6,127 (42.7%) postgraduate year (PGY) 1 shifts, 7,236 (50.4%) PGY-2 shifts, and 998 (6.9%) PGY-3 nonsupervisory shifts (Table 1). Overall, residents treated a mean of 10.1 patients per shift (SD 3.2), with most patients at Emergency Severity Index level 3 or more acute (93.8%). In the initial hour, residents treated a mean of 2.14 patients (SD 1.2), and every subsequent hour was associated with a significant decrease, with the largest in the second, third, and final hours. Emergency medicine resident productivity during a single shift follows a reliable pattern that decreases significantly hourly, a pattern preserved across PGY years and types of shifts. This suggests that resident productivity is a dynamic process, which should be considered in staffing decisions and studied further. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Asthma Medication Ratio Predicts Emergency Depart...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in Asthma Medication Ratio Predicts Emergency Department Visits and Hospitalizations in Children with Asthma, published in Volume 3,...

  15. Surgical airway in emergency department intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Lindsay A; Dunn, Mark; Mckeown, Dermot W; Oglesby, Angela J

    2011-06-01

    To determine the frequency of and primary indication for surgical airway during emergency department intubation. Prospectively collected data from all intubations performed in the emergency department from January 1999 to July 2007 were analysed to ascertain the frequency of surgical airway access. Original data were collected on a structured proforma, entered into a regional database and analysed. Patient records were then reviewed to determine the primary indication for a surgical airway. Emergency department intubation was undertaken in 2524 patients. Of these, only five patients (0.2%) required a surgical airway. The most common indication for a surgical airway was trauma in four of the five patients. Two patients had attempted rapid sequence induction before surgical airway. Two patients had gaseous inductions and one patient received no drugs. In all five patients, surgical airway was performed secondary to failed endotracheal intubation attempt(s) and was never the primary technique used. In our emergency department, surgical airway is an uncommon procedure. The rate of 0.2% is significantly lower than rates quoted in other studies. The most common indication for surgical airway was severe facial or neck trauma. Our emergency department has a joint protocol for emergency intubation agreed by the Departments of Emergency Medicine, Anaesthesia and Critical Care at the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. We believe that the low surgical airway rate is secondary to this collaborative approach. The identified low rate of emergency department surgical airway has implications for training and maintenance of skills for emergency medicine trainees and physicians.

  16. [The evaluation of academic emergency department design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Turgut; Aydinuraz, Kuzey; Oktay, Cem; Saygun, Meral; Ağalar, Fatih

    2007-01-01

    In our study which was based upon a questionnaire, the inner and outer architectural designs of emergency services of Emergency Medicine Departments were investigated. In this descriptive study, a standard questionnaire was sent to 26 Emergency Medicine Departments which were operating at that time. In the questionnaire, the internal, external architectural and functional features were questioned. Answers of 22 Emergency Medicine Departments were analysed. Two Emergency Medicine Departments that were not operating at that time were not included in the study. The analysis of the replies revealed that only 59% (n=13) of the Emergency Medicine Departments were designed as an emergency service prior to the construction. The ambulance parking areas were not suitable in 77% of the emergency units while only 54.5% (n=12) had protection against adverse weather conditions. In only 59% (n=13) of the emergency units, a triage unit was present and in only one of the in only one (4.5%), a decontamination room was available. It was understood that only 32% (n=8) of the emergency units were appropriate in enlarging their capacity taking the local risk factors into consideration. There was a toilette for disabled patients in only 18% (n=4) of the units as well. Considering a 12-year of history of the Emergency Medicine in Turkey, the presence of a lecture room is still 68% (n=15) in emergency departments which reflects that academic efforts in this field is emerging in challenging physical conditions. The results of our study revealed that emergency service architecture was neglected in Turkey and medical care given was precluded by the insufficient architecture. The design of emergency services has to be accomplished under guidance of scientific data and rules taking advices of architects who have knowledge and experience on this field.

  17. Tackling Communication Barriers Between Long-Term Care Facility and Emergency Department Transfers to Improve Medication Safety in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callinan, Stephanie M; Brandt, Nicole J

    2015-07-01

    In 2013, the American College of Emergency Physicians, American Geriatrics Society, Emergency Nurses Association, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine created geriatric emergency department guidelines, making recommendations for staffing/administration, follow up and transitions of care, education, quality improvement, equipment/supplies, and other policies, procedures, and protocols to be implemented. Awareness of these guidelines, as well as communication barriers, can help improve the delivery of care for older adults during transitions in care, particularly regarding medication safety. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Emergency department triage: an ethical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastmans Chris

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency departments across the globe follow a triage system in order to cope with overcrowding. The intention behind triage is to improve the emergency care and to prioritize cases in terms of clinical urgency. Discussion In emergency department triage, medical care might lead to adverse consequences like delay in providing care, compromise in privacy and confidentiality, poor physician-patient communication, failing to provide the necessary care altogether, or even having to decide whose life to save when not everyone can be saved. These consequences challenge the ethical quality of emergency care. This article provides an ethical analysis of "routine" emergency department triage. The four principles of biomedical ethics - viz. respect for autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice provide the starting point and help us to identify the ethical challenges of emergency department triage. However, they do not offer a comprehensive ethical view. To address the ethical issues of emergency department triage from a more comprehensive ethical view, the care ethics perspective offers additional insights. Summary We integrate the results from the analysis using four principles of biomedical ethics into care ethics perspective on triage and propose an integrated clinically and ethically based framework of emergency department triage planning, as seen from a comprehensive ethics perspective that incorporates both the principles-based and care-oriented approach.

  19. Emergency department triage: an ethical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Emergency departments across the globe follow a triage system in order to cope with overcrowding. The intention behind triage is to improve the emergency care and to prioritize cases in terms of clinical urgency. Discussion In emergency department triage, medical care might lead to adverse consequences like delay in providing care, compromise in privacy and confidentiality, poor physician-patient communication, failing to provide the necessary care altogether, or even having to decide whose life to save when not everyone can be saved. These consequences challenge the ethical quality of emergency care. This article provides an ethical analysis of "routine" emergency department triage. The four principles of biomedical ethics - viz. respect for autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice provide the starting point and help us to identify the ethical challenges of emergency department triage. However, they do not offer a comprehensive ethical view. To address the ethical issues of emergency department triage from a more comprehensive ethical view, the care ethics perspective offers additional insights. Summary We integrate the results from the analysis using four principles of biomedical ethics into care ethics perspective on triage and propose an integrated clinically and ethically based framework of emergency department triage planning, as seen from a comprehensive ethics perspective that incorporates both the principles-based and care-oriented approach. PMID:21982119

  20. Emergency Contraception: a survey of Hospital Emergency Departments Staffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization defines emergency contraception (EC as a means to prevent unwanted pregnancy. In countries where EC is dispensed behind the counter, emergency departments are a preferred point of care for its prescription and dispensing. In light of this situation and as no studies on emergency contraception in emergency departments in Italy have been conducted to date, this study was designed with a view to analyze the responses of emergency room physicians in relation to their prescribing habits and knowledge about the drug and in relation to frequency and profile of women arriving for care at hospital emergency departments in Piedmont and requesting prescription for the morning-after pill. This cross-sectional survey involved 29 hospital emergency departments in Piedmont where no gynecologists are on active duty. The survey instrument was a 24-item questionnaire. Analysis of responses revealed that in the physicians’ opinion the vast majority of requests came from Italian nationals (97% ranging in age from 18 to 30 years (76%, single and not cohabiting with a partner (60%, and nulliparous (64.0%. Women mostly request EC for first-time and the most common reasons were condom breakage or slippage. Just over half the physicians (52% stated that emergency contraception prescription was not an appropriate part of care provided at an emergency department and 72% stated they felt uneasy about prescribing emergency contraception. The survey also revealed gaps in physician knowledge about the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of emergency contraception pills.

  1. Emergency Contraception: a survey of Hospital Emergency Departments Staffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization defines emergency contraception (EC as a means to prevent unwanted pregnancy. In countries where EC is dispensed behind the counter, emergency departments are a preferred point of care for its prescription and dispensing. In light of this situation and as no studies on emergency contraception in emergency departments in Italy have been conducted to date, this study was designed with a view to analyze the responses of emergency room physicians in relation to their prescribing habits and knowledge about the drug and in relation to frequency and profile of women arriving for care at hospital emergency departments in Piedmont and requesting prescription for the morning-after pill. This cross-sectional survey involved 29 hospital emergency departments in Piedmont where no gynecologists are on active duty. The survey instrument was a 24-item questionnaire. Analysis of responses revealed that in the physicians’ opinion the vast majority of requests came from Italian nationals (97% ranging in age from 18 to 30 years (76%, single and not cohabiting with a partner (60%, and nulliparous (64.0%. Women mostly request EC for first-time and the most common reasons were condom breakage or slippage. Just over half the physicians (52% stated that emergency contraception prescription was not an appropriate part of care provided at an emergency department and 72% stated they felt uneasy about prescribing emergency contraception. The survey also revealed gaps in physician knowledge about the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of emergency contraception pills.

  2. Prediction of bacteremia in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie Kristine Jessen; Mackenhauer, Julie; Hvass, Anne Mette Sondrup Wulff

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to validate a previously published clinical decision rule for predicting a positive blood culture in emergency department (ED) patients with suspected infection on the basis of major and minor criteria and a total score (Shapiro et al., J Emerg Med, 2008...

  3. Child maltreatment, parents & the emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoytema van Konijnenburg, E.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on the evaluation of several methods of screening for child maltreatment at the emergency department, with an emphasis on screening based on parental risk factors (‘child check’). The use of a screening checklist (mandatory in all Dutch emergency

  4. Clinical Overview and Emergency-Department Whiteboards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    In Denmark emergency departments are newly established and still in a process of devising their procedures and technology support. Electronic whiteboards are a means of supporting clinicians in creating and maintaining the overview necessary to provide quality treatment of patients. The concrete...... meaning of the notion of overview is, however, fussy. To explore the notion of overview and how it might be affected by whiteboards, we conducted a survey at two emergency departments and, for reasons of comparison, a pediatric department. Our results indicate that respondents consider the information...... on their dry-erase whiteboards important to their overview and that they are positive toward the introduction of electronic whiteboards. At the emergency departments, the phy-sicians’ and nurses’ overall perception of their overview correlates with different subcomponents of overview, suggesting differences...

  5. Evaluation of Performance Indexes of Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Baratloo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The importance of evaluating performance indicators in the emergency department, as one of the most important departments of hospital, is obvious to everyone. Therefore, in this study we aimed to appraise the five performance indicators, approved by the ministry of health, in Shohadaye Tajrish hospital, Tehran, Iran. Methods: In a descriptive cross-sectional study based on the profiles of all the patients admitted to the emergency department, performance indicators in the emergency department were evaluated. The study was divided into 2 parts about the establishment of emergency medicine system and training the medical staff: the first 6 months of 1392 and the second. Then these 2 periods were compared using Mann-Whitney U test while P< 0.05 was considered as the level of significance. Results: Of the studied indicators, mean triage time was 6.04 minutes in the first 6 months which was reduced to 1.5 minutes in the second 6 months (p=0.016. In addition, the percentage of patients who moved out of the department in 12 hours was lowered from 97.3% in the first period to 90.4% in the second (p=0.004. While, the percentage of patients who were decided upon in 6 hours (p=0.2, unsuccessful CPR percentage (p=0.34 and patients discharged against medical advice (p=0.42 showed no significant difference. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the establishment of the emergency medicine system in the emergency department could lead to more efficient triage. Due to the differences made after their establishment including: different pattern of the patients admitted, increased stay of the patients in the department due to their need for prolonged intensive care, a raise in patient referral to the hospital by pre-hospital services and a higher percentage of occupied hospital beds, other indicators have not shown a significant improvement.

  6. Managed care and the pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, D

    1999-12-01

    The growth of managed care has provided health benefits to millions of children while attempting to control the increase in health care costs. In adhering to these goals, MCOs are often at odds with emergency departments, and the emergency department physicians providing emergency care. The appropriateness or inappropriateness of emergency department visits can be disputed, but no criteria have been established. Even the definition of emergency is debated, although many states are adopting a prudent layperson standard. Emergency medicine physicians, primary care providers, and MCOs must cooperate to fully educate parents about the appropriate use of pediatric emergency services. Patients and MCOs should use facilities that can deliver pediatric emergency and critical care or provide appropriate transport systems to facilities that can. COBRA and EMTALA set the legal requirements to which emergency departments must comply when patients present for care. The basic caveats under COBRA require a medical screening examination for every patient and the stabilization of all patients with emergency medical conditions before inquiring about insurance or patients' ability to pay. A part of gatekeeping, MCOs often require authorization for treatment. MCOs authorize payment only. Evaluation and emergency treatment should not be withheld pending authorization. After the medical screening examination, recommended treatment should be in patients' best interests. All patients with potentially life-threatening conditions should be stabilized before transport, and all transfers must comply with the EMTALA. The transfer of unstable patients purely for economic reasons is a violation of the EMTALA. When stable, patients may be transferred to other facilities, but patients requiring specialty care should be taken to facilities best able to provide that care. Financial considerations should be superseded by medical necessity. Finally, improvements can be made in the way emergency

  7. Perceptions of Emergency Department Physicians Toward Collaborative Practice With Nurse Practitioners in an Emergency Department Setting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wingert, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    Once considered reserved for life-threatening disease or illness, emergency departments in the United States are now described as the primary care clinic and the social work department for many Americans (Grumback, Keane & Bindman, 1993...

  8. Emergency department management of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Portal, Daniel A; Horn, Amanda E; Vilke, Gary M; Chan, Theodore C; Ufberg, Jacob W

    2014-03-01

    Precipitous obstetric deliveries can occur outside of the labor and delivery suite, often in the emergency department (ED). Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency with significant risk of adverse outcome. To review multiple techniques for managing a shoulder dystocia in the ED. We review various techniques and approaches for achieving delivery in the setting of shoulder dystocia. These include common maneuvers, controversial interventions, and interventions of last resort. Emergency physicians should be familiar with multiple techniques for managing a shoulder dystocia to reduce the chances of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Preparing emergency personnel in dialysis: a just-in-time training program for additional staffing during disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoler, Genevieve B; Johnston, James R; Stevenson, Judy A; Suyama, Joe

    2013-06-01

    There are 341 000 patients in the United States who are dependent on routine dialysis for survival. Recent large-scale disasters have emphasized the importance of disaster preparedness, including supporting dialysis units, for people with chronic disease. Contingency plans for staffing are important for providing continuity of care for a technically challenging procedure such as dialysis. PReparing Emergency Personnel in Dialysis (PREP-D) is a just-in-time training program designed to train individuals having minimum familiarity with the basic steps of dialysis to support routine dialysis staff during a disaster. A 5-module educational program was developed through a collaborative, multidisciplinary effort. A pilot study testing the program was performed using 20 nontechnician dialysis facility employees and 20 clinical-year medical students as subjects. When comparing pretest and posttest scores, the entire study population showed a mean improvement of 28.9%, with dialysis facility employees and medical students showing improvements of 21.8% and 36.4%, respectively (P just-in-time training format. The knowledge gained by using the PREP-D program during a staffing shortage may allow for continuity of care for critical services such as dialysis during a disaster.

  10. Clinical pharmacy services in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Sofie Rahman; Acquisto, Nicole M; Coralic, Zlatan; Basalyga, Vicki; Campbell, Matthew; Kelly, John J; Langkiet, Kevin; Pearson, Claire; Sokn, Erick; Phelan, Michael

    2018-01-31

    The emergency department (ED) is a fast-paced, high-risk, and often overburdened work environment. Formal policy statements from several notable organizations, including the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) and the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP), have recognized the importance of clinical pharmacists in the emergency medicine (EM) setting. EM clinical pharmacists work alongside emergency physicians and nurses at the bedside to optimize pharmacotherapy, improve patient safety, increase efficiency and cost-effectiveness of care, facilitate antibiotic stewardship, educate patients and clinicians, and contribute to scholarly efforts. This paper examines the history of EM clinical pharmacists and associated training programs, the diverse responsibilities and roles of EM clinical pharmacists, their impact on clinical and financial outcomes, and proposes a conceptual model for EM clinical pharmacist integration into ED patient care. Finally, barriers to implementing EM clinical pharmacy programs and limitations are considered. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of physician staffed emergency teams with paramedic teams assisted by telemedicine--a randomized, controlled simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rörtgen, Daniel; Bergrath, Sebastian; Rossaint, Rolf; Beckers, Stefan K; Fischermann, Harold; Na, In-Sik; Peters, David; Fitzner, Christina; Skorning, Max

    2013-01-01

    Emergency medical services (EMSs) vary considerably. While some are physician staffed, most systems are run by paramedics. The objective of this randomized, controlled simulation study was to compare the emergency care between physician staffed EMS teams (control group) and paramedic teams that were supported telemedically by an EMS physician (telemedicine group). Overall 16 teams (1 EMS physician, 2 paramedics) were randomized to the control group or the telemedicine group. Telemedical functionalities included two-way audio communication, transmission of vital data (numerical values and curves) and video streaming from the scenario room to the remotely located EMS physician. After a run-in scenario all teams completed four standardized scenarios, in which no highly invasive procedures (e.g. thoracic drain) were required, two using high-fidelity simulation (burn trauma, intoxication) and two using standardized patients (renal colic, barotrauma). All scenarios were videotaped and analyzed by two investigators using predefined scoring items. Non case-specific items (31 vs. 31 scenarios): obtaining of 'symptoms', 'past medical history' and 'events' were carried out comparably, but in the telemedicine group 'allergies' (17 vs. 28, OR 7.69, CI 2.1-27.9, p=0.002) and 'medications' (17 vs. 27, OR 5.55, CI 1.7-18.0, p=0.004) were inquired more frequently. No significant differences were found regarding the case-specific items and in both groups no potentially dangerous mistreatments were observed. Telemedically assisted paramedic care was feasible and at least not inferior compared to standard EMS teams with a physician on-scene in these scenarios. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Psychiatric service users' experiences of emergency departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Kathrine; Lou, Stina; Jensen, Lotte Groth

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is increased clinical and political attention towards integrating general and psychiatric emergency departments (ED). However, research into psychiatric service users’ experiences regarding general EDs is limited. Aim: To identify and summarize current, qualitative evidence rega...... the discomfort. Overall, the results of this review speak in favour of integrated EDs where service users’ needs are more likely to be recognized and accommodated.......Background: There is increased clinical and political attention towards integrating general and psychiatric emergency departments (ED). However, research into psychiatric service users’ experiences regarding general EDs is limited. Aim: To identify and summarize current, qualitative evidence...... regarding service users’ experiences attending EDs. A secondary aim is to apply and test the newly developed CERQual approach to summarizing qualitative review findings. Methods: A systematic literature review of five databases based on PRISMA guidelines yielded 3334 unique entries. Screening by title...

  13. Enhanced monitoring of abnormal emergency department demands

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2016-06-13

    This paper presents a statistical technique for detecting signs of abnormal situation generated by the influx of patients at emergency department (ED). The monitoring strategy developed was able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of abnormal situations caused by abnormal patient arrivals to the ED. More specifically, This work proposed the application of autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models combined with the generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) test for anomaly-detection. ARMA was used as the modelling framework of the ARMA-based GLR anomaly-detection methodology. The GLR test was applied to the uncorrelated residuals obtained from the ARMA model to detect anomalies when the data did not fit the reference ARMA model. The ARMA-based GLR hypothesis testing scheme was successfully applied to the practical data collected from the database of the pediatric emergency department (PED) at Lille regional hospital center, France. © 2015 IEEE.

  14. Emergency anticonception in an emergency department or rural primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Aparicio Cilla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to Know the demand for Emergency Contraception (EC. It is a transversal descriptive study during the period between August 2007 and January 2011 in the emergency department of Health Primary Care of Medina de Pomar.Results for EC 98 women, with a mean age of 34 (range: 15-53 years, 18,3 % were minors. 87,7 % attended during the day and 12,2% at night. The days of the week were the most requested weekends: 63,3 %. Respect to address, women living in Medina de Pomar were 35,7 % versus 64,3 % that from other localities.Conclusions: Most of the women who sought EC were young, frequented the emergency department during weekends and especially during daytime. More than half lived in other locations.

  15. Secondary traumatic stress in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Lindy E; Joy, Jane P

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the prevalence of secondary traumatic stress among Emergency nurses in the West of Scotland and explore their experiences of this. Unexpected death, trauma and violence are regular occurrences that contribute to the stressful environment nurses working in the Emergency department experience. A potential consequence of repeated exposure to such stressors can be referred to as secondary traumatic stress. Triangulation of methods of data collection, using two distinct phases: Phase 1 - quantitative Phase 2 - qualitative METHODS: Quantitative data were collated via postal questionnaire, from a convenience sample of Emergency nurses. Qualitative data were subsequently collated from a focus group constituting of a random sample of these Emergency nurses. Descriptive statistics were computed and thematic analysis conducted. All data were collated during February 2013. 75% of the sampled Emergency nurses reported at least one secondary traumatic stress symptom in the last week. Participants said that acute occupational stressors such as resuscitation and death were the influencing factors towards this. Strategies such as formal debriefing and social support were cited as beneficial tools for the management of secondary traumatic stress; however, barriers such as time and experience were found to inhibit their common use. Secondary traumatic stress is a prevalent phenomenon among Emergency nurses in the West of Scotland and if not managed appropriately, could represent a significant barrier to the mental health of this group and their capacity to provide quality care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Emergency department management of priapism [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolej, Gregory S; Babcock, Christine; Kim, Jeremy

    2017-01-22

    Priapism is a genitourinary emergency that demands a thorough, time-sensitive evaluation. There are 3 types of priapism: ischemic, nonischemic, and recurrent ischemic priapism; ischemic priapism accounts for 95% of cases. Ischemic priapism must be treated within 4 to 6 hours to minimize morbidity, including impotence. The diagnosis of ischemic priapism relies heavily on the history and physical examination and may be facilitated by penile blood gas analysis and penile ultrasound. This issue reviews current evidence regarding emergency department treatment of ischemic priapism using a stepwise approach that begins with aspiration of cavernosal blood, cold saline irrigation, and penile injection with sympathomimetic agents. Evidence-based management and appropriate urologic follow-up of nonischemic and recurrent ischemic priapism maximizes patient outcomes and resource utilization. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice].

  17. Analysis of judicial cases at emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Seviner

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study, we aimed to analyze the demographic and epidemiological features of judicial cases admitted to emergency department, the content of life-threatening of forensic reports, the status of simple medical intervention and outcomes in the emergency department. Material and Methods: Judicial cases, admitted to the emergency department between 01.12.2009 - 31.12.2010 were included in the study. Patients were evaluated from the patient cards retrospectively. Categorical data summarized as number and percentage, numerical measurements summarized as mean and standard deviation. SPSS 17.0 package program was used for statistical analysis of data. The statistical significance level of all tests was p <0.05. Results: Of the 5870 judicial cases, 63.78 % were male and 36.22 % were female. Mean age of patients were 33.75 ± 12.4 years. Traffic accident (27.3 %, intoxication (24.3 % and to be beaten (17.6 % were the first three judicial events. Traffic accidents were seen in males between 26-33 ages mostly and intoxications were seen in females between 18-25 ages commonly. The most reason of injuries were limb injuries with 2404 cases. 73.3 % of patients were discharged and 26.3 % of patients were hospitalized. 0.3% of forensic cases (19 patients died in the emergency department, 0.1% (4 patients died before hospital admission. Death was mostly seen as traffic accidents and fall from height. When forensic reports were evaluated, 28.8 % of males and 11.3 % of females were not resolved with simple medical intervention. Only 3336 (56.8% forensic reports of all forensic cases were stated in a life-threatening situation. 21.1 % of the patients with a life-threatening situation of the current was life-threatening. Conclusion: Forensic cases are most commonly seen in young adult males and ages between 26-33. The frequency of diagnoses in male and female patients are different. Forensic cases require hospitalization rate as high as 26.3%, although the

  18. Emergency Department Overcrowding and Ambulance Turnaround Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu Jin; Shin, Sang Do; Lee, Eui Jung; Cho, Jin Seong; Cha, Won Chul

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe overcrowding in regional emergency departments in Seoul, Korea and evaluate the effect of crowdedness on ambulance turnaround time. This study was conducted between January 2010 and December 2010. Patients who were transported by 119-responding ambulances to 28 emergency centers within Seoul were eligible for enrollment. Overcrowding was defined as the average occupancy rate, which was equal to the average number of patients staying in an emergency department (ED) for 4 hours divided by the number of beds in the ED. After selecting groups for final analysis, multi-level regression modeling (MLM) was performed with random-effects for EDs, to evaluate associations between occupancy rate and turnaround time. Between January 2010 and December 2010, 163,659 patients transported to 28 EDs were enrolled. The median occupancy rate was 0.42 (range: 0.10-1.94; interquartile range (IQR): 0.20-0.76). Overcrowded EDs were more likely to have older patients, those with normal mentality, and non-trauma patients. Overcrowded EDs were more likely to have longer turnaround intervals and traveling distances. The MLM analysis showed that an increase of 1% in occupancy rate was associated with 0.02-minute decrease in turnaround interval (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.03). In subgroup analyses limited to EDs with occupancy rates over 100%, we also observed a 0.03 minute decrease in turnaround interval per 1% increase in occupancy rate (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.05). In this study, we found wide variation in emergency department crowding in a metropolitan Korean city. Our data indicate that ED overcrowding is negatively associated with turnaround interval with very small practical significance.

  19. Emergency Department Overcrowding and Ambulance Turnaround Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu Jin; Shin, Sang Do; Lee, Eui Jung; Cho, Jin Seong; Cha, Won Chul

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to describe overcrowding in regional emergency departments in Seoul, Korea and evaluate the effect of crowdedness on ambulance turnaround time. Methods This study was conducted between January 2010 and December 2010. Patients who were transported by 119-responding ambulances to 28 emergency centers within Seoul were eligible for enrollment. Overcrowding was defined as the average occupancy rate, which was equal to the average number of patients staying in an emergency department (ED) for 4 hours divided by the number of beds in the ED. After selecting groups for final analysis, multi-level regression modeling (MLM) was performed with random-effects for EDs, to evaluate associations between occupancy rate and turnaround time. Results Between January 2010 and December 2010, 163,659 patients transported to 28 EDs were enrolled. The median occupancy rate was 0.42 (range: 0.10-1.94; interquartile range (IQR): 0.20-0.76). Overcrowded EDs were more likely to have older patients, those with normal mentality, and non-trauma patients. Overcrowded EDs were more likely to have longer turnaround intervals and traveling distances. The MLM analysis showed that an increase of 1% in occupancy rate was associated with 0.02-minute decrease in turnaround interval (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.03). In subgroup analyses limited to EDs with occupancy rates over 100%, we also observed a 0.03 minute decrease in turnaround interval per 1% increase in occupancy rate (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.05). Conclusions In this study, we found wide variation in emergency department crowding in a metropolitan Korean city. Our data indicate that ED overcrowding is negatively associated with turnaround interval with very small practical significance. PMID:26115183

  20. Emergency anticonception in an emergency department or rural primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Aparicio Cilla; Rosa Fernández Artola; Cristina Pérez del Río

    2013-01-01

    The objective is to Know the demand for Emergency Contraception (EC). It is a transversal descriptive study during the period between August 2007 and January 2011 in the emergency department of Health Primary Care of Medina de Pomar.Results for EC 98 women, with a mean age of 34 (range: 15-53 years), 18,3 % were minors. 87,7 % attended during the day and 12,2% at night. The days of the week were the most requested weekends: 63,3 %. Respect to address, women living in Medina de Pomar were 35,7...

  1. HCUP Nationwide Emergency Department Database (NEDS) Restricted Access File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) was created to enable analyses of emergency department (ED) utilization patterns and support public health...

  2. HCUP State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD) - Restricted Access File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD) contain the universe of emergency department visits in participating States. Restricted access data files are...

  3. Evaluation of fever in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Sarah; Chavez, Summer A; Perkins, Jack; Long, Brit; Koyfman, Alex

    2017-11-01

    Fever is one of the most common complaints in the emergency department (ED) and is more complex than generally appreciated. The broad differential diagnosis of fever includes numerous infectious and non-infectious etiologies. An essential skill in emergency medicine is recognizing the pitfalls in fever evaluation. This review provides an overview of the complaint of fever in the ED to assist the emergency physician with a structured approach to evaluation. Fever can be due to infectious or non-infectious etiology and results from the body's natural response to a pyrogen. Adjunctive testing including C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and procalcitonin has been evaluated in the literature, but these tests do not have the needed sensitivity and specificity to definitively rule in a bacterial cause of fever. Blood cultures should be obtained in septic shock or if the results will change clinical management. Fever may not be always present in true infection, especially in elderly and immunocompromised patients. Oral temperatures suffer from poor sensitivity to diagnose fever, and core temperatures should be utilized if concern for fever is present. Consideration of non-infectious causes of elevated temperature is needed based on the clinical situation. Any fever evaluation must rigorously maintain a broad differential to avoid pitfalls that can have patient care consequences. Fever is complex and due to a variety of etiologies. An understanding of the pathophysiology, causes, and assessment is important for emergency physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Frequent users of the pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, Jade; Osmanlliu, Esli; Zhang, Xun; Clavel, Virginie; Eisman, Harley; Rodrigues, Robert; Oskoui, Maryam

    2017-04-06

    Emergency department (ED) crowding is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Its etiology is multifactorial, and frequent ED use (defined as more or equal to five visits per year) is a major contributor to high patient volumes. Our primary objective is to characterize the frequent user population. Our secondary objective is to examine risk factors for frequent emergency use. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of pediatric emergency department (PED) visits at the Montreal Children's Hospital using the Système Informatique Urgence (SIURGE), electronic medical record database. We analysed the relation between patient's characteristics and the number of PED visits over a 1-year period following the index visit. Patients totalling 52,088 accounted for 94,155 visits. Of those, 2,474 (4.7%) patients had five and more recurrent visits and accounted for 16.6% (15,612 visits) of the total PED visits. Lower level of acuity at index visit (odds ratio [OR] 0.85) was associated with a lower number of recurrent visits. Lower socioeconomic status (social deprivation index OR 1.09, material deprivation index OR 1.08) was associated with a higher number of recurrent visits. Asthma (OR 1.57); infectious ear, nose, and sinus disorders (OR 1.33); and other respiratory disorders (OR 1.56) were independently associated with a higher incidence of a recurrent visit within the year following the first visit. Our study is the first Canadian study to assess risk factors of frequent pediatric emergency use. The identified risk factors and diagnoses highlight the need for future evidence-based, targeted innovative research evaluating strategies to minimize ED crowding, to improve health outcomes and to improve patient satisfaction.

  5. Violence in the accident and emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimond, B

    1994-07-01

    It is not surprising that the increased level of violence in society has had its effect upon safety within the Accident and Emergency (A & E) department. At a time when every health professional including General Practitioners (GPs) report incidents of assault during their work, it is inevitable that such incidents should also occur within hospitals. Many A & E departments now employ security firms to guard the premises and to be on call should trouble arise. Most departments would have a system of closed circuit television which may be useful in identifying and controlling trouble at an early stage and in assisting in the recognition of offenders subsequently. Unfortunately such measures are not entirely successful in preventing violence in the departments, and the nurse may be confronted by such situations as: An injured person coming in with his drunken friends on a Friday night or after a football match, bringing havoc and uproar to the department An injured spouse/cohabitee following a violent quarrel at home, with the uninjured party trailing behind fiercely defensive of his innocence and yet aggressive to others around Tramps, bewildered and terrified, denying the need for help and resisting the assistance of the staff. What is the legal position of the nurse in such situations? If the nurse fears for safety would the right exist to evict such persons from the department even though there may be severe injuries? Is the nurse permitted to take any action in self-defence? What duty exists upon the nurse's employer to secure health and safety?(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Comparison of the National Emergency Department Overcrowding Scale and the Emergency Department Work Index for quantifying emergency department crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Steven J; Ernst, Amy A; Nick, Todd G

    2006-05-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding is just beginning to be quantified. The only two scales presently available are the National Emergency Department Overcrowding Scale (NEDOCS) and the Emergency Department Work Index (EDWIN). To assess the value of the NEDOCS and the EDWIN in predicting overcrowding. The hypothesis of this study was that the NEDOCS and the EDWIN would be equally sensitive and specific for overcrowding. The NEDOCS, the EDWIN, and an overcrowding measure (OV) were determined every two hours for a ten-day period in December 2004. The NEDOCS is a statistically derived calculation, and the EDWIN is a formula-based calculation. The overcrowding measure is a composite of physician and charge nurse expert opinion on the degree of overcrowding as measured on a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS). The primary outcome, overcrowding, was based on the dichotomized OV VAS score at the midpoint of 50 mm (> or =50, overcrowded; overcrowded). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) and an index of adequacy (relative prognostic content) of each measure, on the basis of the likelihood ratio chi-square statistic, were computed to evaluate the performance of NEDOCS and EDWIN. There were 130 completed sampling times over ten days. The OV indicated that the ED was overcrowded 62% of the time. The AUC for the NEDOCS was 0.83 (95% CI = 0.75 to 0.90), and the AUC for the EDWIN was 0.80 (95% CI = 0.73 to 0.88). The NEDOCS score accounts for 97% of the prognostic information provided by combining all variables used in each model into one combined model. The EDWIN score accounts for only 86% (chi2 test for difference, p = 0.02). Both scales had high AUCs, correlated well with each other, and showed good discrimination for predicting ED overcrowding. This establishes construct validity for these scales as measures of overcrowding. Which scale is used in an ED is dependent on which set of data is most readily available, with the favored scale being the

  7. Management of syncope in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, M J

    2009-08-01

    Syncope is a common presenting complaint to the emergency department (ED). Its assessment is difficult. Some serious causes of syncope are transient and patients with a potentially life threatening condition may appear well by the time they reach the ED. Accurate history taking is vital and is often diagnostic whilst identification of a cardiac cause is associated with an increased mortality. This is related to underlying cardiac disease; patients presenting with syncope who have significant cardiac disease should be investigated thoroughly to determine the nature of the underlying heart disease and the cause of syncope. Early work suggested that as many as 30% of patients with cardiac syncope died within one year of presentation. This led to physicians admitting many patients with unexplained syncope however presently there is little evidence that focussed investigation, or even admission leads to an improved prognosis. Studies looking at syncope clinical decision units have though shown these to be of some benefit. Risk stratification studies on syncope in the ED have attempted to help emergency physicians target high-risk patients once those with clearly identifiable conditions have been identified and managed. These clinical decision rules have suffered from poor external validation and in the USA where many of these tools were developed, a universal consensus approach remains lacking. Although no individual tool has yet been successfully implemented into standard practice, as a whole they have probably enabled emergency physicians to become more aware of the risk factors that are likely to lead to poor outcome. It is likely that serious outcome in syncope although significant, is not quite as common as previously thought. Presently the American College of Emergency Physician (ACEP) guidelines are the most useful guidelines written for the emergency physician. With biochemical markers showing some promise, further work may lead to incorporation of these into

  8. Treating pain in the emergency department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kuan, Samuel C

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this audit was to evaluate the impact of brief educational intervention on prompt recognition and treatment of pain in the emergency department. The audit was performed on all patients in the emergency department with pain presenting over a 24-h period on three occasions: preintervention, 1-week postintervention and at 4 months. In 151 patients, pain severity scores were mild (24%), moderate (42%), severe (16%) and unknown (18%). Pain score documentation at triage improved from 72 to 94% during the audit (P = 0.01). There was no significant difference in the number of patients treated within 20 min for severe pain (P = 0.076) and within 60 min for moderate pain (P = 0.796) between audits. The likelihood of receiving analgesia within 20 min increased with the patients\\' pain category (relative risk: 1.8 95% confidence interval: 1.4-2.3). Documentation of pain assessment and the use of pain scores at triage improved after a brief educational intervention but there was no measurable impact on treatment times.

  9. [Headache in a pediatric emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, A; Mangini, S; Salvati, P; Celle, M E; Di Pietro, P

    2008-01-01

    Headache, a very frequent symptom in pediatrics, can severely affect the child and his family's life quality, representing an important reason of access to a Pediatric Emergency Department. From a clinical point of view, it is useful to subdivide headaches in primary and secondary ones. As far as the primary ones are concerned, the common migraine without aura is recognised as the most frequent in the child, while the most recurrent among the second ones are due to infective processes, and they represent 57% of the patients admitted to ED for headache with acute onset. We analyzed data collected from June 2000 to December 2006, at the Pediatric Emergency Department of Institute "G. Gaslini" Genoa, concerning the admissions of patients with headache, with particular attention to the necessity of coming up with a clinical and diagnostical path. During the study, there have been 228.255 admissions, 2.214 of which with a diagnosis of discharge from ED of headache (55% males, 45% females). After triage, 14,3% has been evaluated as white code, 74,3% as green one, 10,8% as yellow one and 0,6% as red code. Final outcome of these patients has been hospitalization for 38%, OBI for 8%, home or ambulatory control for 54%. The accesses to ED for headache are increasing. Better information of the family is needed, with coordination among territorial structures and clinic management in ED.

  10. Emergency Department Presentations following Tropical Cyclone Yasi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Peter; Franklin, Richard Charles; Lawlor, Jenine; Mitchell, Rob; Watt, Kerrianne; Furyk, Jeremy; Small, Niall; Lovegrove, Leone; Leggat, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Emergency departments see an increase in cases during cyclones. The aim of this study is to describe patient presentations to the Emergency Department (ED) of a tertiary level hospital (Townsville) following a tropical cyclone (Yasi). Specific areas of focus include changes in: patient demographics (age and gender), triage categories, and classification of diseases. Data were extracted from the Townsville Hospitals ED information system (EDIS) for three periods in 2009, 2010 and 2011 to coincide with formation of Cyclone Yasi (31 January 2011) to six days after Yasi crossed the coast line (8 February 2012). The analysis explored the changes in ICD10-AM 4-character classification and presented at the Chapter level. There was a marked increase in the number of patients attending the ED during Yasi, particularly those aged over 65 years with a maximum daily attendance of 372 patients on 4 Feb 2011. The most marked increases were in: Triage categories--4 and 5; and ICD categories--diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (L00-L99), and factors influencing health care status (Z00-Z99). The most common diagnostic presentation across all years was injury (S00-T98). There was an increase in presentations to the ED of TTH, which peaked in the first 24-48 hours following the cyclone and returned to normal over a five-day period. The changes in presentations were mostly an amplification of normal attendance patterns with some altered areas of activity. Injury patterns are similar to overseas experience.

  11. Improving handoffs in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Dickson S; Kelly, John J; Beach, Christopher; Berkeley, Ross P; Bitterman, Robert A; Broida, Robert I; Dalsey, William C; Farley, Heather L; Fuller, Drew C; Garvey, David J; Klauer, Kevin M; McCullough, Lynne B; Patterson, Emily S; Pham, Julius C; Phelan, Michael P; Pines, Jesse M; Schenkel, Stephen M; Tomolo, Anne; Turbiak, Thomas W; Vozenilek, John A; Wears, Robert L; White, Marjorie L

    2010-02-01

    Patient handoffs at shift change are a ubiquitous and potentially hazardous process in emergency care. As crowding and lengthy evaluations become the standard for an increasing proportion of emergency departments (EDs), the number of patients handed off will likely increase. It is critical now more than ever before to ensure that handoffs supply valid and useful shared understandings between providers at transitions of care. The purpose of this article is to provide the most up-to-date evidence and collective thinking about the process and safety of handoffs between physicians in the ED. It offers perspectives from other disciplines, provides a conceptual framework for handoffs, and categorizes models of existing practices. Legal and risk management issues are also addressed. A proposal for the development of handoff quality measures is outlined. Practical strategies are suggested to improve ED handoffs. Finally, a research agenda is proposed to provide a roadmap to future work that may increase knowledge in this area. Copyright (c) 2009 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Physician Assistants Contribution to Emergency Department Productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Brook, MD

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this report is to determine physician assistant (PA productivity in anacademic emergency department (ED and to determine whether shift length or department censusimpact productivity.Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted at a tertiary ED during June and July of 2007.Productivity was calculated as the mean number of patients seen each hour. Analysis of variance wasused to compare the productivity of different length shifts, and linear regression analysis was used toassess the relationship between productivity and department volume.Results: One hundred sixty PA shifts were included. Shifts ranged from 4 to 13 hours. Meanproductivity was 1.16 patients per hour (95% confidence interval [CI] ¼ 1.12–1.20. Physicianassistants generated a mean of 2.35 relative value units (RVU per hour (95% CI¼1.98–2.72. Therewas no difference in productivity on different shift lengths (P¼0.73. There was no correlation betweendepartmental census and productivity, with an R2 (statistical term for the coefficient of determination of0.01.Conclusion: In the ED, PAs saw 1.16 patients and generated 2.35 RVUs per hour. The length of theshift did not affect productivity. Productivity did not fluctuate significantly with changing departmentalvolume.

  13. Emergency department overcrowding – implications for paediatric emergency medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding has been an international phenomenon for more than 10 years. It is important to understand that ED overcrowding is a measure of health system efficiency and is not strictly related to ED volumes or capacity. ED overcrowding is defined as a situation in which the demand for emergency services exceeds the ability of physicians and nurses to provide quality care within a reasonable time. The major factor resulting in ED overcrowding is the presence of admitted patients in the ED for prolonged periods of time, not a high volume of low-acuity patients. While limited data are available for paediatric EDs, winter respiratory illnesses set the stage for ED overcrowding, which are epidemic in adult or general EDs. Prehospital-, ED- and hospital-related factors are described in the present article, and these may help prevent or manage this important patient safety problem. PMID:19030415

  14. Emergency department overcrowding - implications for paediatric emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Douglas

    2007-07-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding has been an international phenomenon for more than 10 years. It is important to understand that ED overcrowding is a measure of health system efficiency and is not strictly related to ED volumes or capacity. ED overcrowding is defined as a situation in which the demand for emergency services exceeds the ability of physicians and nurses to provide quality care within a reasonable time. The major factor resulting in ED overcrowding is the presence of admitted patients in the ED for prolonged periods of time, not a high volume of low-acuity patients. While limited data are available for paediatric EDs, winter respiratory illnesses set the stage for ED overcrowding, which are epidemic in adult or general EDs. Prehospital-, ED- and hospital-related factors are described in the present article, and these may help prevent or manage this important patient safety problem.

  15. External validation of the ROSC after cardiac arrest (RACA) score in a physician staffed emergency medical service system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupari, Petteri; Skrifvars, Markus; Kuisma, Markku

    2017-03-29

    The return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after cardiac arrest (RACA) score may have implications as a quality indicator for the emergency medical services (EMS) system. We aimed to validate this score externally in a physician staffed urban EMS system. We conducted a retrospective cohort study. Data on resuscitation attempts from the Helsinki EMS cardiac arrest registry from 1.1.2008 to 31.12.2010 were collected and analyzed. For each attempted resuscitation the RACA score variables were collected and the score calculated. The endpoint was ROSC defined as palpable pulse over 30 s. Calibration was assessed by comparing predicted and observed ROSC rates in the whole sample, separately for shockable and non-shockable rhythm, and separately for resuscitations lead by a specialist, registrar or medical supervisor (i.e., senior paramedic). Data are presented as medians and interquartile ranges. Statistical testing included chi-square test, the Mann-Whitney U test, Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit test and calculation of 95% confidence intervals (CI) for proportions. A total of 680 patients were included of whom 340 attained ROSC. The RACA score was higher in patients with ROSC (0.62 [0.46-0.69] than in those without (0.46 [0.36-0.57]) (p system for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients would allow patient heterogeneity adjustment and measurement of quality of care in analogy to commoly used severity-of-illness- scores developed for the similar purposes for the general intensive care unit population. However, transferring RACA score to another country with different population and EMS system might affect the performance and generalizability of the score. This study found a good overall calibration and moderate discrimination of the RACA score in a physician staffed urban EMS system which suggests external validity of the score. Calibration was suboptimal in patients with a non-shockable rhythm which may due to a local do-not-attempt-resuscitation policy. The lower

  16. Incidental Rickets in the Emergency Department Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John V. Zurlo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency rickets is a childhood osteomalacia, with impaired skeletal development and potentially skeletal deformities. The radiographic findings of rickets are many but include widening, fraying, and cupping of the metaphysis. Developmental delay and related complications of seizure and tetany have also been reported. This medical entity is often thought of as a classic medical disease of the past. However, it persists, and the recognition of rickets is on the rise. The reemergence of rickets correlates with the increase in the number of children exclusively breastfed and with the frequent use of sun block in the pediatric population. We present two cases of rickets, diagnosed through a visit to the Emergency Department made for unrelated symptoms. These two cases illustrate the importance of diagnosing rickets as an “incidental” finding. With early detection, dietary supplementation can be initiated potentially sparing the patient symptomatic disease.

  17. Etiology of Shock in the Emergency Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Jon Gitz; Jensen, Helene Kildegaard; Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard

    2018-01-01

    were included. Discharge diagnoses defined the etiology and were grouped as; distributive septic shock (SS), distributive non-septic shock (NS)), cardiogenic shock (CS), hypovolemic shock (HS), obstructive shock (OS) and other conditions (OC). Outcomes were etiology-based characteristics, annual IR per......INTRODUCTION: The knowledge of the etiology and associated mortality of undifferentiated shock in the emergency department (ED) is limited. We aimed to describe the etiology based proportions and incidence rates (IR) of shock, as well as the associated mortality in the ED. METHODS: Population......-based cohort study at an University Hospital ED in Denmark from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2011. Patients aged ≥18 years living in the ED-catchment area (N = 225,000) with a first time ED presentation with shock (n = 1,646) defined as hypotension (systolic blood pressure ≤100 mmHg)) and ≥1 organ failures...

  18. Therapy Dogs in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolas Nahm

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study examined acceptance by staff and patients of a therapy dog (TD in the emergency department (ED.Methods: Immediately after TD visits to a University Hospital ED, all available ED staff, patients, and their visitors were invited to complete a survey.Results: Of 125 ‘‘patient’’ and 105 staff responses, most were favorable. Ninety-three percent of patients and 95% of staff agreed that TDs should visit EDs; 87.8% of patients and 92% of staff approved of TDs for both adult and pediatric patients. Fewer than 5% of either patients or staff were afraid of the TDs. Fewer than 10% of patients and staff thought the TDs posed a sanitary risk or interfered with staff work.Conclusion: Both patients and staff approve of TDs in an ED. The benefits of animal-assisted therapy should be further explored in the ED setting.

  19. Emergency Department Presentations following Tropical Cyclone Yasi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Aitken

    Full Text Available Emergency departments see an increase in cases during cyclones. The aim of this study is to describe patient presentations to the Emergency Department (ED of a tertiary level hospital (Townsville following a tropical cyclone (Yasi. Specific areas of focus include changes in: patient demographics (age and gender, triage categories, and classification of diseases.Data were extracted from the Townsville Hospitals ED information system (EDIS for three periods in 2009, 2010 and 2011 to coincide with formation of Cyclone Yasi (31 January 2011 to six days after Yasi crossed the coast line (8 February 2012. The analysis explored the changes in ICD10-AM 4-character classification and presented at the Chapter level.There was a marked increase in the number of patients attending the ED during Yasi, particularly those aged over 65 years with a maximum daily attendance of 372 patients on 4 Feb 2011. The most marked increases were in: Triage categories--4 and 5; and ICD categories--diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (L00-L99, and factors influencing health care status (Z00-Z99. The most common diagnostic presentation across all years was injury (S00-T98.There was an increase in presentations to the ED of TTH, which peaked in the first 24-48 hours following the cyclone and returned to normal over a five-day period. The changes in presentations were mostly an amplification of normal attendance patterns with some altered areas of activity. Injury patterns are similar to overseas experience.

  20. A simulated emergency department for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Patricia; Brazil, Victoria; Raymond-Dufresne, Éliane; Nielson, Tracy

    2017-08-01

    During their training, medical students often undertake a rotation in an emergency department (ED), where they are exposed to a wide variety of patient presentations. Simulation can be an effective teaching strategy to help prepare learners for the realities of the clinical environment. Simulating an ED shift can provide students with the opportunity to perform a range of clinical activities, within their scope of practice, in a supervised and supportive learning environment. Medical students often undertake a rotation in an emergency department CONTEXT: There is limited literature describing the structure, syllabus, feasibility and perceived usefulness of simulating a typical ED for medical student training. We developed a simulated ED (simED) teaching session for medical students at our university. Students were informed of the purpose and learning tasks of the session prior to attendance. At the start of their 2-hour simED shift students were allocated 'patients' by the Triage nurse. At the completion of their shift, students attended a debriefing discussion. Student feedback indicated that they felt that the simED: provided a good opportunity to practise skills and apply theory to practice; was realistic and challenging; highlighted the importance of teamwork; and enabled them to identify skills requiring further practise. Suggestions for improvements included a longer time spent in the simED and the opportunity to see more patients. The simED approach seemed to be well received and perceived by medical students as useful preparation for the ED. An overview of the structure, materials and resources used is provided to assist educators seeking to implement similar ED clinical scenarios in their curriculum. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  1. Perceptions of Emergency Department Crowding in Pennsylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pines, Jesse M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The state of emergency department (ED crowding in Pennsylvania has not previously been reported.Methods: We assessed perceptions of ED crowding by surveying medical directors/chairs from Pennsylvania EDs in the spring of 2008.Results: A total of 106 completed the questionnaire (68% response rate. A total of 83% (86/104 agreed that ED crowding was a problem; 26% (27/105 reported that at least half of admitted patients boarded for more than 4 hours. Ninety-eight percent (102/104 agreed that patient satisfaction suffers during crowding and 79% (84/106 stated that quality suffers. Sixty-five percent (68/105 reported that crowding had worsened during the past 2 years. Several hospital interventions were used to alleviate crowding: expediting discharges, 81% (86/106; prioritizing ED patients for inpatient beds, 79% (84/ 106; and ambulance diversion, 55% (57/105. Almost all respondents who had improved ED operations reported that it had reduced crowding.Conclusion: ED crowding is a common problem in Pennsylvania and is worsening in the majority of hospitals, despite the implementation of a variety of interventions. [West J EmergMed. 2013;14(1:1–10.

  2. State Emergency Department Opioid Guidelines: Current Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broida, Robert I; Gronowski, Tanner; Kalnow, Andrew F; Little, Andrew G; Lloyd, Christopher M

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and categorize current state-sponsored opioid guidelines for the practice of emergency medicine (EM). We conducted a comprehensive search of EM-specific opioid prescribing guidelines and/or policies in each state to determine current state involvement in EM opioid prescribing, as well as to evaluate some of the specifics of each guideline or policy. The search was conducted using an online query and a follow-up email request to each state chapter of ACEP. We found that 17 states had emergency department-specific guidelines. We further organized the guidelines into four categories: limiting prescriptions for opioids with 67 total recommendations; preventing/diverting abuse with 56 total recommendations; addiction-related guidelines with 29 total recommendations; and a community resources section with 24 total recommendations. Our results showed that current state guidelines focus on providers limiting opioid pain prescriptions and vetting patients for possible abuse/diversion. This study highlights the 17 states that have addressed opioid prescribing guidelines and categorizes their efforts to date. It is hoped that this study will provide the basis for similar efforts in other states.

  3. Job satisfaction among emergency department staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, M; Asenjo, M; Sánchez, M

    2017-02-01

    To compare job satisfaction among nurses, physicians and administrative staff in an emergency department (ED). To analyse the relationship of job satisfaction with demographic and professional characteristics of these personnel. We performed a descriptive, cross-sectional study in an ED in Barcelona (Spain). Job satisfaction was evaluated by means of the Font-Roja questionnaire. Multivariate analysis determined relationship between the overall job satisfaction and the variables collected. Fifty-two nurses, 22 physicians and 30 administrative staff were included. Administrative staff were significantly more satisfied than physicians and nurses: 3.42±0.32 vs. 2.87±0.42 and 3.06±0.36, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed the following variables to be associated with job satisfaction: rotation among the different ED acuity levels (OR: 2.34; 95%CI: 0.93-5.89) and being an administrative staff (OR: 0.27; 95%CI: 0.09-0.80). Nurses and physicians reported greater stress and work pressure than administrative staff and described a worse physical working environment. Interpersonal relationships obtained the highest score among the three groups of professionals. Job satisfaction of nurses and physicians in an ED is lower than that of administrative staff with the former perceiving greater stress and work pressure. Conversely, interpersonal relationships are identified as strength. Being nurse or physician and not rotating among the different ED acuity levels increase dissatisfaction. Copyright © 2016 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Emergency department triage: independent nursing intervention?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corujo Fontes, Sergio José

    2014-03-01

    The branch hospital triage aimed at, as well as exercised by nurses, has evolved to meet their needs to organize and make visible the nurses' duties. However, it is still not properly considered as independent nursing intervention. Evidencing practice triage nurse in hospital as experienced by their protagonists disclosed the possible causes of this paradoxical competence. In a sample of 41 nurses, of the 52 possible with previous experience in hospital triage in the Emergency Department of the Hospital General Dr. José Molina Orosa in Lanzarote, the nurses themselves carried out an opinion survey that group together statements about different aspects of the triaje nurse. In its results, 65.8% of those polled thought the triaje nursing training to be deficient and even though nearly half 48.7%, was considered competent to decide the level of emergency, 46.3% disagreed to take this task part of their duty. It is conclusive that the training received in hospital triage, regulated and sustained, is deficient, that is the main reason why professionals have their doubts to take on an activity they are not familiar with. Triage systems do not record the entire outcome of the nursing work and nursing methodology does not seem to be quite indicative for this task.

  5. Nurses' perception of nursing workforce and its impact on the managerial outcomes in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi-Chun; Chen, Jih-Chang; Chiu, Hsiao-Ting; Shen, Hsi-Che; Chang, Wen-Yin

    2010-06-01

    (1) To understand nurses' subjective perceptions of the current nursing workforce in their emergency departments, (2) to examine the relationship between nurses' workforce perceptions and its impact on the managerial outcomes and (3) to analyse the correlation between nurses' characteristics and the scores on workforce perception. While the association between workforce perceptions and nurse outcomes is well-documented, few studies have examined how emergency department nurses perceive current workforce and related outcomes. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey. A self-reported workforce perception questionnaire was used to survey 538 registered nurses in the emergency departments of 19 hospitals in northern Taiwan, during May to October 2006. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, chi-square test, independent t-test, Pearson correlation and one-way anova. The mean score of workforce perception was 6.28 points (total = 10 points). Both overtime (p = 0.02) and number of callbacks on days off (p = 0.01) were significantly correlated to current nursing workforce and hospital level. Older nurses tended to have more emergency department experience (r = 0.37; p = 0.01) and those with more emergency department experience tended to have vacation accumulation (r = 0.09; p = 0.04), overtime (r = 0.10; p = 0.03) and better perception of their emergency department's current workforce (r = 0.09; p = 0.05). Although nurses' perceptions were found to be only moderate, overtime and number of callbacks on days off are potential problems that should be addressed by nursing leaders to benefit future emergency nurses. The findings can help drive strategies to ensure adequate staffing, to stabilise the nursing workforce and to prevent nurses from burnout factors such as working long hours, unpredictable schedules and a stressful work environment that may impact both the quality of emergency care and the quality of the nurses' work environment.

  6. The Adequacy of Nurse Staffing in the Emergency Department When Patient Acuity is a Consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    III IV C R D T C IET T EIP T Blood product administration N/A N/A N prn N prn * ************ Change IV bottle/bag/ volutrol N/A E prn E prn E prn... diabetic reaction; psychiatric (uncooperative); high fever with sponge bath; child abuse; fractured hip; rape; patients requiring OR preparation

  7. Forecasting emergency department visits using internet data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, Andreas; Kurland, Lisa; Farrokhnia, Nasim; Castrén, Maaret; Nordberg, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Using Internet data to forecast emergency department (ED) visits might enable a model that reflects behavioral trends and thereby be a valid tool for health care providers with which to allocate resources and prevent crowding. The aim of this study is to investigate whether Web site visits to a regional medical Web site, the Stockholm Health Care Guide, a proxy for the general public's concern of their health, could be used to predict the ED attendance for the coming day. In a retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study, a model for forecasting the daily number of ED visits was derived and validated. The model was derived through regression analysis, using visits to the Stockholm Health Care Guide Web site between 6 pm and midnight and day of the week as independent variables. Web site visits were measured with Google Analytics. The number of visits to the ED within the region was retrieved from the Stockholm County Council administrative database. All types of ED visits (including adult, pediatric, and gynecologic) were included. The period of August 13, 2011, to August 12, 2012, was used as a training set for the model. The hourly variation of visits was analyzed for both Web site and the ED visits to determine the interval of hours to be used for the prediction. The model was validated with mean absolute percentage error for August 13, 2012, to October 31, 2012. The correlation between the number of Web site visits between 6 pm and midnight and ED visits the coming day was significant (r=0.77; PInternet data to predict ED visits is promising. Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Financial Impact of Emergency Department Crowding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foley, Mathew

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The economic benefits of reducing emergency department (ED crowding are potentially substantial as they may decrease hospital length of stay. Hospital administrators and public officials may therefore be motivated to implement crowding protocols. We sought to identify a potential cost of ED crowding by evaluating the contribution of excess ED length of stay (LOS to overall hospital length of stay. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of administrative data of adult patients from two urban hospitals (one county and one university in Brooklyn, New York from 2006-2007. Data was provided by each facility. Extrapolating from prior research (Krochmal and Riley, 2005, we determined the increase in total hospital LOS due to extended ED lengths of stay, and applied cost and charge analyses for the two separate facilities. Results: We determined that 6,205 (5.0% admitted adult patients from the county facility and 3,017 (3.4% patients from the university facility were held in the ED greater than one day over a one-year period. From prior research, it has been estimated that each of these patient’s total hospital length of stay was increased on average by 11.7% (0.61 days at the county facility, and 0.71 days at the university facility. The increased charges over one year at the county facility due to the extended ED LOS was therefore approximately $9.8 million, while the increased costs at the university facility were approximately $3.9 million. Conclusion: Based on extrapolations from Krochmal and Riley applied to two New York urban hospitals, the county hospital could potentially save $9.8 million in charges and the university hospital $3.9 million in costs per year if they eliminate ED boarding of adult admitted patients by improving movement to the inpatient setting. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(2:192-197.

  9. Fall prevention strategy in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muray, Mwali; Bélanger, Charles H; Razmak, Jamil

    2018-02-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to document the need for implementing a fall prevention strategy in an emergency department (ED). The paper also spells out the research process that led to approving an assessment tool for use in hospital outpatient services. Design/methodology/approach The fall risk assessment tool was based on the Morse Fall Scale. Gender mix and age above 65 and 80 years were assessed on six risk assessment variables using χ 2 analyses. A logistic regression analysis and model were used to test predictor strength and relationships among variables. Findings In total, 5,371 (56.5 percent) geriatric outpatients were deemed to be at fall risk during the study. Women have a higher falls incidence in young and old age categories. Being on medications for patients above 80 years exposed both genders to equal fall risks. Regression analysis explained 73-98 percent of the variance in the six-variable tool. Originality/value Canadian quality and safe healthcare accreditation standards require that hospital staff develop and adhere to fall prevention policies. Anticipated physiological falls can be prevented by healthcare interventions, particularly with older people known to bear higher risk factors. An aging population is increasing healthcare volumes and medical challenges. Precautionary measures for patients with a vulnerable cognitive and physical status are essential for quality care.

  10. Emergency department attendance patterns during Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Taimur; Khan, Hameed Ullah; Ahmed, Israr; Eldali, Abdelmoneim

    2016-01-01

    Patient attendance in the emergency department (ED) is inherently variable and unpredictable. Resources might be better allocated if use of the ER could be predicted during the month of fasting (Ramadan), healthy adult Muslims do not eat or drink from dawn to sunset and in the Middle East, social activities occur mostly during night. There is no published data that has reported changes in local ED attendance pattern during Ramadan. Determine if there are differences in tertiary care ed attendance during Ramadan compared to other times of the year. Retrospective, using data from the hospital integrated clinical information system. Tertiary care institution in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All ED visits during the Islamic calendar years of 1431-1434 (December 18, 2009-October 13, 2013) were analyzed. Patient volume, acuity, demographics and admission rate variability between Ramadan and other months. During the study period of 4 years, of 226075 ED patients, 129178 (57.14%) patients were seen during the day shift (07:00 to 18:59). During Ramadan, 10 293 (60%) patients presented during the night shift compared with the day shift (P many ED patients were actually fasting during the study period. This study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital and the patient population presenting to our ed is predominantly Muslim; therefore, the results may not be generalized to populations that are not predominantly Muslim.

  11. Overcrowding in emergency department: an international issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Somma, Salvatore; Paladino, Lorenzo; Vaughan, Louella; Lalle, Irene; Magrini, Laura; Magnanti, Massimo

    2015-03-01

    Overcrowding in the emergency department (ED) has become an increasingly significant worldwide public health problem in the last decade. It is a consequence of simultaneous increasing demand for health care and a deficit in available hospital beds and ED beds, as for example it occurs in mass casualty incidents, but also in other conditions causing a shortage of hospital beds. In Italy in the last 12-15 years, there has been a huge increase in the activity of the ED, and several possible interventions, with specific organizational procedures, have been proposed. In 2004 in the United Kingdom, the rule that 98 % of ED patients should be seen and then admitted or discharged within 4 h of presentation to the ED ('4 h rule') was introduced, and it has been shown to be very effective in decreasing ED crowding, and has led to the development of further acute care clinical indicators. This manuscript represents a synopsis of the lectures on overcrowding problems in the ED of the Third Italian GREAT Network Congress, held in Rome, 15-19 October 2012, and hopefully, they may provide valuable contributions in the understanding of ED crowding solutions.

  12. Hurricane Andrew and a pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, B; Baker, R; Pratt, J

    1994-04-01

    To determine the effect of Hurricane Andrew on a pediatric emergency department. A retrospective analysis of ED visits through the use of computerized records and chart review. A children's hospital in South Florida. All patients presenting to the ED during the control week and the two study weeks after the hurricane. Census, diagnoses, admission rate, and patient geographic origin and age. During week 1, there was an average daily increase of 40.7% in patient volume (P < .01) and a 3.3% decrease in the admission rate (P < .01). The increased census was due mainly to local patients, rather than those from the most devastated areas. More patients were seen with open wounds, gastroenteritis, and impetigo (all, P < .05); more were more than 18 years old (P < .05). By the second week, both census and admission rate returned to normal; cases of cellulitis (P < .05) and open wounds (P < .001) were increased. Although not statistically significant, a higher percentage of hydrocarbon and/or bleach ingestions was seen for both weeks. Following a hurricane, personnel in a pediatric ED can expect to see an increased census, with more diagnoses of open wounds, gastroenteritis, and skin infections. They may also see hydrocarbon and bleach ingestions. Alerting parents to the potential for injury and accidental poisoning in their children after a hurricane may help prevent the reported morbidity.

  13. Referral patterns in elderly emergency department visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Buja

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess elderly individuals' demand for emergency department (ED care, in terms of the characteristics, processes, outcomes, costs by referral pattern. DATA SOURCE: All ED visits involving patients aged 65 and older, extracted from the 2010 dataset of an Local Health Agency, in North-Eastern Italy (no. = 18 648. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Patients were referred by primary care professionals (PCPs in 43.1% of cases, 1.4% came from nursing homes (NH, and 55.5% were self-referred (SR. The SR group had a higher adjusted odds ratio (aOR for non-urgent conditions (1.98 CI 1.85-2.12, but a lower aOR for conditions amenable to ambulatory care (0.53 CI 0.48-0.59, and a lower consumption of resources. The SR group tend to occur more frequently out of hours, and to coincide with a shorter stay at the ED, lower observation unit activation rates, lower hospitalization rates and a lower consumption of services than other two groups. The average costs for all procedures were lower for the SR patients (mean = 106.04 € ± SD 84.90 € than for those referred by PCPs (mean = 138.14 € ± SD 101.17 € or NH (mean = 143.48 € ± SD 95.28 €. CONCLUSION: Elderly patients coming in ED have different characteristics, outcomes and recourses consume by referral pattern.

  14. Approach to dizziness in the emergency department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ileok; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Acute dizziness/vertigo is among the most common causes for visiting the emergency department. The traditional approach to dizziness starts with categorizing dizziness into four types: vertigo, presyncope, disequilibrium, and nonspecific dizziness. However, a recently proposed approach begins with classifying dizziness/vertigo as acute prolonged spontaneous dizziness/vertigo, recurrent spontaneous dizziness/vertigo, recurrent positional vertigo, or chronic persistent dizziness and imbalance. Vestibular neuritis and stroke are key disorders causing acute prolonged spontaneous dizziness/vertigo, but the diagnosis of isolated vascular vertigo has increased by virtue of developments in clinical neurotology and neuroimaging. However, a well-organized bedside examination appears more sensitive than brain imaging in diagnosing strokes presenting with acute dizziness/vertigo. A detailed history is vital to diagnose recurrent spontaneous dizziness/vertigo since confirmatory diagnostic tests are usually unavailable. Isolated positional vertigo is usually caused by benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, which can be treated at the bedside. In recent years, marked progress has occurred in the evaluation/management of acute dizziness/vertigo. However, even with developments in imaging technology, the diagnosis of acute dizziness/vertigo largely relies on bedside examination. PMID:27752577

  15. Paediatric analgesia in an Emergency Department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hawkes, C

    2012-02-03

    Timely management of pain in paediatric patients in the Emergency Department (ED) is a well-accepted performance indicator. We describe an audit of the provision of analgesia for children in an Irish ED and the introduction of a nurse-initiated analgesia protocol in an effort to improve performance. 95 children aged 1-16 presenting consecutively to the ED were included and time from triage to analgesia, and the rate of analgesia provision, were recorded. The results were circulated and a nurse initiated analgesia protocol was introduced. An audit including 145 patients followed this. 55.6% of patients with major fractures received analgesia after a median time of 54 minutes, which improved to 61.1% (p = 0.735) after 7 minutes (p = 0.004). Pain score documentation was very poor throughout, improving only slightly from 0% to 19.3%. No child had a documented pain score, which slightly improved to 19.3%. We recommend other Irish EDs to audit their provision of analgesia for children.

  16. Verbal and physical violence in emergency departments: a survey of nurses in Istanbul, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinar, Rukiye; Ucmak, Firdevs

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the perceived verbal and physical violence and related factors experienced by nurses in emergency settings. Studies on violence in emergency departments indicate an increasing frequency of these incidents. However, little is known about the violence experienced by the Turkish nurses working in emergency departments. Survey. The study population included 255 nurses. Data were collected using a questionnaire. Verbal violence was reported with a frequency of 91.4%. Of the nurses, 74.9% had been exposed to physical violence in at least several episodes during the previous 12 months. Patients' relatives were the main perpetrators, followed by patients, most of whom were male. After experiencing violence, most of the nurses reported that, they had felt fear and only 3% described that they took sick leave, while 80% did not report the incidences of violence they experienced. The nurses described that, after a violent incident, they sought support mainly from their colleagues in emergency departments rather than from the administration. Over half of the nurses (65%) felt safe 'none of the time' in emergency departments, and 89.8% of them described that patients and patient relatives may potentially exhibit violent behaviours towards the staff when they are first admitted to emergency department, while 73.7% believed that the staffing pattern and physical environment of their emergency departments were not adequate to prevent violence. Most of the nurses (83.5%) stated that they should be provided with the training that will help them prevent and manage violence as part of their in-service education, whereas 82.7% of them had not received any such training. The findings have implications for occupational health and safety from both employer and employee perspective. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Postpartum preeclampsia: emergency department presentation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, Lynne M; Withers, Elizabeth; Bakes, Katherine; Abbott, Jean

    2011-04-01

    Postpartum preeclampsia/eclampsia is the presence of hypertension and proteinuria, with or without seizures, occurring up to 4 weeks after delivery. We describe the Emergency Department (ED) presentation, signs and symptoms, results of diagnostic studies, management, and outcome in a cohort of patients diagnosed with postpartum preeclampsia/eclampsia at our institutions, and use this to review the diagnosis and management of postpartum preeclampsia/eclampsia. A retrospective chart review was conducted at two urban teaching hospitals. Twenty-two cases were identified via ICD-9 (International Classification of Diseases, 9(th) revision) codes of discharge diagnoses over an 8-year period. Only those patients who initially presented to an ED in the postpartum period after hospital discharge were included. A standardized data tool was used to extract demographic data, signs and symptoms of preeclampsia/eclampsia, ancillary studies previously associated with eclamptic pathology, and outcome during admission. Of the 22 women, over half (55%) had not been diagnosed with preeclampsia in the ante- or peripartum period. Common prodromal symptoms and signs in the postpartum presentation included headache, visual changes, hypertension, edema, proteinuria, elevated uric acid, and elevated liver function tests. All 4 patients who seized had prodromal symptoms. Women presented from 3 to 10 days postpartum (median: 5 days). Only 10 women were primiparas. Nineteen women presented with diastolic blood pressures > 90 mm, and only 3 of these had diastolic blood pressures of 110 mm Hg or greater. Postpartum preeclampsia/eclampsia often presents to the ED without a history of preeclampsia during the pregnancy. Further, not all women with this diagnosis who present to the ED in the postpartum period will have each of the "classic" features of this disease, including elevated blood pressure, edema, proteinuria, and hyperreflexia. This report is intended to inform emergency physicians of the

  18. Measuring social contacts in the emergency department.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas W Lowery-North

    Full Text Available Infectious individuals in an emergency department (ED bring substantial risks of cross infection. Data about the complex social and spatial structure of interpersonal contacts in the ED will aid construction of biologically plausible transmission risk models that can guide cross infection control.We sought to determine the number and duration of contacts among patients and staff in a large, busy ED. This prospective study was conducted between 1 July 2009 and 30 June 2010. Two 12-hour shifts per week were randomly selected for study. The study was conducted in the ED of an urban hospital. There were 81 shifts in the planned random sample of 104 (78% with usable contact data, during which there were 9183 patient encounters. Of these, 6062 (66% were approached to participate, of which 4732 (78% agreed. Over the course of the year, 88 staff members participated (84%. A radiofrequency identification (RFID system was installed and the ED divided into 89 distinct zones structured so copresence of two individuals in any zone implied a very high probability of contact <1 meter apart in space. During study observation periods, patients and staff were given RFID tags to wear. Contact events were recorded. These were further broken down with respect to the nature of the contacts, i.e., patient with patient, patient with staff, and staff with staff. 293,171 contact events were recorded, with a median of 22 contact events and 9 contacts with distinct individuals per participant per shift. Staff-staff interactions were more numerous and longer than patient-patient or patient-staff interactions.We used RFID to quantify contacts between patients and staff in a busy ED. These results are useful for studies of the spread of infections. By understanding contact patterns most important in potential transmission, more effective prevention strategies may be implemented.

  19. Use of Emergency Ultrasound in Arizona Community Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Richard; Wyman, Michael T; Hernandez, Nicholas C; Guisto, John A; Adhikari, Srikar

    2017-05-01

    Despite the increased educational exposure to point-of-care ultrasound (US) at all levels of medical training, there are utilization gaps between academic and nonacademic emergency department (ED) settings. The purpose of this study was to assess the current practices and potential barriers to the use of point-of-care US in nonacademic EDs throughout the state of Arizona. We conducted a cross-sectional study. An online questionnaire was electronically sent to all nonacademic EDs in Arizona. The survey consisted of questions regarding demographics, current practice patterns, policies, interdepartmental agreements, and perceptions regarding the use of point-of-care US. Seventy nonacademic EDs were identified for inclusion in our study, and 58 EDs completed the survey, which represented an 83% response rate. Seventy-eight percent (95% confidence interval [CI], 67%-89%) perform or interpret point-of-care US examinations for patient care. The 3 most common applications of point-of-care US reported by respondents were focused assessment with sonography for trauma, cardiac US examinations, and line placement, and 36% (95% CI, 22%-50%) bill for point-of-care US examinations. At 75% (95% CI, 62%-88%) of EDs, no one is specifically responsible for reviewing point-of-care US examinations for quality assurance, and at 50% (95% CI, 35%-65%), no mechanism exists to archive images. Eighty-three percent (95% CI, 72%-94%) of EDs think that their groups will benefit from the American College of Emergency Physicians Clinical Ultrasound Accreditation Program. Ultrasound equipment is available in nearly all nonacademic EDs in Arizona. However, it appears that most providers lack US training, credentialing, quality assurance, and reimbursement mechanisms. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  20. The Profile of Neurology Patients Evaluated in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Ufuk Emre; Ayşe Semra Demir; Esra Acıman; Nejla Çabuk; Sibel Kıran; Aysun Ünal

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Early, rapid, and multidisciplinary approaches are very important in the diagnosis of neurological disorders in emergency departments. The present study aimed to investigate the features of patients that presented for neurology consultation in the emergency department. METHODS: The present study included 780 patients. Patient demographic features, reasons for emergent treatment and neurological consultation, neurological diagnosis by the neurologist, and laboratory (total blood...

  1. Physician assistants in Australasian emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Benjamin; Zolcinski, Robert

    2016-08-01

    A physician assistant (PA) is a university qualified health professional who's primary role is to provide medical care under the direction and supervision of medical staff. This is a new profession in Australasia. The PA is well suited to working in both rural, regional and urban settings that deliver emergency medical care. A perspective is presented on their role and scope of practice within the Australasian emergency care system supported by some early findings from their use in a tertiary ED. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  2. Financial impact of emergency department ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soremekun, Olanrewaju A; Noble, Vicki E; Liteplo, Andrew S; Brown, David F M; Zane, Richard D

    2009-07-01

    There is limited information on the financial implications of an emergency department ultrasound (ED US) program. The authors sought to perform a fiscal analysis of an integrated ED US program. A retrospective review of billing data was performed for fiscal year (FY) 2007 for an urban academic ED with an ED US program. The ED had an annual census of 80,000 visits and 1,101 ED trauma activations. The ED is a core teaching site for a 4-year emergency medicine (EM) residency, has 35 faculty members, and has 24-hour availability of all radiology services including formal US. ED US is utilized as part of evaluation of all trauma activations and for ED procedures. As actual billing charges and reimbursement rates are institution-specific and proprietary information, relative value units (RVUs) and reimbursement based on the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) 2007 fee schedule (adjusted for fixed diagnosis-related group [DRG] payments and bad debt) was used to determine revenue generated from ED US. To estimate potential volume, assumptions were made on improvement in documentation rate for diagnostic scans (current documentation rates based on billed volume versus diagnostic studies in diagnostic image database), with no improvements assumed for procedural ED US. Expenses consist of three components-capital costs, training costs, and ongoing operational costs-and were determined by institutional experience. Training costs were considered sunken expenses by this institution and were thus not included in the original return on investment (ROI) calculation, although for this article a second ROI calculation was done with training cost estimates included. For the purposes of analysis, certain key assumptions were made. We utilized a collection rate of 45% and hospitalization rates (used to adjust for fixed DRG payments) of 33% for all diagnostic scans, 100% for vascular access, and 10% for needle placement. An optimal documentation rate of 95% was used to

  3. Dedication increases productivity: an analysis of the implementation of a dedicated medical team in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Pedro; Paiva, José Artur

    2017-12-01

    In several European countries, emergency departments (EDs) now employ a dedicated team of full-time emergency medicine (EM) physicians, with a distinct leadership and bed-side emergency training, in all similar to other hospital departments. In Portugal, however, there are still two very different models for staffing EDs: a classic model, where EDs are mostly staffed with young inexperienced physicians from different medical departments who take turns in the ED in 12-h shifts and a dedicated model, recently implemented in some hospitals, where the ED is staffed by a team of doctors with specific medical competencies in emergency medicine that work full-time in the ED. Our study assesses the effect of an intervention in a large academic hospital ED in Portugal in 2002, and it is the first to test the hypothesis that implementing a dedicated team of doctors with EM expertise increases the productivity and reduces costs in the ED, maintaining the quality of care provided to patients. A pre-post design was used for comparing the change on the organisational model of delivering care in our medical ED. All emergency medical admissions were tracked in 2002 (classic model with 12-h shift in the ED) and 2005/2006 (dedicated team with full-time EM physicians), and productivity, costs with medical human resources and quality of care measures were compared. We found that medical productivity (number of patients treated per hour of medical work) increased dramatically after the creation of the dedicated team (X 2 KW = 31.135; N = 36; p work reduced both in regular hours and overtime. Moreover, hospitalisation rates decreased and the length of stay in the ED increased significantly after the creation of the dedicated team. Implementing a dedicated team of doctors increased the medical productivity and reduced costs in our ED. Our findings have straightforward implication for Portuguese policymakers aiming at reducing hospital costs while coping with increased ED demand.

  4. Management of information within emergencies departments in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: the management of health information is a key pillar in both emergencies reception and handling facilities, given the strategic position and the potential of these facilities within hospitals, and in the monitoring of public health and epidemiology. With the technological revolution, computerization made the ...

  5. Patients in prehospital transport to the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Camilla Louise Nørgaard; Brabrand, Mikkel; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2018-01-01

    in the prehospital setting and 7-day mortality. RESULTS: A total of 32 076 ambulance transfers were recorded. Of these, 20 328 were first-time transfers, including 2692 that received assistance from a physician-staffed mobile emergency care unit (MECU). The 7-day mortality was 5.3% [95% confidence interval (CI): 5...... the strongest association (OR: 17, 95% CI: 14.7-19.7). MECU assistance showed an adjusted OR of 5.3 (95% CI: 4.6-6.1). CONCLUSION: The overall 7-day mortality was 5.3%, but differed in the two subgroups, with 15.4% in the MECU-assisted ambulance transfers and 3.8% in non-MECU-assisted transfers. Older age...

  6. Emergency Department Utilization in the Texas Medicaid...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — There were 44,246 individuals enrolled in TexKat in 2005. Roughly 13 percent of these enrollees had at least one ED visit during the sample period, with one quarter...

  7. FAST scanning in the developing world emergency department ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FAST scanning in the developing world emergency department. ZA Smith, N Postma, D Wood. Abstract. Objectives. To assess the utility of an existing ultrasound machine for the purposes of focused assessment sonography in trauma (FAST) scanning in a developing world emergency department (ED). Design. Prospective ...

  8. Wait Time for Treatment in Hospital Emergency Departments: 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Care Survey: 2003 emergency department summary. Advance data from vital and health statistics; no 358. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2005. Burt CW, McCaig LF, Valverde RH. Analysis of ambulance diversions in U.S. emergency departments. Ann ...

  9. Clinical features of emergency department patients with depression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    serious consequences in the daily and social life of affected individuals. ... Medicine, Incheon St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, 2Department of Emergency Medicine, St. Vincent's Hospital,. College of Medicine, 3Department of Emergency Medicine, Seoul St. Mary`s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic.

  10. Knowledge of autonomic dysreflexia in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Caroline R; Acland, Rick

    2011-10-01

    To determine the level of knowledge that medical staff in the emergency department and spinal unit have of autonomic dysreflexia, its causes, symptoms, treatment and complications; and to educate the participating staff about autonomic dysreflexia. The study design was a prospective questionnaire, which was completed by 91 staff in the spinal unit and emergency department in Christchurch, who then undertook a teaching session on autonomic dysreflexia. 29 of 70 staff in emergency department could not answer any questions. The average mark out of 29 was 2 for the emergency department and 12 for the spinal unit. Only 16 staff in the emergency department had had teaching on autonomic dysreflexia previously. Due to the potentially serious complications of autonomic dysreflexia, staff require teaching on autonomic dysreflexia accompanied by permanent reminders in the form of posters.

  11. Opportunities to preserve forensic evidence in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Matthew

    2016-11-10

    Victims of violence often seek assistance from emergency departments, so emergency nurses are ideally placed to identify them, and other 'forensic' patients, and protect the evidence that could support any ensuing legal process. Emergency nurses who are trained to identify, collect and preserve forensic evidence can support the identification, elimination and prosecution of suspects. This article gives an overview of forensic evidence, and explains how emergency nurses can preserve and collect samples effectively.

  12. Comparison of the International Crowding Measure in Emergency Departments (ICMED) and the National Emergency Department Overcrowding Score (NEDOCS) to measure emergency department crowding: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Adrian; Abel, Gary; Raut, Pramin; Austin, Richard; Dhakshinamoorthy, Vijayasankar; Ayyamuthu, Ravi; Murdoch, Iona; Burton, Joel

    2016-05-01

    There is uncertainty about the best way to measure emergency department crowding. We have previously developed a consensus-based measure of crowding, the International Crowding Measure in Emergency Departments (ICMED). We aimed to obtain pilot data to evaluate the ability of a shortened form of the ICMED, the sICMED, to predict senior emergency department clinicians' concerns about crowding and danger compared with a very well-studied measure of emergency department crowding, the National Emergency Department Overcrowding Score (NEDOCS). We collected real-time observations of the sICMED and NEDOCS and compared these with clinicians' perceptions of crowding and danger on a visual analogue scale. Data were collected in four emergency departments in the East of England. Associations were explored using simple regression, random intercept models and models accounting for correlation between adjacent time points. We conducted 82 h of observation in 10 observation sets. Naive modelling suggested strong associations between sICMED and NEDOCS and clinician perceptions of crowding and danger. Further modelling showed that, due to clustering, the association between sICMED and danger persisted, but the association between these two measures and perception of crowding was no longer statistically significant. Both sICMED and NEDOCS can be collected easily in a variety of English hospitals. Further studies are required but initial results suggest both scores may have potential use for assessing crowding variation at long timescales, but are less sensitive to hour-by-hour variation. Correlation in time is an important methodological consideration which, if ignored, may lead to erroneous conclusions. Future studies should account for such correlation in both design and analysis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. MANAGEMENT OF EXTRIMITY FRACTURE IN EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Sukma Parahita

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Fracture injuries in the extremities are accounted for 40% of the incidence of fractures in the United States and causes high morbidity (physical suffering, lost time, and mental stress. High-energy fractures of the lower limbs can also cause life threatening condition like major vascular injury, crush syndrome, and compartment syndrome. Initial treatment in the emergency room is essential to save lives and to save the fractured extremities. Primary survey (securing the airway, breathing and circulation and the secondary survey will be able to quickly and accurately identify dangerous early complication of fractures, such as major arterial injury, crush syndrome and compartment syndrome. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  14. Strategies for reducing medication errors in the emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    Weant KA; Bailey AM; Baker SN

    2014-01-01

    Kyle A Weant,1 Abby M Bailey,2 Stephanie N Baker2 1North Carolina Public Health Preparedness and Response, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Raleigh, NC, 2University of Kentucky HealthCare, Department of Pharmacy Services, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy, Lexington, KY, USA Abstract: Medication errors are an all-too-common occurrence in emergency departments across the nation. This is largely secondary to a multitu...

  15. Emergency Department care of childhood epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béquignon, E; Teissier, N; Gauthier, A; Brugel, L; De Kermadec, H; Coste, A; Prulière-Escabasse, V

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this review is to determine an efficient and safe primary strategy care for paediatric epistaxis. We searched PubMed and Cochrane databases for studies referenced with key words 'epistaxis AND childhood'. This search yielded 32 research articles about primary care in childhood epistaxis (from 1989 to 2015). Bibliographic references found in these articles were also examined to identify pertinent literature. We compared our results to the specific management of adult epistaxis classically described in the literature. Epistaxis is one of the most common reasons for referral of children to a hospital ENT outpatient department. The bleeding usually originates from the anterior septum, as opposed to adults. Crusting, digital trauma, foreign bodies and nasal colonisation with Staphylococcus aureus have been suggested as specific nosebleed factors in children. Rare aetiologies as juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma appear later during adolescence. There are different modes of management of mild epistaxis, which begin with clearing out blood clots and bidigital compression. An intranasal topical local anaesthetic and decongestant can be used over 6 years of age. In case of active bleeding , chemical cauterisation is preferred to anterior packing and electric cauterisation but is only feasible if the bleeding site is clearly visible. In case of non-active bleeding in children, and in those with recurrent idiopathic epistaxis, antiseptic cream is easy to apply and can avoid 'acrobatic' cauterisation liable to cause further nasal cavity trauma. Aetiologies and treatment vary with patient age and the existence or not of active bleeding at the time of the examination. Local treatments are usually easy to perform, but physicians have to ponder their indications depending on the possible complications in order to inform parents and to know paediatric epistaxis specificities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  16. Emergency department admissions are more profitable than non-emergency department admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Philip L; Lemanski, Michael; Smithline, Howard A; Tomaszewski, Andrew; Mayforth, Janice A

    2009-02-01

    We compare the contribution margin per case per hospital day of emergency department (ED) admissions with non-ED admissions in a single hospital, a 600-bed, academic, tertiary referral, Level I trauma center with an annual ED census of 100,000. This was a retrospective comparison of the contribution margin per case per day for ED and non-ED inpatient admissions for fiscal years 2003, 2004, and 2005 (October 1 through September 30). Contribution margin is defined as net revenue minus total direct costs; it is then expressed per case per hospital day. Service lines are a set of linked patient care services. Observation admissions and outpatient services are not included. Resident expenses (eg, salary and benefits) and revenue (ie, Medicare payment of indirect medical expenses and direct medical expenses) are not included. Overhead expenses are not included (eg, building maintenance, utilities, information services support, administrative services). For fiscal year 2003 through fiscal year 2005, there were 51,213 ED and 57,004 non-ED inpatient admissions. Median contribution margin per day for ED admissions was higher than for non-ED admissions: ED admissions $769 (interquartile range $265 to $1,493) and non-ED admissions $595 (interquartile range $178 to $1,274). Median contribution margin per day varied by site of admissions, by diagnosis-related group, by service line, and by insurance type. In summary, ED admissions in our institution generate a higher contribution margin per day than non-ED admissions.

  17. Survey of illegal immigrants seen in an emergency department.

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, T C; Krishel, S J; Bramwell, K J; Clark, R F

    1996-01-01

    There is growing controversy regarding illegal immigrants and their use of social services, including health care, in this country. We surveyed undocumented persons presenting at our emergency department to investigate the reasons why they sought care in the United States. Overall, 227 visits (8.6%) were made in the emergency department by illegal immigrants, mostly Hispanics. Of 104 patients surveyed, all sought care in this country because they were here at the time, and 86 (83%) intended t...

  18. Survey of directors of emergency departments in California on overcrowding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, John R; Navarro, Misty L; Derlet, Robert W

    2000-01-01

    Objective To survey the directors of emergency departments in California on their opinions of the extent and factors associated with overcrowding in emergency departments. Methods Surveys were mailed to a random sample of emergency department directors. Questions included estimated magnitude, frequency, causes, and effects of overcrowding. Results Of 160 directors surveyed, 113 (71%) responded, and 109 (96%) reported overcrowding as a problem. All (n = 21) university or county hospital directors and most (n = 88 [96%]) private or community hospital directors reported overcrowding. The 4 private or community hospital directors reporting no overcrowding serve smaller communities with populations less than 250,000. Thirty-two directors (28%) reported daily overcrowding. The most cited causes were increasing patient acuity and volume, hospital bed shortage, laboratory delays, and nursing shortage. These putative causes were similar between university or county and private or community hospital directors, except for consultant delays, which were more prevalent in university or county hospital emergency departments. Conclusions Overcrowding is perceived to be a serious problem by emergency department directors. Many factors may contribute to overcrowding, and most are beyond the control of emergency departments. PMID:10854386

  19. The use of 'brutacaine' in Danish emergency departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Michele L.; Hallas, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to investigate whether there was an unmet need for paediatric procedural pain management and/or sedation in Danish emergency departments (EDs). Cross-sectional survey of the 21 emergency hospitals in Denmark. Physical restraint during painful procedures was used by 80% (n=12...

  20. Implementation of Electronic Whiteboards at Two Emergency Departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus; Fleron, Benedicte Frederikke Rex; Hertzum, Morten

    2010-01-01

    We report from a case study of the implementation of an electronic whiteboard system at two emergency departments at Danish hospitals. The purpose of such whiteboards is to support the clinicians in maintaining an overview of the patients at the department. The electronic whiteboard system...

  1. Overcrowding and possible solutions for a busy paediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Muhammad Irfan; Khan, Khalid Mehmood

    2017-09-01

    To quantify the extent of emergency department overcrowding in a tertiary care hospital and to identify possible solutions. This retrospective study was conducted at the National Institute of Child Health, Karachi, and comprised data of all patients presenting to the emergency department from November 2014 to January 2015. Data was collected through the health management information system which generates daily report of patients. Patients who stayed at the emergency department for 4 or more hours were included. Of the 6,505 patients, 2,757(42.38%) were discharged straightaway while 2,555(39.27%) were admitted to different wards and subspecialties. Besides, 934(14.35%) patients left the department against medical advice, 147(2.25%) expired, 89(1.36%) were referred to other hospitals, 20(0.30%) were dead on arrival and 3(0.04%) left without being seen by a physician. Of those who were admitted, 1,049(41%) patients stayed for more than 10 hours before getting the main hospital bed. Mostly, the delays observed were due to delay in getting lab reports, already preoccupied ventilators and incubators in paediatric and neonatal intensive care units, not using checklist for proper re-assessment of patients and early discharge, overburdened by patients coming in just for nebulisation and intravenous or intramuscular medications, the admitting residents detain the unstable patient longer in emergency department before admission to wards. The emergency department of the hospital faced significant overcrowding which overwhelmed efficient standard care.

  2. Fractures in the Pediatric Emergency Department: Are We Considering Abuse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Lindsay R; Penrod, Cody H; Estrada, Cristina M; Arnold, Donald H; Saville, Benjamin R; Xu, Meng; Lowen, Deborah E

    2018-02-01

    Approximately one fourths of infant fractures are due to abuse. Recognition of abuse is important to avoid further morbidity/mortality. There is limited knowledge regarding how frequently pediatric emergency department clinicians consider abuse in infants with fractures. Our primary objective was to estimate the percentage of infants with fractures for whom abuse was considered, and to examine characteristics associated with abuse consideration. We performed a retrospective review of infants <1 year of age presenting to a pediatric emergency department. Our primary outcome variable was consideration of abuse. Our secondary outcome measures were identification of predictor variables associated with consideration of abuse. We identified 509 infants meeting study criteria. Pediatric emergency physicians considered abuse in approximately two thirds of infants with fractures. Consideration was more likely to occur in younger infants, in the presence of no history or unwitnessed injury mechanism, when evaluated by male physicians, and emergency department encounters from 12 am to 6 am.

  3. Managing patients with oncologic complications in the emergency department [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, David; McCurdy, Michael T; Nusbaum, Jeffrey; Gupta, Nachi

    2018-01-22

    As the prevalence of cancer continues to increase in the general population and improvements in cancer treatment prolong survival, the incidence of patients presenting to the emergency department with oncologic complications will, similarly, continue to rise. This issue reviews 3 of the more common presentations of oncology patients to the emergency department: metastatic spinal cord compression, tumor lysis syndrome, and febrile neutropenia. Signs and symptoms of these conditions can be varied and nonspecific, and may be related to the malignancy itself or to an adverse effect of the cancer treatment. Timely evidence-based decisions in the emergency department regarding diagnostic testing, medications, and arrangement of disposition and oncology follow-up can significantly improve a cancer patient's quality of life. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice.].

  4. [Position paper for a reform of medical emergency care in German emergency departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riessen, R; Gries, A; Seekamp, A; Dodt, C; Kumle, B; Busch, H-J

    2015-06-01

    The hospital emergency departments play a central role for the in- and outpatient care of patients with medical emergencies in Germany. In this position paper we point out some general financial and organizational problems of German emergency departments and urge for a higher significance of emergency care in the German health system as an element of public services. The corresponding reform proposals include a change in hospital financing towards a more budget-based system for the emergency departments, an improved structural planning for regional and transregional emergency care, an intensified cooperation with the emergency services of the ambulatory care physicians, a better organizational representation of emergency care within the hospitals and an advancement of emergency medicine in postgraduate medical education.

  5. Effects of fast-track in a university emergency department through the National Emergency Department Overcrowding Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksel, Gokhan; Bildik, Fikret; Demircan, Ahmet; Keles, Ayfer; Kilicaslan, Isa; Guler, Sertac; Corbacioglu, Seref Kerem; Turkay, Asli; Bekgoz, Burak; Dogan, Nurettin Ozgur

    2014-07-01

    To determine the impact of a fast track area on emergency department crowding and its efficacy for non-urgent patients. The prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in an adult emergency department of a university-affiliated hospital in Turkey from September 17 to 30, 2010. Non-urgent patients were defined as those with Canadian Triage Acuity Scale category 4/5. The fast track area was open in the emergency department for one whole week, followed by another week in which fast track area was closed. Demographic information of patients, their complaints on admission, waiting times, length of stay and revisits were recorded. Overcrowding evaluation was performed via the National Emergency Department Overcrowding Study scale. In both weeks, the results of the patients were compared and the effects of fast track on the results were analysed. Continuous variables were compared via student's t test or Mann Whitney U test. Demographic features of the groups were evaluated by chi-square test. A total of 249 patients were seen during the fast track week, and 239 during the non-fast track week at the emergency department. Satisfaction level was higher in the fast track group than the non-fast track group (p overcrowding in the emergency department was lessened. It also improved effectiveness and quality measures.

  6. Potential benefit of physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service for regional trauma care system activation: An observational study in rural Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Tomohiro; Nagano, Takehiko; Ochiai, Hidenobu

    2017-05-01

    Objective: Involvement of all regional medical facilities in a trauma system is challenging in rural regions. We hypothesized that the physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service potentially encouraged local facilities to participate in trauma systems by providing the transport of patients with trauma to those facilities in a rural setting. Materials and Methods: We performed two retrospective observational studies. First, yearly changes in the numbers of patients with trauma and destination facilities were surveyed using records from the Miyazaki physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service from April 2012 to March 2014. Second, we obtained data from medical records regarding the mechanism of injury, severity of injury, resuscitative interventions performed within 24 h after admission, secondary transports owing to undertriage by attending physicians, and deaths resulting from potentially preventable causes. Data from patients transported to the designated trauma center and those transported to non-designated trauma centers in Miyazaki were compared. Results: In total, 524 patients were included. The number of patients transported to non-designated trauma centers and the number of non-designated trauma centers receiving patients increased after the second year. We surveyed 469 patient medical records (90%). There were 194 patients with major injuries (41%) and 104 patients with multiple injuries (22%), and 185 patients (39%) received resuscitative interventions. The designated trauma centers received many more patients with trauma (366 vs. 103), including many more patients with major injuries (47% vs. 21%, p service potentially encouraged non-designated trauma centers to participate in trauma systems while maintaining patient safety.

  7. Managing the advanced cancer patient in the Australian emergency department environment : Findings from a national survey of emergency department clinicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J. Weiland (Tracey); Lane, H. (Heather); G.A. Jelinek; C.H.L. Marck (Claudia); Weil, J. (Jennifer); M. Boughey (Mark); Philip, J. (Jennifer)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Delivery of care to people with advanced cancer in the emergency department (ED) is complicated by competing service demands, workloads and physical design constraints. We explored emergency clinicians’ attitudes to the ED environment when caring for patients who present with

  8. Emergency Department Management of Delirium in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn E.J. Gower, DO

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of elderly patients are presenting to the emergency department. Numerousstudies have observed that emergency physicians often fail to identify and diagnose delirium in theelderly. These studies also suggest that even when emergency physicians recognized delirium, theystill may not have fully appreciated the import of the diagnosis. Delirium is not a normal manifestation ofaging and, often, is the only sign of a serious underlying medical condition. This article will review thesignificance, definition, and principal features of delirium so that emergency physicians may betterappreciate, recognize, evaluate, and manage delirium in the elderly.

  9. [Competence of triage nurses in hospital emergency departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Segura, Estrella; Lleixà-Fortuño, Mar; Salvadó-Usach, Teresa; Solà-Miravete, Elena; Adell-Lleixà, Mireia; Chanovas-Borrás, Manel R; March-Pallarés, Gemma; Mora-López, Gerard

    2017-06-01

    To identify associations between sociodemographic characteristics variables and competence levels of triage nurses in hospital emergency departments. Descriptive, cross-sectional, multicenter study of triage nurses in hospital emergency departments in the southwestern area of Catalonia (Ebre River territory). We used an instrument for evaluating competencies (the COM_VA questionnaire) and recording sociodemographic variables (age, sex, total work experience, emergency department experience, training in critical patient care and triage) and perceived confidence when performing triage. We then analyzed the association between these variables and competency scores. Competency scores on the COM_VA questionnaire were significantly higher in nurses with training in critical patient care (P=.001) and triage (P=0.002) and in those with longer emergency department experience (P<.0001). Perceived confidence when performing triage increased with competency score (P<.0001) and training in critical patient care (P<.0001) and triage (P=.045). The competence of triage nurses and their perception of confidence when performing triage increases with emergency department experience and training.

  10. Patient satisfaction with physiotherapy in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Lorraine A; Anaf, Sophie; Gordon, Jane

    2010-10-01

    This research aims to explore patient satisfaction with ED physiotherapy within the Australian context by providing a qualitative perspective with in-depth exploration of the factors underlying patients' satisfaction. The physiotherapist was part of the Emergency Department Allied Health Team of social worker and occupational therapist. A qualitative, interpretive, field-based study using face-to-face interviews were carried out post-physiotherapy treatment within the emergency department, followed-up 2-3 weeks later with telephone interviews. Twenty two participants took part in the face-to-face interviews and 15 in the follow-up interviews. Of the 22 participants who took part in the initial interviews 19 were over 65 years of age, with a mean age of 78 years. Within the category 'Physiotherapy in the emergency department' the themes were; expectations, bedside manner, physiotherapy management (i.e. assessment, advice, hands-on, exercise, follow-up/referral) and satisfaction. The physiotherapist at the Australian emergency department appeared to make an impact on patients' experiences in the emergency department through his thorough subjective assessment of the patients' home environment, coping skills and social supports, his assessment of functional mobility, his provision of exercises, advice and hands-on treatment, as well as his involvement in organising follow-up or referral to other services. The physiotherapist's bedside manner shaped patients' perceptions throughout their assessment and treatment, reassuring and comforting patients within the emergency environment. Participants were satisfied with the experience of attending the physiotherapist in the emergency department and commented the blend of skills of the physiotherapists enhanced the service provision and self reported patient outcomes. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Workloads in Australian emergency departments a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyneham, Joy; Cloughessy, Liz; Martin, Valmai

    2008-07-01

    This study aimed to identify the current workload of clinical nurses, managers and educators in Australian Emergency Departments according to the classification of the department Additionally the relationship of experienced to inexperienced clinical staff was examined. A descriptive research method utilising a survey distributed to 394 Australian Emergency departments with a 21% response rate. Nursing workloads were calculated and a ratio of nurse to patient was established. The ratios included nurse to patient, management and educators to clinical staff. Additionally the percentage of junior to senior clinical staff was also calculated. Across all categories of emergency departments the mean nurse:patient ratios were 1:15 (am shift), 1:7 (pm shift) and 1:4 (night shift). During this period an average of 17.1% of attendances were admitted to hospital. There were 27 staff members for each manager and 23.3 clinical staff for each educator. The percentage of junior staff rostered ranged from 10% to 38%. Emergency nurses cannot work under such pressure as it may compromise the care given to patients and consequently have a negative effect on the nurse personally. However, emergency nurses are dynamically adjusting to the workload. Such conditions as described in this study could give rise to burnout and attrition of experienced emergency nurses as they cannot resolve the conflict between workload and providing quality nursing care.

  12. Pandemic influenza and major disease outbreak preparedness in US emergency departments: a selected survey of emergency health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Melinda J; Hsu, Edbert B; Shah, Sneha H; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Kirsch, Thomas D

    2011-01-01

    To assess the level of pandemic preparedness at emergency departments (EDs) around the country and to better understand current barriers to preparedness in the United States represented by health professionals in the American College of Emergency Physician (ACEP) Disaster Medicine Section (DMS). METHODS, DESIGN, and A cross-sectional survey of ACEP DMS members was performed. A total of 300 members were surveyed both via e-mail and with paper surveys during the 2009 ACEP Scientific Assembly DMS Meeting. An optional comments section was included for section members'perspectives on barriers to preparedness. A 15-item pandemic preparedness score was calculated for each respondent based on key preparedness indicators as defined by the authors. Results were analyzed with descriptive statistics, Chi2 analysis, Cochran-Armitage trend test, and analysis of variance. Free text comments were coded and subjected to frequency-based analysis. A total of 92 DMS members completed the survey with a response rate of31 percent. Although 85 percent of those surveyed indicated that their hospital had a plan for pandemic influenza response and other infectious disease threats, only 68 percent indicated that their ED had a plan, and 52 percent indicated that their hospital or ED had conducted disaster preparedness drills. Only 57 percent indicated that there was a plan to augment ED staff in the event of a staffing shortage, and 63 percent indicated that there were adequate supplies of personal protective equipment. While 63 percent of respondents indicated that their ED had a plan for distribution of vaccines and antivirals, only 32 percent ofEDs had a plan for allocation of ventilators. A total of 42 percent of respondents felt that their ED was prepared in the event of a pandemic influenza or other disease outbreak, and only 35 percent felt that their hospital was prepared. The average pandemic preparedness score among respondents was 8.30 of a total of 15. Larger EDs were more likely

  13. Physician staffed helicopter emergency medical service dispatch via centralised control or directly by crew - case identification rates and effect on the Sydney paediatric trauma system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Alan A; Lee, Anna; Weatherall, Andrew

    2012-12-18

    Severe paediatric trauma patients benefit from direct transport to dedicated Paediatric Trauma Centres (PTC). Parallel case identification systems utilising paramedics from a centralised dispatch centre versus the crew of a physician staffed Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) allowed comparison of the two systems for case identification rates and subsequent timeliness of direct transfer to a PTC. Paediatric trauma patients over a two year period from the Sydney region with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15 were retrospectively identified from a state wide trauma registry. Overall paediatric trauma system performance was assessed by comparisons of the availability of the physician staffed HEMS for patient characteristics, transport mode (direct versus indirect) and the times required for the patient to arrive at the paediatric trauma centre. The proportion of patients transported directly to a PTC was compared between the times that the HEMS service was available versus the time that it was unavailable to determine if the HEMS system altered the rate of direct transport to a PTC. Analysis of variance was used to compare the identifying systems for various patient characteristics when the HEMS was available. Ninety nine cases met the inclusion criteria, 44 when the HEMS system was operational. Patients identified for physician response by the HEMS system were significantly different to those that were not identified with higher median ISS (25 vs 18, p = 0.011), and shorter times to PTC (67 vs 261mins, p = 0.015) and length of intensive care unit stays (2 vs 0 days, p = 0.045). Of the 44 cases, 21 were not identified, 3 were identified by the paramedic system and 20 were identified by the HEMS system, (P system was available (RR 1.81, 95% CI 1.20-2.73). The median time (minutes) to arrival at the PTC was shorter when HEMS available (HEMS available 92, IQR 50-261 versus HEMS unavailable 296, IQR 84-583, P < 0.01). Physician staffed

  14. Confined space emergency response: assessing employer and fire department practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael P; Madison, Heather N; Healy, Stephen B

    2012-01-01

    An emergency response plan for industrial permit-required confined space entry is essential for employee safety and is legally required. Maintaining a trained confined space rescue team, however, is costly and technically challenging. Some employers turn to public fire departments to meet their emergency response requirements. The confined space emergency response practices of employers and fire departments have not been previously assessed. We present (1) federal data on the U.S. occurrence between 1992 and 2005 of confined space fatal incidents involving toxic and/or oxygen-deficient atmospheres; (2) survey data from 21 large companies on permit-required confined space emergency response practices; (3) data on fire department arrival times; and (4) estimates by 10 senior fire officers of fire department rescue times for confined space incidents. Between 1992 and 2005, 431 confined space incidents that met the case definition claimed 530 lives, or about 0.63% of the 84,446 all-cause U.S. occupational fatal injuries that occurred during this period. Eighty-seven (20%) incidents resulted in multiple fatalities. Twelve (57%) of 21 surveyed companies reported that they relied on the fire department for permit-required confined space emergency response. Median fire department arrival times were about 5 min for engines and 7 min for technical rescue units. Fire department confined space rescue time estimates ranged from 48 to 123 min and increased to 70 and 173 min when hazardous materials were present. The study illustrates that (1) confined space incidents represent a small but continuing source of fatal occupational injuries in the United States; (2) a sizeable portion of employers may be relying on public fire departments for permit-required confined space emergency response; and (3) in the event of a life-threatening emergency, fire departments usually are not able to effect a confined space rescue in a timely manner. We propose that the appropriate role for the

  15. Implementing evidence-based practices in an emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Jeanette W.; Nilsen, Per

    2016-01-01

    of semi-structured interviews. An activity system analysis, as described in the Cultural Historical Activity Theory, was conducted to identify various contradictions that could exist between different parts of the activity system. RESULTS: The main contradiction identified was that guidelines......BACKGROUND: An emergency department is typically a place of high activity where practitioners care for unanticipated presentations, which yields a flow culture so that actions that secure available beds are prioritised by the practitioners. OBJECTIVES: How does the flow culture in an emergency...... department influence nurses' use of a research-based clinical guideline and a nutrition screening routine. METHODS: Ethnographic fieldwork was carried out over three months. The first author followed nurses, medical secretaries and doctors in the emergency department. Data were also collected by means...

  16. Crowding and Delivery of Healthcare in Emergency Departments: The European Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaprakash, Namita

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Emergency department (ED crowding is a multifactorial problem, resulting in increased ED waiting times, decreased patient satisfaction and deleterious domino effects on the entire hospital. Although difficult to define and once limited to anecdotal evidence, crowding is receiving more attention as attempts are made to quantify the problem objectively. It is a worldwide phenomenon with regional influences, as exemplified when analyzing the problem in Europe compared to that of the United States. In both regions, an aging population, limited hospital resources, staff shortages and delayed ancillary services are key contributors; however, because the structure of healthcare differs from country to country, varying influences affect the issue of crowding. The approach to healthcare delivery as a right of all people, as opposed to a free market commodity, depends on governmental organization and appropriation of funds. Thus, public funding directly influences potential crowding factors, such as number of hospital beds, community care facilities, and staffing. Ultimately ED crowding is a universal problem with distinctly regional root causes; thus, any approach to address the problem must be tailored to regional influences.[West J Emerg Med. 2009; 10:233-239].

  17. Situational Factors Associated With Burnout Among Emergency Department Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozo, Jose Andres; Olson, DaiWai M; Thu, Hlaing Sue; Stutzman, Sonja E

    2017-06-01

    Emergency departments are high-stress environments for patients and clinicians. As part of the clinical team, nurses experience this stress daily and are subject to high levels of burnout, which has been shown to lead to hypertension, depression, and anxiety. Presence of these diseases may also contribute to burnout, creating a cycle of stress and illness. This prospective qualitative study used a phenomenological approach to better understand factors associated with burnout among emergency department nurses. Burnout manifests itself in multiple modes, can affect nurses' decisions to leave the profession, and must be addressed to mitigate the phenomenon.

  18. [Hospitality for elderly patients in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Marie-Claude; Dami, Fabrice; Hugli, Olivier; Renard, Delphine; Foucault, Eliane; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2015-12-09

    Demographic evolution results in a growing use of emergency department by elderly patients. They require special care to avoid any further degradation of cognitive and functional abilities already compromised by the disease or injury that led them to hospital in the first place. Through a clinical case, we list the risks related to the care of these particular patients in the emergency department. Early recognition of those risks and careful management of these patients' specific needs can significantly contribute to reduce lengths of stay, an important outcome from both the individual patient's and society's perspective.

  19. [Usefulness of inflammation and infection biomarkers in the Emergency Department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Candel-González, Francisco Javier; González Del Castillo, Juan

    2014-03-01

    Infectious processes account for 10% of patient seen in the emergency department. To administer antibiotics early, and before any other therapeutic-diagnostic decisions (complementary tests, microbiological samples, intensity of hemodynamic support, need for admission, etc.) have direct repercussions on the survival of patients with severe bacterial infections (bacteremia, severe sepsis or septic shock). In this context, the emergency department represents a critical level where the suspicion of infection and it diagnosis is made and treatment is started, and the progression and prognosis will be determined by the speed of this action. However, the clinical manifestations of infectious diseases are often non-specific and variable which makes early recognition of these patients and situations difficult. Inflammation and infection biomarkers have been around for years as helpful tools for improving emergency medical diagnoses and management of infection in the emergency department. The aim of this review is to summarize the published scientific evidence, in order to clarify the existing controversies, comparing the usefulness of the major biomarkers of inflammation and infection. It will alas suggest recommendations for their use in order to improve diagnosis, prognostic evaluation and management of infected patients in the emergency department. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  20. The Profile of Neurology Patients Evaluated in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Emre

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Early, rapid, and multidisciplinary approaches are very important in the diagnosis of neurological disorders in emergency departments. The present study aimed to investigate the features of patients that presented for neurology consultation in the emergency department. METHODS: The present study included 780 patients. Patient demographic features, reasons for emergent treatment and neurological consultation, neurological diagnosis by the neurologist, and laboratory (total blood count, serum glucose level, urea, creatine, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and D-dimer levels and imaging findings were retrospectively evaluated based on patient charts. RESULTS: Impaired consciousness was the most frequent reason for neurological consultation (19.7%. Among these patients, ischemic stroke was diagnosed in 27.9%, hypoxic encephalopathy in 18.2%, cerebral hemorrhage in 9.1%, and 11% had no neurological diagnosis. Other common reasons for neurological consultation were vertigo, headache, seizure, and stroke. Clinical findings were related to other systemic causes in 43.7% of the study group. Focal neurological findings were present, especially in patients that presented with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, epilepsy, and hypoxic encephalopathy. CONCLUSION: In emergency departments, metabolic causes should be ruled out in patients with impaired consciousness and the absence of focal neurological signs. Intracranial structural disorders must be evaluated when focal neurological signs are present. Cautiously prepared algorithms and neurological examination training will help improve the accuracy of emergency department diagnoses

  1. Strategies for reducing medication errors in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weant KA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kyle A Weant,1 Abby M Bailey,2 Stephanie N Baker2 1North Carolina Public Health Preparedness and Response, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Raleigh, NC, 2University of Kentucky HealthCare, Department of Pharmacy Services, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy, Lexington, KY, USA Abstract: Medication errors are an all-too-common occurrence in emergency departments across the nation. This is largely secondary to a multitude of factors that create an almost ideal environment for medication errors to thrive. To limit and mitigate these errors, it is necessary to have a thorough knowledge of the medication-use process in the emergency department and develop strategies targeted at each individual step. Some of these strategies include medication-error analysis, computerized provider-order entry systems, automated dispensing cabinets, bar-coding systems, medication reconciliation, standardizing medication-use processes, education, and emergency-medicine clinical pharmacists. Special consideration also needs to be given to the development of strategies for the pediatric population, as they can be at an elevated risk of harm. Regardless of the strategies implemented, the prevention of medication errors begins and ends with the development of a culture that promotes the reporting of medication errors, and a systematic, nonpunitive approach to their elimination. Keywords: emergency medicine, pharmacy, medication errors, pharmacists, pediatrics

  2. Profiling wound management in the emergency department: A descriptive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Rachel; Jennings, Natasha; McGuiness, William; Miller, Charne

    2016-08-01

    The service profile of wound, skin and ulcer presentations to emergency departments is an area that lacks an existing published commentary. Knowledge of these presentations would inform the allocation of resources, staff training, and, in turn, patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to describe the discharge and referral status of adult patients presenting to one Australian emergency department with a wound, skin or ulcer condition. A retrospective descriptive review was conducted of all emergency presentations including discharge and referral statuses for skin, wound and ulcer related conditions from 1st January 2014 until 31st December 2014. A total of 4231 wound, skin and ulcer conditions were managed, accounting for 7% of the total emergency presentations. Wound conditions were the most prevalent (n=3658; 86%). Males were more likely to present for all three conditions. For all conditions, discharge to home was the most common destination. Following discharge to home, over half all patients were referred to the local medical officer. Nursing workforce models, education and training needs to reflect the skill set required to respond to wound, skin and ulcer conditions to ensure that high quality skin and wound care continues outside of the emergency department. Copyright © 2016 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pediatric wound care and management in the emergency department [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jennifer E; Pade, Kathryn H

    2017-10-23

    Traumatic wounds and lacerations are common pediatric presenting complaints to emergency departments. Although there is a large body of literature on wound care, many emergency clinicians base management of wounds on theories and techniques that have been passed down over time. Therefore, controversial, conflicting, and unfounded recommendations are prevalent. This issue reviews evidence-based recommendations for wound care and management, including wound cleansing and irrigation, anxiolysis/sedation techniques, closure methods, and post-repair wound care. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  4. [Emergency departments: pediatric quality indicators as guide to quality assurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Measuring the quality of care in emergency departments requires tools to quantify the most important aspects in the care process. The quality indicator is the quantitative measure used in quality assurance. To review the document created by the Catalan Society of Emergency Medicine (SCME) and the Avedis Donabedian Foundation (FAD) in which the quality indicators for the emergency departments were established and to incorporate their methodology and select the indicators that could be adapted to pediatric emergencies. To add new indicators that, in the opinion of experts in pediatric emergencies, could be useful in daily pediatric care. To agree on the definitive list of indicators for use in pediatric emergencies and to define those that will be considered the main indicators. To develop a document on behalf of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Emergencies (SEUP), which will serve as a reference in quality of care. In the first stage, a Working Group of the SEUP was formed. The SCME/FAD paper was distributed after exclusion of the indicators that were not applicable to children. Each member adapted the indicators and proposed others. The Working Group then chose a set of indicators considered essential in any pediatric emergency department. The final document has 89 indicators, each with the following parameters: dimension, justification, ratio, explanation of terms, population, type, sources of information, standard and comments. Depending on the content, they are classified in one of the following sections: diseases, activities and work areas. Eighteen indicators were adapted to the pediatric age group. Twenty new indicators were added and 12 were proposed as basic or essential. The quality indicators are useful in measuring concrete and specific aspects of clinical care and in providing information on quality. The indicators provide valid, reliable and objective information. The indicator is an early warning sign to identify areas requiring improvement and allows

  5. Management of information within emergencies departments in developing countries: analysis at the National Emergency Department in Benin

    OpenAIRE

    Ahanhanzo, Yolaine Gl?l?; Kpozehouen, Alphonse; Sopoh, Ghislain; Sossa-J?r?me, Charles; Ouedraogo, Laurent; Wilmet-Dramaix, Mich?le

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of health information is a key pillar in both emergencies reception and handling facilities, given the strategic position and the potential of these facilities within hospitals, and in the monitoring of public health and epidemiology. With the technological revolution, computerization made the information systems evolve in emergency departments, especially in developed countries, with improved performance in terms of care quality, productivity and patient satisfact...

  6. Reliability and validity of emergency department triage systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wulp, I.

    2010-01-01

    Reliability and validity of triage systems is important because this can affect patient safety. In this thesis, these aspects of two emergency department (ED) triage systems were studied as well as methodological aspects in these types of studies. The consistency, reproducibility, and criterion

  7. Interprofessional team dynamics and information flow management in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilardi, Silvia; Guglielmetti, Chiara; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2014-06-01

    In Emergency Departments, fragmentation and breakdown in information exchange can be important factors leading to adverse events. This article aims to consider the critical aspects of collaborative teamwork in Emergency Departments that may have an impact on the information flow. On the basis of Distributed Cognition Theory, we have assumed that cognitive outcomes in critical-care settings are not confined to the thoughts of isolated individuals; rather, they are better understood as properties of a distributed cognitive system across the minds of the clinical team members and across the technological artefacts. We report on an exploratory ethnographic study of two Emergency Departments. Data were collected over a period of four months in 2008 via observation and interviews. The results highlight a specific distribution of cognitive work between physicians and nurses. The nurse's roles as information highlighter, memory keeper and process organizer helped to ensure the information flow and to overcome some of the problems identified with the computer-assisted communication process. Such distribution of cognitive work improved care quality, but it crossed established professional boundaries. As cross-boundary distribution of cognitive work in Emergency Departments can be perceived as role substitution, building an interprofessional working system is needed to avoid information breakdown in fast-moving contexts. To realize an interprofessional working system, practice-based training is required, aimed at developing a deep understanding of team cognition. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Epidemiology of death in the emergency department of a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A recorded death rate of 8.6% is high, suspected contributory factors include systemic deficiencies such as the lack of a trauma system, prehospital care; late presentation, the role of chemist operators, traditional healers, and delayed referral systems. Key words: Epidemiology of death, emergency department, tertiary health ...

  9. Patient and provider attitudes to emergency department-based HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patient and provider attitudes to emergency department-based HIV counselling and testing in South Africa. ... We also used two previously validated survey instruments to gather data on patients' HIV knowledge and providers' stigma against patients living with HIV, as we anticipated that these may have an impact on ...

  10. Procedures and Collaborative Information Seeking: A Study of Emergency Departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Reddy, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Information seeking is a central and inherently collaborative activity in the emergency department (ED) which is the common entry point to hospitals for nearly all acute patients. In this paper, we investigate how ED clinicians’ collabo-rative information seeking (CIS) is shaped by the procedures...

  11. Clinical features of emergency department patients with depression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical features of emergency department patients with depression who had attempted to commit suicide by poisoning. ... MDD patients. Conclusion: In poisoning patients with MDD, physicians in the ED must consider that they have a higher tendency to show suicidal behavior and to have ingested multiple types of drugs.

  12. Acute confusion and ataxia in the emergency department with an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 54 year old man presented to the Emergency Department with a one day ... nephropathy.The most likely cause of acute kidney injury in ... a renal ultrasound. Blood cultures and a lumbar puncture for cerebrospinal fluid analysis should also be done to rule out infective causes of confusion. If these tests are unremarkable.

  13. A Review of Transbuccal Fentanyl Use in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette O. Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with severe, painful injuries and illnesses treated in the emergency department are commonly administered opioid medications. Intravenous administration provides the most rapid onset of pain relief and is readily titrated. Fentanyl, administered intravenously, is well documented as an effective medication for pain management in the emergency department. It is preferred in many settings due to its minimal hemodynamic effects, as compared to other commonly used opioids. However, not all patients require intravenous access. These patients are given orally administered pain medications. The oral route is effective at minimizing pain but has a much slower onset of action when compared to the intravenous route. As an alternative to the slower onset of action seen with oral opioids, this paper discusses the use of fentanyl buccal tablet for pain management in the emergency department. Fentanyl buccal tablets are readily absorbed, with a bioavailability of approximately 65%, and have a more rapid onset of action than achieved with traditional oral opioids used in the emergency department.

  14. FAST scanning in the developing world emergency department ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To assess the utility of an existing ultrasound machine for the purposes of focused assessment sonography in trauma (FAST) scanning in a developing world emergency department (ED). Design. Prospective study undertaken over a 12-month period. Trauma patients attending the ED were FAST scanned by ...

  15. Development and Testing of Emergency Department Patient Transfer Communication Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Communication problems are a major contributing factor to adverse events in hospitals. The contextual environment in small rural hospitals increases the importance of emergency department (ED) patient transfer communication quality. This study addresses the communication problems through the development and testing of ED quality…

  16. [Causes of 72-hour return visits to hospital emergency departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Puente, Alberto; Del Río-Mata, José; Arjona-Huertas, José Luis; Mora-Ordóñez, Begoña; Nieto-de Haro, Lourdes; Lara-Blanquer, Antonio; Martínez-Reina, Alfonso; Martínez Del Campo, Miguel

    2015-10-01

    The return-visit rate has been suggested as a measure of emergency department quality of care. We aimed to identify the reasons for emergency revisits and the percentage of returns related to problems with quality of care in the previous visit. Cross-sectional observational study of clinical records for a random sample of unscheduled returns within 72 hours of discharge from the emergency departments of 3 hospitals attending a population of nearly 3 million in the Spanish province of Malaga. The records were reviewed by 2 data collectors, who assigned a reason for revisits according to a standardized classification. A sample of 1075 emergency revisits were reviewed; 895 met the inclusion criteria. The most common reasons for revisits were the persistence or progression of disease (48.8%), an unrelated new problem (9.3%), and referral from a hospital that did not have the required specialized service (8.6%). Reasons attributable to the patient accounted for 14.5% of the revisits; 15.2% were attributable to health care staff errors, 9.2% to system organization, and 61.1% to the disease process. Most emergency department revisits are related to the progression of the disease that led to the first visit. Only a small percentage can be linked to diagnostic or treatment errors in the previous visit.

  17. Evaluation of Head Trauma Cases in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alim Cokuk

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study, we aimed to determine the epidemiological characteristics, morbidity and mortality rates of patients admitted to the emergency department with head trauma. Material and Methods: In this study, ambulatory and hospitalized patients over the age of 18 brought to the Emergency Department because of head trauma between 01.12.2009 - 31.12.2010 were analyzed retrospectively. Patient data were recorded to standard data entry form. SPSS 17.0 package program was used for statistical analysis of data. The statistical significance level of all tests was p <0.05. Results: 5200 patients were included in this study. The average age of the patients was 39.97 ± 16.66 years. 4682'si patients (90 % were discharged from the emergency department. The most common reason for admission to the emergency department was falls (41.81 % in the discharged patients. 518 (10 % patients were hospitalized. Gender of these patients was 110 female (21:24% and 408 male (78.76%. 256 patients (48.35% were injured as a result of a traffic accident. 201(38.8% of the cerebral CT were reported as normal and 89 (17.2% of the cerebral CT were reported as traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in hospitalized patients. The fracture of lumbar spine (12 % was detected as an additional pathological disease in patients. 75 patients hospitalized because of head trauma (14.5% had died (1.44 % of all patients. Cervical spine fracture was the most common (14 patients, 18.68 % additional pathology in patients who died. Thoracic trauma was detected as the second most common (13 patients, 17.33 % additional pathology. Conclusion: Most of the patients admitted to the emergency department with head injury had a minor trauma. Patients can be discharged from the emergency department after a thorough physical examination and simple medical intervention. Most of the head injury patients admitted to hospital were male. The most common reason of the patients with head injury admitted to

  18. The Integration of Palliative Care into the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursah BASOL

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Palliative care (PC is a new and developing area. It aims to provide the best possible quality of life for patients with life-limiting diseases. It does not primarily include life-extending therapies, but rather tries to help patients spend the rest of their lives in the best way. PC patients often are admitted to emergency departments during the course of a disease. The approach and management of PC include differences with emergency medicine. Thus, there are some problems while providing PC in the ED. With this article, the definition, main features, benefits, and problems of providing PC are presented, with the primary aim of emphasizing the importance of PC integration into the ED. Key words: Emergency department, integration, palliative care, training

  19. Strategies for reducing medication errors in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weant, Kyle A; Bailey, Abby M; Baker, Stephanie N

    2014-01-01

    Medication errors are an all-too-common occurrence in emergency departments across the nation. This is largely secondary to a multitude of factors that create an almost ideal environment for medication errors to thrive. To limit and mitigate these errors, it is necessary to have a thorough knowledge of the medication-use process in the emergency department and develop strategies targeted at each individual step. Some of these strategies include medication-error analysis, computerized provider-order entry systems, automated dispensing cabinets, bar-coding systems, medication reconciliation, standardizing medication-use processes, education, and emergency-medicine clinical pharmacists. Special consideration also needs to be given to the development of strategies for the pediatric population, as they can be at an elevated risk of harm. Regardless of the strategies implemented, the prevention of medication errors begins and ends with the development of a culture that promotes the reporting of medication errors, and a systematic, nonpunitive approach to their elimination.

  20. Consequences of peritonism in an emergency department setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørsum-Meyer, Thomas; Schmidt, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In patients who were referred to the emergency department (ED) with abdominal pain, it is crucial to determine the presence of peritonism to allow for appropriate handling and subsequent referral to stationary departments. We aimed to assess the incidence of perceived peritonism...... to have signs indicative of peritonism, and 90% were admitted to the Department of Surgery (DS). Also, 24% of those patients with signs of peritonism and admission to the DS underwent surgical intervention in terms of laparotomy/laparoscopy. Five of the patients without peritonism underwent surgery...... with statistical significance were found regarding a stay in the emergency room (ER) or ordered imaging from the ER. Conclusion: Peritonism was a common finding in our setting. Peritonism did not require more acute surgery or imaging. The duration of the patient's stay in the ER was not influenced by a finding...

  1. Emergency department patient characteristics: Potential impact on emergency medicine residency programs in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshove-Bolk, Jolande; Mencl, Francis; van Rijswijck, Bas T F; Weiss, Ilanit M; Simons, Maarten P; van Vugt, Arie B

    2006-12-01

    We set out to study emergency department patient characteristics at a busy level-2 trauma center, to gain insight into the practise of emergency medicine, which is not yet recognized as a specialty in the Netherlands. From May 27 to July 4 2001, the following data were recorded from the charts of all patients presenting to the emergency department: age, time and form of presentation, diagnostics, treatment, disposition and the single best diagnosis (International Classification of Disease-10 classification). The majority (84%) of the 5234 patients (134/day) patients seen were self-referred and treated by the emergency department physician. The remaining 16% were referred, usually by their general practitioner, directly to a specialty service, which saw them in the emergency department. Self-referred patients tended to be younger (average 33 years), with minor trauma, and infrequently required diagnostics (37%), treatment (49%) or admission (4%). The referred patients were older (average 50 years), with 41% needing admission. Only 16% of all patients were under 16 years of age. In all, there were five deaths (referred patients), 12 resuscitations, seven intubations, seven chest tube insertions and no lumbar punctures performed during the study period. The acuity of self-referred patients seen by the emergency physicians is low, with little diagnostic testing and few interventions and resuscitations, even in a busy center. This has both training and practise implications and it may be inappropriate to take an emergency medicine practise model or curriculum from another country based on its emergency department population.

  2. Differential diagnosis of vertigo and dizziness in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozono, Yoshiyuki; Kitahara, Tadashi; Fukushima, Munehisa; Michiba, Takahiro; Imai, Ryusuke; Tomiyama, Youichirou; Nishiike, Suetaka; Inohara, Hidenori; Morita, Hisaki

    2014-02-01

    To establish a system of differential diagnosis for vertigo/dizziness at the Emergency Department (ED), careful history-taking of complications and examinations of nystagmus should be helpful and therefore prepared by ED staff. Vertigo/dizziness could come from various kinds of organs for equilibrium, sometimes resulting in an emergency due to the central origin. In the present study, we checked patients' background data at the ED in advance of a definitive diagnosis at the Department of Otolaryngology and examined the significance of the correlation between the data and the diagnosis. We studied a series of 120 patients with vertigo/dizziness, who visited the Departments of Emergency and Otolaryngology between April 2011 and March 2012. At the ED, we first checked patients' backgrounds and carried out neurologic and neuro-otologic examinations. At the Department of Otolaryngology, we finally diagnosed all the patients according to the criteria and classified the origins of vertigo/dizziness into central and non-central diseases. The ratio of patients with disease of central origin was 12.5% and that for non-central origin was 87.5%. The risk factors for cerebrovascular disease such as hypertension, heart disease, and diabetes were also the risk factors for central vertigo/dizziness by the chi-squared test. To predict a central origin for vertigo/dizziness, only gaze nystagmus was the significant factor by multivariate regression analysis.

  3. Emergency Department Overcrowding in Turkey: Reasons, Facts and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, O D; Cevik, S E; Bulut, M; Guneyses, O; Aydin, S A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors affecting the long waiting times of the patients in a university hospital. This study included 3000 of the adults above 18 years and pediatric trauma patients under 18 years who applied to emergency department between February 2009 and April 2009. The examination period of the physician, length of stay, length of hospitalization, waiting times for hospitalization and follow up times in the emergency department were recorded. Moreover, the patients were divided into four groups according to the reasons for waiting. In our study, the time period between 4 pm-12 pm was determined as the busiest time for the applications. Average length of stay in the emergency department for 3000 patients was 146.7±160.2 minutes. The length of stay for the patients consulted was longer than the length of stay for the ones who were not consulted. Because of the fact that our hospital did not have appropriate bed capacity, 41.1% of the patients waited less than two hours, 13. 4% of the patients waited more than 8 hours. It was also found that the waiting times of the Group two patients (206,7±145,2 minutes) was longer than Group one (95,5±73,9 minutes) patients and the waiting times of Group three patients (470,7±364,7 minutes) was longer than Group one patients. In conclusion, cooperation of the managers, relevant departments and a multidisciplinary approach are necessary to achieve the goals to reduce overcrowding in the emergency departments.

  4. [The syncope in Emergency Department: usual management vs guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, A; Baldini, E; Suppa, M; Rosa, A; Coppola, A; Cavicchi, F; Contu, E; Petroni, C; Strano, S; Scarpellini, M G

    2011-01-01

    The syncope is a common cause of admission to Emergency Departments, representing around 1-3% of all admissions to the service. However, elderly age and important comorbidities often hinder a definite etiologic diagnosis, with increasing requests for diagnostic tests and longer periods of hospitalization. We analyzed the management of 1,204 patients admitted to our Emergency Department for transient loss of consciousness in the period between 1 June 2009 and 1 June 2010, evaluating the following parameters: average age, gender, triage color code at admittance, performed diagnostic tests, diagnosis at discharge from ED and destination ward. We also studied a subgroup of 93 patients admitted to emergency medicine units evaluating their OESIL score at admittance, comorbidities, performed diagnostic tests and diagnosis at discharge from the ward. In the Emergency Department, 45% of patients were discharged with a diagnosis of syncope of unknown origin; in 21% of patients syncope was excluded; 19% of patients received a diagnosis of cardiogenic syncope; 11% were diagnosed with a presyncope; 3% with orthostatic hypotension and 1% with vasovagal syncope. In emergency medicine units, 51% of patients were discharged with a diagnosis of cardiogenic syncope, 11% were diagnosed with vasovagal syncope, 11% with presyncope, 11% with TIA, 8% with loss of consciousness non-syncope and 8% with syncope of unknown origin. Management of patients with syncope, elderly people with important comorbidities in particular, is still a serious problem for the emergency physician. The creation of specialized units for the management of syncope, the so-called syncope units, through the implementation of a shared diagnostic and therapeutic protocol, aims at reducing inappropriate hospitalization and average length of stay.

  5. Evaluating Emergency Department Asthma Management Practices in Florida Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Alexandra C H; Carretta, Henry J; Dudley, Julie K; Forrest, Jamie R; Folsom, Abbey N

    2016-01-01

    To assess gaps in emergency department (ED) asthma management at Florida hospitals. Survey instrument with open- and closed-ended questions. Topics included availability of specific asthma management modalities, compliance with national guidelines, employment of specialized asthma care personnel, and efforts toward performance improvement. Emergency departments at 10 large hospitals in the state of Florida. Clinical care providers and health administrators from participating hospitals. Compliance with national asthma care guideline standards, provision of specific recommended treatment modalities and resources, employment of specialized asthma care personnel, and engagement in performance improvement efforts. Our results suggest inconsistency among sampled Florida hospitals' adherence to national standards for treatment of asthma in EDs. Several hospitals were refining their emergency care protocols to incorporate guideline recommendations. Despite a lack of formal ED protocols in some hospitals, adherence to national guidelines for emergency care nonetheless remained robust for patient education and medication prescribing, but it was weaker for formal care planning and medical follow-up. Identified deficiencies in emergency asthma care present a number of opportunities for strategic mitigation of identified gaps. We conclude with suggestions to help Florida hospitals achieve success with ED asthma care reform. Team-based learning activities may offer an optimal strategy for sharing and implementing best practices.

  6. The ABC of handover: impact on shift handover in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Maisse; Brown, Ruth; Vincent, Charles; Woloshynowych, Maria

    2012-12-01

    A study was undertaken to test the impact of a new tool for shift handover, 'The ABC of Handover', in the emergency department (ED). The impact on shift handover following implementation of this structured tool, the effect on clinical and organisational aspects of the subsequent shift and the opinions of users of this new tool are reported. A prospective observational before and after study was performed to explore the effect of implementing 'The ABC of Handover' on clinical and organisational practice using a questionnaire. 41 handovers were observed before implementation of 'The ABC of Handover' and 42 were observed after. The new tool was successfully implemented and resulted in a change of practice which led to a significant increase in the operational issues mentioned at handover from a mean of 34% to a mean of 86% of essential items with the ABC method. Over the study period, middle-grade staff demonstrated improved situational awareness as they adopted proactive management of operational issues such as staffing or equipment shortages. All participants reported that 'The ABC of Handover' improved handover regardless of the seniority of the doctor giving it, and found the ABC method easy to learn. Successful implementation of 'The ABC of Handover' led to a change of practice in the ED. Improving handover resulted in better organisation of the shift and heightened awareness of potential patient safety issues. The ABC method provides a framework for organising the shift and preparing for events in the subsequent shift.

  7. Crowding and delivery of healthcare in emergency departments: the European perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jayaprakash, Namita

    2009-11-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding is a multifactorial problem, resulting in increased ED waiting times, decreased patient satisfaction and deleterious domino effects on the entire hospital. Although difficult to define and once limited to anecdotal evidence, crowding is receiving more attention as attempts are made to quantify the problem objectively. It is a worldwide phenomenon with regional influences, as exemplified when analyzing the problem in Europe compared to that of the United States. In both regions, an aging population, limited hospital resources, staff shortages and delayed ancillary services are key contributors; however, because the structure of healthcare differs from country to country, varying influences affect the issue of crowding. The approach to healthcare delivery as a right of all people, as opposed to a free market commodity, depends on governmental organization and appropriation of funds. Thus, public funding directly influences potential crowding factors, such as number of hospital beds, community care facilities, and staffing. Ultimately ED crowding is a universal problem with distinctly regional root causes; thus, any approach to address the problem must be tailored to regional influences.

  8. Low compliance with a validated system for emergency department triage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dorthea; Jensen, Nanna Martin; Maaløe, Rikke

    2011-01-01

    Bispebjerg Hospital has introduced a triage system at the Emergency Department (ED) based on "primary criteria" and a physiological scoring system named the Bispebjerg Early Warning Score (BEWS). A BEWS is calculated on the basis of five vital signs which are accessible bedside. Patients who have...... a "primary criterion" or a BEWS = 5 are presumed to be critically ill or severely injured and should be received by a multidisciplinary team, termed the Emergency Call (EC) and Trauma Call (TC), respectively. The aim of this study was to examine compliance with this triage system at Bispebjerg Hospital....

  9. Medical Identity Theft in the Emergency Department: Awareness is Crucial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelino Mancini

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Medical Identity theft in the emergency department (ED can harm numerous individuals, and many frontline healthcare providers are unaware of this growing concern. The two cases described began as typical ED encounters until red flags were discovered upon validating the patient’s identity. Educating all healthcare personnel within and outside the ED regarding the subtle signs of medical identity theft and implementing institutional policies to identify these criminals will discourage further fraudulent behavior. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:–0.

  10. An integration of Emergency Department Information and Ambulance Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Nada; El-Masri, Samir; Saddik, Basema

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose an Emergency Department Information System that will be integrated with the ambulance system to improve the communication, enhance the quality of provided emergency services and facilitate information sharing. The proposed system utilizes new advanced technologies such as mobile web services that overcome the problems of interoperability between different systems, HL7 and GPS. The system is unique in that it allows ambulance officers to locate the nearest specialized hospital and allows access to the patient's electronic health record as well as providing the hospital with required information to prepare for the incoming patient.

  11. Emergency department patient characteristics: Potential impact on emergency medicine residency programs in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elshove-Bolk, J.; Mencl, F.; Rijswijck, B.T. van; Weiss, I.M.; Simons, M.P.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We set out to study emergency department patient characteristics at a busy level-2 trauma center, to gain insight into the practise of emergency medicine, which is not yet recognized as a specialty in the Netherlands. METHODS: From May 27 to July 4 2001, the following data were recorded

  12. Screening of the frail patient in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rasmus; Brabrand, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    and evaluated from the results of the included studies. Results: Four studies met the exact inclusion criteria. Four different frailty screening scales: Clinical Frailty Scale, Deficit Accumulation Index, Identification of Seniors At Risk and The Study of Osteoporotic Fracture frailty index used...... in the emergency department were described and compared. Predictive values for various outcomes are represented and discussed. Conclusions: The results suggest that frailty successfully predicts increased risk of hospitalization, nursing home admission, mortality and prolonged length of stay after an initial...... assessment should be identified as soon as possible, this systematic review only identified four cohort studies of frailty assessment in emergency departments.Although frailty screening appeared to predict the risk of mortality and of admission to hospital/nursing home, these four studies did not show...

  13. Syncope: a review of emergency department management and disposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pranjal R; Quinn, James V

    2015-01-01

    Syncope is defined as a transient loss of consciousness due to cerebral hypoperfusion with spontaneous return to baseline function without intervention. It is a common chief complaint of patients presenting to the emergency department. The differential diagnosis for syncope is broad and the management varies significantly depending on the underlying etiology. In the emergency department, determining the cause of a syncopal episode can be difficult. However, a thorough history and certain physical exam findings can assist in evaluating for life-threatening diagnoses. Risk-stratifying patients into low, moderate and high-risk groups can assist in medical decision making and help determine the patient’s disposition. Advancements in ambulatory monitoring have made it possible to obtain prolonged cardiac evaluations of patients in the outpatient setting. This review will focus on the diagnosis and management of the various types of syncope. PMID:27752576

  14. Prognostic value of infrared thermography in an emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jesper K; Kellett, John G; Jensen, Nadia H

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this study, we aimed to investigate the prognostic potential of infrared thermography in a population of medical patients admitted to the emergency department. Central-to-peripheral temperature gradients were analyzed for association with 30-day mortality. METHODS: This prospective...... as a marker for central temperature and the three others as markers for peripheral temperatures, resulting in three gradients per patient. Thirty-day follow-up was performed and 30-day mortality was reported. RESULTS: One hundred and ninety-eight patients were included and the number of events was nine...... observational study included 198 medical patients admitted to the Emergency Department, at Odense University Hospital. A standardized thermal picture was taken and temperatures of the inner canthus, the earlobe, the nose tip, and the tip of the third finger were reported. The inner canthus was chosen...

  15. Analysis of factors that determine hospitalization of emergency department patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Szwamel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Optimization of health care financing under current standards of treatment can be achieved by determining the factors that affect the number of hospital admissions at emergency departments (ED, and their significance. Objectives . Identification of factors determining hospitalizations at emergency department. Material and methods . The study involved 150 emergency department patients in Kedzierzyn-Kozle. An original questionnaire, the Health Behaviors Inventory, and a modified version of the Camberwell Assessment of Need Short Appraisal Schedule (CANSAS were used. Results. At greatest risk of hospitalization are those patients who: take more than 4 drugs (OR 12.17, 95% CI 2.97–73.67; are being treated for chronic diseases (OR 5.37, 95% CI 2.56–11.62; are above 44.5 years of age (OR 3.14, 95% CI 1.54–6.51; are being treated at an outpatient specialist clinic (OR 3.87, 95% CI 1.85–8.32; have a BMI above 27.1 (OR 2.84, 95% CI 1.39–5.88; have at most average material status (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.20–0.87; have symptoms of severity greater than 5 (OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.11–4.55; and have a low index of unsatisfied needs (a Camberwell index lower than 0.825: OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.17–0.72. Conclusions . Any program to prevent hospitalization should be based on the measurement of health behavior, should focus on promoting knowledge of chronic diseases and the means of preventing them, and should involve patient education on the purpose of emergency departments. It is necessary to strive for increase responsiveness of healthcare to patients’ needs and to support the area of primary-care-oriented services in the field of ‘small surgery’.

  16. Perceptions of nurse practitioners by emergency department doctors in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Weiland, Tracey J.; Mackinlay, Claire; Jelinek, George A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The Australian Medical Association is strongly opposed to the nurse practitioner (NP) role with concerns that NPs may become doctor substitutes without the requisite training and education that the medical role demands. Despite this, NPs have been heralded by some as a potential solution to the access block, workforce shortage and increased demand affecting emergency departments (EDs). Aims The purpose of this study was to determine the perception of NPs by medical staff working in...

  17. Medical identity theft in the emergency department: awareness is crucial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Michelino

    2014-11-01

    Medical identity theft in the emergency department (ED) can harm numerous individuals, and many frontline healthcare providers are unaware of this growing concern. The two cases described began as typical ED encounters until red flags were discovered upon validating the patient's identity. Educating all healthcare personnel within and outside the ED regarding the subtle signs of medical identity theft and implementing institutional policies to identify these criminals will discourage further fraudulent behavior.

  18. Factors associated with medication errors in the pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilà-de-Muga, Mònica; Colom-Ferrer, Laura; Gonzàlez-Herrero, Mariona; Luaces-Cubells, Carles

    2011-04-01

    To describe the prevalence, type, and factors associated with medication errors in a pediatric emergency department. This is a descriptive retrospective study about the treatments administered in the pediatric emergency department during a week in November 2007. We used the protocols and clinical guides at our center as pattern of reference. The errors were classified as follows: (1) prescription error: drug involved, indication, dose, and route of administration; (2) severity of the error; and (3) associated factors: triage category, age of the patient, training level of the physician, day of the week, and hour of the day. In 377 of 1906 checked reports, some treatments were prescribed. A total of 92 errors (15%) were detected and all of them were prescription errors: 50 (8%) for inappropriate indication and 42 (7 %) for inadequate dose. Also, 87 were considered insignificant errors, 5 were moderate and none were severe. There was a higher rate of errors among residents with less experience. We did not find differences in the triage category neither in the age of the patient. In the weekends and holidays, we commit more errors compared in weekdays (28% vs 18 %, P=0.02). Between 24 and 8 hours, we registered more errors than between 8 and 16 and between 16 and 24 hours (32.3% vs 17.9% vs 21.2%; P=0.03). Error rates in drugs administered exclusively in the emergency department are slightly higher than others evaluating house orders and emergency department treatments. The high assistance pressure during weekends and holidays and the tiredness during the night are risk factors of prescribing errors. Periodical evaluation of the prescriptions is necessary to develop the best strategies to apply every time. Copyright © 2011 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  19. Emergency Department Use among Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Rini; Madhavan, Suresh; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2016-01-01

    A cross-sectional analyses using Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (2006-2011) was conducted to examine the trends, type of ED visits, and mean total ED charges for adults aged 22-64 years with and without ASD (matched 1:3). Around 0.4% ED visits (n = 25,527) were associated with any ASD and rates of such visits more than doubled from 2006 to…

  20. The use of triage in Danish Emergency Departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard Lindberg, Søren; la Cour, Jeppe Lerche; Folkestad, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The emergency departments (EDs) handle approximately 1,000,000 contacts annually. Danish health care is undergoing reorganization that involves the creation of fewer and larger EDs to handle these contacts. There is therefore a need to prioritize the use of resources to optimize treatment. We thu...... wanted to investigate if Danish EDs are using triage systems and, if so, which systems they are using....

  1. Modelling the contact propagation of nosocomial infection in emergency departments

    OpenAIRE

    Jaramillo, Cecilia; Taboada, Manel; Epelde, Francisco; Rexachs, Dolores; Luque Amat, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The nosocomial infection is a special kind of infection that is caused by microorganisms acquired inside a hospital. In the daily care process of an emergency department, the interactions between patients and sanitary staff create the environment for the transmission of such microorganisms. Rates of morbility and mortality due to nosocomial infections areimportant indicators of the quality of hospital work. In this research, we use Agent Based Modeling and Simulation tech...

  2. Analysis of ectopic pregnancies admitted to emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    Simsek, Yeliz; Ay, Mehmet Oguzhan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Ectopic pregnancy (EP) may cause significant morbidity and mortality. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the demographic characteristics, presence of risk factors and diagnostic parameters of the patient with EP and predicting parameters for ruptured EP. Methods: Patients who presented to emergency department (ED) and diagnosed as EP within one year were included to the study. The demographic characteristics, β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-HCG) levels, transvaginal ultrasonogr...

  3. Nurse-Physician Teamwork in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Ajeigbe, David Oladipo

    2012-01-01

    Background: Teamwork gained momentum in the 1980s. Research studies in the military and aviation demonstrated that teamwork is essential to safety. There were limited studies dealing with the practice of teamwork between nurses and physicians in the Emergence Departments (EDs). Aims: Descriptive aim of the study was to examine differences between staff in the Interventional and Control Groups on perception of staff teamwork. The exploratory aim was to examine staff perception of job satisfac...

  4. Tumor lysis syndrome in the emergency department: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ñamendys-Silva SA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Silvio A Ñamendys-Silva,1,2 Juan M Arredondo-Armenta,1 Erika P Plata-Menchaca,2 Humberto Guevara-García,1 Francisco J García-Guillén,1 Eduardo Rivero-Sigarroa,2 Angel Herrera-Gómez,1 1Department of Critical Care Medicine, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, 2Department of Critical Care Medicine, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico Abstract: Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS is the most common oncologic emergency. It is caused by rapid tumor cell destruction and the resulting nucleic acid degradation during or days after initiation of cytotoxic therapy. Also, a spontaneous form exists. The metabolic abnormalities associated with this syndrome include hyperkalemia, hyperphosphatemia, hypocalcemia, hyperuricemia, and acute kidney injury. These abnormalities can lead to life-threatening complications, such as heart rhythm abnormalities and neurologic manifestations. The emergency management of overt TLS involves proper fluid resuscitation with crystalloids in order to improve the intravascular volume and the urinary output and to increase the renal excretion of potassium, phosphorus, and uric acid. With this therapeutic strategy, prevention of calcium phosphate and uric acid crystal deposition within renal tubules is achieved. Other measures in the management of overt TLS are prescription of hypouricemic agents, renal replacement therapy, and correction of electrolyte imbalances. Hyperkalemia should be treated quickly and aggressively as its presence is the most hazardous acute complication that can cause sudden death from cardiac arrhythmias. Treatment of hypocalcemia is reserved for patients with electrocardiographic changes or symptoms of neuromuscular irritability. In patients who are refractory to medical management of electrolyte abnormalities or with severe cardiac and neurologic manifestations, early dialysis is recommended.Keywords: tumor lysis syndrome, emergency department, emergency

  5. [Loyal frequent users of hospital emergency departments: the FIDUR project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Alonso, Cesáreo; Romero Pareja, Rodolfo; Rivas García, Aristides; Jiménez Gallego, Rosa; Majo Carbajo, Yolanda; Aguilar Mulet, Juan Mariano

    2016-02-01

    To describe the characteristics of frequent users of hospital emergency departments and analyze whether characteristics varied in relation to how revisits were distributed over the course of the year studied. Retrospective study of patients over the age of 14 years who were treated in a hospital emergency department at least 10 times in 2013. Patients were identified in 17 public hospitals in the Spanish autonomous community of Madrid. Data related to the first and successive visits were gathered and analyzed by quarter year. We included 2340 patients with a mean (SD) age of 54 (21) years. A total of 1361 (58.%) were women, 1160 (50%) had no concomitant diseases, 1366 (58.2%) were substance abusers, and 25 (1.1%) were homeless. During the first visit, 2038 (87.1%) complained of a recent health problem, and 289 (12.4%) were admitted. Sixty (2.6%) patients concentrated their revisits in a single quarters 335 (14.3%) in 2 quarters, 914 (39.1%) in 3, and 1005 (42.9%) in 4. Patients whose revisits were distributed over more quarters were older (> 65 years), had more concomitant conditions, were on more medications (P women (P = .012) and more likely to have a specific diagnosis (P loyally comes to the same emergency department over the course of a year. Patients whose revisits are dispersed over a longer period have more complex problems and use more resources during their initial visit.

  6. Acute Coronary Syndrome: Emergency Department Evaluation and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veauthier, Brian; Sievers, Karlynn; Hornecker, Jaime

    2015-10-01

    Patients with chest pain who present to emergency departments have a significantly higher incidence of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) than patients with chest pain presenting to outpatient settings, so emergency department clinicians should have a lower threshold for considering ACS as an etiology. Evaluating patients with suspected ACS in the emergency department involves obtaining a history, physical examination, electrocardiograms (ECGs), and cardiac troponin measurements in conjunction with risk calculators. These parameters cannot be used individually because, for example, a normal ECG result does not exclude ACS and troponin levels can be elevated in many conditions. All patients with suspected ACS should receive aspirin, if not contraindicated, as soon as possible. Those with an ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) or those without STEMI who are in unstable condition should be triaged to undergo reperfusion therapy, typically via percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), within 120 minutes of first medical contact. If that time limit cannot be met because the patient must be transferred to a PCI-capable facility, fibrinolytic therapy should be initiated within 30 minutes of presentation if STEMI is present. (Fibrinolytic therapy is contraindicated for myocardial infarction without STEMI.) Patients also should receive nitroglycerin to relieve angina and beta blockers if not contraindicated. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  7. Responding to the refusal of care in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jennifer; Venkat, Arvind; Davenport, Moira

    2014-01-01

    The emergency department (ED) serves as the primary gateway for acute care and the source of health care of last resort. Emergency physicians are commonly expected to rapidly assess and treat patients with a variety of life-threatening conditions. However, patients do refuse recommended therapy, even when the consequences are significant morbidity and even mortality. This raises the ethical dilemma of how emergency physicians and ED staff can rapidly determine whether patient refusal of treatment recommendations is based on intact decision-making capacity and how to respond in an appropriate manner when the declining of necessary care by the patient is lacking a basis in informed judgment. This article presents a case that illustrates the ethical tensions raised by the refusal of life-sustaining care in the ED and how such situations can be approached in an ethically appropriate manner.

  8. Assessment and Management of Bullied Children in the Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Muhammad; Ryan, Mary; Foster, Carla Boutin; Peterson, Janey

    2015-01-01

    Bullying is an important public health issue in the United States. Up to 30% of children report exposure to such victimization. Not only does it hurt bully victim, but it also negatively impacts the bully, other children, parents, school staff, and health care providers. Because bullying often presents with accompanying serious emotional and behavioral symptoms, there has been an increase in psychiatric referrals to emergency departments. Emergency physicians may be the first responders in the health care system for bullying episodes. Victims of bullying may present with nonspecific symptoms and be reluctant to disclose being victimized, contributing to the underdiagnosis and underreporting of bully victimization. Emergency physicians therefore need to have heightened awareness of physical and psychosocial symptoms related to bullying. They should rapidly screen for bullying, assess for injuries and acute psychiatric issues that require immediate attention, and provide appropriate referrals such as psychiatry and social services. This review defines bullying, examines its presentations and epidemiology, and provides recommendations for the assessment and evaluation of victims of bullying in the emergency department. PMID:23462401

  9. Emergency Department and Older Adult Motor Vehicle Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotfipour, Shahram

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2009, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention reported there were 33 million licensed drivers 65 years and older in the U.S. This represents a 23 percent increase from 1999, number that is predicted to double by 2030. Although, motor vehicle collisions (MVC-related to emergency department (ED visits for older adults are lower per capita than for younger adults, the older-adults MVCs require more resources, such as additional diagnostic imaging and increased odds of admission. Addressing the specific needs of older-adults could lead to better outcomes yet not enough research currently exists. It is important to continue training emergency physicians to treat the increasing older-patient population, but its also imperative we increase our injury prevention and screening methodology. We review research findings from the article: Emergency Department Visits by Older Adults for Motor Vehicle Collisions: A Five-year national study, with commentary on current recommendation and policies for the growing older-adult driving population. [West J Emerg Med.2013;14(6:582–584.

  10. Management of angioedema without urticaria in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrosa, Maria; Prieto-García, Alicia; Sala-Cunill, Anna

    2014-12-01

    Angioedema refers to a localized, transient swelling of the deep skin layers or the upper respiratory or gastrointestinal mucosa. It develops as a result of mainly two different vasoactive peptides, histamine or bradykinin. Pathophysiology, as well as treatment, is different in each case; nevertheless, the resulting signs and symptoms may be similar and difficult to distinguish. Angioedema may occur at any location. When the affected area involves the upper respiratory tract, both forms of angioedema can lead to an imminent upper airway obstruction and a life-threatening emergency. Emergency physicians must have a basic understanding of the pathophysiology underlying this process. Angioedema evaluation in the emergency department (ED) should aim to distinguish between histamine- and bradykinin-induced angioedema, in order to provide appropriate treatment to patients. However, diagnostic methods are not available at the ED setting, neither to confirm one mechanism or the other, nor to identify a cause. For this reason, the management of angioedema should rely on clinical data depending on the particular features of the episode and the patient in each case. The history-taking should be addressed to identify a possible etiology or triggering agent, recording complete information for an ulterior diagnostic study in the outpatient clinic. It is mandatory quickly to recognize and treat a potential life-threatening upper airway obstruction or anaphylaxis. This review focuses on the underlying mechanisms and management of histamine- and bradykinin-induced angioedema at the emergency department and provides an update on the currently available treatments.

  11. Emergency department visits during an Olympic gold medal television broadcast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelmeier, Donald A; Vermeulen, Marian J

    2011-01-01

    Practice pattern variations are often attributed to physician decision-making with no accounting for patient preferences. To test whether a mass media television broadcast unrelated to health was associated with changes in the rate and characteristics of visits for acute emergency care. Time-series analysis of emergency department visits for any reason. Population-based sample of all patients seeking emergency care in Ontario, Canada. The broadcast day was defined as the Olympic men's gold medal ice hockey game final. The control days were defined as the 6 Sundays before and after the broadcast day. A total of 99 447 visits occurred over the 7 Sundays, of which 13 990 occurred on the broadcast day. Comparing the broadcast day with control days, we found no significant difference in the hourly rate of visits before the broadcast (544 vs 537, p = 0.41) or after the broadcast (647 vs 639, p = 0.55). In contrast, we observed a significant reduction in hourly rate of visits during the broadcast (647 vs 783, p television broadcasts can influence patient preferences and thereby lead to a decrease in emergency department visits.

  12. Drug-induced angioedema: experience of Italian emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertazzoni, G; Spina, M T; Scarpellini, M G; Buccelletti, F; De Simone, M; Gregori, M; Valeriano, V; Pugliese, F R; Ruggieri, M P; Magnanti, M; Susi, B; Minetola, L; Zulli, L; D'Ambrogio, F

    2014-06-01

    Acute angioedema represents a cause of admission to the emergency department requiring rapid diagnosis and appropriate management to prevent airway obstruction. Several drugs, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and oral antidiabetics, have been reported to induce angioedema. The aim of this prospective observational study conducted in a setting of routine emergency care was to evaluate the incidence and extent of drug-induced non-histaminergic angioedema in this specific clinical setting, and to identify the class of drugs possibly associated with angioedema. Patients admitted to seven different emergency departments (EDs) in Rome with the diagnosis of angioedema and urticaria were enrolled during a 6-month period. Of the 120,000 patients admitted at the EDs, 447 (0.37 %) were coded as having angioedema and 655 (0.5 %) as having urticaria. After accurate clinical review, 62 cases were defined as drug-induced, non-histaminergic angioedema. NSAIDs were the most frequent drugs (taken by 22 out of 62 patients) associated with the angioedema attack. Of the remaining patients, 15 received antibiotic treatment and 10 antihypertensive treatment. In addition, we observed in our series some cases of angioedema associated with drugs (such as antiasthmatics, antidiarrheal and antiepileptics) of which there are few descriptions in the literature. The present data, which add much needed information to the existing limited literature on drug-induced angioedema in the clinical emergency department setting, will provide more appropriate diagnosis and management of this potentially life-threatening adverse event.

  13. [Acute Datura stramonium poisoning in an emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, Bernard; Martis, Antoine; Moreau, Céline; Arlie, Gilles; Kintz, Pascal; Leclerc, Johan

    2007-10-01

    The toxic effects of Datura stramonium most often include visual and auditory hallucinations, confusion and agitation. Severe and even fatal complications (coma, respiratory distress or death in more than 5% of cases) are not rare since the lethal concentration of the drug's toxic substances (i.e., atropine and scopolamine) is close to the level at which delirium occurs. A 17-year-old man was admitted to our emergency department with agitation, delirium with persecutory ideation and frightening hallucinations of being assaulted by animals. Blood samples taken 12 hours after Datura stramonium ingestion and analyzed with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) found 1.7 ng/mL of atropine, close to the lethal level. After restraint and treatment with the antipsychotic drug cyamemazine, the young man returned to normal 36 hours after drug ingestion. A 17-year-old woman was admitted to our emergency department after losing consciousness on a public thoroughfare. At the emergency department, 2 hours after she had ingested Datura stramonium, she was agitated, with delirium, anxiety, and frightening visual and tactile hallucination of green turtles walking on her as well as auditory hallucinations. Blood samples at D0, D1 and D2 after Datura stramonium ingestion, analyzed with LC-MS/MS, found: 1.4, 1.0, and 0.2 ng/mL of scopolamine, respectively. Atropine was massively eliminated in urine on D1 (114 ng/mL). After restraint and cyamemazine treatment, the young woman returned to normal 40 hours after she had first ingested this hallucinogen. These cases of intoxication with Datura stramonium are, to our knowledge, the first clinical reports correlated with toxicologic analysis by the reference method (LC-MS/MS) in an emergency setting. Since neither the drug-users nor those accompanying them usually volunteer information about drug use, it is important to consider this specific risk in cases of agitation and confusion in adolescents or young adults.

  14. Hypoglycemic treatment of diabetic patients in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Caballero Requejo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To analyze if the hypoglycemic therapy prescribed in the Emergency Department adapts to the consensus recommendations available, as well as to assess its clinical impact. Methods: A descriptive observational study, which included patients awaiting hospital admission, who were in the Observation Ward of the Emergency Department and had been previously diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, and were receiving treatment with hypoglycemic drugs at home. The management of antidiabetic treatment and its clinical impact were assessed. Results: 78 patients were included. At admission to the Emergency Department, treatment was modified for 91% of patients, and omitted for 9%. The most prescribed treatment was sliding scale insulin (68%. The treatments prescribed coincided in a 16.7% with the recommendations by the Spanish Society of Emergency Medicine. After intervention by the Pharmacist, the omission descended to 1.3%, and the adaptation to the recommendations increased to 20.5%. Comparing patients whose treatment coincided with the recommendations and those who did not, the clinical impact was respectively: mean glycemia at 24 hours: 138.3 } 49.5 mg/dL versus 182.7 } 97.1 mg/dL (p = 0.688; mean rescues with insulin lispro: } 1.6 versus 1.5 } 1.8 (p = 0.293; mean units of insulin lispro administered: 4.6 } 12.7 IU versus 6.6 } 11.3 IU (p = 0.155. Conclusions: We found antidiabetic prescriptions to have a low adaptation to consensus recommendations. These results are in line with other studies, showing an abuse of sliding scale regimen as single hypoglycemic treatment

  15. Evaluation of the performance of French physician-staffed emergency medical service in the triage of major trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Sophie Rym; Gauss, Tobias; Duchateau, François-Xavier; Truchot, Jennifer; Harrois, Anatole; Raux, Mathieu; Duranteau, Jacques; Mantz, Jean; Paugam-Burtz, Catherine

    2014-06-01

    Proper prehospital triage of trauma patients is a cornerstone for the process of care of trauma patients. In France, emergency physicians perform this process according to a national triage algorithm called Vittel Triage Criteria (VTC), introduced in 2002 to help the triage decision-making process. The aim of this two-center study was to evaluate the performance of the triage process based on the VTC to identify major trauma patients in the Paris area. This was a retrospective analysis of two cohorts. The first cohort consisted of all patients admitted between January 2011 and September 2012 in two trauma referral centers in the region of Paris (Ile de France) and allowed estimation of overtriage. Undertriage was assessed in a second cohort made up of all prehospital trauma interventions from one emergency medicine sector during the same period. Adequate triage was defined by a direct admission of patients with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) greater than 15 into one of the regional trauma centers, and undertriage was defined as an initial nonadmission to a trauma center. Overtriage was defined by an admission of patients with an ISS of 15 or lower to a trauma center. The performance of the VTC was evaluated according to a strict to-the-letter application of the VTC and termed as theoretical triage. Logistic regression was performed to identify VTC criteria able to predict major trauma. Among 998 admitted patients of the first cohort, 173 patients (17%) were excluded because they were not directly admitted in the first 24 hours. In the first cohort (n = 825), adequate triage was 58% and overtriage was 42%. In the second cohort (n = 190), adequate triage was 40%, overtriage was 60%, and undertriage was less than 1%. Theoretical triage generated a nonsignificantly lower overtriage and a higher undertriage compared with observed triage. The most powerful predictors of major trauma were paralysis (odds ratio [OR,] 0.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03-0.22), flail

  16. Emergency department revisits for pediatric acute asthma exacerbations: association of factors identified in an emergency department asthma tracking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh-Kelly, Christine M; Kelly, Kevin J; Drendel, Amy L; Grabowski, Laura; Kuhn, Evelyn M

    2008-08-01

    To identify clinical variables associated with a greater likelihood of emergency department (ED) revisit for acute asthma within 7 days after an initial ED visit for acute asthma exacerbation. Cross-sectional study of subjects from a prospectively enrolled cohort of children aged 0 to 18 years with physician-diagnosed asthma in the ED Allies Tracking System. Demographics and data on quality of life, health care utilization, environmental factors, chronic asthma severity, and ED management were collected. Emergency department revisits for acute asthma within 7 days of a prior visit resulting in discharge were compared with those without a revisit, using chi2 and t tests and logistic regression. Four thousand two hundred twenty-eight ED asthma visits were enrolled; 3276 visits resulted in discharge. Persistent asthma was identified in 66% of visits. Emergency department revisits within 7 days of a prior visit occurred following 133 (4.1%) visits. There were no significant differences in environmental factors or ED management between visits with and without an ED revisit. In univariate analysis factors associated with a greater revisit likelihood included age younger than 2 years, black race or Hispanic ethnicity, persistent asthma, public insurance, lower quality of life, and greater health care utilization in the prior 12 months. Variables independently significant (P children younger than 2 years or with persistent asthma or lower asthma quality-of-life scores are at greater risk for ED revisits after acute ED asthma care.

  17. Markers of overcrowding in a pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stang, Antonia S; McGillivray, David; Bhatt, Maala; Colacone, Antoinette; Soucy, Nathalie; Léger, Ruth; Afilalo, Marc

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to identify markers of overcrowding in pediatric emergency departments (PEDs) according to expert opinion and then to use statistical methods to further explore the underlying construct of overcrowding. A cross-sectional survey of all PED directors (n = 12) and pediatric emergency medicine fellowship program directors (n = 10) across Canada was conducted to elicit expert opinion on relevant markers of emergency department (ED) crowding. The list of markers was reduced to those specific to the ED for which data could be extracted from one tertiary care PED from an existing computerized patient tracking system. Data representing 2,190 consecutive shifts and 138,361 patient visits were collected between April 2005 and March 2007. Common factor analysis (CFA) was used to determine the underlying factors that best represented overcrowding as determined by markers identified by experts in pediatric emergency medicine The main markers of overcrowding identified by the survey included measures of patient volume (25%), ED operational processes (55%), and delays in transferring patients to inpatient beds (13%). Data collected on 41 markers were retained for the CFA. The results of the CFA indicated that the largest portion of variation in the data (48%) was accounted for by markers describing patient volumes and flow through the ED. Measures of admission delays accounted for a smaller proportion of variability (9%). The results suggest that for this tertiary PED, markers of ED operational processes and patient volume may be more relevant for determination of overcrowding than markers reflecting delays in transferring patients to inpatient beds. This study provides a foundation for further research on markers of overcrowding specific to the pediatric setting. (c) 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  18. Quality and safety implications of emergency department information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Heather L; Baumlin, Kevin M; Hamedani, Azita G; Cheung, Dickson S; Edwards, Michael R; Fuller, Drew C; Genes, Nicholas; Griffey, Richard T; Kelly, John J; McClay, James C; Nielson, Jeff; Phelan, Michael P; Shapiro, Jason S; Stone-Griffith, Suzanne; Pines, Jesse M

    2013-10-01

    The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services "meaningful use" incentive programs, in tandem with the boundless additional requirements for detailed reporting of quality metrics, have galvanized hospital efforts to implement hospital-based electronic health records. As such, emergency department information systems (EDISs) are an important and unique component of most hospitals' electronic health records. System functionality varies greatly and affects physician decisionmaking, clinician workflow, communication, and, ultimately, the overall quality of care and patient safety. This article is a joint effort by members of the Quality Improvement and Patient Safety Section and the Informatics Section of the American College of Emergency Physicians. The aim of this effort is to examine the benefits and potential threats to quality and patient safety that could result from the choice of a particular EDIS, its implementation and optimization, and the hospital's or physician group's approach to continuous improvement of the EDIS. Specifically, we explored the following areas of potential EDIS safety concerns: communication failure, wrong order-wrong patient errors, poor data display, and alert fatigue. Case studies are presented that illustrate the potential harm that could befall patients from an inferior EDIS product or suboptimal execution of such a product in the clinical environment. The authors have developed 7 recommendations to improve patient safety with respect to the deployment of EDISs. These include ensuring that emergency providers actively participate in selection of the EDIS product, in the design of processes related to EDIS implementation and optimization, and in the monitoring of the system's ongoing success or failure. Our recommendations apply to emergency departments using any type of EDIS: custom-developed systems, best-of-breed vendor systems, or enterprise systems

  19. Experience of morning reports in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, C; Chaddad, M; El Rassy, E

    2015-07-01

    Morning report in the emergency medicine departments is an emerging teaching modality in the medicine curriculum. Our institution, Hotel-Dieu de France hospital, a multidisciplinary tertiary care university hospital affiliated to the Saint Joseph University of Medical Sciences, is the only hospital in Middle East to hold morning reports in the emergency department (ED). We evaluate the usefulness of the morning report as a pedagogic tool as it assesses the content, quality of the discussions, professionalism, leadership, participation and duration of the morning report. The particularity of this paper is that it takes into consideration the interns' input often under-recognised in the studies. An anonymous questionnaire was diffused to the residents and interns that rotated in the ED during the previous year. It consisted of seven multiple-choice questions to evaluate the quality of the presentations, targeted discussions, ethics and professionalism, evidence-based medicine, clinical reasoning, relation of cases to discussions and implication of the ED physician. Overall, of the 63 patients who answered the survey, 65.1% were satisfied by the content. The majority considered the quality of the discussions acceptable and the leadership and participation satisfactory, professionalism was judged poor. Both residents and interns were satisfied of the teaching point of the morning reports. The only fail back observed was professionalism and pathophysiological discussions that require to be added to the sessions, whereas clinical management, teaching points, leadership and time management were completely satisfactory. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  20. [Epidemiological characteristics in suicidal adolescents seen in the Emergency Department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margarit Soler, Adriana; Martínez Sanchez, Lídia; Martínez Monseny, Antonio; Trenchs Sainz de la Maza, Victoria; Picouto González, María Dolores; Villar Cabeza, Francisco; Luaces Cubells, Carles

    2016-07-01

    Suicide attempt in adolescents is a major global health problem. In order to prevent them, the risks factors need to be identified. The present study evaluates the clinical and epidemiological aspects of adolescent patients after attempted suicide, who were seen in an emergency department. Description of retrospective study of patients younger than 18 years who visited emergency department unit after a suicide attempt, during the period from 2008 to 2012. A total of 241 patients were included, of whom 203 were female. The median age of the patients was 15.6 years. Psiquiatric history was present in 65.1% of the patients. The most frequent suicide mechanism was drug overdose (94.2%). Attempted suicide ideation was more common in males and in patients with previous attempts, and were also more related to sequels. Moreover, patients with an overdose were associated with psychiatric history and clinical toxicity. Patients with any of the following characteristics; male, psychiatric history, a history of previous suicide attempts and/or clinical toxicity at the time of the visit in the emergency center, were more associated suicidal ideation before the attempt. Therefore, they had greater severity and risk repeating the attempt. They require a careful psychiatric evaluation and close monitoring. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Smartphones and Medical Applications in the Emergency Department Daily Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshir, Amirhosein; Karimialavijeh, Ehsan; Sheikh, Hojjat; Vahedi, Motahar; Momeni, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Medical applications help physicians to make more rapid and evidence based decisions that may provide better patient care. This study aimed to determine the extent to which smart phones and medical applications are integrated in the emergency department daily practice. In a cross sectional study, a modified standard questionnaire (Payne et al.) consisting of demographic data and information regarding quality and quantity of smartphone and medical app utilization was sent to emergency-medicine residents and interns twice (two weeks apart), in January 2015. The questionnaire was put online using open access "Web-form Module" and the address of the web page was e-mailed along with a cover letter explaining the survey. Finally, responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics and SPSS 22 software. 65 cases participated (response rate 86%). The mean age of interns and residents were 25.03 ± 1.13 and 30.27 ± 4.68 years, respectively (p UpToDate, respectively. 38 (61.3%) of the respondents were using their apps more than once a day and mostly for drug information. English (83.9%), Persian (12.9%), and other languages (3.2%) were preferred languages for designing a medical software among the participants, respectively. The findings of present study showed that smartphones are very popular among Iranian interns and residents in emergency department and a substantial number of them own a smartphone and are using medical apps regularly in their clinical practice.

  2. Epidemiological characteristics of pediatric epistaxis presenting to the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, Sophie; Shapiro, Nina L; Bhattacharyya, Neil

    2017-12-01

    Investigate the epidemiological characteristics of pediatric epistaxis in the emergency department setting. Cross-sectional study using national databases. Children (age epistaxis were extracted from the State Emergency Department Databases for New York, Florida, Iowa, and California for the calendar year 2010. Associated diagnoses, procedures, encounter characteristics, and demographic data were examined. There were 18,745 cases of pediatric epistaxis (mean age 7.54 years, 57.4% male). Overall, 6.9% of patients underwent procedures to control epistaxis, of which 93.5% had simple anterior epistaxis control. The distribution of pediatric epistaxis was highest in spring and summer months (p epistaxis presentations (38.8%, p epistaxis control procedure performed (p epistaxis control procedure (p epistaxis control procedure compared to those of minority backgrounds (p epistaxis are uninvolved cases that do not require procedural intervention. The overrepresentation of low socioeconomic status patients may suggest an overutilization of emergency services for minor cases of epistaxis, and perhaps a lack of access to primary care providers. This is the first study to evaluate racial and socioeconomic factors in relationship to pediatric epistaxis. Further investigation is needed to better elucidate these potential disparities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Using data to drive emergency department design: a metasynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Shari J

    2012-01-01

    There has been an uptick in the field of emergency department (ED) operations research and data gathering, both published and unpublished. This new information has implications for ED design. The specialty suffers from an inability to have these innovations reach frontline practitioners, let alone design professionals and architects. This paper is an attempt to synthesize for design professionals the growing data regarding ED operations. The following sources were used to capture and summarize the research and data collections available regarding ED operations: the Emergency Department Benchmarking Alliance database; a literature search using both PubMed and Google Scholar search engines; and data presented at conferences and proceedings. Critical information that affects ED design strategies is summarized, organized, and presented. Data suggest an optimal size for ED functional units. The now-recognized arrival and census curves for the ED suggest a department that expands and contracts in response to changing census. Operational improvements have been dearly identified and are grouped into three categories: input, throughput, and outflow. Applications of this information are suggested. The sentinel premise of this meta-synthesis is that data derived from improvement work in the area of ED operations has applications for ED design. EDs can optimize their functioning by marrying good processes and operations to good design. This review paper is an attempt to bring this new information to the attention of the multidisciplinary team of architects, designers, and clinicians.

  4. Bariatric surgery patients: reasons to visit emergency department after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Sánchez, Juan A; Corujo-Vázquez, Omar; Sahai-Hernández, Mrisa

    2007-01-01

    Morbid obesity prevalence is reaching epidemic proportions in Western society. Long-term weight loss can be achieved by bariatric surgery. This surgery also has a positive impact in the reduction of obesity related co-morbid conditions. The purpose of this study is to determine the reasons that bariatric surgery patients had to visit the emergency department within a three month period after surgery. A retrospective chart review study was performed at the UPR Hospital in Carolina. Patients with the diagnosis of morbid obesity who had bariatric surgery were identified. Of the 283 patients who met the criteria, the following information was obtained: gender, age, height, weight, pre-operative BMI, obesity-related comorbid conditions, post operative length of stay (LOS), and reasons and length of stay of Emergency Department (ED) visits within a 3 month period after surgery. Statistical analysis was done with Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Program. The same profile of gender and BMI was obtained between the population that had the surgery and the sample that visited the ED, the group of patients between 20-29 years old was more likely to visit the ED. No correlation was found between a longer post operative length of stay and an increased probability of visiting the ED. Of the population, 5% had to visit ED within a three month period. The most common post operative complications were: Abdominal Pain (46.2%), Emesis (38.5%), and Dehydration (30.8%). Other less frequent complications were nausea, DVT, pneumonia, dizziness, gastritis, infected wound and upper GI bleeding. The most common reasons that bariatric surgery patients had to visit the emergency department within a three month period after surgery were: abdominal pain, emesis, dehydration and nausea. These complications could most likely be attributed to patient poor compliance with diet, resulting in the classical symptoms of the dumping syndrome which is common in patients that have undergone

  5. Interventions performed by the clinical pharmacist in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Muniz Maloni Miranda

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To demonstrate the role and importance of the clinicalpharmacist in the Emergency Department by means of identification,classification, and assessment of the number of interventionsperformed by this professional. Methods: This was a retrospectivestudy conducted during the period of January 1st, 2010 to December31st, 2010, at the Morumbi Emergency Department of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein. The interventions were performed by the clinical pharmacists by means of his/her role along with the interdisciplinary team and active search in clinical charts, with daily analysis of medical prescriptions during the period of eight hours (10:00 to 19:00 from Monday to Friday. Results: A total of 3,542 medical prescriptions were written and there were 1,238 interventions. Classifications and quantities of interventions were as follows: administration route: 105 (8.48%; frequency: 73 (5.89%; dosage: 431 (35%; renal function: 14 (1.13%; compatibility: 50 (4%; dilution: 121 (9.77%; legibility: 39 (3.15%; pharmacovigilance: 7 (0.56%; adverse reaction to medications: 7 (0.56%; allergy: 35 (2.82%; infusion time: 76 (6.13%; indication: 52 (4.20%; medication reconciliation: 2 (0.16%; enteral medication administration: 38 (3%; scheduling: 7 (0.56%; specific anticoagulant protocol: 44 (3.55%; specific hypoglycemic agent protocol: 42 (3.99%. Conclusion: The study allowed the demonstration of the importance of the clinical pharmacist active in the Emergency Department. By the classification and by the number of interventions carried out, it was possible to observe that the Clinical Pharmacy Service had a great impact on the increased safety for the patient and prevention of adverse events.

  6. Overcrowding in the emergency departments: Challenges and opportunities for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Muhammad Akbar; Mian, Asad; Najeed, Fatima; Shahzad, Hira

    2015-12-01

    With the advent of Emergency Medicine, one can observe an increase in the number of Emergency Departments (ED) across the country. However, most EDs struggle due to an overwhelming number of patients. Overcrowding can lead to delays in patient care. For a city like Karachi which is an active disaster zone, preemptive preparedness is required in the face of terror threats and such overcrowding needs to be decreased to a bare minimum. The most frequent causes of prolonged length of stay (LOS) in the ED include non-availability of in-hospital beds, delays in response to subspecialty consultations and escalating medical expenses. All of these can negatively impact patient care by putting patient safety at risk and patient care in jeopardy. There is an increased risk of unintentional medical errors and a concomitant increase in unwanted lawsuits. A few simple interventions which may help alleviate this situation to some extent have been discussed.

  7. System dynamics and dysfunctionalities: levers for overcoming emergency department overcrowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Gordon D

    2011-12-01

    Overcrowding of U.S. emergency departments (EDs) is a widely recognized and growing problem. This presentation offers the perspectives of a primary care physician (PCP) examining the problem at three levels: global health policy, quality process improvement, and more intimate clinical caring. It posits that ED overcrowding is actually a symptom of 10 more fundamental problems in U.S. health care and EDs: variations/supply-demand mismatch; primary care provider shortfalls; limited after-hours access; admission throughput challenges; clinical challenges related to discontinuity patients; clinical challenges related to those with special needs; interruptions; testing logistical challenges; suboptimal information systems; and fragmented/dysfunctional health insurance system, leaving many un- and underinsured. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  8. Dog bites in children treated in a pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, L M; Gardner, M J; O'Connor, J; Amon, N

    2000-01-01

    Unintentional injury is the leading cause of death and disability among children. This study sought to describe the characteristics of dog bite injuries to aid in promoting healthy environments for children. This descriptive, retrospective study of one hospital's 1997 emergency department records detailed dog bite injuries to children and adolescents and resultant emergency treatment (N = 204). Children dog's owner was generally a parent or neighbor. Only 2 children received rabies prophylaxis. Parents and children need information about safe interactions with dogs, including community leash laws and quarantine guidelines. Nurses should know the procedures for reporting dog bite injuries to local health authorities. Interested nurses can find many opportunities to assist with community safety campaigns.

  9. Transient global amnesia: emergency department evaluation and management [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Jeremy Samuel; Nemes, Andreea; Zaurova, Milana

    2016-08-22

    Transient global amnesia is a clinically distinct syndrome characterized by the acute inability to form new memories. It can last up to 24 hours. The diagnosis is dependent on eliminating other more serious etiologies including toxic ingestions, acute strokes, complex partial seizures, and central nervous system infections. Transient global amnesia confers no known long-term risks; however, when abnormal signs or symptoms are present, they take precedence and guide the formulation of a differential diagnosis and investigation. In witnessed transient global amnesia with classic features, a minimalist approach is reasonable, avoiding overtesting, inappropriate medication, and medical interventions in favor of observation, ensuring patient safety, and reassuring patients and their families. This review provides a detailed framework for distinguishing transient global amnesia from its dangerous mimics and managing its course in the emergency department. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice].

  10. Recognizing and managing adrenal disorders in the emergency department [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutright, Amy; Ducey, Stephen; Barthold, Claudia L; Kim, Jeremy

    2017-09-22

    Primary and secondary adrenal insufficiency are underrecognized conditions among emergency department patients, affecting an estimated 10% to 20% of critically ill patients. The signs and symptoms of cortisol deficit can be nonspecific and wide-ranging, and identification and swift treatment with stress-dosing of hydrocortisone is vital to avoid life-threatening adrenal crisis. Laboratory evaluation focuses on identification of electrolyte abnormalities typical of adrenal insufficiency, and while additional testing may depend on the type and severity of symptoms, it should not delay corticosteroid replacement. This issue provides recommendations on effective management of patients presenting with adrenal insufficiency, with particular attention to the management of critically ill and septic patients, pregnant patients, and children. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice.].

  11. The transmission and interpretation of emergency department radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, J J; Grabowski, W; Mangelsdorff, A D

    1982-08-01

    Twenty-five radiographic studies representative of the spectrum of trauma cases that might present to an emergency department were selected from actual cases presenting at Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC) in San Antonio, Texas. The studies were then transmitted from a local television studio via satellite back to BAMC and three other Army hospitals. A panel of 29 physicians (11 radiologists, 7 emergency physicians, and 11 others from various specialty areas) viewed the images on commercial grade television sets and attempted to make a diagnosis. The diagnostic accuracy of the radiologists (86%) was significantly better than that of the other two groups (77% each). However, given the overall expense of a teleradiology network, this difference in accuracy - especially when translated into clinically significant errors - might not justify the establishment of such a network in terms of cost-effectiveness.

  12. Emergency department physician internet use during clinical encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Robin; Finnell, John T

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the Internet log files from emergency department workstations to determine search patterns, compared them to discharge diagnoses, and the emergency medicine curriculum as a way to quantify physician search behaviors. The log files from the computers from January 2006 to March 2010 were mapped to the EM curriculum and compared to discharge diagnoses to explore search terms and website usage by physicians and students. Physicians in the ED averaged 1.35 searches per patient encounter using Google.com and UpToDate.com 83.9% of the time. The most common searches were for drug information (23.1%) by all provider types. The majority of the websites utilized were in the third tier evidence level for evidence-based medicine (EBM). We have shown a need for a readily accessible drug knowledge base within the EMR for decision support as well as easier access to first and second tier EBM evidence.

  13. Factors associated with inappropriate utilisation of emergency department services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selasawati, H G; Naing, L; Wan Aasim, W A; Winn, T; Rusli, B N

    2007-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the associated factors and the reasons for inappropriate utilisation of Emergency Department (ED) services at Universiti Sains Malaysia Hospital. A case-control study was conducted with 170 cases from ED and 170 controls from the Outpatient Department (OPD). A self-administered questionnaire was designed and used to obtain sociodemographic data, knowledge on the functions of ED and OPD, health seeking attitude and behaviour, and reasons for seeking treatment at ED. The study found that gender, marital status, family size, shift work, perceived illness, and knowledge on the role and functions of ED and OPD were significant associated factors. The three most common reasons for inappropriate utilisation of ED were as follows: "due to severity of illness" (85%), "can't go to OPD during office hours" (42%), and "ED near my house" (27%).

  14. Hidden Grief and Lasting Emotions in Emergency Department Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Darcie; Napolitano, Nancy; Chevalier, Kelly; Pettorini-D'Amico, Susan

    2016-11-01

    The emergency department (ED) environment poses unique risks to developing moral distress and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in nurses. This impacts ED registered nurses' (RNs') ability to remain resilient. The purpose of this article is to explore the benefit of recognizing the signs and symptoms of burnout, introduce interventions to combat PTSD, and improve resiliency in ED RNs. The use of the wounded healer theory provides a framework to help nurse managers develop strategies such as critical incident stress debriefing (CISD) to address emotional distress.

  15. Geriatric nursing assessment and intervention in an emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie; Wagner, Lis; Hendriksen, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    To describe and test a model for structured nursing assessment and intervention to older people discharged from emergency department (ED). Background. Older people recently discharged from hospital are at high risk of readmission. This risk may increase when they are discharged straight home from...... assessment, the nurse made relevant referrals to the geriatric outpatient clinic, community health centre, general practitioner or made arrangements with next of kin. Results. One hundred and fifty people participated, mean age was 81.7. At discharge, they had a mean of 1.9 unresolved problems, after 1 month...

  16. Prevalence of Homelessness in the Emergency Department Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Brett J; Calogero, Cristina G; Elsayed, Kareem S; Abbasi, Osman Z; Enyart, Joshua; Friel, Timothy J; Abunamous, Yasir H; Dusza, Stephen W; Greenberg, Marna Rayl

    2017-01-01

    Introduction According to the National Alliance to End Homelessness, the national rate of homelessness has been cited as 17.7 homeless people/10,000 people in the general population, and 24.8 homeless veterans/10,000 veterans in the general population. However, it is unknown what the prevalence of homelessness is in the emergency department (ED) setting. We set out to determine the prevalence of homelessness or at risk for homelessness in the ED setting. Methods Using a five-question screenin...

  17. A practical approach to paediatric emergencies in the radiology department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Nigel McBeth [University Medical Centre, Utrecht, Division of Perioperative Care and Emergency Medicine, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2009-05-15

    Acute life-threatening events involving children in the radiology department are rare. Nonetheless, radiologists should be competent in the relatively simple procedures required to maintain or restore vital functions in paediatric patients, particularly if their practice involves seriously ill or sedated children. This article gives a practical overview of the immediate management of paediatric emergencies that the radiologist is likely to encounter, using a structured (ABCD) approach. Emphasis is given to the early recognition of respiratory embarrassment and shock, and early intervention to prevent deterioration towards circulatory arrest. The management of cardiorespiratory arrest, anaphylaxis and convulsions in children is also addressed. (orig.)

  18. Marketing and public relations in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, T A; Tilson, W; Hemingway, J

    1987-02-01

    This article outlines the elements of successful ED marketing, as well as providing definitions for terms used within the marketing process. In today's competition and rapidly changing environment, marketing and public relations are tools that every ED Medical Director may want to consider. Because the marketing process requires a great deal of time and effort, as well as a high degree of intellectual honesty, it should never be entered into without a strong commitment. However, marketing the ED can be among the most productive, stimulating, and gratifying experiences for the ED Medical Director, the emergency department physicians, and all ED service personnel.

  19. Stress in emergency departments: experiences of nurses and doctors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Healy, Sonya

    2012-01-31

    The effects of stressful incidents on emergency department (ED) staff can be profound. Witnessing aggression, violence or the death of patients, or participating in resuscitation, can be emotionally and physically demanding. Despite the frequency of these events, ED staff do not become immune to the stress they cause, and are often ill prepared and under supported to cope with them. This article reports on a study of nurses\\' and doctors\\' attitudes to, and experiences of, workplace stress in three EDs in Ireland, and offers some suggestions on how stress among ED staff can be reduced.

  20. Violence in the Emergency Department: A Global Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Allison; Kiefer, Christopher

    2017-09-01

    Violence against health care workers is an unfortunately common event. Because of several inherent factors, emergency departments are particularly vulnerable. Once an incident occurs, it often goes unreported and leads to both physical and mental trauma. Health care workers should learn to recognize the cues that patients are escalating toward violence and be familiar with various options for sedating agitated patients. If sedation is not successful, physical restraint may become necessary. There are measures that can be taken that may help minimize the likelihood of violence toward health care workers. These measures include legislation, physical design, and increased security. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of the Canadian Emergency Department Diagnosis Shortlist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Bernard; Afilalo, Marc; Boivin, Jean François; Bullard, Michael; Grafstein, Eric; Schull, Michael; Lang, Eddy; Colacone, Antoinette; Soucy, Nathalie; Xue, Xiaoqing; Segal, Eli

    2010-07-01

    Managers of emergency departments (EDs), governments and researchers would benefit from reliable data sets that characterize use of EDs. Although Canadian ED lists for chief complaints and triage acuity exist, no such list exists for diagnosis classification. This study was aimed at developing a standardized Canadian Emergency Department Diagnosis Shortlist (CED-DxS), as a subset of the full International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, with Canadian Enhancement (ICD-10-CA). Emergency physicians from across Canada participated in the revision of the ICD-10-CA through 2 rounds of the modified Delphi method. We randomly assigned chapters from the ICD-10-CA (approximately 3000 diagnoses) to reviewers, who rated the importance of including each diagnosis in the ED-specific diagnosis list. If 80% or more of the reviewers agreed on the importance of a diagnosis, it was retained for the final revision. The retained diagnoses were further aggregated and adjusted, thus creating the CED-DxS. Of the 83 reviewers, 76% were emergency medicine (EM)-trained physicians with an average of 12 years of experience in EM, and 92% were affiliated with a university teaching hospital. The modified Delphi process and further adjustments resulted in the creation of the CED-DxS, containing 837 items. The chapter with the largest number of retained diagnoses was injury and poisoning (n = 292), followed by gastrointestinal (n = 59), musculoskeletal (n = 55) and infectious disease (n = 42). Chapters with the lowest number retained were neoplasm (n = 18) and pregnancy (n = 12). We report the creation of the uniform CED-DxS, tailored for Canadian EDs. The addition of ED diagnoses to existing standardized parameters for the ED will contribute to homogeneity of data across the country.

  2. Complexities of emergency communication: clinicians' perceptions of communication challenges in a trilingual emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Jack Kh; Chan, Engle Angela; Murray, Kristen A; Slade, Diana; Matthiessen, Christian Mim

    2017-11-01

    To understand the challenges that clinicians face in communicating with patients and other clinicians within a Hong Kong trilingual emergency department. Effective communication has long been recognised as fundamental to the delivery of quality health care, especially in high-risk and time-constrained environments such as emergency departments. The issue of effective communication is particularly relevant in Hong Kong emergency departments, due to the high volume of patients and the linguistic complexity of this healthcare context. In Hong Kong, emergency department clinicians are native speakers of Chinese, but have received their medical training in English. The clinicians read and record virtually all of their medical documentation in English, yet they communicate verbally with patients in Cantonese and Mandarin. In addition, communication between clinicians occurs in spoken Cantonese, mixed with medical English. Thus, medical information is translated numerous times within one patient journey. This complex linguistic environment creates the potential for miscommunication. A mixed-methods design consisting of a quantitative survey with a sequential qualitative interview. Data were collected in a survey from a purposive sample of 58 clinicians and analysed through descriptive statistics. Eighteen of the clinicians were then invited to take part in semi-structured interviews, the data from which were then subjected to a manifest content analysis. Nearly half of the clinicians surveyed believed that medical information may be omitted or altered through repeated translation in a trilingual emergency department. Eighty-three per cent of clinicians stated that there are communication problems at triage. Over 40% said that they have difficulties in documenting medical information. Around 50% believed that long work hours reduced their ability to communicate effectively with patients. In addition, 34% admitted that they rarely or never listen to patients during a

  3. Management of information within emergencies departments in developing countries: analysis at the National Emergency Department in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahanhanzo, Yolaine Glèlè; Kpozehouen, Alphonse; Sopoh, Ghislain; Sossa-Jérôme, Charles; Ouedraogo, Laurent; Wilmet-Dramaix, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    The management of health information is a key pillar in both emergencies reception and handling facilities, given the strategic position and the potential of these facilities within hospitals, and in the monitoring of public health and epidemiology. With the technological revolution, computerization made the information systems evolve in emergency departments, especially in developed countries, with improved performance in terms of care quality, productivity and patient satisfaction. This study analyses the situation of Benin in this field, through the case of the Academic Clinic of Emergency Department of the National University Teaching Hospital of Cotonou, the national reference hospital. The study is cross-sectional and evaluative. Collection techniques are literature review and structured interviews. The components rated are resources, indicators, data sources, data management and the use-dissemination of the information through a model adapted from Health Metrics Network framework. We used quantitative and qualitative analysis. The absence of a regulatory framework restricts the operation of the system in all components and accounts for the lack and inadequacy of the dedicated resources. Dedication of more resources for this system for crucial needs such as computerization requires sensitization and greater awareness of the administrative authorities about the fact that an effective health information management system is of prime importance in this type of facility.

  4. Diagnosis of Aortic Dissection in Emergency Department Patients is Rare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M. Alter

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aortic dissection is a rare event. While the most frequent symptom is chest pain, that is a common emergency department (ED chief complaint and other diseases causing chest pain occur much more often. Furthermore, 20% of dissections are without chest pain and 6% are painless. For these reasons, diagnosing dissections may be challenging. Our goal was to determine the number of total ED and atraumatic chest pain patients for every aortic dissection diagnosed by emergency physicians. Methods: Design: Retrospective cohort. Setting: 33 suburban and urban New York and New Jersey EDs with annual visits between 8,000 and 80,000. Participants: Consecutive patients seen by emergency physicians from 1-1-1996 through 12-31-2010. Observations: We identified aortic dissection and atraumatic chest pain patients using the International Classification of Diseases 9th Revision and Clinical Modification codes. We then calculated the number of total ED and atraumatic chest pain patients for every aortic dissection, along with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results: From a database of 9.5 million ED visits, we identified 782 aortic dissections or one for every 12,200 (95% CI [11,400-13,100] visits. The mean age of dissection patients was 66±16 years and 38% were female. There were 763,000 (8% with atraumatic chest pain diagnoses. Thus, there is one dissection for every 980 (95% CI [910-1,050] atraumatic chest pain patients. Conclusion: The diagnosis of aortic dissections by emergency physicians is rare and challenging. An emergency physician seeing 3,000 to 4,000 patients a year would diagnose an aortic dissection approximately every three to four years.

  5. Trends in suicide attempts at an emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica M. Alves

    Full Text Available Objective: To characterize the profile of suicide attempts treated at an emergency department in the municipality of Arapiraca, state of Alagoas, Brazil, from 2009 to 2012. Methods: We analyzed all emergency department records containing a diagnosis of suicide attempt. Data were evaluated using Student’s t test and Pearson’s chi-square test. Significance was accepted at p<0.05. Results: We identified 2,142 cases. Suicide attempts were more frequent among women and young adults, but deaths were more frequent among men. Suicide attempts were most frequent among patients aged 10 to 39 years (81.1%. Drug intoxication (65.0% and non-drug poisoning (16.2% were significantly more prevalent than other methods of suicide. The month of April (10.6% accounted for the greatest number of cases, and July had the smallest number (5.5%. Suicide attempts were most prevalent in spring (28.3%, on Sundays (18.4% and Saturdays (16.8%, and from 12:00 p.m. to 5:59 p.m. Conclusion: Suicide prevention measures should focus on young women. Further research into the care provided to suicide attempters and better monitoring of the sale and use of medicines and poisons could be useful.

  6. EMDOC (Emergency Department overcrowding) Internet-based safety net research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Robert; Kiss, Attilla

    2008-07-01

    Emergency Department (ED) overcrowding is a national crisis with few prospective data to document its occurrence. The objective of this study was to prospectively collect data on variables involved in Emergency Department overcrowding (EMDOC) using an Internet-based data entry model. A prospective observational Internet-based study involving 18 hospitals over a 13-month period was designed. Investigators input data into the EmDOC Internet site at 10:00 p.m. on 7 random days each month. The study found that the primary reason for ED overcrowding was lack of inpatient beds. Important means were: patient-to-nurse ratio = 2.85, diversion was 7.4 h/24 h, and hospital census was 83%. From ED waiting room to an ED bed took a mean time of 209 min. The mean number of makeshift beds was 3.1. There was no single variable that was noted to define or predict overcrowding. Documentation of factors involved in ED overcrowding found that overcrowding was not just an ED problem, but a problem that occurs due to overcrowding in the entire institution.

  7. Early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at hospital emergency department

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2015-10-21

    Overcrowding is one of the most crucial issues confronting emergency departments (EDs) throughout the world. Efficient management of patient flows for ED services has become an urgent issue for most hospital administrations. Handling and detection of abnormal situations is a key challenge in EDs. Thus, the early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at EDs plays an important role from the point of view of improving management of the inspected EDs. It allows the EDs mangers to prepare for high levels of care activities, to optimize the internal resources and to predict enough hospitalization capacity in downstream care services. This study reports the development of statistical method for enhancing detection of abnormal daily patient arrivals at the ED, which able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of abnormal situations. The autoregressive moving average (ARMA)-based exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) anomaly detection scheme proposed was successfully applied to the practical data collected from the database of the pediatric emergency department (PED) at Lille regional hospital center, France.

  8. Syncope in pediatric patients presenting to an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massin, Martial M; Bourguignont, Astrid; Coremans, Christine; Comté, Laetitia; Lepage, Philippe; Gérard, Paul

    2004-08-01

    To assess the epidemiology of syncope coming to medical attention among unselected children referred to an emergency department in Western Europe. We analyzed the cause of syncope and diagnostic workup of 226 consecutive pediatric patients seen in our emergency department because of a syncopal event. Neurocardiogenic syncope and neurologic disorders were the most common diagnoses (80% and 9%, respectively). Other causes included psychologic, cardiac, respiratory, toxicologic, and metabolic problems. The neurocardiogenic and disease-related syncopes were easily identified or suspected by history and physical examination. Electrocardiography was not performed in 132 cases (58%). Most patients with suspected neurocardiogenic syncope had an electroencephalogram, and 29% were admitted to the hospital. Cardiac disorders represented 5 cases (2%); 2 had been previously misdiagnosed. Syncope in children can result from a wide variety of causes. Consequently, an evaluation that fails to approach this problem in a goal-directed fashion proves to be very expensive, time-consuming, and frustrating to all concerned. Thorough history and physical examination are usually all that are necessary to guide practitioners in choosing the diagnostic tests that apply to a given patient.

  9. Kaizen: a method of process improvement in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Gregory H; McCoin, Nicole Streiff; Lescallette, Richard; Russ, Stephan; Slovis, Corey M

    2009-12-01

    Recent position statements from health care organizations have placed a strong emphasis on continuous quality improvement (CQI). CQI finds many of its roots in kaizen, which emphasizes small, low-cost, low-risk improvements. Based on the successful Kaizen Programs at organizations such as Toyota, the authors thought the emergency department (ED) would be an ideal environment to benefit from such a program. The authors sought to create a CQI program using a suggestion-based model that did not require a large time commitment, was easy to implement, and had the potential to empower all physicians in the department. It would not take the place of other improvement efforts, but instead augment them. The hypothesis was that such a program would foster sustainable engagement of emergency physicians in system improvement efforts and lead to a continuous stream of low-cost implementable system improvement interventions. A CQI program was created for the physician staff of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, focusing on a suggestion-based model using kaizen philosophy. Lectures teaching kaizen philosophy were presented. Over the past 4 years, a methodology was developed utilizing a Web-based application, the Kaizen Tracker, which aids in the submission and implementation of suggestions that are called kaizen initiatives (KIs). The characteristics of the KIs submitted, details regarding resident and faculty participation, and the effectiveness of the Kaizen Tracker were retrospectively reviewed. There were 169, 105, and 101 KIs placed in the postimplementation calendar years 2006, 2007, and 2008, respectively. Seventy-six percent of KIs submitted thus far have identified a "process problem." Fifty-three percent of KIs submitted have led to operational changes within the ED. Ninety-three percent of the resident physicians entered at least one KI, and 73% of these residents submitted more than one KI. Sixty-nine percent of the

  10. Pain management: association with patient satisfaction among emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Hemangini C; Marco, Catherine A

    2014-04-01

    Patient satisfaction with emergency care is associated with timeliness of care, empathy, technical competence, and information delivery. Previous studies have demonstrated inconsistent findings regarding the association between pain management and patient satisfaction. This study was undertaken to determine the association between pain management and patient satisfaction among Emergency Department (ED) patients presenting with acute painful conditions. In this survey study, a standardized interview was conducted at the Emergency Department at the University of Toledo Medical Center in May-July 2011. Participants were asked to answer 18 questions pertaining to patient satisfaction. Additional data collected included demographic information, pain scores, and clinical management. Among 328 eligible participants, 289 (88%) participated. The mean triage pain score on the verbal numeric rating scale was 8.2 and the mean discharge score was 6.0. The majority of patients (52%) experienced a reduction in pain of 2 or more points. Participants received one pain medication dose (44%), two medication doses (14%), three medication doses (5%), or four medication doses (2%). Reduction in pain scores of 2 or more points was associated with a higher number of medications administered. Reduction in pain scores was associated with higher satisfaction as scored on questions of patient perceptions of adequate assessment and response to pain, and treatment of pain. There was a significant association between patient satisfaction and a reduction in pain of 2 or more points and number of medications administered. Effective pain management is associated with improved patient satisfaction among ED patients with painful conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder in Emergency Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Untara; Qamar, Iqra; Jafry, Farhana; Hassan, Mudasar; Shagufta, Shanila; Odhejo, Yassar Islamail; Ahmed, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) patients, when in crisis, are frequent visitors of emergency departments (EDs). When these patients exhibit symptoms such as aggressiveness, impulsivity, intense anxiety, severe depression, self-harm, and suicidal attempts or gestures, diagnosis, and treatment of the BPD becomes challenging for ED doctors. This review will, therefore, outline advice to physicians and health-care providers who face this challenging patient population in the EDs. Crisis intervention should be the first objective of clinicians when dealing with BPD in the emergency. For the patients with agitation, symptom-specific pharmacotherapy is usually recommended, while for non-agitated patients, short but intensive psychotherapy especially dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has a positive effect. Although various psychotherapies, either alone or integrated, are preferred modes of treatment for this group of patients, the effects of psychotherapies on BPD outcomes are small to medium. Proper risk management along with developing a positive attitude and empathy toward these patients will help them in normalizing in an emergency setting after which treatment course can be decided. PMID:28824467

  12. Exploring person-centredness in emergency departments: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Donna; McCance, Tanya; Melby, Vidar

    2016-05-01

    Person-centred approaches to care delivery have been increasingly promoted in international policy and strategy, but despite this there is evidence of failings within healthcare systems that negatively impact on the care experience for patients and staff. This paper explores the international literature on person-centredness within emergency departments (EDs). The Person-centred Practice Framework was used as the underpinning theoretical framework. This theory contends that staff must possess certain attributes to manage the care environment appropriately to deliver effective care processes in order to achieve effective person-centred outcomes for patients and staff. An initial search of the literature identified no relevant papers that discussed person-centredness as a concept within EDs. A further search using terms drawn from a definition of person-centredness revealed literature that reflected components of person-centredness. Themes that emerged included medical-technical intervention, a culture of worthiness, managing the patient journey, nurse/doctor relationships, patients' and relatives' experience of care, and ED as a stressful environment. The themes can be mapped onto the Person-centred Practice Framework, suggesting that components of person-centred practice have emerged from studies in a fragmented fashion, without consideration of person-centredness as a whole within an ED context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Conversion disorder in a neurological emergency department: Restrospective series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Cardozo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the conversion disorder in a neurological emergency department. Methods: It is common that the initial approach to this patients include the use of various diagnostic exams. In this series we reviewed 94 patients that arrived a neurological emergency room in a 3 year period.Results: 72 patients were females (76%, and the initial presumptive diagnosis were: neurovascular syndrome in 36 patients (38.3%, convulsive disorder in 20 patients (21.28%, and conversive disorder in 8 patients (8.51%. 82 patients had motor symptoms and 61 sensitive symptoms. 88 patients (93% required neuroimaging studies, 77 (81% patients underwent through basic biochemical panels. Other tests performed were: electroencephalogram in 12 patients (12.77%, electromyography in 11 patients (11.7%, lumbar punction in 8 patients (8.04% and regarding the medical consult in the care of these patients 11 were evaluated by 1 specialists, 35 (37.2% by 2 different specialties, 42 (44.63% patients required evaluation by 3, and 6 patients (6.38% required evaluation by 4 different specialties.Conclusions: Based on this data, we conclude that conversion disorders require a lot of resources in the emergency room and that the similarities with neurological diseases demands a complete workup including expensive diagnostic tools. However, this patients can be discharged safely without requiring hospitalization.

  14. How do patients with chest pain access Emergency Department care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Severen, Evie; Willemsen, Robert; Vandervoort, Pieter; Sabbe, Marc; Dinant, Geert-Jan; Buntinx, Frank

    2017-12-01

    It is important that patients with symptoms of acute coronary syndrome receive appropriate medical care as soon as possible. Little is known about the preadmission actions that patients with chest pain take before arrival at the Emergency Department (ED). This study aimed to describe the actions of patients with chest pain or pressure after onset of symptoms. What is the first action following onset of symptoms? Who is the first lay or professional person to be contacted? Which steps are taken first? How is the patient transported to the hospital? Consecutive patients, arriving at the ED of two large hospitals in Belgium, were asked additional questions during the initial assessment. Overall, 35% of 412 consecutive patients with chest pain admitted to the ED were diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome. A total of 57% contacted a GP between symptom onset and arrival at the ED. Only 32% of the patients were transported to the ED by ambulance, 16% drove themselves and 52% arrived by other means of transport (by family, neighbour, GP, public transport). In Belgium, the GP is still the first professional to be contacted for most patients. Other patients initially rely on their partner, family or friends when symptoms emerge. Too often, patients with chest pain rely on other transport to get to the ED instead of calling the Emergency Medical Services. This study included only patients who ultimately attended the ED.

  15. Patients who leave the emergency department against medical advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choung Ah; Cho, Joon Pil; Choi, Sang Cheon; Kim, Hyuk Hoon; Park, Ju Ok

    2016-06-01

    Discharge against medical advice (DAMA) from the emergency department (ED) accounts for 0.1% to 2.7% of all ED discharges. DAMA carries a risk of increased mortality and readmissions. Our aim was to investigate the general characteristics of DAMA patients and the differences between them and non-DAMA patients. We reviewed data collected by the National Emergency Medical Center between 2010 and 2011. Subjects were categorized into 2 groups, namely, the DAMA group and the non-DAMA group. We compared these groups with respect to age, gender, trauma or non-trauma status, type of hospital, health insurance, level of consciousness on admission, and diagnosis. Of 8,000,529 patients, 222,389 (2.78%) left against medical advice. The risk factors for DAMA across all age groups were as follows: no medical insurance (odds ratio [OR], 1.993), initial response to voice (OR, 2.753) or pain (OR, 2.101), trauma admission (OR, 1.126), admission to a local emergency medical center (OR, 1.215), and increased age. A high risk of DAMA was observed among patients with immune, endocrine, psychiatric, neurological, circulatory diseases, and external causes of morbidity and mortality. Although DAMA cases account for only a small percentage of hospital discharges, they are important because DAMA patients have high readmission and mortality rates. It is therefore important to understand the general characteristics and predictors of DAMA in order to improve patient outcome and minimize the economic burden on the healthcare system.

  16. Security, Violent Events, and Anticipated Surge Capabilities of Emergency Departments in Washington State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S. Weyand

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Over the past 15 years, violent threats and acts against hospital patients, staff, and providers have increased and escalated. The leading area for violence is the emergency department (ED given its 24/7 operations, role in patient care, admissions gateway, and center for influxes during acute surge events. This investigation had three objectives: to assess the current security of Washington State EDs; to estimate the prevalence of and response to threats and violence in Washington State EDs; and to appraise the Washington State ED security capability to respond to acute influxes of patients, bystanders, and media during acute surge events. Methods: A voluntary, blinded, 28-question Web-based survey developed by emergency physicians was electronically delivered to all 87 Washington State ED directors in January 2013. We evaluated responses by descriptive statistical analyses. Results: Analyses occurred after 90% (78/87 of ED directors responded. Annual censuses of the EDs ranged from < 20,000 to 100,000 patients and represented the entire spectrum of practice environments, including critical access hospitals and a regional quaternary referral medical center. Thirty-four of 75 (45% reported the current level of security was inadequate, based on the general consensus of their ED staff. Nearly two-thirds (63% of EDs had 24-hour security personnel coverage, while 28% reported no assigned security personnel. Security personnel training was provided by 45% of hospitals or healthcare systems. Sixty-nine of 78 (88% respondents witnessed or heard about violent threats or acts occurring in their ED. Of these, 93% were directed towards nursing staff, 90% towards physicians, 74% towards security personnel, and 51% towards administrative personnel. Nearly half (48% noted incidents directed towards another patient, and 50% towards a patient’s family or friend. These events were variably reported to the hospital administration. After an acute

  17. Clinical Aspects and Emergent Management of Snake Bites Presented to Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedriye Sonmez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Evaluating the epidemiologic characteristics and management of snake bites presenting to emergency departments. Material and Method: In this retrospective study 74 cases of snakebites admitted to Emergency Department of Diyarbakir Training and Research Hospital between 2008 and 2009 were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Fourty-six (62.2% of patients were male and 28 (37.8% were female. Mean age of the study population was 34.85±19.17 (min 7- max 80 years. Most of the snakebites occurred between 18.00 to 06.00 hours and at home (73%. 79.7% of snake bites occurred to upper extremities. %93 of cases had intravenous administration of antivenin (one dose. Neither none of the patients needed recurrent administration. Discussion: Snake bites are still a major public health problem especially in rural areas. Particularly emergency care physicians should be adequately capable and sophisticated in multidisciplinary management of snake bites.

  18. Work conditions, mental workload and patient care quality: a multisource study in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Matthias; Müller, Andreas; Holland, Stephan; Wedel, Susanne; Woloshynowych, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Workflow interruptions, multitasking and workload demands are inherent to emergency departments (ED) work systems. Potential effects of ED providers' work on care quality and patient safety have, however, been rarely addressed. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and associations of ED staff's workflow interruptions, multitasking and workload with patient care quality outcomes. We applied a mixed-methods design in a two-step procedure. First, we conducted a time-motion study to observe the rate of interruptions and multitasking activities. Second, during 20-day shifts we assessed ED staff's reports on workflow interruptions, multitasking activities and mental workload. Additionally, we assessed two care quality indicators with standardised questionnaires: first, ED patients' evaluations of perceived care quality; second, patient intrahospital transfers evaluated by ward staff. The study was conducted in a medium-sized community ED (16 600 annual visits). ED personnel's workflow was disrupted on average 5.63 times per hour. 30% of time was spent on multitasking activities. During 20 observations days, data were gathered from 76 ED professionals, 239 patients and 205 patient transfers. After aggregating daywise data and controlling for staffing levels, prospective associations revealed significant negative associations between ED personnel's mental workload and patients' perceived quality of care. Conversely, workflow interruptions were positively associated with patient-related information on discharge and overall quality of transfer. Our investigation indicated that ED staff's capability to cope with demanding work conditions was associated with patient care quality. Our findings contribute to an improved understanding of the complex effects of interruptions and multitasking in the ED environment for creating safe and efficient ED work and care systems. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  19. Key indicators of overcrowding in Canadian emergency departments: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospina, Maria B; Bond, Kenneth; Schull, Michael; Innes, Grant; Blitz, Sandra; Rowe, Brian H

    2007-09-01

    To identify the level of consensus among a group of Canadian emergency department (ED) experts on the importance of a set of indicators to document ED overcrowding. A 2-round Delphi survey was conducted from February 2005 to April 2005, with a multidisciplinary group of 38 Canadian experts in various aspects of ED operations who rated the relevance of 36 measures and ranked their relative importance as indicators of ED overcrowding. The response rates for the first and second rounds were 84% and 87%, respectively. The most important indicator identified by the experts was the percentage of the ED occupied by inpatients (mean on a 7-point Likert-type scale 6.53, standard deviation [SD] 0.80). The other 9 indicators, in order of the importance attributed, were the total number of ED patients (mean 6.35, SD 0.75), the total time in the ED (mean 6.16, SD 1.04), the percentage of time that the ED was at or above capacity (mean 6.16, SD 1.08), the overall bed occupancy (mean 6.19, SD 0.93), the time from bed request to bed assignment (mean 6.06, SD 1.08), the time from triage to care (mean 5.84, SD 1.08) the physician satisfaction (mean 5.84, SD 1.22), the time from bed availability to ward transfer (mean 5.53, SD 1.72) and the number of staffed acute care beds (mean 5.53, SD 1.57). Ten clinically important measures were prioritized by the participants as relevant indicators of ED overcrowding. Indicators derived from consensus techniques have face validity, but their metric properties must be tested to ensure their effectiveness for identifying ED overcrowding in different settings.

  20. Decreasing troponin turnaround time in the emergency department using the central laboratory: A process improvement study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelstler, Arlene M; Rowland, Ralph; Theoret, Jennifer; Takla, Robert B; Szpunar, Susan; Patel, Shraddha P; Lowry, Andrew M; Pena, Margarita E

    2015-03-01

    To implement collaborative process improvement measures to reduce emergency department (ED) troponin turnaround time (TAT) to less than 60min using central laboratory. This was an observational, retrospective data study. A multidisciplinary team from the ED and laboratory identified opportunities and developed a new workflow model. Process changes were implemented in ED patient triage, staffing, lab collection and processing. Data collected included TAT of door-to-order, order-to-collect, collect-to-received, received-to-result, door-to-result, ED length of stay, and hemolysis rate before (January-August, 2011) and after (September 2011-June 2013) process improvement. After process improvement and implementation of the new workflow model, decreased median TAT (in min) was seen in door-to-order (54 [IQR43] vs. 11 [IQR20]), order-to-collect (15 [IQR 23] vs. 10 [IQR12]), collect-to-received (6 [IQR8] vs. 5 [IQR5]), received-to-result (30 [IQR12] vs. 24 [IQR11]), and overall door-to-result (117 [IQR60] vs. 60 [IQR40]). A troponin TAT of <60min was realized beginning in May 2012 (59 [IQR39]). Hemolysis rates decreased (14.63±0.74 vs. 3.36±1.99, p<0.0001), as did ED length of stay (5.87±2.73h vs. 5.15±2.34h, p<0.0001). Conclusion Troponin TAT of <60min using a central laboratory was achieved with collaboration between the ED and the laboratory; additional findings include a decreased ED length of stay. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Innovations in Emergency Nursing: Transforming Emergency Care Through a Novel Nurse-Driven Emergency Department Telehealth Express Care Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Catherine; Krinsky, Rhonda; Sharma, Rahul

    2018-04-06

    Emergency department overcrowding and acuity are significant challenges to patients and staff. Low-acuity patients have extended wait times, and decreased satisfaction can have a negative effect on patient flow. A multidisciplinary ED team developed and launched the first ED-based Telehealth Express Care Service, where patients who present to the emergency department with minor complaints are offered a "virtual visit" with a board-certified emergency physician located remotely. More than 6 months into the program, more than 1,300 patients have been treated. These patients experienced decreased length of stay (2.5 hours to 38 minutes) and increased satisfaction. The program is very well received by staff members who appreciate its efficiency. Telehealth has the potential to optimize ED efficiency, increase patient satisfaction, and promote safe, high-quality provision of care. Copyright © 2018 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnosing Achilles tendon injuries in the emergency department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gibbons, Lynda

    2013-09-01

    Achilles tendon (AT) injury is an overuse injury often seen in professional and recreational athletes. It tends to affect men, particularly those in their thirties and forties, more than women, and is typically seen in people who are intermittently active. To ensure AT ruptures are identified and treated effectively, early intervention in emergency departments (EDs) is crucial. This article discusses how advanced nurse practitioners can use their comprehensive problem-solving, clinical decision-making and clinical judgement skills to manage patients who present with suspected AT injury. It also describes the anatomy of tendon rupture, the aetiology and mechanism of injuries, and the importance of assessment and diagnostic tools, therapeutic techniques and management strategies. Finally, it considers the psychological effect this injury can have on patients, while in the ED and after discharge. A case study is included as an example of ED management.

  3. Analysis of a US Department of Energy Emergent Technologies Cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strader, Cliff; Ellis, Elizabeth; Barrie, Martin D; Tankersley, William; Wallace, Phil

    2012-12-12

    As a major user of engineered nanoparticles, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) uses various methods to monitor the health of emergent technologies workers (ETW) who handle or could potentially be exposed to unbound engineered nanoparticles (UNP). Using data from DOE’s Illness and Injury Surveillance Program (IISP), Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) created a registry of ETWs. IISP currently tracks 125,000 workers at 14 DOE facilities. Workers in IISP, who were classified as ETWs, were placed in a separate database using Microsoft Access. Using SAS (Version 9.2; Cary, NC), the health status of this cohort was analyzed by a variety of different variables such as age, gender, occupation, years of employment, number of years classified as an ETW, and site.

  4. Injury patterns in children with frequent emergency department visits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, B

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare injury patterns in children with many and few emergency department (ED) visits in order to reveal the causes for the frequent visits. METHODS: Three cohorts of Danish children (total 579 721 children) were followed for three years when their ages were 0-2, 6-8, and 12......-14 years. Information on all ED visits was obtained from the Danish National Patient Registry. Injury type, place of accident, injury mechanism, admission, and distance to ED were compared between children with frequent ED visits (five or more during the three years) and children with only one visit....... RESULTS: Children with frequent visits had a different injury pattern with 0-46% more superficial injuries and 25-82% more dislocations, sprains, and strains. There was 20-30% fewer fractures and 12% fewer falls from a higher level. 15-51% fewer were admitted. CONCLUSIONS: Children with many ED visits had...

  5. Myasthenia gravis with acute respiratory failure in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Hasan Huseyin; Uca, Ali Ulvi; Teke, Turgut; Altas, Mustafa; Karatas, Emine

    2016-06-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is defined as a sudden malfunction in the ability of respiratory system to maintain adequate gas exchange. Acute hypercapnic respiratory failure develops as a result of ventilation deficiency and it is defined as an increase of PaCO 2 above 45 mmHg. Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is a sporadically developing auto-immune deficiency where the neuro-muscular transmission is affected and it is one of the important reasons for neurologically-induced respiratory distress. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old male patient previously undiagnosed MG, who presented with ARF. MG is not a common entity that we encounter daily. Patients on occasions may present to the emergency department because of acute exacerbation. Though most of them were known cases, we should be aware of some unrecognized cases and should consider MG as a differential diagnosis for patients with acute respiratory failure.

  6. The effect of boarders on emergency department process flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Eoin; Saunders, Jean; Cummins, Fergal

    2014-05-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding with boarders and waiting times are a significant concern in many countries. We aim to show the relationship between boarders in the ED and the percentage time to disposition in under 6 h for our ED patients. A review was carried out to show the percentage of patients presenting to the ED compliant with a 6-h standard per day compared to the number of attendances, the number of admissions to the hospital, and the number of boarders in the ED per day. Over the 2-year study period, there was an average 0.37% fall in the ED's rate of compliance per day, with a 6-h standard for each boarder in the ED. Boarding patients in the ED has a negative effect on compliance with our 6-h standard of time to disposition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Health Information Technology Adoption in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selck, Frederic W; Decker, Sandra L

    2016-02-01

    To describe the trend in health information technology (IT) systems adoption in hospital emergency departments (EDs) and its effect on ED efficiency and resource use. 2007-2010 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey - ED Component. We assessed changes in the percent of visits to EDs with health IT capability and the estimated effect on waiting time to see a provider, visit length, and resource use. The percent of ED visits that took place in an ED with at least a basic health IT or an advanced IT system increased from 25.2 and 3.1 percent in 2007 to 69.1 and 30.6 percent in 2010, respectively (p Health Research and Educational Trust.

  8. Cycling Injuries Presenting to an Irish Emergency Department

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    J Foley, J

    2016-06-01

    There is little published data on cycling injuries in Ireland and the present study aims to describe the cycling related injuries presenting to the emergency department (ED), of a tertiary urban university hospital. This is a retrospective review of cycling-related injuries presenting to the ED of St. Vincent’s University Hospital (SVUH) from 1st of January to 31st of December 2014. There were 534 cycling related injuries presenting to the ED during the study period. Just over 71% of the patients were male, and 14.8% of patients presented following a collision with a motor vehicle. Forty patients required admission to hospital following their injury with 6 of these patients spending time in the intensive care unit. Cycling is now a very popular means of transport and exercise activity in Ireland and using hospital based data, it is possible that EDs may provide a vector for guiding injury prevention strategies in the future

  9. Emergency team calls for critically ill non-trauma patients in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Marker; Do, Hien Quoc; Rasmussen, Søren W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Handling critically ill patients is a complex task for Emergency Department (ED) personnel. Initial treatment is of major importance and requires adequately experienced ED doctors to initiate and decide for the right medical or surgical treatment. Our aim was, with regard to clinical...... presentation, management and mortality to describe adult non-trauma patients that upon ED arrival elicited emergency team calls. METHODS: An observational study of adult patients (≥ 18 years) admitted to a regional ED with conditions that elicited acute team activation and additional emergency team...... consultation calls for non-ED specialist physicians. Emergency team calls were two-tiered with 'orange' and 'red' calls. Additionally, intensive care unit (ICU) admission charts were reviewed to identify the total number of adult non-trauma and non-cardiac arrest patients admitted to the ICU from the ED during...

  10. Dental Trauma in a Pediatric Emergency Department Referral Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Emily; Hickey, Patricia; Nguyen-Tran, Thuy; Louie, Jeff

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe dental and associated oral injuries in a pediatric population that presents to an emergency department. We performed a retrospective study and identified children from January 2007 to September 2011. Charts were reviewed for any subject, age from newborn to younger than 19 years, based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes for any dental or oral injury. Data abstraction included demographics, time of day of presentation, location and identification of tooth (s) injured, management, and disposition. We identified 108 children with dental and if present, associated oral injuries. The median age was 12.3 years, the most common tooth injured were the primary (25.9%) or permanent (62%) upper central incisors, and the majority of subjects presented in the afternoon (mean time was 3:50 PM, SD ±24 minutes). A large proportion of dental injuries occurred in patients with permanent dentation (62%) and half of all children had more than 1 tooth injury. The majority of children (75%) were evaluated by either pediatric dental, oral surgery, or otolaryngology services, whereas 3.7% of the cases required multiple services. Twenty-five percent of children had an associated jaw fracture. Eighty-three percent of children were discharged home, of those, 49.1% were prescribed opioids, and 38.3% oral antibiotics. Emergency departments are often relied upon to evaluate and treat simple and complex dental and oral injuries. The ability to use a multidisciplinary team to manage pediatric oral and dental trauma is essential for care.

  11. Emergency department staff preparedness for mass casualty events involving children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, Michal; Avraham, Miri; Nasi-Bashari, Anat; Idelman, Sigalit; Peretz, Yaniv; Morag, Shani; Silner, Dina; Weiss, Gali

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, the World Health Organization in general, and Israel in particular, have dealt with mass casualty events (MCEs) resulting from terrorism. Children are the casualties in many of these events-a reality that forces hospitals to prepare to deal with such a scenario. A literature review designed to identify unique recommendations regarding pediatric MCEs highlights both a lack of existing training programs and uncertainty on the part of health care staff when dealing with these events. The purpose of the study was to examine the preparedness level of emergency department staff to deal with MCEs involving pediatric casualties. The study included 104 physicians and nurses working in, or responding to, the emergency department at a hospital in Israel. The study included a 41-item questionnaire examining perception, approaches, and staff knowledge regarding dealing with pediatric MCEs versus those involving adults. The reliability of all sections of the questionnaire ranged between Chronbach's alpha coefficient 0.6 alpha-0.94. The preparedness levels for MCEs involving children were found to be low. Study participants ranked the likelihood of a pediatric MCE lower than one involving adults, while ranking significantly higher (P = .000) their ability to cope mentally and the knowledge and skills required when treating adults involved in MCEs. While nurses ranked higher than physicians regarding their knowledge and skills in dealing with pediatric MCE casualties, the level of knowledge for MCEs involving children was low in all subjects. Staff agreement for the parent of an MCE victim to be present during treatment was medium-low. On the basis of these findings, additional research involving a larger number of individuals and hospitals is indicated to determine if these results are consistent throughout the region.

  12. Paediatric emergency department overcrowding and adverse patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Melissa; Meckler, Garth; Doan, Quynh

    2017-10-01

    General emergency department crowding negatively impacts patient care, and increases patient morbidity. This study seeks to determine if markers of paediatric emergency department (PED) flow are independently associated with negative outcomes and increased health care utilization. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of PED visits from 2008 to 2012. Data were pulled from an electronic administrative database. Using multivariate logistic regression models, we measured the association between odds of adverse outcomes (hospital/paediatric intensive care unit [PICU] admission, unscheduled return visits and mortality) with markers of PED flow (shift mean length of stay [LOS] and daily rate of patients leaving without being seen [LWBS]). We found an association between the daily LWBS proportion and the odds of being admitted to the hospital (odds ratio [OR]: 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2, 3.7), as well as admission to the PICU (OR: 8.9; 95% CI: 1.1, 71.3). We found a statistically significant increase in the odds of admission if seen during shifts in the third or fourth quartile mean shift LOS. We observed lower odds of returning to the PED with increased daily LWBS proportions (OR: 0.4; 95% CI: 0.2, 0.7), but found no association between the odds of returning to the PED and mean shift LOS. While we found an association between our pre-defined measures of adverse outcomes and markers of PED flow (or crowding), further studies are needed to determine whether PED overcrowding is the cause or effect of increased hospital and PICU admissions.

  13. Costochondritis. A prospective analysis in an emergency department setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disla, E; Rhim, H R; Reddy, A; Karten, I; Taranta, A

    1994-11-14

    Costochondritis (CC) is a common, but poorly understood condition among patients with chest wall pain. We have prospectively analyzed distinctive features of patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain and CC. Patients with a chief complaint of chest pain, not due to trauma, fever, or malignancy, were prospectively evaluated for the presence of CC and compared with another chest pain group without CC. Of 122 consecutive patients studied, 36 had CC (30%) and in 17 the pain induced reproduced the original one (15%). Women made up 69% of the patients with CC (vs 31% of control subjects) and Hispanics 47% (vs 24% of control subjects). Only three patients (8%) with CC met the American College of Rheumatology criteria for fibromyalgia, while none of the control subjects did. Widespread pain was more common in the CC group (42% vs 5%). The mean sedimentation rate in the CC group was 44 +/- 31 mm/h vs 41 +/- 31 mm/h in the control group. The acute myocardial infarction rate was 6% in the CC group vs 28% in the control group. Rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis were diagnosed in three and two patients, respectively, of 32 patients with CC cases. One year later, 11 (55%) of 21 patients with CC were still suffering from chest pain, but only one third still had definite CC. Costochondritis is common among patients with chest pain in an emergency department setting, with a higher frequency among women and Hispanics. It is associated with fibromyalgia in only a minority of cases. Patients with CC appear to have a lower frequency of acute myocardial infarction. Spontaneous resolution is seen in most cases at 1 year.

  14. Pain management of acute appendicitis in Canadian pediatric emergency departments.

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    Robb, Andrea L; Ali, Samina; Poonai, Naveen; Thompson, Graham C

    2017-11-01

    Children with suspected appendicitis are at risk for suboptimal pain management. We sought to describe pain management patterns for suspected appendicitis across Canadian pediatric emergency departments (PEDs). A retrospective medical record review was undertaken at 12 Canadian PEDs. Children ages 3 to 17 years who were admitted to the hospital in February or October 2010 with suspected appendicitis were included. Patients were excluded if partially assessed or treated at another hospital. Data were abstracted using a study-specific, standardized electronic data extraction tool. The primary outcome was the proportion of children who received analgesia while in the emergency department (ED). Secondary outcomes included the proportion of children receiving intravenous (IV) morphine and the timing of analgesic provision. A total of 619 health records were abstracted; mean (SD) patient age was 11.4 (3.5) years. Sixty-one percent (381/616) of patients received analgesia in the ED; 42.8% (264/616) received IV morphine. Other analgesic agents provided included oral acetaminophen (23.5% [145/616]) and oral ibuprofen (5.8% [36/616]). The median (IQR) initial dose of IV morphine was 0.06 (0.04, 0.09) mg/kg. The median (IQR) time from triage to the initial dose of analgesia was 196 (101, 309.5) minutes. Forty-three percent (117/269) of children receiving analgesia received the initial dose following surgical consultation; 43.7% (121/277) received their first analgesic after abdominal ultrasound was performed. Suboptimal and delayed analgesia remains a significant issue for children with suspected appendicitis in Canadian PEDs. This suggests a role for multidimensional knowledge translation interventions and care protocols to improve timely access to analgesia.

  15. Application of lean manufacturing techniques in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Eric W; Singh, Sabi; Cheung, Dickson S; Wyatt, Christopher C; Nugent, Andrew S

    2009-08-01

    "Lean" is a set of principles and techniques that drive organizations to continually add value to the product they deliver by enhancing process steps that are necessary, relevant, and valuable while eliminating those that fail to add value. Lean has been used in manufacturing for decades and has been associated with enhanced product quality and overall corporate success. To evaluate whether the adoption of Lean principles by an Emergency Department (ED) improves the value of emergency care delivered. Beginning in December 2005, we implemented a variety of Lean techniques in an effort to enhance patient and staff satisfaction. The implementation followed a six-step process of Lean education, ED observation, patient flow analysis, process redesign, new process testing, and full implementation. Process redesign focused on generating improvement ideas from frontline workers across all departmental units. Value-based and operational outcome measures, including patient satisfaction, expense per patient, ED length of stay (LOS), and patient volume were compared for calendar year 2005 (pre-Lean) and periodically after 2006 (post-Lean). Patient visits increased by 9.23% in 2006. Despite this increase, LOS decreased slightly and patient satisfaction increased significantly without raising the inflation adjusted cost per patient. Lean improved the value of the care we delivered to our patients. Generating and instituting ideas from our frontline providers have been the key to the success of our Lean program. Although Lean represents a fundamental change in the way we think of delivering care, the specific process changes we employed tended to be simple, small procedure modifications specific to our unique people, process, and place. We, therefore, believe that institutions or departments aspiring to adopt Lean should focus on the core principles of Lean rather than on emulating specific process changes made at other institutions.

  16. Human bite wounds: a swiss emergency department experience.

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    Tabbara, Malek; Hatzigianni, Panagiota; Fux, Christoph; Zimmermann, Heinz; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K

    2012-04-01

     Human bites (HB) are the third most common bite wound diagnosed in emergency departments, after dog and cat bites. Management of HB can be challenging, given the high risk of infection associated with multiorganism-rich oral flora. Recognition and early aggressive treatment are essential steps in preventing infections and other associated complications. A retrospective, 10-year electronic chart review was performed, which identified 104 HB. Diagnosis, treatment, and outcome were noted for each case. Most of the patients were male, with a male:female ratio of 4:1. A majority of patients (n = 53, 51%) presented with finger and hand injuries. Only 13.8% were bitten on the head or neck, and 25% on the upper limbs. The remainder (35.2%) of patients sustained injuries to other body parts. Twelve operations were necessary and performed by plastic and hand surgeons. More than half of the patients (60.5%) received antibiotic therapy, and 84.6% of the patients had their tetanus prophylaxis administered or received a booster by the time of treatment. Only 40.4% of patients had a post-bite serology test to rule out bloodborne viral infections, none of whom tested positive. The viral status of the biter was known in two cases. The goals of HB management are to minimize infection risk and its complications, and to prevent the transmission of systemic infections, such as hepatitis B/C and HIV. Accurate documentation and a management algorithm should be instituted in emergency departments in order to achieve these goals. .

  17. Lethal means access and assessment among suicidal emergency department patients

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    Betz, Marian E.; Miller, Matthew; Barber, Catherine; Beaty, Brenda; Miller, Ivan; Camargo, Carlos A.; Boudreaux, Edwin D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Reducing access to lethal means (especially firearms) might prevent suicide, but counseling of at-risk individuals about this strategy may not be routine. Among emergency department (ED) patients with suicidal ideation or attempts (SI/SA), we sought to describe home firearm access and examine ED provider assessment of access to lethal means. Methods This secondary analysis used data from the Emergency Department Safety Assessment and Follow-up Evaluation, a 3-phase, 8-center study of adult ED patients with SI/SA (2010-2013). Research staff surveyed participants about suicide-related factors (including home firearms) and later reviewed the ED chart (including documented assessment of lethal means access). Results Among 1358 patients with SI/SA, 11% (95%CI 10-13%) reported ≥1 firearm at home; rates varied across sites (range: 6% to 26%) but not over time. On chart review, 50% (95%CI 47-52%) of patients had documentation of lethal means access assessment. Frequency of documented assessment increased over study phases (40% to 60%, pfirearm ownership rates. Among the 337 (25%, 95%CI 23-27%) patients discharged to home, 55% (95%CI 49-60%) had no documentation of lethal means assessment; of these, 13% (95%CI 8-19; n=24) actually had ≥1 firearm at home. Among all those reporting ≥1 home firearm to study staff, only half (50%, 95%CI 42-59) had provider documentation of assessment of lethal means access. Conclusions Among these ED patients with SI/SA, many did not have documented assessment of home access to lethal means, including patients who were discharged home and had ≥1 firearm at home. PMID:26989850

  18. Comparative emergency department resource utilisation across age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, Ellen; Martin-Khan, Melinda G; Gray, Leonard C

    2017-12-11

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to assess comparative emergency department (ED) resource utilisation across age groups. Methods A retrospective analysis of data collected in the National Non-admitted Patient Emergency Department Care Database was undertaken to assess comparative ED resource utilisation across six age groups (0-14, 15-35, 36-64, 65-74, 75-84 and ≥85 years) with previously used surrogate markers of ED resource utilisation. Results Older people had significantly higher resource utilisation for their individual ED episodes of care than younger people, with the effect increasing with advancing age. Conclusion With ED care of older people demonstrated to be more resource intensive than care for younger people, the projected increase in older person presentations anticipated with population aging will have a magnified effect on ED services. These predicted changes in demand for ED care will only be able to be optimally managed if Australian health policy, ED funding instruments and ED models of care are adjusted to take into account the specific care and resource needs of older people. What is known about the topic? Current Australian ED funding models do not adjust for patient age. Several regional studies have suggested higher resource utilisation of ED patients aged ≥65 years. Anticipated rapid population aging mandates that contribution of age to ED visit resource utilisation be further explored. What does this paper add? The present study of national Australian ED presentations compared ED resource utilisation across age groups using surrogate markers of ED cost. Older people were found to have significantly higher resource utilisation in the ED, with the effect increasing further with advancing age. What are the implications for practitioners? The higher resource utilisation of older people in the ED warrants a review of current ED funding models to ensure that they will continue to meet the needs of an aging population.

  19. Duration of patients’ visits to the hospital emergency department

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    Karaca Zeynal

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Length of stay is an important indicator of quality of care in Emergency Departments (ED. This study explores the duration of patients’ visits to the ED for which they are treated and released (T&R. Methods Retrospective data analysis and multivariate regression analysis were conducted to investigate the duration of T&R ED visits. Duration for each visit was computed by taking the difference between admission and discharge times. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD for 2008 were used in the analysis. Results The mean duration of T&R ED visit was 195.7 minutes. The average duration of ED visits increased from 8 a.m. until noon, then decreased until midnight at which we observed an approximately 70-minute spike in average duration. We found a substantial difference in mean duration of ED visits (over 90 minutes between Mondays and other weekdays during the transition time from the evening of the day before to the early morning hours. Black / African American patients had a 21.4-minute longer mean duration of visits compared to white patients. The mean duration of visits at teaching hospitals was substantially longer than at non-teaching hospitals (243.8 versus 175.6 minutes. Hospitals with large bed size were associated with longer duration of visits (222.2 minutes when compared to hospitals with small bed size (172.4 minutes or those with medium bed size (166.5 minutes. The risk-adjusted results show that mean duration of visits on Mondays are longer by about 4 and 9 percents when compared to mean duration of visits on non-Monday workdays and weekends, respectively. Conclusions The duration of T&R ED visits varied significantly by admission hour, day of the week, patient volume, patient characteristics, hospital characteristics and area characteristics.

  20. The Effect of Emergency Department Overcrowding on Efficiency of Emergency Medicine Residents' Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzghabaei, Anita; Shojaee, Majid; Alimohammadi, Hossein; Derakhshanfar, Hojjat; Kashani, Parvin; Nassiriabrishamchi, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Creating a calm and stress-free environment affects education significantly. The effects of the emergency department overcrowding (EDO) on the training of emergency medicine residents (EMR) is a highly debated subject. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of EDO on efficiency of EMR's education. In this cross-sectional study, the effects of overcrowding on EMR's education in the resuscitation room and acute care unit. Data collection was done using a questionnaire, which was filled out by the second year EMRs. The crowding level was calculated based on the national emergency department overcrowding scale (NEDOCS). The relationship between the two studied variables was evaluated using independent sample t-test and SPSS 21 statistical software. 130 questionnaires were filled out during 61 shifts. 47 (77.05%) shifts were overcrowded. The attend's ability to teach was not affected by overcrowding in the resuscitation room (p=0.008). The similar results were seen regarding the attend's training ability in the acute care unit. It seems that the emergency department overcrowding has no effect on the quality of education to the EMRs.

  1. The Effect of Emergency Department Overcrowding on Efficiency of Emergency Medicine Residents’ Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzghabaei, Anita; Shojaee, Majid; Alimohammadi, Hossein; Derakhshanfar, Hojjat; Kashani, Parvin; Nassiriabrishamchi, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Creating a calm and stress-free environment affects education significantly. The effects of the emergency department overcrowding (EDO) on the training of emergency medicine residents (EMR) is a highly debated subject. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of EDO on efficiency of EMR’s education. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the effects of overcrowding on EMR’s education in the resuscitation room and acute care unit. Data collection was done using a questionnaire, which was filled out by the second year EMRs. The crowding level was calculated based on the national emergency department overcrowding scale (NEDOCS). The relationship between the two studied variables was evaluated using independent sample t-test and SPSS 21 statistical software. Results: 130 questionnaires were filled out during 61 shifts. 47 (77.05%) shifts were overcrowded. The attend’s ability to teach was not affected by overcrowding in the resuscitation room (p=0.008). The similar results were seen regarding the attend’s training ability in the acute care unit. Conclusion: It seems that the emergency department overcrowding has no effect on the quality of education to the EMRs. PMID:26495404

  2. The Effect of Emergency Department Overcrowding on Efficiency of Emergency Medicine Residents’ Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Sabzghabaei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Creating a calm and stress-free environment affects education significantly. The effects of the emergency department overcrowding (EDO on the training of emergency medicine residents (EMR is a highly debated subject. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of EDO on efficiency of EMR’s education. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the effects of overcrowding on EMR’s education in the resuscitation room and acute care unit. Data collection was done using a questionnaire, which was filled out by the second year EMRs.  The crowding level was calculated based on the national emergency department overcrowding scale (NEDOCS. The relationship between the two studied variables was evaluated using independent sample t-test and SPSS 21 statistical software. Results: 130 questionnaires were filled out during 61 shifts. 47 (77.05% shifts were overcrowded. The attend’s ability to teach was not affected by overcrowding in the resuscitation room (p=0.008. The similar results were seen regarding the attend’s training ability in the acute care unit. Conclusion: It seems that the emergency department overcrowding has no effect on the quality of education to the EMRs.

  3. Characteristics of frequent emergency department presenters to an Australian emergency medicine network

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    Markham Donna

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To describe the characteristics of emergency department (ED patients defined as frequent presenters (FP presenting to an Australian emergency department network and compare these with a cohort of non-frequent presenters (NFP. Method A retrospective chart review utilising an electronic emergency medicine patient medical record database was performed on patients presenting to Southern Health EDs from March 2009 to March 2010. Non-frequent presenters were defined as patients presenting less than 5 times and frequent presenters as presenting 8 or more times in the study period. Characteristics of both groups were described and compared. Results During the 12-month study period there were 540 FP patients with 4549 admissions and 73,089 NFP patients with 100,943 admissions. FP patients were slightly older with a significant increase in frequency of patients between the ages of 70 to 79 years and they were more likely to be divorced or separated than NFP patients. Frequent presenters to the emergency department were more likely to utilise the ambulance service to arrive at the hospital, or in the custody of police than NFP patients. FPs were more likely to be admitted to hospital, more likely to have an admission to a mental health bed than NFP patients and more likely to self-discharge from the emergency department while waiting for care. Conclusions There are major implications for the utilisation of limited ED resources by frequent presenters. By further understanding the characteristics of FP we may be able to address the specific health care needs of this population in more efficient and cost effective ways. Further research analysing the effectiveness of targeted multidisciplinary interventions aiming to reduce the frequency of ED attendances may be warranted.

  4. Analysis of Trauma Cases Admitted to the Emergency Department

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    Tamer Durdu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Trauma is a serious problem affecting especially the young population in the world. In our study, we aimed to investigate to the clinical and demographic characteristics of trauma cases admitted to our emergency department. Material and Method: The research data were collected from 1267 patients who applied to the Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital Emergency Service with trauma. The patients’ demographic data, vital sign and symptoms at the application time, the trauma mechanism, requested consultations, and the patients’ discharge or hospitalization procedure were recorded on the forms. Results: The average age of the patients was determined as 35.3±15.4. Male ratio of the patients was 75.4%. The most frequently trauma type was resulted from motorized vehicle accident (55.8%. While the mechanism of blunt trauma was significantly at a high rate (83.1%, the most frequently exposed anatomical region was upper extremities (44.8%. Discussion: Trauma affects young adult males more frequently.

  5. Managing pediatric dental trauma in a hospital emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jonathan; Sheller, Barbara; Velan, Elizabeth; Caglar, Derya; Scott, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) examine types of dental trauma presenting to a hospital emergency department (ED); (2) describe the medical services provided to these patients; and (3) quantify time spent during ED encounters for dental trauma emergencies. Records of 265 patients who presented to the ED with dental trauma over a three-year period were reviewed. Demographics, injury types, triage acuity, pain scores, and dental/medical treatment and times were analyzed. Patient demographics and injury types were similar to previous studies. Eighty-two percent of patients received mid-level triage scores; 41 percent of patients had moderate to severe pain. The most frequently provided medical services were administration of analgesics and/or prescriptions (78 percent). The mean times were: 51 minutes waiting for a physician; 55 minutes with dentists; and 176 minutes total time. Higher triage acuity and pain levels resulted in significantly longer wait times for physician assessment. Dental evaluation, including treatment, averaged 32 percent of time spent at the hospital. A dental clinic is the most efficient venue for treating routine dental trauma. Patients in this study spent the majority of time waiting for physicians and receiving nondental services. Most patients required no medical intervention beyond prescriptions commonly used in dental practice.

  6. Emergency Department Frequent Users for Acute Alcohol Intoxication

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    Marc L. Martel

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A subset of frequent users of emergency services are those who use the emergency department (ED for acute alcohol intoxication. This population and their ED encounters have not been previously described. Methods: This was a retrospective, observational, cohort study of patients presenting to the ED for acute alcohol intoxication between 2012 and 2016. We collected all data from the electronic medical record. Frequent users for alcohol intoxication were defined as those with greater than 20 visits for acute intoxication without additional medical chief complaints in the previous 12 months. We used descriptive statistics to evaluate characteristics of frequent users for alcohol intoxication, as well as their ED encounters. Results: We identified 32,121 patient encounters. Of those, 325 patients were defined as frequent users for alcohol intoxication, comprising 11,370 of the encounters during the study period. The median maximum number of encounters per person for alcohol intoxication in a one-year period was 47 encounters (range 20 to 169. Frequent users were older (47 years vs. 39 years, and more commonly male (86% vs. 71%. Frequent users for alcohol intoxication had higher rates of medical and psychiatric comorbidities including liver disease, chronic kidney disease, ischemic vascular disease, dementia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, history of traumatic brain injury, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Conclusion: In this study, we identified a group of ED frequent users who use the ED for acute alcohol intoxication. This population had higher rates of medical and psychiatric comorbidities compared to non-frequent users.

  7. Human health hazards of veterinary medications: information for emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lust, Elaine Blythe; Barthold, Claudia; Malesker, Mark A; Wichman, Tammy O

    2011-02-01

    There are over 5000 approved prescription and over-the-counter medications, as well as vaccines, with labeled indications for veterinary patients. Of these, there are several products that have significant human health hazards upon accidental or intentional exposure or ingestion in humans: carfentanil, clenbuterol (Ventipulmin), ketamine, tilmicosin (Micotil), testosterone/estradiol (Component E-H and Synovex H), dinoprost (Lutalyse/Prostamate), and cloprostenol (Estromate/EstroPlan). The hazards range from mild to life-threatening in terms of severity, and include bronchospasm, central nervous system stimulation, induction of miscarriage, and sudden death. To report medication descriptions, human toxicity information, and medical management for the emergent care of patients who may have had exposure to veterinary medications when they present to an emergency department (ED). The intended use of this article is to inform and support ED personnel, drug information centers, and poison control centers on veterinary medication hazards. There is a need for increased awareness of the potential hazards of veterinary medications within human medicine circles. Timely reporting of veterinary medication hazards and their medical management may help to prepare the human medical community to deal with such exposures or abuses when time is of the essence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Myasthenia gravis with acute respiratory failure in the emergency department

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    Hasan Huseyin Kozak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory failure (ARF is defined as a sudden malfunction in the ability of respiratory system to maintain adequate gas exchange. Acute hypercapnic respiratory failure develops as a result of ventilation deficiency and it is defined as an increase of PaCO2 above 45 mmHg. Myasthenia Gravis (MG is a sporadically developing auto-immune deficiency where the neuro-muscular transmission is affected and it is one of the important reasons for neurologically-induced respiratory distress. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old male patient previously undiagnosed MG, who presented with ARF. MG is not a common entity that we encounter daily. Patients on occasions may present to the emergency department because of acute exacerbation. Though most of them were known cases, we should be aware of some unrecognized cases and should consider MG as a differential diagnosis for patients with acute respiratory failure. Keywords: Acute respiratory failure, Myasthenia graves, Emergency medicine

  9. Pain management in emergency department: intravenous morphine vs. intravenous acetaminophen

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    Morteza Talebi Doluee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is the most common complaint in emergency department and there are several methods for its control. Among them, pharmaceutical methods are the most effective. Although intravenous morphine has been the most common choice for several years, it has some adverse effects. There are many researches about intravenous acetaminophen as an analgesic agent and it appears that it has good analgesic effects for various types of pain. We searched some electronic resources for clinical trials comparing analgesic effects of intravenous acetaminophen vs. intravenous morphine for acute pain treatment in emergency setting.In two clinical trials, the analgesic effect of intravenous acetaminophen has been compared with intravenous morphine for renal colic. The results revealed no significant difference between analgesic effects of two medications. Another clinical trial revealed that intravenous acetaminophen has acceptable analgesic effects on the post-cesarean section pain when combined with other analgesic medications. One study revealed that administration of intravenous acetaminophen compared to placebo before hysterectomy decreased consumption of morphine via patient-controlled analgesia pump and decreased the side effects. Similarly, another study revealed that the infusion of intravenous acetaminophen vs. placebo after orthopedic surgery decreased the consumption of morphine after the surgery. A clinical trial revealed intravenous acetaminophen provided a level of analgesia comparable to intravenous morphine in isolated limb trauma, while causing less side effects than morphine.It appears that intravenous acetaminophen has good analgesic effects for visceral, traumatic and postoperative pains compare with intravenous morphine.

  10. The association between length of emergency department boarding and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Adam J; Thode, Henry C; Viccellio, Peter; Pines, Jesse M

    2011-12-01

    Emergency department (ED) boarding has been associated with several negative patient-oriented outcomes, from worse satisfaction to higher inpatient mortality rates. The current study evaluates the association between length of ED boarding and outcomes. The authors expected that prolonged ED boarding of admitted patients would be associated with higher mortality rates and longer hospital lengths of stay (LOS). This was a retrospective cohort study set at a suburban academic ED with an annual ED census of 90,000 visits. Consecutive patients admitted to the hospital from the ED and discharged between October 2005 and September 2008 were included. An electronic medical record (EMR) system was used to extract patient demographics, ED disposition (discharge, admit to floor), ED and hospital LOS, and in-hospital mortality. Boarding was defined as ED LOS 2 hours or more after decision for admission. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate the association between length of ED boarding and hospital LOS, subsequent transfer to an intensive care unit (ICU), and mortality controlling for comorbidities. There were 41,256 admissions from the ED. Mortality generally increased with increasing boarding time, from 2.5% in patients boarded less than 2 hours to 4.5% in patients boarding 12 hours or more (p boarding time (p boarded for more than 24 hours. The increases were still apparent after adjustment for comorbid conditions and other factors. Hospital mortality and hospital LOS are associated with length of ED boarding. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  11. Emergency Department Physician Internet Use during Clinical Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Robin; Finnell, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study explored the Internet log files from emergency department workstations to determine search patterns, compared them to discharge diagnoses, and the emergency medicine curriculum as a way to quantify physician search behaviors. Methods: The log files from the computers from January 2006 to March 2010 were mapped to the EM curriculum and compared to discharge diagnoses to explore search terms and website usage by physicians and students. Results: Physicians in the ED averaged 1.35 searches per patient encounter using Google.com and UpToDate.com 83.9% of the time. The most common searches were for drug information (23.1%) by all provider types. The majority of the websites utilized were in the third tier evidence level for evidence-based medicine (EBM). Conclusion: We have shown a need for a readily accessible drug knowledge base within the EMR for decision support as well as easier access to first and second tier EBM evidence. PMID:23304394

  12. The effect of tropical cyclones (typhoons) on emergency department visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Hao; Hou, Sen-Kuang; Shih, Frank Fuh-Yuan; Su, Syi

    2013-09-01

    Case reports have indicated that a tropical cyclone may increase Emergency Department (ED) visits significantly. To examine emergency health care demands across a series of tropical cyclones, and to build a predictive model to analyze a cyclone's potential effect. This was an observational non-concurrent prospective study performed in Taiwan. Twenty hospitals were included. The number of daily ED visits in each hospital was our primary end point, and data were retrieved from the database provided by the National Health Insurance Research Database. Our study examined the period from 2000 to 2008. A total of 22 tropical cyclones (typhoons) that had passed over eastern Taiwan and covered the area under study were included. Multiple linear regression time-series models were employed to estimate the effects of "days since typhoon landfall" and various characteristics of the typhoons on the end point of daily ED visits to each hospital. The final multiple linear regression time-series model showed that the number of daily ED visits increased in areas where a strong typhoon had landed directly, with the increase being evident during the first 2 days since landfall. Our model also indicated that the three most important variables to predict a change in the pattern of daily ED visits were intensity of typhoon, simultaneous heavy rain, and direct landfall. During tropical cyclones, emergency services were under increased demand in selected time periods and areas. Health care authorities should collect information to build local models to optimize their resources allocation in preparation. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pediatric Referrals to an Emergency Department From Urgent Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olympia, Robert P; Wilkinson, Robert; Dunnick, Jennifer; Dougherty, Brendan J; Zauner, Debra

    2016-10-08

    The aims of this study were to describe pediatric emergency department (ED) referrals from urgent care centers and to determine the percentage of referrals considered essential and serious. A prospective study was conducted between April 2013 and April 2015 on patients younger than 21 years referred directly to an ED in central Pennsylvania from surrounding urgent care centers. Referrals were considered essential or serious based on investigations/procedures performed or medications/consultations received in the ED. Analysis was performed on 455 patient encounters (mean age, 8.7 y), with 347 (76%) considered essential and 40 (9%) considered serious. The most common chief complaints were abdominal pain (83 encounters), extremity injury (76), fever (39), cough/cold (29), and head/neck injury (29). Thirty-three percent of the patients received laboratory diagnostic investigations (74% serum, 56% urine), and 52% received radiologic investigations (67% x-ray, 17% computed tomography scan, 13% ultrasound, 11% magnetic resonance imaging). Forty-four percent of the patients received a procedure, with the most common being intravenous (IV) placement (66%); reduction, casting, or splinting of extremity fracture/dislocation (18%); and laceration repair (14%). The most common medications administered were IV fluids (33%), oral analgesics (30%), and IV analgesics (26%). Eighty-three percent of the patients were discharged home, 12% were hospitalized, and 4% had emergent surgical intervention. The most common primary diagnoses were closed extremity fracture (60 encounters), gastroenteritis (42), brain concussion (28), upper respiratory infection (24), and nonsurgical, unspecified abdominal pain (24). Many ED referrals directed from urgent care centers in our sample were considered essential, and few were considered serious. Urgent care centers should develop educational and preparedness strategies based on the epidemiology of emergencies that may occur.

  14. Predictors of psychiatric boarding in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misek, Ryan K; DeBarba, Ashley E; Brill, April

    2015-01-01

    The emergency psychiatric care is system is overburdened in the United States. Patients experiencing psychiatric emergencies often require resources not available at the initial treating facility and frequently require transfer to an appropriate psychiatric facility. Boarding of psychiatric patients, defined as a length of stay greater than four hours after medical clearance, is ubiquitous throughout emergency departments (EDs) nationwide. Boarding is recognized as a major cause of ambulance diversions and ED crowding and has a significant adverse impact on healthcare providers, patient satisfaction, and hospital costs. We sought to identify differences between patients who boarded versus patients who did not board, to identify factors amenable to change and identify interventions that could lead to a decrease in overall psychiatric patient length of stay and improve patient care. This study is a retrospective multicenter cohort study of all patients assessed to require inpatient psychiatric hospitalization at two community EDs in Illinois from July 1, 2010 through June 30, 2012. We identified 671 patients and collected insurance status, sex, age, time of arrival, time of disposition and time of transfer. There was a statistically significant difference in the insurance status between the cohort of patients boarding in the ED compared to non-boarders prior to inpatient psychiatric admission. Our study identified 95.4% of uninsured patients who were boarded in the ED, compared to 71.8% of Medicare/Medicaid patients and 78.3% of patients with private insurance (χ(2)=50.6, df=2, pboarded significantly longer than Medicare/Medicaid and privately insured patients. Patients with private insurance boarded longer than those with Medicare/Medicaid. Patients transferred to publicly funded facilities had significantly longer ED length of stay than patients transferred to private facilities.

  15. Emergency department noise: mental activation or mental stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folscher, Lindy-Lee; Goldstein, Lara Nicole; Wells, Mike; Rees, David

    2015-06-01

    Healthcare professionals working in emergency medicine are often exposed to noisy environments. We determined if there is any difference in cognitive task performance required for clinical decision-making of healthcare professionals in a quiet compared with noisy environment and to assess the subjective experience of participants with regard to performance in a noisy environment. This was a prospective cross-over study conducted at three academic hospitals in Johannesburg, South Africa. 41 doctors involved in the emergency management of patients were administered six matched and prevalidated medical questions over a 30-min period. Each doctor completed half of the questions with exposure to ambient noise (range 40-52 dB(A)) and the other half with exposure to pre-recorded background emergency department noise at 80-85 dB(A). The questions were completed in alternating quiet and noise: half of the physicians answered the odd questions in noise and half answered even numbered questions in noise. Each question was scored out of 10 and the time taken to complete each question was recorded. Overall median test scores in quiet and noise were 18.5/30 and 20/30 (p=0.2), respectively; time for test completion was longer in quiet (836 s in quiet and 819 s in noise (p=0.006)). While there was no statistically significant difference in task performance, 65% of the doctors found the noise distracting with 88% experiencing varying degrees of stress. Performance of mental tasks is maintained during noise exposure but noise exposure is associated with significant degrees of self-reported distress. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Emergency department security programs, community crime, and employee assaults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blando, James D; McGreevy, Katharine; O'Hagan, Emily; Worthington, Karen; Valiante, David; Nocera, Maryalice; Casteel, Carri; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2012-03-01

    Violence against health care workers is a serious occupational health hazard, especially for emergency department (ED) employees. A significant degree of variability in security programs among hospital EDs is present in part due to the absence of federal legislation requiring baseline security features. Nationally, only voluntary guidelines from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for the protection of health care workers exist. The purpose of this study was to examine ED security programs and employee assault rates among EDs with different financial resources, size, and background community crime rates. This cross-sectional survey was conducted among large and small hospitals located in communities with low or high rates of community crime. Hospital financial data were collected through the state health department, and employee assault data were abstracted from hospital OSHA logs. Comparisons were made using a chi-squared or Wilcoxon test. Small hospitals located in towns with low community crime rates implemented the fewest security program features despite having the second highest rate of assault-related OSHA-recordable injuries among ED employees (0.66 per 100,000 staff hours). Due to the highly stressful workplace characteristics of EDs, the risk of employee assault is universal among all hospital sizes in all types of communities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Does Limiting Oral Contrast Decrease Emergency Department Length of Stay?

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    Erik Barton

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine the impact on emergency department (EDlength of stay (LOS of a new protocol for intravenous (IV-contrast only abdominal/pelvic computedtomography (ABCT compared to historical controls.Methods: This was a retrospective case-controlled study performed at a single academic medicalcenter. Patients ≥ 18 undergoing ABCT imaging for non-traumatic abdominal pain were included inthe study. We compared ED LOS between historical controls undergoing ABCT imaging with PO/IVcontrast and study patients undergoing an IV-contrast-only protocol. Imaging indications were thesame for both groups and included patients with clinical suspicion for appendicitis, diverticulitis, smallbowel obstruction, or perforation. We identified all patients from the hospital’s electronic storehouse(imaging code, ordering department, imaging times, and we abstracted ED LOS and dispositionfrom electronic medical records.Results: Two hundred and eleven patients who underwent PO/IV ABCT prep were compared to 184patients undergoing IV-contrast only ABCT prep. ED LOS was shorter for patients imaged with theIV-contrast only protocol (4:35 hrs vs. 6:39 hrs, p < 0.0001.Conclusion: Implementation of an IV-contrast only ABCT prep for select ED patients presentingfor evaluation of acute abdominal pain significantly decreased ED LOS.

  18. The Impact of Psychiatric Patient Boarding in Emergency Departments

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    B. A. Nicks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Studies have demonstrated the adverse effects of emergency department (ED boarding. This study examines the impact of resource utilization, throughput, and financial impact for psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement. Methods. The authors retrospectively studied all psychiatric and non-psychiatric adult admissions in an Academic Medical Center ED (>68,000 adult visits from January 2007-2008. The main outcomes were ED length of stay (LOS and associated reimbursement. Results. 1,438 patients were consulted to psychiatry with 505 (35.1% requiring inpatient psychiatric care management. The mean psychiatric patient age was 42.5 years (SD 13.1 years, with 2.7 times more women than men. ED LOS was significantly longer for psychiatric admissions (1089 min, CI (1039–1140 versus 340 min, CI (304–375; <0.001 when compared to non-psychiatric admissions. The financial impact of psychiatric boarding accounted for a direct loss of ($1,198 compared to non-psychiatric admissions. Factoring the loss of bed turnover for waiting patients and opportunity cost due to loss of those patients, psychiatric patient boarding cost the department $2,264 per patient. Conclusions. Psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement remain in the ED 3.2 times longer than non-psychiatric patients, preventing 2.2 bed turnovers (additional patients per psychiatric patient, and decreasing financial revenue.

  19. The impact of psychiatric patient boarding in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicks, B A; Manthey, D M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Studies have demonstrated the adverse effects of emergency department (ED) boarding. This study examines the impact of resource utilization, throughput, and financial impact for psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement. Methods. The authors retrospectively studied all psychiatric and non-psychiatric adult admissions in an Academic Medical Center ED (>68,000 adult visits) from January 2007-2008. The main outcomes were ED length of stay (LOS) and associated reimbursement. Results. 1,438 patients were consulted to psychiatry with 505 (35.1%) requiring inpatient psychiatric care management. The mean psychiatric patient age was 42.5 years (SD 13.1 years), with 2.7 times more women than men. ED LOS was significantly longer for psychiatric admissions (1089 min, CI (1039-1140) versus 340 min, CI (304-375); P boarding accounted for a direct loss of ($1,198) compared to non-psychiatric admissions. Factoring the loss of bed turnover for waiting patients and opportunity cost due to loss of those patients, psychiatric patient boarding cost the department $2,264 per patient. Conclusions. Psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement remain in the ED 3.2 times longer than non-psychiatric patients, preventing 2.2 bed turnovers (additional patients) per psychiatric patient, and decreasing financial revenue.

  20. An exploration of emergency nurses' perceptions, attitudes and experience of teamwork in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Elise; Porter, Joanne E; Morphet, Julia

    2017-05-01

    Teamwork may assist with increased levels of efficiency and safety of patient care in the emergency department (ED), with emergency nurses playing an indispensable role in this process. A descriptive, exploratory approach was used, drawing on principles from phenomenology and symbolic interactionism. Convenience, purposive sampling was used in a major metropolitan ED. Semi structured interviews were conducted, audio recorded, and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Three major themes emerged from the data. The first theme 'when teamwork works' supported the notion that emergency nurses perceived teamwork as a positive and effective construct in four key areas; resuscitation, simulation training, patient outcomes and staff satisfaction. The second theme 'team support' revealed that back up behaviour and leadership were critical elements of team effectiveness within the study setting. The third theme 'no time for teamwork' centred around periods when teamwork practices failed due to various contributing factors including inadequate resources and skill mix. Outcomes of effective teamwork were valued by emergency nurses. Teamwork is about performance, and requires a certain skill set not necessarily naturally possessed among emergency nurses. Building a resilient team inclusive of strong leadership and communication skills is essential to being able to withstand the challenging demands of the ED. Copyright © 2017 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Security, Violent Events, and Anticipated Surge Capabilities of Emergency Departments in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyand, Jonathan S; Junck, Emily; Kang, Christopher S; Heiner, Jason D

    2017-04-01

    Over the past 15 years, violent threats and acts against hospital patients, staff, and providers have increased and escalated. The leading area for violence is the emergency department (ED) given its 24/7 operations, role in patient care, admissions gateway, and center for influxes during acute surge events. This investigation had three objectives: to assess the current security of Washington State EDs; to estimate the prevalence of and response to threats and violence in Washington State EDs; and to appraise the Washington State ED security capability to respond to acute influxes of patients, bystanders, and media during acute surge events. A voluntary, blinded, 28-question Web-based survey developed by emergency physicians was electronically delivered to all 87 Washington State ED directors in January 2013. We evaluated responses by descriptive statistical analyses. Analyses occurred after 90% (78/87) of ED directors responded. Annual censuses of the EDs ranged from center. Thirty-four of 75 (45%) reported the current level of security was inadequate, based on the general consensus of their ED staff. Nearly two-thirds (63%) of EDs had 24-hour security personnel coverage, while 28% reported no assigned security personnel. Security personnel training was provided by 45% of hospitals or healthcare systems. Sixty-nine of 78 (88%) respondents witnessed or heard about violent threats or acts occurring in their ED. Of these, 93% were directed towards nursing staff, 90% towards physicians, 74% towards security personnel, and 51% towards administrative personnel. Nearly half (48%) noted incidents directed towards another patient, and 50% towards a patient's family or friend. These events were variably reported to the hospital administration. After an acute surge event, 35% believed the initial additional security response would not be adequate, with 26% reporting no additional security would be available within 15 minutes. Our study reveals the variability of ED security

  2. Management of headache disorders in the Emergency Department setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pari, Elisa; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Gipponi, Stefano; Venturelli, Elisabetta; Liberini, Paolo; Rao, Renata; Padovani, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    Headache is a common presenting complaint in the Emergency Department. The aim of this study was to delineate the demographic profile of patients presenting a chief complaint of headache and to assess the application of diagnostic algorithms for the management of these patients. We examined patients admitted to the Spedali Civili Hospital ED between January 2005 and December 2009 who complained of headache not related to trauma and all patients hospitalized for headache in Neurological Clinic, from ED, between January 2008 and December 2009. 7495 patients were examined at ED for headaches. 72 % of patients were discharged, 22 % were admitted. From 2005 to 2009, there was a definite decrease in the rate of hospitalization due to headache (15 vs 9.9 % in Department of Neurology and 26 vs 18.9 % in all Departments). Considering the decrease year by year, this reduction was significant from 2007 to 2008, when the algorithms were adopted. The most common diagnosis in the ED was "Non-specific headache" (41 %), followed by "Primary headaches and complications of primary headaches" (20.8 %), "Secondary headaches not associated with risk of serious disease" (20.4 %) and "Secondary headache associated with risk of serious disease" (5 %). Over 2-year period (2008-2009) we found an increase in the diagnosis of "Primary headaches and complications of primary headaches" and "Secondary headaches associated with risk of serious disease" compared with a decrease of "nonspecific headache" and "secondary headaches not associated with risk of serious disease". The use of the diagnostic algorithms and collaborative network between the ED and the Headache Center can improve the management of patients with headache in ED.

  3. Factors influencing the implementation of the guideline Triage in emergency departments: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.A.P.; van Achterberg, T.; Adriaansen, M.J.M.; Kampshoff, C.S.; Schalk, D.M.J.; Mintjes-de Groot, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Aims and objectives. The objectives are: (1) to identify factors that influence the implementation of the guideline Triage in emergency departments [2004] in emergency departments in the Netherlands, and (2) to develop tailored implementation strategies for implementation of this guideline.

  4. Factors influencing the implementation of the guideline triage in emergency departments: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.A.M.; Achterberg, T. van; Adriaansen, M.J.M.; Kampshoff, C.S.; Schalk, D.M.; Mintjes-de Groot, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The objectives are: (1) to identify factors that influence the implementation of the guideline Triage in emergency departments [2004] in emergency departments in the Netherlands, and (2) to develop tailored implementation strategies for implementation of this guideline.

  5. Effects of Systematic Screening and Detection of Child Abuse in Emergency Departments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwers, Eveline C. F. M.; Korfage, Ida J.; Affourtit, Marjo J.; Scheewe, Dop J. H.; van de Merwe, Marjolijn H.; Vooijs-Moulaert, Anne-Françoise S. R.; van den Elzen, Annette P. M.; Jongejan, Mieke H. T. M.; Ruige, Madelon; Manaï, Badies H. A. N.; Looman, Caspar W. N.; Bosschaart, Adriaan N.; Teeuw, Arianne H.; Moll, Henriëtte A.; de Koning, Harry J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although systematic screening for child abuse of children presenting at emergency departments might increase the detection rate, studies to support this are scarce. This study investigates whether introducing screening, and training of emergency department nurses, increases the detection

  6. How Much Time Do Unhospitalized Patients Applying for Emergency Services Stay in Emergency Department

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    Mansur Kürsad Erkuran

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The patients applying to a emergency service may stay longer than necessary for diagnosis, monitoring and treatment. This can be due to the inadequacy of the treatment performed in emergency department or to the absence of the required unit in the hospital. In this study, we analyzed the waiting period of the patients who have not been hospitalized. METHODS: The patients applying to Bolu İzzet Baysal Public Hospital Emergency Unit between 24.11.2009 and 25.08.2011 have been studied regarding their application date, the season, and their waiting period in the emergency unit. The data have been analyzed using the statistics software Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, version 17.0 for Windows. The chi-square χ2 test has been used for the determination of the percentage distribution and significance and p<0,05 has been considered significant. RESULTS: 4215 patients applying to Bolu İzzet Baysal Public Hospital Emergency Unit between 24.11.2009 and 25.08.2011 and monitored without hospitalization have been studied. The patients mainly presented during spring (p<0.05. The application occurred more often between 20.00 PM – 23.59 PM (p<0.005. The mean duration of the accept-standby of the patients in emergency unit was 09±12 (minimum 0 minute, maximum 130 minutes. The patients waited 0,26 ±70 minutes in emergency unit examination (minimum 0 minute, maximum 1292 minutes. The total waiting time in emergency unit was 52 ±100 minutes (minimum 10, maximum 1435 minutes. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: In this study, we observed that the duration of the hospitalization in emergency unit is longer than the ideal duration.

  7. Should diagnosis codes from emergency department data be used for case selection for emergency department key performance indicators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Stuart C; Wills, Rachael A; Johnston, Trisha C

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the suitability of emergency department (ED) discharge diagnosis for identifying patient cohorts included in the definitions of key performance indicators (KPIs) that are used to evaluate ED performance. Hospital inpatient episodes of care with a principal diagnosis that corresponded to an ED-defined KPI were extracted from the Queensland Hospital Admitted Patient Data Collection (QHAPDC) for the year 2010-2011. The data were then linked to the corresponding ED patient record and the diagnoses applied in the two settings were compared. The asthma and injury cohorts produced favourable results with respect to matching the QHAPDC principal diagnosis with the ED discharge diagnosis. The results were generally modest when the QHAPDC principal diagnosis was upper respiratory tract infection, poisoning and toxic effects or a mental health diagnosis, and were quite poor for influenza. There is substantial variation in the capture of patient cohorts using discharge diagnosis as recorded on Queensland Hospital Emergency Department data. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE TOPIC? There are several existing KPIs that are defined according to the diagnosis recorded on ED data collections. However, there have been concerns over the quality of ED diagnosis in Queensland and other jurisdictions, and the value of these data in identifying patient cohorts for the purpose of assessing ED performance remains uncertain. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD? This paper identifies diagnosis codes that are suitable for use in capturing the patient cohorts that are used to evaluate ED performance, as well as those codes that may be of limited value. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTITIONERS? The limitations of diagnosis codes within ED data should be understood by those seeking to use these data items for healthcare planning and management or for research into healthcare quality and outcomes.

  8. Characterizing New England Emergency Departments by Telemedicine Use

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    Kori S. Zachrison

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Telemedicine connects emergency departments (ED with resources necessary for patient care; its use has not been characterized nationally, or even regionally. Our primary objective was to describe the prevalence of telemedicine use in New England EDs and the clinical applications of use. Secondarily, we aimed to determine if telemedicine use was associated with consultant availability and to identify ED characteristics associated with telemedicine use. Methods: We analyzed data from the National Emergency Department Inventory-New England survey, which assessed basic ED characteristics in 2014. The survey queried directors of every ED (n=195 in the six New England states (excluding federal hospitals and college infirmaries. Descriptive statistics characterized ED telemedicine use; multivariable logistic regression identified independent predictors of use. Results: Of the 169 responding EDs (87% response rate, 82 (49% reported using telemedicine. Telemedicine EDs were more likely to be rural (18% of users vs. 7% of non-users, p=0.03; less likely to be academic (1% of users vs. 11% of non-users, p=0.01; and less likely to have 24/7 access to neurology (p<0.001, neurosurgery (p<0.001, orthopedics (p=0.01, plastic surgery (p=0.01, psychiatry (p<0.001, and hand surgery (p<0.001 consultants. Neuro/stroke (68%, pediatrics (11%, psychiatry (11%, and trauma (10% were the most commonly reported applications. On multivariable analysis, telemedicine was more likely in rural EDs (odds ratio [OR] 4.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30–14.86, and less likely in EDs with 24/7 neurologist availability (OR 0.21, 95% CI [0.09–0.49], and annual volume <20,000 (OR 0.24, 95% CI [0.08–0.68]. Conclusion: Telemedicine is commonly used in New England EDs. In 2014, use was more common among rural EDs and EDs with limited neurology consultant availability. In contrast, telemedicine use was less common among very low-volume EDs.

  9. Prescription History of Emergency Department Patients Prescribed Opioids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A Hoppe

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To use Colorado’s prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP to describe the recent opioid prescription history of patients discharged from our emergency department (ED with a prescription for opioid pain medications.Methods: Retrospective cohort study of 300 adult ED patients who received an opioid prescription. We abstracted prescription histories for the six months prior to the ED visit from the PDMP, and abstracted clinical and demographic variables from the chart.Results: There were 5,379 ED visits during the study month, 3,732 of which were discharged. Providers wrote 1,165 prescriptions for opioid analgesics to 1,124/3,732 (30% of the patients. Median age was 36 years. Thirty-nine percent were male. Patients were 46% Caucasian, 26% African American, 22% Hispanic, 2% Asian and 4% other. These were similar to our overall ED population. There was substantial variability in the number of prescriptions, prescribers and total number of pills. A majority (205/296 of patients had zero or one prescription. The 90th percentile for number of prescriptions was seven, while the 10th percentile was zero. Patients in the highest decile tended to be older, with a higher proportion of Caucasians and females. Patients in the lowest decile resembled the general ED population. The most common diagnoses associated with opioid prescriptions were abdominal pain (11.5%, cold/flu symptoms (9.5%, back pain (5.4%, flank pain (5.0% and motor vehicle crash (4.7%.Conclusion: Substantial variability exists in the opioid prescription histories of ED patients, but a majority received zero or one prescription in the preceding six months. The top decile of patients averaged more than two prescriptions per month over the six months prior to ED visit, written by more than 6 different prescribers. There was a trend toward these patients being older, Caucasian and female. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(3:247–252.

  10. Breaking bad (news) death-telling in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogle, Angela M; Go, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Many physicians struggle with death-telling in sudden death. Families can be negatively impacted by suboptimal death-telling. Appropriate preparation and education can make death notification less stressful for the physician and may help decrease the development of pathologic grief in the surviving family members that can occur when death is unexpected. Although still controversial, there is a growing body of evidence that family witnessed resuscitation may be beneficial to the grieving process and desired by the public. A previously healthy 21-year-old male comes toyour community emergency department (ED) for a cough that started 4 days ago. He denies fever, shortness of breath, and chest pain. He does admit to a remote history of drug abuse. He states he is feeling "OK" and is only here because his family insisted he come because they were worried he might have pneumonia. His vital signs are normal and he appears well; therefore, he is triaged to the waiting room. About 30 minutes lates the patient complains of shortness of breath and he is brought back to an exam room. The patient is now hypotensive, tachycardic, and pulse oximetry is noted to be 87% on room air. A chest x-ray reveals severe pulmonary edema and an EKG shows ST segment elevation in multiple leads. The patient is taken to the cardiac catheterization lab by the interventional cardiologist, who makes the diagnosis of a ruptured aortic valve due to damage from endocarditis. The patient is returned to the ED to await emergent transfer to a tertiary facility; however, the patient rapidly decompensates and a Code Blue is called. Despite the absence of return of spontaneous circulation, resuscitation efforts are prolonged while the ED social worker attempts to contact the patient's family to come to the ED. Finally, the resuscitation is terminated and the patient is pronounced dead. Several hours later the patient's elderly mother arrives and asks you: "What's going on with Mikey?"

  11. Plastic surgery telehealth consultation expedites Emergency Department treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Angie M; Granick, Mark S; Scott, Sandra

    2017-02-01

    Plastic surgery is a field that is particularly amenable to a telehealth milieu, as visual exam and radiographs guide proper diagnosis and management. The goals of this study were to evaluate telehealth feedback executed through an iPad app for plastic surgery-related consultations. A Quality Assurance/Quality Improvement (QA/QI) study was conducted over a 1-month period during which patients with hand injuries, facial injuries, or acute wounds presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) of a level-one trauma centre and university hospital were monitored. The study utilized a commercial iPad application through which up to four images and a brief history could be sent to a remote Plastic Surgery Educator (PSE) for evaluation. The PSE would respond with best practice information, references and videos to assist ED point-of-care providers. During the 1-month period of this study, there were 42 ED consultations for plastic surgical conditions. There was a highly significant difference in overall mean response time between consultants and PSEs (48.3 minutes vs. 8.9 minutes respectively, p < 0.001). The agreement between PSEs and consultants regarding patient assessment and care was 85.7% for in-person consultations and 100% for phone consultations. In four cases of telephone consultations, the ED providers placed splints incorrectly on hand-injured patients. Our results show that telehealth consultations to a remote plastic surgeon based on digital images and a brief history were able to produce timely and accurate responses in an emergency care facility. This design may have significant impact in rural areas, underserved populations, or regions abroad.

  12. The impact of emergency department overcrowding on resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Simon A; McCartney, Jeannie R; Swoboda, Thomas K; Yorek, Lauren; Arnold, Thomas C

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the effect of Emergency Department (ED) overcrowding on resident education. To determine the impact of ED overcrowding on Emergency Medicine (EM) resident education. A prospective cross-sectional study was performed from March to May 2009. Second- and third-year EM residents, blinded to the research objective, completed a questionnaire at the end of each shift. Residents were asked to evaluate the educational quality of each shift using a 10-point Likert scale. Number of patients seen and procedures completed were recorded. Responses were divided into ED overcrowding (group O) and non-ED overcrowding (group N) groups. ED overcrowding was defined as >2 h of ambulance diversion per shift. Questionnaire responses were compared using Mann-Whitney U tests. Number of patients and procedures were compared using unpaired T-tests. During the study period, 125 questionnaires were completed; 54 in group O and 71 in group N. For group O, the median educational value score was 8 (interquartile range [IQR] 7-10), compared to 8 (IQR 8-10) for group N (p = 0.24). Mean number of patients seen in group O was 12.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.4-13.2), compared to 13.9 (95% CI 12.7-15) in group N (p = 0.034). In group O, mean number of procedures was 0.9 (95% CI 0.6-1.2), compared to 1.3 (95% CI 1-1.6) in group N (p = 0.047). During overcrowding, EM residents saw fewer patients and performed fewer procedures. However, there was no significant difference in resident perception of educational value during times of overcrowding vs. non-overcrowding. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Renal colic at emergency departments. Epidemiologic, diagnostic and etiopathogenic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, José A Hermida; Palmes, M de la Paz Pérez; Ferrer, Juan Francisco Loro; Urdangarain, Otto Ochoa; Nuñez, Abdel Buduen

    2010-04-01

    To investigate epidemiologic, etiopathogenic and clinical factors associated with emergency renal colic (RC). METHODS ANDS RESULTS: We performed a prospective cross-sectional multicenter case-control study of 146 patients treated for RC at emergency departments. Data collected included age, sex, localization/severity of pain, symptoms, personal/family medical history, urine analysis, etiopathogenic factors, chemical composition of the lithiasis, and x-ray studies. Comparative statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 12.2 software. RC was more frequent in men; maximum incidence was between 31-50 years for both sex, with 36.3% in men and 21.23% in women; 60.27% of patients rated pain as severe; 140 RC patients (95.89%) had urologic antecedents vs. 15 (10.27%) controls without RC (ppain; 23.28% of RC patients had family history for urinary lithiasis vs. 6.16% controls (pLithiasis was observed by KUB x-ray in 42.10% of RC patients vs. 57.89% controls, most frequent calculi composition was calcium oxalate monohydrate and dehydrate (61,2%). The incidence of urinary lithiasis and RC in our health care area shows a male predominance. The characteristic pain of RC is severe and appears suddenly. It starts in the back (lumbar region), below the ribs, radiating towards the groin and external genitals (testicles in man or major lips in woman) on the same side. Nausea and vomiting are frequent. Family history of urinary lithiasis and low water intake are risk factors that need to be investigated. Occupations associated with a sedentary life style or with a hot, dry workplace show a higher incidence of lithiasis. A hot, dry climate favours the formation of urinary lithiasis and the highest incidence of lithiasis is in the summer, during the months of July and August. The most frequent component of urolithiasis in our study, as well as in other studies, was calcium oxalate monohydrate and dihydrate.

  14. Ontario's emergency department process improvement program: the experience of implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotteau, Leahora; Webster, Fiona; Salkeld, Erin; Hellings, Chelsea; Guttmann, Astrid; Vermeulen, Marian J; Bell, Robert S; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Rowe, Brian H; Nigam, Amit; Schull, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, Lean manufacturing principles have been applied to health care quality improvement efforts to improve wait times. In Ontario, an emergency department (ED) process improvement program based on Lean principles was introduced by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care as part of a strategy to reduce ED length of stay (LOS) and to improve patient flow. This article aims to describe the hospital-based teams' experiences during the ED process improvement program implementation and the teams' perceptions of the key factors that influenced the program's success or failure. A qualitative evaluation was conducted based on semistructured interviews with hospital implementation team members, such as team leads, medical leads, and executive sponsors, at 10 purposively selected hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Sites were selected based, in part, on their changes in median ED LOS following the implementation period. A thematic framework approach as used for interviews, and a standard thematic coding framework was developed. Twenty-four interviews were coded and analyzed. The results are organized according to participants' experience and are grouped into four themes that were identified as significantly affecting the implementation experience: local contextual factors, relationship between improvement team and support players, staff engagement, and success and sustainability. The results demonstrate the importance of the context of implementation, establishing strong relationships and communication strategies, and preparing for implementation and sustainability prior to the start of the project. Several key factors were identified as important to the success of the program, such as preparing for implementation, ensuring strong executive support, creation of implementation teams based on the tasks and outcomes of the initiative, and using multiple communication strategies throughout the implementation process. Explicit incorporation of these factors into the

  15. Survey of attitudes of senior emergency physicians towards the introduction of emergency department ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, R E; Lee, A; Clenaghan, S; McGovern, S; Martyn, C; Bowra, J

    2005-08-01

    Emergency department ultrasound (EDU) is widely practised in the USA, Australia, parts of Europe, and Asia. EDU has been used in the UK since the late 1990s but as yet, few areas have established a practice. To assess the current climate of opinion with respect to the practice, constraints, and establishment of EDU among emergency department (ED) consultants on the island of Ireland. A postal questionnaire was formulated, piloted, and assessed for ambiguity by a sample of ED consultants and an independent non-ED consultant, prior to being mailed to all ED consultants in Ireland. Of the 58 consultants canvassed 46 (79%) responded. Of the respondents, 40 (87%) strongly agreed/agreed that EDU is appropriate and should be performed in the ED. Of these, 3 (7%) are currently performing EDU; 37 (80%) have not had formal training in EDU, however 42 (91%) support the establishment of national guidelines for training in focused ultrasound in the ED. Problems instituting EDU were often multifactorial. Commonly highlighted difficulties included financial issues (24 respondents, 52%) and radiology department support (16 respondents, 34%). Other cited problems include varying interdepartmental practices (15 respondents, 33%) and (for some EDs) low numbers of patients requiring EDU, with projected difficulties in skills maintenance. Despite the vast majority of ED consultants being in favour of EDU, very few actually perform it on a regular basis or have had any formal training. Highlighted difficulties in EDU implementation included financial constraints, lack of support from radiology departments, and lack of formal training.

  16. Survivors of torture: prevalence in an urban emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hexom, Braden; Fernando, Dinali; Manini, Alex F; Beattie, Lars K

    2012-10-01

    Torture has been documented in 132 countries, and approximately 400,000 survivors of torture reside in the United States. It is unknown if torture survivors seek medical care in emergency departments (EDs). The authors set out to estimate the prevalence of survivors of torture presenting to an urban ED. A cross-sectional survey of ED patients was performed by convenience sampling from October 2008 to September 2009 in a large urban teaching hospital in New York City. ED patients not of a vulnerable population were consented and entered into the study. Participants were asked two screening questions to ascertain if they were self-reported survivors of torture. For exploratory purposes only, these individuals were further queried about their experiences. The detailed responses of these self-reported survivors of torture were compared to the United Nations Convention Against Torture (UNCAT) definition by a blinded, independent panel. Of 470 study participants, 54 individuals (11.5%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.6% to 14.4%) self-reported torture. Nine (16.7%) had ongoing physical disabilities, 30 (55.6%) had recurrent intrusive and distressing memories, 42 (77.8%) never had a physician inquire about torture, and only eight (14.8%) had requested political asylum. Of these self-reported survivors of torture, 29 (53.7%) met the UNCAT definition, for an adjudicated prevalence of 6.2% (95% CI = 4.3% to 8.7%). Self-reported survivors of torture presented to this urban ED, and a significant proportion of them met the UNCAT definition of a torture survivor. Continuing torture-related medical and psychological sequelae were identified, yet there was a low rate of asylum-seeking. Only a minority were previously identified by a physician. These data suggest an unrecognized public health concern and an opportunity for emergency physicians to intervene and refer survivors of torture to existing community resources. © 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  17. Adolescent suicide risk screening in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Cheryl A; O'Mara, Roisin M; Hayward, Charles N; Cunningham, Rebecca M

    2009-11-01

    Many adolescents who die by suicide have never obtained mental health services. In response to this, the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention recommends screening for elevated suicide risk in emergency departments (EDs). This cross-sectional study was designed to examine 1) the concurrent validity and utility of an adolescent suicide risk screen for use in general medical EDs and 2) the prevalence of positive screens for adolescent males and females using two different sets of screening criteria. Participants were 298 adolescents seeking pediatric or psychiatric emergency services (50% male; 83% white, 16% black or African American, 5.4% Hispanic). The inclusion criterion was age 13 to 17 years. Exclusion criteria were severe cognitive impairment, no parent or legal guardian present to provide consent, or abnormal vital signs. Parent or guardian consent and adolescent assent were obtained for 61% of consecutively eligible adolescents. Elevated risk was defined as 1) Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire-Junior [SIQ-JR] score of > or =31 or suicide attempt in the past 3 months or 2) alcohol abuse plus depression (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-3 [AUDIT-3] score of > or =3, Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale-2 [RADS-2] score of > or =76). The Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS) and Problem Oriented Screening Instrument for Teenagers (POSIT) were used to ascertain concurrent validity. Sixteen percent (n = 48) of adolescents screened positive for elevated suicide risk. Within this group, 98% reported severe suicide ideation or a recent suicide attempt (46% attempt and ideation, 10% attempt only, 42% ideation only) and 27% reported alcohol abuse and depression. Nineteen percent of adolescents who screened positive presented for nonpsychiatric reasons. One-third of adolescents with positive screens were not receiving any mental health or substance use treatment. Demonstrating concurrent validity, the BHS scores of adolescents with positive screens and the POSIT

  18. Seasonal Variation in Emergency Department Visits Among Pediatric Headache Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakalnis, A; Heyer, G L

    2016-09-01

    To ascertain whether seasonal variation occurs in emergency department (ED) visits for headache among children and adolescents. A retrospective review was conducted using the electronic medical records of ED visits for headache at a tertiary children's hospital through calendar years 2010-2014. Using ICD-9 diagnostic codes for headache and migraine, the numbers of headache visits were determined and compared by season and during school months vs summer months. A total of 6572 headache visits occurred. Headache visits increased during the fall season (133 ± 27 visits per month) compared with other seasons (101 ± 19 visits per month), P ≤ .002, but did not differ when comparing school months (113 ± 25 visits per month) and summer months (100 ± 24 visits per month), P = .1. The corresponding increase in ED visits during the fall season coincides with the start of the school year. Academic stressors and the change in daily schedule may lead to more headaches and more ED headache visits among school-aged youth. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  19. Monthly variation of United States pediatric headache emergency department visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedia, Sita; Ginde, Adit A; Grubenhoff, Joseph A; Kempe, Allison; Hershey, Andrew D; Powers, Scott W

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this article is to determine the monthly variation of emergency department (ED) visits for pediatric headache. We hypothesized youth have increased headache-related ED visits in the months associated with school attendance. Using a United States representative sample of ED visits in the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 1997 to 2009, we estimated number of visits associated with ICD-9 codes related to headache, migraine, status migrainosus, or tension-type headache in 5- to 18-year-olds. Age-stratified multivariate models are presented for month of visit (July as reference). There was a national estimate of 250,000 ED visits annually related to headache (2.1% of total visits) in 5- to 18-year-olds. In 5- to 11-year-olds, the adjusted rate of headache-related visits was lower in April (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.20, 0.88). In 12- to 18-year-olds, there were higher rates in January (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.16, 3.14) and September (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.06, 2.55). In adolescents we found higher ED utilization in January and September, the same months associated with school return from vacation for a majority of children nationally. No significant reduction in the summer suggests that school itself is not the issue, but rather changes in daily lifestyle and transitions.

  20. Assessment of suicidal youth in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Michele S; Asarnow, Joan R

    2015-06-01

    Accurate evaluation of suicidal adolescents in the emergency department (ED) is critical for safety and linkage to follow-up care. We examined self-reports of 181 adolescents who presented to an ED with suicidal ideation (SI) or a suicide attempt (SA). Parents also completed self-reports. Results showed fair agreement between parents and youth on the reason for the ED visit (e.g., SI vs. SA) and greater agreement between independent judges and youths than between judges and parents. In accordance with accepted definitions of suicide attempts (e.g., Crosby, Ortega, & Melanson, 2011; O'Carroll, Berman, Maris, Moscicki, Tanney, & Silverman, 1996, p. 237; Posner, Oquendo, Gould, Stanley, & Davies, 2007, p. 1035; Silverman, Berman, Sanddal, O'Carroll, & Joiner, 2007, p. 248), most youth with SA as the reason for the ED visit reported some intent to die associated with the attempt. Finally, youth presenting to the ED with SA did not differ clinically from youth presenting with SI, and almost half of youths with SI reported past suicide attempts. These results highlight the need to emphasize adolescents' reports in clinical decision making, suggest adolescents' defined suicide attempts similarly to published definitions, and show that assessment of past SAs, as well as present suicidal thoughts and behaviors, is critical in determining future risk. © 2014 The American Association of Suicidology.

  1. Acute bilateral vision loss in emergency department: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceren sen Tanrikulu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Stroke occurs due to the interruption of blood flow to the brain and it is divided into ischemic and hemorrhagic. In the ischemic strokes, while the most commonly affected vessel is median cerebral artery (MCA, it is particularly affected bilateral posterior cerebral artery (PCA is very rare condition. In this study, a case of sudden loss of vision and bilateral occipital infarct associated with bilateral vertebral system pathology and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene mutation were reported. A 62-year-old man was admitted with sudden loss of vision complaint starting 10 h before applying to emergency department. The patient was oriented and cooperative. On neurological examination, there was complete loss of vision in the right eye and only a response to light in the left eye. On the brain computerized tomography (CT, ischemic lesions were observed in the bilateral occipital areas and on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, there were foci showing diffusion limitation in cortico-subcortical areas of bilateral parieto-occipital region. On the detailed examination at the clinic, MTHFR (a1298c gene mutation was detected. Bilateral occipital infarction is rare and its diagnosis can be difficult because of its atypical symptoms. Therefore, occipital infarction should be suspected when the only sign is isolated vision loss in patients with risk factor for thromboembolism in their history and detailed visual-neurological examination of these patients should be performed. Keywords: MTHFR, Occipital infarctus, Visual loss

  2. Pediatric psychiatric emergency department visits during a full moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Shyama; Maniaci, Vincenzo; Linares, Marc Yves-Rene; Lozano, Juan M

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to verify the hypothesis that the lunar cycle influences the number of pediatric psychiatric emergency department (ED) visits. Pediatric psychiatric ED visits between 2009 and 2011 were obtained retrospectively. Patients aged between 4 and 21 years presenting to Miami Children's Hospital ED with a primary psychiatric complaint were included in the study. Patients with a concomitant psychiatric problem and a secondary medical condition were excluded. The number of psychiatric visits was retrieved for the full moon dates, control dates as well as the day before and after the full moon when the moon appears full to the naked eye (full moon effect). A comparison was made using the 2-sample independent t test. Between 2009 and 2011, 36 dates were considered as the true full moon dates and 108 dates as the "full moon effect." A total of 559 patients were included in the study. The 2-sample independent t tests were performed between the actual full moon date and control dates, as well as between the "full moon effect" dates and control dates. Our results failed to show a statistical significance when comparing the number of pediatric psychiatric patients presenting to a children's hospital ED during a full moon and a non-full moon date. Our study's results are in agreement with those involving adult patients. The full moon does not affect psychiatric visits in a children's hospital.

  3. An Early Warning System for Overcrowding in the Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoot, Nathan; Aronsky, Dominik

    2006-01-01

    Overcrowding of emergency departments impedes health care access and quality nationwide. A real-time early warning system for overcrowding may allow administrators to alleviate the problem before reaching a crisis state. Two original probabilistic models – a logistic regression and a recurrent neural network – were created to predict overcrowding crises one hour in the future. The two original and two pre-existing models were validated at 8,496 observation points from January 1, 2006 to February 28, 2006. All models showed high discriminatory ability in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (logistic regression = .954; recurrent neural network = .957; EDWIN = .879; NEDOCS = .924). At comparable rates of false alarms, the logistic regression gave more advance notice of crises than other models (logistic regression = 62 min; recurrent neural network = 13 min; EDWIN = 0 min; NEDOCS = 0 min). These results demonstrate the feasibility of using models based on key operational variables to anticipate overcrowding crises in real time. PMID:17238359

  4. Emergency department management of patients with ACE-inhibitor angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Michael E; Rosenbaum, Steven; Vilke, Gary M; Almazroua, Faisal Y

    2013-11-01

    Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) are one of the most prescribed medications worldwide. Angioedema is a well-recognized adverse effect of this class of medications, with a reported incidence of ACEI angioedema of up to 1.0%. Of importance to note, ACEI angioedema is a class effect and is not dose dependent. The primary goal of this literature search was to determine the appropriate Emergency Department management of patients with ACEI angioedema. A MEDLINE literature search from January 1990 to August 2012 and limited to human studies written in English for articles with keywords of ACEI angioedema. Guideline statements and non-systematic reviews were excluded. Studies identified then underwent a structured review from which results could be evaluated. Five hundred sixty-two papers on ACEI angioedema were screened and 27 appropriate articles were rigorously reviewed in detail and recommendations given. The literature search did not support any specific treatment protocol with a high level of evidence due to the limited--and limitations of the--available studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Methamphetamine Use and Emergency Department Utilization: 20 Years Later

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Richards

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Methamphetamine (MAP users present to the emergency department (ED for myriad reasons, including trauma, chest pain, and psychosis. The purpose of this study is to determine how their prevalence, demographics, and resource utilization have changed. Methods. Retrospective review of MAP patients over 3 months in 2016. Demographics, mode of arrival, presenting complaints, disposition, and concomitant cocaine/ethanol use were compared to a 1996 study at the same ED. Results. 638 MAP-positive patients, 3,013 toxicology screens, and 20,203 ED visits represented an increase in prevalence compared to 1996: 461 MAP-positive patients, 3,102 screens, and 32,156 visits. MAP patients were older compared to the past. Mode of arrival was most frequently by ambulance but at a lower proportion than 1996, as was the proportion of MAP patients with positive cocaine toxicology screens and ethanol coingestion. Admission rate was lower compared to the past, as was discharge to jail. The proportion of MAP patients presenting with blunt trauma was lower compared to the past and higher for chest pain. Conclusion. A significant increase in the prevalence of MAP-positive patients was found. Differences in presenting complaints and resource utilization may reflect the shifting demographics of MAP users, as highlighted by an older patient population relative to the past.

  6. Telemedicine consultations and medication errors in rural emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmar, Madan; Kuppermann, Nathan; Romano, Patrick S; Yang, Nikki H; Nesbitt, Thomas S; Phan, Jennifer; Nguyen, Cynthia; Parsapour, Kourosh; Marcin, James P

    2013-12-01

    To compare the frequency of physician-related medication errors among seriously ill and injured children receiving telemedicine consultations, similar children receiving telephone consultations, and similar children receiving no consultations in rural emergency departments (EDs). We conducted retrospective chart reviews on seriously ill and injured children presenting to 8 rural EDs with access to pediatric critical care physicians from an academic children's hospital. Physician-related ED medication errors were independently identified by 2 pediatric pharmacists by using a previously published instrument. The unit of analysis was medication administered. The association of telemedicine consultations with ED medication errors was modeled by using hierarchical logistic regression adjusting for covariates (age, risk of admission, year of consultation, and hospital) and clustering at the patient level. Among the 234 patients in the study, 73 received telemedicine consultations, 85 received telephone consultations, and 76 received no specialist consultations. Medications for patients who received telemedicine consultations had significantly fewer physician-related errors than medications for patients who received telephone consultations or no consultations (3.4% vs. 10.8% and 12.5%, respectively; P medications for patients who received telemedicine consultations had a lower odds of physician-related errors than medications for patients who received telephone consultations (odds ratio: 0.19, P Pediatric critical care telemedicine consultations were associated with a significantly reduced risk of physician-related ED medication errors among seriously ill and injured children in rural EDs.

  7. A randomized trial of loading vancomycin in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosini, Jamie M; Laughner, Julie; Levine, Brian J; Papas, Mia A; Reinhardt, John F; Jasani, Neil B

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing vancomycin dosing may help eradicate bacteria while avoiding resistance. The guidelines recommend loading doses; however, there are no data to demonstrate that this may result in a more rapid achievement of therapeutic troughs. To evaluate the percentage of troughs reaching therapeutic levels at 12, 24, and 36 hours following an initial vancomycin dose of 30 mg/kg compared with 15 mg/kg. This prospective, randomized study was performed in a community academic medical center. Patients who were to receive vancomycin in the emergency department were randomized to an initial traditional dose of 15 mg/kg or a 30-mg/kg loading dose followed by 15 mg/kg every 12 hours for 3 doses. Patients weighing >120 kg or with creatinine clearances vancomycin, there was a significantly greater proportion of patients reaching target trough levels of 15 mg/L among the patients who received a loading dose as compared with a traditional dose (34% vs 3%, P vancomycin achieved a higher percentage of therapeutic levels at 12 hours when compared with the traditional dose of 15 mg/kg, without increased nephrotoxicity or adverse events. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. [General principles of wound management in emergency departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, M T; Högele, A M; Hanschen, M; von Matthey, F; Beer, A-K; Gebhardt, F; Biberthaler, P; Kanz, K-G

    2016-04-01

    Wound management is one of the major tasks in emergency departments. The surrounding intact skin but not the wound itself should be disinfected before starting definitive wound treatment. Hair should first be removed by clipping to 1-2 mm above the skin with scissors or clippers as shaving the area with a razor damages the hair follicles and increases the risk of wound infections. Administration of local anesthetics should be performed directly through the exposed edges of the wound. After wound examination, irrigation is performed with Ringer's solution, normal saline or distilled water. The next step is débridement of contaminated and devitalized tissue. There are several wound closure techniques available, including adhesive tapes, staples, tissue adhesives and numerous forms of sutures. Management of specific wounds requires particular strategies. A bleeding control problem frequently occurs with scalp lacerations. Superficial scalp lacerations can be closed by alternative wound closure methods, for example by twisting and fixing hair and the use of tissue adhesives, i.e. hair apposition technique (HAT). For strongly bleeding lacerations of the scalp, the epicranial aponeurosis should be incorporated into the hemostasis. Aftercare varies depending on both the characteristics of the wound and those of the patient and includes adequate analgesia as well as minimizing the risk of infection. Sufficient wound aftercare starts with the treating physician informing the patient about the course of events, potential complications and providing relevant instructions.

  9. Geography and travel distance impact emergency department visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Philip L; Garb, Jane L; Capraro, Geoffrey A; Li, Haiping; Smithline, Howard A; Wait, Richard B

    2011-03-01

    Little has been written about the geographic basis of emergency department (ED) visits. The objective of this study is to describe the impact of geography on ED visits. A retrospective analysis was conducted of ED visits during a 1-year period at a single institution using spatial interaction analysis that models the pattern of flow between a series of origins (census block groups) and a destination (ED). Patients were assigned to census block groups based upon their verified home address. The study hospital is the only Level I trauma, pediatric, and tertiary referral center in the area. There are 11 other hospitals with EDs within a 40-mile radius. Each patient visit within this radius, including repeat visits, was included. Patients with an invalid home address, a post office box address, or those who lived outside a 40-mile radius were excluded. ED visits per 100 population were calculated for each census block group. There were 98,584 (95%) visits by 63,524 patients that met study inclusion criteria. Visit rates decreased with increasing distance from the ED (p Geography and travel distance significantly impact ED visits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Quality measurement in the emergency department: past and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuur, Jeremiah D; Hsia, Renee Y; Burstin, Helen; Schull, Michael J; Pines, Jesse M

    2013-12-01

    As the United States seeks to improve the value of health care, there is an urgent need to develop quality measurement for emergency departments (EDs). EDs provide 130 million patient visits per year and are involved in half of all hospital admissions. Efforts to measure ED quality are in their infancy, focusing on a small set of conditions and timeliness measures, such as waiting times and length-of-stay. We review the history of ED quality measurement, identify policy levers for implementing performance measures, and propose a measurement agenda. Initial priorities include measures of effective care for serious conditions that are commonly seen in EDs, such as trauma; measures of efficient use of resources, such as high-cost imaging and hospital admission; and measures of diagnostic accuracy. More research is needed to support the development of measures of care coordination and regionalization and the episode cost of ED care. Policy makers can advance quality improvement in ED care by asking ED researchers and organizations to accelerate the development of quality measures of ED care and incorporating the measures into programs that publicly report on quality of care and incentive-based payment systems.

  11. Complement activation in emergency department patients with severe sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, John G; Bracho, David O; Chung-Esaki, Hangyul M; Lee, Moonseok; Rana, Gurpreet K; Sen, Ananda; Jones, Alan E

    2010-04-01

    This study assessed the extent and mechanism of complement activation in community-acquired sepsis at presentation to the emergency department (ED) and following 24 hours of quantitative resuscitation. A prospective pilot study of patients with severe sepsis and healthy controls was conducted among individuals presenting to a tertiary care ED. Resuscitation, including antibiotics and therapies to normalize central venous and mean arterial pressure (MAP) and central venous oxygenation, was performed on all patients. Serum levels of Factor Bb (alternative pathway), C4d (classical and mannose-binding lectin [MBL] pathway), C3, C3a, and C5a were determined at presentation and 24 hours later among patients. Twenty patients and 10 healthy volunteer controls were enrolled. Compared to volunteers, all proteins measured were abnormally higher among septic patients (C4d 3.5-fold; Factor Bb 6.1-fold; C3 0.8-fold; C3a 11.6-fold; C5a 1.8-fold). Elevations in C5a were most strongly correlated with alternative pathway activation. Surprisingly, a slight but significant inverse relationship between illness severity (by sequential organ failure assessment [SOFA] score) and C5a levels at presentation was noted. Twenty-four hours of structured resuscitation did not, on average, affect any of the mediators studied. Patients with community-acquired sepsis have extensive complement activation, particularly of the alternative pathway, at the time of presentation that was not significantly reversed by 24 hours of aggressive resuscitation.

  12. Somnabulism: Emergency Department Admissions Due to Sleepwalking-Related Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C Sauter

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Somnambulism is a state of dissociated consciousness, in which the affected person is partially asleep and partially awake. There is pervasive public opinion that sleepwalkers are protected from hurting themselves. There have been few scientific reports of trauma associated with somnambulism and no published investigations on the epidemiology or trauma patterns associated with somnambulism. METHODS: We included all emergency department (ED admissions to University Hospital Inselspital, Berne, Switzerland, from January 1, 2000, until August 11, 2015, when the patient had suffered a trauma associated with somnambulism. Demographic data (age, gender, nationality and medical data (mechanism of injury, final diagnosis, hospital admission, mortality and medication on admission were included. RESULTS: Of 620,000 screened ED admissions, 11 were associated with trauma and sleepwalking. Two patients (18.2% had a history of known non-rapid eye movement parasomnias. The leading cause of admission was falls. Four patients required hospital admission for orthopedic injuries needing further diagnostic testing and treatment (36.4%. These included two patients with multiple injuries (18.2%. None of the admitted patients died. CONCLUSION: Although sleepwalking seems benign in the majority of cases and most of the few injured patients did not require hospitalization, major injuries are possible. When patients present with falls of unknown origin, the possibility should be evaluated that they were caused by somnambulism.

  13. Somnambulism: Emergency Department Admissions Due to Sleepwalking-Related Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Thomas C; Veerakatty, Sajitha; Haider, Dominik G; Geiser, Thomas; Ricklin, Meret E; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K

    2016-11-01

    Somnambulism is a state of dissociated consciousness, in which the affected person is partially asleep and partially awake. There is pervasive public opinion that sleepwalkers are protected from hurting themselves. There have been few scientific reports of trauma associated with somnambulism and no published investigations on the epidemiology or trauma patterns associated with somnambulism. We included all emergency department (ED) admissions to University Hospital Inselspital, Berne, Switzerland, from January 1, 2000, until August 11, 2015, when the patient had suffered a trauma associated with somnambulism. Demographic data (age, gender, nationality) and medical data (mechanism of injury, final diagnosis, hospital admission, mortality and medication on admission) were included. Of 620,000 screened ED admissions, 11 were associated with trauma and sleepwalking. Two patients (18.2%) had a history of known non-rapid eye movement parasomnias. The leading cause of admission was falls. Four patients required hospital admission for orthopedic injuries needing further diagnostic testing and treatment (36.4%). These included two patients with multiple injuries (18.2%). None of the admitted patients died. Although sleepwalking seems benign in the majority of cases and most of the few injured patients did not require hospitalization, major injuries are possible. When patients present with falls of unknown origin, the possibility should be evaluated that they were caused by somnambulism.

  14. Emergency Department Presentation of Patients with Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindor, Rachel A; Tweet, Marysia S; Goyal, Kiran A; Lohse, Christine M; Gulati, Rajiv; Hayes, Sharonne N; Sadosty, Annie T

    2017-03-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an infrequently recognized but potentially fatal cause of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) that disproportionately affects women. Little is currently known about how patients with SCAD initially present. We sought to describe patients who presented to the emergency department (ED) with symptoms of SCAD to improve providers' awareness and recognition of this condition. We performed a retrospective medical record review of all patients who presented to the ED of a single academic medical center from January 1, 2002 through October 31, 2015 and were subsequently diagnosed with SCAD by angiography. These patients were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes and a Boolean search of the diagnosis field of the medical record. Data regarding patients' presentations and course were abstracted by two independent reviewers. We identified 20 episodes of SCAD involving 19 patients, all of whom were female. The majority of patients had 0-1 conventional cardiovascular disease risk factors. Most patients had chest pain (85%), initial electrocardiograms without evidence of ischemia (85%), and elevated initial troponin (72%). The most common diagnosis in providers' differential was acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Patients with SCAD present with similar symptoms compared to patients with ACS caused by atherosclerotic disease, but have different risk profiles. Providers should consider SCAD in patients presenting with symptoms concerning for ACS, especially in younger female patients without traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, as their risk may be significantly underestimated with commonly used ACS risk-stratifiers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hydrochlorothiazide Induced Lichen Planus in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Billy; Miller, Morgan; Chew, Edward

    2017-04-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is a mucocutaneous inflammatory disease that involves papulosquamous eruption of the skin, scalp, nails, and mucous membranes. This uncommon condition has a higher prevalence in African Americans and females. Women accounts for 50% of cutaneous LP (CLP) and 60% to 75% of oral LP (OLP) cases. Diagnosis is centered around clinical presentation. Patient evaluation requires a comprehensive physical examination to identify any potential sites of involvement. LP is usually described by the "Six P's": planar, purple, polygonal, pruritic, papules, and plaques. Drug-induced LP, or lichenoid drug reactions, is uncommon and usually indiscernible from other forms of LP. Lichenoid drug reactions exhibit parakeratosis, dermal infiltrates of eosinophils, or perivascular lymphocytic infiltrates affecting the reticular dermis. An extended time interval between the initiation of drug to the onset of symptoms usually does not exclude potential diagnosis of a lichenoid drug reaction. We describe a case of hydrochlorothiazide-induced LP without prolonged exposure to sunlight diagnosed in the emergency department (ED). In this case, a pharmacist-conducted medication reconciliation played an integral role in accurately recognizing this adverse drug reaction. Our case report adds to the limited available literature on the topic, most of which originated more than 30 years ago.

  16. Emergency Department utilization among Deaf American Sign Language users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Michael M; Winters, Paul C; Sen, Ananda; Zazove, Philip; Fiscella, Kevin

    2015-10-01

    Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users comprise a linguistic minority population with poor health care access due to communication barriers and low health literacy. Potentially, these health care barriers could increase Emergency Department (ED) use. To compare ED use between deaf and non-deaf patients. A retrospective cohort from medical records. The sample was derived from 400 randomly selected charts (200 deaf ASL users and 200 hearing English speakers) from an outpatient primary care health center with a high volume of deaf patients. Abstracted data included patient demographics, insurance, health behavior, and ED use in the past 36 months. Deaf patients were more likely to be never smokers and be insured through Medicaid. In an adjusted analysis, deaf individuals were significantly more likely to use the ED (odds ratio [OR], 1.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-3.51) over the prior 36 months. Deaf American Sign Language users appear to be at greater odds for elevated ED utilization when compared to the general hearing population. Efforts to further understand the drivers for increased ED utilization among deaf ASL users are much needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Patients overwhelmingly prefer inpatient boarding to emergency department boarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viccellio, Peter; Zito, Joseph A; Sayage, Valerie; Chohan, Jasmine; Garra, Gregory; Santora, Carolyn; Singer, Adam J

    2013-12-01

    Boarding of admitted patients in the emergency department (ED) is a major cause of crowding. One alternative to boarding in the ED, a full-capacity protocol where boarded patients are redeployed to inpatient units, can reduce crowding and improve overall flow. Our aim was to compare patient satisfaction with boarding in the ED vs. inpatient hallways. We performed a structured telephone survey regarding patient experiences and preferences for boarding among admitted ED patients who experienced boarding in the ED hallway and then were subsequently transferred to inpatient hallways. Demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as patient preferences, including items related to patient comfort and safety using a 5-point scale, were recorded and descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. Of 110 patients contacted, 105 consented to participate. Mean age was 57 ± 16 years and 52% were female. All patients were initially boarded in the ED in a hallway before their transfer to an inpatient hallway bed. The overall preferred location after admission was the inpatient hallway in 85% (95% confidence interval 75-90) of respondents. In comparing ED vs. inpatient hallway boarding, the following percentages of respondents preferred inpatient boarding with regard to the following 8 items: rest, 85%; safety, 83%; confidentiality, 82%; treatment, 78%; comfort, 79%; quiet, 84%; staff availability, 84%; and privacy, 84%. For no item was there a preference for boarding in the ED. Patients overwhelmingly preferred the inpatient hallway rather than the ED hallway when admitted to the hospital. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Improvement of emergency department patient flow using lean thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Miquel; Suárez, Montse; Asenjo, María; Bragulat, Ernest

    2018-02-13

    To apply lean thinking in triage acuity level-3 patients in order to improve emergency department (ED) throughtput and waiting time. A prospective interventional study. An ED of a tertiary care hospital. Triage acuity level-3 patients. To apply lean techniques such as value stream mapping, workplace organization, reduction of wastes and standardization by the frontline staff. Two periods were compared: (i) pre-lean: April-September, 2015; and (ii) post-lean: April-September, 2016. Variables included: median process time (time from beginning of nurse preparation to the end of nurse finalization after doctor disposition) of both discharged and transferred to observation patients; median length of stay; median waiting time; left without being seen, 72-h revisit and mortality rates, and daily number of visits. There was no additional staff or bed after lean implementation. Despite an increment in the daily number of visits (+8.3%, P lean implementation. No significant differences were registered in left without being seen rate (5.23% vs 4.95%), 72-h revisit rate (3.41% vs 3.93%), and mortality rate (0.23% vs 0.15%). Lean thinking is a methodology that can improve triage acuity level-3 patient flow in the ED, resulting in better throughput along with reduced waiting time. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  19. Using online analytical processing to manage emergency department operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Bradley D; Asplin, Brent R

    2004-11-01

    The emergency department (ED) is a unique setting in which to explore and evaluate the utility of information technology to improve health care operations. A potentially useful software tool in managing this complex environment is online analytical processing (OLAP). An OLAP system has the ability to provide managers, providers, and researchers with the necessary information to make decisions quickly and effectively by allowing them to examine patterns and trends in operations and patient flow. OLAP software quickly summarizes and processes data acquired from a variety of data sources, including computerized ED tracking systems. It allows the user to form a comprehensive picture of the ED from both system-wide and patient-specific perspectives and to interactively view the data using an approach that meets his or her needs. This article describes OLAP software tools and provides examples of potential OLAP applications for care improvement projects, primarily from the perspective of the ED. While OLAP is clearly a helpful tool in the ED, it is far more useful when integrated into the larger continuum of health information systems across a hospital or health care delivery system.

  20. Geriatric Syncope and Cardiovascular Risk in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nissa J; Grossman, Shamai A

    2017-04-01

    Syncope is a transient loss of consciousness that is caused by a brief loss in generalized cerebral blood flow. This article reviews the background, epidemiology, etiologies, evaluation, and disposition considerations of geriatric patients with syncope, with a focus on cardiovascular risk. Although syncope is one of the most common symptoms in elderly patients presenting to the emergency department, syncope causes in geriatric patients can present differently than in younger populations, and the underlying etiology is often challenging to discern. History, physical examination, and electrocardiography (ECG) have the greatest utility in evaluating syncope. Additional testing should be guided by history and physical examination. There are multiple scoring tools developed to aid in management and these are reviewed in the article. Common predictors that would indicate a need for further work-up include a history of cardiac or valvular disease (i.e., ventricular dysrhythmia, congestive heart failure), abnormal ECG, anemia or severe volume depletion (i.e., from a gastrointestinal bleed), syncope while supine or with effort, report of palpitations or chest pain, persistent abnormal vital signs, or family history of sudden death. With advancing age, cardiovascular morbidity plays a more frequent and important role in the etiology of syncope. The syncope work-up should be tailored to the patient's presentation. Disposition should be based on the results of the initial evaluation and risk factors for adverse outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Violence against nurses in emergency departments in jordan: nurses' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darawad, Muhammad W; Al-Hussami, Mahmoud; Saleh, Ali M; Mustafa, Waddah Mohammad; Odeh, Haifa

    2015-01-01

    Violence against nurses in emergency departments (EDs) has become a widespread phenomenon affecting nurses' job satisfaction and work performance. Literature is scarce regarding prevalence rates and causes of violence directed toward nurses in Jordan. The present study investigated violence experienced by Jordanian nurses in EDs and causes of violence from their perspectives. This descriptive study collected data from 174 Jordanian ED nurses. The majority of the participants (91.4%) reported experiencing violence (verbal 95.3% vs. physical 23.3%). According to participants, the most common causes of violence in the ED were crowding and workload (75.9%), and the least was care of patients with dementia or Alzheimer's disease (35.6%). Violence is common in Jordanian EDs, giving rise to many heath and behavioral consequences. Health care administrators are obligated to protect nurses from violent incidents by providing adequate safety measures, beneficial administrative procedures, and sincere efforts to overcome the causes of this phenomenon. © 2015 The Author(s).

  2. Ambient Ozone and Emergency Department Visits for Cellulitis

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    Mieczysław Szyszkowicz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives were to assess and estimate an association between exposure to ground-level ozone and emergency department (ED visits for cellulitis. All ED visits for cellulitis in Edmonton, Canada, in the period April 1992–March 2002 (N = 69,547 were examined. Case-crossover design was applied to estimate odds ratio (OR, and 95% confidence interval per one interquartile range (IQR increase in ozone concentration (IQR = 14.0 ppb. Delay of ED visit relating to exposure was probed using 0- to 5-day exposure lags. For all patients in the all months (January–December and lags 0 to 2 days, OR = 1.05 (1.02, 1.07. For male patients during the cold months (October-March: OR = 1.05 (1.02, 1.09 for lags 0 and 2 and OR = 1.06 (1.02, 1.10 for lag 3. For female patients in the warm months (April-September: OR = 1.12 (1.06, 1.18 for lags 1 and 2. Cellulitis developing on uncovered (more exposed skin was analyzed separately, observed effects being stronger. Cellulitis may be associated with exposure to ambient ground level ozone; the exposure may facilitate cellulitis infection and aggravate acute symptoms.

  3. Developing an emergency department crowding dashboard: A design science approach.

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    Martin, Niels; Bergs, Jochen; Eerdekens, Dorien; Depaire, Benoît; Verelst, Sandra

    2017-08-30

    As an emergency department (ED) is a complex adaptive system, the analysis of continuously gathered data is valuable to gain insight in the real-time patient flow. To support the analysis and management of ED operations, relevant data should be provided in an intuitive way. Within this context, this paper outlines the development of a dashboard which provides real-time information regarding ED crowding. The research project underlying this paper follows the principles of design science research, which involves the development and study of artifacts which aim to solve a generic problem. To determine the crowding indicators that are desired in the dashboard, a modified Delphi study is used. The dashboard is implemented using the open source Shinydashboard package in R. A dashboard is developed containing the desired crowding indicators, together with general patient flow characteristics. It is demonstrated using a dataset of a Flemish ED and fulfills the requirements which are defined a priori. The developed dashboard provides real-time information on ED crowding. This information enables ED staff to judge whether corrective actions are required in an effort to avoid the adverse effects of ED crowding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A stochastic optimization model for shift scheduling in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Rifai, Omar; Garaix, Thierry; Augusto, Vincent; Xie, Xiaolan

    2015-09-01

    Excessive waiting time in Emergency Departments (ED) can be both a cause of frustration and more importantly, a health concern for patients. Waiting time arises when the demand for work goes beyond the facility's service capacity. ED service capacity mainly depends on human resources and on beds available for patients. In this paper, we focus on human resources organization in an ED and seek to best balance between service quality and working conditions. More specifically, we address the personnel scheduling problem in order to optimize the shift distribution among employees and minimize the total expected patients' waiting time. The problem is also characterized by a multi-stage re-entrant service process. With an appropriate approximation of patients' waiting times, we first propose a stochastic mixed-integer programming model that is solved by a sample average approximation (SAA) approach. The resulting personnel schedules are then evaluated using a discrete-event simulation model. Numerical experiments are then performed with data from a French hospital to compare different personnel scheduling strategies.

  5. EVALUATION OF SUICIDE ATTEMPT CASES ADMITTED TO EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

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    Hamit Sirri Keten

    2015-06-01

    Material and Methods: A total of 70 attempted suicide cases admitted to Emergency Department of Kahramanmaras Sutcu imam University Medical Faculty Hospital between 01.03.2012 and 01.03.2013 examined retrospectively. Results: Among the 70 patients included in the study, 26 (37.1% were male and 44 (62.9% were female with a mean age of 26.3+/-11.2 years. Of all, 10 (14.3% cases were reported to have one or more previous suicide attempts. Investigation of methods of suicide revealed that 64 (91.4% used medication or toxic substance ingestion, 5 (7.1% stabbing, and 1 (1.4% preferred hanging as suicide method. All of those of preferred stabbing as a means of suicide were males. Conclusion: In order to tackle suicidal attempts author suggests that collective preventive policies should be developed by local governments, non-governmental organizations and health care providers. [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(2.000: 102-105

  6. Emergency Department Visits by Older Adults for Motor Vehicle Collisions

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    Vogel, Jody A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To describe the epidemiology and characteristics of emergency department (ED visits by older adults for motor vehicle collisions (MVC in the United States (U.S..Methods: We analyzed ED visits for MVCs using data from the 2003–2007 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS. Using U.S. Census data, we calculated annual incidence rates of driver or passenger MVC-related ED visits and examined visit characteristics, including triage acuity, tests performed and hospital admission or discharge. We compared older (65+ years and younger (18-64 years MVC patients and calculated odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CIs to measure the strength of associations between age group and various visit characteristics. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of admissions for MVC-related injuries among older adults.Results: From 2003–2007, there were an average of 237,000 annual ED visits by older adults for MVCs. The annual ED visit rate for MVCs was 6.4 (95% CI 4.6-8.3 visits per 1,000 for older adults and 16.4 (95% CI 14.0-18.8 visits per 1,000 for younger adults. Compared to younger MVC patients, after adjustment for gender, race and ethnicity, older MVC patients were more likely to have at least one imaging study performed (OR 3.69, 95% CI 1.46-9.36. Older MVC patients were not significantly more likely to arrive by ambulance (OR 1.47; 95% CI 0.76–2.86, have a high triage acuity (OR 1.56; 95% CI 0.77-3.14, or to have a diagnosis of a head, spinal cord or torso injury (OR 0.97; 95% CI 0.42-2.23 as compared to younger MVC patients after adjustment for gender, race and ethnicity. Overall, 14.5% (95% CI 9.8-19.2 of older MVC patients and 6.1% (95% CI 4.8-7.5 of younger MVC patients were admitted to the hospital. There was also a non-statistically significant trend toward hospital admission for older versus younger MVC patients (OR 1.78; 95% CI 0.71-4.43, and admission to the ICU if

  7. How emergency nurse practitioners view their role within the emergency department: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Rees, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    The Emergency Nurse Practitioner (ENP) role has become established over the last two decades within emergency care. This role has developed to meet the rising demands of healthcare, combat the continuing medical workforce shortfall and address targets around healthcare delivery within emergency care. The ENP role has been widely evaluated in terms of patient satisfaction, safety and outcome. To date there is no published literature exploring what drives senior nurses to undertake this role which involves additional clinical responsibility and educational preparation for no increase in pay. This research seeks to explore how Emergency Nurse Practitioners view their role within the Emergency Department and Emergency Care Team. A qualitative approach was utilised in order to gain greater in-depth understanding of ENPs' perspectives. A purposive sample of eight ENPs was chosen and semi-structured interviews were digitally recorded. The transcribed interviews were subjected to thematic analysis to look for any recurrent themes. Following analysis of the data, four main themes emerged with a total of eight sub themes. The findings suggested that whilst the role had been accepted amongst doctors within the ED, there was still a lack of understanding of the role outside the ED and conflict still existed amongst junior nurses. ENPs were motivated to undertake the role in order to gain greater job satisfaction. The findings also highlighted the concerns regarding financial remuneration for the role, lack of standardisation of the role and educational preparation. The study concludes that education has a key role in the development and acceptance of the role and that ENPs are disappointed with the lack of financial remuneration for the role. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Telehealth-Enabled Emergency Medical Services Program Reduces Ambulance Transport to Urban Emergency Departments

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    James Robert Langabeer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Emergency medical services (EMS agencies transport a significant majority of patients with low acuity and non-emergent conditions to local emergency departments (ED, affecting the entire emergency care system’s capacity and performance. Opportunities exist for alternative models that integrate technology, telehealth, and more appropriately aligned patient navigation. While a limited number of programs have evolved recently, no empirical evidence exists for their efficacy. This research describes the development and comparative effectiveness of one large urban program. Methods The Houston Fire Department initiated the Emergency Telehealth and Navigation (ETHAN program in 2014. ETHAN combines telehealth, social services, and alternative transportation to navigate primary care-related patients away from the ED where possible. Using a case-control study design, we describe the program and compare differences in effectiveness measures relative to the control group. Results During the first 12 months, 5,570 patients participated in the telehealth-enabled program, which were compared against the same size control group. We found a 56% absolute reduction in ambulance transports to the ED with the intervention compared to the control group (18% vs. 74%, P<.001. EMS productivity (median time from EMS notification to unit back in service was 44 minutes faster for the ETHAN group (39 vs. 83 minutes, median. There were no statistically significant differences in mortality or patient satisfaction. Conclusion We found that mobile technology-driven delivery models are effective at reducing unnecessary ED ambulance transports and increasing EMS unit productivity. This provides support for broader EMS mobile integrated health programs in other regions.

  9. Impact of an ABCDE team triage process combined with public guidance on the division of work in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantonen, Jarmo; Lloyd, Robert; Mattila, Juho; Kauppila, Timo; Menezes, Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    To study the effects of applying an emergency department (ED) triage system, combined with extensive publicity in local media about the "right" use of emergency services, on the division of work between ED nurses and general practitioners (GPs). An observational and quasi-experimental study based on before-after comparisons. Implementation of the ABCDE triage system in a Finnish combined ED where secondary care is adjacent, and in a traditional primary care ED where secondary care is located elsewhere. GPs and nurses from two different primary care EDs. Numbers of monthly visits to different professional groups before and after intervention in the studied primary care EDs and numbers of monthly visits to doctors in the local secondary care ED. The beginning of the triage process increased temporarily the number of independent consultations and patient record entries by ED nurses in both types of studied primary care EDs and reduced the number of patient visits to a doctor compared with previous years but had no effect on doctor visits in the adjacent secondary care ED. No further decrease in the number of nurse or GP visits was observed by inhibiting the entrance of non-urgent patients. The ABCDE triage system combined with public guidance may reduce non-urgent patient visits to doctors in different kinds of primary care EDs without increasing visits in the secondary care ED. However, the additional work to implement the ABCDE system is mainly directed to nurses, which may pose a challenge for staffing.

  10. Trends in Adult Cancer-Related Emergency Department Utilization: An Analysis of Data From the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Donna R; Gallicchio, Lisa; Brown, Jeremy; Liu, Benmei; Kyriacou, Demetrios N; Shelburne, Nonniekaye

    2017-10-12

    The emergency department (ED) is used to manage cancer-related complications among the 15.5 million people living with cancer in the United States. However, ED utilization patterns by the population of US adults with cancer have not been previously evaluated or described in published literature. To estimate the proportion of US ED visits made by adults with a cancer diagnosis, understand the clinical presentation of adult patients with cancer in the ED, and examine factors related to inpatient admission within this population. Nationally representative data comprised of 7 survey cycles (January 2006-December 2012) from the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample were analyzed. Identification of adult (age ≥18 years) cancer-related visits was based on Clinical Classifications Software diagnoses documented during the ED visit. Weighted frequencies and proportions of ED visits among adult patients with cancer by demographic, geographic, and clinical characteristics were calculated. Weighted multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the associations between inpatient admission and key demographic and clinical variables for adult cancer-related ED visits. Adult cancer-related ED utilization patterns; identification of primary reason for ED visit; patient-related factors associated with inpatient admission from the ED. Among an estimated 696 million weighted adult ED visits from January 2006 to December 2012, 29.5 million (4.2%) were made by a patient with a cancer diagnosis. The most common cancers associated with an ED visit were breast, prostate, and lung cancer, and most common primary reasons for visit were pneumonia (4.5%), nonspecific chest pain (3.7%), and urinary tract infection (3.2%). Adult cancer-related ED visits resulted in inpatient admissions more frequently (59.7%) than non-cancer-related visits (16.3%) (P adults, breast, prostate, and lung cancer were the most common cancer diagnoses presenting to the ED. Pneumonia was the most common

  11. Screening for Sexual Orientation in Psychiatric Emergency Departments

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    Currier, Glenn W.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Our goal was to explore whether emergency department (ED patients would disclose their sexual orientation in a research evaluation and to examine demographic and clinical characteristics of patients by self-identified sexual orientation. Methods: Participants (n=177 presented for psychiatric treatment at three urban EDs in New York City, Rochester, NY, and Philadelphia, PA. Participants were interviewed in the context of a larger study of a standardized suicide risk assessment. We assessed participants’ willingness to answer questions regarding sexual orientation along three dimensions: a self-description of sexual orientation, a self-description of sexual attraction, and the gender of any prior sexual partners. Results: No participants (0/177 refused to respond to the categorical question about sexual orientation, 168/177 (94.9% agreed to provide information about prior sexual partners, and 100/109 (91.7% provided information about current sexual attraction toward either gender. Of all 177 participants, 154 (87.0% self-identified as heterosexual, 11 (6.2% as bisexual, 10 (5.6% as gay or lesbian, and 2 (1.1% indicated they were not sure. As compared with heterosexual patients, lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB patients were significantly younger and more likely to be non-white, but did not differ significantly in terms of education, income, employment, or religious affiliation or participation. Further, LGB participants did not differ from self-identified heterosexual participants for lifetime suicide attempt rate or lifetime history of any mood, substance-related, psychotic spectrum, or other Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV Axis I disorder. Of self-identified heterosexual participants 5.6% (5/89 reported sexual attraction as other than ‘only opposite sex,’ and 10.3% (15/142 of sexually active ‘heterosexual’ participants reported previous same-gender sexual partners. Conclusion

  12. Cognitive Impairment among Older Adults in the Emergency Department

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    Hirschman, Karen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Within the next 30 years, the number of visits older adults will make to emergency departments (EDs is expected to double from 16 million, or 14% of all visits, to 34 million and comprise nearly a quarter of all visits.Objective: The objectives of this study were to determine prevalence rates of cognitive impairment among older adults in the ED and to identify associations, if any, between environmental factors unique to the ED and rates of cognitive impairment.Methods: A cross-sectional observational study of adults 65 and older admitted to the ED of a large, urban, tertiary academic health center was conducted between September 2007 and May 2008. Patients were screened for cognitive impairment in orientation, recall and executive function using the Six-Item Screen (SIS and the CLOX1, clock drawing task. Cognitive impairment among this ED population was assessed and both patient demographics and ED characteristics (crowding, triage time, location of assessment, triage class were compared through adjusted generalized linear models.Results: Forty-two percent (350/829 of elderly patients presented with deficits in orientation and recall as assessed by the SIS. An additional 36% of elderly patients with no impairment in orientation or recall had deficits in executive function as assessed by the CLOX1. In full model adjusted analyses patients were more likely to screen deficits in orientation and recall (SIS if they were 85 years or older (Relative Risk [RR]=1.63, 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI]=1.3-2.07, black (RR=1.85, 95% CI=1.5-2.4 and male (RR=1.42, 95% CI=1.2-1.7. Only age was significantly associated with executive functioning deficits in the ED screened using the clock drawing task (CLOX1 (75-84 years: RR=1.35, 95% CI= 1.2-1.6; 85+ years: RR=1.69, 95% CI= 1.5-2.0.Conclusion: These findings have several implications for patients seen in the ED. The SIS coupled with a clock drawing task (CLOX1 provide a rapid and simple method for

  13. A retrospective study on epidemiology of hypoglycemia in Emergency Department

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    Juvva Gowtham Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoglycemia is one among the leading causes for Emergency Department (ED visits and is the most common and easily preventable endocrine emergency. This study is aimed at assessing the incidence and elucidating the underlying causes of hypoglycemia. Materials and Methods: A retrospective, observational study which included patients registering in ED with a finger prick blood glucose ≤60 mg/dl at the time of arrival. All patients aged above 15 years with the above inclusion criteria during the period of August 2010 to July 2013 were selected. The study group was categorized based on diabetic status into diabetic and nondiabetic groups. Results: A total of 1196 hypoglycemic episodes encountered at the ED during the study period were included, and of which 772 with complete data were analyzed. Underlying causes for hypoglycemia in the diabetic group (535 mainly included medication related 320 (59.81%, infections 108 (20.19%, and chronic kidney disease 61 (11.40%. Common underlying causes of hypoglycemia in nondiabetic group (237, 30.69% included infections 107 (45.15%, acute/chronic liver disease 42 (17.72%, and malignancies 22 (9.28%. Among diabetic subjects on antidiabetic medications (n = 320, distribution over 24 h duration clearly reported two peaks at 8th and 21st h. The incidence of hypoglycemia and death per 1000 ED visits were 16.41 and 0.73 in 2011, 16.19 and 0.78 in 2012, 17.20 and 1.22 in 2013 with an average of 16.51 and 0.91, respectively. Conclusion: Bimodal distribution with peaks in incidences of hypoglycemic attacks at 8th and 21st h based on hourly distribution in a day can be correlated with the times just before next meal. None of the patients should leave ED without proper evaluation of the etiology of hypoglycemia and the problem should be addressed at each individual level. Increasing incidence of death over the years is alarming, and further studies are needed to conclude the root cause.

  14. Forecasting daily patient volumes in the emergency department.

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    Jones, Spencer S; Thomas, Alun; Evans, R Scott; Welch, Shari J; Haug, Peter J; Snow, Gregory L

    2008-02-01

    Shifts in the supply of and demand for emergency department (ED) resources make the efficient allocation of ED resources increasingly important. Forecasting is a vital activity that guides decision-making in many areas of economic, industrial, and scientific planning, but has gained little traction in the health care industry. There are few studies that explore the use of forecasting methods to predict patient volumes in the ED. The goals of this study are to explore and evaluate the use of several statistical forecasting methods to predict daily ED patient volumes at three diverse hospital EDs and to compare the accuracy of these methods to the accuracy of a previously proposed forecasting method. Daily patient arrivals at three hospital EDs were collected for the period January 1, 2005, through March 31, 2007. The authors evaluated the use of seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average, time series regression, exponential smoothing, and artificial neural network models to forecast daily patient volumes at each facility. Forecasts were made for horizons ranging from 1 to 30 days in advance. The forecast accuracy achieved by the various forecasting methods was compared to the forecast accuracy achieved when using a benchmark forecasting method already available in the emergency medicine literature. All time series methods considered in this analysis provided improved in-sample model goodness of fit. However, post-sample analysis revealed that time series regression models that augment linear regression models by accounting for serial autocorrelation offered only small improvements in terms of post-sample forecast accuracy, relative to multiple linear regression models, while seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average, exponential smoothing, and artificial neural network forecasting models did not provide consistently accurate forecasts of daily ED volumes. This study confirms the widely held belief that daily demand for ED services is characterized by

  15. [Spanish nurses' survey on triage in hospital emergency departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Bermejo, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    To describe the opinions of Spanish nurses on hospital emergency department (ED) triage and to compare their level of satisfaction with different triage systems. Descriptive survey-based study of the opinions of nurses working in Spanish EDs. The online questionnaire was self-administered by the respondents. Items covered demographic data, degrees of experience and training, level of satisfaction, and aspects related to triage in general and to the type of triage used in the respondent's hospital. Valid responses were received from 833 of the 857 nurses contacted (97.2% response rate); the nurses worked at 161 hospitals. Eighty hospitals (49.7%) used the Andorran Triage System adapted as the Spanish Triage System (ATM-STS) and 49 (30.4%) used the Manchester Triage System (MTS). The mean (SD) age of respondents was 38.5 (7.8) years; 652 (78.3%) of the respondents were women. Nurses were responsible for triage in 140 (87%) of the hospitals. Four hundred nurses (48.0%) believed triage is a full-team responsibility and 367 (44.0%) believed it was a nursing responsibility. Six hundred three (77.2%) had received specific training in triage. Seven hundred nine (85.1%) believed that triage always or almost always ensures better care for patients with the most serious emergencies, 681 (81.7%) believed that the triage nurse's opinion is taken into consideration, and 663 (79.6%) believed that patients are seen by a physician according to the assigned triage level. Nurses feel supported and generally respected by other nurses. Two hundred thirty (26.7%) would change the triage system they use, but only 100 (43.5%) could name a system they would switch to. Triage is performed by nurses in most of the hospitals, although nearly half of the respondents believe this responsibility should be shared with doctors. Nurses have a good opinion of triage and are generally satisfied with it, but there is variation according to the system implemented in their hospital.

  16. 42 CFR 9.9 - Facility staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS STANDARDS OF CARE FOR... of the activities and chimpanzee population of the sanctuary. The level of staffing shall be adequate... issues related to captive nonhuman primates. Experience in these areas dealing specifically with...

  17. A Multimedia Medical Communication Link Between A Radiology Department And An Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Morris; Robertson, John G.; Belanger, Garry; Georganas, Nicolas D.; Mastronardi, Jim; Cohn-Sfetcu, Sorin; Dillon, Richard F.; Tombaugh, Jo W.

    1989-05-01

    The most critical aspect of a radiologist's work is the communication of his findings to the attending physician responsible for the patient's care. This is also the part of the process that is least well organized and the most subject to failure. At the University of Ottawa Medical Communications Research Centre we are investigating technical means to improve communications between radiologists and attending physicians. We first introduce the radiology communication service problem and show why it is essentially a multimedia communication problem. We then briefly describe a multimedia communication system designed and implemented by our research team. The multimedia system consists of several workstations linked by the Hospital's LAN. Each physician workstation comprises a Compaq 386/20 Mhertz microcomputer with 16 Mbytes of RAM, a 500 Mbyte image disk, an image memory which drives a 1000 line monochrome monitor. The images are digitized using a Konica laser-based film digitizer (2430 by 2000 10-bit pixels for a standard chest radiograph). The multimedia file server manager station is built around a PC-AT compatible with a Northern Telecom MERIDIAN SL-1ST digital PBX and a Meridian Mail digital voice messaging system. This last device is used to store voice data and is linked via the PBX to the workstations' digital telephones. A SYTEK 6000 local area network (LAN) links all workstations to the file server. All data, image and graphic information is transmitted via this network, while the twisted pair connections linking the digital PBX to the telephone sets are used for transmitting voice data. Finally, we provide details of an in-hospital trial linking the Department of Radiological Sciences and the Emergency Department at the Ottawa Civic Hospital, a 950 bed tertiary care teaching hospital.

  18. The child with headache in a pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conicella, Elena; Raucci, Umberto; Vanacore, Nicola; Vigevano, Federico; Reale, Antonino; Pirozzi, Nicola; Valeriani, Massimiliano

    2008-07-01

    To investigate clinical features of a pediatric population presenting with headache to a pediatric emergency department (ED) and to identify headache characteristics which are more likely associated with serious, life-threatening conditions in distinction from headaches due to more benign processes. Although headache is a common problem in children visiting a pediatric ED, a few studies thus far have attempted to identify the clinical characteristics most likely associated with suspected life-threatening disease. A retrospective chart review of all consecutive patients who presented with a chief complaint of headache at ED over a 1-year period was conducted. Etiologies were classified according to the International Headache Society diagnostic criteria 2nd edition. Four hundred and thirty-two children (0.8% of the total number of visits) aged from 2 to 18 years (mean age 8.9 years) were enrolled in our study. There were 228 boys (53%) and 204 girls (47%). School-age group was the most represented (66%). The most common cause of headache was upper respiratory tract infections (19.2%). The remaining majority of non-life-threatening headache included migraine (18.5%), posttraumatic headache (5.5%), tension-type headache (4.6%). Serious life-threatening intracranial disorders (4.1%) included meningitis (1.6%), acute hydrocephalus (0.9%), tumors (0.7%). We found several clinical clues which demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with dangerous conditions: pre-school age, recent onset of pain, occipital location, and child's inability to describe the quality of pain and objective neurological signs. Differential diagnosis between primary and secondary headaches can be very difficult, especially in an ED setting. The majority of headaches are secondary to respiratory infectious diseases and minor head trauma. Our data allowed us to identify clinical features useful to recognize intracranial life-threatening conditions.

  19. Pediatric emergency department discharge prescriptions requiring pharmacy clarification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Michelle C; Gittelman, Michael A; Widecan, Michelle L; Luria, Joseph W

    2015-06-01

    The aims of the study were to analyze and classify reasons why retail pharmacies need to contact the pediatric emergency department (PED) for clarification on outpatient prescriptions generated using an electronic prescribing system and to categorize the severity of errors captured. A retrospective chart review was conducted at a PED that cares for approximately 92,000 patients annually. All pharmacy callbacks documented in the electronic medical record between August 1, 2008 and July 31, 2009 were included. A datasheet was used to capture patient demographics (age, sex, race, insurance), prescriptions written, and reason for callback. Each call was then assigned a severity level, and time to respond to all calls was estimated. Frequencies were used to analyze the data. A total of 731 errors for 695 callbacks were analyzed from 49,583 prescriptions written at discharge. The most common errors included administrative/insurance issues 342/731 (47%) and prescription writing errors 298/731 (41%). The errors were classified as insignificant (340/729 [47%]), problematic (288/729 [40%]), significant (77/729 [11%]), serious (12/729 [1.64%]), and severe (12/729 [1.64%]). Almost 96% of errant prescriptions were not able to be filled as originally written and required a change by the prescriber. These calls required approximately 127 hours to complete. Prescription errors requiring a pharmacy callback are typically insignificant. However, 13.8% of callbacks about an error were considered significant, serious, or severe. Automated dose checking and verifying insurance coverage of prescribed medications should be considered essential components of prescription writing in a PED.

  20. Examining the sources of occupational stress in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, S; Yap, C; Mason, S

    2016-12-01

    Previous work has established that health care staff, in particular emergency department (ED) personnel, experience significant occupational stress but the underlying stressors have not been well quantified. Such data inform interventions that can reduce cases of occupational mental illness, burnout, staff turnover and early retirement associated with cumulative stress. To develop, implement and evaluate a questionnaire examining the origins of occupational stress in the ED. A questionnaire co-designed by an occupational health practitioner and ED management administered to nursing, medical and support staff in the ED of a large English teaching hospital in 2015. The questionnaire assessed participants' demographic characteristics and perceptions of stress across three dimensions (demand-control-support, effort-reward and organizational justice). Work-related stressors in ED staff were compared with those of an unmatched control group from the acute ear, nose and throat (ENT) and neurology directorate. A total of 104 (59%) ED staff returned questionnaires compared to 72 staff (67%) from the acute ENT/neurology directorate. The ED respondents indicated lower levels of job autonomy, management support and involvement in organizational change, but not work demand. High levels of effort-reward imbalance and organizational injustice were reported by both groups. Our findings suggest that internal ED interventions to improve workers' job control, increase support from management and involvement in organizational change may reduce work stress. The high levels of effort-reward imbalance and organizational injustice reported by both groups may indicate that wider interventions beyond the ED are also needed to address these issues. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Prescription History of Emergency Department Patients Prescribed Opioids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghland, John; Yaron, Michael; Heard, Kennon

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: To use Colorado's prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) to describe the recent opioid prescription history of patients discharged from our emergency department (ED) with a prescription for opioid pain medications. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of 300 adult ED patients who received an opioid prescription. We abstracted prescription histories for the six months prior to the ED visit from the PDMP, and abstracted clinical and demographic variables from the chart. Results: There were 5,379 ED visits during the study month, 3,732 of which were discharged. Providers wrote 1,165 prescriptions for opioid analgesics to 1,124/3,732 (30%) of the patients. Median age was 36 years. Thirty-nine percent were male. Patients were 46% Caucasian, 26% African American, 22% Hispanic, 2% Asian and 4% other. These were similar to our overall ED population. There was substantial variability in the number of prescriptions, prescribers and total number of pills. A majority (205/296) of patients had zero or one prescription. The 90th percentile for number of prescriptions was seven, while the 10th percentile was zero. Patients in the highest decile tended to be older, with a higher proportion of Caucasians and females. Patients in the lowest decile resembled the general ED population. The most common diagnoses associated with opioid prescriptions were abdominal pain (11.5%), cold/flu symptoms (9.5%), back pain (5.4%), flank pain (5.0%) and motor vehicle crash (4.7%). Conclusion: Substantial variability exists in the opioid prescription histories of ED patients, but a majority received zero or one prescription in the preceding six months. The top decile of patients averaged more than two prescriptions per month over the six months prior to ED visit, written by more than 6 different prescribers. There was a trend toward these patients being older, Caucasian and female. PMID:23687544

  2. Perceptions of nurse practitioners by emergency department doctors in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Tracey J; Mackinlay, Claire; Jelinek, George A

    2010-08-26

    The Australian Medical Association is strongly opposed to the nurse practitioner (NP) role with concerns that NPs may become doctor substitutes without the requisite training and education that the medical role demands. Despite this, NPs have been heralded by some as a potential solution to the access block, workforce shortage and increased demand affecting emergency departments (EDs). The purpose of this study was to determine the perception of NPs by medical staff working in Australian EDs. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with closed and open-ended questions. Participants were drawn from a representative stratified sample of two city, two metropolitan and two provincial hospitals of each State/Territory. A total of 95 doctors from 35 EDs participated in this study including 36 Departmental Directors; 36% of participating Directors indicated having an NP on staff. Doctors were strongly opposed to the statement that NPs could replace either nurses or other prevocational doctors; 71 interviewees commented on the role of NPs in the ED. Thematic analyses revealed polarised views held by doctors. Eight major themes were identified, the most common being that there is a lack of clarity of the NP role definition, their scope of practice and differentiation from the medical role. Although ED NPs represent a highly skilled professional group their role is poorly understood by ED doctors. Opposition to the NP role is a significant barrier to the introduction of great numbers of ED NPs as a strategy to overcome the medical workforce shortage. The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12245-010-0214-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  3. Management of cellulitis in a pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khangura, Simi; Wallace, Jonathan; Kissoon, Niranjan; Kodeeswaran, Tanuja

    2007-11-01

    (1) To determine antibiotic choices, route of administration, and outcomes of children treated as outpatients with noncomplicated, nonfacial cellulitis at a tertiary care center. (2) To determine the number of visits and time spent in the emergency department (ED) for treatment. A descriptive case-control study. A tertiary care pediatric ED at an academic medical center. Medical records of all otherwise healthy children (aged 1-16 yrs) presenting with noncomplicated, nonfacial cellulitis over a 3-year period (January 1, 2001-December 31, 2003) were reviewed. Data extracted included the following: demographics; clinical presentation; laboratory and microbiology results; management, including choice, dose, and route of antibiotic(s); treatment failures; and time spent in the ED. None. Two hundred sixty-nine patients met the inclusion criteria, and their charts were selected for review. The oral antibiotic most often prescribed was cephalexin (N = 105). Treatment failure occurred in 10 (8.9%) of the cases. The intravenous antibiotic most often prescribed was cefazolin (N = 124; 39 received cefazolin alone, and 85 received cefazolin and probenecid). The cefazolin-only group had 12 (31%) treatment failures, whereas the cefazolin and probenecid group had 7 (8.1%) treatment failures. More time in the ED (521 +/- 287 minutes) and more visits (3.4 +/- 2.8) were seen in the intravenous group as compared with the oral group (time in ED, 164 +/- 139 minutes; visits, 1.4 +/- 1). Noncomplicated, nonfacial cellulitis is most commonly treated using first-generation cephalosporins. Treatment with oral antibiotics was effective and required fewer visits and less time in the ED compared with intravenous treatment. Twice-daily cefazolin and probenecid was associated with less treatment failures and admissions than cefazolin alone and may represent a reasonable alternative for children with nonfacial cellulitis requiring intravenous antibiotics.

  4. Impact of the emergency department streaming decision on patients' outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S W; Horwood, C; Li, J Y; Hakendorf, P H; Teubner, D J O; Thompson, C H

    2015-12-01

    Streaming occurs in emergency department (ED) to reduce crowding, but misallocation of patients may impact patients' outcome. The study aims to determine the outcomes of patients misallocated by the ED process of streaming into likely admission or discharge. This is a retrospective cohort study, at an Australian, urban, tertiary referral hospital's ED between January 2010 and March 2012, using propensity score matching for comparison. Total and partitioned ED lengths of stay, inpatient length of stay, in-hospital mortality and 7- and 28-day unplanned readmission rate were compared between patients who were streamed to be admitted against those streamed to be discharged. Total ED length of stay did not differ significantly for admitted patients if allocated to the wrong stream (median 7.6 h, interquartile range 5.7-10.6, cf. 7.5 h, 5.3-11.2; P = 0.34). The median inpatient length of stay was shorter for those initially misallocated to the discharge stream (1.8 days, 1.1-3.0, cf. 2.4 days, 1.4-3.9; P stream stayed in the ED longer than those appropriately allocated (5.2 h, 3.7-7.3, cf. 4.6 h, 3.3-6.4; P streaming process. Patients' discharge from the ED was slower if they had been allocated to the admission stream. Streaming carries few risks for patients misallocated by such a process. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  5. Variation in Charges for Emergency Department Visits Across California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Renee Y; Antwi, Yaa Akosa

    2014-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have shown that charges for inpatient and clinic procedures vary substantially; however, there is scant data on variation in charges for emergency department (ED) visits. Outpatient ED visits are typically billed using CPT-coded levels to standardize the intensity of services received, providing an ideal element on which to evaluate charge variation. Thus, we sought to analyze the variation in charges for each level of ED visits, and examine whether hospital and market-level factors could help predict these charges. Methods Using 2011 charge data provided by every non-federal California hospital to the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, we analyzed the variability in charges for each level of ED visits and used linear regression to assess whether hospital and market characteristics could explain the variation in charges. Results Charges for each ED visit level varied widely; for example, charges for a level 4 visit ranged from $275 to $6,662. Government hospitals charged significantly less than non-profit hospitals, while hospitals that paid higher wages, served higher proportions of Medicare and Medicaid patients, and were located in areas with high costs of living charged more. Overall our models explained only 30–41% of the between-hospital variation in charges for each level of ED visits. Conclusions Our findings of extensive charge variation in ED visits add to the literature in demonstrating the lack of systematic charge setting in the U.S. healthcare system. These widely varying charges affect the hospital bills of millions of uninsured patients and insured patients seeking care out-of-network, and continue to play a role in many aspects of healthcare financing. PMID:24888673

  6. Costs of Expanded Rapid HIV Testing in Four Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schackman, Bruce R; Eggman, Ashley A; Leff, Jared A; Braunlin, Megan; Felsen, Uriel R; Fitzpatrick, Lisa; Telzak, Edward E; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Branson, Bernard M

    2016-01-01

    The HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 065 trial sought to expand HIV screening of emergency department (ED) patients in Bronx, New York, and Washington, D.C. This study assessed the testing costs associated with different expansion processes and compared them with costs of a hypothetical optimized process. Micro-costing studies were conducted in two participating EDs in each city that switched from point-of-care (POC) to rapid-result laboratory testing. In three EDs, laboratory HIV testing was only conducted for patients having blood drawn for clinical reasons; in the other ED, all HIV testing was conducted with laboratory testing. Costs were estimated through direct observation and interviews to document process flows, time estimates, and labor and materials costs. A hypothetical optimized process flow used minimum time estimates for each process step. National wage and fringe rates and local reagent costs were used to determine the average cost (excluding overhead) per completed nonreactive and reactive test in 2013 U.S. dollars. Laboratory HIV testing costs in the EDs ranged from $17.00 to $23.83 per completed nonreactive test, and POC testing costs ranged from $17.64 to $37.60; cost per completed reactive test ranged from $89.29 to $123.17. Costs of hypothetical optimized HIV testing with automated process steps were approximately 45% lower for nonreactive tests and 20% lower for reactive tests. The cost per ED visit to conduct expanded HIV testing in each hospital ranged from $1.21 to $3.96. An optimized process could achieve additional cost savings but would require an investment in electronic system interfaces to further automate testing processes.

  7. Facial palsy in children: emergency department management and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Hsien; Chang, Yu-Che; Shih, Hong-Mo; Chen, Chun-Yu; Chen, Jih-Chang

    2010-02-01

    To describe the characteristics of children who present to an emergency department (ED) with facial palsy and determine the association of outcome with etiology, degree of initial paralysis, and ED management. This was a retrospective cohort study of children who presented to an ED with facial nerve paralysis (FNP). There were 85 patients with a mean age of 8.0 (SD, 6.1) years; 60% (n = 51) of the patients were male, and 65.9% (n = 56) were admitted to the hospital. Bell palsy (50.6%) was the most common etiology followed by infectious (22.4%), traumatic (16.5%), congenital (7.1%), and neoplastic etiologies (3.5%). Patients with Bell palsy had shorter recovery times (P = 0.049), and traumatic cases required a longer time for recovery (P = 0.016). Acute otitis media (AOM)-related pediatric FNP had shorter recovery times than non-AOM-related cases (P = 0.005) in infectious group. Patients given steroid therapy did not have a shorter recovery time (P = 0.237) or a better recovery (P = 0.269). There was no difference in recovery rate of pediatric patients with Bell palsy between hospitalization or not (P = 0.952). Bell palsy, infection, and trauma were most common etiologies of pediatric FNP. Recovery times were shorter in pediatric patients with Bell palsy and AOM-related FNP, whereas recovery took longer in traumatic cases. Steroid therapy did not seem beneficial for pediatric FNP. Hospitalization is not indicated for pediatric patients with Bell palsy.

  8. Prognostic factors in outcome of angioedema in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Sarah; Curtis, R Mason; Ball, Ian; Borici-Mazi, Rozita

    2014-01-01

    Angioedema is a transient, localized swelling caused by two distinct mechanisms, mediated by histamine and bradykinin, respectively, although a proportion of cases remain idiopathic. Studies that characterize undifferentiated angioedema presenting in emergency departments (EDs) are limited. This study investigates the presentation patterns of undifferentiated angioedema in the ED based on the presumed mechanism of swelling. Medical records from all ED visits to two tertiary care hospitals from July 2007 to March 2012 were electronically reviewed. Records with documented visible swelling on general inspection and/or fiberoptic laryngoscopy and a diagnostic code for anaphylactic shock, angioneurotic edema, allergy unspecified, defects in the complement system, or unspecified drug adverse effects were included. Demographic, clinical, and outcome data were collected via a standardized form. Data were analyzed descriptively, including frequencies and percentages for categorical data and means and SDs for continuous data. Predictors for admission were identified using multivariate logistic regression models. ED records from 527 visits for angioedema by 455 patients were included in the study. Annual rate of angioedema was 1 per 1000 ED visits. Urticaria was associated with peripheral (p = 0.008) and lip angioedema (p = 0.001), and the absence of urticaria correlated with tongue angioedema (p = 0.001) and trended toward correlation with pharyngeal angioedema (p = 0.056). Significant predictors of admission included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced angioedema (odds ratio [OR], 15.3), epinephrine treatment (OR, 8.34), hypotension (OR, 15.7), multiple-site angioedema (OR, 4.25), and pharyngeal (OR, 1.23) and tongue angioedema (OR, 4.62). Concomitant urticaria was associated with a significant longer stay in the ED (p angioedema, need for airway management, length of ED visit, and recurrence. A detailed drug and family history, screening blood work for C1 esterase

  9. [Children with injuries treated in hospital emergency departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestrović, Julije; Milunović, Pjer; Skelin, Ana; Carija, Robert; Catipović, Tatjana; Mestrović, Marija; Mujkić, Aida

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine characteristics of injuries of children admitted to the Emergency Department (ED) of University Hospital Split, and also to define the mechanisms of injuries, as well as the type and severity of injuries. We evaluated 3,221 children with injuries treated in the ED of the University Hospital of Split in the period from January to July 2009. The following indicators were analyzed: age, gender, anatomic distribution of injuries, mechanism, Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the need for hospital and intensive care admission. Chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests were used in order to determine statistical relevance of the results. Boys were more often injured than girls (65.6%), and most of the injured children were older than 13 years (41.7%). The majority of patients (96%) had minor injuries (ISS injuries were caused by falls (71.3%), and limbs were the most frequently injured body region (67.1%). However, road traffic accidents (RTA) required hospitalization more often than any other mechanism (25% of patients), and the leading injury in RTA victims was head injury (38% of patients). Older children were more susceptible to RTAs (64.5%), and the majority of children were injured as passengers in cars (36.4%). Children with head injuries, and those injured in RTAs, were more often hospitalized and more often admitted to intensive care unit than other patients. The most frequently injured body region in children treated in ED are limbs, and the most frequent mechanism of injury is fall. However, the most severe are head injuries, and the majority of severe injuries are caused by RTAs. These data are important for programs of injury prevention.

  10. Emergency department overcrowding: Quality improvement in a Taiwan Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chen-Mei; Liang, Li-Lin; Chang, Yun-Te; Juang, Wang-Chuan

    2018-04-14

    Overcrowding of hospital emergency departments (ED) is a worldwide health problem. The Taiwan Joint Commission on Hospital Accreditation has stressed the importance of finding solutions to overcrowding, including, reducing the number of patients with >48 h stay in the ED. Moreover, the Ministry of Health and Welfare aims at transferring non-critical patients to district or regional hospitals. We report the results of our Quality Improvement Project (QIP) on ED overcrowding, especially focusing on reducing length of stay (LOS) in ED. For QIP, the following 3 action plans were initiated: 1) Changing the choice architecture of patients' willingness to transfer from opt-in to opt-out; 2) increasing the turnover rate of beds and daily monitoring of the number of free beds for boarding ED patients; 3) reevaluation of patients with a LOS of >32 h after the morning shift. Transfer rates increased minimally after implementation of this project, but the sample size was too small to achieve statistical significance. No significant increase was observed in the number of free medical beds, but discharge rates after 12 pm decreased significantly (p 32 h were reevaluated first. After QIP, the proportion of LOSs of >48 h dropped significantly. Changing the choice architecture may require further systemic effort and a longer observation duration. Higher-level administrators will need to formulate a more comprehensive bed management plan to speed up the turnover rate of free inpatient beds. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Emergency Department Patient Burden from an Electronic Dance Music Festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Neeraj; Gimbar, Renee P; Walla, Lisa M; Thompson, Trevonne M

    2017-11-03

    Electronic dance music (EDM) festivals are increasingly common and psychoactive substance use is prevalent. Although prehospital care can obviate the transfer of many attendees to health care facilities (HCFs), little is known regarding the emergency department (ED) burden of patients presenting from EDM festivals. This study describes the patient volume, length of stay (LOS), and presenting complaints of patients from a 3-day EDM festival in close proximity to an area ED. Medical charts of patients presenting to one HCF from an EDM festival were reviewed for substances used, ED LOS, and sedative medications administered. Additionally, preparedness techniques are described. Over the 3-day festival, 28 patients presented to the ED (median age 21 years; range 18-29 years). Twenty-five had complaints related to substance use including ethanol (n = 18), "molly" or "ecstasy" (n = 13), and marijuana (n = 8). Three patients required intensive care or step-down unit admission for endotracheal intubation, rhabdomyolysis, and protracted altered mental status. The median LOS for discharged patients was 265 min (interquartile range 210-347 min). Eleven patients required the use of sedative medications, with cumulative doses of 42 mg of lorazepam and 350 mg of ketamine. All patients presented within the hours of 5:00 pm and 2:15 am. The majority of ED visits from an EDM festival were related to substance use. ED arrival times clustered during the evening and were associated with prolonged LOS. Few patients required hospital admission, but admitted patients required high levels of care. HCFs should use these data as a guide in planning for future events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Factors associated with emergency department visits due to acute asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalcin P.T.R.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to identify characteristics related to poor disease control and frequent visits to the emergency department (ED. The objective of the present study was to compare the characteristics of patients attending the adult ED for treatment of asthma exacerbation with those attending an asthma specialist clinic (AC in the same hospital, and to determine the factors associated with frequent visits to the ED. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of consecutive patients (12 years and older attending the ED (N = 86 and the AC (N = 86. Significantly more ED patients than AC patients reported ED visits in the past year (95.3 vs 48.8%; P < 0.001 and had difficulty performing work (81.4 vs 49.4%; P < 0.001. Significantly more AC than ED patents had been treated with inhaled corticosteroids (75.6 vs 18.6%; P < 0.001 used to increase or start steroid therapy when an attack was perceived (46.5 vs 20.9%; P < 0.001 and correctly used a metered-dose inhaler (50.0 vs 11.6%; P < 0.001. The history of hospital admissions (odds ratio, OR, 4.00 and use of inhaled corticosteroids (OR, 0.27 were associated with frequent visits to the ED. In conclusion, ED patients were more likely than AC patients to be dependent on the acute use of the ED, were significantly less knowledgeable about asthma management and were more likely to suffer more severe disease. ED patients should be considered an important target for asthma education. Facilitating the access to ambulatory care facilities might serve to reduce asthma morbidity.

  13. Multimedia Education Increases Elder Knowledge of Emergency Department Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E. Terndrup

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elders who utilize the emergency department (ED may have little prospectiveknowledge of appropriate expectations during an ED encounter. Improving elder orientation toED expectations is important for satisfaction and health education. The purpose of this study wasto evaluate a multi-media education intervention as a method for informing independently livingelders about ED care. The program delivered messages categorically as, the number of tests,providers, decisions and disposition decision making.Methods: Interventional trial of representative elders over 59 years of age comparing pre andpost multimedia program exposure. A brief (0.3 hour video that chronicled the key events after ahypothetical 911 call for chest pain was shown. The video used a clinical narrator, 15 ED healthcare providers, and 2 professional actors for the patient and spouse. Pre- and post-video testsresults were obtained with audience response technology (ART assessed learning using a 4point Likert scale.Results: Valid data from 142 participants were analyzed pre to post rankings (Wilcoxon signedranktests. The following four learning objectives showed significant improvements: number oftests expected [median differences on a 4-point Likert scale with 95% confidence intervals: 0.50(0.00, 1.00]; number of providers expected 1.0 (1.00, 1.50; communications 1.0 (1.00, 1.50;and pre-hospital medical treatment 0.50 (0.00, 1.00. Elders (96% judged the intervention asimproving their ability to cope with an ED encounter.Conclusion: A short video with graphic side-bar information is an effective educational strategy toimprove elder understanding of expectations during a hypothetical ED encounter following calling911.

  14. Diagnostic approach to constipation impacts pediatric emergency department disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumpitazi, Corrie E; Rees, Chris A; Camp, Elizabeth A; Henkel, Erin B; Valdez, Karina L; Chumpitazi, Bruno P

    2017-10-01

    Constipation is a common cause of abdominal pain in children presenting to the emergency department (ED). The objectives of this study were to determine the diagnostic evaluation undertaken for constipation and to assess the association of the evaluation with final ED disposition. A retrospective chart review of children presenting to the pediatric ED of a quaternary care children's hospital with abdominal pain that received a soap suds enema therapy. A total of 512 children were included, 270 (52.7%) were female, and the median age was 8.0 (IQR: 4.0-11.0). One hundred and thirty eight patients (27%) had a digital rectal exam (DRE), 120 (22.8%) had bloodwork performed, 218 (43%) had urinalysis obtained, 397 (77.5%) had abdominal radiographs, 120 (23.4%) had abdominal ultrasounds, and 18 (3.5%) had computed tomography scans. Children who had a DRE had a younger median age (6.0, IQR: 3.0-9.25 vs. 8.0, IQR: 4.0-12.0; p<0.001) and were significantly less likely to have radiologic imaging (OR=0.50, 95% CI 0.32-0.78; p=0.002), but did not have an increased odds of being discharged home. After adjusting for gender, ethnicity, and significant past medical history those with an abdominal radiograph were less likely to be discharged to home (aOR=0.56, 95% CI 0.31-1.01; p=0.05). The diagnostic evaluation of children diagnosed with fecal impaction in the ED varied. Abdominal imaging may be avoided if children receive a DRE. When children presenting to the ED with abdominal pain had an abdominal radiograph, they were more likely to be admitted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Racial Differences in Pediatric Emergency Department Triage Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, Heather G; Kharbanda, Anupam B; Flood, Andrew; Harmon, Brian; Puumala, Susan E; Payne, Nathaniel R

    2016-05-01

    Racial disparities are frequently reported in emergency department (ED) care. To examine racial differences in triage scores of pediatric ED patients. We hypothesized that racial differences existed but could be explained after adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical factors. We examined all visits to two urban, pediatric EDs between August 2009 and March 2010. Demographic and clinical data were electronically extracted from the medical record. We used logistic regression to analyze racial differences in triage scores, controlling for possible covariates. There were 54,505 ED visits during the study period, with 7216 (13.2%) resulting in hospital admission. White patients accounted for 36.4% of visits, African Americans 28.5%, Hispanics 18.0%, Asians 4.1%, and American Indians 1.8%. After adjusting for potential confounders, African American (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.69-2.12), Hispanic (aOR 1.77, 95% CI 1.55-2.02), and American Indian (aOR 2.57, 95% CI 1.80-3.66) patients received lower-acuity triage scores than Whites. In three out of four subgroup analyses based on presenting complaints (breathing difficulty, abdominal pain, fever), African Americans and Hispanics had higher odds of receiving low-acuity triage scores. No racial differences were detected for patients with presenting complaints of laceration/head injury/arm injury. However, among patients admitted to the hospital, African Americans (aOR 1.47, 95% CI 1.13-1.90) and Hispanics (aOR 1.71, CI 1.22-2.39) received lower-acuity triage scores than Whites. After adjusting for available sociodemographic and clinical covariates, African American, Hispanic, and American Indian patients received lower-acuity triage scores than Whites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Boarding admitted children in the emergency department impacts inpatient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekmezian, Arpi; Chung, Paul J

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to assess the relationship between boarding of admitted children in the emergency department (ED) and cost, inpatient length of stay (LOS), mortality, and readmission. This was a retrospective study of 1,792 pediatric inpatients admitted through the ED and discharged from the hospital between February 20, 2007 and June 30, 2008 at a major teaching hospital with an annual ED volume of 40,000 adult and pediatric patients.The main predictor variable was boarding time (time from admission decision to departure for an inpatient bed, in hours). Covariates were patient age, payer group, times of ED and inpatient bed arrival, ED triage acuity, type of inpatient service, intensive care unit admission, surgery, and severity of inpatient illness. The main outcome measures, cost (dollars) and inpatient LOS (hours), were log-transformed and analyzed using linear regressions. Secondary outcomes, mortality and readmission to the hospital within 72 hours of discharge, were analyzed using logistic regression. Mean ED LOS for admitted patients was 9.0 hours. Mean boarding time was 5.1 hours. Mean cost and inpatient LOS were $9893 and 147 hours, respectively. In general, boarding time was associated with cost (P boarding times were associated with greater inpatient LOS especially among patients triaged as low acuity (P = 0.008). In addition, longer boarding times were associated with greater probability of being readmitted among patients on surgical services (P = 0.01). Among low-acuity and surgical patients, longer boarding times were associated with longer inpatient LOS and more readmissions, respectively.

  17. The relationship between inpatient discharge timing and emergency department boarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Emilie S; Khare, Rahul K; Venkatesh, Arjun K; Van Roo, Ben D; Adams, James G; Reinhardt, Gilles

    2012-02-01

    Patient crowding and boarding in Emergency Departments (EDs) impair the quality of care as well as patient safety and satisfaction. Improved timing of inpatient discharges could positively affect ED boarding, and this hypothesis can be tested with computer modeling. Modeling enables analysis of the impact of inpatient discharge timing on ED boarding. Three policies were tested: a sensitivity analysis on shifting the timing of current discharge practices earlier; discharging 75% of inpatients by 12:00 noon; and discharging all inpatients between 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. A cross-sectional computer modeling analysis was conducted of inpatient admissions and discharges on weekdays in September 2007. A model of patient flow streams into and out of inpatient beds with an output of ED admitted patient boarding hours was created to analyze the three policies. A mean of 38.8 ED patients, 22.7 surgical patients, and 19.5 intensive care unit transfers were admitted to inpatient beds, and 81.1 inpatients were discharged daily on September 2007 weekdays: 70.5%, 85.6%, 82.8%, and 88.0%, respectively, occurred between noon and midnight. In the model base case, total daily admitted patient boarding hours were 77.0 per day; the sensitivity analysis showed that shifting the peak inpatient discharge time 4h earlier eliminated ED boarding, and discharging 75% of inpatients by noon and discharging all inpatients between 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. both decreased boarding hours to 3.0. Timing of inpatient discharges had an impact on the need to board admitted patients. This model demonstrates the potential to reduce or eliminate ED boarding by improving inpatient discharge timing in anticipation of the daily surge in ED demand for inpatient beds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An Epidemiologic Study of Traumatic Brain Injuries in Emergency Department

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    Vahid Monsef Kasmaei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic brain injuries (TBI are one of the most important causes of death in patients under the age of 25 years and is responsible for one third of total deaths caused by trauma. Therefore, knowing its epidemiologic pattern in different populations seems vital. Therefore, this study aims to examine the epidemiologic pattern of TBI in emergency department. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the profiles of 1000 patients affected by TBI were selected using simple random sampling. The examined variables in this study included demographic, season, mechanism of injury, accompanying injuries, level of consciousness, hospitalization duration, computed tomography (CT scan results, needing surgery, admission to intensive care unit, and outcome of the patient. In the end, independent risk factors for the death of patients were determined. Results: 1000 patients suffering from were studied (81.8% male; mean age 38.5±21.7 years. The frequency of their referral to hospital in spring (31.4% was more (p<0.01. 45.9% of the patients had a level of consciousness less than 9 based on the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS. Subdural (45.9% and epidural bleeding (23.7% were the most common findings in CT scans in this study (p<0.001. Finally, 233 (23.3% of the patients were dead. Over 60 years of age, falling and motorcycle accidents, intracranial hemorrhage accompanied by brain contusion, subdural bleeding, a GCS of less than 9, and the need to be admitted to intensive care unit were independent risk factors of death in TBI. Conclusion: Age Over 60 years, falling and motorcycle accidents, intracranial hemorrhage accompanied by brain contusion, subdural bleeding, a GCS of less than 9, and need to be admitted to intensive care unit were independent risk factors for the death in TBI patients.

  19. Victims of bullying in the emergency department with behavioral issues.

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    Waseem, Muhammad; Arshad, Arslan; Leber, Mark; Perales, Orlando; Jara, Fernando

    2013-03-01

    Bullying has become one of the most significant school problems experienced by our children. Victims of bullying are prone to a variety of psychological and behavioral symptoms. We noted that many children referred to the Emergency Department (ED) with behavioral symptoms provided a history of bullying. To measure the prevalence of bullying in children referred to the ED for behavioral symptoms and to determine its association with psychiatric disorders. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in an urban hospital, identifying children from 8 to 19 years of age who presented to the ED with behavioral symptoms. We reviewed the ED psychiatry notes to retrieve the report indicating whether these children were bullied and had previous psychiatric diagnoses. These children were classified into bullied and non-bullied groups. Over the study period, 591 children visited the ED with behavioral issues. Out of 591, 143 (24%) children reported bullying. More boys (100) than girls (43) reported bullying (p = 0.034). The mean age of children in the bullied group was 10.6 years (95% confidence interval 10.1-11.2). One hundred eleven (77.6%) children in the bullied group had a prior psychiatric diagnosis. Children in the bullied group were hospitalized significantly less than children in the non-bullied group (10/143 [7%] vs. 80/368 [18%]; p = 0.002). The prevalence of bullying among the ED children with behavioral symptoms is substantial. Every fourth child with behavioral symptoms reported bullying. Four in five children who reported bullying had a prior diagnosis of "disorder of behavior." Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Duration of Mechanical Ventilation in the Emergency Department

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    Lauren B. Angotti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Due to hospital crowding, mechanically ventilated patients are increasingly spending hours boarding in emergency departments (ED before intensive care unit (ICU admission. This study aims to evaluate the association between time ventilated in the ED and in-hospital mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU and hospital length of stay (LOS. Methods: This was a multi-center, prospective, observational study of patients ventilated in the ED, conducted at three academic Level I Trauma Centers from July 2011 to March 2013. All consecutive adult patients on invasive mechanical ventilation were eligible for enrollment. We performed a Cox regression to assess for a mortality effect for mechanically ventilated patients with each hour of increasing LOS in the ED and multivariable regression analyses to assess for independently significant contributors to in-hospital mortality. Our primary outcome was in-hospital mortality, with secondary outcomes of ventilator days, ICU LOS and hospital LOS. We further commented on use of lung protective ventilation and frequency of ventilator changes made in this cohort. Results: We enrolled 535 patients, of whom 525 met all inclusion criteria. Altered mental status without respiratory pathology was the most common reason for intubation, followed by trauma and respiratory failure. Using iterated Cox regression, a mortality effect occurred at ED time of mechanical ventilation > 7 hours, and the longer ED stay was also associated with a longer total duration of intubation. However, adjusted multivariable regression analysis demonstrated only older age and admission to the neurosciences ICU as independently associated with increased mortality. Of interest, only 23.8% of patients ventilated in the ED for over seven hours had changes made to their ventilator. Conclusion: In a prospective observational study of patients mechanically ventilated in the ED, there was a significant mortality benefit to

  1. Incidence of emergency department visits and complications after abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Ushma D; Desai, Sheila; Zlidar, Vera; Weitz, Tracy A; Grossman, Daniel; Anderson, Patricia; Taylor, Diana

    2015-01-01

    To conduct a retrospective observational cohort study to estimate the abortion complication rate, including those diagnosed or treated at emergency departments (EDs). Using 2009-2010 abortion data among women covered by the fee-for-service California Medicaid program and all subsequent health care for 6 weeks after having an abortion, we analyzed reasons for ED visits and estimated the abortion-related complication rate and the adjusted relative risk. Complications were defined as receiving an abortion-related diagnosis or treatment at any source of care within 6 weeks after an abortion. Major complications were defined as requiring hospital admission, surgery, or blood transfusion. A total of 54,911 abortions among 50,273 fee-for-service Medi-Cal beneficiaries were identified. Among all abortions, 1 of 16 (6.4%, n=3,531) was followed by an ED visit within 6 weeks but only 1 of 115 (0.87%, n=478) resulted in an ED visit for an abortion-related complication. Approximately 1 of 5,491 (0.03%, n=15) involved ambulance transfers to EDs on the day of the abortion. The major complication rate was 0.23% (n=126, 1/436): 0.31% (n=35) for medication abortion, 0.16% (n=57) for first-trimester aspiration abortion, and 0.41% (n=34) for second-trimester or later procedures. The total abortion-related complication rate including all sources of care including EDs and the original abortion facility was 2.1% (n=1,156): 5.2% (n=588) for medication abortion, 1.3% (n=438) for first-trimester aspiration abortion, and 1.5% (n=130) for second-trimester or later procedures. Abortion complication rates are comparable to previously published rates even when ED visits are included and there is no loss to follow-up. II.

  2. Clinical spectrum of rhabdomyolysis presented to pediatric emergency department

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Rhabdomyolysis is a potentially life-threatening syndrome that can develop from a variety of causes. The aim of the work is to analyze the clinical spectrum and to evaluate the prevalence of various etiologies in children, who present to the emergency department (ED) with rhabdomyolysis. Methods During a 6-year study period, we retrospectively analyzed the medical charts of patients, aged 18 years or younger, with a definite diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis and serum creatinine phosphokinase (CK) levels greater than 1000IU/L. We analyzed the clinical spectrum and evaluated the potential risk factors of acute renal failure (ARF). Results Thirty-seven patients (mean age = 10.2 ± 5.5 years), including 26 males and 11 females, were enrolled in the study. Two of the most common presented symptoms in these 37 patients were muscle pain and muscle weakness (83.8% and 73%, respectively). Dark urine was reported in only 5.4% of the patients. The leading cause of rhabdomyolysis in the 0- to 9-year age group was presumed infection, and the leading cause in the 10- to 18-year age group was trauma and exercise. The incidence of ARF associated with rhabdomyolysis was 8.1 % and no child needed for renal replacement therapy (RRT). We did not identify any reliable predictors of ARF or need for RRT. Conclusions The classic triad of symptoms of rhabdomyolysis includes myalgia, weakness and dark urine are not always presented in children. The cause of rhabdomyolysis in younger age is different from that of teenager group. However, the prognosis of rhabdomyolysis was good with appropriate management. PMID:24004920

  3. Effectiveness of Emergency Medicine Wards in reducing length of stay and overcrowding in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shuk Man; Choi, Kenny Tze Ying; Wong, Eliza Mi Ling; Lee, Larry Lap Yip; Yeung, Richard Sai Dat; Chan, Jimmy Tak Shing; Chair, Sek Ying

    2014-04-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of an Emergency Medicine Ward (EMW) in reducing the length of stay (LOS) in the emergency department, length of hospitalization, emergency medical admission rate, and the hospital bed occupancy rate. This study is a cross-sectional, observational study with a retrospective, quantitative record review conducted at the EMW of a regional acute hospital in Hong Kong from January 2009 to June 2009. During the study, a retrospective audit was conducted on 1834 patient records. The five main groups of patients admitted into EMW suffered from cardiac disease (26.5%), pneumonia (19.6%), dizziness (16.2%), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (12.3%), and gastroenteritis (7.9%). The mean LOS in the EMW was 1.27 days (SD=0.59). The average emergency medical admission rate within the six-month period was significantly reduced relative to that before the EMW became operational (January 2008 to June 2008). Clinically, the medical in-patient bed occupancy was significantly reduced by 6.2%. The average LOS during in-patient hospitalization after the EMW was established decreased to 4.13 days from the previous length of 5.16 days. EMWs effectively reduce both the LOS during in-patient hospitalization and the avoidable medical admission rate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Prosthetic hip dislocations: is relocation in the emergency department by emergency medicine staff better?

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    Lawrey, Emma; Jones, Peter; Mitchell, Robin

    2012-04-01

    Prosthetic hip dislocation is common. This study compares prosthetic hip relocations attempted within the ED by emergency doctors and those under orthopaedic care in the ED or operating theatre (OT). Retrospective cohort study of patients presenting to Auckland City Hospital Adult Emergency Department with prosthetic hip dislocations between 1 January 2003 and 14 April 2008. Primary outcomes were proportion of successful relocation attempts and length of hospital stay. Secondary outcomes were: time to relocation, complications, post-procedural advice, representation rate and long-term outcomes for first-time dislocations. There were 410 eligible presentations during the study period. Emergency medicine (EM) was successful in 254/323 attempts (79%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 74-83). Orthopaedics were successful in 25/35 reductions in the ED (71%, 95% CI 55-84) and 49/51 OT attempts (96%, 95% CI 86-100), P = 0.004 for location OT versus ED. Median times to discharge were 8.8 h for EM, 28.3 h for orthopaedics in the ED and 81 h for orthopaedics in the OT, P < 0.001 for EM versus orthopaedics. Mechanical complications of procedures and early redislocations were infrequent. Complication of sedation were more often seen in OT compared to ED (23/47 [49%, 95% CI 35-63]vs 37/318 [12%, 95% CI 9-16]). There was no difference between EM and orthopaedics in the proportion of hips successfully relocated or complications in the ED; however, EM patients were discharged much sooner, with important resource implications. Procedures carried out in the OT were more successful than in the ED but resulted in prolonged hospital stays and were associated with more complications. © 2012 The Authors. EMA © 2012 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  5. Dysuria in the Emergency Department: Missed Diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis

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    Morgan D. Wilbanks

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The clinical presentation of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection (chlamydia in women is often indistinguishable from a urinary tract infection. While merited in the setting of dysuria, emergency department (ED clinicians do not routinely test for chlamydia in women. The primary aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency of chlamydia testing among women presenting to the ED with dysuria. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of women 19-25 years of age presenting with dysuria to an urban ED and who had been coded with urinary tract infection (UTI as their primary diagnosis (ICD-9 599.0 from October 2005 to March 2011. We excluded women who were pregnant, had underlying anatomical or neurological urinary system pathology, had continuation of symptoms from UTI or a sexually transmitted infection (STI diagnosed elsewhere, or were already on antibiotics for a UTI or STI. We identified the rates of sexual history screening, pelvic examination and chlamydia assay testing and evaluated predictors using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Of 280 women with dysuria and a UTI diagnosis, 17% were asked about their sexual history, with 94% reporting recent sexual activity. Pelvic examination was performed in 23%. We were unable to determine the overall chlamydia prevalence as only 20% of women in the cohort were tested. Among the 20% of women tested for chlamydia infection, 21% tested positive. Only 42% of chlamydia-positive women were prescribed treatment effective for chlamydia (azithromycin or doxycycline at their visit; the remaining were prescribed UTI treatment not effective against chlamydia. Predictors of sexual history screening included vaginal bleeding (OR 5.4, 95% CI=1.5 to 19.6 and discharge (OR 2.8, 95% CI=1.1 to 6.9. Predictors of a pelvic examination being performed included having a complaint of vaginal discharge (OR 11.8, 95% CI=4.2 to 32.9, a sexual history performed (OR 2.5, 95% CI=1.1 to 5

  6. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Citywide Emergency Department Care Coordination Program to Reduce Prescription Opioid Related Emergency Department Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neven, Darin; Paulozzi, Leonard; Howell, Donelle; McPherson, Sterling; Murphy, Sean M; Grohs, Becky; Marsh, Linda; Lederhos, Crystal; Roll, John

    2016-11-01

    Increasing prescription overdose deaths have demonstrated the need for safer emergency department (ED) prescribing practices for patients who are frequent ED users. We hypothesized that the care of frequent ED users would improve using a citywide care coordination program combined with an ED care coordination information system, as measured by fewer ED visits by and decreased controlled substance prescribing to these patients. We conducted a multisite randomized controlled trial (RCT) across all EDs in a metropolitan area; 165 patients with the most ED visits for complaints of pain were randomized. For the treatment arm, drivers of ED use were identified by medical record review. Patients and their primary care providers were contacted by phone. Each patient was discussed at a community multidisciplinary meeting where recommendations for ED care were formed. The ED care recommendations were stored in an ED information exchange system that faxed them to the treating ED provider when the patient presented to the ED. The control arm was subjected to treatment as usual. The intervention arm experienced a 34% decrease (incident rate ratios = 0.66, p prescription from the ED relative to the control group. Declines of 43.7%, 53.1%, 52.9%, and 53.1% were observed in the treatment group for morphine milligram equivalents, controlled substance pills, prescriptions, and prescribers, respectively. This RCT showed the effectiveness of a citywide ED care coordination program in reducing ED visits and controlled substance prescribing. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Emergency department utilization rates and modalities among immigrant population. A 5-year survey in a large Italian urban emergency department

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    Marcello Zinelli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The rates and modalities of healthcare services utilization for migrant population may differ from natives, since the health needs of the former are influenced by some factors such as health status, self-perceived needs, healthseeking behavior, language barriers and cultural differences. Only scarce and often conflicting data have been published so far on migrants’ utilization of healthcare services in Europe, and even less data are available on emergency departments (EDs. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare utilization rates and modalities of presentation to the large urban ED of the University Hospital of Parma, Italy (averaging 85,000 visits per year, by Italian native and foreign-born populations during 2008-2012. Throughout the study period 424,466 ED visits were recorded, 64,435 (15.4% of which by foreign-born patients. A significant difference between utilization rates was observed for all the triage-codes, with higher rates for foreign-born low-acuity codes (green plus white codes: 87.5 vs 73.9, P<0.0001 and lower rates for high-acuity codes (yellow plus red codes: 12.5 vs 26.1%, P<0.0001. The utilization rate was 253.9 visits per 1000 inhabitants for the Italian-native group and 309.7 per 1000 for the foreign-born group (odds ratio 1.23; 95% CI: 1.01-1.48; P=0.034. Different modalities of presentation were also observed, with a high rate of selfreferrals (82.3 vs 71.4%, P<0.001. The results of this study suggest that a better knowledge of available Italian healthcare services among immigrants is advisable and should be encouraged.

  8. Demographic variations in HIV testing history among emergency department patients: implications for HIV screening in US emergency departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Roland C; Catanzaro, Bethany M; Seage, George R; Mayer, Kenneth H; Clark, Melissa A; DeGruttola, Victor G; Becker, Bruce M

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the proportion of emergency department (ED) patients who have been tested for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and assess if patient history of HIV testing varies according to patient demographic characteristics. Design From July 2005–July 2006, a random sample of 18–55-year-old English-speaking patients being treated for sub-critical injury or illness at a northeastern US ED were interviewed on their history of HIV testing. Logistic regression models were created to compare patients by their history of being tested for HIV according to their demography. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated. Results Of 2107 patients surveyed who were not known to be HIV-infected, the median age was 32 years; 54% were male, 71% were white, and 45% were single/never married; 49% had private health-care insurance and 45% had never been tested for HIV. Of the 946 never previously tested for HIV, 56.1% did not consider themselves at risk for HIV. In multivariable logistic regression analyses, those less likely to have been HIV tested were male (OR: 1.32 [1.37–2.73]), white (OR: 1.93 [1.37–2.73]), married (OR: 1.53 [1.12–2.08]), and had private health-care insurance (OR: 2.10 [1.69–2.61]). There was a U-shaped relationship between age and history of being tested for HIV; younger and older patients were less likely to have been tested. History of HIV testing and years of formal education were not related. Conclusion Almost half of ED patients surveyed had never been tested for HIV. Certain demographic groups are being missed though HIV diagnostic testing and screening programmes in other settings. These groups could potentially be reached through universal screening. PMID:19564517

  9. Effect of an Emergency Department HIV Testing Program on the Proportion of Emergency Department Patients Who Have Been Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudepohl, Nathan J.; Lindsell, Christopher J.; Hart, Kimberly W.; Ruffner, Andrew H.; Trott, Alexander T.; Fichtenbaum, Carl J.; Lyons, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The lack of well-described population-level outcome measures for emergency department (ED) HIV testing is one barrier to translation of screening into practice. We demonstrate the impact of an ED diagnostic testing and targeted screening program on the proportion of ED patients ever tested for HIV and explore cumulative effects on testing rates over time. Methods Data were extracted from electronic HIV testing program records and administrative hospital databases for January 2003 to December 2008 to obtain the monthly number of ED visits and HIV tests. We calculated the proportions of (1) patients tested in the program who reported a previous HIV test or had been previously tested in the program, and (2) the cumulative number of unique ED patients who were tested in our program. Results During the study period, 165,665 unique patients made 491,552 ED visits and the program provided 13,509 tests to 11,503 unique patients. From 2003 to 2008, tested patients who reported a history of an HIV test increased by 0.085% per month (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.037% to 0.133%), from 67.7% to 74.4%; the percentage of tested patients who had previous testing in the program increased by 0.277% per month (95% CI 0.245% to 0.308%), from 3.2% to 21.2%; and the percentage of unique ED patients previously tested in the program increased by 0.100% per month (95% CI 0.096% to 0.105%), reaching a cumulative proportion of 6.9%. Conclusion Our HIV testing program increased the proportion of ED patients who have been tested for HIV at least once and repeatedly tested a subset of individuals. HIV screening, even during a minority of ED visits, can have important cumulative effects over time. PMID:21684393

  10. 76 FR 23708 - Safety Zone; Pierce County Department of Emergency Management Regional Water Exercise, East...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-28

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Pierce County Department of Emergency Management Regional Water Exercise, East... the Regional Water Rescue Exercise. Basis and Purpose The Pierce County, Washington, Department of... to read as follows: Sec. 165.T13-0251 Safety Zone; Pierce County Department of Emergency Management...

  11. Prevalence of Homelessness in the Emergency Department Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Brett J; Calogero, Cristina G; Elsayed, Kareem S; Abbasi, Osman Z; Enyart, Joshua; Friel, Timothy J; Abunamous, Yasir H; Dusza, Stephen W; Greenberg, Marna Rayl

    2017-04-01

    According to the National Alliance to End Homelessness, the national rate of homelessness has been cited as 17.7 homeless people/10,000 people in the general population, and 24.8 homeless veterans/10,000 veterans in the general population. However, it is unknown what the prevalence of homelessness is in the emergency department (ED) setting. We set out to determine the prevalence of homelessness or at risk for homelessness in the ED setting. Using a five-question screening tool derived from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Health and Human Services and the Veterans Administration definition for homelessness, we surveyed all patients meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria on scheduled shifts in one of three EDs in Northeastern Pennsylvania. To participate, subjects had to be a registered patient in the ED, be 18 years or older, speak English, have the capacity to answer survey questions, not be critically ill, be willing to participate, and not have taken the survey before. We selected two survey periods to represent seasonal variations. We included 4,395 subjects in the analysis. The mean age of those who screened positive for homelessness or at risk for homelessness was 43.1 (SD 16.6). Overall, 136 (3.1%) participants screened positive for at risk for homelessness and 309 (7.0%) screened positive for homelessness. A total of 103 subjects (9.8%) screened positive for homelessness or at risk for homelessness on weekends and 312 (10.3%) on weekdays (p=0.64). The proportion of those screening positive for homelessness or at risk for homelessness varied by site: 145 (7.5%) at the trauma center, 151(9.1%) at the suburban site, and 149 (18.7%) at the center city site, p<0.001.There was no statistical significance to the difference between the trauma center and the suburban site (p=.088), but there was statistical significance between both the suburban and the trauma center when compared to the center city site (both p<0.0001). The proportion of those

  12. Evaluation of Cases with Rabies Risk Presenting to Emergency Department

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    Fevzi Yilmaz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: All around the world 10-12 million people/year receive rabies prophylaxis. Rabies is an acute fatal central nervous system viral enfection. The virus can infect all warm-blooded animals and almost in all cases the enfection results with fatal encephalitis. The aim of this study is to determine the demographic characteristics of cases with rabies risk exposures and behind this to emphasise the significance of cooperation between the institutions to perform effective and accurate treatment. Material and Method: This study was performed with retrospective analysis of 1429 cases who attended to Emergency Department of Diyarbakir Goverment Hospital between January 2007-2010 for animal bites and exposures with the risk of rabies. Statistical analysis of data was performed SPSS V16 pocket programme. Data were defined as frequency and %. For statistical analysis Chi-Square and Fischer exact test was used. A value of P<0.05 was accepted statistically significant. Results: A total of 1055 (73.8% were male, 374 (26.2% were female and the mean age was 21.75 ± 16.9 (6 months-87 years. The major group in children was 6-11 years old and 651 (% 45.5 of the cases attended to hospital were under 18 years old. The vast majority (39.3% in adults were between 19-49 years. In our study 808 (56.5% of the cases  were bitten, 597 (41.8% of the cases  were scrabbled by the animal and 24 (1.7%of them  had indirect contact with the animal Both of them were taken into prophylactic vaccination programme (p<0.05. The vast majority of animal bites were dog (67%  and cat (28%. 3 doses of Human diploid cell vaccine-HDCV were administered to 1001 (70% of the patients and 5 doses to 428 (30% of patients. Human rabies immune globulin-HRIG were administered to 475 (33,3% of the patients in addition to vaccine. Discussion:  In our region rabies risk exposure is an important public health problem. Public oriented education should be given about attending to health care

  13. Hand hygiene compliance of healthcare professionals in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zottele, Caroline; Magnago, Tania Solange Bosi de Souza; Dullius, Angela Isabel Dos Santos; Kolankiewicz, Adriane Cristina Bernat; Ongaro, Juliana Dal

    2017-08-28

    To analyze compliance with hand hygiene by healthcare professionals in an emergency department unit. This is a longitudinal quantitative study developed in 2015 with healthcare professionals from a university hospital in the state of Rio Grande do Sul. Each professional was monitored three times by direct non-participant observation at WHO's five recommended moments in hand hygiene, taking the concepts of opportunity, indication and action into account. Descriptive and analytical statistics were used. Fifty-nine healthcare professionals participated in the study. The compliance rate was 54.2%. Nurses and physiotherapists showed a compliance rate of 66.6% and resident physicians, 41.3%. When compliance was compared among professional categories, nurses showed greater compliance than resident physicians (OR = 2.83, CI = 95%: 1.09-7.34). Hand hygiene compliance was low. Multidisciplinary approaches could be important strategies for forming partnerships to develop learning and implementation of hand hygiene practices. Analisar a adesão à higienização das mãos dos profissionais de saúde em unidade de Pronto-Socorro. Estudo quantitativo longitudinal desenvolvido com profissionais de saúde de um Hospital Universitário do Rio Grande do Sul, em 2015. Para cada profissional, realizaram-se três acompanhamentos com observação direta não participante nos cinco momentos preconizados para higienização das mãos, levando-se em conta os conceitos de Oportunidade, Indicação e Ação. Utilizou-se da estatística descritiva e analítica. Participaram do estudo 59 profissionais de saúde. A taxa de adesão foi de 54,2%. Os enfermeiros e fisioterapeutas obtiveram a taxa de adesão de 66,6% e os médicos residentes, de 41,3%. Ao ser comparada a adesão entre as categorias profissionais, os enfermeiros tiveram maior aderência do que os médicos residentes (RC=2,83; IC=95%:1,09-7,34). A adesão à higienização das mãos foi baixa. Abordagens multidisciplinares podem ser

  14. Studying protocol-based pain management in the emergency department

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    Akkamahadevi Patil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Majority of the patients presenting to emergency department (ED have pain. ED oligoanalgesia remains a challenge. Aims: This study aims to study the effect of implementing a protocol-based pain management in the ED on (1 time to analgesia and (2 adequacy of analgesia obtained. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional study in the ED. Methods: Patients aged 18–65 years of age with pain of numeric rating scale (NRS ≥4 were included. A series of 100 patients presenting before introduction of the protocol-based pain management were grouped “pre-protocol,” and managed as per existing practice. Following this, a protocol for management of all patients presenting to ED with pain was implemented. Another series of 100 were grouped as “post-protocol” and managed as per the new pain management protocol. The data of patients from both the groups were collected and analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistical tests such as percentage, mean and standard deviation and inferential statistical tests such as Pearson coefficient, Student's t-test were applied. Differences were interpreted as significant when P < 0.05. Results: Mean time to administer analgesic was significantly lesser in the postprotocol group (preprotocol 20.30 min vs. postprotocol 13.05 min; P < 0.001. There was significant difference in the pain relief achieved (change in NRS between the two groups, with greater pain relief achieved in the postprotocol group (preprotocol group 4.6800 vs. postprotocol group 5.3600; P < 0.001. Patients' rating of pain relief (assessed on E5 scale was significantly higher in the postprotocol group (preprotocol 3.91 vs. postprotocol 4.27; P = 0.001. Patients' satisfaction (North American Spine Society scale with the overall treatment was also compared and found to be significantly higher in postprotocol group (mean: preprotocol 1.59 vs. postprotocol 1.39; P = 0.008. Conclusion: Protocol-based pain management provided timely and

  15. Medication Overdoses at a Public Emergency Department in Santiago, Chile

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    Pablo Aguilera, MD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While a nationwide poison control registry exists in Chile, reporting to the center is sporadic and happens at the discretion of the treating physician or by patients’ self-report. Moreover, individual hospitals do not monitor accidental or intentional poisoning in a systematic manner. The goal of this study was to identify all cases of intentional medication overdose (MO that occurred over two years at a large public hospital in Santiago, Chile, and examine its epidemiologic profile. Methods: This study is a retrospective, explicit chart review conducted at Hospital Sótero del Rio from July 2008 until June 2010. We included all cases of identified intentional MO. Alcohol and recreational drugs were included only when they were ingested with other medications. Results: We identified 1,557 cases of intentional MO and analyzed a total of 1,197 cases, corresponding to 0.51% of all emergency department (ED presentations between July 2008 and June 2010. The median patient age was 25 years. The majority was female (67.6%. Two peaks were identified, corresponding to the spring of each year sampled. The rate of hospital admission was 22.2%. Benzodiazepines, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and tricyclic antidepressants (TCA were the causative agents most commonly found, comprising 1,044 (87.2% of all analyzed cases. Acetaminophen was involved in 81 (6.8% cases. More than one active substance was involved in 35% of cases. In 7.3% there was ethanol co-ingestion and in 1.0% co-ingestion of some other recreational drug (primarily cocaine. Of 1,557 cases, six (0.39% patients died. TCA were involved in two of these deaths. Conclusion: Similar to other developed and developing nations, intentional MO accounts for a significant number of ED presentations in Chile. Chile is unique in the region, however, in that its spectrum of intentional overdoses includes an excess burden of tricyclic antidepressant and benzodiazepine overdoses, a

  16. Prevalence of radioactive signals from surveillance of an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyette, Frank; Suyama, Joe; Rosen, Jerry; Allswede, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Since the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States, concerns have been raised regarding the threat of a radiological terrorist weapon. Although the probability of the employment of a nuclear device is remote, the potential of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) or "dirty bomb" is of concern. While it is unlikely that such a device would produce massive numbers of casualties, it is far more likely that it would result in public panic and perhaps even disable the local healthcare system. The utility of surveillance with radiation detectors in the healthcare setting has not been fully evaluated. The objective of this study was to characterize the prevalence of radioactive sources entering an urban emergency department (ED). A retrospective review of data obtained from a radiation detector positioned to detect radioactive people entering an ED of an urban academic hospital that serves 45,000 patients/year was performed. Graphical outputs of radioactivity were recorded in Microsoft Excel (Microsoft, Redmond, WA, US) spreadsheets in microREM/hour. Data were collected continuously from 22 December 2003 to 22 January 2004. An event was defined as any elevation in radiation levels >95% confidence interval from the mean level of background radiation over 72 hours (h). A total of 215 events were observed over a 28-day period, with a mean value of 7.7 events/day, and a maximum of 15 events/day. During the 28-day period, the baseline mean level of background radiation was 2-4 microREM/h. Readings ranged from 2,148.28-17,292.25 microREM/h with a maximum sustained detector exposure of 684.37 microREM. Distinct signal patterns were seen at both detectors including tonic, phasic, dual, and short duration spikes. The number of radioactive signals detected from persons entering the ED was much higher than expected. While the vast majority of these signals pose no health threat, they may make routine screening for a radiological terrorist event difficult. Further

  17. Delayed complications of emergency airway management: a study of 533 emergency department intubations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakles, John C; Deacon, John M; Bair, Aaron E; Keim, Samuel M; Panacek, Edward A

    2008-11-01

    Airway management is a critical procedure performed frequently in emergency departments (EDs). Previous studies have evaluated the complications associated with this procedure but have focused only on the immediate complications. The purpose of this study is to determine the incidence and nature of delayed complications of tracheal intubation performed in the ED at an academic center where intubations are performed by emergency physicians (EPs). All tracheal intubations performed in the ED over a one-year period were identified; 540 tracheal intubations were performed during the study period. Of these, 523 charts (96.9%) were available for review and were retrospectively examined. Using a structured datasheet, delayed complications occurring within seven days of intubation were abstracted from the medical record. Charts were scrutinized for the following complications: acute myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, airway trauma from the intubation, and new respiratory infections. An additional 30 consecutive intubations were examined for the same complications in a prospective arm over a 29-day period. The overall success rate for tracheal intubation in the entire study group was 99.3% (549/553). Three patients who could not be orally intubated underwent emergent cricothyrotomy. Thus, the airway was successfully secured in 99.8% (552/553) of the patients requiring intubation. One patient, a seven-month-old infant, had unanticipated subglottic stenosis and could not be intubated by the emergency medicine attending or the anesthesiology attending. The patient was mask ventilated and was transported to the operating room for an emergent tracheotomy. Thirty-four patients (6.2% [95% CI 4.3 - 8.5%]) developed a new respiratory infection within seven days of intubation. Only 18 patients (3.3% [95% CI 1.9 - 5.1%]) had evidence of a new respiratory infection within 48 hours, indicating possible aspiration pneumonia secondary to airway management. Three patients (0.5% [95% CI 0

  18. Delayed Complications of Emergency Airway Management: A Study of 533 Emergency Department Intubations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keim, Samuel M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Airway management is a critical procedure performed frequently in emergency departments (EDs. Previous studies have evaluated the complications associated with this procedure but have focused only on the immediate complications. The purpose of this study is to determine the incidence and nature of delayed complications of tracheal intubation performed in the ED at an academic center where intubations are performed by emergency physicians (EPs.METHODS: All tracheal intubations performed in the ED over a one-year period were identified; 540 tracheal intubations were performed during the study period. Of these, 523 charts (96.9% were available for review and were retrospectively examined. Using a structured datasheet, delayed complications occurring within seven days of intubation were abstracted from the medical record. Charts were scrutinized for the following complications: acute myocardial infarction (MI, stroke, airway trauma from the intubation, and new respiratory infections. An additional 30 consecutive intubations were examined for the same complications in a prospective arm over a 29-day period.RESULTS: The overall success rate for tracheal intubation in the entire study group was 99.3% (549/553. Three patients who could not be orally intubated underwent emergent cricothyrotomy. Thus, the airway was successfully secured in 99.8% (552/553 of the patients requiring intubation. One patient, a seven-month-old infant, had unanticipated subglottic stenosis and could not be intubated by the emergency medicine attending or the anesthesiology attending. The patient was mask ventilated and was transported to the operating room for an emergent tracheotomy. Thirty-four patients (6.2% [95% CI 4.3 - 8.5%] developed a new respiratory infection within seven days of intubation. Only 18 patients (3.3% [95% CI 1.9 - 5.1%] had evidence of a new respiratory infection within 48 hours, indicating possible aspiration pneumonia secondary to airway

  19. Moral experience and ethical challenges in an emergency department in Pakistan: emergency physicians' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Waleed

    2015-04-01

    Emergency departments (ED) are often stressful environments posing unique ethical challenges-issues that primarily raise moral rather than clinical concerns-in patient care. Despite this, there are very few reports of what emergency physicians find ethically challenging in their everyday work. Emergency medicine (EM) is a relatively young but rapidly growing specialty that is gaining acceptance worldwide. The aim of this study was to explore the perspectives of EM residents and physicians regarding the common ethical challenges they face during patient care in one of only two academic EM departments in Pakistan. These challenges could then be addressed in residents' training and departmental practice guidelines. A qualitative research design was employed and in-depth interviews were conducted with ED physicians. Participants were encouraged to think of specific examples from their work, to highlight the particular ethical concerns raised and to describe in detail the process by which those concerns were addressed or left unresolved. Transcripts were analysed using grounded theory methods. Thirteen participants were interviewed and they described four key challenges: how to provide highest quality care with limited resources; how to be truthful to patients; what to do when it is not possible to provide or continue treatment to patients; and when (and when not) to offer life-sustaining treatments. Participants' accounts provided important insights into how physicians tried to resolve these challenges in the 'local moral world' of an ED in Pakistan. The study highlights the need for developing systematic and contextually appropriate mechanisms for resolving common ethical challenges in the EDs and for training residents in moral problem solving. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Emergency Service Triage Patterns and the Associated Emergency Department Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvarajah, Shalini; Haider, Adil H; Schneider, Eric B; Sadowsky, Cristina L; Becker, Daniel; Hammond, Edward R

    2015-12-15

    Paralysis is an indication for trauma patients to be preferentially triaged by emergency services to designated level I or II trauma centers (TC). We sought to describe triage practices for patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) and its associated emergency department (ED) outcomes. Adults ages ≥ 18 years with a diagnosis of acute TSCI (International Classification of Diseases-9: 806 and 952) in the 2006-2011 United States Nationwide Emergency Department Sample were included in these analyses. Outcomes assessed include triage to non-trauma centers (NTC), which is referred to as "under-triage," and ED mortality. Of 117,444 adults with TSCI, 33.4% were under-triaged to NTC. Under-triage was more prevalent with increasing age. Among patients under-triaged to NTC, 37.4% had new injury severity score (NISS) >15, representing severe injuries or polytrauma. Among patients with NISS >15, the odds of ED mortality in NTC were four-fold greater compared to level I trauma centers (TC-I) (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 4.06; 95% confidence interval = 1.87-8.79; p triage of adults with acute TSCI occurred in at least one-third of the cases. Patients triaged to NTC rather than TC-I experienced higher likelihood of death in the ED even after controlling for personal and injury characteristics. Further research is necessary to elucidate detailed clinical and logistical factors that may be associated with under-triage of acute TSCI, to facilitate interventions aimed at improving patient experience and outcomes.

  1. Acuity Prediction Using Emergency Medical Services Prenotifications in a Pediatric Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Kristy; Gochman, Robert; Bullaro, Francesca; Kaufman, Bradley; Krief, William

    2018-04-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) prenotifications are critical, although they oftentimes inaccurately convey the arriving patient's true acuity, resulting in inappropriate preparation in the emergency department. The objectives of this study were (1) to determine interrater reliability of acuity prediction based on prenotifications among physicians and (2) to compare predicted versus actual patient acuity based on prenotifications. A panel of physicians reviewed recordings of EMS prenotifications and then predicted the patient's acuity using the Emergency Severity Index (ESI). The scores were analyzed for interrater reliability using the weighted κ statistic. In the prospective phase of the study, physicians predicted an ESI before patient arrival based solely on the EMS prenotification and then calculated an actual ESI upon arrival. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and comparisons between the predicted and actual ESI were performed using Wilcoxon signed rank for matched pairs. Panelists reviewed a total of 23 recordings, and the interrater reliability was 0.23 overall (SE, 0.026; P fair agreement. One hundred patients were enrolled in the prospective analysis. There was a statistically significant difference between the predicted and actual ESI made by physicians (P = 0.0001). For 46 patients, the predicted and actual scores matched, but 13 patients were "undertriaged," and 41 patients were "overtriaged" based on predicted acuity. Interpretation of acuity using EMS prenotifications among physicians was only fairly reliable, and physicians had difficulty predicting actual acuity based on prenotifications. Improper preparation based on these prenotifications can potentially impact patient care and resource allocation.

  2. Homelessness and housing crises among individuals accessing services within a Canadian emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forchuk, C; Reiss, J P; Mitchell, B; Ewen, S; Meier, A

    2015-08-01

    Studies have indicated that individuals who are homeless access hospital emergency departments more frequently and may have different needs than individuals who are housed. Successful interventions have been developed and tested to reduce discharge to homelessness for psychiatric inpatients but have not been similarly tested for discharge from emergency departments. This study was developed to provide baseline data on this issue to inform future emergency department interventions. Findings from the current study suggest that discharge from emergency departments to homelessness happens frequently in London, Canada. Participants are unlikely to spontaneously disclose their housing/homelessness issue when first entering the emergency department, which may result in services that do not adequately meet their complex needs. Screening for housing issues is necessary within emergency departments and psychiatric crisis teams as housing issues may be a reason for accessing care or contribute to the presenting condition. Nurses are in an ideal position to evaluate housing needs among emergency department patients. Services outside of the emergency department are also needed to address housing issues, particularly outside of regular office hours. Individuals who have mental health issues and are homeless or in housing crisis have been found to access emergency departments more frequently than individuals with stable housing. While emergency departments primarily focus on medical issues, homeless individuals may require psychosocial support as well. This study examined issues around housing crises and emergency department use for individuals with mental illness in Canada. Collecting baseline data about these issues is important to inform subsequent interventions. Administrative data from a hospital emergency department and psychiatric crisis service were collected, and five individuals accessing the emergency department for psychiatric reasons were interviewed. Results

  3. Factors associated with the occurrence of cardiac arrest after emergency tracheal intubation in the emergency department.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Young Kim

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Emergency tracheal intubation has achieved high success and low complication rates in the emergency department (ED. The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence of post-intubation CA and determine the clinical factors associated with this complication. METHODS: A matched case-control study with a case to control ratio of 1:3 was conducted at an urban tertiary care center between January 2007 and December 2011. Critically ill adult patients requiring emergency airway management in the ED were included. The primary endpoint was post-intubation CA, defined as CA within 10 minutes after tracheal intubation. Clinical variables were compared between patients with post-intubation CA and patients without CA who were individually matched based on age, sex, and pre-existing comorbidities. RESULTS: Of 2,403 patients who underwent emergency tracheal intubation, 41 patients (1.7% had a post-intubation CA within 10 minutes of the procedure. The most common initial rhythm was pulseless electrical activity (78.1%. Patients experiencing CA had higher in-hospital mortality than patients without CA (61.0% vs. 30.1%; p<0.001. Systolic hypotension prior to intubation, defined as a systolic blood pressure ≤ 90 mmHg, was independently associated with post-intubation CA (OR, 3.67 [95% CI, 1.58-8.55], p = 0.01. CONCLUSION: Early post-intubation CA occurred with an approximate 2% frequency in the ED. Systolic hypotension before intubation is associated with this complication, which has potentially significant implications for clinicians at the time of intubation.

  4. Sentinel visits in emergency department patients with diabetes mellitus as a warning sign for hyperglycemic emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Justin W; Gushulak, Katherine M; Columbus, Melanie P; Hamelin, Alexandra L; Wells, George A; Stiell, Ian G

    2018-03-01

    Patients with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus may have a sentinel emergency department (ED) visit for a precipitating condition prior to presenting for a hyperglycemic emergency, such as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS). This study's objective was to describe the epidemiology and outcomes of patients with a sentinel ED visit prior to their hyperglycemic emergency visit. This was a 1-year health records review of patients≥18 years old presenting to one of four tertiary care EDs with a discharge diagnosis of hyperglycemia, DKA, or HHS. Trained research personnel collected data on patient characteristics, management, disposition, and determined whether patients came to the ED within the 14 days prior to their hyperglycemia visit. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. Of 833 visits for hyperglycemia, 142 (17.0%; 95% CI: 14.5% to 19.6%) had a sentinel ED presentation within the preceding 14 days. Mean (SD) age was 50.5 (19.0) years and 54.4% were male; 104 (73.2%) were discharged from this initial visit, and 98/104 (94.2%) were discharged either without their glucose checked or with an elevated blood glucose (>11.0 mmol/L). Of the sentinel visits, 93 (65.5%) were for hyperglycemia and 22 (15.5%) for infection. Upon returning to the ED, 61/142 (43.0%) were admitted for severe hyperglycemia, DKA, or HHS. In this unique ED-based study, diabetic patients with a sentinel ED visit often returned and required subsequent admission for hyperglycemia. Clinicians should be vigilant in checking blood glucose and provide clear discharge instructions for follow-up and glucose management to prevent further hyperglycemic emergencies from occurring.

  5. Emergency department management of patients with thermal burns [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolles, Juliana; Gupta, Nachi; Nusbaum, Jeffrey

    2018-02-01

    Thermal burn injuries are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to treatment of the burns, emergency clinicians must assess for inhalation injury, exposure to toxic gases, and related traumatic injuries. Priorities for emergency resuscitation include stabilization of airway and breathing, intravenous fluid administration, pain control, and local wound care. Special populations, including children and pregnant women, require additional treatment considerations. Referral to specialized burn care for select patients is necessary to improve long-term outcomes. This article reviews thermal burn classification and evidence-based treatment strategies. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice.].

  6. A systematic review of triage-related interventions to improve patient flow in emergency departments

    OpenAIRE

    Oredsson, Sven; Jonsson, Håkan; Rognes, Jon; Lind, Lars; Göransson, Katarina; Ehrenberg, Anna; Asplund, Kjell; Castrén, Maaret; Farrohknia, Nasim

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Overcrowding in emergency departments is a worldwide problem. A systematic literature review was undertaken to scientifically explore which interventions improve patient flow in emergency departments. Methods A systematic literature search for flow processes in emergency departments was followed by assessment of relevance and methodological quality of each individual study fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Studies were excluded if they did not present data on waiting time...

  7. Community pediatric hospitalists providing care in the emergency department: an analysis of physician productivity and financial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudas, Robert A; Monroe, David; McColligan Borger, Melissa

    2011-11-01

    Community hospital pediatric inpatient programs are being threatened by current financial and demographic trends. We describe a model of care and report on the financial implications associated with combining emergency department (ED) and inpatient care of pediatric patients. We determine whether this type of model could generate sufficient revenue to support physician salaries for continuous in-house coverage in community hospitals. Financial productivity and selected performance indicators were obtained from a retrospective review of registration and billing records. Data were obtained from 2 community-based pediatric hospitalist programs, which are part of a single health system and included care delivered in the ED and inpatient settings during a 1-year period from July 1, 2008, to July 1, 2009. Together, the combined programs were able to generate 6079 total relative value units and collections of $244,828 annually per full-time equivalent (FTE). Salary, benefits, and practice expenses totaled $235,674 per FTE. Thus, combined daily revenues exceeded expenses and provided 104% of physician salary, benefits, and practice expenses. However, 1 program generated a net profit of $329,715 ($40,706 per FTE), whereas the other recorded a loss of $207,969 ($39,994 per FTE). Emergency department throughput times and left-without-being-seen rates at both programs were comparable to national benchmarks. Incorporating ED care into a pediatric hospitalist program can be an effective strategy to maintain the financial viability of pediatric services at community hospitals with low inpatient volumes that seek to provide 24-hour pediatric staffing.

  8. Health services use associated with emergency department closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Enemark, Ulrika; Foldspang, Anders

    2011-01-01

    , 1997-2003. Data were extracted from administrative registries including information on individual use of emergency services and other hospital care, contact with GPs and socioeconomic background. Health services' use by the Morsø population was measured before reduction in emergency room opening hours...... of substitute health services. By contrast, Morsø women compared to the rest of Viborg county reduced their use of GP services in terms of face-to-face visits (β = -0.08, P = 0.020), telephone consultations (β = -0.11, P = 0.007), home visits (β = -0.48, P = 0.009), and their inpatient hospital utilization (β...... = -0.12, P = 0.022) during the period when emergeny services were only available in the daytime. CONCLUSIONS: Emergency services at neighbouring hospitals (40 kilometres distance) were able to compensate, in part, for the decreased local emergency service provision. Concurrent changes in health care...

  9. Communication between nurses and physicians: strategies to surviving in the emergency department trenches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abourbih, Daniel; Armstrong, Sherry; Nixon, Kirsty; Ackery, Alun D

    2015-02-01

    The emergency department (ED) is a challenging and stressful work environment where communication lapses can lead to negative health outcomes. This article offers strategies to Emergency Medicine residents, nurses and staff physicians on how to improve communication to optimize patient care. © 2014 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  10. Administration Medication Errors in Emergency Department in Level III Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia González Gómez

    2012-01-01

    • Objective: To determine the prevalence of medication errors associated with the administration in the emergency room of University Hospital Marques de Valdecilla. • Introduction: Adverse events related to health care, are increasingly common, it is estimated that between 44000 and 98000 people served in U.S. hospitals die from adverse events related to health care. In 7000 these deaths are caused by medication errors. In Spain the studies speak of similar figures. The emergency services are...

  11. Availability of emergency contraception: a survey of hospital emergency department gynaecologists and emergency physicians in Piedmont, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Marco; Casagranda, Ivo; Charrier, Lorena; Gianino, Maria Michela

    2012-10-01

    To compare the knowledge and the willingness of emergency physicians and gynaecologists caring for women in Italian emergency departments (EDs) to prescribe levonorgestrel-only emergency contraceptive pills (LNG-EC pills). A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2009; anonymous postal questionnaires were mailed to the medical staff working at the 30 EDs located in Piedmont (Italy). Emergency physicians and gynaecologists have similar knowledge of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of LNG-EC pills, but do not feel at ease in prescribing these and consider the prescription of LNG-EC pills an inappropriate activity for ED staff. In Italy, unlike in most other European countries, LNG-EC pills are still prescription drugs. Thus it may be useful to further investigate the reasons why Italian ED medical staff do not feel the prescription of LNG-EC pills should be within their remit and whether women can successfully obtain the prescription from physicians working in other services that can be accessed around the clock.

  12. The use of propofol for procedural sedation in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, Abel; Blackburn, Carol; McCabe, Aileen; Reece, Emilia; O'Connor, Ger; Glasheen, John; Staunton, Paul; Cronin, John; Sampson, Christopher; McCoy, Siobhan C; O'Sullivan, Ronan; Cummins, Fergal

    2015-07-29

    There is increasing evidence that propofol is efficacious and safe for procedural sedation (PS) in the emergency department (ED) setting. However, propofol has a narrow therapeutic window and lacks of a reversal agent. The aim of this review was to cohere the evidence base regarding the efficacy and safety profile of propofol when used in the ED setting for PS. To identify and evaluate all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing propofol with alternative drugs (benzodiazepines, barbiturates, etomidate and ketamine) used in the ED setting for PS. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 9), MEDLINE (1950 to September week 2 2013) and EMBASE (1980 to week 2 2013). We searched the Current Controlled Trials metaRegister of Clinical Trials (compiled by Current Science) (September 2013). We checked the reference lists of trials and contacted trial authors. We imposed no language restriction. We re-ran the search in February 2015. We will deal with the one study awaiting classification when we update the review. RCTs comparing propofol to alternative drugs (benzodiazepines, barbiturates, etomidate and ketamine) used in the ED setting for PS in participants of all ages. Two authors independently performed data extraction. Two authors performed trial quality assessment. We used mean difference (MD), odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to measure effect sizes. Two authors independently assessed and rated the methodological quality of each trial using The Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias. Ten studies (813 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Two studies only included participants 18 years and younger; six studies only included participants 18 years and older; one study included participants between 16 and 65 years of age and one study included only adults but did not specify the age range. Eight of the included studies had a high risk of bias. The included studies

  13. Rates of TBI-related Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths - United States, 2001 – 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In general, total combined rates for traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations and deaths have increased over the past...

  14. Improving the Brooke Army Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine Admissions Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fuda, John R

    2006-01-01

    This study determined, evaluated, and proposed ways to mitigate factors contributing to overcrowding and wait times experienced by patients admitted through the Brooke Army Medical Center Emergency Department...

  15. Child abuse pediatric consults in the pediatric emergency department improve adherence to hospital guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Tara; Valvano, Thomas; Nugent, Melodee; Melzer-Lange, Marlene

    2013-10-01

    Little data describes the role of child abuse pediatricians in consultation for physical abuse patients the pediatric emergency department. To compare adherence in the emergency department to hospital physical abuse guidelines and need to return for testing between 2 groups: those receiving a child abuse consultation in the pediatric emergency department vs those who received standard emergency department care with subsequent child abuse review. We reviewed 471 records of visits to the pediatric emergency department for physical abuse. Data collected included demographics, studies performed, whether patients need to return after child abuse review, child abuse subpoenas, child abuse testimony in court. Patients who received a child abuse consult in the emergency department or inpatient were more likely to be younger and to have more severe injuries. In cases where a consult was obtained, there was 100% adherence to emergency department clinical guidelines vs 66% when no consult was obtained. In addition, in cases that did not receive a child abuse consult, 8% had to return to the hospital for labs or radiographs after their emergency department visit. Child abuse consultation in the pediatric emergency department improves compliance with clinical guidelines and decreases the likelihood that patients will need to return for further testing.

  16. Incident Reporting to Improve Patient Safety: The Effects of Process Variance on Pediatric Patient Safety in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OʼConnell, Karen J; Shaw, Kathy N; Ruddy, Richard M; Mahajan, Prashant V; Lichenstein, Richard; Olsen, Cody S; Funai, Tomohiko; Blumberg, Stephen; Chamberlain, James M

    2018-04-01

    Medical errors threaten patient safety, especially in the pediatric emergency department (ED) where overcrowding, multiple handoffs, and workflow interruptions are common. Errors related to process variance involve situations that are not consistent with standard ED operations or routine patient care. We performed a planned subanalysis of the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network incident reporting data classified as process variance events. Confidential deidentified incident reports (IRs) were collected and classified by 2 independent investigators. Events categorized as process variance were then subtyped for severity and contributing factors. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The study intention was to describe and measure reported medical errors related to process variance in 17 EDs in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network from 2007 to 2008. Between July 2007 and June 2008, 2906 eligible reports were reviewed. Process variance events were identified in 15.4% (447/2906). The majority were related to patient flow (35.4%), handoff communication (17.2%), and patient identification errors (15.9%). Most staff involved included nurses (47.9%) and physicians (28%); trainees were infrequently reported. The majority of events did not result in harm (65.7%); 17.9% (80/447) of cases were classified as unsafe conditions but did not reach the patient. Temporary harm requiring further treatment or hospitalization was reported in 5.6% (25/447). No events resulted in permanent harm, near death, or death. Contributing factors included human factors (92.1%), in particular handoff communication, interpersonal skills, and compliance with established procedures, and system-level errors (18.1%), including unclear or unavailable policies and inadequate staffing levels. Although process variance events accounted for approximately 1 in 6 reported safety events, very few led to patient harm. Because human and system-level factors contributed to

  17. Emergency department management of early sepsis: a national survey of emergency medicine and intensive care consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiwaji, Zoeb; Brady, Shirin; McIntyre, Lauralyn A; Gray, Alasdair; Walsh, Timothy S

    2014-12-01

    Early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) is recommended for sepsis management in current guidelines, but the underpinning evidence is controversial. Clinician beliefs and the capacity to implement all recommended elements of EGDT in emergency departments (EDs) are uncertain. Our study aimed to explore self-reported management of early sepsis by Scottish emergency medicine (EM) and intensive care medicine (ICM) consultants, delineate important differences and determine the guideline recommendations rated most important and deliverable within the ED. A postal survey using a hypothetical patient with septic shock was sent to all EM and ICM consultants practising in Scotland. 67% (76/114) EM and 61% (96/157) ICM consultants responded. Normal saline was preferred by EM respondents ('always/often used': EM 86%, ICM 23%, pmanagement of sepsis exist between Scottish ICM and EM consultants. Transfusion practice is highly variable, suggesting clinical uncertainty. Lactate is considered more important than ScVO2 measurement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. [Emergency endoscopy in children: experience of a digestive endoscopy department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacchione, D; Mortilla, M G; Ricci, E; Bertoni, G; Conigliaro, R; Orsi, P; Bedogni, G; Lamborghini, A; Banchini, G

    1992-01-01

    Many changes and advances have been achieved in the last years, so that emergency endoscopy has now a definite role also in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in childhood. In order to determinate main indications to endoscopic examination, and which are the most useful diagnostic and therapeutic measures that should be performed, we examined the records of 202 patients (aged 1 day-14 years) undergone emergency endoscopy from June 1979 to January 1990. Patients were referred to endoscopy because of foreign bodies or caustic ingestion, hematemesis, and in one patient a suspected intussusception. We didn't record any complication. Our study shows that emergency endoscopy has a definite role also in pediatric age and gives a diagnostic and therapeutic gain in the management of many diseases.

  19. Tattoos and Piercing: A Review for the Emergency Department Physician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William K. Mallon

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Tattoos and piercings are increasingly part of everyday life for large sections of the population, and more emergency physicians are seeing these body modifications (BM adorn their patients. In this review we elucidate the most common forms of these BMs, we describe how they may affect both the physical and psychological health of the patient undergoing treatment, and also try to educate around any potential pitfalls in treating associated complications. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:393–398.

  20. PREPARING FOR THE GERIATRIC TSUNAMI – AN EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT PARADIGM SHIFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Ducharme, MD CM, FRCP

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Emergency Department has witnessed multiple paradigm shifts within a very short period of time. It is likely that the aging of the population will create the greatest shift to date. As the number of people over age 75 swells, the demands on the emergency department to have available multi-disciplinary geriatric capabilities to manage their complex non-medical problems risk overwhelming the ability of the department to manage the acutely ill and injured as is its mandate. Crowding could spiral out of control, resulting in worsening outcomes for emergency department patients. Anticipating the geriatric tsunami and preparing a health care system, both in and outside of a hospital will be critical. Creating a geriatric emergency department in isolation risks having governments designate the emergency department as the portal of entry for all community geriatric needs, which can only compromise further acute care, care already threatened by tightened budgets, increasing health care costs and insufficient community resources.

  1. Low compliance with a validated system for emergency department triage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dorthea; Jensen, Nanna Martin; Maaløe, Rikke

    2011-01-01

    a "primary criterion" or a BEWS = 5 are presumed to be critically ill or severely injured and should be received by a multidisciplinary team, termed the Emergency Call (EC) and Trauma Call (TC), respectively. The aim of this study was to examine compliance with this triage system at Bispebjerg Hospital....

  2. Family-witnessed resuscitation in emergency departments: Doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion. Short-course training such as postgraduate advanced life support and other continued professional development activities should have a positive effect on this practice. The more experienced doctors are and the longer they work in emergency medicine, the more comfortable they appear to be with the concept ...

  3. Arrival time pattern and waiting time distribution of patients in the emergency outpatient department of a tertiary level health care institution of North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Tiwari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emergency Department (ED of tertiary health care institute in India is mostly overcrowded, over utilized and inappropriately staffed. The challenges of overcrowded EDs and ill-managed patient flow and admission processes result in excessively long waits for patients. Aim: The objective of the present study was to analyze the patient flow system by assessing the arrival and waiting time distribution of patients in an Emergency out Patient Department (EOPD. Materials and Methods: This short cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in the EOPD of a Tertiary level health care Institution in North India in the month of May, 2011. The data was obtained from 591 patients, who were present in the EOPD during the month of May, 2011. The waiting time, inter arrival time between two consecutive patients were calculated in addition to the daily census data (discharge rate, admission rate and transfer out rates etc. of the emergency. Results: Arrival time pattern of patients in the EOPD was highly stochastic with the peak arrival hours to be "9.00-12.00 h" in which around 26.3% patients arrived in the EOPD. The primary waiting areas of patients included patients "under observation" (29.6%; "waiting for routine diagnostic tests" (16.4% and "waiting for discharge" (14.6%. Around 71% patients were waiting due to reasons within emergency complex. Conclusion: The patient flow of the ED could only be addressed by multifaceted, multidisciplinary and hospital wide approach.

  4. A practical approach to paediatric emergencies in the radiology department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner, Nigel McBeth

    Acute life-threatening events involving children in the radiology department are rare. Nonetheless, radiologists should be competent in the relatively simple procedures required to maintain or restore vital functions in paediatric patients, particularly if their practice involves seriously ill or

  5. Errors in fracture diagnoses in the emergency department--characteristics of patients and diurnal variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallas, Peter; Ellingsen, Trond

    2006-01-01

    Evaluation of the circumstances related to errors in diagnosis of fractures at an Emergency Department may suggest ways to reduce the incidence of such errors.......Evaluation of the circumstances related to errors in diagnosis of fractures at an Emergency Department may suggest ways to reduce the incidence of such errors....

  6. The Consumer Quality Index in an accident and emergency department : Internal consistency, validity and discriminative capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Nanne; Sturms, Leontien M.; Stellato, Rebecca K.; Schrijvers, Augustinus J P; van Stel, Henk F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients' experiences are an indicator of health-care performance in the accident and emergency department (A&E). The Consumer Quality Index for the Accident and Emergency department (CQI A&E), a questionnaire to assess the quality of care as experienced by patients, was investigated.

  7. Discharge from an emergency department observation unit and a surgical assessment unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Helen; Qvist, Niels; Backer Mogensen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the experiences of patients with acute abdominal pain at discharge from an emergency department observation unit compared with discharge from a surgical assessment unit.......To investigate the experiences of patients with acute abdominal pain at discharge from an emergency department observation unit compared with discharge from a surgical assessment unit....

  8. Applications of End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide (ETCO2) Monitoring in Emergency Department; a Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Shafiee, Sajad; Zamani Kiasari, Alieh; Sazgar, Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    Capnograph is an indispensable tool for monitoring metabolic and respiratory function. In this study, the aim was to review the applications of end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) monitoring in emergency department, multiple databases were comprehensively searched with combination of following keywords: "ETCO2", "emergency department monitoring", and "critical monitoring" in PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, Index Copernicus, EBSCO and Cochrane Database.

  9. Current use of intraosseous infusion in Danish emergency departments: a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Rune; Hallas, Peter; Brabrand, Mikkel

    2010-01-01

    Intraosseous infusion (IOI) is recommended when intravenous access cannot be readily established in both pediatric and adult resuscitation. We evaluated the current use of IOI in Danish emergency departments (EDs).......Intraosseous infusion (IOI) is recommended when intravenous access cannot be readily established in both pediatric and adult resuscitation. We evaluated the current use of IOI in Danish emergency departments (EDs)....

  10. Nurses' evaluation of a new formalized triage system in the emergency department - a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mette Brehm; Forberg, Jakob Lundager

    2011-01-01

    Formalized triage in the emergency department (ED) is not widely used in Denmark; this study explores the effects of introducing a five-level process triage system in a Danish ED.......Formalized triage in the emergency department (ED) is not widely used in Denmark; this study explores the effects of introducing a five-level process triage system in a Danish ED....

  11. Recent Suicidal Ideation among Patients in an Inner City Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgen, Mark A.; Walton, Maureen A.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Barry, Kristen L.; Chermack, Steve T.; De Chavez, Peter; Blow, Frederic C.

    2009-01-01

    The rates and associated features of suicidal ideation among 5,641 patients seeking routine, nonsuicide related care in an inner-city emergency department were examined. Approximately 8% of patients seeking routine care in the emergency department reported some form of suicidal ideation within the past 2 weeks. Suicidal ideation was common in…

  12. Maxillofacial trauma in the emergency department: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckett, J W; Lynham, A; Lee, G A; Perry, M; Harrington, U

    2014-04-01

    In 1978 the Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines were first implemented and are viewed by many as the gold standard of care in the emergency setting. It may not be immediately obvious where assessment and management of maxillofacial injuries fits within these trauma guidelines. This article aims to provide a concise, contemporary guide for the treatment of maxillofacial trauma in the emergency setting. An electronic database search was conducted in PubMed and Science Direct on articles from 1970 to the present day. The key search terms were Maxillofacial, Trauma, ATLS, Advanced Trauma Life Support, EMST, Early Management of Severe Trauma, Airway, Eye, Ophthalmic and Management. The findings were compiled into a review article. The article was then reviewed by experts in the fields of Maxillofacial Surgery and Ophthalmology to ensure content and contextual accuracy. Physicians are becoming increasingly exposed to major maxillofacial injuries. Resuscitative measures can be complex and require prompt decisions especially in gaining a secure airway. A proposed treatment algorithm for maxillofacial trauma patients has been devised by the authors. It is imperative that sight preserving assessment and interventions are not forgotten in the emergency management of maxillofacial trauma. We propose an algorithm for the management of maxillofacial trauma, and recommend the use of CT as a powerful adjunct to clinical examination in patients with maxillofacial trauma. Copyright © 2013 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. All rights reserved.

  13. Lean Manufacturing Improves Emergency Department Throughput and Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Marlena; Chui, Kristen; Rimicci, Janet; Callagy, Patrice; Hereford, James; Shen, Sam; Norris, Robert; Pickham, David

    2015-09-01

    A multidisciplinary team led by nursing leadership and physicians developed a plan to meet increasing demand and improve the patient experience in the ED without expanding the department's current resources. The approach included Lean tools and engaged frontline staff and physicians. Applying Lean management principles resulted in quicker service, improved patient satisfaction, increased capacity, and reduced resource utilization. Incorporating continuous daily management is necessary for sustainment of continuous improvement activities.

  14. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: Diagnosis And Treatment In The Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugg, Charles Walter; Taira, Taku

    2016-12-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease is a common disease that is associated with significant complications including infertility, chronic pelvic pain, ruptured tubo-ovarian abscess, and ectopic pregnancy. The diagnosis may be delayed when the presentation has nonspecific signs and symptoms. Even when it is properly identified, pelvic inflammatory disease is often treated suboptimally. This review provides evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment, disposition, and follow-up of patients with pelvic inflammatory disease. Arranging follow-up of patients within 48 to 72 hours and providing clear patient education are fundamental to ensuring good patient outcomes. Emerging issues, including new pathogens and evolving resistance patterns among pelvic inflammatory disease pathogens are reviewed.

  15. 77 FR 14832 - Plumchoice, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Balance Staffing, Insight Global Staffing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... Staffing, Insight Global Staffing, and Technisource, Scarborough, ME; Amended Certification Regarding..., Inc., including on-site leased workers from Balance Staffing, Insight Global Staffing, and... from Balance Staffing, Insight Global Staffing, and Technisource, Scarborough, Maine, who became...

  16. Designing a clinical dashboard to fill information gaps in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Jordan L; Cimino, James J; Fred, Matthew R; Green, Robert A; Vawdrey, David K

    2014-01-01

    Data fragmentation within electronic health records causes gaps in the information readily available to clinicians. We investigated the information needs of emergency medicine clinicians in order to design an electronic dashboard to fill information gaps in the emergency department. An online survey was distributed to all emergency medicine physicians at a large, urban academic medical center. The survey response rate was 48% (52/109). The clinical information items reported to be most helpful while caring for patients in the emergency department were vital signs, electrocardiogram (ECG) reports, previous discharge summaries, and previous lab results. Brief structured interviews were also conducted with 18 clinicians during their shifts in the emergency department. From the interviews, three themes emerged: 1) difficulty accessing vital signs, 2) difficulty accessing point-of-care tests, and 3) difficulty comparing the current ECG with the previous ECG. An emergency medicine clinical dashboard was developed to address these difficulties.

  17. Older adolescent presentations to a children's hospital emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Shweta; Ng, Elaine Yu Ching; Foo, Feng; Noori, Omar; McCaskill, Mary; Steinbeck, Katharine

    2016-08-01

    To describe the characteristics, diagnoses and outcomes of older adolescents, aged 16-19 years, presenting to a paediatric ED. A retrospective review of total ED presentations by older adolescents to a tertiary paediatric hospital between 2010 and 2012, inclusive, was undertaken to determine if behavioural or mental health problems were common. A total of 1184 ED presentations by 730 older adolescents were identified. Injury and abdominal pain were the most common complaints for presentations by older adolescents to the ED. The median length of stay in ED was 241 (range: 0-3873) min. More than 60% of the older adolescent ED presentations were triaged urgent or semi-urgent, and 39% of all these presentations resulted in hospital admission. Two-thirds of these older adolescents had a chronic illness, which accounted for 77% of all ED presentations by older adolescents. The history of chronic illness was considered related or relevant in the evaluation and management of over 80% of older adolescents. Of all the ED presentations by older adolescents with chronic illness, only one quarter had transition planning documentation. A high prevalence of chronic illness was found in older adolescents attending the paediatric ED. There was no evidence that behavioural and mental health issues dominated. These findings reflect admission policy. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  18. Patient satisfaction with procedural sedation in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Olivia G; Taylor, David McD; Lee, Marina; Ding, Juen-Li; Ashok, Aadith; Johnson, Damian; Peck, Daniel; Knott, Jonathan; Weinberg, Laurence

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine patient satisfaction with procedural sedation as a function of nature of the procedure and depth of sedation. We undertook a prospective observational study of adult patients who received procedural sedation in two EDs (20 month period). The level of sedation was determined by an investigator, using the Observers Assessment of Anaesthesia/Sedation Scale (1 = awake to 6 = no response to noxious stimuli). Patient satisfaction was measured with the Iowa Satisfaction with Anaesthesia Scale after full recovery. This was self-administered, comprised 11 items (e.g. 'I felt pain') and has a score range of -3 (poor satisfaction) to +3 (very satisfied). A total of 163 patients were enrolled (51.2% men, mean age 50.7 years). The median (interquartile range) satisfaction score was 2.7 (0.7). Patient satisfaction was lower among patients who had orthopaedic procedures (median 2.6 vs 2.8, P patient satisfaction is high. Greater satisfaction is associated with deeper sedation, sedation with propofol and non-orthopaedic procedures. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  19. Emergency department management of smoke inhalation injury in adults [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterness, Karalynn; Ahn, Christine; Nusbaum, Jeffrey; Gupta, Nachi

    2018-03-01

    Smoke inhalation injury portends increased morbidity and mortality in fire-exposed patients. Upper airway thermal burns, inflammation from lower airway irritants, and systemic effects of carbon monoxide and cyanide can contribute to injury. A standardized diagnostic protocol for inhalation injury is lacking, and management remains mostly supportive. Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for concomitant traumatic injuries. Diagnosis is mostly clinical, aided by bronchoscopy and other supplementary tests. Treatment includes airway and respiratory support, lung protective ventilation, 100% oxygen or hyperbaric oxygen therapy for carbon monoxide poisoning, and hydroxocobalamin for cyanide toxicity. Due to its progressive nature, many patients with smoke inhalation injury warrant close monitoring for development of airway compromise. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice.].

  20. The health of healthcare: Emergency department physician well-being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gagne

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physician health and well-being is an important issue that ultimately affects job performance. We compared the self-reported incidence of known medical issues, physical and mental health symptoms, and health behaviors of Emergency Physicians (EPs with the general public in the United States. Methods: Questions selected from a national survey conducted by the Center for Disease Control (CDC about public health trends were distributed to via Facebook to a private group of 12,917 EPs. Responses were compared between EPs and the general population using Chi-square tests of independence. Results: Our results demonstrated that EPs suffer less from chronic diseases, especially those related to the cardiopulmonary system; however, they suff er from a higher incidence of musculoskeletal pain and infectious disease complaints. EPs also exhibit higher rates of mental health symptoms, sleep-related complications, and alcohol consumption. Conclusions: Awareness, education, and advocacy may help improve physician health and ultimately job performance.

  1. Anemia in the emergency department: evaluation and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, Timothy G; Johnson, Roy L; Rubenstein, Scott D

    2013-11-01

    Anemia is a common worldwide problem that is associated with nonspecific complaints. The initial focus for the emergency evaluation of anemia is to determine whether the problem is acute or chronic. Acute anemia is most commonly associated with blood loss, and the patient is usually symptomatic. Chronic anemia is usually well tolerated and is often discovered coincidentally. Once diagnosed, the etiology of anemia can often be determined by applying a systematic approach to its evaluation. The severity of the anemia impacts clinical outcomes, particularly in critically ill patients; however, the specific threshold to transfuse is uncertain. Evaluation of the current literature and clinical guidelines does not settle this controversy, but it does help clarify that a restrictive transfusion strategy (ie, for patients with a hemoglobin anemias may have well-defined treatment options (eg, sickle cell disease), but empiric use of nutritional supplements to treat anemia of uncertain etiology is discouraged.

  2. Antiemetic treatment in the emergency department: Patient opinions and expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Robert; Graudins, Andis; Anthony, Shane

    2018-02-01

    To determine patient expectations of antiemetic treatment in the ED. Survey of adult ED patients with nausea. expectation of antiemetic treatment as symptoms being 'totally gone', 'a lot less', 'a little less' and 'the same'. comparison between expectations and symptom change when expectations were met; general views on indications for treatment, treatment satisfaction and reasons for additional medication use. Of 176 surveyed, treatment expectation was recorded by 165 (94%). These were: 'totally gone', 'a lot less' or 'a little less' for 60 (36%), 84 (51%) and 21 (13%), respectively. This pre-treatment nomination, was matched or exceeded by the reported level of symptom reduction at 30 min, for 43/87 (49%, 95% CI: 39-60) whose expectations were met, and 6/33 (18%, 95% CI: 7-35) whose were not. The majority (117/176, 66%) believed treatment should be reserved for moderate or severe nausea; 158/176 (90%) would accept treatment if offered; 130/165 (79%) expected a treatment effect by 30 min. Treatment satisfaction findings were similar to expectations being met. Further drug treatment at 30 min was desired by 29/120 (24%) who received an antiemetic drug. Most were improved, but believed additional drugs might help more. Of the 91 not wanting more treatment, most were improved and thought no more drugs were necessary. Most patients expected antiemetic treatment to make symptoms at least 'a lot less'. Most also believe treatment should be reserved for moderate or severe nausea, and should take effect by 30 min. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  3. Adolescent presentations to an adult hospital emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Omar; Batra, Shweta; Shetty, Amith; Steinbeck, Katharine

    2017-10-01

    Age-related policies allow adolescents to access paediatric and adult EDs. Anecdotally, paediatric and adult EDs report challenges when caring for older and younger adolescents, respectively. Our aim was to describe the characteristics of an adolescent population attending an adult ED, co-located with a tertiary paediatric ED. The Westmead Hospital ED database was accessed for 14.5-17.9 years old presentations between January 2010 and December 2012. Patient diagnosis coding (SNOMED) was converted to ICD-10. De-identified data were transferred into Microsoft Excel with analysis performed using spss V22. There were 5718 presentations made to the Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia ED by 4450 patients, representing 3.3% (95% CI 3.2-3.4) of total visits from all patients 14.5 years and above. The mean age of the sample was 16.6 years (male 51.8%). Presentations triaged as level 4 or 5 represented 61.0% (95% CI 58.7-61.3) of visits. The proportion of patients who did not wait to receive care was 13.8% (95% CI 12.9-14.7), which was significantly higher than adult rates (P < 0.01). There were 279 unscheduled return visits (visits made <72 h of discharge) representing 4.9% (95% CI 4.4-5.8) of all presentations. Injury was the most common diagnosis (30.2%, 95% CI 28.8-31.6). Chronic physical illness and alcohol-related visits comprised 2.1% (95% CI 1.7-2.5) and 0.8% (95% CI 0.6-1.0) of adolescent presentations, respectively. Contrary to reported staff perceptions, adolescent chronic physical illness presentations were not a major burden. Alcohol was likely under-recorded as a contributing factor to presentations. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  4. Strategies and solutions to alleviate access block and overcrowding in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Stewart S W; Cheung, N K; Graham, Colin A; Rainer, Timothy H

    2015-08-01

    Access block refers to the delay caused for patients in gaining access to in-patient beds after being admitted. It is almost always associated with emergency department overcrowding. This study aimed to identify evidence-based strategies that can be followed in emergency departments and hospital settings to alleviate the problem of access block and emergency department overcrowding; and to explore the applicability of these solutions in Hong Kong. A systematic literature review was performed by searching the following databases: CINAHL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, EMBASE, MEDLINE (OVID), NHS Evidence, Scopus, and PubMed. The search terms used were "emergency department, access block, overcrowding". The inclusion criteria were full-text articles, studies, economic evaluations, reviews, editorials, and commentaries. The exclusion criteria were studies not based in the emergency departments or hospitals, and abstracts. Abstracts of identified papers were screened, and papers were selected if they contained facts, data, or scientific evidence related to interventions that aimed at improving outcome measures for emergency department overcrowding and/or access block. Papers identified were used to locate further references. All relevant scientific studies were evaluated for strengths and weaknesses using appraisal tools developed by the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme. We identified solutions broadly classified into the following categories: (1) strategies addressing emergency department overcrowding: co-locating primary care within the emergency department, and fast-track and emergency nurse practitioners; and (2) strategies addressing access block: holding units, early discharge and patient flow, and political action--management and resource priority. Several evidence-based approaches have been identified from the literature and effective strategies to overcome the problem of access block and overcrowding of emergency departments may be formulated.

  5. Effective Staffing Takes a Village: Creating the Staffing Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavigan, Margaret; Fitzpatrick, Therese A; Miserendino, Carole

    2016-01-01

    The traditional approaches to staffing and scheduling are often ineffective in assuring sufficient budgeting and deployment of staff to assure the right nurse at the right time for the right cost. As hospital merger activity increases, this exercise is further complicated by the need to rationalize staffing across multiple enterprises and standardize systems and processes. This Midwest hospital system successfully optimized staffing at the unit and enterprise levels by utilizing operations research methodologies. Savings were reinvested to improve staffing models which provided sufficient nonproductive coverage and patient-driven ratios. Over/under-staffing was eliminated in support of the system's recognition that adequate resource planning and deployment are critical to the culture of safety.

  6. Systolic blood pressure and short-term mortality in the emergency department and prehospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders Kasper Bruun; Holler, Jon Gitz; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    : A retrospective, hospital-based cohort study was performed at Odense University Hospital which included all adult patients in the emergency department between 1995 and 2011, all patients transported to the emergency department in ambulances in the period 2012-2013, and all patients serviced by the physician.......7 % (95 % CI [5.3, 6.2]) of 12,270 patients in the mobile emergency care units. Best performing thresholds ranged from 95 to 119 mmHg in the emergency department, 103-120 mmHg in the ambulance, and 101-115 mmHg in the MECU but area under the ROC curve indicated poor overall discriminatory performance...... thresholds than the traditional 90 mmHg. The aim of this study was to identify the best performing systolic blood pressure thresholds with regards to predicting 7-day mortality and to evaluate the applicability of these in the emergency department as well as in the prehospital setting. METHODS...

  7. Characteristics of psychiatric emergency department use among privately insured adolescents with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Luther G; Stuart, Elizabeth A; Vasa, Roma A

    2018-01-01

    This study examined differences in the rates of psychiatric-related emergency department visits among adolescents with autism spectrum disorder, adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and adolescents without autism spectrum disorder or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Additional outcomes included emergency department recidivism, probability of psychiatric hospitalization after the emergency department visit, and receipt of outpatient mental health services before and after the emergency department visit. Data came from privately insured adolescents, aged 12-17 years, with autism spectrum disorder (N = 46,323), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (N = 408,066), and neither diagnosis (N = 2,330,332), enrolled in the 2010-2013 MarketScan Commercial Claims Database. Adolescents with autism spectrum disorder had an increased rate of psychiatric emergency department visits compared to adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (IRR = 2.0, 95% confidence interval: 1.9, 2.1) and adolescents with neither diagnosis (IRR = 9.9, 95% confidence interval: 9.4, 10.4). Compared to the other groups, adolescents with autism spectrum disorder also had an increased probability of emergency department recidivism, psychiatric hospitalization after the emergency department visit, and receipt of outpatient care before and after the visit (all p < 0.001). Further research is required to understand whether these findings extend to youth with other neurodevelopmental disorders, particularly those who are publicly insured.

  8. Initiatives to reduce overcrowding and access block in Australian emergency departments: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Kimberley; Morphet, Julia; Jones, Tamsin; Innes, Kelli; Griffiths, Debra; Williams, Allison

    2014-01-01

    Australian emergency departments are experiencing an increasing demand for their services. Patient throughput continues to expand resulting in overcrowding and access block where patients cannot gain entry to appropriate hospital beds. This is despite both state and federal governments implementing numerous schemes to address the complex causes of stress on emergency departments. This paper explores the current literature and highlights the key strategies adopted by different emergency departments to reduce delays and streamline patient flow, including: waiting room nurses; streaming; rapid assessment teams; short stay units and care coordination programmes. Many of these initiatives have proven successful at reducing the number of people re-presenting to the emergency department, addressing time delays and improving the management of existing resources and patient flow. More recent changes include increasing the scope of practice and workload for triage nurses. With the recent introduction of the National Emergency Access Target, which requires that most patients presenting to Australian emergency departments are reviewed and transferred or discharged from the department within 4h, traditional roles of nurses in the emergency department are changing and expanding to meet the needs of modern healthcare systems.

  9. The National Trauma Data Bank story for emergency department thoracotomy: How old is too old?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Lindsay A; Anstadt, Michael J; Kothari, Anai N; Javorski, Michael J; Gonzalez, Richard P; Luchette, Fred A

    2018-03-01

    The fastest growing segment of the American population is the elderly (>65 years). This change in demographics also is being seen in trauma centers. Emergency department thoracotomy is utilized in an attempt to restore circulation for patients arriving in extremis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between clinical variables, particularly age, and outcomes for injured patients receiving an emergency department thoracotomy. Using the National Trauma Data Bank for years 2008-2012, observations with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure codes for exploratory thoracotomy were identified. Emergency department thoracotomy was defined as any observation that occurred at a time to thoracotomy less than the total time spent in the emergency department thoracotomy, and within 15 minutes of arrival. Mechanisms of injury, demographic data, and injuries were analyzed for predictors of survival and mortality rates. Mortality rates were determined for each decade and year of life. There were 11,380 observations for thoracotomy identified. Of these, 2,519 were emergency department thoracotomy, with the majority (n= 2,026, 80% observations) performed for penetrating wounds. Mortality rates ranged from 80% to 100% for each decade of life. Mortality was 100% for patients >57 years old with either penetrating or blunt mechanisms of injury. Emergency department thoracotomy offered no survival benefit for patients older than 57 years of age. These data suggest that emergency department thoracotomy performed in elderly patients may be futile. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Emergency Department Wait Time and Treatment of Traumatic Digit Amputation: Do Race and Insurance Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Elham; Swiatek, Peter R; Chung, Kevin C

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about the association between the quality of trauma care and management of nonfatal injuries. The authors used emergency department wait times as a proxy for hospital structure, process, and availability of on-call surgeons with microsurgical skills. They evaluated the association between average hospital emergency department wait times and likelihood of undergoing digit replantation for patients with traumatic amputation digit injuries. The authors hypothesized that hospitals with shorter emergency department wait times were associated with higher odds of replantation. Using the 2007 to 2012 National Trauma Data Bank, the authors' final sample included 12,126 patients. Regression modeling was used to first determine factors that were associated with longer emergency department wait times among patients with digit amputation injuries. Second, the authors examined the association between emergency department wait times for this population at a hospital level and replantation after all types of digit amputation and after complicated thumb amputation injuries only. For patients with simple and complicated thumb amputation injuries, and patients with complicated thumb amputation injuries only, longer emergency department wait times were associated with lower odds of replantation. In addition, being minority and having no insurance were associated with longer emergency department wait times; teaching hospitals were associated with shorter emergency department wait times; and finally, for patients with complicated thumb amputation injuries only, there was no association between patients' minority or insurance status and replantation. Variation in emergency department wait time and its effects on treatment of traumatic digit amputation may reflect maldistribution of hand or plastic surgeons with the required microsurgical skills among trauma centers across the United States. Therapeutic, III.

  11. Pain assessment by emergency nurses at triage in the emergency department: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuille, Marilène; Foerster, Maryline; Foucault, Eliane; Hugli, Olivier

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the assessment of pain intensity in the specific context of triage. Acute pain affects most patients admitted to emergency departments, but pain relief in this setting remains insufficient. Evaluation of pain and its treatment at the time of patient triage expedites the administration of analgesia, but may be awkward at this time-pressured moment. The assessment of pain intensity by a validated pain scale is a critical initial step, and a patient's self-reporting is widely considered as the key to effective pain management. According to good practice guidelines, clinicians must accept a patient's statement, regardless of their own opinions. A qualitative methodology rooted in interactionist sociology and on the Grounded theory was used to provide an opportunity to uncover complex decision-making processes, such as those involved in assessing pain. A sociologist conducted semi-structured interviews during the 2013-2014 winter months with twelve nurses and trained in the use of an established protocol, focusing on the assessment of pain intensity. The interviews were recorded, fully transcribed and analysed. The most frequently used pain scale was the Verbal Numerical Rating Scale. Discrepancies between self-assessment and evaluation by a nurse were common. To restore congruence between the two, nurses used various tactics, such as using different definitions of the high-end anchor of the scale, providing additional explanations about the scale, or using abnormal vital signs or the acceptance of morphine as a proof of the validity of severe pain ratings. Nurses cannot easily suspend their own judgement. Their tactics do not express a lack of professionalism, but are consistent with the logic of professional intervention. This article presents triage nurses' reality in a time-pressured environment, and understanding this conflict may outline new educational targets to further improve pain management in ED. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Predictors of psychiatric boarding in the pediatric emergency department: implications for emergency care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharff, Elizabeth A; Ginnis, Katherine B; Ross, Abigail M; Blood, Emily A

    2011-06-01

    Patients who present to the emergency department (ED) and require psychiatric hospitalization may wait in the ED or be admitted to a medical service because there are no available inpatient psychiatric beds. These patients are psychiatric "boarders." This study describes the extent of the boarder problem in a large, urban pediatric ED, compares characteristics of psychiatrically hospitalized patients with boarders, and compares predictors of boarding in 2 ED patient cohorts. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in 2007-2008. The main outcome measure was placement into a psychiatric facility or boarding. Predictors of boarding in the present analysis were compared with predictors from a similar study conducted in the same ED in 1999-2000. Of 461 ED patient encounters requiring psychiatric admission, 157 (34.1%) boarded. Mean and median boarding duration for the sample were 22.7(SD, 8.08) and 21.18 hours, respectively. Univariate generalized estimating equations demonstrated increased boarding odds for patients carrying Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition diagnoses of autism, mental retardation, and/or developmental delay (P = 0.01), presenting during the weekend (P = 0.03) or presenting during months without school vacation (P = 0.02). Suicidal ideation (SI) significantly predicted boarding status, with increased likelihood of boarding for severe SI (P = 0.02). Age, race, insurance status, and homicidal ideation did not significantly predict boarding in the 2007-2008 patient cohort, although they did in the earlier study. Systemic factors and SI predicted boarding status in both cohorts. Suicidal patients continue to board. Limits within the system, including timing of ED presentation and a dearth of specialized services, still exist, elevating the risk of boarding for some populations. Implications for pediatric ED psychiatric care delivery are discussed.

  13. Prevalence and record of alcoholism among emergency department patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Manozzo Boniatti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of alcoholism among inpatients, to identify social and demographic factors associated with this prevalence and to determine its rate of recognition by the medical team. METHODS: The study population consisted of all patients admitted to the emergency room at Hospital São Lucas, Porto Alegre, Brazil, between July and September of 2005. The data were collected in two steps: an interview with the patient and a review of the medical records to investigate the cases of alcoholism recorded by the medical team. The questionnaire consisted of questions concerning social and demographic data, smoking habits and Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. RESULTS: We interviewed 248 patients. Twenty-eight (11.3% were identified as alcoholics. Compared to the patients with a negative Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test value (less than 8, those with a positive Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test were more likely to be male, illiterate and smokers. The medical records of 217 (87.5% patients were reviewed. Only 5 (20.0% of the 25 patients with a positive Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test whose medical records were reviewed were identified as alcoholics by the medical team. The diagnosis made by the medical team, compared to Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, shows only a 20% sensitivity, 93% specificity and positive and negative predictive values of 29% and 90%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Alcoholism has been underrecognized in patients who are hospitalized, and, as such, this opportunity for possible early intervention is often lost. Key social and demographic factors could provide physicians with risk factors and, when used together with a standardized diagnostic instrument, could significantly improve the rate of identification of alcoholic patients.

  14. Factors Influencing Emergency Department Preference for Access to Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary T. Hawn

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: African-Americans are more likely than Caucasians to access healthcare through theemergency department (ED; however, the reasons behind this pattern are unclear. The objectiveis to investigate the effect of race, insurance, socioeconomic status, and perceived health on thepreference for ED use.Methods: This is a prospective study at a tertiary care ED from June to July 2009. Patients weresurveyed to capture demographics, healthcare utilization, and baseline health status. The primaryoutcome of interest was patient-reported routine place of healthcare. Other outcomes includedfrequency of ED visits in the previous 6 months, barriers to primary care and patient perception ofhealth using select questions from the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36.Results: Two hundred and ninety-two patients completed the survey of whom 58% were African-American and 44% were uninsured. African-Americans were equally likely to report 3 or more visitsto the ED, but more likely to state a preference for the ED for their usual place of care (24% vs.13%, p < 0.01. No significant differences between groups were found for barriers to primary care,including insurance. African-Americans less often reported comorbidities or hospitalization withinthe previous 6 months (23% vs. 34%, p = 0.04. On logistic regression modeling, African-Americanswere more than 2 times as likely to select the ED as their usual place of healthcare (OR 2.24, 95%CI 1.22 - 4.08.Conclusion: African-Americans, independent of health insurance, are more likely than Caucasiansto designate the ED as their routine place of healthcare.

  15. The introduction of the Manchester triage scale to an emergency department in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, J G

    2012-02-03

    Triage is an integral part of the modern emergency department. The use of a recognised triage system has many advantages for the emergency department including reference to a recognised decision-making structure and support in the form of a professionally accepted and validated system. As part of a programme of internal change the Manchester triage system (MTS) was introduced to an emergency department in the Republic of Ireland. This article outlines the introduction of this method of triage and cites the domestic and international drivers of the change.

  16. Emergency department diagnosis of supraspinatus tendon calcification and shoulder impingement syndrome using bedside ultrasonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A 45-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a 2-day history of severe left shoulder pain made worse with movement. Emergency department (ED) bedside point-of-care static and dynamic ultrasound examination of the supraspinatus tendon revealed supraspinatus tendon calcification with impingement syndrome, and the patient was urgently referred to orthopedics after ED pain control was achieved. Bedside shoulder and supraspinatus tendon evaluation with static and dynamic ultrasonography can assist in the rapid diagnosis of supraspinatus tendon calcification and supraspinatus tendon impingement syndrome in the emergency department. PMID:23398632

  17. Adverse drug events leading to emergency department visits at an eye hospital: A brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Safa; Mohebbi, Niayesh; Gholami, Kheirollah; Jabbarvand, Mahmoud

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate adverse drug events (ADEs) resulting in emergency department visits in an eye hospital. Emergency department visits at Farabi Eye Hospital were assessed for a 7-day period. The patients' eye disorders and drug history were evaluated to detect ADEs. Of 1631 emergency visits, 5 (0.3%, 95% CI: 0.13-0.71%) were drug related. Tetracaine eye drops accounted for 4 (80%, 95% CI: 38-96%) cases with corneal involvement. The other case was an intense conjunctival injection due to naphazoline eye drops. ADEs should be considered in differential diagnosis of ocular emergency problems and preventive measure should be considered.

  18. Thoracotomy in the emergency department for resuscitation of the mortally injured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiacomo, J Christopher; Angus, L D George

    2017-06-01

    Emergency department resuscitative thoracotomy is an intervention of last resort for the acutely dying victim of trauma. In light of improvements in pre-hospital emergency systems, improved operative strategies for survival such as damage control and improvements in critical care medicine, the most extreme of resuscitation efforts should be re-evaluated for the potential survivor, with success properly defined as the return of vital signs which allow transport of the patient to the operating room. A retrospective review of all patients at a suburban level I trauma center who underwent emergency department resuscitative thoracotomy as an adjunct to the resuscitation efforts normally delivered in the trauma receiving area over a 22 year period was performed. Survival of emergency department resuscitative thoracotomy was defined as restoration of vital signs and transport out of the trauma resuscitation area to the operating room. Sixty-eight patients were identified, of whom 27 survived the emergency department resuscitative thoracotomy and were transported to the operating room. Review of pre-hospital and initial hospital data between these potential long term survivors and those who died in the emergency department failed to demonstrate trends which were predictive of survival of emergency department resuscitative thoracotomy. The only subgroup which failed to respond to emergency department resuscitative thoracotomy was patients without signs of life at the scene who arrived to the treatment facility without signs of life. The patient population of the "potential survivor" has been expanded due to advances in critical care practices, technology, and surgical technique and every opportunity for survival should be provided at the outset. Emergency department resuscitative thoracotomy is warranted for any patient with thoracic or subdiaphragmatic trauma who presents in extremis with a history of signs of life at the scene or organized cardiac activity upon arrival

  19. [Prevention of cardiovascular complications associated with diabetes mellitus: hospital emergency department involvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo Villa, Teresa; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esther; Caurel Sastre, Zaida; Martín Martínez, Alfonso; Merinero Palomares, Raúl; Alvarez Rodríguez, Virginia; Portero Sánchez, Isabel

    2015-06-01

    To analyze the risk profile of patients with diabetes who seek care from hospital emergency departments and emergency department involvement in preventing cardiovascular complications in these patients. Cross-sectional analysis of case series from 2 Spanish hospital emergency departments. We included all patients with a history or final diagnosis of diabetes mellitus who were treated in the emergency department between November 1, 2010, and June 30, 2011. Each patient's cardiovascular risk profile was analyzed. The main outcome was the appropriate of prescribed treatment to prevent cardiovascular complications according to the 2012 guidelines of the American Diabetes Association on the patient's discharge from emergency care. A total of 298 patients were included; 275 (92%) had type II diabetes. Ninety percent of the series (269 patients) had at least 1 cardiovascular risk factor and 147 (49%) had prior target organ damage; target organ damage was newly diagnosed in 41 (14%). Fifty-eight percent (172 patients) were discharged home from the emergency department. Although 215 patients (72%) were not adhering to at least 1 previously prescribed preventive treatment and 30 (10%) were not adhering to any prescribed treatment, drug prescriptions were modified only in 1.1% to 3.3% of patients and no follow-up was recommended in 42 cases (24%). Although diabetic patients treated in emergency departments are at high risk for cardiovascular complications, their visit is not used to optimize preventive treatment for these complications or ensure appropriate follow-up.

  20. Modeling factors influencing the demand for emergency department services in ontario: a comparison of methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meaney Christopher

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency departments are medical treatment facilities, designed to provide episodic care to patients suffering from acute injuries and illnesses as well as patients who are experiencing sporadic flare-ups of underlying chronic medical conditions which require immediate attention. Supply and demand for emergency department services varies across geographic regions and time. Some persons do not rely on the service at all whereas; others use the service on repeated occasions. Issues regarding increased wait times for services and crowding illustrate the need to investigate which factors are associated with increased frequency of emergency department utilization. The evidence from this study can help inform policy makers on the appropriate mix of supply and demand targeted health care policies necessary to ensure that patients receive appropriate health care delivery in an efficient and cost-effective manner. The purpose of this report is to assess those factors resulting in increased demand for emergency department services in Ontario. We assess how utilization rates vary according to the severity of patient presentation in the emergency department. We are specifically interested in the impact that access to primary care physicians has on the demand for emergency department services. Additionally, we wish to investigate these trends using a series of novel regression models for count outcomes which have yet to be employed in the domain of emergency medical research. Methods Data regarding the frequency of emergency department visits for the respondents of Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS during our study interval (2003-2005 are obtained from the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS. Patients' emergency department utilizations were linked with information from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS which provides individual level medical, socio-demographic, psychological and behavioral information for

  1. Update on Emergency Department Visits Involving Energy Drinks: A Continuing Public Health Concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the risks involved with their use, gaining additional information about these beverages is important. The Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) is a public health surveillance system that monitors drug-related emergency department (ED) visits ...

  2. [Managing the discharge of diabetic patients from the emergency department: a consensus paper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuervo Pinto, Rafael; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esther; González Pérez de Villar, Noemí; Artola-Menéndez, Sara; Girbés Borrás, Juan; Mata-Cases, Manel; Galindo Rubio, Mercedes; Puig Larrosa, Juan; Muñoz Albert, Ricardo; Díaz Pérez, José Ángel

    2017-10-01

    Eighty to 90% of patients attended in emergency departments are discharged to home. Emergency department physicians are therefore responsible for specifying how these patients are treated afterwards. An estimated 30% to 40% of emergency patients have diabetes mellitus that was often decompensated or poorly controlled prior to the emergency. It is therefore necessary to establish antidiabetic treatment protocols that contribute to adequate metabolic control for these patients in the interest of improving the short-term prognosis after discharge. The protocols should also maintain continuity of outpatient care from other specialists and contribute to improving the long-term prognosis. This consensus paper presents the consensus of experts from 3 medical associations whose members are directly involved with treating patients with diabetes. The aim of the paper is to facilitate the assessment of antidiabetic treatment when the patient is discharged from the emergency department and referred to outpatient care teams.

  3. EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT (ED) OVERCROWDING: EVIDENCE-BASED ANSWERS TO FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    RJ Salway; R Valenzuela; JM Shoenberger; WK Mallon; A Viccellio

    2017-01-01

    Overcrowding in emergency departments is a problem in many countries around the world, including the United States and Chile. Emergency department (ED) overcrowding causes problems for patients and staff, including increased waiting times, increased ambulance diversion, increased length of stay, increased medical errors, increased patient mortality, and increased harm to hospitals due to financial losses. This article aims to describe the etiology of ED overcrowding and potential solutions th...

  4. Family-Witnessed Resuscitation: Perceptions of Nurses and Doctors Working in an Australian Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Rose; Watkins, Rochelle; Bushby, Angela; Combs, Shane

    2012-01-01

    Inconsistencies abound in the literature regarding staff attitudes and perceptions toward family-witnessed resuscitation. Our study builds on previous research by using a validated tool to investigate emergency department staff perceptions of family-witnessed resuscitation. A cross-sectional survey was distributed to 221 emergency department doctors' and nurses'. We found few differences between doctors and nurses perceptions toward family-witnessed resuscitation. Both nurses and doctors who ...

  5. Measuring emergency department crowding in an inner city hospital in The Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Anneveld, Martijn; van der Linden, Christien; Grootendorst, Diana; Galli-Leslie, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Background Overcrowding in the emergency department (ED) is an increasing problem worldwide. In The Netherlands overcrowding is not a major issue, although some urban hospitals struggle with increased throughput. In 2004, Weiss et al. created the NEDOCS tool (National Emergency Department Over Crowding Study), a web-based instrument to measure objective overcrowding with scores between 0 (not busy at all) to above 181 (disaster). In this study we tried to validate the accuracy of the NEDOCS t...

  6. Pseudologia Fantastica in the Emergency Department: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn Thom

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatrists commonly encounter deception in the emergency department. This article presents the case of a patient who presents to the emergency department with an unusual and elaborate web of deceptions along multiple themes including feigning medical illness, multiple losses, and grandiose academic and athletic achievements. We review the clinical characteristics of pseudologia fantastica and discuss how this patient’s constellation of malingering, factitious disorder, and personality disorder suggests this diagnosis.

  7. [The admittance to paediatric emergency departments of children and teenagers after a suicide attempt].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbarres, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Paediatric emergency departments frequently admit children and teenagers who have attempted suicide. Cases vary depending on the child's age with however some common risk factors, notably acute alcohol abuse. It is essential that adapted procedures are followed as soon as these youngsters arrive in the emergency department in order to help them feel secure. Afterwards, specific and compassionate care is provided in order to prepare them for their hospitalisation and treatment.

  8. Workplace violence in the emergency department in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    ALSHEHRI, WALEED MOHAMMED A.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored workplace violence among emergency department nurses and doctors in public hospitals in Saudi Arabia for the first time. Workplace violence is prevalent among nurses and doctors and it has physical, psychological and emotional impact. There is a lack of safety measures, precautions and management support for victims. Most staff feel vulnerable to violence in the next 12 months of employment. The findings will inform Emergency Department managements and the Ministry of H...

  9. Creation of a United States Emergency Medical Services Administration Within the Department of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    fragmentally shared amongst the three primary departments. Critics argue that: Unlike the fire service, with its home in the Department of Homeland...policy and measures.28 Already significantly impacted by overuse, emergency room diversions and healthcare facility shutdowns , EMS systems in the...Professionals During Disasters, Pandemics, and Other Extreme Emergencies,” Prepared for the American Nurses Association by the Center for Health Policy

  10. Lost in translation? How patients perceive the extended scope of physiotherapy in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaf, Sophie; Sheppard, Lorraine A

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the perceptions of emergency department physiotherapy practice by emergency patients in metropolitan and regional Australia with a view to probing how consumers interpret the place of physiotherapy in such an acute, non-traditional setting. A qualitative investigation using a descriptive open-ended questionnaire technique was administered to emergency patients in order to thematically analyse their perceptions of emergency physiotherapy practice. Case 1 was a metropolitan emergency department in Melbourne, Australia. Case 2 was a regional emergency department in North Queensland, Australia. A purposeful, convenience sample of 80 emergency department patients (n=40, Case 1; n=40, Case 2) responded to the open-ended questionnaire. Data were thematically analysed using NVivo software and manual analysis, facilitating constant case comparison, and were reflected upon continually within an interpretivist framework. Participants at both emergency departments had a general, but limited, awareness of the role of physiotherapy. Among multiple themes identified were six key domains which participants could recognise as being both the role of general physiotherapy and also relevant to the emergency setting. These were sports injury management, musculoskeletal care, rehabilitation and mobility, pain management, respiratory care and management of elderly patients. Discussions also involved those areas that were specific to general physiotherapy practice or emergency department care but which did not overlap. Participants in this study demonstrated a general, but limited, awareness of the scope of physiotherapy practice. There was strong identification of musculoskeletal-based interventions, with less familiarity with the potential role of physiotherapy in cardiorespiratory and rehabilitative management. Further research is needed on consumer awareness of the broader, less traditional roles of physiotherapy to increase acceptance and familiarity of its extended

  11. Utility, charge, and cost of inpatient and emergency department serum folate testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theisen-Toupal, Jesse; Horowitz, Gary L; Breu, Anthony C

    2013-02-01

    Serum folate levels are commonly ordered for multiple indications in the inpatient and emergency department settings. Since mandatory folic acid fortification in 1998, there has been a decreasing prevalence of folate deficiency in the United States. Our objective was to determine the indications, rate of deficiency, charge and cost per deficient result, and change in management per deficient result in serum folate testing in inpatients and emergency department patients. Retrospective analysis of all inpatient and emergency department serum folate tests. We analyzed all inpatient and emergency department serum folate tests performed over a 12-month period. We reviewed the charts of 250 patients and all low-normal or deficient serum folate levels to determine indications, comorbidities, and change in management based on result. Charge and cost analyses were performed. All inpatient and emergency department patients with a serum folate test performed at a major medical center in Boston, Massachusetts. A total of 2093 serum folate tests were performed in 1944 patients with 2 deficient levels. The most common indications were anemia without macrocytosis and anemia with macrocytosis. The amount charged per deficient result was $158,022. The cost to the hospital per deficient result was less than $2093. In folic acid fortified countries, serum folate testing has low utility and poor cost effectiveness for all indications in inpatients and emergency department patients. Copyright © 2012 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  12. Overcrowding and clinical risk in Emergency Departments. A model for the reduction in NEDOCS: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todisco, Celestino

    2015-09-14

    Overcrowding in Emergency Departments represents one of the main concerns in effective hospital management today. In order to reduce this phenomenon, this study experimented with a new organizational model that exploited available resources, without incurring additional costs. Through the redistribution of hospital beds, it was possible to reduce access blocks in the Emergency Department of the test hospital. The observational period of this study was of 120 days, and daily surveys of crowding were performed at predetermined intervals. The measurement of overcrowding was calculated utilizing the National Emergency Department Overcrowding Score. The findings reveal a significant reduction in overcrowding due to an increase of only 6 beds in the Emergency Department. Currently, it is known that the principle cause of overcrowding is attributed to a lack of hospital beds for inpatients. Numerous studies have shown that through the lengthening of inpatient hospitalizations it is possible to improve crowding levels in Emergency Department. This findings of this study robustly demonstrate that a small increase in the number of available beds available in emergency department leads to a decrease in all variables of the NEDOCS, and in particular, that of the severely and dangerous overcrowding score.

  13. Contributing factors of frequent use of the emergency department: A synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Timothy R

    2017-11-01

    Overcrowding in emergency departments is an issue that has a negative impact worldwide. As attendance in emergency departments has increased, the ability to provide critical services to patients suffering from actual medical emergencies in a timely manner has decreased as these departments are many times at or over capacity. One patient population whose negative influence has been researched with regard to their impact on the overcrowding issue is that of the frequent user. A search of two electronic databases was conducted to identify factors that frequent users state as their reasoning for using an emergency department. Peer reviewed articles in English were searched for in CINAHL Plus and PubMed, as well as a review of reference lists. A review of the literature identified two predominant factors related to frequent users in the emergency department: a lack of awareness of medical necessity and issues of access. To address the frequent users in emergency departments, implications for practice need to be explored and implemented. Implications for practice include education of medical necessity for the frequent users, expansion of the pre-hospital role in primary care and inappropriate use prevention, and improvement of access to alternative healthcare services. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 78 FR 25282 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security Federal Emergency Management Agency-008...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... Homeland Security (DHS)/Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)-008 System name: DHS/FEMA-008 Disaster... Management Information System- Individual Assistance (NEMIS-IA), and Enterprise Data Warehouse/ Operational... 1974; Department of Homeland Security Federal Emergency Management Agency--008 Disaster Recovery...

  15. Oxygen therapy for sepsis patients in the emergency department : a little less?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolmeijer, Renate; ter Maaten, Jan C.; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Ligtenberg, Jack J. M.

    Liberal oxygen therapy has been a cornerstone in the treatment of critically ill patients. Recently, awareness of hyperoxia toxicity has emerged. We investigated the partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood (PaO2) in sepsis patients admitted to the emergency department treated with a reduced

  16. [Chest pain in the emergency department : Differential diagnosis and diagnostic strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhnlein, T

    2017-01-01

    Chest pain as the leading symptom in emergency patients can have numerous causes and requires an immediate and targeted diagnostic and therapeutic strategy. Clinical scoring systems facilitate risk assessment for individual patients. In the emergency department, critical factors for success are defined professional qualification standards for physicians and nursing staff combined with a well-functioning organization of all technical procedures.

  17. Improving Emergency Department Triage Classification with Computerized Clinical Decision Support at a Pediatric Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisch, Joseph Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Emergency Severity Index (ESI) is an emergency department (ED) triage classification system based on estimated patient-specific resource utilization. Rules for a computerized clinical decision support (CDS) system based on a patient's chief complaint were developed and tested using a stochastic model for predicting ESI scores.…

  18. Adapting the I-PASS Handoff Program for Emergency Department Inter-Shift Handoffs

    OpenAIRE

    Heilman, James A; Flanigan, Moira; Nelson, Anna; Johnson, Tom; Yarris, Lalena M

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction Academic Emergency Department (ED) handoffs are high-risk transfer of care events. Emergency medicine residents are inadequately trained to handle these vital transitions. We aimed to explore what modifications the I-PASS (Illness severity, Patient summary, Action list, Situation awareness and contingency plans, and Synthesis by receiver) handoff system requires to be effectively modified for use in ED inter-...

  19. The use of high‐flow nasal cannula in the pediatric emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine N. Slain

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: High‐flow nasal cannula should be considered for pediatric emergency department patients with respiratory distress not requiring immediate endotracheal intubation; prospective, pediatric emergency department‐specific trials are needed to better determine responsive patient populations, ideal high‐flow nasal cannula settings, and comparative efficacy vs. other respiratory support modalities.

  20. Clinical review: Emergency department overcrowding and the potential impact on the critically ill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Robert M; Trzeciak, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Critical care constitutes a significant and growing proportion of the practice of emergency medicine. Emergency department (ED) overcrowding in the USA represents an emerging threat to patient safety and could have a significant impact on the critically ill. This review describes the causes and effects of ED overcrowding; explores the potential impact that ED overcrowding has on care of the critically ill ED patient; and identifies possible solutions, focusing on ED based critical care. PMID:15987383

  1. 75 FR 32855 - Safety Zone; Pierce County, WA, Department of Emergency Management, Regional Water Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Pierce County, WA, Department of Emergency Management, Regional Water Exercise AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Pierce County, Washington, Department of... immediate action is necessary to ensure safety of participants in the Pierce County Regional Water Rescue...

  2. Determining the Optimum Number of Nursing Staff Is Needed in Kerman Shafa Hospital Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S NooriHekmat

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: The results indicated that the emergency department of the studied hospital is facing with nurse shortage, particularly at night shift. Solutions to fit the number of nurses with patients in this emergency department can be classified in two areas of demand and supply of emergency services at different hours of day. Since only the early hours of the night shift is faced with large numbers of patients, the rational allocation of overtime to the evening shift nursing staff can be helpful. Furthermore, the hospital can correctly implement the triage nursing so that patient with high priority will serve at the best time.

  3. [The department of interdisciplinary emergency medicine: organization, structure and process optimization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Michael; Pietsch, Christian; Gries, André

    2009-06-01

    The essential tasks of a department of interdisciplinary emergency medicine are the initial triage and assessment of vital function as well as the subsequent organization und initiation of emergency treatment. A previously defined set of diagnostic and therapeutic measures is carried out before the patient is allocated to an in-hospital clinical service and is admitted to a ward. Moreover, diagnosis and treatment for outpatients are performed. "Time" is a critical factor to be considered for all organizational and structural aspects of a department of interdisciplinary emergency medicine.

  4. Emergency Department Utilization and Self-Reported Symptoms in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Patricia; Kennedy, Richard; Williams, Courtney; Brown, Cynthia J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The rise in emergency department (ED) utilization among older adults is a nursing concern, because emergency nurses are uniquely positioned to positively impact the care of older adults. Symptoms have been associated with ED utilization, however, it remains unclear if symptoms are the primary reason for ED utilization. Purpose Describe the self-reported symptoms of community-dwelling older adults prior to accessing the emergency department. Examine the differences in self-reported symptoms among those who utilized the emergency department, and those who did not. Procedures A prospective longitudinal design was used. The sample included 403 community-dwelling older adults 75 years and older. Baseline in-home interviews were conducted followed by monthly telephone interviews over 15 months. Main Findings Commonly reported symptoms at baseline included pain, feeling tired, and having shortness of breath. In univariate analysis, pain, shortness of breath, fair/poor well-being, and feeling tired were significantly correlated with ED utilization. In multivariable models, problems with balance, and fair/poor well-being were significantly associated with ED utilization. Conclusions Several symptoms were common among this cohort of older adults. However, there were no significant differences in the types of symptoms reported by older adults who utilized the emergency department compared to those who did not use the emergency department. Based on these findings, symptoms among community-dwelling older adults may not be the primary reason for ED utilization. PMID:28131350

  5. Propofol for procedural sedation and analgesia reduced dedicated emergency nursing time while maintaining safety in a community emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Joshua C; Abraham, Michael K; Barrueto, Fermin F; Lemkin, Daniel L; Hirshon, Jon M

    2013-09-01

    Procedural sedation and analgesia is a core competency in emergency medicine. Propofol is replacing midazolam in many emergency departments. Barriers to performing procedural sedation include resource utilization. We hypothesized that emergency nursing time is shorter with propofol than midazolam, without increasing complications. Retrospective analysis of a procedural sedation registry for two community emergency departments with combined census of 100,000 patients/year. Demographics, procedure, and ASA physical classification status of adult patients receiving procedural sedation between 2007-2010 with midazolam or propofol were analyzed. Primary outcome was dedicated emergency nursing time. Secondary outcomes were procedural success, ED length of stay, and complication rate. Comparative statistics were performed with Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, chi-square, or Fisher's exact test. Linear regression was performed with log-transformed procedural sedation time to define predictors. Of 328 procedural sedation and analgesia, 316 met inclusion criteria, of which 60 received midazolam and 256 propofol. Sex distribution varied between groups (midazolam 3% male; propofol 55% male; P = 0.04). Age, procedure, and ASA status were not significantly different. Propofol had shorter procedural sedation time (propofol 32.5 ± 24.2 minutes; midazolam 78.7 ± 51.5 minutes; P procedural success (propofol 98%; midazolam 92%; P = 0.02). There were no significant differences between complication rates (propofol 14%; midazolam 13%; P = 0.88) or emergency department length of stay (propofol 262.5 ± 132.8 minutes; midazolam 288.6 ± 130.6 minutes; P = 0.09). Use of propofol resulted in shorter emergency nursing time and higher procedural success rate than midazolam with a comparable safety profile. Copyright © 2013 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Screening for Suicidal Ideation and Attempts among Emergency Department Medical Patients: Instrument and Results from the Psychiatric Emergency Research Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael H.; Abar, Beau W.; McCormick, Mark; Barnes, Donna H.; Haukoos, Jason; Garmel, Gus M.; Boudreaux, Edwin D.

    2013-01-01

    Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal 15 calls for organizations "to identify patients at risk for suicide." Overt suicidal behavior accounts for 0.6% of emergency department (ED) visits, but incidental suicidal ideation is found in 3%-11.6%. This is the first multicenter study of suicide screening in EDs. Of 2,243 patients in…

  7. [Evidence of the validity of the Emergency Severity Index for triage in a general hospital emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Ruipérez, Tomás; Leal Costa, César; Adánez Martínez, María de Gracia; García Pérez, Bartolomé; Nova López, Daniel; Díaz Agea, José Luis

    2015-10-01

    To determine whether the Emergency Severity Index (ESI) is valid for triage according to evidence based on classifying real patients in a general referral hospital's emergency department. Observational, cross-sectional descriptive study carried out in the emergency department of Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca in Murcia. Thirty-two nurses used the ESI algorithm to triage 410 patients as they arrived seeking care. The results were compared to a gold standard (a triage expert's opinion, which was later confirmed by an expert committee after discussion, if necessary, of cases for which opinions were not unanimous). We calculated sensitivity, specificity, under- and over-triage rates, as well as descriptive statistics about resource assignment, exitus, patients who left without being seen, destination on discharge, and times. ESI was highly correlated with resources (ρ = -0.717, P < .01) and moderately correlated with destination on discharge (ρ = -0.437, P < .01). Regarding time spent in the department, we found that patients assigned ESI levels 1 and 2 had significantly longer stays, and those assigned ESI levels 4 and 5 had significantly shorter stays (p < 0,001). Interobserver agreement was good or very good, indicating that this triage tool is reliable. This pilot of the ESI triage algorithm in the emergency department of a referral hospital found evidence supporting the system's validity.

  8. The Performance of the Pediatric Trauma Score in a Pediatric Emergency Department: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Anıl

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of the Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS in predicting significant trauma in patients presenting with blunt trauma to a high-level pediatric emergency department. Methods: Patients younger than 15 years of age presenting to the pediatric emergency department of the Tepecik Training and Research Hospital with acute high-energy blunt trauma were analyzed prospectively. The PTS was calculated on arrival at the pediatric emergency department. The patients were classified into two groups as follows: patients with a PTS of ≤8 comprised the significant trauma group, while patients with a PTS of >8 made up the non- significant trauma group. Results: Two-hundred-thirteen children with a mean age of 6.1±3.9 years (range: 10 days-15 years were included in the study. The frequency of coagulation testing and thorax computed tomography in the pediatric emergency department, need for critical interventions and therapies in the pediatric emergency department, rate of hospitalization, need for transfer to the pediatric intensive care unit, mechanical ventilation, operation, blood transfusion, and mortality rate were statistically higher in the significant trauma group (p<0.05. PTS ≤8 exhibited a sensitivity of 56.2% and a specificity of 90.8% for hospitalization (AUROC: 0.682; 95% confidence interval: 0.610-0.755. The PTS was significantly correlated with length of hospital stay (r=-0.493; p<0.001 and length of observation in the pediatric emergency department (r=-0.442; p<0.01. Conclusion: PTS on arrival at a high-level pediatric emergency department is a good predictor of the need for critical interventions/therapies and mortality in children with high-energy blunt trauma. However, its accuracy is moderate for the prediction of hospitalization.

  9. Trauma in elderly patients evaluated in a hospital emergency department in Konya, Turkey: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara H

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hasan Kara,1 Aysegul Bayir,1 Ahmet Ak,1 Murat Akinci,1 Necmettin Tufekci,1 Selim Degirmenci,1 Melih Azap21Department of Emergency Medicine, Selçuk University, Konya, Turkey; 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Konya Numune Hospital, Konya, TurkeyPurpose: Trauma is a common cause of admission to the hospital emergency department. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cause of admission, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of patients aged ≥65 years admitted to an emergency department in Turkey because of blunt trauma.Materials and methods: Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for 568 patients (314 women and 254 men aged ≥65 years who were admitted to an emergency department of a tertiary care hospital.Results: Trauma was caused by low-energy fall in 379 patients (67%, traffic accident in 79 patients (14%, high-energy fall in 69 patients (12%, and other causes in 41 patients (7%. The most frequent sites of injury were the lower extremity, thorax, upper extremity, and head. The femur was the most frequent fracture site. After evaluation in the emergency department, 377 patients (66% were hospitalized. There were 31 patients (5% who died. Risk of hospitalization after trauma was significantly associated with trauma to the lower extremity, thorax, and spine; fractures of the femur and rib; and intracranial injury.Conclusion: Emergency department admission after trauma in patients aged $65 years is common after low-energy falls, and most injuries occur to the extremities. It is important to focus on prevention of falls to decrease the frequency of trauma in the elderly.Keywords: fall, femur, fracture, injury

  10. Demographic, Seasonal, and Geographic Differences in Emergency Department Visits for Epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaaban, Mohamad R; Zhang, Dong; Resto, Vicente; Goodwin, James S

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the demographics and seasonal and geographic variation of epistaxis in the United States. Study Design Retrospective cohort analysis based on data from Medicare claims. Setting Emergency department visits. Subjects and Methods We used a 5% sample of Medicare data from January 2012 to December 2012. Our cohort included patients with an incident diagnosis of epistaxis during a visit to the emergency department, excluding those with a diagnosis in the prior 12 months. Demographics included age, sex, race, and ethnicity. We compared the rate of emergency department visits for epistaxis by geographic division and individual states. Results In the 5% sample of Medicare data, 4120 emergency department visits for incident epistaxis were identified in 2012. Our results showed an increase in the emergency department visits for epistaxis with age. Compared with patients 85 years old were 1.36 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.23-1.50), 2.37 (95% CI, 2.14-2.62), and 3.24 (95% CI, 2.91-3.62) more likely to present with epistaxis, respectively. Men were 1.24 (95% CI, 1.17-1.32) times more likely to present with epistaxis than women. Blacks were 1.23 (95% CI, 1.10-1.36) times more likely to present with epistaxis when compared with non-Hispanic whites. Epistaxis emergency department visits were 40% lower in the summer months versus winter. The seasonal variation was more pronounced in the northern versus southern United States. Conclusion Emergency department visits for epistaxis increase with age and appear to be seasonal, with a more pronounced variation in the northern versus southern United States.

  11. Fabulous award for staffing app.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-02

    A safe staffing app giving up-to-date information on the number of nurses on the wards at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust scooped top prize at the inaugural Academy of Fabulous NHS Stuffawards in London last week.

  12. Impact of staffing parameters on operational reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.A.; Houghton, F.K.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on a project related to human resource management of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) High-Level Waste (HLW) Tank program. Safety and reliability of waste tank operations is impacted by several issues, including not only the design of the tanks themselves, but also how operations and operational personnel are managed. As demonstrated by management assessments performed by the Tiger Teams, DOE believes that the effective use of human resources impacts environment safety, and health concerns. For the of the current paper, human resource management activities are identified as ''Staffing'' and include the of developing the functional responsibilities and qualifications of technical and administrative personnel. This paper discusses the importance of staff plans and management in the overall view of safety and reliability. The work activities and procedures associated with the project, a review of the results of these activities, including a summary of the literature and a preliminary analysis of the data. We conclude that although identification of staffing issues and the development of staffing plans contributes to the overall reliability and safety of the HLW tanks, the relationship is not well understood and is in need of further development

  13. Impact of staffing parameters on operational reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.A.; Houghton, F.K.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on a project related to human resource management of the Department of Energy (DOEs) High-Level Waste (HLW) Tank program. Safety and reliability of waste tank operations is impacted by several issues, including not only the design of the tanks themselves, but also how operations and operational personnel are managed. As demonstrated by management assessments performed by the Tiger Teams, DOE believes that the effective use of human resources impacts environment, safety, and health concerns. For the purposes of the current paper, human resource management activities are identified as 'Staffing' and include the process of developing the functional responsibilities and qualifications of technical and administrative personnel. This paper discusses the importance of staff plans and management in the overall view of safety and reliability, the work activities and procedures associated with the project, a review of the results of these activities, including a summary of the literature and a preliminary analysis of the data. We conclude that, although identification of staffing issues and the development of staffing plans contributes to the overall reliability and safety of the HLW tanks, the relationship is not well understood and is in need of further development

  14. Emergency Department overcrowding and ambulance diversion: the impact and potential solutions of extended boarding of admitted patients in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshaker, Jonathan S; Rathlev, Niels K

    2006-04-01

    Emergency Department (ED) crowding and ambulance diversion have been increasingly significant national problems for more than a decade. Surveys of hospital directors have reported overcrowding in almost every state and 91% of hospital ED directors report overcrowding as a problem. The problem has developed because of multiple factors in the past 20 years, including a steady downsizing in hospital capacity, closures of a significant number of EDs, increased ED volume, growing numbers of uninsured, and deceased reimbursement for uncompensated care. Initial position statements from major organizations, including JCAHO and the General Accounting Office, suggested the problem of overcrowding was due to inappropriate use of emergency services by those with no urgent conditions, probably cyclical, and needed no specific policy response. More recently, the same and other organizations have more forcefully highlighted the problem of overcrowding and focused on the inability to transfer emergency patients to inpatient beds as the single most important factor contributing to ED overcrowding. This point has been further solidified by initial overcrowding research. This article will review how overcrowding occurred with a focus on the significance and potential remedies of extended boarding of admitted patients in the Emergency Department.

  15. Emergency nurses' knowledge and self-rated practice skills when caring for older patients in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Helen; Bennett, Paul N; Ockerby, Cherene; Hutchinson, Alison M; Considine, Julie

    2017-11-01

    Older adults are high users of emergency department services and their care requirements can present challenges for emergency nurses. Although clinical outcomes for older patients improve when they are cared for by nurses with specialist training, emergency nurses' knowledge and self-assessment of care for older patients is poorly understood. To assess emergency nurses' knowledge and self-rating of practice when caring for older patients. A cross-sectional self-report survey of emergency nurses (n=101) in Melbourne, Australia. Mean scores were 12.7 (SD 2.66) for the 25-item knowledge of older persons questionnaire, and 9.04 (SD 1.80) for the 15-item gerontic health related questions. Scores were unaffected by years of experience as a registered nurse or emergency nurse. More than 80% of nurses rated themselves as 'very good' or 'good' in assessing pain (94.9%), identifying delirium (87.8%), and identifying dementia (82.8%). Areas with a 'poor' ratings were identifying depression (46.5%), assessing polypharmacy (46.5%) and assessing nutrition (37.8%). There was variation in knowledge and self-rating of practice related to care of older patients. The relationship between knowledge and self-ratings of practice in relation to actual emergency nursing care of older people and patient outcomes warrants further exploration. Copyright © 2017 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Jaundice in the emergency department: meeting the challenges of diagnosis and treatment [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Todd; Wheatley, Matthew; Gupta, Nachi; Nusbaum, Jeffrey

    2018-03-01

    There are approximately 52,000 visits a year to emergency departments for patients presenting with jaundice. While many of these patients will not have immediately life-threatening pathology, it is essential that the emergency clinician understands the pathophysiology of jaundice, as this will guide the appropriate workup to detect critical diagnoses. Patients who present with jaundice could require intravenous antibiotics, emergent surgery, and, in severe cases, organ transplantation. This issue will focus on the challenge of evaluating and treating the jaundiced patient in the ED using the best available evidence from the literature. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice.].

  17. Detection of child abuse in emergency departments: a multi-centre study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louwers, Eveline C F M; Korfage, Ida J; Affourtit, Marjo J; Scheewe, Dop J H; van de Merwe, Marjolijn H; Vooijs-Moulaert, Francoise A F S R; Woltering, Claire M C; Jongejan, Mieke H T M; Ruige, Madelon; Moll, Henriëtte A; De Koning, Harry J

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study examines the detection rates of suspected child abuse in the emergency departments of seven Dutch hospitals complying and not complying with screening guidelines for child abuse. Design Data on demographics, diagnosis and suspected child abuse were collected for all children aged ≤18 years who visited the emergency departments over a 6-month period. The completion of a checklist of warning signs of child abuse in at least 10% of the emergency department visits was considered to be compliance with screening guidelines. Results A total of 24 472 visits were analysed, 54% of which took place in an emergency department complying with screening guidelines. Child abuse was suspected in 52 children (0.2%). In 40 (77%) of these 52 cases, a checklist of warning signs had been completed compared with a completion rate of 19% in the total sample. In hospitals complying with screening guidelines for child abuse, the detection rate was higher (0.3%) than in those not complying (0.1%, pchild abuse in 0.2% of all children visiting the emergency department of seven Dutch hospitals. The numbers of suspected abuse cases detected were low, but an increase is likely if uniform screening guidelines are widely implemented. PMID:21278429

  18. Difficult airway equipment in departments of emergency medicine in Ireland: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, K; Cummins, F

    2004-02-01

    Adverse effects associated with difficult airway management can be catastrophic and include death, brain injury and myocardial injury. Closed-malpractice claims have shown prolonged and persistent attempts at endotracheal intubation to be the most common situation leading to disastrous respiratory events. To date, there has been no evaluation of the types of difficult airway equipment currently available in Irish departments of emergency medicine. The objective of this survey was to identify the difficult airway equipment available in Irish departments of emergency medicine. Departments of emergency medicine in the Republic of Ireland with at least one dedicated Emergency Medicine consultant were surveyed via telephone. All of the departments contacted held at least one alternative device on site for both ventilation and intubation. The most common alternative ventilation device was the laryngeal mask airway (89%). The most common alternative intubating device was the surgical airway device (100%). Irish departments of emergency medicine compare well with those in the UK and USA, when surveyed concerning difficult airway equipment. However, we believe that this situation could be further improved by training inexperienced healthcare providers in the use of the laryngeal mask airway and intubating laryngeal mask airway, by placing greater emphasis on the ready availability of capnography and by the increased use of portable difficult airway storage units.

  19. Accuracy of general practitioner medication histories for patients presenting to the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Simone; Welch, Susan; Harding, Andrew; Abbott, Leonie; Riyat, Baljit; Morrow, Mel; Lawrence, Dona; Rodda, Sheridan; Heward, Sarah

    2014-10-01

    Clinical handover and obtaining best possible medication histories (BPMH) at transition points in care are key patient safety pri-orities. This study aimed to determine the accuracy of medication histories documented on general practitioner (GP) referral letters for patients referred to emergency departments. This was a multicentre prospective observational study in eight emergency departments. Patients taking ≥1 regular medication, referred to the emergency department with a GP letter and seen by a pharmacist were included. GP medication regimens were compared with BPMH documented by the emergency department pharmacist. Of the GP letters (total 414), 361 (87%) had one or more discrepancies in the patients' regular medications and 62% had one or more regular medication discrepancies of moderate-high significance. Omission of medication was more prevalent in hand-written letters (P DISCUSSION: GP referral letters should not be used in isolation to determine the medication regimen taken before an emergency department presentation. Interventions are indicated to improve awareness and accuracy of medication documentation.

  20. Forensic patients in the emergency department: Who are they and how should we care for them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filmalter, Celia J; Heyns, T; Ferreira, R

    2017-10-16

    Patients who suffer violent, crime related injuries are likely to seek medical assistance in emergency departments. Forensic patients may not disclose the cause of their injuries leading to the impairment of evidence. We explored healthcare providers' perceptions of forensic patients and how they should be cared for. The perceptions of physicians and nurses regarding the profiles and care of forensic patients were explored in three urban emergency departments. The data were collected through a talking wall and analysed collaboratively, with the participants, using content analysis. Healthcare providers in emergency departments differentiated between living and deceased forensic patients. Healthcare providers identified living forensic patients as victims of sexual assault, assault, gunshots and stab wounds, and abused children. Deceased patients included patients that were dead on arrival or died in the emergency departments. Healthcare providers acknowledged that evidence should be collected, preserved and documented. Every trauma patient in the emergency department should be treated asa forensic patient until otherwise proven. If healthcare providers are unable to identify forensic patients and collect the evidence present, the patients' human right to justice will be violated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of Pain Management in Pediatric Emergency Department in Mashhad -Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadshah Farhat

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pain may be described as a sensation of hurt or strong discomfort and is the body's way of sending message to the brain that an injury has occurred. Pain medicines block these messages or reduce their effect on the brain. Accurate administration of analgesia have a long –lasting effect on children whole experience of medical care and affects parents' and children's future reaction to pediatrics emergency departments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pain management on children in our emergency department. Materials and Methods: In this study we evaluated the relief of pain and anxiety on 100 children who referred to our pediatric Emergency Department (ED in Imam Reza Hospital- Mashhad .The patients were assessed based on the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP recommendations about pain.  Results: Patients were gone under IV Line 97%, Intubation 5% and Lumbar Puncture 28%. Training had been provided to 70% participants in the Emergency Department. Nonpharmacologic stress reduction was used in 35% of cases. Family presence was allowed only in 5%. Prehospital pain controlling was began on 20% of patients and continued in ED on 40%. At the time of discharge 40% prescribed analgesics. Sedation and pain prophylaxis was provided for 10% of patients undergoing painful procedures in ED.  Conclusion: According to results, pain management in our Pediatric Emergency Department was inadequate. Physicians and prehospital EMS providers should be justified about the importance of pain relieving and trained how to use all available analgesic and sedative options.

  2. Difficult airway equipment in departments of emergency medicine in Ireland: results of a national survey.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, K

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Adverse effects associated with difficult airway management can be catastrophic and include death, brain injury and myocardial injury. Closed-malpractice claims have shown prolonged and persistent attempts at endotracheal intubation to be the most common situation leading to disastrous respiratory events. To date, there has been no evaluation of the types of difficult airway equipment currently available in Irish departments of emergency medicine. The objective of this survey was to identify the difficult airway equipment available in Irish departments of emergency medicine. METHODS: Departments of emergency medicine in the Republic of Ireland with at least one dedicated Emergency Medicine consultant were surveyed via telephone. RESULTS: All of the departments contacted held at least one alternative device on site for both ventilation and intubation. The most common alternative ventilation device was the laryngeal mask airway (89%). The most common alternative intubating device was the surgical airway device (100%). CONCLUSIONS: Irish departments of emergency medicine compare well with those in the UK and USA, when surveyed concerning difficult airway equipment. However, we believe that this situation could be further improved by training inexperienced healthcare providers in the use of the laryngeal mask airway and intubating laryngeal mask airway, by placing greater emphasis on the ready availability of capnography and by the increased use of portable difficult airway storage units.

  3. Factors that influence the development of compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction in emergency department nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsaker, Stacie; Chen, Hsiu-Chin; Maughan, Dale; Heaston, Sondra

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to determine the prevalence of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout in emergency department nurses throughout the United States and (b) to examine which demographic and work-related components affect the development of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout in this nursing specialty. This was a nonexperimental, descriptive, and predictive study using a self-administered survey. Survey packets including a demographic questionnaire and the Professional Quality of Life Scale version 5 (ProQOL 5) were mailed to 1,000 selected emergency nurses throughout the United States. The ProQOL 5 scale was used to measure the prevalence of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout among emergency department nurses. Multiple regression using stepwise solution was employed to determine which variables of demographics and work-related characteristics predicted the prevalence of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout. The α level was set at .05 for statistical significance. The results revealed overall low to average levels of compassion fatigue and burnout and generally average to high levels of compassion satisfaction among this group of emergency department nurses. The low level of manager support was a significant predictor of higher levels of burnout and compassion fatigue among emergency department nurses, while a high level of manager support contributed to a higher level of compassion satisfaction. The results may serve to help distinguish elements in emergency department nurses' work and life that are related to compassion satisfaction and may identify factors associated with higher levels of compassion fatigue and burnout. Improving recognition and awareness of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout among emergency department nurses may prevent emotional exhaustion and help identify interventions that will help nurses remain empathetic and

  4. Risk of influenza transmission in a hospital emergency department during the week of highest incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Esteve, Miguel; Bautista-Rentero, Daniel; Zanón-Viguer, Vicente

    2018-02-01

    To estimate the risk of influenza transmission in patients coming to a hospital emergency department during the week of highest incidence and to analyze factors associated with transmission. Retrospective observati