WorldWideScience

Sample records for staff student consultative

  1. NICU consultants and support staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newborn intensive care unit - consultants and support staff; Neonatal intensive care unit - consultants and support staff ... a baby's nipple-feeding readiness and oral-motor skills. Speech therapists will also help with feeding skills ...

  2. 10 CFR 51.40 - Consultation with NRC staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consultation with NRC staff. 51.40 Section 51.40 Energy....40 Consultation with NRC staff. (a) A prospective applicant or petitioner for rulemaking is encouraged to confer with NRC staff as early as possible in its planning process before submitting...

  3. HEFCE Staff Recruitment Incentives: Consultation on "Golden Hellos".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Funding Council for England, Bristol.

    This "consultation" notifies interested parties of the plans by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) to introduce recruitment incentives for teaching staff in higher education, also known as "golden hellos." These are being introduced from 2003-2004 to encourage new entrants to teaching in higher education…

  4. Belgium; Staff Report for the 2001 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2002-01-01

    This 2001 Article IV Consultation highlights that following four years of robust expansion, real GDP growth in Belgium slowed markedly in 2001, as higher oil prices, declining equity values, and the deteriorating external environment adversely affected business investment, household consumption, and exports. The outlook for 2002 depends critically on a recovery in the world economy and, especially, in Belgium’s key European trading partners. Growth for the year is projected by the IMF staff a...

  5. Developing Critical Thinking through Student Consulting Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canziani, Bonnie; Tullar, William L.

    2017-01-01

    The authors present survey results from faculty at 44 universities on the role of student consulting projects in developing business students' critical thinking. They conclude that students can improve critical thinking by engaging in guided primary and secondary research to inform their business assumptions that underpin business planning and…

  6. Kingdom of the Netherlands—Aruba; Staff Report for the 2005 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2005-01-01

    The staff report for the 2005 Article IV Consultation on the Kingdom of the Netherlands—Aruba highlights the economic developments and policies. Meeting the challenges of population aging requires policies that create conditions for faster productivity growth. IMF Staff recommended applying the successful model of public-private sector cooperation developed in the tourism industry to promote diversification in other areas, in particular in financial services. Staff urged the authorities to sp...

  7. Small Business & Consultancy: Exploration of an Experiment with Student Consultants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Hollaender

    2007-01-01

    In this paper I’ll discuss the first outcomes of an explorative research concerning the consultancy projects of a consultancy-based learning programme (Minor Consultancy 2006 - 2007, half-year bachelor programme University of Applied Sciences, Hogeschool Utrecht, The Netherlands). In order to

  8. Botswana; Staff Report for the 2002 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2002-01-01

    This 2002 Article IV Consultation highlights that real GDP growth of Botswana slipped to an estimated 1¼ percent in 2001/02 (July–June), largely reflecting a downturn in the global diamond market and a drop in Botswana’s diamond production. The non-mining sectors performed better, especially the service industries. Their success is in part a product of Botswana’s market-friendly environment, sound macroeconomic policies, and investments in education and physical infrastructure. The overall fi...

  9. Kuwait; Staff Report for the 2014 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2014-01-01

    This 2014 Article IV Consultation highlights that economic activity in Kuwait picked up in 2014. Non-oil growth is projected at 3.5 percent driven by a combination of continued increase in domestic consumption and some pick-up in government capital spending and private investment. Flat oil production would keep the overall real GDP growth positive at 1.3 percent. The average inflation rate is forecast to remain at about 3 percent. The current account and fiscal surpluses are expected to remai...

  10. Impact of three alternative consultation training formats on self-efficacy and consultation skills of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aper, Leen; Reniers, Jan; Koole, Sebastiaan; Valcke, Martin; Derese, Anselme

    2012-01-01

    Conducting a consultation is a core competence of medical professionals. Consultation training of medical students centers on clinical, communication, reasoning and reflection skills. The training incorporates practice with a standardized simulated patient and supervising physician, to prepare for real patient encounters. To meet the request for more training, while dealing with an increasing student population and limited staff availability, alternative formats of consultation training were developed and evaluated. To investigate the impact of three consultation training formats on students' self-efficacy beliefs and their consultation skills acquisition. The three formats comprised (1) traditional training with supervising physician, (2) autonomous training with feedback from simulated patients and peers, without direct supervision and (3) online training based on video fragments and answering guiding questions. A quasi-experimental pre/posttest study was set up, with random assignment of students to a training condition. The differential impact was tested on two dependent measures: self-efficacy and consultation performance. Self-efficacy was tested with a nine-item scale and the cognitive component of consultation performance was tested on the base of responses to a standardized video case. The autonomous training has a significant positive effect on students' self-efficacy (p=0.016). The traditional training and the online training did only positively influence the cognitive component of the consultation competence (ptraining contributes to the learning process in a different way. In order to achieve optimum learning effects, medical educators should be aware of the particular impact of specific trainings on the cognitive and motivational side of skills and pursue a balanced mixture of instructional formats.

  11. Education, consultation, guidance, students, advisor, teacher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Seyedmajidi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Student counseling and supervision play an important role to overcome learning problems and to achieve educational goals. The present study is intended to investigate viewpoints of students regarding educational guidance and advice studying at Babol University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional survey, viewpoints of 480 students were collected by a questionnaire. The validity and reliability of the questionnaire had been approved before. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 17 software. Chi- square and ANOVA tests were administered. Results: 61.2% of all participants were female and 38.8% were males with mean age of 21.3±4.0. 37.2% of these students lacked sufficient knowledge and information on how to request from their advisors for help and guidance. Half of students (50.3% reported attendance of advisors and holding routine consultation is inappropriate. Advisors made more educational files for females compare to males (P=0.001. No difference observed regarding educational disciplines of the advisors regarding students were dissatisfied with help and guidance received from paramedics and dentistry students in most fields (87.3% and 81.5% respectively. Conclusion: It seems that either student has no sufficient information about tasks of advisors and/or advisors may not do their tasks properly. It is recommended the students to be acquainted with advisors’ tasks upon their entrance into the university. Training classes for new academics would be helpful.

  12. New Zealand; 2012 Article IV Consultation: Staff Report; Staff Supplement; Public Information Notice

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2012-01-01

    The New Zealand economy continues to grow at a modest pace. The 2012 Article IV Consultation reports that domestic demand has remained soft as households and businesses continue to deleverage amid a weak housing market and an uncertain outlook. Executive Directors endorse that output growth should pick up somewhat in 2012 as earthquake reconstruction spending is expected to gain pace. High household debt is likely to weigh on the growth of private consumption as households will need to save t...

  13. Bolivia; 2009 Article IV Consultation: Staff Report; Staff Supplement; Staff Statement; Public Information Notice on the Executive Board Discussion; and Statement by the Executive Director for Bolivia

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2010-01-01

    The staff report for Bolivia’s 2009 Article IV Consultation describes economic developments and policies. The impact of the global recession on Bolivia has been milder than in other countries in the region. Lower commodity exports and remittances have resulted in a sharp narrowing of the external current account surplus. The financial system has been barely affected by the global crisis owing to its limited integration with international capital markets. As the economy gathers momentum, a tig...

  14. Training for staff who support students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Eleanor; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Hu, Wendy

    2016-02-01

    Front-line administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff often find themselves providing pastoral and learning support to students, but they are often not trained for this role, and this aspect of their work is under-acknowledged. Staff participating in an action research study at two medical schools identified common concerns about the personal impact of providing student support, and of the need for professional development to carry out this responsibility. This need is magnified in clinical placement settings that are remote from on-campus services. Informed by participatory action research, brief interactive workshops with multimedia training resources were developed, conducted and evaluated at eight health professional student training sites. These workshops were designed to: (1) be delivered in busy clinical placement and university settings; (2) provide a safe and inclusive environment for administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff to share experiences and learn from each other; (3) be publicly accessible; and (4) promote continued development and roll-out of staff training, adapted to each workplace (see http://www.uws.edu.au/meusupport). The workshops were positively evaluated by 97 participants, with both teaching and administrative staff welcoming the opportunity to discuss and share experiences. Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves. Participatory action research can be a means for producing and maintaining effective training resources as well as the conditions for change in practice. In our workshops, staff particularly valued opportunities for guided discussion using videos of authentic cases to trigger reflection, and to collaboratively formulate student support guidelines, customised to each site. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Are Students Customers? Perceptions of Academic Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomas, Laurie

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the notion of the student as a customer in a university, focusing on the perceptions of academic staff. Changes in the higher education sector in recent years have significantly reduced the differences between universities and other types of organisations and it has been argued that students have become "consumers" of…

  16. Psychological consultation in a paediatric setting: A qualitative analysis of staff experiences of a psychosocial forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Jessica L; Benson, Sally

    2015-07-01

    The use of psychosocial forums in paediatric settings has been recommended as a means of providing psychological consultancy. However, no research has explored staff perceptions of these meetings or whether they have a positive impact on patient care. In this study, six members of a paediatric gastroenterology multidisciplinary team were interviewed about their experience of a weekly psychosocial forum using a qualitative approach. The data revealed that staff regarded the forum as an essential and useful part of the service. Staff reported a number of benefits to their clinical work as a result of attending the forum, in addition to the general benefits of having a clinical psychologist available to see patients. However, staff also made recommendations for improving the forum. The results suggest that psychosocial forums may provide an efficient means of delivering specialist psychological consultation for patients with psychological difficulties, in line with Department of Health recommendations for paediatric services. Future research should aim to investigate the effectiveness of psychosocial forums in different settings and to establish the cost-effectiveness of these meetings. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Trend of newspaper consultation by students of federal University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research investigated the trend of Newspaper consultation by the students of Federal University of Technology, Owerri. Survey research design was adopted for this Study. Data was obtained from the University Library's Records of users' statistics for Newspaper consultation for ten years, 2004-2013. Questionnaire was ...

  18. Teaching medical students consultation skills using e-learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Merete; Witt, Klaus; Fridorff-Jens, Peter Kindt

    2015-01-01

    Teaching consultation skills to medical students using e-learning. Introduction: We have been teaching Family Medicine at the University of Copenhagen for more than twenty years. We wish to develop a method to evaluate the current teaching of consultation skills and the effect of new interventions...... on-line and comparing the answers in the intervention group to the usual course? [2] Material and Method All students at the course in 2013 were included in the project (n=351), approximately half constituted the control group. For the on-line teaching we use different short video....... During the course each student works eight days as a doctor in a general practice clinic. They see real patients and video their consultations and analyse them in small group sessions at the university with their teacher and fellow students. We teach them patient centred medicine [1].The final evaluation...

  19. Mental Health Service Utilization among Students and Staff in 18 Months Following Dawson College Shooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquelon, Paule; Lesage, Alain; Boyer, Richard; Guay, Stéphane; Bleau, Pierre; Séguin, Monique

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate service utilization by students and staff in the 18 months following the September 13, 2006, shooting at Dawson College, Montreal, as well as the determinants of this utilization within the context of Canada's publicly managed healthcare system. A sample of 948 from among the college's 10,091 students and staff agreed to complete an adapted computer or web-based standardized questionnaire drawn from the Statistics Canada 2002 Canadian Community Health Survey cycle 1.2 on mental health and well-being. In the 18 months following the shooting, there was a greater incidence and prevalence not only of PTSD, but also of other anxiety disorders, depression, and substance abuse. Staff and students were as likely to consult a health professional when presenting a mental or substance use disorder, with females more likely to do so than males. Results also indicated that there was relatively high internet use for mental health reasons by students and staff (14% overall). Following a major crisis event causing potential mass trauma, even in a society characterized by easy access to public, school and health services and when the population involved is generally well educated, the acceptability of consulting health professionals for mental health or substance use problems represents a barrier. However, safe internet access is one way male and female students and staff can access information and support and it may be useful to further exploit the possibilities afforded by web-based interviews in anonymous environments.

  20. The communication competency of medical students, residents and consultants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouda, Jan C.; van de Wiel, Harry B. M.

    Objective: The model of expert performance predicts that neither physicians in training nor experienced physicians will reach an expert level in communication. This study tested this hypothesis. Methods: Seventy-one students, twenty-five residents and fourteen consultants performed a 'breaking bad

  1. Using Facebook Data to Turn Introductory Statistics Students into Consultants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Adam F.

    2017-01-01

    Facebook provides businesses and organizations with copious data that describe how users are interacting with their page. This data affords an excellent opportunity to turn introductory statistics students into consultants to analyze the Facebook data using descriptive and inferential statistics. This paper details a semester-long project that…

  2. Experiences of Australian School Staff in Addressing Student Cannabis Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Peter J.; Norberg, Melissa M.; Dillon, Paul; Manocha, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Cannabis is the most frequently used illicit drug by Australian secondary school students yet there is scant research investigating school staff responses to student cannabis use. As such, this study surveyed 1,692 school staff who attended "Generation Next" seminars throughout Australia. The self-complete survey identified that the…

  3. Staff and Student Perceptions of Plagiarism and Cheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    Cheating, plagiarism, and other forms of academic misconduct are a significant issue in higher education. In this study, the attitudes of academic staff and students in a 3 year undergraduate nursing program to various forms of academic misconduct were assessed and compared. Forty-nine percent of staff and 39% of students thought that cheating on…

  4. Intramural Staff Handbook. Student Staff Personnel Manual from the Office of Intramural/Recreational Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudenhoeffer, Frances Tomlin; Fedak, Joseph F.

    This student staff personnel manual is designed to orient student employees of the New Mexico State University (Las Cruces) Office of Intramural/Recreational Sports to their duties and responsibilities and to provide personnel policies and standard operating procedures. Topics include: student employment procedures, pay rates for job…

  5. The communication competency of medical students, residents and consultants

    OpenAIRE

    Wouda, Jan C.; van de Wiel, Harry B. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The model of expert performance predicts that neither physicians in training nor experienced physicians will reach an expert level in communication. This study tested this hypothesis. Methods: Seventy-one students, twenty-five residents and fourteen consultants performed a 'breaking bad news' exercise with a simulated patient. Their communication competency was assessed with the CELI instrument. Actor assessments were also obtained. The differences in communication competency betwe...

  6. Mental Health Service Utilization among Students and Staff in 18 Months Following Dawson College Shooting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paule Miquelon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate service utilization by students and staff in the 18 months following the September 13, 2006, shooting at Dawson College, Montreal, as well as the determinants of this utilization within the context of Canada’s publicly managed healthcare system. Methods A sample of 948 from among the college’s 10,091 students and staff agreed to complete an adapted computer or web-based standardized questionnaire drawn from the Statistics Canada 2002 Canadian Community Health Survey cycle 1.2 on mental health and well-being. Results In the 18 months following the shooting, there was a greater incidence and prevalence not only of PTSD, but also of other anxiety disorders, depression, and substance abuse. Staff and students were as likely to consult a health professional when presenting a mental or substance use disorder, with females more likely to do so than males. Results also indicated that there was relatively high internet use for mental health reasons by students and staff (14% overall. Conclusions Following a major crisis event causing potential mass trauma, even in a society characterized by easy access to public, school and health services and when the population involved is generally well educated, the acceptability of consulting health professionals for mental health or substance use problems represents a barrier. However, safe internet access is one way male and female students and staff can access information and support and it may be useful to further exploit the possibilities afforded by web-based interviews in anonymous environments.

  7. Student and Staff Perceptions of a Vacation Research Assistantship Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Felicity; Stephens, Danielle; Morgan, Jessica; Upton, Penney; Upton, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    There is a push for universities to equip graduates with desirable employability skills and "hands-on" experience. This article explores the perceptions of students and staff experiences of a research assistantship scheme. Nine students from the University of Worcester were given the opportunity to work as a student vacation researcher…

  8. Building Multicultural Residential Communities: A Model for Training Student Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryk, Taryn; Thompson, Monita C.; Boynton, Trelawny

    2013-01-01

    The growing diversity and changing demographics within the United States increases the importance of students developing skills to engage across identity difference. The purpose of this chapter is to describe how a pre-employment course for student staff members is used as a multicultural intervention training to provide students with the…

  9. Nursing staff perceptions of student contributions in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter-Smith, Cheryl; Helms, Jennifer E; Burris, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Because nursing is a practice discipline, students are placed in clinical settings to collaborate with professional nurses in caring for patients. This descriptive study aimed to explore the benefits and limitations of undergraduate nursing students in the clinical setting. A 54-item instrument, Nursing Students' Contributions to Clinical Agencies, was used to collect data from staff nurses (N = 84) at three hospitals. The instrument also provided space for participants to share qualitative data, which revealed perceptions with which staff nurses were likely to agree and three key themes: Eager to Learn, Willing to Help, and Serving Their Time. The major implication for students is that they are often judged on their assertiveness skills and should offer assistance so they appear eager to learn. Faculty must ascertain that students understand their objectives for the clinical rotation and share those objectives with the staff nurses to enhance their learning experience. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Analysis of Parent, Teacher, and Consultant Speech Exchanges and Educational Outcomes of Students With Autism During COMPASS Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    RUBLE, LISA; BIRDWHISTELL, JESSIE; TOLAND, MICHAEL D.; MCGREW, JOHN H.

    2011-01-01

    The significant increase in the numbers of students with autism combined with the need for better trained teachers (National Research Council, 2001) call for research on the effectiveness of alternative methods, such as consultation, that have the potential to improve service delivery. Data from 2 randomized controlled single-blind trials indicate that an autism-specific consultation planning framework known as the collaborative model for promoting competence and success (COMPASS) is effectiv...

  11. Handbook of Student Journalism: A Guide for Staff and Advisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Edmund C.; Krieghbaum, Hillier

    Intended for student journalists and their advisers, this book surveys many aspects of scholastic and professional journalism: the nature and function of scholastic and professional journalism, the building of an effective staff, the language of the press, and the law and student journalists. Sections are also devoted to extensive discussion of…

  12. Attitudes and Perceptions of Faculty, Staff and Students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Second-Hand Smoke in a University Campus: Attitudes and Perceptions of Faculty, Staff and Students. ... International Journal of Health Research ... a smoke free policy would be a positive move and could possibly improve the quality of life for the campus community, while not negatively affecting student enrollment status.

  13. Medical Students and Staff Physicians: The Question of Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noller, Michael; Mai, Johnny P; Zapanta, Philip E; Camacho, Macario

    2017-07-01

    Social media's prevalence among the professional world is rapidly increasing. Its use among medical personnel-specifically, medical students, resident physicians, and staff physicians-could compromise personal-professional boundaries. Could the acceptance or lack of acceptance of a friend request bias the medical student application process? If friend requests are accepted, then medical students, resident physicians, and staff physicians are provided access to very personal aspects of one another's lives, which may not have been the intent. The question remains whether the separation of one's personal life from work is necessary. Should medical students restrict social media relationships with residents and staff physicians to professional social media networks? The suitability and opportunities of social media among medical professionals is an ongoing issue for research that needs continued evaluation.

  14. Effectiveness of Consultation on Student Ratings Feedback: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, Angela R.; Coe, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Consultation on student ratings is recognized as an important strategy to support university teachers in learning from student ratings feedback. However, there is little evidence to suggest which practices and strategies are most important for successful consultation. As the use of student ratings increases, such evidence becomes increasingly…

  15. Analysis of Parent, Teacher, and Consultant Speech Exchanges and Educational Outcomes of Students with Autism during COMPASS Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruble, Lisa; Birdwhistell, Jessie; Toland, Michael D.; McGrew, John H.

    2011-01-01

    The significant increase in the numbers of students with autism combined with the need for better trained teachers (National Research Council, 2001) call for research on the effectiveness of alternative methods, such as consultation, that have the potential to improve service delivery. Data from 2 randomized controlled single-blind trials indicate…

  16. School climate: perceptual differences between students, parents, and school staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Christine M.; Spira, Adam P.; Parisi, Jeanine M.; Rebok, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that school climate can have a great impact on student, teacher, and school outcomes. However, it is often assessed as a summary measure, without taking into account multiple perspectives (student, teacher, parent) or examining subdimensions within the broader construct. In this study, we assessed school climate from the perspective of students, staff, and parents within a large, urban school district using multilevel modeling techniques to examine within- and between-school variance. After adjusting for school-level demographic characteristics, students reported worse perceptions of safety and connectedness compared to both parent and staff ratings (all p climate ratings within a school. Understanding how perceptions differ between informants can inform interventions to improve perceptions and prevent adverse outcomes. PMID:28642631

  17. Loss, Responsibility, Blame? Staff Discourses of Student Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlay, Lesley; Deane, Janis

    2012-01-01

    Student plagiarism and difficulties with writing have been widely investigated in the literature, but there has been less research on staff perspectives. A Joint Information Services Committee (JISC)-funded questionnaire (n = 80) and focus group study investigated the views of lecturers, librarians and study advisors at a UK post-92 university,…

  18. Student and staff perceptions and experiences of the introduction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The Objective Structured Practical Examination (OSPE) is widely recognised as one of the more objective methods of assessing practical skills in healthcare programmes, including undergraduate physiotherapy curricula. Objectives. To obtain feedback from both students and staff who were involved in the ...

  19. Does Size Matter? The Impact of Student-Staff Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Gael

    2013-01-01

    Student-staff ratios (SSRs) in higher education have a significant impact on teaching and learning and critical financial implications for organisations. While SSRs are often used as a currency for quality both externally for political reasons and internally within universities for resource allocations, there is a considerable amount of ambiguity…

  20. School Library Development and Use by Staff and Students of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated school library development and use by staff and students of secondary schools in the Federal capital territory, Abuja. The overall objective of the study is to examine the state of secondary school library development and its usage, find out if these libraries have achieved the expected level of ...

  1. 34 CFR 76.652 - Consultation with representatives of private school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Consultation with representatives of private school students. 76.652 Section 76.652 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education STATE... Enrolled in Private Schools § 76.652 Consultation with representatives of private school students. (a) An...

  2. Improving teaching on the basis of student evaluation: integrative teaching consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibbecke, Gerald; Kahmann, Janine; Pignotti, Tanja; Altenberger, Leander; Kadmon, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Due to the development of medical education in the past decade the role of teachers has changed and requires higher didactic competence. Student evaluation of teaching alone does not lead to considerable improvement of teaching quality. We present the concept of "Integrative Teaching Consultation", which comprises both the teacher's reflection and own objectives to improve their teaching as well as data from students ratings. Teachers in collaboration with a teaching consultant reflect on their teaching ability and set themselves improvement goals. Then the consultant himself observes a teaching session and subsequently analyses the respective student evaluation in order to give meaningful feedback to the teacher. The combination of student feedback with professional consultation elements can initiate and maintain improvements in teaching. Teaching consultation complements existing faculty development programs and increases the benefit of student evaluations.

  3. Improving teaching on the basis of student evaluation: Integrative teaching consultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wibbecke, Gerald

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Due to the development of medical education in the past decade the role of teachers has changed and requires higher didactic competence. Student evaluation of teaching alone does not lead to considerable improvement of teaching quality. We present the concept of "Integrative Teaching Consultation", which comprises both the teacher’s reflection and own objectives to improve their teaching as well as data from students ratings.Methods: Teachers in collaboration with a teaching consultant reflect on their teaching ability and set themselves improvement goals. Then the consultant himself observes a teaching session and subsequently analyses the respective student evaluation in order to give meaningful feedback to the teacher.Results: The combination of student feedback with professional consultation elements can initiate and maintain improvements in teaching. Conclusion: Teaching consultation complements existing faculty development programs and increases the benefit of student evaluations.

  4. The Study of Staff Satisfaction in Consulting Center System-A Case Study of Job Consulting Centers in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Chia Nan Wang; Tran Thanh Tuyen; Nguyen Nhu Ty

    2014-01-01

    The topic of job satisfaction has been investigated over the years. However, the environmental impact of the work of job consulting centre’s employee satisfaction is beginning to attract the attention of the researcher. Job consulting centre has become an integral part of most organizations today, play an important role in supplying-jobs services. This study aims to examine the key factors that are closely associated with job satisfaction of employees working at job consulting centre as well ...

  5. Web-Based Depression Screening and Psychiatric Consultation for College Students: A Feasibility and Acceptability Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Williams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A steady rise in the prevalence of depression among college students has negatively affected student quality of life. This study investigates the feasibility and acceptability of a Web-based model, including Skype, to screen and provide psychiatric consultation to depressed college students. Methods. Students completed the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 online; those who screened positive (PHQ-9 ≥ 10 or endorsed any level of suicidal ideation were offered Web-based psychiatric consultation using Skype. After the consultation, students filled out a 7-item satisfaction questionnaire to report on the acceptability of this Web-based method. Results. A total of 972 students consented to the online depression screening and 285 screened positive. Of those, 69 students consented and 17 students successfully completed the psychiatric consultation via Skype. Thirteen (76.4% students found the interview useful in helping them understand their depression. Fifteen (88.2% students thought that psychologists and psychiatrists could successfully see patients via videoconferencing. Conclusions. Current online technologies can provide depression screening and psychiatric consultation to college students; those who participated reported a positive experience. Future studies will need to address the low levels of participation among college students and attract students who are underserved, as well as use a videoconferencing platform that adequately protects data confidentiality.

  6. Gender Differences in Students-Staff Violence in Urban and Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: School violence is of public health importance. One important but often overlooked dimension is student-staff violence. The aim of the study was to assess the gender differences in the pattern of students-staff violence in urban and rural areas of Osun state with the hypothesis that male students and staff ...

  7. Factors affecting nursing students' incivility: As perceived by students and faculty staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sanaa Abd El-Azeem; Qalawa, Shereen Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Students' incivility in institutions of higher education is a serious issue that faces educators in performing their teaching duties. The negative impacts associated with uncivil classroom behaviors have been found to contribute to the disruption of the learning process and the classroom learning environment, and the deterioration of the faculty-student relationship. This study assays the incivility level among nursing students, investigates factors affecting student nurses' incivility, and explores the relationship between students' uncivil behavior and factors affecting its occurrence based on the perceptions of students and faculty staff. A descriptive comparative research design included all nursing students (n=186) and faculty staff (n=66) in the Faculty of Nursing, Port Said University. A structured questionnaire was used to collect the data. The results of the study reflected that less than two thirds of students (60.2%) reported irresponsible behaviors, more than half (55.9%) expressed that they behave inappropriately, and 47.8% of them believed that they behave aggressively. The highest percentage of students (55.4%) recorded a high level of uncivil behavior, while faculty staff recorded a lower level regarding aggressive uncivil student behaviors. Both faculty staff and students agreed that a high level of incivility is affected by the studied factors, including issues related to environmental and study climate, faculty policies, political atmosphere, and faculty staff. Uncivil students' behavior interferes with academic achievement and leads to a declined curve of ethics for nursing students, who are to be considered a symbol of ethics when dealing with their patients. Based on the study results, activated implementation of faculty policies on uncivil behaviors is recommended. Also, there is an obvious need to train faculty staff members to deal with uncivil and bullying students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of Parent, Teacher, and Consultant Speech Exchanges and Educational Outcomes of Students With Autism During COMPASS Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruble, Lisa; Birdwhistell, Jessie; Toland, Michael D; McGrew, John H

    2011-01-01

    The significant increase in the numbers of students with autism combined with the need for better trained teachers (National Research Council, 2001) call for research on the effectiveness of alternative methods, such as consultation, that have the potential to improve service delivery. Data from 2 randomized controlled single-blind trials indicate that an autism-specific consultation planning framework known as the collaborative model for promoting competence and success (COMPASS) is effective in increasing child Individual Education Programs (IEP) outcomes (Ruble, Dal-rymple, & McGrew, 2010; Ruble, McGrew, & Toland, 2011). In this study, we describe the verbal interactions, defined as speech acts and speech act exchanges that take place during COMPASS consultation, and examine the associations between speech exchanges and child outcomes. We applied the Psychosocial Processes Coding Scheme (Leaper, 1991) to code speech acts. Speech act exchanges were overwhelmingly affiliative, failed to show statistically significant relationships with child IEP outcomes and teacher adherence, but did correlate positively with IEP quality.

  9. Attitudes of Nursing Facilities' Staff Toward Pharmacy Students' Interaction with its Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Donna; Gavaza, Paul; Deel, Sharon

    2017-06-01

    All Appalachian College of Pharmacy second-year students undertake the longitudinal geriatric early pharmacy practice experiences (EPPE) 2 course, which involves interacting with geriatric residents in two nursing facilities over two semesters. The study investigated the nursing staff's perceptions about the rotation and the pharmacy students' interaction with nursing facility residents. Cross-sectional study. Academic setting. 63 nursing facility staff. A 10-item attitude survey administered to nursing staff. Nursing staff attitude toward pharmacy students' interaction with geriatric residents during the course. Sixty-three responses were received (84% response rate). Most respondents were female (95.2%), who occasionally interacted with pharmacy students (54.8%) and had worked at the facilities for an average of 6.8 years (standard deviation [SD] = 6.7) years. Staff reported that pharmacy students practiced interacting with geriatric residents and nursing facility staff, learned about different medications taken by residents as well as their life as a nursing facility resident. In addition, the student visits improved the mood of residents and staff's understanding of medicines, among others. Staff suggested that students spend more time with their residents in the facility as well as ask more questions of staff. The nursing facility staff generally had favorable attitudes about pharmacy students' visits in their nursing facility. Nursing facility staff noted that the geriatric rotation was a great learning experience for the pharmacy students.

  10. Nuclear Power Acceptance Among University Staffs and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayder, G.; Rahim, M. S. Ab

    2016-03-01

    The need to consider alternative energy sources becomes very real. Nuclear has been identified as an alternative electricity source. However, media reports seem to indicate that there is a resistance among peoples with regards to harnessing nuclear for energy. This study was conducted to assess the acceptance level of university staff and students towards nuclear energy by asking them to answer a questionnaire. The questionnaire was constructed in a way to gauge their background knowledge on the energy situation of the country, the risks involved with regards to nuclear energy and also what aspects need to be improved in order to have a safe integration of nuclear energy into the national energy mix. The overall result of the questionnaire indicated high level of support for nuclear energy. The main areas of concerns however, were waste management, control and governance and also nuclear accidents. These should be identified as fields that require extra attention. However, the positive result obtained from this survey should not be construed as overall strong support in general. There might be different outcomes if the survey was conducted on to the general population as compared to the university students and staff that were involved in this research.

  11. Relationships among Student, Staff, and Administrative Measures of School Climate and Student Health and Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gase, Lauren N.; Gomez, Louis M.; Kuo, Tony; Glenn, Beth A.; Inkelas, Moira; Ponce, Ninez A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: School climate is an integral part of a comprehensive approach to improving the well-being of students; however, little is known about the relationships between its different domains and measures. We examined the relationships between student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate to understand the extent to which they…

  12. Relationships between Student, Staff, and Administrative Measures of School Climate and Student Health and Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gase, Lauren Nichol; Gomez, Louis M.; Kuo, Tony; Glenn, Beth A.; Inkelas, Moira; Ponce, Ninez A.

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND School climate is an integral part of a comprehensive approach to improving the wellbeing of students; however, little is known about the relationships between its different domains and measures. This study examined the relationships between student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate in order to understand the extent to which they were related to each other and student outcomes. METHODS The sample included 33,572 secondary school students from 121 schools in Los Angeles County during the 2014–2015 academic year. A multilevel regression model was constructed to examine the association between the domains and measures of school climate and five outcomes of student wellbeing: depressive symptoms or suicidal ideation, tobacco use, alcohol use, marijuana use, and grades. RESULTS Student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate were weakly correlated. Strong associations were found between student outcomes and student reports of engagement and safety, while school staff reports and administrative measures of school climate showed limited associations with student outcomes. CONCLUSIONS As schools seek to measure and implement interventions aimed at improving school climate, consideration should be given to grounding these efforts in a multi-dimensional conceptualization of climate that values student perspectives and includes elements of both engagement and safety. PMID:28382671

  13. Relationships Among Student, Staff, and Administrative Measures of School Climate and Student Health and Academic Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gase, Lauren N; Gomez, Louis M; Kuo, Tony; Glenn, Beth A; Inkelas, Moira; Ponce, Ninez A

    2017-05-01

    School climate is an integral part of a comprehensive approach to improving the well-being of students; however, little is known about the relationships between its different domains and measures. We examined the relationships between student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate to understand the extent to which they were related to each other and student outcomes. The sample included 33,572 secondary school students from 121 schools in Los Angeles County during the 2014-2015 academic year. A multilevel regression model was constructed to examine the association between the domains and measures of school climate and 5 outcomes of student well-being: depressive symptoms or suicidal ideation, tobacco use, alcohol use, marijuana use, and grades. Student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate were weakly correlated. Strong associations were found between student outcomes and student reports of engagement and safety, while school staff reports and administrative measures of school climate showed limited associations with student outcomes. As schools seek to measure and implement interventions aimed at improving school climate, consideration should be given to grounding these efforts in a multidimensional conceptualization of climate that values student perspectives and includes elements of both engagement and safety. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  14. Web-Based Depression Screening and Psychiatric Consultation for College Students: A Feasibility and Acceptability Study

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Aya; LaRocca, Rachel; Chang, Trina; Trinh, Nhi-Ha; Fava, Maurizio; Kvedar, Joseph; Yeung, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Background. A steady rise in the prevalence of depression among college students has negatively affected student quality of life. This study investigates the feasibility and acceptability of a Web-based model, including Skype, to screen and provide psychiatric consultation to depressed college students. Methods. Students completed the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) online; those who screened positive (PHQ-9 ≥ 10) or endorsed any level of suicidal ideation were offered Web-based p...

  15. Consultation Needs Assessment in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences: Viewpoints of Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrus Jalili

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Consultation can play an effective role in accommodating students to conditions and can be followed by academic achievement. This study was aimed to determine the consultation needs assessment among medical students in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 300 students from undergraduate basic sciences of medical faculty of KUMS during 2016. Two structured questionnaires were applied for collecting data: demographics and consultation needs assessment. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 16 using bivariate correlations, t-test, and ANOVA test. Results: The age range of participants was 19 to 31 with the average of 22.78±2.30. Gender was associated significantly and statistically with the areas of individual growth and promotion needs, educational needs, employment needs and emotional needs; girls in these areas acquired a higher score compared to boys (P<0.05. Furthermore, the domain of individual growth and promotion needs acquired the highest score. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that most of the students' needs were in the field of individual and educational growth and promotion. Furthermore, the average scores of guidance and consultation needs assessment of the female students was higher, with the necessity of paying more attention to the consultation problems among them.

  16. A Multilevel Perspective on the Climate of Bullying: Discrepancies Among Students, School Staff, and Parents

    OpenAIRE

    WAASDORP, TRACY EVIAN; PAS, ELISE T.; O’BRENNAN, LINDSEY M.; BRADSHAW, CATHERINE P.

    2011-01-01

    Although many bullying prevention programs aim to involve multiple partners, few studies have examined perceptual differences regarding peer victimization and the broader bullying climate among students, staff, and parents. The present study utilized multilevel data from 11,674 students, 960 parents, and 1,027 staff at 44 schools to examine the association between school-level indicators of disorder, norms regarding bullying and bullies, and students, parents, and staff perceptions of safety,...

  17. The 5Cs of Consultation: Training Medical Students to Communicate Effectively in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Chad S; Tadisina, Kashyap Komarraju; Saks, Mark; Franzen, Doug; Woods, Rob; Banh, Kenny V; Bounds, Richard; Smith, Michael; Deiorio, Nicole; Schwartz, Alan

    2015-11-01

    Effective communication is critical for health care professionals, particularly in the Emergency Department (ED). However, currently, there is no standardized consultation model that is consistently practiced by physicians or used for training medical graduates. Recently, the 5Cs of Consultation model (Contact, Communicate, Core Question, Collaborate, and Close the Loop) has been studied in Emergency Medicine residents using simulated consultation scenarios. Using an experimental design, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the 5Cs consultation model in a novel learner population (medical students) and in a "real time and real world" clinical setting. A prospective, randomized, controlled study was conducted at eight large, academic, urban, tertiary-care medical centers (U.S. and Canada). Intervention involved two experimental groups (asynchronous and live training) compared to a baseline control group. All participants placed up to four consult phone calls. A senior physician observed and assessed each call using a preapproved 5Cs checklist and a Global Rating Scale (GRS). Participants who received training (asynchronous or live) scored significantly higher on the 5Cs checklist total and GRS than the control group. Both training methods (asynchronous and live) were equally effective. Importantly, learning gains were sustained as students' 5Cs checklist total and GRS scores remained consistently higher at their second, third, and fourth consult (relative to their first consult). At posttest, all participants reported feeling more confident and competent in relaying patient information. Medical students can be trained to use the 5Cs model in a timely, inexpensive, and convenient manner and increase effectiveness of physician consultations originating from the ED. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Path modeling of knowledge, attitude and practice toward palliative care consultation service among Taiwanese nursing staff: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hsueh-Hsing; Shih, Hsiu-Ling; Wu, Li-Fen; Hung, Yu-Chun; Chu, Chi-Ming; Wang, Kwua-Yun

    2017-08-17

    The Taiwanese government has promoted palliative care consultation services (PCCS) to support terminally ill patients in acute ward settings to receive palliative care since 2005. Such an intervention can enhance the quality of life and dignity of terminally ill patients. However, research focusing on the relationship between the knowledge, attitude and practice of a PCCS using path modelling in nursing staff is limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of path modeling on the knowledge, attitude and practice toward PCCS in Taiwanese nursing staff. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study design using convenience sampling. Data collected included demographics, knowledge, attitude and practice as measured by the PCCS inventory (KAP-PCCSI). Two hundred and eighty-four nursing staff from a medical center in northern Taiwan participated in the study in 2013. We performed descriptive statistics, regression analysis, and path modeling using SPSS 19.0 and set p knowledge, attitude, and practice toward PCCS among nurses was the frequency of contact with PCCS. In addition, higher level of knowledge toward PCCS was associated with working in haematology and oncology wards, and participation in education related to palliative care. A more positive attitude toward PCCS was associated with working in a haematology and oncology ward, and experience of friends or relatives dying. Higher level of practice toward PCCS was associated with nurses who participated in education related to palliative care. In the path modeling, we found that holders of a master's degree indirectly positive affected practice toward PCCS. Possession of a bachelor degree or above, being single, working within a haematology and oncology ward, and frequency of contact with PCCS positively affected practice toward PCCS. Based on this study, it is proposed that consultation with PCCS has a positive impact on the care of terminally ill patients. Encouragement of staff to

  19. Sweden; 2004 Article IV Consultation-Staff Report; Staff Statement; Public Information Notice on the Executive Board Discussion; and Statement by the Executive Director for Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2004-01-01

    This 2004 Article IV Consultation highlights that the downturn experienced by the Swedish economy in 2002–03 was relatively mild, with growth remaining well above the European Union average. Expansionary fiscal policy in 2002 underpinned private consumption. Private investment, however, remained weak and activity decelerated when the impact of public sector stimulus waned in the first half of 2003. Economic activity is expected to pick up steadily in 2004–05 as the global recovery gathers pac...

  20. Beliefs about Meditating among University Students, Faculty, and Staff: A Theory-Based Salient Belief Elicitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Alyssa M.; Middlestadt, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Stress impacts college students, faculty, and staff alike. Although meditation has been found to decrease stress, it is an underutilized strategy. This study used the Reasoned Action Approach (RAA) to identify beliefs underlying university constituents' decision to meditate. Participants: N = 96 students, faculty, and staff at a large…

  1. A Multilevel Perspective on the Climate of Bullying: Discrepancies among Students, School Staff, and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waasdorp, Tracy Evian; Pas, Elise T.; O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2011-01-01

    Although many bullying prevention programs aim to involve multiple partners, few studies have examined perceptual differences regarding peer victimization and the broader bullying climate among students, staff, and parents. The present study utilized multilevel data from 11,674 students, 960 parents, and 1,027 staff at 44 schools to examine the…

  2. Use of CD-Rom databases by staff and students in the University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analyses revealed that many staff and students were not properly informed of the existence of CD-Rom databases in the library and they use inappropriate search terms thereby retrieving irrelevant information. CD-ROMs are mostly used for literature search and teaching. Staff and students preferred the use of CD-ROMs to ...

  3. Student and Staff Perceptions of a Learning Management System for Blended Learning in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Kathryn A.; Prieto-Rodriguez, Elena

    2018-01-01

    Higher education institutions routinely use Learning Management Systems (LMS) for multiple purposes; to organise coursework and assessment, to facilitate staff and student interactions, and to act as repositories of learning objects. The analysis reported here involves staff (n = 46) and student (n = 470) responses to surveys as well as data…

  4. Consulting to Support Emotional Behavioral Disordered Students: Implementing a Behavioral School-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Faith

    2012-01-01

    Consulting is a type of helping relationship that usually occurs in a context whereby the consultee (teacher) is trained for the purpose of helping the client (student). The goal is to address a situation in order to solve problems within it and to empower consultees by training them to recognize needs and the resources available to them. The…

  5. The impact of assessing simulated bad news consultations on medical students' stress response and communication performance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, S. van; Tromp, F.; Grosfeld, F.; Cate, O. ten; Bensing, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Seventy second-year medical students volunteered to participate in a study with the aim of evaluating the impact of the assessment of simulated bad news consultations on their physiological and psychological stress and communication performance. Measurements were taken of salivary cortisol, systolic

  6. The impact of assessing simulated bad news consultations on medical students' stress response and communication performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dulmen, Sandra; Tromp, Fred; Grosfeld, Frans; ten Cate, Olle; Bensing, Jozien

    2007-01-01

    Seventy second-year medical students volunteered to participate in a study with the aim of evaluating the impact of the assessment of simulated bad news consultations on their physiological and psychological stress and communication performance. Measurements were taken of salivary cortisol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, state anxiety and global stress using a Visual Analogue Scale. The subjects were asked to take three salivary cortisol samples on the assessment day as well as on a quiet control day, and to take all other measures 5 min before and 10 min after conducting the bad news consultation. Consultations were videotaped and analyzed using the information-giving subscale of the Amsterdam Attitude and Communication Scale (AACS), the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS), and the additional non-verbal measures, smiling, nodding and patient-directed gaze. MANOVA repeated measurements were used to test the difference between the cortisol measurements taken on the assessment and the control day. Linear regression analysis was used to determine the association between physiological and psychological stress measures and the students' communication performance. The analyses were restricted to the sample of 57 students who had complete data records. In anticipation of the communication assessment, cortisol levels remained elevated, indicating a heightened anticipatory stress response. After the assessment, the students' systolic blood pressure, heart rate, globally assessed stress level and state anxiety diminished. Pre-consultation stress did not appear to be related to the quality of the students' communication performance. Non-verbal communication could be predicted by pre-consultation physiological stress levels in the sense that patient-directed gaze occurred more often the higher the students' systolic blood pressure and heart rate. Post-consultation heart rate remained higher the more often the students had looked at the patient and the

  7. Delegate, Collaborate, or Consult? A Capstone Simulation for Senior Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Lorelli S

    2016-01-01

    Clinical experiences are educational and fulfilling for both students and faculty; however, challenges arise in providing students with a variety of experiences where the leadership skills of prioritizing, collaborating, consulting, and delegating care can be developed. This article reports on a capstone simulation created to develop and sustain the prioritization, organization, and delegation skills of fourth year nursing students. Through the introduction of a multipatient simulation prior to graduation, nursing students will have a better understanding of the high-level leadership skills practicing registered nurses must possess in today's demanding health care environment.

  8. Student and staff perceptions of the international postgraduate student experience: A qualitative study of a UK university

    OpenAIRE

    Bird, E.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore student and staff perceptions of academic, personal and social factors influencing the international postgraduate student experience at a UK University. Focus groups were conducted with international students enrolled on a Master in Public Health programme (n=10). An in-depth survey containing open-ended questions was completed by university staff that contribute to postgraduate teaching (n=12). Qualitative data were analysed using Thematic Analysis. Student and st...

  9. School Climate for Gay and Lesbian Students and Staff Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John D.

    1994-01-01

    In high schools, a conspiracy of silence shrouds the sexual orientation issue. Although the social atmosphere is vaguely supportive, fear and the realities of life cause most gays and lesbians to keep their sexual identities hidden. Homophobia can be addressed through staff development, support staff and services, inclusion of homosexual issues in…

  10. School staff perpetration of physical violence against students in Uganda: a multilevel analysis of risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Katherine G; Knight, Louise; Glynn, Judith R; Allen, Elizabeth; Naker, Dipak; Devries, Karen M

    2017-01-01

    Objective To conduct a multilevel analysis of risk factors for physical violence perpetration by school staff against Ugandan students. Design Multilevel logistic regression analysis of cross-sectional survey data from 499 staff and 828 caregivers of students at 38 primary schools, collected in 2012 and 2014 during the Good Schools Study. Setting Luwero District, Uganda. Main outcome measure Past-week use of physical violence by school staff against students was measured using the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect ‘Child Abuse Screening Tool- Child International’ and the WHO Multi-Country Study on Women’s Health and Domestic Violence against Women. Results Of 499 staff, 215 (43%) reported perpetration of physical violence against students in the past week. Individual risk factors associated with physical violence perpetration included being a teacher versus another type of staff member (pviolence against non-students (pviolence (IPV) (pviolence perpetration compared with male staff who had not been a victim of IPV. No evidence was observed for school- or community-level risk factors. Conclusions Physical violence perpetration from school staff is widespread, and interventions are needed to address this issue. Staff who have been victims of violence and who use violence against people other than students may benefit from additional interventions. Researchers should further investigate how school and community contexts influence staff’s physical violence usage, given a lack of associations observed in this study. PMID:28821514

  11. Opening-up education : promoting active learning with students and staff

    OpenAIRE

    Denholm-Price, James; Orwell, Suzan; Soan, Peter

    2015-01-01

    It is well-established that active learning benefits students’ learning (Freeman et al, 2014), however changing pedagogy can be challenging for academic staff. The “Clickers Project” described here, although originally envisaged primarily as an automated mechanism for monitoring student attendance and engagement, additionally made it easy for academic staff to increase in-class interactivity, giving students opportunities for self-assessment and feedback. Over 500 first year students were pro...

  12. 'It's complicated': Staff nurse perceptions of their influence on nursing students' learning. A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Sarah E; MacLeod, Martha L; Schiller, Catharine J

    2018-04-01

    During both teacher-led clinical practica and precepted practica, students interact with, and learn from, staff nurses who work on the clinical units. It is understood that learning in clinical practice is enhanced by positive interactions between staff nurses and nursing students. While much is known about preceptors' experiences of working with nursing students, there is little evidence to date about staff nurses' perspectives of their interactions with students in teacher-led practica. To understand teacher-led clinical practica from the perspective of staff nurses. A qualitative descriptive approach answers the question: How do staff nurses perceive their contributions to nursing students' learning during teacher-led practica? Nine staff Registered Nurses (RNs) working within a regional acute care hospital in western Canada were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. Interview transcripts were analyzed using cross case analysis to discover themes and findings were checked by several experienced RNs. Analysis showed that nurses' interactions with nursing students are complicated. Nurses want to "train up" their future colleagues but feel a heavy burden of responsibility for students on the wards. This sense of burden for the staff nurses is influenced by several factors: the practice environment, the clinical instructor, the students themselves, and the nurses' understanding of their own contributions to student learning. Staff nurses remain willing to support student learning despite multiple factors that contribute to a sense of burden during teacher-led practica. Workplace environment, nursing program, and personal supports are needed to support their continuing engagement in student learning. Nurses need to know how important they are as role models, and the impact their casual interactions have on student nurses' socialization into the profession. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Implementing Montessori Methods for Dementia™ in Ontario long-term care homes: Recreation staff and multidisciplinary consultants' perceptions of policy and practice issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducak, Kate; Denton, Margaret; Elliot, Gail

    2018-01-01

    Montessori-based activities use a person-centred approach to benefit persons living with dementia by increasing their participation in, and enjoyment of, daily life. This study investigated recreation staff and multidisciplinary consultants' perceptions of factors that affected implementing Montessori Methods for Dementia™ in long-term care homes in Ontario, Canada. Qualitative data were obtained during semi-structured telephone interviews with 17 participants who worked in these homes. A political economy of aging perspective guided thematic data analysis. Barriers such as insufficient funding and negative attitudes towards activities reinforced a task-oriented biomedical model of care. Various forms of support and understanding helped put Montessori Methods for Dementia™ into practice as a person-centred care program, thus reportedly improving the quality of life of residents living with dementia, staff and family members. These results demonstrate that when Montessori Methods for Dementia™ approaches are learned and understood by staff they can be used as practical interventions for long-term care residents living with dementia.

  14. Perceived role legitimacy and role importance of Australian school staff in addressing student cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Peter J; Norberg, Melissa M; Dillon, Paul; Manocha, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    The high prevalence of cannabis use by Australian secondary school students makes schools an ideal setting for the delivery of substance use prevention programs. Although efficacious school-based cannabis prevention programs exist, there is scant research investigating the perceived role legitimacy and role importance of school staff. As such, this study surveyed a sample of 1691 Australian school staff by utilizing Generation Next seminars which are attended by professionals working with young people. The self-completed survey identified that, despite elevated contact with students relative to other school staff, teachers reported the least role importance and legitimacy of all school staff. Further, teachers reported the lowest level of staff drug education training, which was an important predictor of an increased feeling of role importance and legitimacy among school staff.

  15. Knowledge about epilepsy by students and staff of a school in Fortaleza-CE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvânia Maria Mendes Vasconcelos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the knowledge of teachers, students and employees of a school about epilepsy. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional, quantitative study held in a school in Fortaleza - CE. The universe consisted of all students and staff at the school who met the following inclusion criteria: to be a student or employee of the night shift, to be 18 years old or above. Data collection occurred in September 2007, by applying a structured questionnaire. From 69 questionnaires, 50 were completed by students, 11 by teachers and eight by other school employees. We divided the sample into two groups: staff (employees and teachers and students. Results: The results show that 22% of staff believed that one of the forms of epilepsy transmission occurred through saliva. It was found that 98% of staff and 94% of students said that epilepsy is a neurological disorder. Concerning the control of the disease, 94% of students and 78% of staff believed that it occurs by taking the medication daily. Among the respondents, 29% of staff and 22% of students felt that people with epilepsy have difficulty in school learning. It was also observed that most participants scored appropriate procedures to be adopted in the seizure. Conclusion: The research determined gaps in the knowledge about epilepsy in the studied sample.

  16. Student Leadership Development in Australian and New Zealand Secondary Girls' Schools: A Staff Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archard, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study regarding the phenomenon of student leadership development as reported by staff members in girls' schools located in Australia and New Zealand. Electronic survey was used as the method of data collection, facilitating both closed and open-ended responses. Using staff responses, the understanding and type…

  17. Imagined and Emerging Career Patterns: Perceptions of Doctoral Students and Research Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Lynn; Turner, Gill

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, research staff positions rather than lectureships are the reality for social sciences PhD graduates wishing academic work. Within this context, our longitudinal study examined how social science doctoral students and research staff in two UK universities imagined their futures in and out of academia. The variation over time in how…

  18. Perspectives from Japanese Staff in Canadian ESL Schools regarding Japanese Students' Groupism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoko

    2006-01-01

    The present study, which stems from a critical approach to common perceptions about ESL learners in the TESOL community, examines the perspectives of Japanese-speaking staff in Canadian ESL institutions on their students' school performance. From September 2003 to April 2004, qualitative data were gathered from 11 staff members through mail…

  19. Student and Staff Perceptions of Key Aspects of Computer Science Engineering Capstone Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olarte, Juan José; Dominguez, César; Jaime, Arturo; Garcia-Izquierdo, Francisco José

    2016-01-01

    In carrying out their capstone projects, students use knowledge and skills acquired throughout their degree program to create a product or provide a technical service. An assigned advisor guides the students and supervises the work, and a committee assesses the projects. This study compares student and staff perceptions of key aspects of…

  20. The impact of assessing simulated bad news consultations on medical students' stress response and communication performance

    OpenAIRE

    Dulmen, S.; Tromp, F.; Grosfeld, F.; ten Cate, Th.J.; Bensing, J.

    2007-01-01

    Seventy second-year medical students volunteered to participate in a study with the aim of evaluating the impact of the assessment of simulated bad news consultations on their physiological and psychological stress and communication performance. Measurements were taken of salivary cortisol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, state anxiety and global stress using a Visual Analogue Scale. The subjects were asked to take three salivary cortisol samples on the assessment day as we...

  1. A before and after study of medical students' and house staff members' knowledge of ACOVE quality of pharmacologic care standards on an acute care for elders unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinek, Samantha P; Cohen, Victor; Nelson, Marcia; Likourezos, Antonios; Goldman, William; Paris, Barbara

    2008-06-01

    The Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) comprehensive set of quality assessment tools for ill older persons is a standard designed to measure overall care delivered to vulnerable elders (ie, those aged > or =65 years) at the level of a health care system or plan. The goal of this research was to quantify the pretest and posttest results of medical students and house staff participating in a pharmacotherapist-led educational intervention that focused on the ACOVE quality of pharmacologic care standards. This was a before and after study assessing the knowledge ofACOVE standards following exposure to an educational intervention led by a pharmacotherapist. It was conducted at the 29-bed Acute Care for Elders (ACE) unit of Maimonides Medical Center, a 705-bed, independent teaching hospital located in Brooklyn, New York. Participants included all medical students and house staff completing a rotation on the ACE unit from August 2004 through May 2005 who completed both the pre-and posttests. A pharmacotherapist provided a 1-hour active learning session reviewing the evidence supporting the quality indicators and reviewed case-based questions with the medical students and house staff. Educational interventions also occurred daily through pharmacotherapeutic consultations and during work rounds. Medical students and house staff were administered the same 15-question, patient-specific, case-based, multiple-choice pre-and posttest to assess knowledge of the standards before and after receiving the intervention. A total of 54 medical students and house staff (median age, 28.58 years; 40 men, 14 women) completed the study. Significantly higher median scores were achieved on the multiple-choice test after the intervention than before (median scores, 14/15 [93.3%] vs 12/15 [80.0%], respectively; P = 0.001). A pharmacotherapist-led educational intervention improved the scores of medical students and house staff on a test evaluating knowledge of evidence

  2. Funding Staff Development for School Improvement and Student Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applewhite, Ann Simpson

    1999-01-01

    When Thornton (Colorado) High School organized for site-based management, the structuring committee understood the importance of providing a professional-development fund for staff members. The school decided to restructure with one central umbrella committee for site-based governance and several subcommittees reporting to the main committee. (MLH)

  3. Person First, Student Second: Staff and Administrators of Color Supporting Students of Color Authentically in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedke, Courtney L.

    2017-01-01

    In this qualitative study I explored the mentoring roles of staff and administrators for first-generation Black, Latinx, and Biracial students. Social reproduction theory (which assesses how inequality is perpetuated or disrupted generationally) was used to analyze social capital cultivated by mentors. Staff of Color nurtured the capital that…

  4. Interviewing and examination skills in paediatric medicine: videotape analysis of student and consultant performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menahem, S

    1987-01-01

    Taking an adequate history and competently examining a patient remain essential prerequisites for making a diagnosis. Four 5th year medical students who had completed 18 months of clinical teaching were assessed at the start and end of their ten-week paediatric term and compared with 4 experienced consultants. A videorecording was made of each patient encounter. The students' history was often incomplete, at times inaccurate and imprecise, despite earlier provision of a framework to obtain the necessary information. The students spent a great proportion of their time examining the child, yet their findings were questionable particularly if the child was uncooperative. The second recording made at the end of the student's paediatric term revealed a general improvement in their confidence and knowledge, though similar deficiencies were observed. The consultants, as expected, did better. They also showed a greater awareness of understanding the child within the context of his family. They spent more time interviewing the parent and child, offered a fuller explanation of the diagnosis and carefully reviewed the management. These findings further emphasize the need to improve and assess the clinical performance of students. PMID:3572942

  5. Language barriers in medical education and attitudes towards Arabization of medicine: student and staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbour, S M; Dewedar, S A; Kandil, S K

    2012-12-04

    Students and staff perspectives on language barriers in medical education in Egypt and their attitude towards Arabization of the medical curriculum were explored in a questionnaire survey of 400 medical students and 150 staff members. Many students (56.3%) did not consider learning medicine in English an obstacle, and 44.5% of staff considered it an obstacle only in the 1st year of medical school. Many other barriers to learning other than language were mentioned. However, 44.8% of students translated English terms to Arabic to facilitate studying and 70.6% of students in their clinical study years would prefer to learn patient history-taking in Arabic. While Arabization in general was strongly declined, teaching in Arabic language was suggested as appropriate in some specialties.

  6. Students, staff from Mexican university visit Virginia Tech

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Heather Riley

    2005-01-01

    A delegation of students and administrators from Tecnologico de Monterrey in Mexico (Monterrey Tec) arrived on Virginia Tech's campus Sept. 8 for a three-day student affairs exchange. The exchange encouraged those from both institutions to share ideas, practices, and resources, as well as provide a cross-cultural experience with college students from an international peer institution.

  7. A comparison of performances of consultant surgeons, NCHDs and medical students in a modified HPAT examination.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, A

    2010-06-01

    Following the implementation of the Fottrell report, entry to medical school in Ireland has undergone significant change. Medical school studentship is now awarded based on a combination of points obtained from the final examination of Irish secondary schools (the leaving certificate) combined with HPAT scores (Health Professions Admissions Test). The HPAT is designed to test a candidate\\'s knowledge in several different fields including problem solving skills, logical and non verbal reasoning. A sample HPAT was administered to a test group composed of consultant surgeons, non consultant hospital doctors, and medical students. Statistical analysis was performed and no significant difference was found between the performances of the groups. This is surprising as it was expected that groups with greater experience at medical problem solving would have translated to higher scores. This exposes a flaw within the HPAT system and a potential weakness in the process of doctor selection.

  8. Pulled in Many Directions: Tensions and Complexity for Academic Staff Responding to International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyrme, Gillian; McGee, Alyson

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an interview-based study of the academic practices of staff members in a New Zealand university in response to international students in their classes and under their supervision. International students enter academic cultures which are inevitably different from those which have provided their academic preparation.…

  9. Student Staff Partnership to Create an Interdisciplinary Science Skills Course in a Research Intensive University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolmer, Cherie; Sneddon, Peter; Curry, Gordon; Hill, Bob; Fehertavi, Szonja; Longbone, Charlotte; Wallace, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    This paper reflects upon the development of a multidisciplinary lesson plan aimed at developing science skills for Physics and Astronomy, Geographical and Earth Sciences, and Chemistry students at a research intensive Scottish university. The lesson plan was co-developed with a small group of staff and undergraduate students from these…

  10. Student and Staff Mental Health Literacy and MindMatters Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sarah; Doyle, Martha

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the literature and the experience of the MindMatters Plus demonstration schools in regard to improving student and staff mental health literacy. The aim of the MindMatters Plus initiative is to build the capacity of secondary schools to increase their support of students with high mental health needs. This is achieved in…

  11. Faculty and Staff Partnering with Student Activists: Unexplored Terrains of Interaction and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezar, Adrianna

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we build on two recent works (Gaston-Gayles, Wolf-Wendel; Tuttle, Twombley, and Ward, 2004; Slocum & Rhoads, 2008) that examine faculty and staff work with student activists, but expand the scope to include new questions such as why and how they partner with students, the impact of institutional context, and what role it might play…

  12. Academic Staff's Perspectives upon Student Plagiarism: A Case Study at a University in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongyan

    2015-01-01

    Much of the previous research concerning student plagiarism has been conducted in Anglo-American settings. The present paper reports a case study of academic staff's perspectives upon student plagiarism at a university in Hong Kong. Based on interviews with 16 instructors, the study focused on the teachers' views and pedagogical practices,…

  13. Understanding gaps between student and staff perceptions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    factors (Scott, Yeld & Hendry, 2007), as well as students struggling to access the discourse of the institution .... students on ECP and three lecturers who have extensive teaching experience in the programme. ... There were significant mismatches in the attitudes to learning, understanding of the field and the literacy skills that ...

  14. An Examination of Cross-Cultural Curriculum Development and Student Cross-Cultural Competencies in a School-Based Consultation Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arra, Christopher T.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this case study was to describe the cross-cultural consultation experiences of school psychology graduate students as they progressed through a semester-long school-based consultation course. Graduate students enrolled in a consultation course completed both quantitative and qualitative assessment measures. The course instructor used…

  15. Counseling Model Application: A Student Career Development Guidance for Decision Maker and Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwan; Gustientiedina; Sunarti; Desnelita, Yenny

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to design a counseling model application for a decision-maker and consultation system. This application as an alternative guidance and individual career development for students, that include career knowledge, planning and alternative options from an expert tool based on knowledge and rule to provide the solutions on student’s career decisions. This research produces a counseling model application to obtain the important information about student career development and facilitating individual student’s development through the service form, to connect their plan with their career according to their talent, interest, ability, knowledge, personality and other supporting factors. This application model can be used as tool to get information faster and flexible for the student’s guidance and counseling. So, it can help students in doing selection and making decision that appropriate with their choice of works.

  16. Student, tutor and staff nurse perceptions of the clinical learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuan, Ooi Loo; Barnett, Tony

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to describe and compare student nurses (n=142), staff nurses (n=54) and nurse tutors (n=8) perceptions of the clinical learning environment (CLE), and to identify factors that enhanced or inhibited student learning. The setting was a private hospital in Penang, Malaysia. Data were collected using a structured, self-administered questionnaire that consisted of six a priori subscales. Principal component analysis supported a six factor solution and a reduction in the number of items from 44 to 34. Participants' overall perception of the CLE was positive, though there were significant differences in 5 of the 6 subscales between the three groups. For students and their tutors, the most positive component of the CLE was 'supervision by clinical instructors'. Staff nurses reported more favourably on the learner friendliness of the CLE than did students or tutors. Factors that enhanced student learning included students' and staff nurses' attitude towards student learning, variety of clinical opportunities, sufficient equipment, and adequate time to perform procedures. Factors that hindered student learning were: overload of students in the clinical unit, busy wards, and students being treated as workers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Recruitment and retention of scholarship recipient nursing students and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Susan K; Sherrod, Roy A

    2011-12-13

    Few problems are more relevant in health care today than nurse recruitment and retention. The purpose of this study was to identify job satisfaction factors for nurse and nursing student education scholarship recipients, as well as examine the relationship of these factors to the intent to complete contractual agreements. Findings revealed that job satisfaction and a positive image of nursing were influential factors in intent to complete contractual agreements. Results may prove valuable information to recruit nursing students and increase job satisfaction.

  18. Using behavioral skills training to promote safe and correct staff guarding and ambulation distance of students with multiple physical disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeyama, Bobby; Sturmey, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The study analyzed the effects of self-recording and behavioral skills training on guarding responses of 3 staff members while they assisted 3 students with multiple disabilities to ambulate. The intervention increased the percentage of correct posture and guarding responses and the distance that students ambulated. These effects generalized when staff taught new students.

  19. NPS Student Services Office Bids Farewell to Longtime Staff Member

    OpenAIRE

    Abel, Brian H.

    2017-01-01

    Today@NPS NPS Student Services Administrator Mario Salim, right, shakes hands with colleagues following the presentation of the Department of the Navy Superior Civilian Service Award during NPS President’s Council, Sept. 26 in Herrmann Hall. Salim will soon retire after 16 years of civil service, matched by his 20­year active duty career as a Navy Personnelman.

  20. The Efficacy of Consulting Practicum in Enhancing Students' Readiness for Professional Career in Management Information Systems: An Empirical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan, Ikpe Justice

    2016-01-01

    Consulting practicum (CP) is a form of experiential learning technique to prepare students for professional careers. While CP has become a popular way to help students acquire the essential practical skills and experience to enhance career readiness and ensure a smooth transition from college to employment, there is a lack of empirical studies…

  1. The attitudes of undergraduate students and staff to the use of electronic learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, B; White, D A; Walmsley, A D

    2004-04-24

    Computer-aided learning (CAL) offers advantages over traditional methods of learning as it allows students to work in their own time and pace. The School of Dentistry at the University of Birmingham has created an electronic learning website, named the Ecourse. This is designed to be a web-based supplement to the dental undergraduate curriculum. The aim of this study was to determine the attitudes of third year dental students and members of staff about the Ecourse website. A questionnaire was produced and piloted before being distributed to all 65 third year dental students to obtain their opinions about the Ecourse website. The views of Ecourse were sought from four members of staff by performing qualitative, semi-structured interviews. Lecture handouts and textbooks were reported as the sources used most often, by 96% of students. Eighty-six per cent of students are accessing the Ecourse mainly at the School of Dentistry, but 53% are also accessing it at home. Students liked the multiple-choice questions, downloading extra notes and looking at pictures and animation to explain clinical procedures. The majority of the students (79%) want the Ecourse to be used as a supplement to the undergraduate programme and 7% wanted it to replace formal lectures. Staff recognised the benefits of the Ecourse but were concerned about plagiarism, the effect on lecture attendance and the lack of feedback from students on existing CAL material. Students consider the Ecourse as a positive method of supplementing traditional methods of learning in the dental undergraduate programme. However in contrast teaching staff expressed negative views on the use of e-learning.

  2. Using Computerized Mental Health Programs in Alternative Education: Understanding the Requirements of Students and Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuosmanen, Tuuli; Fleming, Theresa M; Barry, Margaret M

    2018-06-01

    Computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (cCBT) programs have been shown to be both acceptable and effective with youth. However, their use with more vulnerable youth, such as early school leavers, remains relatively unstudied. This study explored student and staff attitudes toward the use of cCBT in an alternative education setting. Student and staff needs were assessed using the Requirements development approach (Van Velsen, Wentzel, & Van Gemert-Pijnen, 2013). An online staff survey (n = 16) was conducted to provide information on the context of delivery, and stakeholder requirements were further explored in four student workshops (n = 32) and staff group discussions (n = 12). Students' requirements in relation to program look and feel were reflective of issues with literacy and concentration. Activity- rather than text-based programs were considered easier to learn from, whereas attractive design with features such as connecting with others were thought necessary to keep young people engaged. Students wanted to learn practical skills on improving their mental health and well-being, using content that is positive, encouraging, and credible and that can be tailored to individual needs. Anonymity and voluntary participation were considered essential when delivering cCBT in the context of alternative education, as well as additional access from home to ensure timeliness of support. Staff required both flexibility and careful planning and timetabling in order to deliver cCBT in the alternative education setting and to support student engagement. The findings provide novel insight into the needs and preferences of vulnerable youth, with important implications for the implementation of computerized mental health programs in alternative education settings. A better understanding of user needs and preferences is critical for improving the uptake and impact of e-mental health resources.

  3. Developing students' time management skills in clinical settings: practical considerations for busy nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan

    2011-06-01

    In clinical settings, nursing staff often find themselves responsible for students who have varying time management skills. Nurses need to respond sensitively and appropriately, and to teach nursing students how to prioritize and better allocate time. This is important not only for developing students' clinical skills but also for shaping their perceptions about the quality of the placement and their willingness to consider it as a potential work specialty. In this column, some simple, practical strategies that nurses can use to assist students with improving their time management skills are identified. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Medical Student Experiences on Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry Rotations: A Nationwide Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Fremonta; Abbasi, Omair; Kasick, David; Lee, Kewchang; Pelic, Christine; Zinser, Jennifer; Harris, Thomas; Funk, Margo

    Consultation-liaison (C-L) psychiatry clerkship rotations may improve medical students' understanding of psychiatric principles relevant to the settings in which they will ultimately practice. This study aimed to characterize students' experiences on C-L rotations. This cross-sectional survey study, sponsored by the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine Subcommittee on Medical Student Education, was conducted at 5 US medical schools between 2012 and 2016. After the C-L rotation, students completed a voluntary 17-item survey. A total of 235 surveys were collected (mean response rate = 92%). The most frequently endorsed benefit of C-L was learning to manage psychiatric disorders in the context of medical illness (89%). The most frequently endorsed drawback was inconsistent/excessively variable workload (40%). Overall, 82% of respondents recommended C-L to other students; 80% reported that the ideal clerkship would include exposure to both C-L and inpatient psychiatry. Overall, 38% reported that their C-L experience increased their interest in psychiatry as a career. Effect of C-L on interest in psychiatry did not differ by study site, age, sex, clerkship length, or time spent on C-L. Respondents who noted more positive role-modeling on C-L compared to other clerkship rotations were more likely to report increased interest in a psychiatry career (odds ratio = 2.70). Most medical students perceive C-L rotations favorably. Positive role modeling may increase their consideration of psychiatry specialization. The findings that C-L rotation length did not correlate with attitudes and that most students preferred exposure to both inpatient and C-L psychiatry suggest that C-L exposure can beneficially be integrated into core clerkships containing other elements. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Cost of Sustainability in Higher Education: Staff and Student Views of a Campus Food Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Amy; Capetola, Teresa; Lawson, Justin T.; Henderson-Wilson, Claire; Murphy, Berni

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate the sustainability of the food culture at Deakin University and to determine what the barriers to increasing the sustainability of food on the Burwood campus may be. Design/methodology/approach: An online survey of staff and students from the Faculty of Health at the Burwood campus of Deakin University (n =…

  6. Understanding the Use of Educational Technology among Faculty, Staff, and Students at a Medical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazley, Abby Swanson; Annan, Dustin L.; Carson, Nancy E.; Freeland, Melissa; Hodge, Ashley B.; Seif, Gretchen A.; Zoller, James S.

    2013-01-01

    A college of health professions at a medical university located in the southeastern United States is striving to increase the use of educational technology among faculty, staff, and students. A strategic planning group was formed and charged with enhancing the use of educational technology within the college. In order to understand the current…

  7. Perceived Role Legitimacy and Role Importance of Australian School Staff in Addressing Student Cannabis Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Peter J.; Norberg, Melissa M.; Dillon, Paul; Manocha, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    The high prevalence of cannabis use by Australian secondary school students makes schools an ideal setting for the delivery of substance use prevention programs. Although efficacious school-based cannabis prevention programs exist, there is scant research investigating the perceived role legitimacy and role importance of school staff. As such,…

  8. Toxic effects of formalin-treated cadaver on medical students, staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Noha Selim Mohamed Elshaer

    2017-01-02

    Jan 2, 2017 ... Anatomy. Blood cell count. Cadaver. Formaldehyde. Formalin toxicity. Medical students. a b s t r a c t. Background: Formaldehyde can be toxic, allergenic and ... staff members, and workers at the Anatomy department in the Alexandria Faculty of Medicine (AFM). ...... wood workers exposed to formaldehyde.

  9. Stress among Academic Staff and Students' Satisfaction of Their Performances in Payame Noor University of Miandoab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabari, Kamran; Moradi Sheykhjan, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    Present study examined the relationship between stress among academic staff and students' satisfaction of their performances in Payame Noor University (PNU) of Miandoab City, Iran in 2014. The methodology of the research is descriptive and correlation that descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. Statistical Society…

  10. International Study in the Global South: Linking Institutional, Staff, Student and Knowledge Mobilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Ashley; Raghuram, Parvati

    2018-01-01

    The international mobility of institutions, staff, students and knowledge resources such as books and study materials has usually been studied separately. This paper, for the first time, brings these different forms of knowledge mobilities together. Through a historical analysis of South African higher education alongside results from a…

  11. An Investigation into Staff:Student Ratios in Nursing and Midwifery Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter, Susan; And Others

    A study examined the calculation of staff:student ratios (SSRs) in nursing and midwifery education in courses validated by the English National Board for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting (ENB). Data were collected from questionnaires mailed to all 108 colleges of nursing and midwifery and higher education institutions offering ENB-validated…

  12. Redesigning Schools to Reach Every Student with Excellent Teachers: Teacher & Staff Selection, Development, & Evaluation Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Impact, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This toolkit is a companion to the school models provided on OpportunityCulture.org. The school models use job redesign and technology to extend the reach of excellent teachers to more students, for more pay, within budget. Most of these school models create new roles and collaborative teams, enabling all teachers and staff to develop and…

  13. Internet access and usage by staff and students: a case study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study focused on Internet access and usage by staff and students in the University of Jos Main Library. It investigated monthly number of users that queued to access Internet monthly and the number of users who actually had access to use the Internet between January – December 2006. Other things investigated ...

  14. Toxic effects of formalin-treated cadaver on medical students, staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Formaldehyde can be toxic, allergenic and carcinogenic. Evaporation of formaldehyde from formalin-treated cadavers in the anatomy dissection rooms can produce high exposure. This study was conducted to assess acute and chronic toxic effects of formalin-treated cadavers on medical students, staff ...

  15. See your GP, see the world - An activating course concept for fostering students' competence in performing vaccine and travel consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltermann, Esther; Krane, Sibylla; Kiesewetter, Jan; Fischer, Martin R; Schelling, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Performing vaccine and travel consultations is a crucial aspect of the daily routine in general medicine. However, medical education does not provide adequately and structured training for this future task of medical students. While existing courses mainly focus on theoretical aspects, we developed a course aiming to foster practical experience in performing vaccine and travel consultations. Project report: The course was implemented in the simulation clinic at the University of Munich in the summer 2011 semester using role-plays in a simulation-based learning environment. The course represents different disciplines involved in vaccine and travel medicine. Students' learning is supported through active engagement in planning and conducting consultations of patients. The course was implemented successfully and students' acceptance was high. However, there is a need for structured teaching of theoretical basics in vaccine and travel medicine earlier in medical curriculum. The insights gained through our course are used for the development of the structured longitudinal curriculum "vaccine medicine".

  16. Ombuds’ corner: Let's not confuse students and fellows with missing staff

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Vuillemin

    2013-01-01

    One of the main missions of CERN is education. Several programmes are dedicated to training students. Others, like the Fellowship programme, offer graduates to start a career and become professionals in their fields. All these young and fresh people provide very valuable contributions to our Organization.   At the same time, it is important to remember that they (especially the students) are here to learn from our professional staff for their future career. This is the correct exchange: they bring their dedicated work to our projects and they gain experience by working with our staff. There’s no better way to learn than on-the-job. However they should not be considered as missing staff, with the exact same requirements expected from the CERN staff. Potential missing staff in some areas is a separate issue, and educational programmes are not designed to make up for it. On-the-job learning and training are not separated but dynamically linked together, benefiting to both par...

  17. The experiences of English as second language radiation therapy students in the undergraduate clinical program: Perceptions of staff and students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolderston, Amanda; Palmer, Cathryne; Flanagan, Wendy; McParland, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: This qualitative study explores the experiences of undergraduate radiation therapy students who have English as a second language (ESL) in the clinical environment, as well as the experiences of staff members who teach these students. Specific study aims were to increase understanding of the issues faced by this subset of students, including identifying potential barriers to clinical learning. Methods and design: A qualitative methodology was utilized with focus groups as the data collection tool to gain insights from students/recent graduates whose primary language was not English, as well as from staff members who educate this group of students in the clinical environment. Two focus groups were conducted; Group 1 (n = 6) consisted of ESL graduates/students and Group 2 (n = 5) consisted of radiation therapy staff members and clinical coordinators who are actively involved in the education of ESL students. Comparative data analysis of the transcribed discussions was carried out using content analysis and categorized according to the emergent themes. Results: Three overarching themes were identified for both groups, 'Communication', 'Differences' and 'Dealing with it...' The primary barrier for ESL students was seen as proficiency in English, which manifested in a number of ways. This resulted in a lack of confidence and a subsequent sense of alienation. External challenges identified were unfamiliarity with Canadian systems and cultural differences. Support strategies identified included the use of mentorship, professional development and external support for teaching staff and journaling, among others. Conclusions: There are identified challenges for ESL students in the clinical environment, thus it is important to provide support for this population to improve learning outcomes. Recommendations for practice, arising from the study as well as the available literature included: allowing extra time, assisting with improving English proficiency

  18. The experiences of English as second language radiation therapy students in the undergraduate clinical program: Perceptions of staff and students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolderston, Amanda [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology, Room 5-969, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)], E-mail: amanda.bolderston@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Palmer, Cathryne; Flanagan, Wendy; McParland, Neil [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology, Room 5-969, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2008-08-15

    Introduction: This qualitative study explores the experiences of undergraduate radiation therapy students who have English as a second language (ESL) in the clinical environment, as well as the experiences of staff members who teach these students. Specific study aims were to increase understanding of the issues faced by this subset of students, including identifying potential barriers to clinical learning. Methods and design: A qualitative methodology was utilized with focus groups as the data collection tool to gain insights from students/recent graduates whose primary language was not English, as well as from staff members who educate this group of students in the clinical environment. Two focus groups were conducted; Group 1 (n = 6) consisted of ESL graduates/students and Group 2 (n = 5) consisted of radiation therapy staff members and clinical coordinators who are actively involved in the education of ESL students. Comparative data analysis of the transcribed discussions was carried out using content analysis and categorized according to the emergent themes. Results: Three overarching themes were identified for both groups, 'Communication', 'Differences' and 'Dealing with it...' The primary barrier for ESL students was seen as proficiency in English, which manifested in a number of ways. This resulted in a lack of confidence and a subsequent sense of alienation. External challenges identified were unfamiliarity with Canadian systems and cultural differences. Support strategies identified included the use of mentorship, professional development and external support for teaching staff and journaling, among others. Conclusions: There are identified challenges for ESL students in the clinical environment, thus it is important to provide support for this population to improve learning outcomes. Recommendations for practice, arising from the study as well as the available literature included: allowing extra time, assisting with

  19. An Investigation of the Components Used to Calculate Staff:Student Ratios in Nursing and Midwifery Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Sarah; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Responses from 39 of 108 nursing/midwifery schools and colleges determined that most calculate staff:student ratios (SSRs) by dividing total staff by total students. Seventeen different SSR formulae and 10 for full-time equivalency were identified. The need for definition and standardization was suggested. (SK)

  20. Student Pedagogical Teams: Students as Course Consultants Engaged in Process of Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Lorna; Ventura, Susan; Schuldt, Hilary; Donlan, Pamela

    2018-01-01

    Faculty engage in "pedagogical solitude," in which they plan, teach, and assess their work alone. To optimize teaching environments and learning outcomes, students can serve as "student pedagogical teams" (SPT) and provide feedback on instructor performance, course structure, and content. Using self-determination theory, this…

  1. Kenyan medical student and consultant experiences in a pilot decentralized training program at the University of Nairobi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibore, Minnie W; Daniels, Joseph A; Child, Mara J; Nduati, Ruth; Njiri, Francis J; Kinuthia, Raphael M; O'Malley, Gabrielle; John-Stewart, Grace; Kiarie, James; Farquhar, Carey

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the University of Nairobi (UoN) has increased the number of enrolled medical students threefold in response to the growing need for more doctors. This has resulted in a congested clinical training environment and limited opportunities for students to practice clinical skills at the tertiary teaching facility. To enhance the clinical experience, the UoN Medical Education Partnership Initiative Program Undertook training of medical students in non-tertiary hospitals around the country under the mentorship of consultant preceptors at these hospitals. This study focused on the evaluation of the pilot decentralized training rotation. The decentralized training program was piloted in October 2011 with 29 fourth-year medical students at four public hospitals for a 7-week rotation. We evaluated student and consultant experiences using a series of focus group discussions. A three-person team developed the codes for the focus groups and then individually and anonymously coded the transcripts. The team's findings were triangulated to confirm major themes. Before the rotation, the students expressed the motivation to gain more clinical experience as they felt they lacked adequate opportunity to exercise clinical skills at the tertiary referral hospital. By the end of the rotation, the students felt they had been actively involved in patient care, had gained clinical skills and had learned to navigate socio-cultural challenges in patient care. They further expressed their wish to return to those hospitals for future practice. The consultants expressed their motivation to teach and mentor students and acknowledged that the academic interaction had positively impacted on patient care. The decentralized training enhanced students' learning by providing opportunities for clinical and community experiences and has demonstrated how practicing medical consultants can be engaged as preceptors in students learning. This training may also increase students' ability

  2. Using consultation in student groups to improve development of team work skills amongst more reluctant students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    Since Aalborg University (AAU) was founded it has been using an educational model, where Problem Based Learning is the turning point. Each semester the students work in groups using half of the study time to solve and document a real-world engineering problem. Working with problems gives...... the students a very deep learning of the subjects they study and also very good problem solving skills and team work competencies both highly appreciated by the Danish companies. An important aspect of the first semester of the education is a course where the students get tools and tricks for good...... showed less interest in the course than e.g. Software and Computer Science students. The consequences of this are that app. 1/3 of the BAIT students don’t develop their team work skills and competences to the level that is expected. The development of team work skills is closely connected to how...

  3. Direct Behavioral Consultation: Effects on Teachers' Praise and Student Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrene, Brad A.; Lestremau, Lauren; Zoder-Martell, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Direct behavioral consultation is an extension of traditional behavioral consultation and focuses on assessment and training in the classroom during ongoing classroom activities. This study evaluated direct behavioral consultation services in two elementary alternative classrooms referred following a program evaluation in which data suggested…

  4. Academic integrity and plagiarism: perceptions and experience of staff and students in a school of dentistry: a situational analysis of staff and student perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, P J; Hughes, C

    2012-02-01

    This project has investigated student and staff perceptions and experience of plagiarism in a large Australian dental school to develop a response to an external audit report. Workshops designed to enhance participants' understanding of plagiarism and to assist with practical ways to promote academic integrity within the school were provided to all students and staff. Anonymous surveys were used to investigate perceptions and experience of plagiarism and to assess the usefulness of the workshops. Most participants felt that plagiarism was not a problem in the school, but a significant number were undecided. The majority of participants reported that the guidelines for dealing with plagiarism were inadequate and most supported the mandatory use of text-matching software in all courses. High proportions of participants indicated that the workshops were useful and that they would consider improving their practice as a result. The study provided data that enhanced understanding of aspects of plagiarism highlighted in the report at the school level and identified areas in need of attention, such as refining and raising awareness of the guidelines and incorporation of text-matching software into courses, as well as cautions to be considered (how text-matching software is used) in planning responsive action. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Kenyan medical student and consultant experiences in a pilot decentralised training program at the University of Nairobi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibore, Minnie W.; Daniels, Joseph A.; Child, Mara J.; Nduati, Ruth; Njiri, Francis J.; Kinuthia, Raphael; O'Malley, Gabrielle; John-Stewart, Grace; Kiarie, James; Farquhar, Carey

    2015-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, the University of Nairobi (UoN) has increased the number of enrolled medical students three-fold in response to the growing need for more doctors. This has resulted in a congested clinical training environment and limited opportunities for students to practice clinical skills at the tertiary teaching facility. To enhance the clinical experience, the UoN Medical Education Partnership Initiative Program undertook to train medical students in non-tertiary hospitals around the country under the mentorship of consultant preceptors at these hospitals. This study focused on the evaluation of the pilot decentralised training rotation. Methods The decentralised training program was piloted in October 2011 with 29 fourth-year medical students at four public hospitals for a seven-week rotation. We evaluated student and consultant experiences using a series of focus group discussions. A three-person team developed the codes for the focus groups and then individually and anonymously coded the transcripts. The teams’ findings were triangulated to confirm major themes. Results Before the rotation, the students expressed the motivation to gain more clinical experience as they felt they lacked adequate opportunity to exercise clinical skills at the tertiary referral hospital. By the end of the rotation, the students felt they had been actively involved in patient care, had gained clinical skills and had learned to navigate socio-cultural challenges in patient care. They further expressed the wish to return to those hospitals for future practice. The consultants expressed their motivation to teach and mentor students and acknowledged that the academic interaction had positively impacted on patient care. Discussion The decentralised training enhanced students’ learning by providing opportunities for clinical and community experiences and has demonstrated how practicing medical consultants can be engaged as preceptors in students learning. This

  6. The Role(s) of Student Voice in 14-19 Education Policy Reform: Reflections on Consultation and Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood, Jannette

    2013-01-01

    Certain policy areas with considerable impact on young people's educational experiences and achievements, notably assessment and qualifications, do not involve consultation with young people to any meaningful extent. Findings from a national study, which included focus groups with 243 students in the 14-19 phase, are presented with respect to…

  7. Challenges of the Administrative Consultation Wiki Research Project as a Learning and Competences Development Method for MPA Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Polonca; Stare, Janez

    2015-01-01

    Administrative Consultation Wiki (ACW) is a project run under the auspices of the Faculty of Administration and the Ministry of Public Administration in Slovenia since 2009. A crucial component thereof is the involvement of students of Master of Public Administration (MPA) degree programs to offer them an opportunity to develop competences in…

  8. Supporting the Inclusion of a Student with Asperger Syndrome: A Case Study Using Conjoint Behavioural Consultation and Self-Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Lee A.

    2005-01-01

    Conjoint behavioural consultation (CBC) is an indirect form of service delivery that combines the resources of home and school to meet the academic, social and behavioural needs of children. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the utility of CBC as a service delivery model for supporting the inclusion of a student with Asperger syndrome in…

  9. Negative Impact of Employment on Engineering Student Time Management, Time to Degree, and Retention: Faculty, Administrator, and Staff Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Will

    2012-01-01

    Interviews with faculty, administrators, staff, and students at four engineering programs reveal the role of undergraduate student employment on retention and timely degree completion among engineering students. Dueling narratives reveal how student approaches to earning an engineering degree differ greatly from faculty, administrator, and staff…

  10. Beliefs about meditating among university students, faculty, and staff: a theory-based salient belief elicitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Alyssa M; Middlestadt, Susan E

    2014-01-01

    Stress impacts college students, faculty, and staff alike. Although meditation has been found to decrease stress, it is an underutilized strategy. This study used the Reasoned Action Approach (RAA) to identify beliefs underlying university constituents' decision to meditate. N=96 students, faculty, and staff at a large midwestern university during spring 2012. A survey measured the RAA global constructs and elicited the beliefs underlying intention to meditate. Thematic and frequency analyses and multiple regression were performed. Quantitative analyses showed that intention to meditate was significantly predicted (R2=.632) by attitude, perceived norm, and perceived behavioral control. Qualitative analyses revealed advantages (eg, reduced stress; feeling calmer), disadvantages (eg, takes time; will not work), and facilitating circumstances (eg, having more time; having quiet space) of meditating. Results of this theory-based research suggest how college health professionals can encourage meditation practice through individual, interpersonal, and environmental interventions.

  11. Dental students' and staff perceptions of the impact of learning environment disruption on their learning and teaching experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The, A J M; Adam, L; Meldrum, A; Brunton, P

    2017-10-06

    This project is a qualitative investigation into student and staff experiences of the effect of a major building redevelopment on their Dental School learning and teaching environments. Currently, there is little research exploring the impact of disruptions to the learning environment on students' learning and staff teaching experiences. Data were collected in 2016 using an online survey, semi-structured interviews and focus groups with students and staff. Data were analysed using a general inductive approach. Four broad themes emerged as follows: (i) students valued having a space for personal and collaborative work within the Dental School; (ii) both staff and students positioned staff contributions to learning experiences above the role of the physical learning environment; (iii) the majority of staff and students not feel that the physical environment limited their clinical training; and (iv) staff and students were able to adapt to the impact of building redevelopment through resilience and organisation. Results of this research have informed the provision of collegial spaces at the School, both as the building redevelopment continues, and in planning for the completed building. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Case study - Implementing a plagiarism detection service: ways of working with staff and students

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Judy

    2012-01-01

    The session will outline how Turnitin was introduced to the University of Kent in 2006 and then implemented over the following academic year, including recent follow-up developments. The University Guidelines on Using Turnitin will be discussed, along with the use of specific Academic Integrity resources to support the use of Turnitin. There will be information about how staff are using Turnitin; how it has been received by students; the impact on reported instances of plagiarism (in specific...

  13. Oral hygiene practices and habits among dental students and staff in a dental college, India.

    OpenAIRE

    Sudhakara reddy, R; Lavanya, R; Saimadhavi, N; Jyothirmai, K; Saikiran, Ch

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Oral health is an essential component of general health in one's life. Oral self practices are very effective in keeping up one's good oral health from an individual's point of view. Such hygienic conditions prevent many oral diseases from happening or control them from damaging oral health adversely. Aim: To investigate the oral hygiene practices and habits among dental students and staff in a dental college. Materials and methods:  A survey with the aid of speci...

  14. Students Partner with Laboratory Staff to Modernize LES-9 Satellite Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-29

    orbiting counterpart, a satellite model built by Minuteman Technical High School students and Laboratory staff hangs reminiscent of one of the...communications satellite was developed for the U.S. Air Force and designed to operate in coplanar, circular, inclined, and geosynchronous orbits . Royster...Laboratory’s first pioneering inventions, the Lincoln Experimental Satellite (LES) family. Launched on 14 March 1976, LES-9 is the last in a series of

  15. Asthma in a university campus: a survey of students and staff of Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhabor, Gregory E; Obaseki, Daniel O; Awopeju, Olayemi F; Ijadunola, Kayode T; Adewole, Olufemi O

    2016-01-01

    Asthma continues to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. But, its burden among adult populations in university campuses is not well described. Through a multistage cluster sampling of students and staff of the Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria, we obtained a representative sample, each for students and staff. We administered the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) screening questionnaire to all the respondents. A subgroup did a spirometry test and completed a detailed questionnaire. Asthma was considered "possible", if a respondent provided affirmative response to symptoms of "wheezing or whistling", "attack of shortness of breath", "diagnosed attack of asthma" in the last 12 months or "currently taking medicines for asthma". From population of 13,750 students and 1428 staff of the university, we systematically sampled 2750 (20%) students and all the staff. Amongst these, 2372 students and 455 staff completed the screening questionnaire. The mean age (SD) of the responders was 21.9 (3.2) and 46.1 (8.9) for students and staff and most of them were men; 58.6% and 65.9%, respectively. While an estimated 2.6% (95% CI: 1.7-3.5) of students had an asthma attack in the preceding 12 months, 14.5% (95% CI: 12.5-16.5) and 25.2% (95% CI: 22.8-27.7) reported shortness of breath and nocturnal cough, respectively. The staff population reported fewer symptoms. The proportion with "possible asthma" was 18.2% (95% CI: 16.0-20.4) for students and 8.0% (95% CI: 5.4-10.7) for staff. The prevalence of asthma is high among students and staff of Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria.

  16. Student and staff experiences of attendance monitoring in undergraduate obstetrics and gynecology: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deane RP

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Richard P Deane, Deirdre J Murphy Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Trinity College Dublin, The University of Dublin, Coombe Women & Infants University Hospital, Dublin, Republic of Ireland  Background: Despite the widespread introduction of active learning strategies to engage students across modern medical curricula, student attendance and attendance monitoring remain a challenging issue for medical educators. In addition, there is little published evidence available to medical educators regarding the use of attendance monitoring systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the opinions of students and staff about the use of a paper-based student logbook to record student attendance across all clinical and classroom-based learning activities within an undergraduate clinical rotation in obstetrics and gynecology (OBGYN. Methods: Each student undertaking the clinical rotation in OBGYN was required to complete a paper-based logbook in a booklet format that listed every clinical and classroom-based activity that the student was expected to attend. A cross-sectional survey evaluating the acceptability, practicality, and effect on access to learning opportunities of using the logbook was undertaken. The survey was conducted among all medical students who completed their OBGYN rotation over a full academic year and staff who taught on the program. Results: The response rate was 87% (n=128/147 among students and 80% (n=8/10 among staff. Monitoring attendance was widely acceptable to students (n=107/128, 84% and staff (n=8/8, 100%. Most students (n=95/128, 74% and staff (n=7/8, 88% recommended that attendance should be mandatory during rotations. Almost all staff felt that attendance should contribute toward academic credit (n=7/8, 88%, but students were divided (n=73/128, 57%. Students (n=94/128, 73% and staff (n=6/8, 75% reported that the use of the logbook to record attendance with tutor signatures was a satisfactory system, although

  17. Language use in consultation: Can “we” help teachers and students?

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Daniel S.; Guiney, Meaghan C.; Barrett, Courteney A.

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing the use of function words such as pronouns in conversation is an increasingly popular approach in social psychology, but has not yet been applied to the study of school-based consultation. The two central purposes of this study were to: (1) examine how language is used by consultants-in-training (CITs) and consultees within a collaborative model of consultation, and (2) to explore the relation between language use and the collaborative relationship, consultee outcomes, and client ou...

  18. Student and staff experiences of attendance monitoring in undergraduate obstetrics and gynecology: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Richard P; Murphy, Deirdre J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the widespread introduction of active learning strategies to engage students across modern medical curricula, student attendance and attendance monitoring remain a challenging issue for medical educators. In addition, there is little published evidence available to medical educators regarding the use of attendance monitoring systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the opinions of students and staff about the use of a paper-based student logbook to record student attendance across all clinical and classroom-based learning activities within an undergraduate clinical rotation in obstetrics and gynecology (OBGYN). Each student undertaking the clinical rotation in OBGYN was required to complete a paper-based logbook in a booklet format that listed every clinical and classroom-based activity that the student was expected to attend. A cross-sectional survey evaluating the acceptability, practicality, and effect on access to learning opportunities of using the logbook was undertaken. The survey was conducted among all medical students who completed their OBGYN rotation over a full academic year and staff who taught on the program. The response rate was 87% (n=128/147) among students and 80% (n=8/10) among staff. Monitoring attendance was widely acceptable to students (n=107/128, 84%) and staff (n=8/8, 100%). Most students (n=95/128, 74%) and staff (n=7/8, 88%) recommended that attendance should be mandatory during rotations. Almost all staff felt that attendance should contribute toward academic credit (n=7/8, 88%), but students were divided (n=73/128, 57%). Students (n=94/128, 73%) and staff (n=6/8, 75%) reported that the use of the logbook to record attendance with tutor signatures was a satisfactory system, although students questioned the need for recording attendance at every classroom-based activity. Most students felt that the logbook facilitated access to learning experiences during the rotation (n=90/128, 71%). Staff felt that the process of signing

  19. Good Intentions: Teaching and Specialist Support Staff Perspectives of Student Disclosure of Mental Health Issues in Post-Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venville, Annie; Street, Annette F.; Fossey, Ellie

    2014-01-01

    This article reports findings from a qualitative case study, as part of which staff perspectives of student disclosure of mental health issues in an Australian post-secondary vocational education setting were explored. Twenty teaching and specialist support staff from four vocational education and training institutions participated in individual…

  20. The Impact of Occupational Stress on Academic and Administrative Staff, and on Students: An Empirical Case Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablanedo-Rosas, Jose Humberto; Blevins, Randall C.; Gao, Hongman; Teng, Wen-Yuan; White, Joann

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the impact of occupational stress among academic staff, administrative staff, and students in a well-established US university environment. The results show that there are different correlations associated with stress such as organisational demand, health issues, and stress management. Findings suggest that occupational…

  1. Exploring the Contribution of Professional Staff to Student Outcomes: A Comparative Study of Australian and UK Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Carroll; Regan, Julie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the second stage of a comparative study between two higher education institutions: one in Australia and the other in the United Kingdom, which explored the contributions of professional staff to student outcomes. The first stage acted as a scoping exercise to ascertain how the contributions of professional staff to student…

  2. "Should I prioritize medical problem solving or attentive listening?": the dilemmas and challenges that medical students experience when learning to conduct consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aper, Leen; Veldhuijzen, Wemke; Dornan, Tim; van de Ridder, Monica; Koole, Sebastiaan; Derese, Anselme; Reniers, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Communication skills can be trained alongside clinical reasoning, history taking or clinical examination skills. This is advocated as a solution to the low transfer of communication skills. Still, students have to integrate the knowledge/skills acquired during different curriculum parts in patient consultations at some point. How do medical students experience these integrated consultations within a simulated environment and in real practice when dealing with responsibility? Six focus groups were conducted with (pre-)/clerkship students. Students were motivated to practice integrated consultations with simulated patients and felt like 'real physicians'. However, their focus on medical problem solving drew attention away from improving their communication skills. Responsibility for real patients triggered students' identity development. This identity formation guided the development of an own consultation style, a process that was hampered by conflicting demands of role models. Practicing complete consultations results in the dilemma of prioritizing medical problem solving above attention for patient communication. Integrated consultation training advances this dilemma to the pre-clerkship period. During clerkships this dilemma is heightened because real patients trigger empathy and responsibility, which invites students to define their role as doctor. When training integrated consultations, educators should pay attention to students' learning priorities and support the development of students' professional identity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Emotional responses of tutors and students in problem-based learning: lessons for staff development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Deborah; Hughes, Patricia

    2005-02-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a method of teaching and learning that is used increasingly in medical and health care curricula worldwide. The literature on PBL is considerable and continues to develop. One important aspect of PBL is that students and tutors spend a lot of time together and this fosters an informal atmosphere that may encourage intimacy. The existing literature on PBL has not considered the emotional and psychological aspects of PBL nor the concomitant need for staff support and development. We present a discussion paper considering the ways in which educationalists using or considering using PBL could be informed by the psychological and psychotherapeutic literature on groups and group dynamics, in particular the work of Wilfred Bion. We discuss how PBL tutorials may arouse emotional responses that could result in unconsidered behaviours that impede student learning. We argue that faculty and PBL tutors need to agree and remain alert to the primary task of the group. Faculty should develop professional standards for tutors to use as reference points to ensure the group stays on course and achieves its intended outcomes. We conclude that greater attention should be paid by educationalists and faculty to identifying possible tutor emotional responses as part of initial PBL tutor training and ongoing staff development. We offer vignettes that have been successfully used in training and staff development at a UK medical school to demonstrate the practical application of our theoretical discussion.

  4. Staff Perceptions of the Effect of the Leader in Me on Student Motivation and Peer Relationships in Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidd, Charlene

    2016-01-01

    Staff and student surveys at Lane Elementary School (pseudonym) confirm that students lack motivation to complete class work and often struggle to interact appropriately with one another. Similar concerns are reported across the United States as indicated by national Gallup Poll results on student motivation, peer relationships, and feelings of…

  5. Has the inclusion of a longitudinally integrated communication skills program improved consultation skills in medical students? A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameena Shah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence highlights a lack of communication skills in doctors leading to dysfunctional consultations. To address this deficit, a private medical college instituted curricular reforms with inclusion of a longitudinal communication skills program. A pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of this program by comparing the consultation skills of medical students of this college with a medical college without a communication skills program. Methods: A 4-station Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE was conducted in the third and final year. Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare the difference in the distribution between OSCE stations total and construct scores. Results: At the end of the third year, 21 (31.34%, students of the study site (medical college 1 [college with integrated longitudinal communication skills program] and 31 (46.26% students from the comparison site (medical college 2 [comparable college without communication skills program] consented. Medical college 1 achieved a significantly higher overall mean total station score of 68.0% (standard deviation [SD] =13.5 versus 57.2% (SD = 15.4 (P < 0.001. Significantly higher mean scores were achieved on three stations. At the end of the final year, 19 students (29.3% from medical college 1 and 22 (34% students from medical college 2 consented. The difference in overall mean total station score reduced from 9.2% to 7.1% (70.2 (SD = 13.7 versus 63.1 (SD = 15.2 (P = 0.004. The mean scores of both colleges decreased in "Patient presenting with Hepatitis C Report" station (P values 0.004 and 0.775 and in "Patient Request for Faith Healing Therapy in Diabetes Mellitus" station (P values 0.0046 and 0.036, respectively. Conclusion: Longitudinal communication skills in an undergraduate curriculum positively impacted consultation skills. Community-based training and faculty development are required to develop effective patient-centered consultation skills.

  6. Physician assistant student exposure to the long-term care setting by working with a consultant pharmacist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, LaDonna S; Morton, Jill M; Albers, Jessica N; Pham, Gennevieve T

    2012-01-01

    Physician assistant (PA) students need exposure to a wide range of clinical settings including long-term care (LTC); however, finding consistent educational LTC opportunities is difficult. This article describes a unique, replicable, educational opportunity for PA students to get exposure to the LTC setting by working with a consultant pharmacist. Pairs of students spent 4 hours with the pharmacist, reviewing and copresenting two to three patient charts. Students completed a questionnaire that asked them to describe what they had learned. Students indicated they had an increased appreciation of having strong knowledge of medication prescribing and monitoring and avoiding polypharmacy, as well as disease prevention, the importance of interprofessional care, and preventing medication errors. Although LTC settings vary, consultant pharmacists may provide a reliable gateway to the LTC setting for PA students. Gains in skills were not directly measured; however, students reported an increased appreciation for aspects of geriatric care related to all six of the competencies outlined in Competencies for the Physician Assistant Profession.

  7. [Telematic consultations by nursing staff for patients with inflammatory bowel disease: evaluation of its capacity for resolving problems and its costs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanromán Alvarez, Luciano; de Castro Parga, Maria Luisa; Hernández Ramírez, Vicent; Pineda Mariño, Juan Ramón; Salgado Alvarez, Carlos; Rodríguez Grégori, Jose Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with a significant use of healthcare resources. In 2009, a digestive diseases nursing consultation, with availability of health telematic media was created in our hospital (CHUVI). The important activity performed in this area encouraged us to quantify the cost savings for the care health system. 1) To evaluate the results of the implementation of a telematic IBD consultation. 2) To assess the capacity for resolving problems by nurses. 3) To estimate the potential cost savings of telematic nursing consultation in IBD. We collected data on telematic activity from 2009 to 2011. The estimated cost saving was calculated by applying the fees for health services published by our National Health Service (SERGAS) for care in new outbreaks of IBD activity. Data were analyzed with SPSS 15.0 RESULTS: There was a significant linear increase on the resolution of telephone demands by nurses (P=.03) and an important decrease of demands needing medical advice (P<.0001). Focusing on IBD outbreak claims (n=452), only 65 patients (14.38%) required medical attention in emergency services, and 33 (7.3%) were hospitalized. Altogether we calculated an average cost saving since 2009 to 2011 of 73,603€. We found a gradual increase in resolving telematic care demands by nurses. Telematic consultation can lead to significant cost savings, which justify the implementation of a digestive diseases nurse consultation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Experimental Effects of Student Evaluations Coupled with Collaborative Consultation on College Professors' Instructional Skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, M.H.; in 't Veld, R.; Vorst, H.C.M.; van Driel, J.H.; Mellenbergh, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    This experimental study concerned the effects of repeated students’ evaluations of teaching coupled with collaborative consultation on professors’ instructional skills. Twenty-five psychology professors from a Dutch university were randomly assigned to either a control group or an experimental

  9. Expanding Technical Assistance Consultation to Public Schools: District-Wide Evaluation of Instructional and Behavior Support Practices for Students with Developmental Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Robert F.; Luiselli, James K.; Jefferson, Gretchen, L.

    2002-01-01

    Describes consultation to a public school district in the form of a systems-wide evaluation of instructional and behavior support practices for students with developmental disabilities. The format of the evaluative model, respective findings, suggested remedies, and implications for large-scale public school consultation are provided. (Contains 22…

  10. Are school-level factors associated with primary school students' experience of physical violence from school staff in Uganda?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Louise; Nakuti, Janet; Allen, Elizabeth; Gannett, Katherine R; Naker, Dipak; Devries, Karen M

    2016-01-01

    The nature and structure of the school environment has the potential to shape children's health and well being. Few studies have explored the importance of school-level factors in explaining a child's likelihood of experiencing violence from school staff, particularly in low-resource settings such as Uganda. To quantify to what extent a student's risk of violence is determined by school-level factors we fitted multilevel logistic regression models to investigate associations and present between-school variance partition coefficients. School structural factors, academic and supportive environment are explored. 53% of students reported physical violence from staff. Only 6% of variation in students' experience of violence was due to differences between schools and half the variation was explained by the school-level factors modelled. Schools with a higher proportion of girls are associated with increased odds of physical violence from staff. Students in schools with a high level of student perceptions of school connectedness have a 36% reduced odds of experiencing physical violence from staff, but no other school-level factor was significantly associated. Our findings suggest that physical violence by school staff is widespread across different types of schools in this setting, but interventions that improve students' school connectedness should be considered. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  11. Effects of School Staff Communication on Initiations and Repair Strategies of Students with Severe Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzroni, Orit E.; Shalev, Maayan

    2017-01-01

    The study examined the effects of the types of communication breakdowns of the communication partners on the repair strategies of students with severe intellectual disability during interaction within the natural school environment. Forty-eight staff members, divided into two groups based on daily vs. weekly contact with the student, and 12…

  12. "Empty Signifiers" and "Dreamy Ideals": Perceptions of the "International University" among Higher Education Students and Staff at a British University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartner, Alina; Cho, Yoonjoo

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on a mixed-methods case study investigating how higher education staff and students understand, experience and envision the "international university." As it is becoming clear that international student mobility is not in itself a panacea for universities seeking to internationalise, "internationalisation at…

  13. Using Behavioral Skills Training to Promote Safe and Correct Staff Guarding and Ambulation Distance of Students with Multiple Physical Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeyama, Bobby; Sturmey, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The study analyzed the effects of self-recording and behavioral skills training on guarding responses of 3 staff members while they assisted 3 students with multiple disabilities to ambulate. The intervention increased the percentage of correct posture and guarding responses and the distance that students ambulated. These effects generalized when…

  14. Cyprus; 2011 Article IV Consultation: Staff Report; Supplement; Public Information Notice on the Executive Board Discussion; and Statement by the Executive Director for Cyprus

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Article IV Consultation report discusses the Cypriot economy, which faces strong headwinds and downside risks owing to financial turbulence in the euro area and the large exposure of Cypriot banks to Greece. Executive Directors noted that Cyprus faces daunting economic challenges in the face of faltering external demand and worsening domestic financial conditions. Directors urged the authorities to act forcefully to restore sound public finances and safeguard the stability of the ban...

  15. Student and School Staff Strategies to Combat Cyberbullying in an Urban Student Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelfrey, William V., Jr.; Weber, Nicole L.

    2015-01-01

    Research indicates that cyberbullying is occurring among middle and high school student populations at increasing rates. There is limited research, however, on strategies students use to combat cyberbullying, as well as how schools implement policies, intervention tactics, and prevention strategies. This qualitative study aimed to explore, among a…

  16. Staff and Student Perceptions of Support Services for International Students in Higher Education: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Pam; Dunworth, Katie

    2012-01-01

    One aspect of the internationalisation of higher education in Australia has been a large growth in the number of international students enrolled in universities. While this has brought a number of benefits to the institutions, the students themselves report varying levels of satisfaction with their experience. One area which can contribute to…

  17. School staff, parent and student perceptions of a Breakfast in the Classroom model during initial implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folta, Sara C; Carmichael Djang, Holly; Halmo, Megan; Metayer, Nesly; Blondin, Stacy A; Smith, Kathleen S; Economos, Christina D

    2016-06-01

    To understand perspectives of stakeholders during initial district-wide implementation of a Breakfast in the Classroom (BIC) model of the School Breakfast Program. Qualitative data were collected from twenty-nine focus groups and twenty interviews with stakeholders in a school district early in the process of implementing a BIC model of the School Breakfast Program. Ten elementary schools within a large, urban school district in the USA that served predominantly low-income, racial/ethnic minority students. Purposively selected stakeholders in elementary schools that had implemented BIC for 3-6 months: students (n 85), parents/guardians (n 86), classroom teachers (n 44), cafeteria managers (n 10) and principals (n 10). Four primary themes emerged, which were interpreted based on the Diffusion of Innovations model. School staff had changed their perceptions of both the relative disadvantages and costs related to time and effort of BIC over time; the majority of each stakeholder group expressed an appreciation for BIC; student breakfast consumption varied from day to day, related to compatibility of foods with child preferences; and stakeholders held mixed and various impressions of BIC's potential impacts. The study underscores the importance of engaging school staff and parents in discussions of BIC programming prior to its initiation to pre-emptively address concerns related to cost, relative disadvantages and compatibility with child preferences and school routines/workflow. Effectively communicating with stakeholders about positive impacts and nutritional value of the meals may improve support for BIC. These findings provide new information to policy makers, districts and practitioners that can be used to improve implementation efforts, model delivery and outcomes.

  18. Getting Together to Improve the School Environment: User Consultation, Participatory Design and Student Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolner, Pam; Hall, Elaine; Wall, Kate; Dennison, David

    2007-01-01

    This article first investigates historical trends in both the practice and the understanding of consultation, considering the often contrasting perspectives of architects and designers, compared to teachers and educationalists. Differing assumptions held by these two broad groups of professionals can lead to conflicting aims and objectives for…

  19. Feedback on video recorded consultations in medical teaching: why students loathe and love it – a focus-group based qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baerheim Anders

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Feedback on videotaped consultations is a useful way to enhance consultation skills among medical students. The method is becoming increasingly common, but is still not widely implemented in medical education. One obstacle might be that many students seem to consider this educational approach a stressful experience and are reluctant to participate. In order to improve the process and make it more acceptable to the participants, we wanted to identify possible problems experienced by students when making and receiving feedback on their video taped consultations. Methods Nineteen of 75 students at the University of Bergen, Norway, participating in a consultation course in their final term of medical school underwent focus group interviews immediately following a video-based feedback session. The material was audio-taped, transcribed, and analysed by phenomenological qualitative analysis. Results The study uncovered that some students experienced emotional distress before the start of the course. They were apprehensive and lacking in confidence, expressing fear about exposing lack of skills and competence in front of each other. The video evaluation session and feedback process were evaluated positively however, and they found that their worries had been exaggerated. The video evaluation process also seemed to help strengthen the students' self esteem and self-confidence, and they welcomed this. Conclusion Our study provides insight regarding the vulnerability of students receiving feedback from videotaped consultations and their need for reassurance and support in the process, and demonstrates the importance of carefully considering the design and execution of such educational programs.

  20. Student Engagement in First Year of an ICT Degree: Staff and Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheard, Judy; Carbone, Angela; Hurst, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a study of student engagement in the first year of their undergraduate information and communication technology (ICT) degree at an Australian university. The study was conducted at Monash University in the four undergraduate ICT degrees of the Faculty of Information Technology. The study draws on data collected from staff…

  1. Teacher and staff perceptions of school environment as predictors of student aggression, victimization, and willingness to intervene in bullying situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espelage, Dorothy L; Polanin, Joshua R; Low, Sabina K

    2014-09-01

    This study examines how teacher and staff perceptions of the school environment correlate with student self-reports of bullying, aggression, victimization, and willingness to intervene in bullying incidents using multi-informant, multilevel modeling. Data were derived from 3,616 6th grade students across 36 middle schools in the Midwest, who completed survey measures of bullying, aggression, victimization, and willingness to intervene in bullying situations. Teachers and staff (n = 1,447) completed a school environment survey. Bivariate associations between school-level and student self-reports indicated that as teacher and staff perceive aggression as a problem in their school, students reported greater bully perpetration, fighting, peer victimization, and less willingness to intervene. Further, as staff and teacher report greater commitment to prevent bullying and viewed positive teacher and student relationships, there was less bullying, fighting, and peer victimization, and greater willingness to intervene. In a model where all school environment scales were entered together, a school commitment to prevent bullying was associated with less bullying, fighting, and peer victimization. Student-reports of bully perpetration and peer victimization were largely explained by staff and teacher commitment to bully prevention, whereas fighting and willingness to intervene were largely explained by student characteristics (e.g., gender). We conclude that efforts to address bullying and victimization should involve support from the school administration. School psychologists should play an active role in the school climate improvement process, by creating a school climate council consisting of students, parents, and teachers; administering school climate measures; identifying specific school improvement targets from these data, and engaging all stakeholders in the ongoing school improvement plan. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Feasibility and cost of a medical student proxy-based mobile teledermatology consult service with Kisoro, Uganda, and Lake Atitlán, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greisman, Laura; Nguyen, Tan M; Mann, Ranon E; Baganizi, Michael; Jacobson, Mark; Paccione, Gerald A; Friedman, Adam J; Lipoff, Jules B

    2015-06-01

    The expansion of mobile technology and coverage has unveiled new means for delivering medical care to isolated and resource-poor communities. Teledermatology, or dermatology consultation from a distance using technology, is gaining greater acceptance among physicians and patients. To evaluate feasibility and cost of a smartphone-based teledermatology consult service utilizing a designated medical student proxy to facilitate all consults on site, and to evaluate the service's effect upon diagnosis and management. An IRB-approved smartphone-based teledermatology consult service was established to serve two rural communities in the developing world: Kisoro, Uganda, and Lake Atitlán, Guatemala. Fourth-year medical students were recruited as proxies for each site, responding to consults by local doctors and transmitting photographs and clinical information via a smartphone application to a dermatology resident and attending in the USA over an encrypted website. At the Ugandan site, when indicated, the medical student performed skin biopsies under supervision, and rotating Montefiore residents transported specimens back to the USA. From October 2011 to August 2012, 93 cases were evaluated by the consult service (57 from Uganda and 36 from Guatemala). Initial diagnoses changed completely in 55.9% (52 of 93) of cases, and management changes were recommended in 89.2% (83 of 93) of cases. The estimated total cost of supplies and technology was 42.01 USD per consult and 64.24 USD per biopsy (including processing). Given fixed upfront costs, the cost per consult decreased with each additional case. Smartphone-based systems for teledermatology consultation using a medical student proxy are feasible for delivery of care in the developing world at relatively little cost. Optimization and sustainability of this system requires and deserves further investigation in larger studies. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  3. Knowledge of Ebola virus disease: An evaluation of university students and staff regarding the current Ebola issue around the globe

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    Usman Abubakar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ebola virus disease (EVD is at the moment a global pandemic disease. The importance of public awareness and alertness toward the disease cannot be underestimated since it is an important step to prevent unnecessary anxiety, fear, as well as an excessive reaction that accompany such anxiety. The main objective of this study is to assess the current level of knowledge and perception of students and staff at Universiti Sains Malaysia toward EVD. Method: A cross sectional survey method was used, and a self-administered questionnaire was used as an instrument for data collection. The questionnaire consisted of three sections. Section A with 6 questions pertaining to demographic data of respondents′, Section B had 20 questions pertaining to respondents knowledge of cause, symptoms, transmission, prevention, and current affairs about EVD. Section C had 12 questions pertaining to respondents′ perception toward EVD. Respondents in this study included both students and staff. Results: From the 520 questionnaire (400 among students and 120 among staff distributed, only 458 were retrieved (380 from students and 78 from staff. Results showed that majority of the students were female (163; 66.0% for undergraduates, 71; 53.4% for postgraduate and 50; 64.1% for staff. The majority of the students first learned about EVD from the internet (193, 80.4%; 102, 81.0%; and 43, 58.9%, respectively, for undergraduate, postgraduate, and staff. This study found that the current level of knowledge about EVD among respondents is low (median knowledge score <50%. However, postgraduate students possess more knowledge than undergraduate and staff (median score 46.2%, P = 0.002. In addition, staff respondents from the university hospital (clinic were found to possess more knowledge than other category of staff (median score = 61.5%, P = 0.002. Furthermore, sciences based students were found to have more knowledge than arts and social sciences based students

  4. Computer Use Ethics among University Students and Staffs: The Influence of Gender, Religious Work Value and Organizational Level

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    Mohamed, Norshidah; Karim, Nor Shahriza Abdul; Hussein, Ramlah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which individual characteristics, which are gender, religious (Islamic) work value, and organization level (students and staff), are related to attitudes toward computer use ethics. This investigation is conducted in an academic setting in Malaysia, among those subscribing to the…

  5. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Mental Health First Aid Training among Student Affairs Staff at a Canadian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Jennifer; Brooks, Meghan; Burrow, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of providing the Mental Health First Aid training program to student affairs staff. The objective of the training was to increase knowledge of mental health, enhance sensitivity, and raise confidence to intervene and assist individuals experiencing a mental health issue. We found the training successfully met…

  6. The Importance of School Staff Referrals and Follow-Up in Connecting High School Students to HIV and STD Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasberry, Catherine N.; Liddon, Nicole; Adkins, Susan Hocevar; Lesesne, Catherine A.; Hebert, Andrew; Kroupa, Elizabeth; Rose, India D.; Morris, Elana

    2017-01-01

    This study examined predictors of having received HIV and sexually transmitted disease (STD) testing and having been referred by school staff for HIV/STD testing. In 2014, students in seven high schools completed paper-and-pencil questionnaires assessing demographic characteristics, sexual behavior, referrals for HIV/STD testing, and HIV/STD…

  7. Campus Microclimates for LGBT Faculty, Staff, and Students: An Exploration of the Intersections of Social Identity and Campus Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Annemarie

    2012-01-01

    This ethnographic study of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) faculty, staff, graduate students, and undergraduates expands the higher education conversation about campus climate beyond the traditional organizational-level paradigm. Findings suggest that LGBT individuals with similar organizational roles shared common experiences and…

  8. Long-Term Effectiveness of Two Educational Methods on Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice Toward Palliative Care Consultation Services Among Nursing Staff: A Longitudinal Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hsueh-Hsing; Wu, Li-Fen; Hung, Yu-Chun; Chu, Chi-Ming; Wang, Kwua-Yun

    2018-05-01

    This experimental study investigated long-term effectiveness of two educational methods on knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) about palliative care consultation services (PCCS) among nurses, recruited from a medical center located in Northern Taiwan in 2015, using a stratified cluster sampling method, with 88 participants in multimedia (experimental) and 92 in traditional paper education (control) group. Data were collected using KAP-PCCS questionnaire before education, immediately after, and 3rd and 6th month after education. Results showed that both K-PCCSI and P-PCCSI significantly increased immediately after, and at the 3rd month after education for the experimental group; the K-PCCSI remained significantly higher for the experimental group at the 6th month. The highest increase in scores for both K-PCCSI and P-PCCSI was observed at the 3rd month. There was no significant change in A-PCCS in both groups after follow-up periods, when compared before education. Therefore, using multimedia every 3 months to continue strengthening their knowledge may increase the referrals of terminal patients to PCCS.

  9. Lack of respect, role uncertainty and satisfaction with clinical practice among nursing students: the moderating role of supportive staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletta, Maura; Portoghese, Igor; Aviles Gonzales, Cesar Ivan; Melis, Paola; Marcias, Gabriele; Campagna, Marcello; Minerba, Luigi; Sardu, Claudia

    2017-07-18

    Clinical learning placements provide a real-world context where nursing students can acquire clinical skills and the attitudes that are the hallmark of the nursing profession. Nonetheless, nursing students often report dissatisfaction with their clinical placements. The aim of this study was to test a model of the relationship between student's perceived respect, role uncertainty, staff support, and satisfaction with clinical practice. A cross-sectional, descriptive survey was completed by 278 second- and third-year undergraduate nursing students. Specifically, we tested the moderating role of supportive staff and the mediating role of role uncertainty. We found that lack of respect was positively related to role uncertainty, and this relationship was moderated by supportive staff, especially at lower levels. Also, role uncertainty was a mediator of the relationship between lack of respect and internship satisfaction; lack of respect increased role uncertainty, which in turn was related to minor satisfaction with clinical practice. This study explored the experience of nursing students during their clinical learning placements. Unhealthy placement environments, characterized by lack of respect, trust, and support increase nursing students' psychosocial risks, thus reducing their satisfaction with their clinical placements. Due to the current global nursing shortage, our results may have important implications for graduate recruitment, retention of young nurses, and professional progression.

  10. Consulting Overseas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosensweig, Fred; And Others

    Consultants experience difficulty in being effective in a foreign country, particularly in developing countries. Difficulties include definite cross-cultural differences that consultants lack the skills to overcome or adjust to, language and communication differences, consultants' inability to adjust to a new situation quickly, and inability of…

  11. How stressful is doctor-patient communication? Physiological and psychological stress of medical students in simulated history taking and bad-news consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsman, Robert L; Pranger, Susan; Koot, Stephanie; Fabriek, Marcel; Karemaker, John M; Smets, Ellen M A

    2010-07-01

    Medical communication can be a stressful experience for both doctors and patients. In particular, inexperienced doctors facing the demanding task of a bad news consultation may experience high levels of distress. The aim of this exploratory study is to test students' differential cardiovascular reactivity to history taking and bad news consultations with a simulated patient, and to test the relation between the students' self-reported stressfulness of the consultation and their cardiovascular response. Fourth and fifth year medical students (n=20) conducted a history taking (HT) and a bad news (BN) consultation in a randomized order with a standardized patient. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) were assessed by way of the Finapres-technique in four conditions: rest, reading aloud, and during both consultations. Self-reported stress was assessed before and after each interview using the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and a visual analogue scale (VAS). Both HT and BN provoked more cardiovascular stress than reading. Bad-news provoked the highest HR and CO responses compared to all other conditions, and had a greater impact when it was the student's first consultation. The STAI and VAS data showed some correlations with the cardiovascular stress measures and a comparable but less significant pattern in stress response. The effect of order of the HT and BN consultations on the students' stress levels suggests an additional impact of novelty and habituation. Unfamiliarity with the patient may enhance the stressfulness of the task of breaking bad news. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. What Do We Say When We Talk about Sustainability?: Analyzing Faculty, Staff and Student Definitions of Sustainability at One American University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Katharine A.; Legere, Sasha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze how faculty, staff and students at one American University define the term sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: The authors analyze student, staff and faculty definitions by comparing word frequency counts to a list of the 25 most frequently found words in over 100 definitions of…

  13. "What Do You Think the Aims of Doing a Practical Chemistry Course Are?" A Comparison of the Views of Students and Teaching Staff across Three Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    George-Williams, Stephen R.; Ziebell, Angela L.; Kitson, Russell R. A.; Coppo, Paolo; Thompson, Christopher D.; Overton, Tina L.

    2018-01-01

    The aims of teaching laboratories is an important and ever-evolving topic of discussion amongst teaching staff at teaching institutions. It is often assumed that both teaching staff and students are implicitly aware of these aims, although this is rarely tested or measured. This assumption can lead to mismatched beliefs between students and…

  14. A case-based learning approach for teaching undergraduate veterinary students about dairy herd health consultancy issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malher, Xavier; Bareille, Nathalie; Noordhuizen, Jos P T M; Seegers, Henri

    2009-01-01

    A case-based learning (CBL) format was implemented at the Veterinary School of Nantes, France, for veterinary students in their last year of the curriculum who had chosen to track toward a farm animal career. The focus of the CBL format was learning about dairy herd health consultancy. The goal was to emphasize teamwork among students, introduce professional communications and advisory relationships with clients, and work within the technical and economic limitations of participating farms. These farms volunteered to participate and had identified a problem. The learning objectives included gaining basic knowledge of herd-level diseases and the methods to control these within herds. The program focused on health audits of dairy farms performed by teams of four to five students, culminating in submission of a herd health management action plan specific for the farm visited by each team. The CBL program was comprised of defined learning objectives for each team. The learning process was supervised, from orientation through to validation, by a panel of experts from within the veterinary school and from local industry. Teams submitted written reports that listed recommendations and an action plan for implementation. This report was defended by each team in front of the farmers, their professional partners, and the panel of supervisors. Assessment of the program by students, participating farms, and industry professionals was positive.

  15. Supporting adolescent emotional health in schools: a mixed methods study of student and staff views in England

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    Campbell Rona

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schools have been identified as an important place in which to support adolescent emotional health, although evidence as to which interventions are effective remains limited. Relatively little is known about student and staff views regarding current school-based emotional health provision and what they would like to see in the future, and this is what this study explored. Methods A random sample of 296 English secondary schools were surveyed to quantify current level of emotional health provision. Qualitative student focus groups (27 groups, 154 students aged 12-14 and staff interviews (12 interviews, 15 individuals were conducted in eight schools, purposively sampled from the survey respondents to ensure a range of emotional health activity, free school meal eligibility and location. Data were analysed thematically, following a constant comparison approach. Results Emergent themes were grouped into three areas in which participants felt schools did or could intervene: emotional health in the curriculum, support for those in distress, and the physical and psychosocial environment. Little time was spent teaching about emotional health in the curriculum, and most staff and students wanted more. Opportunities to explore emotions in other curriculum subjects were valued. All schools provided some support for students experiencing emotional distress, but the type and quality varied a great deal. Students wanted an increase in school-based help sources that were confidential, available to all and sympathetic, and were concerned that accessing support should not lead to stigma. Finally, staff and students emphasised the need to consider the whole school environment in order to address sources of distress such as bullying and teacher-student relationships, but also to increase activities that enhanced emotional health. Conclusion Staff and students identified several ways in which schools can improve their support of adolescent

  16. Management Practices of Cats Owned by Faculty, Staff, and Students at Two Midwest Veterinary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith L. Stella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding cat owners’ housing, care, and management practices is important for promoting cat welfare. A survey study was conducted on the housing and management practices used for cats by students, faculty, and staff of The Ohio State University and Purdue University veterinary colleges. Subjects were 138 cat-owner dyads. Most cats (74% were housed strictly indoors in keeping with common US veterinary recommendations. However, many did not implement best practices outlined for behavior and other welfare needs of indoor cats. The percentage of respondents placing resources where cats could be disrupted while using them was 31%, 53%, and 30% for resting areas, food/water dishes, and litter boxes, respectively. Many cats were not provided a litter box in a private area (35%, in multiple areas of the house (51%, or that was regularly washed (73%. Horizontal scratching opportunities were not provided to 38% of cats; 32% were not provided toys that mimic prey and 91% of cats were fed a diet consisting of >75% dry food. These findings suggest a need for more concerted efforts to educate owners about meeting their cats’ welfare needs so as to attenuate risks and improve cat physical and behavioral welfare outcomes.

  17. Climate Study of the Learning Environment for Faculty, Staff, and Students at a U.S. Dental School: Foundation for Culture Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch-Kinch, C A; Duff, R E; Ramaswamy, V; Ester, T V; Sponseller, S A; Seeley, J A

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the culture and climate for diversity and inclusion and the humanistic learning environment for students, faculty, and staff at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry. From July 2014 to June 2015, two committees of 16 faculty members, staff members, and students, in partnership with trained program evaluators, used a participatory program evaluation (PPE) process to conduct the assessment using key informant interviews, surveys, and focus groups. The topics addressed were humanistic environment, learning environment, diversity and inclusion, microaggressions and bullying, and activities and space. All staff members, all faculty members (both full- and part-time), and all students in all four years were invited to participate in the parallel but distinctive versions of the survey from November 10 to 25, 2014. Response rates for each group were as follows: 50% (318/642) for students, 68% (217/320) for staff, and 40% (147/366) for faculty; numbers responding to individual items varied. Among the respondents, the majority (76% faculty, 67% staff, 80% students) agreed that the environment fostered learning and personal growth and that a humanistic environment was important (97% faculty, 95% staff, 94% students). Many reported having experienced/witnessed a micro-aggression or bullying. Many also reported having "ever had" dissatisfaction with the learning environment (44% faculty, 39% staff, 68% students). The students sought better relationships with the faculty; the staff and faculty members sought opportunities for professional development and mentoring. Recommendations included cultural sensitivity training, courses for interpersonal skills, leadership and team-building efforts, addressing microaggressions and bullying, creating opportunities for collaboration, and increasing diversity of faculty, staff, and students. These recommendations were incorporated into the school's strategic plan. In this study, a utilization

  18. Quality of Student Paper Sources Improves after Individual Consultation with Librarians. A Review of: Reinsfelder, T. L. (2012. Citation analysis as a tool to measure the impact of individual research consultations. College & Research Libraries, 73(3, 263-277.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Newton Miller

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To determine whether the quality of sources used for a research paper will improve after a student receives one-on-one instruction with a librarian. To test citation analysis and a rating scale as means for measuring effectiveness of one-on-one consultations.Design – Citation analysis.Setting – Academic library of a large American university.Subjects – Papers from 10 courses were evaluated. In total, 76 students were asked to meet with librarians. Of these, 61 actually participated. Another 36 students from the control group were not asked to meet with a librarian (although 1 partook in a consultation.Methods – Librarians invited faculty to participate in a new service to help improve quality of student research papers. Eligible courses included those with a required research paper component where papers could be evaluated at different times in the project. Faculty instructed students in the class to meet with the librarian after a first draft of a paper was written. Students from seven courses were asked to meet with a librarian. Courses included English Composition (2, Geography (1, Child Development (1, Occupational Therapy (1, Marketing (1 and Women Writers (1. Three courses acted as control groups (all English Composition. After meeting with students to make recommendations, librarians used a rating scale (measuring relevancy, authority, appropriate dates and scope to review the quality of sources in both drafts and final papers.Main Results – One-on-one consultations with a librarian resulted in sources being of a higher quality in the final paper. With the exception of authority, the differences between draft and final paper were statistically significant in all measures (overall quality, relevance, dates and scope. Those in the control group showed no improvement in quality of sources between draft and final paper.Conclusion – Quality of sources in final paper improves after one-on-one consultations with

  19. Integrating Models of Collaborative Consultation and Systems Change to Implement Forgiveness-Focused Bullying Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaar, Nicole R.; Freedman, Suzanne; Carlon, Amy; Watson, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Through collaborative consultation with school staff, school psychologists have increasingly helped schools add bullying prevention and intervention programming to their service delivery systems. As schools search for ways to lessen the impact of bullying on the social-emotional health and academic achievement of students, forgiveness education is…

  20. Use of personal phones by senior nursing students to access health care information during clinical education: staff nurses' and students' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann-Price, Ruth A; Kennedy, Lynn D; Godwin, Catherine

    2012-11-01

    Research indicates that having electronic resources readily available increases learners' ability to make clinical decisions and confidence in patient care. This mixed-method, descriptive pilot study collected data about senior prelicensure nursing students using smartphones, a type of mobile electronic device (MED), in the clinical area. The smartphones contained nursing diagnosis, pharmacology, and laboratory information; an encyclopedia; and the MEDLINE database. Student (n = 7) data about smartphone use during a 10-week clinical rotation were collected via student-recorded usage logs and focus group recordings. Staff nurses' (n = 5) perceptions of students' use of smartphones for clinical educational resources were collected by anonymous survey. Both the focus group transcript and staff surveys were evaluated and the themes summarized by content analysis. Positive results and barriers to use, such as cost and technological comfort levels, are discussed. The results may help nurse educators and administrators initiate further research of MEDs as a clinical resource. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Healthcare Students' Perceptions of a Simulated Interprofessional Consultation in an Outpatient Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitout, H.; Human, A.; Treadwell, I.; Sobantu, N. A.

    2016-01-01

    Newly graduated healthcare workers should appreciate the importance of teamwork and each profession's unique role in a multi-disciplinary team. At Medunsa, an institution for higher education of healthcare professionals, each profession's teaching occurs independently. This study explores the perceptions of healthcare students and their…

  2. Student, Faculty, and Staff Approval of University Smoke/Tobacco-Free Policies: An Analysis of Campus Newspaper Articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Christopher M; Kabir, Zubair; Greiner, Birgit A; Davoren, Martin P

    2018-01-01

    To provide a nontraditional source of data to university policymakers regarding student, faculty, and staff approval of university smoke/tobacco-free policies, as published through campus newspaper articles. From January to April 2016, a total of 2523 articles were retrieved concerning campus smoking/tobacco at 4-year, public universities. Of these, 54 articles met the inclusion factors, which described 30 surveys about campus approval of tobacco-free policies and 24 surveys about smoke-free policies. In all, the surveys included more than 130 000 respondents. With the exception of 4 surveys, all reported that the most of the respondents approved a tobacco/smoke-free campus policy. Although the study had several limitations, the findings provide a synthesis from a nontraditional data source that is consistent with findings from the peer-reviewed literature, in which most of the students, faculty, and staff on university campuses approve of smoke/tobacco-free campus policies.

  3. Integration of Higher Education and Endogenous Development in Staff, Students and Curricula Development Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mwadiwa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher education in most developing countries, particularly on the African continent, suffers a major contradiction, where even though the populations in nearly all African countries are of mixed cultural backgrounds, the university curriculum content encompasses, predominantly, the modern western view. Accordingly efforts and experiences for staff, student and curriculum development incorporating research, teaching and learning capacities focus, primarily, on modern concepts, approaches and methodologies. Thus most development initiatives are consequently looking to modern western view to motivate individuals who have come to associate modern western schooling and school-type programmes with success and the non-modern western world views with failure (Rustemeyer 2011:15. Arguably, modern western view pervades nearly every aspect of daily lives of traditional societies dwelling in rural communities whilst being increasingly influenced by inevitable factors of universal marketplace economically. This article challenges the University of Technology to become more passionately initiative in supporting the essence of ‘endogenous development (ED meaning development originating from within through encouraging and promoting networking with rural Community-based Traditional Institutions. The international Comparing and Supporting Endogenous Development (COMPAS Network describes endogenous development as an empowering process of the community, in which cultural awakening, creation of unity and participatory action are essential elements (COMPAS 2006:9. The significant aspect of the endogenous development approach is the willingness of development experts to implant their work and effort in the worldviews of the Traditional Institutions even though the professionals may not fully understand or agree with the worldviews of the respective Traditional Institutions.

  4. The evidence-based practice profiles of academic and clinical staff involved in pre-registration nursing students' education: a cross sectional survey of US and UK staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Penney; Scurlock-Evans, Laura; Williamson, Kathleen; Rouse, Joanne; Upton, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Competency in evidence-based practice (EBP) is a requirement for graduate nurses. Despite a growing body of research exploring the EBP profiles of students, little research has explored the EBP profiles of nurse educators. To explore: the differences/similarities in the EBP profiles of US and UK clinical and academic faculty; the barriers nurse educators experience when teaching EBP; the impact of postgraduate education on EBP profile and; what nurse educators perceive "success" in implementing and teaching EBP to be. A cross-sectional online survey design was employed. Two Universities delivering undergraduate nursing education in the US and UK, in partnership with large hospital systems, small community hospitals, community settings, and independent sector health organisations. Eighty-one nurse educators working in academic and clinical contexts in the US and UK (US academic=12, US clinical=17, UK academic=9, UK clinical=43) were recruited opportunistically. Participants were emailed a weblink to an online survey, comprising demographic questions, the Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire and open-ended questions about EBP barriers, facilitators and successes. Quantitative results indicated that academic faculty scored significantly higher on knowledge and skills of EBP, than clinical faculty, but revealed no other significant differences on EBP use or attitudes, or between US and UK professionals. Participants with postgraduate training scored significantly higher on EBP knowledge/skills, but not EBP attitudes or use. Qualitative findings identified key themes relating to EBP barriers and facilitators, including: Evidence-, organisational-, and teaching-related issues. Perceptions of successes in EBP were also described. Nurse educators working in the UK and US face similar EBP barriers to teaching and implementation, but view it positively and use it frequently. Clinical staff may require extra support to maintain their EBP knowledge and skills in

  5. Knowledge and attitude towards cervical cancer screening among female students and staff in a tertiary institution in the Niger Delta

    OpenAIRE

    Owoeye I.O.G; Ibrahim .I.A

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is a largely preventable disease. In western countries, the incidence of and mortality associated with cervical cancer has reduced substantially following the introduction of effective cervical screening programmes. This is in contrast to what is obtained in Africa including Nigeria where cervical screening is rudimentary or non- existent. Aim: This study seeks to assess the knowledge, level of perception and the attitude of female staff and students of Niger Delta...

  6. How stressful is doctor-patient communication? Physiological and psychological stress of medical students in simulated history taking and bad-news consultations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsman, Robert L.; Pranger, Susan; Koot, Stephanie; Fabriek, Marcel; Karemaker, John M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Medical communication can be a stressful experience for both doctors and patients. In particular, inexperienced doctors facing the demanding task of a bad news consultation may experience high levels of distress. The aim of this exploratory study is to test students' differential

  7. University life and pandemic influenza: Attitudes and intended behaviour of staff and students towards pandemic (H1N1 2009

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    MacIntyre C Raina

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a pandemic young adults are more likely to be infected, increasing the potential for Universities to be explosive disease outbreak centres. Outbreak management is essential to reduce the impact in both the institution and the surrounding community. Through the use of an online survey, we aimed to measure the perceptions and responses of staff and students towards pandemic (H1N1 2009 at a major university in Sydney, Australia. Methods The survey was available online from 29 June to 30 September 2009. The sample included academic staff, general staff and students of the University. Results A total of 2882 surveys were completed. Nearly all respondents (99.6%, 2870/2882 were aware of the Australian pandemic situation and 64.2% (1851/2882 reported either "no anxiety" or "disinterest." Asian-born respondents were significantly (p Conclusions Responses to a pandemic are subject to change in its pre-, early and mid-outbreak stages. Lessons for these institutions in preparation for a second wave and future disease outbreaks include the need to promote positive public health behaviours amongst young people and students.

  8. School Indicators of Violence Experienced and Feeling Unsafe of Dutch LGB Versus Non-LGB Secondary Students and Staff, 2006-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Ton

    2016-12-01

    Gender and sexual orientation are expressed in heterosexual, lesbian (L), gay (G), bisexual (B), transgender (T), or queer (Q) interests and behavior. Compared with heterosexual persons, LGBTQ persons seem to experience more antisocial behavior, including negative discrimination and violence. To assess differences in LGBTQ-related discrimination in schools, the question for this research is "Do the degrees of violence experienced and feeling unsafe of LGBTQ students and staff in a school differ from those of non-LGBTQ students and staff in the same school?" Secondary analysis was carried out on data from a Dutch national digital monitor survey on safety in secondary schools. In 2006, 2008, and 2010, participation amounted to 570 schools, 18,300 teaching and support staff, and 216,000 students. Four indicators were constructed at the school level: two Mokken Scale means assessing severity of violence experienced and two Alpha Scale means assessing feeling unsafe. Analysis of mean differences showed that LGB students experienced more violence and felt less safe than non-LGB students; LGB staff felt less safe in school than non-LGB staff. When LGB students experienced more violence at school than non-LGB students, LGB students also felt less safe than non-LGB students for all 3 years. No such relationships existed for LGB staff, or between LGB staff and LGB students. No significant relationships were found between the four LGB school indicators and contextual school variables. The outcomes and uniqueness of the study are discussed. Recommendations are made to improve assessment and promote prosocial behavior of students and staff in schools. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Consulting parents on childhood obesity and implications for medical student learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Maree; Coat, Suzette

    2009-10-01

    It is important that medical schools take some account of community expectations for health care when planning curricula. This is particularly important for emerging public health problems such as childhood obesity. The aim of this study was to explore parent attitudes to the role of the doctor in childhood obesity and implications for medical student learning. The views of eight mothers and one father were explored through interview. Transcripts were analysed using an iterative process of theme identification and testing against transcript data. A range of recruitment strategies were used in an attempt to increase participant numbers. Participants believed doctors should support parent decisions about children's diet and life-style and be prepared to 'step-in' with a more active role when, in the parent's view, this was needed. Participants wanted doctors to provide advice on healthy nutrition, be proficient in child physical assessment and be able to communicate sensitively with both children and parents. Although the parents who agreed to be interviewed expressed views demonstrating their commitment to preventing and reducing childhood obesity, many other parents declined the invitation to contribute. It may be that parent concern within the broader community that childhood obesity is a real and significant health risk does not reflect the level of concern of the medical profession. The most likely implications for the teaching of medical students are a need for more comprehensive teaching around healthy diet and activity for all children, improved recognition of overweight and obesity and ongoing communication skills development.

  10. Nursing staff and nursing students' emotions towards homosexual patients and their wish to refrain from nursing, if the option existed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röndahl, Gerd; Innala, Sune; Carlsson, Marianne

    2004-03-01

    Studies have reported that homosexual patients fear they will not receive adequate care if they openly show their sexual orientation, for example, when introducing their partner. The aims of this study were to investigate the emotions of nursing staff and nursing students, and possible relations to cultural background and gender, towards homosexual patients; whether nursing staff and nursing students would choose to refrain from nursing homosexual patients, if the option existed; and, if so, how they express their wish to refrain from nursing this group of patients. All participants received verbal and written information before the study started. Returning a completed questionnaire indicated a participant's tacit consent. Approval was obtained from the heads of departments and persons in charge of nursing and nursing assistant programmes. The study had a descriptive, comparative design, and an Affect Adjective Checklist (AAC) and specially designed Nursing Behaviour Questionnaire (NBQ) were used. The participants included nurses and assistant nurses from an infectious disease clinic, and students enrolled in a university nursing programme and upper secondary assistant nurses' training, all in central Sweden. The findings showed that both professional nursing staff (response rate 67%, n = 57), and students (response rate 62%, n = 165), expressed emotions of homophobic anger, homophobic guilt and delight. Groups with a cultural background other than Swedish expressed more homophobia. No gender differences were indicated for homophobic emotions. In the professional group, 36% would refrain from nursing for homosexual patients if given the option. The corresponding figure for the students was 9%. The limitations were that the sample was small and not randomly selected, and as participation was anonymous no follow-up could be done. It was concluded that the emotional factors of homosexual anger and homosexual guilt might be of value in helping to explain and predict

  11. The effect of an educational program based on the PRECEDE Model on the level of academic consultants' ability and students' satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazavehei SMM

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Universities have important responsibilities to prevent physical, emotional, social and academic problems during the course of their study. To achieve this goal, it is necessary that universities offer effective academic advising services to the students. Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of programs offered for developing academic consultants (AC ability by assessing students’ satisfaction with the consultation they recieve. Methods: From a total of 90 ACs and 2,500 students in the Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, 72 AC and 445 students from four colleges (Medicine, Health Sciences, Dentistry, Nursing and Midwifery voluntarily participated in the pretest. 87 ACs were randomly assigned into two groups (Group Bf participated in a workshop designed based on PRECEDE model; Group Cf was offered material relevant to academic consultation. According to the AC groups, the students were divided into groupBs(n=363; their AC have participated in workshop, group Cs (n=408; their AC received Educational Material, and groupDs (n= 190; the student have no active AC. Data collection was conducted by questionnaires, pre-test and post-test (after one academic semester prior to the intervention. Results: Mean scores of knowledge (M=14.77, SD=3.01 (especially in the College of Medicine and Dentistry and attitude (M=61.79, SD=5.78 of AC about offering effective academic advising to the students was improved significantly in both intervention groups, but this effect was more pronounced in group Bf compared with group Cf (M= 1 1.54,SD=2.76; M=59.23,SD=8.6 (n=44, and group Af (the pre-test group (M=10.67,SD=4.2; M=57.2,SD=1 1.6. Students in group Bf significantly were more satisfied with consultation they received and more willing to use consultation services of their ACs. Conclusion: The PRECEDE model's educational workshop program was more effective in modifying the AC ability in offering effective academic advising, guiding, and

  12. Perceptions of Academic Staff towards Accommodating Students with Disabilities in a Civil Engineering Undergraduate Program in a University in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayat, Nafisa; Amosun, Seyi Ladele

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of academic staff towards admission of students with disabilities, and their accommodation once accepted into an undergraduate Civil Engineering program in a South African university. Qualitative responses relating to the perceptions of five academic staff were obtained through semi-structured interviews. The…

  13. Attitude of Academic Staff in Nigerian Tertiary Educational Institutions to Student Evaluation of Instruction (SEI): A Case Study of Cross River State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaka, Idaka I.; Joshua, Monday T.

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the attitude of academic staff in Nigerian tertiary educational institutions to student evaluation of instruction (SEI) and to find out the variable factors that influenced the expressed attitude of members of the academic staff, using Cross River State University as a case study. The study was a survey and so a…

  14. The Effects of Instructions, Rehearsal, Modeling, and Feedback on Acquisition and Generalization of Staff Use of Discrete Trial Teaching and Student Correct Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarokoff, Randi A.; Sturmey, Peter

    2008-01-01

    A limited number of studies have investigated the effects of behavioral skills training (BST) on staff acquisition and generalization of discrete trial teaching (DTT) and student behavior. BST was used to improve three staff's use of DTT interactions with four children with autism. A multiple baseline design across participants was used to assess…

  15. Training Sessional Academic Staff to Provide Quality Feedback on University Students' Assessment: Lessons from a Faculty of Law Learning and Teaching Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Kelly; Bell, Tamara; Dwyer, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The quality of feedback provided to university students has long been recognised as the most important predictor of student learning and satisfaction. However, providing quality feedback to students is challenging in the current context, in which universities increasingly rely on casualised and inexperienced academic staff to assess undergraduate…

  16. The relationship between empowerment and effectiveness of staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effectiveness is one of the management concepts considered and studied always by management scientists and experts. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different dimensions of empowerment (servicing staff, staff monitoring, consulting staff, and training staff) on dimensions of effectiveness of staff (staff ...

  17. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 July 2006: The modifications are listed below: Financial and social conditions for Paid Associates, Fellows and Students (introduction of a new payment scheme for the Paid Scientific Associates Programme - reorganization of the Fellowship Programme - modification of the Student subsistence rates) Protection of members of the personnel against the financial consequences of illness, accident and disability (clarification of the scope of the relevant provisions - new definition of disability and associated benefits - revised role of the Joint Advisory Rehabilitation and Disability Board - bringing together the relevant provisions). Copies of this update (modification# 16) are available in departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at the following address: http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Administrative Circular ...

  18. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1st January 1996 are modified as follows as of 1st July 2006: Financial and social conditions for Paid Associates, Fellows and Students (introduction of a new payment scheme for the Paid Scientific Associates Programme-reorganisation of the Fellowship Programme-modification of Student subsistence rates) Protection of members of the personnel against the financial consequences of illness, accident and disability (clarification of the scope of the relevant provisions-new definition of disability and associated benefits-revised role of the Joint Advisory Rehabilitation and Disability Board-bringing together of the relevant provisions). Copies of this update (modification No.16) are available from Departmental secretariats. In addition, the Staff Rules and Regulations can be consulted on the Web at the following address: http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Administrative Circular No. 14 (Rev. 2)-July 2006 Protection of members o...

  19. Suicidality among medical students – A practical guide for staff members in medical schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Thea; Plener, Paul; Kliemann, Andrea; Fegert, Jörg M.; Allroggen, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Although suicidality in medical students is important, few studies dealt with this issue regarding German universities. Our aims were to describe the epidemiology as well as factors leading to suicidality in medical students. Furthermore we wanted to raise awareness for this topic among university employees and show options for handling suicidal crises in students. This manuscript especially aims to address university employees working in direct contact with students (such as student counselors or teachers). PMID:24282451

  20. Teacher-to-Teacher Consultation: Facilitating Consistent and Effective Intervention across Grade Levels for Students with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Matthew J.; Dupaul, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Teacher-to-teacher consultation (TTC) is an extension of standard behavioral consultation that seeks to transfer an established and effective intervention across a grade-level transition by including teachers from both grade levels as conjoint consultees at the beginning of the second school year. The purpose of the current study was to determine…

  1. What Is the Use of Fieldwork? Conceptions of Students and Staff in Geography and Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Alison; Magnier, Kirsty; Weaver, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores conceptions of the purpose of fieldwork held by undergraduates and academic staff in the disciplines of geography and geology. Phenomenographic analysis of written data reveals six qualitatively distinct conceptions broadly classified as "fragmented" and "cohesive". While considerable commonality in…

  2. Is It Bullying, Teen Dating Violence, or Both? Student, School Staff, and Parent Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzog, Jodi L.; Harpel, Tammy; Rowley, Rochelle

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the views of school staff, early adolescents, and parents about which behaviors constitute bullying or teen dating violence (TDV), with attention focused on perceived overlap between the two. To achieve this aim, a mixed-methods design was used to quantitatively investigate the factors associated with…

  3. Observed Consultation: Confidence and Accuracy of Assessors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweed, Mike; Ingham, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Judgments made by the assessors observing consultations are widely used in the assessment of medical students. The aim of this research was to study judgment accuracy and confidence and the relationship between these. Assessors watched recordings of consultations, scoring the students on: a checklist of items; attributes of consultation; a…

  4. Special Educator's Consultation Handbook. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idol, Lorna

    This book is written primarily for special educators who offer resource and consultation support for students with mild handicaps and students at risk for school failure. Examples of consultation projects implemented and evaluated in the field are used to illustrate principles of effective consultation. Suggestions and guidelines are provided for…

  5. International mobility placements enable students and staff in Higher Education to enhance transversal and employability-related skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Henrietta J

    2015-10-01

    Internationalization has commanded an ever-more prominent position in higher education over recent years, and is now firmly entrenched. While academia has long been outward looking-international research collaborations, conferences and student exchanges are well-established practices-it is relatively recently that internationalization has become a goal in its own right, rather than a consequence of normal academic activity. There are multiple interdependent drivers behind this: a focus on graduate employability and development of broad competencies and transferable skills in addition to subject-specific training, 'international awareness' being confirmed as a graduate attribute that is highly valued by employers, the availability of detailed information enabling prospective students to choose between Higher Education Institutions on the basis of their international opportunities and graduate employment rates, increasing competition between Institutions to attract the best students and to ascend national and international league tables, and (both driving and reflecting these trends) national policy frameworks. This minireview focuses on two aspects of internationalization of direct relevance to microbiology students and academic staff in a typical Higher Education Institution: student research placements overseas, and the impact of international mobility on teaching practice and the student experience. Practical strategies for developing intercultural awareness and enhancing employability are highlighted. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Teachers, students and staff´s ideas on the University of São Paulo in 1968

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macioniro Celeste Filho

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available During the 1968 university reform, the University of São Paulo discussed several proposals for its reorganization, albeit disagreement was rife. In several units of USP committees of teachers, students and staff, with equal representations, were urged to formulate proposals and give suggestions on how USP should be. Their proposals had a common basis: they conceived an integrated university and the establishment of flexible curricula. They believed it was viable to replace all the USP faculties by institutes. A Curriculum Board would be established to organize the reform and to be one of its basis. Current research analyzes the different proposals made by the USP academic community in 1968.

  7. The Effect of Teachers' Staff Development in the Use of Higher-Order Questioning Strategies on Third Grade Students' Rubric Science Assessment Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield-Sloan, Maryrose B.; Ruzicka, Mary F.

    2005-01-01

    The type of staff development necessary to improve student achievement is not the type of in-service where elementary teachers just attend a workshop to learn a specific activity to be used when teaching a particular concept. Rather, a comprehensive instructional strategy is the one designed to enhance student comprehension and mastery for…

  8. The Psychological Contract of Science Students: Social Exchange with Universities and University Staff from the Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Paddy; Prince, Nike

    2015-01-01

    Considerable research has been undertaken involving the student experience and depicting undergraduate students as consumers of education. This construction of the relationship between students and universities is based primarily on notions of economic exchange. In this paper, using the construct of the psychological contract, we show that social…

  9. Academic Staff Perceptions of Factors Underlying Program Completion by Australian Indigenous Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Roianne; Usher, Kim; Foster, Kim; Stewart, Lee

    2014-01-01

    An increase in the number of Indigenous health professionals is one way to help reduce the poor health outcomes of Australia's Indigenous people. However, while Indigenous students are enrolling in Australian tertiary undergraduate nursing courses in increasing numbers, their completion rates remain lower than non-Indigenous students and many…

  10. Digital Age Adds New Dimension to Incidents of Staff-Student Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on how the current must-have tools of adolescent social networks--cell phone text messaging, Web sites such as MySpace and Facebook, and e-mail--are being used by teachers and other school employees who prey on students to foster inappropriate relationships and perpetrate abuse. When the sexual abuse of students by educators…

  11. Professional Staff Contributions to Student Retention and Success in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jenny

    2018-01-01

    Student attrition remains a persistent problem within the Australian higher education sector. Contributing factors include financial, reputational and quality issues, which can pose significant risks for a university's sustainability. Institutional culture is fundamental to decisions student make about withdrawing or remaining in higher education.…

  12. Mental Health Consultation in Early Childhood Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernzweig, Jane; Ramler, Malia; Alkon, Abbey

    2009-01-01

    Early childhood mental health consultation is a relationship-based intervention that promotes children's social and emotional development. Benefits include improved childhood behaviors, improved staff self-efficacy, and lowered parental stress. Child care center directors are more likely to be satisfied with consultation when they are involved in…

  13. Supporting College and University Students with Invisible Disabilities: A Guide for Faculty and Staff Working with Students with Autism, AD/HD, Language Processing Disorders, Anxiety, and Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oslund, Christy

    2013-01-01

    With increasing numbers of students with invisible disabilities attending college and university, faculty and staff find themselves faced with new challenges. This practical handbook provides lecturers, tutors, disability services, and administrative staff with an overview of the invisible disabilities they may encounter, dispelling common myths…

  14. Can we rely on simulated patients' satisfaction with their consultation for assessing medical students' communication skills? A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gude, T; Grimstad, H; Holen, A; Anvik, T; Baerheim, A; Fasmer, O B; Hjortdahl, P; Vaglum, P

    2015-12-18

    In medical education, teaching methods offering intensive practice without high utilization of faculty resources are needed. We investigated whether simulated patients' (SPs') satisfaction with a consultation could predict professional observers' assessment of young doctors' communication skills. This was a comparative cross-sectional study of 62 videotaped consultations in a general practice setting with young doctors who were finishing their internship. The SPs played a female patient who had observed blood when using the toilet, which had prompted a fear of cancer. Immediately afterwards, the SP rated her level of satisfaction with the consultation, and the scores were dichotomized into satisfaction or dissatisfaction. Professional observers viewed the videotapes and assessed the doctors' communication skills using the Arizona Communication Interview Rating Scale (ACIR). Their ratings of communication skills were dichotomized into acceptable versus unacceptable levels of competence. The SPs' satisfaction showed a predictive power of 0.74 for the observers' assessment of the young doctors and whether they reached an acceptable level of communication skills. The SPs' dissatisfaction had a predictive power of 0.71 for the observers' assessment of an unacceptable communication level. The two assessment methods differed in 26% of the consultations. When SPs felt relief about their cancer concern after the consultation, they assessed the doctors' skills as satisfactory independent of the observers' assessment. Accordance between the dichotomized SPs' satisfaction score and communication skills assessed by observers (using the ACIR) was in the acceptable range. These findings suggest that SPs' satisfaction scores may provide a reliable source for assessing communication skills in educational programs for medical trainees (students and young doctors). Awareness of the patient's concerns seems to be of vital importance to patient satisfaction.

  15. [Computerized ranking test in three French universities: Staff experience and students' feedback].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, D; Meyer, G; Cymbalista, F; Bouaziz, J-D; Falgarone, G; Tesniere, A; Gervais, J; Cariou, A; Peffault de Latour, R; Marat, M; Moenaert, E; Guebli, T; Rodriguez, O; Lefort, A; Dreyfuss, D; Hajage, D; Ricard, J-D

    2016-03-01

    The year 2016 will be pivotal for the evaluation of French medical students with the introduction of the first computerized National Ranking Test (ECNi). The SIDES, online electronic system for medical student evaluation, was created for this purpose. All the universities have already organized faculty exams but few a joint computerized ranking test at several universities simultaneously. We report our experience on the organization of a mock ECNi by universities Paris Descartes, Paris Diderot and Paris 13. Docimological, administrative and technical working groups were created to organize this ECNi. Students in their fifth year of medical studies, who will be the first students to sit for the official ECNi in 2016, were invited to attend this mock exam that represented more than 50% of what will be proposed in 2016. A final electronic questionnaire allowed a docimological and organizational evaluation by students. An analysis of ratings and rankings and their distribution on a 1000-point scale were performed. Sixty-four percent of enrolled students (i.e., 654) attended the three half-day exams. No difference in total score and ranking between the three universities was observed. Students' feedback was extremely positive. Normalized over 1000 points, 99% of students were scored on 300 points only. Progressive clinical cases were the most discriminating test. The organization of a mock ECNi involving multiple universities was a docimological and technical success but required an important administrative, technical and teaching investment. Copyright © 2016 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Full Circle Program's Family Consulting Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    In 1989-90, Full Circle Program's Family Consulting Services (FCS) staff provided family reunification services to 50 children and their families in San Francisco and Marin counties. Staff members developed individualized treatment strategies for each family, acting as advocates for the needs of the child. These services included medical and…

  17. Participants' Evaluation of Consultation: Implications for Training in School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Laurie McGarry; Plotts, Cynthia; Lasser, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of graduate students' consultation skills is essential to competent practice in school settings. Congruence of evaluation of the consultation experience has been shown as an important factor in the development of competent consultants in other, related disciplines. The current study analysed student consultant and teacher consultee…

  18. Use of Student Field-Based Consulting in Business Education: A Comparison of American and Australian Business Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciglimpaglia, Donald; Toole, Howard R.

    2010-01-01

    This study reports the results of a comparative study of American business schools and Australian schools of commerce regarding utilization of field-based consultancy and associated critical variables. Respondents in the survey were 141 deans of Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accredited business schools in the United…

  19. Focusing on Student Learning to Guide the Use of Staff Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Imelda; Baume, David; Assinder, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The paper develops and illustrates a model for designing courses. The model gives explicit attention to educational considerations, principally to the importance of active, goal-directed student learning. It also explores economic considerations, principally how to make the best possible use of the time of the teacher in planning and running the…

  20. Reducing the Prevalence of Plagiarism: A Model for Staff, Students and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Teh Eng (Elaine); Paull, Megan

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of plagiarism, according to the literature, is increasing. But why do students plagiarise and why the increase? Is it due to laziness, opportunity, ignorance, fear or ambivalence? Or do they know that there is little chance of any significant penalty? The literature suggests that all of these apply. Given this, are universities and,…

  1. An Afterschool Program for Economically Disadvantaged Youth: Perceptions of Parents, Staff, and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Katrina W.; Williams, Lunetta M.; Daniel, Larry G.

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated perceived effects of an afterschool program located in 6 Title 1 schools on students' achievement, self-esteem, and attitudes. Data sources comprised surveys (n = 257), 5 focus groups (n= 23), and an individual interview with the program director (n = 1). Survey data indicated overall satisfaction with the program.…

  2. CHAMPS II: A Peer Leadership Program for High School Students & Staff. Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, Patricia; Vallenari, Alison

    CHAMPS Peer Leadership is a program designed to prepare school and community teams that can empower youth to take responsibility for themselves and to prevent abusive behaviors. Students who can set goals, build teams, communicate, take self-responsibility, possess self-esteem, and feel empowered, also have the capability to respond positively to…

  3. Bridging the Gap in Expectations between International Students and Academic Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Emma; Forland, Heather

    2008-01-01

    This article is concerned with the transition into higher education in the United Kingdom of students with an East Asian background. Such a fusion of cultures (the Western individualist culture and East Asian collectivist culture) often creates a clash of traditions. The tensions that arise between the expectations of the most rapidly growing…

  4. Success in Student-Faculty/Staff SoTL Partnerships: Motivations, Challenges, Power, and Definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acai, Anita; Akesson, Bree; Allen, Meghan; Chen, Victoria; Mathany, Clarke; McCollum, Brett; Spencer, Jennifer; Verwoord, Roselynn E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Partnerships with students are considered one of the principles of good Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) practice. However, not all partnerships are equally successful. What characteristics are common to successful partnerships and what preparatory elements can lead toward more successful partnerships? In this article, our team of…

  5. Improving Student Preparedness and Retention--Perceptions of Staff at Two Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, David; Nicoll, Camilla; von Treuer, Kathryn; Kolar, Christina; Palermo, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    In 2010 the Australian government provided funding under the Higher Education Participation and Partnerships Program (HEPPP) to assist universities to achieve a 20 percent participation rate for students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. This funding has allowed universities the opportunity to implement projects towards this end. This study…

  6. A randomized trial examining the effects of Conjoint Behavioral Consultation in rural schools: Student outcomes and the mediating role of the teacher-parent relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Susan M; Witte, Amanda L; Holmes, Shannon R; Coutts, Michael J; Dent, Amy L; Kunz, Gina M; Wu, ChaoRong

    2017-04-01

    The results of a large-scale randomized controlled trial of Conjoint Behavioral Consultation (CBC) on student outcomes and teacher-parent relationships in rural schools are presented. CBC is an indirect service delivery model that addresses concerns shared by teachers and parents about students. In the present study, the intervention was aimed at promoting positive school-related social-behavioral skills and strengthening teacher-parent relationships in rural schools. Participants were 267 students in grades K-3, their parents, and 152 teachers in 45 Midwest rural schools. Results revealed that, on average, improvement among students whose parents and teachers experienced CBC significantly outpaced that of control students in their teacher-reported school problems and observational measures of their inappropriate (off-task and motor activity) and appropriate (on-task and social interactions) classroom behavior. In addition, teacher responses indicated significantly different rates of improvement in their relationship with parents in favor of the CBC group. Finally, the teacher-parent relationship was found to partially mediate effects of CBC on several student outcomes. Unique contributions of this study, implications of findings for rural students, study limitations and suggestions for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Calming the campus: training school staff and crisis teams to manage student behavior during emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kendall

    2007-01-01

    Conversations with school and crisis personnel following large scale emergencies in and around schools, such as shootings, wildfires, and the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, indicated a need for pre-incident training in managing student behavior during emergencies. This article outlines a training program of this kind and offers suggestions regarding both content and process of this training. The suggestions follow discussion of the unique context and needs of the school setting.

  8. S urvey on the Communication Skills that the College Students of School of Physical Education and Sports Perceived from the Teaching Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan HACICAFEROĞLU

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine level of com munication skills perceived by college students of School of Physical Education and Sports (PES from teaching staff. The sample of the study, conducted by using screening model, consisted of 633 PES college students. Research data were collected by “Asses sment Scale for Communication Skills ” . Arithmetic mean, t - test, one - way variance analysis (ANOVA and Tukey test were used in the study. Consequently, it is determined that students in the sample perceived positive communication skills from teaching staff at moderate - level. It is observed that, except variable of respect dimension in the department where they receive education, there wasn’t any statistically significant difference in the students' gender variable with respect to the dimension of the democra tic attitude, whereas there were significant differences in all lower dimensions according to the class variable. It is also concluded that college students of coaching and management department perceived more communication skills from the teaching staff c ompared to the students of teaching department in respect dimension, and freshmen and the sophomores perceived more communication skills positively with more points compared to the other college students with respect to the dimensions of respect, expressio n, values , motivation and democratic attitude.

  9. Sharps and Needlestick Injuries Among Medical Students, Surgical Residents, Faculty, and Operating Room Staff at a Single Academic Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Lynn Y; Torres, Rosalicia; Syed, Sohail; Boyle, Sean; Ata, Ashar; Beyer, Todd D; Rosati, Carl

    The hospital is a place of high risk for sharps and needlestick injuries (SNI) and such injuries are historically underreported. This institutional review board approved study compares the incidence of SNI among all surgical personnel at a single academic institution via an anonymous electronic survey distributed to medical students, surgical residents, general surgery attendings, surgical technicians, and operating room nurses. The overall survey response rate was 37% (195/528). Among all respondents, 55% (107/195) had a history of a SNI in the workplace. The overall report rate following an initial SNI was 64%. Surgical staff reported SNIs more frequently, with an incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 1.33 (p = 0.085) when compared with attendings. When compared with surgical attendings, medical students (IRR of 2.86, p = 0.008) and residents (IRR of 2.21, p = 0.04) were more likely to cite fear as a reason for not reporting SNIs. Approximately 65% of respondents did not report their exposure either because of the time consuming process or the patient involved was perceived to be low-risk or both. The 2 most common reasons for not reporting SNIs at our institution are because of the inability to complete the time consuming reporting process and fear of embarrassment or punitive response because of admitting an injury. Further research is necessary to mitigate these factors. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. The experience of international doctoral education in nursing: an exploratory survey of staff and international nursing students in a British university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Catrin

    2007-07-01

    As part of the internationalization of higher education, increasing numbers of international doctoral students are coming to study in British nursing schools. This paper reports on a small-scale exploratory survey that sought to investigate the educational experiences of these students and their supervisors in one British School of Nursing. Both staff and students saw great value in international education. However both groups identified the need for greater support to facilitate adjustment in a number of areas, including: understanding the PhD process, studying in a second language, working within a different academic culture, managing the supervision relationship, and finding a sense of community. This was a small study, but the findings confirm key issues identified in the limited available literature. Recommendations include staff training and the development of additional in-puts for students. Future research should include qualitative, longitudinal and multi-site studies to more thoroughly assess the process and outcomes of international doctoral education in nursing.

  11. School Mental Health Consultation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, John A.

    The goals of the School Mental Health Consultation Program, a cooperative effort of the Children and Youth Service at High Plains Mental Health Center and the Unified School District 489 in Hays, Kansas, are to evaluate students' behavioral problems, to assess how students' difficulties affect teachers, and to help the consultee assess the…

  12. SENIOR STAFF ADVANCEMENT COMMITTEE (SSAC)

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Composition and mandateThe Senior Staff Advancement Committee is composed of members nominated ad persona by the Director-General.The Committee examines proposals from Divisions concerning promotions to grade 13 in Career Path IX, changes of career path to Career Path IX and advancements to the exceptional grade in Career path VIII.The Director-General may consult the Committee on any matter related to senior staff careers.The Committee makes its recommendations to the Director-General.

  13. Partners with Clinical Practice: Evaluating the Student and Staff Experiences of On-line Continuing Professional Development for Qualified Nephrology Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susannah QUINSEE

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Partners with Clinical Practice: Evaluating the Student and Staff Experiences of On-line Continuing Professional Development for Qualified Nephrology Practitioners Judith HURST Susannah QUINSEE City University London, THE UNITED KINGDOM ABSTRACT The inclusion of online learning technologies into the higher education (HE curriculum is frequently associated with the design and development of new models of learning. One could argue that e-learning even demands a reconfiguration of traditional methods of learning and teaching. However, this transformation in pedagogic methodology does not just impact on lecturers and teachers alone. Online learning has ‘pervasive impacts and changes in other HE functions’ (HEFCE, p.2. Thus, e-learning is a transformational process that posits new challenges for staff and students, both in educational methods and support. Many political, clinical, financial and social influences impact on registered health professionals’ ability to continue their professional development. This is particularly pertinent in the delivery of nephrology care. In order to evaluate the programme that has now run for 2 years in the context of this institution, evaluative research methodology sought to explore the experiences of the staff and students involved. Qualitative data was collected from the students and a reflective framework was used to form the basis of a focus group for the staff. This paper will present how a virtual learning environment (VLE was developed utilising the pedagogic framework of solution-focused learning. It will demonstrate evaluation of the students’ experiences compared to their traditional classroom-learning counterparts, and highlight the reflections of staff developers as they moved into new roles and developed different aspects of their present roles within a traditional HE context.

  14. Quality of doctoral nursing education in the United Kingdom: exploring the views of doctoral students and staff based on a cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Hugh; Keeney, Sinead; Kim, Mi Ja; Park, Chang Gi

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the quality of doctoral education in nursing in the United Kingdom. In recent decades, doctoral education programmes in nursing are increasing worldwide. There are many reasons for this and concerns have been raised regarding the quality of provision in and across countries. To date, the quality of doctoral education on a global level has not been reported in the literature. This United Kingdom study is part of a seven country investigation into the quality of doctoral education in nursing (Australia, Japan, Korea, South Africa, Thailand, United Kingdom and United States of America). A quantitative study using a cross-sectional comparative survey design. An online survey was administered to collect the views of doctoral students and staff members on four domains: programme, faculty/staff, resource and evaluation. The study was carried out between 2010-2012. In most cases, staff perceived these more positively than students and the differences in perception were often statistically significant. Interestingly, many students rated the quality of supervision as excellent, whereas no staff member rated supervision this highly. The crucial importance of resources was confirmed in the path analysis of the four Quality of Doctoral Nursing Education domains. This demonstrates that investment in resources is much more cost-effective than investment in the other domains in relation to improving the overall quality of doctoral education in nursing. This study has wide-ranging implications for how the quality of doctoral education is monitored and enhanced. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Can final year medical students significantly contribute to patient care? A pilot study about the perception of patients and clinical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Christian; Edelhäuser, Friedrich; Tauschel, Diethard; Riechmann, Merle; Tekian, Ara

    2010-01-01

    Active participation of medical students in patient care has been shown to be important for professional development of learners. Not much is known about the impact of active student participation (ASP) to the quality of patient care. We established a Clinical Education Ward (CEW) for the final year medical students caring for patients under structured clinical supervision. This study investigates the views of both patients and clinical staff on the impact of ASP on patient care. The Picker Inpatient Questionnaire (PIQ) was used to survey all the patients admitted to the CEW during the pilot phase. Results concerning the general quality of health care and the patient-physician relationship (PPR) were compared to two matched pair control groups: patients of the same department (CG1) and of internal wards in Germany (CG2). In addition, quantitative and qualitative data were collected from patients and clinical staff members to specify the impact of students on patient care. Out of 111 patients, 64 responded. The PIQ results revealed very minor problems in the assessment of the overall general quality of care and in PPR at the CEW, while significant improvements existed when compared to CG2. Furthermore, 79% of the patients and 95% of the staff members recorded a positive impact of ASP. Qualitative data illustrated and complemented these results. Chances and challenges in programs with high participation of students in clinical care are discussed. ASP may not only be useful for learners but also offers chances and benefits for patient care.

  16. Nursing and pharmacy students' use of emotionally intelligent behaviours to manage challenging interpersonal situations with staff during clinical placement: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloughen, Andrea; Foster, Kim

    2017-04-20

    To identify challenging interpersonal interactions experienced by nursing and pharmacy students during clinical placement, and strategies used to manage those situations. Healthcare students and staff experience elevated stress when exposed to dynamic clinical environments, complex care and challenging professional relationships. Emotionally intelligent behaviours are associated with appropriate recognition and management of emotions evoked by stressful experiences and development of effective relationships. Nursing and pharmacy students' use of emotionally intelligent behaviours to manage challenging interpersonal situations is not well known. A qualitative design, using semi-structured interviews to explore experiences of challenging interpersonal situations during clinical placement (Phase two of a larger mixed-methods study). Final-year Australian university nursing and pharmacy students (n = 20) were purposefully recruited using a range of Emotional Intelligence scores (derived in Phase one), measured using the GENOS Emotional intelligence Inventory (concise version). Challenging interpersonal situations involving student-staff and intrastaff conflict, discourteous behaviour and criticism occurred during clinical placement. Students used personal and relational strategies, incorporating emotionally intelligent behaviours, to manage these encounters. Strategies included reflecting and reframing, being calm, controlling discomfort and expressing emotions appropriately. Emotionally intelligent behaviours are effective to manage stressful interpersonal interactions. Methods for strengthening these behaviours should be integrated into education of nursing and pharmacy students and qualified professionals. Education within the clinical/workplace environment can incorporate key interpersonal skills of collaboration, social interaction and reflection, while also attending to sociocultural contexts of the healthcare setting. Students and staff are frequently exposed

  17. Effects of Consultee Problem Presentation and Consultant Training on Consultant Problem Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conoley, Collie W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined consultee's influence on process of problem definition. Hypothesized that consultee would influence consultant's ability to formulate specific, descriptive problems by consultee's original problem conceptualization. Findings from 18 doctoral student consultants enrolled in mental health consultation course and behavioral analysis class…

  18. Behavior Consultation: A Five-Year Evaluation of Consultant and Client Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochwill, Thomas W.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Documents the effects of training in behavioral consultation on 17 school psychology graduate students and on 44 client outcomes. Training focused on principles and mastery of applied behavioral therapy and consultation, relationship skills, and systems entry issues. Consultees and consultants expressed overall consumer satisfaction with the…

  19. Cross-Sectional Survey on the Dengue Knowledge, Attitudes and Preventive Practices Among Students and Staff of a Public University in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugova, H; Wallis, S

    2017-04-01

    Behavioural impact programmes are especially effective for dengue control and prevention. Universities are key settings for health promotion, so understanding factors that influence the practice of dengue prevention within a university community becomes important. This study aimed to examine the factors affecting dengue knowledge, attitude and preventive practices amongst students and staff of a public university. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A total of 372 students and staff of the NDUM were recruited by stratified sampling method. Data were collected via self-administered pre-tested structured questionnaires covering socio-demography and dengue KAP. Data were analysed descriptively. For bivariate analysis, Chi square test was applied. To explore the factors independently associated with the practice of dengue prevention, a logistic regression model was introduced. Overall, the participants had moderate dengue-related knowledge, good attitudes and good preventive practices. The majority had misconceptions about mosquito biting habits (83.8 %), seasonality of dengue epidemics (73.2 %), and mosquito breeding sites (70.3 %). Staff were more likely to have good dengue-related knowledge (p dengue knowledge and monthly average household income (p = 0.008), age (p dengue was associated with being a non-Malay (p = 0.034), having higher monthly average household income (p = 0.047) and tertiary education (p dengue knowledge and dengue attitudes were significantly and positively associated with practice of dengue prevention. Dengue preventive strategies amongst university students and staff should focus on maintaining good dengue-related preventive practices. Educational campaigns should mainly target students, young staff members, and those with lower level of education and income.

  20. Interprofessional training for final year healthcare students: a mixed methods evaluation of the impact on ward staff and students of a two-week placement and of factors affecting sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGettigan, Patricia; McKendree, Jean

    2015-10-26

    Multiple care failings in hospitals have led to calls for increased interprofessional training in medical education to improve multi-disciplinary teamwork. Providing practical interprofessional training has many challenges and remains uncommon in medical schools in the UK. Unlike most previous research, this evaluation of an interprofessional training placement takes a multi-faceted approach focusing not only on the impact on students, but also on clinical staff delivering the training and on outcomes for patients. We used mixed methods to examine the impact of a two-week interprofessional training placement undertaken on a medical rehabilitation ward by three cohorts of final year medical, nursing and therapy students. We determined the effects on staff, ward functioning and participating students. Impact on staff was evaluated using the Questionnaire for Psychological and Social factors at work (QPSNordic) and focus groups. Ward functioning was inferred from standard measures of care including length of stay, complaints, and adverse events. Impact on students was evaluated using the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Survey (RIPLS) among all students plus a placement survey among medical students. Between 2007 and 2010, 362 medical students and 26 nursing and therapy students completed placements working alongside the ward staff to deliver patient care. Staff identified benefits including skills recognition and expertise sharing. Ward functioning was stable. Students showed significant improvements in the RIPLS measures of Teamwork, Professional Identity and Patient-Centred Care. Despite small numbers of students from other professions, medical students' rated the placement highly. Increasing student numbers and budgetary constraints led to the cessation of the placement after three years. Interprofessional training placements can be delivered in a clinical setting without detriment to care and with benefits for all participants. While financial support is

  1. Skills for Effective Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustin, Dick; Ehly, Stewart

    1984-01-01

    Discusses counselor skills that promote effective consultation. Reviews research on effective school consultation and presents a five-stage model which involves phasing in, problem identification, implementation, evaluation, and termination. Provides recommendations for the process and products of consultation. (JAC)

  2. Consultant management estimating tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    The New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) Consultant Management Bureaus primary responsibilities are to negotiate staffing hours/resources with : engineering design consultants, and to monitor the consultant's costs. Currently the C...

  3. Consulting in Collection Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Lee

    1980-01-01

    Considers the role of the consultant in the areas of library collection development and weeding, and offers suggestions on determining the need for a consultant, obtaining one, and what to do when the consultant arrives. (FM)

  4. Teacher and Principal Perceptions of Student Victimization and the Schools' Response to Violence: The Contributions of Context on Staff Congruence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Susan; Astor, Ron; Benbenishty, Rami

    2009-01-01

    Consistency in staff awareness and response is a key programmatic centerpiece in most school violence prevention and intervention programs. Staff consensus on the definition of violence, the behaviors that constitute violence, the extent of the problem, and how to deal with violent situations are often the cornerstone of evidence-based programs.…

  5. A comparison between the effect of training performed by teachers and by health staff on the knowledge of high school students about AIDS in Bushehr/Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherafat Akaberian

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A.I.D.S as a worldwide crisis continues to spread in Iran too. The number of afflicted patients has reached 5780 subjects most of them are between 20 to 40 years of age. Prevention is one of the most effective methods to combat this human hazard. Promotion of general knowledge is thought to be the preliminary measure in this regard. Although, schools have turned to be the most favorable environment for health education, the issue of the group to afford training has remained controversial in our country yet. The aim of this research is a comparison between the effect of training performed by teachers or health staff on the knowledge of students of the first high school grade in Bushehr/ Iran. A total of 684 male and female students of the first high school grade were selected according to cluster random sampling. The selected students were divided into two groups and training for A.I.D.S using the same contents was done by their teachers and health staff separately. Before intervention, the mean knowledge scores of female & male students about A.I.D.S were 16.68 and 15.52, respectively. There was no significant difference in female students in two groups but teacher trained male students showed an increment score of 4.17 while in health staff ones, the score increment was 2.22 (P<0.01. In conclusion, the level of knowledge about A.I.D.S was not satisfactory in the high school students in Bushehr and for education in this group their sex in conjunction to different training methods should be considered.

  6. How Are University Gyms Used by Staff and Students? A Mixed-Method Study Exploring Gym Use, Motivation, and Communication in Three UK Gyms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Rapport

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined university gym use by staff and students using mixed methods: participant observation and an e-survey. Research in three UK universities entailed 16 observation sessions and an e-survey that reached 3396 students and staff. The research focused on gym use, the gym environment, the presentation of the self, and social interaction within gym spaces. The gyms were found to have a difficult role to play in providing functionality for some, while helping others to be active and minimize feelings of isolation and lack of control. This led to these gyms developing spaces of exercise rather than therapeutic spaces, and divisions in use of space, with some areas rarely used and often highly gendered, resulting in contested meanings produced within Healthy University discourses and physical activities.

  7. A study on knowledge and practice regarding biomedical waste management among staff nurses and nursing students of Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences, Ranchi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamim Haider

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospitals are the centre of cure and also the important centres of infectious waste generation. Effective management of Biomedical Waste (BMW is not only a legal necessity but also a social responsibility. Aims and Objectives: To assess the knowledge and practice in managing the biomedical wastes among nursing staff and student nurses in RIMS, Ranchi. Materials and methods: The study was conducted at RIMS, Ranchi from Oct 2013 to March 2014 (6 months. It was a descriptive, hospital based, cross-sectional study. A total of 240 nurses participated in the present study, randomly chosen from various departments A pre-designed, pre-tested, structured proforma was used for data collection after getting their informed consent. Self-made scoring system was used to categorize the participants as having good, average and poor scores. Data was tabulated and analyzed using percentages and chi-square test. Results: The knowledge regarding general information about BMW management was assessed(with scores 0-8,it was found  that level of knowledge was better in student nurses than staff nurses as student nurses scored good(6-8correct answers in more than half of the questions (65%.Whereas staff nurses scored good in only 33.33% questions. When the practical information regarding the BMW management is assessed (with scores 0-8, it was found that staff nurses had relatively better practice regarding BMW management than students as they scored good(6-8correct answers in 40% and 30% respectively. Conclusion: Though overall knowledge of study participants was good but still they need good quality training to improve their current knowledge about BMW. 

  8. Multifunction system service students and staff of higher education institutions by the example of ENGECON based on solutions IT -Card

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulakova Ekaterina Yurevna

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to the creation of multifunctional system service students and staff of universities based on smart card using the concept of electronic "purse." Experience of other countries with a similar solution shows that the system allows the university to significantly reduce maintenance costs of its activities and at the same time improve the quality of services provided. Also in this paper present my vision of the problem and its solution in our university - ENGECON.

  9. Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Remove of the staff association office   The Staff Association offices are going to be renovated during the coming four months, February to May 2014. The physical move from our current premises 64/R-002 to our temporary office in  510/R-010 will take place on Friday January 31st, so the Secretariat will be closed on that day. Hence, from Monday February 3rd until the end of May 2014 the Staff Association Secretariat will be located in 510/R-010 (entrance just across the CERN Printshop).    

  10. Convergence and translation: attitudes to inter-professional learning and teaching of creative problem-solving among medical and engineering students and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoelstra, Howard; Stoyanov, Slavi; Burgoyne, Louise; Bennett, Deirdre; Sweeney, Catherine; Drachsler, Hendrik; Vanderperren, Katrien; Van Huffel, Sabine; McSweeney, John; Shorten, George; O'Flynn, Siun; Cantillon-Murphy, Padraig; O'Tuathaigh, Colm

    2014-01-22

    Healthcare worldwide needs translation of basic ideas from engineering into the clinic. Consequently, there is increasing demand for graduates equipped with the knowledge and skills to apply interdisciplinary medicine/engineering approaches to the development of novel solutions for healthcare. The literature provides little guidance regarding barriers to, and facilitators of, effective interdisciplinary learning for engineering and medical students in a team-based project context. A quantitative survey was distributed to engineering and medical students and staff in two universities, one in Ireland and one in Belgium, to chart knowledge and practice in interdisciplinary learning and teaching, and of the teaching of innovation. We report important differences for staff and students between the disciplines regarding attitudes towards, and perceptions of, the relevance of interdisciplinary learning opportunities, and the role of creativity and innovation. There was agreement across groups concerning preferred learning, instructional styles, and module content. Medical students showed greater resistance to the use of structured creativity tools and interdisciplinary teams. The results of this international survey will help to define the optimal learning conditions under which undergraduate engineering and medicine students can learn to consider the diverse factors which determine the success or failure of a healthcare engineering solution.

  11. Convergence and translation: attitudes to inter-professional learning and teaching of creative problem-solving among medical and engineering students and staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare worldwide needs translation of basic ideas from engineering into the clinic. Consequently, there is increasing demand for graduates equipped with the knowledge and skills to apply interdisciplinary medicine/engineering approaches to the development of novel solutions for healthcare. The literature provides little guidance regarding barriers to, and facilitators of, effective interdisciplinary learning for engineering and medical students in a team-based project context. Methods A quantitative survey was distributed to engineering and medical students and staff in two universities, one in Ireland and one in Belgium, to chart knowledge and practice in interdisciplinary learning and teaching, and of the teaching of innovation. Results We report important differences for staff and students between the disciplines regarding attitudes towards, and perceptions of, the relevance of interdisciplinary learning opportunities, and the role of creativity and innovation. There was agreement across groups concerning preferred learning, instructional styles, and module content. Medical students showed greater resistance to the use of structured creativity tools and interdisciplinary teams. Conclusions The results of this international survey will help to define the optimal learning conditions under which undergraduate engineering and medicine students can learn to consider the diverse factors which determine the success or failure of a healthcare engineering solution. PMID:24450310

  12. Consultation Barriers between Teachers and External Consultants: A Grounded Theory of Change Resistance in School Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornberg, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study, conducted in Sweden, was to investigate the cultural barriers between school personnel (teachers and principals) and nonschool personnel (a resource team), who were external to the school system, regarding consultation about challenging or difficult-to-teach students. Focus groups with teachers, principals, and the resource…

  13. Hazardous alcohol use and cultural adjustment among U.S. college students abroad in Italy: Findings and recommendations for study abroad staff and researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael A; Poyrazli, Senel; Broyles, Lauren Matukaitis

    2016-01-01

    Italy is a top destination for U.S. college students studying abroad. Both international and local Italian media outlets, such as city newspapers, have cited the discordance between Italian cultural norms and U.S. college students' drinking behaviors. Hazardous alcohol consumption abroad, such as binge drinking, can result in individual- (e.g., physical injury) and social- (e.g., promotion of negative stereotypes) level adverse consequences. We assessed the prevalence of hazardous alcohol use and recent binge drinking in a sample of U.S. college students studying abroad in Italy (n = 111). We evaluated associations among drinking and cultural adjustment and determined which sociocultural factors predicted binge drinking for students abroad. Forty-six percent of students were classified as hazardous drinkers and 63% reported recent binge drinking. Socializing with American peers was a significant predictor for binge drinking abroad. Binge drinking was quite prevalent in our sample of students studying abroad in Italy. Study abroad advisors, instructors, and staff should consider diverse strategies to screen, educate, prevent, and/or intervene on alcohol misuse with their students. These strategies should be personalized to both the student as well as the host culture's norms.

  14. Staff and students' perceptions and experiences of teaching and assessment in Clinical Skills Laboratories: interview findings from a multiple case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Catherine E; Casey, Dympna; Shaw, David; Murphy, Kathy

    2012-08-01

    The Clinical Skills Laboratory has become an essential structure in nurse education and several benefits of its use have been identified. However, the literature identifies the need to examine the transferability of skills learned there into the reality of practice. This research explored the role of the Clinical Skills Laboratory in preparing nursing students for the real world of practice. This paper focuses specifically on the perceptions of the teaching and assessment strategies employed there. Qualitative multiple case study design. Five case study sites. Interviewees (n=58) included academic staff, clinical staff and nursing students. Semi-structured interviews. The Clinical Skills Laboratory can provide a pathway to practice and its authenticity is significant. Teaching strategies need to incorporate communication as well as psychomotor skills. Including audio-visual recording into assessment strategies is beneficial. Effective relationships between education institutions and clinical settings are needed to enhance the transferability of the skills learned. The Clinical Skills Laboratory should provide an authentic learning environment, with the appropriate use of teaching strategies. It is crucial that effective links between educators and clinical staff are established and maintained. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Introducing an online community into a clinical education setting: a pilot study of student and staff engagement and outcomes using blended learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kathleen; Tobin, Jacinta

    2010-01-26

    There are growing reasons to use both information and communication functions of learning technologies as part of clinical education, but the literature offers few accounts of such implementations or evaluations of their impact. This paper details the process of implementing a blend of online and face-to-face learning and teaching in a clinical education setting and it reports on the educational impact of this innovation. This study designed an online community to complement a series of on-site workshops and monitored its use over a semester. Quantitative and qualitative data recording 43 final-year medical students' and 13 clinical educators' experiences with this blended approach to learning and teaching were analysed using access, adoption and quality criteria as measures of impact. The introduction of the online community produced high student ratings of the quality of learning and teaching and it produced student academic results that were equivalent to those from face-to-face-only learning and teaching. Staff had mixed views about using blended learning. Projects such as this take skilled effort and time. Strong incentives are required to encourage clinical staff and students to use a new mode of communication. A more synchronous or multi-channel communication feedback system might stimulate increased adoption. Cultural change in clinical teaching is also required before clinical education can benefit more widely from initiatives such as this.

  16. Introducing an online community into a clinical education setting: a pilot study of student and staff engagement and outcomes using blended learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobin Jacinta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are growing reasons to use both information and communication functions of learning technologies as part of clinical education, but the literature offers few accounts of such implementations or evaluations of their impact. This paper details the process of implementing a blend of online and face-to-face learning and teaching in a clinical education setting and it reports on the educational impact of this innovation. Methods This study designed an online community to complement a series of on-site workshops and monitored its use over a semester. Quantitative and qualitative data recording 43 final-year medical students' and 13 clinical educators' experiences with this blended approach to learning and teaching were analysed using access, adoption and quality criteria as measures of impact. Results The introduction of the online community produced high student ratings of the quality of learning and teaching and it produced student academic results that were equivalent to those from face-to-face-only learning and teaching. Staff had mixed views about using blended learning. Conclusions Projects such as this take skilled effort and time. Strong incentives are required to encourage clinical staff and students to use a new mode of communication. A more synchronous or multi-channel communication feedback system might stimulate increased adoption. Cultural change in clinical teaching is also required before clinical education can benefit more widely from initiatives such as this.

  17. Milk Options Observation (MOO): A Mixed-Methods Study of Chocolate Milk Removal on Beverage Consumption and Student/Staff Behaviors in a Rural Elementary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Melinda M; Spurlock, Margaret; Ramsey, Katrina; Smith, Jamie; Beamer, Beth Ann; Aromaa, Susan; McGinnis, Paul B

    2017-08-01

    Providing flavored milk in school lunches is controversial, with conflicting evidence on its impact on nutritional intake versus added sugar consumption and excess weight gain. Nonindustry-sponsored studies using individual-level analyses are needed. Therefore, we conducted this mixed-methods study of flavored milk removal at a rural primary school between May and June 2012. We measured beverage selection/consumption pre- and post-chocolate milk removal and collected observation field notes. We used linear and logistic mixed models to assess beverage waste and identified themes in staff and student reactions. Our analysis of data from 315 unique students and 1,820 beverages choices indicated that average added sugar intake decreased by 2.8 g postremoval, while average reductions in calcium and protein consumption were negligible (12.2 mg and 0.3 g, respectively). Five thematic findings emerged, including concerns expressed by adult staff about student rebellion following removal, which did not come to fruition. Removing flavored milk from school-provided lunches may lower students' daily added sugar consumption without considerably decreasing calcium and protein intake and may promote healthy weight.

  18. The Good School Toolkit for reducing physical violence from school staff to primary school students: a cluster-randomised controlled trial in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, Karen M; Knight, Louise; Child, Jennifer C; Mirembe, Angel; Nakuti, Janet; Jones, Rebecca; Sturgess, Joanna; Allen, Elizabeth; Kyegombe, Nambusi; Parkes, Jenny; Walakira, Eddy; Elbourne, Diana; Watts, Charlotte; Naker, Dipak

    2015-07-01

    Violence against children from school staff is widespread in various settings, but few interventions address this. We tested whether the Good School Toolkit-a complex behavioural intervention designed by Ugandan not-for-profit organisation Raising Voices-could reduce physical violence from school staff to Ugandan primary school children. We randomly selected 42 primary schools (clusters) from 151 schools in Luwero District, Uganda, with more than 40 primary 5 students and no existing governance interventions. All schools agreed to be enrolled. All students in primary 5, 6, and 7 (approximate ages 11-14 years) and all staff members who spoke either English or Luganda and could provide informed consent were eligible for participation in cross-sectional baseline and endline surveys in June-July 2012 and 2014, respectively. We randomly assigned 21 schools to receive the Good School Toolkit and 21 to a waitlisted control group in September, 2012. The intervention was implemented from September, 2012, to April, 2014. Owing to the nature of the intervention, it was not possible to mask assignment. The primary outcome, assessed in 2014, was past week physical violence from school staff, measured by students' self-reports using the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect Child Abuse Screening Tool-Child Institutional. Analyses were by intention to treat, and are adjusted for clustering within schools and for baseline school-level means of continuous outcomes. The trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01678846. No schools left the study. At 18-month follow-up, 3820 (92·4%) of 4138 randomly sampled students participated in a cross-sectional survey. Prevalence of past week physical violence was lower in the intervention schools (595/1921, 31·0%) than in the control schools (924/1899, 48·7%; odds ratio 0·40, 95% CI 0·26-0·64, pSchool Toolkit is an effective intervention to reduce violence against children from school staff in Ugandan

  19. On becoming a consultant: a study exploring the journey to consultant practice

    OpenAIRE

    Henwood, Suzanne; Booth, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Background: This paper reports a qualitative study exploring the establishment of non-medical consultant roles in Radiography. Given the difficulties reported in recruiting and retaining staff in these posts, we hope this paper offers a historical documentation of those consultants who were some of the first in post, sharing their stories of how they obtained and transitioned into their roles.\\ud \\ud Methods: This paper is part of a two year case study exploring the leadership domain of consu...

  20. International Distance Consulting via Web Conferencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachyanun Nilsook

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to study the result of the use of international distance consulting via web conferencing. The research discovered that: 1 the open source programs can be only used with desktop computers, but not with laptop computers 2 the result of the use along the consulting process is considered normal 3 there are some observations that are different from the criteria of evaluation: the picture quality, the sound quality, the interaction during the consulting, and the files management of the system. The students agree with the international distance consulting via web conferencing process that consists of 5 steps: 1 Preparation of the consulting system 2 Problem survey 3 Problem study 4 Determine the objective and resolve the problem 5 Make the conclusion of the consulting system.

  1. On becoming a consultant: A study exploring the journey to consultant practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henwood, S.; Booth, L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This paper reports a qualitative study exploring the establishment of non-medical consultant roles in Radiography. Given the difficulties reported in recruiting and retaining staff in these posts, we hope this paper offers a historical documentation of those consultants who were some of the first in post, sharing their stories of how they obtained and transitioned into their roles. Methods: This paper is part of a two year case study exploring the leadership domain of consultant practice. The focus of this paper is a reflection, by the consultants, of their journey to becoming a consultant; a documentation of some of the practical issues in establishing the roles; and the transition to higher levels of practice. Eight consultant radiographers participated in the initial interviews (two consultants withdrew from the study subsequent to this). In-depth iterative interviewing was used to explore and record individual stories and experiences. Findings: The consultants shared their perceptions of being in post, including their own motivation to progress to a new role, how prepared they felt initially, the lack of role models, the lack of clarity surrounding the role and a perception of ‘being on display’. Conclusions: The paper offers insight into the journey of these consultants and some of the common characteristics they share. These characteristics give some indication of what motivated them to step into higher level roles, in particular the need to drive change and improvement. The paper also offers suggestions for how the transition into the role could be more effectively supported. - Highlights: • Identifies characteristics thought to contribute to effective consultant practice. • A desire to change practice is a major motivator in applying for a consultant post. • The consultant role was a natural evolution for some, not a desired career pathway. • There is recognition that the initial consultants were pioneers for the profession.

  2. The Contemporary Consultant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olson, Thomas; Poulfelt, Flemming; Greiner, Larry

    This book complements The handbook of Management Consulting: The Contemporary Consultant: Insights from Leading Experts, 1e but can also be studied separately. The book consists of 20 cases including Harvard and Stanford cases. The cases present the broad range of topics that are pertinent...... to current management consulting. Each of the four parts of the text presents a cogent introduction by the editors, delineating topics that are critical for today's consultants to understand. The cases represent major practice areas of consulting and afford new insights into change processes and other...... current management issues facing consulting firms. These cases, together with the handbook, will prepare consultants and other business managers for a successful future in a highly competitive consulting environment....

  3. Tribal Consultation Tracking System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The consultation-related information the AIEO Consultation Team working with our Tribal Portal contractors has developed a Lotus Notes Database that is capable of...

  4. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows: as from 1 April 2003 • Article R II 1.19 - Types and duration of contracts of staff members (page 15) as from 1 July 2003 Implementation of the category of local staff members Copies of this update are available in the divisional secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  5. Job Satisfaction Of Hospital Nursing Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Pietersen

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Health care managers realize that job satisfaction impacts on nursing staff retention. This study examined the job satisfaction of nursing staff (N = 109 at a government hospital. Just more than half of the respondents were generally satisfied. Feelings that nursing is worthwhile and satisfying, and financial stability at the hospital could promote staff retention. Specific intrinsic - (promotion, and extrinsic factors (routinization, working conditions, pay, interaction with supervisors, and organizational support could impact negatively on retention. Management should use these findings as a basis for staff consultation, developmental strategies, and interventions. Future research on other nursing populations is recommended.

  6. International Students in the Higher Education Classroom: Initial Findings from Staff at Two Post-92 Universities in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Paul; Gourlay, Lesley Jane; Gannon-Leary, Pat

    2010-01-01

    A significant body of work has emerged over the last 10 years investigating the experiences of international university students. These studies have covered various challenges faced by some groups of international students relating to culture, language and integration and have been prompted by the increase in international students studying in the…

  7. 3 CFR - Tribal Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... Recommendations for improving the plans and making the tribal consultation process more effective, if any, should... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tribal Consultation Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of November 5, 2009 Tribal Consultation Memorandum for the Heads of Executive...

  8. Bioethics Consultations and Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Jennie

    2011-01-01

    Making difficult healthcare decisions is often helped by consultation with a bioethics committee. This article reviews the main bioethics principles, when it is appropriate and how to call a bioethics consult, ethical concerns, and members of the consult team. Bioethics resources are included.

  9. Consultant survival guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Sahena

    2014-04-01

    Taking up a new consultant post can be both exciting and daunting. Once the elation of completing years of training and successfully securing a valued position has subsided, the reality of the task ahead becomes apparent. A new consultant needs to develop a number of skills to develop as a clinical leader and understand the processes within the National Health Service (NHS) that enable service development and innovation. In a programme packed with esteemed speakers, the Royal College of Physicians' one-day conference, Consultants' survival guide: how to succeed as a new consultant provided practical tips and advice for senior trainees and new consultants.

  10. Attitudes of Veterinary Teaching Staff and Exposure of Veterinary Students to Early-Age Desexing, with Review of Current Early-Age Desexing Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alannah Jupe

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 50% of cats admitted to Australian shelters are kittens, and 26% of dogs are puppies, and, particularly for cats, euthanasia rates are often high. Cats can be pregnant by 4 months of age, yet the traditional desexing age is 5–6 months, and studies in Australasia and Nth America reveal that only a minority of veterinarians routinely perform early age desexing (EAD of cats or dogs, suggesting they are not graduating with these skills. This study aimed to describe the attitudes of veterinary teaching staff in Australian and New Zealand universities towards EAD, and to determine if these changed from 2008 to 2015. It also aimed to identify students’ practical exposure to EAD. Most (64% of the 25 participants in 2015 did not advocate EAD in their teaching and, in their personal opinion, only 32% advocated it for cats. Concerns related to EAD cited by staff included anesthetic risk, orthopedic problems, hypoglycemia, and, in female dogs, urinary incontinence. Those who advocated EAD cited benefits of population control, ease of surgery and behavioral benefits. Only three of the eight universities provided a majority of students with an opportunity to gain exposure to EAD procedures before graduation, and in two of these, most students had an opportunity to perform EAD. In conclusion, most veterinary students in Australia and New Zealand are not graduating with the knowledge or skills to perform EAD, and have little opportunity while at university to gain practical exposure. Welfare agencies could partner with universities to enable students to experience EAD.

  11. Manual patient transfers used most often by student and staff nurses are consistent with their perceptions of transfer training, and performance confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk, Paula M; Weir, Patricia L; Andrews, David M

    2015-01-01

    A disconnect in manual patient transfer (MPT) training practices for nurses, between what is taught and used in academic and clinical settings, could have implications for injury. This study aimed to determine: 1. what MPTs student and staff nurses use in clinical settings, and 2. if the MPTs used most often were also the ones they perceived that they received training for and had the most confidence performing. Survey responses from student nurses (n=163) (mid-sized university) and staff nurses (n=33) (local hospital) regarding 19 MPTs were analyzed to determine which transfers were perceived to be used most often, and which ones they had received training for and had the greatest confidence performing. The MPTs nurses perceived using most often were the same transfers they had the greatest confidence performing and for which they perceived receiving training. However, these MPTs were not taught at the university at the time of this investigation. Reducing the disconnect between manual patient transfer training obtained in the academic and clinical environments will hopefully reduce the risk of injury for nurses and improve the quality of care for patients.

  12. The effect of aggression management training programmes for nursing staff and students working in an acute hospital setting. A narrative review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckemann, B; Zeller, A; Hahn, S; Dassen, T; Schols, J M G A; Halfens, R J G

    2015-01-01

    Patient aggression is a longstanding problem in general hospital nursing. Staff training is recommended to tackle workplace aggression originating from patients or visitors, yet evidence on training effects is scarce. To review and collate current research evidence on the effect of aggression management training for nurses and nursing students working in general hospitals, and to derive recommendations for further research. Systematic, narrative review. Embase, MEDLINE, the Cochrane library, CINAHL, PsycINFO, pubmed, psycArticles, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection were searched for articles evaluating training programs for staff and students in acute hospital adult nursing in a 'before/after' design. Studies published between January 2000 and September 2011 in English, French or German were eligible of inclusion. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed with the 'Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies'. Main outcomes i.e. attitudes, confidence, skills and knowledge were collated. Nine studies were included. Two had a weak, six a moderate, and one a strong study design. All studies reported increased confidence, improved attitude, skills, and knowledge about risk factors post training. There was no significant change in incidence of patient aggression. Our findings corroborate findings of reviews on training in mental health care, which point to a lack of high quality research. Training does not reduce the incidence of aggressive acts. Aggression needs to be tackled at an organizational level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Qualitative Exploration of the DIGCOMP Digital Competence Framework: Attitudes of students, academics and administrative staff in the health faculty of a UK HEI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Evangelinos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports upon findings of a series of semi-structured interviews with students, academics and administrative staff from a health care faculty in a UK Higher Education Institution (HEI. Exploring their experiences of mapping to the EU DIGCOMP Digital Competence Framework, a hermeneutic lens enables a more nuanced approach to attitudes towards Digital Competence (DC. One of the eight lifelong learning key-competences required for managers, doctors, nurses and other health-related professionals, DC is crucial to professional development. Defined by 14 themes, the findings express the participants’ experiences, knowledge and level of comprehension of the subject. Our findings indicate students are conflating digital social media skills with their skills for the workplace, resulting in over-confidence; academics raising concerns about work/private life balance offered by the affordances of handheld devices; administrative staff that are far more confident and managing a range of technology’s effectively. The research further reveals that the DIGICOMP framework is applicable as a generic framework for professional practice.

  14. The Role of Aid to Medical, Osteopathic, and Dental Students in a New Health Manpower Education Policy. Staff Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    Current and future financial aid to students of medicine, osteopathy, and dentistry (MODs) is discussed in the context of federal health manpower objectives. Options for providing financial access to such students are analyzed. The report was prepared for the Senate Budget Committee in response to a request by Senator Lawton Chiles as part of…

  15. Male Student-Athlete Perceptions of University Academic Staff Expectations: A Qualitative Analysis of Perceptions, Value and Academic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeck, Teresa A.

    2010-01-01

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 male collegiate student-athletes in a revenue-generating sport in an effort to better inform current academic support practitioners how to best serve this population. The inquiry focused on student-athlete perceptions of two areas: (1) perceptions regarding the expectations academic personnel have…

  16. Housing Is an Epicenter for Change: A Narrative of Students and Staff Championing Campus Social Change Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otchere, Kimberly; Bankhead, Tekita; Williams, Ayanna

    2017-01-01

    The resurgence of student activism has yielded dynamic change within university housing departments and beyond on college campuses across the country. In higher education, the social, cultural, and political environment continues to be highly racialized and characterized by a string of protests and public displays of student angst. The threat of…

  17. Resolution of the Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    You were many to attend the public information meetings organised in October and we thank you for your interest. In this decision phase of the current Five-Yearly Review of our employment conditions they provided an opportunity to review the Management proposals in detail. They were a moment of exchange also on the various topics under review, and your comments were many and very valuable. Meeting on Thursday 29th October, the Staff Council discussed once more these proposals. It considered that the "package" of proposed measures is not balanced enough in its current form. It decided to formulate additional requests to the Management, relating mainly to the effects of the introduction of the proposed new career system. The resolution adopted this morning also implies that the consultation of staff, originally foreseen next week, is postponed. The staff Council will reconvene in a special session on Thursday, 5th November to reassess its position depending on the progress made regarding its d...

  18. Strengthening Bullying Prevention through School Staff Connectedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2014-01-01

    The growing concern about bullying and school violence has focused national attention on various aspects of school climate and school connectedness. The current study examined dimensions of staff connectedness (i.e., personal, student, staff, and administration) in relation to staff members' comfort intervening in bullying situations (e.g.,…

  19. Department of Training and Consulting - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrzynski, L.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The Department of Training and Consulting regularly serves secondary schools pupils and teachers, university students and the public. Almost 6600 visitors, mainly students from secondary schools in Poland, visited the Department. In addition to regular lectures, demonstrations, visits to the reactor MARIA and two current exhibitions (on nuclear waste and the WWER reactor model), several laboratory experiments have been organized for secondary schools. A one-day summer workshop on '' Basics of nuclear radiation, its properties and use in science, technology and medicine '' offered secondary school teachers a general understanding of the problems connected with radioactivity. The Department is constantly developing experiments that can be conducted by students of secondary schools and universities, as well as by professionals. At the moment, there are about 25 experiments available for the guests of the Department. They cover the measurement of lifetimes, essential elements of radioprotection, absorption of radiation in various materials, excitation of fluorescence radiation, influence of magnetic fields on beta radiation as well as on electrons emitted from a typical electron gun, Compton scattering and elements of gamma spectroscopy, search for radioactive pollutions etc. Three experiments were modernized to enable them to be conducted over the Internet. This project is a bit delayed but should be finished by the end of April 2009. For the third time the Department organized (together with the Institute of Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw) '' The Physical Pathways '' competition for secondary school students. The students could choose one of three possibilities (even all of them): either to submit a scientific paper, to present a demonstration of a physical phenomenon, or to write an essay on the connection between physics and the development of civilization. They could also submit work prepared by a team of up to three persons. The

  20. Collaboration Between Staff and Students in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: The Potential and the Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Allin

    2014-03-01

    (Mann, 2001. Developing effective collaborations between students and lecturers matters for SoTL practice, as such collaborations have the potential to transform teaching and learning in Higher Education, and develop further our understanding of learning (Werder & Otis, 2009.

  1. The art of consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhangoo, Kulwant S

    2014-05-01

    Sophisticated marketing and practice-enhancing strategies can help bring patients to a surgeon's practice. However, the ability to retain these patients and also convert the consultations into surgical procedures depends on the art of consultation. This very important aspect of clinical practice is seldom taught in the medical school. In this paper, the author discusses many aspects of the art of consultation, which he has learned in his practice over the years.

  2. Ethics in Management Consulting

    OpenAIRE

    Vallini, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Ethics is a relevant value in business and management consulting. The presence of recognized ethics tends to reduce the need for informative or legal-contractual precautions in the formalization of relationships, for both of the parts involved in a negotiation. Management Consulting on ethics will develop more and more. Law will consider more and more ethics in business and management consulting. The ethics of corporations influences their workers and behaviour with the customers. It is an e...

  3. Department of Training and Consulting - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrzynski, L.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The Department of Training and Consulting concentrates on the dissemination of knowledge on radiation phenomena: the origins, applications and health effects of ionizing radiation in particular. Its activity is open to the public. However, the main recipients are students of secondary schools and teachers. During about 12 years of such activity the number of visitors has exceeded 60 000 persons, while during last few years the average number of our visitors varies between 6 000 and 7 000 per year, which shows how much this kind of activity is needed. It should be noted that the term 'visitor' is not the most appropriate, because what the 'visitor' actually experiences in the Department is a series of lectures with demonstrations, visits to the MARIA reactor or regular experimenting in a specially designed Laboratory of Atomic and Nuclear Physics for schools, teachers and university students. The Department organized two permanent exhibitions. One is connected with the nuclear waste treatment and storage, another one displays a large model. 4x4x4 m. of a nuclear reactor of the WWER-type which was about to be installed at Zarnowiec about 20 years ago. The Department is equally active during annual Picnics and Festivals of Science in Warsaw and other Polish towns. Our staff is often asked to deliver lectures outside the Institute for Nuclear Studies, and participates in discussions on problems of teaching, in addition, the Department leads, together with the Institute of Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, the annual competition, named '' Physical Paths '', for high-school students. The competition is arranged in three categories: research, demonstration of physical phenomena, and essays on physics and its relation to civilization. This competition particularly stimulates small educational centers in Poland. This year, 2010, the competition was organized for the fifth time. The Department of Training and Consulting arranges regular courses

  4. Consultation Models Revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawaz, S.; Khan, Zulfiquar A.; Mossa, Samir Y.

    2006-01-01

    A new definition is proposed for analyzing the consultation in the primary health care, integrating other models of consultation and provides a framework by which general practitioners can apply the principles of consultation using communication skills to reconcile the respective agenda and autonomy of both doctor and patient into a negotiated agreed plan, which includes both management of health problems and health promotion. Achieving success of consultations depends on time and mutual cooperation between patient and doctor showed by doctor-patient relationship. (author)

  5. Inpatient Consultative Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesbroeck, Lauren K; Shinohara, Michi M

    2015-11-01

    Dermatology consultation can improve diagnostic accuracy in the hospitalized patient with cutaneous disease. Dermatology consultation can streamline and improve treatment plans, and potentially lead to cost savings. Dermatology consultants can be a valuable resource for education for trainees, patients, and families. Inpatient consultative dermatology spans a breadth of conditions, including inflammatory dermatoses,infectious processes, adverse medication reactions, and neoplastic disorders, many of which can be diagnosed based on dermatologic examination alone, but when necessary, bedside skin biopsies can contribute important diagnostic information. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Consultation Model to Facilitate Reading Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilles, Elena; Griffiths, Amy-Jane; Lee, Allison; Cardenas, Santiago; Chacko, Yasmin; Jimerson, Shane R.

    2008-01-01

    Poor reading ability is associated with numerous negative consequences. School psychologists should provide teachers with resources and support to improve student reading ability and prevent these negative outcomes. This paper offers a guide for school psychologists to use in the consultation process when working with teachers to address students'…

  7. Comparing student and staff perceptions of the "Educational Climate" in Spanish Dental Schools using the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás, I; Aneiros, A; Casares-de-Cal, M A; Quintas, V; Prada-López, I; Balsa-Castro, C; Ceballos, L; Gómez-Moreno, G; Llena, C; López-Jornet, P; Machuca, M C; Palés, J

    2018-02-01

    To compare the perceptions of students and teachers of the "Educational Climate" (EC) in Spanish public dental schools. A group of 1064 students and 354 teachers from six Spanish public dental schools responded to the DREEM questionnaire. This has 50 items grouped into five subscales: perception of learning (Learning); perception of teachers (Teachers); academic self-perceptions (Academic); perception of the atmosphere in the faculty (Atmosphere); and social self-perceptions (Social). The DREEM scale provides results for each item, each subscale and the overall EC. The EC scores were 123.2 (61.6%) for the students and 134.1 (67.0%) for the teachers (Pschools; and the different subscales to be "positive and acceptable." The teachers did, however, evaluate the EC, and specifically the learning-teaching process, more positively than their students, identifying fewer problematic educational aspects. Both groups agreed on the need to: improve support systems for students who suffer from stress and reduce teaching based on "factual learning." © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. [Effectiveness of support for asbestos health consultation in health centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamatsu, Yasuko

    2011-09-01

    In this research, we aimed to evaluate the support for asbestos health consultation in health centers. In this exploratory descriptive study, a self-administered original questionnaire was developed and used. Among all 517 health centers, valid responses were returned from 323 (62.5%) consenting centers. Consultations in the previous year ranged from 0-108 cases, with a facility median of 3.0 cases. Among staff members, 86.4% did not receive training and 35.4% had never used the manual. Workplaces that use asbestos within their jurisdiction were recognized by 39.2% of staff members, and 16.7% of these members always supported consultants psychologically. The staff members were not confident about asbestos health consultation: 71.2% for general questions, 76.2% for questions about asbestos-related diseases, and 76.4% for questions about risk of asbestos-related diseases; 51.4% were not confident about the Asbestos-Related Health Damage Relief System. Health center staff members who were significantly more confident were those who had more staff to work with; dealt with many consultations in the previous year; recognized the workplaces using asbestos within their jurisdiction; often used the manual and often psychologically supported consultants. According to the covariance structure analysis model, the 'use of support systems' consisting of 'the use of manual', 'training attendance' and 'recognition of workplaces that use asbestos' positively affected the frequency of psychological support (peffective in building the confidence of health center staff in relation to asbestos health consultation, although the use of these support systems was low.

  9. Assisted Living Facilities: The Next Frontier for Consultant Pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Eva; Blaszczyk, Amie Taggart

    2016-02-01

    Consultant pharmacists improve the lives of older adults by providing medication management, avoiding adverse drug reactions, and uncovering duplicative therapy. Despite this, there is a lack of legislation supporting the role of the consultant pharmacist in many of the settings-other than nursing facilities-where seniors reside. Specifically, federal and state laws do not recognize consultant pharmacists for their specialized role in pharmacotherapy and the potential benefits they bring to older adults in assisted living facilities. Among many services, consultant pharmacists may provide monthly medication reviews, staff medication education, and medication system management in assisted living facilities. A literature search was conducted to identify literature supporting the benefits of consultant pharmacists in assisted living facilities. Gaps in available literature are discussed as are ideas for expanding the role of consultant pharmacists in assisted living facilities.

  10. Factors Related to Life satisfaction, Meaning of life, Religiosity and Death Anxiety in Health Care Staff and Students: A Cross Sectional Study from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha KS

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Death is beyond one's personal control, generates great concern and anxiety, among human beings. Studies exploring the association between religious attitudes and death attitudes in adolescents and young adults in postmodern society are scarce. This study examines the relationship between five dimensions of attitude toward death (fear of death, death avoidance, neutral acceptance, approach acceptance, and escape acceptance, death anxiety, life satisfaction and meaning, religiosity and selected personal factors among health care staff and students in three teaching hospitals. A total of 230 adolescents and adults both sexes who were willing participated. Diener et al Satisfaction with Life, Steger et al Meaning of Life Questionnaire; Templer's Death Anxiety Scale, Wong's Death Attitude Profile-R and a religious attitude scale were administered. Findings showed students' search for meaning was higher than faculty. An unusual finding of higher Approach acceptance death attitude in students emerged. Correlation analysis revealed that presence of meaning was related to greater life satisfaction in both groups. It was further related to higher religiosity in both groups and higher neutral acceptance of death and lesser death anxiety in students alone. In both groups search for meaning was positively associated with death anxiety. Faculty's search for meaning was positively associated with negative death attitudes and surprisingly one positive death attitude. Death anxiety was more with faculty's advancing age, and was also more when both groups held negative death attitudes. Religiosity was positively associated with death anxiety in students. Further, religiosity was not only positively associated with positive death attitudes of approach acceptance (both groups and neutral acceptance (faculty but also with negative attitude of death avoidance (faculty. Death anxiety was more despite both groups embracing approach acceptance death attitude indicating

  11. University Students Are Unaware of the Role of Academic Librarians. A Review of: Bickley, R. & Corral, S. (2011. Student perceptions of staff in the information commons: A survey at the University of Sheffield. Reference Services Review, 39(2, 223-243. doi:10.1108/00907321111135466

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty Thomson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To discover students’ perceptionsof information commons staff, and todetermine how these perceptions influence theuse of library resources.Design – Post-experience survey with onefollow-up interview.Setting – The University of Sheffield, a postsecondaryinstitution in England.Subjects – All undergraduate andpostgraduate students were invited to takepart. Just over 1% of the student population, or250 students, completed the survey.Methods – Information about the survey wassent to students’ institutional email addresses.One follow up interview was carried out viaemail using the critical incident technique.Main Results – Students do not understandthe academic roles of librarians. They areunlikely to approach library staff for academicsupport, preferring to turn to instructors, otherstudents, friends, and family. Most studentshad positive opinions about assistancereceived in the Information Commons, but asmall number reflected on previous badexperiences with staff, or on a fear of beingmade to feel foolish. The vast majority ofstudents who did not seek help in theInformation Commons stated that this wasbecause they did not require assistance. Most students do not perceive a difference between Information Commons staff and library staff.Conclusion – Students have positive views of Information Commons staff at the University of Sheffield, but have low awareness of the roles of professional librarians. Librarians need to develop partnerships with academic staff and strengthen their presence in both physical and online learning environments to promote their academic roles.

  12. The Contemporary Consultant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olson, Thomas; Poulfelt, Flemming; Greiner, Larry

    This book complements The handbook of Management Consulting: The Contemporary Consultant: Insights from Leading Experts, 1e but can also be studied separately. The book consists of 20 cases including Harvard and Stanford cases. The cases present the broad range of topics that are pertinent...

  13. The Dream Consultant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhr, Sara Louise; Kirkegaard, Line

    2013-01-01

    Consultants are known to work extreme hours. We show empirically how consultants fantasize about off-work activities, which are impossible to realize with their work schedule. These fantasies are, however, not obstructing their work, but important to justify the extreme hours and sustain desire...

  14. Applied DMP Consultation Workshop

    OpenAIRE

    Zilinski, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    This workshop allowed participants to work through a data management plan consultation, using a real world example. The workshop covered data management plans (DMPs), described in detail the areas that are typically included in a DMP, and utilized tools and resources to help support a DMP consultation with disciplinary faculty.

  15. The Appropriateness of a California Student and Staff Survey for Measuring Middle School Climate. REL 2014-039

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Thomas; Voight, Adam

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of states and school districts use school climate assessments in progress reporting systems and are interested in incorporating these assessments into accountability systems. This analysis of response data from middle school students and teachers on the California School Climate, Health, and Learning Survey examines the…

  16. Staff and Student Perceptions of English Language Policies and Practices in "International" Universities: A UK Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jennifer; Wingate, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a small qualitative study which aimed to gain an understanding of how lecturers and international students perceive the English language policies and practices at their institutions. The findings show that most participants perceive current policies and practices as unfair. However, there were discrepancies in lecturers' and…

  17. To What Extent Is Capital Expenditure in UK Higher Education Meeting the Pedagogical Needs of Staff and Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steven; Sutcliffe, Michael J.; Bragg, Joanna; Harris, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Capital expenditure at United Kingdom (UK) universities is rapidly rising, with new buildings erected on the premise that national and international competitiveness must be maintained. We examine students' engagement with and conceptualisation of university estate, and explore broader questions about the extent to which building design can…

  18. Student Loans in Developing Countries: An Evaluation of the Colombian Performance. Bank Staff Working Paper No. 182.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallade, Jean-Pierre

    The student loan program run by the Instituto Colombiano de Credito Educativo y Estudios Tecnicos en el Exterior (ICETEX) has three main objectives: to increase the country's supply of highly skilled manpower, to achieve more equality of educational opportunity, and to provide a meaningful source of finance for higher education. An analysis of…

  19. Students' Note-Taking Challenges in the Twenty-First Century: Considerations for Teachers and Academic Staff Developers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Note-taking in lectures is often taken to be the distinguishing characteristic of learning at university. It is typically assumed that this is a commonsensical skill that students either have or will learn through trial and error. The data from a research project in one New Zealand university suggest that taking good notes is not a skill that…

  20. "These Are Our Babies": University Student Tutors, Urban Learners, Public School and University Staff Crafting Community through Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    For nine semesters approximately 100 third through fifth graders have come by bus from their urban impact schools (Anyon, 2005) only a few city blocks away, to the campus of an historic Black university for tutoring. Pairs of university student tutors--typically freshmen, sophomores and juniors from multiple disciplines across campus--accept…

  1. Preceptor development. Use a staff development specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneller, S; Hoeppner, M

    1994-01-01

    Preceptor orientation is a well identified need. Less often identified is the critical role the staff development specialist plays in the ongoing support and development of preceptors. In this article, the authors explain activities of coaching, facilitating, mentoring, and consulting. These role components are essential in the ongoing development of preceptors. This support also may help retain preceptors.

  2. From Research Assistant to Professional Research Assistance: Research Consulting as a Form of Research Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn E. Pollon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Research assistantships have long been viewed as an extension of the formal education process, a form of apprenticeship, and a pathway into the professional practice of research in institutional settings. However, there are other contexts in which researchers practice research. This self-study documents the formative role research assistantships played in the authors’ development as professional research consultants. Four professional research consultants who held research assistant positions during their master’s and doctoral studies describe the contributions of their research assistantship experiences to the advancement of their knowledge, skills, and passion for research and subsequently to their career decisions. Professional research consulting is identified as a natural extension of research assistant roles and a potential career path. The article enhances current understandings about the ways research assistantships contribute to the development of researchers, and specifically to the development of professional research consultants. The analysis will be of interest to students contemplating entering into research assistantships, current research assistants, current research assistant supervisors, academic staff looking to improve their research productivity, and department chairs.

  3. Negotiating exceptions to clients' problem discourse in consultative dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Tom; Pyle, Nathan R

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how consultants negotiated exceptions to clients problem or aspiration discourse in lifestyle consultations held for research purposes. Participants from a university campus (students and employees) were recruited for 1-hr lifestyle consultations with therapist consultants having graduate training and supervision in narrative and solution-focused therapy. The consultations were held with the expectation that consultants would, at least once, invite discussions of exceptions in client's problem or aspiration discourse. We wanted to understand how such discussions were initiated and brought to conclusion by examining client and consultants use of conversational practices. Twelve volunteer 'clients' participated in consultations with our six volunteering consultants. These consultations were videotaped then passages were selected where consultants initiated exception discussions with the clients involved. The 18 selected passages were discursively analyzed for general rhetorical features evident in those passages, and three passages were transcribed and analyzed using conversation analysis to make evident more specific rhetorical features of exception discussions, as they were engaged in by consultants and clients. Ten general features of exception discussions were highlighted and the more specific conversational analyses revealed a 'messiness' that was related to how exception discussions were introduced and negotiated as a novel discourse in the consultations. We discuss our findings in the context of therapists' use of exception questions and discussions in therapy and highlight particular conversational practices and sensitivities relevant to engaging clients in such exception discussions. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  4. Chile; Staff Report for the 2003 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2003-01-01

    Chile has successfully resisted contagion from neighboring countries difficulties. Chile's inflation targeting framework has successfully anchored inflation expectations and increased the economy's resilience to external shocks while maintaining price stability. The floating exchange rate regime is an essential part of the macroeconomic policy framework and continues to serve Chile well. The interest in recapitalizing the central bank is welcomed. Executive Directors commend Chile for the tra...

  5. Australia; Staff Report for the 2011 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2011-01-01

    In this study, Australia’s economic performance from the onset of the global financial crisis is discussed. A healthy banking system, flexible exchange rate, and robust demand for commodities from Asia are important for good performance. Although recent global market volatility has increased uncertainty about the economic outlook and tilted risks downward, strong commodity demand from emerging Asia underpins Australia’s favorable economic prospects. The importance of tax and structural reform...

  6. REVIEW ON COLLEGE TRANSPORTATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BASED ON ANDROID BASED GPS SYSTEM FOR EFFICIENTLY LOCATE THE BUSES FOR STAFF & STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Shubham Sethi*, Yash Udawat, Shreyas Gupta, Shivanshu Nagarkar

    2016-01-01

    As we know that everyone will be late to catch a bus in his college days. Now, it is very difficult to find the route of different buses and the students need to call to their class mates to locate the current position of the bus. In this paper, we have elaborates the problems with existing system and what are the other systems which are currently running in the market. We have also provides the process flow of the existing system.

  7. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  8. Pathways to Banking: Improving Access for Students from Non-Privileged Backgrounds. Research by The Boston Consulting Group for the Sutton Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    The financial services sector is a vital and vibrant part of a national economy but it recruits from a small and relatively privileged segment of society. This report, which summarises research from the Boston Consulting Group (BCG), shows for the first time the extent of the challenge. The Sutton Trust's "Pathways to Banking" programme…

  9. The Adjustment Problems Faced by International and Overseas Chinese Students Studying in Taiwan Universities: A Comparison of Student and Faculty/Staff Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, John R.; Galloway, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Over the last 15 years the number of international students studying at universities in Taiwan has increased dramatically; however, to date, there have been few studies that measured the cultural adjustment problems that this diverse group of students experience. To remedy this problem, this study gathered data from 1,174 international students…

  10. Consultant radiographer leadership - A discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogg, Peter; Hogg, Dianne; Henwood, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Effective leadership can be defined in many ways and is an essential element of successful organisations; poor leadership can result in problems such as low staff morale, high staff turnover and reduced productivity. Effective leadership behaviours are well documented in the literature and various leadership models have been proposed that illustrate these behaviours. This discussion paper does not focus on any particular model. Instead it considers the 'Leadership Qualities Framework' which was developed specifically for use within the UK National Health Service. This framework draws upon a range of leadership models and as such it gives a broad indication of leadership behaviours. The framework comprises three components - 'personal qualities', 'setting direction' and 'delivering the service'. This paper commences with an argument as to why effective leadership is important in organisations generally, and specifically within healthcare organisations. Various examples of leadership are illustrated from within and outside the NHS in order to demonstrate effective leadership behaviours. The Leadership Qualities Framework is then examined, along with scenarios to illustrate effective leadership behaviours in context (i.e. within a healthcare organisation). Subsequent reflections on the scenarios aim to identify leadership behaviours that are explained within the framework. The final element of this paper draws on [limited] published evidence of where consultant radiographers have demonstrated effective leadership behaviours. In this section the published evidence is examined and reflected upon. At the end of the article we indicate additional reading for those who wish to further develop their theoretical and practical leadership skills

  11. Making consultations run smoothly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Astrid Pernille; Jensen, Torben Elgaard

    2012-01-01

    the field of science and technology studies (STS), including notions of relationality, multiplicity and otherness. Through this lens, and based on extensive fieldwork, it describes the daily work of arranging time before, during and after consultations. In conclusion, it suggests that a STS......This article investigates the skilful use of time in general practice consultations. It argues that consultation work involves social and material interactions, which are only partially conceptualized in existing medical practice literatures. As an alternative, this article employs ideas from...

  12. Attitudes of medical students and staff toward organ donation in cases of brain death: a survey at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahmatkeshan, Mozhgan; Fallahzadeh, Ebrahim; Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Najib, Khadijeh-Sadat; Farjadian, Shirin

    2014-03-01

    Organ transplant is one of the most important management strategies for end-of-life patients. The demand for organs in patients awaiting transplant is increasing, and many of these patients die before a donor is found. To determine the attitudes of medical students and staff at clinical institutions affiliated with a large medical university in the Eastern Mediterranean region toward organ donation in cases of brain death. A total of 500 medical students, physicians, and nurses recruited at hospitals and medical centers affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in Shiraz, Iran.Design and Setting-Information about participants' demographic characteristics, knowledge of organ donation, and willingness to donate their own organs after death was collected by using self-administered questionnaires. Most participants (78%) had favorable attitudes toward donating their own organs after brain death. However, only about 25% of them carried an organ donation card. In addition to public media, the main sources of information about organ donation after brain death were their professors and textbooks. An association in charge of improving public awareness and facilitating the process of registration and issuance of donation cards appears to be necessary.

  13. Consulting Informs Best Practice in Academia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Blair

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Conversational Plenary Session began with a clear agenda of describing the process and challenge of developing eLearning and eTraining. After a brief discussion of the benefits and challenges of the modality, the conversation quickly segued to a highly spirited conversation related to consulting and the negative implications when one calls oneself a consultant. In fact, this became an integral theme of multiple discussions throughout the rest of the conference. This author strives to identify a selection of literature which supports the viewpoint that consulting does indeed inform best practices in academia. Those professors with up-to-the-minute consultancies in their fields offer an enriched experience for their students.

  14. Efficiency principles of consulting entrepreneurship

    OpenAIRE

    Moroz Yustina S.; Drozdov Igor N.

    2015-01-01

    The article reviews the primary goals and problems of consulting entrepreneurship. The principles defining efficiency of entrepreneurship in the field of consulting are generalized. The special attention is given to the importance of ethical principles of conducting consulting entrepreneurship activity.

  15. ACF Tribal Consultation Policy

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The purpose of the ACF Tribal Consultation Policy is to build meaningful relationships with federally recognized tribes by engaging in open, continuous, and...

  16. Development of a radiation protection competency framework, a consultancies perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, P A

    2016-01-01

    The UK nuclear industry is suffering heightened concerns of a skills gap. This has led to companies, and in particular consultancies recruiting increasing numbers of graduates and less experienced staff. The following paper provides an overview of an approach to developing a radiation protection based competency framework within a consultancy with the aim of supporting the identification of the required initiatives to support the development of staff, their careers, and the profession. It is hoped this will provide useful guidance for organisations that are embarking on establishing a training and development programme. (paper)

  17. Attitudes and preferences concerning interprofessional education of first-year students and experienced medical and nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Stephan; Vasilakis, Thomas; Stein, Barbara; Stadelmann, Jessica; Münzinger, Angelika; Fley, Gabriele; Hach, Isabel; Jassmann, Marco; Härlein, Jürgen

    2017-03-01

    In order to enhance patient outcome and patient safety in healthcare, interprofessional education (IPE) has over the years become a specific area of interest focusing on teaching concepts, research methods, and implementation strategies. To achieve commitment and positive attitudes as part of the institutional readiness towards IPE, the adoption of change management aspects can support its early implementation. This short report presents results of a baseline survey on attitudes and preferences for IPE among first-year students in medicine and nursing, as well as among chief physicians, nurse directors, and administrative directors at the associated university hospital. For the survey, the UWE-IP (University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire) was used along with ten customised questions. Overall, a high degree of approval for IPE was observed in all participants. Furthermore, participants showed positive attitudes in three of the four UWE-IP subscales. However, neutral to negative attitudes were documented in subscale interprofessional interaction.

  18. Consulting in the Library Network Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markuson, Barbara Evans

    1980-01-01

    Describes four elements of consulting in library networks: network client groups, potential sources of consultants, categories of network consulting, and difficulties in network-related consulting. (FM)

  19. Factors influencing the current practice of self-medication consultations in Eastern Indonesian community pharmacies: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brata, Cecilia; Fisher, Colleen; Marjadi, Brahmaputra; Schneider, Carl R; Clifford, Rhonda M

    2016-05-13

    Research has shown that the current practice of pharmacy staff when providing self-medication consultations in Indonesia is suboptimal. To improve the performance of pharmacy staff when providing self-medication consultations in community pharmacies, the factors that influence current practice need to be understood. The aim of this study is to identify the factors that influence current practice of pharmacy staff when handling self-medication consultations in Eastern Indonesian community pharmacies. Fifteen in-depth interviews were conducted with pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, pharmacy owners, and counter attendants. Thematic analysis was used to generate findings. The current practice of pharmacy staff when handling self-medication consultations is directly influenced by the professionalism of pharmacy staff and patient responses to the consultations. These factors are in turn affected by the organisational context of the pharmacy and the external pharmacy environment. The organisational context of the pharmacy includes staffing, staff affordability, and the availability of time and facilities in which to provide consultations. The external pharmacy environment includes the number of trained pharmacy staff in the research setting, the relevance of pharmacy education to the needs of pharmacy practice, the support offered by the Indonesian Pharmacists Association, a competitive business environment, and the policy environment. Complex and inter-related factors influence the current practice of pharmacy staff when providing self-medication consultations in community pharmacies in this research setting. Multiple strategies will be required to improve consultation practices.

  20. Exploring the research domain of consultant practice: Experiences of consultant radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, R.; Paterson, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This paper reports on one part of a larger study. The aim of the overall study was to explore what the core domain of research means to consultant radiographers in clinical practice and to identify the key factors that facilitate or hinder research activity by this staff group. Design and method: Grounded theory research methodology was employed. This second part of the study involved telephone interviews with twenty five consultant radiographers. Results: Results indicate there are variations across clinical specialties as to the amount and level of research undertaken by consultant radiographers. The principal barriers revealed were: lack of time; excessive clinical workload; lack of skills and confidence to undertake research; poor research culture; and lack of support. The main facilitators noted were: dedicated time, research training and up-skilling; mutually beneficial collaborations; managerial understanding of the research domain of the role; and research focussed on clinical demand. Conclusion: Fulfilling the clinical role is imperative and integral to the profession at consultant level; however, if it is undertaken to the detriment of the other domains then these practitioners may not be operating at ‘consultant’ level. Overall improvements must be made to ensure that the consultant radiographer role is delivering on current expectations and is safeguarded for the future of the next generation of radiographers. - Highlights: • Consultant radiographers undertake research but have concerns about their research skills. • Research aims to improve practice and patients' experiences. • Relatively few consultant radiographers publish their work regularly. • Consultant radiographers allocate little protected time for research due to clinical demands.

  1. Shared consultant physician posts.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooke, J

    2012-01-31

    Our aim was to assess the acceptability and cost-efficiency of shared consultancy posts. Two consultant physicians worked alternate fortnights for a period of twelve months. Questionnaires were distributed to general practitioners, nurses, consultants and junior doctors affected by the arrangement. Patients or their next of kin were contacted by telephone. 1\\/17 of consultants described the experience as negative. 14\\/19 junior doctors reported a positive experience. 11 felt that training had been improved while 2 felt that it had been adversely affected. 17\\/17 GPs were satisfied with the arrangement. 1\\/86 nurses surveyed reported a negative experience. 1\\/48 patients were unhappy with the arrangement. An extra 2.2 (p<0.001) patients were seen per clinic. Length of stay was shortened by 2.49 days (p<0.001). A saving of 69,212 was made due to decreased locum requirements. We present data suggesting structured shared consultancy posts can be broadly acceptable and cost efficient in Ireland.

  2. A Comparison of Pyramidal Staff Training and Direct Staff Training in Community-Based Day Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberlin, Alayna T.; Beauchamp, Ken; Agnew, Judy; O'Brien, Floyd

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated two methods of training staff who were working with individuals with developmental disabilities: pyramidal training and consultant-led training. In the pyramidal training, supervisors were trained in the principles of applied behavior analysis (ABA) and in delivering feedback. The supervisors then trained their direct-care…

  3. The PLAN Classroom. A Guide for Consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969

    This document is a guide for consultants observing teacher behavior, its effects on students, and learning environment conditions in a PLAN (Program for Learning in Accordance with Needs) classroom. (Appended are a series of 27 questions and answers which describe PLAN, an individualized, computer-assisted instructional system initially operating…

  4. Psychoanalytic School Consultation: A Collaborative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzner, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a psychoanalytic consultation model to an independent grade 7-12 school that offers a practical and efficient approach to improve school climate. This model may stand alone or complement other approaches, and it can be implemented in both independent and public school settings. It focuses not only on "at risk" students,…

  5. Delivering an MBA Management Consulting Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMaire, Ryan; Fisher, Kirk; Watson, Edward F., III

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on an innovative MBA elective consulting course that attempts to address how to better prepare inexperienced MBA students for a competitive job market. This article is a best practice paper designed to provide insights and encouragement to educators.

  6. How well prepared are medical students for their first year as doctors? The views of consultants and specialist registrars in two teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, C; Matheson, D

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate (1) the extent to which first year doctors (foundation year 1 doctors, F1s) in two teaching hospitals in the Trent Deanery were rated by specialist registrars (SpRs) and consultants as being well prepared for practice; (2) the importance ascribed by SpRs and consultants to the various items of core knowledge, skills and attitudes outlined in the publication of the General Medical Council, Tomorrow's Doctors. SpRs and consultants were asked to rate: how well prepared F1s were in a range of items of core knowledge, skills and attitudes that a new medical graduate must possess as outlined in Tomorrow's Doctors; the importance for a new doctor of each item of core knowledge, skills and attitudes; and how well the medical school had prepared F1s in respect of key generic issues related to their practice. In most of the items of core knowledge, skills and attitudes covering 8 of the 11 topic areas of Tomorrow's Doctors, F1s were seen as not prepared for starting work, especially in regard to clinical and practical skills and the more challenging communication skills. They were best prepared in asking for help and in basic communication skills. Overall, F1s in the study were not well prepared either to perform the tasks that await them or in terms of most of the specific background knowledge and skills necessary for the successful execution of those tasks. The level of preparedness raises important issues about medical training and transition from medical graduate to first year doctor. Further research is needed to determine whether this situation exists in other regions of the UK.

  7. Understanding the consultation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laing, A.C.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation focuses on the consultation processes between industry, government and First Nations communities regarding resource development. The expectations of the Crown are to facilitate capacity building within First Nations, to promote traditional use studies and to participate with industry proponents on certain consultation issues. The role of industry is to encourage partnerships between established contractors and First Nations contracting firms to allow First Nations firms to grow and experience success under the guidance of a mentor company. It is important to realize that solid First Nations relations are the key to shorter time lines and lower costs in developing projects. However, consultation and involvement must be 'real' with benefits and participation that fall within the First Nations Communities' definition of success

  8. An Empirical Study of Multidimensional Fidelity of COMPASS Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Venus; Ruble, Lisa A; McGrew, John H; Yu, Yue

    2017-08-31

    Consultation is essential to the daily practice of school psychologists (National Association of School Psychologist, 2010). Successful consultation requires fidelity at both the consultant (implementation) and consultee (intervention) levels. We applied a multidimensional, multilevel conception of fidelity (Dunst, Trivette, & Raab, 2013) to a consultative intervention called the Collaborative Model for Promoting Competence and Success (COMPASS) for students with autism. The study provided 3 main findings. First, multidimensional, multilevel fidelity is a stable construct and increases over time with consultation support. Second, mediation analyses revealed that implementation-level fidelity components had distant, indirect effects on student Individualized Education Program (IEP) outcomes. Third, 3 fidelity components correlated with IEP outcomes: teacher coaching responsiveness at the implementation level, and teacher quality of delivery and student responsiveness at the intervention levels. Implications and future directions are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Peer versus staff tutoring in problem-based learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.G. Schmidt (Henk); A. van der Arend (Arie); I. Kokx (Irma); L. Boon (Louis)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractEffects of student versus staff tutoring on student learning in a problem-based, health sciences curriculum were studied. Academic achievement of 334 tutorial groups guided by staff tutors was compared with achievement of 400 groups guided by student tutors. In addition, students rated

  10. Consultation Content not Consultation Length Improves Patient Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, Thomas I.; Smith, Rebecca H.

    2014-01-01

    The suggestion that increased consultation length leads to improved patient satisfaction has some evidence, albeit uncertain. Importantly there are other determinants within the doctor-patient consultation that themselves may be responsible for this improved satisfaction and it is these we investigate in this paper. A systematic review of PubMed and associated papers was carried out using search terms ‘family practice consultation length’, ‘general practice consultation length’, ‘local health authority consultation length’ and ‘primary care consultation length’. 590 papers were originally selected using these search terms, post scoring this number became 9. The results obtained support the idea that consultation length does not directly improve consultation outcome, but rather there are variables integrated within the consultation affecting this. Increased time purely allows a physician to implement management, particularly relating to psychosocial aspects. PMID:25657939

  11. Consultation content not consultation length improves patient satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas I Lemon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The suggestion that increased consultation length leads to improved patient satisfaction has some evidence, albeit uncertain. Importantly there are other determinants within the doctor-patient consultation that themselves may be responsible for this improved satisfaction and it is these we investigate in this paper. A systematic review of PubMed and associated papers was carried out using search terms ′family practice consultation length′, ′general practice consultation length′, ′local health authority consultation length′ and ′primary care consultation length′. 590 papers were originally selected using these search terms, post scoring this number became 9. The results obtained support the idea that consultation length does not directly improve consultation outcome, but rather there are variables integrated within the consultation affecting this. Increased time purely allows a physician to implement management, particularly relating to psychosocial aspects.

  12. International Consultation and Training on Group Work in South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Farah A.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a consultation and training for faculty and graduate students in South Asia under the auspices of the United Nations' Transfer of Knowledge Through Expatriate Nationals (TOKTEN) Program. It describes the development of a consultation relationship and training on group work. Needs assessments focusing on both cultural…

  13. Training of technical staff and technical staff managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, G.F.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of Technical Staff and Technical Staff Managers training is to provide job skills enhancement to individuals selected to fill key technical positions within a nuclear utility. This training is unique in that unlike other training programs accredited by the National Academy for Nuclear Training, it does not lead to specific task qualification. The problems encountered when determining the student population and curriculum are a direct result of this major difference. Major problems encountered are determining who should attend the training, what amount of training is necessary and sufficient, and how to obtain the best feedback in order to effect substantive program improvements. These topics will be explored and possible solutions discussed

  14. Reduce, Manage or Cope: A Review of Strategies for Training School Staff to Address Challenging Behaviours Displayed by Students with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoesz, Brenda M.; Shooshtari, Shahin; Montgomery, Janine; Martin, Toby; Heinrichs, Dustin J.; Douglas, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    Members of a knowledge translation and exchange (KTE) research team assessed the training needs of the teaching staff at a school for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities (IDD). In response to this need, KTE researchers retrieved peer-reviewed articles for training staff working with individuals with IDD who exhibit challenging…

  15. Resistance, Reactance, and Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jan N.; Falk, Robert S.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a review of techniques for dealing with consultee resistance. Suggests the social psychological theory of reactance is a useful conceptual framework for considering resistance in consultation. Discusses examples of its application, variables that predict the likely effectiveness of a reactance utilization intervention, and ethical issues.…

  16. Shifting Design Consultancy Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henry; Huijboom, Nina; Holm Nielsen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge-intensive business services, such as design consultancies are perceived as key drivers for innovation and competitiveness. However, many designers create their own companies, which often remain as one-man companies. By interviewing designers who own small design firms we found patterns...

  17. Ethical Issues in Consulting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Lois

    1980-01-01

    Identifies common ethical dilemmas that arise in performance technology consultant-client relationships and the difficulties both parties have in resolving them. Questions of integrity v ethics, legality v ethics, conflict of interest issues, contracts and fee issues, and ownership issues are addressed. (MER)

  18. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Association will shortly be renewing the mandate of half of the Staff Council. This is an opportunity for you to become more directly involved in the Staff Association's work and help promote and defend the staff's interests and, more broadly, those of the Organization itself.

  19. An integrated occupational hygiene consultation model for the catering industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Kuei; Lee, Lien-Hsiung

    2010-07-01

    Vegetable oil used in food processing, during high-temperature exposure, will generate particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are carcinogenic chemical compounds, with the potential to cause lung disease for restaurant kitchen staff. This study's design includes a three-stage consultation process with eight major consultation items, in order to build an integrated consultation model for occupational hygiene. This model combines inspection and consultation, targeting Chinese restaurants in the catering industry. Characteristics of the integrated consultation model include cooperation between different government departments and collaboration with nongovernmental, professional consulting organizations. An additional benefit of the model is the building of a good partnership relationship with the Catering Trade Association. The consultation model helps Chinese restaurants attain improvements in their work environments with minimal investment. Postconsultation, results show a 63.35% and 61.98% (P < 0.001) decrease in the mean time-weighted concentration of exposure to PM and PAHs, respectively. The overall regulation compliance rate of Chinese restaurants significantly increased from 34.3% to 89.6%. These results show that the integrated consultation model for occupational hygiene not only helps small and medium enterprises reduce exposure concentrations in the workplace but also has specific potential for successful implementation in Taiwan.

  20. Saudi Arabia; 2013 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2013-01-01

    This staff report on Saudi Arabia’s 2013 Article IV Consultation discusses economic policies and development. As the largest crude oil exporter, and the only producer with significant spare capacity, Saudi Arabia plays a systemic and stabilizing role in the global oil market. In 2011, Saudi Arabia formally committed through the G20 to use its systemic position in the oil market to promote global stability. Saudi Arabia raised oil production to a 30-year high to ensure demand was met the abrup...

  1. Accompanied consultations in occupational health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, J; Hobson, H; Sharp, R

    2016-04-01

    Accompanied consultations are often reported as difficult by occupational physicians but have not been studied in the occupational health setting. To collect information about accompanied consultations and the impact of the companion on the consultation. We collected data on all accompanied consultations by two occupational physicians working in a private sector occupational health service over the course of 16 months. Accompanied consultations were matched to non-accompanied consultations for comparison. We collected data on 108 accompanied consultations. Accompanied consultations were more likely to be connected with ill health retirement (P Occupational health practitioners may benefit from better understanding of accompanied consultations and guidance on their management. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Consultant choice across decision contexts: are abortion decisions different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finken, L L; Jacobs, J E

    1996-04-01

    A survey conducted among college students in the midwestern US indicated that abortion decision-making consultation patterns differ substantially from those associated with other types of decisions. Surveyed were 169 predominantly White, middle-income students (68 males and 101 females) 18-20 years of age recruited from an introductory psychology class. Participants were presented with vignettes that pertained to four types of decisions: abortion (unplanned pregnancy), medical (cancer treatment type), future (career move), and interpersonal (crisis with a friend). For each decision, students were asked who they would consult (specific family members, significant others, friends, various professionals) and the order in which they would consult them. The mean number of consultants selected was 3.72 for abortion, 5.54 for medical, 4.90 for future-oriented, and 2.41 for interpersonal decisions. Significant others were selected most often for all decision scenarios; however, the highest frequency of consultation and lowest mean rank order for the significant other was on the abortion decision. The next most important consultant for abortion decisions was friends, then family members, and, finally, professionals. The only gender difference was a greater tendency for females to consult their mothers. For every category of consultant (except best friend), the pattern differed depending on the type of decision. These findings underscore the importance of considering context and multifaceted approaches in the design of programs aimed at enhancing adolescents' decision-making skills.

  3. 'The nice thing about doctors is that you can sometimes get a day off school': an action research study to bring lived experiences from children, parents and hospice staff into medical students' preparation for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Jessica; Yardley, Sarah

    2016-12-01

    Patient and public involvement in healthcare is important to ensure services meet their needs and priorities. Increasingly, patient experiences are being used to educate healthcare professionals. The potential contribution to medical education of children and parents using hospice services has not yet been fully explored. (1) To explore perceptions of what medical students must learn to become 'good doctors' among children, parents and staff in a hospice. (2) To collaborate with children/parents and staff to develop educational materials based on their lived experiences for medical students. (3) To assess feasibility of student-led action research in a children's hospice to develop research skills. Prospective ethical approval received. Volunteer children (n=7), parents (n=5) and staff (n=6) were recruited from a children's hospice. Data were generated in audio-recorded semistructured focus groups, individual interviews and/or activity workshops. Participants discussed what newly qualified doctors' needed to care for children with life-limiting conditions. Audio data were transcribed and combined with visual data for thematic analysis. Findings were refined by participant feedback. This paper presents thematic findings and educational material created from the project. Thematic analysis identified six learning themes: (1) treat children as individuals; (2) act as a person before being a doctor; (3) interpersonal communication; (4) appreciate the clinical environment; (5) learn from children, parents and other staff; (6) how to be a doctor as part of a team. The student researcher successfully developed qualitative research skills, coproducing materials with participants for sharing learning derived from lived experiences. All participants were willing and able to make valuable contributions, and believed that this was a worthwhile use of time and effort. Further work is required to understand how best to integrate the experiences of children in hospices into

  4. Concertation or Consultation. That is the question.

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    In April 2017 (as reported in Echo No. 268), the Staff Association, when invited to an Enlarged Directorate meeting, stressed that “concertation requires a positive attitude and mutual trust. […] The Staff Association is firmly committed in this respect but does not consider that the concertation process is as effective as we should like”. The continued lack, for the Staff Association, of an effective concertation process led to a revisiting of the situation in June 2017 (Echo No. 271), in an article that stressed the importance of the concertation process at CERN since it was introduced in 1983, the year in which the Standing Concertation Committee (SCC) replaced the Standing Consultation Committee. The importance of concertation was also highlighted by Mr Bernard Dormy, Chair of TREF, in an interview he gave to the Staff Association at the end of January 2018 (Echo No. 284), when he retired from his position as the Chair of the Forum. “To sum it up, I would certainl...

  5. 78 FR 48342 - Consultation Agreements: Proposed Changes to Consultation Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    .... OSHA-2010-0010] RIN 1218-AC32 Consultation Agreements: Proposed Changes to Consultation Procedures... federally-funded On-site Consultation Program to: Clarify, so it more directly reflects the wording of... proposed rule. DATES: This withdrawal becomes effective August 8, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...

  6. Mentoring for new consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackroyd, R; Adamson, K A

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence of the benefits of having a mentor during the early years as a consultant. Mentoring encourages and provides support to an individual in their professional development. Although there are different forms of mentoring there is recognition that developing a formal mentoring scheme can provide a consistent approach and support within a framework. The Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh has introduced a mentoring scheme for new consultants that provides a forum for supporting them in their ongoing professional wellbeing. There is potential that the process of mentoring can improve an individual's development, and motivate and encourage them to develop the skills needed to achieve their goals, thus having an impact on ultimately improving their ability to deliver an effective patient-centred service.

  7. Tutoring Mentoring Peer Consulting

    OpenAIRE

    Szczyrba, Birgit; Wildt, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    Consulting, Coaching und Supervision, Tutoring, Mentoring und kollegiale Beratung: Beratungsangebote verschiedenster Art werden wie selbstverständlich in den Berufen nachgefragt, die mit Beziehung und Interaktion, mit komplexen sozialen Organisationen und Systemen, mit hoher Verantwortlichkeit, aber unsicheren Handlungsbedingungen zu tun haben. Mittlerweile beginnt diese Nachfrage auch in den Hochschulen zu steigen. Eine solche Steigerung wird ausgelöst durch den Wandel in den Lehr-Lernkultur...

  8. [Indoor environment consultant nurse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frain, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable development combines a search for comfort with a reduction in energy consumption and these aspects can have a negative impact on health. In Brittany, a nurse trained in respiratory and environmental health as well as therapeutic education carries out, on medical prescription and as part of an association, environmental audits of patients' homes or their workplace. As an indoor environment medical consultant, she informs, orientates and promotes good healthcare practices.

  9. "Systematizing" ethics consultation services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Courtenay R; Eves, Margot M; Allen, Nathan G; Smith, Martin L; Peña, Adam M; Cheney, John R; Majumder, Mary A

    2015-03-01

    While valuable work has been done addressing clinical ethics within established healthcare systems, we anticipate that the projected growth in acquisitions of community hospitals and facilities by large tertiary hospitals will impact the field of clinical ethics and the day-to-day responsibilities of clinical ethicists in ways that have yet to be explored. Toward the goal of providing clinical ethicists guidance on a range of issues that they may encounter in the systematization process, we discuss key considerations and potential challenges in implementing system-wide ethics consultation services. Specifically, we identify four models for organizing, developing, and enhancing ethics consultation activities within a system created through acquisitions: (1) train-the-trainer, (2) local capacity-building, (3) circuit-riding, and (4) consolidated accountability. We note each model's benefits and challenges. To our knowledge, this is the first paper to consider the broader landscape of issues affected by consolidation. We anticipate that clinical ethicists, volunteer consultants, and hospital administrators will benefit from our recommendations.

  10. Sport psychology group consultation using social networking web sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Frederick; Shipherd, Amber M; Gershgoren, Lael; Filho, Edson Medeiros; Basevitch, Itay

    2012-08-01

    A social networking Web site, Facebook, was used to deliver long-term sport psychology consultation services to student-athletes (i.e., soccer players) in 30- to 60-min weekly sessions. Additional short-term team building, group cohesion, communication, anger management, injury rehabilitation, mental toughness, commitment, and leadership workshops were provided. Cohesion and overall relationships between both the student-athletes and the sport psychology consultants benefited from this process. Social networking Web sites offer a practical way of providing sport psychology consulting services that does not require use of major resources. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. E3 Staff Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E3 Staff database is maintained by E3 PDMS (Professional Development & Management Services) office. The database is Mysql. It is manually updated by E3 staff as...

  12. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Typically, ground staff scheduling is centrally planned for each terminal in an airport. The advantage of this is that the staff is efficiently utilized, but a disadvantage is that staff spends considerable time walking between stands. In this paper a decentralized approach for ground staff...... scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the staff scheduling is planned decentralized for each zone. The advantage of this approach is that the staff...... work in a smaller area of the terminal and thus spends less time walking between stands. When planning decentralized the allocation of stands to flights influences the staff scheduling since the workload in a zone depends on which flights are allocated to stands in the zone. Hence solving the problem...

  13. Examining Teacher Use of Praise Taught during Behavioral Consultation: Implementation and Generalization Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffee, Gina; Kratochwill, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we examined the extent to which teachers implement and generalize a praise intervention learned during behavioral consultation. Four elementary teachers and 15 of their students (3-4 per teacher) participated in the study. In each classroom, 1 student was randomly assigned as the consultation target student, 1 as the generalization…

  14. A Case Study of Online Peer Coaching of Consultant Communication Skill Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wizda, Lorraine L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the this study was to explore how peer coaches support the development of collaborative communication skills in an online format for consultants in training (CITs). The program examined was Instructional Consultation which pairs a consultant with a teacher to work collaboratively to resolve the teacher's concern regarding a student.…

  15. Consultation in the Gifted-Education Arena: Old Wine in a New Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrell, Frank C.

    2007-01-01

    In this commentary, I provide a brief overview of definitions and types of consultation, as well as a discussion of the distinction between consultation and collaboration. I then apply the information from this review to the four articles on consulting about gifted and talented students. Using Caplan's framework, I argue that these papers contain…

  16. The Use of Student Consulting Projects as an Active Learning Pedagogy: A Case Study in a Production/Operations Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heriot, Kirk C.; Cook, Ron; Jones, Rita C.; Simpson, Leo

    2008-01-01

    Active learning has attracted considerable attention in higher education in response to concerns about how and what students are learning. There are many different forms of active learning, yet most of them are classroom based. We propose an alternative to active learning in the classroom through active learning outside of the classroom in the…

  17. Service-Learning by Doing: How a Student-Run Consulting Company Finds Relevance and Purpose in a Business Strategy Capstone Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David F.; Sherwood, Arthur Lloyd; DePaolo, Concetta A.

    2010-01-01

    A challenge for undergraduate learning in strategy is that the students lack professional work experiences. Without a rich background of experience, many strategic management topics are difficult to grasp. Our solution has been to develop a strategic management capstone course that combines service-learning and problem-based learning. The…

  18. CHIEF OF STAFF FINANCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Internal Audit, Military. Museums, Documentation. Service, Language. Service, Financial Co-ordination, Chief Pay Mas- ter, Programming and Budget, Electronic Data. Processing and Expenditure Control. Chief of Staff Finance. With effect from 13 February 1978 Chief of Staff. Management Services became Chief of Staff.

  19. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2007-01-01

    The Staff Association will shortly be renewing the mandate of half of the Staff Council. This is an opportunity for you to become more directly involved in the Staff Association’s work and help promote and defend the staff’s interests and, more broadly, those of the Organization itself.

  20. Consulting in Electronic Commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina Loredana Tache

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Economic development of electronic services provide advice and many agents of existingreferral systems to recommend and provide products, information and customized views of thecommunity through a personalized interaction in real time. Distributed systems of autonomous agentsare becoming increasingly important in electronic comet because the basic decisions of agents adviceon trust and reputation are taken in a similar way human society. If these decisions will be as a realconsumer protection, when new aspects of online consumer legislation will become usefulinformation in advice and consulting of electronic commerce.

  1. EQClinic: a platform for learning communication skills in clinical consultations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunfeng Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Doctors’ verbal and non-verbal communication skills have an impact on patients’ health outcomes, so it is important for medical students to develop these skills. Traditional, non-verbal communication skills training can involve a tutor manually annotating a student's non-verbal behaviour during patient–doctor consultations, but this is very time-consuming. Tele-conference systems have been used in verbal communication skills training. Methods: We describe EQClinic, a system that enables verbal and non-verbal communication skills training during tele-consultations with simulated patients (SPs, with evaluation exercises promoting reflection. Students and SPs can have tele-consultations through the tele-consultation component. In this component, SPs can provide feedback to students through a thumbs-up/ thumbs-down tool and a comments box. EQClinic automatically analyses communication features in the recorded consultations, such as facial expressions, and provides graphical representations. Our 2015 pilot study investigated whether EQClinic helped students be aware of their non-verbal behaviour and improve their communication skills, and evaluated the usability of the platform. Students received automated feedback, and SP and tutor evaluations, and then completed self-assessment and reflection questionnaires. Results: Eight medical students and three SPs conducted 13 tele-consultations using EQClinic. More students paid attention to their non-verbal communication and students who were engaged in two consultations felt more confident in their second consultation. Students rated the system positively, felt comfortable using it (5.9/7, and reported that the structure (5.4/7 and information (5.8/7 were clear. This pilot provides evidence that EQClinic helps, and positively influences, medical students practise their communication skills with SPs using a tele-conference platform. Discussion: It is not easy to improve non

  2. EQClinic: a platform for learning communication skills in clinical consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunfeng; Scott, Karen M; Lim, Renee L; Taylor, Silas; Calvo, Rafael A

    2016-01-01

    Doctors' verbal and non-verbal communication skills have an impact on patients' health outcomes, so it is important for medical students to develop these skills. Traditional, non-verbal communication skills training can involve a tutor manually annotating a student's non-verbal behaviour during patient-doctor consultations, but this is very time-consuming. Tele-conference systems have been used in verbal communication skills training. We describe EQClinic, a system that enables verbal and non-verbal communication skills training during tele-consultations with simulated patients (SPs), with evaluation exercises promoting reflection. Students and SPs can have tele-consultations through the tele-consultation component. In this component, SPs can provide feedback to students through a thumbs-up/ thumbs-down tool and a comments box. EQClinic automatically analyses communication features in the recorded consultations, such as facial expressions, and provides graphical representations. Our 2015 pilot study investigated whether EQClinic helped students be aware of their non-verbal behaviour and improve their communication skills, and evaluated the usability of the platform. Students received automated feedback, and SP and tutor evaluations, and then completed self-assessment and reflection questionnaires. Eight medical students and three SPs conducted 13 tele-consultations using EQClinic. More students paid attention to their non-verbal communication and students who were engaged in two consultations felt more confident in their second consultation. Students rated the system positively, felt comfortable using it (5.9/7), and reported that the structure (5.4/7) and information (5.8/7) were clear. This pilot provides evidence that EQClinic helps, and positively influences, medical students practise their communication skills with SPs using a tele-conference platform. It is not easy to improve non-verbal communication skills in a short time period. Further evaluation of

  3. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  4. 25 CFR 36.86 - Are there staff training requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... section before the first day of student occupancy for the year. (1) First Aid/Safety/Emergency & Crisis... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are there staff training requirements? 36.86 Section 36... Programs Staffing § 36.86 Are there staff training requirements? (a) All homeliving program staff as well...

  5. Concertation rather than Consultation or Negotiation!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    At CERN, the Concertation between the Management and the Personnel has been in effect since 1983, the year in which the Standing Concertation Committee (SCC) came to replace the Standing Consultation Committee. Since then, the concertation process has been enshrined in the Staff Rules and Regulations, which define its scope of application: “Any proposed measures of a general nature regarding the conditions of employment or association of members of the personnel shall be the subject of discussion within the SCC” (S VII 1.08). More generally, all questions relating to the employment and working conditions of the members of personnel are discussed in the SCC, including in particular issues of remuneration, social protection (CHIS and Pension Fund), career evolution... In Article S VII 1.07 of the Staff Rules and Regulations it is also stated that: “Discussion shall mean a procedure whereby the Director-General and the Staff Association concert together to try to reach a common po...

  6. Impact of Diabetes E-Consults on Outpatient Clinic Workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoll, Brian; Parikh, Pratik J; Gallimore, Jennie; Harrell, Stephen; Burke, Brian

    2015-08-01

    An e-consult is an electronic communication system between clinicians, usually a primary care physician (PCP) and a medical or surgical specialist, regarding general or patient-specific, low complexity questions that would not need an in-person consultation. The objectives of this study were to understand and quantify the impact of the e-consult initiative on outpatient clinic workflow and outcomes. We collected data from 5 different Veterans Affairs (VA) outpatient clinics and interviewed several physicians and staff members. We then developed a simulation model for a primary care team at an outpatient clinic. A detailed experimental study was conducted to determine the effects of factors, such as e-consult demand, view-alert notification arrivals, walk-in patient arrivals, and PCP unavailability, on e-consult cycle time. Statistical tests indicated that 4 factors related to outpatient clinic workflow were significant, and levels within each of the 4 significant factors resulted in statistically different e-consult cycle times. The arrival rate of electronic notifications, along with patient walk-ins, had a considerable effect on cycle time. Splitting the workload of an unavailable PCP among the other PCPs, instead of the current practice of allocating it to a single PCP, increases the system's ability to handle a much larger e-consult demand. The full potential of e-consults can only be realized if the workflow at the outpatient clinics is designed or modified to support this initiative. This study furthers our understanding of how e-consult systems can be analyzed and alternative workflows tested using statistical and simulation modeling to improve care delivery and outcomes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Pulkovskij martirolog: sotrudniki i aspiranty GAO - zhertvy vojny i blokady %t Pulkovo book of martyrs: staff members and graduate students of the main observatory as victum of the war and blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, V. Yu.; Soboleva, T. V.

    The tragedy of war and the blockade of Leningrad did not fail to have its impact on Pulkovo and its inhabitants. Many of the latter did not survive to witness the Victory Day, and the Astronomical Capital of the World - as the Pulkovo Observatory was called in the past - was razed to the ground. To commemorate the staff members of the USSR Academy of Sciences Main (Pulkovo) Observatory that perished in the war, a memorial board has been installed with 13 names engraved on it. Unfortunately, this figure is four times less than the Main Observatory really lost - roughly every third staff member lost his/her life in the war. The paper is the first endeavour to provide the complete and accurate list of losses that the Russian Academy of Sciences Main Observatory bore as a result of the war and blockade. Fifty-three died of hunger during the time of blockade. This mournful list includes astronomers proper as well as graduate students, technical and servicing staff members. It is not the names of Leningrad Pulkovites only that the authors of the above paper mention. Seeking to pay memorial honours to all staff members and graduate students of the Main Observatory who became victims of the war and blockade, the authors also adduce the names of staff members of the Nikolaevsk and Simeiz Branches of the Main Observatory, as well as those who worked in the Observatory before and in the very beginning of the war but were not formally its staff members at the moment they died. Making the names of the perished Pulkovites known is a tribute of commemoration to all Leningraders that were in the city during the blockade. The book of martyrs above is based on the unpublished documents of the Main Observatory Archive and the data extracted from the St. Petersburg Book of Memory, as well as other materials. The names are arranged alphabetically, and the structure of each entry is the same. The paper provides the foreword and comments.

  8. Student Research Projects Inhibiting Factors from the Students Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Nikrooz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Identifying the research barriers and assess the ability of students to use the university services and facilities is crucial to promote research activities. Present study was carried out to determine the inhibiting factors influencing the student's research projects from the view point of Yasuj University of Medical Sciences students in 2008. Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional study 96 students of Yasuj Medical University were selected by stratified random sampling. The data were collected by validate & reliable questionnaire, containing demographic information, inhibiting factors related to students (personal and organization. The data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: The mean scores against the personal barriers and the organizational barriers questions were 43.23±12.96 and 62.58±12.08 respectively. There was a significant difference between personal and organizational barriers (P<0.001 and personal barriers were more important. According to the results, the student's inadequate skills & knowledge of research methodology and lack of awareness of research topics were the most prevalent personal barriers. The most prevalent organizational barriers were unavailability of research consulters, inadequate research skills of consulter, insufficient facilities & equipment and lack of motivating staff & faculties. Other variables such as gender, subject of study and research experience are mentioned in the full text. Conclusion: This study showed that the personal barriers were more important than organizational barriers which interfere with the student's research projects. This can be corrected and controlled by teachers, faculty members, university officials and students, themselves.

  9. Consultant en gestion configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Lugones Altamirano, Maximiliano

    2012-01-01

    Ce mémoire présente une synthèse de mon Projet de Fin d’Etude (PFE) dans le cadre de ma formation ISAE ENSICA. J’ai choisi la société de service Capgemini Aerospace & Defense à Toulouse pour ce dernier stage de 6 mois. Et plus précisément dans le Skill Group Business Application Consulting (BAC) parce que je voulais faire un stage mélangeant de la gestion de projet avec de l’ingénierie. Mon sujet de stage n’a pas été figé à l’avance car les choses vont très vite dans le conseil et précisém...

  10. A survey of final year medical students at University College, Galway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, M; Leonard, B E

    1993-01-01

    The results of this survey of final year medical students at a provincial Irish university showed that over three-quarters came from families in which at least one parent was in a professional or semi-professional occupation. The majority of the students had repeated their Leaving Certificate examination. Most students expressed dissatisfaction with the career guidance counselling they received during their second level education. All the students came from secondary schools. While the majority expressed satisfaction with their choice of University course, approximately one-third had considered withdrawing from the course, particularly during the pre-clinical years. The main reasons given were financial difficulties, personal problems and difficulties with the course. Despite the provision of student counsellors and academic staff members to assist such students, the majority did not consult any staff member for help. Most students expected they would have to obtain employment outside of Ireland.

  11. Digital store and forward imaging as a quality assessment tool for emergency plastic surgery consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Ian C; Lee, Yoomie; Granick, Mark S; Scott, Sandra S

    2014-01-01

    Plastic surgery is a frequently consulted service in most emergency departments (EDs). The inclusion of a digital image with a plastic surgery consultation would allow the consultant to immediately assess the severity of the condition and either provide instruction to ED staff if minor or mobilize resources to facilitate operative management if more severe. During a 4-month period, all plastic surgery consultations that were seen in person by one of 4 senior plastic surgery residents were included. In addition, an examination of all consultations seen during that time period at the plastic surgery clinic was undertaken to determine the quality of preclinic management. During the study period, 78 ED consultations were performed by the plastic surgery residents and included in the study. During the collection period, 374 patients were seen in the plastic surgery clinic. Of these, 154 patients were ED referrals. Evaluation by the senior author revealed that all consultations seen in the ED were appropriate and needed specialist management. Of the ED referrals sent to clinic, but not seen by a plastic surgery consultant in the ED several errors in patient management were noticed. The study demonstrated that ED consultations were appropriate for specialty evaluation in all cases, and that insufficient consultations were placed to provide optimal medical care. The role of telemedicine in creating more efficient and effective consultation processes is promising, but numerous legal barriers must be overcome before these modalities can be widely deployed.

  12. Faculty Consultation: An Emerging Role for the Counseling Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchener, Karen G.; Hurst, James C.

    1974-01-01

    Development by a university counseling center staff of a training procedure to help students interact productively in small groups to learn academic material is described. After refinement of the program (entitled Education Through Student Interaction), emphasis was placed on teaching faculty to train students by means of this procedure. (Author)

  13. Disability Awareness and University Staff Training in Ireland (Practice Brief)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padden, Lisa; Ellis, Carol

    2015-01-01

    It is vital that all university staff have awareness of the difficulties that may be experienced by students with disabilities. Staff must be given the knowledge and resources to support these students effectively. University College Dublin (UCD) Access & Lifelong Learning has developed a communication and training strategy to improve…

  14. Mother-infant consultation during drug treatment: Research and innovative clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lester Barry M

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper details a model for consulting with mothers and infants, and drug treatment staff used in a residential drug treatment program and relevant to other treatment settings. The role of parent-infant consultation based on the Neonatal Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS was evaluated. Methods A sequential cohort model was used to assign participants to 1. NNNS consultation versus 2. standard care. The effects of NNNS consultation were evaluated using the Parenting Stress Index and NNNS summary scores. Results Participants in the NNNS consultation condition had significantly less stress overall, and less stress related to infant behavior than participants in standard care. There were no differences in infant behavior on the NNNS Summary scores. Conclusion The implications for NNNS consultation in drug treatment programs is outlined. The importance of prevention/intervention to establish satisfactory mother-infant interaction in recovery programs which include a central parenting component is indicated.

  15. Combining continuing education with expert consultation via telemedicine in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Xavier; Aird, James; Tho, Ly; Bintcliffe, Fiona; Monsell, Fergal; Gollogly, Jim; Noor, Saqib

    2014-04-01

    Telemedicine has the potential to increase access to both clinical consultation and continuing medical education in Cambodia. We present a Cambodian surgical centre's experience with a collaboration in which complicated orthopaedic cases were presented to a panel of consultants using free online videoconferencing software, providing a combined opportunity for both continuing education and the enhancement of patient care. Effects of the case conference on patient care were examined via a retrospective review and clinician perspectives were elicited via a qualitative survey. The case conference altered patient care in 69% of cases. All Cambodian staff reported learning from the conference and 78% reported changes in their care for patients not presented at the conference. Real-time videoconferencing between consultants in the developed world and physicians in a developing country may be an effective, low-cost and easily replicable means of combining direct benefits to patient care with continuing medical education.

  16. Advanced training of tax consultants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adigamova Farida F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to review and analyze the data on the necessity to provide an educational environment for training and advanced training of tax consultants in Russia. The article considers the types of tax consulting, the historical background of training financiers in Russia, as well as identifies conditions determining the significance of tax consulting. The research establishes the connection between the negative attitude to tax payment and tax evasion. The advanced training of tax consultants should be a continuous process as they need to take into account both external and internal taxpayers risks associated with the development of law and law-enforcement practice. Obviously, the training of tax consultants should take into account the experience of developed foreign countries, such as Germany, Austria, Czech Republic, Slovakia and other European countries as well. In Russia, it is necessary to open educational institutions, which will not only be involved in the certification of tax consultants, but also provide training courses. These courses should contribute to constant increase of tax consultants knowledge, consider the tax treatment of economic activities, as well changes in the legislation, economics, finance, accounting, manufacturing processes, which will improve the quality of services provided by tax consultants.

  17. The transition to hospital consultant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerman, Michiel; Teunissen, Pim W.; Jorgensen, Rasmus Lundhus

    2013-01-01

    Danish and Dutch new consultants' perceptions regarding the transition to consultant were compared to gain insight into this period, particularly the influence of contextual factors concerning the organisation of specialty training and health care therein. Preparation for medical and generic comp...... competencies, perceived intensity and burnout were compared. Additionally, effects of differences in working conditions and cultural dimensions were explored....

  18. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 31st of October to the 14th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months and will keep the next Staff Council very busy. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to vote * * * * * * * Vote Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the election...

  19. New staff contract policy

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at TREF and on the recommendation of the Finance Committee, Council approved a new staff contract policy, which became effective on 1 January 2006. Its application is covered by a new Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) 'Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members'. The revised circular replaces the previous Circulars No. 9 (Rev. 3) 'Staff contracts' and No. 2 (Rev. 2) 'Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period for staff members'. The main features of the new contract policy are as follows: The new policy provides chances for long-term employment for all staff recruits staying for four years without distinguishing between those assigned to long-term or short-term activities when joining CERN. In addition, it presents a number of simplifications for the award of ICs. There are henceforth only 2 types of contract: Limited Duration (LD) contracts for all recruitment and Indefinite Contracts (IC) for...

  20. Scholarship reconsidered: implications for reward and recognition of academic staff in schools of nursing and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kylie M; Crookes, Patrick A; Else, Fabienne; Crookes, Ellie

    2012-03-01

    This paper discusses the issues facing the nursing academic workforce and the development of a project at the University of Wollongong in Australia which attempts to address this problem. The project draws on Boyer's work around 'scholarship reconsidered' to enable new ways of thinking about the nature of 'research' and how the work of a diversifying workforce can be recognized and rewarded within institutions. We conducted a series of interviews with senior university staff to identify key issues around academic promotion processes. Feedback from these interviews, along with extensive internal and external consultation and benchmarking, will be used to redraft promotion documentation that includes discipline-specific performance expectations. Interviews revealed a number of perceived and actual barriers to promotion of academic staff who did not conform to a 'traditional' view of research expectations. It was widely felt that unspoken expectations about research performance were being used to judge applications for promotion, and that this disadvantaged people from practice or professional backgrounds, or people who had heavy administrative or clinical roles. Internal university processes need to reflect the reality of a diversified workforce. Practice and professional disciplines have responsibilities beyond meeting traditional research output measurements. More flexible and transparent expectation guidelines and career development pathways are needed to build holistic schools and faculty and enable maximum staff productivity. By redefining scholarship, schools and faculties are able to meet the multiple demands of the government, the institution, individual staff, students and the profession. Not everyone can do traditional research all the time, and staff involved in other scholarly work should be able to rewarded and promoted. By taking the lead in this issue, nursing as a discipline can set its own agenda, and pave the way for other disciplines. It can also

  1. Maximizing competence through professional development: increasing disability knowledge among One-Stop Career Center staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Allison Cohen; Timmons, Jaimie Ciulla; Boeltzig, Heike; Hamner, Doris; Fesko, Sheila

    2006-01-01

    The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (USA) mandates that partners in the One-Stop Career Center system be prepared to serve a diverse customer base. Effective service delivery depends in part on a focus on human resources and professional development. This article presents innovative strategies for One-Stop Career Center staff training related to serving customers with disabilities. Findings from case study research conducted in several One-Stops across the country revealed that staff struggled with both knowledge and attitudes around disability issues. To address these concerns, local leaders developed practices that provided opportunities to gain practical skills and put acquired knowledge to use. These included a formalized curriculum focused on disability issues; informal support and consultation from a disability specialist; and exposure and learning through internships for students with disabilities. Implications are offered to stimulate thinking and creativity in local One-Stops regarding the most effective ways to facilitate staff learning and, in turn, improve services for customers with disabilities.

  2. Consultation in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, H A

    2001-01-01

    The advantages of classroom, playground, and hallway observation are that the diagnosing child and adolescent psychiatrist can directly observe the difficulties the child is having. When the psychiatrist is an employee of the school district, there can be easier access and quicker help for challenging students.

  3. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 January 2004: • Preliminary note - Terminology realignment following the restructuring of the Organization (page - i -) • Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73) • Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74) • Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81) • Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2003/2004, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2003 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 3/2004, are available in the departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  4. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows : as from 1 July 2002 Article R IV 1.41 - Method of adjustment of the amount of subsistence indemnity (page 53) as from 1 January 2003 Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73) Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74) Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81) Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2002/2003, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2002 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 4/2003, are available in the divisional secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at : http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  5. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 January 2005 : Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73) Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74) Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81) Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2004/2005, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2004 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 4/2005, are available in the departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  6. AMENDMENTS TO THE STAFF RULES AND REGULATIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 January 2002: Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73). Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74). Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81). Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2001/2002, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2001 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 4/2002, are available in the divisional secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web HERE Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  7. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 28 of October to the 11th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months, and in particular the Five-yearly-Review 2015, subject of the questionnaire that you probably recently filled out. All this will keep the next Staff Council very busy indeed. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to v...

  8. A program of industrial consultation by a community mental health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepkin, M

    1975-01-01

    A staff member of a community mental health center provided consultation services to untrained industrial counselors at a large private corporation. Characteristics of "newer' workers, ethnically different from supervisors, are described. Attitude change is the key, but difficult to bring about. The consultant had full cooperation of the counselors, but never gained full support from management. The article describes procedures for training counselors and successful and unsuccessful efforts to reach foremen.

  9. Staff Association Cocktail

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    The Staff Association has been organising for many years a cocktail with delegates of the Member States participating in Finance Committees of March and September. This cocktail is held at the end of the day, after the Finance Committee meeting. This direct and regular communication helps establish an ongoing contact between the Staff Association and CERN Member States and, more recently, the Associate Member States. Ambassadors of the CERN Staff Association, who are Members of the Personnel, have the opportunity to meet their national delegation in an informal and friendly atmosphere. These exchanges, facilitated by the use of the national language, allow the personnel via the Staff Association to express its ideas and positions on current affairs and fundamental issues, and also to hear about those of the delegations in return.

  10. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the ...

  11. A decision-analytic approach to the optimal allocation of resources for endangered species consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converse, Sarah J.; Shelley, Kevin J.; Morey, Steve; Chan, Jeffrey; LaTier, Andrea; Scafidi, Carolyn; Crouse, Deborah T.; Runge, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    The resources available to support conservation work, whether time or money, are limited. Decision makers need methods to help them identify the optimal allocation of limited resources to meet conservation goals, and decision analysis is uniquely suited to assist with the development of such methods. In recent years, a number of case studies have been described that examine optimal conservation decisions under fiscal constraints; here we develop methods to look at other types of constraints, including limited staff and regulatory deadlines. In the US, Section Seven consultation, an important component of protection under the federal Endangered Species Act, requires that federal agencies overseeing projects consult with federal biologists to avoid jeopardizing species. A benefit of consultation is negotiation of project modifications that lessen impacts on species, so staff time allocated to consultation supports conservation. However, some offices have experienced declining staff, potentially reducing the efficacy of consultation. This is true of the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Washington Fish and Wildlife Office (WFWO) and its consultation work on federally-threatened bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus). To improve effectiveness, WFWO managers needed a tool to help allocate this work to maximize conservation benefits. We used a decision-analytic approach to score projects based on the value of staff time investment, and then identified an optimal decision rule for how scored projects would be allocated across bins, where projects in different bins received different time investments. We found that, given current staff, the optimal decision rule placed 80% of informal consultations (those where expected effects are beneficial, insignificant, or discountable) in a short bin where they would be completed without negotiating changes. The remaining 20% would be placed in a long bin, warranting an investment of seven days, including time for negotiation. For formal

  12. [Nurses, teachers and pioneers: the students and permanent teaching staff at the opening of International School of Nursing in Lyon in 1965].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, Michel

    2012-06-01

    On the initiative of the World health organization, the international School of nursing university education opens in Lyon on September the 6th, 1965 and closes 30 years later. After having approached the national and international context of this creation, the study, based on archives and contemporary printed sources and various interviews of living witnesses, boarding and teaching, only-female staff present at the opening of the School, shows that it's all about pioneers and activists to the nursing cause, each of them doing it her own way. The background, the training, the personality, the educational choices and the publications of most of them give evidence of their will to contribute actively to the development and valuation of nursing as a discipline without naming it, by being inspired by foreign experiences well ahead of the french situation at the time. Good intentions to confront with the complex reality of the stakes and games of the numerous actors involved in those years realization.

  13. Defense mechanisms in ethics consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agich, George J

    2011-12-01

    While there is no denying the relevance of ethical knowledge and analytical and cognitive skills in ethics consultation, such knowledge and skills can be overemphasized. They can be effectively put into practice only by an ethics consultant, who has a broad range of other skills, including interpretive and communicative capacities as well as the capacity effectively to address the psychosocial needs of patients, family members, and healthcare professionals in the context of an ethics consultation case. In this paper, I discuss how emotion can play an important interpretive role in clinical ethics consultation and why attention to the role of defense mechanisms can be helpful. I concentrate on defense mechanisms, arguing first, that the presence of these mechanisms is understandable given the emotional stresses and communicative occlusions that occur between the families of patients and critical care professionals in the circumstances of critical care; second, that identifying these mechanisms is essential for interpreting and managing how these factors influence the way that the "facts" of the case are understood by family members; and, third, that effectively addressing these mechanisms is an important component for effectively doing ethics consultation. Recognizing defense mechanisms, understanding how and why they operate, and knowing how to deal with these defense mechanisms when they pose problems for communication or decision making are thus essential prerequisites for effective ethics consultation, especially in critical care.

  14. Accommodations: Staff Identity and University Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Andrew; Herrick, Tim; Keating, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Space has been of growing significance in social theory in recent years, yet, explorations of it in the scholarship of higher education have been limited. This is surprising, given the critical role space has in shaping staff and students' engagement with the university. Taking a practice-based approach and focusing on academic identities, this…

  15. Antenatal consultation for parents whose child may require admission to neonatal intensive care: a focus group study for media design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hauff, Patrick; Long, Karen; Taylor, Barbara; van Manen, Michael A

    2016-05-14

    For parents whose child may require admission to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), the antenatal consultation is often their first point of contact with the child's medical team. Consultation challenges health professionals, as parents may be anxious, overwhelmed, or even exhausted by what is and what might occur. Despite consultation being a common practice, there is a paucity of research on how to support practitioners and parents. The purpose of this study was to gain insights into important relational aspects of antenatal consultation that may be used to spur the development of media to support consultation. Focus group, as a data collection method, was employed to gather insights about antenatal consultation from a total of 50 hospital staff and 17 NICU parents from a large urban NICU program in western Canada. Qualitative content analysis was applied to the obtained materials to explicate themes that may serve as necessary understandings for media design. Participating hospital staff and parents expressed their desire for a good antenatal consultation with comments grouped under the following themes: supporting the building of a caring relation; sharing information in conversation; and, preparing for what is to come. To support the emerging relations of baby, parent, and hospital staff, a good antenatal consultation needs to convey care, understanding, and empathy; create possibilities for open and genuine conversations; and, foster the buildings of respect, confidence, and trust.

  16. The Impact of Comer's School Development Program's Student Staff Support Team Process on High-Incidence Special Education Referrals in One Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson-Robinson, Joi

    2010-01-01

    This study examines whether the Comer (1996) placement model process reduces the overrepresentation of certain student groups into high-incidence disabilities programs. High-incidence disabilities are those disabilities which require an extensive degree of "professional judgment" by the teacher in determining whether or not a disability exists…

  17. The usefulness of the Staff-Patient Interaction Response Scale for palliative care nursing for measuring the empathetic capacity of nursing students.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaansen, M.; Achterberg, T. van; Borm, G.

    2008-01-01

    In communicating with patients, especially patients receiving palliative care, empathy plays an important role. Little research has as yet been conducted into the development of the empathetic capacity of nursing students at various educational levels. An instrument that may be suitable for such

  18. Alternatives to the face-to-face consultation in general practice: focused ethnographic case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Helen; Brant, Heather; Ziebland, Sue; Bikker, Annemieke; Campbell, John; Gibson, Andy; McKinstry, Brian; Porqueddu, Tania; Salisbury, Chris

    2018-01-29

    NHS policy encourages general practices to introduce alternatives to the face-to-face consultation, such as telephone, email, e-consultation systems, or internet video. Most have been slow to adopt these, citing concerns about workload. This project builds on previous research by focusing on the experiences of patients and practitioners who have used one or more of these alternatives. To understand how, under what conditions, for which patients, and in what ways, alternatives to face-to-face consultations present benefits and challenges to patients and practitioners in general practice. Focused ethnographic case studies took place in eight UK general practices between June 2015 and March 2016. Non-participant observation, informal conversations with staff, and semi-structured interviews with staff and patients were conducted. Practice documents and protocols were reviewed. Data were analysed through charting and the 'one sheet of paper' mind-map method to identify the line of argument in each thematic report. Case study practices had different rationales for offering alternatives to the face-to-face consultation. Beliefs varied about which patients and health issues were suitable. Co-workers were often unaware of each other's practice; for example, practice policies for use of e-consultations systems with patients were not known about or followed. Patients reported benefits including convenience and access. Staff and some patients regarded the face-to-face consultation as the ideal. Experience of implementing alternatives to the face-to-face consultation suggests that changes in patient access and staff workload may be both modest and gradual. Practices planning to implement them should consider carefully their reasons for doing so and involve the whole practice team. © British Journal of General Practice 2018.

  19. Psychiatric consulting in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana María Castro Pérez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The psychiatric consultation is broadly defined as an educational relationship between a psychiatrist, a general practitioner and other professionals working in the area of Mental Health. Currently it is a fundamental tool to optimize the treatment of psychiatric patients in primary care, given the high prevalence of these conditions and limited access to hours of specialty. Psychiatric Consulting is centrally positioned because patients are generally reluctant to consult with specialists, either because of the stigma associated with psychiatric illness or the cost effectiveness of the specialty. This leads patients to consult in primary care. Therefore we were interested in reviewing the evidence supporting this activity and what are the benefits it delivers. After reviewing the literature we conclude that the Psychiatric Consultation helps to improve the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of psychiatric disorders in primary care, particularly the management of depressive disorders and somatoform disorders, improving the resolution capabilities of general practitioners, thus lowering the associated healthcare costs of these conditions. There is no evidence to support the health benefits of training general practitioners.

  20. Nursing unit managers, staff retention and the work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine M; Roche, Michael A; Blay, Nicole; Stasa, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This paper examined the impact of leadership characteristics of nursing unit managers, as perceived by staff nurses, on staff satisfaction and retention. A positive work environment will increase levels of job satisfaction and staff retention. Nurse leaders play a critical role in creating a positive work environment. Important leadership characteristics of the front-line nurse manager include visibility, accessibility, consultation, recognition and support. Secondary analysis of data collected on 94 randomly selected wards in 21 public hospitals across two Australian states between 2004-2006. All nurses (n = 2488, 80·3% response rate) on the selected wards were asked to complete a survey that included the 49-item Nursing Work Index-Revised [NWI-R] together with measures of job satisfaction, satisfaction with nursing and intention to leave. Subscales of the NWI-R were calculated. Leadership, the domain of interest, consisted of 12 items. Wards were divided into those reporting either positive or negative leadership. Data were analysed at the nurse level using spss version 16. A nursing manager who was perceived to be a good leader, was visible, consulted with staff, provided praise and recognition and where flexible work schedules were available was found to distinguish the positive and negative wards. However, for a ward to be rated as positive overall, nurse leaders need to perform well on all the leadership items. An effective nursing unit manager who consults with staff and provides positive feedback and who is rated highly on a broad range of leadership items is instrumental in increasing job satisfaction and satisfaction with nursing. Good nurse managers play an important role in staff retention and satisfaction. Improved retention will lead to savings for the organisation, which may be allocated to activities such as training and mentorship to assist nurse leaders in developing these critical leadership skills. Strategies also need to be put in place to

  1. Problems and Prospects in Training Psychologists to Consult with Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drotar, Dennis

    There are training dilemmas which are characteristic of medical settings. Clinical psychology students interning in a hospital setting are unfamiliar with the hospital culture, and the demands of patient care require a practical active approach. Experiences with training clinical psychologists to consult with pediatricians are reviewed. Disparate…

  2. Networking: A Key to Career Communication and Management Consulting Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Now that job security with one organization is a relic of the past and companies are outsourcing training and other "nonessential" functions, the author suggests in his career communication classes that students develop the same inventive strategies to plan their employment futures that management consultants use to market themselves in the 21st…

  3. Managing Resistance: An Essential Consulting Skill for Learning Disabilities Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Marilyn; Bauwens, Jeanne

    1988-01-01

    The article explores characteristics of resistance by general educators to special education consultation programs. It offers teachers of learning disabled students strategies for managing specific types of resistance as well as a general plan for minimizing resistance as well as suggestions for evaluating the impact of resistance management…

  4. Administration of International Cooperative Education Exchanges. A Wingspread Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, Robert M., Ed.

    Papers are presented from a consultation program on administration of international cooperative education exchanges. The papers provide the broad context in which the International Association for the Exchange of Students for Technical Experience/United States will develop programs and administrative services to facilitate international placements…

  5. Developing a Consulting Program in Special Education: Implementation and Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisberg, Lenny; Wolf, Ronald

    1986-01-01

    The article presents a five-step model for implementing a consulting teacher model and effective interventions for mildly handicapped students in regular education settings. Interventions include principles of effective teaching, mastery learning, peer and cross-age tutoring, cooperative learning groups, and instruction in metacognitive learning…

  6. Patient assessment: effective consultation and history taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Gerri

    This article explores patient consultation with specific reference to the Calgary-Cambridge consultation guide. It provides an overview of history taking and explores the patient's perspective during the consultation. The article also discusses the skills required to provide information effectively. In addition, the article addresses 'safety netting' and emphasises the interdependence of communication and consultation skills.

  7. Fine Arts: 3. Contribution of the University Teaching Staff to the Development of Creative Imagination of the Fine Arts Profile Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roşca-Ceban Daniela

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is developing of the CISA in FAD course. The acquired skills will enable the creative explanation, understanding of the current artistic principles and the achievement of quality creative products. The research problem is the indigence of the creative process, the mechanical combination and the intuitive reproduction of the students' plastic artists experience and the lack of creative imagination in the creative process.

  8. BNFL Sellafield further public consultation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The main issues raised during the further public consultation on the draft Sellafield authorisations for the discharge of radioactive wastes from the British Nuclear Fuel (BNFL) Sellafield site are outlined. An analysis of the categories and numbers of the 42,500 responses is made. The public consultation was based on five documents; a letter to consultees from the Department of the Environment and the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF); the report by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution and the Inspectorate of MAFF on their earlier consultation exercise; a paper by BNFL on the economic and commercial justification of the Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP); a statement of the Government's policy on reprocessing and THORP and a document prepared by BNFL on the environmental implication of THORP. (UK)

  9. Promoting Learning by Inquiry Among Undergraduates in Soil Sciences: Scaffolding From Project-based Courses to Student-Staff Research Grants by the National Research Agency in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ismaily, Said; Kacimov, Anvar; Al-Maktoumi, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Three strategies in a soil science undergraduate programme with inquiry-based learning (IBL) principles at Sultan Qaboos University, Oman, are presented. The first strategy scaffolds courses into three phases: with direct instructional guidance, structured IBL, and finally, guided to open IBL. The second strategy involves extra-curricular activities of undergraduates, viz. conducting workshops on soils for pupils in grades 7-9 with their teachers. The third strategy promotes the teaching-research nexus through collaboration between the undergraduates and faculty within a student-supporting, government-funded programme through 1-year long research grants of up to 5,500 US/project. The efficiency of the strategies was evaluated by students' evaluations of courses and instructors and questionnaire-based surveys. Statistics of students' responses in teaching evaluations of IBL courses showed a significantly higher level of satisfaction compared with regular courses taught in the department and college. In surveys of other constituencies of the program, viz. the secondary schools, more than 90% of respondents "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that they had learned new information/secrets about soils. The indicators of success in the third strategy are: winning a highly competitive grant and, moreover, earning an even more competitive annual national award for the best executed research project. The two top graduates of the IBL soil programme progressed into the MSc programme with the university and national scholarships. Key words: inquiry based learning, soil science undergraduate program, scaffold of courses, outreach activities, teaching-research nexus, evaluation of program's efficiency

  10. Faculty and Staff: The Weather Radar of Campus Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Patricia; Cofer, James; Austin, Jan L.; Inman, Dean; Martin, Tim; Rook, Steve; Stokes, Tim; Wilkinson, Leah

    1998-01-01

    The campus climate for faculty and staff is one of change and uncertainty. College faculty are varied and bring to their work diverse perspectives. They are challenged to redefine their work, assimilate interdisciplinary and active learning techniques into their repertoires, and deal with a new population of students. Nonteaching staff may find…

  11. Impact Of Staff Morale On Performance In School Organizations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationship between the morale of staff (i.e. teachers' morale) and performance in school organizations was looked at in this study. The research was carried out on a randomly selected sample of one hundred and twenty (120) students and teaching staff from the three colleges in Covenant University, Ota, Ogun State.

  12. "Struggling Readers: What Consultants Need to Know." The Consultant's Corner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Howard

    2004-01-01

    To help struggling readers' improve their reading, educational consultants must know a great deal about reading, reading assessment, and struggling readers. This article provides basic information about these topics by discussing Lipson and Wixson's (2003) Assessment-Instruction Process, making recommendations for working with struggling readers…

  13. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from : 1 January 2005 Internal taxation of remuneration, payments and other financial benefits (New articles IV 2.01, R IV 2.01 to 2.04 pages 56 bis & 56 ter; Annex R A 1 bis page 73 bis) 1 September 2005 Reimbursement of education fees (Article R A 8.01 page 81) for the academic year 2005/2006 1 November 2005 Age limit (Article R II 6.04 page 37) 1 January 2006 Scale of basic salaries and scale of basic stipends (Annex R A 1 page 73 & Annex R A 2 page 74 respectively). Family Allowance and Child Allowance (Annex R A 4 page 76) New contract policy for staff members (Articles R II 1.19 & 1.20 page 15, R II 1.23 page 16, II 6.01 page 36, R II 6.02 & R II 6.06 page 37, VIII 1.03 page 68, R A 9.01 page 83). Copies of this update (modification # 15) are available in departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at the following addr...

  14. Integrated soil, water and nutrient management for sustainable rice-wheat cropping systems in Asia. Report of a FAO/IAEA consultants' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    A Consultants' Meeting on 'Integrated soil, water and nutrient management for sustainable rice-wheat cropping systems in Asia' was held at FAO, Rome, August 22-25, 2000. Five consultants, together with one staff from IAEA headquarters, one staff from IAEA Laboratories, Seibersdorf, five staff from FAO headquarters, two staff from FAO regional offices, one observer from ACIAR, one observer from Cornell University with expertise in crop, nutrient, soil and water management, attended the meeting. The consultants presented reviews of the situation regarding studies of water and nutrient dynamics in rice-wheat systems in South Asia. These were complemented by a paper on the development of 15 N techniques to study the contribution of N from legumes. The consultants also provided recommendations on the formulation and implementation of an FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP). Refs, figs, tabs

  15. Integration of CERN staff

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    An example of the integration of CERN staff in the neighbouring communes is provided by the hamlet of Bugnon at St-Genis-Pouilly (Ain), FRance. The CERN installation on the Swiss site are visible on the left in the background. Behind them the Saleve mountain in Haute-Savoie.

  16. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the m...

  17. Systematic Staff Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Norman L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the process of staff selection for the general studies department at Piedmont Technical College. Makes suggestions on how to write a job description, establish selection criteria, develop the selection process, and make the selection itself. Includes sample forms used in the process. (DR)

  18. The Staff of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rebecca

    1994-01-01

    Some children have chronic illnesses that require diet modifications as part of their medical treatment. Advises school districts to hire a registered dietitian or look for resources at a local hospital or public health office. In addition, schools should work with parents, improve staff training, and conduct spot checks of school cafeterias. (MLF)

  19. Mapping Staff Competencies for Information Literacy Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Corrall

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Information literacy (IL is a key strategic objective for academic libraries. Many academic librarians are involved in designing, developing and delivering IL programmes, using both classroom teaching and e-learning methods. IL has also become a priority at institutional level and some universities and colleges have formal policies and strategies to integrate and embed IL in the curriculum. IL interventions also happen informally at enquiry points and reference desks, when queries offer ‘teachable moments’ for library staff to help students develop information skills and understanding while solving their information problems. Research shows that such instruction features strongly in both face-to-face and virtual reference transactions, but few IL policies and strategies cover this frontline personalised IL support. Similarly, most discussion of staff training and development for IL education has centred on the teaching roles and pedagogical knowledge of professional librarians, with limited discussion of the competencies needed for frontline interventions by paraprofessionals or assistants. This workshop promotes an inclusive holistic model of IL education and library workforce development. It will investigate the skills and knowledge needed by frontline staff to contribute effectively to the IL mission of academic libraries. It will focus on the learning support needed by students from different educational, social, ethnic and cultural backgrounds, with particular reference to postgraduate students, as a group typifying this diversity. The facilitator will review IL interventions and library staff competencies discussed in the literature. Participants will discuss typical queries or problems presented by different categories of postgraduate students and then identify the skills, knowledge and understanding required by frontline staff to provide an appropriate service response. The skillsets identified will be compared with those of teaching

  20. Interns as teachers of medical students: a pilot programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunne, B

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, rising numbers of medical students and an increasingly demanding clinical workload has put pressures on the educational systems for medical students in the hospital. Bedside teaching remains central to education, but tutorial delivery by registrars, tutors and consultants has proven to be increasingly difficult with the greater numbers of students now in the undergraduate system. AIMS: We have performed a pilot study to determine the feasibility of developing a Junior Tutor Programme, to assist in the delivery of tutorials to undergraduate medical students. METHODS: This was designed and delivered by interns under the supervision of the academic staff in the Departments of Medicine and Surgery in Connolly Hospital. The programme was evaluated by a questionnaire filled in by the students anonymously. RESULTS: A supervised programme of tutorials delivered by interns is a potentially useful way to ensure delivery of clinical teaching to undergraduate medical students.

  1. Why are some patients in treatment for advanced cancer reluctant to consult their GP?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åbom, Birgit; Pfeiffer, Per

    2009-01-01

    and therefore consulted the doctor or the staff at the cancer treatment centre before seeking advice from their GP. Some patients found that the GP was not familiar enough with the treatments given; others that they did not want to inconvenience the busy GP with what they perceived to be minor non...

  2. Introducing Consultancy Supervision in a Primary School for Children with Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Della

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a pilot study where consultancy supervision was introduced into a primary school for pupils with SEBD in England. School staff engaged with supervision and evaluated their experience through a quantitative and qualitative methodology. The paper explores the nature of supervision, the qualities of the supervisory relationship…

  3. Image intelligence online consulting: A flexible and remote access to strategic information applied to verification of declaration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassy, A.F. de; Denizot, L.

    2001-01-01

    Commercial satellite imagery is giving International Institutions specialized Information Departments access to a great source of valuable intelligence. High resolution and multiple sensors have also led to a growing complexity of interpretation that calls for a greater need of consulting, verification and training in the field in order to make it eligible as an operational source of verification. Responding to this need, Fleximage is extending its Image intelligence (IMINT) training program to include a fully operational and flexible online consulting and training program. Image Intelligence (IMINT) Online Program, a new approach to acquiring IMINT expertise, supported by Internet technologies, and managed by a professional team of experts and technical staff. Fleximage has developed a virtual learning environment on the Internet for acquiring IMINT expertise. Called the IMINT Online Program, this dynamic learning environment provides complete flexibility and personalization of the process for acquiring expertise. The IMINT online program includes two services: Online Consulting and Online Training. The Online Consulting service is designed for the technical staff of an organization who are already operational in the field of image intelligence. Online Consulting enables these staff members to acquire pertinent expertise online that can be directly applied to their professional activity, such as IAEA verification tasks. The Online Training service is designed for the technical staff of an organization who are relatively new to the field of image intelligence. These staff members need to build expertise within a formal training program. Online Training is a flexible and structured program for acquiring IMINT expertise online

  4. Consultative Instructor Supervision and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William W.

    2010-01-01

    Organizations vary greatly in how they monitor training instructors. The methods used in monitoring vary greatly. This article presents a systematic process for improving instructor skills that result in better teaching and better learning, which results in better-prepared employees for the workforce. The consultative supervision and evaluation…

  5. Narrative and Structure in Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, David

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the process of consultation to professional networks, teams, groups and individuals concerned with the mental health of children and young people in the care system, and those adopted. Frequently there are significant elements of early trauma suffered by the young people and disruption in the professional organisation. The…

  6. Gamification in a Consulting Company

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauw, Frank; Bazylevska, L.; Aiello, M.

    2014-01-01

    Gamification refers to the use of game-design elements in a non-gaming context. The consulting company Capgemini has set up a rudimentary Gamification platform to help motivating the people to do extra work for the company in their spare time. In order to re- ward people for this effort, they can

  7. Faculty Consulting: Responsibility or Promiscuity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Carol M; Lewis, Darrell R.

    1984-01-01

    The potential benefits--to the individual, the institution, and society--and the potential costs of faculty consulting are examined. A review of the relevant literature and data precedes a presentation of new findings and a taxonomy for developing institutional guidelines. (Author/MLW)

  8. Consulta ginecológica sob a ótica de estudantes do ensino médio do Rio de Janeiro, RJ Consulta ginecológica bajo la óptica de estudiantes de educación secundaria en Rio de Janeiro, RJ High school students' opinions of gynecological consultations in Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra de Morais Pereira

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar diferenças socioculturais e percepções sobre a consulta ginecológica por adolescentes. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com 418 alunas do ensino médio de três escolas de diferentes perfis, localizadas na cidade do Rio de Janeiro, RJ, em 2010. Aplicou-se questionário estruturado, abordando características sociodemográficas, comportamento sexual e avaliação da consulta ginecológica. Utilizou-se o teste de Qui-quadrado (Yates e o t de Student, adotando-se p OBJETIVO: Analizar diferencias socioculturales y percepciones sobre la consulta ginecológica en adolescentes. MÉTODOS: Estudio transversal con 418 alumnas de educación secundaria de tres escuelas con diferentes perfiles, localizadas en la ciudad de Rio de Janeiro, RJ, en 2010. Se aplicó cuestionario estructurado, abordando características sociodemográficas, comportamiento sexual y evaluación de la consulta ginecológica. Se utilizó la prueba de Chi-cuadrado (Yates y el t de Student, adoptándose un pOBJECTIVE: To analyze sociocultural differences and perceptions of gynecological consultations for high school girls. METHODS: A transversal study with 418 high school girls from three schools of different profiles in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil in 2010. A structured questionnaire encompassing socio-demographic characteristics, sexual behavior and evaluation of gynecological consultations was completed. Yates' Chi-square test and the Student's t-test were utilized adopting a value of p < 0.05. RESULTS: The students of private and federal public schools presented similar profiles but both were different from the state school girls. The latter had lower socioeconomic status, and their parents had lower levels of education, the predominance of afro-descendants was observed, as were a larger number of sexual partners, pregnancy and cases of sexual violence. The average age of menarche and sexarche among the students were similar, but the first

  9. Doctors as patients: postal survey examining consultants and general practitioners adherence to guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, M; Calnan, M; Wall, B

    1999-09-04

    To examine the adherence by senior NHS medical staff to the BMA guidelines on the ethical responsibilities of doctors towards themselves and their families. Postal semistructured questionnaire. Four randomly selected NHS trusts and three local medical committees in South Thames region. Consultants and principals in general practice. Personal use of health services. The response rate was 64% (724) for general practitioners and 72% (427) for consultants after three mailings. Most (1106, 96%) respondents were registered with a general practitioner, although little use was made of their services. 159 (26%) general practitioners were registered with a general practitioner in their own practice and 80 (11%) admitted to looking after members of their family. 73 (24%) consultants would never see their general practitioner before obtaining consultant advice. Most consultants and general practitioners admitted to prescribing for themselves and their family. Responses to vignettes for different health problems indicated a general reluctance to take time off, but there were differences between consultants and general practitioners and by sex. Views on improvements needed included the possibility of a "doctor's doctor," access to out of area secondary care, an occupational health service for general practitioners, and regular health check ups. The guidelines are largely not being followed, perhaps because of the difficulties of obtaining access to general practitioners outside working hours. The occupational health service should be expanded and a general practitioner service for NHS staff piloted.

  10. Data-based psychiatric consultation: applying mainframe computer capability to consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkin, M K; Mackenzie, T B; Callies, A L

    1985-04-01

    Critical, intertwined objectives for consultation psychiatry include 1) the development of data-based clinical practices, and 2) heightening the effectiveness of consultation. Toward these ends, the Consultation Psychiatry Service at the University of Minnesota has previously conducted systematic studies of consultation and established an ongoing data collection system for consultations. Both steps have relied extensively upon mainframe computer capability. This primary application of computer capability to the field of psychiatric consultation is reviewed by the authors.

  11. Knowledge, attitude and awareness of speciality of oral and maxillofacial surgery amongst medical consultants of vadodara district in gujarat state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Navin; Patel, Nameeta; Mahajan, Amit; Shah, Rishabh

    2015-03-01

    Aim of this study was to survey the knowledge, attitude and awareness of the subject of oral and maxillofacial surgery speciality amongst the consultants and practitioners of medicine in district of Vadodara. List of members of various specialities in medical faculty were obtained from Indian Medical Association, Baroda branch and staff members of medical colleges of Vadodara district. A questionnaire survey was made which was distributed and their options were noted. Surgical removal of third molar, oral submucous fibrosis and implants were the problems where oral surgeons were preferred. For maxillofacial trauma plastic surgeons and orthopaedic surgeons were preferred than oral surgeons. For maxillofacial pathology E.N.T surgeons were mostly preferred. There is low awareness regarding oral and maxillofacial surgery amongst the general practitioners and medical consultants in Vadodara district. Survey shows that our training needs to be upgraded and revamped so that our trainees (post graduates in oral surgery) and have a greater "hands-on" exposure during their postgraduate training. They will then be able to handle increasingly complex cases in a multispecialty setup when they graduate and earn the mutual respect of the medical and dental fraternity and also the general public. MBBS students during their dental postings should be made aware of the depth and scope of oral surgery branch.

  12. Simulated consultations: a sociolinguistic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Sarah; Roberts, Celia; Hawthorne, Kamila; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2016-01-15

    Assessment of consulting skills using simulated patients is widespread in medical education. Most research into such assessment is sited in a statistical paradigm that focuses on psychometric properties or replicability of such tests. Equally important, but less researched, is the question of how far consultations with simulated patients reflect real clinical encounters--for which sociolinguistics, defined as the study of language in its socio-cultural context, provides a helpful analytic lens. In this debate article, we draw on a detailed empirical study of assessed role-plays, involving sociolinguistic analysis of talk in OSCE interactions. We consider critically the evidence for the simulated consultation (a) as a proxy for the real; (b) as performance; (c) as a context for assessing talk; and (d) as potentially disadvantaging candidates trained overseas. Talk is always a performance in context, especially in professional situations (such as the consultation) and institutional ones (the assessment of professional skills and competence). Candidates who can handle the social and linguistic complexities of the artificial context of assessed role-plays score highly--yet what is being assessed is not real professional communication, but the ability to voice a credible appearance of such communication. Fidelity may not be the primary objective of simulation for medical training, where it enables the practising of skills. However the linguistic problems and differences that arise from interacting in artificial settings are of considerable importance in assessment, where we must be sure that the exam construct adequately embodies the skills expected for real-life practice. The reproducibility of assessed simulations should not be confused with their validity. Sociolinguistic analysis of simulations in various professional contexts has identified evidence for the gap between real interactions and assessed role-plays. The contextual conditions of the simulated

  13. Consultations

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    Référence: Contrat CRDI N°: 123456. 1. Honoraires. 20 jours @ 400 CAD/jour. 8 000.00 CAD. 2. Dépenses autorisées (spécifiées au contrat). Forfait pour visas, etc. 150.00 CAD. Per diems à Dakar : 10 jrs @ 225 CAD/jr. 2 250.00 CAD. Photocopies (5 copies x 30 pages @ 0.10 CAD/page*). 15.00 CAD. Dépenses totales.

  14. "How long does it take?" A mixed methods evaluation of computer-related work in GP consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, James; Buckingham, Susan; Thomson, Fionagh; Milne, Heather; Sheikh, Aziz; Fernando, Bernard; Cresswell, Kathrin; Williams, Robin; Pinnock, Hilary

    2015-12-24

    Systematic reviews have suggested that time spent on computer-related tasks increases consultation length. However, these reviews pre-date the current ubiquitous use of computers in U.K. general practice. As part of a U.K. national study of the influence of information technology (IT) on the interaction between patients and healthcare professionals during consultations, we explored how IT functions affected time allocation and styles of computer use during general practitioner (GP) consultations. We drew on multichannel video recording of consultations and measured consultation phases and the duration of computer-related tasks. We related measures of actual time to GP's interpretation of computer use elicited in qualitative interviews. Our sample included recordings of 112 consultations from 6 GPs in three practices. The computer was used for about one-third of the greater consultation. However, its use was concentrated pre- and post- the patient consultation. The workflow of consultation was exemplified through six computer use cases. Most functionality was accepted and accommodated within the consultation, though disruptive and time-consuming tasks were generally delegated to administrative staff. Recognised styles of computer use (minimal, block and conversational) were apparent, but applied very flexibly by GPs according to the nature of the consultation. In contrast to earlier reports, contemporary computer use does not appear to have lengthened consultations. GPs adopted different styles of computer use in different consultations, challenging classifications that seek to stereotype GP computer use. Designing systems that support this versatility require an understanding of the fluid application of computer use within consultation structure.

  15. Department of Training and Consulting - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrzynski, L.

    2007-01-01

    Department of Training and Consulting is regularly serving secondary schools' pupils and teachers, university students and the public. As usual we have been visited by about 7000 visitors, mainly students from secondary schools in Poland. The Department is constantly developing experiments which can be conducted by students of secondary schools and universities, as well as by professionals. At the moment there are about 20 experiments available for the guests of the Department. They cover measurements of the lifetimes, elements of radioprotection, absorption of radiation in various materials, excitation of fluorescence radiation, influence of magnetic field on beta radiation as well as electrons emitted from typical electron gun, Compton scattering and elements of gamma spectroscopy, search for radioactive pollutions etc. In addition the Department was very active during Science Picnic in May and Science Festival in September, when the Department proposed organisation of a '' Day with Radioactivity ''. '' The Day '' consisted of a number of public lectures and demonstrations. In addition two evenings were dedicated to a public debate on energy sources and energy demands and supply in next 50-100 years. One should also mention organisation and leading of the professional course for accelerators' operators, as well as starting a new university course on '' Nuclear Energy and Its Use '' (Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University, Warsaw). The web side of the Department contains educational materials (part of it can be found on international platform http://www.nupex.org), quizzes and self-teaching materials. (author)

  16. Uruguay; 2011 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2011-01-01

    This 2011 Article IV Consultation highlights that the growth momentum in Uruguay has continued into 2011 but a slowdown is under way, led by weaker exports and slower public investment. Uruguay’s economic and financial vulnerabilities are modest, and the government has reduced debt vulnerabilities significantly and built important financial buffers. Executive Directors have commended authorities’ skillful macroeconomic management that has underpinned Uruguay’s excellent economic performance, ...

  17. Ultrasound for the Pulmonary Consultant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astha Chichra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bedside ultrasonographic assessment of the lung and pleura provides rapid, noninvasive, and essential information in diagnosis and management of various pulmonary conditions. Ultrasonography helps in diagnosing common conditions, including consolidation, interstitial syndrome, pleural effusions and masses, pneumothorax, and diaphragmatic dysfunction. It provides procedural guidance for various pulmonary procedures, including thoracentesis, chest tube insertion, transthoracic aspiration, and biopsies. This article describes major applications of ultrasonography for the pulmonary consultant along with illustrative figures and videos.

  18. Business Plan : Cultural consultant company

    OpenAIRE

    Absiye, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the circumstances of immigrants in Finland with the intention of establishing a consultant company that would help the immigrants in their integration process in Finland. The primary data of this study were obtained from the results of the “survey on work and well-being among people of foreign origin” conducted between 2015 until 2016 by Statistic Finland. Additionally, the author did background research on the institutions of Finland and respect...

  19. The Staff Association, TREF, Finance Committee and CERN Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    The Staff Association, following its participatory and consensual approach, always tries to find the best possible agreements for the Organization and its staff. For this our main assets are in discussion and consultation with the management, explanatory work and persuasion at TREF, and in other meetings, with delegates from Member States. TREF (Tripartite Employment Conditions Forum), a forum for exchange and discussion "The objective of the Forum is to improve the decision-making process by giving those concerned the opportunity and time to understand fully the positions of all participants." (CERN / RTG / 8) The Tripartite Forum on Employment Conditions (TREF) was created by CERN Council in June 1994 and is composed of representatives of the Member States, the Management and the Staff Association. The forum is tasked with the studies of remuneration and employment conditions at CERN and does not have decision authority. As its name suggests, TREF allows an exchange of views between the th...

  20. Beyond the 'dyad': a qualitative re-evaluation of the changing clinical consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinglehurst, Deborah; Roberts, Celia; Li, Shuangyu; Weber, Orest; Singy, Pascal

    2014-09-29

    To identify characteristics of consultations that do not conform to the traditionally understood communication 'dyad', in order to highlight implications for medical education and develop a reflective 'toolkit' for use by medical practitioners and educators in the analysis of consultations. A series of interdisciplinary research workshops spanning 12 months explored the social impact of globalisation and computerisation on the clinical consultation, focusing specifically on contemporary challenges to the clinician-patient dyad. Researchers presented detailed case studies of consultations, taken from their recent research projects. Drawing on concepts from applied sociolinguistics, further analysis of selected case studies prompted the identification of key emergent themes. University departments in the UK and Switzerland. Six researchers with backgrounds in medicine, applied linguistics, sociolinguistics and medical education. One workshop was also attended by PhD students conducting research on healthcare interactions. The contemporary consultation is characterised by a multiplicity of voices. Incorporation of additional voices in the consultation creates new forms of order (and disorder) in the interaction. The roles 'clinician' and 'patient' are blurred as they become increasingly distributed between different participants. These new consultation arrangements make new demands on clinicians, which lie beyond the scope of most educational programmes for clinical communication. The consultation is changing. Traditional consultation models that assume a 'dyadic' consultation do not adequately incorporate the realities of many contemporary consultations. A paradox emerges between the need to manage consultations in a 'super-diverse' multilingual society, while also attending to increasing requirements for standardised protocol-driven approaches to care prompted by computer use. The tension between standardisation and flexibility requires addressing in educational

  1. Outcomes of Ethics Consultations in Adult ICUs: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Selena S; Couillard, Philippe; Roze des Ordons, Amanda; Fiest, Kirsten M; Lorenzetti, Dianne L; Jette, Nathalie

    2018-02-01

    Clinical ethics consultation as a mechanism for supporting patients, family, and staff during ethically challenging situations has become standard of care. Despite this, there is a lack of consensus about the effectiveness of clinical ethics consultation consultation in the ICU. We performed a systematic review of outcomes associated with clinical ethics consultation within adult ICUs. We searched MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane CENTRAL, Embase, PsycINFO, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature from 1984 to May 2017. Two reviewers independently screened articles, assessed eligibility, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias using the Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias tool and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Pooled estimates of effect were calculated where possible. We screened 3,970 abstracts and reviewed 325 full-text articles of which 16 met all eligibility criteria. We examined changes in processes and outcomes as a result of clinical ethics consultation in the ICU. Categories of outcomes included user perception, clinical decision, or conflict resolution and resource utilization. The use of clinical ethics consultation in the ICU was associated with positive user experience (383/435 found clinical ethics consultation helpful), although stress and disagreement with clinical ethics consultation recommendations was greater in a subset (113/431 surrogates and providers). Consensus for a clinical decision was more frequently achieved with clinical ethics consultation (odds ratio, 4.09; 95% CI, 1.01-16.55; p = 0.05). Clinical ethics consultation was associated with lower resource utilization including significantly decreased ICU length of stay (mean difference, -4.65 d; 95% CI, -8.86 to -0.44; p = 0.03). Our review identified outcome-based assessment as the predominant measure used to report effectiveness of clinical ethics consultation consultations. In particular, clinical ethics consultation decreased ICU length of stay and increased family and

  2. Core Competencies for Training Effective School Consultants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhouse, Katie Lynn Sutton

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop and validate a set of core competencies of effective school-based consultants for preservice school psychology consultation training. With recent changes in service delivery models, psychologists are challenged to engage in more indirect, preventative practices (Reschly, 2008). Consultation emerges as…

  3. 15 CFR 923.57 - Continuing consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... § 923.57 Continuing consultation. (a) As required by subsection 306(d)(3)(B) of the Act, a State must establish an effective mechanism for continuing consultation and coordination between the management agency... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Continuing consultation. 923.57...

  4. 76 FR 55678 - Tribal Consultation Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... consultation is requested or required. DATES: The effective date of this policy is the date of signature by the... to conduct timely, respectful, meaningful, and effective two-way communication and consultation with... Consultation Policy AGENCY: Administration for Children and Families. ACTION: Final policy issuance. SUMMARY...

  5. 34 CFR 75.191 - Consultation costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Consultation costs. 75.191 Section 75.191 Education... Development of Curricula Or Instructional Materials § 75.191 Consultation costs. An applicant may budget reasonable consultation fees or planning costs in connection with the development of curricula or...

  6. Information for contractors' staff

    CERN Multimedia

    The Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    We have observed a significant decrease in the number of completed Certificates for Work in Controlled Radiation Areas being submitted with applications for dosimeters for your staff. Henceforth, we shall no longer be able to issue dosimeters without a certificate, which must be signed by the employee and the contractor's radiation-protection expert. You can obtain the certificate form from the Dosimetry Service at Building 24/E-011 or from our Website: http://service-rp-dosimetry.web.cern.ch/service-rp-dosimetry/. Thank you for your understanding. The Dosimetry Service

  7. STAFF VACANCY LIST

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    For economy reasons, it has been decided to stop printing and distributing this list to Staff Members. It can be found on the Web (LIST). Divisional Administrative Officers will receive an updated printed copy on a monthly basis and are asked to display this in a public place in their division. Copies will also be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (No. 60) in the glass-fronted cabinet (close to the lifts) and also on the notice board close to the Post Office. A copy will also be given to the Reception (Building No. 33). Human Resources Division Tel. 74606

  8. Managing your engineering consultants: Steps for simultaneously improving operations, project implementation, and your bottom line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchen, E.R.; Perilloux, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    The domestic oil and gas industry has responded to depleting reserves and increasing operating costs by downsizing the overhead required to maintain production and processing facilities. For many companies this downsizing has resulted in a reduced in-house engineering staff and a greater reliance on consulting engineering services. To get the most benefit from consulting engineering companies, the partnership between consultants and the oil and gas company needs to be carefully considered. Unfortunately, these partnerships are often developed at the home office with visionary goals in mind, only to be implemented reluctantly on a local level. A better strategy is to implement partnering tools on the local level and allow these partnerships to develop naturally, and at times, uniquely, at each location. The following such tools detailed in this paper are: manpower leveraging -- using field-trained consulting engineers to address project design/implementation and field/construction support so that the operating company's engineers may focus on management and detailed development of high-return projects; enhanced project scope and design review -- developing and reviewing project scope(s) and preliminary engineering designs to minimize engineering/construction costs as well as optimize the operability and constructability of the project; and consulting rate standardization -- understanding and structuring the consultant's rates so that neither side is exploited and so that the project is staffed in the interest of project execution and not maximum profits for the consultant

  9. Analyzing the Effect of Consultation Training on the Development of Consultation Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Markeda L.; Newell, Terrance

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of one consultation course on the development of pre-service school psychologists' consultation knowledge, confidence, and skills. Computer-simulation was used as a means to replicate the school environment and capture consultants' engagement throughout the consultation process without…

  10. Perinatal staff perceptions of safety and quality in their service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinni, Suzanne V; Wallace, Euan M; Cross, Wendy M

    2014-11-28

    Ensuring safe and appropriate service delivery is central to a high quality maternity service. With this in mind, over recent years much attention has been given to the development of evidence-based clinical guidelines, staff education and risk reporting systems. Less attention has been given to assessing staff perceptions of a service's safety and quality and what factors may influence that. In this study we set out to assess staff perceptions of safety and quality of a maternity service and to explore potential influences on service safety. The study was undertaken within a new low risk metropolitan maternity service in Victoria, Australia with a staffing profile comprising midwives (including students), neonatal nurses, specialist obstetricians, junior medical staff and clerical staff. In depth open-ended interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire were conducted with 23 staff involved in the delivery of perinatal care, including doctors, midwives, nurses, nursing and midwifery students, and clerical staff. Data were analyzed using naturalistic interpretive inquiry to identify emergent themes. Staff unanimously reported that there were robust systems and processes in place to maintain safety and quality. Three major themes were apparent: (1) clinical governance, (2) dominance of midwives, (3) inter-professional relationships. Overall, there was a strong sense that, at least in this midwifery-led service, midwives had the greatest opportunity to be an influence, both positively and negatively, on the safe delivery of perinatal care. The importance of understanding team dynamics, particularly mutual respect, trust and staff cohesion, were identified as key issues for potential future service improvement. Senior staff, particularly midwives and neonatal nurses, play central roles in shaping team behaviors and attitudes that may affect the safety and quality of service delivery. We suggest that strategies targeting senior staff to enhance their performance in

  11. The Staff Association and you

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2013-01-01

    The Staff Association, your representative with the Management and the Member States The article VII 1.01 of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SR&R) provides that “the relations between the Director-General and the personnel shall be established either on an individual basis or on a collective basis with the Staff Association as intermediary”. This essential role of the Staff representatives, of being the spokesperson of the entire staff of the Organization vis-à-vis the Director-General and the Members States, is achieved through regular participation in the various joint advisory committees defined in the SR&R. The most important are the Standing Concertation Committee and the TREF, tripartite forum where your representatives meet with the Member States delegates, in the presence of the Management, to explain the position of the staff on the various issues concerning employment conditions. The Finance Committee also gives the opportunity to the Staff Association to ...

  12. Strangers at the Benchside: Research Ethics Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Mildred K.; Tobin, Sara L.; Greely, Henry T.; McCormick, Jennifer; Boyce, Angie; Magnus, David

    2008-01-01

    Institutional ethics consultation services for biomedical scientists have begun to proliferate, especially for clinical researchers. We discuss several models of ethics consultation and describe a team-based approach used at Stanford University in the context of these models. As research ethics consultation services expand, there are many unresolved questions that need to be addressed, including what the scope, composition, and purpose of such services should be, whether core competencies for consultants can and should be defined, and how conflicts of interest should be mitigated. We make preliminary recommendations for the structure and process of research ethics consultation, based on our initial experiences in a pilot program. PMID:18570086

  13. Consultant breast radiographers: Where are we now?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, Zebby

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to: • Evaluate the current role of the consultant breast radiographer. • Compare current practice with the four key components for consultant practice. • Gauge the support of radiologist colleagues. • Determine the other professional commitments involved with the role. This study could be the precursor for a macro study of all consultant radiographer practice in other specialities. Methodology: Methodology used was a comparative ethnographic study. Questionnaires to the 24 consultant breast radiographers currently in post, and consultant breast radiologists, who work with them, were conducted. Data collection was a qualitative thematic approach. Conclusion: Consultant breast radiographers provide high quality care to patients through excellent clinical practice, leadership and good communication. However, this study shows hospital Trusts emphasis for non medical consultants is for clinical practice first. Some radiologists are still a barrier to progression for consultant breast radiographers, and radiologists have a big influence in recruitment decisions. Consultant breast radiographer posts are well established, their numbers are increasing through recognition of the role and of their abilities and performance. Consultant breast radiographers state that becoming a consultant is the major achievement of their career, proving the Society of Radiographers' vision of the four-tier career structure has been well received by the radiography profession

  14. Reflections on the role of consultant radiographers in the UK: what is a consultant radiographer?

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, Lisa; Henwood, Suzanne; Miller, Paul K.

    2016-01-01

    Context: This paper is the second paper from a two year in depth case study, exploring the role of consultant radiographers in the UK.\\ud \\ud Methods: A longitudinal case study approach was used to determine the role of consultant radiographers. Interviews were used to explore experiences of being a consultant, which were analysed using thematic analysis. Eight consultant radiographers participated (Note, two of the consultants withdrew after the first interview due to workload). Therefore tw...

  15. [Teenagers' drawings in transcultural consultations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Amalini; Titia Rizzi, Alice

    The place of teenagers' drawings has been studied as part of a transcultural consultation, based on the creativity of the children of migrants. When speaking is difficult, drawings enable teenagers to show another dimension of their internal world. Aravin, a young Tamil boy, who lacked the necessary words, was able to express all the complexity of his thoughts through his drawings, finally being able to formulate in the group the difficult situations which he was drawing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. The administrative staff recruitment and selection in Romanian public higher education institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Luminita Mihaela Strajeri

    2009-01-01

    Administrative staff, it will be argued, is essential to the activity of higher education. Adminis-trative staff make up about 44% of the Romanian public higher education workforce, working directly with students and providing services that allow schools to function. There is a major shortfall in the effort and attention now being devoted to the administrative staff of all kinds, despite the workload and importance of this staff. The paper looks at some of the challenges facing higher educati...

  17. Improving staff selection processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerinus, Marie; Shannon, Marina

    2014-11-11

    This article, the second in a series of articles on Leading Better Care, describes the actions undertaken in recent years in NHS Lanarkshire to improve selection processes for nursing, midwifery and allied health professional (NMAHP) posts. This is an area of significant interest to these professions, management colleagues and patients given the pivotal importance of NMAHPs to patient care and experience. In recent times the importance of selecting staff not only with the right qualifications but also with the right attributes has been highlighted to ensure patients are well cared for in a safe, effective and compassionate manner. The article focuses on NMAHP selection processes, tracking local, collaborative development work undertaken to date. It presents an overview of some of the work being implemented, highlights a range of important factors, outlines how evaluation is progressing and concludes by recommending further empirical research.

  18. Integrated soil, water and nutrient management in conservation agriculture. Report of the FAO/IAEA consultants' meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Consultants' Meeting (CM) was organized in close consultation with the Land and Water Development Division (AGL) of FAO. Five Consultants from Australia, Brazil, India, Kenya, and the USA, and two IAEA staff participated in the CM. The objectives of the CM were: (i) To review current knowledge concerning the optimal management of external inputs and natural resources under conservation agriculture (CA) practice (ii) To define research priorities in conservation agriculture (iii) To define the role of nuclear techniques in research in conservation agriculture (iv) To draft a Project Document for an FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) in Conservation Agriculture (2005-2009). The Scientific Secretary opened the CM and provided an overview of the activities within the Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition (SWMCN) Sub-programme. The Consultants and the IAEA staff member made oral presentations. The Consultants from Australia and the USA each made two presentations. The Consultants' provided overviews of past and current work on zero- vs. conventional tillage, in particular carbon and nutrient (N and P) dynamics, water balance and soil physical properties. The Consultants identified research priorities within CA and the role of nuclear techniques in research on CA. Conclusions and Recommendations were formulated, and a proposal for a new Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on CA was drafted

  19. What Is the Role of Ethics Consultation in the Moral Habitability of Health Care Environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Wendy

    2017-06-01

    Ethics consultation has traditionally focused on the provision of expert guidance to health care professionals when challenging quandaries arise in clinical cases. Its role, however, is expanding as demands on health care organizations are negatively impacting their moral habitability. A sign of this impact can be seen in the moral distress experienced by staff and administrators, such that some leave their positions and their organizations. Ethics consultation, more broadly conceived, can be a major asset in ensuring that ethical practice is meaningfully supported, that moral distress is mitigated, and that the organizational environment is morally habitable. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Report of the consultants' meeting on the use of nuclear techniques to develop management practices for increasing crop production and soil fertility in acid soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Richard; Zapata, Felipe

    1999-01-01

    A Consultants' Meeting on 'The use of nuclear techniques to develop management practices for increasing crop production and soil fertility in acid soils' was held in Vienna at the IAEA headquarters from March 1-3, 1999. The meeting was attended by six consultants with expertise in tropical acid soils drawn from International Agricultural Research Organisations and universities together with staff members of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division. The consultants' presentations reviewed advances in approaches for the sustainable intensification of agricultural productivity in tropical acid soils in Latin America, Africa and South East Asia. The consultants also provided recommendations on the formulation and implementation of the future CRP

  1. Experiences with online consultation systems in primary care: case study of one early adopter site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Michael; Shaw, Sara; Swinglehurst, Deborah

    2017-11-01

    There is a strong policy drive towards implementing alternatives to face-to-face consultations in general practice to improve access, efficiency, and cost-effectiveness. These alternatives embrace novel technologies that are assumed to offer potential to improve care. To explore the introduction of one online consultation system (Tele-Doc) and how it shapes working practices. Mixed methods case study in an inner-city general practice. The study was conducted through interviews with IT developers, clinicians, and administrative staff, and scrutiny of documents, websites, and demonstrator versions of Tele-Doc, followed by thematic analysis and discourse analysis. Three interrelated themes were identified: online consultation systems as innovation, managing the 'messiness' of general practice consultations, and redistribution of the work of general practice. These themes raise timely questions about what it means to consult in contemporary general practice. Uptake of Tele-Doc by patients was low. Much of the work of the consultation was redistributed to patients and administrators, sometimes causing misunderstandings. The 'messiness' of consultations was hard to eliminate. In-house training focused on the technical application rather than associated transformations to practice work that were not anticipated. GPs welcomed varied modes of consulting, but the aspiration of improved efficiency was not realised in practice. Tele-Doc offers a new kind of consultation that is still being worked out in practice. It may offer convenience for patients with discrete, single problems, and a welcome variation to GPs' workload. Tele-Doc's potential for addressing more complex problems and achieving efficiency is less clear, and its adoption may involve unforeseeable consequences. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  2. Initiating palliative care consults for advanced dementia patients in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Kei; Wu, Mark; Medairos, Robert; Grudzen, Corita R; Balsells, Herberth; Marcus, David; Whitson, Micah; Ahmad, Danish; Duprey, Kael; Mancherje, Noel; Bloch, Helen; Jaffrey, Fatima; Liberman, Tara

    2014-03-01

    Patients with dementia, an underrecognized terminal illness, frequently visit the emergency department (ED). These patients may benefit from ED-initiated palliative care (PC) consultation. The study's objective was to track the rate of ED-initiated PC consultation for patients with advanced dementia (AD) after an educational intervention, and to categorize decision making for physicians who chose not to initiate consultation. As part of a quality improvement project at a suburban, tertiary care, university-affiliated medical center, emergency physicians (EPs) were taught to identify AD patients and initiate PC consultation. A convenience sample of patients over age 70 was screened for AD by research staff from July 1, 2012 to August 1, 2012 using the Functional Assessment Staging (FAST) criteria. A questionnaire was then administered to patients' physicians to inquire about barriers to initiating consultation. Questionnaires and medical records of those who met AD criteria were reviewed to examine patient characteristics, disposition information, and consultation initiation barriers. Patients (N=548) over 70 who visited the ED were approached and 304 completed the screening. Fifty-one of the 304 met criteria for AD. Their average age was 86; 33% were male. Eighteen of the 51 (35%) patients received a PC consultation sometime during their ED or hospital stay. Four of the 18 (22%) consultations were ED initiated. In 23 of 51 (45%) unique cases, physicians responded to the questionnaire. The majority felt that a PC consult was not appropriate for patients based on their knowledge, attitudes, or beliefs. Preexisting physician attitudes, knowledge, and beliefs prevent emergency physicians from addressing PC needs for AD patients.

  3. Exploring relationships between sexual orientation and satisfaction with faculty and staff interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Jason C; Inkelas, Karen Kurotsuchi

    2012-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) students are a unique population within colleges and universities, yet, few studies have sought to uncover the distinctive environmental influences and background characteristics that foster their satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between sexual orientation and a sense of satisfaction with faculty and staff interactions among undergraduate students. Analysis of variance results indicated that LGB students, on average, reported significantly higher satisfaction with faculty and staff interactions than heterosexual students. Using Astin's (1993 ) input-environments-outcome model as a conceptual framework, the hierarchical regression analysis yielded numerous significant variables as predictors for student satisfaction with faculty and staff interactions.

  4. The Effect of Peer-to-Peer Training on Staff Interactions with Adults with Dual Diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Lori L.; Sturmey, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Researchers have demonstrated the importance of training behavioral skills to staff members working with consumers with developmental disabilities. A training program that does not rely solely on consultants or administrators may benefit human services agencies that have limited resources to allocate to training. In the present study, the…

  5. The meaning of physical environmental factors on patient, family, carers and staff outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joost van Hoof; E. Morales; H.S.M. Kort; E.R.C.M. Huisman

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In recent years, the effects of the physical environment on the healing process and well-being has proved to be increasingly relevant for the patient, family, carers (PFC), and staff. Moreover, it is a growing concern among health care providers, environmental psychologist, consultants,

  6. University First Year Advisors: A network approach for first year student transition and retention. A Practice Report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Box

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Focussing expressly on student support and retention, improving the first year experience has been addressed by Murdoch University through the implementation of a School discipline-specific network of professional First Year Advisors (FYAs. FYA initiatives, both broad-based and varied, have been developed in alignment with the changing needs of students as identified throughout the semesters. A combination of outreach telephone campaigns and face-to-face student support enables FYAs to conduct a "just in time" approach to positively increase student engagement, and ultimately, retention. With a bespoke database, FYAs and academic staff have been able to streamline the process of reporting students in need of support, and gather data relating to student retention. The FYA program is yet to be formally evaluated although initial feedback and student consultation is promising. This paper outlines the program's development, current initiatives and expected outcomes.  

  7. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF A REMOTE MEDICAL CONSULTATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "A. Delrobaee

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Telemedicine is an indispensable tool in the hands of doctors to accelerate and facilitate the process of data interchange. To publicize and distribute the culture of utilizing this technology and providing the necessary equipment for this purpose and also to commence some useful activities in this field of science in Iran, the researchers group have designed and performed a telemedicine internet site with the goal of medical consultation. Software was designed and prepared, which is accessible to three groups of users with definite level of access for each one: normal users, doctors and site administrators. There are four main forums on this website with the following titles: medical consultation (Q&A, doctors’ special forum, scientific and research centers and also special disease groups, and the forum of graduates and medical students. Ultimately, we could achieve a new horizon to expand telemedicine activities in the field of medical consultation. A free web-based system was developed through the address of www.teleteb.com with the aim of remote medical consultation, developing the public health services and creating a powerful scientific and research link in the society of medicine.

  8. CURBSIDE CONSULTATION IN HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M. Sporer

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION A user friendly reference for decision making in hip arthroplasty designed in a question formed clinical problem scenarios and answers format .The articles composed of the answers, containing current concepts and preferences of experts in primary and revision hip surgery are enhanced by several images, diagrams and references and written in the form of a curbside consultation by Scott M. Sporer, MD. and his collaborators. PURPOSE By this practical reference of hip arthroplasty, Scott M. Sporer, MD. and the contributors have aimed providing the reader practical and clinically relevant information, evidence-based advices, their preferences and opinions containing current concepts for difficult and controversial clinical situations in total hip replacement surgery which are often not addressed clearly in traditional references. FEATURES The book is composed of 9 sections and 49 articles each written by a different expert designed in a question and answers format including several images and diagrams and also essential references at the end of each article. In the first section preoperative questions is subjected. Second section is about preoperative acetabulum questions. Third section is about preoperative femur questions. Fourth section is about intraoperative questions. Intraoperative acetabulum question is subjected in the fifth section and the intraoperative femur questions in the sixth section. The seventh section is about postoperative questions. Eighth and ninth sections are about general questions about failure and failure of acetabulum in turn. AUDIENCE Mainly practicing orthopedic surgeons, fellows and residents who are interested in hip arthroplasty have been targeted but several carefully designed scenarios of controversial and difficult situations surrounding total hip replacement surgery and the current information will also be welcomed by experienced clinicians practicing in hip arthroplasty. ASSESSMENT Scott M. Sporer

  9. Academic staff reward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    improvement of performance evaluation and the reward system, and improving the skill and ability of ... quality of the student experience of higher ..... excellence. The currently available reward systems of the institution other than the basic salary are poor and there is also no significant difference among the different level of.

  10. University Staff Members' Attitudes and Knowledge about Learning Disabilities and Disability Support Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Christopher; Flannery, Brigid K.; Wren, Carol

    2008-01-01

    This investigation examined university staff members' attitudes towards students with learning disabilities (LD) at the postsecondary level. Although prior research has examined university faculty perceptions of students with LD, little is known about staff members' attitudes and perceptions. A survey instrument was administered to approximately…

  11. The Effects of Disability-Focused Training on the Attitudes and Perceptions of University Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Christopher; Lombardi, Allison; Wren, Carol T.

    2011-01-01

    This investigation examines the relationship between prior disability-focused training and university staff members' attitudes toward students with learning disabilities (LD). A survey containing items pertaining to prior disability-focused training experiences and attitudes about students with LD was administered to 300 university staff members.…

  12. Consultative exercise on dose assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, B A; Parker, T; Simmonds, J R; Sumner, D

    2001-06-01

    A summary is given of a meeting held at Sussex University, UK, in October 2000, which allowed the exchange of ideas on methods of assessment of dose to the public arising from potential authorised radioactive discharges from nuclear sites in the UK. Representatives of groups with an interest in dose assessments were invited, and hence the meeting was called the Consultative Exercise on Dose Assessments (CEDA). Although initiated and funded by the Food Standards Agency, its organisation, and the writing of the report, were overseen by an independent Chairman and Steering Group. The report contains recommendations for improvement in co-ordination between different agencies involved in assessments, on method development and on the presentation of data on assessments. These have been prepared by the Steering Group, and will be taken forward by the Food Standards Agency and other agencies in the UK. The recommendations are included in this memorandum.

  13. Otolaryngology Consult Carts: Maximizing Patient Care, Surgeon Efficiency, and Cost Containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Mark C; Royer, Allison K

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an otolaryngology consult cart system to ensure prompt delivery to the bedside of all the unique equipment and medications required for emergent and urgent otolaryngology consults. An otolaryngology practice responsible for emergency room and hospital consult coverage sought to create a cart containing all equipment, medications, and supplies for otolaryngology consults. Meetings with hospital administration and emergency room, nursing, pharmacy, central processing, and operating room staff were held to develop a system for the emergent delivery of the cart to the needed location, sterilization and restocking of equipment between uses, and appropriate billing of supplies. Two months were required from conception to implementation. All equipment was purchased new, including flexible scopes and headlights. The cart is sterilized, restocked, and maintained by central processing after each use. The equipment is available to handle all airway emergencies as well as all common otolaryngology consults and is delivered bedside in less than 5 minutes. The development of a self-contained otolaryngology consult cart requires coordination with a wide variety of hospital departments. This system, while requiring initial monetary and time investment, has resulted in improved patient care, cost containment, and surgeon convenience. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Department of Training and Consulting - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrzynski, L.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The Department of Training and Consulting regularly serves secondary schools pupils and teachers, university students and the public. As usual we have been visited by over 6400 visitors, mainly students from secondary schools in Poland. In the opinion of the teachers the outcome of all visits was very positive. In addition, special courses on radioactivity and nuclear energy dedicated to teachers were organized. Many lectures have been delivered outside of the Department, in schools, universities and institutes. The Department is constantly developing experiments that can be conducted by students of secondary schools and universities, as well as by professionals. At the moment there are about 28 experiments available for the guests of the Department. The list of experiments and their descriptions can be found on our home page http://dsid.ipj.gov.pl. They cover the measurement of lifetimes, essential elements of radioprotection, absorption of radiation in various materials, excitation of fluorescence radiation, influence of magnetic fields on beta radiation as well as on electrons emitted from a typical electron gun, Compton scattering and elements of gamma spectroscopy, the search for radioactive pollution, the basics of the wave-particle dualism of matter, and the recently added Frank-Hertz experiment and radioactive decay of thoron. For the fifth time the Department has organized (together with the Institute of Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw) '' The Physical Pathways '' competition for students of secondary schools. The students could choose one of three possibilities (even all of them): either to submit a scientific paper, to present a demonstration of a physical phenomena, or to write an essay on the connection between physics and the development of civilization. They could also submit work prepared by a team of up to 3 persons. The level of the competition turned out to be very high. The competition apparently attracts more and

  15. Department of Training and Consulting - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrzynski, L.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The Department of Training and Consulting is regularly serving secondary schools' pupils and teachers, university students and the public. As usual, we have been visited by over 5000 visitors, mainly students from secondary schools in Poland. In this contest, it is worth to mention the organization of the two 3-days Workshops '' On the nuclear energy from the very basics '', aimed to offer the teachers of secondary schools general understanding of the problems connected with nuclear energy. The Workshops were organized in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency and Polish Atomic Agency. Also two other one-day courses on the nuclear radiation were organized for teachers from rather remote parts of Poland. In the teachers' opinion all these events were very successful. The Department is constantly developing experiments that can be conducted by students of secondary schools and universities, as well as by professionals. At the moment there are about 20 experiments available for the guests of the Department. They cover the measurements of lifetimes, essential elements of radioprotection, absorption of radiation in various materials, excitation of fluorescence radiation, influence of magnetic field on beta radiation as well as on electrons emitted from a typical electron gun, Compton scattering and elements of gamma spectroscopy, search for radioactive pollutions etc. A new task of preparing some experiments to be driven through the internet was put forward. It is hoped that this project will end within 2008. For the second time the Department has organized (together with the Institute of Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw) '' The Physical Pathways '' competition for the students of secondary schools. The students could choose one of three possibilities (even all of them): either to submit a scientific paper, or to present demonstration of a physical phenomena, or to write an essay on the connection between physics and the

  16. Doctor-patient communication: a comparison between telemedicine consultation and face-to-face consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Sawada, Yoshie; Takizawa, Takako; Sato, Hiroko; Sato, Mahito; Sakamoto, Hironosuke; Utsugi, Toshihiro; Sato, Kunio; Sumino, Hiroyuki; Okamura, Shinichi; Sakamaki, Tetsuo

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare doctor-patient communications in clinical consultations via telemedicine technology to doctor-patient communications in face-to-face clinical consultations. Five doctors who had been practicing internal medicine for 8 to 18 years, and twenty patients were enrolled in this study; neither doctors nor patients had previous experience of telemedicine. The patients received both a telemedicine consultation and a face-to-face consultation. Three measures--video observation, medical record volume, and participants' satisfaction--were used for the assessment. It was found that the time spent on the telemedicine consultation was substantially longer than the time spent on the face-to-face consultation. No statistically significant differences were found in the number of either closed or open-ended questions asked by doctors between both types of consultation. Empathy-utterances, praise-utterances, and facilitation-utterances were, however, seen less in the telemedicine consultations than in the face-to-face consultations. The volume of the medical records was statistically smaller in the telemedicine consultations than in the face-to-face consultations. Patients were satisfied with the telemedicine consultation, but doctors were dissatisfied with it and felt hampered by the communication barriers. This study suggests that new training programs are needed for doctors to develop improved communication skills and the ability to express empathy in telemedicine consultations.

  17. Staff Definitions of Challenging Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgie, Sarah; Hastings, Richard P.

    2002-01-01

    Fifty staff working with adults with mental retardation rated potentially challenging behaviors in terms of: (1) whether they thought the behaviors were challenging, and (2) whether the behaviors should be the focus of intervention. Results found that staff were less likely to identify as challenging those behaviors having negative effects on…

  18. A Framework for Bilingual School Consultation to Facilitate Multitier Systems of Support for English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Bryn; Sullivan, Amanda L.

    2017-01-01

    Bilingual students comprise a substantial and growing proportion of U.S. school enrollment and often experience unsatisfactory school outcomes attributed to limited opportunities to learn. Bilingual consultants have the unique opportunity to shape school psychological services and general education supports for all bilingual students by working…

  19. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Vote Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. Voting will begin on Monday 31 October. Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will  represent you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site. (http://association.web.cern.ch) Elections Timetable Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee. 

  20. Development and assessment of social and emotional competence through simulated patient consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galal, Suzanne; Carr-Lopez, Sian; Seal, Craig R; Scott, Amy N; Lopez, Chris

    2012-09-10

    To determine whether a quantitative tool could be used to measure social emotional competence and whether the development of social emotional competence through a pharmacy practicum course is possible. First-year pharmacy students completed the Social Emotional Development Inventory (SED-I) online and then participated in a series of mock patient consultations on smoking cessation and nonprescription medication. The 212 students enrolled in the course completed the SED-I. Evaluation of students' performance in the clinical cases using a patient counseling assessment form showed that students' social emotional competencies significantly improved. Observer ratings for "influence" and "connection" on the assessment form predicted student performance in the clinical cases. Role-play exercises in which students engage in patient consultations can be used to develop social emotional competence in pharmacy students, and the SED-I and a patient counseling assessment form can be used to assess learning and improvement in this area.

  1. Registered Nurses´ View of Performing Pain Assessment among Persons with Dementia as Consultant Advisors

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Christina; Sidenvall, Birgitta; Bergh, Ingrid; Ernsth-Bravell, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pain assessment in persons with dementia is well known as a challenging issue to professional caregivers, because of these patients´ difficulties in verbalising pain problems. Within municipal dementia care in Sweden, pain assessment has become problematic for registered nurses, as they have entered a new role in their nursing profession, from being clinical practitioners to becoming consultant advisers to other health care staff. Aim: To present municipal registered nurses´ view ...

  2. Republic of Slovenia; Staff Report for the 2013 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2014-01-01

    This Information Annex highlights that Slovenia maintains an exchange system that is free of restrictions on the making of payments and transfers for current international transactions, with the exception of exchange restrictions maintained for security reasons. Slovenian fiscal statistics are timely and high quality. The Ministry of Finance publishes a comprehensive monthly Bulletin of Government Finance, which presents monthly data on the operations of the state budget, local governments, s...

  3. Consultant Skill and Efficiency and the Implementation and Outcomes of Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergan, John R.; Tombari, Martin L.

    1976-01-01

    This article describes an investigation of consultant services rendered by school psychologists to teachers. Results indicated that consultants lacking in skills failed to identify consultee problems and never reached the stage of plan development and implementation. Consultants successful in identifying problems were able to solve those problems.…

  4. The impact of training in a pupil centred behaviour plan on staff self-efficacy, staff burnout, and pupil challenging behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Cooke, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Challenging behaviour in schools is a phenomenon focused on by a number of educational documents (Ofsted, 2010) and the media (Vasager, 2011). Challenging behaviour has been shown to have negative impact on a number of student and staff outcomes (DfE, 2012a). Staff outcomes impacted by challenging behaviour include increasing burnout (Crone, Hawken & Bergstrom, 2007) and decreasing self-efficacy (Mitchell & Hastings, 2001), which have been connected to negative impact on staff health (Hasting...

  5. Ubiquitous consultation tool for decentral knowledge workers

    OpenAIRE

    Nazari Shirehjini, A.A.; Rühl, C.; Noll, S.

    2003-01-01

    The special issue of this initial study is to examine the current work situation of consulting companies, and to elaborate a concept for supporting decentralized working consultants. The concept addresses significant challenges of decentralized work processes by deploying the Peer-to-Peer methodology to decentralized expert and Knowledge Management, cooperation, and enterprise resource planning.

  6. Lessons Learned from a Consultation Process Overseas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Soto, César

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary I discuss three international school consultation experiences, highlighting aspects that serve as lessons for professional development and the implementation of effective and helpful strategies that meet the needs of children and youth in school systems. Relationships developed and maintained between the consulting teams and the…

  7. 24 CFR 92.358 - Consultant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Consultant activities. 92.358 Section 92.358 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Other Federal Requirements § 92.358 Consultant activities. No...

  8. Bladder Pain Syndrome International Consultation on Incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, P.; Lin, A.; Nordling, J.

    2010-01-01

    Aims of Study: The Bladder Pain Syndrome Committee of the International Consultation on Incontinence was assigned the task by the consultation of reviewing the syndrome, formerly known as interstitial cystitis, in a comprehensive fashion. This included the topics of definition, nomenclature...

  9. Capturing the competence of management consulting work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, Klaasjan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to assess whether the effort of consulting firms and branch organizations to establish a shared and standardized methodology as a means to professionalize consulting and as a standard for training is possible and sensible. - Design/methodology/approach: A

  10. ARL/OMS Consultant Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euster, Joanne R.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Academic Library Consultant Training Program begun in 1979, sponsored by Office of Management Studies (OMS) and designed to provide 80 consultants to aid academic libraries in improving performance. Viewpoints are included from OMS Director and participants concerning program objectives, trainee selection, workshops, internships, and the…

  11. 265 Statistical Consulting and the African Universities

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-07-21

    Jul 21, 2011 ... supervisor's understanding of statistics, self presentation of analysis, etc. Each part gives rise to specific issues and requires that the consultant have various non-statistical skills to deal with these issues. Statistical consulting as been part of the curriculum of advanced countries' universities for more than ...

  12. Expectation Levels in Dictionary Consultation and Compilation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dictionary consultation and compilation is a two-way engagement between two parties, namely a dictionary user and a lexicographer. How well users cope with looking up words in a Bantu language dictionary and to what extent their expectations are met, depends on their consultation skills, their knowledge of the structure ...

  13. Parameters of consultee satisfaction with inpatient academic psychiatric consultation services: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavakumar, Mallika; Gastelum, Emily D; Choo, Tse-Hwei; Gerkin, Jonathan S; Kahn, Debra; Lee, Seonjoo; Nicolson, Stephen E; Rosenthal, Lisa J; Schwartz, Ann C; Tobin, Marie B; Wharton, Ralph N; Shapiro, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Consultation-liaison psychiatrists commonly perceive consultee satisfaction as a useful global measure of consultation-liaison service performance. No tool exists to measure consultee satisfaction. A single-site study at Columbia University Medical Center elicited ratings of parameters importantly contributing to consultee satisfaction within consultation-liaison services. The purpose of this study was to assess the generalizability of the rating of importance of these parameters in a larger, multicenter sample. From October 2013 to January 2014, a confidential and voluntary Web-based survey was distributed to 133 physicians at 7 academic centers in the United States asking them to rate the importance of 16 performance parameters (identified in the previous single-site study) in determining consultee satisfaction. Overall, 87 recipients (65%) responded to the survey. Among all the 16 items, there was no significant difference between sites in ratings of item importance. Of the 16 parameters, 9 received a mean rating in the "important" to "very important" range. Three items, "completion of consultation within 24 hours of request," "understanding the core questions being asked," and "practical and helpful management suggestions for medical staff" were rated as the most important. Quickly managing behavioral problems, management suggestions for nursing staff, verbal communication of recommendations, providing diagnostic clarification, facilitating transfer to inpatient psychiatry, and providing follow-up consultation were other parameters that were highly valued by consultees. We found good generalizability across academic medical centers for ratings of parameters important for consultee satisfaction with consultation-liaison services, which can provide the basis for a consultee satisfaction measurement tool. Copyright © 2015 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Consultant radiographers: Profile of the first generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, Lesley J.; Maehle, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this research is to examine the profile of first generation consultant radiographers: their demographics, educational backgrounds, qualifications and training, career experience and progression, teaching, lecturing and research activities. Method: Participant recruitment was drawn from the Society and College of Radiographers consultant radiographer group. Data collection involved a self-administered paper based and web based questionnaire. Results: Participant response rate of 55% (n = 11). Conclusions: The profile of the first consultant radiographer cohort reflects a diverse and eclectic mix. While some aspects of their development such as educational background, clinical training and skills enhancement are comparable to nurse consultants, clinical experience and employment history show some differences. Commitment to development of expert clinical skills is evident within the profile of the first generation cohort of consultant radiographers however research and leadership training are not strong features.

  15. Track and Connect: Enhancing student retention and success at the University of Sydney. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Barnes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2012, staff in Student Support Services at The University of Sydney piloted an early intervention program to increase first year student engagement and retention. Founded in best-practice, evidence-based research, the Track and Connect program was developed in response to a study into first year undergraduate student attrition by the University’s Planning and Information Office, in consultation with Counselling and Psychological Services. Track and Connect provides tailored advice and support to students identified as at risk of withdrawal from a key first-year subject by demographic markers and on-time data. Trained senior peers contact these students and provide information, encouragement and service referrals at key decision points throughout the semester. This report outlines the program’s development, implementation and early outcomes, and identifies areas for refinement and expansion.

  16. Preparing Dedicated Education Unit Staff Nurses for the Role of Clinical Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Susan A; Bonham, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Dedicated Education Units optimize the expertise of staff nurses to provide clinical instruction to nursing students, thereby creating a need to prepare staff nurses for the teaching role and educate them about clinical teaching strategies. A curriculum to educate Dedicated Education Unit staff nurses in the art of clinical instruction was created to fill this gap in staff development. This article describes the development of an innovative, interactive, evidence-based curriculum to prepare Dedication Education Unit staff nurses and strengthen an academic-practice partnership.

  17. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense... Staff. (a) The Commission will have a support staff, which will include staff members sufficient to expeditiously and efficiently process the applications for payments under this part. All members of the staff...

  18. Description and evaluation of an education and communication skills training course in HIV and AIDS for dental consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, D A; Brain, G; Cushing, A M; Hall, A; Zakrzewska, J M

    2000-05-01

    A 2-day course was organised for dental hospital consultants as part of a project on raising awareness of dental staff about HIV and AIDS. The course comprised an information update, practical experience in the diagnosis of oral conditions and a "hands-on" exercise in infection control. The 2nd day of the course consisted of experiential communication skills training using rôle-play with actors and video feedback. Evaluation of the course showed that the consultants perceived the course to be valuable. There was a general improvement in dentists' confidence in their knowledge, ability to communicate with HIV-positive patients and in talking to staff who are unwilling to provide treatment. These changes are statistically significant and these skills are still being utilized and maintained 2 years later. Information and training packs prepared by multidisciplinary groups using a variety of teaching methods should be made available to those involved in training dental staff.

  19. Outcomes, impact on management, and costs of fungal eye disease consults in a tertiary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodasra, Devon H; Eftekhari, Kian; Shah, Ankoor R; VanderBeek, Brian L

    2014-12-01

    To determine the frequency of clinical management changes resulting from inpatient ophthalmic consultations for fungemia and the associated costs. Retrospective case series. Three hundred forty-eight inpatients at a tertiary care center between 2008 and 2012 with positive fungal blood culture results, 238 of whom underwent an ophthalmologic consultation. Inpatient charts of all fungemic patients were reviewed. Costs were standardized to the year 2014. The Student t test was used for all continuous variables and the Pearson chi-square test was used for categorical variables. Prevalence of ocular involvement, rate of change in clinical management, mortality rate of fungemic patients, and costs of ophthalmic consultation. Twenty-two (9.2%) of 238 consulted patients with fungemia had ocular involvement. Twenty patients had chorioretinitis and 2 had endophthalmitis. Only 9 patients (3.7%) had a change in management because of the ophthalmic consultation. One patient underwent bilateral intravitreal injections. Thirty percent of consulted patients died before discharge or were discharged to hospice. The total cost of new consults was $36 927.54 ($204.19/initial level 5 visit and $138.63/initial level 4). The cost of follow-up visits was $13 655.44 ($104.24/visit). On average, 26.4 patients were evaluated to find 1 patient needing change in management, with an average cost of $5620.33 per change in 1 patient's management. Clinical management changes resulting from ophthalmic consultation in fungemic patients were uncommon. Associated costs were high for these consults in a patient population with a high mortality rate. Together, these data suggest that the usefulness of routine ophthalmic consultations for all fungemic patients is likely to be low. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Department of Training and Consulting: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrzynski, L.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The Department of Training and Consulting is a training centre for high-school students and their teachers, for students of physics and natural sciences in general, last but not least for society broadly understood, including professionals dealing with nuclear radiation. In 2002 the Department was visited by about 5000 high-school students who could listen to the lectures, and take part in experimental demonstrations on ionising radiation, its role in everyday life, technical and medical applications. In addition, the Department led the radiation protection course for the accelerators' operators employed by the Institute for Nuclear Studies. One-day courses on physics of radiation were also arranged for teachers. The Laboratory of Atomic and Nuclear Physics for Schools is still developing. The Laboratory permits high-school students to make simple experiments of qualitative and quantitative character. Its main purpose is to teach the elements of experimental work. In addition, university students of physics can conduct quite complicated experiments. Indeed, the Laboratory is also used for this purpose. The actual list of experiments available to students includes: the behaviour of charged particles in electric and magnetic fields, excitation and properties of photoluminescence, production and properties of X-rays, wave-particle duality, properties of alpha, beta and gamma radiation, elements of gamma spectroscopy including identification of elements by means of induced X-ray fluorescence. The first experience gathered recently is positive although there is still some work to do in order to make the Laboratory more educational. In particular, one of the conclusions drawn from our meetings at the instruments is that although high-school students can follow instructions and understand briefly the physical processes, they are not prepared for reporting the results of the observations or experiments. It is clear that we have to help them in overcoming this