WorldWideScience

Sample records for staff system revisited

  1. Revisiting Legacy Software System Modernization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khadka, R.

    2016-01-01

    Legacy software systems are those that significantly resist modification and evolution while still being valuable to its stakeholders to the extent that their failure has a detrimental impact on business. Despite several drawbacks of legacy software systems, they are still being extensively used in

  2. Generalized spin Sutherland systems revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Fehér

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We present generalizations of the spin Sutherland systems obtained earlier by Blom and Langmann and by Polychronakos in two different ways: from SU(n Yang–Mills theory on the cylinder and by constraining geodesic motion on the N-fold direct product of SU(n with itself, for any N>1. Our systems are in correspondence with the Dynkin diagram automorphisms of arbitrary connected and simply connected compact simple Lie groups. We give a finite-dimensional as well as an infinite-dimensional derivation and shed light on the mechanism whereby they lead to the same classical integrable systems. The infinite-dimensional approach, based on twisted current algebras (alias Yang–Mills with twisted boundary conditions, was inspired by the derivation of the spinless Sutherland model due to Gorsky and Nekrasov. The finite-dimensional method relies on Hamiltonian reduction under twisted conjugations of N-fold direct product groups, linking the quantum mechanics of the reduced systems to representation theory similarly as was explored previously in the N=1 case.

  3. Revisit ocean thermal energy conversion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.C.; Krock, H.J.; Oney, S.K.

    2003-01-01

    by-products, especially drinking water, aquaculture and mariculture, can easily translate into billions of dollars in business opportunities. The current status of the OTEC system definitely deserves to be carefully revisited. This paper will examine recent major advancements in technology, evaluate costs and effectiveness, and assess the overall market environment of the OTEC system and describe its great renewable energy potential and overall benefits to the nations of the world

  4. Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tegtmeier, Silke; Meyer, Verena; Pakura, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    were captured when they described entrepreneurs. Therefore, this paper aims to revisit gender role stereotypes among young adults. Design/methodology/approach: To measure stereotyping, participants were asked to describe entrepreneurs in general and either women or men in general. The Schein......: The images of men and entrepreneurs show a high and significant congruence (r = 0.803), mostly in those adjectives that are untypical for men and entrepreneurs. The congruence of women and entrepreneurs was low (r = 0.152) and insignificant. Contrary to the participants’ beliefs, their explicit notions did...... not have any effect on measures of congruence. However, young adults who knew business owners in their surroundings rated the congruence of women and entrepreneurs significantly higher (r = 0.272) than average. Originality/value: This study is unique in combining “implicit” stereotypes and explicit notions...

  5. Solar system anomalies: Revisiting Hubble's law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plamondon, R.

    2017-12-01

    This paper investigates the impact of a new metric recently published [R. Plamondon and C. Ouellet-Plamondon, in On Recent Developments in Theoretical and Experimental General Relativity, Astrophysics, and Relativistic Field Theories, edited by K. Rosquist, R. T. Jantzen, and R. Ruffini (World Scientific, Singapore, 2015), p. 1301] for studying the space-time geometry of a static symmetric massive object. This metric depends on a complementary error function (erfc) potential that characterizes the emergent gravitation field predicted by the model. This results in two types of deviations as compared to computations made on the basis of a Newtonian potential: a constant and a radial outcome. One key feature of the metric is that it postulates the existence of an intrinsic physical constant σ , the massive object-specific proper length that scales measurements in its surroundings. Although σ must be evaluated experimentally, we use a heuristic to estimate its value and point out some latent relationships between the Hubble constant, the secular increase in the astronomical unit, and the Pioneers delay. Indeed, highlighting the systematic errors that emerge when the effect of σ is neglected, one can link the Hubble constant H 0 to σ Sun and the secular increase V AU to σ Earth . The accuracy of the resulting numerical predictions, H 0 = 74 . 42 ( 0 . 02 ) ( km / s ) / Mpc and V AU ≅ 7.8 cm yr-1 , calls for more investigations of this new metric by specific experts. Moreover, we investigate the expected impacts of the new metric on the flyby anomalies, and we revisit the Pioneers delay. It is shown that both phenomena could be partly taken into account within the context of this unifying paradigm, with quite accurate numerical predictions. A correction for the osculating asymptotic velocity at the perigee of the order of 10 mm/s and an inward radial acceleration of 8 . 34 × 10 - 10 m / s 2 affecting the Pioneer ! space crafts could be explained by this new model.

  6. Revisiting Health System Performance Assessment in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achoki, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Health systems in Africa have long faced a huge burden of disease, amidst pressing resource constraints. However, despite the constraints, the last three decades have seen the region make progress in tackling some of the most critical health challenges. Notably, many countries have registered

  7. Packet models revisited: tandem and priority systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.R.H. Mandjes (Michel)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWe examine two extensions of traditional single-node packet-scale queueing models: tandem networks and (strict) priority systems. Two generic input processes are considered: periodic and Poisson arrivals. For the two-node tandem, an exact expression is derived for the joint distribution

  8. Transposition revisited: New classification and notation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshu Rai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental transposition is a rare and severe anomaly of eruptive position with varied expression. Previously, tooth transpositions have been classified according to the teeth and jaw involved, or by designating specific terms to the different types of transposition (e.g., complete/incomplete, true/false, partial, simple, coronal, and pseudotransposition. However, there is no comprehensive classification-notation system for transposition in literature that systematically discriminates the condition and presents utmost facts for the same. Materials and Methods: To know all the possible types of tooth transposition, literature was searched in PubMed and Medline library, with the keyword “tooth transposition.” A total of 494 articles were obtained. These articles were read, and all possible types of transposition were noted. The obtained data were analyzed systematically and comparatively to design a new classification-notation system. Result and Conclusion: This classification-notation system is outlined to avoid confusion, to ease communication, and to provide a better understanding of the prevailing anomaly. It is easy to remember and convey maximum information. Further, to make it easy for computer archiving, some abbreviations and symbols are added to this classification-notation system.

  9. Periodic solutions of dissipative systems revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Górniewicz

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available We reprove in an extremely simple way the classical theorem that time periodic dissipative systems imply the existence of harmonic periodic solutions, in the case of uniqueness. We will also show that, in the lack of uniqueness, the existence of harmonics is implied by uniform dissipativity. The localization of starting points and multiplicity of periodic solutions will be established, under suitable additional assumptions, as well. The arguments are based on the application of various asymptotic fixed point theorems of the Lefschetz and Nielsen type.

  10. Periodic solutions of dissipative systems revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Górniewicz Lech

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We reprove in an extremely simple way the classical theorem that time periodic dissipative systems imply the existence of harmonic periodic solutions, in the case of uniqueness. We will also show that, in the lack of uniqueness, the existence of harmonics is implied by uniform dissipativity. The localization of starting points and multiplicity of periodic solutions will be established, under suitable additional assumptions, as well. The arguments are based on the application of various asymptotic fixed point theorems of the Lefschetz and Nielsen type.

  11. The systems psychodynamic experiences of organisational transformation amongst support staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Steyn

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The unconscious impact of organisational transformation is often neglected and even denied. This research revealed the manifestation and impact of high levels and different forms of anxiety experienced by employees during transformation. Research objective: The objective was to study and describe the manifesting systems psychodynamic behaviour amongst support staff during organisational transformation. Motivation for the study: Organisational transformation is mostly researched from a leadership viewpoint. Little research data are available on the experiences of support staff on the receiving end of decisions about and implementation of transformation. Research design, approach and method: A qualitative approach within the phenomenological hermeneutic interpretive stance was used. The research was set in a government organisation. A semi-structured interview with four conveniently and purposefully chosen support staff members was thematically analysed using systems psychodynamics as theoretical paradigm. Main findings: Four themes manifested, namely de-authorisation and detachment, being bullied and seduced by leadership, the organisation in the mind as incompetent, and a dangerous and persecutory system. In the discussion, the basic assumptions and relevant constructs are interpreted. Practical implications: Understanding the transformation experiences of support staff could assist the industrial psychologist to facilitate appropriate support in coaching more junior staff towards increasing wellness and work performance. Contribution: Organisational transformation is highlighted as an anxiety provoking experience especially on the lower levels of the organisation. Its potentially deep and complex psychological impact could possibly derail parts of the system if not managed in a psychologically contained manner.

  12. Cabin Staff Management System Mobile Application

    OpenAIRE

    Güneş, Ali; Çevik, İrem

    2017-01-01

    Recent developments inmobile technologies, the usage level of  mobile applications have beenfound to stimulate .Mobile applications are used in every area oflife.This is one of the areas of use upon the aviationThis operation the cabstaff monthly flight planning information system has been developed for amobile application.Application Android operating system has been developed in asuitable.When mobile applications develop ,as well as the server-side for theoperations as PHP and MySql databas...

  13. Equal-area criterion in power systems revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong; Ma, Jinpeng; Kurths, Jürgen; Zhan, Meng

    2018-02-01

    The classic equal-area criterion (EAC) is of key importance in power system analysis, and provides a powerful, pictorial and quantitative means of analysing transient stability (i.e. the system's ability to maintain stable operation when subjected to a large disturbance). Based on the traditional EAC, it is common sense in engineering that there is a critical cleaning time (CCT); namely, a power system is stable (unstable) if a fault is cleared before (after) this CCT. We regard this form of CCT as bipartite. In this paper, we revisit the EAC theory and, surprisingly, find different kinds of transient stability behaviour. Based on these analyses, we discover that the bipartite CCT is only one type among four major types, and, actually, the forms of CCT can be diversified. In particular, under some circumstances, a system may have no CCT or show a periodic CCT. Our theoretical analysis is verified by numerical simulations in a single-machine-infinite-bus system and also in multi-machine systems. Thus, our study provides a panoramic framework for diverse transient stability behaviour in power systems and also may have a significant impact on applications of multi-stability in various other systems, such as neuroscience, climatology or photonics.

  14. STAFF SATISFACTION ESTIMATION SYSTEMS IN RUSSIAN NATIONAL RESEARCH UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A. Novokreshchenova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to study practical approaches to the assessment of employee satisfaction in higher education institutions; to identify and determine the maturity level of assessment systems established in the universities.Methods. The methods involve general and special methods of scientific knowledge such as analogy, systemic and structural analysis, content analysis, and comparison method.Results. The paper presents the results of practical research on Russian universities activities on the sphere of the employee satisfaction assessment. 29 Russian national research universities were selected for the analysis. The levels of systems development of a satisfaction assessment of the personnel and approaches to such procedures are designated on the basis of the content of internal university documents. It is noted that development of satisfaction assessment systems of the personnel of high schools, complex revealing both subjective, and its objective indicators will allow the staff to make more well-founded administrative decisions, and to raise interest of employees in evolution of activity of educational institution; expenses reduction by high school of time and intellectual resources can become an economic benefit.Scientific novelty and practical significance. Material, presented in the paper, can be useful to employees of HR and quality control departments of higher educational institutions of Russia; as well as to managers who work in the education system and participate in the work of staff satisfaction evaluation. Theoretical aspects of the paper can become the basis for the formation and development of models of staff satisfaction evaluation systems and the starting point of any research related to the development of guidelines for the satisfaction staff assessment.

  15. RFID - based Staff Control System (SCS) in Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saparkhojayev, N.

    2015-06-01

    RFID - based Staff Control System (SCS) will allow complete hands-free access control, monitoring the whereabouts of employee and record the attendance of the employee as well. Moreover, with a help of this system, it is possible to have a nice report at the end of the month and based on the total number of worked hours, the salary will be allocated to each personnel. The access tag can be read up to 10 centimeters from the RFID reader. The proposed system is based on UHF RFID readers, supported with antennas at gate and transaction sections, and employee identification cards containing RFID-transponders which are able to electronically store information that can be read / written even without the physical contact with the help of radio medium. This system is an innovative system, which describes the benefits of applying RFID- technology in the Education System process of Republic of Kazakhstan. This paper presents the experiments conducted to set up RFID based SCS.

  16. Revisiting the Didactic Triangle in the Case of an Adaptive Learning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassine Zaoui Seghroucheni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we revisit the classical approach of the didactic triangle designed for the classical learning situation (face to face and adapt it to the situation of an adaptive learning system, we discuss also the different components involved in this didactic triangle and how they interact and influence the learning process in an adaptive learning system.

  17. Battle Staff Training System II: Computer-Based Instruction Supporting the Force XXI Training Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wampler, Richard

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the methodology and lessons learned in the development of the Innovative Tools and Techniques for Brigade and Below Staff Training II - Battle Staff Training System II (ITTBBST-BSTS II...

  18. RFID - based Staff Control System (SCS) in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saparkhojayev, N

    2015-01-01

    RFID - based Staff Control System (SCS) will allow complete hands-free access control, monitoring the whereabouts of employee and record the attendance of the employee as well. Moreover, with a help of this system, it is possible to have a nice report at the end of the month and based on the total number of worked hours, the salary will be allocated to each personnel. The access tag can be read up to 10 centimeters from the RFID reader. The proposed system is based on UHF RFID readers, supported with antennas at gate and transaction sections, and employee identification cards containing RFID-transponders which are able to electronically store information that can be read / written even without the physical contact with the help of radio medium. This system is an innovative system, which describes the benefits of applying RFID- technology in the Education System process of Republic of Kazakhstan. This paper presents the experiments conducted to set up RFID based SCS. (paper)

  19. SMILE Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Appelquist, Joakim; Ekelin, Annelie; Jila, Florian; Hallqvist, Klas

    2003-01-01

    The mobile service "SMILE" supporting care of the elderly is evaluated from an economic as well as an work practice perspective. SMILE Revisited beskriver utvecklingen, införandet och avvecklingen av ett system för mobilt stöd för hemtjänsten. Systemet analyseras dels ur ett ekonomiskt perspektiv, dels ur ett arbetsvetenskapligt perspektiv.

  20. Emergency department revisits for pediatric acute asthma exacerbations: association of factors identified in an emergency department asthma tracking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh-Kelly, Christine M; Kelly, Kevin J; Drendel, Amy L; Grabowski, Laura; Kuhn, Evelyn M

    2008-08-01

    To identify clinical variables associated with a greater likelihood of emergency department (ED) revisit for acute asthma within 7 days after an initial ED visit for acute asthma exacerbation. Cross-sectional study of subjects from a prospectively enrolled cohort of children aged 0 to 18 years with physician-diagnosed asthma in the ED Allies Tracking System. Demographics and data on quality of life, health care utilization, environmental factors, chronic asthma severity, and ED management were collected. Emergency department revisits for acute asthma within 7 days of a prior visit resulting in discharge were compared with those without a revisit, using chi2 and t tests and logistic regression. Four thousand two hundred twenty-eight ED asthma visits were enrolled; 3276 visits resulted in discharge. Persistent asthma was identified in 66% of visits. Emergency department revisits within 7 days of a prior visit occurred following 133 (4.1%) visits. There were no significant differences in environmental factors or ED management between visits with and without an ED revisit. In univariate analysis factors associated with a greater revisit likelihood included age younger than 2 years, black race or Hispanic ethnicity, persistent asthma, public insurance, lower quality of life, and greater health care utilization in the prior 12 months. Variables independently significant (P children younger than 2 years or with persistent asthma or lower asthma quality-of-life scores are at greater risk for ED revisits after acute ED asthma care.

  1. Development of a medical staff recruitment system for teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recruitment of staff into teaching hospitals in Nigeria, acts as the first step towards creating competitive strength and strategic advantage for such institutions. However, one of the major problems associated with these institutions in the South Western part of Nigeria is their mode of staff recruitment. In this research paper, we ...

  2. Educational technologies in the system of managerial staff mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Gancharik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations related to educational technologies, ensuring the Investigations are related to the educational technologies, ensuring the formation and support of a system of mentoring of managerial staff on the basis of the «cascade» technology training. A new form of cascade training – academic cascade training when the educational institutions create a large-scale information and educational environment on the basis of telecommunication technologies to provide the institute mentoring support in the state bodies and organizations.In comparison with the traditional mentoring (personal experience, students and graduates of the retraining system of educational institutions can transmit the knowledge and skills, acquired by them in the course of training, to the young managers and specialists of their organizations, thereby promoting further innovative educational potential of educational institutions through a system of cascading mentoring. For this purpose, in educational institutions an interactive educational environment is created based on telecommunication technologies, which allows you to create and develop a common information space, to simplify the procedure for communicating the mentors and trainees, to provide a wide access to the content. Telecommunication information technologies are not only a powerful tool, intelligent instrument and means of creating a cascade learning environment, but also an important factor in improving the entire methodical system of mentoring.It is proposed the creation of a large-scale information and educational environment on the basis of telecommunication technologies for cascade training when the educational institutions may become a part of the mentoring institution. On the one hand, they prepare students, including both potential mentors, and on the other hand, using modern telecommunication educational technologies, they participate together with the students-mentors in mentoring activity in

  3. Revisiting the Age of Enlightenment from a Collective Decision Making Systems Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Marko A.; Watkins, Jennifer H.

    2009-01-01

    The ideals of the eighteenth century's Age of Enlightenment are the foundation of modern democracies. The era was characterized by thinkers who promoted progressive social reforms that opposed the long-established aristocracies and monarchies of the time. Prominent examples of such reforms include the establishment of inalienable human rights, self-governing republics, and market capitalism. Twenty-first century democratic nations can benefit from revisiting the systems developed during the E...

  4. The higher school teaching staff professional development system creation on the adaptive management principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borova T.A.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with theoretical analysis of the higher school teaching staff professional development system creation on the adaptive management principles. It is determined the background and components of the higher school teaching staff professional development adaptive management system. It is specified the mechanisms for higher school teaching staff professional development adaptive management: monitoring and coaching. It is shown their place in the higher school teaching staff professional development system on the adaptive management principles. The results of the system efficiency are singled out.

  5. [Multiprofessional family-system training programme in psychiatry--effects on team cooperation and staff strain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwack, Julika; Schweitzer, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    How does the interdisciplinary cooperation of psychiatric staff members change after a multiprofessional family systems training programme? Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 49 staff members. Quantitative questionnaires were used to assess burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory, MBI) and team climate (Team-Klima-Inventar, TKI). The multiprofessional training intensifies interdisciplinary cooperation. It results in an increased appreciation of the nurses involved and in a redistribution of therapeutic tasks between nurses, psychologists and physicians. Staff burnout decreased during the research period, while task orientation and participative security within teams increased. The multiprofessional family systems training appears suitable to improve quality of patient care and interdisciplinary cooperation and to reduce staff burnout.

  6. 76 FR 29235 - California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of FERC Staff Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    ...] California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of FERC Staff Attendance The Federal Energy... User Group, Congestion Revenue Rights May 31, 2011, Systems Interface User Group, Settlement Quality..., and staff's attendance is part of the Commission's ongoing outreach efforts. The teleconferences and...

  7. Transformational leadership and staff retention: an evidence review with implications for healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weberg, Dan

    2010-01-01

    A significant amount of burnout and attrition of nurses occurs in healthcare systems. Nursing leadership has a significant impact on these factors. The purpose of this article is to present an evidence review to determine the impact of transformational leadership on staff satisfaction and burnout. It was found that transformational leadership is significantly related to increased satisfaction, increased staff well-being, decreased burnout, and decreased overall stress in staff nurses.

  8. The Prussian German General Staff System and Its Impact on the General and Admiral Staff Officers of the Federal Armed Forces of Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-15

    manual the description of General Staff officer insignia reads as follows: Dull grey embroidery , stitched by hand, on a crimson underground, 2 x 11...small prongs on either side. The angles of the V-shaped embroidery point downwards. The epaulettes have a crimson underlay. 2 1 General Staff officers...insubordination. Even the French General Staff system does not provide for a jointly responsible adviser. In his Reflexions sur 1 ’ art de la querre, General

  9. Student and Staff Perceptions of a Learning Management System for Blended Learning in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Kathryn A.; Prieto-Rodriguez, Elena

    2018-01-01

    Higher education institutions routinely use Learning Management Systems (LMS) for multiple purposes; to organise coursework and assessment, to facilitate staff and student interactions, and to act as repositories of learning objects. The analysis reported here involves staff (n = 46) and student (n = 470) responses to surveys as well as data…

  10. Performance Appraisal System Impact on University Academic Staff Job Satisfaction and Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndambakuwa, Yustina; Mufunda, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    The University of Zimbabwe (UZ) introduced a performance appraisal system (PAS) designed to improve performance indicators across the board in Public Service including academic/faculty staff at the University of Zimbabwe as part of a nation wide strategy. The Public service is a body responsible for all civil workers including academic staff,…

  11. Geography, Not Health System Affiliations, Determines Patients' Revisits to the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising, Kristin L; Karp, David N; Powell, Rhea E; Victor, Timothy W; Carr, Brendan G

    2018-04-01

    To determine how frequently patients revisit the emergency department after an initial encounter, and to describe revisit capture rates for the same hospital, health system, and geographic region. Florida state data from January 1, 2010, to June 30, 2011, from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. This is a retrospective cohort study of emergency department return visits among Florida adults over an 18-month period. We evaluated pairs of index and 30-day return emergency department visits and compared capture rates for hospital, health system, and geographic units. Data were obtained from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project and the American Hospital Association Annual Survey Database. Among 9,416,212 emergency department visits, 22.6 percent (2,124,441) were associated with a 30-day return. Seventy percent (1,477,772) of 30-day returns occurred to the same hospital. The 30-day return capture rates were highest within the same geographic area: county-level capture at 92 percent (IQR=86-96 percent) versus health system capture at 75 percent (IQR = 68-81 percent). Acute care utilization patterns are often independent of health system boundaries. Current population-based health care models that attribute patients to a single provider or health system may be strengthened by considering geographic patterns of acute care utilization. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  12. Assessing dual-role staff-interpreter linguistic competency in an integrated healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Maria R; Otero-Sabogal, Regina; Newman, Jeffrey

    2007-11-01

    Interpreter services for medical care increase physician-patient communication and safety, yet a "formal certification" process to demonstrate interpreter competence does not exist. Testing and training is left to individual health care facilities nationwide. Bilingual staff are often used to interpret, without any assessment of their skills. Assessing interpreters' linguistic competence and setting standards for testing is a priority. To assess dual-role staff interpreter linguistic competence in an integrated health care system to determine skill qualification to work as medical interpreters. Dual-role staff interpreters voluntarily completed a linguistic competency assessment using a test developed by a language school to measure comprehension, completeness, and vocabulary through written and oral assessment in English and the second language. Pass levels were predetermined by school as not passing, basic (limited ability to read, write, and speak English and the second language) and medical interpreter level. Five staff-interpreter focus groups discussed experiences as interpreters and with language test. A total of 840 dual-role staff interpreters were tested for Spanish (75%), Chinese (12%), and Russian (5%) language competence. Most dual-role interpreters serve as administrative assistants (39%), medical assistants (27%), and clinical staff (17%). Two percent did not pass, 21% passed at basic level, 77% passed at medical interpreter level. Staff that passed at the basic level was prone to interpretation errors, including omissions and word confusion. Focus groups revealed acceptance of exam process and feelings of increased validation in interpreter role. We found that about 1 in 5 dual-role staff interpreters at a large health care organization had insufficient bilingual skills to serve as interpreters in a medical encounter. Health care organizations that depend on dual-role staff interpreters should consider assessing staff English and second language

  13. Revisiting Anomaly-based Network Intrusion Detection Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolzoni, D.

    2009-01-01

    Intrusion detection systems (IDSs) are well-known and widely-deployed security tools to detect cyber-attacks and malicious activities in computer systems and networks. A signature-based IDS works similar to anti-virus software. It employs a signature database of known attacks, and a successful match

  14. Revisiting the dose calculation methodologies in European decision support systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Kasper Grann; Roos, Per; Hou, Xiaolin

    2012-01-01

    in connection with management of the consequences of other types of contaminating incidents, including ‘dirty bomb’ explosions. This would require a number of new modelling features and parametric changes. Also for nuclear power plant preparedness a number of revisions of the decision support systems are called...

  15. Autocorrelation in queuing network-type production systems - revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Erland Hejn

    2007-01-01

    In managing production systems, a strong emphasis is placed on the reduction of variance in specific transformation processes (e.g. for quality control purposes) and on controlling the level of variability in general, as for instance with the Bullwhip effect. However, the possible disturbing inte...

  16. Autocorrelation in queuing network type production systems - revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Erland Hejn

    -production systems (Takahashi and Nakamura, 1998) establishes that autocorrelation plays definitely a non-negligible role in relation to the dimensioning as well as functioning of Kanban-controlled production flow lines . This must logically either imply that production managers are missing an important aspect...

  17. Representational System Predicate Use and Convergence in Counseling: Gloria Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Mary Ann; Johnson, Marilyn

    1984-01-01

    Analayzed transcripts of Three Approaches to Psychotherapy (Shostrom, 1966) for counselor and client representational system predicate use. Although different patterns of predicate use emerged, only limited support for Neurolinguistic Programming theory was found. The findings of different patterns of predicate use were related to convergence and…

  18. The role of glycans in immune evasion: the human fetoembryonic defence system hypothesis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Gary F

    2014-03-01

    Emerging data suggest that mechanisms to evade the human immune system may be shared by the conceptus, tumour cells, persistent pathogens and viruses. It is therefore timely to revisit the human fetoembryonic defense system (Hu-FEDS) hypothesis that was proposed in two papers in the 1990s. The initial paper suggested that glycoconjugates expressed in the human reproductive system inhibited immune responses directed against gametes and the developing human by employing their carbohydrate sequences as functional groups. These glycoconjugates were proposed to block specific binding interactions and interact with lectins linked to signal transduction pathways that modulated immune cell functions. The second article suggested that aggressive tumour cells and persistent pathogens (HIV, H. pylori, schistosomes) either mimicked or acquired the same carbohydrate functional groups employed in this system to evade immune responses. This subterfuge enabled these pathogens and tumour cells to couple their survival to the human reproductive imperative. The Hu-FEDS model has been repeatedly tested since its inception. Data relevant to this model have also been obtained in other studies. Herein, the Hu-FEDS hypothesis is revisited in the context of these more recent findings. Far more supportive evidence for this model now exists than when it was first proposed, and many of the original predictions have been validated. This type of subterfuge by pathogens and tumour cells likely applies to all sexually reproducing metazoans that must protect their gametes from immune responses. Intervention in these pathological states will likely remain problematic until this system of immune evasion is fully understood and appreciated.

  19. BKP and CKP revisited: the odd KP system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimakis, Aristophanes; Müller-Hoissen, Folkert

    2009-01-01

    By restricting a linear system for the KP hierarchy to those independent variables t n with odd n, its compatibility (Zakharov-Shabat conditions) leads to the 'odd KP hierarchy'. The latter consists of pairs of equations for two dependent variables, taking values in an (typically noncommutative) associative algebra. If the algebra is commutative, the odd KP hierarchy is known to admit reductions to the BKP and the CKP hierarchy. We approach the odd KP hierarchy and its relation to BKP and CKP in different ways, and address the question of whether noncommutative versions of the BKP and the CKP equation (and some of their reductions) exist. In particular, we derive a functional representation of a linear system for the odd KP hierarchy, which in the commutative case produces functional representations of the BKP and CKP hierarchies in terms of a tau function. Furthermore, we consider a functional representation of the KP hierarchy that involves a second (auxiliary) dependent variable and features the odd KP hierarchy directly as a subhierarchy. A method to generate large classes of exact solutions to the KP hierarchy from solutions to a linear matrix ODE system, via a hierarchy of matrix Riccati equations, then also applies to the odd KP hierarchy, and this in turn can be exploited, in particular, to obtain solutions to the BKP and CKP hierarchies

  20. Revisiting Street Intersections Using Slot-Based Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remi Tachet

    Full Text Available Since their appearance at the end of the 19th century, traffic lights have been the primary mode of granting access to road intersections. Today, this centuries-old technology is challenged by advances in intelligent transportation, which are opening the way to new solutions built upon slot-based systems similar to those commonly used in aerial traffic: what we call Slot-based Intersections (SIs. Despite simulation-based evidence of the potential benefits of SIs, a comprehensive, analytical framework to compare their relative performance with traffic lights is still lacking. Here, we develop such a framework. We approach the problem in a novel way, by generalizing classical queuing theory. Having defined safety conditions, we characterize capacity and delay of SIs. In the 2-road crossing configuration, we provide a capacity-optimal SI management system. For arbitrary intersection configurations, near-optimal solutions are developed. Results theoretically show that transitioning from a traffic light system to SI has the potential of doubling capacity and significantly reducing delays. This suggests a reduction of non-linear dynamics induced by intersection bottlenecks, with positive impact on the road network. Such findings can provide transportation engineers and planners with crucial insights as they prepare to manage the transition towards a more intelligent transportation infrastructure in cities.

  1. Operational Work System Design and Staff Performance in the Nigerian Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Ejikeme Isichei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study investigated the impact of operational work system design on staff performance in selected construction firms in Nigeria. Research Design & Methods: The study used primary data gathered with the use of a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire format administered to 138 respondents. A hypothesis was postulated to test the significance of the research problem. Data analysis was carried out using correlation and multiple regression analysis which proved the significance of the alternative hypothesis as a result of testing the hypothesis. Findings: The findings show that there is a significant relationship between operational work system design and staff performance. The study concludes that operational job design can be advanced as a motivation tool, which is non-monetary in nature, to improve staff performance. Implications & Recommendations: A key drive to improve performance is the satisfaction of staff coupled with an outstanding operational job design which takes into consideration the total physical and mental well-being of staff and its interaction with other organisational factors. The study recommends, among others, that there should be active participation of staff in the design of work in the organisation. Contribution & Value Added: The study provides an empirical approach to enhancing performance in the construction industry and thereby developing an indigenous firm to compete favourably on a growing market.

  2. Preventing work-related stress among staff working in children's cancer Principal Treatment Centres in the UK: a brief survey of staff support systems and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, B; Gibson, F; Bayliss, J; Mukherjee, S

    2018-03-01

    Growing evidence of the association between health professionals' well-being and patient and organisational outcomes points to the need for effective staff support. This paper reports a brief survey of the UK's children's cancer Principal Treatment Centres (PTCs) regarding staff support systems and practices. A short on-line questionnaire, administered in 2012-2013, collected information about the availability of staff support interventions which seek to prevent work-related stress among different members of the multi-disciplinary team (MDT). It was completed by a member of staff with, where required, assistance from colleagues. All PTCs (n = 19) participated. Debriefs following a patient death was the most frequently reported staff support practice. Support groups were infrequently mentioned. There was wide variability between PTCs, and between professional groups, regarding the number and type of interventions available. Doctors appear to be least likely to have access to support. A few Centres routinely addressed work-related stress in wider staff management strategies. Two Centres had developed a bespoke intervention. Very few Centres were reported to actively raise awareness of support available from their hospital's Occupational Health department. A minority of PTCs had expert input regarding staff support from clinical psychology/liaison psychiatry. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Cancer Care Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Staff roster for 1979: National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of resumes from the current staff of the National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems. The Center, founded in January 1976, is one of four areas within the Department of Energy and Environment at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The emphasis of programs at the Center is on energy policy and planning studies at the regional, national, and international levels, involving quantitative, interdisciplinary studies of the technological, economic, social, and environmental aspects of energy systems. To perform these studies the Center has assembled a staff of experts in the areas of science, technology, economics planning, health and safety, information systems, and quantitative analysis.

  4. Metering revisited - innovative concepts for electrical monitoring and reporting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stebbins, W.L.

    1993-01-01

    For the first three-quarters of this century, the monitoring of electrical power and energy has been dominated by conventional electromechanical voltmeters, ammeters, and watthour meters. Only in the last decade have solid state microprocessor-based distal devices become available for application in the commercial and industrial marketplace. These new devices perform the tasks of up to 24 conventional indicating meters for about the price of three. Communication via a RS-485 data link to a PC allows monitoring of up to 70 values including times and dates, min/max history, temperature indications, and energy management alarms. Complex waveform analysis can also be carried out for harmonic problems typically associated with adjustable speed drives that have been installed on fans and pumps for energy management savings. Since metering systems are absolutely essential to a successful Energy Management Process, consideration should be given to applying the latest in metering technology. It should be noted that meters by themselves do not save money, they only cost money to install and maintain. Proper monitoring, recording, and analysis lead to corrective actions which produce the desired result of reducing energy per unit of production or per service performed. Experience has shown that a 1 to 2% reduction can be achieved after meters are installed just by letting the users know that they are being monitored. Up to a 5% reduction can occur when the users then become proactive toward better managing of their energy. Ultimately up to 10% reduction can be achieved when metering is tied directly to the process through a PLC or DCS, in a closed loop automated process control arrangement

  5. Terrestrial nitrogen cycling in Earth system models revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Benjamin D; Prentice, I. Colin; Cornell, Sarah; Davies-Barnard, T; Finzi, Adrien; Franklin, Oskar; Janssens, Ivan; Larmola, Tuula; Manzoni, Stefano; Näsholm, Torgny; Raven, John; Rebel, Karin; Reed, Sasha C.; Vicca, Sara; Wiltshire, Andy; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the degree to which nitrogen (N) availability limits land carbon (C) uptake under global environmental change represents an unresolved challenge. First-generation ‘C-only’vegetation models, lacking explicit representations of N cycling,projected a substantial and increasing land C sink under rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This prediction was questioned for not taking into account the potentially limiting effect of N availability, which is necessary for plant growth (Hungate et al.,2003). More recent global models include coupled C and N cycles in land ecosystems (C–N models) and are widely assumed to be more realistic. However, inclusion of more processes has not consistently improved their performance in capturing observed responses of the global C cycle (e.g. Wenzel et al., 2014). With the advent of a new generation of global models, including coupled C, N, and phosphorus (P) cycling, model complexity is sure to increase; but model reliability may not, unless greater attention is paid to the correspondence of model process representations ande mpirical evidence. It was in this context that the ‘Nitrogen Cycle Workshop’ at Dartington Hall, Devon, UK was held on 1–5 February 2016. Organized by I. Colin Prentice and Benjamin D. Stocker (Imperial College London, UK), the workshop was funded by the European Research Council,project ‘Earth system Model Bias Reduction and assessing Abrupt Climate change’ (EMBRACE). We gathered empirical ecologists and ecosystem modellers to identify key uncertainties in terrestrial C–N cycling, and to discuss processes that are missing or poorly represented in current models.

  6. Lean engineering for planning systems redesign - staff participation by simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, D.J.; Pool, A.; Wijngaard, J.; Mason, S.J.; Hill, R.R.; Moench, L.; Rose, O.

    2008-01-01

    Lean manufacturing aims at flexible and efficient manufacturing systems by reducing waste in all forms, such as, production of defective parts, excess inventory, unnecessary processing steps, and unnecessary movements of people or materials. Recent research stresses the need to include planning

  7. Revisiting the age of enlightenment from a collective decision making systems perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Marko A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Watkins, Jennifer H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The ideals of the eighteenth century's Age of Enlightenment are the foundation of modern democracies. The era was characterized by thinkers who promoted progressive social reforms that opposed the long-established aristocracies and monarchies of the time. Prominent examples of such reforms include the establishment of inalienable human rights, self-governing republics, and market capitalism. Twenty-first century democratic nations can benefit from revisiting the systems developed during the Enlightenment and reframing them within the techno-social context of the Information Age. This article explores the application of social algorithms that make use of Thomas Paine's (English: 1737--1809) representatives, Adam Smith's (Scottish: 1723--1790) self-interested actors, and Marquis de Condorcet's (French: 1743--1794) optimal decision making groups. It is posited that technology-enabled social algorithms can better realize the ideals articulated during the Enlightenment.

  8. An Evaluation of Strategies for Training Staff to Implement the Picture Exchange Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Clarissa S.; Dunning, Johnna L.; Rehfeldt, Ruth Anne

    2011-01-01

    The picture exchange communication system (PECS) is a functional communication system frequently used with individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders who experience severe language delays (Frost & Bondy, 2002). Few empirical investigations have evaluated strategies for training direct care staff how to effectively implement PECS with…

  9. A Case for Staff Development in the California Community College System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrakas, Lefteris

    Using Kurt Lewin's concept of "a dynamic balance of forces", the direction and strength of change tendencies related to staff development in California community colleges were identified through force-analysis. The forces of heritage/tradition, awareness, money, organizational climate, time, reward system, and formal system were examined for their…

  10. Development of a staff recall system for mass casualty incidents using cell phone text messaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Richard H; Ekbatani, Ali; Kaplan, Javier; Shechter, Ronen; Grunwald, Zvi

    2010-03-01

    After a mass casualty incident (MCI), rapid mobilization of hospital personnel is required because of an expected surge of victims. Risk assessment of our department's manual phone tree recall system revealed multiple weaknesses that would limit an effective response. Because cell phone use is widespread within the department, we developed and tested a staff recall system, based in our anesthesia information management system (AIMS), using Short Message Service (SMS) text messaging. We sent test text messages to anesthesia staff members' cell phone numbers, determined the distance from their home to the hospital, and stored this information in our AIMS. Latency testing for the time from transmission of SMS test messages from the server to return of an e-mail reply was determined at 2 different times on 2 different dates, 1 of which was a busy holiday weekend, using volunteers within the department. Two unannounced simulated disaster recall drills were conducted, with text messages sent asking for the anticipated time to return to the hospital. A timeline of available staff on site was determined. Reasons for failure to respond to the disaster notification message were tabulated. Latency data were fit by a log-normal distribution with an average of 82 seconds from message transmission to e-mail reply. Replies to the simulated disaster alert were received from approximately 50% of staff, with 16 projecting that they would have been able to be back at the hospital within 30 minutes on both dates. There would have been 21 and 23 staff in-house at 30 minutes, and 32 and 37 staff in-house at 60 minutes on the first and second test date, respectively, including in-house staff. Of the nonresponders to the alert, 48% indicated that their cell phone was not with them or was turned off, whereas 22% missed the message. Our SMS staff recall system is likely to be able to rapidly mobilize sufficient numbers of anesthesia personnel in response to an MCI, but actual performance

  11. The implications of how school staff handle information for the usage of school information systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, Arend J.

    1996-01-01

    This chapter starts with a description of the various ways in which computer-assisted school information systems (SISs) can support school staff. Subsequently, the results of a review of the research concerning the features of information handling at teacher and at school management level are

  12. Experts on Super Innovators: Understanding Staff Adoption of Learning Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Jane; Aho, Anne-Maria

    2018-01-01

    Learning management systems (LMSs) are widely used in higher education and offer a gateway to innovative, technology-enhanced teaching and learning. However, many university staff still choose not to adopt them or do not explore the more creative functionality. Previous research has developed models of technology adoption which map observed…

  13. The Evolution of Confusion: soft systems methodology and social theory revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Houghton

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Soft Systems Methodology (SSM is a potentially powerful tool for improving the management of the complex social systems aspect of Information Systems. Yet if it is to be employed effectively IS managers need to understand the theory of social systems that makes SSM a meaningful practical approach. However finding out about that social theory is not straightforward. It is 20 years since the first discussions of the social reality implied by Soft Systems Methodology (SSM and the area has been given little attention since. Yet SSM itself has progressed dramatically since those first critiques of its underpinning social theory were first developed. This paper revisits the area in order to provide a contemporary perspective and foundation for future development. It reveals apparent weaknesses in the research debate about SSM and social theory, and shows how the evolution of SSM has apparently been affected by that debate. SSM is introduced and examined according to the primary literature and re-evaluated using Burrell and Morgan's four-paradigm matrix of social theory paradigms in order to understand the social reality implied by SSM. The paper examines criticisms of SSM, the recent evolution of SSM, and suggests future directions for development.

  14. Advancing the IS Curricula: The Identification of Important Communication Skills Needed by IS Staff during Systems Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ruth A.; Luse, Donna W.

    2004-01-01

    Although research indicates communication is important among information systems (IS) staff, users, and managers to ensure successful development projects, the ineffective communication skills of IS staff are often cited as a possible cause of failed IS projects. To develop effective systems, communication between IS users and systems developers…

  15. Re-visiting the Endocannabinoid System and Its Therapeutic Potential in Obesity and Associated Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, Joyce M; Woolcott, Orison

    2017-09-14

    The purpose of the review was to revisit the possibility of the endocannabinoid system being a therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity by focusing on the peripheral roles in regulating appetite and energy metabolism. Previous studies with the global cannabinoid receptor blocker rimonabant, which has both central and peripheral properties, showed that this drug has beneficial effects on cardiometabolic function but severe adverse psychiatric side effects. Consequently, focus has shifted to peripherally restricted cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor blockers as possible therapeutic agents that mitigate or eliminate the untoward effects in the central nervous system. Targeting the endocannabinoid system using novel peripheral CB1 receptor blockers with negligible penetrance across the blood-brain barrier may prove to be effective therapy for obesity and its co-morbidities. Perhaps the future of blockers targeting CB1 receptors will be tissue-specific neutral antagonists (e.g., skeletal muscle specific to treat peripheral insulin resistance, adipocyte-specific to treat fat excess, liver-specific to treat fatty liver and hepatic insulin resistance).

  16. [Opinions and attitudes of clinical staff on systems for the assessment and treatment of children's pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullan, A M; Fernández, E; Badia, M; Lorente, F; Malmierca, F; Zapatero, I

    2013-08-01

    Many factors affect the assessment and treatment of pain, among them being the knowledge and attitudes of clinical staff. The goal of this work was to determine the opinions and attitudes of clinical staff from two hospitals on the different aspects of the assessment and treatment of children's pain. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire issued to clinical staff. The questionnaire was given to the professionals, doctors, and nursing staff of the paediatric services of two hospitals, and to an incidental sample of paediatric doctors. Of the 146 questionnaires sent out, 105 were completed. Participants indicated that standardised scales and physiological recordings were the least frequently used methods to assess children's pain. Participants considered that pharmacological techniques for the treatment of pain were used more frequently than non-pharmacological techniques, at all ages. Participants acknowledged being significantly more knowledgeable about pharmacological methods to relieve paediatric pain than about non-pharmacological methods. There is margin for improvement in systems for the assessment and treatment of children's pain as regards the more frequent and standardised use of techniques and standardised tools for the assessment of pain, and the greater administration of non-pharmacological strategies for its treatment. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of Productivity Improvement Act for Clinical Staff Working in the Health System: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vali, Leila; Tabatabaee, Seyed Saeed; Kalhor, Rohollah; Amini, Saeed; Kiaei, Mohammad Zakaria

    2015-06-12

    The productivity of healthcare staff is one of the main issues for health managers. This study explores the concept of executive regulation of Productivity Improvement Act of clinical staff in health. In this study phenomenological methodology has been employed. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews and focus group composed of 10 hospital experts and experts in human resources department working in headquarter of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences and 16 nursing managers working in public and private hospitals of Mashhad using purposive sampling. Findings were analyzed using Colaizzi's seven step method. The strengths of this Act included increasing spirit of hope in nurses, paying attention to quality of nursing care and decreasing problems related to the work plan development. Some of the weaknesses of Productivity Improvement Act included lack of required executive mechanisms, lack of considering nursing productivity indicator, increasing non-public hospitals problems, discrimination between employees, and removal of resting on night shifts. Suggestions were introduced to strengthen the Act such as increased organizational posts, use of a coefficient for wage in unusual work shifts and consideration of a performance indicator. The results may be used as a proper tool for long term management planning at organization level. Finally, if high quality care by health system staff is expected, in the first step, we should take care of them through proper policy making and focusing on occupational characteristics of the target group so that it does not result in discrimination among the staff.

  18. Feasibility of E-learning management system for the staff of Tehran Municipality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Talebzadeh Nobarian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Empowering employees in specialized and general qualifications fields is required for urban management organization (Tehran Municipality. Planning and establishment of comprehensive system of electronic learning is considered the main goal of human resource and educational managers. . This study tried to investigate the feasibility and execution of electronic learning courses for in-service staff. Training system for in-service staff is the most effective method in educating staff. Implantation of the system includes five necessary variables such as, hardware, software, electronic content, human resources and cultural proceedings. Initially, the main variables and the associated data of 550 people were recorded in the Likert-type scale through the information on the questionnaires. Then correlation analysis, variance and multiple regressions were performed. Description of data containing the collection of general characteristics of respondents, including managers, expertise of human resource and educational managers of Tehran municipality were summarized. The results indicated that the correlation coefficient of variables was R = 0.804 which represents the total correlation of the model. The next output showed the certainty of a linear relationship between the variables through analysis of variance. Then according to the standardized regression coefficients and the initial linear regression equation, the model with five variables was drawn and the effectiveness of each of the variables on the dependent variable (the deployment of Electronic-learning system was examined and interpreted.

  19. Crisis management systems: staff nurses demand more support from their supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2008-08-01

    This study illustrates the contributions of the necessity, comprehensiveness, and difference (between necessity and comprehensiveness) levels of crisis management systems to participants' general satisfaction with their working institutions' nursing-related crisis management activities. Crisis management systems include strategic, technical/structural, assessment, public communication, and psychological/cultural aspects. An effective institutional crisis management system might help to decrease the number of incidents related to medical disputes or to prevent a crisis from worsening and becoming disastrous. A cross-sectional survey was administered during a nursing conference held in Taipei, Taiwan, on June 27, 2005. Two hundred ninety questionnaires were distributed, and 121 were retrieved (response rate, 41.7%; nursing administrators and staff). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Ordinal logistic regression analyses show that being a public hospital managed by the government and having more difference on the strategic aspect between the necessity and comprehensiveness levels contribute to lower satisfaction with nursing-related crisis management activities (Nagelkerke R(2) = .441). In addition, staff nurses perceive higher necessity levels on all five aspects compared to nursing administrators. This study provides important insights into how the policies and activities of a medical institution's crisis management system can be prioritized and implemented. It is also important for students in nursing programs and for currently employed nurses to learn how to manage disputes related to nursing practice, so that early resolution can be achieved and crises can be avoided. These results suggest that staff nurses demand more support from their supervisors.

  20. Information Systems and Corporate Memory: design for staff turn-over

    OpenAIRE

    Colin Sharp; Neil Lewis

    1993-01-01

    The "information age" is reliant upon the information skill-base of people and the storage and access of complete data. Staff turn-over and "down-sizing" as well as the rate of organisational change places increased pressure on the designers of corporate information systems to keep up with the organizational demands. Especially relevant are the "soft" aspects of the corporate information needs of organizations. The term "corporate memory" is introduced to explain the relatively informal colle...

  1. 77 FR 41402 - California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of FERC Staff Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives notice that on the... participants and staff's attendance is part of the Commission's ongoing outreach efforts. The teleconferences...

  2. GIS management system of power plant staff based on wireless fidelity indoor location technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting

    2017-05-01

    The labor conditions and environment of electric power production are quite complicated. It is very difficult to realize the real-time supervision of the employees' working conditions and safety. Using the existing base stations in the power plant, the wireless fidelity network is established to realize the wireless coverage of the work site. We can use mobile phone to communicate and achieve positioning. The main content of this project is based on the special environment of the power plant, designed a suitable for ordinary Android mobile phone indoor wireless fidelity positioning system, real-time positioning and record the scene of each employee's movement trajectory, has achieved real-time staff check Gang, Staff in place, and for the safety of employees to provide a guarantee.

  3. Turning Over Turnover: The Evaluation of a Staff Scheduling System in a Community-Based Program for Adults with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouse, Michael C.; Carroll-Hernandez, Tammy A.; Sherman, James A.; Sheldon, Jan B.

    2004-01-01

    Human service programs often have major problems ensuring that all direct-care staff positions are filled and keeping staff members after they are hired. Work schedules may have an effect on maintaining the longevity of staff. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a revised direct-care staff-scheduling system in community homes…

  4. The impact of systems redesign on staff, patient, and financial outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry-Walker, J

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the impact of a change initiative using the strategies of inpatient bed consolidation and patient population reaggregation on staff, patient, and financial outcomes. Bed consolidation and patient population reaggregation are extensively used strategies in the hospital industry. However, the state of science as it relates to these two strategies is limited, with no studies measuring the effect of bed consolidation, patient reaggregation, or both in isolation of multiple other concurrent care model changes. An exploratory, single case, longitudinal field study design with embedded levels of analysis was used for the study. The impact associated with the reaggregation and consolidation of the acute inpatient system of care was evaluated at the organization, the acute inpatient nursing unit, and the individual nursing staff member levels. This article reports the outcomes found at both the nursing unit level and the staff member level on three general medicine nursing units. Baseline nursing unit-level data are reported from fiscal year 1994-1995 and the first half of fiscal year 1995-1996 (July 1995 through December 1995); data from January 1996 through June 1996 reflect the planning phase of the project. Outcomes related to the change process are reported from the time period January 1996 through June 1997. Staff perceptions of multiple variables were measured at five different data points over a 2-year period. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected. Unit-level cost and hours per patient day (HPPD) increased during or immediately after the merger of major patient populations on two of the study units; no significant variation was found in medication errors or patient falls. The quantitative and qualitative data analysis of the nursing staff member surveys revealed a nursing staff that was dissatisfied with many aspects of their job, worried about job security, had low morale, and had many concerns about the

  5. Implementation of Ray Safe i2 System for staff dose measuring in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershan, Vesna; Atsovska, Violeta

    2013-01-01

    Interventional radiology procedures usually delivered the highest radiation dose to the patients as well as to medical personal. Beside another factors like patient size, fluoroscopy time, machine calibration etc., a good clinical practice has strong effects to staff and patient’s radiation dose. Materials and methods: In August 2012, a Ray Safe i2 system was installed in a private hospital in Skopje. The main purpose of this dosimetry system is to provide real time indication for the current exposure level of the medical personal. Knowing that, the staff has prerequisites to adjust their behavior to minimize unnecessary exposure like changing distance from exposed volume, C-ram angulations, field of view etc. and on this way to develop a good clinical practice. The Ray Safe i2 system is consisted by ten digital dosimeters, two dock stations, real time display, dose viewer and dose manager software. During interventional procedures, each involved staff wears dosimeter which measures and records X-Ray exposure every second and transfer the data wirelessly to the real time display. Color indication bars (green, yellow, red) represents the intensity of the currently received exposure, whereas green zone indicates < 0.2 mSv/h, yellow zone from 0.2 to 2 mSv/h and red zone indications from 2 to 20 mSv/h. Additionally, accumulated dose per individual is displayed next to the color indication bars. By using the software, information about personal dose history, such as annual dose, dose per particular session, hour, day or week, can be viewed and analyzed. Results: In this work it was found that staff accumulated doses were constantly increased over time, but reported number of procedures does not correspond to this tendency. Our assumption is that there is a misleading between reported number and actual performed procedures. Doctor1 received 55 times more dose than Doctor2 and Nurse1 received 11 to 3 times more dose than another Nurses. It was found a correlation of R2

  6. Chairmen Joint Chiefs of Staff's Leadership Using the Joint Strategic Planning System in the 1990s: Recommendations for Strategic Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meinhart, Richard

    2003-01-01

    This monograph examines how the three Chairmen of the Joint Chiefs of Staff adapted and used the Joint Strategic Planning System from 1990 to 2000 to provide advice to the Secretary of Defense and to the...

  7. Assessing the impact of a new health sector pay system upon NHS staff in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchan James

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pay and pay systems are a critical element in any health sector human resource strategy. Changing a pay system can be one strategy to achieve or sustain organizational change. This paper reports on the design and implementation of a completely new pay system in the National Health Service (NHS in England. 'Agenda for Change' constituted the largest-ever attempt to introduce a new pay system in the UK public services, covering more than one million staff. Its objectives were to improve the delivery of patient care as well as enhance staff recruitment, retention and motivation, and to facilitate new ways of working. Methods This study was the first independent assessment of the impact of Agenda for Change at a local and national level. The methods used in the research were a literature review; review of 'grey' unpublished documentation provided by key stakeholders in the process; analysis of available data; interviews with key national informants (representing government, employers and trade unions, and case studies conducted with senior human resource managers in ten NHS hospitals in England Results Most of the NHS trust managers interviewed were in favour of Agenda for Change, believing it would assist in delivering improvements in patient care and staff experience. The main benefits highlighted were: 'fairness', moving different staff groups on to harmonized conditions; equal pay claim 'protection'; and scope to introduce new roles and working practices. Conclusion Agenda for Change took several years to design, and has only recently been implemented. Its very scale and central importance to NHS costs and delivery of care argues for a full assessment at an early stage so that lessons can be learned and any necessary changes made. This paper highlights weaknesses in evaluation and limitations in progress. The absence of systematically derived and applied impact indicators makes it difficult to assess impact and impact

  8. Prescriber and staff perceptions of an electronic prescribing system in primary care: a qualitative assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sittig Dean F

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The United States (US Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 has spurred adoption of electronic health records. The corresponding meaningful use criteria proposed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services mandates use of computerized provider order entry (CPOE systems. Yet, adoption in the US and other Western countries is low and descriptions of successful implementations are primarily from the inpatient setting; less frequently the ambulatory setting. We describe prescriber and staff perceptions of implementation of a CPOE system for medications (electronic- or e-prescribing system in the ambulatory setting. Methods Using a cross-sectional study design, we conducted eight focus groups at three primary care sites in an independent medical group. Each site represented a unique stage of e-prescribing implementation - pre/transition/post. We used a theoretically based, semi-structured questionnaire to elicit physician (n = 17 and staff (n = 53 perceptions of implementation of the e-prescribing system. We conducted a thematic analysis of focus group discussions using formal qualitative analytic techniques (i.e. deductive framework and grounded theory. Two coders independently coded to theoretical saturation and resolved discrepancies through discussions. Results Ten themes emerged that describe perceptions of e-prescribing implementation: 1 improved availability of clinical information resulted in prescribing efficiencies and more coordinated care; 2 improved documentation resulted in safer care; 3 efficiencies were gained by using fewer paper charts; 4 organizational support facilitated adoption; 5 transition required time; resulted in workload shift to staff; 6 hardware configurations and network stability were important in facilitating workflow; 7 e-prescribing was time-neutral or time-saving; 8 changes in patient interactions enhanced patient care but required education; 9 pharmacy

  9. Effect of a 2-tier rapid response system on patient outcome and staff satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Leanne M; Chaboyer, Wendy; Vaux, Amanda; Crouch, Shannon; Burmeister, Elizabeth; Daly, Michael; Joyce, Chris

    2015-08-01

    Rapid response systems (RRS) have been recommended as a strategy to prevent and treat deterioration in acute care patients. Questions regarding the most effective characteristics of RRS and strategies for implementing these systems remain. The aims of this study were to (i) describe the structures and processes used to implement a 2-tier RRS, (ii) determine the comparative prevalence of deteriorating patients and incidence of unplanned intensive care unit (ICU) admission and cardiac arrest prior to and after implementation of the RRS, and (iii) determine clinician satisfaction with the RRS. A quasi-experimental pre-test, post-test design was used to assess patient related outcomes and clinician satisfaction prior to and after implementation of a 2-tier RRS in a tertiary metropolitan hospital. Primary components of the RRS included an ICU Outreach Nurse and a Rapid Response Team. Prevalence of deteriorating patients was assessed through a point prevalence assessment and chart audit. Incidence of unplanned admission to ICU and cardiac arrests were accessed from routine hospital databases. Clinician satisfaction was measured through surveys. Prevalence of patients who met medical emergency call criteria without current treatment reduced from 3% prior to RRS implementation to 1% after implementation; a similar reduction from 9% to 3% was identified on chart review. The number of unplanned admissions to ICU increased slightly from 17.4/month prior to RRS implementation to 18.1/month after implementation (p=0.45) while cardiac arrests reduced slightly from 7.5/month to 5.6/month (p=0.22) but neither of these changes were statistically significant. Staff satisfaction with the RRS was generally high. The 2-tier RRS was accessed by staff to assist with care of deteriorating patients in a large, tertiary hospital. High levels of satisfaction have been reported by clinical staff. Copyright © 2014 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  10. Perceptions and attitudes of hospital staff toward paging system and the use of mobile phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroon, Muhammad; Yasin, Faiza; Eckel, Rachael; Walker, Frank

    2010-10-01

    Our objective was to document the pattern of mobile phone usage by medical staff in a hospital setting, and to explore any perceived benefits (such as improved communications) associated with mobile phones. This cross-sectional survey was conducted in Waterford Regional Hospital, Ireland, where bleep is the official system of communication. All non-consultant hospital doctors, of medical disciplines only, were asked to participate. The questionnaire was designed to explore the pattern and different aspects of mobile phone usage. At the time of study, there were sixty medical junior doctors, and the response rate was 100 percent. All participants used mobile phones while at work, and also for hospital-related work. For 98.3 percent the mobile phone was their main mode of communication while in the hospital. Sixty-two percent (n = 37) made 6-10 calls daily purely for work-related business, and this comprised of ≥ 80 percent of their daily usage of mobile phones. For 98 percent of participants, most phone calls were work-related. Regarding reasons for using mobile phones, all reported that using mobile phone is quicker for communication. Mobile phone usage is very common among the medical personnel, and this is regarded as a more efficient means of communication for mobile staff than the hospital paging system.

  11. Perceptions and attitudes of hospital staff toward paging system and the use of mobile phones.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: Our objective was to document the pattern of mobile phone usage by medical staff in a hospital setting, and to explore any perceived benefits (such as improved communications) associated with mobile phones. METHODS: This cross-sectional survey was conducted in Waterford Regional Hospital, Ireland, where bleep is the official system of communication. All non-consultant hospital doctors, of medical disciplines only, were asked to participate. The questionnaire was designed to explore the pattern and different aspects of mobile phone usage. RESULTS: At the time of study, there were sixty medical junior doctors, and the response rate was 100 percent. All participants used mobile phones while at work, and also for hospital-related work. For 98.3 percent the mobile phone was their main mode of communication while in the hospital. Sixty-two percent (n = 37) made 6-10 calls daily purely for work-related business, and this comprised of >\\/= 80 percent of their daily usage of mobile phones. For 98 percent of participants, most phone calls were work-related. Regarding reasons for using mobile phones, all reported that using mobile phone is quicker for communication.Conclusions: Mobile phone usage is very common among the medical personnel, and this is regarded as a more efficient means of communication for mobile staff than the hospital paging system.

  12. Beyond the Staff: “Alternative” Systems in the Graphical Representation of Organized Sound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Cámara de Landa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a reflection on the limits of the staff in the representation of organized sound is briefly presented, followed by the consideration of the proposals that some ethnomusicologists have developed to highlight particular aspects of music. Some antecedents are provided, such as the synoptic transcription (Constantin Brăiloiu and the paradigmatic transcription (Nicolas Ruwet. Other proposals will be discussed, like the graphical representation of musical structure (Bernard Lortat-Jacob, Hugo Zemp or the use of spectrograms (Charles Seeger, Mireille Hellfer, Lortat-Jacob, Grazia Tuzi, graphic devices (Charles Adams, musemes (Philip Tagg, sonograms (Enrique Cámara, frame by frame musical transcription (Gerhard Kubik, and local systems of notation. According to these proposals, the graphical representation of music beyond the staff maintains its efficiency in current ethnomusicology (with different objectives and even different targets. Moreover, I will argue that it is necessary to take into consideration the place occupied by the use of these tools in the tensions and interactions between etic and emic perspectives, and the need to reconcile the internal consistency required for any system of visual representation of sound, with the need to make permanently flexible proposals based on intercultural dialogue.

  13. Climatology and trend of wind power resources in China and its surrounding regions: a revisit using Climate Forecast System Reanalysis data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejiang Yu; Shiyuan Zhong; Xindi Bian; Warren E. Heilman

    2015-01-01

    The mean climatology, seasonal and interannual variability and trend of wind speeds at the hub height (80 m) of modern wind turbines over China and its surrounding regions are revisited using 33-year (1979–2011) wind data from the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) that has many improvements including higher spatial resolution over previous global reanalysis...

  14. The merits of a staff ombudsman in higher education : a plea for the widespread introduction of a Staff Ombudsman in the Higher Education system in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herfs, Paul; Teppema, Sytske

    2014-01-01

    The position of Staff Ombudsman remains virtually unknown within higher education. This article examines the duties, powers and impact that a Staff Ombudsman can have. Should the position of Staff Ombudsman become a more widespread phenomenon? In other words, what benefits does the appointment of a

  15. Investigating patient safety culture across a health system: multilevel modelling of differences associated with service types and staff demographics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Blanca; Westbrook, Mary T; Dunn, Adam G; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2012-08-01

    To use multilevel modelling to compare the patient safety cultures of types of services across a health system and to determine whether differences found can be accounted for by staffs' professions, organizational roles, ages and type of patient care provided. Application of a hierarchical two-level regression model. All services in the South Australian public health system. Approximately half of the health staff (n = 14 054) in the 46 organizations, classified into 18 types of service, which made up the South Australian public health system. Staff completed the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire. Attitudes regarding Teamwork Climate, Safety Climate, Job Satisfaction, Stress Recognition, Perception of Management and Working Conditions in participants' workplaces. All SAQ indices showed statistically significant although modest variations according to service type. However, most of these differences were not accounted for by the differences in the demographic composition of services' staff. Most favourable safety attitudes were found in the breast screening, primary/community health services, community nursing and metropolitan non-teaching hospitals. Poorer cultures were reported in the psychiatric hospital, mental health, metropolitan ambulance services and top-level teaching hospitals. Demographic differences in safety attitudes were observed; particularly, clinical, senior managerial, aged care and older staff held more favourable attitudes. Differences in staff attitudes have been demonstrated at a macro-level across the type of health services but for the most part, differences could not be explained by staffing composition.

  16. Perception of performance management system by academic staff in an open distance learning higher education environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther M. Maimela

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Institutions of higher learning in South Africa are fast embracing performance management system (PMS as a mechanism for the achievement of teaching excellence and enhancement of research productivity. However, literature provided evidence to show that application of PMS in the private sector had failed to drive competition, efficiency and productivity. Research purpose: The main purpose of this article was to evaluate the perception of academic staff members of an open distance learning institution regarding the implementation of a PMS. Motivation for the study: PMS as a mechanism through which performance of academics is measured has been described as inconsistent with the long tradition of academic freedom, scholarship and collegiality in the academy. Moreso, previous research on the implementation of PMS was limited to private sector organisations, thus resulting in the dearth of empirical literature relating to its practice in service-driven public sector institutions. Research design, approach and method: The article adopted a quantitative research approach using census survey methodology. Data were collected from 492 academic staff from the surveyed institution using a self-developed questionnaire that was tested for high content validity with a consolidated Cronbach’s alpha value of 0.83. Data were analysed using a onesample t-test because of the one-measurement nature of the variable under investigation. Main findings: Major findings of the study indicated that respondents were satisfied with the implementation of the PMS by management. However, the payment of performance bonuses was not considered as sufficiently motivating, thus necessitating a pragmatic review by management. Practical/managerial implications: The findings of this article provided a practical guide to managers on the implementation and management of PMS as an employee performance reward mechanism in non-profit and service-oriented organisations

  17. Seven Issues, Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Whitehead, Jim; De Bra, Paul; Grønbæk, Kaj; Larsen, Deena; Legget, John; schraefel, monica m.c.

    2002-01-01

    It has been 15 years since the original presentation by Frank Halasz at Hypertext'87 on seven issues for the next generation of hypertext systems. These issues are: Search and Query Composites Virtual Structures Computation in/over hypertext network Versioning Collaborative Work Extensibility and Tailorability Since that time, these issues have formed the nucleus of multiple research agendas within the Hypertext community. Befitting this direction-setting role, the issues have been revisited ...

  18. Information Systems and Corporate Memory: design for staff turn-over

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Sharp

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available The "information age" is reliant upon the information skill-base of people and the storage and access of complete data. Staff turn-over and "down-sizing" as well as the rate of organisational change places increased pressure on the designers of corporate information systems to keep up with the organizational demands. Especially relevant are the "soft" aspects of the corporate information needs of organizations. The term "corporate memory" is introduced to explain the relatively informal collective and individual knowledge of employees gained through their experience and position in the organization. This paper elaborates the issues concerned with the "corporate soft data", and makes suggestions for research, as well as for planners of corporate information systems in organizations facing major down-sizing or related changes. It is concluded that there are a number of readily obtainable sources of soft data in the organization and these data should be analysed for inclusion in system development. If organizations are to become learning systems and not just keep repeating the same mistakes, they need to review all aspects of corporate memory, especially the soft data sources and losses.

  19. Development of systemic lupus erythematosus in a male-to-female transsexual: the role of sex hormones revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K L; Mok, C C

    2013-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) predominantly affects women of childbearing age. The infrequency of SLE in men and disease onset in prepubertal or postmenopausal women suggests a role of estrogen in the predisposition to the disease. Patients with hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism are prone to the development of SLE, and the use of exogenous estrogens in women increases the relative risk of SLE onset and disease flares. These observations provide indirect evidence for an opposite role of estrogens and androgens in the pathogenesis of SLE. We report on a male-to-female transsexual who developed SLE 20 years after sex-reassignment surgery and prolonged estrogen therapy. The role of sex hormones in SLE is revisited.

  20. Training and certification program of the operating staff for a 90-day test of a regenerative life support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Prior to beginning a 90-day test of a regenerative life support system, a need was identified for a training and certification program to qualify an operating staff for conducting the test. The staff was responsible for operating and maintaining the test facility, monitoring and ensuring crew safety, and implementing procedures to ensure effective mission performance with good data collection and analysis. The training program was designed to ensure that each operating staff member was capable of performing his assigned function and was sufficiently cross-trained to serve at certain other positions on a contingency basis. Complicating the training program were budget and schedule limitations, and the high level of sophistication of test systems.

  1. A Real-Time Safety and Quality Reporting System: Assessment of Clinical Data and Staff Participation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahn, Douglas A.; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Mundt, Arno J.; Pawlicki, Todd, E-mail: tpawlicki@ucsd.edu

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To report on the use of an incident learning system in a radiation oncology clinic, along with a review of staff participation. Methods and Materials: On September 24, 2010, our department initiated an online real-time voluntary reporting system for safety issues, called the Radiation Oncology Quality Reporting System (ROQRS). We reviewed these reports from the program's inception through January 18, 2013 (2 years, 3 months, 25 days) to assess error reports (defined as both near-misses and incidents of inaccurate treatment). Results: During the study interval, there were 60,168 fractions of external beam radiation therapy and 955 brachytherapy procedures. There were 298 entries in the ROQRS system, among which 108 errors were reported. There were 31 patients with near-misses reported and 27 patients with incidents of inaccurate treatment reported. These incidents of inaccurate treatment occurred in 68 total treatment fractions (0.11% of treatments delivered during the study interval). None of these incidents of inaccurate treatment resulted in deviation from the prescription by 5% or more. A solution to the errors was documented in ROQRS in 65% of the cases. Errors occurred as repeated errors in 22% of the cases. A disproportionate number of the incidents of inaccurate treatment were due to improper patient setup at the linear accelerator (P<.001). Physician participation in ROQRS was nonexistent initially, but improved after an education program. Conclusions: Incident learning systems are a useful and practical means of improving safety and quality in patient care.

  2. A Real-Time Safety and Quality Reporting System: Assessment of Clinical Data and Staff Participation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahn, Douglas A.; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Mundt, Arno J.; Pawlicki, Todd

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report on the use of an incident learning system in a radiation oncology clinic, along with a review of staff participation. Methods and Materials: On September 24, 2010, our department initiated an online real-time voluntary reporting system for safety issues, called the Radiation Oncology Quality Reporting System (ROQRS). We reviewed these reports from the program's inception through January 18, 2013 (2 years, 3 months, 25 days) to assess error reports (defined as both near-misses and incidents of inaccurate treatment). Results: During the study interval, there were 60,168 fractions of external beam radiation therapy and 955 brachytherapy procedures. There were 298 entries in the ROQRS system, among which 108 errors were reported. There were 31 patients with near-misses reported and 27 patients with incidents of inaccurate treatment reported. These incidents of inaccurate treatment occurred in 68 total treatment fractions (0.11% of treatments delivered during the study interval). None of these incidents of inaccurate treatment resulted in deviation from the prescription by 5% or more. A solution to the errors was documented in ROQRS in 65% of the cases. Errors occurred as repeated errors in 22% of the cases. A disproportionate number of the incidents of inaccurate treatment were due to improper patient setup at the linear accelerator (P<.001). Physician participation in ROQRS was nonexistent initially, but improved after an education program. Conclusions: Incident learning systems are a useful and practical means of improving safety and quality in patient care

  3. Integrating staff well-being into the Primary Health Care system: a case study in post-conflict Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Albertien; van Pietersom, Tineke; Lopes Cardozo, Barbara; Rushiti, Feride; Ymerhalili, Genc; Agani, Ferid

    2015-01-01

    Staff well-being including stress awareness and stress management skills is usually not a priority in (mental) health policies. In Kosovo, the level of stress amongst primary health care (PHC) professionals is high because health professionals are part of the population seriously affected by conflict. The need to support staff and look after their well-being was recognised by the Director of the Centre for Development of Family Medicine, Head of Primary Care. In response, the Antares Foundation and the Kosovo Rehabilitation Centre for Torture Victims (KRCT), in close cooperation with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, implemented an integrated psycho-social capacity building programme for PHC professionals. This case-study describes how staff well-being was integrated into the PHC system in Kosovo. This was accomplished through raising awareness on staff well-being and stress management as well as strengthening knowledge of and skills in stress management. Eighteen national PHC staff were trained and more than a thousand family doctors and nurses attended stress management workshops. A steering committee consisting of key stakeholders was responsible for overseeing the execution of the programme. This steering committee successfully advocated for integration of staff well-being and stress management in the revised mental health strategy 2014-2020. The curriculum developed for the training was integrated in the professional staff development programme for family doctors and nurses. The effectiveness of the programme was assessed through an evaluation (including a survey among PHC professionals trained under the programme). Evaluation findings showed that offering structured support, entailing the opportunity to discuss work related problems and providing tools to deal with stress related to work or personal life, helps staff to continue their professional tasks under challenging conditions. Evaluation findings suggest that results can be sustained

  4. Perception of performance management system by academic staff in an open distance learning higher education environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther M. Maimela

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Institutions of higher learning in South Africa are fast embracing performance management system (PMS as a mechanism for the achievement of teaching excellence and enhancement of research productivity. However, literature provided evidence to show that application of PMS in the private sector had failed to drive competition, efficiency and productivity.Research purpose: The main purpose of this article was to evaluate the perception of academic staff members of an open distance learning institution regarding the implementation of a PMS.Motivation for the study: PMS as a mechanism through which performance of academics is measured has been described as inconsistent with the long tradition of academic freedom, scholarship and collegiality in the academy. Moreso, previous research on the implementation of PMS was limited to private sector organisations, thus resulting in the dearth of empirical literature relating to its practice in service-driven public sector institutions.Research design, approach and method: The article adopted a quantitative research approach using census survey methodology. Data were collected from 492 academic staff from the surveyed institution using a self-developed questionnaire that was tested for high content validity with a consolidated Cronbach’s alpha value of 0.83. Data were analysed using a onesample t-test because of the one-measurement nature of the variable under investigation.Main findings: Major findings of the study indicated that respondents were satisfied with the implementation of the PMS by management. However, the payment of performance bonuses was not considered as sufficiently motivating, thus necessitating a pragmatic review by management.Practical/managerial implications: The findings of this article provided a practical guide to managers on the implementation and management of PMS as an employee performance reward mechanism in non-profit and service-oriented organisations

  5. User experience of academic staff in the use of a learning management system tool

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Kock, E

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available comfort level with the use of technology tools. The academic staff are qualified and experienced subject matter experts but this does not translate to having the necessary technical competencies to do online teaching. They consequently could experience...

  6. Total staff costs to implement a decision support system in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Valéria; Lima, Antônio Fernandes Costa; Fugulin, Fernanda Maria Togeiro; Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto; Gaidzinski, Raquel Rapone

    2014-01-01

    to identify the direct labor (DL) costs to put in practice a decision support system (DSS) in nursing at the University Hospital of the University of São Paulo (HU-USP). the development of the DSS was mapped in four sub-processes: Conception, Elaboration, Construction and Transition. To calculate the DL, the baseline salary per professional category was added to the five-year additional remuneration, representation fees and social charges, and then divided by the number of hours contracted, resulting in the hour wage/professional, which was multiplied by the time spend on each activity in the sub-processes. the DL cost corresponded to R$ 752,618.56 (100%), R$ 26,000.00 (3.45%) of which were funded by a funding agency, while R$ 726,618.56 (96,55%) came from Hospital and University resources. considering the total DL cost, 72.1% related to staff wages for the informatics consulting company and 27.9% to the DL of professionals at the HU and the School of Nursing.

  7. Staff grief and support systems for Japanese health care professionals working in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoinaba, Kaori; O'Connor, Margaret; Lee, Susan; Greaves, Judi

    2009-06-01

    This article is a literature report on grief issues for health care professionals, undertaken to identify Japanese nurses' grief experience when they work in palliative care units. Health care professionals' grief experience and its impact have not been well understood or identified as a significant issue in Japan. Published articles relating to this study were searched using electronic catalogues such as CINAHL and PsycINFO, books, and research publications. Key words used for the search were "grief," "palliative care," "nurse," "staff support," and "Japan." Both English and Japanese were used for the literature search in order to collect information regarding nurses' grief and support systems in Japan and elsewhere. The literature search covered the period 1990-2006 inclusive. This article explores these issues in the literature as preparation for establishing a study that will particularly look at the influence of nurses' grief on the quality of care provided. Consideration of Japanese culture as it relates to death and dying and to nursing culture is a significant part of this work.

  8. Total staff costs to implement a decision support system in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Castilho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to identify the direct labor (DL costs to put in practice a decision support system (DSS in nursing at the University Hospital of the University of São Paulo (HU-USP. METHOD: the development of the DSS was mapped in four sub-processes: Conception, Elaboration, Construction and Transition. To calculate the DL, the baseline salary per professional category was added to the five-year additional remuneration, representation fees and social charges, and then divided by the number of hours contracted, resulting in the hour wage/professional, which was multiplied by the time spend on each activity in the sub-processes. RESULTS: the DL cost corresponded to R$ 752,618.56 (100%, R$ 26,000.00 (3.45% of which were funded by a funding agency, while R$ 726,618.56 (96,55% came from Hospital and University resources. CONCLUSION: considering the total DL cost, 72.1% related to staff wages for the informatics consulting company and 27.9% to the DL of professionals at the HU and the School of Nursing.

  9. Risk Management System and Project Staff Education Program for Overseas Construction Project Using the Expert System

    OpenAIRE

    Hirota, Yoichi

    2007-01-01

    The turnover of the Japanese contractors and the consulting firms has kept the same level since 1983, in spite of the fact that the size of domestic market is shrinking. This is why they do not have a proper management system, especially risk management system for the overseas construction projects. This study aims at building risk management system and developing education program that can be applied to reinforcing the ability, based on the author’s experience. Risk is defined as “uncertain ...

  10. Exploring safety systems for dispensing in community pharmacies: focusing on how staff relate to organizational components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Jasmine; Avery, Anthony J; Ashcroft, Darren; Boyd, Matthew; Phipps, Denham L; Barber, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Identifying risk is an important facet of a safety practice in an organization. To identify risk, all components within a system of operation should be considered. In clinical safety practice, a team of people, technologies, procedures and protocols, management structure and environment have been identified as key components in a system of operation. To explore risks in relation to prescription dispensing in community pharmacies by taking into account relationships between key components that relate to the dispensing process. Fifteen community pharmacies in England with varied characteristics were identified, and data were collected using non-participant observations, shadowing and interviews. Approximately 360 hours of observations and 38 interviews were conducted by the team. Observation field notes from each pharmacy were written into case studies. Overall, 52,500 words from 15 case studies and interview transcripts were analyzed using thematic and line-by-line analyses. Validation techniques included multiple data collectors co-authoring each case study for consensus, review of case studies by members of the wider team including academic and practicing community pharmacists, and patient safety experts and two presentations (internally and externally) to review and discuss findings. Risks identified were related to relationships between people and other key components in dispensing. This included how different levels of staff communicated internally and externally, followed procedures, interacted with technical systems, worked with management, and engaged with the environment. In a dispensing journey, the following categories were identified which show how risks are inextricably linked through relationships between human components and other key components: 1) dispensing with divided attention; 2) dispensing under pressure; 3) dispensing in a restricted space or environment; and, 4) managing external influences. To identify and evaluate risks effectively, an

  11. Management of academic staff activity: modeling and prediction of rating system indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Logunova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the problem of constructing a system of rating indicators for stimulating the work of the academic staff in higher educational institution. Many areas of teacher activity (for example, educational, scientific, international, etc. laid the basis of selection the groups of indicators in the system. Social challenge in improving the quality of educational services determines the relevance of research in the field of modeling and prediction of indicators which characterize the work of high school teacher. To predict the dynamics of the structure of the rating indicators in the system, the authors introduced the concept of drift and variability of each group. Using informational hypercube for the structure of input data allowed authors to take into account the individual characteristics of each parameter included in a mathematical model to describe the rating indicators. To make the prediction of the structure and values of rating system indicators the authors introduced the concept of drift. Drift of indicators takes into account the introduction of new indicators, the removal of existing indicators, and movement of indicators between the groups. In the article, authors introduced a novel quantitative indicator of group variability. The value of this indicator determines the prediction strategy of the teacher work in higher school in the future period. To predict the total amount of stimulating, the complex technique offered and it includes four modules: modeling values within the existing range in the previous period; modeling new index value based on the assumptions introduced using a random number generator; exclusion a range of values of deleted indicators; modeling new values based on the study of the modern trend of indicators. The presence of flexible information structure in the form of a hypercube and complex mathematical model allowed authors to carry out numerical simulation for predicting the values of individual

  12. Adaptive Control for Linear Uncertain Systems with Unmodeled Dynamics Revisited via Optimal Control Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the optimal control modification for linear uncertain plants. The Lyapunov analysis shows that the modification parameter has a limiting value depending on the nature of the uncertainty. The optimal control modification exhibits a linear asymptotic property that enables it to be analyzed in a linear time invariant framework for linear uncertain plants. The linear asymptotic property shows that the closed-loop plants in the limit possess a scaled input-output mapping. Using this property, we can derive an analytical closed-loop transfer function in the limit as the adaptive gain tends to infinity. The paper revisits the Rohrs counterexample problem that illustrates the nature of non-robustness of model-reference adaptive control in the presence of unmodeled dynamics. An analytical approach is developed to compute exactly the modification parameter for the optimal control modification that stabilizes the plant in the Rohrs counterexample. The linear asymptotic property is also used to address output feedback adaptive control for non-minimum phase plants with a relative degree 1.

  13. The new system of education and training of medical staff in radiation protection in Albania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grillo, B.; Preza, K.; Titka, V.; Shehi, G.

    2001-01-01

    The present situation as regarding the education and training of medical staff in radiological protection is discussed. In particular the protection of patients, children and pregnant women were the most sensible topics in some courses held in recent years. Emphasis is given on a number of courses and course units dealing with radiation safety problems in the medical field and their content. (author)

  14. The Role of "Meeting Pupil Needs and Empowering Staff" in Quality Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Alison Lai Fong; Yau, Hon Keung

    2012-01-01

    The study aims to examine the effectiveness of the implementation of "Meeting Pupil Needs and Empowering Staff" in the quality management in Hong Kong primary schools. A case study of nine primary schools was conducted and a qualitative method of interviews was adopted in this study. A total of 9 principals and 9 teachers from 9 primary…

  15. Staff's perceptions of a pressure mapping system to prevent pressure injuries in a hospital ward: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunningberg, Lena; Bååth, Carina; Sving, Eva

    2018-03-01

    To describe staff's perceptions of a continuous pressure mapping system to prevent pressure injury in a hospital ward. Pressure injury development is still a problem in hospitals. It is important to understand how new information and communication technologies can facilitate pressure injury prevention. A descriptive design with qualitative focus group interviews was used. Five categories were identified: "Need of information, training and coaching over a long period of time," "Pressure mapping - a useful tool in the prevention of pressure injury in high risk patients," "Easy to understand and use, but some practical issues were annoying," "New way of working and thinking," and "Future possibilities with the pressure mapping system." The pressure mapping system was an eye-opener for the importance of pressure injury prevention. Staff appreciated the real-time feedback on pressure points, which alerted them to the time for repositioning, facilitated repositioning and provided feedback on the repositioning performed. A continuous pressure mapping system can be used as a catalyst, increasing staff's competence, focus and awareness of prevention. For successful implementation, the nurse managers should have a shared agenda with the clinical nurse leaders, supporting the sustaining and spread of the innovation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Remove of the staff association office   The Staff Association offices are going to be renovated during the coming four months, February to May 2014. The physical move from our current premises 64/R-002 to our temporary office in  510/R-010 will take place on Friday January 31st, so the Secretariat will be closed on that day. Hence, from Monday February 3rd until the end of May 2014 the Staff Association Secretariat will be located in 510/R-010 (entrance just across the CERN Printshop).    

  17. PPP-RTK by means of S-system theory: revisiting the undifferenced, uncombined network model and a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baocheng; Yuan, Yunbin

    2017-04-01

    A synthesis of two prevailing Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) positioning technologies, namely the precise point positioning (PPP) and the network-based real-time kinematic (NRTK), results in the emergence of the PPP-RTK. This new concept preferably integrates the typical advantage of PPP (e.g. flexibility) and that of NRTK (e.g. efficiency), such that it enables single-receiver users to achieve high positioning accuracy with reasonable timeliness through integer ambiguity resolution (IAR). The realization of PPP-RTK needs to accomplish two sequential tasks. The first task is to determine a class of corrections including, necessarily, the satellite orbits, the satellite clocks and the satellite phase (and code, in case of more than two frequencies) biases at the network level. With these corrections, the second task, then, is capable of solving for the ambiguity-fixed, absolute position(s) at the user level. In this contribution, we revisit three variants (geometry-free, geometry-fixed, and geometry- and satellite-clock-fixed) of undifferenced, uncombined PPP-RTK network model and discuss their implications for practical use. We carry out a case study using multi-day, dual-frequency GPS data from the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC), aiming to assess the (static and kinematic) positioning performance (in terms of time-to-first-fix and accuracy) that is achievable by PPP-RTK users across China.

  18. Evaluating Proposed Investments in Power System Reliability and Resilience: Preliminary Results from Interviews with Public Utility Commission Staff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaCommare, Kristina [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Larsen, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Eto, Joseph [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Policymakers and regulatory agencies are expressing renewed interest in the reliability and resilience of the U.S. electric power system in large part due to growing recognition of the challenges posed by climate change, extreme weather events, and other emerging threats. Unfortunately, there has been little or no consolidated information in the public domain describing how public utility/service commission (PUC) staff evaluate the economics of proposed investments in the resilience of the power system. Having more consolidated information would give policymakers a better understanding of how different state regulatory entities across the U.S. make economic decisions pertaining to reliability/resiliency. To help address this, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) was tasked by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis (EPSA) to conduct an initial set of interviews with PUC staff to learn more about how proposed utility investments in reliability/resilience are being evaluated from an economics perspective. LBNL conducted structured interviews in late May-early June 2016 with staff from the following PUCs: Washington D.C. (DCPSC), Florida (FPSC), and California (CPUC).

  19. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  20. A novel system for providing compatible blood to patients during surgery: "self-service" electronic blood banking by nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, G; Chiu, D S; Chung, A S; Wong, H F; Chan, M W; Lui, Y K; Choy, F M; Chan, J C; Chan, A H; Lam, S T; Fan, T C

    1996-04-01

    A good blood bank must be able to provide compatible blood units promptly to operating room patients with minimal wastage. A "self-service" by nursing staff blood banking system that is safe, efficient, and well-accepted has been developed. Specific blood units are no longer assigned to surgical patients who have a negative pretransfusion antibody screen, irrespective of the type of surgery. A computer-generated list of the serial numbers of all group-identical blood units currently in the blood bank inventory is provided for each patient. The units themselves are not labeled with a patient's name. The group O list will be provided for group O patients, the group A list for group A patients, and so forth. Should the patient require transfusion during surgery, the operating room nurses go to the refrigerator, remove any group-identical unit, and check the serial number of the unit against the serial numbers on the patient's list. If the serial number is on that list, the blood bank will accept responsibility for compatibility. The system was implemented in 1995. Since implementation, a total of 2154 patients have undergone operations at this hospital. Thirty-two patients received more than 10 units of red cells each. There were no transfusion errors. The crossmatch-to-transfusion ratio was reduced from 1.67 to 1.12. Turnaround time for supplying additional or urgent units to patients in operating room was shortened from 33 to 2.5 minutes. There was no incidence of a blood unit's serial number not being on the list. Work by nurses and technical staff was reduced by nearly 50 percent. The "self-service" (by nursing staff) blood banking system described is safe and efficient. It saves staff time and can be easily set up.

  1. Staff supplement to the draft report on human engineering guide to control room evaluation: response to comments, sample checklist, draft systems review guidelines, and evaluation procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    This staff supplement to Draft Report NUREG/CR-1580, Human Engineering Guide to Control Room Evaluation, provides staff responses to comments on the draft report and supplemental material not provided in the draft report. The supplemental material includes new draft guidelines for the systems review of nuclear power plant control rooms and sample checklists and corresponding human engineering guidelines

  2. What stops hospital clinical staff from following protocols? An analysis of the incidence and factors behind the failure of bedside clinical staff to activate the rapid response system in a multi-campus Australian metropolitan healthcare service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Bill; Marshall, Stuart; Buist, Michael David; Finnigan, Monica; Kitto, Simon; Hore, Tonina; Sturgess, Tamica; Wilson, Stuart; Ramsay, Wayne

    2012-07-01

    To explore the causes of failure to activate the rapid response system (RRS). The organisation has a recognised incidence of staff failing to act when confronted with a deteriorating patient and leading to adverse outcomes. A multi-method study using the following: a point prevalence survey to determine the incidence of abnormal simple bedside observations and activation of the rapid response team by clinical staff; a prospective audit of all patients experiencing a cardiac arrest, unplanned intensive care unit admission or death over an 8-week period; structured interviews of staff to explore cognitive and sociocultural barriers to activating the RRS. Southern Health is a comprehensive healthcare network with 570 adult in-patient beds across four metropolitan teaching hospitals in the south-eastern sector of Melbourne. Frequency of physiological instability and outcomes within the in-patient hospital population. Qualitative data from staff interviews were thematically coded. The incidence of physiological instability in the acute adult population was 4.04%. Nearly half of these patients (42%) did not receive an appropriate clinical response from the staff, despite most (69.2%) recognising their patient met physiological criteria for activating the RRS, and being 'quite', or 'very' concerned about their patient (75.8%). Structured interviews with 91 staff members identified predominantly sociocultural reasons for failure to activate the RRS. Despite an organisational commitment to the RRS, clinical staff act on local cultural rules within the clinical environment that are usually not explicit. Better understanding of these informal rules may lead to more appropriate activation of the RRS.

  3. The E. coli pET expression system revisited-mechanistic correlation between glucose and lactose uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurm, David Johannes; Veiter, Lukas; Ulonska, Sophia; Eggenreich, Britta; Herwig, Christoph; Spadiut, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are mainly produced in mammalian cells to date. However, unglycosylated antibody fragments can also be produced in the bacterium Escherichia coli which brings several advantages, like growth on cheap media and high productivity. One of the most popular E. coli strains for recombinant protein production is E. coli BL21(DE3) which is usually used in combination with the pET expression system. However, it is well known that induction by isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) stresses the cells and can lead to the formation of insoluble inclusion bodies. In this study, we revisited the pET expression system for the production of a novel antibody single-chain variable fragment (scFv) with the goal of maximizing the amount of soluble product. Thus, we (1) investigated whether lactose favors the recombinant production of soluble scFv compared to IPTG, (2) investigated whether the formation of soluble product can be influenced by the specific glucose uptake rate (q s,glu) during lactose induction, and (3) determined the mechanistic correlation between the specific lactose uptake rate (q s,lac) and q s,glu. We found that lactose induction gave a much greater amount of soluble scFv compared to IPTG, even when the growth rate was increased. Furthermore, we showed that the production of soluble protein could be tuned by varying q s,glu during lactose induction. Finally, we established a simple model describing the mechanistic correlation between q s,lac and q s,glu allowing tailored feeding and prevention of sugar accumulation. We believe that this mechanistic model might serve as platform knowledge for E. coli.

  4. Grief revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, B Y

    2005-06-01

    The article serves to examine the cultural influences on attitudes towards the deceased and bereaved, as well as on the practice of mourning, and to revisit normal and pathological variants of grief. Grief is a subjective state of psychological and physiological reaction to the loss of a loved one. Reaction to the loss is experienced internally in a uniform manner across cultures. However, mourning, the voluntary social expression of the loss, varies from culture to culture. Rituals provide a standardised mode of behaviour, which helps to relieve the sense of uncertainty or loss. There were reports of ghost sightings involving foreign tourists in the 6 worst-hit southern provinces in Thailand following the tsunami tragedy. This phenomenon of "mass hallucinations" is understandable from the cultural perspective. New models of grief have been developed to account for the individuality and diversity of grief and to encompass the social, behavioural and spiritual dimensions of loss as well as those of the psychological and physical. Clinically, the duration of grief reactions varies widely, depending on the nature of the loss and the connection to the deceased. In the case of the tsunami tragedy, with relatives missing, homes swept away and familiar neighbourhoods turned into wastelands, many victims are likely to have complicated grief. Traumatic grief, which includes a prominent component of separation distress characterised by yearning and searching and frequent "bittersweet" recollections of the deceased, has been associated with long-term dysfunction. Grief work utilising the traumatic grief treatment protocol appears to be a promising intervention.

  5. The long-term variability of Changma in the East Asian summer monsoon system: A review and revisit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, June-Yi; Kwon, MinHo; Yun, Kyung-Sook; Min, Seung-Ki; Park, In-Hong; Ham, Yoo-Geun; Jin, Emilia Kyung; Kim, Joo-Hong; Seo, Kyong-Hwan; Kim, WonMoo; Yim, So-Young; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2017-05-01

    Changma, which is a vital part of East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) system, plays a critical role in modulating water and energy cycles in Korea. Better understanding of its long-term variability and change is therefore a matter of scientific and societal importance. It has been indicated that characteristics of Changma have undergone significant interdecadal changes in association with the mid-1970s global-scale climate shift and the mid-1990s EASM shift. This paper reviews and revisits the characteristics on the long-term changes of Changma focusing on the underlying mechanisms for the changes. The four important features are manifested mainly during the last few decades: 1) mean and extreme rainfalls during Changma period from June to September have been increased with the amplification of diurnal cycle of rainfall, 2) the dry spell between the first and second rainy periods has become shorter, 3) the rainfall amount as well as the number of rainy days during August have significantly increased, probably due to the increase in typhoon landfalls, and 4) the relationship between the Changma rainfall and Western Pacific Subtropical High on interannual time scale has been enhanced. The typhoon contribution to the increase in heavy rainfall is attributable to enhanced interaction between typhoons and midlatitude baroclinic environment. It is noted that the change in the relationship between Changma and the tropical sea surface temperature (SST) over the Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic Oceans is a key factor in the long-term changes of Changma and EASM. Possible sources for the recent mid-1990s change include 1) the tropical dipole-like SST pattern between the central Pacific and Indo-Pacific region (the global warming hiatus pattern), 2) the recent intensification of tropical SST gradients among the Indian Ocean, the western Pacific, and the eastern Pacific, and 3) the tropical Atlantic SST warming.

  6. The role of Middle Managers in the enhancement of staff professionalism for the Further Education system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey, Jayne

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The Statutory Instrument of September 2007 approved as part of the regulatory powers of the Education Act (DfES, 2002 established regulations for a minimum undertaking of 30 hours’ Continuing Professional Development (CPD for all teaching staff on a year-on-year basis. Seen as part of the professionalisation agenda for the Further Education (FE sector, this regulation has placed additional responsibilities on the role of Middle Managers. Here we report on a small-scale research project based in one College of Further Education which set out to explore and better understand the role of Middle Managers in supporting the professionalisation agenda. The study determined to explore how Middle Managers, defined as those with operational rather than strategic roles, were supporting their colleagues whilst also trying to secure time for their own Continuing Professional Development (CPD. The impact of the IfL’s approach to dual professionalism is also explored.

  7. Design of an automated staff scheduling system for an independent pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Ilgin

    2018-01-25

    In service industries, employee salaries and wages often constitute the largest portion of the costs to the company. This is very true in the case of an independent pharmacy, which employs pharmacists and pharmacy technicians. Thus, for pharmacies to cost effectively meet the increasing demand for pharmaceuticals, it is crucial that pharmacy managers efficiently allocate the pharmacy staff's time. Through a case study, this paper demonstrates the use of an Excel VBA based on a mathematical model to schedule the staff of an independent pharmacy. The whole year data was used in this study. After collection of whole year's data, the number of prescriptions to be filled for each day by hour of hour of the day were sourced and classified. It is indicated that the pharmacy employees' time could be more efficiently assigned to meet the demand of the pharmacy. The benefit of modeling the pharmacy employees at this pharmacy is based on the data (the number of total prescriptions filled on Friday in March) with the following results; 12 h shifts are covered where one employee must be between 04:00-16:00, two employees between 06:00-18:00, one employee between 07:00-19:00 and one employee between 15:00-03:00. In this study a basic model was presented that can be used schedule pharmacy employees in an independent pharmacy and solved by Excel VBA. This model can be further extended to meet the needs of a specific pharmacy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the ...

  9. Revisiting Bourdieu: Alternative Educational Systems in the Light of the Theory of Social and Cultural Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azaola, Marta Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The paper reflects upon the principles and practice of an alternative educational system operating in rural Mexico in the light of Bourdieu's theory of cultural and social reproduction. Bourdieu's theory seeks to explain processes of reproduction of power relations within schools and society; whereas alternative educational systems seek to expand…

  10. Revisiting the Role of Cultural Capital in East Asian Educational Systems: The Case of South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Soo-yong; Schofer, Evan; Kim, Kyung-keun

    2012-01-01

    The concept of cultural capital has proved invaluable in understanding educational systems in Western countries, and recent work seeks to extend those insights to the diverse educational systems of other geographic regions. Using data from the 2000 Programme for International Student Assessment, the authors explored cultural capital in South Korea…

  11. DIAMS revisited: Taming the variety of knowledge in fault diagnosis expert systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haziza, M.; Ayache, S.; Brenot, J.-M.; Cayrac, D.; Vo, D.-P.

    1994-01-01

    The DIAMS program, initiated in 1986, led to the development of a prototype expert system, DIAMS-1 dedicated to the Telecom 1 Attitude and Orbit Control System, and to a near-operational system, DIAMS-2, covering a whole satellite (the Telecom 2 platform and its interfaces with the payload), which was installed in the Satellite Control Center in 1993. The refinement of the knowledge representation and reasoning is now being studied, focusing on the introduction of appropriate handling of incompleteness, uncertainty and time, and keeping in mind operational constraints. For the latest generation of the tool, DIAMS-3, a new architecture has been proposed, that enables the cooperative exploitation of various models and knowledge representations. On the same baseline, new solutions enabling higher integration of diagnostic systems in the operational environment and cooperation with other knowledge intensive systems such as data analysis, planning or procedure management tools have been introduced.

  12. Revisiting the coupled-mass system and analogy with a simple band gap structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levesque, L

    2006-01-01

    A great deal of insight can be gained from the analysis of coupled masses connected to springs in order to understand better the origin of band gaps in physical systems. The approach is based on the application of the superposition principle for finding the general solution in simple mechanical systems involving functions, which vary periodically with time. Graphs show that sums of periodic functions oscillating at different frequencies lead to an exchange of energy from one oscillator to another in a simple mechanical system of three objects connected by identical springs. A system of a large number of masses connected to springs having the same spring constant K is then considered and compared with a system in which the spring constants alternate from K to another value G when connecting one mass to another. Using the results found from the mechanical systems, an analogy of charge oscillations excited on both uniform and corrugated surfaces is presented. The results obtained attempt to expand understanding of the origin of the band gap occurring in some systems involving periodic motions

  13. MODEL OF COOPERATION OF THE SYSTEM OF STAFF EDUCATION FOR INDUSTRY – CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK OF EDUCATIONAL CLUSTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata PRADELA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Education of staff for industry in Poland is carried out in vocational education system in schools, responsible for education of qualified workers and in system of technical universities, responsible for engineering education. This article concentrates on aspects of education of qualified workers. There is presented model of cooperation insitution responsible for vocational education for industry on the basis of concept of educational cluster. The first part of the article describes aims and determinants of cluster formulation. The second – model of structure of educational cluster, particularly: stakeholders of cluster (potential participants of cluster, scope of cooperation, information flows and stakeholders’ activities. The last part of article discusses possibilities of implementati on the model: (a by creation educational strategies and (b by caring out projects concentrated on particular problem.

  14. The standard system for conducting the TNA (Training Needs Analysis) of Staff (delrapport fra EU Erasmus+ project SMART

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ulla Højmark

    2016-01-01

    The Training Needs Analysis (TNA) has been carried out with the staff of the partner organisations. A standard system for conducting a quantitative and a qualitative training needs analysis had been developed and it has been used as a framework for the analysis from the 4 partners: Limerick...... training needs analysis. The needs of teachers/trainers and organisations highlighted in the three multiplier-events are also included in the summary conclusions....... and translation of the standardised system to suit their own individual context. Limerick and Palermo have completed both a quantitative and a qualitative training needs analyses. Copenhagen and Esbjerg have completed a qualitative training needs analysis. This report summarises the findings of the four partners...

  15. [The system of selection and training of military-medical staff for the 40th army (1979-1989)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabinkin, V V

    2015-10-01

    In December 1979 in order to fulfil their internationalist duty troops and units of the 40th Army of the Armed Forces of the USSR was brought into Afghanistan. For complete and qualitative manning of the army with the military doctors it was needed in a short time to create a system capable to carry out candidates selection, their education and specialized training for work in extreme conditions of combat operations. This system was created in a short time. The article presents information about its features, advantages and problems that had to be solved during the entire period of the Soviet-Afghan war. The complex staff arrangements had allowed solving medical support problems of the 40th Army on the high level.

  16. Evaluating the Medical Kit System for the International Space Station(ISS) - A Paradigm Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailey, Melinda J.; Urbina, Michelle C.; Hughlett, Jessica L.; Gilmore, Stevan; Locke, James; Reyna, Baraquiel; Smith, Gwyn E.

    2010-01-01

    Medical capabilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) have been packaged to help astronaut crew medical officers (CMO) mitigate both urgent and non-urgent medical issues during their 6-month expeditions. Two ISS crewmembers are designated as CMOs for each 3-crewmember mission and are typically not physicians. In addition, the ISS may have communication gaps of up to 45 minutes during each orbit, necessitating medical equipment that can be reliably operated autonomously during flight. The retirement of the space shuttle combined with ten years of manned ISS expeditions led the Space Medicine Division at the NASA Johnson Space Center to reassess the current ISS Medical Kit System. This reassessment led to the system being streamlined to meet future logistical considerations with current Russian space vehicles and future NASA/commercial space vehicle systems. Methods The JSC Space Medicine Division coordinated the development of requirements, fabrication of prototypes, and conducted usability testing for the new ISS Medical Kit System in concert with implementing updated versions of the ISS Medical Check List and associated in-flight software applications. The teams constructed a medical kit system with the flexibility for use on the ISS, and resupply on the Russian Progress space vehicle and future NASA/commercial space vehicles. Results Prototype systems were developed, reviewed, and tested for implementation. Completion of Preliminary and Critical Design Reviews resulted in a streamlined ISS Medical Kit System that is being used for training by ISS crews starting with Expedition 27 (June 2011). Conclusions The team will present the process for designing, developing, , implementing, and training with this new ISS Medical Kit System.

  17. Output power maximization of low-power wind energy conversion systems revisited: Possible control solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, Ciprian; Munteanu, Iulian; Bratcu, Antoneta Iuliana; Ceanga, Emil

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the problem of output power maximization for low-power wind energy conversion systems operated in partial load. These systems are generally based on multi-polar permanent-magnet synchronous generators, who exhibit significant efficiency variations over the operating range. Unlike the high-power systems, whose mechanical-to-electrical conversion efficiency is high and practically does not modify the global optimum, the low-power systems global conversion efficiency is affected by the generator behavior and the electrical power optimization is no longer equivalent with the mechanical power optimization. The system efficiency has been analyzed by using both the maxima locus of the mechanical power versus the rotational speed characteristics, and the maxima locus of the electrical power delivered versus the rotational speed characteristics. The experimental investigation has been carried out by using a torque-controlled generator taken from a real-world wind turbine coupled to a physically simulated wind turbine rotor. The experimental results indeed show that the steady-state performance of the conversion system is strongly determined by the generator behavior. Some control solutions aiming at maximizing the energy efficiency are envisaged and thoroughly compared through experimental results.

  18. Process and system - A dual definition, revisited with consequences in metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhm, K. H.

    2010-07-01

    Lets assert that metrology life could be easier scientifically as well as technologically, if we, intentionally, would make an explicit distinction between two outstanding domains, namely the given, really existent domain of processes and the just virtually existent domain of systems, the latter of which is designed and used by the human mind. The abstract domain of models, by which we map the manifold reality of processes, is itself part of the domain of systems. Models support comprehension and communication, although they are normally extreme simplifications of properties and behaviour of a concrete reality. So, systems and signals represent processes and quantities, which are described by means of Signal and System Theory as well as by Stochastics and Statistics. The following presentation of this new, demanding and somehow irritating definition of the terms process and system as a dual pair is unusual indeed, but it opens the door widely to a better and more consistent discussion and understanding of manifold scientific tools in many areas. Metrology [4] is one of the important fields of concern due to many reasons: One group of the soft and hard links between the domain of processes and the domain of systems is realised by concepts of measurement science on the one hand and by instrumental tools of measurement technology on the other hand.

  19. Orbital Period Variations in the NY Vir System, Revisited in the Light of New Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baştürk Özgür

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available NY Virginis is an eclipsing binary system with a subdwarf B primary and an M type dwarf secondary. Recent studies (Qian et al. 2012; Lee et al. 2014 suggested the presence of two circumbinary planets with a few Jovian masses within the system. Lee et al. (2014 examined the orbital stabilities of the suggested planets, using the best-fit parameters derived from their eclipse timing variation analysis. They found that the outer companion should be ejected from the system in about 800 000 years. An observational report from Pulley et al. (2016 pointed out that the recent mideclipse times of the binary deviate significantly from the models suggested by Lee et al. (2014. In fact, variations in the orbital period of the system had already been recognized by many authors, but the parameters of these variations vary significantly as new data accumulate. Here, we analyze the eclipse timing variations of the NY Vir system, using new mid-eclipse times that we have obtained together with earlier published measurements in order to understand the nature of the system and constrain its parameters.

  20. Open-nucleus theory for beef cattle breeding systems: A revisitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recami, E.; Packer, I.U.; Tenorio Vasconselos, M.

    1990-07-01

    A theoretical model for Open-Nucleus Systems is herein described in the case of beef cattle breeding. One of the starting points is the observation that the majority of the standard theoretical models for open-nucleus breeding systems were constructed for the case of discrete generations, i.e. for the cases in which the dam average fertility coefficient is f>2. In the case of cattle herds, when only a fraction of the breeding dams can be replaced, it is therefore worthwhile to build up anew a rather rigorous theoretical model, with overlapping generations, and check its predictions. Namely, we apply the new formulae - explicitly depending on β F , ν F , ν M , K and R - to the system in which all breeding sires are in the Nucleus (and are reared in the nucleus itself), and are mated to both Nucleus and Base dams via artificial insemination. Optimal system design has been looked for by the NAG and MINOS computation programs, operated on Vax computers. Opening the nucleus in this situation results to be very effective since the (optimum) asymptotic genetic gain per generation for ''closed nucleus'' systems (x=0) results to be, when e.g. R≡F/M≅200, more than 40% lower than the (optimum) asymptotic genetic gain, G*, for open nucleus systems. Optimal design corresponds to: (i) having a fraction p≅16% of the female population in the nucleus; (ii) replacing practically all the (nucleus) breeding sires by the best (nucleus born) males: ν M =97/98%; (iii) using for dam replacement all (b≅100%) the (base and nucleus born) females; (iv) implementing a high upward gene migration (x≅80%), while all the surplus nucleus-born females are to be used as base replacements. This corresponds to replace, at each generation, also almost all the nucleus dams (ν F ≅95/100%), and the largest possible fraction of base dams (β F ≅30%, a value changing with p). 17 refs

  1. Early Microbes Modify Immune System Development and Metabolic Homeostasis-The "Restaurant" Hypothesis Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Michael J; Frank, Daniel N; Friedman, Jacob E

    2017-01-01

    The developing infant gut microbiome affects metabolism, maturation of the gastrointestinal tract, immune system function, and brain development. Initial seeding of the neonatal microbiota occurs through maternal and environmental contact. Maternal diet, antibiotic use, and cesarean section alter the offspring microbiota composition, at least temporarily. Nutrients are thought to regulate initial perinatal microbial colonization, a paradigm known as the "Restaurant" hypothesis. This hypothesis proposes that early nutritional stresses alter both the initial colonizing bacteria and the development of signaling pathways controlled by microbial mediators. These stresses fine-tune the immune system and metabolic homeostasis in early life, potentially setting the stage for long-term metabolic and immune health. Dysbiosis, an imbalance or a maladaptation in the microbiota, can be caused by several factors including dietary alterations and antibiotics. Dysbiosis can alter biological processes in the gut and in tissues and organs throughout the body. Misregulated development and activity of both the innate and adaptive immune systems, driven by early dysbiosis, could have long-lasting pathologic consequences such as increased autoimmunity, increased adiposity, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This review will focus on factors during pregnancy and the neonatal period that impact a neonate's gut microbiome, as well as the mechanisms and possible links from early infancy that can drive increased risk for diseases including obesity and NAFLD. The complex pathways that connect diet, the microbiota, immune system development, and metabolism, particularly in early life, present exciting new frontiers for biomedical research.

  2. Revisiting the Blended Learning Literature: Using a Complex Adaptive Systems Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuping; Han, Xibin; Yang, Juan

    2015-01-01

    This research has two aims: (1) to bridge a gap in blended learning research--the lack of a systems approach to the understanding of blended learning research and practice, and (2) to promote a more comprehensive understanding of what has been achieved and what needs to be achieved in blended learning research and practice. To achieve these aims,…

  3. Human factors/ergonomics as a systems discipline? "The human use of human beings" revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollnagel, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Discussions of the possible future of Human factors/ergonomics (HFE) usually take the past for granted in the sense that the future of HFE is assumed to be more of the same. This paper argues that the nature of work in the early 2010s is so different from the nature of work when HFE was formulated 60-70 years ago that a critical reassessment of the basis for HFE is needed. If HFE should be a systems discipline, it should be a soft systems rather than a hard systems discipline. It is not enough for HFE to seek to improve performance and well-being through systems design, since any change to the work environment in principle alters the very basis for the change. Instead HFE should try to anticipate how the nature of work will change so that it can both foresee what work will be and propose what work should be. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Revisiting the Stability of Spatially Heterogeneous Predator-Prey Systems Under Eutrophication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, J Z; Morozov, A Yu; Arashkevich, E G; Nikishina, A

    2015-10-01

    We employ partial integro-differential equations to model trophic interaction in a spatially extended heterogeneous environment. Compared to classical reaction-diffusion models, this framework allows us to more realistically describe the situation where movement of individuals occurs on a faster time scale than on the demographic (population) time scale, and we cannot determine population growth based on local density. However, most of the results reported so far for such systems have only been verified numerically and for a particular choice of model functions, which obviously casts doubts about these findings. In this paper, we analyse a class of integro-differential predator-prey models with a highly mobile predator in a heterogeneous environment, and we reveal the main factors stabilizing such systems. In particular, we explore an ecologically relevant case of interactions in a highly eutrophic environment, where the prey carrying capacity can be formally set to 'infinity'. We investigate two main scenarios: (1) the spatial gradient of the growth rate is due to abiotic factors only, and (2) the local growth rate depends on the global density distribution across the environment (e.g. due to non-local self-shading). For an arbitrary spatial gradient of the prey growth rate, we analytically investigate the possibility of the predator-prey equilibrium in such systems and we explore the conditions of stability of this equilibrium. In particular, we demonstrate that for a Holling type I (linear) functional response, the predator can stabilize the system at low prey density even for an 'unlimited' carrying capacity. We conclude that the interplay between spatial heterogeneity in the prey growth and fast displacement of the predator across the habitat works as an efficient stabilizing mechanism. These results highlight the generality of the stabilization mechanisms we find in spatially structured predator-prey ecological systems in a heterogeneous environment.

  5. The Relationship Between Burnout Syndrome Among the Medical Staff and Work Conditions in the Polish Healthcare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głębocka, Alicja

    2017-01-01

    Psychologists emphasize that people employed in social service organizations are vulnerable to chronic stress and burnout syndrome caused by a close and unsatisfied interpersonal relationship. However, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a feeling of diminished personal accomplishment can be attributed to other external factors. One of them is poor living and occupational conditions. According to a report by OECD, the healthcare system in Poland is the worst among the member countries. The aim of the present study was to define the relationship between occupational burnout and the rating of the Polish healthcare system among the medical staff. The study included 224 participants. The Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Dehumanized Behavior and the Głębocka and Rużyczka scale of Behavioral Indicators of Patient's Dehumanization were applied. The evaluations of the healthcare system were also collected. The results demonstrate that physicians were the group of most emotionally exhausted and, simultaneously, most life-satisfied persons, while nurses presented the highest level of dehumanization and the lowest level of satisfaction from life achievements. Only did physicians evaluate the healthcare system as a relatively good one. They were also more tolerant of latent dehumanization. A relationship between the dimensions of burnout and the evaluation of healthcare system were observed. The emotionally exhausted or prone to dehumanization persons were more likely to evaluate the Polish healthcare system negatively.

  6. The iodine–plutonium–xenon age of the Moon–Earth system revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avice, G.; Marty, B

    2014-01-01

    Iodine–plutonium–xenon isotope systematics have been used to re-evaluate time constraints on the early evolution of the Earth–atmosphere system and, by inference, on the Moon-forming event. Two extinct radionuclides (129I, T1/2=15.6 Ma and 244Pu, T1/2=80 Ma) have produced radiogenic 129Xe and fissiogenic 131−136Xe, respectively, within the Earth, the related isotope fingerprints of which are seen in the compositions of mantle and atmospheric Xe. Recent studies of Archaean rocks suggest that xenon atoms have been lost from the Earth's atmosphere and isotopically fractionated during long periods of geological time, until at least the end of the Archaean eon. Here, we build a model that takes into account these results. Correction for Xe loss permits the computation of new closure ages for the Earth's atmosphere that are in agreement with those computed for mantle Xe. The corrected Xe formation interval for the Earth–atmosphere system is  Ma after the beginning of Solar System formation. This time interval may represent a lower limit for the age of the Moon-forming impact. PMID:25114317

  7. The iodine-plutonium-xenon age of the Moon-Earth system revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avice, G; Marty, B

    2014-09-13

    Iodine-plutonium-xenon isotope systematics have been used to re-evaluate time constraints on the early evolution of the Earth-atmosphere system and, by inference, on the Moon-forming event. Two extinct radionuclides ((129)I, T1/2=15.6 Ma and (244)Pu, T1/2=80 Ma) have produced radiogenic (129)Xe and fissiogenic (131-136)Xe, respectively, within the Earth, the related isotope fingerprints of which are seen in the compositions of mantle and atmospheric Xe. Recent studies of Archaean rocks suggest that xenon atoms have been lost from the Earth's atmosphere and isotopically fractionated during long periods of geological time, until at least the end of the Archaean eon. Here, we build a model that takes into account these results. Correction for Xe loss permits the computation of new closure ages for the Earth's atmosphere that are in agreement with those computed for mantle Xe. The corrected Xe formation interval for the Earth-atmosphere system is [Formula: see text] Ma after the beginning of Solar System formation. This time interval may represent a lower limit for the age of the Moon-forming impact. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  8. The concept of a marine Free-fall CPT systems revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopf, A.; Stegmann, S.

    2005-12-01

    Cone Penetration Tests (CPT) are a widely used method for the geotechnical in situ characterisation of sediments in onshore settings. In the course of enhanced use of the continental shelf and slope by humans impact, the need for time- and cost-efficient solutions in the marine realm is emerging. In order to avoid the challenges of lowering heavy gear to the seafloor for the penetration tests, free drop devices have been developed since the 1970s, however, the use of the majority of them was discontinued owing to technical difficulties in measurement and data interpretation caused by the impact. Based on those experiences, two different free-fall CPT lances were designed for the in situ measurement of strength (tip resistance, sleeve friction), pore pressure and temperature. In addition, deceleration and tilt are monitored for vertical profiling of the penetrated sediment column. Both CPT systems rely on an industry 15 cm2 piezocone with the sensors at the tip and a pressure housing containing a microprocessor at the top. The lightweight (40-100 kg), shallow water (200 m depth) lance works completely autonomous with a volatile memory and battery package, and can be deployed from any platform, even without a winch. The sturdier, deeper water (2500 m depth) system uses both power and telemetry for data transmission from the research vessel. The length and weight of either system can be varied according to the sediment stiffness and hence allow variable penetration depth (usually less than 5 m). Initial use of the CPT systems attests their efficiency and reliability in the measurement of sediment physical properties. While most of the data are collected within the first seconds of the CPT experiments, long term (pore pressure dissipation tests have also been successfully carried out for durations in excess of 6 hours. In a variety of estuarine and marine settings, our studies served objectives such as the assessment of slope stability, navigability of harbours

  9. An audit of acute oncology services: patient experiences of admission procedures and staff utilisation of a new telephone triage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrington, Lorraine; Holch, Patricia; Kenyon, Lucille; Hector, Ceri; Kozlowska, Krystina; Kenny, Anne Marie; Ziegler, Lucy; Velikova, Galina

    2016-12-01

    In 2010, St. James Institute of Oncology (Leeds, UK) created a new acute oncology service (AOS) consisting of a new admissions unit with a nurse-led telephone triage (TT) system. This audit cycle (March 2011 and June 2013) evaluated patient experiences of the reconfigured AOS and staff use of the TT system. Patient views were elicited via a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. The TT forms were analysed descriptively evaluating completion and data quality, reported symptoms and their severity and advice given (including admission rates). Patients (n = 40) reported high satisfaction with the new AOS. However, 56 % of patients delayed 2 days or more before contacting the unit. In 2011, 26 % of all the admitted patients were triaged via the TT system; 133 TT forms were completed. In June 2013, 49 % of the admitted patients were triaged; 264 forms were completed. The most commonly reported symptoms on the TT forms were pain, pyrexia/rigors/infection, diarrhoea, vomiting and dyspnoea. Half of the patients using the TT system were admitted (52 % in 2011, 49 % in 2013). Our audit provided evidence of successful implementation of the TT system with the number of TT forms doubling from 2011 to 2013. The new AOS was endorsed by patients, with the majority satisfied with the care they received.

  10. Revisiting QRS Detection Methodologies for Portable, Wearable, Battery-Operated, and Wireless ECG Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgendi, Mohamed; Eskofier, Björn; Dokos, Socrates; Abbott, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death worldwide. Currently, portable battery-operated systems such as mobile phones with wireless ECG sensors have the potential to be used in continuous cardiac function assessment that can be easily integrated into daily life. These portable point-of-care diagnostic systems can therefore help unveil and treat cardiovascular diseases. The basis for ECG analysis is a robust detection of the prominent QRS complex, as well as other ECG signal characteristics. However, it is not clear from the literature which ECG analysis algorithms are suited for an implementation on a mobile device. We investigate current QRS detection algorithms based on three assessment criteria: 1) robustness to noise, 2) parameter choice, and 3) numerical efficiency, in order to target a universal fast-robust detector. Furthermore, existing QRS detection algorithms may provide an acceptable solution only on small segments of ECG signals, within a certain amplitude range, or amid particular types of arrhythmia and/or noise. These issues are discussed in the context of a comparison with the most conventional algorithms, followed by future recommendations for developing reliable QRS detection schemes suitable for implementation on battery-operated mobile devices. PMID:24409290

  11. Revisiting the Hydrogen Storage Behavior of the Na-O-H System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Mao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state reactions between sodium hydride and sodium hydroxide are unusual among hydride-hydroxide systems since hydrogen can be stored reversibly. In order to understand the relationship between hydrogen uptake/release properties and phase/structure evolution, the dehydrogenation and hydrogenation behavior of the Na-O-H system has been investigated in detail both ex- and in-situ. Simultaneous thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis coupled to mass spectrometry (TG-DTA-MS experiments of NaH-NaOH composites reveal two principal features: Firstly, an H2 desorption event occurring between 240 and 380 °C and secondly an additional endothermic process at around 170 °C with no associated weight change. In-situ high-resolution synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction showed that NaOH appears to form a solid solution with NaH yielding a new cubic complex hydride phase below 200 °C. The Na-H-OH phase persists up to the maximum temperature of the in-situ diffraction experiment shortly before dehydrogenation occurs. The present work suggests that not only is the inter-phase synergic interaction of protic hydrogen (in NaOH and hydridic hydrogen (in NaH important in the dehydrogenation mechanism, but that also an intra-phase Hδ+… Hδ– interaction may be a crucial step in the desorption process.

  12. Revisiting the Role of Cultural Capital in East Asian Educational Systems: The Case of South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Soo-Yong; Schofer, Evan; Kim, Kyung-Keun

    2012-07-01

    The concept of cultural capital has proved invaluable in understanding educational systems in Western countries, and recent work seeks to extend those insights to the diverse educational systems of other geographic regions. We explored cultural capital in South Korea by investigating the relationships among family socioeconomic status (SES), cultural capital, and children's academic achievement using data from the 2000 Programme for International Student Assessment. South Korea was compared with Japan, France, and the United States to understand how institutional features of South Korean education shape the role of cultural capital in academic success. Results showed that family SES had a positive effect on both parental objectified cultural capital and children's embodied cultural capital in South Korea, consistent with evidence from the other countries. Moreover, parental objectified cultural capital had a positive effect on children's academic achievement in South Korea. In contrast to other countries, however, children's embodied cultural capital had a negative effect on academic achievement in South Korea controlling for the other variables. We highlighted several institutional features of South Korean education including a standardized curriculum, extreme focus on test preparation, and extensive shadow education, which may combine to suppress the effect of children's embodied cultural capital on academic achievement.

  13. Battle Staff Training System in Support of Force XXI Training Program: Methodology and Lessons Learned

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andre, Charles

    1997-01-01

    .... The TSPs combine computer-based instruction (CBI) and text. Each TSP presents a course of instruction as CD-ROM based programs and supplemental text based instruction with a training management system...

  14. Exploring safety systems for dispensing in community pharmacies: Focusing on how staff relate to organizational components ?

    OpenAIRE

    Harvey, Jasmine; Avery, Anthony J.; Ashcroft, Darren; Boyd, Matthew; Phipps, Denham L.; Barber, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Background Identifying risk is an important facet of a safety practice in an organization. To identify risk, all components within a system of operation should be considered. In clinical safety practice, a team of people, technologies, procedures and protocols, management structure and environment have been identified as key components in a system of operation. Objectives To explore risks in relation to prescription dispensing in community pharmacies by taking into account relationships betwe...

  15. Smart investments in sustainable food production: revisiting mixed crop-livestock systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, M; Thornton, P K; Notenbaert, A M; Wood, S; Msangi, S; Freeman, H A; Bossio, D; Dixon, J; Peters, M; van de Steeg, J; Lynam, J; Parthasarathy Rao, P; Macmillan, S; Gerard, B; McDermott, J; Seré, C; Rosegrant, M

    2010-02-12

    Farmers in mixed crop-livestock systems produce about half of the world's food. In small holdings around the world, livestock are reared mostly on grass, browse, and nonfood biomass from maize, millet, rice, and sorghum crops and in their turn supply manure and traction for future crops. Animals act as insurance against hard times and supply farmers with a source of regular income from sales of milk, eggs, and other products. Thus, faced with population growth and climate change, small-holder farmers should be the first target for policies to intensify production by carefully managed inputs of fertilizer, water, and feed to minimize waste and environmental impact, supported by improved access to markets, new varieties, and technologies.

  16. 25 Years of CIO and IT Leadership – Revisiting Managerial Roles in Information Systems Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunderlich, Nico; Beck, Roman

    2017-01-01

    on the empirical analysis, we add a new role definition. The result is an updated, comprehensive, and modernized IT leadership construct, that takes the role of the CIO not only as IT leader, but as central agency for developing a digital mindset in the top management team but also throughout the whole......Knowledge-intensive organizations are challenged by the digitization of business models and the need for IT knowledge throughout whole organizations. This changes the role of CIOs from a central IT leader towards a digitization ambassador for the whole organization. In this research, we develop...... and validate a multidimensional IT leadership roles construct, which is theoretically based on Mintzberg’s managerial roles. We empirically evolve the construct based on a quantitative survey among 228 CIOs in the U.S., where we assess the management roles of prior information systems research. Based...

  17. Intelligent Computing System for Reservoir Analysis and Risk Assessment of Red River Formation, Class Revisit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sippel, Mark A.

    2002-09-24

    Integrated software was written that comprised the tool kit for the Intelligent Computing System (ICS). The software tools in ICS are for evaluating reservoir and hydrocarbon potential from various seismic, geologic and engineering data sets. The ICS tools provided a means for logical and consistent reservoir characterization. The tools can be broadly characterized as (1) clustering tools, (2) neural solvers, (3) multiple-linear regression, (4) entrapment-potential calculator and (5) combining tools. A flexible approach can be used with the ICS tools. They can be used separately or in a series to make predictions about a desired reservoir objective. The tools in ICS are primarily designed to correlate relationships between seismic information and data obtained from wells; however, it is possible to work with well data alone.

  18. Revisiting the Climate Impacts of Cool Roofs around the Globe Using an Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Ban-Weiss, G. A.; Zhang, K.; Liu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Solar reflective "cool roofs" absorb less sunlight than traditional dark roofs, reducing solar heat gain, and decreasing the amount of heat transferred to the atmosphere. Widespread adoption of cool roofs could therefore reduce temperatures in urban areas, partially mitigating the urban heat island effect, and contributing to reversing the local impacts of global climate change. The impacts of cool roofs on global climate remain debated by past research and are uncertain. Using a sophisticated Earth system model, the impacts of cool roofs on climate are investigated at urban, continental, and global scales. We find that global adoption of cool roofs in urban areas reduces urban heat islands everywhere, with an annual- and global-mean decrease from 1.6 to 1.2 K. Decreases are statistically significant, except for some areas in Africa and Mexico where urban fraction is low, and some high-latitude areas during wintertime. Analysis of the surface and TOA energy budget in urban regions at continental-scale shows cool roofs causing increases in solar radiation leaving the Earth-atmosphere system in most regions around the globe, though the presence of aerosols and clouds are found to partially offset increases in upward radiation. Aerosols dampen cool roof-induced increases in upward solar radiation, ranging from 4% in the United States to 18% in more polluted China. Adoption of cool roofs also causes statistically significant reductions in surface air temperatures in urbanized regions of China (-0.11±0.10 K) and the United States (-0.14±0.12 K); India and Europe show statistically insignificant changes. Though past research has disagreed on whether widespread adoption of cool roofs would cool or warm global climate, these studies have lacked analysis on the statistical significance of global temperature changes. The research presented here indicates that adoption of cool roofs around the globe would lead to statistically insignificant reductions in global mean air

  19. Revisiting the Diego Blood Group System in Amerindians: Evidence for Gene-Culture Comigration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Bégat

    Full Text Available Six decades ago the DI*A allele of the Diego blood group system was instrumental in proving Native American populations originated from Siberia. Since then, it has received scant attention. The present study was undertaken to reappraise distribution of the DI*A allele in 144 Native American populations based on current knowledge. Using analysis of variance tests, frequency distribution was studied according to geographical, environmental, and cultural parameters. Frequencies were highest in Amazonian populations. In contrast, DI*A was undetectable in subarctic, Fuegian, Panamanian, Chaco and Yanomama populations. Closer study revealed a correlation that this unequal distribution was correlated with language, suggesting that linguistic divergence was a driving force in the expansion of DI*A among Native Americans. The absence of DI*A in circumpolar Eskimo-Aleut and Na-Dene speakers was consistent with a late migratory event confined to North America. Distribution of DI*A in subtropical areas indicated that gene and culture exchanges were more intense within than between ecozones. Bolstering the utility of classical genetic markers in biological anthropology, the present study of the expansion of Diego blood group genetic polymorphism in Native Americans shows strong evidence of gene-culture comigration.

  20. Axogenesis in the antennal nervous system of the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria revisited: the base pioneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, Erica; Liu, Yu; Boyan, George

    2015-01-01

    The antennal nervous system of the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria comprises two parallel pathways projecting to the brain, each pioneered early in embryogenesis by a pair of sibling cells located at the antennal tip. En route, the growth cones of pioneers from one pathway have been shown to contact a guidepost-like cell called the base pioneer. Its role in axon guidance remains unclear as do the cellular guidance cues regulating axogenesis in the other pathway supposedly without a base pioneer. Further, while the tip pioneers are known to delaminate from the antennal epithelium into the lumen, the origin of this base pioneer is unknown. Here, we use immunolabeling and immunoblocking methods to clarify these issues. Co-labeling against the neuron-specific marker horseradish peroxidase and the pioneer-specific cell surface glycoprotein Lazarillo identifies not only the tip pioneers but also a base pioneer associated with each of the developing antennal pathways. Both base pioneers co-express the mesodermal label Mes3, consistent with a lumenal origin, whereas the tip pioneers proved Mes3-negative confirming their affiliation with the ectodermal epithelium. Lazarillo antigen expression in the antennal pioneers followed a different temporal dynamic: continuous in the tip pioneers, but in the base pioneers, only at the time their filopodia and those of the tip pioneers first recognize one another. Immunoblocking of Lazarillo expression in cultured embryos disrupts this recognition resulting in misguided axogenesis in both antennal pathways.

  1. Systemic lupus erythematosus in the multiethnic Malaysian population: disease expression and ethnic differences revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmin, R; Sockalingam, S; Cheah, T E; Goh, K J

    2013-08-01

    Ethnic differences in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have been previously described in the multiethnic Malaysian population. However, there have since been many demographic and socioeconomic changes in the country. The aim of this study is to re-examine the clinical and immunological profiles of Malaysian SLE patients of different ethnic backgrounds. Consecutive follow-up patients at the University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) from July 2010 until March 2011 were included in the study. The most common clinical manifestations were malar rash (61.3%), arthritis (52.3%), haematological disease (51.6%), oral ulcers (51%) and renal disease (40.6%). Ethnic Indians had fewer malar and discoid rashes but were at higher risk of arthritis, serositis, renal and neuropsychiatric disease compared to Malays and Chinese Malaysians. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) was less common in Chinese. A longer duration of SLE correlated with a lower SLEDAI score. Overall, the spectrum disease expression was similar to the earlier Malaysian study but the frequency of the more severe disease manifestations, viz. renal, haematological, neuropsychiatric involvements and serositis, were lower. This study further emphasises differences primarily between ethnic Indians and the other races in Malaysia.

  2. University Staff Perspectives on Change Management Strategies in Student Information System Adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang-Kosma, Winnie W.

    2010-01-01

    The process of information technology adoption and use is critical to deriving benefits of information technology. Thus, one of the most challenging issues in information systems research is to understand how people have experienced the adoption process that may lead to insights to why they accept or reject the information technology (Davis,…

  3. Passive immunisation, an old idea revisited: Basic principles and application to modern animal production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedegaard, Chris J; Heegaard, Peter M H

    2016-06-01

    Immunisation by administration of antibodies (immunoglobulins) has been known for more than one hundred years as a very efficient means of obtaining immediate, short-lived protection against infection and/or against the disease-causing effects of toxins from microbial pathogens and from other sources. Thus, due to its rapid action, passive immunisation is often used to treat disease caused by infection and/or toxin exposure. However immunoglobulins may also be administered prior to exposure to infection and/or toxin, although they will not provide long-lasting protection as is seen with active immunisation (vaccination) in which an immunological memory is established by controlled exposure of the host to the pathogen in question. With multi-factorial infectious diseases in production animals, especially those that have proven hard to control by vaccination, the potential of passive immunisation remains big. This review highlights a number of examples on the use of passive immunisation for the control of infectious disease in the modern production of a range of animals, including pigs, cattle, sheep, goat, poultry and fish. Special emphasis is given on the enablement of passive immunisation strategies in these production systems through low cost and ease of use as well as on the sources, composition and purity of immunoglobulin preparations used and their benefits as compared to current measures, including vaccination (also comprising maternal vaccination), antibiotics and feed additives such as spray-dried plasma. It is concluded that provided highly efficient, relatively low-price immunoglobulin products are available, passive immunisation has a clear role in the modern animal production sector as a means of controlling infectious diseases, importantly with a very low risk of causing development of bacterial resistance, thus constituting a real and widely applicable alternative to antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Revisiting the Rise of Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems Using Search Query Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, John W; Althouse, Benjamin M; Allem, Jon-Patrick; Leas, Eric C; Dredze, Mark; Williams, Rebecca S

    2016-06-01

    Public perceptions of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) remain poorly understood because surveys are too costly to regularly implement and, when implemented, there are long delays between data collection and dissemination. Search query surveillance has bridged some of these gaps. Herein, ENDS' popularity in the U.S. is reassessed using Google searches. ENDS searches originating in the U.S. from January 2009 through January 2015 were disaggregated by terms focused on e-cigarette (e.g., e-cig) versus vaping (e.g., vapers); their geolocation (e.g., state); the aggregate tobacco control measures corresponding to their geolocation (e.g., clean indoor air laws); and by terms that indicated the searcher's potential interest (e.g., buy e-cigs likely indicates shopping)-all analyzed in 2015. ENDS searches are rapidly increasing in the U.S., with 8,498,000 searches during 2014 alone. Increasingly, searches are shifting from e-cigarette- to vaping-focused terms, especially in coastal states and states where anti-smoking norms are stronger. For example, nationally, e-cigarette searches declined 9% (95% CI=1%, 16%) during 2014 compared with 2013, whereas vaping searches increased 136% (95% CI=97%, 186%), even surpassing e-cigarette searches. Additionally, the percentage of ENDS searches related to shopping (e.g., vape shop) nearly doubled in 2014, whereas searches related to health concerns (e.g., vaping risks) or cessation (e.g., quit smoking with e-cigs) were rare and declined in 2014. ENDS popularity is rapidly growing and evolving. These findings could inform survey questionnaire development for follow-up investigation and immediately guide policy debates about how the public perceives the health risks or cessation benefits of ENDS. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Revisiting Molecular Dynamics on a CPU/GPU system: Water Kernel and SHAKE Parallelization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruymgaart, A Peter; Elber, Ron

    2012-11-13

    We report Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and Open-MP parallel implementations of water-specific force calculations and of bond constraints for use in Molecular Dynamics simulations. We focus on a typical laboratory computing-environment in which a CPU with a few cores is attached to a GPU. We discuss in detail the design of the code and we illustrate performance comparable to highly optimized codes such as GROMACS. Beside speed our code shows excellent energy conservation. Utilization of water-specific lists allows the efficient calculations of non-bonded interactions that include water molecules and results in a speed-up factor of more than 40 on the GPU compared to code optimized on a single CPU core for systems larger than 20,000 atoms. This is up four-fold from a factor of 10 reported in our initial GPU implementation that did not include a water-specific code. Another optimization is the implementation of constrained dynamics entirely on the GPU. The routine, which enforces constraints of all bonds, runs in parallel on multiple Open-MP cores or entirely on the GPU. It is based on Conjugate Gradient solution of the Lagrange multipliers (CG SHAKE). The GPU implementation is partially in double precision and requires no communication with the CPU during the execution of the SHAKE algorithm. The (parallel) implementation of SHAKE allows an increase of the time step to 2.0fs while maintaining excellent energy conservation. Interestingly, CG SHAKE is faster than the usual bond relaxation algorithm even on a single core if high accuracy is expected. The significant speedup of the optimized components transfers the computational bottleneck of the MD calculation to the reciprocal part of Particle Mesh Ewald (PME).

  6. The Staff Perceptions of Behavior and Discipline Survey: A Tool to Help Achieve Systemic Change through Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerborn, Laura L.; Tyre, Ashli D.; King, Joe P.

    2015-01-01

    The practices of schoolwide positive behavior support (SWPBS) are dependent on staff implementation in classroom and common areas throughout the school. Thus, gaining the support and commitment of school staff is a critical step toward reaching full implementation of SWPBS. However, achieving buildingwide support can be challenging; many schools…

  7. NATO: Revisiting American Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    NATO: Revisiting American Commitment by Captain Thomas F Hurley II United States Navy United...STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT .33 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NATO: Revisiting American Commitment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...the 21st century. The strategic benefit to the United States may no longer be worth the commitment to the alliance. The U.S. should reevaluate its

  8. The Danish System Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, John S.

    The paper is a supplement to an earlier paper in the same series which reviews Danish higher education until 1977. Expansion in higher education in the last 20 years, approaching the scale of mass higher education, culminated in a crisis in 1977. At that time, a trend toward self-government and participatory governing boards was seen as the end of…

  9. Computing system of staff evaluation; Sistema informatizado de avaliacao de pessoal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Marcelo Garcez; Aguiar, Joao Eugenio Lopes [TRANSPETRO, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Accidents with lost time: using a different concept to deal with safety, focusing directly on the behavior of the worker, leading the worker to a shaper perception of the risks and thus enabling a change of behavior towards a safer attitude. 'Sounds and Links' Project: the programmatic content was made through musical dynamics because music has the power to evoke feelings, stimulating the participants to live intra personal and interpersonal relationships in order to promote safe behaviors. The methodology used was: 'Andragogic (adult education) Model'; multi discipline language; Methodology of 'experiencing and living'; and Focus on the day-to-day situations of work and life. The project was applied to four groups with 60 people, consisting of employees from TRANSPETRO and its contractors, other group with 60 people, composed by leaders, and one group with all participants of the five groups for the general closing session. Expecting Results and consequence of the Project: to turn the concept of safety into a real value to the worker; to preserve the integrity and to value the life; pursuit a lasting and stable changing of behavior, with culture base on safety; and to support the management safety system and reduction of the accidents. (author)

  10. THEORY AND PRACTICE OF RHYTHM IN THE PROFESSIONAL TRAINING SYSTEM FOR ATHLETES AND TEACHING STAFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Aftimichuk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background . Rhythm is important for the implementation of all processes as in nature and in living organisms. It organizes motor human activity making it more productive and rational. On teaching working and sports motions the process of the impellent work correct rhythm assimilation plays an important role because it determines the movement performance optimum that is shown in its automation process reduction. As a result, man’s physical strength and nervous energy are saved. Rhythm category acquires a special status for the physical training specialist. All his activity including the motor component depends on the rhythm. The aim of the research is to study the physiology of rhythm and justify the more efficient training process for future teachers and coaches. Methods . The following theoretical research methods were used: the abstract and axiomatic methods, analysis and synthesis, induction and deduction, idealization, comparison and generalization. Results. As a result of study of materials from the natural sciences, numerology, psychology, music, cybernetics, synergetic, physiology, was found that the change of different states, as in nature and in living organisms, is an undulating rhythmic character. Physiological basis of the same rhythm is dynamic change excitation and inhibition processes occurring in the central nervous system. In this paper features of rhythm were identified. To accelerate the assimilation of motor action rational rhythm it is necessary to develop a sense of rhythm which is successfully formed in during the musical-motor activities. Conclusions. For today the study of the rhythm phenomenon in professional preparation on physical education and sport, in our opinion, requires the further study. Adding exercises involving certain motor skills elements similar in rhythmic structure with professional and technical actions to the coaches and teachers education and the competitive technology formation should be

  11. Effective teamwork in primary healthcare through a structured patient-sorting system - a qualitative study on staff members' conceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maun, Andy; Engström, Miriam; Frantz, Anna; Brämberg, Elisabeth Björk; Thorn, Jörgen

    2014-11-28

    Primary healthcare meets increased demands from an aging population concerning quality and availability while concurrently dealing with a growing shortage of general practitioners and imperfect efficiency in healthcare processes. Reorganization and team development can improve quality and performance but projects in primary care frequently do not attain the targeted results. By developing and introducing a structured patient-sorting system a primary healthcare centre in Western Sweden increased its access rate significantly and employed its medical professionals more efficiently. The aim of this study was to explore staff members' conceptions of the structured patient-sorting system in order to gain an inside perspective on this project. In this qualitative study 16 interviews were conducted over a period of two years and data was analysed using a phenomenographic approach to identify the various conceptions of the eleven participants. Three categories of description were identified: The system was conceptualized as 1) a framework for the development of patient-centred processes that were clear and consistent, 2) a promotor of professional development and a shared ideal of cooperative practice and 3) a common denominator and catalyst in conflict management. This study demonstrates that the introduction of a structured patient-sorting system makes it possible for several important change processes to take place concurrently: improvement of healthcare processes, empowerment of professionals and team development. It therefore indicates the importance of an appropriate, contextualized framework to support multiple concomitant quality improvement processes. Knowledge from this study can be used to assist and improve future implementations in primary healthcare centres.

  12. Offset steering in multiamp ion sources - revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, W.

    1993-01-01

    Steering of the individual beamlets in multiamp ion beams by offsetting the axes of circular extraction holes in three-electrode acceleration systems is revisited. A consistent application of the Langmuir-Blodgett theory of a spherical diode gives a stronger deflection per unit offset than assumed hitherto. (orig.)

  13. Revisiting Weak Simulation for Substochastic Markov Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, David N.; Song, Lei; Zhang, Lijun

    2013-01-01

    of the logic PCTL\\x, and its completeness was conjectured. We revisit this result and show that soundness does not hold in general, but only for Markov chains without divergence. It is refuted for some systems with substochastic distributions. Moreover, we provide a counterexample to completeness...

  14. Ratings Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Signe Sophus

    2015-01-01

    til at finde en relation mellem faldende tv-seertal og streaming på baggrund af målestandarterne inden for seertal og webtraffik i Denmark (TV Meter og Gemius). Den argumenterer for, at de nuværende markedsbaserede målesystemer er ude af stand til at opfange et publikum, der i stigende grad ser tv på...... tværs af medier og platforme, forskudt i tid og on-demand. This article focuses on audience ratings, which have functioned as the central ‘currency’ informing the media trade. It discusses changes to the production and accuracy of audience ratings at a time when established standards are being...... challenged. The article departs from an empirical study based on existing systems of audience measurement for television and online activity in Denmark (TV Meter and Gemius), examining the shortcomings of these systems for arriving at similar estimates of the impact of streaming on flow television...

  15. Experts: to crack down on violence in the ED, establish a robust system of reporting, educating staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Researchers say that most ED personnel will experience some form of physical or verbal violence at some point in their careers. However, when such incidents are regularly reported, the patients involved can be flagged in a hospital's computer system, making future events involving the same patients much less likely. Further, when ED personnel are alert to the clues that a patient or family member is becoming agitated, early intervention can usually prevent the situation from escalating to violence. About one-half of all ED personnel will experience a physical assault, and 97%-100% will experience verbal abuse during their careers, according to research. A first step in developing a strategy for dealing with violence is to educate ED personnel about what constitutes workplace violence so that all such incidents can be reported. Experts say many ED workers fail to recognize some instances of violence, based on the intent of the person involved. However, intent should not be a factor, they say. In many cases, empathy and good customer service skills can prevent tense situations from escalating to violence, but experts say that it is important to intervene at the first sign of agitation. ED administrators should gather input from frontline staff on how to most effectively derail instances of violence.

  16. Internationalization Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Torben; Shaver, Myles

    2011-01-01

    We refine internationalization theory by hypothesizing that international expansion is a discontinuous process characterized by an initial ‘big step.’ Firms have to build an infrastructure (e.g., architecture, management systems, and mind-set) to support international operations the first time...... they venture abroad, and subsequent international operations are able to leverage this infrastructure. Thus, we hypothesize that the internationalization process is characterized by: (1) firms taking a long period to make their first international investment; and (2) firms taking shorter but constant periods...

  17. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the m...

  18. Immersion revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Chr.; Nordahl, Rolf; Serafin, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    of existing definitions of immersion originating within the study of video games, virtual environments, and literary works of fiction. Based on this review, a three-dimensional taxonomy of the various conceptualizations of immersion is proposed. That is, the existing definitions of immersion may be broadly......The term immersion continues to be applied inconsistently within and across different fields of research connected with the study of virtual reality and interactive media. Moreover, immersion is oftentimes used interchangeably with the terms presence and engagement. This article details a review...... divided into three categories, each representing a dimension of the taxonomy: immersion as a property of a system, a subjective response to narrative contents, or a subjective response to challenges within the virtual environment. Finally, four distinct theories of presence are introduced and, based...

  19. REVIEW ON COLLEGE TRANSPORTATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BASED ON ANDROID BASED GPS SYSTEM FOR EFFICIENTLY LOCATE THE BUSES FOR STAFF & STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Shubham Sethi*, Yash Udawat, Shreyas Gupta, Shivanshu Nagarkar

    2016-01-01

    As we know that everyone will be late to catch a bus in his college days. Now, it is very difficult to find the route of different buses and the students need to call to their class mates to locate the current position of the bus. In this paper, we have elaborates the problems with existing system and what are the other systems which are currently running in the market. We have also provides the process flow of the existing system.

  20. EXPERIENCE OF NORMATIVE-LEGAL TRAINING OF PEDAGOGICAL STAFF IN THE SYSTEM OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND INCREASE QUALIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andzhela Muharbievna Shekhmirzova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the experience of normative and legal training of pedagogical personnel in the sphere of higher and additional professional education. The results of the analysis of the actual state of the system of normative and legal training of teachers are shown. The problems of forming normative-legal competence are analyzed. The relationship between the improvement of the system of normative-legal training of pedagogical cadres and the solution of a number of problems of a methodological nature is determined. At the same time, the problem of conceptual modeling of an effective pedagogical system of normative-legal training of pedagogical cadres is considered as a core, around which others group in a certain subordination. From the system positions it is shown the need to create an effective system of training teachers for the proper use of regulatory and legal acts in pedagogical activity, to solve complex problems, taking into account dynamically updated legislation. Based on the revealed methodological problems of normative-legal training of teachers, the need for a holistic view of the formation of regulatory-legal competence in the context of continuous teacher education. The purpose of research – presentation of a model of continuous regulatory education of teachers in the field of higher and additional professional education on the basis of identified methodological problems. Method or methodology of work: In the article a set of various methods of pedagogical research is presented: theoretical - analysis of scientific and pedagogical literature on the research problem, study and analysis of normative and legal documentation on the topic under consideration, theoretical generalization of research results; empirical - a survey, an analysis of the content of pedagogical documentation and performance, expert evaluation, modeling. Results: The model of continuous normative-legal training of pedagogical personnel in the sphere of

  1. Multifunction system service students and staff of higher education institutions by the example of ENGECON based on solutions IT -Card

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulakova Ekaterina Yurevna

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to the creation of multifunctional system service students and staff of universities based on smart card using the concept of electronic "purse." Experience of other countries with a similar solution shows that the system allows the university to significantly reduce maintenance costs of its activities and at the same time improve the quality of services provided. Also in this paper present my vision of the problem and its solution in our university - ENGECON.

  2. Impact of a Computer System and the Encoding Staff Organization on the Encoding Stays and on Health Institution Financial Production in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazin, Marianne; El Merini, Amine; Staccini, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    In France, medicalization of information systems program (PMSI) is an essential tool for the management planning and funding of health. The performance of encoding data inherent to hospital stays has become a major challenge for health institutions. Some studies have highlighted the impact of organizations set up on encoding quality and financial production. The aim of this study is to evaluate a computerized information system and new staff organization impact for treatment of the encoded information.

  3. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Association will shortly be renewing the mandate of half of the Staff Council. This is an opportunity for you to become more directly involved in the Staff Association's work and help promote and defend the staff's interests and, more broadly, those of the Organization itself.

  4. A comparative study of job satisfaction among regular and staff on contract in the primary health care system in Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Job satisfaction is a pleasant emotional state associated with the appreciation of one′s work and contributes immensely to performance in an organization. The purpose of this study was to assess the comparative job satisfaction among regular and staff on contract in Government Primary Urban Health Centers in Delhi, India. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in 2013, on a sample of 333 health care providers who were selected using a multistage random sampling technique. The sample included medical officers (MOs, auxiliary nurses and midwives (ANMs, pharmacists and laboratory technicians (LTs/laboratory assistants (LAs among regular and staff on contract. Analysis was done using SPSS version 18, and appropriate statistical tests were applied. Results: The job satisfaction for all the regular staff that is, MOs, ANMs, pharmacists, LAs, and LTs were relatively higher (3.3 ± 0.44 than the contract staff (2.7 ± 0.45 with ′t′value 10.54 (P < 0.01. The mean score for regular and contract MOs was 3.2 ± 0.46 and 2.7 ± 0.56, respectively, and the same trends were found between regular and ANMs on the contract which was 3.4 ± 0.30 and 2.7 ± 0.38, regular and pharmacists on the contract was 3.3 ± 0.50 and 2.8 ± 0.41, respectively. The differences between groups were significant with a P < 0.01. Conclusion: Overall job satisfaction level was relatively low in both regular and contract staff. The factors contributing to satisfaction level were privileges, interpersonal relations, working-environment, patient relationship, the organization′s facilities, career development, and the scarcity of human resources (HRs. Therefore, specific recommendations are suggested to policy makers to take cognizance of the scarcity of HRs and the on-going experimentation with different models under primary health care system.

  5. Revisiting city connectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mans, U.

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces a new perspective on city connectivity in order to analyze non-hub cities and their position in the world economy. The author revisits the different approaches discussed in the Global Commodity Chains (GCC), Global Production Networks (GPN) and World City Network (WCN)

  6. Revisiting Okun's Relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dixon, R.; Lim, G.C.; van Ours, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Our paper revisits Okun's relationship between observed unemployment rates and output gaps. We include in the relationship the effect of labour market institutions as well as age and gender effects. Our empirical analysis is based on 20 OECD countries over the period 1985-2013. We find that the

  7. Revisiting the Okun relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dixon, R. (Robert); Lim, G.C.; J.C. van Ours (Jan)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractOur article revisits the Okun relationship between observed unemployment rates and output gaps. We include in the relationship the effect of labour market institutions as well as age and gender effects. Our empirical analysis is based on 20 OECD countries over the period 1985–2013. We

  8. Revisiting the Rhetorical Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, Kris; Soetaert, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the special strand on "Revisiting the rhetorical curriculum" is to explore the educational potential of a new rhetorical perspective, specifically in relation to different traditions within educational and rhetorical studies. This implies that we do not only look at education "in" rhetoric, but that we position education also "as" a…

  9. Revisiting Professional Teacher Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    The Australian Society for Music Education's (ASME) involvement in the development of professional standards for music educators was a significant and active research time in the history of the Society. As ASME celebrates its golden jubilee, it is appropriate to revisit that history and consider the future prospects of subject-specific standards.…

  10. The Faraday effect revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Nenciu, Gheorghe

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series revisiting the (effect of) Faraday rotation. We formulate and prove the thermodynamic limit for the transverse electric conductivity of Bloch electrons, as well as for the Verdet constant. The main mathematical tool is a regularized magnetic and geometric...

  11. A Hydrostatic Paradox Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    This paper revisits a well-known hydrostatic paradox, observed when turning upside down a glass partially filled with water and covered with a sheet of light material. The phenomenon is studied in its most general form by including the mass of the cover. A historical survey of this experiment shows that a common misunderstanding of the phenomenon…

  12. Life quality index revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2004-01-01

    The derivation of the life quality index (LQI) is revisited for a revision. This revision takes into account the unpaid but necessary work time needed to stay alive in clean and healthy conditions to be fit for effective wealth producing work and to enjoyable free time. Dimension analysis consist...

  13. Seven Issues Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Whitehead, Jim; De Bra, Paul

    2002-01-01

    and Tailorability Since that time, these issues have formed the nucleus of multiple research agendas within the Hypertext community. Befitting this direction-setting role, the issues have been revisited several times, by Halasz in his 1991 Hypertext keynote talk, and by Randy Trigg in his 1996 Hypertext keynote...

  14. Improving radiation awareness and feeling of personal security of non-radiological medical staff by implementing a traffic light system in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilmaier, C.; Mayor, A.; Zuber, N.; Weishaupt, D. [Stadtspital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiology; Fodor, P. [Stadtspital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine

    2016-03-15

    Non-radiological medical professionals often need to remain in the scanning room during computed tomography (CT) examinations to supervise patients in critical condition. Independent of protective devices, their position significantly influences the radiation dose they receive. The purpose of this study was to assess if a traffic light system indicating areas of different radiation exposure improves non-radiological medical staff's radiation awareness and feeling of personal security. Phantom measurements were performed to define areas of different dose rates and colored stickers were applied on the floor according to a traffic light system: green = lowest, orange = intermediate, and red = highest possible radiation exposure. Non-radiological medical professionals with different years of working experience evaluated the system using a structured questionnaire. Kruskal-Wallis and Spearman's correlation test were applied for statistical analysis. Fifty-six subjects (30 physicians, 26 nursing staff) took part in this prospective study. Overall rating of the system was very good, and almost all professionals tried to stand in the green stickers during the scan. The system significantly increased radiation awareness and feeling of personal protection particularly in staff with ? 5 years of working experience (p < 0.05). The majority of non-radiological medical professionals stated that staying in the green stickers and patient care would be compatible. Knowledge of radiation protection was poor in all groups, especially among entry-level employees (p < 0.05). A traffic light system in the CT scanning room indicating areas with lowest, in-termediate, and highest possible radiation exposure is much appreciated. It increases radiation awareness, improves the sense of personal radiation protection, and may support endeavors to lower occupational radiation exposure, although the best radiation protection always is to re-main outside the CT room during the scan.

  15. E3 Staff Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E3 Staff database is maintained by E3 PDMS (Professional Development & Management Services) office. The database is Mysql. It is manually updated by E3 staff as...

  16. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Typically, ground staff scheduling is centrally planned for each terminal in an airport. The advantage of this is that the staff is efficiently utilized, but a disadvantage is that staff spends considerable time walking between stands. In this paper a decentralized approach for ground staff...... scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the staff scheduling is planned decentralized for each zone. The advantage of this approach is that the staff...... work in a smaller area of the terminal and thus spends less time walking between stands. When planning decentralized the allocation of stands to flights influences the staff scheduling since the workload in a zone depends on which flights are allocated to stands in the zone. Hence solving the problem...

  17. Modern Challenges and Perspectives in Development of Academic Staff in Higher Schools and Peculiarities of Military Education System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neno Hristov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Current paper presents a book review made by Colonel Assoc. Prof. Neno Hristov, D.Sc. on the monograph “Modern challenges and perspectives in development of academic staff in higher schools and peculiarities of military education system” – an edition of Innovations and Sustainability Academy – Bulgaria authored by Corresponding Member of the Russian Academy of Natural History Prof. Dr. Eng. Venelin Terziev and Colonel Assoc. Prof. Dr. Eng. Georgi Georgiev from Vasil Levski National Military University – Veliko Tarnovo.

  18. The Use of Communication Apps by Medical Staff in the Australian Health Care System: Survey Study on Prevalence and Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Amanda; Wickramasinghe, Nilmini; Claydon-Platt, Damian; Balakrishnan, Vikram; Smart, Philip

    2018-02-09

    The use of communication apps on mobile phones offers an efficient, unobtrusive, and portable mode of communication for medical staff. The potential enhancements in patient care and education appear significant, with clinical details able to be shared quickly within multidisciplinary teams, supporting rapid integration of disparate information, and more efficient patient care. However, sharing patient data in this way also raises legal and ethical issues. No data is currently available demonstrating how widespread the use of these apps are, doctor's attitudes towards them, or what guides clinician choice of app. The objective of this study was to quantify and qualify the use of communication apps among medical staff in clinical situations, their role in patient care, and knowledge and attitudes towards safety, key benefits, potential disadvantages, and policy implications. Medical staff in hospitals across Victoria (Australia) were invited to participate in an anonymous 33-question survey. The survey collected data on respondent's demographics, their use of communication apps in clinical settings, attitudes towards communication apps, perceptions of data "safety," and why one communication app was chosen over others. Communication apps in Victorian hospitals are in widespread use from students to consultants, with WhatsApp being the primary app used. The median number of messages shared per day was 12, encompassing a range of patient information. All respondents viewed these apps positively in quickly communicating patient information in a clinical setting; however, all had concerns about the privacy implications arising from sharing patient information in this way. In total, 67% (60/90) considered patient data "moderately safe" on these apps, and 50% (46/90) were concerned the use of these apps was inconsistent with current legislation and policy. Apps were more likely to be used if they were fast, easy to use, had an easy login process, and were already in

  19. CHIEF OF STAFF FINANCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Internal Audit, Military. Museums, Documentation. Service, Language. Service, Financial Co-ordination, Chief Pay Mas- ter, Programming and Budget, Electronic Data. Processing and Expenditure Control. Chief of Staff Finance. With effect from 13 February 1978 Chief of Staff. Management Services became Chief of Staff.

  20. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2007-01-01

    The Staff Association will shortly be renewing the mandate of half of the Staff Council. This is an opportunity for you to become more directly involved in the Staff Association’s work and help promote and defend the staff’s interests and, more broadly, those of the Organization itself.

  1. Remembered Experiences and Revisit Intentions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnes, Stuart; Mattsson, Jan; Sørensen, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    path modelling, we examine the impact of positive affect tourist experiences on the development of revisit intentions. We find that longer-term remembered experiences have the strongest impact on revisit intentions, more so than predicted or immediate memory after an event. We also find that remembered...

  2. Deterministic Graphical Games Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Daniel; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2008-01-01

    We revisit the deterministic graphical games of Washburn. A deterministic graphical game can be described as a simple stochastic game (a notion due to Anne Condon), except that we allow arbitrary real payoffs but disallow moves of chance. We study the complexity of solving deterministic graphical...... games and obtain an almost-linear time comparison-based algorithm for computing an equilibrium of such a game. The existence of a linear time comparison-based algorithm remains an open problem....

  3. Time functions revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Albert

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we revisit our joint work with Antonio Siconolfi on time functions. We will give a brief introduction to the subject. We will then show how to construct a Lipschitz time function in a simplified setting. We will end with a new result showing that the Aubry set is not an artifact of our proof of existence of time functions for stably causal manifolds.

  4. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  5. Nurse staff allocation by nurse patient ratio vs. a computerized nurse dependency management system: a comparative cost analysis of Australian and New Zealand hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, Liza; Plummer, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Coding, costing, and accounting for nursing care requirements in Australian public and private hospitals lacks systematic research. Nurse costing for two nurse staffing allocation methods--nurse patient ratios and a computerized nurse dependency management system--were compared. Retrospective nursing workload management data were obtained from hospital information systems in 21 acute care public and private hospitals in Australia and New Zealand. Descriptive statistics, cost analysis, and cost modeling were conducted for 103,269 shifts of nursing care. The comparison of costs for nursing staff by nurse-patient ratios and by a computerized nurse dependency management system demonstrated differences. The provision of nursing care using the computerized nurse dependency management system was, overall, lower in cost than for nurse-patient ratios.

  6. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! After verification by the Electoral Commission, all candidates for the elections to the Staff Council have been registered. It is now up to you, members of the Staff Association, to vote for the candidate(s) of your choice. We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. We are using an electronic voting system; all you need to do is click the link below and follow the instructions on the screen. https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017 The deadline for voting is Monday, 13 November at midday (12 pm). Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The ...

  7. Resolution of the Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    You were many to attend the public information meetings organised in October and we thank you for your interest. In this decision phase of the current Five-Yearly Review of our employment conditions they provided an opportunity to review the Management proposals in detail. They were a moment of exchange also on the various topics under review, and your comments were many and very valuable. Meeting on Thursday 29th October, the Staff Council discussed once more these proposals. It considered that the "package" of proposed measures is not balanced enough in its current form. It decided to formulate additional requests to the Management, relating mainly to the effects of the introduction of the proposed new career system. The resolution adopted this morning also implies that the consultation of staff, originally foreseen next week, is postponed. The staff Council will reconvene in a special session on Thursday, 5th November to reassess its position depending on the progress made regarding its d...

  8. Reframing in dentistry: revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuvvula, Sivakumar; Kamatham, Rekalakshmi; Challa, Ramasubbareddy; Asokan, Sharath

    2013-01-01

    The successful practice of dentistry involves a good combination of technical skills and soft skills. Soft skills or communication skills are not taught extensively in dental schools and it can be challenging to learn and at times in treating dental patients. Guiding the child's behavior in the dental operatory is one of the preliminary steps to be taken by the pediatric dentist and one who can successfully modify the behavior can definitely pave the way for a life time comprehensive oral care. This article is an attempt to revisit a simple behavior guidance technique, reframing and explain the possible psychological perspectives behind it for better use in the clinical practice.

  9. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 31st of October to the 14th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months and will keep the next Staff Council very busy. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to vote * * * * * * * Vote Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the election...

  10. New staff contract policy

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at TREF and on the recommendation of the Finance Committee, Council approved a new staff contract policy, which became effective on 1 January 2006. Its application is covered by a new Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) 'Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members'. The revised circular replaces the previous Circulars No. 9 (Rev. 3) 'Staff contracts' and No. 2 (Rev. 2) 'Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period for staff members'. The main features of the new contract policy are as follows: The new policy provides chances for long-term employment for all staff recruits staying for four years without distinguishing between those assigned to long-term or short-term activities when joining CERN. In addition, it presents a number of simplifications for the award of ICs. There are henceforth only 2 types of contract: Limited Duration (LD) contracts for all recruitment and Indefinite Contracts (IC) for...

  11. Why revisit your cost-accounting strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, Ricky

    2014-07-01

    Healthcare entities seeking to develop effective cost-accounting systems should take six steps to avoid potential pitfalls: Secure broad executive-level support for the effort. Ensure systems are in place to analyze the disparate data. Define measurable objectives to ensure that implementation achieves desired results. Give due consideration to implementation planning. Train support staff sufficiently to avoid underutilization. Develop a sufficiently broad base of staff support for the system.

  12. The impact of a closed‐loop electronic prescribing and administration system on prescribing errors, administration errors and staff time: a before‐and‐after study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Bryony Dean; O'Grady, Kara; Donyai, Parastou; Jacklin, Ann; Barber, Nick

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of a closed‐loop electronic prescribing, automated dispensing, barcode patient identification and electronic medication administration record (EMAR) system on prescribing and administration errors, confirmation of patient identity before administration, and staff time. Design, setting and participants Before‐and‐after study in a surgical ward of a teaching hospital, involving patients and staff of that ward. Intervention Closed‐loop electronic prescribing, automated dispensing, barcode patient identification and EMAR system. Main outcome measures Percentage of new medication orders with a prescribing error, percentage of doses with medication administration errors (MAEs) and percentage given without checking patient identity. Time spent prescribing and providing a ward pharmacy service. Nursing time on medication tasks. Results Prescribing errors were identified in 3.8% of 2450 medication orders pre‐intervention and 2.0% of 2353 orders afterwards (p<0.001; χ2 test). MAEs occurred in 7.0% of 1473 non‐intravenous doses pre‐intervention and 4.3% of 1139 afterwards (p = 0.005; χ2 test). Patient identity was not checked for 82.6% of 1344 doses pre‐intervention and 18.9% of 1291 afterwards (p<0.001; χ2 test). Medical staff required 15 s to prescribe a regular inpatient drug pre‐intervention and 39 s afterwards (p = 0.03; t test). Time spent providing a ward pharmacy service increased from 68 min to 98 min each weekday (p = 0.001; t test); 22% of drug charts were unavailable pre‐intervention. Time per drug administration round decreased from 50 min to 40 min (p = 0.006; t test); nursing time on medication tasks outside of drug rounds increased from 21.1% to 28.7% (p = 0.006; χ2 test). Conclusions A closed‐loop electronic prescribing, dispensing and barcode patient identification system reduced prescribing errors and MAEs, and increased confirmation of patient identity before

  13. Attitudes and opinions of nursing and medical staff regarding the supply and storage of medicinal products before and after the installation of a drawer-based automated stock-control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardern-Jones, Joanne; Hughes, Donald K; Rowe, Philip H; Mottram, David R; Green, Christopher F

    2009-04-01

    This study assessed the attitudes of Emergency Department (ED) staff regarding the introduction of an automated stock-control system. The objectives were to determine attitudes to stock control and replenishment, speed of access to the system, ease of use and the potential for future uses of the system. The study was carried out in the Countess of Chester Hospital NHS Foundation Trust (COCH) ED, which is attended by over 65,000 patients each year. All 68 ED staff were sent pre-piloted, semi-structured questionnaires and reminders, before and after automation of medicines stock control. Pre-implementation, 35 staff (66.1% of respondents) reported that problems occurred with access to medicine storage keys 'very frequently' or 'frequently'. Twenty-eight (52.8%) respondents 'agreed' or 'strongly agreed' that medicines were quickly accessed, which rose to 41 (77%) post-automation (P fluids and refrigerated items. Twenty-seven (51.9%) staff reported access to the system within 1 min and 17 (32.7%) staff reported access within 1-2 min. The majority of staff found the system 'easy' or 'very easy' to use and there was a non-significant relationship between previous use of information technology and acceptance of the system. From a staff satisfaction perspective, automation improved medicines storage, security and stock control, and addressed the problem of searching for keys to storage areas. Concerns over familiarity with computers, queuing, speed of access and an improved audit trail do not appear to have been issues, when compared with the previous manual storage of medicines.

  14. The renin-angiotensin system in malignant hypertension revisited: plasma renin activity, microangiopathic hemolysis, and renal failure in malignant hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Born, Bert-Jan H.; Koopmans, Richard P.; van Montfrans, Gert A.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malignant hypertension is a renin-dependent form of hypertension. However, the variations in renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation in malignant hypertension are not completely understood. A proposed mechanism for ongoing RAS activation is the presence of microangiopathic hemolysis

  15. Software Engineering with Formal Methods: The Development of a Storm Surge Barrier Control System - Revisiting Seven Myths of Formal Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tretmans, G.J.; Wijbrans, K.C.J.; Chaudron, M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of formal methods in the development of the control system for the Maeslant Kering. The Maeslant Kering is the movable dam which has to protect Rotterdam from floodings while, at (almost) the same time, not restricting ship traffic to the port of Rotterdam. The control

  16. A Systemic View of the Learning and Differentiation of Scientific Concepts: The Case of Electric Current and Voltage Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Ismo T.; Kokkonen, Tommi

    2014-01-01

    In learning conceptual knowledge in physics, a common problem is the incompleteness of a learning process, where students' personal, often undifferentiated concepts take on more scientific and differentiated form. With regard to such concept learning and differentiation, this study proposes a systemic view in which concepts are considered as…

  17. Systems consolidation revisited, but not revised: The promise and limits of optogenetics in the study of memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, Oliver; Nadel, Lynn

    2017-12-05

    Episodic memories (in humans) and event-like memories (in non-human animals) require the hippocampus for some time after acquisition, but at remote points seem to depend more on cortical areas instead. Systems consolidation refers to the process that promotes this reorganization of memory. Various theoretical frameworks accounting for this process have been proposed, but clear evidence favoring one or another of these positions has been lacking. Addressing this issue, a recent study deployed some of the most advanced neurobiological technologies - optogenetics and calcium imaging - and provided high resolution, precise observations regarding brain systems involved in recent and remote contextual fear memories. We critically review these findings within their historical context and conclude that they do not resolve the debate concerning systems consolidation. This is because the relevant question concerning the quality of memory at recent and remote time points has not been answered: Does the memory reorganization taking place during systems consolidation result in changes to the content of memory? Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The 4-particle hydrogen-anti-hydrogen system revisited. Twofold molecular Hamiltonian symmetry and natural atom anti-hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hooydonk, G.

    2005-01-01

    The historical importance of the original quantum mechanical bond theory proposed by Heitler and London in 1927 as well as its pitfalls are reviewed. Modern ab initio treatments of H-H-bar systems are inconsistent with the logic behind algebraic Hamiltonians H ± = H 0 ± ΔH for charge-symmetrical and charge-asymmetrical 4 unit charge systems like H 2 and HH-bar. Their eigenvalues are exactly those of 1927 Heitler-London (HL) theory. Since these 2 Hamiltonians are mutually exclusive, only the attractive one can apply for stable natural molecular H 2 . A wrong choice leads to problems with anti-atom H-bar. In line with earlier results on band and line spectra, we now prove that HL chose the wrong Hamiltonian for H 2 . Their theory explains the stability of attractive system H 2 with a repulsive Hamiltonian H 0 + ΔH instead of with the attractive one H 0 - ΔH, representative for charge-asymmetrical system HH-bar. A new second order symmetry effect is detected in this attractive Hamiltonian, which leads to a 3-dimensional structure for the 4-particle system. Repulsive HL Hamiltonian H + applies at long range but at the critical distance, attractive charge-inverted Hamiltonian H - takes over and leads to bond H 2 but in reality, HH-bar, for which we give an analytical proof. This analysis confirms and generalizes an earlier critique of the wrong long range behavior of HL-theory by Bingel, Preuss and Schmidtke and by Herring. Another wrong asymptote choice in the past also applies for atomic anti-hydrogen H-bar, which has hidden the Mexican hat potential for natural hydrogen. This generic solution removes most problems, physicists and chemists experience with atomic H-bar and molecular HH-bar, including the problem with antimatter in the Universe. (author)

  19. Assesment of mucoadhesion using small deformation rheology revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harloff-Helleberg, Stine; Vissing, Karina Juul; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2017-01-01

    This work revisits the commonly used approach to assess mucoadhesion in drug delivery by small deformation rheology. The results show that biosimilar mucus serves as a more predictive mucus model system when compared to mucin suspensions. Data is fitted including error propagation, different from...

  20. A Feminist Revisit to the First-Year Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Anita

    1996-01-01

    A seminar at Chicago-Kent College of Law (Illinois) that reviews six first-year law school courses by focusing on feminist issues in course content and structure is described. The seminar functions as both a review and a shift in perspective. Courses revisited include civil procedure, contracts, criminal law, justice and the legal system,…

  1. Revisiting Constructivist Teaching Methods in Ontario Colleges Preparing for Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    At the time of writing, the first community colleges in Ontario were preparing for transition to an accreditation model from an audit system. This paper revisits constructivist literature, arguing that a more pragmatic definition of constructivism effectively blends positivist and interactionist philosophies to achieve both student centred…

  2. Validity of the SMS, Phone, and medical staff Examination sports injury surveillance system for time-loss and medical attention injuries in sports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M; Wedderkopp, N; Myklebust, Grete

    2018-01-01

    The accurate measurement of sport exposure time and injury occurrence is key to effective injury prevention and management. Current measures are limited by their inability to identify all types of sport-related injury, narrow scope of injury information, or lack the perspective of the injured...... athlete. The aims of the study were to evaluate the proportion of injuries and the agreement between sport exposures reported by the SMS messaging and follow-up telephone part of the SMS, Phone, and medical staff Examination (SPEx) sports injury surveillance system when compared to measures obtained...... measures of injury consequences beyond time-loss from sport. However, this needs to be further evaluated in large-scale studies....

  3. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 28 of October to the 11th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months, and in particular the Five-yearly-Review 2015, subject of the questionnaire that you probably recently filled out. All this will keep the next Staff Council very busy indeed. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to v...

  4. Revisiting the Resilience of Chestnut Forests in Corsica: from Social-Ecological Systems Theory to Political Ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve Michon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The "chestnut civilization" is often used to qualify agrarian inland Corsica. Based on a critical review of historical sources and research on present dynamics, we show how this "civilization" has built up on a long series of resistance and adaptation to external political forces, from Genovese and French domination up to the present period of independence claims. The construction of the castagnetu, the Corsican chestnut (Castanea sativa mill. forest, as a social-ecological system is based on a constantly evolving compromise between wild and domestic attributes, but also on socio-political resistance, incorporation, and innovation. We argue that the castagnetu's resilience, beyond its social-ecological qualities and its economic profitability, is closely linked to a constant incorporation of identity and cultural values into chestnut trees and gardens, but also to the role assigned to the castagnetu by its supporters in the political positioning of their relations to both central power and outside actors.

  5. The linkage between hillslope vegetation changes and late-Quaternary fluvial-system aggradation in the Mojave Desert revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, J. D.

    2014-03-01

    Valley-floor-channel and alluvial-fan deposits and terraces in the southwestern US record multiple episodes of late Quaternary fluvial aggradation and incision. Perhaps the most well constrained of these episodes took place from the latest Pleistocene to the present in the Mojave Desert. One hypothesis for this episode, i.e. the paleo-vegetation change hypothesis (PVCH), posits that a reduction in hillslope vegetation cover associated with the transition from Pleistocene woodlands to Holocene desert scrub generated a pulse of sediment that triggered a primary phase of aggradation downstream, followed by channel incision, terrace abandonment, and initiation of a secondary phase of aggradation further downstream. A second hypothesis, i.e. the extreme-storm hypothesis, attributes episodes of aggradation and incision to changes in the frequency and/or intensity of extreme storms. In the past decade a growing number of studies has advocated the extreme-storm hypothesis and challenged the PVCH on the basis of inconsistencies in both timing and process. Here I show that in eight out of nine sites where the timing of fluvial-system aggradation in the Mojave Desert is reasonably well constrained, measured ages of primary aggradation and/or incision are consistent with the predictions of the PVCH if the time-transgressive nature of paleo-vegetation changes with elevation is fully taken into account. I also present an alternative process model for PVCH that is more consistent with available data and produces sediment pulses primarily via an increase in drainage density (i.e. a transformation of hillslopes into low-order channels) rather than solely via an increase in sediment yield from hillslopes. This paper further documents the likely important role of changes in upland vegetation cover and drainage density in driving fluvial-system response during semiarid-to-arid climatic changes.

  6. Revisiting validity in cross-cultural psychometric-test development: A systems-informed shift towards qualitative research designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Swanepoel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The problem of enhancing validity in cross-cultural psychometric-test development in the field of clinical psychology has been perpetuated by several factors. Societal biases and value judgements, a positivistic paradigm, and challenges associated with multiculturalism continually spill over into cross-cultural research methodology. An overemphasis on quantitative methods and insufficient exploration of the meaning of the concepts to be measured tend to threaten construct validity. Objectives and Methods: This article tracks some of the progress in the field of clinical cross-cultural psychometric-test development – prior to and since the International Test Commission Guidelines, and including the complex South African situation – to give support to the perspective that previous cross-cultural research inadequately equips contemporary researchers to develop valid tests for multicultural clinical contexts. Results: A systems-informed paradigm shift is proposed, which involves the application of systemic concepts such as circularity, relationality, neutrality, and a concern with process issues. Ideally, multidisciplinary, multicultural test-developing teams that include members of the target-cultural group should consult and collaborate with the target groups before embarking on test-adaptation or test-development activities. Such teamwork would help to ensure that the meaning of the relevant concept/s is captured in a valid way for each cultural group. Furthermore, such collaboration should form a part of using qualitative research designs more frequently in clinical cross-cultural psychometric-test development. Conclusions: The emphasis should be on building theory and generating hypotheses, in order to pursue a deeper understanding of the constructs under investigation, and to advance theoretical developments in the field of clinical cross-cultural psychometric-test development.

  7. Engaging Frontline Leaders and Staff in Real-Time Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennifer; Hebish, Linda J; Mann, Sharon; Ching, Joan M; Blackmore, C Craig

    2016-04-01

    The relationship of staff satisfaction and engagement to organizational success, along with the integral influence of frontline managers on this dimension, is well established in health care and other industries. To specifically address staff engagement, Virginia Mason Medical Center, an integrated, single-hospital health system, developed an approach that involved leaders, through the daily use of standard work for leaders, as well as staff, through a Lean-inspired staff idea system. Kaizen Promotion Office (KPO) staff members established three guiding principles: (1) Staff engagement begins with leader engagement; (2) Integrate daily improve- ment (kaizen) as a habitual way of life not as an add-on; and (3) Create an environment in which staff feel psycho- logically safe and valued. Two design elements--Standard Work for Leaders (SWL) and Everyday Lean Ideas (ELIs) were implemented. For the emergency department (ED), an early adopter of the staff engagement work, the challenge was to apply the guiding principles to improve staff engagement while improving quality and patient and staff satisfaction, even as patient volumes were increasing. Daily huddles for the KPO staff members and weekly leader rounds are used to elicit staff ideas and foster ELIs in real time. Overall progress to date has been tracked in terms of staff satisfaction surveys, voluntary staff turnover, adoption of SWL, and testing and implementation of staff ideas. For example, voluntary turnover of ED staff decreased from 14.6% in 2011 to 7.5% in 2012, and 2.0% in 2013. Organizationwide, at least 800 staff ideas are in motion at any given time, with finished ones posted in an idea supermarket website. A leadership and staff engagement approach that focuses on SWL and on capturing staff ideas for daily problem solving and improvement can contribute to organization success and improve the quality of health care delivery.

  8. Reframing in dentistry: Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Nuvvula

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The successful practice of dentistry involves a good combination of technical skills and soft skills. Soft skills or communication skills are not taught extensively in dental schools and it can be challenging to learn and at times in treating dental patients. Guiding the child′s behavior in the dental operatory is one of the preliminary steps to be taken by the pediatric dentist and one who can successfully modify the behavior can definitely pave the way for a life time comprehensive oral care. This article is an attempt to revisit a simple behavior guidance technique, reframing and explain the possible psychological perspectives behind it for better use in the clinical practice.

  9. Deterministic Graphical Games Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Klas Olof Daniel; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2012-01-01

    Starting from Zermelo’s classical formal treatment of chess, we trace through history the analysis of two-player win/lose/draw games with perfect information and potentially infinite play. Such chess-like games have appeared in many different research communities, and methods for solving them......, such as retrograde analysis, have been rediscovered independently. We then revisit Washburn’s deterministic graphical games (DGGs), a natural generalization of chess-like games to arbitrary zero-sum payoffs. We study the complexity of solving DGGs and obtain an almost-linear time comparison-based algorithm...... for finding optimal strategies in such games. The existence of a linear time comparison-based algorithm remains an open problem....

  10. Metamorphosis in Craniiformea revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altenburger, Andreas; Wanninger, Andreas; Holmer, Lars E.

    2013-01-01

    We revisited the brachiopod fold hypothesis and investigated metamorphosis in the craniiform brachiopod Novocrania anomala. Larval development is lecithotrophic and the dorsal (brachial) valve is secreted by dorsal epithelia. We found that the juvenile ventral valve, which consists only of a thin....... We show that the “brachiopod fold hypothesis,” which argues that brachiopods are transversely “folded” across the ontogenetic anterior–posterior axis, should be rejected at least with respect to the craniiforms. The data now suggest that the Craniiformea may be a derived group within......), such as a through-gut and missing hinge articulation, may thus be secondarily derived characters of the Craniiformea within the Rhynchonelliformea....

  11. AN IMPACT OF THE EFFICIENT FUNCTIONING OF THE VENTILATION AND AIR-CONDITIONING SYSTEM ON THERMAL COMFORT OF THE MEDICAL STAFF IN THE OPERATING ROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Jankowski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ventilation and air conditioning systems are necessary for developing proper parameters of indoor envi-ronment in operating rooms. The main task of ventilation and air conditioning in those specific areas consists in creating desirable temperature, reducing the number of microorganisms and the concen-trations of hazardous gases and substances in the air, as well as ensuring the proper direction of airflow. In Poland, indoor environment in operating rooms has to comply with the requirements set out in three regulations (Journal of Laws of 2002 No. 75, item 690, as amended, Journal of Laws of 2002 No. 217, item 1833, Journal of Laws of 2011 No. 31, item 158, as amended and the document entitled "Guidelines for the design of general hospitals". Given insufficient accuracy of the abovementioned national documents, it is a common practice to use foreign standards, i.e. ASHRAE Standard 170-2013, DIN 1946-4: 2008 and FprCEN TR 16244: 2011. When considering the conditions for thermal comfort, it is important to bear in mind a close link between air flow velocity and air temperature. Air in the zone occupied by patients and medical staff must not cause the sensation of draft. Furthermore, air velocity should be sufficient to eliminate interference caused by the presence of people and other sources of heat. It should also reduce the turbulence level in the air in the operating room. Efficient functioning of ventilation and air conditioning was tested during treatments and operations carried out on three wards of a Warsaw hospital. Tests were performed with the participation of medical staff from various surgical units. They were asked to perform minor manual tasks to simulate work on the op-erating table, and to complete a questionnaire on subjective thermal sensation. The applied methodology is widely used during testing of general and local ventilation in public buildings. Air temperature, relative humidity, air flow supply and exhaust air from the

  12. Staff Association Cocktail

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    The Staff Association has been organising for many years a cocktail with delegates of the Member States participating in Finance Committees of March and September. This cocktail is held at the end of the day, after the Finance Committee meeting. This direct and regular communication helps establish an ongoing contact between the Staff Association and CERN Member States and, more recently, the Associate Member States. Ambassadors of the CERN Staff Association, who are Members of the Personnel, have the opportunity to meet their national delegation in an informal and friendly atmosphere. These exchanges, facilitated by the use of the national language, allow the personnel via the Staff Association to express its ideas and positions on current affairs and fundamental issues, and also to hear about those of the delegations in return.

  13. The Effect of Implementing Knowledge Management System in Supplier Selection Content to Improve Learning Performance of Online Travel Agencies Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariya, Pakinee; Chakpitak, Nopasit; Sureepong, Pradorn

    2016-01-01

    Supplier selection knowledge of OTAs businesses is one of the most valuable and significant knowledge since OTAs now operate businesses that gain their benefits from having many kinds of tourism products and services for customers to browse from in their own online booking systems. The better the suppliers, the more successful will OTAs be. The…

  14. Equilibrium phases in the multiferroic BiFeO3-PbTiO3 system – a revisit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothai V.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The(1-x BiFeO3-(x PbTiO3 solid solution exhibiting a Morphotropic Phase Boundary (MPB has attracted considerable attention recently because of its unique features such as multiferroic, high Curie point (TC ~ 700°C and giant tetragonality (c/a -1 ~ 0.19. Different research groups have reported different composition range of MPB for this system. In this work we have conclusively proved that the wide composition range of MPB reported in the literature is due to kinetic arrest of the metastable rhombohedral phase and that if sufficient temperature and time is allowed the metastable phase disappears. The genuine MPB was found to be x=0.27 for which the tetragonal and the rhombohedral phases are in thermodynamic equilibrium. In-situ high temperature structural study of x=0.27 revealed the sluggish kinetics associated with the temperature induced structural transformation. Neutron powder diffraction study revealed that themagnetic ordering at room temperature occurs in the rhombohedral phase. The magnetic structure was found to be commensurate G-type antiferromagnetic with magnetic moments parallel to the c-direction (of the hexagonal cell. The present study suggests that the equilibrium properties in this solid solution series should be sought for x=0.27.

  15. Consolidated results of the AECB staff's detailed review of Ontario Hydro Nuclear's integrated independent performance assessment and safety system functional inspection findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    In January 1997, Ontario Hydro announced that a team of nuclear industry experts from the United States, called the Nuclear Performance Advisory Group (NPAG), had been employed to help manage its nuclear program and to implement needed improvements in Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN) operations. In the spring of 1997, NPAG initiated a series of detailed reviews of OHN's operations, at its Pickering, Bruce and Darlington nuclear generating stations and in OHN's Head Office groups. These reviews, called 'Independent Integrated Performance Assessments' (UPA) and 'Safety System Functional Inspections' (SSFI), were carried out in April and May of this year with the objective of developing 'an integrated, accurate, and comprehensive understanding of the performance of OHN'.They were conducted in response to a request from the President of Ontario Hydro for a 'brutally honest' assessment of Ontario Hydro Nuclear. NPAG has since been integrated into Ontario Hydro's line organization. Ontario Hydro's Board of Directors received the results of the IIPAs and SSFIs and an Ontario Hydro report titled Basis for Continued Operation on August 12, 1997. AECB staff has been reviewing the reports containing these results since receiving them at that time. The conclusions of these studies are extremely critical of the management of Ontario Hydro Nuclear. They identify a large number of shortcomings in the operation and maintenance of the nuclear generating stations. Ontario Hydro states in the IIPA and SSFI reports that the reports are, by design, negative in slant and emphasize the weaknesses in performance rather than the strengths. The reports conclude that the stations can continue to operate safety while the near and long term improvements are implemented. This report contains the consolidated results of the AECB staffs detailed review of the IIPA and SSFI findings. (author)

  16. Detainees, staff, and health care services in immigration detention centres: a descriptive comparison of detention systems in Sweden and in the Benelux countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soorej J. Puthoopparambil

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immigration detention has been shown to negatively affect the health and well-being of detainees. The aim of the study was to describe and compare policies and practices that could affect the health and well-being of immigrant detainees in the Benelux countries (Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg to those in Sweden. Design: This was a case study. Data were collected in two phases using a questionnaire developed particularly for this study. In the first phase, authorities in the Benelux countries responded to the questionnaire via email. During the second phase, a research team visited detention centres in the Benelux countries to observe and further explore, strengthening findings through triangulation. Data on Swedish detention centres were collected in previous studies. Results: Compared to the Benelux countries, Sweden has limited health care provision available in the detention centres. Swedish detention centres did not have mental health care professionals working at the centres and had fewer restrictions within the centres with regard to access to mobile phone, internet, and various recreational activities. Compared to Sweden, the detention centres in the Benelux countries have more staff categories providing services to the detainees that are provided with relevant and timely on-the-job training. All the countries, except Belgium, provide subsistence allowances to detainees. Conclusion: Despite the Common European Asylum System framework, differences exist among the four European Union member states in providing services to immigrant detainees. This study highlights these differences, thereby providing a window on how these diverse approaches may serve as a learning tool for improving services offered to immigrant detainees. In Sweden, the health care available to detainees and training and recruitment of staff should be improved, while the Benelux countries should strive to reduce restrictions within detention centres.

  17. LIFELONG LEARNING: SYSTEM OF DEVELOPMENT OF STAFF IN THE SCIENTIFIC LIBRARY OF ODESA I. I. MECHNIKOV NATIONAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. П. Пружина

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The main subject of article is consideration of own model of the system of professional development of the Scientific library of Odesa I. I. Mechnikov National University which covers all employees and library of higher educational institutions of Odessa and the South of Ukraine. The purpose of work is consideration of a technique and forms of work, which positively influence effective realization of creative, physical and labor capacity of collective and give significant assistance in growth of professionalism of each of employees. Training of employees consists of three levels: professional retraining, professional development, general education development. Practice has shown that such combination of forms of professional development brings positive results and affects the general professional standard of librarians. The main result of work of article is illumination of system of development of personnel, which allows organizing a constant control behind quality of knowledge of experts, to create a databank about structure and qualification of personnel, to plan his movements and to form a reserve of an administrative board of library. Scientific library of Odesa I. I. Mechnikov National University is the uniform methodical center for all high school libraries of the South of Ukraine. Results of research have practical value for employees of libraries, and all those who are interested in this subject.

  18. Continuous Space Education System and its Role in Increasing Efficiency of Engineering Staff Training for Ukraine Space Rocket Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novykov, O.; Perlik, V.; Polyakov, N.; Khytorniy, V.

    2009-01-01

    Adjustment to new economical and social conditions in Ukraine, being a space-faring country, requires a new concept in improving efficiency of engineering education to provide rocket and space field with highly qualified engineers and scientists. General strategy to solve this task is to combine the efforts of the secondary schools, academic institutions, R&D institutes and production enterprises in order to educe gifted youth as early as possible and to train them into rocket and space field specialists following the scheme of continuous education: school - institution of higher education - enterprise. This report analyzes the 20-year experience of Dniepropetrovsk State University, Yuzhnoye State Design Office and Ukraine's National Center for the Aerospace Education of Youth in their joint efforts to organize the system of continuous education and how it managed to enhance the training efficiency of the engineering skills.

  19. The Decolonial Turn Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro-Rodrigues, Luis

    2017-01-01

    In a recent article in this journal, Vorster and Quinn offered a set of recommendations on how academic staff developers can advise university lecturers on decolonising their curricula and methods. Their main advice was to integrate more African cultural elements into their teaching. However, Vorster and Quinn's advice is rather general. In this…

  20. Short Message System (SMS) revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Eivind Ortind; Dahl, Mads Ronald

    In a rapidly changing world of technology, communication and information is everywhere around us. Technology is constantly moving the frontier for what is possible and having an increasing impact on education. New inventions create new ways of effective mass communication and the expectations fro...... route was chosen as part of improving the digital communication and information environment at the faculty. A SMS service was implemented and tested in three settings: course communication tool, University administration tool and as examination result tool....

  1. 32 CFR 1602.5 - Area office staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Area office staff. 1602.5 Section 1602.5....5 Area office staff. The compensated employees, civilian and military, of the Selective Service System employed in an area office will be referred to as the area office staff. ...

  2. Revisiting The Depleted Self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Reggie

    2018-04-01

    This article revisits Donald Capps's book The Depleted Self (The depleted self: sin in a narcissistic age. Fortress Press, Minneapolis, 1993), which grew out of his 1990 Schaff Lectures at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. In these lectures Capps proposed that the theology of guilt had dominated much of post-Reformation discourse. But with the growing prevalence of the narcissistic personality in the late twentieth century, the theology of guilt no longer adequately expressed humanity's sense of "wrongness" before God. Late twentieth-century persons sense this disjunction between God and self through shame dynamics. Narcissists are not "full" of themselves, as popular perspectives might indicate. Instead, they are empty, depleted selves. Psychologists suggest this stems from lack of emotional stimulation and the absence of mirroring in the early stages of life. The narcissist's search for attention and affirmation takes craving, paranoid, manipulative, or phallic forms and is essentially a desperate attempt to fill the internal emptiness. Capps suggests that two narratives from the Gospels are helpful here: the story of the woman with the alabaster jar and the story of Jesus's dialogue with Mary and John at Calvary. These stories provide us with clues as to how depleted selves experienced mirroring and the potential for internal peace in community with Jesus.

  3. Magnetic moments revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towner, I.S.; Khanna, F.C.

    1984-01-01

    Consideration of core polarization, isobar currents and meson-exchange processes gives a satisfactory understanding of the ground-state magnetic moments in closed-shell-plus (or minus)-one nuclei, A = 3, 15, 17, 39 and 41. Ever since the earliest days of the nuclear shell model the understanding of magnetic moments of nuclear states of supposedly simple configurations, such as doubly closed LS shells +-1 nucleon, has been a challenge for theorists. The experimental moments, which in most cases are known with extraordinary precision, show a small yet significant departure from the single-particle Schmidt values. The departure, however, is difficult to evaluate precisely since, as will be seen, it results from a sensitive cancellation between several competing corrections each of which can be as large as the observed discrepancy. This, then, is the continuing fascination of magnetic moments. In this contribution, we revisit the subjet principally to identify the role played by isobar currents, which are of much concern at this conference. But in so doing we warn quite strongly of the dangers of considering just isobar currents in isolation; equal consideration must be given to competing processes which in this context are the mundane nuclear structure effects, such as core polarization, and the more popular meson-exchange currents

  4. Revisiting energy efficiency fundamentals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Lombard, L.; Velazquez, D. [Grupo de Termotecnia, Escuela Superior de Ingenieros, Universidad de Sevilla, Camino de los Descubrimientos s/n, 41092 Seville (Spain); Ortiz, J. [Building Research Establishment (BRE), Garston, Watford, WD25 9XX (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    Energy efficiency is a central target for energy policy and a keystone to mitigate climate change and to achieve a sustainable development. Although great efforts have been carried out during the last four decades to investigate the issue, focusing into measuring energy efficiency, understanding its trends and impacts on energy consumption and to design effective energy efficiency policies, many energy efficiency-related concepts, some methodological problems for the construction of energy efficiency indicators (EEI) and even some of the energy efficiency potential gains are often ignored or misunderstood, causing no little confusion and controversy not only for laymen but even for specialists. This paper aims to revisit, analyse and discuss some efficiency fundamental topics that could improve understanding and critical judgement of efficiency stakeholders and that could help in avoiding unfounded judgements and misleading statements. Firstly, we address the problem of measuring energy efficiency both in qualitative and quantitative terms. Secondly, main methodological problems standing in the way of the construction of EEI are discussed, and a sequence of actions is proposed to tackle them in an ordered fashion. Finally, two key topics are discussed in detail: the links between energy efficiency and energy savings, and the border between energy efficiency improvement and renewable sources promotion.

  5. Staff rotation: implications for occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A; Andriuk, M L; Langlois, P; Provost, E

    1995-10-01

    Occupational therapy departments of tertiary care hospitals can provide staff with opportunities to gain diverse clinical experience if they rotate through the various services such as surgery, medicine, geriatrics, plastic surgery and orthopaedics. The system of rotation offers both advantages and disadvantages for the staff and the institution. The Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, a large university teaching hospital, had traditionally offered staff the opportunity to rotate. Changes in staffing and their needs however, resulted in rotation becoming an important issue within the department. This article presents the pros and the cons of rotation and non-rotation systems as identified by therapists and administrators across Canada. Staff rotation was found to have an effect on job satisfaction and a therapist's career orientation. Given these findings, administrators may want to reconsider the role of the generalist and specialist in their facilities.

  6. Integration of CERN staff

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    An example of the integration of CERN staff in the neighbouring communes is provided by the hamlet of Bugnon at St-Genis-Pouilly (Ain), FRance. The CERN installation on the Swiss site are visible on the left in the background. Behind them the Saleve mountain in Haute-Savoie.

  7. Systematic Staff Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Norman L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the process of staff selection for the general studies department at Piedmont Technical College. Makes suggestions on how to write a job description, establish selection criteria, develop the selection process, and make the selection itself. Includes sample forms used in the process. (DR)

  8. The Staff of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rebecca

    1994-01-01

    Some children have chronic illnesses that require diet modifications as part of their medical treatment. Advises school districts to hire a registered dietitian or look for resources at a local hospital or public health office. In addition, schools should work with parents, improve staff training, and conduct spot checks of school cafeterias. (MLF)

  9. Kuyper and Apartheid: A revisiting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UPuser

    Kuyper and Apartheid: A revisiting. Patrick Baskwell (Brandon, Florida, USA) .... conflicts. Such was the tradition of apocalyptic fanaticism which – secularised and revivified – was inherited by Lenin and by Hitler. (Cohn 1961:309-310). 3. FERTILE SOIL. This amalgamation ..... Israel did for the Arabs. The first Boer nationalist ...

  10. Revisiting Inter-Genre Similarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Bob L.; Gouyon, Fabien

    2013-01-01

    We revisit the idea of ``inter-genre similarity'' (IGS) for machine learning in general, and music genre recognition in particular. We show analytically that the probability of error for IGS is higher than naive Bayes classification with zero-one loss (NB). We show empirically that IGS does...

  11. Spinning pipe gas lens revisited

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mafusire, C

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available , there is little information on optical phase aberrations and no study to date on the propagation parameters of the laser beam, but has rather remained rooted in the domain of ray optics. Researchers revisit the spinning pipe gas lens in this paper with new...

  12. A remote coal deposit revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen-Kofoed, Jørgen A.; Kalkreuth, Wolfgang; Petersen, Henrik I.

    2012-01-01

    In 1908, members of the “Danmark Expedition” discovered a coal deposit in a very remote area in western Germania Land, close to the margin of the inland ice in northeast Greenland. The deposit was, however, neither sampled nor described, and was revisited in 2009 for the first time since its...

  13. STAFF MARKETING IN MODERN RUSSIAN CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya N. Kretova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The conception of staff marketing, which was developed abroad, is effectively used in the developed countries for a long time. Its main advantage consists in the possibility of organizing some planning for the implementation of staff strategy: staff marketing provides the enterprise on the long-term basis with human resources capable of forming strategic potential, which would allow to implement the planned activities. Numerous problems of formation and development of civilized market relations in our country do not allow to fully implement the detailed models of staff marketing in domestic realities. On the basis of the analysis of theoretical developments and factors that have a practical impact on the implementation of marketing personnel in modern Russian conditions, the authors describe the essential elements of the conception. The primary purposes of staff marketing for domestic enterprises, grouped into the internal and external marketing are substantiated and disclosed. The special attention is paid to increasing the staff loyalty, which has dominant influence on business outcomes. The algorithm of events for the development of motivation system is proposed; at the stage of studying job satisfaction it is recommend to apply analytical calculations with the use of Shewhart control charts. Unlike traditional statistical tools based on the inspection of already implemented results, this approach is aimed at preventing negative tendencies and avoids losses associated with dissatisfaction with difficulty, as the individual employee and the team as a whole. Modern Russian enterprises can fully realize the conception of staff marketing only through rethinking of the consequences for all directions of work with the staff, as reflected in the definition of objectives, motivating staff and ensuring social responsibility of the enterprise.

  14. Izmit Foreshocks Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, W. L.; Bulut, F.

    2016-12-01

    Much of what we know about the initiation of earthquakes comes from the temporal and spatial relationship of foreshocks to the initiation point of the mainshock. The 1999 Mw 7.6 Izmit, Turkey, earthquake was preceded by a 44 minute-long foreshock sequence. Bouchon et al. (Science, 2011) analyzed the foreshocks using a single seismic station, UCG, located to the north of the east-west fault, and concluded on the basis of waveform similarity that the foreshocks repeatedly re-ruptured the same fault patch, driven by slow slip at the base of the crust. We revisit the foreshock sequence using seismograms from 9 additional stations that recorded the four largest foreshocks (Mw 2.0 to 2.8) to better characterize spatial and temporal evolution of the foreshock sequence and their relationship to the mainshock hypocenter. Cross-correlation timing and hypocentroid location with hypoDD reveals a systematic west-to-east propagation of the four largest foreshocks toward the mainshock hypocenter. Foreshock rupture dimensions estimated using spectral ratios imply no major overlap for the first three foreshocks. The centroid of 4th and largest foreshock continues the eastward migration, but lies within the circular source area of the 3rd. The 3rd, however, has a low stress drop and strong directivity to the west . The mainshock hypocenter locates on the eastern edge of foreshock 4. We also re-analyzed waveform similarity of all 18 foreshocks recorded at UCG by removing the common mode signal and clustering the residual seismogram using the correlation coefficient as the distance metric. The smaller foreshocks cluster with the larger events in time order, sometimes as foreshocks and more commonly as aftershocks. These observations show that the Izmit foreshock sequence is consistent with a stress-transfer driven cascade, moving systematically to the east along the fault and that there is no observational requirement for creep as a driving mechanism.

  15. Patient and staff doses in interventional neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bor, D.; Cekirge, S.; Tuerkay, T.; Turan, O.; Guelay, M.; Oenal, E.; Cil, B.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation doses for interventional examinations are generally high and therefore necessitate dose monitoring for patients and staff. Relating the staff dose to a patient dose index, such as dose-area product (DAP), could be quite useful for dose comparisons. In this study, DAP and skin doses of 57 patients, who underwent neuro-interventional examinations, were measured simultaneously with staff doses. Although skin doses were comparable with the literature data, higher DAP values of 215 and 188.6 Gy cm 2 were measured for the therapeutical cerebral and carotid examinations, respectively, owing to the use of biplane system and complexity of the procedure. Mean staff doses for eye, finger and thyroid were measured as 80.6, 77.6 and 28.8 μGy per procedure. The mean effective dose per procedure for the radiologists was 32 μSv. In order to allow better comparisons to be made, DAP normalised doses were also presented. (authors)

  16. The Tension between the Decision and Control Perspectives of Accounting Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, John

    2009-01-01

    to use different accounting systems for different purposes. That is not the norm. The tensions are managed within a single accounting system and that leads to trade-offs in the accounting system. I will revisit these conflicts of uses of accounting systems using product costing, transfer pricing and fair...... value as examples....

  17. Closed-system drug-transfer devices plus safe handling of hazardous drugs versus safe handling alone for reducing exposure to infusional hazardous drugs in healthcare staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Best, Lawrence Mj; Tanguay, Cynthia; Lennan, Elaine; Korva, Mika; Bussières, Jean-François

    2018-03-27

    Occupational exposure to hazardous drugs can decrease fertility and result in miscarriages, stillbirths, and cancers in healthcare staff. Several recommended practices aim to reduce this exposure, including protective clothing, gloves, and biological safety cabinets ('safe handling'). There is significant uncertainty as to whether using closed-system drug-transfer devices (CSTD) in addition to safe handling decreases the contamination and risk of staff exposure to infusional hazardous drugs compared to safe handling alone. To assess the effects of closed-system drug-transfer of infusional hazardous drugs plus safe handling versus safe handling alone for reducing staff exposure to infusional hazardous drugs and risk of staff contamination. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, OSH-UPDATE, CINAHL, Science Citation Index Expanded, economic evaluation databases, the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and ClinicalTrials.gov to October 2017. We included comparative studies of any study design (irrespective of language, blinding, or publication status) that compared CSTD plus safe handling versus safe handling alone for infusional hazardous drugs. Two review authors independently identified trials and extracted data. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) and mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using both fixed-effect and random-effects models. We assessed risk of bias according to the risk of bias in non-randomised studies of interventions (ROBINS-I) tool, used an intracluster correlation coefficient of 0.10, and we assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE. We included 23 observational cluster studies (358 hospitals) in this review. We did not find any randomised controlled trials or formal economic evaluations. In 21 studies, the people who used the intervention (CSTD plus safe handling) and control (safe handling alone) were pharmacists or pharmacy

  18. NICU consultants and support staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newborn intensive care unit - consultants and support staff; Neonatal intensive care unit - consultants and support staff ... a baby's nipple-feeding readiness and oral-motor skills. Speech therapists will also help with feeding skills ...

  19. Radiative corrections to neutrino deep inelastic scattering revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbuzov, Andrej B.; Bardin, Dmitry Yu.; Kalinovskaya, Lidia V.

    2005-01-01

    Radiative corrections to neutrino deep inelastic scattering are revisited. One-loop electroweak corrections are re-calculated within the automatic SANC system. Terms with mass singularities are treated including higher order leading logarithmic corrections. Scheme dependence of corrections due to weak interactions is investigated. The results are implemented into the data analysis of the NOMAD experiment. The present theoretical accuracy in description of the process is discussed

  20. Dynamic Topography Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moresi, Louis

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic Topography Revisited Dynamic topography is usually considered to be one of the trinity of contributing causes to the Earth's non-hydrostatic topography along with the long-term elastic strength of the lithosphere and isostatic responses to density anomalies within the lithosphere. Dynamic topography, thought of this way, is what is left over when other sources of support have been eliminated. An alternate and explicit definition of dynamic topography is that deflection of the surface which is attributable to creeping viscous flow. The problem with the first definition of dynamic topography is 1) that the lithosphere is almost certainly a visco-elastic / brittle layer with no absolute boundary between flowing and static regions, and 2) the lithosphere is, a thermal / compositional boundary layer in which some buoyancy is attributable to immutable, intrinsic density variations and some is due to thermal anomalies which are coupled to the flow. In each case, it is difficult to draw a sharp line between each contribution to the overall topography. The second definition of dynamic topography does seem cleaner / more precise but it suffers from the problem that it is not measurable in practice. On the other hand, this approach has resulted in a rich literature concerning the analysis of large scale geoid and topography and the relation to buoyancy and mechanical properties of the Earth [e.g. refs 1,2,3] In convection models with viscous, elastic, brittle rheology and compositional buoyancy, however, it is possible to examine how the surface topography (and geoid) are supported and how different ways of interpreting the "observable" fields introduce different biases. This is what we will do. References (a.k.a. homework) [1] Hager, B. H., R. W. Clayton, M. A. Richards, R. P. Comer, and A. M. Dziewonski (1985), Lower mantle heterogeneity, dynamic topography and the geoid, Nature, 313(6003), 541-545, doi:10.1038/313541a0. [2] Parsons, B., and S. Daly (1983), The

  1. Experiences of Latinos with limited English proficiency with patient registration systems and their interactions with clinic front office staff: an exploratory study to inform community-based translational research in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, William A; Cubillos, Laura; Breen, James; Hall, Megan; Rojas, Krycya Flores; Mooneyham, Rachel; Schaal, Jennifer; Hardy, Christina Yongue; Dave, Gaurav; Jolles, Mónica Pérez; Garcia, Nacire; Reuland, Daniel S

    2015-12-23

    Health services research of Latinos with limited English proficiency (LEP) have largely focused on studying disparities related to patient-provider communication. Less is known about their non-provider interactions such as those with patient registration systems and clinic front office staff; these interactions precede the encounter with providers and may shape how comfortable patients feel about their overall health services experience. This study explored Latino patients with LEP experiences with, and expectations for, interactions with patient registration systems and front office staff. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews with Latinos with LEP (≥ 18 years of age) who seek health services in the Piedmont Triad region, North Carolina. We analyzed participants' quotes and identified themes by using a constant comparison method. This research was conducted by a community-academic partnership; partners were engaged in study design, instrument development, recruitment, data analysis, and manuscript writing. Qualitative analysis allowed us to identify the following recurring themes: 1) inconsistent registration of multiple surnames may contribute to patient misidentification errors and delays in receiving health care; 2) lack of Spanish language services in front office medical settings negatively affect care coordination and satisfaction with health care; and 3) perceived discrimination generates patients' mistrust in front office staff and discomfort with services. Latino patients in North Carolina experience health services barriers unique to their LEP background. Participants identified ways in which the lack of cultural and linguistic competence of front office staff negatively affect their experiences seeking health services. Healthcare organizations need to support their staff to encourage patient-centered principles.

  2. Revisiting monotop production at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucheneb, Idir; Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Deandrea, Aldo; Fuks, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Scenarios of new physics where a single top quark can be produced in association with large missing energy (monotop) have been recently studied both from the theoretical point of view and by experimental collaborations. We revisit the originally proposed monotop setup by embedding the effective couplings of the top quark in an SU(2) L invariant formalism. We show that minimality selects one model for each of the possible production mechanisms: a scalar field coupling to a right-handed top quark and an invisible fermion when the monotop system is resonantly produced, and a vector field mediating the interactions of a dark sector to right-handed quarks for the non-resonant production mode. We study in detail constraints on the second class of scenarios, originating from contributions to standard single top processes when the mediator is lighter than the top quark and from the dark matter relic abundance when the mediator is heavier than the top quark.

  3. Revisiting monotop production at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Boucheneb, Idir; Deandrea, Aldo; Fuks, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Scenarios of new physics where a single top quark can be produced in association with large missing energy (monotop) have been recently studied both from the theoretical point of view and by experimental collaborations. We revisit the originally proposed monotop setup by embedding the effective couplings of the top quark in an SU(2)L invariant formalism. We show that minimality selects one model for each of the possible production mechanisms: a scalar field coupling to a right-handed top quark and an invisible fermion when the monotop system is resonantly produced, and a vector field mediating the interactions of a dark sector to right-handed quarks for the non-resonant production mode. We study in detail constraints on the second class of scenarios, originating from contributions to standard single top processes when the mediator is lighter than the top quark and from the dark matter relic abundance when the mediator is heavier than the top quark.

  4. Leadership and Management Theories Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Mona Toft

    2001-01-01

    The goal of the paper is to revisit and analyze key contributions to the understanding of leadership and management. As a part of the discussion a role perspective that allows for additional and/or integrated leader dimensions, including a change-centered, will be outlined. Seemingly, a major challenge on the substantive level is the integration of soft and hard managerial functions, while the concepts used in presenting these should at least in transition be able to contain a distinction bet...

  5. Leadership and Management Theories Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Mona Toft

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to revisit and analyze key contributions to the understanding of leadership and to discuss the relevance of maintaining a distinct line of demarcation between leadership and management. As a part of the discussion a role perspective that allows for additional and/or integrated leader dimensions, including a change-centered, will be outlined. Seemingly, a major challenge on the substantive level is the integration of soft and hard managerial functions, while the conce...

  6. Information for contractors' staff

    CERN Multimedia

    The Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    We have observed a significant decrease in the number of completed Certificates for Work in Controlled Radiation Areas being submitted with applications for dosimeters for your staff. Henceforth, we shall no longer be able to issue dosimeters without a certificate, which must be signed by the employee and the contractor's radiation-protection expert. You can obtain the certificate form from the Dosimetry Service at Building 24/E-011 or from our Website: http://service-rp-dosimetry.web.cern.ch/service-rp-dosimetry/. Thank you for your understanding. The Dosimetry Service

  7. STAFF VACANCY LIST

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    For economy reasons, it has been decided to stop printing and distributing this list to Staff Members. It can be found on the Web (LIST). Divisional Administrative Officers will receive an updated printed copy on a monthly basis and are asked to display this in a public place in their division. Copies will also be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (No. 60) in the glass-fronted cabinet (close to the lifts) and also on the notice board close to the Post Office. A copy will also be given to the Reception (Building No. 33). Human Resources Division Tel. 74606

  8. The Staff Association and you

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2013-01-01

    The Staff Association, your representative with the Management and the Member States The article VII 1.01 of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SR&R) provides that “the relations between the Director-General and the personnel shall be established either on an individual basis or on a collective basis with the Staff Association as intermediary”. This essential role of the Staff representatives, of being the spokesperson of the entire staff of the Organization vis-à-vis the Director-General and the Members States, is achieved through regular participation in the various joint advisory committees defined in the SR&R. The most important are the Standing Concertation Committee and the TREF, tripartite forum where your representatives meet with the Member States delegates, in the presence of the Management, to explain the position of the staff on the various issues concerning employment conditions. The Finance Committee also gives the opportunity to the Staff Association to ...

  9. RE-VISIT OF HST FUV OBSERVATIONS OF THE HOT-JUPITER SYSTEM HD 209458: NO Si iii DETECTION AND THE NEED FOR COS TRANSIT OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballester, G. E. [University of Arizona, Dept. of Planetary Sciences, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, 1541 E University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721-0063 (United States); Ben-Jaffel, L., E-mail: gilda@lpl.arizona.edu, E-mail: bjaffel@iap.fr [UPMC Univ. Paris 06, UMR7095, Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2015-05-10

    The discovery of O i atoms and C ii ions in the upper atmosphere of HD 209458b, made with the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) using the G140L grating, showed that these heavy species fill an area comparable to the planet’s Roche lobe. The derived ∼10% transit absorption depths require super-thermal processes and/or supersolar abundances. From subsequent Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) observations, C ii absorption was reported with tentative velocity signatures, and absorption by Si iii ions was also claimed in disagreement with a negative STIS G140L detection. Here, we revisit the COS data set showing a severe limitation in the published results from having contrasted the in-transit spectrum against a stellar spectrum averaged from separate observations, at planetary phases 0.27, 0.72, and 0.49. We find variable stellar Si iii and C ii emissions that were significantly depressed not only during transit but also at phase 0.27 compared to phases 0.72 and 0.49. Their respective off-transit 7.5% and 3.1% flux variations are large compared to their reported 8.2 ± 1.4% and 7.8 ± 1.3% transit absorptions. Significant variations also appear in the stellar line shapes, questioning reported velocity signatures. We furthermore present archive STIS G140M transit data consistent with no Si iii absorption, with a negative result of 1.7 ± 18.7 including ∼15% variability. Silicon may still be present at lower ionization states, in parallel with the recent detection of extended magnesium, as Mg i atoms. In this frame, the firm detection of O i and C ii implying solar or supersolar abundances contradicts the recent inference of potential 20–125× subsolar metallicity for HD 209458b.

  10. Orthovoltage machines revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piyaratna, N.; Ariyaratna, K.

    2000-01-01

    Until the advent of megavoltage radiation, orthovoltage units operating up to 300 KV were used to deliver radiotherapy. Side effects due to higher doses to normal organs were inevitable because of less penetrating photon beams. With the advent of the megavoltage equipment more penetrating photon beams replaced the orthovoltage beams to treat deep seated tumours more effectively. The use of the orthovoltage energy range has since been limited to superficial skin cancers and many palliative treatments such as bony metastases, in particular ribs and spine. When the Linear Accelerators (linacs) with electron energy range were introduced into the radiotherapy field the use of orthovoltage range was further reduced. The electron beams were successfully used to treat superficial cancers and the demand for the orthovoltage units became less. Because of this many of the reputable manufacturers of orthovoltage units (eg. Philips) ceased the production of these units over a decade. During the eighties, the only available orthovoltage unit was the Siemens Stabilopan. In the early nineties Pantak introduced a new orthovoltage unit incorporated with new technology. NSW cancer treatment centres purchased several of these machines. Considering the capital cost and the annual maintenance cost, reliability, computer controlled accurate dose delivery, number of RT staff required to operate the unit and the Medicare revenue, it is cost beneficial to install an orthovoltage unit in a modern radiotherapy department. Copyright (1999) Australian Institute of Radiography

  11. Improving staff selection processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerinus, Marie; Shannon, Marina

    2014-11-11

    This article, the second in a series of articles on Leading Better Care, describes the actions undertaken in recent years in NHS Lanarkshire to improve selection processes for nursing, midwifery and allied health professional (NMAHP) posts. This is an area of significant interest to these professions, management colleagues and patients given the pivotal importance of NMAHPs to patient care and experience. In recent times the importance of selecting staff not only with the right qualifications but also with the right attributes has been highlighted to ensure patients are well cared for in a safe, effective and compassionate manner. The article focuses on NMAHP selection processes, tracking local, collaborative development work undertaken to date. It presents an overview of some of the work being implemented, highlights a range of important factors, outlines how evaluation is progressing and concludes by recommending further empirical research.

  12. Teaching Staff Advanced Training: European Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    The issue of teaching staff advanced training is paid much attention in many countries. In the Republic of Moldova progressive professional credits system is used. Credits are scored not only in assigning teaching degrees or issuing a certificate of continuing professional education, but also for teachers' evaluation at the educational…

  13. Sleep Quality among Female Hospital Staff Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Li Chien

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate sleep quality of hospital staff nurses, both by subjective questionnaire and objective measures. Methods. Female staff nurses at a regional teaching hospital in Northern Taiwan were recruited. The Chinese version of the pittsburgh sleep quality index (C-PSQI was used to assess subjective sleep quality, and an electrocardiogram-based cardiopulmonary coupling (CPC technique was used to analyze objective sleep stability. Work stress was assessed using questionnaire on medical worker’s stress. Results. A total of 156 staff nurses completed the study. Among the staff nurses, 75.8% (117 had a PSQI score of ≥5 and 39.8% had an inadequate stable sleep ratio on subjective measures. Nurses with a high school or lower educational degree had a much higher risk of sleep disturbance when compared to nurses with a college or higher level degree. Conclusions. Both subjective and objective measures demonstrated that poor sleep quality is a common health problem among hospital staff nurses. More studies are warranted on this important issue to discover possible factors and therefore to develop a systemic strategy to cope with the problem.

  14. [Improving nursing staff accuracy in administering chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Ying; Chu, Yun-Li; Chiou, Yen-Gan; Chiang, Ming-Chu

    2009-12-01

    As most anticancer drugs are cytotoxic, their safe and error-free application is important. We analyzed data from the hematology-oncology ward chemotherapy checklist dated January 13th through February 3rd, 2007 and found accuracy rates for chemotherapy drug usage as low as 68.4%. Possible causes identified for this poor result include incomplete chemotherapy standards protocols, lack of chemotherapy quality control, and insufficient chemotherapy knowledge amongst nursing staff. This project aimed to improve the accuracy of nursing staff in administering chemotherapy and to raise nursing staff knowledge regarding chemotherapy. Our strategies for improvement included completing a chemotherapy standards protocol, establishing a chemotherapy quality-control monitoring system, augmenting chemotherapy training and adding appropriate equipment and staff reminders. After strategies were implemented, accuracy in chemotherapy administration rose to 96.7%. Related knowledge amongst nursing staff also improved from an initial 77.5% to 89.2%. Implementing the recommended measures achieved a significant improvement in the accuracy and quality of chemotherapy administered by nursing personnel.

  15. Staff Performance Evaluation in Public Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drumea C.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In public Organizations staff performance is difficult to measure in absence of overall quantitative performance indicators. There are also the qualitative indicators that give an overview on staff’s motivation, strive, ability, commitment to values, teamwork. These aspects are even less easy to illustrate, in private and public sectors equally. In both cases, measuring staff performance at work, as well as its input on the global performance of the organization is a difficult task which has in practice different approaches. Subsequently, this paper is discussing the system indicators and performance triggers used in International Organizations UN affiliated, in order to adjust staff classification and benefits to their staff’s performance.

  16. Exposure of Medical Staff during Interventional Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osvay, M.; Turak, O.

    2013-01-01

    The medical staff during interventional procedures receives significant doses on their hands, or parts of their body not covered with protective shielding equipment, as they are close to X-rays field. It can be stated, that interventional radiology and cardiology have one of the highest doses among the X-ray diagnostic procedures. The radiologist use X-ray machine directly in the interventional procedures. The occupational dose is measured only by one Kodak film badge worn under the lead apron for the estimation of the effective dose in Hungary. Our lecture presents the results of dose measurements on eye lens, hands, knees using LiF thermoluminescent dosemeters on the medical staff of two Hungarian hospitals. Results suggest that wearing only one film badge (or other dosemeter system) under the lead apron does not provide proper information on the real occupational dose of medical staff.(author)

  17. Leadership and Management Theories Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mona Toft

    2001-01-01

    The goal of the paper is to revisit and analyze key contributions to the understanding of leadership and management. As a part of the discussion a role perspective that allows for additional and/or integrated leader dimensions, including a change-centered, will be outlined. Seemingly, a major...... challenge on the substantive level is the integration of soft and hard managerial functions, while the concepts used in presenting these should at least in transition be able to contain a distinction between hard, soft, and general practices....

  18. Hong Kong's Consumption Function Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Li-gang Liu; Laurent Pauwels; Andrew Tsang

    2007-01-01

    This paper revisits the relationship among consumption, income and wealth using Hong Kong data. We find that the permanent income hypothesis is weakly supported by Hong Kong¡¦s consumption data prior to 1997, but it is not supported for the sample period after 1997 and the whole sample period spanning from 1984 to 2006. Furthermore, we find that both anticipated and unanticipated income and wealth effects have influences on Hong Kong¡¦s consumption. While temporary tax changes may have some i...

  19. THE STAFF ASSOCIATION'S INTERNAL COMMISSIONS A source of innovative ideas

    CERN Multimedia

    STAFF ASSOCIATION

    2010-01-01

    In the heart of the Staff Association, internal commissions carry out preparatory work which is indispensable for productive discussions in Staff Council and Executive Committee meetings. These working groups, composed of staff delegates and interested staff members, are think tanks for all subjects in the area assigned to them. Five commissions are active in 2010 : The “In-Form-Action” Commission develops a communication strategy (Information), organizes staff mobilization and action (Action) and promotes delegate training (Formation [training]), in order to enhance, support and professionalize the activities of the Staff Association. The Commission for “Employment Conditions” deals with remuneration, the advancement system, working hours, recruitment, and retention, among other things. It gives its opinion on proposals by the Management or elaborates its own proposals. The Commission for “Health and Safety” examines all aspec...

  20. Polish Decadence: Leopold Staff's Igrzysko in the European Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Przybos

    2012-03-01

    expression. It is my hypothesis that taken out of its secular context, religious revisionism of the kind practiced by French decadents may be seen as shocking transgression in a fiercely catholic country like Poland. In the country that lost its independence in 1794 and was ever since seeking to regain it, Catholic Church was perceived as an essential ally in the struggle against main occupying powers: Orthodox Russia, and Protestant Prussia. In the course of the 19th century Catholicism and patriotism had been effectively fused in Polish national conscience. In this charged political context a Polish author revisiting Church dogma or tradition was at risk of being perceived not only as a religious outcast but also as a traitor to the cause of Polish independence. To test my hypothesis I propose to examine Igrzysko (Game, a forgotten play by Leopold Staff. Admired today chiefly as a poet, the young Staff wrote Igrzysko in Poland after a long sojourn in Paris where he had lived among the international crowd of fin de siècle writers and artists. The play was first produced in Lemberg in 1909 and after a few performances vanished forever from Polish theatrical repertoire. Leopold Staff's play is set in ancient Rome and depicts tribulations of an actor who, while impersonating a Christian awaiting crucifixion, converts to Christianity. In his play, Staff revives the legend of Saint Genesius, an actor in Arles who died a martyr's death in 286 under Diocletian. In Spain, Saint Genesius's legend inspired Lope de Vega who wrote Acting is Believing (Lo fingido verdadero, 1607. In France, it was the source for Jean Rotrou's Saint Genest (1646. All told, the legend of Genesius is a popular theme for artists who wish to explore the distinction between art and life. An important addition to this old tradition, Staff's play contains, however, a decadent and potentially scandalous twist. Unlike in Acting is Believing and Saint Genest, the protagonist's conversion is very short

  1. The teaching staff of the public education system in the period of the First Russian Revolution (1905–1907 years (on the materials of the Black Sea province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin V. Taran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article on the basis of archival documents examines the role of teaching staff of educational institutions of the Black Sea province during the First Russian revolution. The attention is paid to the participation of students of senior classes in the revolutionary movement. Among the materials are the archival documents of central and regional archives, namely the state archive of the Russian Federation, Russian state military historical archive, the state archive of the Krasnodar Krai, the center for documentation of contemporary history of Krasnodar Krai and the archive department of historical museum of city-resort Sochi. The authors come to the conclusion that on the territory of the Black Sea province, the activities of significant part of the teaching staff were aimed at destabilization of the political situation, contributing to the overthrow of the existing government. Rather than to protect the high schools students from the influence of political propaganda and to return students to the classrooms, some teachers have contributed to reverse the process, encouraging the study of the political programs of the parties and the desire to participate in the revolutionary movement. As a result, the schoolchildren, minors with unsettled teenage psychology participated in various revolutionary actions, which could lead to the tragic consequences.

  2. Optimal decoupling controllers revisited

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 1 (2013), s. 1-16 ISSN 0324-8569 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020197 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : linear systems * fractional representations * decoupling controller s * stabilizing controller s * optimal controller s Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory

  3. Random eigenvalue problems revisited

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a stochastic reduced basis approximation which can be applied to discrete or discretized continuous dynamic systems. ... methods are proposed to obtain joint distributions of the natural frequencies of discrete linear systems. In § 2, some ... variables are Gaussian. When the basic random variables are non-Gaussian, a new.

  4. Random eigenvalue problems revisited

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    eigenvalue problems arising in engineering systems is dominated by perturbation methods. These methods work ... eigenvalues are presented and their limitations in the context of engineering dynamic systems have been ...... ment of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (eds) K S Jagadish, R N Iyengar.

  5. Staff Definitions of Challenging Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgie, Sarah; Hastings, Richard P.

    2002-01-01

    Fifty staff working with adults with mental retardation rated potentially challenging behaviors in terms of: (1) whether they thought the behaviors were challenging, and (2) whether the behaviors should be the focus of intervention. Results found that staff were less likely to identify as challenging those behaviors having negative effects on…

  6. Professional Training of Junior Medical Staff: European Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliasova, Yuliia

    2017-01-01

    The article covers current problems of professional training of junior medical staff. The main disadvantages of Ukrainian system of medical education that impede the intention of improving quality of professional training of junior medical staff have been analyzed. European experience in organizing medical education, namely, in Great Britain,…

  7. Maintaining Nursing Staff Performance on an Intensive Behavior Therapy Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, B. D., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The authors suggest ways to establish quality behavioral programs within a hospital for the mentally ill. They emphasize the importance of staff morale, consistency of effort, teamwork, staff training and reinforcement. Procedures said to be responsible for successful maintenance include a flexible credit economy system. (Author/CL)

  8. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Vote Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. Voting will begin on Monday 31 October. Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will  represent you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site. (http://association.web.cern.ch) Elections Timetable Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee. 

  9. Tourists' perceptions and intention to revisit Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Lazar, Ana Florina; Komolikova-Blindheim, Galyna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The overall purpose of this study is to explore tourists' perceptions and their intention to revisit Norway. The aim is to find out what are the factors that drive the overall satisfaction, the willingness to recommend and the revisit intention of international tourists that spend their holiday in Norway. Design-Method-Approach - the Theory of Planned Behavior (Ajzen 1991), is used as a framework to investigate tourists' intention and behavior towards Norway as destination. The o...

  10. 42 CFR 488.30 - Revisit user fee for revisit surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Provisions § 488.30 Revisit user fee for revisit surveys. (a) Definitions. As used in this section, the following definitions apply: Certification (both initial and recertification) means those activities as... allegation of noncompliance, as defined in § 488.1. Provider of services, provider, or supplier has the...

  11. Nordic Corporate Governance Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Steen

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the key elements of the Nordic governance model, which include a distinct legal system, high governance ratings and low levels of corruption. Other characteristics include concentrated ownership, foundation ownership, semi two-tier board structures, employee representation...

  12. Pipe failure probability - the Thomas paper revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lydell, B.O.Y.

    2000-01-01

    Almost twenty years ago, in Volume 2 of Reliability Engineering (the predecessor of Reliability Engineering and System Safety), a paper by H. M. Thomas of Rolls Royce and Associates Ltd. presented a generalized approach to the estimation of piping and vessel failure probability. The 'Thomas-approach' used insights from actual failure statistics to calculate the probability of leakage and conditional probability of rupture given leakage. It was intended for practitioners without access to data on the service experience with piping and piping system components. This article revisits the Thomas paper by drawing on insights from development of a new database on piping failures in commercial nuclear power plants worldwide (SKI-PIPE). Partially sponsored by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI), the R and D leading up to this note was performed during 1994-1999. Motivated by data requirements of reliability analysis and probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), the new database supports statistical analysis of piping failure data. Against the background of this database development program, the article reviews the applicability of the 'Thomas approach' in applied risk and reliability analysis. It addresses the question whether a new and expanded database on the service experience with piping systems would alter the original piping reliability correlation as suggested by H. M. Thomas

  13. Alexander's law revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Gary P; McCaslin, Devin L; Kaylie, David M

    2008-09-01

    It is a common occurrence in the balance function laboratory to evaluate patients in the post-acute period following unilateral vestibular system impairment. It is important to be able to differentiate spontaneous nystagmus (SN) emanating from peripheral vestibular system impairments from asymmetric gaze-evoked nystagmus (GEN) that originates from central ocular motility impairment. To describe the three elements of Alexander's Law (AL) that have been used to define SN from unilateral peripheral impairment. Additionally, a fourth element is described (i.e., augmentation of spontaneous nystagmus from unilateral peripheral vestibular system impairment) that differentiates nystagmus of peripheral vestibular system origin from nystagmus that originates from a central eye movement disorder. Case reports. Case data were obtained from two patients both showing a nystagmus that followed AL. None Videonystagmography (VNG), rotational, vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP), and neuro-imaging studies were presented for each patient. The nystagmus in Case 1 occurred as a result of a unilateral, peripheral, vestibular system impairment. The nystagmus was direction-fixed and intensified in the vision-denied condition. The nystagmus in Case 2, by appearance identical to that in Case 1, was an asymmetric gaze-evoked nystagmus originating from a space-occupying lesion in the cerebello-pontine angle. Unlike Case 1, the nystagmus did not augment in the vision-denied condition. Although nystagmus following AL usually occurs in acute peripheral vestibular system impairment, it can occur in cases of central eye movement impairment. The key element is whether the SN that follows AL is attenuated or augmented in the vision-denied condition. The SN from a unilateral peripheral vestibular system impairment should augment in the vision denied condition. An asymmetric GEN will either not augment, decrease in magnitude, or disappear entirely, in the vision-denied condition.

  14. Open mushrooms: stickiness revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dettmann, Carl P; Georgiou, Orestis

    2011-01-01

    We investigate mushroom billiards, a class of dynamical systems with sharply divided phase space. For typical values of the control parameter of the system ρ, an infinite number of marginally unstable periodic orbits (MUPOs) exist making the system sticky in the sense that unstable orbits approach regular regions in phase space and thus exhibit quasi-regular behaviour for long periods of time. The problem of finding these MUPOs is expressed as the well-known problem of finding optimal rational approximations of a real number, subject to some system-specific constraints. By introducing a generalized mushroom and using properties of continued fractions, we describe for the first time a zero measure set of control parameter values ρ in (0, 1) for which all MUPOs are destroyed and therefore the system is less sticky, leading to a different power law exponent for the Poincare recurrence time distribution statistics. The open mushroom (billiard with a hole) is then considered in order to quantify the stickiness exhibited due to MUPOs and exact leading order expressions for the algebraic decay of the survival probability function P(t)∼C/t are calculated for mushrooms with triangular and rectangular stems. Numerical simulations are also performed which confirm our predictions for both sticky and less sticky mushrooms.

  15. Pharmaco-prosthodontics revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A R Jagadeeshwaran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacology is the branch of medicine and biology concerned with the study of drug action. The two main aspects of concern are the effects of drugs on biological systems and the effect of biological systems on efficacy and metabolism of drugs. Prosthodontics is that specialty of dentistry which deals with patients of all ages, hence making it more important to know about the local and systemic effects of drugs and their side effects. The aim of this article is to provide necessary information about the drugs to make a more knowledgeable assessment when prescribing any drug to the patients. Pharmacology in prosthodontics is a field which needs further research and studies as it is one of the most neglected fields and is often underestimated by clinicians.

  16. Revisiting sample entropy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindan, R. B.; Wilson, J. D.; Eswaran, H.; Lowery, C. L.; Preißl, H.

    2007-03-01

    We modify the definition of sample entropy (SaEn) by incorporating a time delay between the components of the block (from which the densities are estimated) and show that the modified method characterizes the complexity of the system better than the original version. We apply the modified SaEn to the standard deterministic systems and stochastic processes (uncorrelated and long range correlated (LRC) processes) and show that the underlying complexity of the system is better quantified by the modified method. We extend this analysis to the RR intervals of the normal and congestive heart failure (CHF) subjects (available via www.physionet.org) and show that there is a good degree of separation between the two groups.

  17. BeII** revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, C.F.

    1982-01-01

    Doubly excited 1s2snl and 1s2pnl quartet states of BeII** are readily populated in beam-foil experiments and line-rich spectra have been obtained covering 600 to 5500 A wavelength range. In spite of several theoretical calculations a substantial number of observed lines have not been identified. The quartet system in BeII is an intersting one from a theoretical point of view. Three electron systems are simple enough that a fairly high level of accuracy is attainable without the calculations becoming horrendous. The important correlation effects are between the outer two electrons and, to a good approximation, the three-electrons system may be treated as a two-electron system outside a 1s-core. The multi-configuration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) method has been used successfully in a number of studies. Programs are under development that take into account the non-orthogonality of orbitals in the initial and final state, and allow for some non-orthogonal orbitals in a wavefunction expansion. LS dependent relativistic effects are also included. A study of BeII** was undertaken to evaluate the MCHF techniques being developed and to assit in the identification of observed lines. Most of the earlier calculations concentrated on the lower-lying levels. In this work particular attention was given to the more highly-excited states, though calculations for lower-lying states had to be repeated in order to predict life-times

  18. Hund's Multiplicity Rule Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioux, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The plausible and frequently used explanation of the singlet and triplet wave functions for a two-electron system is presented. Its findings reveal that the antisymmetric triplet spatial wave function keeps electrons apart, while the symmetric singlet spatial wave function permits electrons to be close together.

  19. Random eigenvalue problems revisited

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The description of real-life engineering structural systems is associated with some amount of uncertainty in specifying material properties, geometric parameters, boundary conditions and applied loads. In the context of structural dynamics it is necessary to consider random eigenvalue problems in order to account for these ...

  20. Scanner calibration revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pozhitkov Alexander E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calibration of a microarray scanner is critical for accurate interpretation of microarray results. Shi et al. (BMC Bioinformatics, 2005, 6, Art. No. S11 Suppl. 2. reported usage of a Full Moon BioSystems slide for calibration. Inspired by the Shi et al. work, we have calibrated microarray scanners in our previous research. We were puzzled however, that most of the signal intensities from a biological sample fell below the sensitivity threshold level determined by the calibration slide. This conundrum led us to re-investigate the quality of calibration provided by the Full Moon BioSystems slide as well as the accuracy of the analysis performed by Shi et al. Methods Signal intensities were recorded on three different microarray scanners at various photomultiplier gain levels using the same calibration slide from Full Moon BioSystems. Data analysis was conducted on raw signal intensities without normalization or transformation of any kind. Weighted least-squares method was used to fit the data. Results We found that initial analysis performed by Shi et al. did not take into account autofluorescence of the Full Moon BioSystems slide, which led to a grossly distorted microarray scanner response. Our analysis revealed that a power-law function, which is explicitly accounting for the slide autofluorescence, perfectly described a relationship between signal intensities and fluorophore quantities. Conclusions Microarray scanners respond in a much less distorted fashion than was reported by Shi et al. Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration. We recommend against using these slides.

  1. Life concerns of elderly people living at home determined as by Community General Support Center staff: implications for organizing a more effective integrated community care system. The Kurihara Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Junko; Meguro, Kenichi; Sato, Yuko; Chiba, Yumiko

    2014-09-01

    In Japan, the integrated community care system aims to enable people to continue to live in their homes. Based on the concept, one of the activities of a Community General Support Center (CGSC) is to provide preventive intervention based on a Community Support Program. Currently, a Basic Checklist (BC) is sent to elderly people to identify persons appropriate for a Secondary Prevention Program. To find people who had not responded to the BC, CGSC staff evaluated the files of 592 subjects who had participated in the Kurihara Project to identify activities they cannot do that they did in the past, decreased activity levels at home, loss of interaction with people other than their family, and the need for medical interventions. This information was classified, when applicable, into the following categories: (A) 'no life concerns'; (B) 'undecided'; and (C) 'life concerns'. The relationships between these classifications and clinical information, certified need for long-term care, and items on the BC were examined. The numbers of subjects in categories A, B, and C were 291, 42, and 186, respectively. Life concerns were related to scores on the Clinical Dementia Rating, global cognitive function, depressive state, and apathy. Most items on the BC were not associated with classification into category C, but ≥25% of the subjects had life concerns related to these items. Assessment of life concerns by the CGSC staff has clinical validity. The results suggest that there are people who do not respond to the checklist or apply for Long-Term Care Insurance, meaning that they 'hide' in the community, probably due to apathy or depressive state. To organize a more effective integrated community care system, the CGSC staff should focus mainly on preventive care. © 2014 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2014 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  2. Perinatal staff perceptions of safety and quality in their service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinni, Suzanne V; Wallace, Euan M; Cross, Wendy M

    2014-11-28

    Ensuring safe and appropriate service delivery is central to a high quality maternity service. With this in mind, over recent years much attention has been given to the development of evidence-based clinical guidelines, staff education and risk reporting systems. Less attention has been given to assessing staff perceptions of a service's safety and quality and what factors may influence that. In this study we set out to assess staff perceptions of safety and quality of a maternity service and to explore potential influences on service safety. The study was undertaken within a new low risk metropolitan maternity service in Victoria, Australia with a staffing profile comprising midwives (including students), neonatal nurses, specialist obstetricians, junior medical staff and clerical staff. In depth open-ended interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire were conducted with 23 staff involved in the delivery of perinatal care, including doctors, midwives, nurses, nursing and midwifery students, and clerical staff. Data were analyzed using naturalistic interpretive inquiry to identify emergent themes. Staff unanimously reported that there were robust systems and processes in place to maintain safety and quality. Three major themes were apparent: (1) clinical governance, (2) dominance of midwives, (3) inter-professional relationships. Overall, there was a strong sense that, at least in this midwifery-led service, midwives had the greatest opportunity to be an influence, both positively and negatively, on the safe delivery of perinatal care. The importance of understanding team dynamics, particularly mutual respect, trust and staff cohesion, were identified as key issues for potential future service improvement. Senior staff, particularly midwives and neonatal nurses, play central roles in shaping team behaviors and attitudes that may affect the safety and quality of service delivery. We suggest that strategies targeting senior staff to enhance their performance in

  3. [What mirror neurons have revealed: revisited].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Akira; Maeda, Kazutaka

    2014-06-01

    The first paper on mirror neurons was published in 1992. In the span of over two decades since then, much knowledge about the relationship between social cognitive function and the motor control system has been accumulated. Direct matching of visual actions and their corresponding motor representations is the most important functional property of mirror neuron. Many studies have emphasized intrinsic simulation as a core concept for mirror neurons. Mirror neurons are thought to play a role in social cognitive function. However, the function of mirror neurons in the macaque remains unclear, because such cognitive functions are limited or lacking in macaque monkeys. It is therefore important to discuss these neurons in the context of motor function. Rizzolatti and colleagues have stressed that the most important function of mirror neurons in macaques is recognition of actions performed by other individuals. I suggest that mirror neurons in the Macaque inferior pariental lobule might be correlated with body schema. In the parieto-premotor network, matching of corollary discharge and actual sensory feedback is an essential neuronal operation. Recently, neurons showing mirror properties were found in some cortical areas outside the mirror neuron system. The current work would revisit the outcomes of mirror neuron studies to discuss the function of mirror neurons in the monkey.

  4. 32 CFR 1605.8 - Staff of Region Headquarters for Selective Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff of Region Headquarters for Selective... SERVICE SYSTEM SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM ORGANIZATION Region Administration § 1605.8 Staff of Region..., the staff of each region for Selective Service shall consist of as many officers, either military or...

  5. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense... Staff. (a) The Commission will have a support staff, which will include staff members sufficient to expeditiously and efficiently process the applications for payments under this part. All members of the staff...

  6. Quantum potentiality revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Gregg

    2017-10-01

    Heisenberg offered an interpretation of the quantum state which made use of a quantitative version of an earlier notion, , of Aristotle by both referring to it using its Latin name, potentia, and identifying its qualitative aspect with . The relationship between this use and Aristotle's notion was not made by Heisenberg in full detail, beyond noting their common character: that of signifying the system's objective capacity to be found later to possess a property in actuality. For such actualization, Heisenberg required measurement to have taken place, an interaction with external systems that disrupts the otherwise independent, natural evolution of the quantum system. The notion of state actualization was later taken up by others, including Shimony, in the search for a law-like measurement process. Yet, the relation of quantum potentiality to Aristotle's original notion has been viewed as mainly terminological, even by those who used it thus. Here, I reconsider the relation of Heisenberg's notion to Aristotle's and show that it can be explicated in greater specificity than Heisenberg did. This is accomplished through the careful consideration of the role of potentia in physical causation and explanation, and done in order to provide a fuller understanding of this aspect of Heisenberg's approach to quantum mechanics. Most importantly, it is pointed out that Heisenberg's requirement of an external intervention during measurement that disrupts the otherwise independent, natural evolution of the quantum system is in accord with Aristotle's characterization of spontaneous causation. Thus, the need for a teleological understanding of the actualization of potentia, an often assumed requirement that has left this fundamental notion neglected, is seen to be spurious. This article is part of the themed issue `Second quantum revolution: foundational questions'.

  7. Quantum potentiality revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Gregg

    2017-11-13

    Heisenberg offered an interpretation of the quantum state which made use of a quantitative version of an earlier notion, [Formula: see text], of Aristotle by both referring to it using its Latin name, potentia , and identifying its qualitative aspect with [Formula: see text] The relationship between this use and Aristotle's notion was not made by Heisenberg in full detail, beyond noting their common character: that of signifying the system's objective capacity to be found later to possess a property in actuality. For such actualization, Heisenberg required measurement to have taken place, an interaction with external systems that disrupts the otherwise independent, natural evolution of the quantum system. The notion of state actualization was later taken up by others, including Shimony, in the search for a law-like measurement process. Yet, the relation of quantum potentiality to Aristotle's original notion has been viewed as mainly terminological, even by those who used it thus. Here, I reconsider the relation of Heisenberg's notion to Aristotle's and show that it can be explicated in greater specificity than Heisenberg did. This is accomplished through the careful consideration of the role of potentia in physical causation and explanation, and done in order to provide a fuller understanding of this aspect of Heisenberg's approach to quantum mechanics. Most importantly, it is pointed out that Heisenberg's requirement of an external intervention during measurement that disrupts the otherwise independent, natural evolution of the quantum system is in accord with Aristotle's characterization of spontaneous causation. Thus, the need for a teleological understanding of the actualization of potentia, an often assumed requirement that has left this fundamental notion neglected, is seen to be spurious.This article is part of the themed issue 'Second quantum revolution: foundational questions'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. Academic staff reward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    improvement of performance evaluation and the reward system, and improving the skill and ability of ... quality of the student experience of higher ..... excellence. The currently available reward systems of the institution other than the basic salary are poor and there is also no significant difference among the different level of.

  9. The Slingshot Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarseth, Sverre

    Some 30 years ago, the paper by Saslaw, Valtonen and Aarseth introduced the term ``gravitational slingshot'' into the literature. The concept was invoked to explain the properties of double radio sources by means of ejection from a strongly bound triple system, where a binary was also ejected by recoil. Since then several investigations have illustrated the general behaviour of such triple interactions in different types of N-body systems, although not much detailed analysis is available. In this celebratory contribution, we present some new data from standard star cluster modelling containing primordial binaries and triples, as well as results from a binary black hole simulation with two massive members. In the star cluster case, the process of mass loss from evolving stars, together with general mass segregation, promotes favourable interactions involving compact subsystems of binaries and triples in the central region. Three-body interactions often lead to energetic ejections, with one or more of the components attaining relatively large terminal velocities. Hence the presence of primordial binaries in both open clusters and the richer globulars inevitably produces some high escape velocities which can be observed in principle. The second type of stellar system to be discussed is based on the scenario of two approaching galactic cores with density cusps, each having a massive black hole. After the subsystems become well mixed, the two massive components soon form a hard binary which gains energy by ejecting other members. Such a massive binary has a large cross section and can be very effective in depleting bound stars from the core. Again high-velocity escapers are produced, with their terminal speeds related to the shrinking binary size. Although the large mass ratio prevents escape by recoil here, the Brownian motions of the binary exceed the predicted values significantly. This wandering is due to the small restoring force near the centre and has

  10. Environmental policy performance revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugbjerg, Carsten; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2012-01-01

    Studies of environmental policy performance tend to concentrate on the impact of particular policy institutions or of single policy instruments. However, environmental policies most often consist of a package of policy instruments. Further, these studies pay no or very little attention to policy......-country variation in organic food consumption is explained by differences in the packages of policy instruments applied, controlling for numerous systemic and individual-level alternative explanations. The analysis suggests that for environmental and political reasons, governments should apply more demand......-side instruments when introducing environmental policies....

  11. Crop Classification Using Short-Revisit Multitemporal SAR Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Henning; Mattia, Francesco; Satalino, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Classification of crops and other land cover types is an important application of both optical/infrared and SAR satellite data. It is already an import application of present satellite systems, as it will be for planned missions, such as the Sentinels. An airborne SAR data set with a short revisit......, and that cross-polarized backscatter produces the best results, with errors down to 3%–6% at the two frequencies. There is a trade-off between the polarimetric information and the multitemporal information, where the best overall results are obtained using the multitemporal information. If only a few...

  12. Dissipation in relativistic pair-plasma reconnection: revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenitani, Seiji

    2018-01-01

    Basic properties of relativistic magnetic reconnection in electron–positron pair plasmas are investigated by using a particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. We first revisit a problem by Hesse and Zenitani (2007 Phys. Plasmas 14 112102), who examined the kinetic Ohm’s law across the X line. We formulate a relativistic Ohm’s law by decomposing the stress–energy tensor. Then, the role of the new term, called the heat-flow inertial term, is examined in the PIC simulation data. We further evaluate the energy balance in the reconnection system. These analyses demonstrate physically transparent ways to diagnose relativistic kinetic data.

  13. Rational-Emotive Staff Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Susan G.; Forman, Bruce D.

    1980-01-01

    The application of Rational-Emotive Therapy principles and techniques in in-service education for school personnel is discussed. Teacher and counselor participation in a staff development program is described. (Author)

  14. Nanotechnology safety concerns revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Stephan T; McNeil, Scott E

    2008-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging science involving manipulation of matter at the nanometer scale. Due to concerns over nanomaterial risks, there has been a dramatic increase in focused safety research. The present review provides a summary of these published findings, identifying areas of agreement and discordance with regard to: (1) the potential for nanomaterial exposure, (2) the relative hazard nanomaterials pose to humans and the environment, and (3) the present deficits in our understanding of risk. Special attention is paid to study design and methodologies, offering valuable insight into the complexities encountered with nanomaterial safety assessment. Recent data highlight the impact of surface characteristics on nanomaterial biocompatibility and point to the inadequacy of the current size-dependent mechanistic paradigms, with nanoscale materials lacking unique or characteristic toxicity profiles. The available data support the ability of the lung, gastrointestinal tract, and skin to act as a significant barrier to the systemic exposure of many nanomaterials. Furthermore, the acute systemic toxicity of many nanomaterials appear to be low. By contrast, the potential pulmonary toxicity of certain nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes, is significant, requiring a better understanding of exposure to further evaluate their risk. While these findings arrive at an overall picture of material-specific rather than nanogeneralized risk, any conclusions should clearly be tempered by the fact that nanomaterial safety data are limited. Until such time as the exposures, hazards, and environmental life cycle of nanomaterials have been more clearly defined, cautious development and implementation of nanotechnology is the most prudent course.

  15. The power reinforcement framework revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jeppe; Andersen, Kim Normann; Danziger, James N.

    2016-01-01

    public organizations. This article revisits the 30-yearold power reinforcement framework by means of an empirical analysis on the use of mobile technology in a large-scale programme in Danish public sector home care. It explores whether and to what extent administrative management has controlled decision......-dominated and centrally controlled technologies that were the main focus of the 1970s and 1980s studies. Yet this study concludes that there is general support for the reinforcement framework in the contemporary application of mobile technology in public sector home care.......-making and gained most benefits from mobile technology use, relative to the effects of the technology on the street-level workers who deliver services. Current mobile technology-in-use might be less likely to be power reinforcing because it is far more decentralized and individualized than the mainly expert...

  16. The Levy sections theorem revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, Annibal; Gleria, Iram; Matsushita, Raul; Silva, Sergio Da

    2007-01-01

    This paper revisits the Levy sections theorem. We extend the scope of the theorem to time series and apply it to historical daily returns of selected dollar exchange rates. The elevated kurtosis usually observed in such series is then explained by their volatility patterns. And the duration of exchange rate pegs explains the extra elevated kurtosis in the exchange rates of emerging markets. In the end, our extension of the theorem provides an approach that is simpler than the more common explicit modelling of fat tails and dependence. Our main purpose is to build up a technique based on the sections that allows one to artificially remove the fat tails and dependence present in a data set. By analysing data through the lenses of the Levy sections theorem one can find common patterns in otherwise very different data sets

  17. Secret Public Key Protocols Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hoon Wei; Paterson, Kenneth G.

    Password-based protocols are important and popular means of providing human-to-machine authentication. The concept of secret public keys was proposed more than a decade ago as a means of securing password-based authentication protocols against off-line password guessing attacks, but was later found vulnerable to various attacks. In this paper, we revisit the concept and introduce the notion of identity-based secret public keys. Our new identity-based approach allows secret public keys to be constructed in a very natural way using arbitrary random strings, eliminating the structure found in, for example, RSA or ElGamal keys. We examine identity-based secret public key protocols and give informal security analyses, indicating that they are secure against off-line password guessing and other attacks.

  18. SENIOR STAFF ADVANCEMENT COMMITTEE (SSAC)

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Composition and mandateThe Senior Staff Advancement Committee is composed of members nominated ad persona by the Director-General.The Committee examines proposals from Divisions concerning promotions to grade 13 in Career Path IX, changes of career path to Career Path IX and advancements to the exceptional grade in Career path VIII.The Director-General may consult the Committee on any matter related to senior staff careers.The Committee makes its recommendations to the Director-General.

  19. Audit culture revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shore, Cris; Wright, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The spread of the rationality and techniques of financial accounting into new systems for measuring, ranking and auditing performance represents one of the most important and defining features of contemporary governance. Audit procedures are redefining accountability, transparency, and good...... governance and reshaping the way organisations and individuals have to operate. They also undermine professional autonomy and have unanticipated and dysfunctional consequences. Taking up the concept of ‘audit culture’ as an analytical framework, we examine the origins, spread and rationality driving...... these new financialized techniques of governance, not least through the work of the ‘Big 4’ accountancy firms, and trace their impact across a number of different fields, from administration and the military to business corporations and universities. Following Strathern’s observation that audit is ‘where...

  20. SS Cygni Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Smith

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available New spectroscopic and photometric observations of SS Cygni, the brightest dwarf nova system, have been obtained, with the aim of mapping starspots on the surface of the secondary star. Four nights of echelle spectroscopy in quiescence have been obtained using the 2.2-m telescope at San Pedro Martir (Mexico in August 2012 and another two nights at the 3.5-m telescope at Apache Point Observatory, USA, in September 2012, but these data are still being reduced. Simultaneous CCD photometry was also obtained at the two sites, and the Mexican photometry was extended into the subsequent long outburst. This presentation reveals some interesting photometric behaviour in that outburst, but further data will be necessary before the nature of the behaviour can be determined.

  1. Cannabis and psychosis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damjanović, Aleksandar; Pantović, Maja; Damjanović, Aleksandra; Dunjić-Kostić, Bojana; Ivković, Maja; Milovanović, Srđan; Lacković, Maja; Dimitrijević, Ivan

    2015-03-01

    The association between cannabinoids and psychosis has been known for almost a thousand years, but it is still speculated whether cannabis use may be a contributory cause of psychosis, that is, whether it may precipitate schizophrenia in those at risk. In this paper, we will briefly present the data from individual longitudinal studies in the field, together with the factors that are considered important for the association of cannabis abuse and occurrence of schizophrenia and prevention opportunities in the target population. The reviewed studies clearly suggest that cannabis abuse predicts an increased risk for schizophrenia, particularly in young adults. They underline both the need to create adequate prevention measures and consequently avoid the occurrence of the disease in the young at risk. Particular attention should be additionally devoted toward encouraging the young presenting with psychotic symptoms to stop or, at the very least, reduce the frequency of cannabis abuse. The issues are undoubtedly to be addressed by the health care system in general.

  2. Kahler Moduli Inflation Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J; Copeland, Edmund J; Gomez-Reino, Marta; Nunes, Nelson J

    2010-01-01

    We perform a detailed numerical analysis of inflationary solutions in Kahler moduli of type IIB flux compactifications. We show that there are inflationary solutions even when all the fields play an important role in the overall shape of the scalar potential. Moreover, there exists a direction of attraction for the inflationary trajectories that correspond to the constant volume direction. This basin of attraction enables the system to have an island of stability in the set of initial conditions. We provide explicit examples of these trajectories, compute the corresponding tilt of the density perturbations power spectrum and show that they provide a robust prediction of n_s approximately 0.96 for 60 e-folds of inflation.

  3. Why join the Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Becoming a member of the Staff Association (SA) is above all a personal choice, showing that the joining person’s commitment and adherence to values such as solidarity, social cohesion, etc.In September, the SA launches a membership campaign to convince a maximum number to join, to inform, arouse interest and support. Posters, emails and individual contacts are part of the campaign programme, just like this editorial. As far as individual contacts are concerned, we ask you to give time and lend an ear to the delegates of your department in the Staff Council, who will approach you, in order to make an open and constructive discussion possible. Do not hesitate to ask questions and let them know your thoughts about the SA, as (constructive) criticism enables us to progress. The Staff Association and its role of collective representation The Staff Association, via its delegates, represents collectively all staff of the Organization before the Director-General and Member States. To do this, staff rep...

  4. Staff Knowledge, Adherence to Infection Control Recommendations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staff Knowledge, Adherence to Infection Control Recommendations and Seroconversion Rates in Hemodialysis Centers in Khartoum. ... Adherence of staff members to infection control recommendations was evaluated by direct observation. Results: ... A structured training program for HD staff members is urgently required.

  5. Conformal Lorentz geometry revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teleman, Kostake

    1996-02-01

    . We also show that Mach's principle on inertial motions receives an explanation in our theory by considering the particular geodesic paths, for which one of the partners of an interacting pair is fixed and sent to infinity. In fact we study a dynamical system (W,L) which presents some formal and topological similarities with a system of two particles interacting gravitationally. (W,L) is the only conformally invariant relativistic two-point dynamical system. At the end we show that W can be naturally regarded as the base of a principal GL(2,C)-bundle which comes with a natural connection. We study this bundle from differential geometric point of view. Physical interpretations will be discussed in a future paper. This text is an improvement of a previous version, which was submitted under the title ``Hypertwistor Geometry.'' [See, K. Teleman, ``Hypertwistor Geometry (abstract),'' 14th International Conference on General Relativity and Gravitation, Florence, Italy, 1995.] The change of the title and many other improvements are due to the valuable comments of the referee, who also suggested the author to avoid hazardous interpretations.

  6. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  7. Endocannabinoid transport revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolussi, Simon; Gertsch, Jürg

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are arachidonic acid-derived endogenous lipids that activate the endocannabinoid system which plays a major role in health and disease. The primary endocannabinoids are anandamide (AEA, N-arachidonoylethanolamine) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol. While their biosynthesis and metabolism have been studied in detail, it remains unclear how endocannabinoids are transported across the cell membrane. In this review, we critically discuss the different models of endocannabinoid trafficking, focusing on AEA cellular uptake which is best studied. The evolution of the current knowledge obtained with different AEA transport inhibitors is reviewed and the confusions caused by the lack of their specificity discussed. A comparative summary of the most important AEA uptake inhibitors and the studies involving their use is provided. Based on a comprehensive literature analysis, we propose a model of facilitated AEA membrane transport followed by intracellular shuttling and sequestration. We conclude that novel and more specific probes will be essential to identify the missing targets involved in endocannabinoid membrane transport. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Spaceflight Revolution Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, William Sims

    2005-01-01

    This essay will first consider whether technological breakthroughs in space technology and the rational motives of ordinary institutions have the capacity to break out of this relatively static situation. Then we will survey the roles that social movements of various kinds might play and conclude with an examination of one particular nascent movement that might possibly build the foundation for a spacefaring civilization. A third of a century ago, practical nuclear fission rockets were under development, but this approach now seems environmentally unacceptable. It is hard to devise a more environmentally benign propellant than the hydrogen and oxygen used by the main engines of the Space Shuttle. There is some hope that nanotechnology will save the day with materials based on carbon nanotubes that are vastly stronger yet lighter than metals.6 However, the X-33 failure shows that it is not easy to work with radically new structural materials in demanding aerospace applications, and we may be many decades away from being able to manufacture propellant tanks, wings, and other large structures from carbon nanotubes. Satellites in low-Earth and synchronous orbit are of great importance in the collection and distribution of information, thus essential to the information economy. The wide range of civilian applications includes telephone, data transmission, television, navigation, weather observation, agriculture monitoring, and prospecting for natural resources.8 The technology is largely perfected, and incremental progress can be achieved by improvement in information systems and simply by investing in more relatively small satellites of the kinds we already have.

  9. A Vanishing Star Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    VLT Observations of an Unusual Stellar System Reinhold Häfner of the Munich University Observatory (Germany) is a happy astronomer. In 1988, when he was working at a telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory, he came across a strange star that suddenly vanished off the computer screen. He had to wait for more than a decade to get the full explanation of this unusual event. On June 10-11, 1999, he observed the same star with the first VLT 8.2-m Unit Telescope (ANTU) and the FORS1 astronomical instrument at Paranal [1]. With the vast power of this new research facility, he was now able to determine the physical properties of a very strange stellar system in which two planet-size stars orbit each other. One is an exceedingly hot white dwarf star , weighing half as much as the Sun, but only twice as big as the Earth. The other is a much cooler and less massive red dwarf star , one-and-a-half times the size of planet Jupiter. Once every three hours, the hot star disappears behind the other, as seen from the Earth. For a few minutes, the brightness of the system drops by a factor of more than 250 and it "vanishes" from view in telescopes smaller than the VLT. A variable star named NN Serpentis ESO PR Photo 30a/99 ESO PR Photo 30a/99 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 468 pix - 152k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 936 pix - 576k] [High-Res - JPEG: 2304 x 2695 pix - 4.4M] Caption to ESO PR Photo 30a/99 : The sky field around the 17-mag variable stellar system NN Serpentis , as seen in a 5 sec exposure through a V(isual) filter with VLT ANTU and FORS1. It was obtained just before the observation of an eclipse of this unsual object and served to centre the telescope on the corresponding sky position. The field shown here measures 4.5 x 4.5 armin 2 (1365 x 1365 pix 2 ; 0.20 arcsec/pix). The field is somewhat larger than that shown in Photo 30b/99 and has the same orientation to allow comparison: North is about 20° anticlockwise from the top and East is 90° clockwise from that direction. The

  10. Coded aperture tomography revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizais, Y.; Rowe, R.W.; Zubal, I.G.; Bennett, G.W.; Brill, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    Coded aperture (CA) Tomography never achieved wide spread use in Nuclear Medicine, except for the degenerate case of Seven Pinhole tomagraphy (7PHT). However it enjoys several attractive features (high sensitivity and tomographic ability with a statis detector). On the other hand, resolution is usually poor especially along the depth axis and the reconstructed volume is rather limited. Arguments are presented justifying the position that CA tomography can be useful for imaging time-varying 3D structures, if its major drawbacks (poor longitudinal resolution and difficulty in quantification) are overcome. Poor results obtained with 7PHT can be explained by both a very limited angular range sampled and a crude modelling of the image formation process. Therefore improvements can be expected by the use of a dual-detector system, along with a better understanding of its sampling properties and the use of more powerful reconstruction algorithms. Non overlapping multipinhole plates, because they do not involve a decoding procedure, should be considered first for practical applications. Use of real CA should be considered for cases in which non overlapping multipinhole plates do not lead to satisfactory solutions. We have been and currently are carrying out theoretical and experimental works, in order to define the factors which limit CA imaging and to propose satisfactory solutions for Dynamic Emission Tomography

  11. Revisiting Stephan's Quintet with deep optical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Pierre-Alain; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Renaud, Florent

    2018-03-01

    Stephan's Quintet, a compact group of galaxies, is often used as a laboratory to study a number of phenomena, including physical processes in the interstellar medium, star formation, galaxy evolution, and the formation of fossil groups. As such, it has been subject to intensive multiwavelength observation campaigns. Yet, models lack constrains to pin down the role of each galaxy in the assembly of the group. We revisit here this system with multiband deep optical images obtained with MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), focusing on the detection of low surface brightness (LSB) structures. They reveal a number of extended LSB features, some new, and some already visible in published images but not discussed before. An extended diffuse, reddish, lopsided, halo is detected towards the early-type galaxy NGC 7317, the role of which had so far been ignored in models. The presence of this halo made of old stars may indicate that the group formed earlier than previously thought. Finally, a number of additional diffuse filaments are visible, some close to the foreground galaxy NGC 7331 located in the same field. Their structure and association with mid-infrared emission suggest contamination by emission from Galactic cirrus.

  12. Excel-based scheduling for reallocation of nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-19

    Outi Annelli Tuominen and colleagues write in Nursing Management about the use of an Excel-based scheduling system for reallocation of nursing staff, which was trialled on ward managers and assistant ward managers.

  13. The Niulang Staff - A Cowhearding Stick as Weapon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald W. Cheung

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Yu Qi created the Niulang staff system about 300 years ago. He taught Xiao Side and the art was passed down within the Xiao family to the current grandmaster, Xiao Mingkui. The staff is about 1-meter long and incorporates techniques from both long and short weapons. The concept of yin and yang is central to Niulang staff practice, requiring a proper balance between defense and attack as well as softness and power. The staff always moves in a spiral motion and short explosive power is generated from the waist/kua of the body. Yi (intent and shen (spirit are central elements guiding the external movements. The Niulang staff art is designated in China as a major traditional wushu discipline for preservation and research.

  14. Booking staff online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    For those still using agency nurses and midwives, online booking could become a convenient option if a new website is successful, writes Steven Black. Newcross Healthcare Solutions, a company that provides temporary staffing solutions for NHS trusts and private hospitals, and for public and private care homes, has launched a UK wide online booking system.

  15. Origin of Sex Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Mauro; Zintzaras, Elias; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2003-10-01

    Why did sex ever arise in the first place? Why it does not disappear in view of the greater efficiency of asexuals? These are clearly two different questions, and we suggest here that the solution for the origin of sex does not necessarily come from theoretical considerations based on currently existing genetic systems. Thus, while we agree with a number of authors in that the emergence of sex (understood as the exchange of genetic material between genomes) is deeply rooted in the origin of life and happened during the very early stages in the transition from individual genes (`replicators') to bacteria-like cells (`reproducers'), we challenge the idea that recombinational repair was the major selective force for the emergence of sex. Taking the stochastic corrector model as a starting point, we provide arguments that question the putative costs of redundancy in primitive protocells. In addition, if genes that cause intragenomic conflict (i.e., parasites) are taken into account, it is certainly wrong to suggest that cellular fusion would be beneficial at the population level (although this strong claim needs some qualifications). However, when a continuous input of deleterious mutations that impair the fitness of the protocell as a whole is considered in the model (in the realistic range in which stable mutant distributions of quasi-species within compartments are established), there are circumstances when sex could be beneficial as a side effect of the dynamic equilibrium between cellular fusion-mutation-selection. The scenario we have explored numerically is fully consistent with the idea that the universal ancestor was not a discrete entity but an ensemble of proto-organisms that exchanged much genetic information.

  16. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Fraietta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired testicular function, i.e., hypogonadism, can result from a primary testicular disorder (hypergonadotropic or occur secondary to hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction (hypogonadotropic. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism can be congenital or acquired. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is divided into anosmic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (Kallmann syndrome and congenital normosmic isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The incidence of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is approximately 1-10:100,000 live births, and approximately 2/3 and 1/3 of cases are caused by Kallmann syndrome (KS and idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, respectively. Acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism can be caused by drugs, infiltrative or infectious pituitary lesions, hyperprolactinemia, encephalic trauma, pituitary/brain radiation, exhausting exercise, abusive alcohol or illicit drug intake, and systemic diseases such as hemochromatosis, sarcoidosis and histiocytosis X. The clinical characteristics of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism are androgen deficiency and a lack/delay/stop of pubertal sexual maturation. Low blood testosterone levels and low pituitary hormone levels confirm the hypogonadotropic hypogonadism diagnosis. A prolonged stimulated intravenous GnRH test can be useful. In Kallmann syndrome, cerebral MRI can show an anomalous morphology or even absence of the olfactory bulb. Therapy for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism depends on the patient's desire for future fertility. Hormone replacement with testosterone is the classic treatment for hypogonadism. Androgen replacement is indicated for men who already have children or have no desire to induce pregnancy, and testosterone therapy is used to reverse the symptoms and signs of hypogonadism. Conversely, GnRH or gonadotropin therapies are the best options for men wishing to have children. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is one of the rare conditions in

  17. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraietta, Renato; Zylberstejn, Daniel Suslik; Esteves, Sandro C

    2013-01-01

    Impaired testicular function, i.e., hypogonadism, can result from a primary testicular disorder (hypergonadotropic) or occur secondary to hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction (hypogonadotropic). Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism can be congenital or acquired. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is divided into anosmic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (Kallmann syndrome) and congenital normosmic isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism). The incidence of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is approximately 1-10:100,000 live births, and approximately 2/3 and 1/3 of cases are caused by Kallmann syndrome (KS) and idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, respectively. Acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism can be caused by drugs, infiltrative or infectious pituitary lesions, hyperprolactinemia, encephalic trauma, pituitary/brain radiation, exhausting exercise, abusive alcohol or illicit drug intake, and systemic diseases such as hemochromatosis, sarcoidosis and histiocytosis X. The clinical characteristics of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism are androgen deficiency and a lack/delay/stop of pubertal sexual maturation. Low blood testosterone levels and low pituitary hormone levels confirm the hypogonadotropic hypogonadism diagnosis. A prolonged stimulated intravenous GnRH test can be useful. In Kallmann syndrome, cerebral MRI can show an anomalous morphology or even absence of the olfactory bulb. Therapy for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism depends on the patient's desire for future fertility. Hormone replacement with testosterone is the classic treatment for hypogonadism. Androgen replacement is indicated for men who already have children or have no desire to induce pregnancy, and testosterone therapy is used to reverse the symptoms and signs of hypogonadism. Conversely, GnRH or gonadotropin therapies are the best options for men wishing to have children. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is one of the rare conditions in which specific

  18. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraietta, Renato; Zylberstejn, Daniel Suslik; Esteves, Sandro C

    2013-01-01

    Impaired testicular function, i.e., hypogonadism, can result from a primary testicular disorder (hypergonadotropic) or occur secondary to hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction (hypogonadotropic). Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism can be congenital or acquired. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is divided into anosmic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (Kallmann syndrome) and congenital normosmic isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism). The incidence of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is approximately 1-10:100,000 live births, and approximately 2/3 and 1/3 of cases are caused by Kallmann syndrome (KS) and idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, respectively. Acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism can be caused by drugs, infiltrative or infectious pituitary lesions, hyperprolactinemia, encephalic trauma, pituitary/brain radiation, exhausting exercise, abusive alcohol or illicit drug intake, and systemic diseases such as hemochromatosis, sarcoidosis and histiocytosis X. The clinical characteristics of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism are androgen deficiency and a lack/delay/stop of pubertal sexual maturation. Low blood testosterone levels and low pituitary hormone levels confirm the hypogonadotropic hypogonadism diagnosis. A prolonged stimulated intravenous GnRH test can be useful. In Kallmann syndrome, cerebral MRI can show an anomalous morphology or even absence of the olfactory bulb. Therapy for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism depends on the patient's desire for future fertility. Hormone replacement with testosterone is the classic treatment for hypogonadism. Androgen replacement is indicated for men who already have children or have no desire to induce pregnancy, and testosterone therapy is used to reverse the symptoms and signs of hypogonadism. Conversely, GnRH or gonadotropin therapies are the best options for men wishing to have children. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is one of the rare conditions in which specific

  19. Implications of staff 'churn' for nurse managers, staff, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine; Roche, Michael; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Catling-Paull, Christine

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the term "churn" is used not only because of the degree of change to staffing, but also because some of the reasons for staff movement are not classified as voluntary turnover. The difficulties for the nurse managing a unit with the degree of "churn" should not be under-estimated. Changes to skill mix and the proportions of full-time, agency, and temporary staff present challenges in providing clinical leadership, scheduling staff, performance management, and supervision. Perhaps more importantly, it is likely that there is an impact on the continuity of care provided in the absence of continuity of staffing. A greater understanding of the human and financial costs and consequences, and a willingness to change established practices at the institutional and ward level, are needed.

  20. Forensic seismology revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, A.

    2007-01-01

    The first technical discussions, held in 1958, on methods of verifying compliance with a treaty banning nuclear explosions, concluded that a monitoring system could be set up to detect and identify such explosions anywhere except underground: the difficulty with underground explosions was that there would be some earthquakes that could not be distinguished from an explosion. The development of adequate ways of discriminating between earthquakes and underground explosions proved to be difficult so that only in 1996 was a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) finally negotiated. Some of the important improvements in the detection and identification of underground tests—that is in forensic seismology—have been made by the UK through a research group at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE). The paper describes some of the advances made in identification since 1958, particularly by the AWE Group, and the main features of the International Monitoring System (IMS), being set up to verify the Test Ban. Once the Treaty enters into force, then should a suspicious disturbance be detected the State under suspicion of testing will have to demonstrate that the disturbance was not a test. If this cannot be done satisfactorily the Treaty has provisions for on-site inspections (OSIs): for a suspicious seismic disturbance for example, an international team of inspectors will search the area around the estimated epicentre of the disturbance for evidence that a nuclear test really took place. Early observations made at epicentral distances out to 2,000 km from the Nevada Test Site showed that there is little to distinguish explosion seismograms from those of nearby earthquakes: for both source types the short-period (SP: ˜1 Hz) seismograms are complex showing multiple arrivals. At long range, say 3,000 10,000 km, loosely called teleseismic distances, the AWE Group noted that SP P waves—the most widely and well-recorded waves from underground explosions—were in

  1. Training of technical staff and technical staff managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, G.F.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of Technical Staff and Technical Staff Managers training is to provide job skills enhancement to individuals selected to fill key technical positions within a nuclear utility. This training is unique in that unlike other training programs accredited by the National Academy for Nuclear Training, it does not lead to specific task qualification. The problems encountered when determining the student population and curriculum are a direct result of this major difference. Major problems encountered are determining who should attend the training, what amount of training is necessary and sufficient, and how to obtain the best feedback in order to effect substantive program improvements. These topics will be explored and possible solutions discussed

  2. Radiation monitoring of PET staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trang, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Positron emission tomography (PET) is becoming a common diagnostic tool in hospitals, often located in and employing staff from the Nuclear Medicine or Radiology departments. Although similar in some ways, staff in PET departments are commonly found to have the highest radiation doses in the hospital environment due to unique challenges which PET tracers present in administration as well as production. The establishment of a PET centre with a dedicated cyclotron has raised concerns of radiation protection to the staff at the WA PET Centre and the Radiopharmaceutical Production and Development (RAPID) team. Since every PET centre has differing designs and practices, it was considered important to closely monitor the radiation dose to our staff so that improvements to practices and design could be made to reduce radiation dose. Electronic dosimeters (MGP DMC 2000XB), which have a facility to log time and dose at 10 second intervals, were provided to three PET technologists and three PET nurses. These were worn in the top pocket of their lab coats throughout a whole day. Each staff member was then asked to note down their duties throughout the day and also note the time they performed each duty. The duties would then correlate with the dose with which the electronic monitor recorded and an estimate of radiation dose per duty could be given. Also an estimate of the dose per day to each staff member could be made. PET nurses averaged approximately 20 μ8v per day getting their largest dose from caring for occasional problematic patients. Smaller doses of a 1-2 μ8v were recorded for injections and removing cannulas. PET technologists averaged approximately 15 μ8v per day getting their largest dose of 1-5μ8v mainly from positioning of patients and sometimes larger doses due to problematic patients. Smaller doses of 1-2 μ5v were again recorded for injections and removal of cannulas. Following a presentation given to staff, all WA PET Centre and RAPID staff

  3. Revisiting the study of pedophilia phenomenon and related issues in Russia and in the world on the basis of Yuri Burlan’s System vector Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Vinevskaya, Anna; Ochirova, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    The paper is about pedophilia phenomenon. Pedophilia is a phenomenon that should be studied through innovative approaches in science. The causes of pedophilia and the early prophylaxis methods have been discovered in Yuri Burlan’s System-Vector Psychology.

  4. Commentary: "Who was caring for Mary?" revisited: a call for all academic physicians caring for patients to focus on systems and quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwick, Frederick S; Spear, Steven J

    2009-12-01

    Over 15 years have passed since Mary's near death (Annals of Internal Medicine. 1993;118:146-148). Disappointment in the care by fellow academic physicians persists; however, a reanalysis of her case through the lens of complex systems design and performance yields a more accurate and actionable perspective. Mary's suffering was not due to human failure alone. Human failure was provoked and exacerbated by broken processes including ambiguous assignments of responsibility; inadequate transfers of information and authority; unreliable or unavailable protocols for providing safe, effective treatment; and a failure to integrate the deep but narrow perspectives of individual specialists into a complete picture of Mary's condition. Her case exemplifies, in personal terms, many of the system challenges academic medical centers face: Faculty have other missions that can conflict with patient care; disease complexity is high, requiring input from multiple subspecialists; clinical departments serve as roadblocks to communication; and novice physicians, requiring close supervision, have primary responsibility for the day-to-day care of acutely ill patients. The academic physicians who first cared for Mary unwittingly accepted flawed systems, and they failed to work around them. At great monetary and emotional expense, last-minute heroics saved Mary. In a dysfunctional system, even the most conscientious physician may be viewed as uncaring. As Mary's case so clearly illustrates, patients and their families see the system and the physician as one. Only by working to improve the systems of delivery will academic physicians again be consistently viewed as caring.

  5. NO to sacrificing future staff!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    During our public meetings last week, we reviewed several subjects. However, the most urgent one today is the 2nd package of measures for our Pension Fund. In our previous issue, we devoted a long article to the Management’s plan for staff recruited from January 2012. A disaster! As we announced at our meetings, the Staff Association will organize a referendum at the beginning of April. For the message to be heard it is vital that as many staff as possible take part. By voting you will express your support to your staff representatives to stand in the way of these unacceptable measures. It is a matter of urgency that the staff makes their voice heard. Time is short, the decisions will be made in June. The future of our Organization is as stake. This is our future colleagues we are talking about. We must prevent this sacrifice. They must be welcomed in such a manner that there is no uneasiness between us. They must be made to feel welcome in their new family, CERN, our CERN. That they should pay an ...

  6. Paediatric diarrhoea rehydration therapy revisited

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    severe staff shortages, frequent review and recalculation of fluid requirements may not be possible, leading to many preventable deaths due to inadequate rehydration. King Edward VIII Hospital serves the rapidly expanding urban and semi-urban black population of Durban. The total annual outpatient population of 85 000 ...

  7. Staff Concerns in Schools Planning for and Implementing School-Wide Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyre, Ashli D.; Feuerborn, Laura L.; Woods, Leslie

    2018-01-01

    Understanding staff concerns about a systemic change effort allows leadership teams to better anticipate and address staff needs for professional development and support. In this study, staff concerns in nine schools planning for or implementing School-Wide Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (SWPBIS) were explored using the…

  8. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. The voting takes place from 23 October to 13 November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017. Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November and 5 December. Candidates for the 2017 Elections

  9. Supported Conversation for hospital staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Hysse B; Løvholt, Annelise P.; Mathiesen, Lone Lundbak

    in communication and interaction, Supported Conversation for Adults with Aphasia (SCA) was adapted and implemented in a large neurological department at Rigshospitalet-Glostrup in Copenhagen. Method 152 staff members representing different health professionals were assigned to one of eleven courses during a six...... month period. Each course had 10-12 participants and lasted 6 hours, including instruction in the SCA principles, video analysis, interdisciplinary group work, and practice sessions with PWAs. Self-assessed learning outcomes were evaluated with a brief questionnaire filled out by staff members...... in communication, also showed significant improvements across all staff groups. After the course, more time to spend with patients was perceived as the most important factor to further increase communication success with PWA. Conclusion The results show that interdisciplinary SCA-courses successfully increase...

  10. Revisiting tourist behavior via destination brand worldness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kayak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Taking tourists’ perspective rather than destination offerings as its core concept, this study introduces “perceived destination brand worldness” as a variable. Perceived destination brand worldness is defined as the positive perception that a tourist has of a country that is visited by tourists from all over the world. Then, the relationship between perceived destination brand worldness and intention to revisit is analyzed using partial least squares regression. This empirical study selects Taiwanese tourists as its sample, and the results show that perceived destination brand worldness is a direct predictor of intention to revisit. In light of these empirical findings and observations, practical and theoretical implications are discussed.

  11. Staff Development for School Improvement: An Illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelfelt, Roy A., Ed.

    This document contains 11 papers on school staff development: (1) "The Staff Development for School Improvement Program" (Winifred I. Warnat); (2) "A Teacher's View of a Staff Development Project" (Lynn Kleiman); (3) "Staff Development from the Principal's Perspective" (Dixie Hibner); (4) "Stepping-Stones to Success" (Barbara A. Skone); (5)…

  12. 22 CFR 902.3 - Board staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Board staff. 902.3 Section 902.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD ORGANIZATION § 902.3 Board staff. The chairperson shall select the Board's executive secretary and other staff provided for in the Act. The executive secretary and staff...

  13. 17 CFR 8.05 - Enforcement staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enforcement staff. 8.05... staff. (a) Each exchange shall establish an adequate enforcement staff which shall be authorized by the... staff shall consist of employees of the exchange and/or persons hired on a contract basis. It may not...

  14. The behavior of a paramagnetic system in electric and magnetic fields as exemplified by revisiting Li@B10H14

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medved, M.; Demissie, T.B.; McKee, M.L.; Hnyk, Drahomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 19 (2017), s. 12229-12236 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-01618S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : nonlinear-optical properties * coupled-cluster theory * open -shell systems * 3-dimensional aromaticity * polyhedral boranes Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  15. Revisiting the four-level inverted-Y system under both Doppler-free and Doppler-broadened conditions: an analytical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Arindam; Islam, Khairul; Bandyopadhyay, Amitava; Bhattacharyya, Dipankar

    2016-01-01

    We report the occurrence of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the simulated probe response signal for a four-level inverted-Y type system that is being acted upon by a weak coherent probe field, a strong coherent pump field and a coherent repump field. There are two ground energy levels, one intermediate energy level and one uppermost energy level. The weak probe field couples the lowest ground level to the intermediate level whereas the repump field connects the other ground level with the intermediate level. The strong control field couples the intermediate level with the uppermost energy level, thereby forming an inverted-Y type system. The density matrix based theoretical model has been developed and solved analytically for this four-level system and the probe response signal has been simulated at different values of the control and repump Rabi frequencies, control and repump frequency detunings and under both Doppler-free and Doppler-broadened conditions using the parameters of 87 Rb D 2 transition. Extremely low line width (few tens of kHz) for the EIT signal has been noticed under thermal averaging for copropagating probe, control and repump field configuration. The EIT signal is found to be immune to the variation in the control Rabi frequency. (paper)

  16. Facility specialists and inspectorate staff of the nuclear regulatory authority training in the field of management systems in compliance with the latest IAEA standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapralov, E.; Kapralov, Y.; Kozlov, V.; Filimonov, G.

    2007-01-01

    A problem of reducing a human factor negative influence reduction upon nuclear safety should be solved on the whole at the expense of introducing integrated management systems with a comprehensive application of regulatory control, training and inspections. This paper covers FSUE VO Safety and Training and Methodical Center of Nuclear and Radiation Safety approach towards training matters, which is one of the key factors in implementing quality and safety management systems. (author)

  17. Prison staff and the health promoting prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixey, Rachael; Woodall, James

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss some of the obstacles to implementing policy and strategy related to health promoting prisons. It focuses on the role of prison officers and raises issues concerning their conditions of service, training and organisational culture in a situation where the prison system faces security issues, overcrowding and high levels of ill health among prisoners. This paper emerged as a result of significant overlapping themes between two separate studies conducted by the authors. The paper draws on the authors' qualitative data from these studies. The findings demonstrate the ambiguities and tensions in changing organisational cultures and among prison staff. Alongside the qualitative data, the paper draws on theory regarding policy implementation at the micro-level to show how staff can block or speed up that implementation. Prison officers are an essential part of health promoting prisons, but have been relatively ignored in the discussion of how to create healthier prisons. The contribution that prison staff make to creating health promoting prisons has been under-explored, yet pertinent theory can show how they can be more effectively involved in making changes in organisational culture.

  18. Leukemia and ionizing radiation revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttler, J.M. [Cuttler & Associates Inc., Vaughan, Ontario (Canada); Welsh, J.S. [Loyola University-Chicago, Dept. or Radiation Oncology, Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, Illinois (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A world-wide radiation health scare was created in the late 19508 to stop the testing of atomic bombs and block the development of nuclear energy. In spite of the large amount of evidence that contradicts the cancer predictions, this fear continues. It impairs the use of low radiation doses in medical diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy. This brief article revisits the second of two key studies, which revolutionized radiation protection, and identifies a serious error that was missed. This error in analyzing the leukemia incidence among the 195,000 survivors, in the combined exposed populations of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, invalidates use of the LNT model for assessing the risk of cancer from ionizing radiation. The threshold acute dose for radiation-induced leukemia, based on about 96,800 humans, is identified to be about 50 rem, or 0.5 Sv. It is reasonable to expect that the thresholds for other cancer types are higher than this level. No predictions or hints of excess cancer risk (or any other health risk) should be made for an acute exposure below this value until there is scientific evidence to support the LNT hypothesis. (author)

  19. Individualist Biocentrism vs. Holism Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie McShane

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available While holist views such as ecocentrism have considerable intuitive appeal, arguing for the moral considerability of ecological wholes such as ecosystems has turned out to be a very difficult task. In the environmental ethics literature, individualist biocentrists have persuasively argued that individual organisms—but not ecological wholes—are properly regarded as having a good of their own . In this paper, I revisit those arguments and contend that they are fatally flawed. The paper proceeds in five parts. First, I consider some problems brought about by climate change for environmental conservation strategies and argue that these problems give us good pragmatic reasons to want a better account of the welfare of ecological wholes. Second, I describe the theoretical assumptions from normative ethics that form the background of the arguments against holism. Third, I review the arguments given by individualist biocentrists in favour of individualism over holism. Fourth, I review recent work in the philosophy of biology on the units of selection problem, work in medicine on the human biome, and work in evolutionary biology on epigenetics and endogenous viral elements. I show how these developments undermine both the individualist arguments described above as well as the distinction between individuals and wholes as it has been understood by individualists. Finally, I consider five possible theoretical responses to these problems.

  20. Neutrino assisted GUT baryogenesis revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Chih; Päs, Heinrich; Zeißner, Sinan

    2018-03-01

    Many grand unified theory (GUT) models conserve the difference between the baryon and lepton number, B -L . These models can create baryon and lepton asymmetries from heavy Higgs or gauge boson decays with B +L ≠0 but with B -L =0 . Since the sphaleron processes violate B +L , such GUT-generated asymmetries will finally be washed out completely, making GUT baryogenesis scenarios incapable of reproducing the observed baryon asymmetry of the Universe. In this work, we revisit the idea to revive GUT baryogenesis, proposed by Fukugita and Yanagida, where right-handed neutrinos erase the lepton asymmetry before the sphaleron processes can significantly wash out the original B +L asymmetry, and in this way one can prevent a total washout of the initial baryon asymmetry. By solving the Boltzmann equations numerically for baryon and lepton asymmetries in a simplified 1 +1 flavor scenario, we can confirm the results of the original work. We further generalize the analysis to a more realistic scenario of three active and two right-handed neutrinos to highlight flavor effects of the right-handed neutrinos. Large regions in the parameter space of the Yukawa coupling and the right-handed neutrino mass featuring successful baryogenesis are identified.

  1. The linkages among hillslope-vegetation changes, elevation, and the timing of late-Quaternary fluvial-system aggradation in the Mojave Desert revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, J. D.

    2014-08-01

    Valley-floor-channel and alluvial-fan deposits and terraces in the southwestern US record multiple episodes of late-Quaternary fluvial-system aggradation and incision. Perhaps the most well-constrained of these episodes took place from the latest Pleistocene to the present in the Mojave Desert. One hypothesis for this episode - i.e., the paleovegetation-change hypothesis (PVCH) - posits that a reduction in hillslope vegetation cover associated with the transition from Pleistocene woodlands to Holocene desert scrub generated a pulse of sediment that triggered a primary phase of aggradation downstream, followed by channel incision, terrace abandonment, and initiation of a secondary phase of aggradation further downstream. A second hypothesis - i.e., the extreme-storm hypothesis - attributes episodes of aggradation and incision to changes in the frequency and/or intensity of extreme storms. In the past decade a growing number of studies has advocated the extreme-storm hypothesis and challenged the PVCH on the basis of inconsistencies in both timing and process. Here I show that in eight out of nine sites where the timing of fluvial-system aggradation in the Mojave Desert is reasonably well constrained, measured ages of primary aggradation are consistent with the predictions of the PVCH if the time-transgressive nature of paleovegetation changes with elevation is fully taken into account. I also present an alternative process model for PVCH that is more consistent with available data and produces sediment pulses primarily via an increase in drainage density (i.e., a transformation of hillslopes into low-order channels) rather than solely via an increase in sediment yield from hillslopes. This paper further documents the likely important role of changes in upland vegetation cover and drainage density in driving fluvial-system response during semiarid-to-arid climatic changes.

  2. Revisiting current “barefoot doctors” in border areas of China: system of services, financial issue and clinical practice prior to introducing integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiuyun

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Under-5-years child mortality remains high in rural China. Integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI was introduced to China in 1998, but only a few rural areas have been included. This study aimed at assessing the current situation of the health system of rural health care and evaluating the clinical competency of village doctors in management of childhood illnesses prior to implementing IMCI programme in remote border rural areas. Methods The study was carried out in the border areas of Puer prefecture of Yunnan province. There were 182 village doctors in the list of the health bureau in these border areas. Of these, 154 (84.6% were recruited into the study. The local health system components were investigated using a qualitative approach and analyzed with triangulation of information from different sources. The clinical component was assessed objectively and quantitatively presented using descriptive statistics. Results The study found that the New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NRCMS coordinated the health insurance system and the provider service through 3 tiers: village doctor, township and county hospitals. The 30 RMB per person per year premium did not cover the referral cost, and thereby decreased the number of referrals. In contrast to available treatment facilities and drug supply, the level of basic medical education of village doctors and township doctors was low. Discontent among village doctors was common, especially concerning low rates of return from the service, exceptions being procedures such as injections, which in fact may create moral hazards to the patients. Direct observation on the assessment and management of paediatric patients by village doctors revealed inadequate history taking and physical examination, inability to detect potentially serious complications, overprescription of injection and antibiotics, and underprescription of oral rehydration salts and poor quality of counseling

  3. Revisiting current "barefoot doctors" in border areas of China: system of services, financial issue and clinical practice prior to introducing integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuyun; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Xia, Xiaoling; Sangsupawanich, Pasuree; Zheng, Wenjing; Ma, Keling

    2012-08-07

    Under-5-years child mortality remains high in rural China. Integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) was introduced to China in 1998, but only a few rural areas have been included. This study aimed at assessing the current situation of the health system of rural health care and evaluating the clinical competency of village doctors in management of childhood illnesses prior to implementing IMCI programme in remote border rural areas. The study was carried out in the border areas of Puer prefecture of Yunnan province. There were 182 village doctors in the list of the health bureau in these border areas. Of these, 154 (84.6%) were recruited into the study. The local health system components were investigated using a qualitative approach and analyzed with triangulation of information from different sources. The clinical component was assessed objectively and quantitatively presented using descriptive statistics. The study found that the New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NRCMS) coordinated the health insurance system and the provider service through 3 tiers: village doctor, township and county hospitals. The 30 RMB per person per year premium did not cover the referral cost, and thereby decreased the number of referrals. In contrast to available treatment facilities and drug supply, the level of basic medical education of village doctors and township doctors was low. Discontent among village doctors was common, especially concerning low rates of return from the service, exceptions being procedures such as injections, which in fact may create moral hazards to the patients. Direct observation on the assessment and management of paediatric patients by village doctors revealed inadequate history taking and physical examination, inability to detect potentially serious complications, overprescription of injection and antibiotics, and underprescription of oral rehydration salts and poor quality of counseling. There is a need to improve health finance and clinical

  4. One-step Conversion of Levulinic Acid to Succinic Acid Using I2/t-BuOK System: The Iodoform Reaction Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasumi, Ryosuke; Narita, Shodai; Miyamoto, Kazunori; Tominaga, Ken-Ichi; Takita, Ryo; Uchiyama, Masanobu

    2017-12-21

    The iodoform reaction has long been used as a qualitative test for acetyl and/or ethanol units in organic molecules. However, its synthetic applications are quite limited. Here, we describe a tuned iodoform reaction for oxidative demethylation reaction with I 2 and t-BuOK in t-BuOH, in which in situ-generated t-BuOI serves as the chemoselective iodinating agent. This system enables one-step conversion of levulinic acid to succinic acid, a major four-carbon chemical feedstock. This oxidative demethylation is also applicable to other compounds containing an acetyl group/ethanol unit, affording the corresponding carboxylic acids in a selective manner.

  5. English for Airport Ground Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes part of a European Commission Leonardo project that aimed to design a multimedia course for English language learners seeking work as ground staff in European airports. The structural-functional analysis of the dialogues written from the course showed that, across the four trades explored (security guards, ground handlers,…

  6. Agency Directionality and Staff Individuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, James C.; And Others

    Psychologists who choose work as members of counseling agencies are likely to experience some dissonance between what their individual interests and skills would have them do professionally and what they are asked to do as a staff member of the agency. Conversely, as a component of a larger institution or community, an agency's very existence may…

  7. Creativity in nursing staff development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, K A; Korte, P D

    1990-01-01

    The use of creative teaching techniques in nursing staff development generates enthusiasm for learning in both the learner and the educator. We report the process used to develop alternative teaching approaches and examples of these programs. A cost analysis of a traditional versus an innovative program is provided. Advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are reviewed.

  8. Factors Influencing Real Estate Brokerage Sales Staff Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Michael A. Abelson; K. Michele Kacmar; Ellen F. Jackofsky

    1990-01-01

    This research examined factors that affect residential real estate sales staff performance from sixteen firms of various sizes in different residential markets. The human capital model was related to sales staff commission earnings. A psychological factors model and management systems model were introduced that explained variance beyond that accounted for by the human capital model. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that five of the twenty-seven variables examined accounted for most o...

  9. Thrust Slip Rates as a Control on the Presence and Spatial Distribution of High Metamorphic Heating Rates in Collisional Systems: The "Hot Iron" Model Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thigpen, R.; Ashley, K. T.; Law, R. D.; Mako, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    In natural systems, two key observations indicate that major strain discontinuities such as faults and shear zones should play a fundamental role in orogenic thermal evolution: (1) Large faults and shear zones often separate components of the composite orogen that have experienced broadly different thermal and deformational histories, and (2) quantitative metamorphic and diffusional studies indicate that heating rates are much faster and the duration of peak conditions much shorter in natural collisional systems than those predicted by numerical continuum deformation models. Because heat transfer processes such as conduction usually operate at much slower time scales than rates of other tectonic processes, thermal evolution is often transient and thus can be strongly influenced by tectonic disturbances that occur at rates much faster than thermal relaxation. Here, we use coupled thermal-mechanical finite element models of thrust faults to explore how fault slip rate may fundamentally influence the thermal evolution of individual footwall and hanging wall thrust slices. The model geometry involves a single crustal-scale thrust with a dip of 25° that is translated up the ramp at average velocities of 20, 35, and 50 km Myr-1, interpreted to represent average to relatively high slip rates observed in many collisional systems. Boundary conditions include crustal radioactive heat production, basal mantle heat flow, and surface erosion rates that are a function of thrust rate and subsequent topography generation. In the models, translation of the hanging wall along the crustal-scale detachment results in erosion, exhumation, and retrograde metamorphism of the emerging hanging wall topography and coeval burial, `hot iron' heating, and prograde metamorphism of the thrust footwall. Thrust slip rates of 20, 35, and 50 km Myr-1 yield maximum footwall heating rates ranging from 55-90° C Myr-1 and maximum hanging wall cooling rates of 138-303° C Myr-1. These relatively rapid

  10. Box-Counting Dimension Revisited: Presenting an Efficient Method of Minimizing Quantization Error and an Assessment of the Self-Similarity of Structural Root Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouda, Martin; Caplan, Joshua S; Saiers, James E

    2016-01-01

    Fractal dimension (FD), estimated by box-counting, is a metric used to characterize plant anatomical complexity or space-filling characteristic for a variety of purposes. The vast majority of published studies fail to evaluate the assumption of statistical self-similarity, which underpins the validity of the procedure. The box-counting procedure is also subject to error arising from arbitrary grid placement, known as quantization error (QE), which is strictly positive and varies as a function of scale, making it problematic for the procedure's slope estimation step. Previous studies either ignore QE or employ inefficient brute-force grid translations to reduce it. The goals of this study were to characterize the effect of QE due to translation and rotation on FD estimates, to provide an efficient method of reducing QE, and to evaluate the assumption of statistical self-similarity of coarse root datasets typical of those used in recent trait studies. Coarse root systems of 36 shrubs were digitized in 3D and subjected to box-counts. A pattern search algorithm was used to minimize QE by optimizing grid placement and its efficiency was compared to the brute force method. The degree of statistical self-similarity was evaluated using linear regression residuals and local slope estimates. QE, due to both grid position and orientation, was a significant source of error in FD estimates, but pattern search provided an efficient means of minimizing it. Pattern search had higher initial computational cost but converged on lower error values more efficiently than the commonly employed brute force method. Our representations of coarse root system digitizations did not exhibit details over a sufficient range of scales to be considered statistically self-similar and informatively approximated as fractals, suggesting a lack of sufficient ramification of the coarse root systems for reiteration to be thought of as a dominant force in their development. FD estimates did not

  11. Box-counting dimension revisited: presenting an efficient method of minimising quantisation error and an assessment of the self-similarity of structural root systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eBouda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fractal dimension (FD, estimated by box-counting, is a metric used to characterise plant anatomical complexity or space-filling characteristic for a variety of purposes. The vast majority of published studies fail to evaluate the assumption of statistical self-similarity, which underpins the validity of the procedure. The box-counting procedure is also subject to error arising from arbitrary grid placement, known as quantisation error (QE, which is strictly positive and varies as a function of scale, making it problematic for the procedure's slope estimation step. Previous studies either ignore QE or employ inefficient brute-force grid translations to reduce it. The goals of this study were to characterise the effect of QE due to translation and rotation on FD estimates, to provide an efficient method of reducing QE, and to evaluate the assumption of statistical self-similarity of coarse root datasets typical of those used in recent trait studies. Coarse root systems of 36 shrubs were digitised in 3D and subjected to box-counts. A pattern search algorithm was used to minimise QE by optimising grid placement and its efficiency was compared to the brute force method. The degree of statistical self-similarity was evaluated using linear regression residuals and local slope estimates.QE due to both grid position and orientation was a significant source of error in FD estimates, but pattern search provided an efficient means of minimising it. Pattern search had higher initial computational cost but converged on lower error values more efficiently than the commonly employed brute force method. Our representations of coarse root system digitisations did not exhibit details over a sufficient range of scales to be considered statistically self-similar and informatively approximated as fractals, suggesting a lack of sufficient ramification of the coarse root systems for reiteration to be thought of as a dominant force in their development. FD estimates did

  12. Repositioning accuracy of two different mask systems-3D revisited: Comparison using true 3D/3D matching with cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Walter, Cornelia; Rahn, Angelika; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Loeb, Iris; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The repositioning accuracy of mask-based fixation systems has been assessed with two-dimensional/two-dimensional or two-dimensional/three-dimensional (3D) matching. We analyzed the accuracy of commercially available head mask systems, using true 3D/3D matching, with X-ray volume imaging and cone-beam CT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients receiving radiotherapy (intracranial/head-and-neck tumors) were evaluated (14 patients with rigid and 7 with thermoplastic masks). X-ray volume imaging was analyzed online and offline separately for the skull and neck regions. Translation/rotation errors of the target isocenter were analyzed. Four patients were treated to neck sites. For these patients, repositioning was aided by additional body tattoos. A separate analysis of the setup error on the basis of the registration of the cervical vertebra was performed. The residual error after correction and intrafractional motility were calculated. Results: The mean length of the displacement vector for rigid masks was 0.312 ± 0.152 cm (intracranial) and 0.586 ± 0.294 cm (neck). For the thermoplastic masks, the value was 0.472 ± 0.174 cm (intracranial) and 0.726 ± 0.445 cm (neck). Rigid masks with body tattoos had a displacement vector length in the neck region of 0.35 ± 0.197 cm. The intracranial residual error and intrafractional motility after X-ray volume imaging correction for rigid masks was 0.188 ± 0.074 cm, and was 0.134 ± 0.14 cm for thermoplastic masks. Conclusions: The results of our study have demonstrated that rigid masks have a high intracranial repositioning accuracy per se. Given the small residual error and intrafractional movement, thermoplastic masks may also be used for high-precision treatments when combined with cone-beam CT. The neck region repositioning accuracy was worse than the intracranial accuracy in both cases. However, body tattoos and image guidance improved the accuracy. Finally, the combination of both mask systems with 3D

  13. Three-Stream, Bicarbonate-Based Hemodialysis Solution Delivery System Revisited: With an Emphasis on Some Aspects of Acid-Base Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Susie Q; Kohn, Orly F; Cheng, Yuk-Lun; Kjellstrand, Carl M; Ing, Todd S

    2017-06-01

    Hemodialysis patients can acquire buffer base (i.e., bicarbonate and buffer base equivalents of certain organic anions) from the acid and base concentrates of a three-stream, dual-concentrate, bicarbonate-based, dialysis solution delivery machine. The differences between dialysis fluid concentrate systems containing acetic acid versus sodium diacetate in the amount of potential buffering power were reviewed. Any organic anion such as acetate, citrate, or lactate (unless when combined with hydrogen) delivered to the body has the potential of being converted to bicarbonate. The prescribing physician aware of the role that organic anions in the concentrates can play in providing buffering power to the final dialysis fluid, will have a better knowledge of the amount of bicarbonate and bicarbonate precursors delivered to the patient. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Revisiting the formal foundation of Probabilistic Databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, B.; van Keulen, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    One of the core problems in soft computing is dealing with uncertainty in data. In this paper, we revisit the formal foundation of a class of probabilistic databases with the purpose to (1) obtain data model independence, (2) separate metadata on uncertainty and probabilities from the raw data, (3)

  15. Residual Momentum and Reversal Strategies Revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Huij (Joop); S.D. Lansdorp (Simon)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIn this note we revisit the 2011 and 2013 papers of Blitz, Huij, and Martens (BHM2011), and Blitz, Huij, Lansdorp, and Verbeek (BHLV2013) in which momentum and reversal strategies on residual returns are proposed. Our results indicate that the main findings of these studies, that

  16. Mofolo's Chaka revisited via the original text

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oi, oi! … you must go by the right path': Mofolo's Chaka revisited via the original text. Thomas Mofolo never defended himself against accusations that his novel Chaka distorts historical facts to express anti-Nguni sentiments under the guise of Christianity. But in a way he foreshadowed the possibility of it, by including as part ...

  17. Revisiting Hansen Solubility Parameters by Including Thermodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwerse, Manuel J; Fernández-Maldonado, Ana María; Rousseau, Simon; Moreau-Masselon, Chloe; Roux, Bernard; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2017-01-01

    The Hansen solubility parameter approach is revisited by implementing the thermodynamics of dissolution and mixing. Hansen's pragmatic approach has earned its spurs in predicting solvents for polymer solutions, but for molecular solutes improvements are needed. By going into the details of entropy

  18. The Pills problem revisited | Brennan | Quaestiones Mathematicae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We revisit the pills problem proposed by Knuth and McCarthy. In a bottle there are m large pills and n small pills. The large pill is equivalent to two small pills. ... Mathematics Subject Classification (2000): Primary: 05A15; Secondary: 60C05. Key words: Pills problem, recursions, harmonic numbers, generating functions.

  19. Coccolithophorids in polar waters: Wigwamma spp. revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Østergaard, Jette B.; Heldal, Mikal

    2013-01-01

    A contingent of weakly calcified coccolithophorid genera and species were described from polar regions almost 40 years ago. In the interim period a few additional findings have been reported enlarging the realm of some of the species. The genus Wigwamma is revisited here with the purpose of provi...... appearance of the coccolith armour of the cell...

  20. Revisiting the stratigraphy of the Mesoproterozoic Chhattisgarh ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present work supports the existence of two sub-basins separated .... Updated geological map of the Chhattisgarh basin (this work). Cross sections along ..... Conclusion. This revisiting of the stratigraphy of Chhattisgarh. Supergroup requires three major corrections to the standard model (GSI 2005; Naqvi 2005). First, the.

  1. Revisiting the importance of childhood activity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-05

    Nov 5, 2012 ... Review Article: Revisiting the importance of childhood activity. 249. Vol 55 No 3. S Afr Fam Pract 2013. Introduction. There has been a drastic increase in documented childhood morbidity and mortality relating to poor nutrition, obesity and low activity levels in recent years. Formalised exercise programmes ...

  2. Revisiting separation properties of convex fuzzy sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Separation of convex sets by hyperplanes has been extensively studied on crisp sets. In a seminal paper separability and convexity are investigated, however there is a flaw on the definition of degree of separation. We revisited separation on convex fuzzy sets that have level-wise (crisp) disjointne...

  3. The Evil of Banality: Arendt Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnich, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    "The banality of evil" (Arendt) remains controversial and useful. Ironically, the concept is now itself a banality. To revisit and extend it, we consider the "evil of banality", the profound dangers of cliched thoughtlessness. A distinction is proposed: "intensive" versus "extensive evils". The former takes…

  4. The Faraday effect revisited: General theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia Decebal; Nenciu, Gheorghe; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    This paper is the first in a series revisiting the Faraday effect, or more generally, the theory of electronic quantum transport/optical response in bulk media in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The independent electron approximation is assumed. For free electrons, the transverse...

  5. Staff

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    TÜ teadustöötajaist ja õppejõududest on 2/3 doktorikraadiga. TÜ rektor Jaak Aaviksoo ja teadusprprektor Ain Heinaru valiti Euroopa kõrghariduspoliitika juhtorganitesse. Sotsiaalteaduskonna prof. Wolfgang Drechsler sai Saksa-Eesti akadeemiliste suhete arendamise eest Saksamaa Liitvabariigi Teeneteristi

  6. From placement to prison revisited: Do mental health services disrupt the delinquency pipeline among Latino, African American and Caucasian youth in the child welfare system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Antonio R; Greeson, Johanna K P; Kim, Minseop; Thompson, Allison; DeNard, Christina

    2015-12-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities in delinquency among child welfare-involved youth are well documented. However, less is known about the mechanisms through which these disparities occur. This study explores the extent to which sets of variables predict the occurrence of juvenile delinquency and whether race/ethnicity moderates the strength of the relationships between (1) social, emotional, and behavioral (SEB) problems and delinquency and (2) mental health service use and delinquency. We used a nationally representative sample of 727 African American, Caucasian, and Latino youth between the ages of 12-17 who were referred to the child welfare system. Controlling for age, gender, placement instability, maltreatment history, poverty, and urbanicity, linear regression analyses revealed that African American and Latino youth engaged in more delinquent acts than Caucasian youth did. However, service use decreased the likelihood of engaging in more delinquent acts for African Americans. Additional efforts are needed to illuminate and address the contextual and organizational barriers to delivering effective mental health services as a strategy to reduce racial disparities in delinquent behavior. Copyright © 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Double neutron stars: merger rates revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruslinska, Martyna; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Klencki, Jakub; Benacquista, Matthew

    2018-03-01

    We revisit double neutron star (DNS) formation in the classical binary evolution scenario in light of the recent Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo DNS detection (GW170817). The observationally estimated Galactic DNS merger rate of R_MW = 21^{+28}_{-14} Myr-1, based on three Galactic DNS systems, fully supports our standard input physics model with RMW = 24 Myr-1. This estimate for the Galaxy translates in a non-trivial way (due to cosmological evolution of progenitor stars in chemically evolving Universe) into a local (z ≈ 0) DNS merger rate density of Rlocal = 48 Gpc-3 yr-1, which is not consistent with the current LIGO/Virgo DNS merger rate estimate (1540^{+3200}_{-1220} Gpc-3 yr-1). Within our study of the parameter space, we find solutions that allow for DNS merger rates as high as R_local ≈ 600^{+600}_{-300} Gpc-3 yr-1 which are thus consistent with the LIGO/Virgo estimate. However, our corresponding BH-BH merger rates for the models with high DNS merger rates exceed the current LIGO/Virgo estimate of local BH-BH merger rate (12-213 Gpc-3 yr-1). Apart from being particularly sensitive to the common envelope treatment, DNS merger rates are rather robust against variations of several of the key factors probed in our study (e.g. mass transfer, angular momentum loss, and natal kicks). This might suggest that either common envelope development/survival works differently for DNS (˜10-20 M⊙ stars) than for BH-BH (˜40-100 M⊙ stars) progenitors, or high black hole (BH) natal kicks are needed to meet observational constraints for both types of binaries. Our conclusion is based on a limited number of (21) evolutionary models and is valid within this particular DNS and BH-BH isolated binary formation scenario.

  8. Effect of dispersive long-range corrections to the pressure tensor: The vapour-liquid interfacial properties of the Lennard-Jones system revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Ruiz, F. J.; Blas, F. J., E-mail: felipe@uhu.es [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Centro de Investigación de Física Teórica y Matemática, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Mendiboure, B. [Laboratoire des Fluides Complexes et leurs Réservoirs, UMR5150, Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, B. P. 1155, Pau Cedex 64014 (France); Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I. [Centro de Investigación de Física Teórica y Matemática, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Departamento de Geología, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain)

    2014-11-14

    We propose an extension of the improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janeček [J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 6264–6269 (2006)], presented recently by MacDowell and Blas [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 074705 (2009)] to account for the intermolecular potential energy of spherical, rigid, and flexible molecular systems, to deal with the contributions to the microscopic components of the pressure tensor due to the dispersive long-range corrections. We have performed Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of spherical Lennard-Jones molecules with different cutoff distances, r{sub c} = 2.5, 3, 4, and 5σ. In addition, we have also considered cutoff distances r{sub c} = 2.5 and 3σ in combination with the inhomogeneous long-range corrections proposed in this work. The normal and tangential microscopic components of the pressure tensor are obtained using the mechanical or virial route in combination with the recipe of Irving and Kirkwood, while the macroscopic components are calculated using the Volume Perturbation thermodynamic route proposed by de Miguel and Jackson [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 164109 (2006)]. The vapour-liquid interfacial tension is evaluated using three different procedures, the Irving-Kirkwood method, the difference between the macroscopic components of the pressure tensor, and the Test-Area methodology. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles, coexistence densities, vapour pressure, critical temperature and density, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying particular attention to the effect of the cutoff distance and the long-range corrections on these properties. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the cutoff distance (at fixed temperature) is to sharpen the vapour-liquid interface, to decrease the vapour pressure, and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. As a result, the interfacial

  9. eWOM, Revisit Intention, Destination Trust and Gender

    OpenAIRE

    Abubakar, Abubakar Mohammed; Ilkan, Mustafa; Al-Tal, Raad Meshall; Eluwole, Kayode

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates the impact of eWOM on intention to revisit and destination trust, and the moderating role of gender in medical tourism industry. Result from structural equation modeling (n=240) suggests the following: (1) that eWOM influences intention to revisit and destination trust; (2) that destination trust influences intention to revisit; (3) that the impact of eWOM on intention to revisit is about 1.3 times higher in men; (4) that the impact of eWOM on destination trust is ab...

  10. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Asscociation

    2015-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! Be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will represent you over the next two years and they will without doubt appreciate your gratitude. The voting takes place from the 26th of October to the 9th of November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2015.   Elections Timetable Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 8 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. Candidates for the 2015 elections

  11. Towards mobile staff members management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encheva, Sylvia

    2017-07-01

    Todays project management requires a number of abilities which involve finding quick solutions to shortage of staff members with possession of specific qualities. When persons with team responsibilities are under pressure or due to various circumstances are unable to perform exhaustive search in databases, an interactive visualization tool can come in quite handy in finding good solutions unforeseen occurrences. In particular we propose application of selected graphs for facilitating mobile human resource management.

  12. Managing a multicultural radiology staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhizar, R; Dowd, S; Giger, J

    1997-01-01

    Opportunities for minorities in healthcare increased with the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s. More recently, funds from the U.S. Public Health Service have been targeted toward disadvantaged minorities. The workforce in healthcare, and in business in general, has become increasingly multicultural. Much of the literature in healthcare management lacks practical guidelines for managing a diverse workforce. Communication, both verbal and nonverbal, and culture are closely intertwined. Managers, as they develop multicultural teams, will need to understand how culture influences communication in their organizations. Space, spatial behavior, and cultural attitudes influence people's behavior. This is a particularly important consideration for a radiology staff, which must often work in close quarters. For some cultural groups, the family as an organization has more significance than even personal, work-related or national causes. People's orientation to time, whether for the past, present or future, is usually related to the culture in which they grew up. Again, this may become an important issue for a radiology administrator whose organization must run punctually and time-efficiently. How patients feel about their environment, whether they believe they are in control or believe in an external locus of control, is of particular interest to those who attempt therapeutic changes in a patient's healthcare. Does the patient believe that illness is divine will or that suffering is intrinsic to the human condition? There is increasing research in the United States to show that people do differ biologically according to race. Such differences exist among patients as well as among staff members. It has been popular to assume that differences among races do not exist. Unfortunately such an attitude does not allow for different attributes and responses of individuals. Managing a multicultural staff presents a challenge to administrators who must be skilled in working with

  13. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   Global CERN Career paths AA - G 14     Number of seats for fellows representatives Global CERN 5 For more informat...

  14. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 21 September, at noon Start date for receipt of the application Friday 16 October, at noon Closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   ...

  15. Closing the quality gap: revisiting the state of the science (vol. 2: the patient-centered medical home).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John W; Jackson, George L; Powers, Benjamin J; Chatterjee, Ranee; Bettger, Janet Prvu; Kemper, Alex R; Hasselblad, Vic; Dolor, Rowena J; Irvine, R Julian; Heidenfelder, Brooke L; Kendrick, Amy S; Gray, Rebecca

    2012-07-01

    As part of the Closing the Quality Gap: Revisiting the State of the Science series of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), this systematic review sought to identify completed and ongoing evaluations of the comprehensive patient-centered medical home (PCMH), summarize current evidence for this model, and identify evidence gaps. We searched PubMed®, CINAHL®, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for published English-language studies, and a wide variety of databases and Web resources to identify ongoing or recently completed studies. Two investigators per study screened abstracts and full-text articles for inclusion, abstracted data, and performed quality ratings and evidence grading. Our functional definition of PCMH was based on the definition used by AHRQ. We included studies that explicitly claimed to be evaluating PCMH and those that did not but which met our functional definition. Seventeen studies with comparison groups evaluated the effects of PCMH (Key Question [KQ] 1). Older adults in the United States were the most commonly studied population (8 of 17 studies). PCMH interventions had a small positive impact on patient experiences (including patient-perceived care coordination) and small to moderate positive effects on preventive care services (moderate strength of evidence [SOE]). Staff experiences were also improved by a small to moderate degree (low SOE). There were too few studies to estimate effects on clinical or most economic outcomes. Twenty-one of 27 studies reported approaches that addressed all 7 major PCMH components (KQ 2), including team-based care, sustained partnership, reorganized care or structural changes to care, enhanced access, coordinated care, comprehensive care, and a systems-based approach to quality. A total of 51 strategies were used to address the 7 major PCMH components. Twenty-two of 27 studies reported information on financial systems used to implement PCMH, implementation strategies, and

  16. Strategies and best practices for staff renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottingham, C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the strategies and best practices for staff renewal in the electricity sector. Strategic initiatives for staff renewal include strategic recruiting, succession planning, employee relations, knowledge management and strategic partnerships

  17. The Joint Staff Officer's Guide 2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    The Joint Forces Staff College (JFSC) educates staff officers and other leaders in joint operational-level planning and warfighting and instills a commitment to joint, multinational, and interagency teamwork, attitudes, and perspectives...

  18. Staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimova, N.U.; Malisheva, E.Yu.; Shosafarova, Sh.G.

    2010-01-01

    Present article is devoted to staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics. Data on staff radiation exposure obtained during 2005-2008 years was analyzed. It was found that average individual doses of staff of various occupations in Dushanbe city for 2008 year are at 0.29-2.16 mSv range. They are higher than the average health indicators but lower than maximum permissible dose. It was defined that paramedical personnel receives the highest doses among the various categories of staff.

  19. Become a staff delegate: why not you?

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2009-01-01

    Following a decision taken at the Staff Association General Assembly in May 2008, staff delegates are elected in the autumn of odd-numbered years. The next elections which will lead to a total renewal of the Staff Council will thus take place in November 2009. Will you be a candidate?

  20. Get the Staff You Need This Summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Christy L.

    1997-01-01

    Strategies for recruiting camp staff include tailoring messages to the needs and interests of prospective staff; utilizing former staff; hiring older workers; encouraging parents, former campers, and special interest groups to volunteer; and offering competitive pay. Provides an example of a target population (Generation X, born 1963-83) and key…

  1. Strengthening Bullying Prevention through School Staff Connectedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2014-01-01

    The growing concern about bullying and school violence has focused national attention on various aspects of school climate and school connectedness. The current study examined dimensions of staff connectedness (i.e., personal, student, staff, and administration) in relation to staff members' comfort intervening in bullying situations (e.g.,…

  2. Self Efficacy among University Academic Staff

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was no significant difference between teaching staff and professional librarians on collective educators' self efficacy but significant difference existed between male and female academic staff on collective educators' self efficacy. The implication of the result in terms of collaborative work among academic staff was ...

  3. Short Communication Employee -Driven Staff Training and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the concept of staff training and development within the South African context. The changing labour legislation in South Africa makes it mandatory for the employer to provide training and development. However, staff have an important role to play in staff training and development. The paper gives an ...

  4. 28 CFR 551.32 - Staff supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff supervision. 551.32 Section 551.32 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Inmate Organizations § 551.32 Staff supervision. (a) The Warden shall appoint a staff member as the...

  5. 13 CFR 400.105 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 400.105 Section 400.105... Board Procedures § 400.105 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director of the Board advises... with respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff, and...

  6. 13 CFR 500.105 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 500.105 Section 500.105... LOAN PROGRAM Board Procedures § 500.105 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director of the... direction with respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff...

  7. 20 CFR 900.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff. 900.5 Section 900.5 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION § 900.5 Staff. (a) The... the Act and performs such other functions as the Board may delegate to him. (b) Members of the staffs...

  8. 14 CFR 1310.6 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 1310.6 Section 1310.6 Aeronautics... GUARANTEED LOAN § 1310.6 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director advises and assists the Board... administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff, and performs such other duties as the...

  9. Improving Staff Productivity in Mental Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This guide is concerned with productivity measurement and improvement in mental health centers, and focuses on the relationship between service outputs and available clinical staff, i.e., staff productivity. Staff productivity measures are described as useful in identifying existing levels of productivity, making comparisons to determine the…

  10. Cancer Ward Staff Group: An Intervention Designed to Prevent Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, William H.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a case study illustrating organizational and system contingencies for introducing and maintaining a support group for oncology nursing staff in a large general hospital culture. Criteria for long-run survivability of innovation in a work system are applied to a group structured like that described by Balint for training physicians in…

  11. The Mutations Occurred after the Implementation of Bologna’s System in the Romanian Educational Services. Analysis Realized on the Didactic Staff of the Faculty of Economic Science and Business Administration, Iasi

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Mihaela Nicolau,

    2010-01-01

    In the present stage of development of Romanian society, several changes and challengeshave emerged in what concerns educational services, and staff management started to focus more andmore on developing its resources – the didactic staff. “The consequences are clear: the trainingprograms will not be aimed only at pedagogical, didactic or technical development. Besidesimproving their didactic performance, teachers will have to become better colleagues, good teammembers and, if possible, even ...

  12. Revisiting the Harris-Hatang Dialogue

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Revisiting the Harris-Hatang Dialogue: A Critique of “What it (Might) Mean(s) to be an African Archivist” ... A city rich in culture that for once forced me to wish that I should have been a sociologist or anthropologist. The idea of Zanzibar as an archives never crossed my mind. Harris still has to convince me about that. This kind ...

  13. Revisiting Cementoblastoma with a Rare Case Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayanirmala Subramani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cementoblastoma is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm which is characterized by the proliferation of cellular cementum. Diagnosis of cementoblastoma is challenging because of its protracted clinical, radiographic features, and bland histological appearance; most often cementoblastoma is often confused with other cementum and bone originated lesions. The aim of this article is to overview/revisit, approach the diagnosis of cementoblastoma, and also present a unique radiographic appearance of a cementoblastoma lesion associated with an impacted tooth.

  14. The operating staff of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, G.; Christ, W.

    1988-01-01

    The training of its staff is one of the pillars of the safe and economical operation of a power plant. This is why power plant owners began to systematically train their staff already in the 50s, and why they created central training facilities. Staff members who have undergone this training make an indispensable contribution to the acceptedly high safety and availability of German power plants. The substantial cost of creating training facilities and of schooling plant staff is considered to be an investment for the future. Low labour turnover permits careful observation and development of staff and leads to a high standard of knowledge and experience. (orig./HSCH) [de

  15. FACTORS INFLUENCING TOURISTS’ REVISIT TO BALI AS MICE DESTINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Eka Mahadewi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Plan to revisit of MICE tourists has been highlighted as an important research topic in competitive market of tourism destinations especially in MICE Destination. Despite the considerable number of research on MICE tourists, it remains unclear why MICE tourists undertake to plan their repeated visits and what kind of indicators influenced. This research aims to identify factors influencing MICE tourists to revisit to Bali – Indonesia. By using SEM (Structural Equation Model, one of the results of this study indicated that MICE Destination’s attribute, Promotion, Satisfaction and Image were the important factor to affect Revisit of MICE tourists to come again or revisit to Bali as MICE Destination. Concerning with MICE tourists perception on revisit; tourist visit to Bali for MICE destination can be enhanced by promotion through image of Bali.

  16. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral colle...

  17. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 26 September, posters, etc. call for applications Wednesday 26 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the application Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November. In its meeting on 19 September 2011, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges 0.1 to 0.6: Sector Department Career path AA – A – B – C – D Career path E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 18 si&e...

  18. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 13 si&...

  19. The timeline of the lunar bombardment: Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidelli, A.; Nesvorny, D.; Laurenz, V.; Marchi, S.; Rubie, D. C.; Elkins-Tanton, L.; Wieczorek, M.; Jacobson, S.

    2018-05-01

    The timeline of the lunar bombardment in the first Gy of Solar System history remains unclear. Basin-forming impacts (e.g. Imbrium, Orientale), occurred 3.9-3.7 Gy ago, i.e. 600-800 My after the formation of the Moon itself. Many other basins formed before Imbrium, but their exact ages are not precisely known. There is an intense debate between two possible interpretations of the data: in the cataclysm scenario there was a surge in the impact rate approximately at the time of Imbrium formation, while in the accretion tail scenario the lunar bombardment declined since the era of planet formation and the latest basins formed in its tail-end. Here, we revisit the work of Morbidelli et al. (2012) that examined which scenario could be compatible with both the lunar crater record in the 3-4 Gy period and the abundance of highly siderophile elements (HSE) in the lunar mantle. We use updated numerical simulations of the fluxes of asteroids, comets and planetesimals leftover from the planet-formation process. Under the traditional assumption that the HSEs track the total amount of material accreted by the Moon since its formation, we conclude that only the cataclysm scenario can explain the data. The cataclysm should have started ∼ 3.95 Gy ago. However we also consider the possibility that HSEs are sequestered from the mantle of a planet during magma ocean crystallization, due to iron sulfide exsolution (O'Neil, 1991; Rubie et al., 2016). We show that this is likely true also for the Moon, if mantle overturn is taken into account. Based on the hypothesis that the lunar magma ocean crystallized about 100-150 My after Moon formation (Elkins-Tanton et al., 2011), and therefore that HSEs accumulated in the lunar mantle only after this timespan, we show that the bombardment in the 3-4 Gy period can be explained in the accretion tail scenario. This hypothesis would also explain why the Moon appears so depleted in HSEs relative to the Earth. We also extend our analysis of the

  20. Research staff and public engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    Public engagement plays an important role in the contemporary UK academy, and is promoted through initiatives such as Beacons of Public Engagement and research grant 'Pathways to Impact'. Relatively little is known, however, about academic experiences of such engagement activities. This study...... focuses on one staff group, contract researchers, to explore the perceived challenges and opportunities of public engagement. Qualitative and quantitative data-from a web-based survey and three focus groups-are used to show that, while engagement activities are often seen as rewarding, the challenges...... involved in participating in them are profound. While researchers report practical needs, such as for logistical support or communication training, key barriers relate to the conditions of contract research more generally, and specifically to job insecurity, transiency, and lack of autonomy....

  1. Single-shot work extraction in quantum thermodynamics revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shang-Yung

    2018-01-01

    We revisit the problem of work extraction from a system in contact with a heat bath to a work storage system, and the reverse problem of state formation from a thermal system state in single-shot quantum thermodynamics. A physically intuitive and mathematically simple approach using only elementary majorization theory and matrix analysis is developed, and a graphical interpretation of the maximum extractable work, minimum work cost of formation, and corresponding single-shot free energies is presented. This approach provides a bridge between two previous methods based respectively on the concept of thermomajorization and a comparison of subspace dimensions. In addition, a conceptual inconsistency with regard to general work extraction involving transitions between multiple energy levels of the work storage system is clarified and resolved. It is shown that an additional contribution to the maximum extractable work in those general cases should be interpreted not as work extracted from the system, but as heat transferred from the heat bath. Indeed, the additional contribution is an artifact of a work storage system (essentially a suspended ‘weight’ that can be raised or lowered) that does not truly distinguish work from heat. The result calls into question the common concept that a work storage system in quantum thermodynamics is simply the quantum version of a suspended weight in classical thermodynamics.

  2. Staff Training for Nanoindustry in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorov Sergey Grigoryevich

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The nanotechnology industry represents such a direction of the development of science, technologies and industries by means of which Russia will be able to achieve advanced positions in the world. For the last decade the necessary regulatory base for nanotech industry development was created in the country, beginning with the concept of nanotechnological works, and the strategy of nanotech industry development, and finishing by the program of nanotech industry development in Russia till 2015. The special place is allocated for education in the field of nanotechnologies and nanomaterials. The system of staff training for nanotech industry is developing very quickly. The departments of nanotechnologies are established almost in all leading higher education institutions of Russia, the institutes of scientific and educational centers as well as the centers of collective use are introduced in the country, the national nanotechnological network is functioning. RUSNANO State Corporation of Nanotechnologies makes significant contribution to the training of innovation staff. The corporation is planning to create at least 100 educational programs of staff training and retraining for the needs of nanotech industry. The fund of infrastructure and educational programs was established in RUSNANO which in 2012 launched the project on creation of training system in the field of nanotechnology in the e-Learning mode. In 2013 the fund created the autonomous non-profit organization “Electronic Education for Nanotech Industry” (“eNano” which became the leading developer of innovative branch educational resources and the operator on rendering educational services for nanotech industry. Since 2011 in RUSNANO there is a School League which set for itself the task to make the contribution to improvement of the situation in teaching naturalscience disciplines at schools. At the same time, according to the results of students enrolment in Russia in 2011-2014, the

  3. G. N. Rassam Joins AGU Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassan N. Rassam joined the AGU staff today, assuming the dual roles of Division Director for Public Information and Marketing and of Special Assistant for Nonprint Publications. He comes to AGU from the American Geological Institute, where he has been chief editor and assistant director of the GeoRef Information System.As Director of Public Information and Marketing, Rassam will head one of AGU's five divisions. He will have under his purview the Public Information Department and the Promotion and Sales Department. The Public Information Department produces Eos and also has the responsibility for press relations, including the preparation of news releases and the operation of press rooms at meetings. These activities are critical to the implementation of AGU's public education and public affairs initiatives, as well as to the central role of AGU in promoting the unity of geophysics.

  4. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of a Measure of Staff/Child Interaction Quality (the Classroom Assessment Scoring System in Early Childhood Education and Care Settings and Child Outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Perlman

    Full Text Available The quality of staff/child interactions as measured by the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS in Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC programs is thought to be important for children's outcomes. The CLASS is made of three domains that assess Emotional Support, Classroom Organization and Instructional Support. It is a relatively new measure that is being used increasingly for research, quality monitoring/accountability and other applied purposes. Our objective was to evaluate the association between the CLASS and child outcomes. Searches of Medline, PsycINFO, ERIC, websites of large datasets and reference sections of all retrieved articles were conducted up to July 3, 2015. Studies that measured association between the CLASS and child outcomes for preschool-aged children who attended ECEC programs were included after screening by two independent reviewers. Searches and data extraction were conducted by two independent reviewers. Thirty-five studies were systematically reviewed of which 19 provided data for meta-analyses. Most studies had moderate to high risk of bias. Of the 14 meta-analyses we conducted, associations between Classroom Organization and Pencil Tapping and between Instructional Support and SSRS Social Skills were significant with pooled correlations of .06 and .09 respectively. All associations were in the expected direction. In the systematic review, significant correlations were reported mainly from one large dataset. Substantial heterogeneity in use of the CLASS, its dimensions, child outcomes and statistical measures was identified. Greater consistency in study methodology is urgently needed. Given the multitude of factors that impact child development it is encouraging that our analyses revealed some, although small, associations between the CLASS and children's outcomes.

  5. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of a Measure of Staff/Child Interaction Quality (the Classroom Assessment Scoring System) in Early Childhood Education and Care Settings and Child Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Michal; Falenchuk, Olesya; Fletcher, Brooke; McMullen, Evelyn; Beyene, Joseph; Shah, Prakesh S

    2016-01-01

    The quality of staff/child interactions as measured by the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) in Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) programs is thought to be important for children's outcomes. The CLASS is made of three domains that assess Emotional Support, Classroom Organization and Instructional Support. It is a relatively new measure that is being used increasingly for research, quality monitoring/accountability and other applied purposes. Our objective was to evaluate the association between the CLASS and child outcomes. Searches of Medline, PsycINFO, ERIC, websites of large datasets and reference sections of all retrieved articles were conducted up to July 3, 2015. Studies that measured association between the CLASS and child outcomes for preschool-aged children who attended ECEC programs were included after screening by two independent reviewers. Searches and data extraction were conducted by two independent reviewers. Thirty-five studies were systematically reviewed of which 19 provided data for meta-analyses. Most studies had moderate to high risk of bias. Of the 14 meta-analyses we conducted, associations between Classroom Organization and Pencil Tapping and between Instructional Support and SSRS Social Skills were significant with pooled correlations of .06 and .09 respectively. All associations were in the expected direction. In the systematic review, significant correlations were reported mainly from one large dataset. Substantial heterogeneity in use of the CLASS, its dimensions, child outcomes and statistical measures was identified. Greater consistency in study methodology is urgently needed. Given the multitude of factors that impact child development it is encouraging that our analyses revealed some, although small, associations between the CLASS and children's outcomes.

  6. The operational staff during exercise RESUME-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, J. [Jensen Consult, Virum (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    With more than 100 participants entering the exercise RESUME-95 the Exercise Planning Committee decided to establish an operational staff named Directing Staff (DISTAFF) to ensure that the exercise plan was followed, the planned activities were carried out and to intervene if anything went wrong. In general the duties of the operational staff involve tasks such as secretarial assistance, keeping log of the progress of the situation and gathering, updating and distributing information on all aspects of the situation. Throughout the entire event it is the staff`s responsibility to keep a general view of the current situation and to make the necessary plans for the progress of the situation based on the available information. Furthermore the staff should ensure necessary contact to the public and to the media. (au).

  7. Measuring hospital medical staff organizational structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortell, S M; Getzen, T E

    1979-01-01

    Based on organization theory and the work of Roemer and Friedman, seven dimensions of hospital medical staff organization structure are proposed and examined. The data are based on a 1973 nationwide survey of hospital medical staffs conducted by the American Hospital Association. Factor analysis yielded six relatively independent dimensions supporting a multidimensional view of medical staff organization structure. The six dimensions include 1) Resource Capability, 2) Generalist Physician Contractual Orientation, 3) Communication/Control, 4) Local Staff Orientation, 5) Participation in Decision Making, and 6) Hospital-Based Physician Contractual Orientation. It is suggested that these dimensions can be used to develop an empirical typology of hospital medical staff organization structure and to investigate the relationship between medical staff organization and public policy issues related to cost containment and quality assurance. PMID:511580

  8. Systematic Exploitation of Marginal Flexibility in Staff Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawaetz, Peter

    1984-01-01

    The Technical University of Denmark has tried to free resources in a stagnant or declining budget for development of new subject areas by planned contraction of ordinary activities, with only moderate success due to low mobility and strong specialization of the scientific staff. A more realistic planning system has been introduced, using…

  9. Strategic Joint Staff Force Posture and Readiness Process Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-31

    2014 © Sa Majesté la Reine (en droit du Canada), telle que représentée par le ministre de la Défense nationale, 2014 Strategic Joint Staff Force...requirements. One of the outstanding requirements and currently under development is to develop the business intelligence capability for all DND ERP system

  10. Staff Development for Rural Middle Schools through Regional Conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, William F.

    1994-01-01

    Isolation, limited access to colleges and universities, and financial constraints restrict staff development opportunities for rural school systems. Recognizing these problems, the Virginia Middle School Association has adopted a regional conference structure that shifts meeting locations throughout seven major areas. The "hot topics"…

  11. Job Satisfaction Of Hospital Nursing Staff

    OpenAIRE

    Charlotte Pietersen

    2005-01-01

    Health care managers realize that job satisfaction impacts on nursing staff retention. This study examined the job satisfaction of nursing staff (N = 109) at a government hospital. Just more than half of the respondents were generally satisfied. Feelings that nursing is worthwhile and satisfying, and financial stability at the hospital could promote staff retention. Specific intrinsic - (promotion), and extrinsic factors (routinization, working conditions, pay, interaction with supervisors, a...

  12. The staff regulations of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Following the first comprehensive review of the Provisional Staff Regulations conducted by the Secretariat, the Board of Governors approved on 12 June 2002 amendments to the Provisional Staff Regulations including the removal of the attribute 'provisional' from their title. The revised Staff Regulations of the Agency are set forth in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. There is a subject index at the end of the document

  13. Primary health care staff's perception of childhood tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Stephanie; Rose, Michala Vaaben; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diagnosing tuberculosis in children remains a great challenge in developing countries. Health staff working in the front line of the health service delivery system has a major responsibility for timely identification and referral of suspected cases of childhood tuberculosis. This study...... explored primary health care staff’s perception, challenges and needs pertaining to the identification of children with tuberculosis in Muheza district in Tanzania. Methods: We conducted a qualitative study that included 13 semi-structured interviews and 3 focus group discussions with a total of 29 health...... staff purposively sampled from primary health care facilities. Analysis was performed in accordance with the principles of a phenomenological analysis. Results: Primary health care staff perceived childhood tuberculosis to be uncommon in the society and tuberculosis was rarely considered as a likely...

  14. The relationship between empowerment and effectiveness of staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effectiveness is one of the management concepts considered and studied always by management scientists and experts. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different dimensions of empowerment (servicing staff, staff monitoring, consulting staff, and training staff) on dimensions of effectiveness of staff (staff ...

  15. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows: as from 1 April 2003 • Article R II 1.19 - Types and duration of contracts of staff members (page 15) as from 1 July 2003 Implementation of the category of local staff members Copies of this update are available in the divisional secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  16. Job Satisfaction Of Hospital Nursing Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Pietersen

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Health care managers realize that job satisfaction impacts on nursing staff retention. This study examined the job satisfaction of nursing staff (N = 109 at a government hospital. Just more than half of the respondents were generally satisfied. Feelings that nursing is worthwhile and satisfying, and financial stability at the hospital could promote staff retention. Specific intrinsic - (promotion, and extrinsic factors (routinization, working conditions, pay, interaction with supervisors, and organizational support could impact negatively on retention. Management should use these findings as a basis for staff consultation, developmental strategies, and interventions. Future research on other nursing populations is recommended.

  17. Revisiting the Political Economy of Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Garnham

    2014-02-01

    The task of the paper and the seminar was to revisit some of Nicholas Garnham’s ideas, writings and contributions to the study of the Political Economy of Communication and to reflect on the concepts, history, current status and perspectives of this field and the broader study of political economy today. The topics covered include Raymond Williams’ cultural materialism, Pierre Bourdieu’s sociology of culture, the debate between Political Economy and Cultural Studies, information society theory, Karl Marx’s theory and the critique of capitalism.

  18. Large J expansion in ABJM theory revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimov, H; Mladenov, S; Rashkov, R C

    Recently there has been progress in the computation of the anomalous dimensions of gauge theory operators at strong coupling by making use of the AdS/CFT correspondence. On the string theory side they are given by dispersion relations in the semiclassical regime. We revisit the problem of a large-charge expansion of the dispersion relations for simple semiclassical strings in an [Formula: see text] background. We present the calculation of the corresponding anomalous dimensions of the gauge theory operators to an arbitrary order using three different methods. Although the results of the three methods look different, power series expansions show their consistency.

  19. The Faraday effect revisited: General theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia Decebal; Nenciu, Gheorghe; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2006-01-01

    This paper is the first in a series revisiting the Faraday effect, or more generally, the theory of electronic quantum transport/optical response in bulk media in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The independent electron approximation is assumed. At zero temperature and zero frequency......, if the Fermi energy lies in a spectral gap, we rigorously prove theWidom-Streda formula. For free electrons, the transverse conductivity can be explicitly computed and coincides with the classical result. In the general case, using magnetic perturbation theory, the conductivity tensor is expanded in powers...

  20. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriner, John

    2012-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  1. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  2. Staff Group Trainer: Development of a Computer-Driven, Structured, Staff Training Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koger, Milton

    1998-01-01

    .... The project produced two training support packages (TSP)--battalion and brigade--designed to train these staffs to more effectively and efficiently communicate within and between staff sections, command post, and the unit commander...

  3. An Epidemiological Approach to Staff Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamis, Edna

    This paper describes a conceptual model of staff burnout in terms of independent, intervening and dependent variables. Staff burnout is defined, symptoms are presented, and the epidemiological approach to burnout is descussed. Components of the proposed model, which groups determinants of mental health into three domains, consist of: (1)…

  4. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M. W. J.; Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; Bosman, Anna M. T.; Jahoda, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Background: A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about dealing with incidents and limit physical risk of…

  5. 20 CFR 638.801 - Staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff training. 638.801 Section 638.801 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Administrative Provisions § 638.801 Staff training. The...

  6. The Support Needs of Staff Developers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, David J.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a study conducted at an annual staff development conference to determine the needs of professional staff developers in British higher education. An overview of the research strategy, which was based on an action research model, is provided; the ranking of needs areas is discussed; and needs statements with justifications are appended.…

  7. Gaming: a creative strategy for staff education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartzendruber, D

    1994-02-01

    Providing staff development in a stimulating, innovative manner is the challenge of all nurse educators. This article discusses gaming, a creative teaching strategy that can help meet these needs. Games designed specifically for the education of dialysis staff will be reviewed. Advantages of the various games will also be examined.

  8. Futuristics: A Tool for Staff Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Margaret J.; Hurst, James C.

    1979-01-01

    Creative use of future planning as a staff development tool can have short- and long-term benefits for the individual and the organization. Its potential for stimulating creativity, reducing crisis management, and developing staff cohesion is unequaled. The individual, the organization, the technology and the manager are the important factors.…

  9. 40 CFR 1.25 - Staff Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff Offices. 1.25 Section 1.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters § 1.25 Staff Offices. (a) Office of Administrative Law Judges. The Office of...

  10. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background - A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about

  11. An Ivory Staff Terminal from Alcester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Heslop

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Alcester staff terminal is an outstanding example of late Anglo-Saxon carving on a small scale. It was supposedly discovered in 1873 in the garden of the rectory at Alcester (Warwickshire and comes from a pastoral staff that would have belonged to a bishop or abbot. This article contains a 3D visualisation of the terminal.

  12. Quality Control in Child Care Staff Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Merwin R.

    1975-01-01

    This paper focuses on the process of staff selection of child care staff at a residential treatment center for children, ages 8-16. Phases of candidate selection, an "open-door" interview procedure, the orientation of hired candidates and the agency's philosophy, procedures and practices are discussed. (GO)

  13. Staff attitudes towards patients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendsborg, Per; Bratbo, Johanne; Dannevang, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Stigmatizing attitudes have been reported in international studies among staff in psychiatry. The authors wanted to investigate if this was the case in Denmark.......Stigmatizing attitudes have been reported in international studies among staff in psychiatry. The authors wanted to investigate if this was the case in Denmark....

  14. 29 CFR 511.7 - Committee staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Committee staff. 511.7 Section 511.7 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS WAGE ORDER PROCEDURE FOR AMERICAN SAMOA § 511.7 Committee staff. Each industry committee will be furnished a lawyer, to...

  15. 28 CFR 600.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 600.5 Section 600.5 Judicial Administration OFFICES OF INDEPENDENT COUNSEL, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL POWERS OF SPECIAL COUNSEL § 600.5 Staff. A Special Counsel may request the assignment of appropriate Department employees to assist the...

  16. Staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in South African public sector mental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To document staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in public. sector mental health services in South Africa. Design. Cross-sectional survey. Method. Aquestionnaire was distributed to provincial mental health co-ordinators requesting numbers of full-time equivalent (FTE) staff who provide mental health care at all ...

  17. Capacity management of nursing staff as a vehicle for organizational improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elkhuizen, Sylvia G.; Bor, Gert; Smeenk, Marjolein; Klazinga, Niek S.; Bakker, Piet J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Capacity management systems create insight into required resources like staff and equipment. For inpatient hospital care, capacity management requires information on beds and nursing staff capacity, on a daily as well as annual basis. This paper presents a comprehensive capacity model

  18. Bolivia; 2009 Article IV Consultation: Staff Report; Staff Supplement; Staff Statement; Public Information Notice on the Executive Board Discussion; and Statement by the Executive Director for Bolivia

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2010-01-01

    The staff report for Bolivia’s 2009 Article IV Consultation describes economic developments and policies. The impact of the global recession on Bolivia has been milder than in other countries in the region. Lower commodity exports and remittances have resulted in a sharp narrowing of the external current account surplus. The financial system has been barely affected by the global crisis owing to its limited integration with international capital markets. As the economy gathers momentum, a tig...

  19. The operational staff during exercise RESUME-95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, J.

    1997-01-01

    With more than 100 participants entering the exercise RESUME-95 the Exercise Planning Committee decided to establish an operational staff named Directing Staff (DISTAFF) to ensure that the exercise plan was followed, the planned activities were carried out and to intervene if anything went wrong. In general the duties of the operational staff involve tasks such as secretarial assistance, keeping log of the progress of the situation and gathering, updating and distributing information on all aspects of the situation. Throughout the entire event it is the staff's responsibility to keep a general view of the current situation and to make the necessary plans for the progress of the situation based on the available information. Furthermore the staff should ensure necessary contact to the public and to the media. (au)

  20. [Burnout syndrome among health staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiel-García, José Angel; Rodríguez-Morán, Martha; Guerrero-Romero, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of burnout syndrome components among the medical and nursing staff of the second care level hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social and Instituto de Seguridad Social al Servicio de los Trabajadores del Estado from Durango, Mexico. A cross-sectional comparative study was carried out among 73 physicians and 100 nurses randomly selected from both hospitals. The prevalence of burnout syndrome components was established by the Maslash Burnout Inventory, which determines the presence of physical/emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and labor performance. In addition, sociodemographic and labor information was collected. Prevalence was calculated with a reliability interval of 95% (CI 95%). 73 physicians and 100 nurses enrolled, corresponding to 22.8% and 14.5% of such personnel working in both institutions. Among the IMSS and ISSSTE workers respectively, the prevalence of depersonalization was 43.2% (34.4-52.9) and 14.5% (6.8-25.8), whereas the prevalence of physical/emotional exhaustion was 41.4% (32.7-51.1) and 19.4% (10.4-31.4). Pre-valence of labor performance was higher among the personnel of Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social: 99.1% (95.1-100) versus 96.8% (88.8-100). Severe depersonalization (p = 0.004), but not emotional exhaustion (p = 0.09) nor labor performance (p = 0.06) was significantly higher among personnel working at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. Prevalence of depersonalization and physical/emotional exhaustion was higher among physicians and nurses of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social; nonetheless, their labor performance was high. Our finding suggests that personnel working at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social make a greater effort to maintain the high labor performance that medical care requires.

  1. Training and Practices of Cannabis Dispensary Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Nancy A; Kieschnick, Dustin; Sottile, James E; Babson, Kimberly A; Vandrey, Ryan; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The proliferation of cannabis dispensaries within the United States has emerged from patient demand for the legalization of cannabis as an alternative treatment for a number of conditions and symptoms. Unfortunately, nothing is known about the practices of dispensary staff with respect to recommendation of cannabis strains/concentrations for specific patient ailments. To address this limitation, the present study assessed the training and practices of cannabis dispensary staff. Materials and Methods: Medical and nonmedical dispensary staff ( n =55) were recruited via e-mail and social media to complete an online survey assessing their demographic characteristics, dispensary features, patient characteristics, formal training, and cannabis recommendation practices. Results: Fifty-five percent of dispensary staff reported some formal training for their position, with 20% reporting medical/scientific training. A majority (94%) indicated that they provide specific cannabis advice to patients. In terms of strains, dispensary staff trended toward recommendations of Indica for anxiety, chronic pain, insomnia, nightmares, and Tourette's syndrome. They were more likely to recommend Indica and hybrid plants for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)/trauma and muscle spasms. In contrast, staff were less likely to recommend Indica for depression; hybrid strains were most often recommended for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In terms of cannabinoid concentrations, dispensary staff were most likely to recommend a 1:1 ratio of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC):cannabidiol (CBD) for patients suffering from anxiety, Crohn's disease, hepatitis C, and PTSD/trauma, while patients seeking appetite stimulation were most likely to be recommended THC. Staff recommended high CBD for arthritis and Alzheimer's disease and a high CBD or 1:1 ratio for ALS, epilepsy, and muscle spasms. Conclusions: Although many dispensary staff are making recommendations consistent with

  2. Increased 30-Day Emergency Department Revisits Among Homeless Patients with Mental Health Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chun Nok; Arora, Sanjay; Menchine, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Patients with mental health conditions frequently use emergency medical services. Many suffer from substance use and homelessness. If they use the emergency department (ED) as their primary source of care, potentially preventable frequent ED revisits and hospital readmissions can worsen an already crowded healthcare system. However, the magnitude to which homelessness affects health service utilization among patients with mental health conditions remains unclear in the medical community. This study assessed the impact of homelessness on 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions among patients presenting with mental health conditions in an urban, safety-net hospital. We conducted a secondary analysis of administrative data on all adult ED visits in 2012 in an urban safety-net hospital. Patient demographics, mental health status, homelessness, insurance coverage, level of acuity, and ED disposition per ED visit were analyzed using multilevel modeling to control for multiple visits nested within patients. We performed multivariate logistic regressions to evaluate if homelessness moderated the likelihood of mental health patients' 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions. Study included 139,414 adult ED visits from 92,307 unique patients (43.5±15.1 years, 51.3% male, 68.2% Hispanic/Latino). Nearly 8% of patients presented with mental health conditions, while 4.6% were homeless at any time during the study period. Among patients with mental health conditions, being homeless contributed to an additional 28.0% increase in likelihood (4.28 to 5.48 odds) of 30-day ED revisits and 38.2% increase in likelihood (2.04 to 2.82 odds) of hospital readmission, compared to non-homeless, non-mental health (NHNM) patients as the base category. Adjusted predicted probabilities showed that homeless patients presenting with mental health conditions have a 31.1% chance of returning to the ED within 30-day post discharge and a 3.7% chance of hospital readmission, compared to non

  3. Increased 30-Day Emergency Department Revisits Among Homeless Patients with Mental Health Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Nok Lam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with mental health conditions frequently use emergency medical services. Many suffer from substance use and homelessness. If they use the emergency department (ED as their primary source of care, potentially preventable frequent ED revisits and hospital readmissions can worsen an already crowded healthcare system. However, the magnitude to which homelessness affects health service utilization among patients with mental health conditions remains unclear in the medical community. This study assessed the impact of homelessness on 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions among patients presenting with mental health conditions in an urban, safety-net hospital. Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of administrative data on all adult ED visits in 2012 in an urban safety-net hospital. Patient demographics, mental health status, homelessness, insurance coverage, level of acuity, and ED disposition per ED visit were analyzed using multilevel modeling to control for multiple visits nested within patients. We performed multivariate logistic regressions to evaluate if homelessness moderated the likelihood of mental health patients’ 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions. Results: Study included 139,414 adult ED visits from 92,307 unique patients (43.5±15.1 years, 51.3% male, 68.2% Hispanic/Latino. Nearly 8% of patients presented with mental health conditions, while 4.6% were homeless at any time during the study period. Among patients with mental health conditions, being homeless contributed to an additional 28.0% increase in likelihood (4.28 to 5.48 odds of 30-day ED revisits and 38.2% increase in likelihood (2.04 to 2.82 odds of hospital readmission, compared to non-homeless, non-mental health (NHNM patients as the base category. Adjusted predicted probabilities showed that homeless patients presenting with mental health conditions have a 31.1% chance of returning to the ED within 30-day post discharge and a 3

  4. The role of brand destination experience in determining revisit intention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Jan; Barnes, Stuart; Sørensen, Flemming

    experience, which provides a more holistic and unified view of the brand destination. The research uses a logistic regression model to determine the role of satisfaction and brand experience in determining revisit intentions. The study also examines differences among subgroups and four brand experience sub......-constructs. The findings suggest that brand experience is an important determinant of revisit intentions, but that there is variation among respondent groups. The paper rounds off with conclusions and implications for research and practice....

  5. Issues facing families of infants discharged after cardiac surgery: the perceptions of charity helpline staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Jo; Tregay, Jenifer; Bull, Catherine; Knowles, Rachel L; Crowe, Sonya; Brown, Katherine

    2018-03-05

    To elicit the perceptions of helpline staff who talk to parents of children discharged after cardiac surgery in infancy about parents' key concerns. A qualitative study involving semistructured interviews with 10 staff at four heart charities. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using Framework analysis. Staff identified the knowledge, communication and support needs of parents which they described in terms of the impact of patient and family factors, sources of support and systems. Staff perceptions of helplines, in terms of the function of a helpline and the roles of its staff, together with staff's personal views based on their experience of multiple encounters with many families, influenced how they viewed families' needs and responded to their requests. Helpline staff provided important, previously uncaptured evidence about the challenges faced by parents of children discharged after cardiac surgery in infancy. Staff have an important role in supporting communication, in terms of speaking to families about how to talk to professionals and talking to professionals directly to get or give information when parents are unable to do so. Capturing the perspective of helpline staff about communication issues has highlighted the need for interventions with professionals as well as parents. ©2018 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The Staff Association and its history

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    The Staff Association will celebrate its 60th birthday in the spring of 2015. We are collecting all information about the sixty years of the Staff Association. In particular, we are looking at publications of the Staff Association, which started with the “Staff Association Journal”, in 1955, which later became “Le Proton déchainé”, then, more simply, “Proton” in 1982 (the figure on the left shows the different mutations of our magazine). In our collection we are missing a few issues, in particular № 1 (dated mid-1955).     Dear reader, if have any old issues of this magazine, or of Graviton (figure on the right), another magazine edited by the Staff Association, or any other material or information that might help us document the history of the Staff Association, we would very much like to have a copy of the material or your contribution (written or oral). Please contact the Staff Association Sec...

  7. Job and task analysis for technical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toline, B.C.

    1991-01-01

    In September of 1989 Cooper Nuclear Station began a project to upgrade the Technical Staff Training Program. This project's roots began by performing job and Task Analysis for Technical Staff. While the industry has long been committed to Job and Task Analysis to target performance based instruction for single job positions, this approach was unique in that it was not originally considered appropriate for a group as diverse as Tech Staff. Much to his satisfaction the Job and Task Analysis Project was much less complicated for Technical Staff than the author had imagined. The benefits of performing the Job and Task Analysis for Technical Staff have become increasingly obvious as he pursues lesson plan development and course revisions. The outline for this presentation will be as follows: philosophy adopted; preparation of the job survey document; performing the job analysis; performing task analysis for technical staff and associated pitfalls; clustering objectives for training and comparison to existing program; benefits now and in the future; final phase (comparison to INPO guides and meeting the needs of non-degreed engineering professionals); and conclusion. By focusing on performance based needs for engineers rather than traditional academics for training the author is confident the future Technical Staff Program will meet the challenges ahead and will exceed requirements for accreditation

  8. World Ships - Architectures & Feasibility Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, A. M.; Pak, M.; Putz, D.; Buhler, C.; Reiss, P.

    A world ship is a concept for manned interstellar flight. It is a huge, self-contained and self-sustained interstellar vehicle. It travels at a fraction of a per cent of the speed of light and needs several centuries to reach its target star system. The well- known world ship concept by Alan Bond and Anthony Martin was intended to show its principal feasibility. However, several important issues haven't been addressed so far: the relationship between crew size and robustness of knowledge transfer, reliability, and alternative mission architectures. This paper addresses these gaps. Furthermore, it gives an update on target star system choice, and develops possible mission architectures. The derived conclusions are: a large population size leads to robust knowledge transfer and cultural adaptation. These processes can be improved by new technologies. World ship reliability depends on the availability of an automatic repair system, as in the case of the Daedalus probe. Star systems with habitable planets are probably farther away than systems with enough resources to construct space colonies. Therefore, missions to habitable planets have longer trip times and have a higher risk of mission failure. On the other hand, the risk of constructing colonies is higher than to establish an initial settlement on a habitable planet. Mission architectures with precursor probes have the potential to significantly reduce trip and colonization risk without being significantly more costly than architectures without. In summary world ships remain an interesting concept, although they require a space colony-based civilization within our own solar system before becoming feasible.

  9. Cooptation of Peer Support Staff: Quantitative Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Alberta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective In 2007, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS sent a letter to state Medicaid directors outlining requirements for implementing peer-based recovery support services (P-BRSS as a Medicaid-funded service. Since then, 30 states have implemented these services. Although the literature describing implementation of P-BRSS has identified the cooptation of peer support staff (PSS as a barrier to the effective provision of P-BRSS, the evidence for it remains anecdotal. This study attempts to determine if the context of employment in either a treatment organization or peer organization affected cooptation. Methods We conducted a survey of PSS in the fall of 2013. In all, 92 of the 181 respondents were working as PSS at the time, 53 in treatment organizations. Chi-square analysis was used to determine if the context of employment had an effect on the cooptation of peer staff. Results Peer staff working in treatment organizations reported that they were supervised by treatment staff and participated in employment-related training to improve their skills at providing treatment services more frequently than their counterparts in peer organizations. Peer staff working in treatment organizations also participated in training and education to prepare for employment as treatment professionals more frequently than peer staff working in peer organizations. Conclusions and Implications for Practice Peer staff members working in treatment organizations are subject to processes of acculturation into professional cultures that peer staff working in peer organizations are not. Effective implementation of P-BRSS should include specific efforts to minimize the cooptation of peer staff.

  10. Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Douglas

    1996-01-01

    Reviews Maslow's hierarchy of needs and characterization of the self-actualizing personality, suggesting that since few people meet his self-actualization criteria, an educational system designed to produce such personalities may fail, with teachers attending only to the hierarchy's lower stages (self-esteem and self-actualization) which dilutes…

  11. [Considerations regarding the food of the hospital staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardin, Anne

    2005-02-01

    The question concerning the food of the hospital staff has drawn attention only tardily. However, food is a faithful mirror in which the knowledge, the capacities, the values and the imaginary ones of an institution are reflected. It is in 1905 that the reform made by the "Administration générale de l'Assistance Publique de Paris" is specifically concerned, for the first time, by the food of the hospital staff. It is a change in the practices, founded until then on the principle of equality in food treatment, resulting probably from the monastic form of the hospital in the earliest times. The introduction of the system into force today was done gradually in the years 1930. From now on, hospital staff pay their meal to the administration which establishes the account of it on the basis of a refectory card. At the end of this evolution, nothing is similar any more in the hospital on the ground of the hierarchical relations between the administration and its staff. The era of self-service restaurants has open, transforming the consumer into an autonomous active and participative individual, in an institution converted into the play of democraty company.

  12. 14 CFR 385.33 - Review by the staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Review by the staff. 385.33 Section 385.33...) ORGANIZATION STAFF ASSIGNMENTS AND REVIEW OF ACTION UNDER ASSIGNMENTS Procedure on Review of Staff Action § 385.33 Review by the staff. Where a petition for review is duly filed, the staff member may, upon...

  13. 34 CFR 75.519 - Dual compensation of staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dual compensation of staff. 75.519 Section 75.519... by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.519 Dual compensation of staff. A grantee may not use its grantee to pay a project staff member for time or work for which that staff member is compensated from some other...

  14. Oncology staff reflections about a 52-year-old staff Christmas choir: constructivist research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Clare C; Hornby, Colin J; Pearson, Elizabeth J M; Ball, David L

    2010-12-01

    Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre has one of the world's most enduring staff Christmas choirs. Commencing in 1956, the choir performs in a cafeteria, patient wards, and outpatient waiting areas before each Christmas. With recent emphasis on oncology staff support needs the choir's relevance warranted investigation. This constructivist research examined what effect the staff Christmas choir had on the choir members and staff bystanders in 2008. Sampling was convenience and purposive. Staff choir members were invited to participate during rehearsals, and staff bystanders were invited at seven choir performances in the hospital. Respondents completed anonymous and semistructured questionnaires and the conductor (of 29 years) was interviewed. The inductive, comparative, and cyclic data analyses were informed by grounded theory and qualitative interrater reliability was performed. Questionnaires from 64 staff were returned. The choir elicited positive emotions, memories, Christmas spirit, hospital community and/or work-life effects for many staff, in a cancer context described as sometimes "overwhelming" and "stressful." Choir members' reactions included stress relief, friendship and feeling rewarded. Bystanders' reactions included feeling uplifted, inspired and moved. Suggestions for future performances were offered, including musical acknowledgement of other religious festivals. Two respondents were concerned about intrusive effects on patients and work practices. A staff Christmas choir supported most choir member and staff bystander respondents in an oncology hospital and is recommended in comparable contexts. Further investigation is warranted to extend understanding about Christmas music's effects in palliative care settings.

  15. Behavioral Emergency Response Team: Implementation Improves Patient Safety, Staff Safety, and Staff Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicko, Cdr Jennifer M; Schroeder, Lcdr Rebecca A; Byers, Cdr William S; Taylor, Lt Adam M; Spence, Cdr Dennis L

    2017-10-01

    Staff members working on our nonmental health (non-MH) units (i.e., medical-surgical [MS] units) were not educated in recognizing or deescalating behavioral emergencies. Published evidence suggests a behavioral emergency response team (BERT) composed of MH experts who assist with deescalating behavioral emergencies may be beneficial in these situations. Therefore, we sought to implement a BERT on the inpatient non-MH units at our military treatment facility. The objectives of this evidence-based practice process improvement project were to determine how implementation of a BERT affects staff and patient safety and to examine nursing staffs' level of knowledge, confidence, and support in caring for psychiatric patients and patients exhibiting behavioral emergencies. A BERT was piloted on one MS unit for 5 months and expanded to two additional units for 3 months. Pre- and postimplementation staff surveys were conducted, and the number of staff assaults and injuries, restraint usage, and security intervention were compared. The BERT responded to 17 behavioral emergencies. The number of assaults decreased from 10 (pre) to 1 (post); security intervention decreased from 14 to 1; and restraint use decreased from 8 to 1. MS staffs' level of BERT knowledge and rating of support between MH staff and their staff significantly increased. Both MS and MH nurses rated the BERT as supportive and effective. A BERT can assist with deescalating behavioral emergencies, and improve staff collaboration and patient and staff safety. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  16. Development of a Refined Staff Group Trainer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quensel, Susan

    1999-01-01

    .... As a follow-on effort to the previous SGT project, the goal was to refine a brigade-level staff training program to more effectively and efficiently coordinate the activities within and between the...

  17. Public Relations Strategies for Scholastic Publication Staffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkle, Bruce E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the importance to scholastic publications staffs of four public relations strategies: meticulous research, systematic planning, strengthening communication efforts, and evaluation. Notes internal and external factors crucial to good public relations. Lists activities to consider. (SR)

  18. Technique for determining training staff size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frye, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Determining an adequate training staff size is a vital function of a training manager. Today's training requirements and standards have dictated a more stringent work load than ever before. A trainer's role is more than just providing classroom lectures. In most organizations the instructor must develop programs, lesson plans, exercise guides, objectives, test questions, etc. The tasks of a training organization are never ending and the appropriate resources must be determined and allotted to do the total job. A simple method exists for determining an adequate staff. Although not perfect, this method will provide a realistic approach for determining the needed training staff size. This method considers three major factors: instructional man-hours; non-instructional man-hours; and instructor availability. By determining and adding instructional man-hours and non-instructional man-hours a total man-hour distribution can be obtained. By dividing this by instructor availability a staff size can be determined

  19. Meeting staff representatives of the European Agencies

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      The AASC (Assembly of Agency Staff Committee) held its 27th Meeting of the specialized European Agencies on 26 and 27 May on the premises of the OHIM (Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market) in Alicante, Spain. Two representatives of the CERN Staff Association, in charge of External Relations, attended as observers. This participation is a useful complement to regular contacts we have with FICSA (Federation of International Civil Servants' Associations), which groups staff associations of the UN Agencies, and the annual CSAIO conferences (Conference of Staff Associations of International Organizations), where each Autumn representatives of international organizations based in Europe meet to discuss themes of common interest to better promote and defend the rights of the international civil servants. All these meetings allow us to remain informed on items that are directly or indirectly related to employment and social conditions of our colleagues in other international and Europ...

  20. Does staff diversity imply openness to diversity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – Post-secondary educational organizations are currently some of the most diverse settings to be found. However, few educational studies have dealt with staff diversity and hardly any has looked outside the USA. The purpose of this paper is to present a study of members of international...... university departments in Denmark. The authors set out to investigate the relationship between different types of staff diversity and openness to diversity in terms of linguistic, visible, value, and informational heterogeneity. Design/methodology/approach – This study uses responses from 489 staff members......, was unrelated or negatively associated with positive diversity attitudes. Originality/value – Few studies deal with the role of staff diversity and no prior studies the authors know of have examined the link between diversity types and openness to diversity....

  1. Improvements in Productivity Through Staff Integration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kelly, David S

    1988-01-01

    .... The prognosis is not good. This paper addresses one facet of improving a shipyard's position in an increasingly competitive environment improvements in over-all productivity resulting from integration of the functions of the shipyard staff...

  2. Better protecting staff working alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindlehurst, Darren

    2016-08-01

    Established four and a half years ago as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Dutch-headquartered personal security and critical communications solutions provider, Atus BV, Hereford-based Atus Systems has since established a strong UK-wide client base supplying personal pagers, wireless personal alarm units, and the associated infrastructure, predominantly to high secure mental health facilities, prisons, and detention centres. Recent months, however, mark a new chapter for it, with the launch of a 'unique' lone worker protection system able to identify such personnel's location even when they are indoors and out of range of GPS coverage, and a sophisticated two-way enterprise critical messaging system. As HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, discovered from MD, Darren Swindlehurst, the company will target both systems squarely at the NHS and private healthcare providers, as well as at its more 'traditional' customers.

  3. Nursing staff shortage and in-hospital informal care in an oncology hospital in Greece: the nursing staff's perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapountzi-Krepia, Despina; Lavdaniti, Maria; Psychogiou, Maria; Arsenos, Panagiotis; Paralikas, Theodossios; Triantafylidou, Paraskevi; Georgiadou, Charikleia

    2008-06-01

    There is a broad variety of factors that are contributing to the nursing staff shortage. They include low wages, poor image of nursing, job satisfaction, ageing of the nursing workforce and cost reductions. In the Greek National Health System, there is a policy of open-visiting hours in hospitals. Family members stay with the patients for many hours and provide in-hospital informal care. The purpose of this study is to describe the perceptions of nursing staff about the nursing staff shortage and the in-hospital informal care in a Greek oncology hospital. For the data collection we used a 30-item questionnaire. The majority of the participants (82.9%) stated that most patients have a family member staying longer than the official visiting hours for assisting with care. A main reason according to the nurses' opinion (37.4%) is the nursing staff shortage. In addition, most nurses disagree with relatives providing some of the informal caregiving activities. The findings are consistent with the findings of other studies. They might be of interest to Greek health authorities, to nurses and to Greek citizens in order to implement possible solutions to improve the hospitalization in Greek hospitals.

  4. The Begg's uprighting spring - Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinay; Sundareswaran, Shobha

    2015-01-01

    Uprighting springs, an integral part of the Begg ligsht wire differential force technique is gaining more and more popularity, as a useful adjunct in contemporary preadjusted edgewise appliance systems as well. It can be used with brackets containing vertical slots for mesiodistal crown uprighting, or as braking auxiliaries providing additional anchorage while protracting posteriors. Here, we present a simple and quick chair side method of fabricating and customizing uprighting springs according to the required crown/root movement for correction. This communication would serve as a ready reckoner during fabrication of the springs, thus dispelling the confusion that usually arises regarding direction and position of the coil and active arm.

  5. Cycloid psychosis: perris criteria revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Devender Singh

    2010-01-01

    Cases presenting with recurrent confusion, alteration of psychomotor activity, and brief psychosis with good inter-episode recovery have many differing etiologies. Only rarely does one diagnose such cases as cycloid psychosis. Even among budding psychiatrists, there seems to be a lack of awareness of this unique disorder. This may be because the present international diagnostic classification systems, ICD10 and DSM IV, do not recognize it as a separate entity. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose cycloid psychosis. Awareness and recognizing such cases would be helpful clinically as cycloid psychosis entails a distinct prognosis and may require a specific treatment.

  6. Extended thermodynamics revisited: renormalized flux variables and second sound in rigid solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebon, Georgy; Ruggieri, Marianna; Valenti, Antonino

    2008-01-01

    Propagation of heat waves in rigid bodies is investigated. The originality of the approach is that it rests on a revisited version of extended irreversible thermodynamics. In comparison with earlier developments, two innovations are proposed. First, we depart from the linear approach, best illustrated by Cattaneo's relation, to explore the non-linear regime. Second, the extra variables are no longer the usual dissipative fluxes, but renormalized expressions of the fluxes, in order to include the specific material properties of the systems under study. The present model is particularly well suited for studying heat transport at low temperatures in dielectric crystals

  7. The Provisional Staff Regulations of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    In accordance with Article VII.E of the Statute and of the general principles approved by the General Conference in resolution GC.1(S)/RES/13, the Board of Governors has established 'the terms and conditions on which the Agency's staff shall be appointed, remunerated and dismissed.' The Provisional Staff Regulations thus approved and amended by the Board up to 15 January 1959 are reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency

  8. Training for staff who support students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Eleanor; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Hu, Wendy

    2016-02-01

    Front-line administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff often find themselves providing pastoral and learning support to students, but they are often not trained for this role, and this aspect of their work is under-acknowledged. Staff participating in an action research study at two medical schools identified common concerns about the personal impact of providing student support, and of the need for professional development to carry out this responsibility. This need is magnified in clinical placement settings that are remote from on-campus services. Informed by participatory action research, brief interactive workshops with multimedia training resources were developed, conducted and evaluated at eight health professional student training sites. These workshops were designed to: (1) be delivered in busy clinical placement and university settings; (2) provide a safe and inclusive environment for administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff to share experiences and learn from each other; (3) be publicly accessible; and (4) promote continued development and roll-out of staff training, adapted to each workplace (see http://www.uws.edu.au/meusupport). The workshops were positively evaluated by 97 participants, with both teaching and administrative staff welcoming the opportunity to discuss and share experiences. Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves. Participatory action research can be a means for producing and maintaining effective training resources as well as the conditions for change in practice. In our workshops, staff particularly valued opportunities for guided discussion using videos of authentic cases to trigger reflection, and to collaboratively formulate student support guidelines, customised to each site. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Staff rosters for 1979: environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The roster of the scientific and professional staffs of the Environmental Programs of the Department of Energy and Environment has been compiled as of December 1979. Staff members have been listed according to their organizational units, i.e., the Atmospheric Sciences Division, the Environmental Chemistry Division, the Oceanographic Sciences Division, and the Land and Freshwater Environmental Sciences Group. Educational background, research interests, professional activities, summary of experience at BNL, and selected publications have been included for each member listed.

  10. Protection of staff in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melkamu, M. A.

    2013-04-01

    This project focuses on the interventional radiology. The main objective of this project work was to provide a guidance and advice for occupational exposure and hospital management to optimize radiation protection safety and endorse safety culture. It provides practical information on how to minimize occupational exposure in interventional radiology. In the literature review all considerable parameters to reduce dose to the occupationally exposed are well discussed. These parameters include dose limit, risk estimation, use of dosimeter, personal dose record keeping, analysis of surveillance of occupational dose, investigation levels, and proper use of radiation protection tools and finally about scatter radiation dose rate. In addition the project discusses the ways to reduce occupational exposure in interventional radiology. The methods for dose reduction are minimizing fluoroscopic time, minimizing the number of fluoroscopic image, use of patient dose reduction technologies, use of collimation, planning interventional procedures, positioning in low scattered areas, use of protective shielding, use of appropriate fluoroscopic imaging equipment, giving training for the staff, wearing the dosimeters and know their own dose regularly, and management commitment to quality assurance and quality control system and optimization of radiation protection of safety. (author)

  11. The foundations of diffusion revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligen, B. P. van; Carreras, B. A.; Sanchez, R.

    2005-07-01

    Fick's Law lies at the basis of the study of particle and heat transport in many fields of physics. The detailed analysis of transport in magnetically confined plasmas has revealed a very rich phenomenology, including some rather unusual behaviour, such as an unexpected scaling of confinement with system size, power degradation, stiff profiles, rapid transient phenomena (cold and heat pulses) and non-local behaviour, and profile peaking during off axis fueling. It has been extremely difficult to capture these phenomena in the standard transport modelling framework, i.e. local Fickian transport. Ad-hoc modifications of the standard transport paradigm have been proposed, but no unified framework has emerged that is capable of reproducing all phenomena. In the present talk, we review the foundations of the diffusive transport paradigm in terms of the Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW), which is a generalization of standard Brownian motion. Using a simplified one-dimensional single-field model that incorporates a critical gradient mechanism, we will present a number of highly suggestive results, demonstrating that all mentioned phenomena arise in a natural fashion in this type of model. In addition, we discuss the fluid limit and show that the model produces a radially increasing effective diffusion and an inward directed pinch, very similar to the actual situation in confined plasmas. Finally, we will discuss the general relevance of this type of model for a more profound understanding of transport in magnetic confinement systems, while indicating future developments in this line of investigation. (Author)

  12. Hospital staff experiences of their relationships with adults who self-harm: A meta-synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Sophie; Glover, Lesley

    2017-09-01

    This review aimed to synthesize qualitative literature exploring inpatient hospital staff experiences of their relationships with people who self-harm. Nine studies were identified from a systematic search of five research databases. Papers included the experiences of physical health and mental health staff working in inpatient settings. The studies employed various qualitative research methods and were appraised using an adapted quality assessment tool (Tong, Sainsbury, & Craig, 2007). A meta-synthesis was conducted using traditional qualitative analysis methods including coding and categorizing data into themes. Three main themes derived from the data. 'The impact of the system' influenced the extent to which staff were 'Fearing the harm from self-harm', or were 'Working alongside the whole person'. A fear-based relationship occurred across mental health and physical health settings despite differences in training; however, 'Working alongside the whole person' primarily emerged from mental health staff experiences. Systemic factors provided either an inhibitory or facilitative influence on the relational process. Staff experiences of their relationship with people who self-harm were highlighted to have an important impact on the delivery and outcome of care. Increasing support for staff with a focus on distress tolerance, managing relational issues, and developing self-awareness within the relationship may lead to a more mutually beneficial experience of care. Equally, structure, clarity, and support within inpatient systems may empower staff to feel more confident in utilizing their existing skills. Working with people who self-harm can be emotionally challenging and how staff cope with this can significantly impact on the engagement of staff and patients. Increasing the skills of staff in managing relational issues and tolerating distress, as well as providing support and reflective practice groups may be useful in managing emotional responses to working with

  13. Revisiting kaon physics in general Z scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoi Endo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available New physics contributions to the Z penguin are revisited in the light of the recently-reported discrepancy of the direct CP violation in K→ππ. Interference effects between the standard model and new physics contributions to ΔS=2 observables are taken into account. Although the effects are overlooked in the literature, they make experimental bounds significantly severer. It is shown that the new physics contributions must be tuned to enhance B(KL→π0νν¯, if the discrepancy of the direct CP violation is explained with satisfying the experimental constraints. The branching ratio can be as large as 6×10−10 when the contributions are tuned at the 10% level.

  14. Post-Inflationary Gravitino Production Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.; Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We revisit gravitino production following inflation. As a first step, we review the standard calculation of gravitino production in the thermal plasma formed at the end of post-inflationary reheating when the inflaton has completely decayed. Next we consider gravitino production prior to the completion of reheating, assuming that the inflaton decay products thermalize instantaneously while they are still dilute. We then argue that instantaneous thermalization is in general a good approximation, and also show that the contribution of non-thermal gravitino production via the collisions of inflaton decay products prior to thermalization is relatively small. Our final estimate of the gravitino-to-entropy ratio is approximated well by a standard calculation of gravitino production in the post-inflationary thermal plasma assuming total instantaneous decay and thermalization at a time $t \\simeq 1.2/\\Gamma_\\phi$. Finally, in light of our calculations, we consider potential implications of upper limits on the gravitin...

  15. Mola'a Revisited: Reef Panpipes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The first main shoot for the Reef Islands Ethnographic Film Series in the Solomon Islands, in 1996, was seriously affected by the un- expected death of one of the main characters and partners in the project, Alfred Melotu, the paramount chief of the Aiwoo-speaking people on the island of Ngasinue....... His death and funeral resulted in the first film we produced from the series, Alfred Melotu – the funeral of a paramount chief (2002), and footage from this plays an import- ant role in the installation film, Passage (2014), that forms a crucial element of the ethnographic exhibition, The Life...... of the Dead, at Moesgaard Museum (MOMU). In 2005 I revisited the Reef Islands and Mola’a, a small settlement on the northern tip of Ngasinue, where Alfred had settled with his extended family only a few years prior to his death. It was mainly a courtesy visit to his descendants, especially Agnes, his widow...

  16. Coccolithophorids in polar waters: Trigonaspis spp. revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Østergaard, Jette B.

    2015-01-01

    of crystallites that cover the surfaces of both the tower-shaped flagellar pole coccoliths and the disc-shaped body coccoliths are the keystone features of the genus. Circumstantial evidence exists linking species of Trigonaspis with species of Pappomonas in haploid-diploid life cycles.......A group of weakly calcified coccolithophorid genera and species were described from polar regions several decades ago. In the interim period a few additional findings have been reported adding to the morphological and biogeographical databases of some of the species. The holococcolithophorid genus...... Trigonaspis is revisited here with the purpose of providing, based on additional sampling from both polar regions, an update on species morphology, life history aspects and biogeography. The genus Trigonaspis as currently circumscribed comprises four taxa – two from each polar region. The triangular plates...

  17. Sparse random matrices: The eigenvalue spectrum revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semerjian, Guilhem; Cugliandolo, Leticia F.

    2003-08-01

    We revisit the derivation of the density of states of sparse random matrices. We derive a recursion relation that allows one to compute the spectrum of the matrix of incidence for finite trees that determines completely the low concentration limit. Using the iterative scheme introduced by Biroli and Monasson [J. Phys. A 32, L255 (1999)] we find an approximate expression for the density of states expected to hold exactly in the opposite limit of large but finite concentration. The combination of the two methods yields a very simple geometric interpretation of the tails of the spectrum. We test the analytic results with numerical simulations and we suggest an indirect numerical method to explore the tails of the spectrum. (author)

  18. The Faraday effect revisited General theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cornean, H D; Pedersen, T G

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the first in a series revisiting the Faraday effect, or more generally, the theory of electronic quantum transport/optical response in bulk media in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The independent electron approximation is assumed. For free electrons, the transverse conductivity can be explicitly computed and coincides with the classical result. In the general case, using magnetic perturbation theory, the conductivity tensor is expanded in powers of the strength of the magnetic field $B$. Then the linear term in $B$ of this expansion is written down in terms of the zero magnetic field Green function and the zero field current operator. In the periodic case, the linear term in $B$ of the conductivity tensor is expressed in terms of zero magnetic field Bloch functions and energies. No derivatives with respect to the quasimomentum appear and thereby all ambiguities are removed, in contrast to earlier work.

  19. Neutrino dark energy. Revisiting the stability issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggers Bjaelde, O.; Hannestad, S.; Schrempp, L.; Tocchini-Valentini, D.

    2007-05-01

    A coupling between a light scalar field and neutrinos has been widely discussed as a mechanism for linking (time varying) neutrino masses and the present energy density and equation of state of dark energy. However, it has been pointed out that the viability of this scenario in the non-relativistic neutrino regime is threatened by the strong growth of hydrodynamic perturbations associated with a negative adiabatic sound speed squared. In this paper we revisit the stability issue in the framework of linear perturbation theory in a model independent way. The criterion for the stability of a model is translated into a constraint on the scalar-neutrino coupling, which depends on the ratio of the energy densities in neutrinos and cold dark matter. We illustrate our results by providing meaningful examples both for stable and unstable models. (orig.)

  20. Revisiting R-invariant direct gauge mediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Cheng-Wei [Center for Mathematics and Theoretical Physics andDepartment of Physics, National Central University,Taoyuan, Taiwan 32001, R.O.C. (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica,Taipei, Taiwan 11529, R.O.C. (China); Physics Division, National Center for Theoretical Sciences,Hsinchu, Taiwan 30013, R.O.C. (China); Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Harigaya, Keisuke [Department of Physics, University of California,Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); ICRR, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Ibe, Masahiro [Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); ICRR, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Yanagida, Tsutomu T. [Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2016-03-21

    We revisit a special model of gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking, the “R-invariant direct gauge mediation.” We pay particular attention to whether the model is consistent with the minimal model of the μ-term, i.e., a simple mass term of the Higgs doublets in the superpotential. Although the incompatibility is highlighted in view of the current experimental constraints on the superparticle masses and the observed Higgs boson mass, the minimal μ-term can be consistent with the R-invariant gauge mediation model via a careful choice of model parameters. We derive an upper limit on the gluino mass from the observed Higgs boson mass. We also discuss whether the model can explain the 3σ excess of the Z+jets+E{sub T}{sup miss} events reported by the ATLAS collaboration.

  1. Healthier times?: revisiting Indigenous Australian health history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyton, Greg

    2009-01-01

    The perception that Indigenous Australians were primitive hunters and gatherers who lived in a nomadic 'Stone Age' culture resonates through most narratives found on Indigenous people in pre-colonial times. This narrative is better placed in the realm of myth; I contest claims that the life expectancy of Indigenous Australians was only forty years in pre-colonial times, by providing suggestive evidence that there is a strong probability that longevity favoured Indigenous Australians in comparison to many poorer sectors of the European population living in slum habitats. As well, I will challenge notions that Indigenous Australians were more violent than supposedly 'civilised' nations. Finally I express the hope that future researchers will revisit archival sources to develop a more nuanced perspective on the past.

  2. Night nursing – staff's working experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Ann-Mari

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the duties and working conditions of registered, and enrolled nurses have previously been described from different perspectives, they have not been examined from the night nursing aspect. The aim of the study was to describe the night nursing staff's working experiences. Methods The design of the study is qualitative and descriptive. Interviews were conducted with 10 registered and 10 enrolled nurses working as night staff at a Swedish University Hospital. The interview guide was thematic and concerned the content of their tasks, as well as the working conditions that constitute night nursing. In addition, the interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis. Results The night duties have to be performed under difficult conditions that include working silently in dimmed lighting, and making decisions when fatigue threatens. According to the night staff, its main goals are to provide the patients with rest and simultaneously ensure qualified care. Furthermore, the night nursing staff must prepare the ward for the daytime activities. Conclusion The most important point is the team work, which developed between the registered and enrolled nurses and how necessary this team work is when working at night. In order for nurses working at night to be fully appreciated, the communication between day and night staff in health care organizations needs to be developed. Furthermore, it is important to give the night staff opportunities to use its whole field of competence.

  3. Job satisfaction among emergency department staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, M; Asenjo, M; Sánchez, M

    2017-02-01

    To compare job satisfaction among nurses, physicians and administrative staff in an emergency department (ED). To analyse the relationship of job satisfaction with demographic and professional characteristics of these personnel. We performed a descriptive, cross-sectional study in an ED in Barcelona (Spain). Job satisfaction was evaluated by means of the Font-Roja questionnaire. Multivariate analysis determined relationship between the overall job satisfaction and the variables collected. Fifty-two nurses, 22 physicians and 30 administrative staff were included. Administrative staff were significantly more satisfied than physicians and nurses: 3.42±0.32 vs. 2.87±0.42 and 3.06±0.36, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed the following variables to be associated with job satisfaction: rotation among the different ED acuity levels (OR: 2.34; 95%CI: 0.93-5.89) and being an administrative staff (OR: 0.27; 95%CI: 0.09-0.80). Nurses and physicians reported greater stress and work pressure than administrative staff and described a worse physical working environment. Interpersonal relationships obtained the highest score among the three groups of professionals. Job satisfaction of nurses and physicians in an ED is lower than that of administrative staff with the former perceiving greater stress and work pressure. Conversely, interpersonal relationships are identified as strength. Being nurse or physician and not rotating among the different ED acuity levels increase dissatisfaction. Copyright © 2016 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The LCLS Gas Attenuator Revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryutov, D

    2005-01-01

    In the report ''X-ray attenuation cell'' [1] a preliminary analysis of the gas attenuator for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) was presented. This analysis was carried out for extremely stringent set of specifications. In particular, a very large diameter for the unobstructed beam was set (1 cm) to accommodate the spontaneous radiation; the attenuator was supposed to cover the whole range of energies of the coherent radiation, from 800 eV to 8000 eV; the maximum attenuation was set at the level of 10 4 ; the use of solid attenuators was not allowed, as well as the use of rotating shutters. The need to reach a sufficient absorption at the high-energy end of the spectrum predetermined the choice of Xe as the working gas (in order to have a reasonable absorption at a not-too-high pressure). A sophisticated differential pumping system that included a Penning-type ion pump was suggested in order to minimize the gas leak into the undulator/accelerator part of the facility. A high cost of xenon meant also that an efficient (and expensive) gas-recovery system would have to be installed. The main parameter that determined the high cost and the complexity of the system was a large radius of the orifice. The present viewpoint allows for much smaller size of the orifice, r 0 = 1.5 mm. (1) The use of solid attenuators is also allowed (R.M. Bionta, private communication). It is, therefore, worthwhile to reconsider various parameters of the gas attenuator for these much less stringent conditions. This brief study should be considered as a physics input for the engineering design. As a working gas we consider now the argon, which, on the one hand, provides a reasonable absorption lengths and, on the other hand, is inexpensive enough to be exhausted into the atmosphere (no recovery). The absorption properties of argon are illustrated by Fig.1 where the attenuation factor A is shown for various beam energies, based on Ref. [2]. The other relevant parameters for argon are

  5. Planning Staff and Space Capacity Requirements during Wartime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepner, Elisa B; Spencer, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Determining staff and space requirements for military medical centers can be challenging. Changing patient populations change the caseload requirements. Deployment and assignment rotations change the experience and education of clinicians and support staff, thereby changing the caseload capacity of a facility. During wartime, planning becomes increasingly more complex. What will the patient mix and caseload volume be by location? What type of clinicians will be available and when? How many beds are needed at each facility to meet caseload demand and match clinician supply? As soon as these factors are known, operations are likely to change and planning factors quickly become inaccurate. Soon, more beds or staff are needed in certain locations to meet caseload demand while other locations retain underutilized staff, waiting for additional caseload fluctuations. This type of complexity challenges the best commanders. As in so many other industries, supply and demand principles apply to military health, but very little is stable about military health capacity planning. Planning analysts build complex statistical forecasting models to predict caseload based on historical patterns. These capacity planning techniques work best in stable repeatable processes where caseload and staffing resources remain constant over a long period of time. Variability must be simplified to predict complex operations. This is counterintuitive to the majority of capacity planners who believe more data drives better answers. When the best predictor of future needs is not historical patterns, traditional capacity planning does not work. Rather, simplified estimation techniques coupled with frequent calibration adjustments to account for environmental changes will create the most accurate and most useful capacity planning and management system. The method presented in this article outlines the capacity planning approach used to actively manage hospital staff and space during Operations Iraqi

  6. The evolution of individuality revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzvilavicius, Arunas L; Blackstone, Neil W

    2018-03-25

    Evolutionary theory is formulated in terms of individuals that carry heritable information and are subject to selective pressures. However, individuality itself is a trait that had to evolve - an individual is not an indivisible entity, but a result of evolutionary processes that necessarily begin at the lower level of hierarchical organisation. Traditional approaches to biological individuality focus on cooperation and relatedness within a group, division of labour, policing mechanisms and strong selection at the higher level. Nevertheless, despite considerable theoretical progress in these areas, a full dynamical first-principles account of how new types of individuals arise is missing. To the extent that individuality is an emergent trait, the problem can be approached by recognising the importance of individuating mechanisms that are present from the very beginning of the transition, when only lower-level selection is acting. Here we review some of the most influential theoretical work on the role of individuating mechanisms in these transitions, and demonstrate how a lower-level, bottom-up evolutionary framework can be used to understand biological complexity involved in the origin of cellular life, early eukaryotic evolution, sexual life cycles and multicellular development. Some of these mechanisms inevitably stem from environmental constraints, population structure and ancestral life cycles. Others are unique to specific transitions - features of the natural history and biochemistry that are co-opted into conflict mediation. Identifying mechanisms of individuation that provide a coarse-grained description of the system's evolutionary dynamics is an important step towards understanding how biological complexity and hierarchical organisation evolves. In this way, individuality can be reconceptualised as an approximate model that with varying degrees of precision applies to a wide range of biological systems. © 2018 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  7. Strategic Planning by the Chairmen, Joint Chiefs of Staff, 1990 to 2005

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meinhart, RIchard

    2006-01-01

    .... This Letort Paper examines how four Chairmen Joint Chiefs of Staff from 1990 to 2005 used a strategic planning system to enable them to meet their statutory responsibilities specified in Title 10 US...

  8. Medical staff involvement in nursing homes: development of a conceptual model and research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, Renée; Rosenthal, Marsha; Wetle, Terrie; Tyler, Denise; Clark, Melissa; Intrator, Orna

    2014-02-01

    Medical staff (physicians, nurse practitioners, physicians' assistants) involvement in nursing homes (NH) is limited by professional guidelines, government policies, regulations, and reimbursements, creating bureaucratic burden. The conceptual NH Medical Staff Involvement Model, based on our mixed-methods research, applies the Donabedian "structure-process-outcomes" framework to the NH, identifying measures for a coordinated research agenda. Quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews conducted with medical directors, administrators and directors of nursing, other experts, residents and family members and Minimum Data Set, the Online Certification and Reporting System and Medicare Part B claims data related to NH structure, process, and outcomes were analyzed. NH control of medical staff, or structure, affects medical staff involvement in care processes and is associated with better outcomes (e.g., symptom management, appropriate transitions, satisfaction). The model identifies measures clarifying the impact of NH medical staff involvement on care processes and resident outcomes and has strong potential to inform regulatory policies.

  9. The venom optimization hypothesis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, David; King, Glenn F

    2013-03-01

    Animal venoms are complex chemical mixtures that typically contain hundreds of proteins and non-proteinaceous compounds, resulting in a potent weapon for prey immobilization and predator deterrence. However, because venoms are protein-rich, they come with a high metabolic price tag. The metabolic cost of venom is sufficiently high to result in secondary loss of venom whenever its use becomes non-essential to survival of the animal. The high metabolic cost of venom leads to the prediction that venomous animals may have evolved strategies for minimizing venom expenditure. Indeed, various behaviors have been identified that appear consistent with frugality of venom use. This has led to formulation of the "venom optimization hypothesis" (Wigger et al. (2002) Toxicon 40, 749-752), also known as "venom metering", which postulates that venom is metabolically expensive and therefore used frugally through behavioral control. Here, we review the available data concerning economy of venom use by animals with either ancient or more recently evolved venom systems. We conclude that the convergent nature of the evidence in multiple taxa strongly suggests the existence of evolutionary pressures favoring frugal use of venom. However, there remains an unresolved dichotomy between this economy of venom use and the lavish biochemical complexity of venom, which includes a high degree of functional redundancy. We discuss the evidence for biochemical optimization of venom as a means of resolving this conundrum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Quorum sensing by farnesol revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polke, Melanie; Jacobsen, Ilse D

    2017-10-01

    Quorum sensing, a form of molecular communication in microbial communities, is relatively well studied in bacterial species, but poorly understood in fungi. Farnesol, a quorum sensing molecule secreted by the opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans, was the first quorum sensing molecule described in a eukaryotic organism. However, despite considerable research efforts and advances in recent years, the mechanisms behind its action remain largely elusive. Only recently, we showed that deletion of the C. albicans gene EED1 (eed1Δ), which is essential for hyphal maintenance, resulted in both increased farnesol production and hypersensitivity to farnesol, providing a link between farnesol signaling and elongated hyphal growth. This finding raised several questions concerning farnesol signaling. In this short review we use the unique phenotype of the eed1Δ mutant to summarize current hypotheses and to speculate on possible mechanisms of quorum sensing in C. albicans and its implication in fungus-host interaction, by drawing comparisons to comparatively well-studied quorum sensing systems in bacteria.

  11. Revisiting the False Confession Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Toro, Viviana; Lopez-Morales, Cesar A

    2018-03-01

    Despite the existence of important safeguards in our criminal legal system, innocent suspects often succumb to forceful and deceptive interrogation techniques. Among those over-represented members of the false confessor population are minors, people with cognitive and intellectual disabilities, and those with psychiatric disorders. Some of the confessions made by these at-risk populations can hardly be considered voluntary or reliable, but they are generally admitted at trial, regardless of their prejudicial effect. Forensic psychiatrists should become more involved in the overall process of evaluating confessions, not only testifying in courts, but also assisting policymakers in reforming the interrogation process and influencing the legal process. Thus, forensic psychiatrists may give their expert opinion by providing proper training to police interrogators and examining videotaped interrogations. In addition, forensic experts can be instrumental in contributing to three legal solutions that we propose to the false confession problem: a constitutional approach, an evidence law approach, and a jury instruction approach. Each of these approaches requires forensic psychiatrists to help judges and jurors understand the coercive nature of the interrogation process and its effect on suspects' behavior. © 2018 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  12. Friction and anchorage loading revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dholakia, Kartik D

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary concepts of sliding mechanics explain that friction is inevitable. To overcome this frictional resistance, excess force is required to retract the tooth along the archwire (ie, individual retraction of canines, en masse retraction of anterior teeth), in addition to the amount of force required for tooth movement. The anterior tooth retraction force, in addition to excess force (to overcome friction), produces reciprocal protraction force on molars, thereby leading to increased anchorage loading. However, this traditional concept was challenged in recent literature, which was based on the finite element model, but did not bear correlation to the clinical scenario. This article will reinforce the fact that clinically, friction increases anchorage loading in all three planes of space, considering the fact that tooth movement is a quasistatic process rather than a purely continuous or static one, and that conventional ways of determining the effects of static or dynamic friction on anchorage load cannot be applied to clinical situations (which consist of anatomical resistance units and a complex muscular force system). The article does not aim to quantify friction and its effect on the amount of anchorage load. Rather, a new perspective regarding the role of various additional factors (which is not explained by contemporary concept) that may influence friction and anchorage loading is provided..

  13. Origins of Hot Jupiters, Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Bodenheimer, Peter; Laughlin, Greg

    2015-12-01

    Hot Jupiters, giant extrasolar planets with orbital periods less than ~10 days, have long been thought to form at large radial distances (a > 2AU) in protostellar disks, only to subsequently experience large-scale inward migration to the small orbital radii at which they are observed. Here, we propose that a substantial fraction of the hot Jupiter population forms in situ, with the Galactically prevalent short-period super-Earths acting as the source population. Our calculations suggest that under conditions appropriate to the inner regions of protostellar disks, rapid gas accretion can be initiated for solid cores of 10-20 Earth masses, in line with the conventional picture of core-nucleated accretion. This formation scenario leads to testable consequences, including the expectation that hot Jupiters should frequently be accompanied by additional planets, reminiscent of those observed in large numbers by NASA’s Kepler Mission and Doppler velocity surveys. However, dynamical interactions during the early stages of planetary systems' evolutionary lifetimes tend to increase the mutual inclinations of exterior, low-mass companions to hot Jupiters, making transits rare. High-precision radial velocity monitoring provides the best prospect for their detection.

  14. Astrosociological Implications of Astrobiology (Revisited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Supporters of astrobiology continue to organize the field around formalized associations and organizations under the guise of the so-called ``hard'' sciences (e.g., biology and the related physical/natural sciences). The so-called ``soft'' sciences-including sociology and the other social sciences, the behavioral sciences, and the humanities-remain largely separated from this dynamically growing field. However, as argued in this paper, space exploration involving the search for extraterrestrial life should be viewed as consisting of two interrelated parts (i.e., two sides of the same coin): astrobiology and astrosociology. Together, these two fields broadly combine the two major branches of science as they relate to the relationship between human life and alien life, as appropriate. Moreover, with a formalized system of collaboration, these two complimentary fields would also focus on the implications of their research to human beings as well as their cultures and social structures. By placing the astrosociological implications of astrobiology at a high enough priority, scientists interested in the search for alien life can augment their focus to include the social, cultural, and behavioral implications that were always associated with their work (yet previously overlooked or understated, and too often misunderstood). Recognition of the astrosociological implications expands our perception about alien life by creating a new emphasis on their ramifications to human life on Earth.

  15. Resonance effect in the allyl cation and anion: a revisit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yirong

    2004-08-20

    The interest over the magnitude of the conjugation effect in the allyl cation (1) and anion (2) has been revived recently by Barbour and Karty (J. Org. Chem. 2004, 69, 648-654), who derived the resonance energies of 20-22 and 17-18 kcal/mol for 1 and 2, respectively, using an empirical extrapolation approximation. This paper revisits the case by explicitly calculating the Pauling-Wheland resonance energy, which measures the stabilization from the most stable resonance structure to the delocalized energy-minimum state of a conjugated system, using our newly developed block-localized wave function (BLW) method. This BLW method has the geometrical optimization capability. The computations result in adiabatic resonance energies of 37 kcal/mol for 1 and 38 kcal/mol for 2. The significant disagreement between these values and Barbour and Karty's results originates from the neglect of structural and electronic variations in their derivation which are energy costing. Copyright 2004 American Chemical Society

  16. Revisiting Cross-Channel Information Transfer for Chromatic Aberration Correction

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Tiancheng

    2017-12-25

    Image aberrations can cause severe degradation in image quality for consumer-level cameras, especially under the current tendency to reduce the complexity of lens designs in order to shrink the overall size of modules. In simplified optical designs, chromatic aberration can be one of the most significant causes for degraded image quality, and it can be quite difficult to remove in post-processing, since it results in strong blurs in at least some of the color channels. In this work, we revisit the pixel-wise similarity between different color channels of the image and accordingly propose a novel algorithm for correcting chromatic aberration based on this cross-channel correlation. In contrast to recent weak prior-based models, ours uses strong pixel-wise fitting and transfer, which lead to significant quality improvements for large chromatic aberrations. Experimental results on both synthetic and real world images captured by different optical systems demonstrate that the chromatic aberration can be significantly reduced using our approach.

  17. Innovative public library services - staff-less or staff-intensive?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav Viggo

    2014-01-01

    materials from their home address. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether such developments will necessarily lead to a situation where public libraries become self-service institutions or to what extent self-service and innovative staff-intensive library services can develop and co...... that staff attitudes toward staff-less libraries, and – more surprising – also toward more staff-intensive practices have been somewhat reluctant and skeptical. The paper also presents leadership initiatives which have proved to handle such resistances constructively. Originality/value – The paper contains...

  18. German General Staff Officer Education and Current Challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Groeters, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    "German General Staff Officer Education and Current Challenges" examines the institutional education of German General Staff Officers, as experienced by the author, and offers a "Conceptual Competency...

  19. The effectiveness of staff training focused on increasing emotional intelligence and improving interaction between support staff and clients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlmans, L.J.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Derksen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed

  20. High pressure phase transformations revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitas, Valery I.

    2018-04-01

    High pressure phase transformations play an important role in the search for new materials and material synthesis, as well as in geophysics. However, they are poorly characterized, and phase transformation pressure and pressure hysteresis vary drastically in experiments of different researchers, with different pressure transmitting media, and with different material suppliers. Here we review the current state, challenges in studying phase transformations under high pressure, and the possible ways in overcoming the challenges. This field is critically compared with fields of phase transformations under normal pressure in steels and shape memory alloys, as well as plastic deformation of materials. The main reason for the above mentioned discrepancy is the lack of understanding that there is a fundamental difference between pressure-induced transformations under hydrostatic conditions, stress-induced transformations under nonhydrostatic conditions below yield, and strain-induced transformations during plastic flow. Each of these types of transformations has different mechanisms and requires a completely different thermodynamic and kinetic description and experimental characterization. In comparison with other fields the following challenges are indicated for high pressure phase transformation: (a) initial and evolving microstructure is not included in characterization of transformations; (b) continuum theory is poorly developed; (c) heterogeneous stress and strain fields in experiments are not determined, which leads to confusing material transformational properties with a system behavior. Some ways to advance the field of high pressure phase transformations are suggested. The key points are: (a) to take into account plastic deformations and microstructure evolution during transformations; (b) to formulate phase transformation criteria and kinetic equations in terms of stress and plastic strain tensors (instead of pressure alone); (c) to develop multiscale continuum