WorldWideScience

Sample records for staff training programmes

  1. Assessment of Non-Professional Staff Training programme In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The type of training available to them include job orientation, formal in-service training, job rotation, typewriting, computer training, Factors like lack of finance, poor remuneration for teachers, delay in releasing the results, lack of basic teaching facilities, lukewarm attitude of staff militate against effective establishment of ...

  2. A 'Communication and Patient Safety' training programme for all healthcare staff: can it make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peter; Allen, Kellie; Daly, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Communication breakdown is a factor contributing to most cases of patient harm, and this harm continues to occur at unacceptable levels. Responding to this evidence, the Metro South District of Queensland Health (Australia) has developed a communication skills training programme titled 'Communication and Patient Safety'. The three modules, each lasting 3½ h, cover both staff-to-patient and staff-to-staff communication issues, and an unusual feature is that clinical and non-clinical staff attend together. Following positive evaluation data from our initial pilot programme (involving 350 staff in a single hospital), the programme was expanded to all five hospitals in the district, and has now been completed by over 3000 staff. The results show that despite the significant time commitment, participants find the courses useful and relevant (Kirkpatrick level 1), they learn and retain new material (level 2), and they report changes in behaviour at individual, team and facility levels (level 3). Although it remains a challenge to obtain quantitative data showing that training such as this directly improves patient safety (level 4), our qualitative and informal feedback indicates that participants and their managers perceive clear improvements in the 'communication culture' after a workplace team has attended the courses. Improving 'communication for safety' in healthcare is a worldwide imperative, and other healthcare jurisdictions should be able to obtain similar results to ours if they develop and support interactive, non-didactic training in communication skills.

  3. Evaluation of a Staff Training Programme using Positive Psychology coaching with film and theatre elements in care homes: views and attitudes of residents, staff and relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Azucena; Wenborn, Jennifer; Ledgerd, Ritchard; Orrell, Martin

    2017-03-01

    There is a recognised need to improve staff training in care homes. The aim of this study was to conduct a qualitative evaluation of the Ladder to the Moon Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme (CCSEP), a staff training programme aimed at enhancing staff-resident communication. Focus groups were conducted with residents able to provide consent; staff and relatives and managers were interviewed in two care homes. A theoretical framework was developed to interpret the impact of CCSEP using Framework Analysis. Residents noted that the programme appeared to result in staff interacting more with them, as well as enjoying working together as a team. Staff reported an improved sense of teamwork, developing more positive attitudes towards residents, as well as their concerns about using theatrical techniques in the care setting. Relatives identified care home organisational aspects as being barriers to implementation, and some regarded CCSEP simply as 'entertainment' rather than 'creative care'. This study provides an insight into the potential of this staff training programme to improve staff-resident interactions. However, participants' varying views of CCSEP highlight the need to brief staff, residents and relatives before implementation so as to enable full understanding of the aim. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Outcomes in knowledge, attitudes and confidence of nursing staff working in nursing and residential care homes following a dementia training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Anthony; Scerri, Charles

    2017-11-08

    Dementia training programmes for staff working in long-term care settings have been found to be effective in improving staff outcomes. This study investigated the impact of a dementia training programme for all Maltese nursing staff working in public nursing/residential homes on their knowledge, attitudes and confidence. Additionally, we identified the predictors of these domains before and after the programme. A 14-hour training programme focusing on dementia management, care and policy was developed for all nursing staff working in public nursing and residential homes in Malta. A pretest-posttest design was used to evaluate the participants' knowledge of dementia, attitudes and confidence in working with residents with dementia using validated tools. Demographic variables were measured and compared with each staff domain. The majority of nursing staff attended the training programme with 261 fully completed questionnaires being collected pre-training and 214 post-training. The programme significantly improved nursing staff knowledge, attitudes and confidence. Stepwise regression analysis of each staff domain showed that the strongest predictor in all models at pre-training was the intensity of previous training programmes. Furthermore, staff who attended previous training continued to improve in their attitudes and confidence following programme completion. The study continues to shed further evidence on the impact of dementia training programs on staff outcomes. It also indicated that the intensity of previous participation in dementia training programmes was related to the participants' knowledge, attitudes and confidence and that continual exposure to training had a cumulative effect.

  5. Evaluation of the 'Ladder to the Moon, Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme' staff training: Two quasi-experimental case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Azucena; Wenborn, Jennifer; Swinson, Tom; Orrell, Martin

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of the CCSEP on care home staff in two care settings for older people in one nursing home and one residential home. Care homes provide personal care and accommodation for older people. The English Dementia Strategy aims to improve the quality of service provision for people with dementia. This includes specific mention of improving the quality of life in care homes and as such includes objectives related to developing the workforce knowledge and skills. The Ladder to the Moon Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme (CCSEP) is a staff training approach based on the Positive Psychology framework that uses theatre- and film-based activities. This study used a wait-list controlled design. However, the data analysis plan was amended to reflect difficulties in data collection, and a quasi-experimental case study approach was consequently utilised. Outcome measures for staff attitudes and beliefs were as follows: Sense of Competence in Dementia Care Staff; Approaches to Dementia Questionnaire; Job Satisfaction Index; Brief Learning Transfer System Inventory; and Scale of Positive and Negative Experience. The Quality of Interaction Schedule (QUIS) was used to observe changes in staff-resident interaction. Fifty staff in two care homes completed the questionnaires and forty-one undertook formal CCSEP training. In Home A (nursing home), there was no significant change in any of the measures. In Home B (residential home), the QUIS showed an increase in positive interactions post intervention; a significant increase in the Building Relationship subscale of Sense of Competence; and a significant increase in staff sense of hopefulness towards people with dementia. The Brief Learning Transfer System Inventory showed a significant decrease post-intervention. The intervention did not significantly affect the happiness or job satisfaction of care home staff. The results of this study provide tentative evidence about the efficacy of this staff training

  6. Mental health knowledge and skills among preschool nurseries' staff in Alexandria and the effect of an in-service training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Din, Amira G Self; Shokeir, Nagwa Fouad; Ziady, Hany Hassan

    2002-01-01

    Day care centres and kindergartens, have potential effects on children's physical, social and mental developments. The present study was carried out to assess the knowledge and skills of nurseries' staff in Alexandria as regard child mental health, and to evaluate the outcome of an in-service child mental health training programme. For this purpose 10% of the registered nurseries in Alexandria were selected by the stratified random sampling technique using proportional allocation (n = 54) to represent the six districts of Alexandria. Data were collected from all staff members of selected nurseries present during the visits to the nurseries (n = 172). A self-administered questionnaire was used and including general information about the respondents, and their knowledge and skills regarding child mental health. From the total sample, 52 were randomly selected to attend a 2-day in-service mental health training programme. Results of the study revealed deficiency of knowledge and skills of the staff in most of the tested items. However, staff who were graduates of Faculties of Kindergarten, Education and Arts were significantly better than other educational categories regarding the number of correct or partially correct answers. The training programme proved to cause a significant improvement in knowledge and skills of the staff in most of the items. It was recommended to increase the staff who have educational background of kindergarten and education, to give more attention to continuous evaluation of nurseries' staff knowledge and skills, and to apply a maintained system of pre and in-service child mental health training programmes for them.

  7. A study into the effectiveness of a postural care training programme aimed at improving knowledge, understanding and confidence in parents and school staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotham, S; Hamilton-West, K E; Hutton, E; King, A; Abbott, N

    2017-09-01

    Parents and school staff lack knowledge and confidence when providing postural care to physically disabled children. This can act as a barrier to the successful implementation of therapy. To address this problem, we developed a novel training programme to improve knowledge and confidence in providing postural care and evaluate the impact of the training programme in parents and school staff. The postural care training programme included three elements: a 2-h interactive workshop facilitated by physiotherapists and occupational therapists, a follow-up home/school visit and a follow-up telephone call. The Understanding, Knowledge and Confidence in Providing Postural Care for Children with Disabilities questionnaire was utilized to evaluate the impact and includes subscales assessing knowledge and understanding, concerns and confidence in providing postural care. The Understanding, Knowledge and Confidence in Providing Postural Care for Children with Disabilities questionnaire was completed at baseline and 6 weeks later. The training programme was delivered to N = 75 parents and school staff. Of these, N = 65 completed both baseline and follow-up measures and were used in the data analysis. Participants and therapists were also invited to provide further feedback on the overall training programme via interviews and focus groups. Paired samples t-tests were used to determine statistically significant differences between baseline and follow-up scores for each of the three subscales. Mean levels of understanding and knowledge and confidence improved (P confidence in parents and school staff that care for children with significant physical postural care impairments. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Improving the rehabilitative management of client sexual health concerns after neurological disability: evaluation of a staff sexuality training programme in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Grahame; Anwar, Samir; Wilson, Joan; Bertapelle, Tanya

    2006-10-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a staff sexuality training programme as a means of improving the rehabilitative management of client sexual health concerns after neurological disability. A prospective controlled pre- and posttest evaluation design with six-month follow-up. Seventy-four multidisciplinary rehabilitation and disability staff who attended a two-day workshop, and a control group of 25 staff members who did not receive the training. Two workshops were held at major rehabilitation centres in the North and South Islands of New Zealand respectively. The Sex Attitude Scale, as well as three purpose-designed measures including an objective knowledge test, a self-rating inventory of skills and clinical activity, and a single-item measure of the degree of staff comfort. Workshop participants showed significant increases in knowledge, skills and comfort comparing pre-to post-workshop scores. A number of these gains were maintained at the six-month follow-up. There was an associated increase in the level of reported staff activity in addressing patient/client sexual health concerns in the six months to follow-up, compared to a similar time period preceding the workshop. In contrast, the control group had similar pre-workshop scores to the workshop participants, but recorded no increase on the measures, or in their level of reported activity, at the six-month follow-up. The programme showed initial promise as an effective intervention in upgrading the capacity of staff working in rehabilitation and disability agencies to address the sexual health concerns of their patients/clients.

  9. Battle Command Staff Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    Table (Table lA ) and a Reaction Table (Table IB). In sum, METT-T is varied to increase the difficulty of the Tables- "crawl, walk, run." Training...Delay 0800 0900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 I~~~ Frag OrdraOd f ofsty D , ,elay Snapshots of Battle Proposed as Bn and FS Tables 1~ lA Hasty Attack...for subsequent development of CSS vertical BCST Tabics whether executed in virtud or constructive simulation. Draw on the expertise and counsel of the

  10. 2001 - 2002 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    1ST TERM 1ST OCTOBER - 23 NOVEMBER 2001 LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS The Autumn term of the Academic Training Programme is about to start. As usual, the first term includes lectures primarily dedicated to Post-graduate students. These are meant to help students complement the courses available from their home Universities with lectures on topics close to CERN activities. The lectures are nevertheless open to all CERN staff, and in particular to young Fellows. This year's series include courses on Accelerator Physics, on Field Theory, and on Symmetry Breaking Phenomena in Physics. The course on Accelerators by Dr. Wilson has been a regular feature on the Academic Training programme for many previous editions. This year, the course will be updated to include new sections on Colliders and on future facilities such as the Neutrino Factory. A good introduction to this very successful course can be found in the previous version of these lectures, available from the Web Lecture Archive Project: http://w...

  11. Short Communication Employee -Driven Staff Training and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the concept of staff training and development within the South African context. The changing labour legislation in South Africa makes it mandatory for the employer to provide training and development. However, staff have an important role to play in staff training and development. The paper gives an ...

  12. Staff training and development, enhancement of job performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The success of any organization/institution lies on the ability of its workforce to deliver. This ability/skill is acquired through training, which enhances job performance. In essence, the research examined the training and development programmes enjoyed by all senior staff of FUTO library with the aim of finding out its effects ...

  13. A formative evaluation of a staff reward and recognition programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleemah Salie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: It is generally assumed that reward and recognition programmes have increased staff motivation and reduced staff turnover.Research purpose: The main aim of this evaluation was to test the plausibility of the programme theory underlying a staff reward and recognition programme within a retail setting. Secondary aims were to assess whether or not the programme was implemented as intended and whether or not its outcomes were well defined.Motivation for the study: Different groups of people may have different assumptions about whether a reward and recognition programme works or not. This evaluation was motivated by the different assumptions held by programme stakeholders, programme recipients and social science researchers regarding the programme.Research design, approach and method: This formative evaluation used a descriptive design. Primary qualitative data were collected by means of structured interviews with the Human Resource Development (HRD Facilitator and ten programme participants.Main findings: The results showed that the programme theory was not plausible and that the programme was not implemented as intended. Although the HRD Facilitator and the participants agreed that the programme led to improved customer service, they disagreed about the other programme outcomes.Practical/managerial implications: This evaluation contains practical suggestions for improving the programme theory, the programme implementation process and the redefinition of the outcomes of the programme as standard performance indicators.Contribution/value-add: This evaluation contributed to the limited literature on the effect of reward and recognition programmes. Whilst there is a vast amount of literature pertaining to such programmes, very few formal evaluations exist about them.

  14. Case study: Grundtvig In-service Staff Training for Adult Education Staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friche, Nanna; Rasmussen, Palle

    2010-01-01

    This case study investigates the implementation in Denmark of a specific action under the European Commission's Grundtvig programme, the scheme of individual grants to adult education staff for participating in in-service training courses abroad. The emphasis in the case study is on the individual...

  15. Enhancing Training of Staff of the Agricultural Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper, identified the areas where staff of the Agricultural Development Programme (ADP) that carry out grassroots extension service delivery need to be trained and the field problems requiring research intervention. Secondary data from Annual Performance Survey (APS) report of NAERLS and NPAFS between 2010 ...

  16. (ARV) treatment training programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    Recommendations are made for improved training effectiveness and for specific national policy on training, to meet the demand for scaling up ..... This was a proxy measurement of any benefit from training, since we could not implement a ...... Finally we appreciate all the volunteers who participated in this study. References.

  17. (ARV) treatment training programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    successful ARV programme requires that all components of a functional management system be put in place for effective and efficient functioning.This would include logistics, human resources, financial planning, and monitoring and ..... which service recipients were surveyed on the quality of service delivery noted above.

  18. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M. W. J.; Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; Bosman, Anna M. T.; Jahoda, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Background: A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about dealing with incidents and limit physical risk of…

  19. Training staff to manage challenging behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background - A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about

  20. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background - A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about

  1. A systems approach to developing staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffort, D W

    1998-01-01

    This chapter shows how concepts from organizational psychology can be used to design a comprehensive staff training model for a statewide mental health service system, and emphasizes the importance of competency identification in this model.

  2. Teaching Staff Advanced Training: European Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Kovalchuk Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    The issue of teaching staff advanced training is paid much attention in many countries. In the Republic of Moldova progressive professional credits system is used. Credits are scored not only in assigning teaching degrees or issuing a certificate of continuing professional education, but also for teachers’ evaluation at the educational institution. Advanced training of teaching staff in France is provided by various institutions of postgraduate education, university institutes and regional ce...

  3. Training Teachers in Complex Classroom Organizations (Mixed-Age Classes) To Improve Instruction and Classroom Management Behaviour. Effects of a Staff Development Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Erik; And Others

    A quasi-experimental, treatment-control group investigation was designed to test the effects on Dutch primary school teachers of the staff development program "Dealing with Mixed-Age Classes." Research findings from mixed-age classes, effective teaching, and classroom management and organization were translated into teaching behaviors.…

  4. Refocusing the training of psychiatric rehabilitation staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, P W; McCracken, S G

    1995-11-01

    The authors describe an approach to training staff in psychiatric rehabilitation programs that is based on principles of organizational psychology. The approach promotes two shifts in the focus of training. First, training efforts should not only educate individual staff members about state-of-the-art rehabilitation skills but also organize the treatment team into a system that will consistently carry out these skills. Second, training should help the team develop user-friendly programs rather than insisting on faithful implementation of state-of-the-art interventions. A four-phase, eight-step training method called interactive staff training that can help programs achieve these goals is presented. The first phase involves obtaining administrative support for change, assessing staff needs, and forming a program committee. In the second phase, staff participate in decision making about program components, and a facilitator conducts sessions to reach consensus on a draft program. A pilot program is implemented and evaluated in the third phase. In the final phase, a user-friendly program is maintained through continuous quality improvement.

  5. Teaching Staff Advanced Training: European Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalchuk Vasyl

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The issue of teaching staff advanced training is paid much attention in many countries. In the Republic of Moldova progressive professional credits system is used. Credits are scored not only in assigning teaching degrees or issuing a certificate of continuing professional education, but also for teachers’ evaluation at the educational institution. Advanced training of teaching staff in France is provided by various institutions of postgraduate education, university institutes and regional centers of education in order to help teachers to renew their professional knowledge and at the same time to refocus it on the level of consciousness according to the real problems of school and the community. The feature of teaching staff advanced training in France is that it is teachers’ personal matter and duration of all periods of training should come to one year during all professional career. In Finland, teaching staff advanced training is organized directly in schools under aegis of the National Board of Education, the National Centre for Advanced Training in Education, departments of teacher education and other faculties of higher educational institutions on credit system basis. Among the topical forms there are targeted, cascade, common (cooperative teaching and learning by own example. In the UK, advanced training takes place in two models: the course model based on higher educational establishments and school based in-service education. The main purpose of advanced training system is to familiarize teachers with theoretical and practical innovations in educational activities, progressive teaching technologies, and consolidate their skills of independent acquisition of knowledge necessary for their professional development.

  6. Teaching Staff Advanced Training: European Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    The issue of teaching staff advanced training is paid much attention in many countries. In the Republic of Moldova progressive professional credits system is used. Credits are scored not only in assigning teaching degrees or issuing a certificate of continuing professional education, but also for teachers' evaluation at the educational…

  7. Data Intelligence Training for Library Staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombouts, J.; Princic, A.; Verbakel, E.; Potters, N.; De Smaele, M.; Noordegraaf, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Data Intelligence 4 Librarians course was developed by 3TU.Datacentrum at the end of 2011 to provide online resources and training for digital preservation practitioners, specifically for library staff. The course objectives are to transfer and exchange knowledge about data management, and to

  8. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  9. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form a...

  10. Competency-based Education and Training of medical staff. A Programm of the Medical Academy Waldbreitbach: Concept – Implementation – Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasske, Eva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the Medical Academy Waldbreitbach is to connect individual and organisational requirements in order to promote an appropriate and multi-locational development of medical competency in the face of the continuously evolving challenges of clinical practice. Integral processes in this are the reduction of organisational learning barriers and the successive integration of competency-oriented learning events in the structures of personnel and organisational development. The modular system for the further development of doctors’ skills serves here as a supplementary and recommendation system for both existing curricula and those defined by regulatory organisations and professional associations.Methods: The Medical Academy’s modular system has a two-dimensional structure. In addition to the axis of biography orientation, the model orients itself around issues relating to the needs of a doctor in any individual professional position, as well as with whom he comes into contact and where his primary challenges lie. In order to achieve better integration in day-to-day routine and a needs-specific orientation of content, the modular system provides a combination of “one, two or three day and two- three- or four-hour training units” depending upon the topic. The transfer of experiential knowledge with the aid of practical exercises is a central element of the didactic model.Results: Through the combined use of summative and formative assessment, the significance of a dialogue-orientated approach in both planning and in the organisational process was highlighted. In feedback discussions and quantitative evaluation sheets, participants identified in particular cross-generational knowledge sharing as a central element for the development of personal values alongside the interdisciplinary transfer of knowledge. The combination of specialist and interdisciplinary topics, for example on team processes or communication, is frequently

  11. Competency-based Education and Training of medical staff. A Programm of the Medical Academy Waldbreitbach: Concept – Implementation – Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasske, Eva; Beil, Michael; Keller, Katrin

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the Medical Academy Waldbreitbach is to connect individual and organisational requirements in order to promote an appropriate and multi-locational development of medical competency in the face of the continuously evolving challenges of clinical practice. Integral processes in this are the reduction of organisational learning barriers and the successive integration of competency-oriented learning events in the structures of personnel and organisational development. The modular system for the further development of doctors’ skills serves here as a supplementary and recommendation system for both existing curricula and those defined by regulatory organisations and professional associations. Methods: The Medical Academy’s modular system has a two-dimensional structure. In addition to the axis of biography orientation, the model orients itself around issues relating to the needs of a doctor in any individual professional position, as well as with whom he comes into contact and where his primary challenges lie. In order to achieve better integration in day-to-day routine and a needs-specific orientation of content, the modular system provides a combination of “one, two or three day and two- three- or four-hour training units” depending upon the topic. The transfer of experiential knowledge with the aid of practical exercises is a central element of the didactic model. Results: Through the combined use of summative and formative assessment, the significance of a dialogue-orientated approach in both planning and in the organisational process was highlighted. In feedback discussions and quantitative evaluation sheets, participants identified in particular cross-generational knowledge sharing as a central element for the development of personal values alongside the interdisciplinary transfer of knowledge. The combination of specialist and interdisciplinary topics, for example on team processes or communication, is frequently emphasised

  12. Southern African AIDS Training Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafoe, G H

    1994-01-01

    The Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA) with the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), in a little over 2 years, have established a Southern African AIDS Training Programme (SAT) that is effective in developing community-based responses to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Based in Harare, Zimbabwe, the program provides financial assistance, training, monitoring, and advice and information to 120 project partners. The average grant size is $40,000. In a second phase of the project, SAT will attempt to meet the requests of its partners for more services. Currently, to meet needs for rapid, responsive training, and novel approaches to skill building, SAT has developed a collaborative nongovernmental organization (NGO) initiative, "The School Without Walls". This program identifies and amplifies what has worked effectively for organizations and programs. Other similar organizations and programs learn from these experiences. Site visits, apprenticeships, mentor organizations, and skills-building based on shared problem-diagnosis and resolution are some of the techniques employed. A draft report of the CIDA midterm external evaluation of SAT recommends renewal of the program, resourcing of the program to meet its regional responsibilities, and adoption of "The School Without Walls" as a central strategy for southern Africa.

  13. Academic Training: 2003 - 2004 Academic Training Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch 3rd Term - 5 April to 2nd July 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 April Complex Systems, Chaos and Measurements by P. Collet / Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France 26, 27, 28, 29 April The Theory of Heavy Ion Collisions by U. Wiedemann / CERN-PH/TH 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 May Particle Identification at the LHC by D. Fournier / LAL, Orsay, France 1, 2, 3, 4 June Neural Systems, Genetic Algorithms by V. Robles Forcada and M. Perez Hernandez / Univ. Politecnica de Madrid E. 7, 8, 9, June Real Time Process Control by T. Riesco / CERN-TS 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 June The Cosmic Microwave Background by M. Zaldarriaga / Harvard University, USA 21, 22, 23, June Fixed Target Physics at CERN : Results and Prospects by J. Engelen / CERN-DG 28, 29, 30 June, 1, 2, July Search for Dark Matter by B. Sadoulet / Univ. of California, Berkeley, USA The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstrac...

  14. Evaluation of Training Programme in Organizations. | Patwardhan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... interviews of the superiors were used as instruments for evaluation. Evaluation suggested positive effect of the training programme. It can be stated that the Three Dimensional Model for Training Evaluation is applicable for training in other set ups also, such as, educational, medical, social work, etc. and about any training ...

  15. STAFF TRAINING MANAGEMENT IN AN COMMERCIAL BANK: EFFECTS AND SYNERGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey V. Artemyev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the dependence of a commercial bank on a staff number and a profit on staff training expenses. Necessity of an address approach in the process of the staff training is proved. The key features of this approach are revealed. The authors describe its realization in the automated system of training control.

  16. Evaluating a training programme for executive coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolyne Beets

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The evaluation of training programmes provides methodological and logistical challenges to evaluators and human resource (HR managers. The training of executive coaches is no exception in this regard. Research purpose: The study aimed to investigate one particular aspect of the results of an executive coach training programme, and the extent to which knowledge, skills and attitudes acquired during the programme were applied in practical settings.Motivation for the study: Too little is known in South Africa about the effectiveness of training programmes, including executive coach training programmes. There is a need to demonstrate methodological approaches that would provide valid and reliable data.Research design, approach and method: The success case method (SCM was used to guide the study, consisting first of a survey of 80 participants in the training programme, followed by eight interviews to compare successful with less successful cases of skills transfer.Main findings: All six successful coaches were applying the proximal outcomes from the training with good results, with several valuable consequences resulting from the training. Barriers to successful implementation included personal circumstances and unfulfilled expectations of the programme content.Practical/managerial implications: Aspects of the training programme that could be improved included: the buddy selection system, more individualised feedback about self-development, closer supervision, and more support from programme managers.Contribution/value-add: This evaluation contributes to the evaluation literature by providing a documented exploration of a systematic application of the SCM. It also contributes to the coach training literature by providing a systematic evaluation of a coach training intervention in South Africa.

  17. 2006-2007 Academic Training Programme Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    Please help the Academic Training Committee to plan the 2006-07 programme of lectures by filling in the 2006-07 Academic Training Programme Questionnaire, which can be found at: http://academia.web.cern.ch/academia/questionnaire/ If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training'form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received.

  18. Testing the effects of an empowerment-based leadership development programme: part 2 - staff outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahinten, V S; Macphee, M; Hejazi, S; Laschinger, H; Kazanjian, M; McCutcheon, A; Skelton-Green, J; O'Brien-Pallas, L

    2014-01-01

    To determine if nurse leaders' attendance at a leadership development programme based on an empowerment framework would increase staff perceptions of organisational support and organisational commitment. Leadership empowering behaviours are teachable relational competencies that have been associated with quality leader-staff relationships and positive staff outcomes. A quasi-experimental, pre-test-post-test design was used to compare perceptions of staff whose leaders participated in a year-long leadership programme with staff of similar leaders who did not attend the programme. A series of multiple regression analyses were used to test the conceptual model of programme effects. Leaders' programme participation was directly associated with greater staff organisational commitment 1 year after the programme. Both programme attendance and leader-empowering behaviours were found to act as independent catalysts for staff empowerment, with structural empowerment partially mediating the effects of leader empowering behaviours on organisational commitment. Leader participation in a development programme based on an empowerment framework may be an important means of increasing staff organisational commitment, a key predictor of staff turnover. Leadership development programmes should emphasize relational competencies, including leader empowering behaviours, given their potential for enhancing organisational commitment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Staff Training for Nanoindustry in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorov Sergey Grigoryevich

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The nanotechnology industry represents such a direction of the development of science, technologies and industries by means of which Russia will be able to achieve advanced positions in the world. For the last decade the necessary regulatory base for nanotech industry development was created in the country, beginning with the concept of nanotechnological works, and the strategy of nanotech industry development, and finishing by the program of nanotech industry development in Russia till 2015. The special place is allocated for education in the field of nanotechnologies and nanomaterials. The system of staff training for nanotech industry is developing very quickly. The departments of nanotechnologies are established almost in all leading higher education institutions of Russia, the institutes of scientific and educational centers as well as the centers of collective use are introduced in the country, the national nanotechnological network is functioning. RUSNANO State Corporation of Nanotechnologies makes significant contribution to the training of innovation staff. The corporation is planning to create at least 100 educational programs of staff training and retraining for the needs of nanotech industry. The fund of infrastructure and educational programs was established in RUSNANO which in 2012 launched the project on creation of training system in the field of nanotechnology in the e-Learning mode. In 2013 the fund created the autonomous non-profit organization “Electronic Education for Nanotech Industry” (“eNano” which became the leading developer of innovative branch educational resources and the operator on rendering educational services for nanotech industry. Since 2011 in RUSNANO there is a School League which set for itself the task to make the contribution to improvement of the situation in teaching naturalscience disciplines at schools. At the same time, according to the results of students enrolment in Russia in 2011-2014, the

  20. 2005-06 Academic Training Programme Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    Please help the Academic Training Committee to plan the 2005-06 programme of lectures by filling in the 2005-06 Academic Training Programme Questionnaire which can be found at: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  1. Faculty staff and rural placement supervisors' pre- and post-placement perceptions of a clinical rural placement programme in NSW Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G; Blinkhorn, A

    2013-02-01

    Staff views on a rural clinical placement involving 4th year dental undergraduates from the University of Sydney (Australia) were collected in order to monitor whether the programme was feasible and acceptable to the academic Faculty Staff and the rural clinical supervisors. An evaluation of the rural placement programme was undertaken in 2009 at three rural sites in New South Wales (Australia). Semi-structured pre- and post-placement in person interviews recorded the views of three University Faculty Staff whilst similar data were collected by telephone interviews for three supervising clinicians at the rural clinical sites. Interviews gathered opinions on the organisation, implementation and outcomes of the rural placement programme. Eight qualitative analysis identified themes were specified and included communication, programme duration, effect on students and staff, benefits of the programme, rural intentions, programme sustainability and the success of the programme. Positive pre-placement aspects were potentially good clinical experience, new environment, sharing of knowledge and interaction with a rural community. Negative issues were anxieties about students' clinical ability to offer a service, missing lectures and maintaining clinical training quotas. The post-placement themes were generally positive; staff reported that the students enjoyed the rural community experience, their communication and clinical skills improved. According to the staff, the placement programme was feasible and provided acceptable positive clinical and personal development for the students. This research will help educators planning to incorporate a rural clinical programme into a University curriculum. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Correctional Staff Training Institutes. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Illinois Univ., East St. Louis, Center for the Study of Crime, Delinquency and Corrections.

    Three national institutes for correctional staff trainers incorporated new techniques in an attempt to upgrade corrections programs through improved staff development. There were 78 trainer and 200 middle management staff and correctional officers involved in the program, representing more than 100 correctional institutions in the United States.…

  3. Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Regular Lecture Programme 9 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Inner Tracking Detectors by Pippa Wells (CERN) 10 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Calorimeters (2/5) by Philippe Bloch (CERN) 11 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Muon systems (3/5) by Kerstin Hoepfner (RWTH Aachen) 12 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Particle Identification and Forward Detectors by Peter Krizan (University of Ljubljana and J. Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia) 13 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Trigger and Data Acquisition (5/5) by Dr. Brian Petersen (CERN) from 11:00 to 12:00 at CERN ( Bldg. 222-R-001 - Filtration Plant )

  4. Development of a competency based training programme to support multidisciplinary working in a combined biochemistry/haematology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, R S; Longmire, W; Galloway, M J; Smellie, W S

    2000-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a competency based training programme to support multidisciplinary working in a combined biochemistry and haematology laboratory. The training programme was developed to document that staff were trained in the full range of laboratory tests that they were expected to perform. This programme subsequently formed the basis for the annual performance review of all staff. All staff successfully completed the first phase of the programme. This allowed laboratory staff to work unsupervised at night as part of a partial shift system. All staff are now working towards achieving a level of competence equivalent to the training level required for state registration by the Council for Professions Supplementary to Medicine. External evaluation of the training programme has included accreditation by the Council for Professions Supplementary to Medicine and reinspection by Clinical Pathology Accreditation (UK) Ltd. The development of a competency based training system has facilitated the introduction of multidisciplinary working in the laboratory. In addition, it enables the documentation of all staff to ensure that they are fully trained and are keeping up to date, because the continuing professional development programme in use in our laboratory has been linked to this training scheme. This approach to documentation of training facilitated a recent reinspection by Clinical Pathology Accreditation (UK) Ltd.

  5. Using psychological science to improve summer camp staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Ethan D

    2007-10-01

    Preseason staff training is an exciting and stressful time for all camping professionals. By using principles of developmental psychology, learning theory, and self-monitoring, however, we can maximize the usefulness of training sessions. This article also discusses educating staff about children's mental health issues and managing challenging situations with adolescents.

  6. Programme Budgets for Graduate Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelquist, Claes G.; And Others

    The development of a methodological framework for planning, programming, and budgeting which is specific to graduate training and research activities at the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden is described. This pilot project is regarded as a step towards developing and implementing a generalized approach to an output-oriented finance…

  7. 2002 - 2003 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    1st TERM : November - December 2002   LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS 18, 19, 20, 21, 22 November 2002 Telling the Truth with Statistics by R. Barlow / Univ. of Manchester, UK 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg. 500     REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 2, 3, 4, 5 December 2002 Introduction to String Theory by W. Lerche / CERN-TH 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg. 500 The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc.) will be published in the CERN bulletin, the WWW, and by Notices before each term and for each series of lectures. Françoise Benz Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  8. Battle Staff Training System II: Computer-Based Instruction Supporting the Force XXI Training Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wampler, Richard

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the methodology and lessons learned in the development of the Innovative Tools and Techniques for Brigade and Below Staff Training II - Battle Staff Training System II (ITTBBST-BSTS II...

  9. Adapting existing training standards for unmanned aircraft: finding ways to train staff for unmanned aircraft operations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burger, CR

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available As unmanned aircraft are introduced into civil airspace, a framework for training and licencing of dispatch and operating staff will be required. This paper assesses existing pilot training unit standards and proposes a framework within which staff...

  10. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures.

  11. The Galileo Teacher Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Rosa

    The Galileo Teacher Training Program is a global effort to empower teachers all over the world to embark on a new trend in science teaching, using new technologies and real research meth-ods to teach curriculum content. The GTTP goal is to create a worldwide network of "Galileo Ambassadors", promoters of GTTP training session, and a legion of "Galileo Teachers", edu-cators engaged on the use of innovative resources and sharing experiences and supporting its pears worldwide. Through workshops, online training tools and resources, the products and techniques promoted by this program can be adapted to reach locations with few resources of their own, as well as network-connected areas that can take advantage of access to robotic, optical and radio telescopes, webcams, astronomy exercises, cross-disciplinary resources, image processing and digital universes (web and desktop planetariums). Promoters of GTTP are expert astronomy educators connected to Universities or EPO institutions that facilitate the consolidation of an active support to newcomers and act as a 24 hour helpdesk to teachers all over the world. GTTP will also engage in the creation of a repository of astronomy education resources and science research projects, ViRoS (Virtual Repository of resources and Science Projects), in order to simplify the task of educators willing to enrich classroom activities.

  12. 2007 2008 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 6 & 8 May 2008 11:00 -12:00 – Main Auditorium, bldg. 500-1 Energy isn’t Everything: CERN’s Fixed Target Niche Prof. John DAINTON / Cockcroft Institute & Liverpool University, UK Fixed target physics at CERN remains an essential part of the Laboratory’s scientific programme and horizon. In recent years fixed target and decay physics using CERN’s unique accelerator and beam facilities has continued to enable unique experiments to be undertaken. An overview is presented of the status of this physics and, wherever appropriate, of its future. LECTURE SERIES 7 May 2008 11:00 -12:00 – TH Auditorium – Bldg. 4-3-006 A rich revenue from the use of radioactive beams and radioactive targets: recent highlights from the nTOF and ISOLDE facilities 9 May 2008 11:00 -12:00 – Main Auditorium, bldg. 500-1 The fifth decade of ISOLDE: HIE-ISOLDE Professor Mark HUYSE, Leuven University, BE The On-Line Isotope Mass Separator ISOLDE is a facility dedicated to the production of a...

  13. 2006 - 2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    1st Term: 02.10. 2006 - 15.12.2006 LECTURE SERIES Practical statistics for particle physicists by L. Lyons, Univ. Oxford, GB 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 October 11:00 -12:00 - Main Auditorium, Bldg 500 Gravitational waves by M. Landry, LIGO Hanford Observatory, Richland, USA 16, 17, 18 October 11:00-12:00 - Main Auditorium, Bldg 500 Neutrino physics, past and future by B. Kayser, FERMILAB, Batavia, USA 27, 28, 29, 30 November, 1 December 11:00-12:00 - TH Auditorium, Bldg 4, 3rd Floor QCD: are we ready for the LHC by S. Frixione, INFN, Genoa, It 4, 5, 6, 7 December 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc.) will be published in the CERN bulletin, the WWW, and by Notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  14. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendar of courses for November to December 2007Calendrier des cours prévus de novembre à décembre 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary.Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (Full) Communicating effectively - residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) FP7 Training - How to Negotiate and Administer Framework 7 Grant Agreements (English) 21 November (7 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (English) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (français) 5, 6, 7 décembre (2 places disponibles) Core Development Pac...

  15. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendar of courses for November to December 2007Calendrier des cours prévus de novembre à décembre 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary.Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (Full) Communicating effectively - residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) FP7 Training - How to Negotiate and Administer Framework 7 Grant Agreements (English) 21 November (12 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (English) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (français) 5, 6, 7 décembre (4 places disponibles) Core Development Pa...

  16. A multi disciplinary obstetric emergency training programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whelan, Mary

    2012-09-01

    The Rotunda Hospital (Dublin) obstetric emergency training programme (RHOET) was designed, in 2008, to meet the ongoing education and training needs of the local multidisciplinary team. Prior to its implementation, senior midwives attended the advanced life support in obstetrics (ALSO) course, and many of the obstetricians attended the Management of obstetric emergencies and trauma (MOET) and\\/or ALSO courses. Attendance at these off site courses meant that the only opportunity for team training was the informal and ad hoc \\'drills and skills\\' that took place in the birthing suite. This paper documents our journey since RHOET was implemented.

  17. Transformational leadership training programme for charge nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duygulu, Sergul; Kublay, Gulumser

    2011-03-01

    This paper is a report of an evaluation of the effects of a transformational leadership training programme on Unit Charge Nurses' leadership practices. Current healthcare regulations in the European Union and accreditation efforts of hospitals for their services mandate transformation in healthcare services in Turkey. Therefore, the transformational leadership role of nurse managers is vital in determining and achieving long-term goals in this process. The sample consisted of 30 Unit Charge Nurses with a baccalaureate degree and 151 observers at two university hospitals in Turkey. Data were collected using the Leadership Practices Inventory-Self and Observer (applied four times during a 14-month study process from December 2005 to January 2007). The transformational leadership training programme had theoretical (14 hours) and individual study (14 hours) in five sections. Means, standard deviations and percentages, repeated measure tests and two-way factor analysis were used for analysis. According the Leadership Practices Inventory-Self and Observer ratings, leadership practices increased statistically significantly with the implementation of the programme. There were no significant differences between groups in age, length of time in current job and current position. The Unit Charge Nurses Leadership Practices Inventory self-ratings were significantly higher than those of the observers. There is a need to develop similar programmes to improve the leadership skills of Unit Charge Nurses, and to make it mandatory for nurses assigned to positions of Unit Charge Nurse to attend this kind of leadership programme. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. 2007 2008 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 27, 28 & 29 May 2008 11:00 -12:00 – Main Auditorium, bldg. 500-1 The biological effects of ionizing radiation M. STREIT-BIANCHI, CERN, Geneva, CH Since the discovery of X-rays the practical use of ionizing radiation and its damaging effects have been a source of concern for occupational health and radiation protection. This led to the introduction of dose limits and strict controls associated with the use of radiation for civil uses. This Academic Training lecture series will discuss the effects of radiation on humans with special emphasis on the health effects of low doses. Radiation risks as assessed from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Chernobyl as well as others accidental and occupational exposures will be presented and discussed. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 June 2008 11:00 -12:00 – Main Auditorium, bldg. 500-1 Technology and applications of high field accelerator magnets Dr. G. AMBROSIO, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, USA Superconducting magnets are an enabling technology for high ene...

  19. 2007 2008 Academic Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 27, 28 & 29 May 2008 11:00 -12:00 – Main Auditorium, bldg. 500-1 The biological effects of ionizing radiation M. STREIT-BIANCHI, CERN, Geneva, CH Since the discovery of X-rays the practical use of ionizing radiation and its damaging effects have been a source of concern for occupational health and radiation protection. This led to the introduction of dose limits and strict controls associated with the use of radiation for civil uses. This Academic Training lecture series will discuss the effects of radiation on humans with special emphasis on the health effects of low doses. Radiation risks as assessed from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Chernobyl as well as others accidental and occupational exposures will be presented and discussed. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 June 2008 11:00 -12:00 – Main Auditorium, bldg. 500-1 Technology and applications of high field accelerator magnets Dr. G. AMBROSIO, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, USA Superconducting magnets are an enabling technology for high ene...

  20. The effectiveness of staff training focused on increasing emotional intelligence and improving interaction between support staff and clients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlmans, L.J.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Derksen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed

  1. [Efficacy of an oral health training programme for visually impaired individuals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardina, Giuseppe Alessandro; Buonamente, Adriana; Messina, Pietro

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of an oral health training programme for visually impaired individuals and their families or caretakers. The training programme was based on reliance on the other senses. The study was performed at an institute for the blind in Palermo (Italy). Oral hygiene and health status of 30 visually impaired subjects aged 15-60 years were evaluated by interview and use of the Decayed Missing Filled (DMF) and Simplified Oral Hygiene by Green-Vermillion (OHI-S) indices. Subjects underwent an oral health training programme at the end of which their oral hygiene and health status was once again evaluated. Participants were found to have poor oral hygiene at the beginning of the study. Subsequent evaluations to measure improvements after the training programme revealed no changes in oral health status. These results underscore the enormous difficulties encountered by staff and families in applying preventive oral health programmes.

  2. A Structured Writing Programme for Staff: Facilitating Knowledge, Skills, Confidence and Publishing Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Marcia; Radloff, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The growing interest in the higher education sector in publishing pedagogical research has led to a focus on professional development for staff who wish to engage in this endeavour. This paper describes and evaluates a specific programme designed to help university staff to prepare and submit a high-quality paper to a peer-reviewed journal.…

  3. Training needs of recreation staff at recreation centres: Supervising ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results suggest that staff do not possess the basic recreation knowledge and that, in turn, may lead to unnecessary work pressure on the supervising area manager. In the local government, procedures are already in place that could help the staff if they needed funding for further training. Unfortunately, the available ...

  4. EuroTraining - Supporting University Programmes in Nanoelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ivan Ring; Bruun, Erik

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes how the EuroTraining project supports a timely introduction of new nanoelectronics university programmes in Europe. The provisions include training courses, training material and training roadmaps describing the structure and content of nanoelectronics curricula. In order...

  5. Launch of technical training courses for programmers

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    This autumn, two new technical training courses have been launched for scientists and engineers at CERN who undertake programming tasks, particularly in C and C++. Both courses are taught by Andrzej Nowak, an expert in next-generation and cutting-edge computing technology research.   The training courses are organised in cooperation with CERN openlab and are sponsored by the CERN IT department – there is only a nominal registration fee of 50 CHF. This is an opportunity not to be missed! Computer architecture and hardware-software interaction (2 days, 26-27 October) The architecture course offers a comprehensive overview of current topics in computer architecture and their consequences for the programmer, from the basic Von Neumann schema to its modern-day expansions. Understanding hardware-software interaction allows the programmer to make better use of all features of available computer hardware and compilers. Specific architectural ...

  6. Focused training programmes for solving growth problems of very small businesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Perks

    2008-12-01

    research: The value of the research lies in the fact that specific focus areas were identified within the training programmes. Other studies have attempted to identify training programmes but the content thereof was not necessarily linked to the problems that very small businesses experienced, especially when attempting to grow. Time-, staff- and financial constraints regarding training programmes can be overcome.Conclusions: Training programmes should focus on specific training areas, be after hours and be well publicised. Computer training should preferably be on site on a one-to-one basis. Training programmes should suit the skills level of the very small business entrepreneurs and be broken up into smaller sessions to ensure understanding and meeting time constraints.

  7. IEA Energy Training Capacity-building Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    The IEA has carried out training activities in energy-related areas from its origins as an agency, with the Emergency Response Exercises (ERE), designed to prepare member countries for oil supply disruption through a set of specially prepared drills simulating crisis conditions. The globalisation of world energy markets in recent years and the wider engagement of the IEA beyond its members have expanded this role, as demand for training instruction has increased. In response, the IEA has created the Energy Training and Capacity-Building Programme, which, through seminars and workshops, secondments and internships, will offer training in the methods and standards that make IEA work in a wide range of energy-related areas, including statistics, the international standard for objective policy recommendations.

  8. Customer care a training manual for library staff

    CERN Document Server

    Gannon-Leary, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Customer Care provides a detailed course suitable for delivery to library staff at all levels. It can be used as a stand-alone reference work for customer care processes and procedures or, alternatively, it can be used by library staff to tailor a customer care course to suit the requirements and training needs of their own staff.Dual use - reference work and/or training manualPotential as a text bookApplicable to a wider context than LIS - could be used for a whole HEI institutional approach to customer care or in local authorities/public services

  9. Equity development programmes for academic staff at South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current academic staff profile in South African Higher Education reflects much of the skewdness of the past. The central dilemma faced by these institutions is how to achieve an equitable ratio in the short and medium terms. In response to government concerns expressed through the National Plan on Higher Education, ...

  10. House Staff Communication Training and Patient Experience Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladoyin A Oladeru MPH

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess whether communication training for house staff via role-playing exercises (1 is well received and (2 improves patient experience scores in house staff clinics. Methods: We conducted a pre–post study in which the house staff for 3 adult hospital departments participated in communication training led by trained faculty in small groups. Sessions centered on a published 5-step strategy for opening patient-centered interviews using department-specific role-playing exercises. House staff completed posttraining questionnaires. For 1 month prior to and 1 month following the training, patients in the house staff clinics completed surveys with Clinician and Group Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CG-CAHPS questions regarding physician communication, immediately following clinic visits. Preintervention and postintervention results for top-box scores were compared. Results: Forty-four of a possible 45 house staff (97.8% participated, with 31 (70.5% indicating that the role-playing exercise increased their perception of the 5-step strategy. No differences in patient responses to CG-CAHPS questions were seen when comparing 63 preintervention surveys to 77 postintervention surveys. Conclusion: Demonstrating an improvement in standard patient experience surveys in resident clinics may require ongoing communication coaching and investigation of the “hidden curriculum” of training.

  11. Employability and entrepreneurship skills training programme for final year undergraduate students in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Essau, Cecilia A.; Asuzu, Michael; Asuzu, Chioma; Adebiyi, A. Olupelumi; O'Regan, Stephen; Kang, Daljit; Liñán, Francisco; Guzmán Cuevas, Joaquín J. (Coordinador)

    2011-01-01

    The main aims of the present project are develop a training programme to enhance employability and entrepreneurship skills to final year students; promote entrepreneurial culture, self-employment, and economic independence; and capacity building among staff at the University of Ibadan. Twenty final year students participated in the training for 8 days spread over a 10 week period. Results showed that all the participants reported their experience on the program as highly r...

  12. The effectiveness of staff training focused on increasing emotional intelligence and improving interaction between support staff and clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, L J M; Embregts, P J C M; Gerits, L; Bosman, A M T; Derksen, J J L

    2015-07-01

    Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed at emotional intelligence and interactions between staff and clients. The effects of the training on emotional intelligence, coping style and emotions of support staff were investigated. Participants were 214 support staff working within residential settings for individuals with ID and challenging behaviour. The experimental group consisted of 76 staff members, 138 staff members participated in two different control groups. A pre-test, post-test, follow-up control group design was used. Effectiveness was assessed using questionnaires addressing emotional intelligence, coping and emotions. Emotional intelligence of the experimental group changed significantly more than that of the two control groups. The experimental group showed an increase in task-oriented coping, whereas one control group did not. The results with regard to emotions were mixed. Follow-up data revealed that effects within the experimental group were still present four months after the training ended. A staff training aimed at emotional intelligence and staff-client interactions is effective in improving emotional intelligence and coping styles of support staff. However, the need for more research aiming at the relationship between staff characteristics, organisational factors and their mediating role in the effectiveness of staff training is emphasised. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Training Needs of Vocational Forestry Staff in Ogun State Nigeria.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Onyii Ogbonna

    Department of Agricultural Economics and Extension, Bowen University, Iwo, Osun State. ... Keywords:- Vocational staff, Training needs, Forestry Activities, Knowledge level,. Skill level. Introduction. Forests contribute in different forms to national and .... SSCE/GCE certificate; 32.17% had been on the job for 1-5years.

  14. Building Multicultural Residential Communities: A Model for Training Student Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryk, Taryn; Thompson, Monita C.; Boynton, Trelawny

    2013-01-01

    The growing diversity and changing demographics within the United States increases the importance of students developing skills to engage across identity difference. The purpose of this chapter is to describe how a pre-employment course for student staff members is used as a multicultural intervention training to provide students with the…

  15. Designing resistance training programmes to enhance muscular fitness: a review of the acute programme variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Stephen P; Tarpenning, Kyle M; Marino, Frank E

    2005-01-01

    The popularity of resistance training has grown immensely over the past 25 years, with extensive research demonstrating that not only is resistance training an effective method to improve neuromuscular function, it can also be equally effective in maintaining or improving individual health status. However, designing a resistance training programme is a complex process that incorporates several acute programme variables and key training principles. The effectiveness of a resistance training programme to achieve a specific training outcome (i.e. muscular endurance, hypertrophy, maximal strength, or power) depends on manipulation of the acute programme variables, these include: (i) muscle action; (ii) loading and volume; (iii) exercise selection and order; (iv) rest periods; (v) repetition velocity; and (vi) frequency. Ultimately, it is the acute programme variables, all of which affect the degree of the resistance training stimuli, that determine the magnitude to which the neuromuscular, neuroendocrine and musculoskeletal systems adapt to both acute and chronic resistance exercise. This article reviews the available research that has examined the application of the acute programme variables and their influence on exercise performance and training adaptations. The concepts presented in this article represent an important approach to effective programme design. Therefore, it is essential for those involved with the prescription of resistance exercise (i.e. strength coaches, rehabilitation specialists, exercise physiologists) to acquire a fundamental understanding of the acute programme variables and the importance of their practical application in programme design.

  16. Evaluating a Special Education Training Programme in Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delkamiller, Julie; Swain, Kristine D.; Ritzman, Mitzi J.; Leader-Janssen, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined a two-year special education and inclusive practices in-service training programme with a university in Nicaragua. Participants included 14 teachers from nine schools in Nicaragua. Participants' knowledge of special education concepts were evaluated as part of assessing the training modules. In addition, programme evaluation…

  17. The Effectiveness of Staff Training Focused on Increasing Emotional Intelligence and Improving Interaction between Support Staff and Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, L. J. M.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A. M. T.; Derksen, J. J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed at emotional intelligence and interactions…

  18. MASSIVE OPEN ONLINE COURSES FOR PEDAGOGICAL STAFF TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Gyshchina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. At the present time much attention of the society is fixed more and more to the problem of qualification improvement of pedagogical staff on account of total informatization of society, cardinal technological changes, becoming stronger interrelation of education, science and production, and active introduction in practice of professional standards. The existing system of professional development of pedagogical staff stands in need of reorganization and modernization. The search of the formats corresponding to modern realities, models and technologies of continuous training and retraining of education experts is becoming urgent today.The aim of the article is to show the possibilities of innovative forms of distance learning, realized in the form of a massive open online course (MOOC, for the training and continuous training of pedagogical staff.Methodology and research methods. The methods involve system-based analysis, synthesis, and generalization.Results and scientific novelty. The concept «mass open online course» (MOOC is clarified. MOOC is considered as a form of electronic distance training carried out on the basis of educational multimedia content, and wherein a large number of participants are involved online. The advantages of MOOC in the organization of hybrid forms of distance learning are shown: these online courses enable to combine planned online interactions of students with lecturers and tutors; mass discussions on topical professional subjects; offline study of records of training materials, and independent participants’ online coursework.The model of professional development of pedagogical staff on the basis of MOOC and realization of the principles of open education is presented: open platform, open schedule, open training, and open certification. The main approaches to the formation of new educational environment based on MOOC are designated as an innovative platform of preparation and professional

  19. Say 'trouble's gone': chronic illness and employability in job training programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Emma K

    2013-01-01

    The concept of biographical disruption has unique relevance for socioeconomically disadvantaged groups who participate in entry-level job training programmes. In these programmes trainees often suffer from various forms of chronic illness and must arrange these illnesses into a picture of employability. In this article I use ethnographic data and narrative analysis to examine closely two trainees' illness-related experiences, expressions and talk, and find that their ability to present their illnesses in ways that are consistent with programmatic goals is strongly influenced by family support, responsibilities and roles, as well as particular aspects of illness, like the interpretability of symptoms. I also find that the concept of biographical disruption has a curious traction in the world of job training, particularly among job training programme staff who would like to see trainees mobilise a variety of resources to help manage their illness. However, for trainees, many of whom have lived with chronic illness for years, the concept of biographical disruption may be more limited as a tool for understanding the experiences of illness. A more meaningful disruptive force in the lives of trainees appears to be the programme itself and the strategies for dealing with illness that programme staff may extend. © 2012 The Author. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2012 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Integration of MOOCs in Advanced Mining Training Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveleva, Irina; Greenwald, Oksana; Kolomiets, Svetlana; Medvedeva, Elena

    2017-11-01

    The paper covers the concept of innovative approaches in education based on incorporating MOOCs options into traditional classroom. It takes a look at the ways higher education instructors working with the mining engineers enrolled in advanced training programmes can brighten, upgrade and facilitate the learning process. The shift of higher education from in-class to online format has changed the learning environment and the methods of teaching including professional retraining courses. In addition, the need of mining companies for managers of a new kind obligates high school retraining centres rapidly move towards the 21st century skill framework. One of widely recognized innovations in the sphere of e-learning is MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) that can be used as an effective teaching tool for organizing professional training of managing staff of mining companies within the walls of a university. The authors share their instructional experience and show the benefits of introducing MOOCs options at the courses designed for retraining mining engineers and senior managers of coal enterprises. Though in recent researches the pedagogical value of MOOCs is highly questioned and even negated this invention of the 21st century can become an essential and truly helpful instrument in the hands of educators.

  1. Lessons learnt from a three-year pilot field epidemiology training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Damian; Durand, A Mark; Hancock, Thane; Cash, Haley L; Hardie, Kate; Paterson, Beverley; Paulino, Yvette; White, Paul; Merritt, Tony; Fitzgibbons, Dawn; Gopalani, Sameer Vali; Flint, James; Edwin A Merilles, Onofre; Kashiwabara, Mina; Biaukula, Viema; Lepers, Christelle; Souares, Yvan; Nilles, Eric; Batikawai, Anaseini; Huseynova, Sevil; Patel, Mahomed; Saketa, Salanieta T; Durrheim, David; Henderson, Alden; Roth, Adam

    2017-01-01

    The Pacific region has widely dispersed populations, limited financial and human resources and a high burden of disease. There is an urgent need to improve the availability, reliability and timeliness of useable health data. The purpose of this paper is to share lessons learnt from a three-year pilot field epidemiology training programme that was designed to respond to these Pacific health challenges. The pilot programme built on and further developed an existing field epidemiology training programme for Pacific health staff. The programme was delivered in country by epidemiologists working for Pacific Public Health Surveillance Network partners. The programme consisted of five courses: four one-week classroom-based courses and one field epidemiology project. Sessions were structured so that theoretical understanding was achieved through interaction and reinforced through practical hands-on group activities, case studies and other interactive practical learning methods. As of September 2016, 258 students had commenced the programme. Twenty-six course workshops were delivered and one cohort of students had completed the full five-course programme. The programme proved popular and gained a high level of student engagement. Face-to-face delivery, a low student-to-facilitator ratio, substantial group work and practical exercises were identified as key factors that contributed to the students developing skills and confidence. Close engagement of leaders and the need to quickly evaluate and adapt the curriculum were important lessons, and the collaboration between external partners was considered important for promoting a harmonized approach to health needs in the Pacific.

  2. Rapid realist review of the evidence: achieving lasting change when mental health rehabilitation staff undertake recovery-oriented training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Melanie; Bhanbhro, Sadiq; Cook, Sarah; Killaspy, Helen

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the factors contributing to lasting change in practice following a recovery-based training intervention for inpatient mental health rehabilitation staff. Staff training may help nurses and other staff groups in inpatient mental health rehabilitative settings to increase their recovery-oriented practice. There are no published reviews on the effectiveness of such training and few long-term evaluations. This review informed a realist evaluation of a specific intervention (GetREAL). Rapid realist review methodology was used to generate and prioritize programme theories. ASSIA, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Medline, PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science and grey literature searches were performed in September 2014-March 2015 with no date restrictions. Stakeholders suggested further documents. GetREAL project documentation was consulted. Programme theory development took place iteratively with literature identification. Stakeholders validated and prioritized emerging programme theories and the prioritized theories were refined using literature case studies. Fifty-one relevant documents fed into 49 programme theories articulating seven mechanisms for lasting change. Prioritized mechanisms were: staff receptiveness to change; and staff feeling encouraged, motivated and supported by colleagues and management to change. Seven programme theories were prioritized and refined using data from four case studies. Lasting change can be facilitated by collaborative action planning, regular collaborative meetings, appointing a change agent, explicit management endorsement and prioritization and modifying organizational structures. Conversely, a challenging organizational climate, or a prevalence of 'change fatigue', may block change. Pre-intervention exploration may help identify any potential barriers to embedding recovery in the organizational culture. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Staff support for the Health Service Executive (HSE) global health programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, G; Weakliam, D; Boland, M; Fitzgerald, M

    2014-03-01

    The Global Health programme (GHP) within the Health Service Executive (HSE) aims to improve health in developing countries by creating partnerships between Irish and developing world healthcare institutions. To ascertain the level of interest among HSE staff for the GHP a web-based survey was conducted. 1,028 responses were received. Medical professionals, 202 (27.7%) composed the largest category of respondents. The majority, 503 (69.3%) of respondents wished to actively participate in the GHP. 237 (23.1%) staff had previous experience of working in the developing world. This survey highlighted a number of themes respondents considered important for successful partnerships including: reciprocal staff exchange, joint scientific research, the avoidance of "brain drain" and utilising the Internet to link institutions. Less than 1% (2/203) of comments expressed a negative view of the GHP.

  4. Advanced trauma life support training for hospital staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Sudha; Sethi, Dinesh; Chinnock, Paul; Wong, Roger

    2014-08-22

    Injury is responsible for an increasing global burden of death and disability. As a result, new models of trauma care have been developed. Many of these, though initially developed in high-income countries (HICs), are now being adopted in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). One such trauma care model is advanced trauma life support (ATLS) training in hospitals, which is being promoted in LMICs as a strategy for improving outcomes for victims of trauma. The impact of this health service intervention, however, has not been rigorously tested by means of a systematic review in either HIC or LMIC settings. To quantify the impact of ATLS training for hospital staff on injury mortality and morbidity in hospitals with and without such a training program. The search for studies was run on the 16th May 2014. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), Ovid MEDLINE(R), Ovid MEDLINE(R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE(R) Daily and Ovid OLDMEDLINE(R), Embase Classic+Embase (Ovid), ISI WOS (SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, CPCI-S & CPSI-SSH), CINAHL Plus (EBSCO), PubMed and screened reference lists. Randomised controlled trials, controlled trials and controlled before-and-after studies comparing the impact of ATLS-trained hospital staff versus non-ATLS trained hospital staff on injury mortality and morbidity. Three authors applied the eligibility criteria to trial reports for inclusion, and extracted data. None of the studies identified by the search met the inclusion criteria for this review. There is no evidence from controlled trials that ATLS or similar programs impact the outcome for victims of injury, although there is some evidence that educational initiatives improve knowledge of hospital staff of available emergency interventions. Furthermore, there is no evidence that trauma management systems that incorporate ATLS training impact positively on outcome

  5. Benchmarking Danish Vocational Education and Training Programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogetoft, Peter; Wittrup, Jesper

    . This makes it difficult to compare the resources used, since some programmes by their nature require more classroom time and equipment than others. It is also far from straightforward to compare college effects with respect to grades, since the various programmes apply very different forms of assessment...

  6. Virtual vitreoretinal surgery: validation of a training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Vestergaard, Anders Højslet; Grauslund, Jakob

    2017-02-01

    To test the validity of the eyesi surgical simulator as an assessment tool in a virtual reality vitreoretinal training programme. In collaboration with an experienced vitreoretinal surgeon, a virtual vitreoretinal training programme was composed on the eyesi surgical simulator, software version 2.9.2 (VRmagic GmbH, Manheim, Germany). It was completed twice by three groups: 20 medical students, ten residents of ophthalmology and five trained vitreoretinal surgeons. The programme contained six training modules: navigation level 2 (Nav2), forceps training level 5 (ForT5), bimanual training level 3 (BimT3), laser coagulation level 3 (LasC3), posterior hyaloid level 3 (PostH3) and internal limiting membrane peeling level 3 (ILMP3). The scores in each module were assessed from two to five different factors (tissue treatment, efficiency, target achievement, instrument handling and microscope handling), and it was possible to achieve 100 points in each module. At the final training session, the highest overall median score was found for the vitreoretinal surgeons (vitreoretinal surgeons: 434 points, residents: 394.5 points, medical students: 272.5 points, p training programme with validity for the eyesi surgical simulator as an assessment tool for overall score and for four of six vitreoretinal modules. These findings could potentially make the programme a useful tool in the training of future vitreoretinal surgeons. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Conversation as Academic Practice: Tutors' Strategies in Integrating Student Learning in a Professional Training Degree Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Bowden

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Tutors are generally considered to be an additional resource in teaching and learning, as a means of augmenting that of the lecturer. This article explores tutors as academic staff with responsibilities for developing practice competencies and integrating student learning in a social care professional training degree programme. The research is small-scale, based upon data from a purposive sample of five interviews; and upon insider-participant observation notes and reflections in one single setting. The author deployed a situated ethnographic methodology alongside a frame analytic approach. The research found that in their academic practice, tutors reveal how their student contact is oriented to developing a reflective practitioner and they discuss how programme inputs impact on the student’s professional self. Simultaneously, tutors seek to create cross programme integration through finding overlaps with academic programme strands.

  8. The influence of staff training and education on prosthetic and orthotic service quality: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghany, Saeed; Sadeghi-Demneh, Ebrahim; Trinler, Ursula; Onmanee, Pornsuree; Dillon, Michael P; Baker, Richard

    2017-07-01

    Education and training in prosthetics and orthotics typically comply with International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics standards based on three categories of prosthetic and orthotic professionals. This scoping study sought to describe the evidence base available to answer the question, How are prosthetic and orthotic services influenced by the training of staff providing them? Scoping review. A structured search of the peer-reviewed literature catalogued in major electronic databases yielded 3039 papers. Following review of title and abstract, 93 articles were considered relevant. Full-text review reduced this number to 25. Only two articles were identified as providing direct evidence of the effects of training and education on service provision. While both suggested that there was an impact, it is difficult to see how the more specific conclusions of either could be generalised. The other 23 articles provide a useful background to a range of issues including the specification of competencies that training programmes should deliver (3 articles), descriptions of a range of training programmes and the effects of training and education on student knowledge and skills. Although it is considered axiomatic, the service quality is dependent on practitioner education and training. There is insufficient evidence to establish whether levels of training and education in prosthetics and orthotics have an effect on the quality of prosthetic and orthotic services. Clinical relevance There is very little evidence about the effects of training and education of prosthetists and orthotists on service quality. While this is a somewhat negative finding, we feel that it is important to bring this to the attention of the prosthetics and orthotics community.

  9. Evaluating IMU communication skills training programme: assessment tool development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, R; Beevi, Z; Lukman, H

    2008-08-01

    This article describes the development of four assessment tools designed to evaluate the communication skills training (CST) programme at the International Medical University (IMU). The tools measure pre-clinical students' 1) perceived competency in basic interpersonal skills, 2) attitude towards patient-centred communication, 3) conceptual knowledge on doctor-patient communication, and 4) acceptance of the CST programme.

  10. Effects of off-season strength and plyometric training programmes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ineffective maintenance of sport-specific seasonal programmes. As such, the aim of the study was to determine whether an off-season strength and plyometric training programme could enhance isokinetic strength and javelin throwing performance in high-school athletes. Twenty athletes, aged 16 to 19 years, who had at ...

  11. A Staff-Training Program to Increase Spontaneous Vocal Requests in Children With Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Dyer, Kathleen; Karp, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated a staff-training and feedback program to increase (a) staff use of naturalistic language training techniques, and (b) child production of spontaneous vocal requests in a school setting for young children with autism. Training was conducted in integrated preschool centers and in an art group. The results revealed that the training and feedback procedure was successful in increasing staff use of naturalistic language training techniques. Further, these increased strategies ...

  12. ENGINEERING STAFF TRAINING WITH CONSIDERATION OF MODERN ECONOMIC SCIENCE ACHIEVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Litvintseva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Achievements in various fields of modern science have an impact not only on the development of science itself, but also on the formation of human capital, including training of technical personnel needed for the transition to an information society.The aim of the article is to show interinfluence of different sciences of engineering staff training and specific aspects of their training in modern conditions.Methodology and research methods. The research is based on the system-based approach, experimental knowledge generalization, comparative analysis and economics methodology. We used analysis of national and foreign literature, official documents and statistic data of the Russian Federation, Global Competitiveness Index. Also, information processing was carried out using graphic methods.Results. The influence of natural sciences on economic knowledge development as well as on perfection of engineering and engineering education is shown. Decrease in researcher numbers as well as lack of young people in engineering sciences is revealed. In particular, the following disturbing facts are established and emphasized: engineers are a fifth part among graduates and this share has been nearly constant during the last 10 years. However, the number of engineering specialists going abroad for work continues to grow.Scientific novelty. The conclusions on the influence of natural sciences on economic theory development as well applied economics on engineering development are made. Special aspects of modern engineers training as knowledge integrator are highlighted.Practical significance. Based on the analysis of official statistics, data the trend of engineering specialists decrease in Russia is shown. In connection with engineering staff aging and low number of engineering companies, the necessity for new engineering model implementation and new type of engineers training is emphasized.

  13. An international partnership interdisciplinary training programme on public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrioti, Despena; Charalambous, George; Skitsou, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    expertise in course content and audience needs. Given the financial constrains in the country national health system reforms in organization and management to provide efficient services is of the highest importance. Assessing perceived training needs of health professionals will help designing more......Background: Targeted training programmes are more efficient towards skills development. Literature on assessing training needs in order to formulate programmes through international partnerships is very limited. This study intended to identify perceived training needs in public health with an aim...... health (61%) as the highest priorities echoed current population needs. Conclusions: This international partnership training programme was the first of this type provided to a member state by WHO/EURO. It combined academic expertise in curriculum development and teaching technologies with practical...

  14. Could Slackline Training Complement the FIFA 11+ Programme Regarding Training of Neuromuscular Control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Tobias; Kiefer, Julian; Werner, Inge; Federolf, Peter A

    2017-09-01

    The current study compared changes in neuromuscular control between slackline training and the stabilization training elements of the FIFA 11+ programme. Twenty-five students in 2 groups performed a 12-unit training programme. The slackline training group (n = 13) exclusively trained with a slackline. The stabilization training group (n = 12) practised exercises as described in the second part of the FIFA 11+ programme. Improvements in balance were assessed using three tests for dynamic, quasi-static, and perturbed postural control: the star excursion balance test (SEBT), the closed-eye single-leg stance, and the MFT S3-Check. Both groups significantly improved the stability and sensorimotor index of the MFT S3-Check (p FIFA 11+ warm-up programme. If compliance with the FIFA 11+ programme is declining, then slacklining might offer an alternative approach to reach the training goals of improved sensorimotor control.

  15. Training Programmes for Distance Education Professionals: An Analytical Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K. MISRA

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Present paper seeks to analyze the impact of training programmes on distance education professionals of Indira Gandhi National Open University, (IGNOU. The objective of the paper is to identify the training needs of Distance Education Professionals to manage distance education affairs of IGNOU, to evaluate the effectiveness of existing training programmes, to develop a feasible training and professional development model for distance education Professionals (DEPs and to suggest initiatives in existing training for the skill development of DEPs for effective career growth and development. Attempt has been made to apply statistical tools such as skewness, kurtosis, regression and correlation on a different set of variables to assess the impact of the training programmes on DE professionals such as teachers and academics. While addressing the objectives of the study it is revealed that some of the indicators have opened up scope for improvement. Nevertheless trainees have expressed mixed reaction on the quality of training pgrammes with respect to content, methodology and effectiveness. Based on the analysis a workable training model has also been suggested where emphasis on the Common Training Approach (CTA has been given besides, work specific training. For the over all professional development of DEPs a suitable training strategy has been worked out which ensures training at different strata that includes primary, secondary & tertiary level considering the experience & job requirements of the professionals.

  16. Effect of Nursing Home Staff Training on Quality of Patient Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Margaret W.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Assessed effects of nursing home staff training in care for the dying on quality of life of 306 terminally ill patients in 5 pairs of matched nursing homes assigned randomly to trained and not trained staff groups. Patients in trained homes had less depression and greater satisfaction with care than patients in control homes at 1 and 3 months.…

  17. Building workforce capacity to detect and respond to child abuse and neglect cases: A training intervention for staff working in emergency settings in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemington, Tara; Fraser, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    Too many children are brought to hospital emergency departments on numerous occasions before they are recognised as victims of child abuse and neglect. For this reason, improving knowledge and response behaviors of emergency staff at all levels is likely to have a significant impact on better outcomes. An Australian based training programme was the first of its kind to address this issue in a Vietnamese Emergency Department. Titled 'Safe Children Vietnam', the programme aimed to improve knowledge, attitudes and reporting behaviors concerning child abuse in the emergency setting. A pre-post test design was used to evaluate the impact of 'Safe Children Vietnam' on emergency staff knowledge, attitudes and intentions to report child abuse and neglect. Emergency staff including doctors, nurses and healthcare staff (n=116) participated in the clinical training programme. Linear Mixed Model analyses showed that on programme completion, they were more likely to recognise serious cases of all types of abuse. The 'Safe Children Vietnam' programme was effective at improving emergency staff knowledge of child abuse and neglect. A systems wide approach may be necessary to impact on emergency staff attitudes towards reporting cases of abuse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation and impact of cardiotocography training programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pehrson, C; Sørensen, Jette Led; Amer-Wåhlin, I

    2011-01-01

    The interpretation and management of cardiotocography (CTG) tracings are often criticised in obstetric malpractice cases. As a consequence, regular CTG training has been recommended, even though little is known about the effect of CTG training.......The interpretation and management of cardiotocography (CTG) tracings are often criticised in obstetric malpractice cases. As a consequence, regular CTG training has been recommended, even though little is known about the effect of CTG training....

  19. Large strengthening effect of a hip-flexor training programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas Quaade; Zebis, Mette

    2016-01-01

    .17-0.52) Nm/kg, in favour of the strength training group (p training using elastic bands as external loading, for only 6 weeks, substantially improves hip-flexor muscle strength. This simple exercise programme seems promising for future prevention and treatment......PURPOSE: To investigate the effect on hip-flexion strength of a 6-week hip-flexor training programme using elastic bands as resistance. We hypothesized that the training group, compared to a control group, would increase their hip-flexion strength more. METHODS: Thirty-three healthy subjects (45...... % females), 24(5) years of age, were included in a randomized controlled trial and allocated to heavy strength training of the hip-flexor muscles or to control (no strength training). Strength training of the hip-flexors (dominant leg) was performed three times 10 min per week for 6 weeks. The strength...

  20. Evaluating the MESSAGE Communication Strategies in Dementia training for use with community-based aged care staff working with people with dementia: a controlled pretest-post-test study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Erin R; Chenery, Helen J

    2016-04-01

    The study aims to evaluate the effects of a communication skills training programme on community aged care staff's knowledge of communication support in dementia and on staff's care experience. Dementia can lead to impairments in communication. Therefore, quality community-based dementia care requires that staff be skilled communicators, equipped to facilitate interactions with people with dementia. The current investigation evaluated the effectiveness of the MESSAGE Communication Strategies in Dementia for Care Staff training programme with respect to knowledge of communication support and the staff/caregiver experience. A multi-centre controlled pretest/post-test design with randomised cohort allocation was used. Outcome measures were completed at baseline, immediately after training (training group only), and at three-month follow-up. Thirty-eight care staff working in community aged care participated and completed all outcome measures (training = 22; control = 16).Training and control groups completed the following outcome measures: knowledge of communication support strategies, self-efficacy, preparedness to provide care, strain in nursing care and attitude to dementia care. Staff in the training group provided written feedback on the training. A significant improvement in knowledge scores from baseline was found for the training group both immediately after training and at three-month follow-up. There was also a significant training effect for self-efficacy and preparedness to provide care. No significant difference was found for the control group for any measure. No significant training effects were found for measures of strain or attitudes to dementia care. Feedback from staff suggests that the training was well received. The MESSAGE training was positively received by staff and had a significant effect on care staff knowledge, and confidence to provide care for people with dementia. The easily accessible multimedia training programme is well received by

  1. Do Computerised Training Programmes Designed to Improve Working Memory Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apter, Brian J. B.

    2012-01-01

    A critical review of working memory training research during the last 10 years is provided. Particular attention is given to research that has attempted to investigate the efficacy of commercially marketed computerised training programmes such as "Cogmed" and "Jungle Memory". Claimed benefits are questioned on the basis that research methodologies…

  2. Evaluation of a Trauma-Focused CBT Training Programme for IAPT services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Hannah

    2017-09-01

    Therapists in Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services are often expected to treat complex presentations of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), such as individuals with multiple, prolonged or early life trauma histories and significant co-morbidity, for which they have received minimal training. Although high recovery rates for PTSD have been demonstrated in randomized controlled trials, these are not always replicated in routine practice, suggesting that training interventions are required to fill the research-practice gap. This study investigated the outcomes of a therapist training programme on treating PTSD with trauma-focused cognitive behavioural therapy (TF-CBT). Twenty therapists from ten IAPT services participated in the training, which consisted of workshops, webinars and consultation sessions over a 6-month period. Feedback indicated that participants found the training highly acceptable. PTSD knowledge and self- and supervisor-rated competence on TF-CBT measures improved following the training and improvements were maintained a year later. Client outcomes on a PTSD measure improved following the training. Participants reported attempts to disseminate learning from the course back to their teams. The findings indicate that the training programme was successful in improving TF-CBT knowledge, skills and outcomes for IAPT therapists. Tentative support for training 'trauma experts' within IAPT services was found, although institutional constraints and staff turnover may limit the sustainability of the model.

  3. Incorporating cardiopulmonary resuscitation training into a cardiac rehabilitation programme: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartledge, Susie; Finn, Judith; Bray, Janet E; Case, Rosalind; Barker, Lauren; Missen, Diane; Shaw, James; Stub, Dion

    2018-02-01

    Patients with a cardiac history are at future risk of cardiac events, including out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Targeting cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training to family members of cardiac patients has long been advocated, but is an area in need of contemporary research evidence. An environment yet to be investigated for targeted training is cardiac rehabilitation. To evaluate the feasibility of providing CPR training in a cardiac rehabilitation programme among patients, their family members and staff. A prospective before and after study design was used. CPR training was delivered using video self-instruction CPR training kits, facilitated by a cardiac nurse. Data was collected pre-training, post-training and at one month. Cardiac patient participation rates in CPR classes were high ( n = 56, 72.7% of eligible patients) with a further 27 family members attending training. Patients were predominantly male (60.2%), family members were predominantly female (81.5%), both with a mean age of 65 years. Confidence to perform CPR and willingness to use skills significantly increased post-training (both p<0.001). Post training participants demonstrated a mean compression rate of 112 beats/min and a mean depth of 48 mm. Training reach was doubled as participants shared the video self-instruction kit with a further 87 people. Patients, family members and cardiac rehabilitation staff had positive feedback about the training. We demonstrated that cardiac rehabilitation is an effective and feasible environment to provide CPR training. Using video self-instruction CPR training kits enabled further training reach to the target population.

  4. What works in delivering dementia education or training to hospital staff? A critical synthesis of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surr, Claire A; Gates, Cara

    2017-10-01

    The quality of care delivered to people with dementia in hospital settings is of international concern. People with dementia occupy up to one quarter of acute hospital beds, however, staff working in hospitals report lack of knowledge and skills in caring for this group. There is limited evidence about the most effective approaches to training hospital staff on dementia. The purpose of this literature review was to examine published evidence on the most effective approaches to dementia training and education for hospital staff. The review was conducted using critical synthesis and included qualitative, quantitative and mixed/multi- methods studies. Kirkpatrick's four level model for the evaluation of training interventions was adopted to structure the review. The following databases were searched: MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, AMED, British Education Index, Education Abstracts, ERIC (EbscoHost), The Cochrane Library-Cochrane reviews, Economic evaluations, CENTRAL (Wiley), HMIC (Ovid), ASSIA, IBSS (Proquest), Conference Proceedings Citation Indexes (Web of Science), using a combination of keyword for the following themes: Dementia/Alzheimer's, training/education, staff knowledge and patient outcomes. A total of 20 papers were included in the review, the majority of which were low or medium quality, impacting on generalisability. The 16 different training programmes evaluated in the studies varied in terms of duration and mode of delivery, although most employed face-to-face didactic techniques. Studies predominantly reported on reactions to training and knowledge, only one study evaluated outcomes across all of the levels of the Kirkpatrick model. Key features of training that appeared to be more acceptable and effective were identified related to training content, delivery methods, practicalities, duration and support for implementation. The review methodology enabled inclusion of a broad range of studies and permitted common features of successful programmes to be

  5. An efficacy study of a combined parent and teacher management training programme for children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostberg, Monica; Rydell, Ann-Margret

    2012-04-01

    Several parent training programmes and behavioural teacher training programmes built on learning theory have been developed for problem prevention and treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and/or oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) during the last few decades. Group format has often been used for parent training but single-subject designs are more common in teacher training. More studies have focussed on pre-school children than on older children, and a minority have been conducted in public mental health settings. This study aimed to evaluate a combined parent and teacher manual-based group training programme for children with ADHD conducted by the staff at a child and adolescent psychiatric clinic in Sweden. The intervention was a modified version of Barkley's programme. Children were randomized to an Intervention or a Control group. Sixty-one parents and 68 teachers answered questions about ADHD and ODD symptoms, and about behavioural problems when the study started and at a 3-month follow-up. RESULTS showed that the intervention resulted in a reduction of the number of children who met DSM-IV criteria for ADHD and/or ODD. Effects were more pronounced in the home setting than in the school setting, and were further accentuated when both parents and teachers of the same child took part in the intervention. Teachers with more problematic classroom situations benefited most from the intervention. The programme, "Strategies in Everyday Life", has, in a regular clinical setting, demonstrated promising effects on children's disruptive behaviour, and a clinical implication was to recommend involving both parents and teachers in the programme.

  6. The impact of the Dementia ABC educational programme on competence in person-centred dementia care and job satisfaction of care staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokstad, Anne Marie Mork; Døble, Betty Sandvik; Engedal, Knut; Kirkevold, Øyvind; Benth, Jūratė Šaltytė; Selbaek, Geir

    2017-06-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of the Dementia ABC educational programme on the participants' competence in person-centred care and on their level of job satisfaction. The development of person-centred care for people with dementia is highly recommended, and staff training that enhances such an approach may positively influence job satisfaction and the possibility of recruiting and retaining competent care staff. The study is a longitudinal survey, following participants over a period of 24 months with a 6-month follow-up after completion of the programme. A total of 1,795 participants from 90 municipalities in Norway are included, and 580 from 52 municipalities completed all measurements. The person-centred care assessment tool (P-CAT) is used to evaluate person-centredness. The psychosocial workplace environment and job satisfaction questionnaire is used to investigate job satisfaction. Measurements are made at baseline, and after 12, 24 and 30 months. A statistically significant increase in the mean P-CAT subscore of person-centred practice and the P-CAT total score is found at 12, 24 and 30 months compared to baseline. A statistically significant decrease in scores in the P-CAT subscore for organisational support is found at all points of measurement compared to baseline. Statistically significant increases in satisfaction with workload, personal and professional development, demands balanced with qualifications and variation in job tasks as elements of job satisfaction are reported. The evaluation of the Dementia ABC educational programme identifies statistically significant increases in scores of person-centredness and job satisfaction, indicating that the training has a positive impact. The results indicate that a multicomponent training programme including written material, multidisciplinary reflection groups and workshops has a positive impact on the development of person-centred care practice and the job satisfaction of care

  7. A report on the development and implementation of a preceptorship training programme for registered nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June D. Jeggels

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical supervision represents an important aspect in the development of nursing students’ clinical skills. At the School of Nursing (SoN the clinical supervisors employed by the University of the Western Cape (UWC have limited contact sessions with students in the clinical setting. However, with the increase in student numbers a need was identified to strengthen the support given to nursing students in the service setting.Objective: A preceptorship training programme for nurses was developed in 2009, aimed at improving the clinical teaching expertise of professional nurses. The planning phase, based on a preceptorship model, represents a collaborative undertaking by the higher education institution and the nursing directorate of the Provincial Government Western Cape. Method: A two-week, eight credit, short course was approved by the university structures and presented by staff members of the school. The teaching and learning strategies included interactive lectures, small group activities and preceptor-student encounters in simulated and real service settings. Some of the course outcomes were: applying the principles of clinical teaching and learning within the context of adult education, understanding the preceptor role and managing Results: To date, fifty-four participants have attended the course. Following an internal review of the pilot programme in 2010, relevant adjustments to the programme were made. Conclusion: It is recommended that all the stakeholders be involved in the development and implementation of a contextually relevant preceptorship training programme. It is further recommended that the school embarks on an extensive programme evaluation.

  8. A report on the development and implementation of a preceptorship training programme for registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeggels, June D; Traut, Annelene; Africa, Florence

    2013-01-01

    Clinical supervision represents an important aspect in the development of nursing students’ clinical skills. At the School of Nursing (SoN) the clinical supervisors employed by the University of the Western Cape (UWC) have limited contact sessions with students in the clinical setting. However, with the increase in student numbers a need was identified to strengthen the support given to nursing students in the service setting. A preceptorship training programme for nurses was developed in 2009, aimed at improving the clinical teaching expertise of professional nurses. The planning phase, based on a preceptorship model, represents a collaborative undertaking by the higher education institution and the nursing directorate of the Provincial Government Western Cape. A two-week, eight credit, short course was approved by the university structures and presented by staff members of the school. The teaching and learning strategies included interactive lectures, small group activities and preceptor-student encounters in simulated and real service settings. Some of the course outcomes were: applying the principles of clinical teaching and learning within the context of adult education, understanding the preceptor role and managing To date, fifty-four participants have attended the course. Following an internal review of the pilot programme in 2010, relevant adjustments to the programme were made. It is recommended that all the stakeholders be involved in the development and implementation of a contextually relevant preceptorship training programme. It is further recommended that the school embarks on an extensive programme evaluation.

  9. Programmer Job Training for the Disadvantaged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feurzeig, Wallace

    1978-01-01

    Discusses programer job training programs, designed to give the knowledge, skills, and effective job experience required for placement in entry level business programing jobs, to chronically unemployed, low-income adults who lack marketable skills, but demonstrate the intelligence, competence, motivation, and temperament required to do…

  10. EQUIP training the trainers: an evaluation of a training programme for service users and carers involved in training mental health professionals in user-involved care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, C; Grundy, A; Meade, O; Callaghan, P; Lovell, K

    2017-08-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: UK NHS policy highlights the importance of user and carer involvement in health professional training. We know little about service user and carer motivations and experiences of accessing training courses for delivering training to health professionals and how well such courses prepare them for delivering training to healthcare professionals. 'Involvement' in training has often been tokenistic and too narrowly focused on preregistration courses. There is limited data on how best to prepare and support potential service user and carer trainers. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This study adds to the international literature by highlighting service user and carer motivations for accessing a training course for delivering training to health professionals. Service users and carers wanted to gain new skills and confidence in presentation/facilitation as well as to make a difference to healthcare practice. We also learned that service users desired different levels of involvement in training facilitation - some wanted to take a more active role than others. A one-size-fits-all approach is not always appropriate. Encountering resistance from staff in training was a previously unidentified challenge to service user and carers' experience of delivering training in practice and is a key challenge for trainers to address in future. Professional training involvement can be enhanced via specialist training such as the EQUIP training the trainers programme evaluated here. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: When training service users and carers to deliver training to mental health professionals, it is important that service users are equipped to deal with resistance from staff. It is important that service user and carer roles are negotiated and agreed prior to delivering training to healthcare professionals to accommodate individual preferences and allay anxieties. Training for service users and carers must be offered

  11. Evolution of radiation protection training programmes in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monica, Rodriguez Suarez; Elvira, Hernando Velasco; Javier, Menarguez; Javier, Fernandez; Susana, Falcon; Mirian, Bravo [CIEMAT - Radiation Protection Training Unit ( IEE), Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Education and training are an important tool to promote safety culture and to upgrade competence. In this sense, Radiation Protection (R.P.) training programmes are a major challenge in order to achieve occupational, public and environmental radiation protection in all applied fields of ionising radiation.The Spanish R.P. Education and Training system provides a solid and integrated educational model. The needs for a specialized training on R.P. for exposed workers appears into the Spanish regulation in 1964. Since then, a wide variety of R.P. initial, continuous and on the job training courses has been carried out, taking into account the diverse applied fields, the different levels of responsibilities, the technological and methodological advances, as well as the international trends. C.I.E.M.A.T., through the R.P. training Unit, has been organizing and developing most of the R.P. training in Spain since 1964, becoming a reference centre. The educational programmes are being continuously updating and improving in order to complete and adapt all R.P. training levels. Initial training, long-life training, updating or upgrading training, as well as other innovative courses related with R.P. are being offered by C.I.E.M.A.T. each year. Another important aspect of R.P. is the information and training to stake holders. C.I.E.M.A. T. is also working in this sense. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the evolution of R.P. training processes since 1964 in Spain, in order to conclude which are the future trends and the changes required to adapt the Spanish R.P. Education and Training system to the current needs and upcoming scene. (authors)

  12. [SUPPORT, CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMMES, PRAGMATIC CODE OF ETHICS: A CLINICAL APPROACH OF EXECUTIVE TRAINING].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabaret, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    This article aims at introducing an educational sequence completed at l'Institut de Formation des Cadres de Santé (IFCS) at the CHRU in Lille in France, entitled "training project and educational project" present in the "training duties" module whose goal is to generate students'knowledge through co-operative education programmes. By creating this innovative sequence, the educational aim is to use the Institut ground as a ground of learning, associated with the various internship grounds, in order to get the most of co-operative education programmes. Besides, in a pragmatic code of ethics in training, the teaching staff draw their inspiration from a clinical approach of executive training: they regard students as true protagonists in a co-operative plan created for them, wishing to design it with them using their words. Thus, students are brought to criticize the IFCS educational project and debate it with the trainers who have built it. Each partner tries to understand the Other, being aware of their being different. By contributing every year to rewriting the educational project which directly concerns them, students build their professional positions as health executives. They play an active role in co-operative education programmes just like IFCS outside partners.

  13. Therapeutic role of continuous exercise training programme on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Findings of the study revealed significant decreased effect of continuous training programme on SBP, DBP, TC and significant increased effects on VO2max and HDL level at p< 0.05. Also there was a significant negative and positive correlation between changes in VO2max and changes in TC and HDL ...

  14. Development and evaluation of a training programme on primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development and evaluation of a training programme on primary prevention of diabetes for primary care physicians. ... evaluated in two parts – (i) knowledge assessment done by ... CONCLUSION: Diabetic health care at primary health care level can be considerably improved through sensitization and effective educational

  15. Comparative Effects of Circuit Training Programme on Speed and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the Comparative Effects of Circuit Training Programme on Speed and Power of Pre- and Post-Menarcheal girls. A pre-test- posttest control group experimental design was used to carry out the study. A total of 80 Secondary School girls from St. Peter's College, Olomore, Abeokuta, in Ogun State of ...

  16. Comparative Effects of Circuit Training Programme on Speed and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the Comparative Effects of Circuit Training Programme on Speed and Power of Pre- and Post-Menarcheal girls. ... took part in the study. The subjects were not involved in competitive school sports. Stratified random sampling technique was used to select 40 pre-menarceal and 40 postmenarcheal girls ...

  17. Apples to Oranges: Benchmarking Vocational Education and Training Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogetoft, Peter; Wittrup, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses methods for benchmarking vocational education and training colleges and presents results from a number of models. It is conceptually difficult to benchmark vocational colleges. The colleges typically offer a wide range of course programmes, and the students come from different socioeconomic backgrounds. We solve the…

  18. Drop-out from parenting training programmes: a retrospective study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective:Parent training programmes are a well-established treatment approach for children and adolescents with disruptive behaviour disorders. However, dropout from treatment is a common problem that confounds research on the efficacy of this approach, and wastes important mental health resources. This study ...

  19. [Implementation of a national training assessment programme in anaesthesiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjelsager, K.; Malling, B.; Bested, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2004, outcome-based education and in-training assessment was introduced by a reform of postgraduate medical education in Denmark. An assessment programme covering the introductory year of anaesthesiology was constructed. The purpose of this study was to explore to which degree...

  20. CERN High School Teachers Training Programme meets DG

    CERN Document Server

    Brice, Maximilien

    2014-01-01

    CERN's DG Rolf Heuer met with the participants of the High School Teachers Training Programme on 23 July 2014 for a Q&A Session. Following the interaction, he met with the HST Working Group collaborating on a lesson plan for teaching SESAME in high schools.

  1. A Staff-Training Program to Increase Spontaneous Vocal Requests in Children With Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated a staff-training and feedback program to increase (a) staff use of naturalistic language training techniques, and (b) child production of spontaneous vocal requests in a school setting for young children with autism. Training was conducted in integrated preschool centers and in an art group. The results revealed that the training and feedback procedure was successful in increasing staff use of naturalistic language training techniques. Further, these increased strategies were associated with corresponding increases in spontaneous vocal requests for all children during embedded training and ongoing feedback conditions. In addition, probes collected by an unobtrusive observer revealed durability of child requesting when staff feedback was discontinued. Social validity measures from front-line staff regarding the intervention revealed positive ratings. The results are discussed in relation to the continued search for effective service-delivery systems to improve communication for children with autism in the public school setting. PMID:27999635

  2. Staff Training in Autism: The One-Eyed Wo/Man…

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karola Dillenburger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Having well-trained staff is key to ensuring good quality autism services, especially since people affected with autism generally tend to have higher support needs than other populations in terms of daily living, as well as their mental and physical health. Poorly-trained staff can have detrimental effects on service provision and staff morale and can lead to staff burn-out, as well as increased service user anxiety and stress. This paper reports on a survey with health, social care, and education staff who work within the statutory autism services sector in the UK that explored their knowledge and training with regards to autism. Interview data obtained from staff and service users offer qualitative illustrations of survey findings. Overall, the findings expose an acute lack of autism-specific training that has detrimental impacts. At best, this training was based on brief and very basic awareness raising rather than on in-depth understanding of issues related to autism or skills for evidence-based practice. Service users were concerned with the effects that the lack of staff training had on the services they received. The paper concludes with a discussion of policy routes to achieving quality staff training based on international best practice. The focus is on improving the quality of life and mental health for services users and staff, as well as making potentially significant cost-savings for governments.

  3. An interactive training programme to treat body image disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gledhill, Lucinda J; Cornelissen, Katri K; Cornelissen, Piers L; Penton-Voak, Ian S; Munafò, Marcus R; Tovée, Martin J

    2017-02-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a life-threatening mental health condition. A core feature is a disturbance of body image, such that sufferers see themselves as fatter than they actually are. We tested the effectiveness of a novel training programme to recalibrate our participants' perception of body size. In a novel adaptation of a cognitive bias training programme, participants judged the body size of a series of female bodies and were given feedback to improve their accuracy over four daily training sessions. In Study 1, we recruited young women with high concerns about their body size for a randomized controlled study. In Study 2, we then applied the training programme to a case series of women with atypical AN. In Study 1, the training programme significantly improved the body size judgements of women with high body concerns compared to controls. We also found evidence of improved body image and reduced eating concerns in this group. In Study 2, the programme again recalibrated the body size judgements of women with atypical AN. We also saw evidence of a clinically meaningful reduction in their body size and eating-disordered concerns. This training has the potential to be a valuable treatment used together with more traditional talking therapies. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? A core feature of anorexia nervosa (AN) is an overestimation of body size; sufferers believe themselves to be larger than they are in reality. This study shows that an individual's perceptual boundary between what they classify as a fat versus a thin body is not immutable; it can be changed through a cognitive bias training programme. What does this study add? This means that body size overestimation may now be treatable. Critically, as well as improving the accuracy of body size judgements, we also found a clinically significant improvement in participants' eating-disordered concerns. This demonstrates that a targeted behavioural training regime can change

  4. Staff Perspectives of Service User Involvement on Two Clinical Psychology Training Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Simon P.; Holttum, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated both negative and positive staff perspectives of service user involvement on two clinical psychology training courses as part of an ongoing process of service evaluation. Ten clinical psychology staff from two training courses were interviewed over the telephone by a current trainee clinical psychologist using a…

  5. An education and training programme for livestock transporters in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S. Schwartzkopf-Genswein

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The transport of live animals is known to be stressful and therefore can have a direct impact on animal welfare and on food safety and quality. The livestock production and transport industries are increasingly interested in improving animal well-being. This can be accomplished through the use of careful animal handling and good driving practices before, during and after transport. The recently developed Certified Livestock Transporter (CLT training programme in Canada is aimed at ensuring livestock transporters are educated and have access to up-to-date information regarding the humane handling of animals. An overview of the CLT includes examples from the main training manual and species-specific modules. The relationship between education and improved animal welfare is discussed and possible future directions proposed. The examples provided may be modified by other users to develop new education and training programmes relevant to their geographic locations and livestock industries.

  6. CERN Technical Training Programme: Learning for the LHC!

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    In collaboration with AS and AC divisions, the Technical Training Programme is launching EVM Hands-on Tutorials specifically designed for those people involved in the current EVM for LHC exercise. The goal of the EVM Hands-on Training Sessions is to provide insight in Earned Value Management as implemented at CERN. Following this course will enable you to understand the EVM methodology, the tools used at CERN, the procedures used for the data-collection and data-reporting and assist you in analysing cost & schedule variances. The course is an intensive 2-hour 'hands-on' training session. If you are interested in this course, please discuss with your supervisor or your DTO. More information and online registration by EDH are available from the Technical Training web pages: http://www.cern.ch/TechnicalTraining/

  7. CERN Technical Training Programme: Learning for the LHC !

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    In collaboration with AS and AC divisions, the Technical Training Programme is launching EVM Hands-on Tutorials specifically designed for those people involved in the current EVM for LHC exercise. The goal of the EVM Hands-on Training Sessions is to provide insight in Earned Value Management as implemented at CERN. Following this course will enable you to understand the EVM methodology, the tools used at CERN, the procedures used for the data-collection and data-reporting and assist you in analysing cost & schedule variances. The course is an intensive 2-hour 'hands-on' training session. If you are interested in this course, please discuss with your supervisor or your DTO. More information and online registration by EDH are available from the Technical Training web pages: http://www.cern.ch/TechnicalTraining/

  8. Training Needs of Vocational Forestry Staff in Ogun State Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These concerns gave rise to this study with specific objectives to level of knowledge and level of skills of vocational staff in forestry activities. Data were collected using a simple random sampling technique in the selection of 50% of vocational staff totaling 143 respondents. Descriptive statistics and inferential statistics were ...

  9. Evaluation of a training programme to induct medical students in delivering public health talks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ngiap Chuan; Mitesh, Shah; Koh, Yi Ling Eileen; Ang, Seng Bin; Chan, Hian Hui Vincent; How, Choon How; Tay, Ee Guan; Hwang, Siew Wai

    2017-01-01

    It is uncommon for medical students to deliver public health talks as part of their medical education curriculum. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a novel training programme that required medical students to deliver public health talks during their family medicine (FM) clerkship in a Singapore primary care institution. The FM faculty staff guided teams of third-year medical students to select appropriate topics for health talks that were to be conducted at designated polyclinics. The talks were video-recorded and appraised for clarity, content and delivery. The appraisal was done by the student's peers and assigned faculty staff. The audience was surveyed to determine their satisfaction level and understanding of the talks. The students also self-rated the effectiveness of this new teaching activity. A total of 120 medical students completed a questionnaire to rate the effectiveness of the new teaching activity. 85.8% of the students felt confident about the delivery of their talks, 95.8% reported having learnt how to deliver talks and 92.5% perceived this new training modality as useful in their medical education. Based on the results of the audience survey, the speakers were perceived as knowledgeable (53.1%), confident (51.3%) and professional (39.0%). Assessment of 15 video-recorded talks showed satisfactory delivery of the talks by the students. The majority of the students reported a favourable overall learning experience under this new training programme. This finding is supported by the positive feedback garnered from the audience, peers of the medical students and the faculty staff.

  10. Training and Support of Sessional Staff to Improve Quality of Teaching and Learning at Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Gillian; Crane, Linda; Heslop, Ian; Glass, Beverley D

    2015-06-25

    Sessional staff is increasingly involved in teaching at universities, playing a pivotal role in bridging the gap between theory and practice for students, especially in the health professions, including pharmacy. Although sessional staff numbers have increased substantially in recent years, limited attention has been paid to the quality of teaching and learning provided by this group. This review will discuss the training and support of sessional staff, with a focus on Australian universities, including the reasons for and potential benefits of training, and structure and content of training programs. Although sessional staff views these programs as valuable, there is a lack of in-depth evaluations of the outcomes of the programs for sessional staff, students and the university. Quality assurance of such programs is only guaranteed, however, if these evaluations extend to the impact of this training and support on student learning.

  11. ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME 2002/03: TIME TO VOTE!

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Each year at this time the Academic Training Committee makes a selection of possible topics for inclusion in next year's programme. But before a final decision is taken, everyone is given the opportunity to provide their input by selecting the subjects that are particularly relevant for them by filling in a questionnaire. As usual the questionnaire is divided into three sections: high energy physics, postgraduate lectures, applied physics and other topics. There is also space for making suggestions for subjects not listed and for giving comments and feedback on the programme in general. This year's questionnaire is available on the web. Please take the time to study it and choose the sets of lectures that will meet your academic training requirements from September 2002 through June 2003. THE DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION IS APRIL 26. The committee relies on you to make your carefully considered selection and to help it sustain a long standing CERN tradition of providing a high quality Academic Training Programme c...

  12. Influence of staff infection control training on infection-related quality measures in US nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasjit; Stone, Patricia W; Travers, Jasmine L; Cohen, Catherine C; Herzig, Carolyn T A

    2017-09-01

    Health care-associated infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in US nursing home residents. Ongoing training of nursing home staff is vital to the implementation of infection prevention and control processes. Our aim was to describe associations between methods, frequency, and timing of staff infection prevention and control training and infection-related quality measures. In this national survey of nursing homes, timing of staff infection prevention and control training was associated with reduced indwelling urinary catheter use. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Arts-based palliative care training, education and staff development: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, Benjamin Mark; Williams, Sion; Burton, Christopher R; Williams, Lynne

    2017-06-01

    The experience of art offers an emerging field in healthcare staff development, much of which is appropriate to the practice of palliative care. The workings of aesthetic learning interventions such as interactive theatre in relation to palliative and end-of-life care staff development programmes are widely uncharted. To investigate the use of aesthetic learning interventions used in palliative and end-of-life care staff development programmes. Scoping review. Published literature from 1997 to 2015, MEDLINE, CINAHL and Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, key journals and citation tracking. The review included 138 studies containing 60 types of art. Studies explored palliative care scenarios from a safe distance. Learning from art as experience involved the amalgamation of action, emotion and meaning. Art forms were used to transport healthcare professionals into an aesthetic learning experience that could be reflected in the lived experience of healthcare practice. The proposed learning included the development of practical and technical skills; empathy and compassion; awareness of self; awareness of others and the wider narrative of illness; and personal development. Aesthetic learning interventions might be helpful in the delivery of palliative care staff development programmes by offering another dimension to the learning experience. As researchers continue to find solutions to understanding the efficacy of such interventions, we argue that evaluating the contextual factors, including the interplay between the experience of the programme and its impact on the healthcare professional, will help identify how the programmes work and thus how they can contribute to improvements in palliative care.

  14. A report on the development and implementation of a preceptorship training programme for registered nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June D. Jeggels

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical supervision represents an important aspect in the development of nursing students’ clinical skills. At the School of Nursing (SoN the clinical supervisors employed by the University of the Western Cape (UWC have limited contact sessions with students in the clinical setting. However, with the increase in student numbers a need was identified to strengthen the support given to nursing students in the service setting. Objective: A preceptorship training programme for nurses was developed in 2009, aimed at improving the clinical teaching expertise of professional nurses. The planning phase, based on a preceptorship model, represents a collaborative undertaking by the higher education institution and the nursing directorate of the Provincial Government Western Cape.Method: A two-week, eight credit, short course was approved by the university structures and presented by staff members of the school. The teaching and learning strategies included interactive lectures, small group activities and preceptor-student encounters in simulated and real service settings. Some of the course outcomes were: applying the principles of clinical teaching and learning within the context of adult education, understanding the preceptor role and managingResults: To date, fifty-four participants have attended the course. Following an internal review of the pilot programme in 2010, relevant adjustments to the programme were made.Conclusion: It is recommended that all the stakeholders be involved in the development and implementation of a contextually relevant preceptorship training programme. It is further recommended that the school embarks on an extensive programme evaluation. 

  15. University of Ilorin Academic Staffs' Perception of the Harmonisation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is argued that the organisation can also organize trainings and workshops for stakeholders on harmonization of academic programmes and qualifications. This will help to update the academic staffs' knowledge of harmonisation of programmes and qualifications. Keywords: Harmonisation; Mobility; Internationalisation.

  16. DOE Handbook: Guide to good practices for training of technical staff and managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    Training programs at DOE facilities should prepare personnel to safely and efficiently operate the facilities in accordance with DOE requirements. This guide contains information that can be used to develop or validate training programs for technical staff and managers at DOE nuclear facilities. Training programs based on the content of this guide should provide assurance that these personnel perform their jobs safely and competently.

  17. The Effect of Peer-to-Peer Training on Staff Interactions with Adults with Dual Diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Lori L.; Sturmey, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Researchers have demonstrated the importance of training behavioral skills to staff members working with consumers with developmental disabilities. A training program that does not rely solely on consultants or administrators may benefit human services agencies that have limited resources to allocate to training. In the present study, the…

  18. Evaluation of a pilot oral health promotion programme 'Keep Smiling': perspectives from GDPs, health champions and school staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, H; Wright, K; Robertson, C

    2015-04-24

    To evaluate a pilot oral health promotion programme (fluoride varnish and tooth brushing), targeting 3-7-year-olds in primary schools in a deprived area of London. A pilot programme was conducted among five primary schools targeting 3-7-year-old children in a deprived area of London. The programme consisted of a fluoride varnish application and tooth brushing sessions. Outcome (participation rates) and process evaluations were carried out using semi-structured interviews with school staff, health champions and dentists. Overall, 79.2% of the targeted children participated in tooth brushing and 68.6% of children received fluoride varnish. The programme received positive feedback from school staff, dental teams and health champions. It raised awareness of dental health among all stakeholders and provided children with a unique experience, creating a positive image of dental teams. Community engagement and collaboration between health, education and the voluntary sector is feasible and integral in developing oral health promotion programmes aimed at children attending primary schools in a deprived area of London.

  19. Teaching Staff Advanced Training in Russia, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the USA and Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalchuk Vasyl

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article the peculiarities in organization of postgraduate teacher training in foreign countries have been highlighted; the basic problems and prospects for advanced training which stipulate for reforming the relevant national systems have been revealed; common and distinctive trends in their development have been justified. In Russia there is a cascade (cyclic system of teaching staff advanced training, based on the principles of andragogy, namely, continuity, self-control and self-analysis of professional activities by teachers and the use of their own experience during the advanced training. The abovementioned system consists of three phases such as pre-course, course and implementing. Each element of this model is a constituent part of the other, providing cycling and growth. Tasks for teachers are grounded on all the phases of the described system and influence their professional development. In the Republic of Kazakhstan there are three basic systems for teaching staff advanced training, namely, centers of educational excellence at the “Nazarbayev Intellectual Schools”, JSC “National Centre of Teaching Staff Advanced Training” (based on RIPKSO and 16 regional teaching staff advanced training institutes, teaching staff advanced training centres at universities and experimental sections. According to the defined module in the terms of the complex 3-month courses combining face-to-face and online training are provided. In the USA advanced training is provided by multilevel higher educational institutions which offer a wide range of different full-time and distance training programs and some programs are taught directly in educational establishments. The content of advanced training is determined by standards of professional pedagogical education according to the educational program and provides for fundamental, psychological, pedagogical, methodical, IT, practical, social and humanitarian training. Teaching staff advanced

  20. Effectiveness of behavioral skills training on staff performance in a job training setting for high-functioning adolescents with autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palmen, A.M.J.W.; Didden, H.C.M.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have focused on improving staff performance in naturalistic training settings for high-functioning adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. Behavioral skills training, consisting of group instruction and supervisory feedback, was used to improve staff performance on (a) providing

  1. Training the Staff of a Drug Addiction Treatment Facility: A Case Study of Hogar De Encuentro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Andrew A.; Leske, M. Cristina

    1977-01-01

    This paper, presented at the American Public Health Association meeting; Chicago, November 1975, discusses a staff training program at a drug addiction treatment facility established for Spanish-speaking (and other) drug addicts. Staff improved counseling skills and knowledge of drug addiction, but changed little in attitudes toward drug use and…

  2. Assessing the Impact of In-Service Training on Staff Performance at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    performance in terms of knowledge and skills gained. It was recommended that more research is undertaken on all UEW campuses to add to both literature and knowledge of INSET. Keywords: Staff Performance, In-Service Training, Staff Development International Journal of Educational Research Vol. 3 (2) 2007 pp. 217- ...

  3. Customer Service Training for Public Services Staff at Temple University's Central Library System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Gwen

    Arguing that good interpersonal interactions between library staff and their patrons is a major determinant of overall patron satisfaction, this paper describes Temple University's customer service training program for its public services staff. Dubbed the "A+ Service" program, the program focuses on six aspects of library service: (1)…

  4. Training Initiatives for Skills Acquisition in Icts by Academic Staff of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to assess training initiatives for skills acquisition in ICTs by academic staff of the University of Calabar. A descriptive survey design and the random sampling procedure were used to administer 150 copies of a validated questionnaire to academic staff of the university. Of these, 90 usable copies ...

  5. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy: an audit of our training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Swee Ho; Salleh, Ibrahim; Poh, Beow Kiong; Tay, Khoon Hean

    2005-04-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a commonly performed procedure in general surgical practice but it also has an inherently steep learning curve. The training of surgeons in this procedure presents a challenge to teaching hospitals, which essentially have to strike a balance between effective training and safety of the patient. The present study aims first to assess the safety of the structured training programme for this procedure at the Department of Surgery, Changi General Hospital, Singapore. Secondly, it seeks to audit the conversion and bile duct injury rates among the laparoscopic cholecystectomies performed by the department, and the factors which influence these. Notes of all patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the department over an 18-month period were reviewed retrospectively and the relevant data prospectively collected. Demographics, as well as details of cases of conversion to open operation and of bile duct injury were identified and the reasons for each recorded. A total of 443 patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the 18-month period. The most common indication for surgery was biliary colic/dyspepsia (61.4%), followed by cholecystitis, cholangitis, pancreatitis and common bile duct stone. The overall conversion rate was 11.5%. Three hundred and fifty-five patients were operated on by consultant surgeons, while 88 were by registrars who had been through the structured training programme. There was no statistically significant difference found in the conversion rates between these two groups (P = 0.284). Twenty-two of the 268 female (8.2%) patients had conversion to open operation, while 29 of the 175 male patients (16.6%) underwent conversion (P = 0.007). Amongst cases of cholecystitis and cholangitis, the conversion rate for patients operated on within 7 days of onset of symptoms was 35%, while those operated on 8 or more days later had a conversion rate of 29.7% (P = 0.639). There was a solitary case of bile duct

  6. Staff Training As Correlate Of Workers' Productivity In Selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many studies have been carried out on the relationship between training and productivity of workers but none has been carried out on the correlation of training on the individual indices of productivity and workers productivity. It is against this background that this paper investigate the correlation of training on indices of ...

  7. Training Residential Staff to Conduct Trial-Based Functional Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Joseph M.; Bloom, Sarah E.; Kunnavatana, S. Shanun; Collins, Shawnee D.; Clay, Casey J.

    2013-01-01

    We taught 6 supervisors of a residential service provider for adults with developmental disabilities to train 9 house managers to conduct trial-based functional analyses. Effects of the training were evaluated with a nonconcurrent multiple baseline. Results suggest that house managers can be trained to conduct trial-based functional analyses with…

  8. Assessment of training needs of extension staff of agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study identified strong training needs for Edo State extension agents on communication skills (X= 4.60), planning demonstration (X=4.60), evaluation of trials (X= 4.57) and farmers training (X=4.56). The correlation analysis showed that education had significant relationship many areas of the respondents' training ...

  9. Exploring weight loss services in primary care and staff views on using a web-based programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Lisa J; Williams, Sarah; Bradbury, Katherine; Brant, Catherine; Little, Paul; Hobbs, F D Richard; Yardley, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    Demand is increasing for primary care to deliver effective weight management services to patients, but research suggests that staff feel inadequately resourced for such a role. Supporting service delivery with a free and effective web-based weight management programme could maximise primary care resource and provide cost-effective support for patients. However, integration of e-health into primary care may face challenges. To explore primary care staff experiences of delivering weight management services and their perceptions of a web-based weight management programme to aid service delivery. Focus groups were conducted with primary care physicians, nurses and healthcare assistants (n = 36) involved in delivering weight loss services. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Participants thought that primary care should be involved in delivering weight management, especially when weight was aggravating health problems. However, they felt under-resourced to deliver these services and unsure as to the effectiveness of their input, as routine services were not evaluated. Beliefs that current services were ineffective resulted in staff reluctance to allocate more resources. Participants were hopeful that supplementing practice with a web-based weight management programme would enhance patient services and promote service evaluation. Although primary care staff felt they should deliver weight loss services, low levels of faith in the efficacy of current treatments resulted in provision of under-resourced and 'ad hoc' services. Integration of a web-based weight loss programme that promotes service evaluation and provides a cost-effective option for supporting patients may encourage practices to invest more in weight management services.

  10. A Report on Education and Training in the International Council on Archives' Africa Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, James

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, the International Council on Archives launched its Africa Programme (2015-2020) in order to coordinate its support for African archives and archivists. The Programme is focused on two strategic priorities: advocacy and education and training. This article examines the education and training component of the Programme. It begins by…

  11. Parents' Training: Effects of the Self-Help Skills Programme with Down's Syndrome Babies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Maria Teresa; Menendez, Javier

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews studies evaluating the effectiveness of two types of early intervention programmes for babies with Down's syndrome (DS). Evaluation of self-help early intervention programmes was done with two types of training with the parents: in the first the parents learned the training programme from observing the clinician, and in the…

  12. Readiness Enhancement Management Strategies (REMS): a proof of concept and evaluation feasibility study of staff training to improve service engagement by people with personality difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, M; Jinks, M; McMurran, M

    2015-09-01

    One third of people diagnosed with PD do not complete treatment and non-completion is associated with poorer clinical outcomes. Equipping staff to be better able to engage this client group is important, and web-based, self-directed learning is a potentially cost-effective way to train staff. This study examined the implementation of a web-based training programme called Readiness Enhancement Management Strategies (REMS) in three types of service. Completion rates were 94.4% in community health services; 92.3% in prison offender health services; and 46.5% in probation services. Staff found the content of REMS acceptable and useful. This study demonstrated that staff in NHS and criminal justice settings can complete REMS, but staff in probation services are challenged by time pressures and limited computer access. Staff at probation sites were less familiar with PD issues compared with the NHS staff. A web-based staff training programme called Readiness Enhancement Management Strategies (REMS) was developed to promote the engagement of people with personality difficulties in treatment. This 'proof of concept' study examined the REMS implementation process, its acceptability and the feasibility of using service data for future evaluation. Staff in six services working with people diagnosed with personality disorder or undiagnosed people with personality difficulties were eligible to participate: two community health services, two prison offender health services and two probation services. Of 92 eligible staff, 74 were available to undertake REMS. These staff completed knowledge and acceptability surveys and rated service user engagement with treatment. The proportion of treatment sessions attended by service users was collected for a 30-week period. REMS completion rates were community - 94.4%, prison - 92.3% and probation - 46.5%. Three quarters of participants rated REMS as 7 out of 10 or higher. All teams were able to provide service data for the study period

  13. Training residential staff and supervisors to conduct traditional functional analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Joseph M; Bloom, Sarah E; Clay, Casey J; Kunnavatana, S Shanun; Collins, Shawnee D

    2014-07-01

    In this study we extended a training outlined by Iwata to behavioral technicians working for a residential service provider for adults with developmental disabilities. Specifically, we trained ten supervisors and four assistants to organize, conduct, collect data for, and interpret the results of traditional functional analyses (FA; Iwata et al.,1994). Performance was initially low and improved across all measures following training. Results extend previous FA training research by including a tangible condition and by demonstrating that individuals with little to no prior experience conducting FAs can be taught all of the skills required to autonomously conduct them in a relatively short period of time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. How can web-based training facilitate a more carer friendly practice in community-based health and social care services in Norway? Staff experiences and implementation challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssen, Helene; Norheim, Anne; Hanson, Elizabeth

    2017-03-01

    It is a central feature of current Norwegian health and social care policy to see informal carers as active partners. However, research has revealed that carers often experience a lack of recognition by professionals. In 2010, the Norwegian Directorate of Health initiated a web-based competence-building programme (CBP) for health and social care practitioners aimed at facilitating collaboration with carers. The programme comprised case presentations, e-lectures, exercises and topics for discussion, and was introduced in 2012. It was flexible and free of charge. This article is based on a study (2012-2013) that followed the piloting of this CBP in four settings. The study aimed to explore factors that influenced the implementation of the programme and whether or not using it affected health and social care practitioners' attitudes and perceived capacity for collaboration with carers. The study employed a mixed-methods design. A questionnaire was distributed to all staff before and 5 months after the CBP was introduced, followed by focus group interviews with a sample of staff members and individual interviews with the leadership in the involved settings and those who introduced the programme. The quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics, which subsequently formed the basis for the focus group interviews. The qualitative data were analysed by means of content analysis. The programme's introduction was similar across all research settings. Nevertheless, whether or not it was adopted depended to a large extent on leadership commitment and engagement. In settings where the programme's use was monitored, supported by management and formed part of on-the-job training, there seemed to be a positive impact on staff attitudes concerning collaboration with carers. Participant staff reported that their awareness of, motivation for and confidence in collaboration with carers were all strengthened. In contrast, the programme was of minimal benefit in

  15. Clinical staff perceptions of palliative care-related quality of care, service access, education and training needs and delivery confidence in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Rosemary; Gott, Merryn; Raphael, Deborah; O'Callaghan, Anne; Robinson, Jackie; Boyd, Michal; Laking, George; Manson, Leigh; Snow, Barry

    2014-12-01

    Central to appropriate palliative care management in hospital settings is ensuring an adequately trained workforce. In order to achieve optimum palliative care delivery, it is first necessary to create a baseline understanding of the level of palliative care education and support needs among all clinical staff (not just palliative care specialists) within the acute hospital setting. The objectives of the study were to explore clinical staff: perceptions concerning the quality of palliative care delivery and support service accessibility, previous experience and education in palliative care delivery, perceptions of their own need for formal palliative care education, confidence in palliative care delivery and the impact of formal palliative care training on perceived confidence. A purposive sample of clinical staff members (598) in a 710-bed hospital were surveyed regarding their experiences of palliative care delivery and their education needs. On average, the clinical staff rated the quality of care provided to people who die in the hospital as 'good' (x̄=4.17, SD=0.91). Respondents also reported that 19.3% of their time was spent caring for end-of-life patients. However, only 19% of the 598 respondents reported having received formal palliative care training. In contrast, 73.7% answered that they would like formal training. Perceived confidence in palliative care delivery was significantly greater for those clinical staff with formal palliative care training. Formal training in palliative care increases clinical staff perceptions of confidence, which evidence suggests impacts on the quality of palliative care provided to patients. The results of the study should be used to shape the design and delivery of palliative care education programmes within the acute hospital setting to successfully meet the needs of all clinical staff. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Training healthcare professionals as moral case deliberation facilitators: evaluation of a Dutch training programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, M.; Molewijk, A.C.; de Bree, M.; Moraal, M.; Verkerk, M.; Widdershoven, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, moral case deliberation (MCD) sessions have mostly been facilitated by external experts, mainly professional ethicists. We have developed a train the facilitator programme for healthcare professionals aimed at providing them with the competences needed for being an MCD facilitator.

  17. An educational programme for nursing college staff and students during a MERS- coronavirus outbreak in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirling, Bridget V; Harmston, Jennie; Alsobayel, Hana

    2015-01-01

    The Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus is a serious and emerging issue in Saudi Arabia and the world. A response was required to reduce possible disease transmission between the hospital and university. College of Nursing academic staff developed a programme in response to the educational and emotional needs of participants. A MERS-CoV Task Force responded to the rapidly unfolding epidemic. The aim was to find out what nursing staff and nursing students in the college knew about MERS- CoV. While most gaps in knowledge were addressed after an intense information seminar, other learning needs were identified and responded to. The Task Force developed mandatory information sessions for all nursing faculty, students and staff. All staff were informed by email, letters and posters. There are 28 faculty staff, 84 support staff and 480 students in the College of Nursing. The information settings all took place within the College of Nursing, Princess Nourah University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Questionnaires were given to faculty, students and staff to understand their baseline knowledge. After the sessions, faculty, students and staff were asked about what was learned through the sessions, and what educational needs still needed to be addressed. Approval was sought and received by the Ethics Committee for the College of Nursing. Participants completed informed consent forms and the voluntary nature of the study was explained. The total number of people attending the education sessions was133, including 65 students. 18 faculty members attended and 57 support staff. Data was gathered on gaps in participant knowledge and a plan was developed to address the gaps. Policies were established around student participation in clinical and return to work practices for staff with any symptoms. In hospitals there is above average risk for exposure to infectious diseases. Student nurses travel between hospital and university, with the capacity to act as a conduit of

  18. Improving staff perception of a safety climate with crew resource management training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuy, SreyRam; Romero, Ramon A L

    2017-06-01

    Communication failure is one of the top root causes in patient safety adverse events. Crew resource management (CRM) is a team building communication process intended to improve patient safety by improving team dynamics. First, to describe implementation of CRM in a Veterans Affair (VA) surgical service. Second, to assess whether staff CRM training is related to improvement in staff perception of a safety climate. Mandatory CRM training was implemented for all surgical service staff at a VA Hospital at 0 and 12 mo. Safety climate questionnaires were completed by operating room staff at a baseline, 6 and 12 mo after the initial CRM training. Participants reported improvement on all 27 points on the safety climate questionnaire at 6 mo compared with the baseline. At 12 mo, there was sustained improvement in 23 of the 27 areas. This is the first published report about the effect of CRM training on staff perception of a safety climate in a VA surgical service. We demonstrate that CRM training can be successfully implemented widespread in a surgical program. Overall, there was improvement in 100% of areas assessed on the safety climate questionnaire at 6 mo after CRM training. By 1 y, this improvement was sustained in 23 of 27 areas, with the areas of greatest improvement being the performance of briefings, collaboration between nurses and doctors, valuing nursing input, knowledge about patient safety, and institutional promotion of a patient safety climate. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Communicating about Death and Dying: Developing Training for Staff Working in Services for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffrey-Wijne, Irene; Rose, Tracey; Grant, Robert; Wijne, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many people with intellectual disabilities are affected by death, yet conversations about death are often avoided by staff working with them. This study aimed to assess staff training needs and to develop, trial and evaluate a training course on communicating about death and dying. Method:(i) Semi-structured interviews with 20 staff in…

  20. Training staff serving clients with intellectual disabilities: A meta-analysis of aspects determining effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2009-01-01

    The last decades have seen increased emphasis on the quality of training for direct-care staff serving people with intellectual disabilities. Nevertheless, it is unclear what the key aspects of effective training are. Therefore, the aim of the present meta-analysis was to establish the ingredients

  1. Video Feedback in Key Word Signing Training for Preservice Direct Support Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombouts, Ellen; Meuris, Kristien; Maes, Bea; De Meyer, Anne-Marie; Zink, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Research has demonstrated that formal training is essential for professionals to learn key word signing. Yet, the particular didactic strategies have not been studied. Therefore, this study compared the effectiveness of verbal and video feedback in a key word signing training for future direct support staff. Method: Forty-nine future…

  2. Suicide Intervention Training for College Staff: Program Evaluation and Intervention Skill Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannonhouse, Laura; Lin, Yung-Wei Dennis; Shaw, Kelly; Wanna, Reema; Porter, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Suicide remains a pressing issue for college communities. Consequently, gatekeeper trainings are often provided for staff. This study examines the effect of one such program, Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST). Participants: 51 college employees received ASIST in August of 2014 and were compared to 30 wait-list control…

  3. Effect of a tele-training programme on radiographers in the interpretation of CT colonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Carsten; Lefere, Philippe; Gerke, Oke

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the performance of radiographers in CT colonography (CTC) after a tele-training programme, supervised by 2 experienced radiologists. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Five radiographers underwent training in CTC using a tele-training programme mainly based on the interpretation of 75 tr...

  4. Global health training in US obstetrics and gynaecology residency programmes: perspectives of students, residents and programme directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Lisa M; Banks, Erika H; Conroy, Erin M; McGinn, Aileen P; Ghartey, Jeny P; Wagner, Sarah A; Merkatz, Irwin R

    2015-12-01

    Benefits of exposure to global health training during medical education are well documented and residents' demand for this training is increasing. Despite this, it is offered by few US obstetrics and gynaecology (OBGYN) residency training programmes. To evaluate interest, perceived importance, predictors of global health interest and barriers to offering global health training among prospective OBGYN residents, current OBGYN residents and US OGBYN residency directors. We designed two questionnaires using Likert scale questions to assess perceived importance of global health training. The first was distributed to current and prospective OBGYN residents interviewing at a US residency programme during 2012-2013. The second questionnaire distributed to US OBGYN programme directors assessed for existing global health programmes and global health training barriers. A composite Global Health Interest/Importance score was tabulated from the Likert scores. Multivariable linear regression was performed to assess for predictors of Global Health Interest/Importance. A total of 159 trainees (77%; 129 prospective OBGYN residents and 30 residents) and 69 (28%) programme directors completed the questionnaires. Median Global Health Interest/Importance score was 7 (IQR 4-9). Prior volunteer experience was predictive of a 5-point increase in Global Health Interest/Importance score (95% CI -0.19 to 9.85; p=0.02). The most commonly cited barriers were cost and time. Interest and perceived importance of global health training in US OBGYN residency programmes is evident among trainees and programme directors; however, significant financial and time barriers prevent many programmes from offering opportunities to their trainees. Prior volunteer experience predicts global health interest. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Mixed methods evaluation of an interdisciplinary sexuality education programme for staff working with people who have an acquired physical disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Agnes; Sharek, Danika; Nolan, Maeve; Sheerin, Barbara; Flanagan, Paul; Slaicuinaite, Sniguole; Mc Donnell, Sinead; Walsh, Heather

    2012-11-01

    .  To report a study evaluating the effectiveness of a 1-day interdisciplinary sexuality education programme for staff working with people with acquired physical disability.   Changes associated with an acquired physical disability can diminish a person's self-esteem, sense of attractiveness, relationships, and sexual functioning. Research suggests that people are dissatisfied with the quality of information and support around sexuality during their rehabilitation.   A mixed methods design was used, involving pretest and posttest questionnaires and interviews. Questionnaire data were analysed using descriptive statistics and paired samples t-tests to evaluate the effects of the programme on knowledge, skills, and comfort. Interview data were analyzed thematically, with particular emphasis on participants' opinions about the application of the course within practice. Participants were working in the area of acquired disability and rehabilitation, and were drawn from a number of disciplines. Data were collected between 2008-2009.   Comparison of the pre- and postmeasures, based on paired samples t-tests, showed that the programme statistically significantly increased participants' knowledge, skills, and comfort. Participants felt positive and enthusiastic about the programme and reported numerous incidents where they were more willing to raise issues for discussion and create a supportive listening space for patients to talk about their concerns around sexuality.   Providing healthcare practitioners with a 1-day programme leads to positive changes in knowledge, skills, and comfort towards sexuality. Sexuality education may be an ideal topic for bringing practitioners together within an interdisciplinary education context. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Evaluation of training programme uptake in an attempt to reduce obstetric anal sphincter injuries: the SUPPORT programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nadia; Vinayakarao, Latha; Pathak, Sangeeta; Minden, Dawn; Melson, Louise; Vitue, Ella; Pradhan, A

    2017-03-01

    The objective was to assess the feedback from a quality improvement training programme to reduce obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS). Training sessions were organised that included evidence-based information on OASIS risk factors and training on models to measure perineal body length (PBL), perform episiotomies with standard and 60° fixed angle scissors (EPISCISSORS-60®), and measure post-delivery episiotomy suture angles with protractor transparencies. Feedback forms using a Likert scale (1-4) were completed and analysed. The setting was an evidence-based quality improvement programme (Strategy for Using Practical aids for Prevention of OASIS, Recording episiotomies and clinician Training [SUPPORT]) at two National Health Service (NHS) Hospitals in the UK. The participants were midwives and doctors attending the SUPPORT training programme RESULTS: All of the participants (100 %) would recommend the training programme to a friend or colleague. 92 % felt that the training session improved their knowledge of the impact of PBL and perineal distension and their knowledge of the relationship between episiotomy angle and OASIS "a lot" or "somewhat". Based on this feedback, we recommend the addition of the knowledge content of the SUPPORT programme to other centres providing perineal assessment and repair courses.

  7. An Impact Evaluation of the "FoodMate" Programme: Perspectives of Homeless Young People and Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiklejohn, Sarah J.; Barbour, Liza; Palermo, Claire E.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Food insecurity remains an issue for vulnerable populations in developed countries. The potential dietary and food security impacts of nutrition education programmes in Australia remain largely undocumented. This study investigated the impacts of an eight-session nutrition education programme delivered within community case management…

  8. Fall rates in hospital rehabilitation units after individualised patient and staff education programmes: a pragmatic, stepped-wedge, cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Anne-Marie; McPhail, Steven M; Waldron, Nicholas; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; Ingram, Katharine; Flicker, Leon; Bulsara, Max; Haines, Terry P

    2015-06-27

    Falls are the most frequent adverse events that are reported in hospitals. We examined the effectiveness of individualised falls-prevention education for patients, supported by training and feedback for staff, delivered as a ward-level programme. Eight rehabilitation units in general hospitals in Australia participated in this stepped-wedge, cluster-randomised study, undertaken during a 50 week period. Units were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups by use of computer-generated, random allocation sequences. We included patients admitted to the unit during the study with a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of more than 23/30 to receive individualised education that was based on principles of changes in health behaviour from a trained health professional, in addition to usual care. We provided information about patients' goals, feedback about the ward environment, and perceived barriers to engagement in falls-prevention strategies to staff who were trained to support the uptake of strategies by patients. The coprimary outcome measures were patient rate of falls per 1000 patient-days and the proportion of patients who were fallers. All analyses were by intention to treat. This trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials registry, number ACTRN12612000877886). Between Jan 13, and Dec 27, 2013, 3606 patients were admitted to the eight units (n=1983 control period; n=1623 intervention period). There were fewer falls (n=196, 7·80/1000 patient-days vs n=380, 13·78/1000 patient-days, adjusted rate ratio 0·60 [robust 95% CI 0·42-0·94], p=0·003), injurious falls (n=66, 2·63/1000 patient-days vs 131, 4·75/1000 patient-days, 0·65 [robust 95% CI 0·42-0·88], p=0·006), and fallers (n=136 [8·38%] vs n=248 [12·51%] adjusted odds ratio 0·55 [robust 95% CI 0·38 to 0·81], p=0·003) in the intervention compared with the control group. There was no significant difference in length of stay (intervention median 11 days [IQR 7

  9. Public Library Staff as Community Health Partners: Training Program Design and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Anna U; D'Alonzo, Bernadette A; Dupuis, Roxanne; Whiteman, Eliza D; Kallem, Stacey; McClintock, Autumn; Fein, Joel A; Klusaritz, Heather; Cannuscio, Carolyn C

    2017-10-01

    Public libraries are free and open to all-and accessed at high rates by vulnerable populations-which positions them to be key public health allies. However, library staff themselves often feel ill-equipped to address the health and social concerns of their patrons. To fill this gap, we developed a case-based training curriculum to help library staff recognize, engage, and refer vulnerable patrons to appropriate resources. Topics addressed in the training, including homelessness, mental health and substance use disorders, immigration, and trauma, were selected based on findings from a prior community needs assessment. Using a modified measure of self-efficacy, participants ( n = 33) were surveyed before and after each session. Several participants ( n = 7) were also interviewed 4 months after the training was completed. Overall, staff reported significant increases in comfort, confidence, and preparedness in assisting vulnerable patrons across all topic areas. Qualitative findings reflected positive perceived impact and value of the trainings. Staff felt training resources should be made more readily accessible. Improving library staff capacity to address the health and social needs of their patrons can further establish public libraries as partners in improving population health.

  10. Outcomes of classroom-based team training interventions for multiprofessional hospital staff. A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Louise Isager; Østergaard, Doris; Mogensen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    Several studies show that communication errors in healthcare teams are frequent and can lead to adverse events. Team training has been suggested as a way to safer communication and has been implemented in healthcare as classroom-based or simulation-based team training or a combination of both....... The objective of this paper is to systematically review studies evaluating the outcomes of classroom-based multiprofessional team training for hospital staff....

  11. Teaching Staff Advanced Training in Russia, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the USA and Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Kovalchuk Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    In the article the peculiarities in organization of postgraduate teacher training in foreign countries have been highlighted; the basic problems and prospects for advanced training which stipulate for reforming the relevant national systems have been revealed; common and distinctive trends in their development have been justified. In Russia there is a cascade (cyclic) system of teaching staff advanced training, based on the principles of andragogy, namely, continuity, self-control and self-an...

  12. A novel method of assessing quality of postgraduate psychiatry training: experiences from a large training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizrah, Mukhtar; Iacoponi, Eduardo; Parker, Elizabeth; Rymer, Janice; Iversen, Amy; Wessely, Simon

    2013-06-14

    Most assessments of the quality of postgraduate training are based on anonymised questionnaires of trainees. We report a comprehensive assessment of the quality of training at a large postgraduate psychiatry training institute using non-anonymised face-to-face interviews with trainees and their trainers. Two consultant psychiatrists interviewed 99 trainees and 109 trainers. Scoring of interview responses was determined by using a pre-defined criteria. Additional comments were recorded as free text. Interviews covered 13 domains, including: Clinical, teaching, research and management opportunities, clinical environment, clinical supervision, adequacy of job description, absence of bullying and job satisfaction. Multiple interview domain scores were combined, generating a 'Combined' score for each post. The interview response rate was 97% for trainers 88% for trainees. There was a significant correlation between trainee and trainer scores for the same interview domains (Pearson's r = 0.968, pquality of training on a large psychiatry training programme successfully elicited strengths and weakness of our programme. Such an interview scheme could be easily implemented in smaller schemes and may well provide important information to allow for targeted improvement of training. Additionally, trends in quality of training and job satisfaction amongst various psychiatric specialities were identified; specifically speciality posts and liaison posts in psychiatry were revealed to be the most popular with trainees.

  13. Leadership Training Program for Medical Staff in Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Neree; Brabanders, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Today healthcare is facing many challenges in a volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous environment. There is a need to develop strong leaders who can cope with these challenges. This article describes the process of a leadership training program for healthcare professionals in Belgium (named "Clinical Leadership Program" or…

  14. Supervised blood-based self-sample collection and rapid test performance: a valuable alternative to the use of saliva by HIV testing programmes with no medical or nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belza, María J; Rosales-Statkus, M Elena; Hoyos, Juan; Segura, Pilar; Ferreras, Eva; Sánchez, Rebeca; Molist, Gemma; de la Fuente, Luis

    2012-04-01

    Some saliva-based HIV testing programmes have resulted in an unacceptable percentage of false positives. Many countries require blood-based testing programmes to have doctors/nurses. The authors evaluate whether, after brief training and under the supervision of a skilled counsellor, blood-based self-sample collection and rapid test performance could be a valuable alternative. 208 Spanish-speaking attendees at a street-based HIV testing programme in Madrid participated in the study. Participants were tested twice, first in the study and then in the programme, using the same finger-stick whole-blood rapid test (Determine HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo®). Based on previously adapted instructions, the study counsellor explained the procedure to follow throughout the test. Participants then performed the test under the guidance of the counsellor. Demographic and risk behaviour data were collected by a self-administered questionnaire. The test results in the programme and the study were read by the study counsellor. 99.0% (95% CI 96.6% to 99.9%) of participants had a valid result in the study test, the same percentage as in the programme test conducted by the doctor/nurse. Two persons had invalid test results in both the study and the programme, but they were not the same persons. The study provides clear evidence that this methodology is a valuable alternative to saliva for HIV testing programmes when medical or nursing staff required to take blood samples is not available.

  15. A Pilot Investigation into the Efficacy of a Signing Training Strategy for Staff Working with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Darren D.; Jolliffe, Jane

    2009-01-01

    To contribute to increasing the quality and quantity of communication between staff and adults with intellectual disabilities, training was undertaken to enhance the awareness and knowledge of signing as a method of communication. Multidisciplinary team members, residential and day centre staff were trained to use 20 core signs. Training methods…

  16. Effectiveness of a Psycho-Educational Staff Training Program on Attitudes of Staff in a Long-Term Care Facility: A Pilot Study and Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elpers, Kathy; Amano, Takashi; DeCoster, Vaughn; Johnson, Missy

    2017-01-01

    Managing Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) is a significant challenge for staff working in long-term care facilities. This study examines the effectiveness of a psycho-educational training aimed at changing staff's attitudes. The results indicated that participants' attitudes toward dementia were more positive,…

  17. Telephone techniques and etiquette: a medical practice staff training tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2007-01-01

    The telephone is usually the first contact a prospective or new patient has with a medical practice. It is also the method that existing patients and others commonly use to ask questions or convey information. At the same time, a telephone that rings off the hook can be one of the biggest drains on staff time and a source of tremendous frustration. This article suggests practical techniques for managing the medical practice telephone. It provides seven never-fail strategies for saving time on the phone while remaining courteous and attentive to callers. It offers tips to help readers avoid getting caught in an endless game of telephone tag. The article highlights strategies that work particularly well when placing calls and when dealing with a busy signal or voicemail system problem in the practice. It also describes the fine points for taking accurate and complete telephone messages without turning off callers or misleading them. This article further explores practical strategies for using and not abusing the hold button and offers additional tips for telephone equipment and accessories readers may find helpful. Finally, this article suggests guidelines for using an answering machine or voicemail system and provides a 25-question quiz to help readers assess their own telephone technique.

  18. Potentials of Information and Organisational Process Improvement Through Trained Office Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chromjaková Felicita

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the main possibilities on how to improve the production rate, total ef- ficiency and profit-cost ratio in the administrative processes of public administrative offices. The results that are realized from this research serves as an important output for public administration offices in Slovakia. Process improvements can be achieved through the efficient utilization of own-staff potentials, especially by the optimal use of training modules. Well trained own-staff can radically improve the efficiency of office works, jobs and processes and can influence the satisfaction of internal and external stakeholders.

  19. Rapid realist review of the evidence : achieving lasting change when mental health rehabilitation staff undertake recovery-oriented training

    OpenAIRE

    Gee, Melanie; Bhanbhro, Sadiq; Cook, Sarah; Killaspy, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To identify the factors contributing to lasting change in practice following a recovery-based training intervention for inpatient mental health rehabilitation staff.\\ud \\ud Background: Staff training may help nurses and other staff groups in inpatient mental health rehabilitative settings to increase their recovery-oriented practice. There are no published reviews on the effectiveness of such training and few long-term evaluations. This review informed a realist evaluation of a specific ...

  20. Addiction treatment provider attitudes on staff capacity and evidence-based clinical training: results from a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Lena; Amodeo, Maryann; Krull, Ivy; Chassler, Deborah; Weidenfeld, Rachel; de Saxe Zerden, Lisa; Gowler, Rebekah; Lederer, Jaime; Cohen, Alexander; Beltrame, Clelia

    2011-01-01

    This national study of addiction-treatment organizations' implementation of evidence-based practices examines: (1) organizational/leadership factors associated with director (n = 212) attitudes regarding staff resistance to organizational change, and (2) organizational/staff factors associated with staff (n = 312) attitudes regarding evidence-based clinical training. Linear regression analyses, controlling for type of treatment unit, leadership/staff characteristics and organizational readiness to change, identified that directors who perceived their organization needed more guidance and had less staff cohesion and autonomy rated staff resistance to organizational change significantly higher. Staff with higher levels of education and greater agreement that their organization supported change had greater preference for evidence-based trainings. Federal addiction treatment policy should both promote education and training of treatment staff and organizational development of treatment CBOs.  © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  1. The development and implementation of the structured training programme for caregivers of inpatients after stroke (TRACS) intervention: the London Stroke Carers Training Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Anne; Dickerson, Josie; Melbourn, Anne; Steadman, Jayne; Wittink, Margreet; Young, John; Kalra, Lalit; Farrin, Amanda

    2015-03-01

    To describe the content and delivery of the adapted London Stroke Carers Training Course intervention evaluated in the Training Caregivers after Stroke (TRACS) trial. The London Stroke Carers Training Course is a structured training programme for caregivers of inpatients who are likely to return home after their stroke. The course was delivered by members of the multidisciplinary team while the patient was in the stroke unit with one recommended 'follow through' session after discharge home. The intervention consists of 14 training components (six mandatory) that were identified as important knowledge/skills that caregivers would need to be able to care for the stroke patient after discharge home. Following national training days, the London Stroke Carers Training Course was disseminated to intervention sites by the cascade method of implementation. The intervention was adapted for implementation across a range of stroke units. Training days were well attended (median 2.5 and 2.0 attendees per centre for the first and second days, respectively) and the feedback positive, demonstrating 'face validity' for the intervention. However cascading of this training to other members of the multidisciplinary team was not consistent, with 7/18 centres recording no cascade training. The adapted London Stroke Carers Training Course provided a training programme that could be delivered in a standardised, structured way in a variety of stroke unit settings throughout the UK. The intervention was well received by stroke unit staff, however, the cascade method of implementation was not as effective as we would have wished. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Improving communication and practical skills in working with inpatients who self-harm: a pre-test/post-test study of the effects of a training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kool, Nienke; van Meijel, Berno; Koekkoek, Bauke; van der Bijl, Jaap; Kerkhof, Ad

    2014-03-04

    Differing perspectives of self-harm may result in a struggle between patients and treatment staff. As a consequence, both sides have difficulty communicating effectively about the underlying problems and feelings surrounding self-harm. Between 2009 and 2011, a programme was developed and implemented to train mental health care staff (nurses, social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists, and occupational therapists) in how to communicate effectively with and care for patients who self-harm. An art exhibition focusing on self-harm supported the programme. Lay experts in self-harm, i.e. people who currently harm themselves, or who have harmed themselves in the past and have the skills to disseminate their knowledge and experience, played an important role throughout the programme. Paired sample t-tests were conducted to measure the effects of the training programme using the Attitude Towards Deliberate Self-Harm Questionnaire, the Self-Perceived Efficacy in Dealing with Self-Harm Questionnaire, and the Patient Contact Questionnaire. Effect sizes were calculated using r. Participants evaluated the training programme with the help of a survey. The questionnaires used in the survey were analysed descriptively. Of the 281 persons who followed the training programme, 178 completed the questionnaires. The results show a significant increase in the total scores of the three questionnaires, with large to moderate effect sizes. Respondents were positive about the training, especially about the role of the lay expert. A specialised training programme in how to care for patients who self-harm can result in a more positive attitude towards self-harm patients, an improved self-efficacy in caring for patients who self-harm, and a greater closeness with the patients. The deployment of lay experts is essential here.

  3. Spreading of Excellence in SARNET Network on Severe Accidents: The Education and Training Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Paci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The SARNET2 (severe accidents Research NETwork of Excellence project started in April 2009 for 4 years in the 7th Framework Programme (FP7 of the European Commission (EC, following a similar first project in FP6. Forty-seven organisations from 24 countries network their capacities of research in the severe accident (SA field inside SARNET to resolve the most important remaining uncertainties and safety issues on SA in water-cooled nuclear power plants (NPPs. The network includes a large majority of the European actors involved in SA research plus a few non-European relevant ones. The “Education and Training” programme in SARNET is a series of actions foreseen in this network for the “spreading of excellence.” It is focused on raising the competence level of Master and Ph.D. students and young researchers engaged in SA research and on organizing information/training courses for NPP staff or regulatory authorities (but also for researchers interested in SA management procedures.

  4. Writing about stress: the impact of a stress-management programme on staff accounts of dealing with stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M W J; Embregts, Petri J C M; Bosman, Anna M T; Jahoda, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Helping staff serving clients with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour to cope with stress has implications for their own well-being and for the lives of those they support. This study examined staff members' views of stress and the effectiveness of a stress-management intervention. Effectiveness was assessed using written assignments regarding stress management, and changes in views presented were tested in a pre- and post-test control group design. In the first phase, a content analysis was conducted across groups, which revealed that participants expressed a broad variety of views about stress and coping mechanisms, with considerable individual differences. In the second phase, a more fine-grained quantitative analysis was conducted to assess training effectiveness. Results showed an increase in the proportion of coping strategies referred to by the experimental group post-training. This positive change remained at follow-up. The results of the content analysis and the outcome data have implications for staff training. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. What do community football players think about different exercise-training programmes? Implications for the delivery of lower limb injury prevention programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Caroline F; Doyle, Tim L A; Dempsey, Alasdair R; Elliott, Bruce C; Twomey, Dara M; White, Peta E; Diamantopoulou, Kathy; Young, Warren; Lloyd, David G

    2014-04-01

    Players are the targeted end-users and beneficiaries of exercise-training programmes implemented during coach-led training sessions, and the success of programmes depends upon their active participation. Two variants of an exercise-training programme were incorporated into the regular training schedules of 40 community Australian Football teams, over two seasons. One variant replicated common training practices, while the second was an evidence-based programme to alter biomechanical and neuromuscular factors related to risk of knee injuries. This paper describes the structure of the implemented programmes and compares players' end-of-season views about the programme variants. This study was nested within a larger group-clustered randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of two exercise-training programmes (control and neuromuscular control (NMC)) for preventing knee injuries. A post-season self-report survey, derived from Health Belief Model constructs, included questions to obtain players' views about the benefits and physical challenges of the programme in which they participated. Compared with control players, those who participated in the NMC programme found it to be less physically challenging but more enjoyable and potentially of more benefit. Suggestions from players about potential improvements to the training programme and its future implementation included reducing duration, increasing range of drills/exercises and promoting its injury prevention and other benefits to players. Players provide valuable feedback about the content and focus of implemented exercise-training programmes, that will directly inform the delivery of similar, or more successful, programmes in the future.

  6. Getting the Right Staff. Personnel Management Module. Operational Management Programme. Increasing Opportunities for Supervisors and Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Tessa; Murray, Jennifer

    This self-instructional unit for supervisors and managers in the British hotel and catering industry contains information on all the important stages in the process of recruiting staff. The document begins with an introduction and advice on how to use the unit. Five sections cover the following topics: (1) the cost of employment; (2) planning for…

  7. Staff Retention. Personnel Management Module. Operational Management Programme. Increasing Opportunities for Supervisors and Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jennifer

    This self-instructional unit for supervisors and managers in the British hotel and catering industry is based on the view that problems in staff recruitment and retention are directly linked to the level of job satisfaction. The document begins with an introduction and advice on how to use the unit. Five sections cover the following topics: (1)…

  8. Patient and Staff (doctors and nurses) Experiences of Abdominal Hysterectomy in Accelerated Recovery Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Lis; Carlslund, Anne Mette; Møller, Charlotte

    2004-01-01

    the experiences of the women operated and the staff involved. Material and methods: The study is exploratory and descriptive, using qualitative methods. Seventeen women, with good health status, were consecutively selected from August to September 2001. The women were observed and ten were interviewed twice...

  9. EDUCATION QUALITY AND ISSUES OF PEDAGOGICAL STAFF TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir P. Borisenkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to reveal the reasons of deterioration of education quality at the Soviet and Post-Soviet school and, adopting the best experience of the countries that are recognised as world leaders in education; to plan the solution ways to current problems and situation at the Russian school. Methods. The principle of a historicism that expresses the necessity of concrete historical studying of the public phenomena is put in a basis of methodology of the research conducted by the author; it includes pedagogical phenomena (in the course of its origin, its development and transformation, taking into account variety of its communications, dependences and mediations. The concrete methods used in work, are typical for theoretical research: the analysis, an estimation and reduction in system of the empirical and generalised material on the selected theme. Large corpus of the scientific literature is studied. The data of the published international researches on education in which our country is widely involved (PISA, TIMSS, and also the national researches undertaken in the USA, Great Britain and other countries are considered. Methods of expert estimations, and direct supervision of educational process in secondary and higher educational institutions are applied. Results. The general characteristic of evolution of quality of the Russian education is presented during the Soviet and Post-Soviet periods. The factors which have had negative influence on quality of school training during the various periods are revealed. The estimation of the reasons which have caused failures of school reforms, carried out in the USSR in the 60–80s and within two last decades in modern Russia is given. The concurrent important positive shifts in this sphere, taking place in the same years are noted. Results of the international researches on education (PISA and TIMSS are presented; the scoring of Russia among other states is defined, following

  10. Academic Staff's Apathy towards Formal Professional Development Programmes at North West University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makunye, M. M.; Pelser, T. G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore reasons for academics' apathy towards formal professional development programmes at North-West University. The research design was essentially descriptive, employing both qualitative and quantitative research techniques to gather and analyse data. Three techniques, namely, questionnaire surveys, analysis of…

  11. Training community practitioners to work more effectively with parents to prevent childhood obesity: the impact of HENRY upon Children's Centres and their staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, T A; Potrata, B; Hunt, C; Rudolf, M C J

    2012-10-01

    One in four children in England is overweight/obese upon starting school. HENRY (Health Exercise Nutrition for the Really Young) offers a novel, preventive approach to this problem by training practitioners to work more effectively with the parents of preschool children around obesity and lifestyle issues. The programme is being delivered to all Sure Start Children's Centres (the UK government initiative providing family support and childcare in disadvantaged areas) in Leeds, UK. The evaluation covered the first 12 Centres to be trained (these had a reach of approximately 5000 families). A series of semi-structured interviews were conducted with Centre managers, and 'drop boxes' were provided for all staff to leave their comments. Interviews took place up to 11 months post-training, allowing a consideration of any long-term impact. Data from 12 interviews and 106 comment slips indicated that HENRY training was associated with considerable changes to the Centre environment. Immediate effects included changes to Centre policy and practice, including the provision of age-appropriate portion sizes and the introduction of healthy snacks; a strengthening of team working and increased staff confidence around tackling lifestyle change; and enhanced skills when working with families. Training also induced changes within the staff's personal lives (e.g. increased physical activity and family mealtimes). The findings suggest that positive and lasting lifestyle effects can be achieved by brief training courses involving Children's Centre staff teams. Both staff and attendant families appear to benefit. The effect on levels of preschool obesity across the city once HENRY has extended to the remaining Centres is yet to be seen. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2012 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  12. Addressing Adolescent Depression in Schools: Evaluation of an In-Service Training for School Staff in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Carmen R.; Budge, Stephanie L.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated an adolescent depression in-service training for school staff in the United States. A total of 252 school staff (e.g., teachers, principals, counselors) completed assessments prior to and following the in-service and a subsample of these staff participated in focus groups following the in-service and three months later.…

  13. Providing Staff Training and Programming to Support People with Disabilities: An Academic Library Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannen, Michelle H.; Milewski, Steven; Mack, Thura

    2017-01-01

    This case study explores services academic libraries provide to students with disabilities and the impact these can have on the success and experience of these students. The study focuses on staff training and outreach programming. The authors examine the academic library literature surrounding these topics, provide examples of programming…

  14. A Survey on Dementia Training Needs among Staff at Community-Based Outpatient Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Geri; Lawrence, Briana M.; Ounpraseuth, Songthip T.; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a major public health concern. Educating health-care providers about dementia warning signs, diagnosis, and management is paramount to fostering clinical competence and improving patient outcomes. The objective of this project was to describe and identify educational and training needs of staff at community-based outpatient clinics…

  15. ALOHA to New Learning: Uniting Student and Career Staff through Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Lynn N.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines staff training from a different perspective, as a means of transmitting organizational culture to student employees through a closer communication between career and student part-time employees. Results of a qualitative survey suggest communication supports multigenerational relationships and administrators who invest in…

  16. Can primary health care staff be trained in basic life-saving surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Task-shifting at this time in South Sudan is a controversial topic and is not presently government policy. Please send us your views and tell us if you agree with the authors of this article. For example: Can rural middle level non-medical health staff be trained to safely carry out basic emergency surgical procedures?

  17. Effects of staff training on the care of mechanically ventilated patients: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloos, F; Müller, S; Harz, A; Gugel, M; Geil, D; Egerland, K; Reinhart, K; Marx, G

    2009-08-01

    Adherence to guidelines to avoid complications associated with mechanical ventilation is often incomplete. The goal of this study was to assess whether staff training in pre-defined interventions (bundle) improves the quality of care in mechanically ventilated patients. This study was performed on a 50-bed intensive care unit of a tertiary care university hospital. Application of a ventilator bundle consisting of semirecumbent positioning, lung protective ventilation in patients with acute lung injury (ALI), ulcer prophylaxis, and deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis (DVTP) was assessed before and after staff training in post-surgical patients requiring mechanical ventilation for at least 24 h. A total of 133 patients before and 141 patients after staff training were included. Overall bundle adherence increased from 15 to 33.8% (P90% was achieved in both groups. Median tidal volume in patients with ALI remained unaltered. Days on mechanical ventilation were reduced from 6 (interquartile range 2.0-15.0) to 4 (2.0-9.0) (P=0.017). Rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), ICU length of stay, and ICU mortality remained unaffected. In patients with VAP, the median ICU length of stay was reduced by 9 days (P=0.04). Staff training by an ICU change team improved compliance to a pre-defined ventilator bundle. This led to a reduction in the days spent on mechanical ventilation, despite incomplete bundle implementation.

  18. STAFF DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP ON ADULT TRAINING PROGRAMS, REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS (OTTAWA, APRIL 18-19, 1966).

    Science.gov (United States)

    TURNER, W.S.

    REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FROM A STAFF DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE ON ADULT TRAINING PROGRAMS HELD IN OTTAWA, CANADA, 1966 ARE REPORTED. PARTICIPANTS INCLUDED TRADE AND OCCUPATIONAL INSTRUCTORS, BASIC EDUCATION INSTRUCTORS, AND TRAINERS IN INDUSTRY AND TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTES. THE FOLLOWING TOPICS WERE DISCUSSED--THE ROLE OF GOVERNMENT, INDUSTRY,…

  19. Principles and Strategies for Coaching and Mentoring: Ideas for Training Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Margie

    1998-01-01

    Presents principles and strategies for child care coaching and mentoring systems, including: (1) think in terms of a learning and empowerment process; (2) treat staff as you would have them treat children; (3) provide training for different needs and interests; (5) emphasize dispositions as much as skills and knowledge; and (6) build a community…

  20. Care staff training in detection of depression in residential homes for the elderly - Randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisses, AMH; Kluiter, H; Jongenelis, K; Beekman, ATF; Ormel, J

    Background. Many people with depression in residential care homes for the elderly do not receive treatment because their depression remains undetected. Aims. To determine the effects of staff training on the detection, treatment and outcome of depression in residents often homes. Method. We

  1. An Evaluation of Strategies for Training Staff to Implement the Picture Exchange Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Clarissa S.; Dunning, Johnna L.; Rehfeldt, Ruth Anne

    2011-01-01

    The picture exchange communication system (PECS) is a functional communication system frequently used with individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders who experience severe language delays (Frost & Bondy, 2002). Few empirical investigations have evaluated strategies for training direct care staff how to effectively implement PECS with…

  2. Formative evaluation of a teledentistry training programme for oral health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, K K; Nayar, P; Chandak, A; Gupta, N

    2017-03-15

    The objective of this study was to conduct a formative evaluation of a teledentistry (TD) programme that was developed for a predominantly rural state in the Midwestern United States. Formative evaluation data were collected on programme activities from the TD programme records. In addition, the effectiveness of the TD training programme was evaluated using a self-administered paper-based survey administered to the participants, immediately following completion of the training activity. Ninety-three dental students, oral health and other health professionals participated in the TD training programme. Overall, the trainees rated the TD training programme highly, with regard to the content, format and skills improvement. The evaluation also demonstrated a positive change in all trainees' attitudes following the training sessions, with most trainees acknowledging a positive impact of the training on their knowledge and competency. We identified challenges in the development of the TD programme and in expanding access to oral health care for rural communities. Challenges included reimbursement and a limited interest amongst established dental offices. Dental schools can play an important role in preparing both dental health professionals and other health professionals in the use of TD by providing training and oral health expertise. The use of TD by non-dental providers for consultation, referral and disease management has the potential to improve oral health outcomes, particularly for rural and underserved populations. Evaluation data provide critical feedback to programme planners and administrators. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A novel method of assessing quality of postgraduate psychiatry training: experiences from a large training programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Most assessments of the quality of postgraduate training are based on anonymised questionnaires of trainees. We report a comprehensive assessment of the quality of training at a large postgraduate psychiatry training institute using non-anonymised face-to-face interviews with trainees and their trainers. Methods Two consultant psychiatrists interviewed 99 trainees and 109 trainers. Scoring of interview responses was determined by using a pre-defined criteria. Additional comments were recorded as free text. Interviews covered 13 domains, including: Clinical, teaching, research and management opportunities, clinical environment, clinical supervision, adequacy of job description, absence of bullying and job satisfaction. Multiple interview domain scores were combined, generating a ‘Combined’ score for each post. Results The interview response rate was 97% for trainers 88% for trainees. There was a significant correlation between trainee and trainer scores for the same interview domains (Pearson’s r = 0.968, ppsychiatry posts as compared to general adult psychiatry posts (Two tailed t-test, p psychiatry as compared to other specialist psychiatry posts (t-test: p = 0.038, 95% CI: -0.3901, -0.0118). Job satisfaction scores of year 1 to year 3 core trainees showed a significant increase with increasing seniority (Linear regression coefficient = 0.273, 95% CI: 0.033 to 0.513, ANOVA p= 0.026). Conclusions This in-depth examination of the quality of training on a large psychiatry training programme successfully elicited strengths and weakness of our programme. Such an interview scheme could be easily implemented in smaller schemes and may well provide important information to allow for targeted improvement of training. Additionally, trends in quality of training and job satisfaction amongst various psychiatric specialities were identified; specifically speciality posts and liaison posts in psychiatry were revealed to be the most popular with trainees. PMID

  4. Importance of staff training in hotel industry Case Study: Hotel Dukagjini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSc. Albana Gazija

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In every business, independently of the activity, human resources are the most precious capital. In terms of global competition and rapid change, personnel training are essential. Every manager should be able to attract qualified and capable personnel, in order to use their skills in achieving organizational objectives. In a market economy where uncertainty is rather widespread, obtaining knowledge and information is becoming a source for creating competing advantages. One of the most important aspects in contemporary hotel industry is getting to know the new methods and techniques through training. Staff training is an important part in Human Resource Management, in order to improve employee performance, respectively it helps putting their skills to better use and specialization in their work. Application of an efficient training process has an important impact in increasing employee performance.      The aim of this study is to understand the importance of personnel training in hotel industry. The study includes the theoretical part for staff training, importance and benefits. The empirical part is composed by a qualitative method research of Hotel Dukagjini in Peja. The paper’s results have shown that management has a relatively good understan-ding of the importance of personnel training; the hotel may be in a favorable situation if the employees keep taking continuous training.

  5. General medicine advanced training: lessons from the John Hunter training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackel, D; Attia, J; Pickles, R

    2014-03-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid growth in the number of advanced trainees pursuing general medicine as a specialty. This reflects an awareness of the need for broader training experiences to equip future consultant physicians with the skills to manage the healthcare challenges arising from the demographic trends of ageing and increasing comorbidity. The John Hunter Hospital training programme in general medicine has several characteristics that have led to the success in producing general physicians prepared for these challenges. These include support from a core group of committed general physicians, an appropriate and sustainable funding model, flexibility with a focus on genuine training and developing awareness of a systems approach, and strong links with rural practice. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  6. The effectiveness of a diversity awareness training programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colette Cavaleros

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a diversity awareness training programme. A sample of 382 employees from four different departments within a large accounting firm was used to form the groups of a simulated Solomon four-group design. The impact of a two-day workshop on diversity awareness was assessed using a 68-item questionnaire designed to measure awareness of self, impact of differences, performance management, career development, teamwork, work-family needs, participation, organisational culture, relationship building, and general satisfaction with the organisation. Opsomming Die doel met hierdie studie was om die effektiwiteit van ‘n bewustheid-van-diversiteit opleidingsprogram te bepaal. Werknemers uit vier departemente van ‘n groot ouditeursfirma het die groepe van ‘n gesimuleerde Solomon viergroepontwerp gevorm (N = 382. Die impak van ‘n tweedagwerkwinkel oor bewustheid-van-diversiteit is bepaal met ‘n 68-item vraelys wat ontwikkel is om bewustheid van die self, impak van verskille, prestasiebestuur, loopbaanontwikkeling, spanwerk, werk-gesinsbehoeftes, deelname, organisasiekultuur, ontwikkeling van verhoudings, en algemene tevredenheid met die organisasie te meet.

  7. Staff training effective in increasing learning opportunities for school-aged children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huskens, Bibi; Reijers, Hilde; Didden, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on staff's ABA skills during one-to-one play situations and initiations of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Data were collected within a multiple baseline design across 5 dyads. A continuous 20 s interval recording system was used to record motivation, creating opportunities, prompting and reinforcement of staff and child initiations. Training included instruction, consisting of instructions, video examples and role-plays. After this, a 4-h delayed video feedback condition started. Three staff members created significantly more learning opportunities during post-instruction and a significant increase occurred during video feedback for one staff member. Initiatives increased significantly in two children during post-instruction. During follow-up, three children showed unprompted initiatives. The mean percentage of spontaneous initiations increased during follow-up. The findings provide support for training staff in a clinical setting to create learning opportunities, which also may result in concomittant improvement in child initiations.

  8. The Association between Attitude towards the Implementation of Staff Development Training and the Practice of Knowledge Sharing among Lecturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Abd. Latif; Raman, Arumugam; Don, Yahya; Daud, Yaakob; Omar, Mohd Sofian

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to identify the association of teachers' attitude towards the implementation of Staff Development Training with Knowledge Sharing Practices among the lecturers of the Teacher Training Institution (TTI). In addition, this study was also to examine the differences in attitudes towards the implementation of Staff Development…

  9. Towards a framework in interaction training for staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, A.P.A.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Hendriks, A.H.C.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Training support staff in dealing with challenging behaviour in clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) is needed. The goal of this study is to determine which elements need to be incorporated in a training on staff interactions with these clients, building upon a framework and an

  10. Towards a framework in interaction training for staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, A.P.A.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Hendriks, A.H.C.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Training support staff in dealing with challenging behaviour in clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) is needed. The goal of this study is to determine which elements need to be incorporated in a training on staff interactions with these clients, building upon a framework and an

  11. Comparison of two training programmes on paramedic-delivered CPR performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Kevin; Sliwa, Karen; Wallis, Lee; Pillay, Yugan

    2016-05-01

    To compare CPR performance in two groups of paramedics who received CPR training from two different CPR training programmes. Conducted in June 2014 at the Hamad Medical Corporation Ambulance Service, the national ambulance service of the State of Qatar, the CPR performances of 149 new paramedic recruits were evaluated after they had received training from either a traditional CPR programme or a tailored CPR programme. Both programmes taught the same content but differed in the way in which this content was delivered to learners. Exclusive to the tailored programme was mandatory precourse work, continuous assessments, a locally developed CPR instructional video and pedagogical activities tailored to the background education and learner style preferences of paramedics. At the end of each respective training programme, a single examiner who was blinded to the type of training paramedics had received, rated them as competent or non-competent on basic life support skills, condition specific skills, specific overall skills and non-technical skills during a simulated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) assessment. Paramedics who received CPR training with the tailored programme were rated competent 70.9% of the time, compared with paramedics who attended the traditional programme and who achieved this rating 7.9% of the time (pservices/rights-and-licensing/

  12. CASE- METHODOLOGY FOR TRAINING THE SCIENTIFIC PEDAGOGICAL STAFF FOR SERVICES OF A DIGITAL LIBRARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Novytska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a technique using a case method in preparing teaching staff to use digital library services as an example of a training exercise. It has been suggested program, which will be trained users, editors and administrators DL. Developed scale assessment of knowledge and skills of teaching staff for the results of card problems. Created test questions for the training sessions. Discovered the case-method as type of learning method. Discovered the basic characteristics of situational teaching method: analytical and cognitive. Analytical activities may include problem analysis and/or systems analysis and/or causal analysis, and/or praxeological analysis, and/or prognostic analysis and/or target-oriented analysis. Investigated the principle of formation of bibliographic descriptions DL resource based metadata concept of «quality metadata DL». Proved that mistake when making metadata may somehow block access to the DL.

  13. Emotional Intelligence and Occupational Stress among Rehabilitation Staffs working in Tehran’s Training Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khaniyan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between emotional intelligence and occupational stress among rehabilitation staffs in Tehran’s training hospitals . Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 169 staff members selected from a total of 300 rehabilitation staffs working in Tehran’s training hospitals, recruited by random cluster sampling. Two questionnaires were used: The emotional intelligence questionnaire designed by Petrides and Furnham and HSE occupational stress questionnaire. Data obtained from this study were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation and multiple regression tests. Results: An inverse significant relationship existed between occupational stress and emotional intelligence (P<0.001, r=-0.33. There are, also, significant relationships between subscales of emotional intelligence including self-awareness (P=0.031, r=-0.18, social skills (P<0.001, r=-0.302, empathy (P=0.006, r=-0.238 and occupational stress. The results of multiple regressions indicated that the two subscales of ‘understanding other’s emotions’ and ‘social skills’ can be used for predicting occupational stress. Discussion: This study confirmed the relationship between emotional intelligence and occupational stress. Promotion of emotional intelligence through implementing training courses may lower rehabilitation staffs occupational stress or prevent it.

  14. Simulation training for improving the quality of care for older people: an independent evaluation of an innovative programme for inter-professional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Alastair J; Anderson, Janet E; Kodate, Naonori; Thomas, Libby; Thompson, Kellie; Thomas, Beth; Key, Suzie; Jensen, Heidi; Schiff, Rebekah; Jaye, Peter

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of a 2-day simulation training programme for staff designed to improve teamwork and inpatient care and compassion in an older persons' unit. The programme was designed to improve inpatient care for older people by using mixed modality simulation exercises to enhance teamwork and empathetic and compassionate care. Healthcare professionals took part in: (a) a 1-day human patient simulation course with six scenarios and (b) a 1-day ward-based simulation course involving five 1-h exercises with integrated debriefing. A mixed methods evaluation included observations of the programme, precourse and postcourse confidence rating scales and follow-up interviews with staff at 7-9 weeks post-training. Observations showed enjoyment of the course but some anxiety and apprehension about the simulation environment. Staff self-confidence improved after human patient simulation (t=9; df=56; ptraining support and exploring further which aspects of the programme enhance compassion and care of older persons. The study demonstrated that simulation is an effective method for encouraging dignified care and compassion for older persons by teaching team skills and empathetic and sensitive communication with patients and relatives.

  15. Manual on Cost-Effectiveness of Training Modalities in Population Education. Population Education Programme Service Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    This manual is the result of a regional training workshop on the cost-effectiveness of different training strategies in population education by Unesco in Kathmandu, Nepal, June 1-8, 1987. The purpose of the manual is to enable project staff to initiate studies to determine cost-effective training strategies in population growth control education.…

  16. The reach and adoption of a coach-led exercise training programme in community football

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Caroline F; Diamantopoulou, Kathy; Twomey, Dara M; Doyle, Tim L A; Lloyd, David G; Young, Warren; Elliott, Bruce C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the reach and adoption of a coach-led exercise training programme for lower limb injury prevention. Design Secondary analysis of data from a group-clustered randomised controlled trial. Setting A periodised exercise training warm-up programme was delivered to players during training sessions over an 8-week preseason (weeks 1–8) and 18-week playing season. Participants 1564 community Australian football players. Main outcome measurements Reach, measured weekly, was the number of players who attended training sessions. Adoption was the number of attending players who completed the programme in full, partially or not at all. Reasons for partial or non-participation were recorded. Results In week 1, 599 players entered the programme; 55% attended 1 training session and 45% attended > 1 session. By week 12, 1540 players were recruited but training attendance (reach) decreased to training, the majority adopted the full programme—ranging from 96% (week 1) to above 80% until week 20. The most common reasons for low adoption were players being injured, too sore, being late for training or choosing their own warm-up. Conclusions The training programme's reach was highest preseason and halved at the playing season's end. However, when players attended training sessions, their adoption was high and remained close to 70% by season end. For sports injury prevention programmes to be fully effective across a season, attention also needs to be given to (1) encouraging players to attend formal training sessions and (2) considering the possibility of some form of programme delivery outside of formal training. PMID:23482922

  17. The Training Project of Star Researchers, Outstanding Teaching Staff and Leaders with Facilities Available

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer KARAHAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a general consensus on the requirement of a serious regulation at our universities. It is argued that it is necessary to change Constitution and Institution of Higher Education Law for the serious regulation. However, it is impossible to say that all the facilities of the present legislation are used. Our aim is to create a project based on benefiting from continuing education centers to meet the need of star researchers, outstanding teaching staff and leaders in Turkey via the legislation in force. In this study, accessible studies from publications related to university, higher education and continuing education centers are studied. Th e current situation and solution off ers, applications and continuing education centers'activities have been determined. In accordance with these data, solution off ers have been proposed and discussed in line with the literature. According to the data obtained, our students who come with deficiencies from high schools to universities are not given the adequate undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate education. Th ere are studies such as ‘Double Major Program', ‘Medical-Science Physicians Integrated (MD-PhD Doctorate Program which upgrade the qualities. However, these programs are not suff icient and common. Th erefore, it is imposssible to train outstanding teaching staff , star researchesr and leaders who will meet the needs of our country and contribute to the World. Our academic potential needs a quality training except for branch training. On the other hand, the contribution of the Continuing Education Centers existing in university embodiments is limited. It is possible to provide basic skills, integration and research education to the outstanding teaching staff , star researcher and leader candidates. Th ese trainings should be given in a continuous instutionalization and in the formal education system. For this purpose, an academician school can be established within the body continuing

  18. Perceptions of the impact of an advanced training programme on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To compare self-rated competencies in management and leadership before and after training of the participants; to assess participants' experience of the training programme; and to evaluate the management and leadership skills of the participants after training. Methods. A cross-sectional, descriptive analytical method and ...

  19. Integrating palliative care within acute stroke services: developing a programme theory of patient and family needs, preferences and staff perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton Christopher R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Palliative care should be integrated early into the care trajectories of people with life threatening illness such as stroke. However published guidance focuses primarily on the end of life, and there is a gap in the evidence about how the palliative care needs of acute stroke patients and families should be addressed. Synthesising data across a programme of related studies, this paper presents an explanatory framework for the integration of palliative and acute stroke care. Methods Data from a survey (n=191 of patient-reported palliative care needs and interviews (n=53 exploring experiences with patients and family members were explored in group interviews with 29 staff from 3 United Kingdom stroke services. A realist approach to theory building was used, constructed around the mechanisms that characterise integration, their impacts, and mediating, contextual influences. Results The framework includes two cognitive mechanisms (the legitimacy of palliative care and individual capacity, and behavioural mechanisms (engaging with family; the timing of intervention; working with complexity; and the recognition of dying through which staff integrate palliative and stroke care. A range of clinical (whether patients are being ‘actively treated’, and prognostic uncertainty and service (leadership, specialty status and neurological focus factors appear to influence how palliative care needs are attended to. Conclusions Our framework is the first, empirical explanation of the integration of palliative and acute stroke care. The specification in the framework of factors that mediate integration can inform service development to improve the outcomes and experiences of patients and families.

  20. Implementation of a formal in-training assessment programme in anaesthesiology and preliminary results of acceptability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, C; Østergaard, D; van der Vleuten, C P M

    2003-01-01

    in anaesthesiology developed by a working group under the Danish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. METHODS: A questionnaire about the implementation of the programme in practice and the characteristics of the trainees was sent to the educational responsible consultant (ERC) in each of the 26...... programme has been widely implemented across the country. The majority of the programme was acceptable to trainees and had a positive effect on structuring training and on fostering learning. Udgivelsesdato: 2003-Nov...

  1. Guidelines for Professional Training of Junior Medical Staff in the Context of European Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sosnova Myroslava

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with outlining guidelines for improving professional training of junior medical staff based on European experience. Consequently, guidelines and recommendations on enhancing the efficiency of medical education in general and junior medical specialists’ professional training, in particular, published by European Union of Medical Specialists, General Medical Council, World Federation for Medical Education have been studied, analyzed, justified and presented in the paper. According to European Union of Medical Specialists it has been concluded that general aspects of medical specialists’ training are based on the selection process for the access to the medical specialists’ training, duration of training, common trunk, training program and quality assurance; requirements for training institutions involve recognition, size, quality assurance and teaching infructructure; requirements for instructors encompass qualification, training program, teacher/trainee ratio; requirements for trainees cover experience, language and logbook. In addition, the components that define the quality of junior medical specialists’ professional training based on N. Novosolova’s ideas have been indicated. Finally, based on the positive aspects of the guidelines analyzed the appropriate ones that, in our opinion, may be of use in Ukraine, have been presented.

  2. An evaluation of the 18- and 12-month basic postgraduate training programmes in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Niels Kristian; Qvesel, Dorte; Kodal, Troels

    2010-01-01

    and new programmes evaluate their training, and it explores their attitudes towards the new postgraduate training programme. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We developed a questionnaire by which quantitative and qualitative data were collected. The questionnaire was sent to all physicians following basic...... equipped and less ready for continued specialisation than doctors of the 18-month programme and they requested a downward adjustment of the learning objectives associated with the educational positions which follow their basic training. Physicians do not expect the increased focus on learning...... and supervision to compensate for the six-month reduction of the training period. Internal medicine should be included in the basic postgraduate training of all physicians. Training in secondary as well as primary health care was requested. CONCLUSION: The young physicians were reluctant towards the new basic...

  3. TECHNICAL TRAINING: Programmation automate Schneider TSX Premium 2ème niveau - French version only

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch CERN Technical Training 2003: Learning for the LHC ! Annonce de nouvelle formation - cours avancé Dans le cadre du programme de l'Enseignement Technique 2003, et en collaboration avec le GUAPI (Groupe des Utilisateurs d'Automates Programmables Industriels du CERN), une nouvelle formation a été organisée afin de perfectionner les connaissances sur l'outil PL7 de programmation des Automates PREMIUM de Schneider. Ce nouveau cours (niveau 2) s'adresse aux person...

  4. Genital examination training: assessing the effectiveness of an integrated female and male teaching programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBain, Lynn; Pullon, Susan; Garrett, Sue; Hoare, Kath

    2016-11-22

    Learning to undertake intimate female and male examinations is an important part of medical student training but opportunities to participate in practical, supervised learning in a safe environment can be limited. A collaborative, integrated training programme to provide such learning was developed by two university teaching departments and a specialist sexual health service, utilising teaching associates trained for intimate examinations in a simulated clinical educational setting. The objective of this research was to determine changes in senior medical students' self- reported experience and confidence in performing male and female genital examinations, before and after participating in a new clinical teaching programme. A quasi-experimental mixed methods design, using pre and post programme questionnaires and focus groups, was used to assess the effectiveness of the programme. The students reported greatly improved skill, confidence and comfort levels for both male and female genital examination following the teaching programme. Skill, confidence and comfort regarding male examinations were rated particularly low on the pre-teaching programme self- assessment, but post-programme was rated at similar levels to the female examination. This integrated female-male teaching programme (utilising trained teaching associates as simulated patients in a supervised clinical teaching environment) was successful in increasing senior medical students' skills and levels of confidence in performing genital examinations. There were differences between female and male medical students in their learning. Suggestions for improvement included providing more detailed instruction to some clinical supervisors about their facilitation role in the session.

  5. Challenging Ideological Environments: International Teachers' Experiences in an Outside-of-Country Teacher Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Teacher training for developing nation contexts is often conducted in short, intensive inside and outside-of-country programmes. Concerns have been raised in relation to the uncritical take-up of the western-centric material provided by these programmes, which are usually funded by national and international government organizations. This paper…

  6. Programme Content Orientation in Vocational Education and Training and Life Chances--A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kap, Hrvoje

    2014-01-01

    Comparative studies of vocational education and training systems rarely conduct systematic comparisons of the content of educational programmes, partly because of methodological difficulties. Yet, comparing the organisation of curricula can increase our understanding of how programme design reflects orientation towards various life chances in…

  7. Why do medical trainees take time out of their specialty training programmes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agius, Steven J; Tack, Gurinder; Murphy, Philip; Holmes, Stuart; Hayden, Jacky

    2014-10-01

    Postgraduate medical trainees may take time out of programme for personal or professional reasons which can delay completion of training. This survey of out of programme trainees in England explores a phenomenon that impacts significantly upon medical careers and workforce planning.

  8. Using Epidemiological Survey Data to Examine Factors Influencing Participation in Parent-Training Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawska, Alina; Dyah Ramadewi, Mikha; Sanders, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based parent-training programmes aim to reduce child behaviour problems; however, the effects of these programmes are often limited by poor participation rates. This study proposes a model of parent, child and family factors related to parental participation in parenting interventions. A computer-assisted telephone interview was used to…

  9. Evaluation of a clinical governance training programme for non-executive directors of NHS organisations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greco M; Powell R; Jolliffe J; Sweeney K; Wyatt K

    2004-01-01

    Context Non-executive directors in the South West Region. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of a oneday training programme for non-executive directors in critically appraising board clinical governance reports...

  10. Effects of an eccentric training programme on hamstring strain injuries in women football players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Ama Espinosa Gurutze

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: to test the hypothesis that an eccentric training programme applied on women football players would reduce the hamstring injury rate by improving thigh muscle balance and, particularly, hamstring strength.

  11. [Impact study of an active antiflu vaccination programme on the Clermont-Ferrand Teaching Hospital staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoux, A; Denis-Porret, M; Rouffiac, K; Baud, O; Millot-Theis, B; Souweine, B

    2006-03-01

    Protecting health care units from influenza epidemics has a double purpose: to decrease the mortality rate of patients at risk and to reduce work-leave in medical staff. An annual vaccination appears to be the most effective prevention against influenza. In France however the vaccinal coverage of health workers does not exceed 15%. In the 2003-2004 winter, the department of occupational health and the nosocomial disease committee of the Clermont-Ferrand Teaching Hospital initiated an active vaccination campaign. Three joint actions were carried out: date and place of vaccination sessions were individually addressed to every healthcare worker, meetings on prevention of influenza were held, as well as vaccination sessions on the work place in exposed units. Significant results were noted: vaccination rate increased 2.6 fold compared to the previous year (4.8 to 12.6%) and a vaccinal coverage rate of 29% in the exposed units. The results even if far from national objectives encourage the pursuit of the campaigns promoting information and vaccination on the work place. The high frequency of reported postinjection adverse effects (1 out of 3) should be taken into account in future information campaign.

  12. EFFECT OF TWELVE WEEKS SAQ TRAINING PROGRAMME ON SELECTED MOTOR FITNESS VARIABLES AMONG SPRINTERS

    OpenAIRE

    Dr.F.A.Juliance Rajasingh

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of twelve weeks SAQ training programme on selected motor fitness variables among sprinters. It was hypothesized that there would have been a significant effect of twelve weeks SAQ drill training programme on selected motor fitness variables among sprinters. For the present study the subjects were 30 male sprinters from Tirunelveli district, Tamilnadu were selected as subjects at random and their age ranged from 18 to 25 years. For the pre...

  13. A comprehensive professional development training's effect on afterschool program staff behaviors to promote healthy eating and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Robert Glenn; Beets, Michael W; Saunders, Ruth P; Beighle, Aaron; Webster, Collin

    2014-01-01

    Evaluate a comprehensive intervention designed to support staff and program leaders in the implementation of the YMCA of USA healthy eating and physical activity (HEPA) standards for their afterschool programs (3-6 pm). Pre- (fall 2011) and postassessment (spring 2012) no-control group. Four large-scale YMCA afterschool programs serving approximately 500 children. Professional development training founded on the 5Ms (ie, Mission, Model, Manage, Monitor, and Maximize) and LET US Play principles (ie, Lines, Elimination, Team size, Uninvolved staff/kids, and Space, equipment, and rules), on-site booster training sessions, workshops, and ongoing technical support for staff and program leaders from January to May 2012. System for Observing Staff Promotion of Activity and Nutrition. Multilevel mixed-effects linear (ie, staff behaviors expressed as a percentage of the number of scans observed) and logistic regression. A total of 5328 System for Observing Staff Promotion of Activity and Nutrition scans were completed over the 2 measurement periods. Of the 20 staff behaviors identified in HEPA standards and measured in this study, 17 increased or decreased in the appropriate direction. For example, the proportion staff engaged in physical activity with children increased from 26.6% to 37% and the proportion of staff eating unhealthy foods decreased from 42.1% to 4.5%. Comprehensive professional development training, founded on the 5Ms and LET US Play principles, and ongoing technical assistance can have a sizable impact on key staff behaviors identified by HEPA standards for afterschool programs.

  14. A training programme to improve hip strength in persons with lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Lee

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the effect of a 10-week training programme on persons with a lower limb amputation and to determine if this training is sufficient to enable running. Seven transtibial, 8 transfemoral and 1 bilateral amputee (all resulting from trauma, tumour or congenital) were randomly assigned to a training (n  =8) or control group (n = 8). Isokinetic hip flexor and extensor strength at 60 and 120º/s and oxygen consumption while walking at 1.0 m/s were tested pre- and post- a 10-week period. The training group followed a twice weekly hip strengthening programme, while the control group continued with their usual activities. Running ability was determined pre-testing, and attempted after post-testing for the training group only. The training group increased hip strength and decreased oxygen consumption. Six amputees who were previously unable to run were able to after training. The control group decreased intact limb hip extensor strength. The training programme is sufficient to improve hip strength and enable running in persons with a lower limb amputation. As hip strength was reduced in those not following the training programme, it is recommended that strength training be undertaken regularly in order to avoid losing limb strength following amputation.

  15. The evaluation of a frame-of-reference training programme for intern psychometrists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerdi Mulder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The use of assessment centres (ACs has drastically increased over the past decade. However, ACs are constantly confronted with the lack of construct validity. One aspect of ACs that could improve the construct validity significantly is that of assessor training. Unfortunately untrained or poorly trained assessors are often used in AC processes. Research purpose: The purpose of this research was to evaluate a frame-of-reference (FOR programme to train intern psychometrists as assessors at an assessment centre. Motivation of study: The role of an assessor is important in an AC; therefore it is vital for an assessor to be able to evaluate and observe candidates’ behaviour adequately. Commencing with this training in a graduate psychometrist programme gives the added benefit of sending skilled psychometrists to the workplace. Research design, approach and method: A quantitative research approach was implemented, utilising a randomised pre-test-post-test comparison group design. Industrial Psychology postgraduate students (N = 22 at a South African university were used and divided into an experimental group (n = 11 and control group (n = 11. Three typical AC simulations were utilised as pre- and post-tests, and the ratings obtained from both groups were statistically analysed to determine the effect of the FOR training programme. Main findings: The data indicated that there was a significant increase in the familiarity of the participants with the one-on-one simulation and the group discussion simulation. Practical/managerial implications: Training intern psychometrists in a FOR programme could assist organisations in the appointment of more competent assessors. Contribution/value-add: To design an assessor training programme using FOR training for intern psychometrists in the South African context, specifically by incorporating this programme into the training programme for Honours students at universities.

  16. A pilot training programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to lesbian, gay and bisexual patients in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reygan, Finn C G

    2012-05-09

    OBJECTIVE: The international literature points to the specific cancer risks and palliative care needs of lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) populations. However, with the exception of a programme in the USA, there is a lack of training internationally for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. In Ireland, a training project funded by the Irish Cancer Society, the Irish Hospice Foundation and the Health Service Executive developed a training pilot programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. METHODS: Over 200 (N = 201) oncology and palliative care staff participated in 17 brief, 50-min trainings in pilot sites. Evaluation of the training included self-report questionnaires at the end of each training and an evaluation interview with one participant from each of the four sites. RESULTS: The majority of participants reported that they would recommend the training to their colleagues, were interested in further training in the area and found the training useful for their practice. They also reported becoming more familiar with LGB-related language and terminology, became more knowledgeable of LGB health issues and reported becoming more confident in providing care to LGB patients. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations are that the training be made available across the health services in Ireland and included in postgraduate courses for trainee health and social care professionals. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Empowering education: A new model for in-service training of nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHMUD CHAGHARI

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In-service training of nurses plays an indispensable role in improving the quality of inpatient care. Need to enhance the effectiveness of in-service training of nurses is an inevitable requirement. This study attempted to design a new optimal model for in-service training of nurses. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted in two stages during 2015-2016. In the first stage, the Grounded Theory was adopted to explore the process of training 35 participating nurses. The sampling was initially purposeful and then theoretically based on emerging concept. Data were collected through interview, observation and field notes. Moreover, the data were analyzed through Corbin-Strauss method and the data were coded through MAXQDA-10. In the second stage, the findings were employed through Walker and Avant’s strategy for theory construction so as to design an optimal model for in-service training of nursing staff. Results: In the first stage, there were five major themes including unsuccessful mandatory education, empowering education, organizational challenges of education, poor educational management, and educational-occupational resiliency. Empowering education was the core variable derived from the research, based on which a grounded theory was proposed. The new empowering education model was composed of self-directed learning and practical learning. There are several strategies to achieve empowering education, including the fostering of searching skills, clinical performance monitoring, motivational factors, participation in the design and implementation, and problem-solving approach. Conclusion: Empowering education is a new model for in-service training of nurses, which matches the training programs with andragogical needs and desirability of learning among the staff. Owing to its practical nature, the empowering education can facilitate occupational tasks and achieving greater mastery of professional skills among the nurses.

  18. Empowering Education: A New Model for In-service Training of Nursing Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaghari, Mahmud; Saffari, Mohsen; Ebadi, Abbas; Ameryoun, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    In-service training of nurses plays an indispensable role in improving the quality of inpatient care. Need to enhance the effectiveness of in-service training of nurses is an inevitable requirement. This study attempted to design a new optimal model for in-service training of nurses. This qualitative study was conducted in two stages during 2015-2016. In the first stage, the Grounded Theory was adopted to explore the process of training 35 participating nurses. The sampling was initially purposeful and then theoretically based on emerging concept. Data were collected through interview, observation and field notes. Moreover, the data were analyzed through Corbin-Strauss method and the data were coded through MAXQDA-10. In the second stage, the findings were employed through 'Walker and Avants strategy for theory construction so as to design an optimal model for in-service training of nursing staff. In the first stage, there were five major themes including unsuccessful mandatory education, empowering education, organizational challenges of education, poor educational management, and educational-occupational resiliency. Empowering education was the core variable derived from the research, based on which a grounded theory was proposed. The new empowering education model was composed of self-directed learning and practical learning. There are several strategies to achieve empowering education, including the fostering of searching skills, clinical performance monitoring, motivational factors, participation in the design and implementation, and problem-solving approach. Empowering education is a new model for in-service training of nurses, which matches the training programs with andragogical needs and desirability of learning among the staff. Owing to its practical nature, the empowering education can facilitate occupational tasks and achieving greater mastery of professional skills among the nurses.

  19. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Mental Health First Aid Training among Student Affairs Staff at a Canadian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Jennifer; Brooks, Meghan; Burrow, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of providing the Mental Health First Aid training program to student affairs staff. The objective of the training was to increase knowledge of mental health, enhance sensitivity, and raise confidence to intervene and assist individuals experiencing a mental health issue. We found the training successfully met…

  20. A training programme for Taiwan nurses to improve child abuse reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Yu; Chou, Fan-Hao

    2017-08-01

    To design a training programme for nurses and evaluate the effectiveness of the training programme in improving the nurses' self-efficacy in reporting cases of child abuse and neglect. The problem of child abuse and neglect cases has become prevalent throughout numerous countries. Previous studies have found that more than 70% of Taiwanese nurses considered that they required child abuse and neglect training. Moreover, a training programme for child abuse and neglect reporting based on self-efficacy theory in clinical practice has been developed previously. A quasi-experimental research design was implemented. The study participants comprised 80 clinical nurses: 40 in an experimental group and 40 in a control group; the pretest, post-test and follow-up results were compared between the groups. Moreover, an analysis of covariance was applied to test the effectiveness of a nurse child abuse and neglect training programme after controlling for the effects of age, marital status and working years. The experimental and control groups were compared according to their scores on each self-efficacy subscale. The experimental and control groups differed significantly regarding the outcome measures of all six subscales of child abuse and neglect reporting self-efficacy between the pretest and post-test. Therefore, the results supported the hypothesis that nurse self-efficacy in reporting child abuse and neglect cases would improve after completing the Child Abuse and Neglect Training Program for Nurses. The Child Abuse and Neglect Training Program for Nurses is an appropriate training programme for improving nurse competence and confidence in reporting suspected child abuse and neglect cases. This study is relevant to clinical practice because it clarifies a relationship between nurses' self-efficacy and reporting behaviour. It also highlights the importance and effectiveness of the training programme Child Abuse and Neglect Training Program for Nurses in improving nurses

  1. Cognitive training plus a comprehensive psychosocial programme (OPUS) versus the comprehensive psychosocial programme alone for patients with first-episode schizophrenia (the NEUROCOM trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterager, Lone; Christensen, Torben Ø; Olsen, Birthe B

    2011-01-01

    Background: Up to 85% of patients with schizophrenia demonstrate cognitive dysfunction in at least one domain. Cognitive dysfunction plays a major role in functional outcome. It is hypothesized that addition of cognitive training to a comprehensive psychosocial programme (OPUS) enhances both...... cognitive and everyday functional capacity of patients more than the comprehensive psychosocial programme alone. Methods: The NEUROCOM trial examines the effect on cognitive functioning and everyday functional capacity of patients with schizophrenia of a 16-week manualised programme of individual cognitive...... training integrated in a comprehensive psychosocial programme versus the comprehensive psychosocial programme alone. The cognitive training consists of four modules focusing on attention, executive functioning, learning, and memory. Cognitive training involves computer-assisted training tasks as well...

  2. ILearning and EHomeStudy: Multimedia Training and Assessments for Field Survey Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Loftis

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Survey data collection projects strive to collect high quality data from survey respondents. The quality of the data collected is greatly dependent upon the effectiveness of field interviewers (FIs to conduct inperson screenings and interviews. Training FIs and subsequently assessing their knowledge of project protocol, methods and interviewing techniques is critical to the overall success of any data collection effort. For large surveys, as the number of FIs increase, the cost of inperson training can become prohibitively large. As a cost effective solution to increase the quality of the field data, we developed a suite of web and media based training and assessment tools called iLearning and eHomeStudy for training field staff. Besides saving the project costs associated with inperson training, we are also able to provide refresher trainings throughout the year. This application also enables FIs to view standardized training courses at their convenience and at their own pace. This paper describes the technical details, key features and benefits of this application suite, and also it includes some details on user satisfaction and future directions.

  3. Introduction of a drug-detection dog programme in mental health inpatient units: A mixed-methods study of consumer, staff, and carers' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvedy, Samantha M; Furness, Trentham; McKenna, Brian

    2018-02-01

    Many consumers admitted to mental health inpatient units also use illicit drugs, and some continue to do so while receiving treatment. In an attempt to curb the impact of illicit drug use, one of Australia's largest mental health services introduced a programme of drug-detection dog (DDD) searches. Our aim was to evaluate perceptions of the DDD programme among mental health consumers, staff, and carers. A mixed-methods research design using a concurrent triangulation approach was adopted, involving three focus group discussions with consumer, staff, and carer groups, and a structured survey among 94 consumers who were receiving treatment and 102 staff working in the units at the time of a DDD visit. Data were analysed using thematic analysis, and descriptive and inferential statistics. Major themes were that: (i) drug use in these units is perceived as 'prevalent' and 'destructive'; (ii) the DDD programme is 'beneficial' but 'incongruous' in a health-care setting; (iii) consumers are 'uninformed'; and (iv) consequences should be 'customized' to circumstances. Survey results corroborated qualitative themes, with the exception that although concerns about incongruity do exist, they were not prevalent and were outweighed by positive perceptions of the programme. Most perceptions were consistent between consumers and staff. However, consumers tended to think that, if found, drugs should be confiscated, whereas staff were more strongly in favour of the consumer being discharged. In conclusion, the DDD programme was seen as a positive step towards addressing drug use in mental health units. However, improved dissemination of information to consumers through verbal and written communication is required. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  4. Extension of general practice training from three to four years: experiences of a vocational training programme in Southern Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dowling, Stephanie

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the experiences of trainees taking part in an extended (four-year) general practice training programme introduced in the South Eastern region of the Republic of Ireland to replace the previous traditional (three-year) programme. In a qualitative design, eight homogeneous focus groups were held to determine the value of the additional year of training. The first cohort of trainees was interviewed towards the start and at the end of their fourth year. Trainees finishing the following year were also interviewed, as were graduates from the final three-year programme. GP trainers and the four members of the programme directing team comprised two further independent focus groups. Trainees reported that the integration of hospital posts and general practice attachments over the four years was particularly beneficial. The exposure to a variety of different general practices and the opportunity to take part in specialty clinics were considered extremely useful. The fourth year of training was felt to be less pressurised than previous years. Professional and personal development was enhanced; improved readiness to practise and confidence were noted. Perceived disadvantages of extended training included a lack of acknowledgment for doctors in their fourth year and excessive emphasis placed on research during the final year of training. The addition of an extra year of vocational training improves professional and personal development and changes the learning experience for doctors. Doctors felt more confident and ready to enter independent practice at the end of the fourth year of training.

  5. Existing subtitler training programmes and challenges for South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies ... country, legislation and policies that have a bearing on subtitling, training aims, academic level, course duration, course content, subtitling equipment or software used, practical training, entry levels, ideal candidates, assessment and the use of scripts in training.

  6. Using Computer-Based Continuing Professional Education of Training Staff to Develop Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sooraksa, Nanta

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a career development program for staff involved in providing training for small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Thailand. Most of these staff were professional vocational teachers in schools. The program uses information communication technology (ICT), and its main objective is to teach Moodle software as a tool for…

  7. The effect of an eight-week training programme on core stability in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A strong core musculature dynamically stabilises the pelvis during functional movements. Although it has been established that focused core training has a positive effect in numerous sports, little is known about the effect in gymnasts. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of an eight week core training programme on ...

  8. Contextually Responsive Transfer: Perceptions of NNES on an ESL/EFL Teacher Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, Indika; Bartlett, Brendan John

    2008-01-01

    Post-training reflections from nine overseas NNES students were recorded in relation to the extent to which they perceived potential applications of what they had learned in a Contextually Responsive Teacher Training (CRTT) programme in the learning-teaching contexts into which they were returning as English as a Second or Foreign Language…

  9. [The current situation in training and education of assistant staff in interventional cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baberg, H T; Machraoui, A; Barmeyer, J

    1999-02-01

    The number of heart catheter laboratories in Germany has been increasing for years. While there are general training regulations for cardiologists, nothing comparable exists for the assistant staff in interventional cardiology. Qualification is settled within the department. Aim of this study was the determination of the demand in general training and qualification courses. All heart catheter laboratories in North Rhine-Westphalia were questioned. Assistants (227) and medical directors (43) from 48 laboratories (54.0% returns) answered. Of the assistants 59.1% were qualified nurses, 28.2% consulting room assistants, and 10.1% medical technicians. Most of them were female (85.0%); the average age was 34.3 years. Of the assistants 73.1% were not trained in their current hospital or practice. Before their occupation in cardiac catheterization, 51.8% worked in nursing and 17.6% in ECG, sonography, etc. None of the 227 assistants was still in training at the time of questioning although 68.3% of the hospitals and practices accept trainees. Nine out of ten laboratories offer inhouse qualification, mainly in radiation protection (82.1%) and medical fields (66.7%), and 85.3% of the assistants have already attended these. Of the medical directors 90.0% and 99.2% of the assistants consider general training and qualification courses to be necessary. When asked for important fields for training programs, the assistant staff mentions "medicine" (77.6%), "examination assistance" (67.0%), and "EDP" (60.4%), while the medical directors place importance on "quality management" (89.2%) and "radiation protection" (86.5%). The job market for assistants the interventional cardiology is still good: 14.3% of the laboratories plan to take on new employees, 61.9% want to keep their number of assistants. The share of part-time work is low (16.8%). The momentary qualification and training of assistant staff in interventional cardiology does not match the demand. General programs for trainees

  10. The evaluation of a psychological skills training programme for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In terms of psychological wellbeing, the rugby group perceived themselves to have improved significantly more than the control group with regard to personal growth. Its adaptability and comparisons with related studies indicate ready transferability of the programme in sport, health and related community contexts.

  11. Principles for Developing Benchmark Criteria for Staff Training in Responsible Gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, Stefan; Banzer, Raphaela; Gruenerbl, Agnes; Malischnig, Doris; Griffiths, Mark D; Haring, Christian

    2017-03-01

    One approach to minimizing the negative consequences of excessive gambling is staff training to reduce the rate of the development of new cases of harm or disorder within their customers. The primary goal of the present study was to assess suitable benchmark criteria for the training of gambling employees at casinos and lottery retailers. The study utilised the Delphi Method, a survey with one qualitative and two quantitative phases. A total of 21 invited international experts in the responsible gambling field participated in all three phases. A total of 75 performance indicators were outlined and assigned to six categories: (1) criteria of content, (2) modelling, (3) qualification of trainer, (4) framework conditions, (5) sustainability and (6) statistical indicators. Nine of the 75 indicators were rated as very important by 90 % or more of the experts. Unanimous support for importance was given to indicators such as (1) comprehensibility and (2) concrete action-guidance for handling with problem gamblers, Additionally, the study examined the implementation of benchmarking, when it should be conducted, and who should be responsible. Results indicated that benchmarking should be conducted every 1-2 years regularly and that one institution should be clearly defined and primarily responsible for benchmarking. The results of the present study provide the basis for developing a benchmarking for staff training in responsible gambling.

  12. Physical examination skills training: Faculty staff vs. patient instructor feedback-A controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Krautter

    Full Text Available Standardized patients are widely used in training of medical students, both in teaching and assessment. They also frequently lead complete training sessions delivering physical examination skills without the aid of faculty teaching staff-acting as "patient instructors" (PIs. An important part of this training is their ability to provide detailed structured feedback to students which has a strong impact on their learning success. Yet, to date no study has assessed the quality of physical examination related feedback by PIs. Therefore, we conducted a randomized controlled study comparing feedback of PIs and faculty staff following a physical examination assessed by students and video assessors.14 PIs and 14 different faculty staff physicians both delivered feedback to 40 medical students that had performed a physical examination on the respective PI while the physicians observed the performance. The physical examination was rated by two independent video assessors to provide an objective performance standard (gold standard. Feedback of PI and physicians was content analyzed by two different independent video assessors based on a provided checklist and compared to the performance standard. Feedback of PIs and physicians was also rated by medical students and video assessors using a questionnaire consisting of 12 items.There was no statistical significant difference concerning overall matching of physician or PI feedback with gold standard ratings by video assessment (p = .219. There was also no statistical difference when focusing only on items that were classified as major key steps (p = .802, mistakes or parts that were left out during physical examination (p = .219 or mistakes in communication items (p = .517. The feedback of physicians was significantly better rated than PI feedback both by students (p = .043 as well as by video assessors (p = .034.In summary, our study demonstrates that trained PIs are able to provide feedback of equal

  13. Using an alumni survey to target improvements in an emergency medicine training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaeta, Theodore; Mahalingam, Gowtham; Pyle, Matthew; Dam, Aaron; Visconti, Annette

    2018-03-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) is the governing body responsible for accrediting graduate medical training programme in the USA. The Emergency Medicine Milestones (EM-Milestones) were developed by the ACGME and American Board of Emergency Medicine as a guide and monitoring tool for the knowledge, skills, abilities and experiences to be acquired during training. Alumni surveys have been reported as a valuable resource for training programme to identify areas for improvement; however, there are few studies regarding programme improvement in emergency medicine. We aimed to use the EM-Milestones, adapted as an alumni self-assessment survey, to identify areas for training programme improvement. This study was conducted at an urban, academic affiliated, community hospital in New York city with an emergency medicine training programme consisting of 30 residents over 3 years. Alumni of our emergency medicine training programme were sent an EM-Milestones-based self-assessment survey. Participants evaluated their ability in each EM-Milestones subcompetency on a Likert scale. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Response rate was 74% (69/93). Alumni reported achieving the target performance in 5/6 general competencies, with Systems-Based Practice falling below the target performance. The survey further identified 6/23 subcompetencies (Pharmacotherapy, Ultrasound, Wound Management, Patient Safety, Systems-Based Management and Technology) falling below the target performance level. Alumni self-evaluation of competence using the EM-Milestones provides valuable information concerning confidence to practice independently; these data, coupled with regular milestone evaluation of existing trainees, can identify problem areas and provide a blueprint for targeted programme improvement. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted

  14. Cognitive Training Programme in the Decrease of Stress of Daily ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The post-test outcome confirmed that cognitive training was effective in improving daily functioning of the retirees. Emanating from the research findings, the study proffered that persons of age sixty and above should be involved in periodical memory training which involves, teaching mnemonic strategies: organization, ...

  15. Culturally Competent Palliative and Hospice Care Training for Ethnically Diverse Staff in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka-Yahiro, Merle R; McFarlane, Sandra; Koijane, Jeannette; Li, Dongmei

    2017-05-01

    Between 2013 and 2030, older adults 65 years and older of racial/ethnic populations in the U.S. is projected to increase by 123% in comparison to the Whites (Non-Hispanics). To meet this demand, training of ethnically diverse health staff in long-term care facilities in palliative and hospice care is imperative. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a palliative and hospice care training of staff in two nursing homes in Hawaii - (a) to evaluate knowledge and confidence over three time periods, and (b) to compare staff and family caregiver satisfaction at end of program. The educational frameworks were based on cultural and communication theories. Fifty-two ethnically diverse staff, a majority being Asian (89%), participated in a 10-week module training and one 4 hour communication skills workshop. Staff evaluation included knowledge and confidence surveys, pre- and post-test knowledge tests, and FAMCARE-2 satisfaction instrument. There were nine Asian (89%) and Pacific Islander (11%) family caregivers who completed the FAMCARE-2 satisfaction instrument. The overall staff knowledge and confidence results were promising. The staff rated overall satisfaction of palliative care services lower than the family caregivers. Implications for future research, practice, and education with palliative and hospice care training of ethnically diverse nursing home staff is to include patient and family caregiver satisfaction of palliative and hospice care services, evaluation of effectiveness of cross-cultural communication theories in palliative and hospice care staff training, and support from administration for mentorship and development of these services in long term care facilities.

  16. Cluster randomised controlled trial of an infection control education and training intervention programme focusing on meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in nursing homes for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, N S; Gilpin, D F; Tunney, M M; Kearney, M P; Crymble, L; Cardwell, C; Hughes, C M

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this cluster randomised controlled trial was to test the impact of an infection control education and training programme on meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) prevalence in nursing homes. Nursing homes were randomised to intervention (infection control education and training programme; N=16) or control (usual practice continued; N=16). Staff in intervention homes were educated and trained (0, 3 and 6 months) in the principles and implementation of good infection control practice with infection control audits conducted in all sites (0, 3, 6 and 12 months) to assess compliance with good practice. Audit scores were fed back to nursing home managers in intervention homes, together with a written report indicating where practice could be improved. Nasal swabs were taken from all consenting residents and staff at 0, 3, 6 and 12 months. The primary outcome was MRSA prevalence in residents and staff, and the secondary outcome was a change in infection control audit scores. In all, 793 residents and 338 staff were recruited at baseline. MRSA prevalence did not change during the study in residents or staff. The relative risk of a resident being colonised with MRSA in an intervention home compared with a control home at 12 months was 0.99 (95% confidence interval: 0.69, 1.42) after adjustment for clustering. Mean infection control audit scores were significantly higher in the intervention homes (82%) compared with the control homes (64%) at 12 months (P<0.0001). Consideration should be given to other approaches which may help to reduce MRSA in this setting. Copyright 2010 The Hospital Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Creating a Learning Environment to Promote Food Sustainability Issues in Primary Schools? Staff Perceptions of Implementing the Food for Life Partnership Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Orme

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the role that schools can play in promoting education for sustainable development (ESD, and evidence is emerging that schools can be influential in the emerging agenda around the ecological, ethical and social aspects of food, diet and nutrition. With regard to such food sustainability issues, this paper analyses the role of the Food for Life Partnership national programme in supporting garden and farm-based learning activities in 55 primary schools in England, UK. Using a mixed methods approach, the study examined the programme’s implementation through staff perceptions and a range of school change indicators. The study found that the programme delivery was associated with widespread institutional reforms. According to staff, implementation of the programme provided a range of opportunities for pupils to learn about food production and sustainability, but addressing these issues was challenging for teachers and raised a number of questions concerned with effective, equitable and on-going implementation. At a pedagogical level, teachers also reflected on conceptually challenging aspects of food sustainability as a topic for primary school education. The study identified ways that ESD programmes could support schools to think about and implement learning opportunities as well as identifying significant barriers related to resourcing such programmes.

  18. Outreach Programmes for Education and Training: Contributions from the International Cartographic Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, W. E.; Fairbairn, D.

    2012-07-01

    Organisations like the International Cartographic Association champion programmes that develop and deliver education and training to cartographers and geospatial scientists, globally. This can be in the form of traditional university and training college programmes, short courses for professional and technical members of mapping agencies and as outreach initiatives to transfer knowledge about the discipline and its contemporary practices. Through its international community, the ICA undertakes the transfer of knowledge about cartography and GI Science by publishing books and special editions of journals and running workshops. Colleagues from the ICA community conduct these workshops on a volunteer basis, generally with the support of the national member organisation of ICA or the national mapping body. For example, the ICA promotes the generation of extensive publications, generally through its Commissions and Working Groups. The publications include books, journals and the ICA Newsletter. Outreach activities are especially pertinent to up skill colleagues from developing countries. Specialist programmes can be offered for professional and 'everyday' map users (from adults to children). The ICA can assist with its current programmes, designed to embrace professional and non-professional cartographers alike. This paper will address how education and outreach programmes can be supported by international associations, by offering programmes independently, or in partnership with sister associations and national and regional organisations and societies. As well, the paper will address the need to deliver education and outreach programmes not to just the professional international community, but also to map users and citizen map publishers.

  19. 2003 - 2004 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME 1st TERM

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2003-01-01

    1st TERM 29 September to 19 December 2003 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME (Renewable) Energy Policy in the EU Members States and the Accession States By D. Reiche, Free University of Berlin, D 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 October LECTURES SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Introduction to QCD By B. Webber, CERN-TH 20, 21, 22, 23, 24 October The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures.

  20. Effects of a contrast training programme on jumping, sprinting and agility performance of prepubertal basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre Román, Pedro Ángel; Villar Macias, Francisco Javier; García Pinillos, Felipe

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a 10 week contrast training (CT) programme (isometric + plyometric) on jumping, sprinting abilities and agility performance in prepubertal basketball players. Fifty-eight children from a basketball academy (age: 8.72 ± 0.97 years; body mass index: 17.22 ± 2.48 kg/m 2 ) successfully completed the study. Participants were randomly assigned to experimental groups (EG, n = 30) and control groups (CG, n = 28). The CT programme was included in the experimental group's training sessions - twice a week - as part of their usual weekly training regime. This programme included 3 exercises: 1 isometric and 2 plyometric. Jumping, sprinting and agility performance were assessed before and after the training programme. Significant differences were found in posttest between EG and CG in sprint and T-test: EG showed better results than CG. Furthermore, there were significant differences in posttest-pretest between EG and CG in squat jump, countermovement jump, drop jump, sprint and T-test with the EG showing better results than CG. The CT programme led to increases in vertical jump, sprint and agility levels, so that the authors suggest that prepubertal children exhibit high muscular strength trainability.

  1. Biomedical scientist training officers' evaluation of integrated (co-terminus) Applied Biomedical Science BSc programmes: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, S J; Cunningham, J M

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) portfolio for pre-registration training in 2003 allowed universities to develop integrated (co-terminus) biomedical science BSc programmes. Students undertake structured placements within clinical pathology laboratories as part of their degree. The clinical training and professional development of students is undertaken by training officers (TOs), who are experienced Health Professions Council (HPC)-registered biomedical scientists and usually also members of the IBMS. This study aims to evaluate TOs' perceptions of these integrated degrees as a means of delivering pre-registration training for biomedical scientists. A questionnaire to collect quantitative data and be completed anonymously was sent to TOs, via staff at participating universities. Items considered TOs' perceptions in four categories: how well students fitted into the laboratory team, their professional and scientific development, the impact of delivering integrated degrees on service delivery, and the commitment to training students. Surveys took place in 2007, 2008 and 2009 and involved TOs taking students from 10, 14 and 17 universities each year, respectively. The response rates to the survey were 60% in 2007, 34% in 2008 and 12% in 2009. Participants were representative in terms of age, gender and pathology discipline and had a broad range of experience with students. The overall mean score for TOs perceptions was 3.38 in 2007 which increased significantly to 3.99 in 2009 (Kruskall Wallis test chi2 = 21.13, P<0.01). Mean scores in three of the four categories were positive in 2007, although the impact on service delivery was perceived negatively. In all areas, means were significantly greater in 2009. The results indicate that TOs view the integrated degrees favourably and are happy with the scientific and professional development of students. Although designing training sessions suitable for undergraduates took extra work initially

  2. A coordinated comprehensive professional development training's effect on summer day camp staff healthy eating and physical activity promoting behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, R Glenn; Beets, Michael W; Saunders, Ruth P; Beighle, Aaron

    2014-08-01

    The YMCA of USA recently adopted Healthy Eating and Physical Activity (HEPA) Standards for their summer-day- camps (SDCs). Standards call for staff to exhibit HEPA promoting behaviors while eliminating HEPA discouraging behaviors. No studies have evaluated training programs to influence policy specified staff behaviors and related changes in child activity in SDCs. Four YMCA SDCs serving approximately 800 children/week participated in this no control group pre/post pilot study. Professional development training founded in the 5 Ms (Mission, Model, Manage, Monitor, Maximize) and LET US Play principles (lines; elimination; team size; uninvolved staff/kids; and space, equipment, and rules) was delivered to staff. Outcomes were staff promotion behaviors and child activity assessed via systematic observation instruments. Twelve of 17 HEPA staff behaviors changed in the appropriate direction from baseline to postassessment with 5 behaviors reaching statistically significant changes. The percentage of girls and boys observed in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity increased from 15.3% to 18.3% (P > .05) and 17.9% to 21.2%, whereas sedentary behavior decreased from 66.8% to 59.8% and 62.3% to 53.6%, respectively. Evidence suggests that the professional development training designed to assist SDCs to meet the HEPA Standards can lead to important changes in staff behaviors and children's physical activity.

  3. Effects of a recovery-oriented cognitive therapy training program on inpatient staff attitudes and incidents of seclusion and restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nadine A; Grant, Paul M; Luther, Lauren; Beck, Aaron T

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the feasibility of implementing a recovery-oriented cognitive therapy (CT-R) milieu training program in an urban acute psychiatric inpatient unit. Over a 1-month period, 29 staff members learned short-term CT-R strategies and techniques in an 8-h workshop. Trainees' perceptions of CT-R, beliefs about the therapeutic milieu, and attitudes about working with individuals with psychosis were evaluated both before the workshop and 6 months after the workshop had been completed. Incidents of seclusion and restraint on the unit were also tallied prior to and after the training. Results indicate that staff perceptions of CT-R and their beliefs about the therapeutic environment significantly improved, whereas staff attitudes towards individuals with psychosis remained the same. Incidents of seclusion and restraint also decreased after the training. These findings provide evidence that CT-R training is feasible and can improve the therapeutic milieu of an acute psychiatric inpatient unit.

  4. Physical examination skills training: Faculty staff vs. patient instructor feedback—A controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbacher, Katja; Schultz, Jobst-Hendrik; Maatouk, Imad; Herrmann-Werner, Anne; Koehl-Hackert, Nadja; Herzog, Wolfgang; Nikendei, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Background Standardized patients are widely used in training of medical students, both in teaching and assessment. They also frequently lead complete training sessions delivering physical examination skills without the aid of faculty teaching staff–acting as “patient instructors” (PIs). An important part of this training is their ability to provide detailed structured feedback to students which has a strong impact on their learning success. Yet, to date no study has assessed the quality of physical examination related feedback by PIs. Therefore, we conducted a randomized controlled study comparing feedback of PIs and faculty staff following a physical examination assessed by students and video assessors. Methods 14 PIs and 14 different faculty staff physicians both delivered feedback to 40 medical students that had performed a physical examination on the respective PI while the physicians observed the performance. The physical examination was rated by two independent video assessors to provide an objective performance standard (gold standard). Feedback of PI and physicians was content analyzed by two different independent video assessors based on a provided checklist and compared to the performance standard. Feedback of PIs and physicians was also rated by medical students and video assessors using a questionnaire consisting of 12 items. Results There was no statistical significant difference concerning overall matching of physician or PI feedback with gold standard ratings by video assessment (p = .219). There was also no statistical difference when focusing only on items that were classified as major key steps (p = .802), mistakes or parts that were left out during physical examination (p = .219) or mistakes in communication items (p = .517). The feedback of physicians was significantly better rated than PI feedback both by students (p = .043) as well as by video assessors (p = .034). Conclusions In summary, our study demonstrates that trained PIs are able

  5. Parent-training programmes for improving maternal psychosocial health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, J; Coren, E

    2001-01-01

    Mental health problems are common, and there is evidence from a range of studies to suggest that a number of factors relating to maternal psychosocial health can have a significant effect on the mother-infant relationship, and that this can have consequences for both the short and long-term psychological health of the child. The use of parenting programmes is increasing in the UK and evidence of their effectiveness in improving outcomes for mothers is now required. The objective of this review is to address whether group-based parenting programmes are effective in improving maternal psychosocial health including anxiety, depression, and self-esteem. A range of biomedical, social science, educational and general reference electronic databases were searched including MEDLINE, EMBASE CINAHL, PsychLIT, ERIC, ASSIA, Sociofile and the Social Science Citation Index. Other sources of information included the Cochrane Library (SPECTR, CENTRAL), and the National Research Register (NRR). Only randomised controlled trials were included in which participants had been randomly allocated to an experimental and a control group, the latter being either a waiting-list, no-treatment or a placebo control group. Studies had to include at least one group-based parenting programme, and one standardised instrument measuring maternal psychosocial health. A systematic critical appraisal of all included studies was undertaken using a modified version of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) published criteria. The treatment effect for each outcome in each study was standardised by dividing the mean difference in post-intervention scores for the intervention and treatment group, by the pooled standard deviation, to produce an effect size. Where appropriate the results were then combined in a meta-analysis using a fixed-effect model, and 95% confidence intervals were used to assess the significance of the findings. A total of 23 studies were included in the review but only 17

  6. Communities in action: developing a dental ambassador training programme for adults with learning disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witton, R; Potterton, R; Smith, W

    2017-06-01

    Adults with learning disabilities may be at higher risk of poor oral health. The community outreach programme attached to Plymouth University Peninsula Dental School used established links with local agencies for this group to try out an intervention using service users as dental ambassadors. A programme was developed to meet the needs of the group and training in oral health key messages was provided along with support in presentation skills. Early evaluation shows promise in terms of feasibility, interest and improved self-care. Public health competencies being illustrated: Strategic leadership, communication, teaching and training, and collaborative working for health and oral health improvement. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  7. Going out-of-programme as a specialty trainee: procrastination or optimisation of training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Matthew; Azmy, Iman A F; Sanders, David S

    2011-12-01

    Out-of-programme (OOP) activities enable postgraduate trainees to undertake an experience outside of their individual subspecialty training programmes. Activities vary but may include a period of research, additional clinical experiences or time for a planned career break. Determining whether to go OOP is a common dilemma faced by many trainees as they progress through postgraduate training. This review assesses the options trainees have with regards to going OOP, evaluates the potential advantages and disadvantages and also provides advice for those considering an OOP activity.

  8. Strengthening medical training programmes by focusing on professional transitions: a national bridging programme to prepare medical school graduates for their role as medical interns in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Michael J; Luckett, Rebecca; Mantzor, Savara; Bedada, Alemayhu G; Saleeb, Paul; Haverkamp, Miriam; Mosepele, Mosepele; Haverkamp, Cecil; Maoto, Rosa; Prozesky, Detlef; Tapela, Neo; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Barak, Tomer

    2017-12-21

    The improvement of existing medical training programmes in resource-constrained settings is seen as key to addressing the challenge of retaining medical graduates trained at considerable cost both in-country and abroad. In Botswana, the establishment of the national Medical Internship Training Programme (MIT) in 2014 was a first step in efforts to promote retention through the expansion and standardization of internship training, but MIT faces a major challenge related to variability between incoming trainees due to factors such as their completion of undergraduate medical training in different settings. To address this challenge, in August 2016 we piloted a bridging programme for foreign and locally trained medical graduates that aimed to facilitate their transition into internship training. This study aimed to describe the programme and evaluate its impact on the participants' self-rated perceptions of their knowledge, experience, clinical skills, and familiarity with Botswana's healthcare system. We conducted a national, intensive, two-week programme designed to facilitate the transition from medical student to intern and to prepare all incoming interns for their work in Botswana's health system. Participants included all interns entering in August 2016. Formats included lectures, workshops, simulations, discussions, and reflection-oriented activities. The Kellogg Foundation Outcomes Logic Model was used to evaluate the programme, and participants self-rated their knowledge, skills, and attitudes across each of the programme objectives on paired questionnaires before and after participation. 48/54 participants (89%) provided paired data. Participants reported a high degree of satisfaction with the programme (mean 4.2/5). Self-rated preparedness improved after participation (mean 3.2 versus 3.7, p programme prepared them for their internship training. Exploratory analysis revealed that 20/25 participants (80%) reporting either no effect or a negative effect

  9. 2003-2004 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME: H. QUACK

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch LECTURE SERIES 8 and 12 March, from 11.00-12.00 hrs Main Auditorium 9 March, from 11.00-12.00 hrs TH Auditorium* 11 March, from 10.00-12.00 hrs** Main Auditorium Introduction to Cryogenic Engineering H. QUACK, Technische Univ. Dresden, D • Properties of materials • History of cryogenics • Refrigeration processes and machines • Cooling methods • Applications of cryogenics * Please note unusual place. ** Please note unusual time.

  10. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  11. Infection prevention and mass vaccination training for U.S. point of dispensing staff and volunteers: a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebmann, Terri; Loux, Travis M; Zink, Thomas K; Swick, Zachary; Wakefield, Mary

    2015-03-01

    Points of dispensing (PODs) are deployed for medical countermeasure mass dispensing. However, infection prevention and vaccine administration pre-event training offered and just-in-time (JIT) education planned for POD workers have not been assessed. Disaster planners were sent an online questionnaire in 2013. McNemar tests compared training offered to staff versus volunteers and pre-event training versus JIT training. In total, 301 disaster planners participated. The most frequent pre-event training included hand hygiene (59.1% and 28.0%) and personal protective equipment (PPE) selection (52.1% and 24.1%) for staff and volunteers, respectively. Few provided pre-event training on the cold chain technique (14.8% and 5.1%) or smallpox vaccine administration (4.7% and 2.3%) for staff or volunteers. For all topics except smallpox vaccine administration, more staff than volunteers received pre-event training (P vaccine administration to ensure safe and successful POD deployment. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Interval Training Programme on Resting Heart Rate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DATONYE ALASIA

    Enugu, Nigeria, Department of Physiotherapy, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku-Ozalla, Enugu, Nigeria ... Results: Findings of the study revealed significant effect of exercise training program on HR. Also, changes in VO max negatively. 2 correlated with changes in HR (r= -.503) at ... cardiovascular parameters.

  13. Evaluation of HeartMath Training Programme for Improving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of a HeartMath training apparatus on personal resilience and physiological coherence. A within group, pre-test and post-test, outcome evaluative design was employed to assess changes in dependent variables. A small convenience sample of 6 participants, 4 women and ...

  14. Effects of Interval Training Programme on Resting Heart Rate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: It was concluded that moderate intensity interval training programs is effective in the non-pharmacological adjunct management of hypertension and may prevent cardiovascular event through the down regulation of HR in hypertension. Keywords: Hypertension; Interval exercise; cardiovascular risk factor; Heart ...

  15. Family therapy training on a clinical psychology programme

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Alan

    2007-01-01

    The report describes the intake interviewing exercise in a family therapy training unit developed for postgraduates in clinical psychology. The teaching method includes pre-class reading, video modelling, and simulated practice with live feedback. The academic material and other similar practice exercises are contained in the core textbook for this unit.

  16. Effects of Interval Training Programme on Resting Heart Rate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DATONYE ALASIA

    Student's t and Pearson correlation tests were used in data analysis. Results: Findings of the study revealed significant effect of exercise training program on HR ... presentwith a series of functional and anatomic deficits, such as increasedvascular resistance, vessel rarefaction, increased heart energy expenditure, increased.

  17. Evaluation of staff cultural awareness before and after attending cultural awareness training in an Australian emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Rose; Martin, Catherine; Smith, Tammy

    2014-10-01

    Cultural awareness of emergency department staff is important to ensure delivery of appropriate health care to people from all ethnic groups. Cultural awareness training has been found to increase knowledge about other cultures and is widely used as a means of educating staff, however, debate continues as to the effectiveness of these programs. To determine if an accredited cultural awareness training program affected emergency department staff knowledge, familiarity, attitude of and perception towards Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. One group pre-test and post-test intervention study compared the cultural awareness of 44 emergency department staff towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people before and after training. The cultural awareness training was delivered in six hours over three sessions and was taught by an accredited cultural awareness trainer. The cultural awareness training changed perception but did not affect attitude towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in this group. Future strategies to improve staff cultural awareness need to be investigated, developed, implemented and evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Training residential supervisors to provide feedback for maintaining staff teaching skills with people who have severe disabilities.

    OpenAIRE

    Parsons, M B; Reid, D H

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated procedures for training supervisors in a residential setting to provide feedback for maintaining direct-service staff members ' teaching skills with people who have severe disabilities. Using classroom-based instruction and on-the-job observation and feedback, 10 supervisors were initially trained to implement teaching programs themselves. The training improved supervisors' teaching skills but was insufficient to improve the quality of feedback they provided to direct-service sta...

  19. The role of research and training in family planning programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefnawi, F

    1983-01-01

    The slow progress of family planning in Egypt is not due to the insufficiency of human and material resources. The problem lies in the distribution, management, and improvement of these resources. Research and personnel training are critical to directing efforts along the right course and towards the right objectives. The Population Council (USA), at the end of 1972, identified all findings of major significance from international research on family planning programs. Of the 322 studies, not 1 was carried out in Egypt or was based on 2ndary data from Egypt. Since 1972, though, Egyptian social and medical scientists have become actively involved in demographic themes and human reproduction. These are mainly personal iniatives, often limited by a scarcity of funds. Findings of population studies are not as transferable from 1 population to another. Also, there is a diversity of research needs. Many Muslims believe that their religion outlaws birth control. Religious objection appears the most widely shared reason for nonuse. This objection suggests a series of questions on what can be done to influence religious attitudes relating to contraception. A permanent and adequately managed institution for training in family planning and related aspects of maternal education has not been set up in Egypt. Training requirements of different levels and categories of personnel must be carefully identified. The impact of training on the quality of performance must be monitored. Training should not be limited to conventional groups of trainees. Al-Azhar's Islamic Centre for Population Studies and Research was built 5 years ago with initial aid from the United Nations Fund for Population Activities. It was an attempt to create an intellectual focus on population issues, concerning how the quality of life and Islamic standards of its quality affect each other. During the 1st 5 years, the Centre devoted itself to research activities. 44 studies were conducted.

  20. programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aid for AIDS (AfA) is a disease management programme (DIVIPI available to beneficiaries and employees of contracted medical funds and ... the challenges alluded to in the first article, including late enrolment and the measurement of survival, especially in patients with ... I the HIV prevalence and incidence (new infections].

  1. Implementing clinical ethics in German hospitals: content, didactics and evaluation of a nationwide postgraduate training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörries, Andrea; Simon, Alfred; Neitzke, Gerald; Vollmann, Jochen

    2010-12-01

    The Hannover qualifying programme 'ethics consultation in hospitals', conducted by a four-institution cooperation partnership, is an interdisciplinary, scientifically based programme for healthcare professionals interested in ethics consultation services and is widely acknowledged by hospital managements and healthcare professionals. It is unique concerning its content, scope and teaching format. With its basic and advanced modules it has provided training and education for 367 healthcare professionals with 570 participations since 2003 (until February 2010). One characteristic feature is its attractiveness for health professionals from different backgrounds. Internationally, the Hannover programme is one of the few schedules with both academics and non-academics as target groups and a high participation rate of physicians. The concept of the Hannover programme is in great demand, and its schedule is continuously optimised through evaluation. The goals of enabling healthcare professionals from different professional backgrounds to define and reflect ethical problems, to facilitate and support the process of decision-making and to work out structures for their own institutions seem to have been achieved. However, in order to obtain effective and sustainable results, participation in the programme should be supplemented regularly by in-house training sessions or individual expert consultations. Future challenges include new thematic courses and providing a network for former participants, especially when they come from non-academic hospitals. The network is a reasonable platform to discuss participants' experiences, successes and pitfalls. A further task will be research on how the programme's concept can support the sustainability of ethics structures in the various institutions.

  2. Cognitive mechanisms underlying Armoni: a computer-assisted cognitive training programme for individuals with intellectual disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Peñaloza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although a number of cognitive deficits have been described in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID, few studies have examined the use of computer-assisted cognitive training programmes in this group of people. This study sought to determine the cognitive mechanisms underlying 16 activities included in Armoni, a computerized cognitive training programme for individuals with ID, in order to validate its use with this population. Fifty adults with ID from four residential care centres in Spain underwent neuropsychological testing tapping attention, verbal memory, visual memory, comprehension, visuoperception, visuoconstruction, naming ability, verbal fluency, verbal reasoning and motor function. In addition, they performed 16 activities included in the Armoni programme. The relationships between cognitive function and the computer-based activities were assessed using Spearman correlations. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were then used to explore how cognitive function predicted the performance of individuals with ID on the programme activities. Most programme activities correlated with visuoconstruction, comprehension and naming ability. Naming ability, visual memory, comprehension and visuoconstruction contributed the most to the predictive models regarding performance on the Armoni activities. Our findings support the validity of Armoni for cognitive training in individuals with ID.

  3. TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS IN SCUBA DIVERS DURING DIVING CERTIFICATION TRAINING PROGRAMME

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZTÜRK, Özmen; Tek, Mustafa; Seven, Hüseyin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The design of a diving regulator's mouth-piece is known to increase the risk of a temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in SCUBA divers. The total weight of a diving regulator is reflected directly on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) causing articular and periarticular problems. In this study, the prevalence of TMD in SCUBA divers having a training for diving certification is investigated. We also aimed to determine the factors that lead to TMD, and clarify the observation that there i...

  4. Effect of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function: A Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Driscoll Jeremiah

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. To date no studies have reported on the effects of dynamic neuromuscular training on ankle joint positioning during landing from a jump, which has been reported as one of the primary injury mechanisms for ankle joint sprain. This case report details the effects of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function in an athlete with CAI. Methods The athlete took part in a progressive 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric, and speed/agility drills. The outcome measures chosen to assess for interventional efficacy were: 1 Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT scores, 2 Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT reach distances, 3 ankle joint plantar flexion during drop landing and drop vertical jumping, and 4 ground reaction forces (GRFs during walking. Results CAIT and SEBT scores improved following participation in the programme. The angle of ankle joint plantar flexion decreased at the point of initial contact during the drop landing and drop vertical jumping tasks, indicating that the ankle joint was in a less vulnerable position upon landing following participation in the programme. Furthermore, GRFs were reduced whilst walking post-intervention. Conclusions The 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme improved parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI. Further research is now required in a larger cohort of subjects to determine the effects of neuromuscular training on ankle joint injury risk factors.

  5. Effect of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function: A Case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Driscoll, Jeremiah

    2011-06-09

    Abstract Background Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI) are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. To date no studies have reported on the effects of dynamic neuromuscular training on ankle joint positioning during landing from a jump, which has been reported as one of the primary injury mechanisms for ankle joint sprain. This case report details the effects of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function in an athlete with CAI. Methods The athlete took part in a progressive 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric, and speed\\/agility drills. The outcome measures chosen to assess for interventional efficacy were: 1 Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT) scores, 2 Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) reach distances, 3 ankle joint plantar flexion during drop landing and drop vertical jumping, and 4 ground reaction forces (GRFs) during walking. Results CAIT and SEBT scores improved following participation in the programme. The angle of ankle joint plantar flexion decreased at the point of initial contact during the drop landing and drop vertical jumping tasks, indicating that the ankle joint was in a less vulnerable position upon landing following participation in the programme. Furthermore, GRFs were reduced whilst walking post-intervention. Conclusions The 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme improved parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI. Further research is now required in a larger cohort of subjects to determine the effects of neuromuscular training on ankle joint injury risk factors.

  6. 2008 Human Resources Development Programmes in Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gbaje E.S

    It was suggested that for effective HRD, each university library should have a written staff development policy ... through a staff orientation programme and this .... N=41. FUTO. Responses. Percentage( %) Responses. Percentage (%). Orientation. 6. 66.7%. 35. 85.3%. On the job training. 3. 33.3%. 32. 78%. Job rotation. 4.

  7. An A BWR demonstration simulator for training and developing technical staff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Yonezawa, H.; Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. Toshiba has developed a Demonstration Simulator of the A BWR control room that provides a realistic experience for training and education on BWR principles and operations fundamentals. The Demonstration Simulator is located in the Toshiba America Nuclear Energy (Tane) office in Charlotte, North Carolina and is composed of standard office computer equipment set up in a specific arrangement that is representative of the layout of an A BWR control room. The Demonstration Simulator is not intended for licensed operator training, but can provide a framework for encouraging entry level technically oriented nuclear workers to enter the operations field; strengthening the linkage between university energy field curricula and real-life application of theory; and, improving understanding of integrated plant operations for developing station technical staff. This paper describes the A BWR Demonstration Simulator and its applications for training and educating future nuclear workers. (Author)

  8. Work hours regulations for house staff in psychiatry: bad or good for residency training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasminsky, Sonya; Lomonaco, Allison; Auchincloss, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    The movement to limit work hours for house staff has gained momentum in recent years. The authors set out to review the literature on work hours reform, particularly as it applies to psychiatric residency training, and to provide two different viewpoints on the controversy. The authors present the historical background of work hours reform in the United States and review recent literature about resident work hours limitations. Using a debate format, the authors discuss whether the new regulations are having a positive or negative impact on residency training in psychiatry. Drs. Lomonaco and Auchincloss argue that currently-existing work hours restrictions may have unintended consequences for the health of patients and an untoward impact on residents' professional development and academic medicine's overall structure. Dr. Rasminsky argues that work hours restrictions do not go far enough in protecting residents and patients from the harmful effects of fatigue, and that our definition of professionalism needs to be reexamined in light of emerging scientific literature. There should be some limitation on resident work hours, with exact numbers to be determined by growing scientific knowledge about the effects of prolonged wakefulness. More study is needed, particularly in the area of psychiatric residency training.

  9. Setting research priorities to reduce malaria burden in a post graduate training programme: lessons learnt from the Nigeria field epidemiology and laboratory training programme scientific workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawole, Olufunmilayo I; Ajumobi, Olufemi; Poggensee, Gabriele; Nguku, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Although several research groups within institutions in Nigeria have been involved in extensive malaria research, the link between the research community and policy formulation has not been optimal. The workshop aimed to assist post graduate students to identify knowledge gaps and to develop relevant Malaria-related research proposals in line with identified research priorities. A training needs assessment questionnaire was completed by 22 students two week prior to the workshop. Also, a one page concept letter was received from 40 residents. Thirty students were selected based the following six criteria: - answerability and ethics; efficacy and impact; deliverability, affordability; scalability, sustainability; health systems, partnership and community involvement; and equity in achieved disease burden reduction. The workshop was over a three day period. The participants at the workshop were 30 Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme (NFELTP) residents from cohorts 4 and 5. Ten technical papers were presented by the experts from the academia, National Malaria Elimination (NMEP) Programme, NFELTP Faculty and Implementing partners including CDC/PMI. Draft proposals were developed and presented by the residents. The "strongest need" for training was on malaria prevention, followed by malaria diagnosis. Forty seven new research questions were generated, while the 19 developed by the NMEP were shared. Evaluation revealed that all (100%) students either "agreed" that the workshop objectives were met. Full proposals were developed by some of the residents. A debriefing meeting was held with the NMEP coordinator to discuss funding of the projects. Future collaborative partnership has developed as the residents have supported NMEP to develop a research protocol for a national evaluation. Research prioritization workshops are required in most training programmes to ensure that students embark on studies that address the research needs of their country

  10. Development and Evaluation of a Train-the-Trainer Workshop for Hong Kong Community Social Service Agency Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qianling; Stewart, Sunita M; Wan, Alice; Leung, Charles Sai-Cheong; Lai, Agnes Y; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia Siu-Chee

    2017-01-01

    Capacity building approaches are useful in large-scale community-based health promotion interventions. However, models to guide and evaluate capacity building among social service agency staff in community settings are rare in the literature. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a 1-day (7 h) train-the-trainer (TTT) workshop for the "Enhancing Family Well-Being Project". The workshop aimed at equipping staff from different community agencies with the knowledge and skills to design, implement, and evaluate positive psychology-based interventions for their clients in Sham Shui Po, an over-crowded and low-income district in Hong Kong. The current TTT extended and improved on our previous successful model by adding research and evaluation methods (including the Logic Model, process evaluation, and randomized controlled trial), which are important to plan and evaluate the community interventions. Evaluation of the TTT was guided by the Integrated Model of Training Evaluation and Effectiveness (IMTEE), with quantitative and qualitative methods. Quantitative data were collected from pretraining (T1), post-training (T2), and 6-month (T3) and 12-month (T4) follow-up surveys. Qualitative data were collected from four focus groups of agency staff after the intervention. Ninety-three staff from 30 community agencies attended the training, and 90 completed the baseline survey. Eighty-eight, 63, and 57 staff performed the evaluations at T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Agency staff were satisfied with the TTT. Immediate enhancement of knowledge, self-efficacy, and positive attitudes toward the training content was found at T2 (Cohen's d ranged from 0.24 to 1.22, all p building among social service agency staff for community brief, universal family health promotion interventions in diverse settings.

  11. Effects of a Ten Week Training Programme on Repeated Short Sprints among Football Referees of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniam Nathan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate whether a ten week training programme would improve repeated short sprints of football referees in Malaysia. Sixty national football referees were randomly assigned into 3 groups (n=20 namely the control group, experimental one and experimental two. Experimental one followed a 10 week training programme (duration of training 4 days in a week, each session=90 minutes and time 5 pm supervised by a physical education lecturer and his assistants. Experimental two reported for training at a different venue and trained on their own (duration, frequency and time as for experimental one. Pre-test and post-test results were used to determine whether there was an improvement. SPANOVA results rejected the null hypothesis [F (2, 57 =75.86 p<0.05].  Pillai’s Trace indicated there was a significant difference between pre-test and post-test results and significant interaction effect. Tukey Pair Wise Comparison indicated best performance by experimental one and the control group the poorest. The results indicated that the training programme was acceptable.

  12. Analysis of the training load during a hypertrophy-type resistance training programme in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Alex S; Avelar, Ademar; Schoenfeld, Brad J; Fleck, Steven J; Souza, Mariana F; Padilha, Camila S; Cyrino, Edilson S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the specific training load during a resistance training (RT) programme designed to increase muscular hypertrophy in men and women. Thirty-four women (22.7 ± 4.1 years, 58.8 ± 11.9 kg, 162.6 ± 6.2 cm and 22.1 ± 3.6 kg.m(-2)) and 30 men (22.7 ± 4.4 years, 68.4 ± 9.0 kg, 174.5 ± 6.6 cm and 22.5 ± 2.4 kg.m(-2)) underwent a supervised RT programme that was divided into two phases of 8 weeks each. Training consisted of 10-12 exercises performed with three sets of 8-12 repetitions at repetition maximum resistances performed 3 times per week on nonconsecutive days. There was a significant (P training load of all the exercises performed in the first 8 weeks of RT with women showing a higher relative increase than men (+43.6% vs. +32.5%, respectively). This result was not observed during the second 8-week phase of the RT programme during which no significant gender by time interaction (P > 0.05) was shown with both genders having a similar relative increase (+28.7% vs. +24.3%, respectively). Women had a higher increase than men in specific average training load of the upper limb exercises during both the first 8 weeks of training (+30.2% vs. +26.6%, respectively) and the second 8 weeks of training (+31.1% vs. +25.3%, respectively). We conclude that the adaptation in specific training load is influenced by gender.

  13. Conceptualisation and evaluation of a cognitive-behavioural training programme for children and adolescents with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warschburger, P; Fromme, C; Petermann, F; Wojtalla, N; Oepen, J

    2001-05-01

    Obesity is common in children and adolescents with incidence rates increasing both nationally and internationally. Its causes are complex and multifaceted, and obesity is associated with high morbidity and mortality as well as psychological distress. Multidimensional programmes are necessary in the treatment of this chronic disease in order to change eating and physical activity habits. A cognitive-behavioural training programme was developed and evaluated. In combination with diet and exercise, this special group programme that includes well established behavioural methods, was expected to result in long-term weight reduction and decrease of psychological distress in connection with obesity. As part of the six week in-patient rehabilitation for children and adolescents at Viktoriastift in Bad Kreuznach, the three-part programme (experimental group, EG) was compared with a programme that differed only in the psychological intervention component (instead of the specific training programme they undertook muscle relaxation training, comparison group, CG). In total, 197 children and adolescents between 9 and 19 y-of-age were recruited into the study. Somatic (eg weight status), behavioural (eg eating behaviour) and psychological (eg quality of life) outcomes were assessed at five points in time: two weeks before the intervention, at the beginning and end of the programme, as well as six months and one year post-intervention. The study started in spring 1997. Main outcomes will be presented. Pre- vs post-intervention-tests showed significant improvements in self-reported eating behaviours for the EG compared with the CG (F=6.38, Phabits and to reduce somatic and psychosocial consequences. Long-term effects after two years are expected to underscore these results.

  14. Commitment to an Entrepreneurship Training Programme for Self-Employed Entrepreneurs, and Learning from Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Lenita; Hytti, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how self-employed entrepreneurs commit themselves to an entrepreneurship training programme and how such commitment relates to their perceptions of learning. Design/methodology/approach: The data were collected through qualitative, inductive methods by interviewing and observing six entrepreneurs…

  15. Religion and Spirituality within Counselling/Clinical Psychology Training Programmes: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Simon

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing efforts to attend to religious and spiritual issues within clinical/counselling psychology. However, there is limited research demonstrating how successfully such content is integrated into existing training programmes. This investigation sought to review primary research literature related to training…

  16. Effects of an eight-week training programme on pain relief and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of an eight-week training programme on pain relief and physical condition of overweight and obese women with early stage primary knee osteoarthritis. ... with the requirements of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International Committee in terms of pain, physical function, strength and cardiorespiratory endurance.

  17. The Creation of Virtual Communities in a Primary Initial Teacher Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Anne; Tanner, Doug; Jessop, Tansy

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the conditions that have facilitated the use of a customised virtual learning environment as part of a blended learning approach on a part-time postgraduate initial teacher training programme for prospective primary school teachers. It is based on data gathered as part of a study of the impact of e-learning on students…

  18. An Evaluation of Participation in a Schools-Based Youth Mental Health Peer Education Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Aileen; Barry, James; Neary, Marie-Louise; Lane, Sabrina; O'Keeffe, Lynsey

    2016-01-01

    The use of peer education has been well documented within the discipline of health promotion, but not within the youth mental health domain. This paper describes an evaluation of an innovative schools-based peer education training programme that involved preparing young people to deliver a mental health workshop to their peers. Participants…

  19. Mammographic positioning quality of newly trained versus experienced radiographers in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Landsveld-Verhoeven, Cary; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Timmers, Janine; Broeders, Mireille J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to compare mammographic positioning quality of new (NR) versus experienced screening radiographers (ER) in the Netherlands. Before starting to work in breast screening, NR must complete an education programme including a theoretical course (four days), practical training (six weeks),

  20. Development and feasibility of a patient feedback programme to improve consultation skills in general practice training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, M.E.; Blankenstein, A.H.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Schleypen, H.; Schoonheim, P.L.; Stalman, W.A.B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To develop an attractive and effective patient feedback training programme for general practice trainees (GPTs). Methods: First, an exploratory study was conducted in which patients and GPTs were interviewed after they had worked with patient feedback. This contributed to the development

  1. PREVENTIVE TRAINING PROGRAMME FOR PATIENTS AFTER ACUTE CORONARY EVENT-- CORRELATION BETWEEN SELECTED PARAMETERS AND AGE GROUPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vysoký, Robert; Fiala, Jindřich; Dosbaba, Filip; Bat'alik, Ladislav; Nehyba, Svatopluk; Ludka, Ondřej

    2015-09-01

    Interventional cardiovascular training programmes provide a prescription of optimal form and safe intensity. They are part of the second phase of cardiovascular rehabilitation which is a key point in the whole tertiary-preventive care for patients with coronary artery disease. The patients are hemodynamically adapted to a normal physical load, their aerobic capacity is gradually increased, and they learn principles of regular aerobic-resistance exercise. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of modified aerobic-resistance exercise on cardiorespiratory indicators in patients after acute coronary event, and evaluate the differences between monitored parameters in different age groups. The study was conducted on a group of 106 patients (85% of men) of an average age of 60.4 ± 10.9 years, with left ventricular ejec- tion fraction of 57.4 ± 7.2%. All subjects went through an acute coronary event. The time elapsed between the occurence of a coronary event and the beginning of the training programme was 35 ± 8 days. In patients after coronary artery bypass grafting, the time passed was 50 ± 16 days on average. All patients received a two-month aerobic-resistance training with a frequency of three times a week. The length of a training unit was set to 100 minutes (out of which 60 minutes were allocated to individual aerobic training). A significant negative correlation between age and average values of monitored parameters was observed. Even though the values of all parameters are decreasing with increasing age, a shift towards higher values in all parameters occurred after completing the training programme. The study reveals that there are interindividual differences between the parameter values. Asignificant difference in individual parameters was found between different age groups. The result of the study shows that a given parameter could characterize each age group. Completing the interventional training programme also led to a significant increase of

  2. Identifying current training provision and future training needs in allergy available for UK general practice trainees: national cross-sectional survey of General Practitioner Specialist Training programme directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jayne; Rafi, Imran; Smith, Helen; Sheikh, Aziz

    2013-03-01

    There are ongoing concerns about the quality of care provision for allergy in primary care. To identify current training provision in allergy to GP trainees and to understand how this could be enhanced. A cross-sectional survey of GP Speciality Training (GPST) programme directors was undertaken. Programme directors of the 174 GPST schemes were sent an online questionnaire which was informed by the content of the Royal College of General Practitioners curriculum. Quantitative data were descriptively analysed and a thematic analysis was undertaken of free text responses. We obtained responses from 146 directors representing 106 training programmes. Responses indicated that two-thirds (62%, 95% CI 53.1 to 71.5) of programmes were providing at least some allergy training, with the remaining third stating that they either provided no training or were unsure. Overall, one-third (33%, 95% CI 22.7 to 42.2) of programme directors believed that all the relevant allergy-related curriculum requirements were being met. Where provided, this training was believed to be best for organ-specific allergic disorders but was thought to be poorer for systemic allergic disorders, particularly food allergy where 67% (95% CI 57.5 to 76.5) of respondents indicated that training was poor. There was considerable interest in increasing the allergy training provided, preferably through eLearning modules and problem-based learning materials supported by those with relevant specialist knowledge. This UK-wide survey has identified important gaps in the training of GP trainees in relation to allergy care. Addressing these gaps, particularly in the management of systemic allergic disorders, should help to improve delivery of primary care-based allergy care.

  3. Adapting Nepal's polio eradication programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Krishna P; Hampton, Lee M; Gurung, Santosh; Bohara, Rajendra; Rai, Indra K; Anaokar, Sameer; Swift, Rachel D; Cochi, Stephen

    2017-03-01

    Many countries have weak disease surveillance and immunization systems. The elimination of polio creates an opportunity to use staff and assets from the polio eradication programme to control other vaccine-preventable diseases and improve disease surveillance and immunization systems. In 2003, the active surveillance system of Nepal's polio eradication programme began to report on measles and neonatal tetanus cases. Japanese encephalitis and rubella cases were added to the surveillance system in 2004. Staff from the programme aided the development and implementation of government immunization policies, helped launch vaccination campaigns, and trained government staff in reporting practices and vaccine management. Nepal eliminated indigenous polio in 2000, and controlled outbreaks caused by polio importations between 2005 and 2010. In 2014, the surveillance activities had expanded to 299 sites, with active surveillance for measles, rubella and neonatal tetanus, including weekly visits from 15 surveillance medical officers. Sentinel surveillance for Japanese encephalitis consisted of 132 sites. Since 2002, staff from the eradication programme have helped to introduce six new vaccines and helped to secure funding from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. Staff have also assisted in responding to other health events in the country. By expanding the activities of its polio eradication programme, Nepal has improved its surveillance and immunization systems and increased vaccination coverage of other vaccine-preventable diseases. Continued donor support, a close collaboration with the Expanded Programme on Immunization, and the retention of the polio eradication programme's skilled workforce were important for this expansion.

  4. Metacognitive training for patients with schizophrenia: preliminary evidence for a targeted, single-module programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzan, Ryan P; Delfabbro, Paul H; Galletly, Cherrie A; Woodward, Todd S

    2014-12-01

    Metacognitive training is an eight-module, group-based treatment programme for people with schizophrenia that targets the cognitive biases (i.e. problematic thinking styles) thought to contribute to the genesis and maintenance of delusions. The present article is an investigation into the efficacy of a shorter, more targeted, single-module metacognitive training programme, administered individually, which focuses specifically on improving cognitive biases that are thought to be driven by a 'hypersalience of evidence-hypothesis matches' mechanism (e.g. jumping to conclusions, belief inflexibility, reasoning heuristics, illusions of control). It was hypothesised that a more targeted metacognitive training module could still improve performance on these bias tasks and reduce delusional ideation, while improving insight and quality of life. A sample of 28 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and mild delusions either participated in the hour-long, single-session, targeted metacognitive training programme (n = 14), or continued treatment as usual (n = 14). All patients were assessed using clinical measures gauging overall positive symptomology, delusional ideation, quality of life and insight, and completed two cognitive bias tasks designed to elucidate the representativeness and illusion of control biases. After a 2-week, post-treatment interval, targeted metacognitive training patients exhibited significant decreases in delusional severity and conviction, significantly improved clinical insight, and significant improvements on the cognitive bias tasks, relative to the treatment-as-usual controls. Performance improvements on the cognitive bias tasks significantly correlated with the observed reductions in overall positive symptomology. Patients also evaluated the training positively. Although interpretations of these results are limited due to the lack of an optimally designed, randomised controlled trial and a small sample size, the results are promising and warrant

  5. 2003-2004 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME: Y. NIR

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch 22, 23, 24, 25 and 26 March LECTURE SERIES From 11:00 to 12:00 hrs Main Auditorium bldg. 500 on 22, 24, 25 and 26 March TH Auditorium bldg 4 on 23 March Neutrinos Y. NIR, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel The Standard Model predicts that the neutrinos are massless and do not mix. Generic extensions of the Standard Model predict that neutrinos are massive (but, very likely, much lighter than the charged fermions). Therefore, the search for neutrino masses and mixing tests the Standard Model and probes new physics. Measurements of various features of the fluxes of atmospheric, solar and, more recently, reactor neutrinos have provided evidence for neutrino oscillations and therefore for neutrino masses and mixing. These results have significant theoretical implications: new physics exists, and its scale can be estimated. There are interesting lessons for grand unified theories and for models of extra dimensions. T...

  6. Writing About Stress: The Impact of a Stress-Management Programme on Staff Accounts of Dealing with Stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Helping staff serving clients with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour to cope with stress has implications for their own well-being and for the lives of those they support. Method This study examined staff members' views of stress and the effectiveness of a

  7. Establishing a generic training programme for future junior doctors: a role for neurosurgery within the framework of clinical neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadarajah, Ramesh; Amin, Amit; Aldlyami, Ehabb; Kang, Niel; Wong, James Min-Leong; Selway, Richard; Gullan, Richard

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To describe the opinion of junior doctors in neurosurgery in the UK and Eire about future reforms to training, and to relate this to the establishment of a generic neurosciences training programme. METHODS: A postal questionnaire survey of neurosurgery units in UK and Eire (36 units). All senior house officers (SHOs) taking part in a neurosurgery on-call rota during the 6 months between February and August 2003 (n=236); 190 respondents (response rate 81% overall, 90% neurosurgery SHOs and 55% neurology SHOs. The questionnaire covered most aspects of provision of training, working pattern and job satisfaction gained from the post. Also included were questions on future reforms for training. RESULTS: There is an overwhelming acceptance amongst SHOs for training to be centred on generic programmes. The audit also identified that there are many aspects of neurosurgical training which will be very suitable for trainees from other fields, thus supporting the establishment of a generic neurosciences training programme. CONCLUSIONS: The establishment of a generic training programme would encourage an improvement in training standards for the whole SHO grade. To ensure the success of this proposed generic training programme, support from junior doctors and all those involved in postgraduate education is required. Neurosciences teaching has the excellent potential to move towards the planning and formation of a generic neurosciences training programme in-line with the proposed reforms. PMID:16053687

  8. On Thursday 14 September 2006, members of CERN Management welcomed recently-recruited staff members and fellows at the trimester session of the Induction Programme (photographed here with Enrico CHIAVERI, Department HR).

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    On Thursday 14 September 2006, members of CERN Management welcomed recently-recruited staff members and fellows at the trimester session of the Induction Programme (photographed here with Enrico CHIAVERI, Department HR).

  9. The standard system for conducting the TNA (Training Needs Analysis) of Staff (delrapport fra EU Erasmus+ project SMART

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ulla Højmark

    2016-01-01

    The Training Needs Analysis (TNA) has been carried out with the staff of the partner organisations. A standard system for conducting a quantitative and a qualitative training needs analysis had been developed and it has been used as a framework for the analysis from the 4 partners: Limerick...... and translation of the standardised system to suit their own individual context. Limerick and Palermo have completed both a quantitative and a qualitative training needs analyses. Copenhagen and Esbjerg have completed a qualitative training needs analysis. This report summarises the findings of the four partners...

  10. 'Leaders-to-be' complete first ENELA programme. Two more training programmes to be launched in 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, Jean-Claude

    2011-12-15

    The mission of the European Nuclear Energy Leadership Academy (ENELA) is to equip those working in and those working alongside the nuclear energy industry with the skills and expertise they will need to become future leaders and to ensure the further development of sustainable European nuclear energy solutions. The ENELA concept originates from an initiative within the framework of the European Nuclear Energy Forum. The stakeholders of ENELA include, among others, the nuclear industry, supporting suppliers, administrative bodies, national and regional authorities, policymakers, opinion formers and the media. ENELA was established in January 2010. The training and leadership centre and base of operations is near Munich city centre (Germany). In October 2011 20 participants from 8 countries completed the first ENELA programme. (orig.)

  11. Get SET: aligning anatomy demonstrator programmes with Surgical Education and Training selection criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Danielle; Fogg, Quentin A; Lazarus, Michelle D

    2017-12-21

    Prevocational doctors aspiring to surgical careers are commonly recruited as anatomy demonstrators for undergraduate and graduate medical programmes. Entry into Surgical Education and Training (SET) is highly competitive and a unique opportunity exists to align anatomy demonstrator programmes with the selection criteria and core competencies of SET programmes. This study used a qualitative approach to (i) determine what criteria applicants for SET are assessed on and (ii) identify criteria that could be aligned with and enhanced by an anatomy demonstrator programme. The selection guidelines of all nine surgical specialties for the 2017 intake of SET trainees were analysed using qualitative content analysis methodology. The Royal Australasian College of Surgeons adopted a holistic approach to trainee selection that assessed both discipline-specific and discipline-independent skills. Qualitative content analysis identified eight categories of key selection criteria: medical expertise, scholarly activity, professional identity, interpersonal skills, integrity, self-management, insight and self-awareness and community involvement. The structured curriculum vitae was heavily weighted towards discipline-specific skills, such as medical expertise and scholarly activity. Insufficient information was available to determine the weighting of selection criteria assessed by the structured referee reports or interviews. Anatomy demonstrator programmes provide prevocational doctors with unique opportunities to develop surgical skills and competencies in a non-clinical setting. Constructively aligned anatomy demonstrator programmes may be particularly beneficial for prevocational doctors seeking to improve their anatomical knowledge, teaching skills or scholarly activity. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  12. Training Vietnamese diabetes specialists in facilitation methods as part of a train-the-trainer programme in diabetes management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre-Christensen, Ulla; Persson, Frederik; Noctor, Eoin

    2018-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is an important issue in Vietnam, with a doubling in prevalence to 5.4% of the population from 2002 to 2012. Upskilling general practitioners and internal medicine physicians to provide comprehensive, evidence-based diabetes treatment is a key step in addressing this emerging...... challenge. The Vietnamese Association of Diabetes and Endocrinology and Steno Diabetes Center, with Ministry of Health support, deliver a train-the-trainer programme to build diabetes treatment capacity. In this model, an annual 2-day course is delivered to a group of endocrinologists (the ’trainers......’). These doctors then form the faculty for a national training programme on evidence-based diabetes management for general practitioners and internal medicine physicians. In addition to diabetes management topics, various pedagogical methods, with an emphasis on participant interaction, sharing a constructivist...

  13. Experiences from a communication training programme of paid carers in a residential rehabilitation centre for people with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behn, Nicholas; Togher, Leanne; Power, Emma

    2015-01-01

    To determine the impact of a communication training programme by exploring the experiences of paid carers who attended the programme in a residential rehabilitation centre for people with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Five paid carers attended a communication training programme which comprised 17 hours (across 8 weeks). Semi-structured interviews were conducted pre- and post-training. Analysis used a generic procedure with constant comparative analysis to identify categories across and within interview transcripts. Paid carers described improved knowledge and use of strategies, improved communication, positive emotional experiences and barriers and facilitators to consider for future communication training programmes. Training communication skills of paid carers in a residential rehabilitation centre had a positive impact on their conversations with people with TBI. These positive changes support quantitative findings for the effectiveness of communication training.

  14. MO-DE-BRA-04: Hands-On Fluoroscopy Safety Training with Real-Time Patient and Staff Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanderhoek, M; Bevins, N [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) are routinely performed across many different hospital departments. However, many involved staff members have minimal training regarding safe and optimal use of fluoroscopy systems. We developed and taught a hands-on fluoroscopy safety class incorporating real-time patient and staff dosimetry in order to promote safer and more optimal use of fluoroscopy during FGI. Methods: The hands-on fluoroscopy safety class is taught in an FGI suite, unique to each department. A patient equivalent phantom is set on the patient table with an ion chamber positioned at the x-ray beam entrance to the phantom. This provides a surrogate measure of patient entrance dose. Multiple solid state dosimeters (RaySafe i2 dosimetry systemTM) are deployed at different distances from the phantom (0.1, 1, 3 meters), which provide surrogate measures of staff dose. Instructors direct participating clinical staff to operate the fluoroscopy system as they view live fluoroscopic images, patient entrance dose, and staff doses in real-time. During class, instructors work with clinical staff to investigate how patient entrance dose, staff doses, and image quality are affected by different parameters, including pulse rate, magnification, collimation, beam angulation, imaging mode, system geometry, distance, and shielding. Results: Real-time dose visualization enables clinical staff to directly see and learn how to optimize their use of their own fluoroscopy system to minimize patient and staff dose, yet maintain sufficient image quality for FGI. As a direct result of the class, multiple hospital departments have implemented changes to their imaging protocols, including reduction of the default fluoroscopy pulse rate and increased use of collimation and lower dose fluoroscopy modes. Conclusion: Hands-on fluoroscopy safety training substantially benefits from real-time patient and staff dosimetry incorporated into the class. Real-time dose display helps

  15. SYSTEM OF TRAINING AND RETRAINING OF MANAGERIAL STAFF FOR THE COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ARCTIC ZONE OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tsukerman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The work discusses the problems of training and retraining of administrative staff as the most important factor of development based on programoriented management of complex development of the Russian Arctic. Diff erent ways and areas of training and retraining of managerial staff for the Russian Arctic. The analysis of the dynamics of the number of students, graduate students and faculty of educational institutions of higher education. The analysis showed a defi cit of managerial staff and mismatch problems of innovative development of economy and social sphere of the Russian Arctic. The need for interdisciplinary collaboration, including a detailed study severovedeniya. The experience of the functioning of the universities in small towns Arctic countries. Presented proposals for adjustment of legislative regulation of the educational sphere.

  16. [Predonation interview by a trained and authorized paramedical staff: feasibility, reliability and safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, C; Romieu, B; Adjou, C; Giraudeau, B; Bastard, B; Danic, B; Pelletier, B

    2011-04-01

    Predonation interview accounts for a major step in transfusion safety. In France, it must be performed by a physician, following a methodical questioning and a standardized questionnaire. Faced with this evolution, the value of a strictly medical expertise has been progressively losing importance. In many countries, blood donor selection is being organized by non medical trained staff (Québec, Switzerland, e.g.). A decree of April 30, 2006 allowed the Établissement français du sang to experiment a predonation interview by an authorized paramedical staff in the form of a two-phase prospective multicenter study over a year. Phase I "experimental situation": six physician/nurse teams among three blood transfusion centres interviewed 1940 blood-donation candidates, including 253 new donors (13% out of total). Phase 2 "observational study": 3222 blood-donation candidates were interviewed either by a physician or a nurse. In phase I, nurses were able to make a decision without the physician's help in 1921 cases. A total of 1628 candidates were decided capable of donating blood both by physicians and nurses, 174 donors were rejected both by physicians and nurses and 69 were rejected either by physicians or nurses. In phase 2, out of 3222 blood-donation candidates, an average of 12.1% were rejected by nurses and 10% by physicians. The study reported a weaker variability among nurses. Results show that nurses were able to perform predonation interviews with high reliability, without additional risk. The reproducibility of their answers in the field of recipient-risk evaluation was better than the physicians. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  17. Comparison study of chest physiotherapy home training programmes on respiratory functions in patients with muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeldan, Ipek; Gurses, H Nilgun; Yuksel, Husniye

    2008-08-01

    To compare the effects of home training programmes, threshold inspiratory muscle training and breathing exercise on spirometry and maximal pressures in patients with muscular dystrophy. Prospective blinded 12-week study. Cardiopulmonary department of university hospital. Twenty-three patients with muscular dystrophy (17 patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy and 6 patients with Becker muscular dystrophy) assigned to the threshold inspiratory muscle training and breathing exercise groups with alternate allocation. Spirometry, maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax) and maximal expiratory pressure (PEmax) were measured before and after training. In the threshold inspiratory muscle training group threshold pressure load was determined as equal to 30% of weekly PImax measurement. In the breathing exercise group, patients performed deep and forceful diaphragmatic and segmental exercises. All patients performed exercises at home and once a week at hospital under supervision. The improvement of PImax in the threshold inspiratory muscle training group was more significant than the improvement observed in the breathing exercise group (P=0.05). PEmax increased significantly only in the breathing exercise group (P=0.01). Spirometry results did not change significantly in both groups after the training. We conclude that respiratory muscle strength is enhanced by training in the patients with muscular dystrophy who are ambulatory, but inspiratory and/or expiratory training effect is specific to the trained muscles. The techniques that improve the strength of respiratory muscles should be included in the physiotherapy management of patients with muscular dystrophy.

  18. Enhancing Recognition of High Quality, Functional IEP Goals: A Training Activity for Early Childhood Special Education Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Anne; Gillaspy, Kathi; Peters, Mary Louise; Hurth, Joicey

    2014-01-01

    This training activity was created to support participants' understanding of the criteria needed to develop and write high quality, participation-based Individualized Education Program (IEP) goals. The term "functional" is often used to describe what goals ought to be, yet many Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) staff (e.g.,…

  19. Development and Evaluation of a Staff Training Program on Palliative Care for Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Joan E.; Cadogan, Mary P.

    2011-01-01

    Persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) face barriers and disparities at end of life. Among these barriers are limited educational opportunities and a paucity of targeted training materials on palliative care for staff who provide their day-to-day care. This paper reports on a three-phase project undertaken to develop,…

  20. Staff Training for Business Process Improvement: The Benefit of Role-Plays in the Case of KreditSim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borner, Rene; Moormann, Jurgen; Wang, Minhong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to explore staff's experience with role-plays using the example of training bank employees in Six Sigma as a major methodology for business process improvement. Design/methodology/approach: The research is based on a case study. A role-play, KreditSim, is used to simulate a loan approval process that has to be improved by…

  1. Impact of Training on Cognitive Representation of Challenging Behaviour in Staff Working with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Martin; Hogg, James

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cognitive representations of challenging behaviour among staff may influence therapeutic outcomes. This study looked at how cognitive dimensions of Identity, Cause, Consequences, Emotional Reaction and Treatment/Control are affected by training. Materials and Methods: A theoretically derived questionnaire was used to measure the impact…

  2. Impact of Extended Education/Training in Positive Behaviour Support on Staff Knowledge, Causal Attributions and Emotional Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Peter; Bradshaw, Jill; Hughes, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Background: This study sought to gather information about the impact of extended training in positive behaviour support on staff knowledge, causal attributions and emotional responses. Methods: Students completed questionnaires at the beginning, middle and end of a University Diploma course to measure changes in their knowledge of challenging…

  3. Using Behavioral Skills Training to Promote Safe and Correct Staff Guarding and Ambulation Distance of Students with Multiple Physical Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeyama, Bobby; Sturmey, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The study analyzed the effects of self-recording and behavioral skills training on guarding responses of 3 staff members while they assisted 3 students with multiple disabilities to ambulate. The intervention increased the percentage of correct posture and guarding responses and the distance that students ambulated. These effects generalized when…

  4. The Effect of Training Program for Staff Members to Develop Their Skills of Using Virtual Classrooms at King Saud University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Khaled Nahes; Almutairy, Sultan

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims at showing the effectiveness of a suggested training program for staff members at Teachers' College of King Saud University to develop their skills of using virtual classrooms. The research is empirical as it used two experimental groups. The first group is taught how to use the common teaching method and the second group is…

  5. Programme evaluation training for health professionals in francophone Africa: process, competence acquisition and use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banza Baya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While evaluation is, in theory, a component of training programmes in health planning, training needs in this area remain significant. Improving health systems necessarily calls for having more professionals who are skilled in evaluation. Thus, the Université de Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso and the Université de Montréal (Canada have partnered to establish, in Burkina Faso, a master's-degree programme in population and health with a course in programme evaluation. This article describes the four-week (150-hour course taken by two cohorts (2005–2006/2006–2007 of health professionals from 11 francophone African countries. We discuss how the course came to be, its content, its teaching processes and the master's programme results for students. Methods The conceptual framework was adapted from Kirkpatrick's (1996 four-level evaluation model: reaction, learning, behaviour, results. Reaction was evaluated based on a standardized questionnaire for all the master's courses and lessons. Learning and behaviour competences were assessed by means of a questionnaire (pretest/post-test, one year after adapted from the work of Stevahn L, King JA, Ghere G, Minnema J: Establishing Essential Competencies for Program Evaluators. Am J Eval 2005, 26(1:43–59. Master's programme effects were tested by comparing the difference in mean scores between times (before, after, one year after using pretest/post-test designs. Paired sample tests were used to compare mean scores. Results The teaching is skills-based, interactive and participative. Students of the first cohort gave the evaluation course the highest score (4.4/5 for overall satisfaction among the 16 courses (3.4–4.4 in the master's programme. What they most appreciated was that the forms of evaluation were well adapted to the content and format of the learning activities. By the end of the master's programme, both cohorts of students considered that they had greatly improved their

  6. Communication and Influencing for ED Professionals: A training programme developed in the emergency department for the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixon, Andrew; Rixon, Sascha; Addae-Bosomprah, Hansel; Ding, Mingshuang; Bell, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present study is to develop and pilot a communication and influencing skills training programme that meets ED health professionals' needs at an urban district hospital. Qualitative methods within a participatory action research framework were utilised. An interdisciplinary team guided the programme's design and development. A training needs analysis saw team meetings, interviews, focus groups and observations conducted across the ED. Thematic analysis of the data identified health professionals' communication and influencing challenges. The training needs analysis informed the training programme curriculum's development. The pilot programme involved an interdisciplinary group of seven health professionals across 5 × 2 h sessions over 3 months, followed by a post-training survey. Five themes of communication and influencing challenges were identified: participating in effective handovers, involving patients in bedside handovers, effectively communicating with interdepartmental colleagues, asking ED colleagues to do tasks and understanding ED colleagues' roles, expectations and assumptions. Based on these challenges, the formulated RESPECT model (which stands for Relationships, Expectations, Styles, Partnerships, Enquiry, Coaching and Teamwork) informed the training curriculum. The peer coaching model used in the training programme was highly regarded by participants. Communication and Influencing for ED Professionals™ (Babel Fish Group Pty Ltd, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) addresses a gap for communication programmes developed in the ED for the ED. Future research will evaluate the programme's impact in this ED. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  7. Staff training and outreach support for Cognitive Stimulation Therapy and its implementation in practice: a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streater, Amy; Spector, Aimee; Hoare, Zoe; Aguirre, Elisa; Russell, Ian; Orrell, Martin

    2017-12-01

    There is evidence that Cognitive Stimulation Therapy and maintenance Cognitive Stimulation Therapy are effective in mild to moderate dementia. There is, however, little evidence available for its implementation in practice and the impact of outreach support on the sustainability of the programme. Two hundred and forty-one staff members were randomised from 63 dementia care settings between outreach support including an online forum, email, and telephone support, compared to usual Cognitive Stimulation Therapy control group. The primary outcome was average number of attendees to the Cognitive Stimulation Therapy and maintenance Cognitive Stimulation Therapy programmes. There was no difference in average number of attendees between the intervention and usual Cognitive Stimulation Therapy control groups for the Cognitive Stimulation Therapy (p = 0.82) or the maintenance Cognitive Stimulation Therapy programme (p = 0.97). Outreach support does not affect the average number of people with dementia attending the Cognitive Stimulation Therapy or maintenance Cognitive Stimulation Therapy programme. Irrespective of outreach support, the programmes remain widely implemented and yield perceived benefits for people with dementia. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Development of a wheelchair maintenance training programme and questionnaire for clinicians and wheelchair users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Maria Luisa; Bird, Emily; Oyster, Michelle; Worobey, Lynn; Lain, Michael; Bucior, Samuel; Cooper, Rory A; Pearlman, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    Purpose of state: The aims of this study were to develop a Wheelchair Maintenance Training Programme (WMTP) as a tool for clinicians to teach wheelchair users (and caregivers when applicable) in a group setting to perform basic maintenance at home in the USA and to develop a Wheelchair Maintenance Training Questionnaire (WMT-Q) to evaluate wheelchair maintenance knowledge in clinicians, manual and power wheelchair users. The WMTP and WMT-Q were developed through an iterative process. A convenience sample of clinicians (n = 17), manual wheelchair (n ∞ 5), power wheelchair users (n = 4) and caregivers (n = 4) provided feedback on the training programme. A convenience sample of clinicians (n = 38), manual wheelchair (n = 25), and power wheelchair users (n = 30) answered the WMT-Q throughout different phases of development. The subscores of the WMT-Q achieved a reliability that ranged between ICC(3,1) = 0.48 to ICC(3,1) = 0.89. The WMTP and WMT-Q were implemented with 15 clinicians who received in-person training in the USA using the materials developed and showed a significant increase in all except one of the WMT-Q subscores after the WMTP (p users. This training complements the World Health Organization basic wheelchair service curriculum, which only includes training of the clinicians, but does not include detailed information to train wheelchair users and caregivers. This training program offers a time efficient method for providing education to end users in a group setting that may mitigate adverse consequences resulting from wheelchair breakdown. This training program has significant potential for impact among wheelchair users in areas where access to repair services is limited.

  9. Evaluation of the effectiveness of a transfer (interhemispheric) training programme in the early stages of fencing training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Mateusz; Bronikowski, Michał; Nowik, Agnieszka; Tomczak, Maciej; Strugarek, Jan

    2017-07-24

    A high level of motor coordination (with an emphasis on the accuracy of hand movements) is an important part of fencers' training. Research on motor coordination shows that both hemispheres of the brain are involved in controlling the action of each of the upper limbs. As the physical training of one hand is believed to significantly increase the performance of the other (untrained) hand [14], the authors attempt to verify the hypothesis that specialized training of the nondominant limb can improve the performance of the dominant hand in fencing. The study was carried out in Poznań, Poland, in 2015 and involved the experimental (N=8) and control (N=8) groups of cadets (12.7±0.5 years old); body mass 38.69±4.08; body height 153.47±6.17), who were randomly selected from fencers belonging to the Fencing Club "Warta" in Poznań, Poland. Participants in the study belonged to one training group with a similar training experience of about six years. All participants in the study (N = 16) declared righthandedness during trainings and duels. Their right lateralization was also confirmed in a survey, which was conducted using the Edinburgh Questionnaire [21]. The experimental training programme included six weeks of specialized training of the coordination skills of the nondominant side. It was carried out five times a week. Each session took 30 minutes. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of transfer (interhemispheric) training with the use of the nondominant hand in particular, on the performance of the dominant hand in fencing. The results indicate that the transfer (interhemispheric) training reduced test accomplishment time in tasks performed with the right upper limb during accuracy tests. The procedures applied in the study also reduced test accomplishment time in tasks performed with the left upper limb. The study demonstrates that an interhemispheric training programme can effectively improve the accuracy of fencing actions, at least in the early

  10. Partnership work between Public Health and Health Psychology: introduction to a novel training programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Public health services implement individual, community and population level interventions to change health behaviours, improve healthy life expectancy and reduce health inequalities. Understanding and changing health behaviour is complex. Integrating behaviour change theory and evidence into interventions has the potential to improve services. Methods Health Psychologists apply evidence and theories aimed at understanding and changing health behaviour. A Scottish programme is piloting the training of Health Psychologists within NHS contexts to address prominent public health challenges. Results This article outlines the details of this novel programme. Two projects are examined to illustrate the potential of partnership working between public health and health psychology. Conclusion In order to develop and improve behaviour change interventions and services, public health planners may want to consider developing and using the knowledge and skills of Health Psychologists. Supporting such training within public health contexts is a promising avenue to build critical NHS internal mass to tackle the major public health challenges ahead. PMID:21070643

  11. Train the trainer in dementia care. A program to foster communication skills in nursing home staff caring for dementia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzmann, J; Haberstroh, J; Pantel, J

    2016-04-01

    Improvement of communication skills in nursing home staff is key to provide better care for dementia patients and decrease occupational mental stress. An innovative train-the-trainer program to improve and maintain professional caregivers' social competencies in nursing home dementia care is described. Over a period of 6 months, a group of 6 senior staff members were qualified as program trainers (multiplicators) for the TANDEM training program, which qualified them to design, deliver, and evaluate training sessions that foster specific social competencies in dementia care. In a subsequent intervention study with 116 geriatric caregivers in 14 nursing homes, training was provided either by multiplicators (intervention group) or directly by project coworkers (control group). Participants in both groups improved their dementia-specific communication skills. In a follow-up survey, the intervention group also reported lasting reductions in mental stressors at work (p nursing homes to be multiplicators for the TANDEM train-the-trainer program for dementia-specific communication skills has a beneficial influence on social competencies, mental stressors at work, and occupational mental stress of staff who care for dementia patients and may contribute to a sustainable implementation of dementia-specific social competencies.

  12. A Review on Multicultural Education Programmes in Initial Teacher Training in England

    OpenAIRE

    Morito, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on programmes of multicultural education in initial teacher training (ITT) in England. England, which has a long history as a multiethnic and multicultural society, offers significant opportunities for consideration for multicultural educational design. The issue of educating teachers for diverse schools and classrooms needs to be addressed urgently (OECD, 2010). Hence, it is significant to grasp how teacher education offers trainees and teachers the knowledg...

  13. Pre-service EFL teacher training programmes in Jordan : responding to changing circumstances

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Nami, Fouza

    1999-01-01

    The need for well trained teachers of English has grown sharply with the increasing importance of English as a Foreign/Second language in Jordan where the acquisition of the language is no longer confined to the social and academic lite. This paper delineates the three major sources of EFL teachers in Jordan, namely, Community Colleges, University English Departments and University Education Departments, and attempts to describe, and critically survey each of these programme...

  14. Training intervention for health care staff in the provision of existential support to patients with cancer: a randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henoch, Ingela; Danielson, Ella; Strang, Susann; Browall, Maria; Melin-Johansson, Christina

    2013-12-01

    When a patient receives a cancer diagnosis, existential issues become more compelling. Throughout the illness trajectory, patients with cancer are cared for in oncology wards, by home care teams or in hospices. Nurses working with these patients are sometimes aware of the patients' existential needs but do not feel confident when discussing these issues. To determine the effects of a training intervention, where the focus is on existential issues and nurses' perceived confidence in communication and their attitude toward caring for dying patients. This was a randomized, controlled trial with a training intervention comprising theoretical training in existential issues combined with individual and group reflection. In total, 102 nurses in oncology and hospice wards and in palliative home care teams were randomized to a training or non-training group. Primary outcomes, confidence in communication, and attitude toward the care of dying patients were measured at baseline, immediately after the training, and five to six months later. Confidence in communication improved significantly in the training group from baseline (before the training) to both the first and second follow-up, that is, immediately after the training and five months later. The attitude toward caring for the dying did not improve in the training group. This study shows that short-term training with reflection improves the confidence of health care staff when communicating, which is important for health care managers with limited resources. Further studies are needed to explore how patients experience the communication skills of health care staff after such training. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Entrepreneurial training for girls empowerment in Lesotho: A process evaluation of a model programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Mary O'Neill; Kuriansky, Judy; Lytle, Megan; Vistman, Bozhena; Mosisili, 'Mathato S; Hlothoane, Lieketso; Matlanyane, Mapeo; Mokobori, Thabang; Mosuhli, Silas; Pebane, Jane

    2013-12-01

    A Girls Empowerment Programme held in 2010 in Lesotho, Sub-Saharan Africa, focused on HIV/AIDS risk reduction and prevention, life skills and entrepreneurial training (income-generating activities). Entrepreneurial training was a crucial part of equipping the camp attendees with basic skills to help them develop sustainable livelihoods. Such skills and financial independence are essential to enable rural girls to complete their secondary schooling (in a fee-based educational system) and to pursue a career, as well as to further help them be less susceptible to transactional sex and its significant risks. The results of a brief process evaluation with some nested supporting data showed considerable improvement in the girls' knowledge about income-generating activities. In addition, almost half of the camp attendees participated in further entrepreneurial training and about half of these girls went on to develop small businesses. Replication of this model of camp training is recommended and being explored in other African countries.

  16. Another award-winning year for CERN’s apprenticeship training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Anne Gentil-Beccot

    2015-01-01

    CERN has a long tradition of training apprentices. The Organization’s apprenticeship programme, which is based on the Swiss apprenticeship system, dates back to 1965. Since then, over 200 apprentices have been trained at CERN. Each year, seven or eight apprentice electricians, library assistants and physics laboratory technicians qualify after three or four years of training, depending on the job.   UIG prize ceremony 2014: Angelina Bakker (third from right), apprentice physics laboratory technician at CERN, receives her "Certificat fédéral de capacité". On Tuesday, 25 November 2014, CERN was presented with a prize for being the best apprenticeship training scheme provider in 2014. This prize is awarded each year to eight apprenticeship providers active in the different “vocational categories” in the canton of Geneva. The prizes are awarded by the Geneva Department of Public Education, Culture and Sport (DIP)...

  17. Effect of the Canadian Air Force training programme on a submaximal exercise test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappagoda, C T; Linden, R J; Newell, J P

    1979-07-01

    Validation of the submaximal heart rate/oxygen consumption relationship as an index of 'cardiorespiratory fitness' requires the demonstration of systematic alterations in this relationship concomitant with interventions designed to alter physical fitness. To fulfil those criteria a longitudinal training/de-training study was undertaken. Previously sedentary adult subjects undertook the Canadian Airforce 5BX-XBX exercise programme. Submaximal exercise tests were performed before and after training, and following several weeks cessation of training. A regression line of submaximal heart rate on submaximal oxygen consumption was calculated from the data of each submaximal exercise test. Alterations in the regression lines were examined for each subject individually by testing statistically for difference in slope and elevation between any pair of lines. Subjects who undertook the training/de-training study demonstrated significant systematic alterations in the elevation of the regression lines concomitant with periods of training and de-training. The reproducibility of the submaximal heart rate/oxygen consumption relationship was examined in two additional groups of subjects. Group A repeated a submaximal test on 3 or 4 successive days; Group B were tested before and after 16 weeks of normal activity. Subjects in Group A demonstrated non significant, random alterations in the regression lines on repeated testing and subjects in Group B demonstrated random, though on occasion significant, alterations in the regression lines. The elevation of the submaximal heart rate/oxygen consumption relationship is therefore a valid index for detecting sequential changes in 'cardiorespiratory fitness' in individual subjects.

  18. Long Term Effects of a Staff Development Programme on Effective Instruction and Classroom Management for Teachers in Multigrade Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenman, Simon; Raemaekers, Jan

    1995-01-01

    Presents the findings of a six-year staff development program for multigrade teachers. Discovers a significant increase in the time on task levels of the pupils and the instructional and classroom management skills of the teachers. Discusses the implications of, and problems with, the study. (MJP)

  19. The effect of an e-learning supported Train-the-Trainer programme on implementation of suicide guidelines in mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beurs, Derek P; de Groot, Marieke H; de Keijser, Jos; Mokkenstorm, Jan; van Duijn, Erik; de Winter, Remco F P; Kerkhof, Ad J F M

    2015-04-01

    Randomized studies examining the effect of training of mental health professionals in suicide prevention guidelines are scarce. We assessed whether professionals benefited from an e-learning supported Train-the-Trainer programme aimed at the application of the Dutch multidisciplinary suicide prevention guideline. 45 psychiatric departments from all over the Netherlands were clustered in pairs and randomized. In the experimental condition, all of the staff of psychiatric departments was trained by peers with an e-learning supported Train-the-Trainer programme. Guideline adherence of individual professionals was measured by means of the response to on-line video fragments. Multilevel analyses were used to establish whether variation between conditions was due to differences between individual professionals or departments. Multilevel analysis showed that the intervention resulted in an improvement of individual professionals. At the 3 month follow-up, professionals who received the intervention showed greater guideline adherence, improved self-perceived knowledge and improved confidence as providers of care than professionals who were only exposed to traditional guideline dissemination. Subgroup analyses showed that improved guideline adherence was found among nurses but not among psychiatrists and psychologists. No significant effect of the intervention on team performance was found. The ICT environment in departments was often technically inadequate when displaying the video clips clip of the survey. This may have caused considerable drop-out and possibly introduced selection bias, as professionals who were strongly affiliated to the theme of the study might have been more likely to finish the study. Our results support the idea that an e-learning supported Train-the-Trainer programme is an effective strategy for implementing clinical guidelines and improving care for suicidal patients. Netherlands Trial Register (NTR3092 www.trialregister.nl). Copyright © 2015 The

  20. Science Teacher Training Programme in Rural Schools: An ODL Lesson from Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misheck Mhishi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This case study looked at 76 randomly selected preservice science teachers from Mbire and Guruve districts who were learning at the Mushumbi Centre in Zimbabwe and assessed their motivations for enrolling under the Bindura University of Science Education (BUSE’s Virtual and Open Distance Learning (VODL programme. It also looked at the challenges they faced, their views on how instruction under the programme can be improved, and their deployment preferences after graduation. The districts are located in the remote Zambezi Valley, which is characterized by poor infrastructure, pests and diseases, frequent attacks by wild animals on people, domestic animals, and crops, harsh climatic conditions, and seasonal floods, which make it very difficult to attract and retain qualified teachers. Through targeted recruitment, BUSE’s VODL programme sought to train relief teachers already serving in the area in the hope that personal history and family connections would entice them to continue teaching in these areas after attaining their teacher certification. Data was collected using a questionnaire with closed and open-ended questions. Results obtained indicate that despite a lack of funding, a shortage of reading materials, and the nonavailability of e-learning facilities, the students were motivated to join the programme for personal and professional motives and that the students, the majority of whom had taught for two or more years in the districts, would prefer deployments in the area after graduation. The study therefore recommends that deliberate efforts be directed toward the targeted recruitment of school leavers and relief teachers from disadvantaged rural areas who possess the requisite minimum entry qualifications to train as science teachers in order to improve teacher retention in remote areas. Further research into the intrinsic problems in BUSE’s VODL programme and a close scrutiny of its course development techniques are also

  1. SUITABILITY OF FIFA'S "THE 11" TRAINING PROGRAMME FOR YOUNG FOOTBALL PLAYERS - IMPACT ON PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Kuzmic

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of evidence regarding the use of injury prevention programmes for preadolescents participating in sport. "The 11" injury prevention programme was developed by FIFA's medical research centre (F-MARC to help reduce the risk of injury in football players aged 14 years and over. The aim of this study was to determine the suitability and effectiveness of "The 11" for younger football players. Twenty-four [12 experimental (EXP, 12 control (CON] young football players (age 10.4 ± 1.4 yr participated. The EXP group followed "The 11" training programme 5 days per week, for 6 weeks, completing all but one of the 10 exercises. Prior to, and after the intervention, both EXP and CON groups performed a battery of football-specific physical tests. Changes in performance scores within each group were compared using independent t-tests (p ? 0.05. Feedback was also gathered on the young players' perceptions of "The 11". No injuries occurred during the study in either group. Compliance to the intervention was 72%. Measures of leg power (3 step jump and counter-movement jump increased significantly (3.4 and 6.0% respectively, p < 0.05. Speed over 20 m improved by 2% (p < 0.05. Most players considered "The 11" beneficial but not enjoyable in the prescribed format. Given the observed improvements in the physical abilities and the perceived benefits of "The 11", it would appear that a modified version of the programme is appropriate and should be included in the training of young football players, for both physical development and potential injury prevention purposes, as well as to promote fair play. To further engage young football players in such a programme, some modification to "The 11" should be considered

  2. Use of Community Readiness Model to Develop and Evaluate a Pilot Culinary Training Program for School Nutrition Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Deana A; Blevins, Priscilla; Carl, Lillian; Brown, Barbara; Betts, Nancy M; Poe, Tiffany

    2018-02-01

    Use the Community Readiness Model (CRM) to develop and evaluate a contextually appropriate pilot culinary training program for school nutrition staff members. Mixed methods to guide intervention development. Six school districts in rural and urban areas of a southwestern state. School nutrition staff (n = 36; female; 20 years' experience). Pre- and post-training assessments used the CRM. Findings from the pre-assessment were used to develop the pilot culinary training intervention. Readiness to integrate new food preparation methods into existing practices. The researchers used t and Wilcoxon tests to compare overall readiness and dimension scores (P ≤ .05). Thematic analysis was used to identify themes from the discussion component of the assessments. Overall readiness increased from vague awareness to preparation (P = .02). Improved dimensions were knowledge of efforts (P = .004), leadership (P = .05), and knowledge of issues (P = .04). Themes included barriers, leadership, and motivation. The CRM was useful for developing and evaluating a contextually appropriate and effective culinary training program for school nutrition staff. Future efforts should address the provision of additional resources such as on-site chefs, small equipment grants, and engaging school stakeholders. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A 12-week aerobic training programme reduced plasmatic allantoin in adolescents with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosety-Rodriguez, M; Rosety, I; Fornieles-Gonzalez, G; Diaz, A; Rosety, M; Ordonez, F J

    2010-07-01

    To assess the influence of a 12-week training programme on plasmatic levels of allantoin, an in vivo marker for oxidative stress, in adolescents with Down syndrome. This finding would be of great interest, since oxidative damage has been proposed as a pathogenic mechanism of several pathologies in this population. To reach this goal, 31 male adolescents with Down syndrome (16.3 (1.1) years; 155.2 (5.7) cm; 70.8 (4.5) kg) performed a 12-week training programme, three sessions per week, consisting of warm-up (15 min) followed by a main part (20-35 min (increasing 5 min each 3 weeks)) at a work intensity of 60-75% of peak heart rate (increasing by 5% each 3 weeks) and then a cool-down period (10 min). According to previous studies, it should be emphasised that the maximal heart rate for individuals with Down syndrome was predicted by the equation HRmax = 194.5-(0.56 age). The control group included seven age-, sex- and BMI-matched adolescents with trisomy 21 that did not perform any training programme. The levels uric acid and allantoin were assayed in plasma by HPLC. This protocol was approved by an institutional ethics committee. When compared with baseline, plasmatic levels of allantoin were decreased significantly (22.09 (1.62) vs 18.74 (1.38) micromol/l; p<0.001) after being exercised. Furthermore, the allantoin/uric acid ratio was decreased significantly (0.071 (0.006) vs 0.059 (0.004); p<0.05). On the contrary, no changes were reported in controls. A 12-week aerobic programme significantly reduced oxidative damage expressed in terms of plasmatic allantoin content in adolescents with Down syndrome. Further studies on this topic are required.

  4. Mechanical massage and mental training programmes affect employees' anxiety, stress susceptibility and detachment-a randomised explorative pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muller, Jasmin; Handlin, Linda; Harlén, Mikael; Lindmark, Ulrika; Ekström, Anette

    2015-01-01

    .... One not yet evidence-based preventive method designed to help employees keep healthy and be less stressed is an armchair with built-in mechanical massage and mental training programmes, This study...

  5. [Clinical efficacy of structured institution-based teaching programme combined with family rehabilitation training in treatment of childhood autism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Lu, Bin; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Chuan-Guo; Peng, Feng-Xiang; Ma, Li-Fang; Liu, Li-Li; Nie, Wen-Ying

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the clinical efficacy of a structured institution-based teaching programme combined with family rehabilitation training in the treatment of childhood autism. One hundred children with autism were divided into a combination therapy group (n=50) and a control group (n=50). The children in the control group received a structured institution-based teaching programme, and the children in the combination therapy group received a family rehabilitation training besides the structured institution-based teaching programme. Comparisons were made between the two groups by the Autism Behavior Checklist (ABC) score, Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC) score, and Chinese version of Psychoeducational Profile (C-PEP) sore. After 12-months training, each dimension score and total score of ABC in the combination therapy group were all significantly lower than those in the control group (Pautism, structured institution-based teaching programme combined with family rehabilitation training is worthy of clinical promotion and application.

  6. Current Canadian Forces Education and Training for Moral and Ethical Decision Making in Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Chief of Staff CRS Chief Review Services CSSP Canadian Security Studies Programme CTC Combat Training Centre DAD Directorate of Army Doctrine...RMC. Senior officer development includes Joint Command and Staff Programme (JCSP) and the Canadian Security Studies Programme ( CSSP ). Senior

  7. Provision of Support for Psychological Distress by University Staff, and Receptiveness to Mental Health Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margrove, K. L.; Gustowska, M.; Grove, L. S.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing concern over the number of university students and university staff who require psychological support; however, little is known about the impact of this on higher education (HE) staff. University employees (n = 91) from two UK universities completed an anonymous survey which explored their experience of providing support for…

  8. EFFICACY OF A SPORTS SPECIFIC BALANCE TRAINING PROGRAMME ON THE INCIDENCE OF ANKLE SPRAINS IN BASKETBALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Cumps

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine the efficacy of a 22- week prescribed sports specific balance training programme on the incidence of lateral ankle sprains in basketball players. A controlled clinical trial was set up. In total 54 subjects of six teams participated and were assigned to either an intervention (IG or a control group (CG. The IG performed a prescribed balance training programme on top of their normal training routine, using balance semi-globes. The programme consisted of 4 basketball skills each session and its difficulty was progressively thought-out. The intervention lasted 22 weeks and was performed 3 times a week for 5 to 10 minutes. Efficacy of the intervention on the incidence of lateral ankle sprains was determined by calculating Relative Risks (RR, including their 95% Confidence Intervals or CI and incidence rates expressed per 1000h. RR (95% CI showed a significantly lower incidence of lateral ankle sprains in the IG compared to the CG for the total sample (RR= 0.30 [95% CI: 0.11-0.84] and in men (RR= 0.29 [95% CI: 0.09-0.93]. The difference in RR was not confirmed when examining the incidence rates and their 95%CI's, which overlapped. The risk for new or recurrent ankle sprains was slightly lower in the IG (new: RR= 0.76 [95% CI: 0.17-3.40]; re-injury: RR= 0.21 [95% CI: 0.03-1.44]. Based on these pilot results, the use of balance training is recommended as a routine during basketball activities for the prevention of ankle sprains

  9. Care staff training based on person-centered care and dementia care mapping, and its effects on the quality of life of nursing home residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Mami; Sakakibara, Hisataka

    2017-09-01

    To assess the effects of care staff training based on person-centered care (PCC) and dementia care mapping (DCM) on the quality of life (QOL) of residents with dementia in a nursing home. An intervention of staff training based on PCC and DCM was conducted with 40 care staff members at a geriatric nursing home. The effects of the staff training on the QOL of residents with dementia were evaluated by the DCM measurements of 40 residents with dementia three times at about one-month intervals (first, baseline; second, pre-intervention; third, post-intervention). The well-being and ill-being values (WIB values) of the residents with dementia measured by DCM were not different between the first and second rounds before the staff training (p = 0.211). Meanwhile, the WIB values increased from the first and second rounds to the third post-intervention round (p = 0.035 and p dementia.

  10. Training the powerful: issues that emerged during the evaluation of a communication skills training programme for senior cancer care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibila, S; Rabiee, F

    2014-07-01

    'Connected' is the name of the national advanced communication skills training programme developed in 2008 for cancer care professionals in the NHS. A 3-day training course combining didactic and experiential learning elements is run by two facilitators with course participants expected to engage fully in simulated consultations with trained actors. In 2011, and as a result of participant feedback on the length of the course and increasing pressures on budgets and clinical time, the Connected team developed and piloted an alternative 2-day training course. Before its roll-out in 2012, Birmingham City University was commissioned to evaluate the effectiveness and quality of the 2-day course vis-à-vis the 'traditional' 3-day one. This article is written by the two evaluators and it discusses some of the issues that emerged during the evaluation. We broadly grouped these issues into two overlapping categories: the mandatory nature of the course and the different professional background and seniority of participants. In our discussion we consider the implications these issues have for communication skills training policy and practice and put forward suggestions for further research. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Improving problem solving in primary school students: The effect of a training programme focusing on metacognition and working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornoldi, Cesare; Carretti, Barbara; Drusi, Silvia; Tencati, Chiara

    2015-09-01

    Despite doubts voiced on their efficacy, a series of studies has been carried out on the capacity of training programmes to improve academic and reasoning skills by focusing on underlying cognitive abilities and working memory in particular. No systematic efforts have been made, however, to test training programmes that involve both general and specific underlying abilities. If effective, these programmes could help to increase students' motivation and competence. This study examined the feasibility of improving problem-solving skills in school children by means of a training programme that addresses general and specific abilities involved in problem solving, focusing on metacognition and working memory. The project involved a sample of 135 primary school children attending eight classes in the third, fourth, and fifth grades (age range 8-10 years). The classes were assigned to two groups, one attending the training programme in the first 3 months of the study (Training Group 1) and the other serving as a waiting-list control group (Training Group 2). In the second phase of the study, the role of the two groups was reversed, with Training Group 2 attending the training instead of Training Group 1. The training programme led to improvements in both metacognitive and working memory tasks, with positive-related effects on the ability to solve problems. The gains seen in Training Group 1 were also maintained at the second post-test (after 3 months). Specific activities focusing on metacognition and working memory may contribute to modifying arithmetical problem-solving performance in primary school children. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  12. Teaching and the Pedagogical Training of University Teaching Staff – Practice and Opinions under Slovenian Higher Education Legislation

    OpenAIRE

    Aškerc, Katarina; Kočar, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the teaching in higher education in Slovenia, with an emphasis on the pedagogical training and pedagogical qualification of university teaching staff. Various aspects of the latter were examined among 513 respondents. The results showed that university teachers attribute significant importance topedagogical work (the term used in Slovenian higher education legislation), yet nearly half of them had never been involved in any kind of pedagogical courses. The other half of th...

  13. Hand-washing behaviour and nurses' knowledge after a training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkan, Tulay; Findik, Ummu Yildiz; Tokuc, Burcu

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the nurses' hand-washing behaviour and knowledge before and after a training programme. This prospective study involved 200 nurses who participated in hand-washing training at a university hospital in Turkey. The data were collected using a personal information form and pre- and post-test surveys that had been developed by the researchers. During the study, the nurses received 40 min of training on hand washing and a handbook prepared by the researchers. The hand-washing behaviour and knowledge of the nurses were assessed before training and 1 month after the training. To analyse the data, descriptive statistics, a t-test and a Mc Nemar chi-squared test were used. Following the training, there was a significant increase in the frequency of hand washing by the nurses (t = -2.202, P = 0.029), together with an increase in the time allowed for hand washing (P = 0.024, P hand-washing practices (t = -16.081, P hand washing should be implemented to improve the behaviour and knowledge of nurses. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Increasing leadership capacity for HIV/AIDS programmes by strengthening public health epidemiology and management training in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hader Shannon L

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased funding for global human immunodeficiency virus prevention and control in developing countries has created both a challenge and an opportunity for achieving long-term global health goals. This paper describes a programme in Zimbabwe aimed at responding more effectively to the HIV/AIDS epidemic by reinforcing a critical competence-based training institution and producing public health leaders. Methods The programme used new HIV/AIDS programme-specific funds to build on the assets of a local education institution to strengthen and expand the general public health leadership capacity in Zimbabwe, simultaneously ensuring that they were trained in HIV interventions. Results The programme increased both numbers of graduates and retention of faculty. The expanded HIV/AIDS curriculum was associated with a substantial increase in trainee projects related to HIV. The increased number of public health professionals has led to a number of practically trained persons working in public health leadership positions in the ministry, including in HIV/AIDS programmes. Conclusion Investment of a modest proportion of new HIV/AIDS resources in targeted public health leadership training programmes can assist in building capacity to lead and manage national HIV and other public health programmes.

  15. Increasing leadership capacity for HIV/AIDS programmes by strengthening public health epidemiology and management training in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Donna S; Tshimanga, Mufuta; Woelk, Godfrey; Nsubuga, Peter; Sunderland, Nadine L; Hader, Shannon L; St Louis, Michael E

    2009-01-01

    Background Increased funding for global human immunodeficiency virus prevention and control in developing countries has created both a challenge and an opportunity for achieving long-term global health goals. This paper describes a programme in Zimbabwe aimed at responding more effectively to the HIV/AIDS epidemic by reinforcing a critical competence-based training institution and producing public health leaders. Methods The programme used new HIV/AIDS programme-specific funds to build on the assets of a local education institution to strengthen and expand the general public health leadership capacity in Zimbabwe, simultaneously ensuring that they were trained in HIV interventions. Results The programme increased both numbers of graduates and retention of faculty. The expanded HIV/AIDS curriculum was associated with a substantial increase in trainee projects related to HIV. The increased number of public health professionals has led to a number of practically trained persons working in public health leadership positions in the ministry, including in HIV/AIDS programmes. Conclusion Investment of a modest proportion of new HIV/AIDS resources in targeted public health leadership training programmes can assist in building capacity to lead and manage national HIV and other public health programmes. PMID:19664268

  16. Developmental prosopagnosia with concurrent topographical difficulties: A case report and virtual reality training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bate, Sarah; Adams, Amanda; Bennetts, Rachel; Line, Hannah

    2017-12-05

    Several neuropsychological case studies report brain-damaged individuals with concurrent impairments in face recognition (i.e., prosopagnosia) and topographical orientation. Recently, individuals with a developmental form of topographical disorientation have also been described, and several case reports of individuals with developmental prosopagnosia provide anecdotal evidence of concurrent navigational difficulties. Clearly, the co-occurrence of these difficulties can exacerbate the negative psychosocial consequences associated with each condition. This paper presents the first detailed case report of an individual (FN) with developmental prosopagnosia alongside difficulties in topographical orientation. FN's performance on an extensive navigational battery indicated that she primarily has difficulties in the formation and retrieval of cognitive maps. We then evaluated the effectiveness of a short-term virtual reality training programme and found that she is able to form a cognitive map of a particular environment following intense overlearning. Surprisingly, FN's performance on a face recognition task also improved following training. While the latter finding was unexpected and requires further exploration, the training programme reported here may help to alleviate some of the compounded negative psychosocial consequences that are associated with difficulties in finding both locations and people.

  17. Influence of the implementation of a comprehensive intervention programme on premature discharge outcomes from military training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Helena; Tegern, Matthias; Harms-Ringdahl, Karin

    2012-01-01

    The study describes and analyses the influence of a comprehensive intervention on premature discharges (i.e. the military training cannot be completed). 862 male soldiers from three military units were included. The intervention included a screening protocol with a questionnaire and physical tests for musculoskeletal complaints or injuries and functional limitations and, where needed, treatment, early rehabilitation and individually-adjusted physical training. The intervention also included organisation-based training in ergonomics and exercise physiology for officers plus enhanced teamwork between officers and physiotherapist. Not all the soldiers underwent the intervention as planned. The discharge rate was lower in all three units after either of the intervention programmes comparing premature discharge figures with before-implementation study figures. However, significantly fewer soldiers were discharged from the group who underwent the intervention as planned 6.1% compared to the group with the less intensive intervention, 13.1% (p=0.002). The results indicate that the comprehensive intervention programme can reduce the number of premature discharges from the Swedish Armed Forces. The differences between the groups indicate that the effectiveness was greater when the intervention was fully implemented with regard to intensity.

  18. Evaluating a Research Training Programme for People with Intellectual Disabilities Participating in Inclusive Research: The Views of Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullana, Judit; Pallisera, Maria; Català, Elena; Puyalto, Carolina

    2017-07-01

    This article presents the results of evaluating a research training programme aimed at developing the skills of people with intellectual disabilities to actively participate in inclusive research. The present authors opted for a responsive approach to evaluation, using a combination of interviews, questionnaires and focus groups to gather information on the views of students, trainers and members of the research team regarding how the programme progressed, the learning achieved and participants' satisfaction with the programme. The evaluation showed that most of the participants were satisfied with the programme and provided guidelines for planning contents and materials, demonstrating the usefulness of these types of programme in constructing the research group and empowering people with intellectual disabilities to participate in research. The evaluation revealed that the programme had been a positive social experience that fostered interest in lifelong learning for people with intellectual disabilities. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. 42 CFR 432.31 - Training and use of subprofessional staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-time or part-time employment of persons of low income, including: (1) Young, middle-aged, and older... staffing plan must include the kinds of jobs that subprofessional staff can perform. (e) Career service...

  20. WITHDRAWN: Aerobic exercise training programmes for improving physical and psychosocial health in adults with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriolo, Régis B; El Dib, Regina; Ramos, Luis; Atallah, Alvaro N; da Silva, Edina Mk

    2009-07-08

    Although physical fitness has been suggested to improve physical and psychosocial health for a variety of population profiles, there is a lack of information about the safety and effectiveness of aerobic exercise for adults with Down syndrome. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of aerobic exercise training programmes for physiological and psychosocial outcomes in adults with Down syndrome. Search terms and synonyms for "aerobic exercise" and "Down syndrome" were used within the following databases: CENTRAL (2007, Issue 1); MEDLINE via PUBMED (1966 to March 2007); EMBASE (2005 to April 2007); CINAHL (1982 to March 2007); LILACS (1982 to March 2007); PsycINFO (1887 to March 2007); ERIC (1966 to March 2007); CCT (March 2007); Academic Search Elite (to March 2007), C2- SPECTR (to March 2007 ), NRR (2007 Issue 1), ClinicalTrials.gov (accessed March 2007) and within supplements of Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials using supervised aerobic exercise training programmes with behavioral components accepted as co-interventions. Two reviewers selected relevant trials, assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Where appropriate, data was pooled using meta-analysis with a random effects model The two studies included in this trial used different kinds of aerobic activity: walking/jogging and rowing training. One included study was conducted in the USA, the other in Portugal. In the meta-analyses, only maximal treadmill grade, a work performance variable, was improved in the intervention group after aerobic exercise training programmes (-4.26 [95% CI -6.45, -2.06]) grade. The other outcomes in the meta-analysis showed no significant differences between intervention and control groups, as expressed by weighted mean difference: VO(2) peak -0.30 (95% CI -377, 3.17) mL.Kg.min(-1); peak heart rate, -2.84 (95% CI -10.73, 5.05) bpm; respiratory exchange ratio, 0.01 (95% CI -0.04, 0.06); pulmonary ventilation, -5

  1. Coming to grips with challenging behaviour: a cluster randomised controlled trial on the effects of a new care programme for challenging behaviour on burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff on dementia special care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwijsen, S A; Gerritsen, D L; Eefsting, J A; Smalbrugge, M; Hertogh, C M P M; Pot, A M

    2015-01-01

    Caring for people with dementia in dementia special care units is a demanding job. Challenging behaviour is one of the factors influencing the job satisfaction and burnout of care staff. A care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia might, next to diminishing the challenging behaviour of residents, improve job satisfaction and reduce the care staff's feelings of burnout. To determine the effects of a care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia on the burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff. The care programme was implemented according to a stepped wedge design in which care units were randomly divided over five groups with different time points of starting with implementation. 17 Dutch dementia special care units. Care staff members of the 17 units. The care programme consists of an education package and of various structured assessment tools that guide professionals through the multidisciplinary detection, analysis, treatment and evaluation of treatment of challenging behaviour. Burnout, job satisfaction and job demands were measured before implementation, halfway through the implementation process and after all the care units had implemented the care programme. Burnout was measured with the Dutch version of the Maslach burnout inventory (UBOS-C, three subscales); job satisfaction and job demands were measured with subscales of the Leiden Quality of Work Questionnaire. Mixed model analyses were used to determine effects. Care staff could not be blinded for the intervention. Of the 1441 questionnaires, 645 were returned (response 45%, 318 control measurements, 327 intervention measurements) by 380 unique care staff members. Significant effects were found on job satisfaction (0.93, 95% CI 0.48-1.38). On the other outcomes, no significant changes in the scores were found. Positive effects of using the Grip on Challenging behaviour care programme were found on job

  2. Reducing inpatient falls in a 100% single room elderly care environment: evaluation of the impact of a systematic nurse training programme on falls risk assessment (FRA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Inderpal; Okeke, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Inpatient falls (IF) are the most commonly reported safety incidents. The high rate of inpatient falls was reported in a newly built hospital, within Aneurin Bevan University Health Board, Wales (UK). The aim of the project is to reduce the incidence of IF and associated adverse clinical outcomes in a hospital with 100% single rooms. The key mechanism for improvement was education and training of nursing staff around falls risk factors. A Plan-Do-Study-Act methodology was used and a geriatrician-led, systematic nurse training programme on the understanding and correct use of existing multifactorial falls risk assessment (FRA) tool was implemented in April 2013. Pre-training baseline data revealed inadequate falls assessment and low completion rates of the FRA tool. Subsequent, post-training data showed improvement in compliance with all aspects of FRA. Concurrent with nurse training, the actual falls incidence/1000 patient-bed-days fell significantly from the baseline of 18.19±3.46 (Nov 2011-March 2013) to 13.36±2.89 (pMarch 2014) and remained low (mean falls 12.81±2.85) until November 2015. Improved clinical outcomes have been observed in terms of a reduction of length of stay and new care home placements, making total annualised savings of £642,055.

  3. THE EFFECT OF COMMUNICATION SKILLS TRAINING PROGRAMME ON THE ATTITUDE AND PERCEPTIONS OF THE RESIDENTS OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeba Mary Mani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Communication skills are essential for all practicing doctors, which can be taught and assessed by a structured programme. Hence, a specialty-based communication skills training programme was conducted among the residents of the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PMR Department. The aim of the study is to assess the change in attitude and perception among the residents of PMR by a communication skills training programme. MATERIALS AND METHODS It comprised of a data collection procedure. Here, a semi-structured questionnaire was administered to the subjects. It was given as a pre-intervention, post-intervention and as a second phase post-intervention questionnaire. The communication skills training programme (n=16 was conducted after a pre-test evaluation using the validated questionnaire tool. A half-day training programme using composite Teaching-Learning methods (lectures/role play/videos/check list were included. The post-test-1 (n=16 was conducted after the training programme and the post-test-2 (n=16 was conducted after 6 weeks. All the tests used the same validated questionnaire tool with scores allocated to each item. Settings- Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PMR Department among the residents. Study Design- Educational Intervention- A communication skills training programme using composite teaching learning methods. Statistical Analysis- Analysed using SPSS-16 package software. RESULTS The median pre-test score of the sixteen PMR residents was noted to be 33. The median post-test-1 score of the group was noted to be 37. A significant difference was noted between the pre- and post-test-1 score, which was statistically significant Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test z=-3.249 and p value <0.0001. The post-test-2, which was done after 6 weeks of the programme yielded a score of 36, a similar value of post-test-1. The comparison of pre-test score with post-test-1 and post-test-2 scores showed a highly significant improvement in the

  4. Teaching Emotion Recognition Skills to Young Children with Autism: A Randomised Controlled Trial of an Emotion Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Beth T.; Gray, Kylie M.; Tonge, Bruce J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Children with autism have difficulties in emotion recognition and a number of interventions have been designed to target these problems. However, few emotion training interventions have been trialled with young children with autism and co-morbid ID. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of an emotion training programme for a group…

  5. A Train-the-Trainer Design for Green Ambassadors in an Environmental Education Programme on Plastic Waste Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Yannes Tsz-Yan; Chow, Cheuk-Fai; So, Winnie Wing-Mui

    2018-01-01

    To educate a sustainable future, a train-the-trainer (TTT) approach was adopted to train student teachers (STs) from a teacher education institute to be green ambassadors (GAs) in an environmental education (EE) programme with the aim of promoting plastic waste recycling among primary school pupils. The design of the TTT course for the GAs not…

  6. Effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on staff's use of prompts and children's adaptive responses during one-to-one training in children with severe to profound intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonderen, A.M.H. van; Swart, C.C.W. de; Didden, H.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although relatively many studies have addressed staff training and its effect on trainer behavior, the effects of staff training on trainee's adaptive behaviors have seldomly been examined. We therefore assessed effectiveness of staff training, consisting of instruction and video feedback, on (a)

  7. Comparison of Computer Based Instruction to Behavior Skills Training for Teaching Staff Implementation of Discrete-Trial Instruction with an Adult with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosik, Melissa R.; Williams, W. Larry; Garrido, Natalia; Lee, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, behavior skills training (BST) is compared to a computer based training package for teaching discrete trial instruction to staff, teaching an adult with autism. The computer based training package consisted of instructions, video modeling and feedback. BST consisted of instructions, modeling, rehearsal and feedback. Following…

  8. Effectiveness of a structured education reminiscence-based programme for staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units: A study protocol for a cluster randomised trial

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Shea, Eamon

    2011-02-14

    Abstract Background Current projections indicate that there will be a significant increase in the number of people with dementia in Ireland, from approximately 40,000 at present to 100,000 by 2036. Psychosocial interventions, such as reminiscence, have the potential to improve the quality of life of people with dementia. However, while reminiscence is used widely in dementia care, its impact on the quality of life of people with dementia remains largely undocumented and there is a need for a robust and fair assessment of its overall effectiveness. The DementiA education programme incorporating REminiscence for Staff study will evaluate the effectiveness of a structured reminiscence-based education programme for care staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units. Methods\\/Design The study is a two-group, single-blind cluster randomised trial conducted in public and private long-stay residential settings in Ireland. Randomisation to control and intervention is at the level of the long-stay residential unit. Sample size calculations suggest that 18 residential units each containing 17 people with dementia are required for randomisation to control and intervention groups to achieve power of at least 80% with alpha levels of 0.05. Each resident in the intervention group is linked with a nurse and care assistant who have taken the structured reminiscence-based education programme. Participants in the control group will receive usual care. The primary outcome is quality of life of residents as measured by the Quality of Life-AD instrument. Secondary outcomes include agitation, depression and carer burden. Blinded outcome assessment is undertaken at baseline and at 18-22 weeks post-randomisation. Discussion Trials on reminiscence-based interventions for people with dementia have been scarce and the quality of the information arising from those that have been done has been undermined by methodological problems, particularly in relation to scale

  9. Effectiveness of a structured education reminiscence-based programme for staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units: A study protocol for a cluster randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Fionnuala

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current projections indicate that there will be a significant increase in the number of people with dementia in Ireland, from approximately 40,000 at present to 100,000 by 2036. Psychosocial interventions, such as reminiscence, have the potential to improve the quality of life of people with dementia. However, while reminiscence is used widely in dementia care, its impact on the quality of life of people with dementia remains largely undocumented and there is a need for a robust and fair assessment of its overall effectiveness. The DementiA education programme incorporating REminiscence for Staff study will evaluate the effectiveness of a structured reminiscence-based education programme for care staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units. Methods/Design The study is a two-group, single-blind cluster randomised trial conducted in public and private long-stay residential settings in Ireland. Randomisation to control and intervention is at the level of the long-stay residential unit. Sample size calculations suggest that 18 residential units each containing 17 people with dementia are required for randomisation to control and intervention groups to achieve power of at least 80% with alpha levels of 0.05. Each resident in the intervention group is linked with a nurse and care assistant who have taken the structured reminiscence-based education programme. Participants in the control group will receive usual care. The primary outcome is quality of life of residents as measured by the Quality of Life-AD instrument. Secondary outcomes include agitation, depression and carer burden. Blinded outcome assessment is undertaken at baseline and at 18-22 weeks post-randomisation. Discussion Trials on reminiscence-based interventions for people with dementia have been scarce and the quality of the information arising from those that have been done has been undermined by methodological problems, particularly in

  10. Competency-based teacher training: A systematic revision of a proven programme in medical didactics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griewatz, Jan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Competency-based medical education (CBME requires factual knowledge to be practically applied together with skills and attitudes. With the National Competence-Based Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM representing a strong official demand for competence-orientation, it is generally important to explicitly outline its characteristics and review its realisation in teacher trainings. Further requirements are given by the core competencies for medical teachers (KLM. As an example the MQ programme (“Medizindidaktische Qualifikation” in Baden-Wuerttemberg, a long established and well-accepted training, has been critically revised on this basis, concerning its suitability for the demands of CBME, its needs for adjustment and the efforts to be undertaken for its implementation.Methods: In a systematic quality management process the MQ curriculum and its organisational framing were analysed and further developed in a step-wise comprehensive approach, using the six-step cycle by Kern. The procedures included a thorough needs assessment (e.g. literature research, programme mapping, strategic decisions on structure and content, piloting and evaluation. During the process essential elements of project and change management were considered.Results: The experiences of the MQ example revealed helpful information for key factors to be considered in the pending change process any training provider will be confronted with. Guiding questions were developed related to the process phases. Our analyses showed persistent key points of proven value as stable foundation for change, as well as components needing special consideration to foster competence-oriented aims and transfer into practice: reflection, feedback, application-oriented methods and transparent competence development. These aspects have to be consciously perceived and experienced by participants. Taking this into account, we re-designed the course evidence

  11. Competency-based teacher training: A systematic revision of a proven programme in medical didactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griewatz, Jan; Simon, Melanie; Lammerding-Koeppel, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Competency-based medical education (CBME) requires factual knowledge to be practically applied together with skills and attitudes. With the National Competence-Based Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM) representing a strong official demand for competence-orientation, it is generally important to explicitly outline its characteristics and review its realisation in teacher trainings. Further requirements are given by the core competencies for medical teachers (KLM). As an example the MQ programme ("Medizindidaktische Qualifikation") in Baden-Wuerttemberg, a long established and well-accepted training, has been critically revised on this basis, concerning its suitability for the demands of CBME, its needs for adjustment and the efforts to be undertaken for its implementation. Methods: In a systematic quality management process the MQ curriculum and its organisational framing were analysed and further developed in a step-wise comprehensive approach, using the six-step cycle by Kern. The procedures included a thorough needs assessment (e.g. literature research, programme mapping), strategic decisions on structure and content, piloting and evaluation. During the process essential elements of project and change management were considered. Results: The experiences of the MQ example revealed helpful information for key factors to be considered in the pending change process any training provider will be confronted with. Guiding questions were developed related to the process phases. Our analyses showed persistent key points of proven value as stable foundation for change, as well as components needing special consideration to foster competence-oriented aims and transfer into practice: reflection, feedback, application-oriented methods and transparent competence development. These aspects have to be consciously perceived and experienced by participants. Taking this into account, we re-designed the course evidence-based. Besides

  12. Training, supervision and quality of care in selected integrated community case management (iCCM programmes: A scoping review of programmatic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Bosch–Capblanch

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To describe the training, supervision and quality of care components of integrated Community Case Management (iCCM programmes and to draw lessons learned from existing evaluations of those programmes

  13. Effectiveness of balance training programme in reducing the frequency of falling in established osteoporotic women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikó, Ibolya; Szerb, Imre; Szerb, Anna; Poor, Gyula

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effect of a 12-month sensomotor balance exercise programme on postural control and the frequency of falling in women with established osteoporosis. Randomized controlled trial where the intervention group was assigned the 12-month Balance Training Programme and the control group did not undertake any intervention beyond regular osteoporosis treatment. A total of 100 osteoporotic women - at least with one osteoporotic fracture - aged 65 years old and above. Balance was assessed in static and dynamic posture both with performance-based measures of balance, such as the Berg Balance Scale and the Timed Up and Go Test, and with a stabilometric computerized platform. Patients in the intervention group completed the 12-month sensomotor Balance Training Programme in an outpatient setting, guided by physical therapists, three times a week, for 30 minutes. The Berg Balance Scale and the Timed Up and Go Test showed a statistically significant improvement of balance in the intervention group ( p = 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively). Balance tests using the stabilometer also showed a statistically significant improvement in static and dynamic postural balance for osteoporotic women after the completion of the Balance Training Programme. As a consequence, the one-year exercise programme significantly decreased the number of falls in the exercise group compared with the control group. The Balance Training Programme significantly improved the balance parameters and reduced the number of falls in postmenopausal women who have already had at least one fracture in the past.

  14. Increasing Opportunities for Question-Asking in School-Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Effectiveness of Staff Training in Pivotal Response Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuur, Rianne; Huskens, Bibi; Verhoeven, Ludo; Didden, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Deficits in question-asking are common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Furthermore, their opportunities to self-initiate questions are often hindered by directive behavior of their conversation partners. This study assessed the effectiveness of staff training in pivotal response treatment (PRT) on staff member-created…

  15. Effects of a Competency-Based Professional Development Training on Children's Physical Activity and Staff Physical Activity Promotion in Summer Day Camps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Beets, Michael W.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Webster, Collin A.; Moore, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The YMCA of the USA serves more than nine million youth in its summer day camping programs nationwide. In spring 2011, the YMCA of Columbia, SC, with support from the University of South Carolina, adopted a competency-based staff-level training approach in an attempt to align staff behaviors with the YMCA of the USA new physical activity standards…

  16. Evaluation of the effectiveness of anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention programme training components: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jeffrey B; Waxman, Justin P; Richter, Scott J; Shultz, Sandra J

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programmes have shown mixed results, which may be due to differing emphasis on training components. The purpose of this study was to (1) quantify the overall and relative duration of each training component encompassed within these programmes and (2) examine the effect of these durations on ACL injury rates. A systematic review was completed and meta-analyses performed on eligible studies to produce a pooled OR estimate of the effectiveness of these programmes. Meta-regression was used to detect any relationship that programme duration and the duration of individual training components had on ACL injury rates. 13 studies were included for review. Results of the meta-analyses revealed a significant reduction of injuries after preventative training programmes for all ACL injuries (pooled OR estimate of 0.612, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.85; p=0.004) and for non-contact ACL injuries (OR 0.351, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.54; ptraining was associated with a higher injury risk for ACL injury (p=0.04), while greater durations of static stretching was associated with a lower injury risk for non-contact ACL injuries (p=0.04). While ACL prevention programmes are successful in reducing the risk of ACL injury, the ideal combination and emphasis of training components within these programmes remains unclear. Evidence indicates that greater emphases on balance training and static stretching may be associated with an increase and decrease in injury risk, respectively. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. COMPOSITION OF STAFF REVIEW ADVISORY BODIES - 2000 COMPOSITION OF THE JOINT TRAINING BOARD (JTB) - 2000/2001

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Division

    2000-01-01

    For the present staff review, the advisory bodies set up to prepare recommendations are composed as follows:Senior Staff Advancement Committee (SSAC)D. Treille / EP (Convener)C. Benvenuti / ESTD. O. Williams /ITTechnical Engineers & Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) C. Hauviller / EPL. Leistam / ESTS. Jarp / IT [Chairman]F. Pedersen / PSR. Lauckner / SLC. Roche / ETTLong-term contract Boards (LTCBs) (Categories 2 &5a)Tiziano Camporesi / EP [Convener]Florence Ranjard / EP\t[Alternate]Jacques Gruber / PSPeter Sievers / LHCThomas Pettersson / ESTMichel Mayoud / ESTSue Foffano / ASThierry Lagrange / SPLWerner Zapf / HR (Secretary) LTCB 2(Categories 3, 4, 5b & 5c)Véronique Paris / SL [Convener]Fabien Pérriolat / PS\t [Alternate]Mats Wilhelmsson / STVéronique Fassnacht / TISLucie Linssen / EPMichel Mayoud / ESTPatrick Geeraert / FIJohn Cuthbert / HRSeamus Hegarty / HR (Secretary) Composition of the Joint Training Board (JT...

  18. Enhancing Allocentric Spatial Recall in Pre-schoolers through Navigational Training Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena Boccia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Unlike for other abilities, children do not receive systematic spatial orientation training at school, even though navigational training during adulthood improves spatial skills. We investigated whether navigational training programme (NTP improved spatial orientation skills in pre-schoolers. We administered 12-week NTP to seventeen 4- to 5-year-old children (training group, TG. The TG children and 17 age-matched children (control group, CG who underwent standard didactics were tested twice before (T0 and after (T1 the NTP using tasks that tap into landmark, route and survey representations. We determined that the TG participants significantly improved their performances in the most demanding navigational task, which is the task that taps into survey representation. This improvement was significantly higher than that observed in the CG, suggesting that NTP fostered the acquisition of survey representation. Such representation is typically achieved by age seven. This finding suggests that NTP improves performance on higher-level navigational tasks in pre-schoolers.

  19. Training and Staff Development in Early Childhood Education: Beneath the Veneers of Resistance and Professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shareef, Intisar; Gonzalez-Mena, Janet

    1997-01-01

    Describes infant-toddler training-of-trainers workshop in which trainers respond to trainee resistance through role-plays illustrating respectful and disrespectful ways of training and through discussions focusing on accepting and acknowledging the feelings of trainees and trainers. Asserts that forming diverse training teams, valuing opposing…

  20. The ELIXIR-EXCELERATE Train-the-Trainer pilot programme: empower researchers to deliver high-quality training [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Morgan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the main goals of the ELIXIR-EXCELERATE project from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 programme is to support a pan-European training programme to increase bioinformatics capacity and competency across ELIXIR Nodes. To this end, a Train-the-Trainer (TtT programme has been developed by the TtT subtask of EXCELERATE’s Training Platform, to try to expose bioinformatics instructors to aspects of pedagogy and evidence-based learning principles, to help them better design, develop and deliver high-quality training in future. As a first step towards such a programme, an ELIXIR-EXCELERATE TtT (EE-TtT pilot was developed, drawing on existing ‘instructor training’ models, using input both from experienced instructors and from experts in bioinformatics, the cognitive sciences and educational psychology. This manuscript describes the process of defining the pilot programme, illustrates its goals, structure and contents, and discusses its outcomes. From Jan 2016 to Jan 2017, we carried out seven pilot EE-TtT courses (training more than sixty new instructors, collaboratively drafted the training materials, and started establishing a network of trainers and instructors within the ELIXIR community. The EE-TtT pilot represents an essential step towards the development of a sustainable and scalable ELIXIR TtT programme. Indeed, the lessons learned from the pilot, the experience gained, the materials developed, and the analysis of the feedback collected throughout the seven pilot courses have both positioned us to consolidate the programme in the coming years, and contributed to the development of an enthusiastic and expanding ELIXIR community of instructors and trainers.

  1. The experience of dentists who gained enhanced skills in endodontics within a novel pilot training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyas, S; Briggs, P; Gallagher, J E

    2017-02-24

    Objective To explore the experiences of primary care dentists following training to enhance endodontic skills and their views on the implications for the NHS.Design Qualitative study using anonymised free text questionnaires.Setting Primary care general dental services within the National Health Service (NHS) in London, United Kingdom.Subjects and methods Eight primary care dentists who completed this training were asked about factors affecting participant experience of the course, perceived impact on themselves, their organisation, their patients and barriers/facilitators to providing endodontic treatment in NHS primary care. Data were transferred verbatim to a spreadsheet and thematically analysed.Intervention 24-month part-time educational and service initiative to provide endodontics within the NHS, using a combination of training in simulation lab and treatment of patients in primary care.Results Positive impacts were identified at individual (gains in knowledge, skills, confidence, personal development), patient (more teeth saved, quality of care improved) and system levels (access, value for money). Suggested developments for future courses included more case discussions, teaching of practical skills earlier in the course and refinement of the triaging processes. Barriers to using the acquired skills in providing endodontic treatment in primary care within the NHS were perceived to be resources (remuneration, time, skills) and accountability. Facilitators included appropriately remunerated contracts, necessary equipment and time.Conclusion This novel pilot training programme in endodontics combining general practice experience with education/training, hands-on experience and a portfolio was perceived by participants as beneficial for extending skills and service innovation in primary dental care. The findings provide insight into primary dental care practitioners' experience with education/training and have implications for future educational initiatives in

  2. Improving reading comprehension in reading and listening settings: the effect of two training programmes focusing on metacognition and working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretti, Barbara; Caldarola, Nadia; Tencati, Chiara; Cornoldi, Cesare

    2014-06-01

    Metacognition and working memory (WM) have been found associated with success in reading comprehension, but no studies have examined their combined effect on the training of reading comprehension. Another open question concerns the role of listening comprehension: In particular, it is not clear whether training to improve reading comprehension must necessarily be based on processing written material or whether, as suggested in a recent study by Clarke et al. (2010, Psychol. Sci., 21, 1106), a programme based on verbal language could also be effective. The study examined the feasibility of improving text comprehension in school children by comparing the efficacy of two training programmes, both involving metacognition and WM, but one based on listening comprehension, the other on reading comprehension. The study involved a sample of 159 pupils attending eight classes in the fourth and fifth grades (age range 9-11 years). The listening and reading programmes focused on the same abilities/processes strictly related to text comprehension, and particularly metacognitive knowledge and control, WM (per se and in terms of integrating information in a text). The training programmes were implemented by school teachers as part of the class's normal school activities, under the supervision of experts. Their efficacy was compared with the results obtained in an active control group that completed standard text comprehension activities. Our results showed that both the training programmes focusing on specific text comprehension skills were effective in improving the children's achievement, but training in reading comprehension generated greater gains than the listening comprehension programme. Our study suggests that activities focusing specifically on metacognition and WM could foster text comprehension, but the potential benefit is influenced by the training modality, that is, the Reading group obtained greater and longer-lasting improvements than the Active control or

  3. Effects of theory training, hands-on supervision and a self-instructional treatment manual on staff competency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Teikari Hatlenes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Employing a randomized control group design, this study compared the efficacy of staff training using theory training, hands-on supervision and a self-instructional teaching manual. Participants were 12 undergraduate, health or social-work students. Initially, participants were given a three-hour lecture, and as a result, staff-participants increased their use of correct teaching procedures, but not to mastery. Participants in both groups continued to increase their teaching skills after intervention with either hands-on training or the self-instructional manual, though best effect was achieved with hands-on supervision. This effect was maintained at a two-month follow-up. At the end of the experiment, participants in the treatment manual group received hands-on supervision. As a result, their performances increased to the same levels as the participants in the hands-on supervision group. Hence, hands-on supervision was superior in increasing teaching performances. Participants receiving hands-on supervision reported that they were comfortable receiving this type of supervision, that the hands-on supervision was the best way to learn correct teaching procedures and that they would prefer hands-on supervision in a future job situation. Also, independent assessors rated hands-on supervision as the most suitable intervention.

  4. Training of Advanced Cardiac Life Support Skills to Nursing Staff in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in collaboration with resuscitation service, unit managers and clinical mentors. Prior to ACLS certification, classes of Basic Life Support (BLS) were held every week for the staff nurses at King Faisal Hospital. Objectives. The purpose of this innovation was threefold, to: 1.Improve outcomes of patients requiring resuscitation.

  5. Assembling a solid staff. Job rotation, job shaping and cross-training help employee retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redling, Robert

    2003-03-01

    Qualified workers for medical practices are in short supply, and you want to keep the good staff you have. Here are strategies to match employees with the right positions, ease workplace stress, heighten morale and ensure coverage of duties when you're down a position or two.

  6. Training Teaching Staff to Facilitate Spontaneous Communication in Children with Autism: Adult Interactive Style Intervention (AISI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossyvaki, Lila; Jones, Glenys; Guldberg, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that the way adults interact with children with autism can have a great impact on their spontaneous communication. However, to date, few studies have focused on modifying adults' behaviour and even fewer have been conducted in school settings which actively involve teaching staff in designing the intervention.…

  7. Staff training effective in increasing learning opportunities for school-aged children with autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huskens, B.E.B.M.; Reijers, H.T.J.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on staff's ABA skills during one-to-one play situations and initiations of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Methods: Data were collected within a multiple baseline design across 5 dyads. A continuous

  8. Material Production for an EST Course: Coursebook Design for the English Training Programme for Architects and Civil Engineers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the material production of an EST (English for Science and Technology course in an English training programme for architects and civil engineers. The programme was specially designed for the construction professionals whose needs were investigated and analysed by the trainers, ESP (English for Specific Purposes specialists from the British Council and Chinese counterparts. The article firstly focuses on the theories of needs analysis which support the investigation and analysis of the programme. After that, the needs of this programme (for both organization and participants are recognized and organized with illustration of programme framework and a particular course (EST syllabus. Then the literature of material design is reviewed and the rationale for the material writing is discussed with the presentation of a sample unit.

  9. Influence of two high-intensity intermittent training programmes on anaerobic capacity in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Buśko

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the influence of a maximal effort training programme with variation of the pedalling rate on the anaerobic capacity, post-exercise maximal concentration of lactic acid (LA and acid-alkali balance changes in the capillary blood. Identification of the dependence between the lactic acid concentration and the anaerobic capacity produced in the Wingate test was also the goal. The hypothesis that cycloergometer training consisting of maximal efforts with a load equal to 10% of body weight (BW will elicit bigger changes of measured values in comparison to training with a load of 5% BW was verified. Twenty non-athletes, students of UPE took part in the study. They were divided into 2 groups. The first group (M10; n=9 performed maximal efforts with a load equal to 10% of body weight (BW. The second group (M5; n=11 performed maximal efforts with a load of 5% BW. Control measurements of anaerobic capacity (Wingate test were taken every Monday: before the test (0, during 4 weeks of training (1-4 and for 2 weeks after the test (5-6. Blood for the determination of lactic acid concentration and acid-alkali balance was taken from the fingertip before performing the Wingate test – in the 5th, 7th, 9th and 30th resting minute. Changes of maximal power (Pmax were not statistically significant in either group. Significant differences were found between the two groups after the second week of rest. For mean power (Pm the most important changes were noted in the first week from training (M10 – 6.5%; M5 – 11.0% No significant differences were found between groups. Average values of the individual LA concentration peak (the highest LA concentration occurring after the Wingate test for each individual changed significantly in group M10 from 15.233±2.367 mmol/l in the measurement made before training to 12.340±2.353 mmol/l in the measurement taken 2 weeks after training. Group M5 is characterised by a change of this factor

  10. An analysis of two evidence-based parent training programmes and determination of the characteristics for a new programme model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkan, B; Ustün, B; Güvenir, T

    2013-03-01

    The Triple P and Incredible Years are the two best (well-known) parent programmes which cooperate with families and the society, reduce the risk factors and support the protective factors. The programmes also offer a multidisciplinary approach with high evidence standards, use randomized controlled studies and yield long-term results. Accordingly, this literature review was conducted in order to evaluate the efficacy of these two programmes, to determine the (similarities) and differences. 'MEDLINE, PUBMED, COCHRANE' databases, online and published journals and dissertations in Turkey were reviewed for the study. Consequently, results of 49 studies were presented, which were evaluated according to certain criteria such as samples, methods and results. The studies on the Triple P and the Incredible Years Parent Program illustrated a decrease in problematic behaviours of the children and negative parenting practices of parents following the implementation of programmes. However, the studies also pointed out the differences between the Triple P and the Incredible Years Parent Program. It is recommended that a new parent education programme be prepared and tested for our country in accordance with the results of the study. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  11. COMPARISON BETWEEN SYNCHRONOUS AND ASYNCHRONOUS INSTRUCTIONAL DELIVERY METHOD OF TRAINING PROGRAMME ON IN-SERVICE PHYSICAL EDUCATORS’ KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriaki EMMANOUILIDOU,

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to compare the influences of a training programme’s instructional delivery method (synchronous and asynchronous on Greek in-service physical educators’ cognitive understanding on student assessment. Forty nine participants were randomly divided into synchronous, asynchronous, and control group. The experimental groups participated in the same training programme with different online instructional method. The control group received no intervention. A 17-item questionnaire was completed before and after programme implementation by the entire sample. A two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures on the last factor was used for data analysis. The methods x measures interaction effect were significant. Both experimental groups, unlike the control, presented a similar significant increase in their understanding. Conclusively, synchronous and asynchronous instructional approaches of a training programme enhance equally Greek physical educators’ cognitive understanding.

  12. Coming to grips with challenging behaviour: a cluster randomised controlled trial on the effects of a new care programme for challenging behaviour on burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff on dementia special care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, S.A.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Eefsting, J.A.; Smalbrugge, M.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.; Pot, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Caring for people with dementia in dementia special care units is a demanding job. Challenging behaviour is one of the factors influencing the job satisfaction and burnout of care staff. A care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia might, next to

  13. Coming to grips with challenging behaviour: a cluster randomised controlled trial on the effects of a new care programme for challenging behaviour on burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff on dementia special care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, S.A.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Eefsting, J.A.; Smalbrugge, M.; Hertogh, C.M.; Pot, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Caring for people with dementia in dementia special care units is a demanding job. Challenging behaviour is one of the factors influencing the job satisfaction and burnout of care staff. A care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia might, next to

  14. Reaching national consensus on the core clinical skill outcomes for family medicine postgraduate training programmes in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoojee, Yusuf; Mash, Robert

    2017-05-26

    Family physicians play a significant role in the district health system and need to be equipped with a broad range of clinical skills in order to meet the needs and expectations of the communities they serve. A previous study in 2007 reached national consensus on the clinical skills that should be taught in postgraduate family medicine training prior to the introduction of the new speciality. Since then, family physicians have been trained, employed and have gained experience of working in the district health services. The national Education and Training Committee of the South African Academy of Family Physicians, therefore, requested a review of the national consensus on clinical skills for family medicine training. A Delphi technique was used to reach national consensus in a panel of 17 experts: family physicians responsible for training, experienced family physicians in practice and managers responsible for employing family physicians. Consensus was reached on 242 skills from which the panel decided on 211 core skills, 28 elective skills and 3 skills to be deleted from the previous list. The panel was unable to reach consensus on 11 skills. The findings will guide training programmes on the skills to be addressed and ensure consistency across training programmes nationally. The consensus will also guide formative assessment as documented in the national portfolio of learning and summative assessment in the national exit examination. The consensus will be of interest to other countries in the region where training programmes in family medicine are developing.

  15. Evaluation of an advance care planning education programme for nursing homes: A Longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Kirsten; Hodgson, Aruna; Walshe, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the success of a programme of Advance Care Planning education for nursing homes by examining the effect on staff knowledge, Advance Care Planning practice within the home and end-of-life hospital admission rates. Three longitudinal questionnaires assessing staff knowledge, Advance Care Planning Practice and hospital deaths completed before and after the initiation of the Advance Care Planning education programme by homes that had completed the training and those yet to undergo the training. Superior Advance Care Planning knowledge was evident in those staff that had completed the training. There was an increase of 85% in the number of Advance Care Plans completed in the training homes and an overall reduction in hospital deaths of 25% for residents from training homes. A programme of Advance Care Planning education for nursing homes is successful in improving nursing home staff knowledge, increasing Advance Care Planning practice and reducing hospital deaths. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of a mental health training programme on Nigerian school pupils' perceptions of mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduguwa, Adeola Oluwafunmilayo; Adedokun, Babatunde; Omigbodun, Olayinka Olusola

    2017-01-01

    Stigmatizing attitudes and discriminatory behaviour towards persons with mental illness are known to start in childhood. In Nigeria, it is not unusual to see children taunting persons with mental illness. This behaviour continues into adulthood as evidenced by the day-to-day occurrences in the community of negative attitudes and social distance from persons with mental illness. School-based interventions for pupils have been found to increase knowledge about mental illness. Children are recognised as potential agents of change bringing in new ways of thinking. This study determined the effect of a 3-day mental health training for school pupils in Southwest Nigeria, on the perceptions of and social distance towards persons with mental illness. A total of 205 school pupils drawn from two administrative wards were randomly assigned to control and experimental groups. The mean age of the pupils was 14.91 years (±1.3). The pupils in the intervention group received a 5-h mental health training session spaced out over 3-days. Apart from didactic lectures, case history presentations and discussions and role-play were part the training. Outcome measures were rated using a knowledge, attitude and social distance questionnaire at baseline, immediately following the training for both group and 3-week post intervention for the intervention group. A Student Evaluation Form was administered to evaluate the pupils' assessment of the training programme. Frequencies, Chi square statistics, paired t test were used to analyse the data received. At immediate post-intervention, the intervention group had a significantly higher mean knowledge score compared to controls, 21.1 vs. 22.0; p = 0.097 to 26.1 vs 22.0; p mental illness in school pupils in Nigeria.

  17. A System on a Programmable Chip Architecture for Data-Dependent Superimposed Training Channel Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Martín del Campo

    2009-01-01

    with the information, a series of known symbols, whose analysis is used to define the parameters of the filters that remove the distortion of the data. Nevertheless, a part of the available bandwidth has to be destined to these symbols. Until now, no alternative solution has demonstrated to be fully satisfying for commercial use, but one technique that looks promising is superimposed training (ST. This work describes a hybrid software-hardware FPGA implementation of a recent algorithm that belongs to the ST family, known as Data-dependent Superimposed Training (DDST, which does not need extra bandwidth for its training sequences (TS as it adds them arithmetically to the data. DDST also adds a third sequence known as data-dependent sequence, that destroys the interference caused by the data over the TS. As DDST's computational burden is too high for the commercial processors used in mobile systems, a System on a Programmable Chip (SOPC approach is used in order to solve the problem.

  18. How trainees would disclose medical errors: educational implications for training programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Andrew A; Bell, Sigall K; Krauss, Melissa J; Garbutt, Jane; Dunagan, W Claiborne; Fraser, Victoria J; Levinson, Wendy; Larson, Eric B; Gallagher, Thomas H

    2011-04-01

    The disclosure of harmful errors to patients is recommended, but appears to be uncommon. Understanding how trainees disclose errors and how their practices evolve during training could help educators design programmes to address this gap. This study was conducted to determine how trainees would disclose medical errors. We surveyed 758 trainees (488 students and 270 residents) in internal medicine at two academic medical centres. Surveys depicted one of two harmful error scenarios that varied by how apparent the error would be to the patient. We measured attitudes and disclosure content using scripted responses. Trainees reported their intent to disclose the error as 'definitely' (43%), 'probably' (47%), 'only if asked by patient' (9%), and 'definitely not' (1%). Trainees were more likely to disclose obvious errors than errors that patients were unlikely to recognise (55% versus 30%; p error rather than only an adverse event had occurred. Regarding apologies, trainees were split between conveying a general expression of regret (52%) and making an explicit apology (46%). Respondents at higher levels of training were less likely to use explicit apologies (trend p errors (odds ratio 1.40, p = 0.03). Trainees may not be prepared to disclose medical errors to patients and worrisome trends in trainee apology practices were observed across levels of training. Medical educators should intensify efforts to enhance trainees' skills in meeting patients' expectations for the open disclosure of harmful medical errors. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  19. Teaching Staff Advanced Training in Russia, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the USA and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    In the article the peculiarities in organization of postgraduate teacher training in foreign countries have been highlighted; the basic problems and prospects for advanced training which stipulate for reforming the relevant national systems have been revealed; common and distinctive trends in their development have been justified. In Russia there…

  20. Outcomes of classroom-based team training interventions for multiprofessional hospital staff. A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Louise Isager; Østergaard, Doris; Mogensen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    Several studies show that communication errors in healthcare teams are frequent and can lead to adverse events. Team training has been suggested as a way to safer communication and has been implemented in healthcare as classroom-based or simulation-based team training or a combination of both...

  1. Educating vocationally trained family physicians: a survey of graduates from a postgraduate medical education programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Wayne K; Dovey, Susan M

    2016-06-01

    INTRODUCTION Since 1991 the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand has offered postgraduate qualifications specifically designed to educate general practitioners (GPs) about their unique work environment. AIM To determine motivations and impacts of postgraduate education for practising GPs. METHODS Survey of the 100 graduates of the University of Otago, Dunedin postgraduate general practice programme. Ninety five living graduates were approached and 70 (73.7%) responded. Quantitative data about disposition of respondents before enrolling and after completion of the programme were analysed using chi-square and paired t-tests. Free text responses about motivations, impacts and outcomes of the program were thematically analysed. RESULTS 64 GPs graduated with a postgraduate diploma and 36 with a masters degree in general practice. Although the mean number of graduates was 3.5 and 2.0 (respectively), annual enrolments averaged 25.1. Most graduates (60.9%) were aged in their 40s when they started studying and most (94.3%) had a spouse and/or children at home. DISCUSSION This voluntary postgraduate medical education complements traditional medical training but has low external value despite personal, practising and professional benefits. Graduates valued engagement above completion of a qualification. KEYWORDS Medical education; general practitioners; scholarship; professionalism.

  2. Evaluating a Concept Mapping Training Programme by 10 and 13 year-old students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita HABÓK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The PISA 2000 study found large differences between countries in terms of quality of learning. In somecountries, students prefer rote learning to meaningful learning. However, such memorisation of thematerial does not lead to recallable and usable knowledge in the long run. Ausubel's (1968 wellknowntheory serves as a basis for several techniques of meaningful learning, including conceptmapping, which emphasises the visual organization of comprehended information. The present studyreports the results of an experiment using concept mapping for deepening students’ understandingof teaching materials. It focuses on definitions frequently used in science and Hungarian grammarlessons. Results indicate that concept mapping training programmes can improve participants’achievement. Experiences show that the technique of concept mapping is frequently unfamiliar tostudents. More time would be needed for practising and using it in different learning situations.

  3. Effect of sand versus grass training surfaces during an 8-week pre-season conditioning programme in team sport athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnie, Martyn John; Dawson, Brian; Arnot, Mark Alexander; Pinnington, Hugh; Landers, Grant; Peeling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the use of sand and grass training surfaces throughout an 8-week conditioning programme in well-trained female team sport athletes (n = 24). Performance testing was conducted pre- and post-training and included measures of leg strength and balance, vertical jump, agility, 20 m speed, repeat speed (8 × 20 m every 20 s), as well as running economy and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). Heart rate (HR), training load (rating of perceived exertion (RPE) × duration), movement patterns and perceptual measures were monitored throughout each training session. Participants completed 2 × 1 h conditioning sessions per week on sand (SAND) or grass (GRASS) surfaces, incorporating interval training, sprint and agility drills, and small-sided games. Results showed a significantly higher (P < 0.05) HR and training load in the SAND versus GRASS group throughout each week of training, plus some moderate effect sizes to suggest lower perceptual ratings of soreness and fatigue on SAND. Significantly greater (P < 0.05) improvements in VO2max were measured for SAND compared to GRASS. These results suggest that substituting sand for grass training surfaces throughout an 8-week conditioning programme can significantly increase the relative exercise intensity and training load, subsequently leading to superior improvements in aerobic fitness.

  4. Mammographic positioning quality of newly trained versus experienced radiographers in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Landsveld-Verhoeven, Cary; den Heeten, Gerard J; Timmers, Janine; Broeders, Mireille J M

    2015-11-01

    Our purpose was to compare mammographic positioning quality of new (NR) versus experienced screening radiographers (ER) in the Netherlands. Before starting to work in breast screening, NR must complete an education programme including a theoretical course (four days), practical training (six weeks), and a portfolio-review of 50 mammographic screening examinations performed by the radiographer. Furthermore, Dutch screening has an extensive system of quality assurance, including an audit-review of positioning quality of mammograms by ER. We analysed 13,520 portfolio views (NR) and 14,896 audit views (ER) based on pre-specified criteria, e.g., depiction of inframammary angle. Overall positioning was more adequate for NR than ER (CC views: 97% versus 86%, p = 0.00; MLO views: 92% versus 84%, p = 0.00). NR scored better for most of the CC-criteria and showed, for instance, less folds (inadequate: 10% versus 16%, p = 0.00). In contrast, NR encountered more difficulties for MLO views in, for example, depiction of infra-mammary angle (inadequate: 38% versus 34%, p = 0.00). Overall, mammograms from NR were more often considered adequate, because of less severe errors. NR perform better than ER in overall positioning technique. These results stress the need for continuous monitoring and training in breast screening programmes to keep positioning skills up to date. • We evaluated positioning quality of new and experienced Dutch screening radiographers. • New radiographers outperform their experienced colleagues in mammographic positioning quality. • New radiographers make less severe errors compared to experienced colleagues. • There is a need for a continuous individual monitoring and feedback system.

  5. Short-term performance effects of three different low-volume strength-training programmes in college male soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brito, João; Vasconcellos, Fabrício; Oliveira, José

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse the short-term performance effects of three in-season low-volume strength-training programmes in college male soccer players. Fifty-seven male college soccer players (age: 20.31.6 years) were randomly assigned to a resistance-training group (n=12), plyometric training...... with the control group (pperformance by 4.6–6.2% (p....001) compared with the control group. No differences were observed in 5-m sprint and agility performances (p>0.05). Overall, the results suggest that in-season low-volume strength training is adequate for developing strength and speed in soccer players....

  6. Class@Baikal: the Endurance of the UNESCO Training-Through-Research Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, A.; Akhmanov, G.; Khlystov, O.; Tokarev, M.; Korost, D. V.; Poort, J.; Fokina, A.; Giliazetdinova, D. R.; Yurchenko, A.; Vodopyanov, S.

    2014-12-01

    In July 2014, by the initiative of the Moscow State University and Limnological Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, the first Training-through-Research Class@Baikal was launched in Lake Baikal, Russia. The cruise program focused on seafloor sampling and acoustic investigations of gas seeps, flares, mud volcanoes, slumps and debris flows, canyons and channels in the coastal proximity. A comprehensive multidisciplinary program to train students has been developed to cover sedimentology, fluid geochemistry, biology, geophysics and marine geology in general. Daily lectures were conducted on board by academics presenting pertinent research projects, and cruise planning and preliminary results were discussed with all the scientific crew. A daily blog with updates on the expedition activities, images, and ongoing cruise results, was also completed (i.e. visit the cruise blog: http://baikal.festivalnauki.ru/) and gave the opportunity to interact with experts as well as attract the interest also of a broader audience. This project is a follow up to the well-established UNESCO Training-through-Research (TTR) Floating University Programme (http://floatinguniversity.ru/) that covered large areas on the European and arctic margins since 1991 with 18 research cruises attended by about 1000 BSc, MSc and PhD students from Europe, Asia, Africa and America. The crucial goal of both programmes is the training of new generations of scientists through active research directly on the field. Students can access the collected data and samples for their Master and PhD projects. Typically an extensive set of analyses and data processing is completed in-house and the results and interpretations are presented at post cruise meetings and international conferences. The Baikal lake is 25 million years old rift zone and provides a large variety of active geological features that can be easily reached at daily sailing distance. This represents an extraordinary opportunity to switch and focus

  7. A dedicated BI-RADS training programme: Effect on the inter-observer variation among screening radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmers, J.M.H., E-mail: j.timmers@lrcb.nl [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, PO Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and HTA, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Doorne-Nagtegaal, H.J. van [Comprehensive Cancer Centre the Netherlands (IKNL), location Amsterdam, PO Box 9236, 1006 AE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verbeek, A.L.M. [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, PO Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and HTA, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Heeten, G.J. den [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, PO Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, PO Box 22660, 100 MD Amsterdam (Netherlands); Broeders, M.J.M. [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, PO Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and HTA, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    Introduction: The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) was introduced in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme to improve communication between medical specialists. Following introduction, a substantial variation in the use of the BI-RADS lexicon for final assessment categories was noted among screening radiologists. We set up a dedicated training programme to reduce this variation. This study evaluates whether this programme was effective. Materials and methods: Two comparable test sets were read before and after completion of the training programme. Each set contained 30 screening mammograms of referred women selected from screening practice. The sets were read by 25 experienced and 30 new screening radiologists. Cohen's kappa (κ) was used to calculate the inter-observer agreement. The BI-RADS 2003 version was implemented in the screening programme as the BI-RADS 2008 version requires the availability of diagnostic work-up, and this is unavailable. Results: The inter-observer agreement of all participating radiologists (n = 55) with the expert panel increased from a pre-training κ-value of 0.44 to a post-training κ-value of 0.48 (p = 0.14). The inter-observer agreement of the new screening radiologists (n = 30) with the expert panel increased from κ = 0.41 to κ = 0.50 (p = 0.01), whereas there was no difference in agreement among the 25 experienced radiologists (from κ = 0.48 to κ = 0.46, p = 0.60). Conclusion: Our training programme in the BI-RADS lexicon resulted in a significant improvement of agreement among new screening radiologists. Overall, the agreement among radiologists was moderate (guidelines Landis and Koch). This is in line with results found in the literature.

  8. The Efficiency of the University Teaching and Learning Training Program (UTL) on Developing the Teaching Competencies of the Teaching Staff at Imam University

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlRweithy, Eman; Alsaleem, Basma Issa

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at presenting the University Teaching and Learning training program UTL and determining the efficiency of the UTL on developing the teaching competencies of the teaching staff at Imam University in Saudi Arabia. The results revealed that there were statistically significant differences between the performance of the training group…

  9. Training in Information Management for Army Brigade and Battalion Staff: Methods and Preliminary Findings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freeman, Jared

    1997-01-01

    .... The instruction focused on selected skills concerning critical thinking and team coordination. The results of a pilot study suggest that training may have beneficial effects on the targeted skills...

  10. E3 Success Story - Whirlpool Trains Staff on Lean and Green Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whirlpool Corporation invited Green Suppliers Network representatives to its Monterrey facility to provide training on the Lean and Green Advantage. The project sought to expand E3 initiatives to every part of the company's operations.

  11. Training of Residential Social Care Staff to Meet the Needs of Older People with Intellectual Disabilities who Develop Age-Related Health Problems: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northway, Ruth; Jenkins, Robert; Holland-Hart, Daniella

    2017-09-01

    Despite awareness of the age related health needs of people with intellectual disabilities little is known regarding how residential social care staff are prepared to meet such needs. Data were gathered via semi-structured interviews from 14 managers of supported living settings. Transcripts were thematically analysed. Staff may work in supported living settings with no prior experience of care work, and previous knowledge/experience of supporting people in relation to their health is not required. Whilst health related training is provided there is a lack of specific training regarding healthy ageing, and training seems to be reactive to changing needs of tenants meaning that proactive monitoring for changes in health status may not occur. Whilst some training is provided for residential social care staff in relation to health and ageing a more proactive approach is required which should include a focus on healthy ageing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Teaching general practitioners and doctors-in-training to discuss advance care planning: evaluation of a brief multimodality education programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detering, Karen; Silvester, William; Corke, Charlie; Milnes, Sharyn; Fullam, Rachael; Lewis, Virginia; Renton, Jodie

    2014-09-01

    To develop and evaluate an interactive advance care planning (ACP) educational programme for general practitioners and doctors-in-training. Development of training materials was overseen by a committee; informed by literature and previous teaching experience. The evaluation assessed participant confidence, knowledge and attitude toward ACP before and after training. Training provided to metropolitan and rural settings in Victoria, Australia. 148 doctors participated in training. The majority were aged at least 40 years with more than 10 years work experience; 63% had not trained in Australia. The programme included prereading, a DVD, interactive patient e-simulation workshop and a training manual. All educational materials followed an evidence-based stepwise approach to ACP: Introducing the topic, exploring concepts, introducing solutions and summarising the conversation. The primary outcome was the change in doctors' self-reported confidence to undertake ACP conversations. Secondary measures included pretest/post-test scores in patient ACP e-simulation, change in ACP knowledge and attitude, and satisfaction with programme materials. 69 participants completed the preworkshop and postworkshop evaluation. Following education, there was a significant change in self-reported confidence in six of eight items (p=0.008 -0.08). There was a significant improvement (p<0.001) in median scores on the e-simulation (pre 7/80, post 60/80). There were no significant differences observed in ACP knowledge following training, and most participants were supportive of patient autonomy and ACP pretraining. Educational materials were rated highly. A short multimodal interactive education programme improves doctors' confidence with ACP and performance on an ACP patient e-simulation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Knowledge and attitudes of nursing staff and mothers towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Data were analysed using CDC Epi Info version 3.3.2, and Microsoft Excel software programmes. The majority of the mothers (83.3%) did not have prior knowledge of KMC. Sixty per cent of the nursing staff did not have any KMC training. The majority of the mothers were committed to KMC, were satisfied with the ...

  14. IMPACT OF CLINICAL OFFICER ANAESTHETIST TRAINING PROGRAMME AT THE KENYA MEDICAL TRAINING COLLEGE, NAKURU, ON TRAINEE SATISFACTION, QUALITY OF PRACTICE, AND CADRE SHORTFALL ALLEVIATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamai, K; Ng'ang'a, P; Mutisya, R

    2013-07-01

    To determine the impact of Clinical Officer (C.O) Anaesthetist Training programme at Kenya Medical Training College (KMTC) Nakuru, on Trainee satisfaction, quality of practice and cadre shortfall alleviation. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Kenya Medical Training College, Nakuru. All thirty one Clinical Officer Anaesthetist graduates from KMTC Nakuru, since the training programme started 8 years ago. Twenty nine of the 31 C.O Anaesthetist graduates responded. Twenty six of the 29 respondents (89.7%) passed in the final qualifying examination in the first sitting. Twenty one (72.4%) are working in Public health facilities. All graduates are distributed in 16 out of the 47 counties in Kenya. Twenty six (89.7%) are satisfied with the training. Their average working week is 54 hours, with a median of 45 working hours a week. They recommend an improvement in peripheral nerve blocks and epidural training in the 2005 curriculum. C.O Anaesthetist training in KMTC Nakuru over the last eight years has produced self reported satisfied, adequately trained graduates and has had an impact in alleviating shortage of this cadre in Kenya. Improvement in peripheral nerve blocks and epidural training is needed.

  15. Capacity building for critical care training delivery: Development and evaluation of the Network for Improving Critical care Skills Training (NICST) programme in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Tim; De Silva, A Pubudu; Beane, Abi; Welch, John; Sigera, Chathurani; De Alwis, Sunil; Athapattu, Priyantha; Dharmagunawardene, Dilantha; Peiris, Lalitha; Siriwardana, Somalatha; Abeynayaka, Ashoka; Jayasinghe, Kosala Saroj Amarasena; Mahipala, Palitha G; Dondorp, Arjen; Haniffa, Rashan

    2017-04-01

    To deliver and evaluate a short critical care nurse training course whilst simultaneously building local training capacity. A multi-modal short course for critical care nursing skills was delivered in seven training blocks, from 06/2013-11/2014. Each training block included a Train the Trainer programme. The project was evaluated using Kirkpatrick's Hierarchy of Learning. There was a graded hand over of responsibility for course delivery from overseas to local faculty between 2013 and 2014. Sri Lanka. Participant learning assessed through pre/post course Multi-Choice Questionnaires. A total of 584 nurses and 29 faculty were trained. Participant feedback was consistently positive and each course demonstrated a significant increase (p≤0.0001) in MCQ scores. There was no significant difference MCQ scores (p=0.186) between overseas faculty led and local faculty led courses. In a relatively short period, training with good educational outcomes was delivered to nearly 25% of the critical care nursing population in Sri Lanka whilst simultaneously building a local faculty of trainers. Through use of a structured Train the Trainer programme, course outcomes were maintained following the handover of training responsibility to Sri Lankan faculty. The focus on local capacity building increases the possibility of long term course sustainability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Testing a computer-based ostomy care training resource for staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Isabel

    2010-05-01

    Fragmented teaching and ostomy care provided by nonspecialized clinicians unfamiliar with state-of-the-art care and products have been identified as problems in teaching ostomy care to the new ostomate. After conducting a literature review of theories and concepts related to the impact of nurse behaviors and confidence on ostomy care, the author developed a computer-based learning resource and assessed its effect on staff nurse confidence. Of 189 staff nurses with a minimum of 1 year acute-care experience employed in the acute care, emergency, and rehabilitation departments of an acute care facility in the Midwestern US, 103 agreed to participate and returned completed pre- and post-tests, each comprising the same eight statements about providing ostomy care. F and P values were computed for differences between pre- and post test scores. Based on a scale where 1 = totally disagree and 5 = totally agree with the statement, baseline confidence and perceived mean knowledge scores averaged 3.8 and after viewing the resource program post-test mean scores averaged 4.51, a statistically significant improvement (P = 0.000). The largest difference between pre- and post test scores involved feeling confident in having the resources to learn ostomy skills independently. The availability of an electronic ostomy care resource was rated highly in both pre- and post testing. Studies to assess the effects of increased confidence and knowledge on the quality and provision of care are warranted.

  17. 2003 - 2004 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME: 2nd Term - 12 January to 31 March 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 12, 13, 14 January Microelectronics and Nanoelectronics: Trends, and Applications to HEP Instrumentation by P. Jarron / CERN-EP 2, 3, 4 February Quantum Teleportation : Principles and Applications by N. Gisin / Univ. of Geneva, CH 16, 17, 18, 19, 20 February Physics of Extra Dimensions by V. Rubakov / Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, RU 1, 2, 3, 4, March Physics of Shower Simulation at LHC at the Example of GEANT4 by J.P. Wellisch / CERN-EP 8, 9, 11, 12 March Introduction to Cryogenic Engineering by H. Quack / Technische Universität Dresden, D 22, 23, 24, 25, 26 March Neutrinos By Y. Nir / Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, IL LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS 29, 30, 31 March, 1, 2 April Physics beyond the Standard Model by L. Ibanez / CERN-TH The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any chang...

  18. 2003 - 2004 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME: 2nd Term - 12 January to 31 March 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 12, 13, 14 January Microelectronics and Nanoelectronics: Trends, and Applications to HEP Instrumentation by P. Jarron / CERN-EP 2, 3, 4 February Quantum Teleportation : Principles and Applications by N. Gisin / Univ. of Geneva, CH 16, 17, 18, 19, 20 February Physics of Extra Dimensions by V. Rubakov / Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, RU 1, 2, 3, 4, March Physics of Shower Simulation at LHC at the Example of GEANT4 by J.P. Wellisch / CERN-EP 8, 9, 11, 12 March Introduction to Cryogenic Engineering by H. Quack / Technische Universität Dresden, D 22, 23, 24, 25, 26 March Neutrinos By Y. Nir / Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, IL LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS 29, 30, 31 March, 1, 2 April Physics beyond the Standard Model by L. Ibanez / CERN-TH The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to...

  19. The effect of a clinical pharmacist-led training programme on intravenous medication errors : a controlled before and after study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Huong; Pham, Hong-Tham; Vo, Dang-Khoa; Nguyen, Tuan-Dung; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Taxis, Katja

    Background Little is known about interventions to reduce intravenous medication administration errors in hospitals, especially in low-and middle-income countries. Objective To assess the effect of a clinical pharmacist-led training programme on clinically relevant errors during intravenous

  20. Evaluating a Research Training Programme for People with Intellectual Disabilities Participating in Inclusive Research: The Views of Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullana, Judit; Pallisera, Maria; Català, Elena; Puyalto, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Background: This article presents the results of evaluating a research training programme aimed at developing the skills of people with intellectual disabilities to actively participate in inclusive research. Methods: The present authors opted for a responsive approach to evaluation, using a combination of interviews, questionnaires and focus…

  1. An economic evaluation of a proprioceptive balance board training programme for the prevention of ankle sprains in volleyball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, E.A.L.M.; Tulder, van M.; Beek, van der A.J.; Bouter, L.M.; Mechelen, van W.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the cost effectiveness of a proprioceptive balance board training programme for the prevention of ankle sprains in volleyball. METHODS: A total of 116 volleyball teams participated in this study which was carried out during the 2001-2002 volleyball season. Teams were randomly

  2. A Longitudinal Investigation of the Preservice Science Teachers' Beliefs about Science Teaching during a Science Teacher Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldur, Serkan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to investigate the changes in preservice science teachers' beliefs about science teaching during a science teacher training programme. The study was designed as a panel study, and the data were collected from the same participants at the end of each academic year during a four-year period. The participants…

  3. Effects of a Short Teacher Training Programme on the Management of Children's Sexual Behaviours: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnaud, Jean-Paul; Turner, William

    2015-01-01

    This small-scale quasi-experimental study set out to examine the effects of a brief training programme aiming to develop primary school teachers' knowledge, attitudes and confidence in recognising and responding to children who display sexual behaviours. Data on prevalence of sexual behaviours observed by teachers in the study, their level of…

  4. Effects of Self-Efficacy Training Programmes on Adolescents' Sexual Risk-Taking Behaviour in Oyo State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Titilayo Monsurat

    2017-01-01

    Adolescents' sexual risk-taking behavioural issues have generated concerns among parents, teachers and social workers. The study examined the effects of self-efficacy training programmes on adolescents' sexual risk-taking behaviour and also investigated whether socio-economic status and gender would moderate the effects of treatment on sexual…

  5. Hypnosis-Induced Mental Training Programmes as a Strategy to Improve the Self-Concept of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, H. M.; Louw, D. A.

    2009-01-01

    The creation and implementation of strategies that could improve student development is receiving new research interest. The main objective of the research was to establish whether hypnosis-induced mental training programmes as a strategy could alter the self-concept of students which in turn could improve their overall academic functioning. Two…

  6. The Effect of Using a Multiple Intelligences-Based Training Programme on Developing English Majors' Oral Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mahmoud Mohammad Sayed

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of using a Multiple Intelligences-Based Training Programme on developing first-year English majors' oral communication skills. Based on literature review and related studies, a list of 20 oral communication skills was prepared and displayed over a panel of jury members to select…

  7. Do women with pelvic floor dysfunction referred by gynaecologists and urologists at hospitals complete a pelvic floor muscle training programme?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2013-01-01

    For decades women with pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) have been referred to pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), but there is only little information on whether the women complete the programmes and why. The objectives of this study were to investigate to which extent women completed a PFMT...

  8. The Training of Technical Staff in Libyan Industrial Companies: Issues in Traning Needs Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shibani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available By implementing Training Needs Analysis (TNA, organisations can improve the training need identification process and minimise the influence of social factors on nominations for training; such as kinship and friendship, which makes the managers exercised mediation "wasta" and favouritism when they perform their tasks. Therefore, paper presents the results of an investigation into current TNA practice in Libyan industrial companies (LICs, including the barriers that prevent its successful implementation and how it might be improved. A qualitative approach was adopted in collecting data by means of semi-structured interviews with 17 senior managers in two selected companies. The findings show that training needs are mostly identified through an analysis at the individual level only and that no consideration is given to organisational or operational levels. The paper contributes to existing knowledge on the application and effectiveness of TNA in industrial sectors by specifically investigating the implementation of TNA in the Libyan industrial context; it offers ideas and insights to those responsible for training in LICs to improve their understanding of the role of TNA and how they can manage the TNA process to help develop their employees.

  9. Training degree assessment of staff producing parenteral nutrition in Pharmacy Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Mª Romero Jiménez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the level of expertise of Pharmacy personnel in the manufacturing of total parenteral nutrition. Material and methods: An on-line survey including 17 questions concerning key aspects of TPN manufacturing was designed. Survey monkey software was used to create the survey and to analize its results. Results: 135 answers were received. 95% of the participant Pharmacy services had written standard manufacturing procedures. 67% answered that phosphate salts should be the first electrolite to be additioned into the total parenteral nutrition and 34% affirmed that validation of the aseptic manufacturing technique was not performed. As far as personnel training was concerned, 19% of respondents had not received any specific training, although 99% considered it would be necessary to receive it. Conclusions: The polled personell has an acceptable level of expertise but adequate training courses are still necessary and should be promoted from Pharmacy services

  10. Effect of a self-efficacy promotion training programme on the body weight changes in patients undergoing haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliasgharpour, Mansooreh; Shomali, Maryam; Moghaddam, Masoumeh Zakeri; Faghihzadeh, Sograt

    2012-09-01

    Haemodialysis is the most common form of medical management of patients affected by end-stage renal disease (ESRD). For haemodialysis to be successful, strict fluid and weight control is recommended. Education, in terms of self-care activities, is an important intervention for improving patients' outcomes. A self-efficacy promotion training programme can be an effective strategy to bring about behavioural change. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a self-efficacy promotion training programme on the body weight changes in patients undergoing haemodialysis. In this single-blind quasi-experimental study, we recruited a convenience sample of 63 patients undergoing haemodialy-sis from two teaching hospitals and allocated them randomly to the experimental or control group. Patients in the experimental group received a six-session self-efficacy promotion training programme while the control group received the routine care of the institute. Mean body weight gain and self-efficacy were measured before, immediately and two months after the study. The groups did not differ significantly regarding the study variable before the study. However, immediately and two months after the study, the mean body weight gain and self-efficacy in the experimental group were significantly lower and higher, respectively, than the control group (p < 0.05). Implementing a self-efficacy promotion training programme is effective in decreasing weight gain and increasing self-efficacy in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Nurses in haemodialysis units can use self-efficacy promotion training programmes as an effective intervention for improving patients' outcomes. © 2012 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  11. Food production and wastage in relation to nutritional intake in a general district hospital - wastage is not reduced by training the staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, T.; Viggers, L.; Beck, Anne Marie

    2003-01-01

    Background and Aims: To assess the amount of food produced in a hospital kitchen and the amount wasted. To assess the amount of food eaten by patients in relation to their energy needs. To assess whether the food production and wastage could be reduced by training members of the staff. Methods...... a reorganization of nutrition in hospitals, so that this is made the responsibility of specific staff members...

  12. Benefits of Exercise Training For Computer-Based Staff: A Meta Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mothna Mohammed

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Office workers sit down to work for approximately 8 hours a day and, as a result, many of them do not have enough time for any form of physical exercise. This can lead to musculoskeletal discomforts, especially low back pain and recently, many researchers focused on home/office-based exercise training for prevention/treatment of low back pain among this population. Objective: This Meta analyses paper tried to discuss about the latest suggested exercises for the office workers based on the mechanisms and theories behind low back pain among office workers. Method: In this Meta analyses the author tried to collect relevant papers which were published previously on the subject. Google Scholar, Scopus, and PubMed were used as sources to find the articles. Only articles that were published using the same methodology, including office workers, musculoskeletal discomforts, low back pain, and exercise training keywords, were selected. Studies that failed to report sufficient sample statistics, or lacked a substantial review of past academic scholarship and/or clear methodologies, were excluded. Results: Limited evidence regarding the prevention of, and treatment methods for, musculoskeletal discomfort, especially those in the low back, among office workers, is available. The findings showed that training exercises had a significant effect (p<0.05 on low back pain discomfort scores and decreased pain levels in response to office-based exercise training. Conclusion: Office-based exercise training can affect pain/discomfort scores among office workers through positive effects on flexibility and strength of muscles. As such, it should be suggested to occupational therapists as a practical way for the treatment/prevention of low back pain among office workers.

  13. A theory evaluation of an induction programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenrick Hendricks

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: An induction programme is commonly used to help new employees understand their job within the organisation. Research purpose: The main aim of this study was to examine whether or not the programme theory of an induction programme was plausible and would lead to the intended outcomes as described by the programme manager.Motivation for the study: Induction training is one of the most common training programmes in an organisation. However, there is little research to evaluate whether or not the activities of an induction programme will lead to the intended outcomes of such a programme.Research design, approach and method: This theory evaluation used a descriptive design. One hundred and thirteen employees of a media company completed a ten-item, five-point Likert scale which measured their perceptions of the programme’s outcome, identification with the organisation and intentions to stay with the organisation.Main findings: From this theory evaluation it was apparent that an induction programme based on an implausible programme theory could be problematic. An implausible programme theory affects the design of the programme activities and unsuitable activities may not deliver the desired outcomes.Practical/managerial implications: The intention of the evaluation is to guide human resource managers through a process of replacing an implausible programme theory with one that is plausible, and which ensures better alignment of programme activities and outcomes.Contribution/value-add: The evaluators showed how a plausible programme theory could improve programme design. This redesigned induction programme may lead to benefits, such as staff retention and company identification, rather than the vague assumption that it has been conforming to a legal obligation.

  14. Outcomes of a virtual-reality simulator-training programme on basic surgical skills in robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phé, Véronique; Cattarino, Susanna; Parra, Jérôme; Bitker, Marc-Olivier; Ambrogi, Vanina; Vaessen, Christophe; Rouprêt, Morgan

    2017-06-01

    The utility of the virtual-reality robotic simulator in training programmes has not been clearly evaluated. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of a virtual-reality robotic simulator-training programme on basic surgical skills. A simulator-training programme in robotic surgery, using the da Vinci Skills Simulator, was evaluated in a population including junior and seasoned surgeons, and non-physicians. Their performances on robotic dots and suturing-skin pod platforms before and after virtual-simulation training were rated anonymously by surgeons experienced in robotics. 39 participants were enrolled: 14 medical students and residents in surgery, 14 seasoned surgeons, 11 non-physicians. Junior and seasoned surgeons' performances on platforms were not significantly improved after virtual-reality robotic simulation in any of the skill domains, in contrast to non-physicians. The benefits of virtual-reality simulator training on several tasks to basic skills in robotic surgery were not obvious among surgeons in our initial and early experience with the simulator. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. An education and training programme for radiological institutes: impact on the reduction of the CT radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindera, Sebastian T.; Allmen, Gabriel von; Vock, Peter; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt [University of Berne, University Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Berne, Berne (Switzerland); Treier, Reto; Trueb, Philipp R. [Federal Office of Public Health, Radiation Protection Division, Berne (Switzerland); Nauer, Claude [University of Berne, University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, University Hospital Berne, Berne (Switzerland)

    2011-10-15

    To establish an education and training programme for the reduction of CT radiation doses and to assess this programme's efficacy. Ten radiological institutes were counselled. The optimisation programme included a small group workshop and a lecture on radiation dose reduction strategies. The radiation dose used for five CT protocols (paranasal sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary angiography and abdomen) was assessed using the dose-length product (DLP) before and after the optimisation programme. The mean DLP values were compared with national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). The average reduction of the DLP after optimisation was 37% for the sinuses (180 vs. 113 mGycm, P < 0.001), 9% for the brain (982 vs. 896 mGycm, P < 0.05), 24% for the chest (425 vs. 322 mGycm, P < 0.05) and 42% for the pulmonary arteries (352 vs. 203 mGycm, P < 0.001). No significant change in DLP was found for abdominal CT. The post-optimisation DLP values of the sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary arteries and abdomen were 68%, 10%, 20%, 55% and 15% below the DRL, respectively. The education and training programme for radiological institutes is effective in achieving a substantial reduction in CT radiation dose. (orig.)

  16. [The system of selection and training of military-medical staff for the 40th army (1979-1989)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabinkin, V V

    2015-10-01

    In December 1979 in order to fulfil their internationalist duty troops and units of the 40th Army of the Armed Forces of the USSR was brought into Afghanistan. For complete and qualitative manning of the army with the military doctors it was needed in a short time to create a system capable to carry out candidates selection, their education and specialized training for work in extreme conditions of combat operations. This system was created in a short time. The article presents information about its features, advantages and problems that had to be solved during the entire period of the Soviet-Afghan war. The complex staff arrangements had allowed solving medical support problems of the 40th Army on the high level.

  17. A training programme to build cancer research capacity in low- and middle-income countries: findings from Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Lauren D; Barnoya, Joaquin; Gharzouzi, Eduardo N; Benson, Peter; Colditz, Graham A

    2014-04-01

    Guatemala is experiencing an increasing burden of cancer but lacks capacity for cancer prevention, control and research. In partnership with a medical school in the United States of America, a multidisciplinary Cancer Control Research Training Institute was developed at the Instituto de Cancerología (INCAN) in Guatemala City. This institute provided a year-long training programme for clinicians that focused on research methods in population health and sociocultural anthropology. The programme included didactic experiences in Guatemala and the United States as well as applied training in which participants developed research protocols responsive to Guatemala's cancer needs. Although INCAN is the point of referral and service for Guatemala's cancer patients, the institute's administration is also interested in increasing cancer research - with a focus on population health. INCAN is thus a resource for capacity building within the context of cancer prevention and control. Trainees increased their self-efficacy for the design and conduct of research. Value-added benefits included establishment of an annual cancer seminar and workshops in cancer pathology and qualitative analysis. INCAN has recently incorporated some of the programme's components into its residency training and established a research department. A training programme for clinicians can build cancer research capacity in low- and middle-income countries. Training in population-based research methods will enable countries such as Guatemala to gather country-specific data. Once collected, such data can be used to assess the burden of cancer-related disease, guide policy for reducing it and identify priority areas for cancer prevention and treatment.

  18. Importance of staff training in hotel industry Case Study: Hotel Dukagjini

    OpenAIRE

    MSc. Albana Gazija

    2011-01-01

    In every business, independently of the activity, human resources are the most precious capital. In terms of global competition and rapid change, personnel training are essential. Every manager should be able to attract qualified and capable personnel, in order to use their skills in achieving organizational objectives. In a market economy where uncertainty is rather widespread, obtaining knowledge and information is becoming a source for creating competing advantages. One of the most imp...

  19. Exploring Staff Clinical Knowledge and Practice with LGBT Residents in Long-Term Care: A Grounded Theory of Cultural Competency and Training Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Weston V; Vacha-Haase, Tammi

    2016-01-01

    Existing literature shows that LGBT residents are likely to face suboptimal care in LTC facilities due to prejudice and discriminatory policies. The aim of this project was to assess the LGBT cultural competency of staff working in LTC facilities, identify their current training needs, and develop a framework for understanding LGBT cultural competency among LTC staff and providers. This grounded theory study comprised data from focus groups of interdisciplinary staff from three LTC facilities. Results suggested that LTC staff struggle with how to be sensitive to LGBT residents' needs. Tension appeared to exist between wanting to provide an equal standard of care to all LTC residents and fearing they would show "favoritism" or "special treatment," which might be viewed as unprofessional. Participants indicated training could help to address the ambivalence they experience about providing sensitive care to subpopulations of residents who face stigma and oppression. LTC staff stand to benefit from cultural competency training focused on LGBT residents. Training should be not only informational in nature, but also facilitate greater self-awareness and self-efficacy with respect to providing care to LGBT people.

  20. A combined intervention to reduce interruptions during medication preparation and double-checking: a pilot-study evaluating the impact of staff training and safety vests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckels-Baumgart, Saskia; Niederberger, Milena; Manser, Tanja; Meier, Christoph R; Meyer-Massetti, Carla

    2017-10-01

    The aim was to evaluate the impact of staff training and wearing safety vests as a combined intervention on interruptions during medication preparation and double-checking. Interruptions and errors during the medication process are common and an important issue for patient safety in the hospital setting. We performed a pre- and post-intervention pilot-study using direct structured observation of 26 nurses preparing and double-checking 431 medication doses (225 pre-intervention and 206 post-intervention) for 36 patients (21 pre-intervention and 15 post-intervention). With staff training and the introduction of safety vests, the interruption rate during medication preparation was reduced from 36.8 to 28.3 interruptions per hour and during double-checking from 27.5 to 15 interruptions per hour. This pilot-study showed that the frequency of interruptions decreased during the critical tasks of medication preparation and double-checking after the introduction of staff training and wearing safety vests as part of a quality improvement process. Nursing management should acknowledge interruptions as an important factor potentially influencing medication safety. Unnecessary interruptions can be successfully reduced by considering human and system factors and increasing both staff and nursing managers' awareness of 'interruptive communication practices' and implementing physical barriers. This is the first pilot-study specifically evaluating the impact of staff training and wearing safety vests on the reduction of interruptions during medication preparation and double-checking. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Effects of a 12 Week SAQ Training Programme on Agility with and without the Ball among Young Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanović, Zoran; Sporiš, Goran; Trajković, Nebojša; James, Nic; Samija, Krešimir

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 12 week conditioning programme involving speed, agility and quickness (SAQ) training and its effect on agility performance in young soccer players. Soccer players were randomly assigned to two groups: experimental group (EG; n = 66, body mass: 71.3 ± 5.9 kg; body height: 1.77 ± 0.07 m) and control group (CG; n = 66, body mass: 70.6 ± 4.9 kg; body height: 1.76 ± 0.06 m). Agility performance was assessed using field tests: Slalom; Slalom with ball; Sprint with 90° turns; Sprint with 90° turns with ball; Sprint with 180° turns; Sprint with backward and forward running; Sprint 4 x 5 m. Statistically significant improvements (p agility, with and without the ball, with the exception being the Sprint with backward and forward running. This suggests that SAQ training is an effective way of improving agility, with and without the ball, for young soccer players and can be included in physical conditioning programmes. Key pointsSAQ training appears to be an effective way of improving agility with and without the ball in young soccer playersSoccer coaches could use this training during pre-season and in-season trainingCompared with pre-training, there was a statistically significant improvement in all but one measure of agility, both with and without the ball after SAQ training.

  2. Effectiveness of a structured education reminiscence-based programme for staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units: a study protocol for a cluster randomised trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Shea, Eamon

    2011-02-01

    Current projections indicate that there will be a significant increase in the number of people with dementia in Ireland, from approximately 40,000 at present to 100,000 by 2036. Psychosocial interventions, such as reminiscence, have the potential to improve the quality of life of people with dementia. However, while reminiscence is used widely in dementia care, its impact on the quality of life of people with dementia remains largely undocumented and there is a need for a robust and fair assessment of its overall effectiveness. The DementiA education programme incorporating REminiscence for Staff study will evaluate the effectiveness of a structured reminiscence-based education programme for care staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units.

  3. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. The role of quality management, hardware certification and accredited training in PV programmes in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, M. C. [Institute for Sustainable Power, Highlands Ranch, CO (United States); Oldach, R.; Bates, J. [IT Power Ltd, The Manor house, Chineham (United Kingdom)

    2003-09-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the role of quality management, hardware certification and accredited training in PV programmes in developing countries. The objective of this document is to provide assistance to those project developers that are interested in implementing or improving support programmes for the deployment of PV systems for rural electrification. It is to enable them to address and implement quality assurance measures, with an emphasis on management, technical and training issues and other factors that should be considered for the sustainable implementation of rural electrification programmes. It is considered important that quality also addresses the socio-economic and the socio-technical aspects of a programme concept. The authors summarise that, for a PV programme, there are three important areas of quality control to be implemented: quality management, technical standards and quality of training.

  4. EFFECT OF THE CERVICAL ENDURANCE TRAINING PROGRAMME IN MECHANICAL NECK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjal Gogoi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mechanical neck pain commonly arises insidiously and is generally multifactorial in origin. Regardless of the primary source of pain, the prognosis for individual experiencing chronic neck pain is poor. Exercise interventions are important for effective management of patients with neck pain.the objective of the study is to compare the efficacy of cervical endurance training programme with cervical isometric exercise in alleviating symptoms of mechanical neck pain. Methods: 40 subjects were assessed and identified with Mechanical Neck Pain and recruited for the study and were randomly divided into two groups. In one group endurance training for cervical muscles and in another group resisted isometric had been given for 3 weeks. The post treatment scores regarding endurance, pain intensity, disability, Range of motion and muscle power were compared with the pre treatment scores. Results: Paired‘t’ test was done to compare the pretreatment scores with the post treatment scores .Unpaired ‘t’ test was done to compare the post treatment scores of both the groups. The pain intensity, disability were found to be significantly decreased in experimental group than the control group (p<0.001. While the endurance was found to be significantly increased in experimental group than the control group (p < 0.001. The muscle power was found to be slightly increased in the control group than the experimental group .The post treatment cervical range of motion does not have significant difference in between the groups (Flexion- p=0.35 and Extension-p=0.40. Conclusion: This study showed that the progressive endurance exercise is beneficial in alleviating mechanical neck pain and should be incorporated along with the conventional physiotherapy treatment for mechanical neck pain.

  5. [Medical university teaching staff training for formation of communicative competence in dentists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopanova, E V; Lomiashvili, L M

    2015-01-01

    Psychology and pedagogical preparation provides improvement of the ability of psychological interaction with the patient, promotes deepening of constructive cooperation between them. It facilitates collecting and analysis of clinical data and has direct impact on efficiency of treatment and prophylactic actions. Formation of communicative competence becomes one of key problems of continuous medical education. Introduction of the Medical Communication module in the program of professional development will provide modern technologies of training in technics of active hearing, effective communication, adjustment of contact, feedback, behavior in a stress situation.

  6. Balance training in individuals with Parkinson's disease: Therapist-supervised vs. home-based exercise programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atterbury, Elizabeth Maria; Welman, Karen Estelle

    2017-06-01

    Poor locomotion and balance in Parkinson's disease (PD) often diminishes independence. Accordingly, gait is considered one of the most relevant rehabilitation outcomes, and home-based balance exercises might be a viable mode of exercise delivery for individuals with PD. However, research on PD interventions rarely indicate best practices to deliver exercises. Therefore, this study endeavoured to compare the efficacy of a home-based and therapist-supervised balance programme on gait parameters, dynamic balance, balance confidence and motivation in individuals diagnosed with PD. An experimental study design, including a cluster randomized convenience sample, of 40 participants with idiopathic PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage I-III; age: 65.0±7.7years). Participants were divided into a therapist-supervised (n=24) and home-based group (n=16). Groups received either eight weeks of balance training with an exercise therapist or a DVD. Outcome measures include the instrumented Timed-Up-and-Go, Functional Gait Analysis (FGA), Activity-specific Balance confidence (ABC) scale and Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI). Both groups improved in stride length (pexercise therapist included somewhat more benefits after the intervention i.e. stride velocity and cadence in individuals with mild to moderate PD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. New Master’s Programme in Educational Psychology: Training Future Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egorova M.A.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents main results of the project implemented within the framework of the State Contract of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation No. 05.043.12.0018 of 23 may 2014 aimed at developing a set of academic materials for the master’s programme in School Psychology. The article explains the methodological principles underlying the design of academic courses in higher education (master’s degree level fulfilling the requirements of activity- and competency-based approaches to the professional training of psychologists for modern schools. Particular emphasis is placed on organizing the educational process in a way that ensures the formation of competencies in students necessary for their work as qualified school counselors as defined by the professional standard. The article argues that it also is appropriate to organize teaching and learning in modules given that the content of modules correspond with the key professional skills of the school psychologist. The advantages of network interaction between partner organizations for the development of professional competencies in students are described as well.

  8. [Breast-feeding training for the nursing staff at the General Hospital of Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Garduño, A G; de la Rosa-Ruiz, L

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the change of knowledge in nurses attending an eighteen-hour lactation course at the General Hospital of Mexico. The study was conducted from May 1996 to May 1997 and consisted of a breastfeeding training course and pre and post-test course evaluations of nurse participants. One-hundred-and-forty out of 152 nurses were trained and evaluated. Statistical analysis consisted of a paired t-test and analysis of variance. Of 152 nurses attending the course, 140 (92%) completed pre and post-course evaluations. Global results of pre and post-tests were 5.39 +/- 1.37 and 7.74 +/- 0.79, (p < 0.001). The difference was still significant after we compared the instruction level of participants. There was a trend towards a higher level of instruction among those with higher knowledge on lactation in the post-course evaluation (p = 0.004). An 18-hour course given to nurses significantly increased in knowledge on lactation.

  9. Perceptions of the impact of an advanced training programme on the management skills of health professionals in Gauteng, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mutyabule

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. South Africa’s health sector spans the private and the public sectors. Within the sectors, health managers take on strategic leadership roles without formal training in management or leadership – a trend more common in the public sector than the private sector. Health managers are selected based on their clinical skills rather than their leadership or management skills. Objective. To compare self-rated competencies in management and leadership before and after training of the participants; to assess participants’ experience of the training programme; and to evaluate the management and leadership skills of the participants after training. Methods. A cross-sectional, descriptive analytical method and 360° interviewing were used in this study. Participants were evaluated ~18 months after completion of the training programme. A 360° evaluation (360° E of six of the 12 leadership/management competencies was done with the supervisors, colleagues, and subordinates of the participants. Results. All participants rated themselves as improved in 12 managerial and leadership competencies. The 360° E affirmed five of these competencies as improved, with the ability to create and implement a marketing plan rating poorly. Conclusion. Training in management leads to improvement in both leadership and managerial skills of health professionals.

  10. Technical Staff Training at the Ural Private Mining Plants in the First Part of the XIX Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Dashkevitch

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the level and quality of employees’ technical training at the private factories in the Ural region in the pre-reform period of the XIX century, which appears to be one of the least explored aspects in the history of education. Analyzing the existing data and preserved documents, the author attempts to fill the above gaps and demonstrates the dynamics of the private schools development in the factory settlements of the region, their curricula and the government’s attitude to the issue of the factory serfs’ training. The research findings reveal that despite the government’s resistance the number of educated professionals and technicians was gradu- ally increasing in the first half of the XIX century. It was especially noticeable in the large private factories owned by the Demidovs, Stroganoffs and Vsevolozhskys. In the middle of the century, the expertise and skills of the top and senior managerial and technical staff had met the existing requirements. However, the top managers and factory owners anticipated the forthcoming changes in the personnel policy due to the engineering and industrial development in the last half of the century. 

  11. Technical Staff Training at the Ural Private Mining Plants in the First Part of the XIX Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Dashkevitch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the level and quality of employees’ technical training at the private factories in the Ural region in the pre-reform period of the XIX century, which appears to be one of the least explored aspects in the history of education. Analyzing the existing data and preserved documents, the author attempts to fill the above gaps and demonstrates the dynamics of the private schools development in the factory settlements of the region, their curricula and the government’s attitude to the issue of the factory serfs’ training. The research findings reveal that despite the government’s resistance the number of educated professionals and technicians was gradu- ally increasing in the first half of the XIX century. It was especially noticeable in the large private factories owned by the Demidovs, Stroganoffs and Vsevolozhskys. In the middle of the century, the expertise and skills of the top and senior managerial and technical staff had met the existing requirements. However, the top managers and factory owners anticipated the forthcoming changes in the personnel policy due to the engineering and industrial development in the last half of the century. 

  12. The Beck Initiative: Training School-Based Mental Health Staff in Cognitive Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrey A. Creed

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A growing literature supports cognitive therapy (CT as an efficacious treatment for youth struggling with emotional or behavioral problems. Recently, work in this area has extended the dissemination of CT to school-based settings. The current study has two aims: 1 to examine the development of therapists’ knowledge and skills in CT, an evidence-based approach to promoting student well-being, and 2 to examine patterns of narrative feedback provided to therapists participating in the program. As expected, school therapists trained in CT demonstrated significant gains in their knowledge of CT theory and in their demonstration of CT skills, with the majority of therapists surpassing the accepted threshold of competency in CT. In addition, an examination of feedback content suggested that narrative feedback provided to therapists most frequently consisted of positive feedback and instructions for future sessions. Suggestions for future research regarding dissemination of CT are discussed in light of increasing broad access to evidence based practices.

  13. New dimensions in surgical training: immersive virtual reality laparoscopic simulation exhilarates surgical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Tobias; Paschold, Markus; Hansen, Christian; Wunderling, Tom; Lang, Hauke; Kneist, Werner

    2017-11-01

    Virtual reality (VR) and head mount displays (HMDs) have been advanced for multimedia and information technologies but have scarcely been used in surgical training. Motion sickness and individual psychological changes have been associated with VR. The goal was to observe first experiences and performance scores using a new combined highly immersive virtual reality (IVR) laparoscopy setup. During the study, 10 members of the surgical department performed three tasks (fine dissection, peg transfer, and cholecystectomy) on a VR simulator. We then combined a VR HMD with the VR laparoscopic simulator and displayed the simulation on a 360° video of a laparoscopic operation to create an IVR laparoscopic simulation. The tasks were then repeated. Validated questionnaires on immersion and motion sickness were used for the study. Participants' times for fine dissection were significantly longer during the IVR session (regular: 86.51 s [62.57 s; 119.62 s] vs. IVR: 112.35 s [82.08 s; 179.40 s]; p = 0.022). The cholecystectomy task had higher error rates during IVR. Motion sickness did not occur at any time for any participant. Participants experienced a high level of exhilaration, rarely thought about others in the room, and had a high impression of presence in the generated IVR world. This is the first clinical and technical feasibility study using the full IVR laparoscopy setup combined with the latest laparoscopic simulator in a 360° surrounding. Participants were exhilarated by the high level of immersion. The setup enables a completely new generation of surgical training.

  14. THEORY AND PRACTICE OF RHYTHM IN THE PROFESSIONAL TRAINING SYSTEM FOR ATHLETES AND TEACHING STAFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Aftimichuk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background . Rhythm is important for the implementation of all processes as in nature and in living organisms. It organizes motor human activity making it more productive and rational. On teaching working and sports motions the process of the impellent work correct rhythm assimilation plays an important role because it determines the movement performance optimum that is shown in its automation process reduction. As a result, man’s physical strength and nervous energy are saved. Rhythm category acquires a special status for the physical training specialist. All his activity including the motor component depends on the rhythm. The aim of the research is to study the physiology of rhythm and justify the more efficient training process for future teachers and coaches. Methods . The following theoretical research methods were used: the abstract and axiomatic methods, analysis and synthesis, induction and deduction, idealization, comparison and generalization. Results. As a result of study of materials from the natural sciences, numerology, psychology, music, cybernetics, synergetic, physiology, was found that the change of different states, as in nature and in living organisms, is an undulating rhythmic character. Physiological basis of the same rhythm is dynamic change excitation and inhibition processes occurring in the central nervous system. In this paper features of rhythm were identified. To accelerate the assimilation of motor action rational rhythm it is necessary to develop a sense of rhythm which is successfully formed in during the musical-motor activities. Conclusions. For today the study of the rhythm phenomenon in professional preparation on physical education and sport, in our opinion, requires the further study. Adding exercises involving certain motor skills elements similar in rhythmic structure with professional and technical actions to the coaches and teachers education and the competitive technology formation should be

  15. Effects of a small-sided game-based training programme on repeated sprint and change of direction abilities in recreationally-trained football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujalance-Moreno, Pascual; García-Pinillos, Felipe; Latorre-Román, Pedro Á

    2017-02-21

    To examine the effects of 6-week periodized small-sided game (SSG) training intervention on change of direction [COD], sprint and repeated sprint ability [RSA] in recreational male football players. Twenty-three young football players (age: 20.86 years) were randomized in a control group (n = 11) and an experimental group (n = 12). The SSG programme was included in the experimental group's training sessions. The players completed two variations of a SSG (i.e. 2 vs. 2 and 4 vs. 4 players) during intervention. To examine the changes in physical performance after the 6-week periodized SSG training intervention, all players were tested 6 weeks apart (i.e. pre-test and post-test) in sprint, COD ability test, and RSA shuttle test. A 2x2 ANOVA showed that 6-week SSG training intervention induced significant improvements (P0.7) in COD ability test, and variables related to both sprint test and RSA in the experimental group, whereas the control group remained unchanged (P≥0.05, ESRSA test - in terms of BLa, both the experimental group (P=0.001, ES=1.270) and the control group (P=0.010, ES=0.939) increased BLa after the intervention. The current study indicates that a 6-week SSG-based training programme could improve decisive parameters in performance in football, such as COD, RSA and sprint in recreationally trained football players.

  16. The Impact of a Computer Training Program on the Ministry of Education and Higher Education Staff to Improve Computer Skills and Productive Performances

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed S. AbuShugair; Magdy Aqel; Ali. H. Abuseada

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims at identifying the impact of the training program (International Computer Driving Licence, CDL), which is used to improve skills and productivity performances, on the of Education and Higher Education Ministry staff, the sample consisted of 216 school head teachers and head teachers assistant in east and west directorates in Gaza city. The researchers applied the two study tools, which were the computer skills questionnaire, and training impact measuring questionnaire, ...

  17. Capacity building in ocean bathymetry: The Nippon Foundation GEBCO Training Programme at the University of New Hampshire

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Srinivas, K.; Dave, M.; Caceres, H.M.; Morishita, T.; Mustapha, A.A.; Peralta, W.R.; Sharma, S.; Angwenyi, C.

    creation and authoring -Programming/coding: applications of, use of, GEBCO as an entity - History of GEBCO and Ocean Mapping - Needs and requirements: use of GEBCO by cable layers, oil companies, defence, and v.v. - Copyright, who owns soundings, contours... supply or totally lacking. Their new technical skills, reinforced by the network of other ocean scientists they will have developed during the training programme, will be applied to mapping areas of the ocean that has not benefited from much attention...

  18. Increasing opportunities for question-asking in school-aged children with autism spectrum disorder: Effectiveness of staff training in pivotal response treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuur, R.; Huskens, B.E.B.M.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2017-01-01

    Deficits in question-asking are common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Furthermore, their opportunities to self-initiate questions are often hindered by directive behavior of their conversation partners. This study assessed the effectiveness of staff training in pivotal response

  19. Impact of In-Service Training and Staff Development on Workers' Job Performance and Optimal Productivity in Public Secondary Schools in Osun State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejoh, Johnson; Faniran, Victoria Loveth

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of in-service training and staff development on workers' job performance and optimal productivity in public secondary schools in Osun State, Nigeria. The study used the ex-post-facto research design. Three research questions and three hypotheses were generated and tested using questionnaire items adapted from…

  20. How to Support and Engage Students in Alternative Forms of Education and Training? A Qualitative Study of School Staff Members in Flanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praag, Lore; Van Caudenberg, Rut; Nouwen, Ward; Clycq, Noel; Timmerman, Christiane

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on how students, who for a variety of reasons struggle in mainstream secondary schools, can be supported and engaged by alternative forms of education and training to attain a (formal) qualification. Interviews and focus groups are carried out with school staff members of distinct types of alternative learning arenas in Flanders…

  1. Instruction and video feedback to improve staff's trainer behaviour and response prompting during one-to-one training with young children with severe intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonderen, A.M.H. van; Duker, P.C.C.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on correct trainer behaviour and the use of prompt sequences of 10 direct-care staff during one-to-one training with 10 young children with severe intellectual disability. Following baseline, trainers received instruction (written

  2. Methodological Issues of Providing Training in Prevention of Behavioural and Developmental Disorders within Master’s Programme in School Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanovich N. V.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article explores features of providing training in the approbated module “Prevention of Behavioural and Developmental Disorders” within the master’s programme in School Psychology. The programme was developed in accordance with the professional standard for educational psychologists. The article outlines the aims of the module and its place in the context of the programme in general and reveals the main ways of developing competencies specified in the educational standard but selected with respect to professional activities defined by the professional standard. The article also suggests some methodological principles of designing an educational module in practice-oriented training, among which the basic one is reflective activity-based networking. An activity-based content of the module is proposed basing on the psychological definition of prevention as one of the core activities in a psychologist’s work. Finally, the article describes educational outcomes in graduate students upon successful completion of the training, and reflects upon certain problems revealed during the approbation of the module.

  3. Effects of an intradialytic resistance training programme on physical function: a prospective stepped-wedge randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Paul Norman; Fraser, Steve; Barnard, Robert; Haines, Terry; Ockerby, Cherene; Street, Maryann; Wang, Wei Chun; Daly, Robin

    2016-08-01

    Intradialytic exercise programmes are important because of the deterioration in physical function that occurs in people receiving haemodialysis. Unfortunately, exercise programmes are rarely sustained in haemodialysis clinics. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of a sustainable resistance exercise programme on the physical function of people receiving haemodialysis. A total of 171 participants from 15 community satellite haemodialysis clinics performed progressive resistance training using resistance elastic bands in a seated position during the first hour of haemodialysis treatment. We used a stepped-wedge design of three groups, each containing five randomly allocated cluster units allocated to an intervention of 12, 24 or 36 weeks. The primary outcome measure was objective physical function measured by the 30-s sit-to-stand (STS) test, the 8-foot timed up and go (TUG) test and the four-square step test. Secondary outcome measures included quality of life, involvement in community activity, blood pressure and self-reported falls. Exercise training led to significant improvements in physical function as measured by STS and TUG. There was a significant average downward change (β = -1.59, P training can improve the physical function of people receiving dialysis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  4. "The Castle of Remembrance": New insights from a cognitive training programme for autobiographical memory in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalanne, Jennifer; Gallarda, Thierry; Piolino, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Autobiographical memory deficits are prominent from the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and result in a loss of personal identity. Nevertheless, standardised methods of autobiographical memory stimulation for the neuropsychological rehabilitation of patients with AD remain underdeveloped. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of a new cognitive training programme for autobiographical memory (REMau) on both the episodic and semantic components of autobiographical memory performance across lifetime periods, as well as on mood. Pre/post evaluations were conducted on two groups of patients with early to moderate AD, assigned to one of two different training activities: either the REMau or a cognitive training programme focused on collective semantic memory. Statistical comparisons showed significant improvement of episodic and semantic autobiographical memory performance in the REMau group, which was more pronounced for the semantic component, as well as improved mood. By contrast, deleterious pre/post differences were observed in the other group. Most interestingly, this study showed that the REMau programme boosted autobiographical memory from the reminiscence bump period, which is considered crucial for the construction and maintenance of personal identity. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these results for the reduction of autobiographical memory deficits in AD.

  5. The value of the WIRHE Scholarship Programme in training health professionals for rural areas: Views of participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapukata, Nontsikelelo O; Couper, Ian; Smith, Jocelyn

    2017-10-13

    Rural hospitals in South Africa, as elsewhere, face enduring shortages of, and challenges in attracting and retaining, suitably qualified staff. The Wits Initiative for Rural Health Education (WIRHE), based at the University of the Witwatersrand but covering three universities, is a rural scholarship programme established to find local solutions to these challenges in the North West and Mpumalanga provinces. The purpose of this evaluation was to ascertain whether the WIRHE project was achieving its objectives. This article draws from an evaluation commissioned by the Swiss-South African Cooperative Initiative, a major funder of the programme when WIRHE was launched in 2003. Qualitative interviews were conducted either as face-to-face meetings or telephonically with 21 WIRHE students and graduates. Content analysis was undertaken to identify common themes. There was a consistency in the findings as the students and graduates reported similar experiences. Many of the participants were overwhelmed by their initial challenges of having to adapt to a different language, an institutional culture and resources that they previously did not have access to. The participants acknowledged the role of WIRHE staff in facilitating the transition from home to university and, in particular, the value of the financial and academic support. The geographic distance to Wits presented a challenge for the Pretoria- and Sefako Makgatho-based students. The holiday work affirmed clinical advantages for WIRHE students and heightened students' interest in becoming healthcare workers. WIRHE's key success factors are the financial, academic and emotional support offered to students. WIRHE achieved its objectives based on a principled strategic approach and an understanding that students from rural backgrounds are more likely to return to rural areas. The study supports the value of structured support programmes for students of rural origin as they pursue their studies.

  6. The value of the WIRHE Scholarship Programme in training health professionals for rural areas: Views of participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nontsikelelo O. Mapukata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rural hospitals in South Africa, as elsewhere, face enduring shortages of, and challenges in attracting and retaining, suitably qualified staff. The Wits Initiative for Rural Health Education (WIRHE, based at the University of the Witwatersrand but covering three universities, is a rural scholarship programme established to find local solutions to these challenges in the North West and Mpumalanga provinces. The purpose of this evaluation was to ascertain whether the WIRHE project was achieving its objectives.Methods: This article draws from an evaluation commissioned by the Swiss-South African Cooperative Initiative, a major funder of the programme when WIRHE was launched in 2003. Qualitative interviews were conducted either as face-to-face meetings or telephonically with 21 WIRHE students and graduates. Content analysis was undertaken to identify common themes.Results: There was a consistency in the findings as the students and graduates reported similar experiences. Many of the participants were overwhelmed by their initial challenges of having to adapt to a different language, an institutional culture and resources that they previously did not have access to. The participants acknowledged the role of WIRHE staff in facilitating the transition from home to university and, in particular, the value of the financial and academic support. The geographic distance to Wits presented a challenge for the Pretoria- and Sefako Makgatho-based students. The holiday work affirmed clinical advantages for WIRHE students and heightened students’ interest in becoming healthcare workers.Conclusion: WIRHE’s key success factors are the financial, academic and emotional support offered to students. WIRHE achieved its objectives based on a principled strategic approach and an understanding that students from rural backgrounds are more likely to return to rural areas. The study supports the value of structured support programmes for students of

  7. Standardised formal resuscitation training programmes for reducing mortality and morbidity in newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Eugene; Pammi, Mohan; Ryan, Anthony C; Barrington, Keith J

    2015-09-04

    Approximately 10% of all newborns require resuscitation at birth. Training healthcare providers in standardised formal neonatal resuscitation training (SFNRT) programmes may improve neonatal outcomes. Substantial healthcare resources are expended on SFNRT. To determine whether SFNRT programmes reduce neonatal mortality and morbidity, improve acquisition and retention of knowledge and skills, or change teamwork and resuscitation behaviour. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, PREMEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science and the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, ongoing trials and conference proceedings in April 2014 and updated in March 2015. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials including cluster-randomised trials, comparing a SFNRT with no SFNRT, additions to SFNRT or types of SFNRT, and reporting at least one of our specified outcomes. Two authors extracted data independently and performed statistical analyses including typical risk ratio (RR), risk difference (RD), mean difference (MD), and number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) or an additional harmful outcome (NNTH) (all with 95% confidence intervals (CI)). We analysed cluster-randomised trials using the generic inverse variance and the approximate analysis methods. We identified two community-based and three manikin-based trials that assessed the effect of SFNRT compared with no SFNRT. Very low quality evidence from one study suggested improvement in acquisition of knowledge (RR 5.96, 95% CI 3.60 to 9.87) and skills (RR 170, 95% CI 10.8 to 2711) and retention of knowledge (RR 3.60, 95% CI 2.43 to 5.35) and the other study suggested improvement in resuscitation and behavioural scores.We identified three community-based cluster-randomised trials in developing countries comparing SFNRT with basic resuscitation training (Early Newborn Care). In this setting, there was moderate quality evidence that SFNRT decreased early neonatal mortality

  8. Training of Practitioners and Beliefs about Family Skills in Family-Based Prevention Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orte, Carmen; Ballester, Lluís; Amer, Joan; Vives, Marga

    2017-01-01

    To ensure close adherence to the contents of a family-based cognitive-behavioural programme, and maintain a high standard of quality in its implementation, it is important that practitioners' attitudes and beliefs regarding family skills coincide with those of the programme. This paper describes and analyses (observed) potential changes in these…

  9. Innovative Access Programme for Young Mothers Wishing to Train in Childbirth Education: From Concept to Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Mary L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the conception, planning, implementation and evaluation of an access programme arising out of an innovative collaboration between two charities, Straight Talking and the National Childbirth Trust. The access programme was designed at the request of a group of young mothers who had finished compulsory education and subsequently…

  10. Evaluation of a communication and stress management training programme for infertile couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lone; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Boivin, Jackey

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluates a patient education programme focussed on improving communication and stress management skills among couples in fertility treatment.......This study evaluates a patient education programme focussed on improving communication and stress management skills among couples in fertility treatment....

  11. Choosing the Best Training Programme: Is there a Case for Statistical Treatment Rules?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staghøj, Jonas; Svarer, Michael; Rosholm, Michael

    2010-01-01

    When treatment effects of active labour market programmes (ALMPs) are heterogeneous in an observable way across the population, the allocation of the unemployed into different programmes becomes particularly important. In this article, we present a statistical model that can be used to allocate u...

  12. Learning and performance outcomes of mental health staff training in de-escalation techniques for the management of violence and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Owen; Baker, John; Bee, Penny; Lovell, Karina

    2015-06-01

    De-escalation techniques are a recommended non-physical intervention for the management of violence and aggression in mental health. Although taught as part of mandatory training for all National Health Service (NHS) mental health staff, there remains a lack of clarity around training effectiveness. To conduct a systematic review of the learning, performance and clinical safety outcomes of de-escalation techniques training. The review process involved a systematic literature search of 20 electronic databases, eligibility screening of results, data extraction, quality appraisal and data synthesis. A total of 38 relevant studies were identified. The strongest impact of training appears to be on de-escalation-related knowledge, confidence to manage aggression and deescalation performance (although limited to artificial training scenarios). No strong conclusions could be drawn about the impact of training on assaults, injuries, containment and organisational outcomes owing to the low quality of evidence and conflicting results. It is assumed that de-escalation techniques training will improve staff's ability to de-escalate violent and aggressive behaviour and improve safety in practice. There is currently limited evidence that this training has these effects. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  13. Coming of age as communicators: differences in the implementation of common communications skills training in four residency programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razack, Saleem; Meterissian, Sarkis; Morin, Lucie; Snell, Linda; Steinert, Yvonne; Tabatabai, Diana; Maclellan, Anne-Marie

    2007-05-01

    To determine thematic similarities and differences in the implementation of common-content communications skills training (CST) in medicine, surgery, paediatrics, and obstetrics and gynaecology residency programmes. Communications skills training based upon the Kalamazoo consensus statement of communication skills in the clinical encounter was implemented in 4 residency programmes. Field notes of the CST sessions in each programme were analysed and coded for themes, considering the domains of Context, Input, Process and Product ('CIPP' methodology). Immediate learning outcomes were quantitatively assessed using retrospective pre/post methodology. Important differences were noted in the implementation of CST in the 4 disciplines. The 2 surgical disciplines showed relatively less reflective language and greater concentration on straight skill acquisition, whereas the 2 medical disciplines concentrated on the residents' role as teachers of communication skills for buy-in. Thematic similarities between disciplines included similar challenges to being good communicators in practice, as identified by residents (e.g. inadequate time and space), as well as lack of formal training. Quantitative learning outcome data from the educational intervention were significant in all groups (P < 0.05). Common material in CST can be adapted to different disciplines. By analysing for thematic similarities and differences in implementation in the 4 disciplines, a picture of different pedagogic 'subcultures' emerged, with different behavioural norms and values related to the doctor's role as communicator. In shared core competency training, it may be useful to consider these differences in planning, so that the training may be both sensitive to the behavioural norms of different disciplines, and effective.

  14. The effective of preventive training programme on the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atakan Çağlayan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to prevent non-contact Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL injuries that occur more frequently because of anatomic, hormonal and muscular differences in female athletes, with a training programme including neuromuscular, proprioceptive and flexilibity training drills and seeing the changes on physical and physiological parameters on female athletes. Material and Methods: Our study consists of 76 female soccer players (Experimental Group (EG: 20, age:17.2±3.38years and Control Group (CG: 56, age:17.5±3.14years whom participated in Turkish Female Soccer 1. League. EG were given a training programme for six weeks, three days a week, nearly 30 minutes. Retrospective questionnaire that enclosed six months was applied to both EG and CG. For the assesment of physical and physological affects of training programme; leg strength, speed, vertical jump, aerobic and anaerobic capacity, balance, flexibility, height, weight and skinfold thickness were measured. Results: As a result of statistical analysises there wasn’t seen any significant difference on the incidence of ACL injury between EG and CG (p>0.05. A significant difference was detected on vertical jump, aerobic-anaerobic power, balance, leg strength and body fat percentage at the level of (p<0.01, speed and flexibility at the level of p<0.05. Conclusion: After six-week recovery training program there was’t not seen any ACL injury until the end of the season. Furthermore, we observed significant differences after evaulation of biomotor properties of female athletes. We suggest that this kind of researchs must be made perennial with the participation of more athletes with multidisipliner workship.

  15. Influence of a pelvic floor training programme to prevent perineal trauma: A quasi-randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Larios, Fatima; Corrales-Gutierrez, Isabel; Casado-Mejía, Rosa; Suarez-Serrano, Carmen

    2017-07-01

    perineal injury is common after birth and may be caused by tears or episiotomy or both. Perineal massage has been shown to prevent episiotomies in primiparous women. On the other hand, pelvic floor exercises might have an influence by shortening the first and second stages of labour in the primigravida. the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a pelvic floor training following a birth programme on perineal trauma. a single-blind quasi-randomized controlled trial with two groups: standard care and intervention. a tertiary, metropolitan hospital in Seville, Spain. women (n=466) who were 32 weeks pregnant, having a singleton pregnancy and anticipating a normal birth were randomised. Women in the experimental groups were asked to perform a pelvic floor training programme that included: daily perineal massage and pelvic floor exercises from 32 weeks of pregnancy until birth. They were allocated to an intervention group by clusters (antenatal education groups) randomized 1:1. The control group had standard care that did not involve a perineal/pelvic floor intervention. These women were collected in a labour ward at admission 1:3 by midwives. outcomes were analysed by intention-to-treat. Women assigned to the perineal/pelvic floor intervention showed a 31.63% reduction in episiotomy (50.56% versus 82.19%, ppelvic floor exercises and perineal massage may prevent episiotomies and tears in primiparous women. This programme can be recommended to primiparous women in order to prevent perineal trauma. the pelvic floor programme was associated with significantly lower rates of episiotomies and severe perineal trauma; and higher intact perineum when compared with women who received standard care only. the programme is an effective intervention that we recommend to all women at 32nd week of pregnancy to prevent perineal trauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanical massage and mental training programmes affect employees' anxiety, stress susceptibility and detachment-a randomised explorative pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Jasmin; Handlin, Linda; Harlén, Mikael; Lindmark, Ulrika; Ekström, Anette

    2015-09-02

    Working people's reduced ability to recover has been proposed as a key factor behind the increase in stress-related health problems. One not yet evidence-based preventive method designed to help employees keep healthy and be less stressed is an armchair with built-in mechanical massage and mental training programmes, This study aimed to evaluate possible effects on employees' experience of levels of "Anxiety", "Stress Susceptibility", "Detachment" and "Social Desirability" when using mechanical massage and mental training programmes, both separately and in combination, during working hours. Employees from four different workplaces were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: i) Massage and mental training (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage while listening to the mental training programmes, n=19), ii) Massage (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage only, n=19), iii) Mental training (sitting in the armchair and listening to the mental training programmes only, n=19), iv) Pause (sitting in the armchair but not receiving mechanical massage or listening to the mental training programmes, n=19), v) Control (not sitting in the armchair at all, n=17). In order to discover how the employees felt about their own health they were asked to respond to statements from the "Swedish Scale of Personality" (SSP), immediately before the randomisation, after four weeks and after eight weeks (end-of-study). There were no significant differences between the five study groups for any of the traits studied ("Somatic Trait Anxiety", "Psychic Trait Anxiety", "Stress Susceptibility", "Detachment" and "Social Desirability") at any of the occasions. However, the massage group showed a significant decrease in the subscale "Somatic Trait Anxiety" (p=0.032), during the entire study period. Significant decreases in the same subscale were also observed in the pause group between start and week eight (p=0.040) as well as between week four and week

  17. Classroom-based and distance learning education and training courses in end-of-life care for health and social care staff: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsford, David; Jackson, Georgina; O'Brien, Terri; Yates, Sue; Duxbury, Joy

    2013-03-01

    Staff from a range of health and social care professions report deficits in their knowledge and skills when providing end-of-life and palliative care, and education and training has been advocated at a range of levels. To review the literature related to classroom-based and distance learning education and training initiatives for health and social care staff in end-of-life and palliative care, in terms of their target audience, extent, modes of delivery, content and teaching and learning strategies, and to identify the most effective educational strategies for enhancing care. A systematic review of the literature evaluating classroom-based and distance learning education and training courses for health and social care staff in end-of-life and palliative care. Online databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and PSYCHINFO between January 2000 and July 2010. Studies were selected that discussed specific education and training initiatives and included pre-and post-test evaluation of participants' learning. 30 studies met eligibility criteria. The majority reported successful outcomes, though there were some exceptions. Level of prior experience and availability of practice reinforcement influenced learning. Participative and interactive learning strategies were predominantly used along with discussion of case scenarios. Multi-professional learning was infrequently reported and service user and carer input to curriculum development and delivery was reported in only one study. Classroom-based education and training is useful for enhancing professionals' skills and perceived preparedness for delivering end-of-life care but should be reinforced by actual practice experience.

  18. The Early-Career Development of Science Teachers from Initial Training Onwards: The Advantages of a Multifaceted Five-Year Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Julian; Howarth, Sue; King, Chris; Perry, John; Tas, Maarten; Twidle, John; Warhurst, Adrian; Garrett, Caro

    2014-01-01

    If a programme were to be devised for the early-career development of science teachers, what might such a programme look like? This was the focus of a meeting of science educators interested in developing such a structure, from the start of initial teacher training onwards. The contributions, modified and written up here, include a suggested…

  19. Improving communication and practical skills in working with inpatients who self-harm : A pre-test/post-test study of the effect of a training programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaap van der Bijl; prof Berno van Meijel; Nienke Kool; Ad Kerkhof; Bauke Koekkoek

    2014-01-01

    Background Differing perspectives of self-harm may result in a struggle between patients and treatment staff. As a consequence, both sides have difficulty communicating effectively about the underlying problems and feelings surrounding self-harm. Between 2009 and 2011, a programme was developed and

  20. Improving communication and practical skills in working with inpatients who self-harm: a pre-test/post-test study of the effects of a training programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, N.; van Meijel, B.; Koekkoek, B.; van der Bijl, J.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background:Differing perspectives of self-harm may result in a struggle between patients and treatment staff. As a consequence, both sides have difficulty communicating effectively about the underlying problems and feelings surrounding self-harm. Between 2009 and 2011, a programme was developed and

  1. A cluster randomized controlled trial of a structured training programme for caregivers of inpatients after stroke (TRACS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Anne; Young, John; Nixon, Jane; Kalra, Lalit; Smithard, David; Patel, Anita; Knapp, Martin; Monaghan, Josie; Breen, Rachel; Anwar, Shamaila; Farrin, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    The majority of stroke patients are discharged home dependent on informal caregivers, usually family members, to provide assistance with activities of daily living, including bathing, dressing, and toileting. Many caregivers feel unprepared for this role, and this may have a detrimental effect on both the patient and caregiver. To evaluate whether a structured, competency-based training programme for caregivers improves physical and psychological outcomes for patients and their caregivers after disabling stroke, and to determine if such a training programme is cost-effective. A cluster randomized controlled trial. The trial aims to recruit 25 patient and caregiver dyads from each of the 36 participating stroke rehabilitation units. Stroke units have been randomized to either the intervention or control group with randomization stratified by geographical region and quality of care. The intervention is the London Stroke Carer Training Course developed and evaluated in a previous single-centre study. The London Stroke Carer Training Course comprises a number of caregiver training sessions and competency assessment delivered while the patient is in the hospital and one follow-up session after discharge. The multidisciplinary teams in the units randomized to the intervention group have been trained to incorporate delivery of the London Stroke Carer Training Course into ward practice, while those randomized to the control group have continued to provide usual care according to national guidelines. The primary outcomes are extended activities of daily living for the patient and caregiver burden measured at six-months after recruitment. Secondary outcomes include mood and cost-effectiveness, with final follow-up at 12 months. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2011 World Stroke Organization.

  2. Evaluation of nurses' changing perceptions when trained to implement a self-management programme for dual sensory impaired older adults in long-term care: a qualitative study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roets-Merken, L.M; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J; Zuidema, S.U; Dees, M.K; Hermsen, P.G; Kempen, G.I; Graff, M.J.L

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To gain insights into the process of nurses' changing perceptions when trained to implement a self-management programme for dual sensory impaired older adults in long-term care, and into the...

  3. Evaluation of a training programme on knowledge and compliance of nurse assistants' hand hygiene in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T-T; Wu, S-C

    2008-02-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the impact of a comprehensive training programme in hand hygiene for nurse assistants (NAs) on their knowledge and compliance, as well as on the infection rate of nursing home residents. An intervention was conducted in northern Taiwan at three long-term care facilities. Forty NAs participated in a hand-hygiene training programme that included 1h of in-service classes and 30 min of hands-on training. Demographic data and NAs' knowledge and compliance regarding hand hygiene were collected and the infection rate of residents calculated. Three months after hand-hygiene training the NAs had significantly more knowledge (from 13.82 to 15.41, Pcompliance (from 9.34% to 30.36%, P<0.001) than before the intervention. There was a reduction in residents' infection rate from 1.74% (December 2004 to February 2005) and 2.04% (June 2005 to August 2005) to 1.52% (December 2005 to February 2006) (P<0.001).

  4. Rehabilitation of face-processing skills in an adolescent with prosopagnosia: Evaluation of an online perceptual training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bate, Sarah; Bennetts, Rachel; Mole, Joseph A; Ainge, James A; Gregory, Nicola J; Bobak, Anna K; Bussunt, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe the case of EM, a female adolescent who acquired prosopagnosia following encephalitis at the age of eight. Initial neuropsychological and eye-movement investigations indicated that EM had profound difficulties in face perception as well as face recognition. EM underwent 14 weeks of perceptual training in an online programme that attempted to improve her ability to make fine-grained discriminations between faces. Following training, EM's face perception skills had improved, and the effect generalised to untrained faces. Eye-movement analyses also indicated that EM spent more time viewing the inner facial features post-training. Examination of EM's face recognition skills revealed an improvement in her recognition of personally-known faces when presented in a laboratory-based test, although the same gains were not noted in her everyday experiences with these faces. In addition, EM did not improve on a test assessing the recognition of newly encoded faces. One month after training, EM had maintained the improvement on the eye-tracking test, and to a lesser extent, her performance on the familiar faces test. This pattern of findings is interpreted as promising evidence that the programme can improve face perception skills, and with some adjustments, may at least partially improve face recognition skills.

  5. Training-induced changes in physical performance can be achieved without body mass reduction after eight week of strength and injury prevention oriented programme in volleyball female players

    OpenAIRE

    Lehnert, M.; Sigmund, M; P Lipinska; R Vařeková; Hroch, M; Z Xaverová; Stastny, P; P Háp; P Zmijewski

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the changes in muscle strength, power, and somatic parameters in elite volleyball players after a specific pre-season training programme aimed at improving jumping and strength performance and injury prevention. Twelve junior female volleyball players participated in an 8-week training programme. Anthropometric characteristics, isokinetic peak torque (PT) single-joint knee flexion (H) and extension (Q) at 60º/s and 180º/s, counter movement jump (CMJ), s...

  6. Training in the Retail Trade in Spain. Report for the FORCE Programme. Retail Sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez-Vigo, Marisa

    A study examined training in the retail trade in Spain. Employment, work, and training patterns in Spain's retail sector were researched, and case studies of five retail firms were conducted. Two retailers were too small to afford their own training organization but had formulated personnel policies providing for training. The third case was a…

  7. Effects of a relaxation training programme on immediate and prolonged stress responses in women with preterm labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Li-Lan; Lin, Li-Chan; Cheng, Po-Jen; Chen, Chung-Hey; Wu, Shiao-Chi; Chang, Chuan-Lin

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a report of an experimental study of the effects of relaxation-training programme on immediate and prolonged stress responses in women with preterm labour. Hospitalized pregnant women with preterm labour experience developmental and situational stress. However, few studies have been performed on stress management in such women. An experimental pretest and repeated post-test design was used to compare the outcomes for two groups in northern Taiwan from December 2008, to May 2010. A total of 129 women were randomly assigned to an experimental (n = 68) or control (n = 61) group. The experimental group participants were instructed to listen daily to a 13-minute relaxation programme. Measurements involved the stress visual analogue scale, finger temperatures, State Trait Anxiety Inventory, Perceived Stress Scale and Pregnancy-related Anxiety. Two-way analysis of variance and hierarchical linear modelling were used to analyse the group differences. Compared with those in the control group, participants in the experimental group showed immediate improvements in the stress visual analogue scale scores and finger temperatures. The State Trait Anxiety Inventory-State subscale score for the experimental group was significantly lower than that for the control group (P = 0·03). However, no statistically significant differences for the Perceived Stress Scale and Pregnancy-related Anxiety scores were found between the experimental group and the control group. The relaxation-training programme could improve the stress responses of women with preterm labour. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Can an EASYcare based dementia training programme improve diagnostic assessment and management of dementia by general practitioners and primary care nurses? The design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucassen PL

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early diagnosis of dementia benefits both patient and caregiver. Nevertheless, dementia in primary care is currently under-diagnosed. Some educational interventions developed to improve dementia diagnosis and management were successful in increasing the number of dementia diagnoses and in changing attitudes and knowledge of health care staff. However, none of these interventions focussed on collaboration between GPs and nurses in dementia care. We developed an EASYcare-based Dementia Training Program (DTP aimed at stimulating collaboration in dementia primary care. We expect this program to increase the number of cognitive assessments and dementia diagnoses and to improve attitudes and knowledge of GPs and nurses. Methods The DTP is a complex educational intervention that consists of two workshops, a coaching program, access to an internet forum, and a Computerized Clinical Decision Support System on dementia diagnostics. One hundred duos of GPs and nurses will be recruited, from which 2/3 will be allocated to the intervention group and 1/3 to the control group. The effects of implementation of the DTP will be studied in a cluster-randomised controlled trial. Primary outcomes will be the number of cognitive assessments and dementia diagnoses in a period of 9 months following workshop participation. Secondary outcomes are measured on GP and nurse level: adherence to national guidelines for dementia, attitude, confidence and knowledge regarding dementia diagnosis and management; on patient level: number of emergency calls, visits and consultations and patient satisfaction; and on caregiver level: informal caregiver burden and satisfaction. Data will be collected from GPs' electronic medical records, self-registration forms and questionnaires. Statistical analysis will be performed using the MANOVA-method. Also, exploratory analyses will be performed, in order to gain insight into barriers and facilitators for implementation and

  9. Management and Communication programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2005-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the launch of three new courses in the Management and Communication programme: 1.     Managing Time (Open to all Staff Members) The objectives are: To enhance your personal effectiveness through better organisation skills To acquire ways of making the most of your time through improved work habits To reduce stress For the description of this course, please see:  http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/training/MANCO/P9798/S8E_e.asp 2.     Service Orientation (Open to all Staff Members working in a service-related function) The objectives are: To understand the key elements in an effective client/service provider relationship To develop a client focused approach to providing services For the description of this course, please see:  http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/training/MANCO/P9798/serv_e.asp 3.   Introduction to Leadership (Open to Staff in Career Paths E & above, including newly appointed supervisors and Sect...

  10. Management and Communication programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2005-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the launch of three new courses in the Management and Communication programme: 1.     Managing Time (Open to all Staff Members) The objectives are: To enhance your personal effectiveness through better organisation skills To acquire ways of making the most of your time through improved work habits To reduce stress For the description of this course, please see:  http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/training/MANCO/P9798/S8E_e.asp 2.     Service Orientation (Open to all Staff Members working in a service-related function) The objectives are: To understand the key elements in an effective client/service provider relationship To develop a client focused approach to providing services For the description of this course, please see:  http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/training/MANCO/P9798/serv_e.asp 3.   Introduction to Leadership (Open to Staff in Career Paths E & above, including newly appointed supervisors and Secti...

  11. Programme Implementers' Experiences of Evaluation Use in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some of these uses included increased collaboration among different organisations and staff at different levels, inculcating evaluative thinking among programme staff, increased ... Key Words: Evaluation, Evaluation Theory, Programme Evaluation, Evaluation Use, Factors Affecting Evaluation Use, Northern Ghana ...

  12. Evaluating a staff training program on the interaction between staff and people with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour : An observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Zijlmans, L.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a training program focusing on improvement of emotional intelligence (EI) and support staffs’ awareness of their behaviour towards people with an intellectual disability based on interactional patterns. The support provided regarding

  13. Evaluating the systematic implementation of the 'Let Me Decide' advance care planning programme in long term care through focus groups: staff perspectives.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cornally, Nicola

    2015-11-01

    The \\'Let Me Decide\\' Advance Care Planning (LMD-ACP) programme offers a structured approach to End-of-Life (EoL) care planning in long-term care for residents with and without capacity to complete an advance care directive\\/plan. The programme was implemented in three homes in the South of Ireland, with a view to improving quality of care at end of life. This paper will present an evaluation of the systematic implementation of the LMD-ACP programme in the homes.

  14. Perceived needs of health tutors in rural and urban health training institutions in Ghana: Implications for health sector staff internal migration control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kaba Alhassan

    Full Text Available The population of Ghana is increasingly becoming urbanized with about 70% of the estimated 27 million people living in urban and peri-urban areas. Nonetheless, eight out of the ten regions in Ghana remain predominantly rural where only 32% of the national health sector workforce works. Moreover, the rural-urban disparities in the density of health tutors (staff responsible for pre-service training of health professionals are enormous. This paper explores perceived needs of health tutors in rural and urban health training institutions in Ghana.This is a descriptive qualitative study conducted in the Greater Accra and Northern regions of Ghana. The Study used the deductive thematic and sub-thematic analysis approaches. Five health training institutions were randomly sampled, and 72 tutors engaged in separate focus group discussions with an average size of 14 participants per group in each training institution.Perceived rural-urban disparities among health tutors were found in the payment of extra duty allowances; school infrastructure including libraries and internet connectivity; staff accommodation; and opportunities for scholarships and higher education. Health tutors in rural areas generally expressed more frustration with these work conditions than those in urban areas.There is the need to initiate and sustain work incentives that promote motivation of rural health tutors to control ongoing rural-urban migration of qualified staff. It is recommended the following incentives be prioritized to promote retention of qualified health tutors in rural health training schools: payment of research, book and rural allowances; early promotion of rural staff; prioritizing rural tutors for scholarships, and introduction of national best health tutor awards.

  15. Perceived needs of health tutors in rural and urban health training institutions in Ghana: Implications for health sector staff internal migration control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyere, Christopher B.; Nketiah-Amponsah, Edward; Mwini-Nyaledzigbor, Prudence P.

    2017-01-01

    Background The population of Ghana is increasingly becoming urbanized with about 70% of the estimated 27 million people living in urban and peri-urban areas. Nonetheless, eight out of the ten regions in Ghana remain predominantly rural where only 32% of the national health sector workforce works. Moreover, the rural-urban disparities in the density of health tutors (staff responsible for pre-service training of health professionals) are enormous. This paper explores perceived needs of health tutors in rural and urban health training institutions in Ghana. Methods This is a descriptive qualitative study conducted in the Greater Accra and Northern regions of Ghana. The Study used the deductive thematic and sub-thematic analysis approaches. Five health training institutions were randomly sampled, and 72 tutors engaged in separate focus group discussions with an average size of 14 participants per group in each training institution. Results Perceived rural-urban disparities among health tutors were found in the payment of extra duty allowances; school infrastructure including libraries and internet connectivity; staff accommodation; and opportunities for scholarships and higher education. Health tutors in rural areas generally expressed more frustration with these work conditions than those in urban areas. Conclusions There is the need to initiate and sustain work incentives that promote motivation of rural health tutors to control ongoing rural-urban migration of qualified staff. It is recommended the following incentives be prioritized to promote retention of qualified health tutors in rural health training schools: payment of research, book and rural allowances; early promotion of rural staff; prioritizing rural tutors for scholarships, and introduction of national best health tutor awards. PMID:28982194

  16. Effect of support group peer facilitator training programmes on peer facilitator and support group member outcomes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisle, Vanessa C; Gumuchian, Stephanie T; Kloda, Lorie A; Boruff, Jill; El-Baalbaki, Ghassan; Körner, Annett; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Thombs, Brett D

    2016-11-17

    Peer facilitators play an important role in determining the success of many support groups for patients with medical illnesses. However, many facilitators do not receive training for their role and report a number of challenges in fulfilling their responsibilities. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effects of training and support programmes for peer facilitators of support groups for people with medical illnesses on (1) the competency and self-efficacy of group facilitators and (2) self-efficacy for disease management, health outcomes and satisfaction with support groups among group members. Searches included the CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Web of Science databases from inception through 8 April 2016; reference list reviews; citation tracking of included articles; and trial registry reviews. Eligible studies were randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in any language that evaluated the effects of training programmes for peer facilitators compared with no training or alternative training formats on (1) competency or self-efficacy of peer facilitators, and (2) self-efficacy for disease management, health outcomes and satisfaction with groups of group members. The Cochrane Risk of Bias tool was used to assess risk of bias. There were 9757 unique titles/abstracts and 2 full-text publications reviewed. 1 RCT met inclusion criteria. The study evaluated the confidence and self-efficacy of cancer support group facilitators randomised to 4 months access to a website and discussion forum (N=23; low resource) versus website, discussion forum and 2-day training workshop (N=29). There were no significant differences in facilitator confidence (Hedges' g=0.16, 95% CI -0.39 to 0.71) or self-efficacy (Hedges' g=0.31, 95% CI -0.24 to 0.86). Risk of bias was unclear or high for 4 of 6 domains. Well-designed and well-conducted, adequately powered trials of peer support group facilitator training programmes for patients with medical illnesses

  17. Mental health promotion in the Internet age: a consultation with Australian young people to inform the design of an online mindfulness training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monshat, Kaveh; Vella-Brodrick, Dianne; Burns, Jane; Herrman, Helen

    2012-06-01

    Mindfulness training (MT) has been shown to lead to significant improvements in psychological distress and emotion regulation skills. The Internet has many advantages as a medium for building emotional skills in young people. The aim of this study was to involve young people in designing an online MT programme. A draft programme was initially designed based on a review of the literature and an established face-to-face programme for medical students. Twenty young people were then recruited through online advertising and 13 (age 16-26) interviewed. They were asked to comment on how useful, easy to use and enjoyable they found the proposed programme and how the draft version and its planned evaluation strategy could be improved. Interviewee responses were independently processed by two of the authors within a qualitative thematic analysis paradigm. The results showed that young people were eager to engage with the design of this health promotion programme and provided valuable input. All interviewees believed that young people would find the programme desirable. They provided a variety of suggestions about how training structure and content could be improved, how best it could be evaluated and how young people could be encouraged to engage with and complete the programme. It thus appears that online MT is a feasible mental health promotion strategy for young people and that it can be evaluated in a controlled trial. The result of this consultation process was the Mindful Awareness Training and Education (MATE) programme, which has been detailed.

  18. Experiences of Kenyan healthcare workers providing services to men who have sex with men: qualitative findings from a sensitivity training programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise M van der Elst

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Men who have sex with men (MSM in Kenya are at high risk for HIV and may experience prejudiced treatment in health settings due to stigma. An on-line computer-facilitated MSM sensitivity programme was conducted to educate healthcare workers (HCWs about the health issues and needs of MSM patients. Methods: Seventy-four HCWs from 49 ART-providing health facilities in the Kenyan Coast were recruited through purposive sampling to undergo a two-day MSM sensitivity training. We conducted eight focus group discussions (FGDs with programme participants prior to and three months after completing the training programme. Discussions aimed to characterize HCWs’ challenges in serving MSM patients and impacts of programme participation on HCWs’ personal attitudes and professional capacities. Results: Before participating in the training programme, HCWs described secondary stigma, lack of professional education about MSM, and personal and social prejudices as barriers to serving MSM clients. After completing the programme, HCWs expressed greater acknowledgement of MSM patients in their clinics, endorsed the need to treat MSM patients with high professional standards and demonstrated sophisticated awareness of the social and behavioural risks for HIV among MSM. Conclusions: Findings provide support for this approach to improving health services for MSM patients. Further efforts are needed to broaden the reach of this training in other areas, address identified barriers to HCW participation and evaluate programme effects on patient and HCW outcomes using rigorous methodology.

  19. Training Emotional Intelligence Related to Treatment Skills of Staff Working with Clients with Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, L. J. M.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A. M. T.; Derksen, J. J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) who display challenging behaviour may contribute to the continuation of this behaviour, because it causes emotional reactions such as anxiety, anger and annoyance, which may prohibit adequate response behaviour. To enhance staff behaviour and treatment skills a training…

  20. Staff Views of the Importance of Relationships for Knowledge Development: Is Training by Specialists a Waste of Money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Jill; Goldbart, Juliet

    2013-01-01

    Background: The provision of skilled support is dependent on staff knowledge and understanding (Beadle-Brown J., Beecham J., Mansell J., Baumker T., Leigh J., Whelton R. & Richardson L, unpublished data). Influencing staff knowledge and understanding is an important component of interventions. Materials and Methods: Fourteen individual…