WorldWideScience

Sample records for staff recommendations section

  1. Staff Knowledge, Adherence to Infection Control Recommendations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staff Knowledge, Adherence to Infection Control Recommendations and Seroconversion Rates in Hemodialysis Centers in Khartoum. ... Adherence of staff members to infection control recommendations was evaluated by direct observation. Results: ... A structured training program for HD staff members is urgently required.

  2. Superstorm Sandy: Emergency management staff perceptions of impact and recommendations for future preparedness, New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanson, Adam; Hilts, Asante Shipp; Mack, Stephanie; Eidson, Millicent; Nguyen, Trang; Birkhead, Guthrie

    This study collected and summarized feedback from staff at the New York State (NYS) Office of Emergency Management (OEM) and three county OEMs within NYS to understand lessons learned from the 2012 Superstorm Sandy. Cross-sectional qualitative and quantitative analysis. One staff person from each identified critical role from the state and county OEMs who were still employed in the roles identified. In-person interviews in 2014 followed by an anonymous survey in 2015 examined the response strengths, challenges, and recommendations using federally and study-defined Public Health Preparedness Capabilities. Quantitative analysis of staff survey ratings was used to summarize perceptions of interagency collaboration, communication effectiveness, and differences by staff position. Response rates were 78 percent for interviews (n = 7) and 45 percent for surveys (n = 36). In interviews, "emergency operations coordination" was cited most frequently (48 percent), specifically for successful interagency coordination. "Emergency operations coordination" was also cited most among challenges (45 percent), with emphasis on problems with uniformity of software systems across agencies. Survey responses indicated that "volunteer management" (50 percent) and the "safety and health of responders" (40 percent) were frequently reported as challenges. Additionally, 38 percent of OEM staff reported that situation reports submitted by health departments need improvement. Recommendations from OEM staff included "emergency operations coordination" (36 percent) such as sharing of resources and "training" (16 percent) including hospital evacuation training. Analysis of OEM staff feedback identified specific challenges, and concrete recommendations were made to improve response going forward.

  3. SNL RML recommended dosimetry cross section compendium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, P.J.; Kelly, J.G.; Luera, T.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); VanDenburg, J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-11-01

    A compendium of dosimetry cross sections is presented for use in the characterization of fission reactor spectrum and fluence. The contents of this cross section library are based upon the ENDF/B-VI and IRDF-90 cross section libraries and are recommended as a replacement for the DOSCROS84 multigroup library that is widely used by the dosimetry community. Documentation is provided on the rationale for the choice of the cross sections selected for inclusion in this library and on the uncertainty and variation in cross sections presented by state-of-the-art evaluations.

  4. Recommended evaluation procedure for photonuclear cross section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Ouk; Chang, Jonghwa; Fukahori, Tokio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In order to generate photonuclear cross section library for the necessary applications, data evaluation is combined with theoretical evaluation, since photonuclear cross sections measured cannot provide all necessary data. This report recommends a procedure consisting of four steps: (1) analysis of experimental data, (2) data evaluation, (3) theoretical evaluation and, if necessary, (4) modification of results. In the stage of analysis, data obtained by different measurements are reprocessed through the analysis of their discrepancies to a representative data set. In the data evaluation, photonuclear absorption cross sections are evaluated via giant dipole resonance and quasi-deutron mechanism. With photoabsorption cross sections from the data evaluation, theoretical evaluation is applied to determine various decay channel cross sections and emission spectra using equilibrium and preequilibrium mechanism. After this, the calculated results are compared with measured data, and in some cases the results are modified to better describe measurements. (author)

  5. Having lunch at a staff canteen is associated with recommended food habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Eva; Sarlio-Lähteenkorva, Sirpa; Lallukka, Tea

    2004-02-01

    To describe the characteristics of employees having lunch at staff canteens and to examine the association between workplace lunch and recommended food habits. A mailed questionnaire including data on lunch pattern, food habits, sociodemographic background, work-related factors and body weight. Logistic regression models including food habits as dependent variables and lunch pattern, sociodemographic factors, work-related factors and body mass index as independent variables. Helsinki Health Study survey data, collected in spring 2001. Employees from the City of Helsinki reaching 40, 45, 50, 55 and 60 years. The data included 2474 women and 591 men; the response rate was 68%. About half of those with a staff canteen at work had lunch there. Those with higher educational level were more likely to have lunch at the staff canteen, as also were women with pre-school children and normal-weight men. Those having lunch at staff canteens were more likely to follow recommended food habits, compared with other subjects. Having lunch at the staff canteen seemed to increase the consumption frequency of vegetables and fish. Having lunch at staff canteens is associated with the quality of the diet. To serve a cooked meal including vegetables during working time may be an efficient way to improve diet among adult employees. More emphasis should be put on increasing the possibility for employees to have lunch at staff canteens.

  6. Spotting and supporting eating disorders in school: recommendations from school staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knightsmith, P; Treasure, J; Schmidt, U

    2013-12-01

    Eating disorders have a high rate of onset in school-aged children. School staff are in an excellent position to spot the early warning signs and offer support during recovery. This article explores the findings from focus groups conducted with 63 members of staff from 29 UK schools with the aims of (i) understanding whether they are in a good position to support students with eating disorders and (ii) to generate recommendations regarding school staff's training needs for spotting and supporting eating disorders. Participants took part in semi-structured focus groups. These were transcribed and analysed using content analysis principles. Five key themes emerged: (i) many staff do not have a basic understanding of eating disorders, (ii) eating disorders are taboo in the staffroom, (iii) staff do not feel comfortable talking to students about eating disorders, (iv) support is needed to ensure the teacher-parent relationship is a positive one and (v) school staff would welcome practical ideas for how they can best support students during the recovery period. The findings show that school staff currently feel ill-equipped to support students with eating disorders and endorse a need for focused training for school staff to better enable them to support students with eating disorders.

  7. 75 FR 47603 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Recommendations for Premarket...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0395] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Recommendations for Premarket Notifications for Lamotrigine and Zonisamide Assays; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS...

  8. Impact of imaging room environment: staff job stress and satisfaction, patient satisfaction, and willingness to recommend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xiaobo; Joseph, Anjali; Ensign, Janet C

    2012-01-01

    The built environment significantly affects the healthcare experiences of patients and staff. Healthcare administrators and building designers face the opportunity and challenge of improving healthcare experience and satisfaction through better environmental design. The purpose of the study was to evaluate how a novel environmental intervention for imaging rooms, which integrated multiple elements of healing environments including positive distractions and personal control over environment, affects the perceptions and satisfactions of its primary users-patients and staff. Anonymous questionnaire surveys were conducted to compare patient and staff perceptions of the physical environment, satisfaction, and stress in two types of imaging rooms: imaging rooms with the intervention installed (intervention rooms) and traditionally designed rooms without the intervention (comparison rooms). Imaging technologists and patients perceived the intervention rooms to be significantly more pleasant-looking. Patients in the intervention rooms reported significantly higher levels of environmental control and were significantly more willing to recommend the intervention rooms to others. The environmental intervention was effective in improving certain aspects of the imaging environment: pleasantness and environmental control. Further improvement of the imaging environment is needed to address problematic areas such as noise.

  9. Student and staff experiences of attendance monitoring in undergraduate obstetrics and gynecology: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deane RP

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Richard P Deane, Deirdre J Murphy Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Trinity College Dublin, The University of Dublin, Coombe Women & Infants University Hospital, Dublin, Republic of Ireland  Background: Despite the widespread introduction of active learning strategies to engage students across modern medical curricula, student attendance and attendance monitoring remain a challenging issue for medical educators. In addition, there is little published evidence available to medical educators regarding the use of attendance monitoring systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the opinions of students and staff about the use of a paper-based student logbook to record student attendance across all clinical and classroom-based learning activities within an undergraduate clinical rotation in obstetrics and gynecology (OBGYN. Methods: Each student undertaking the clinical rotation in OBGYN was required to complete a paper-based logbook in a booklet format that listed every clinical and classroom-based activity that the student was expected to attend. A cross-sectional survey evaluating the acceptability, practicality, and effect on access to learning opportunities of using the logbook was undertaken. The survey was conducted among all medical students who completed their OBGYN rotation over a full academic year and staff who taught on the program. Results: The response rate was 87% (n=128/147 among students and 80% (n=8/10 among staff. Monitoring attendance was widely acceptable to students (n=107/128, 84% and staff (n=8/8, 100%. Most students (n=95/128, 74% and staff (n=7/8, 88% recommended that attendance should be mandatory during rotations. Almost all staff felt that attendance should contribute toward academic credit (n=7/8, 88%, but students were divided (n=73/128, 57%. Students (n=94/128, 73% and staff (n=6/8, 75% reported that the use of the logbook to record attendance with tutor signatures was a satisfactory system, although

  10. Student and staff experiences of attendance monitoring in undergraduate obstetrics and gynecology: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Richard P; Murphy, Deirdre J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the widespread introduction of active learning strategies to engage students across modern medical curricula, student attendance and attendance monitoring remain a challenging issue for medical educators. In addition, there is little published evidence available to medical educators regarding the use of attendance monitoring systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the opinions of students and staff about the use of a paper-based student logbook to record student attendance across all clinical and classroom-based learning activities within an undergraduate clinical rotation in obstetrics and gynecology (OBGYN). Each student undertaking the clinical rotation in OBGYN was required to complete a paper-based logbook in a booklet format that listed every clinical and classroom-based activity that the student was expected to attend. A cross-sectional survey evaluating the acceptability, practicality, and effect on access to learning opportunities of using the logbook was undertaken. The survey was conducted among all medical students who completed their OBGYN rotation over a full academic year and staff who taught on the program. The response rate was 87% (n=128/147) among students and 80% (n=8/10) among staff. Monitoring attendance was widely acceptable to students (n=107/128, 84%) and staff (n=8/8, 100%). Most students (n=95/128, 74%) and staff (n=7/8, 88%) recommended that attendance should be mandatory during rotations. Almost all staff felt that attendance should contribute toward academic credit (n=7/8, 88%), but students were divided (n=73/128, 57%). Students (n=94/128, 73%) and staff (n=6/8, 75%) reported that the use of the logbook to record attendance with tutor signatures was a satisfactory system, although students questioned the need for recording attendance at every classroom-based activity. Most students felt that the logbook facilitated access to learning experiences during the rotation (n=90/128, 71%). Staff felt that the process of signing

  11. Determinants of staff commitment to hip protectors in long-term care: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korall, Alexandra M B; Loughin, Thomas M; Feldman, Fabio; Cameron, Ian D; Leung, Pet Ming; Sims-Gould, Joanie; Godin, Judith; Robinovitch, Stephen N

    2018-03-17

    If worn, certain models of hip protectors are highly effective at preventing hip fractures from falls in residents of long-term care, but modest acceptance and adherence have limited the effectiveness of hip protectors. Residents of long-term care are more likely to accept the initial offer of hip protectors and to adhere to recommendations concerning the use of hip protectors when staff are committed to supporting the application of hip protectors. Yet, we know very little about the nature of and factors associated with staff commitment to hip protectors in long-term care. To identify factors associated with staff commitment to hip protectors in long-term care. A cross-sectional survey. Thirteen long-term care homes (total beds = 1816) from a single regional health district in British Columbia, Canada. A convenience sample of 535 paid staff who worked most of their time (>50% of work hours) at a participating long-term care home, for at least one month, and for at least 8 h per week. We excluded six (1.1%) respondents who were unaware of hip protectors. Of the remaining 529 respondents, 90% were female and 55% were health care assistants. Respondents completed the Commitment to Hip Protectors Index to indicate their commitment to hip protectors. We used Bayesian Model Averaging logistic regression to model staff commitment as a function of personal variables, experiences with hip protectors, intraorganizational communication and influence, and organizational context. Staff commitment was negatively related to organizational tenure >20 years (posterior probability = 97%; logistic regression coefficient = -0.28; 95% confidence interval = -0.48, -0.08), and awareness of a padded hip fracture (100%; -0.57; -0.69, -0.44). Staff commitment was positively related to the existence of a champion of hip protectors within the home (100%; 0.24; 0.17, 0.31), perceived quality of intraorganizational communication (100%; 0.04; 0.02, 0.05), extent of mutual

  12. The Variance between Recommended and Nursing Staff Levels at Womack Army Medical Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holcek, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    .... This study considered five possible rationales for the existing variances - workload changes, staff experience, observation patients, recovery patients, and outpatient procedures - for 117 work...

  13. 76 FR 789 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Section 905(j) Reports...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0635] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Section 905(j) Reports: Demonstrating Substantial Equivalence for Tobacco Products; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION...

  14. Summary, Conclusions and Recommendations Based on the Evaluation of the Federally Assisted Staff Training (FAST) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syropoulos, Mike

    The primary objective of the Federally Assisted Staff Training (FAST) programs for the 1970-71 academic year was to improve the classroom learning environment in participating Title I schools by expanding the ability of teachers to direct their own improvement by using techniques such as interaction analysis, micro-teaching, and student feedback.…

  15. 76 FR 77025 - Office of New Reactors; Notice of Availability of the Final Staff Guidance Section 1.0, Revision...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    ... the Final Staff Guidance Section 1.0, Revision 2 on Introduction and Interfaces AGENCY: Nuclear... Plants: LWR Edition,'' Section 1.0, Revision 2 on ``Introduction and Interfaces'' (Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS) Accession No. ML112730393). The NRC staff issues revisions to SRP...

  16. The nursing staff's opinion of falls among older persons with dementia. a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slaasletten Randi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to describe the nursing staff's opinion of caring for older persons with dementia with the focus on causes of falls, fall-preventing interventions, routines of documentation and report and the nursing staff's experiences and reactions when fall incidents occur. A further aim was to compare these areas between registered nurses (RNs and enrolled nurses (ENs and staff with ≤5 and >5 years of employment in the care units in question. Background Falls are common among older people and persons with dementia constitute an additional risk group. Methods The study had a cross-sectional design and included nursing staff (n = 63, response rate 66% working in four special care units for older persons with dementia. Data collection was conducted with a questionnaire consisting of 64 questions. Results The respondents reported that the individuals' mental and physical impairment constitute the most frequent causes of falls. The findings also revealed a lack of, or uncertainty about, routines of documentation and reporting fall-risk and fall-preventing interventions. Respondents who had been employed in the care units more than five years reported to a higher degree that colours and material on floors caused falls. RNs considered the residents' autonomy and freedom of movement as a cause of falls to a significantly higher degree than ENs. RNs also reported a significantly longer time than ENs before fall incidents were discovered, and they used conversation and closeness as fall-preventing interventions to a significantly higher degree than ENs. Conclusions Individual factors were the most common causes to falls according to the nursing staff. RNs used closeness and dialog as interventions to a significantly higher degree to prevent falls than ENs. Caring of for older people with dementia consisted of a comprehensive on-going assessment by the nursing staff to balance the residents' autonomy-versus-control to minimise fall

  17. Graphs of the cross sections in the recommended Monte Carlo cross-section library at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soran, P.D.; Seamon, R.E.

    1980-05-01

    Graphs of all neutron cross sections and photon production cross sections on the Recommended Monte Carlo Cross Section (RMCCS) library have been plotted along with local neutron heating numbers. Values for anti ν, the average number of neutrons per fission, are also given

  18. Staff eye doses in a large medical centre in Saudi Arabia: are they meeting the new ICRP recommendations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Haj, Abdalla N.; Al-Gain, Ibrahim; Lobriguito, Aida M.

    2015-01-01

    A 5-y retrospective analysis of the cardiology staff eye doses was performed on 34 staff from different categories (cardiologists, nurses and technologists) at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFSHRC) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. KFSHRC is a tertiary medical centre with 800-bed capacity having more than 5000 cardiac catheterisation procedures performed annually. The aim of the study is to derive staff doses to the lens of the eyes using the personal dose equivalent Hp(0.07) values from the annual TLD dose report for the years 2008-2012 and determine the category of staff with high estimated eye doses. The study also aims to investigate the causes for high doses and recommend dose-reduction techniques. The dose to the lens of the eye was estimated by using the ratio Hp(0.07) slab /H lens of 1.1 where Hp(0.07) values are the reported doses read from TLD badge worn at the collar level. The average annual eye dose of each category for the 5-y monitoring period was determined. Cardiologists tend to receive higher doses than the nurses by a factor of 2-4 and can exceed 5 mSv y -1 . No correlation exists between the eye doses of nurses and the cardiologists. There is a need to use a conversion coefficient in terms of eye lens dose per dose-area product for faster estimation of eye lens doses. However, there is a limitation on the use of the conversion coefficient because it will depend on the clinical procedure and the X-ray tube angulation. Further investigation on this limitation is needed. (authors)

  19. Paramedical staffs knowledge and attitudes towards antimicrobial resistance in Dire Dawa, Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafa, Belay; Endale, Adugna; Bekele, Desalegn

    2017-09-19

    The continuing emergence, development and spread of pathogenic organisms that are resistant to antimicrobials are a cause of increasing concern. The control of antimicrobial resistance requires knowledge of factors causing antimicrobial resistance, good attitudes towards the intervention strategies as well as changes in antibiotic prescribing behavior of health workers. Hence, this study was aimed to assess paramedical staffs' knowledge and attitudes towards antimicrobial resistance and their antibiotics prescription practices in Dire Dawa, Ethiopia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among paramedical staffs working in hospitals and health centers. A total of 218 paramedical staffs were participated and a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20. Chi square/Fisher's exact tests were used for comparison of data and a p value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Out of the total, 137 (62.8%) of paramedical staffs had good knowledge on the factors causing antimicrobial resistance. The most common causes of antimicrobial resistance reported were patients' poor adherence (96.5%), self prescription (95%), and empiric choice of antibiotics (94.5%). In general, more than 80% of the respondents had positive attitudes towards the antimicrobials resistance intervention strategies. Relatively less proportion of participants recognized that antimicrobial resistance as a problem in their local institutions. The most perceived driving forces for unnecessary antibiotics prescriptions were treatment failure (67.7%) and patient push (53.3%). The majority, 76.9% of the prescribers mentioned that standard treatment guidelines were available in their institutions though only 15.7% of them reported referring the guidelines on the daily basis. Among the prescribers, 85.8% never attended formal trainings on antibiotics prescriptions. As this study generated important information on knowledge and attitudes

  20. Holy consent--a dilemma for medical staff when maternal consent is withheld for emergency caesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiniger, C F; Elchalal, U; Sprung, C L; Weissman, C; Matot, I

    2006-04-01

    A parturient (grand multipara) developed arrested labour complicated by severe fetal heart rate decelerations. Senior physicians explained the need for a caesarean section, but she chose to deliver vaginally since rabbinical blessing could not be obtained. Forcing the mother to have a cesarean section without consent is considered "civil battery." The dilemma faced by medical staff and the implications of her refusal for the treating medical staff are described.

  1. Research staff training in a multisite randomized clinical trial: Methods and recommendations from the Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robrina; Morris, David W; Greer, Tracy L; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2014-01-01

    Descriptions of and recommendations for meeting the challenges of training research staff for multisite studies are limited despite the recognized importance of training on trial outcomes. The STRIDE (STimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise) study is a multisite randomized clinical trial that was conducted at nine addiction treatment programs across the United States within the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) and evaluated the addition of exercise to addiction treatment as usual (TAU), compared to health education added to TAU, for individuals with stimulant abuse or dependence. Research staff administered a variety of measures that required a range of interviewing, technical, and clinical skills. In order to address the absence of information on how research staff are trained for multisite clinical studies, the current manuscript describes the conceptual process of training and certifying research assistants for STRIDE. Training was conducted using a three-stage process to allow staff sufficient time for distributive learning, practice, and calibration leading up to implementation of this complex study. Training was successfully implemented with staff across nine sites. Staff demonstrated evidence of study and procedural knowledge via quizzes and skill demonstration on six measures requiring certification. Overall, while the majority of staff had little to no experience in the six measures, all research assistants demonstrated ability to correctly and reliably administer the measures throughout the study. Practical recommendations are provided for training research staff and are particularly applicable to the challenges encountered with large, multisite trials.

  2. IAEA Nuclear Data Section: Progress Report, 2011/12 Summary of Nuclear Data Activity by Staff of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section, May 2011 - April 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, R.; Otsuka, N.; Semkova, V.; Simakov, S.P.; Zerkin, V.

    2012-01-01

    Progress report on nuclear data activity by staff of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section from May 2011 - April 2012: 1) Staff changes 2) Data compilations, EXFOR transmission, EXFOR quality control, EXFOR coverage control, Workshops and meetings in 2011/2012 relevant to EXFOR, CINDA, Evaluated data libraries, files and programs 3) Services, software 4) Visits and Inter-centre cooperation (2011-2012) 5) Nuclear data developments 6) Publications.

  3. Mental healthcare staff well-being and burnout: A narrative review of trends, causes, implications, and recommendations for future interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Judith; Hall, Louise H; Berzins, Kathryn; Baker, John; Melling, Kathryn; Thompson, Carl

    2018-02-01

    Rising levels of burnout and poor well-being in healthcare staff are an international concern for health systems. The need to improve well-being and reduce burnout has long been acknowledged, but few interventions target mental healthcare staff, and minimal improvements have been seen in services. This review aimed to examine the problem of burnout and well-being in mental healthcare staff and to present recommendations for future research and interventions. A discursive review was undertaken examining trends, causes, implications, and interventions in burnout and well-being in healthcare staff working in mental health services. Data were drawn from national surveys, reports, and peer-reviewed journal articles. These show that staff in mental healthcare report poorer well-being than staff in other healthcare sectors. Poorer well-being and higher burnout are associated with poorer quality and safety of patient care, higher absenteeism, and higher turnover rates. Interventions are effective, but effect sizes are small. The review concludes that grounding interventions in the research literature, emphasizing the positive aspects of interventions to staff, building stronger links between healthcare organizations and universities, and designing interventions targeting burnout and improved patient care together may improve the effectiveness and uptake of interventions by staff. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  4. Conflict management styles among Iranian critical care nursing staff: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahanchian, Mohammad Reza; Emami Zeydi, Amir; Armat, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Conflict among nurses has been recognized as an extremely important issue within health care settings throughout the world. Identifying the conflict management style would be a key strategy for conflict management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of conflict management styles and its related factors among Iranian critical care nursing staff. In a descriptive cross-sectional study, a total of 149 critical care nurses who worked in the critical care units of 4 teaching hospitals in Sari (Iran) were evaluated. A 2-part self-reported questionnaire including personal information and Rahim Organizational Conflict Inventory II was used for data collection. Although Iranian critical care nurses used all 5 conflict management styles to manage conflict with their peers, the collaborating style was the most prevalent conflict management style used by them, followed by compromising, accommodating, avoiding, and competing. Male gender was a predictor for both compromising and competing styles, whereas position and shift time were significant predictors for compromising and competing styles, respectively. Based on the results of this study, nurse managers need to take these factors into account in designing programs to help nurses constructively manage unavoidable conflicts in health care setting.

  5. Leadership effectiveness and recorded sickness absence among nursing staff : a cross-sectional pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, Jolanda A. H.; Roelen, Corne A. M.; Van Zweeden, Nely F.; Jongsma, Dianne; Van der Klink, Jac J. L.; Groothoff, Johan W.

    Aim To investigate nurse managers' leadership behaviour in relation to the sickness absence records of nursing staff. Background Sickness absence is high in healthcare and interferes with nursing efficiency and quality. Nurse managers' leadership behaviour may be associated with nursing staff

  6. Depression, anxiety, stress, and their associated factors among Jimma University staff, Jimma, Southwest Ethiopia, 2016: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeshaw Y

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Yigizie Yeshaw,1 Andualem Mossie2 1Department of Medical Physiology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, 2Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia Background: Worldwide, approximately 450 million people suffer from mental disorders. Of these, approximately 150 million are affected with depression. Depression, anxiety, and stress have an impact on productivity, motivation to work, sleep behavior of the individual, and outcome of different chronic diseases. However, till date, there are no studies which evaluated mental health problems among university staff in Ethiopia. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to assess the prevalence of depression, anxiety, stress, and their associated factors among Jimma University staff. Methods: An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 354 staff of Jimma University from March 24 to April 24, 2016. Stratified simple random sampling technique was used. Pretested interviewer-administered Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21 questionnaire was used to collect the data. Data were analyzed using SPSS Version 20.0 software. Results: The prevalence of depression, anxiety, and stress in this study was found to be approximately 22.9%, 19.2%, and 28.2%, respectively. Being female (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =2.43, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.22–4.77, no job satisfaction (AOR =10.59, 95% CI =4.88–22.98, presence of conflict with colleagues (AOR =2.33, 95% CI =1.21–4.49, and khat chewing (AOR =4.99, 95% CI =2.57–9.69 were associated with depression. Presence of conflict with colleagues (AOR =2.46, 95% CI =1.25–4.85, no job satisfaction (AOR =7.12, 95% CI =3.29–15.45, and khat chewing (AOR =2.94, 95% CI =1.52–5.66 were associated with anxiety. Being widowed (AOR =7.46, 95% CI =1.11–50.15, female (AOR =2.72, 95% CI =1.40–5.28, no job satisfaction (AOR =6.69, 95% CI =3.46–12.97, khat

  7. Key health promotion factors among male members of staff at a higher educational institution: A cross-sectional postal survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid Garth

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Men's lifestyles are generally less healthy than women's. This study identifies associations between health-related behaviour in different groups of men working in a Higher Education (HE institution. In addition, men were asked whether they regarded their health-related behaviours as a concern. This article highlights smoking, consumption of alcohol and physical activity as most common men's health-related lifestyle behaviours. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted among all male staff employed by a Higher Education institute in Scotland using a postal self-completed questionnaire. A total of 1,335 questionnaires were distributed and 501 were returned completed (38% return rate. The data were analysed using SPSS 13.0 for Windows. Results Less than 10% currently smoked and almost 44% of these smokers were light smokers. Marital status, job title, consumption of alcohol and physical activity level were the major factors associated with smoking behaviour. Men in manual jobs were far more likely to smoke. Nearly all (90% consumed alcohol, and almost 37% had more than recommended eight units of alcohol per day at least once a week and 16% had more than 21 units weekly. Younger men reported higher amount of units of alcohol on their heaviest day and per week. Approximately 80% were physically active, but less than 40% met the current Government guidelines for moderate physical activity. Most men wanted to increase their activity level. Conclusion There are areas of health-related behaviour, which should be addressed in populations of this kind. Needs assessment could indicate which public health interventions would be most appropriately aimed at this target group. However, the low response rate calls for some caution in interpreting our findings.

  8. Work motivation, task delegation and job satisfaction of general practice staff: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riisgaard, Helle; Søndergaard, Jens; Munch, Maria; Le, Jette V; Ledderer, Loni; Pedersen, Line B; Nexøe, Jørgen

    2017-04-01

    Recent research has shown that a high degree of task delegation is associated with the practise staff's overall job satisfaction, and this association is important to explore since job satisfaction is related to medical as well as patient-perceived quality of care. This study aimed: (1) to investigate associations between degrees of task delegation in the management of chronic disease in general practice, with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as a case and the staff's work motivation, (2) to investigate associations between the work motivation of the staff and their job satisfaction. The study was based on a questionnaire to which 621 members of the practice staff responded. The questionnaire consisted of a part concerning degree of task delegation in the management of COPD in their respective practice and another part being about their job satisfaction and motivation to work. In the first analysis, we found that 'maximal degree' of task delegation was significantly associated with the staff perceiving themselves to have a large degree of variation in tasks, odds ratio (OR) = 4.26, confidence interval (CI) = 1.09, 16.62. In the second analysis, we found that this perceived large degree of variation in tasks was significantly associated with their overall job satisfaction, OR = 2.81, confidence interval = 1.71, 4.61. The results suggest that general practitioners could delegate highly complex tasks in the management of COPD to their staff without influencing the staff's work motivation, and thereby their job satisfaction, negatively, as long as they ensure sufficient variation in the tasks. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. Job satisfaction and associated factors among healthcare staff: a cross-sectional study in Guangdong Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yong; Hu, Xiao-Min; Huang, Xiao-Liang; Zhuang, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Pi; Feng, Li-Fen; Hu, Wei; Chen, Long; Hao, Yuan-Tao

    2016-07-19

    This cross-sectional study aimed to explore job satisfaction among healthcare staff in Guangdong following the health system reforms in 2009, and to investigate the association between job satisfaction and work stress, work-family conflict and doctor-patient relationship. Cross-sectional survey. The Fifth National Health Service Survey was carried out in Guangdong, China. All participants in this study were healthcare staff including physicians, nurses and public health staff from hospitals, health service centres and health clinics. A total of 6583 questionnaires were distributed and collected. After excluding the incomplete questionnaires, 5845 questionnaires were included for the analysis. Sociodemographic information and scores for evaluating job satisfaction, work stress, work-family conflict and doctor-patient relationship were obtained using the questionnaire developed by the National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China. To assess the significantly associated factors on job satisfaction of the healthcare staff in Guangdong, a binary logistic regression model was used. Based on the 5845 valid responses of the healthcare staff who worked in Guangdong, the mean score of overall perception of job satisfaction was 3.99 on a scale of 1-6. Among the sociodemographic variables, occupation, educational background, professional status, years of service, annual income and night shift frequency significantly influenced the level of job satisfaction. Work stress, work-family conflict and doctor-patient relationship also had significant effect on job satisfaction. The overall job satisfaction exceeded slightly dissatisfied (score 3) and approached slightly satisfied (score 4). Measures to enhance job satisfaction include the reduction of workload, increase of welfare, maintaining moderate stress and balancing work-family conflict. Moreover, relevant laws should be issued to protect the healthcare staff from violent acts. Published by

  10. Job satisfaction and associated factors among healthcare staff: a cross-sectional study in Guangdong Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yong; Hu, Xiao-Min; Huang, Xiao-Liang; Zhuang, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Pi; Feng, Li-Fen; Hu, Wei; Chen, Long; Hao, Yuan-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This cross-sectional study aimed to explore job satisfaction among healthcare staff in Guangdong following the health system reforms in 2009, and to investigate the association between job satisfaction and work stress, work–family conflict and doctor–patient relationship. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting The Fifth National Health Service Survey was carried out in Guangdong, China. Participants All participants in this study were healthcare staff including physicians, nurses and public health staff from hospitals, health service centres and health clinics. A total of 6583 questionnaires were distributed and collected. After excluding the incomplete questionnaires, 5845 questionnaires were included for the analysis. Outcome measures Sociodemographic information and scores for evaluating job satisfaction, work stress, work–family conflict and doctor–patient relationship were obtained using the questionnaire developed by the National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China. To assess the significantly associated factors on job satisfaction of the healthcare staff in Guangdong, a binary logistic regression model was used. Results Based on the 5845 valid responses of the healthcare staff who worked in Guangdong, the mean score of overall perception of job satisfaction was 3.99 on a scale of 1–6. Among the sociodemographic variables, occupation, educational background, professional status, years of service, annual income and night shift frequency significantly influenced the level of job satisfaction. Work stress, work–family conflict and doctor–patient relationship also had significant effect on job satisfaction. Conclusions The overall job satisfaction exceeded slightly dissatisfied (score 3) and approached slightly satisfied (score 4). Measures to enhance job satisfaction include the reduction of workload, increase of welfare, maintaining moderate stress and balancing work–family conflict. Moreover

  11. Chairmen Joint Chiefs of Staff's Leadership Using the Joint Strategic Planning System in the 1990s: Recommendations for Strategic Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meinhart, Richard

    2003-01-01

    This monograph examines how the three Chairmen of the Joint Chiefs of Staff adapted and used the Joint Strategic Planning System from 1990 to 2000 to provide advice to the Secretary of Defense and to the...

  12. The evidence-based practice profiles of academic and clinical staff involved in pre-registration nursing students' education: a cross sectional survey of US and UK staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Penney; Scurlock-Evans, Laura; Williamson, Kathleen; Rouse, Joanne; Upton, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Competency in evidence-based practice (EBP) is a requirement for graduate nurses. Despite a growing body of research exploring the EBP profiles of students, little research has explored the EBP profiles of nurse educators. To explore: the differences/similarities in the EBP profiles of US and UK clinical and academic faculty; the barriers nurse educators experience when teaching EBP; the impact of postgraduate education on EBP profile and; what nurse educators perceive "success" in implementing and teaching EBP to be. A cross-sectional online survey design was employed. Two Universities delivering undergraduate nursing education in the US and UK, in partnership with large hospital systems, small community hospitals, community settings, and independent sector health organisations. Eighty-one nurse educators working in academic and clinical contexts in the US and UK (US academic=12, US clinical=17, UK academic=9, UK clinical=43) were recruited opportunistically. Participants were emailed a weblink to an online survey, comprising demographic questions, the Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire and open-ended questions about EBP barriers, facilitators and successes. Quantitative results indicated that academic faculty scored significantly higher on knowledge and skills of EBP, than clinical faculty, but revealed no other significant differences on EBP use or attitudes, or between US and UK professionals. Participants with postgraduate training scored significantly higher on EBP knowledge/skills, but not EBP attitudes or use. Qualitative findings identified key themes relating to EBP barriers and facilitators, including: Evidence-, organisational-, and teaching-related issues. Perceptions of successes in EBP were also described. Nurse educators working in the UK and US face similar EBP barriers to teaching and implementation, but view it positively and use it frequently. Clinical staff may require extra support to maintain their EBP knowledge and skills in

  13. Emergency and Disaster Preparedness of School Transportation Staff and School Buses in the United States: Compliance With Recommendations for School Transportation Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olympia, Robert P; Weber, Christopher; Brady, Jodi; Ho, Susana

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the compliance of school transportation staff and school buses with recommendations for the safe transportation of children to and from school and school-related activities. An electronic questionnaire was distributed to school transportation staff represented by the International Brotherhood of Teamsters during the 2013-2014 academic year. Analysis was performed on 558 completed questionnaires (13% usable response rate). Responders had previous training in first aid (89%), basic life support (28%), and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (52%). Seventy-eight percent of school buses in our sample had restraint devices and 87% had seat belt cutters. Responders reported the immediate availability of the following on their bus: communication devices (81%), first aid kits (97%), fire extinguishers (89%), automated external defibrillators (1%), and epinephrine autoinjectors (2%). Thirty percent of responders have had no previous training in the management of emergencies such as trouble breathing, severe allergic reaction, seizures, cardiac arrest or unresponsiveness, and head, neck, or extremity trauma. Thirteen percent of responders are unfamiliar with or have had no previous training on protocols regarding emergency shelters and community evacuation plans in the event of a disaster. Variability exists in the compliance of school transportation staff and school buses with recommendations for the safe transportation of children. Areas for improvement were identified, such as educating school transportation staff in the recognition and initial management of pediatric emergencies, ensuring the presence of restraint devices, increasing the immediate availability of certain emergency medications and equipment, and familiarizing school transportation staff with designated emergency shelters and community evacuation plans.

  14. Do nursing staff encourage functional activity among nursing home residents? : a cross-sectional study of nursing staff perceived behaviors and associated factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienke O. Kuk; Mirre den Ouden; G. A. Rixt Zijlstra; Jan P.H. Hamers; Gertrudis L.J.M. Kempen; Gerrie J.J.W. Bours

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nursing home residents are mainly inactive. Nursing staff can encourage residents to perform functional activities during daily care activities. This study examines 1) the extent to which nursing staff perceive that they encourage functional activity in nursing home residents and 2) the

  15. Factors Affecting Communication Patterns between Oncology Staff and Family Members of Deceased Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Tal; Gordon, Noa; Perry, Shlomit; Rizel, Shulamith; Stemmer, Salomon M

    Perceptions of the role of oncology medical staff in supporting bereaved families have evolved with the transition to interdisciplinary cancer care. We investigated the interactions between oncology professionals and bereaved families. This cross-sectional study involved all oncology medical staff at the Davidoff Center. Participants were given a questionnaire relating to bereavement follow-up. Responses were measured using a 5-point Likert scale. Of 155 staff members, 107 filled questionnaires with 50% of the families of their deceased patients. Contacting bereaved families was considered the responsibility of the physicians (90%), nurses (84%), or social workers (89%). The main barriers to contacting bereaved families were emotional overload (68%) and lack of time (63%); 60% indicated a need for additional communication tools for bereavement follow-up. In a multivariate analysis, profession (physician vs. nurse), primary workplace (outpatient setting vs. other), and self-defined religion were significant variables with respect to the perceived importance of contacting bereaved families and to actually contacting them. Other factors (e.g., age, gender) were non-significant. Perspectives regarding bereavement actions differ significantly across medical professions, work settings, and self-defined religions. Additional guidance and education regarding bereavement actions is warranted.

  16. Factors Affecting Communication Patterns between Oncology Staff and Family Members of Deceased Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Granot

    Full Text Available Perceptions of the role of oncology medical staff in supporting bereaved families have evolved with the transition to interdisciplinary cancer care. We investigated the interactions between oncology professionals and bereaved families.This cross-sectional study involved all oncology medical staff at the Davidoff Center. Participants were given a questionnaire relating to bereavement follow-up. Responses were measured using a 5-point Likert scale.Of 155 staff members, 107 filled questionnaires with 50% of the families of their deceased patients. Contacting bereaved families was considered the responsibility of the physicians (90%, nurses (84%, or social workers (89%. The main barriers to contacting bereaved families were emotional overload (68% and lack of time (63%; 60% indicated a need for additional communication tools for bereavement follow-up. In a multivariate analysis, profession (physician vs. nurse, primary workplace (outpatient setting vs. other, and self-defined religion were significant variables with respect to the perceived importance of contacting bereaved families and to actually contacting them. Other factors (e.g., age, gender were non-significant.Perspectives regarding bereavement actions differ significantly across medical professions, work settings, and self-defined religions. Additional guidance and education regarding bereavement actions is warranted.

  17. Relationship between stress-related psychosocial work factors and suboptimal health among Chinese medical staff: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Shi-Jiao; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Li-Juan; Yan, Yu-Xiang

    2018-01-01

    Objectives The study aimed to develop and validate a model to measure psychosocial factors at work among medical staff in China based on confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The second aim of the current study was to clarify the association between stress-related psychosocial work factors and suboptimal health status. Design The cross-sectional study was conducted using clustered sampling method. Setting Xuanwu Hospital, a 3A grade hospital in Beijing. Participants Nine hundred and fourteen medical staff aged over 40 years were sampled. Seven hundred and ninety-seven valid questionnaires were collected and used for further analyses. The sample included 94% of the Han population. Main outcome measures The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) and the Suboptimal Health Status Questionnaires-25 were used to assess the psychosocial factors at work and suboptimal health status, respectively. CFA was conducted to establish the evaluating method of COPSOQ. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to estimate the relationship between suboptimal health status and stress-related psychosocial work factors among Chinese medical staff. Results There was a strong correlation among the five dimensions of COPSOQ based on the first-order factor model. Then, we established two second-order factors including negative and positive psychosocial work stress factors to evaluate psychosocial factors at work, and the second-order factor model fit well. The high score in negative (OR (95% CI)=1.47 (1.34 to 1.62), Ppsychosocial work factors increased and decreased the risk of suboptimal health, respectively. This relationship remained statistically significant after adjusting for confounders and when using different cut-offs of suboptimal health status. Conclusions Among medical staff, the second-order factor model was a suitable method to evaluate the COPSOQ. The negative and positive psychosocial work stress factors might be the risk and protective factors of suboptimal

  18. Recommended data for capture cross sections in B5+ + H collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errea, L F; Guzman, F; Illescas, Clara; Mendez, L; Pons, B; Riera, A; Suarez, J

    2006-01-01

    Recommended values for state selective capture cross sections are presented for the collision B 5+ + H(1s) in the energy range from 0.05 to 1000 keV amu -1 . Special attention is focused on capture processes to n = 7 states of B 4+ , which play an important role in spectral diagnostics in fusion plasmas. In order to completely cover the intermediate impact energy domain, quantal, semi-classical and classical treatments have been employed for low, low-intermediate and intermediate-high energies, respectively. We also give some guidelines about the domain of accuracy of the methodologies employed. Additionally, preliminary cross sections of the B 5+ + H(2s) collision are also provided

  19. Efficacy of communication amongst staff members at plastic and reconstructive surgery section using smartphone and mobile WhatsApp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabeer Ahmad Wani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to assess the efficacy of smartphone and its WhatsApp application as a communication method amongst the staff of plastic and reconstructive surgery section at tertiary care health facility. Materials and Methods: From January 2012 onwards, the authors used smartphones and its WhatsApp application as a communication method amongst their team for various aspects of patient management and as a tool for academic endorsements. Results: During the period of this study, there were 116 episodes regarding patient management, which were handled, in a timely fashion by using this application. In addition opinion of rotating residents in the section was sought regarding the efficacy of this method of communication. Overall majority of residents were satisfied with this mode of communication. Conclusions: This new method of communication is an effective method for clinical and academic endorsements. The method is cheap and quick and easy to operate.

  20. Efficacy of communication amongst staff members at plastic and reconstructive surgery section using smartphone and mobile WhatsApp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Shabeer Ahmad; Rabah, Sari M; Alfadil, Sara; Dewanjee, Nancy; Najmi, Yahya

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the efficacy of smartphone and its WhatsApp application as a communication method amongst the staff of plastic and reconstructive surgery section at tertiary care health facility. From January 2012 onwards, the authors used smartphones and its WhatsApp application as a communication method amongst their team for various aspects of patient management and as a tool for academic endorsements. During the period of this study, there were 116 episodes regarding patient management, which were handled, in a timely fashion by using this application. In addition opinion of rotating residents in the section was sought regarding the efficacy of this method of communication. Overall majority of residents were satisfied with this mode of communication. This new method of communication is an effective method for clinical and academic endorsements. The method is cheap and quick and easy to operate.

  1. The Intention of Delivery Room Staff to Encourage the Presence of Husbands/Partners at Cesarean Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Yaira; Tabak, Nili

    2011-01-01

    Objective. In recent years, more and more delivery rooms have allowed husbands/partners to be present during a Cesarean section Nonetheless, many still oppose the idea. The study is designed to investigate the attitudes of Israeli gynecologists, anesthetists, operating-room nurses, and midwives on this issue. Design. The study's theoretical model comes from Fishbein and Ajzen's theory of reasoned action. A self-administered questionnaire was submitted to convenience sample. Subjects. 96 gynecologists, anesthetists, midwives, and operating-room nurses. Results. Significant differences were found between the occupational subgroups. Most of the findings supported the four hypotheses tested and confirmed earlier studies designed to verify the theoretical model. Conclusions. The main conclusion drawn is that delivery and operating-room staff need to be trained in the skills needed to promote the active participation of the baby's father in delivery and, if necessary, in a Cesarean section. PMID:21994815

  2. The Intention of Delivery Room Staff to Encourage the Presence of Husbands/Partners at Cesarean Sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaira Gutman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In recent years, more and more delivery rooms have allowed husbands/partners to be present during a Cesarean section Nonetheless, many still oppose the idea. The study is designed to investigate the attitudes of Israeli gynecologists, anesthetists, operating-room nurses, and midwives on this issue. Design. The study's theoretical model comes from Fishbein and Ajzen's theory of reasoned action. A self-administered questionnaire was submitted to convenience sample. Subjects. 96 gynecologists, anesthetists, midwives, and operating-room nurses. Results. Significant differences were found between the occupational subgroups. Most of the findings supported the four hypotheses tested and confirmed earlier studies designed to verify the theoretical model. Conclusions. The main conclusion drawn is that delivery and operating-room staff need to be trained in the skills needed to promote the active participation of the baby's father in delivery and, if necessary, in a Cesarean section.

  3. 75 FR 32972 - Office of New Reactors: Notice of Availability of the Final Staff Guidance; Section 14.3.12 on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... the Final Staff Guidance; Section 14.3.12 on Physical Security Hardware Inspections, Tests, Analyses... Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants,'' Section 14.3.12 on ``Physical Security Hardware... the proposed Revision 1 on Section 14.3.12 on ``Physical Security Hardware-- Inspections, Tests...

  4. Need assessment of staffs' welfare services at tehran university of medical sciences: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Reza; Mafimoradi, Shiva; Hadi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing the human resources management literature shows an absence of attention given to the employee's benefits. Taking a look at functions of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences' wellbeing services system, it uncovers a gap between employees' real needs and what is delivered to meet their needs. So it requires an improved comprehensive system for delivering wellbeing services (financial, insurance, health care services, educational and training services, etc). Wellbeing need assessment can helps planners to identify vital needs of employee and response to them effectively. Moreover it can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the current services which are delivered. Thus, the aim of this study is to assess wellbeing services of staffs working in TUMS to (1) evaluate the satisfactory rate of services which are delivered, and (2) exploring those wellbeing needs which were not fulfilled by the organization. Being a cross-sectional and analytic-descriptive survey including 98 responding participants, it is conducted by a questionnaire collecting employees' demographic information, their satisfactory rate of the implemented services, and determines unfulfilled wellbeing needs which were not already covered. Results indicated that services related to financial, educational, non-financial, insurance, occupational health and tourism/recreational services were the most satisfactory services successively. 'Staff's unwillingness to receive services' and 'poor announcement' (unawareness on the wellbeing services),' were found to be the most frequent reasons for not receiving the existing wellbeing services. To increase the satisfaction rate and responsiveness to the real needs of the staff, the current delivery system of wellbeing services in the TUMS should be redesigned by defining new wellbeing packages.

  5. Laparoscopic simulation training in gynaecology: Current provision and staff attitudes - a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Christy; Fox, Robert; Hinshaw, Kim; Draycott, Timothy J; James, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore current provision of laparoscopic simulation training, and to determine attitudes of trainers and trainees to the role of simulators in surgical training across the UK. An anonymous cross-sectional survey with cluster sampling was developed and circulated. All Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) Training Programme Directors (TPD), College Tutors (RCT) and Trainee representatives (TR) across the UK were invited to participate. One hundred and ninety-six obstetricians and gynaecologists participated. Sixty-three percent of hospitals had at least one box trainer, and 14.6% had least one virtual-reality simulator. Only 9.3% and 3.6% stated that trainees used a structured curriculum on box and virtual-reality simulators, respectively. Respondents working in a Large/Teaching hospital (p = 0.008) were more likely to agree that simulators enhance surgical training. Eighty-nine percent agreed that simulators improve the quality of training, and should be mandatory or desirable for junior trainees. Consultants (p = 0.003) and respondents over 40 years (p = 0.011) were more likely to hold that a simulation test should be undertaken before live operation. Our data demonstrated, therefore, that availability of laparoscopic simulators is inconsistent, with limited use of mandatory structured curricula. In contrast, both trainers and trainees recognise a need for greater use of laparoscopic simulation for surgical training.

  6. Local health department epidemiologic capacity: a stratified cross-sectional assessment describing the quantity, education, training, and perceived competencies of epidemiologic staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Kaitlin A; Shafir, Shira C; Shoaf, Kimberley I

    2013-01-01

    Local health departments (LHDs) must have sufficient numbers of staff functioning in an epidemiologic role with proper education, training, and skills to protect the health of communities they serve. This pilot study was designed to describe the composition, training, and competency level of LHD staff and examine the hypothesis that potential disparities exist between LHDs serving different sized populations. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted with directors and epidemiologic staff from a sample of 100 LHDs serving jurisdictions of varied sizes. Questionnaires included inquiries regarding staff composition, education, training, and measures of competency modeled on previously conducted studies by the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. Number of epidemiologic staff, academic degree distribution, epidemiologic training, and both director and staff confidence in task competencies were calculated for each LHD size strata. Disparities in measurements were observed in LHDs serving different sized populations. LHDs serving small populations reported a smaller average number of epidemiologic staff than those serving larger jurisdictions. As size of population served increased, percentages of staff and directors holding bachelors' and masters' degrees increased, while those holding RN degrees decreased. A higher degree of perceived competency of staff in most task categories was reported in LHDs serving larger populations. LHDs serving smaller populations reported fewer epidemiologic staff, therefore might benefit from additional resources. Differences observed in staff education, training, and competencies suggest that enhanced epidemiologic training might be particularly needed in LHDs serving smaller populations. RESULTS can be used as a baseline for future research aimed at identifying areas where training and personnel resources might be particularly needed to increase the capabilities of LHDs.

  7. Local health department epidemiologic capacity: a stratified cross-sectional assessment describing the quantity, education, training, and perceived competencies of epidemiologic staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin A O'Keefe

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Local health departments (LHDs must have sufficient numbers of staff functioning in an epidemiologic role with proper education, training and skills to protect the health of communities they serve. This pilot study was designed to describe the composition, training and competency level of LHD staff and examine the hypothesis that potential disparities exist between LHDs serving different sized populations.Material and Methods: Cross-sectional surveys were conducted with directors and epidemiologic staff from a sample of 100 LHDs serving jurisdictions of varied sizes. Questionnaires included inquiries regarding staff composition, education, training and measures of competency modeled on previously conducted studies by the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. Number of epidemiologic staff, academic degree distribution, epidemiologic training and both director and staff confidence in task competencies were calculated for each LHD size strata.Results: Disparities in measurements were observed in LHDs serving different sized populations. LHDs serving small populations reported a smaller average number of epidemiologic staff than those serving larger jurisdictions. As size of population served increased, percentages of staff and directors holding bachelors’ and masters’ degrees increased, while those holding RN degrees decreased. A higher degree of perceived competency of staff in most task categories was reported in LHDs serving larger populations.Discussion: LHDs serving smaller populations reported fewer epidemiologic staff, therefore might benefit from additional resources. Differences observed in staff education, training and competencies suggest that enhanced epidemiologic training might be particularly needed in LHDs serving smaller populations. Results can be used as a baseline for future research aimed at identifying areas where training and personnel resources might be particularly needed to increase the

  8. Staff's normative attitudes towards coercion: the role of moral doubt and professional context-a cross-sectional survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molewijk, Bert; Kok, Almar; Husum, Tonje; Pedersen, Reidar; Aasland, Olaf

    2017-05-25

    The use of coercion is morally problematic and requires an ongoing critical reflection. We wondered if not knowing or being uncertain whether coercion is morally right or justified (i.e. experiencing moral doubt) is related to professionals' normative attitudes regarding the use of coercion. This paper describes an explorative statistical analysis based on a cross-sectional survey across seven wards in three Norwegian mental health care institutions. Descriptive analyses showed that in general the 379 respondents a) were not so sure whether coercion should be seen as offending, b) agreed with the viewpoint that coercion is needed for care and security, and c) slightly disagreed that coercion could be seen as treatment. Staff did not report high rates of moral doubt related to the use of coercion, although most of them agreed there will never be a single answer to the question 'What is the right thing to do?'. Bivariate analyses showed that the more they experienced general moral doubt and relative doubt, the more one thought that coercion is offending. Especially psychologists were critical towards coercion. We found significant differences among ward types. Respondents with decisional responsibility for coercion and leadership responsibility saw coercion less as treatment. Frequent experience with coercion was related to seeing coercion more as care and security. This study showed that experiencing moral doubt is related to some one's normative attitude towards coercion. Future research could investigate whether moral case deliberation increases professionals' experience of moral doubt and whether this will evoke more critical thinking and increase staff's curiosity for alternatives to coercion.

  9. Poor adherence to folic acid and iodine supplement recommendations in preconception and pregnancy: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Lenka; Umberger, Wendy; Makrides, Maria; Zhou, Shao J

    2016-10-01

    To determine pregnant women's knowledge of and adherence to the recommendations for periconceptional folic acid supplementation (PFS) and iodine supplementation (IS). Secondary objectives include determining predictors of adherence, and identifying influential nutrition information sources. A cross-sectional online survey was completed by 857 pregnant women, including a national cohort (n=455) recruited using an online panel provider and a South Australian cohort (n=402) recruited from a public maternity hospital. Adherence to PFS and IS recommendations was 27% and 23%, respectively. Planning pregnancy and awareness of the correct timing of recommendations were predictors of adherence for both recommendations. Not consuming any alcohol during pregnancy and living in metropolitan areas also predicted adherence to the IS recommendation. Awareness of the recommendation was greater for folic acid (more than 90%) than iodine (56-69%). Knowledge of the importance of folic acid and iodine was greater than knowledge regarding the recommended dose and timing of supplementation. Main healthcare providers were considered the most influential nutrition information sources. Knowledge of and adherence to supplement recommendations for preconception and pregnancy needs improvement. While main healthcare providers may play an important role, further research is needed to explore strategies for increasing adoption of recommendations. © 2016 Public Health Association of Australia.

  10. Recommendations by dental staff and use of toothpicks, dental floss and interdental brushes for approximal cleaning in an adult Swedish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Särner, Barbro; Birkhed, Dowen; Andersson, Pia; Lingström, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the recommendations relating to the use of approximal cleaning aids given by dental hygienists and dentists, the self-care practices in a Swedish population and the ability to remove dental plaque. A structured questionnaire was randomly distributed to 500 dental hygienists and 500 dentists and a similar questionnaire was distributed to 1000 randomly selected individuals, divided equally into the following age groups: 15 to 20, 21 to 40, 41 to 60 and > 60 years. A clinical examination evaluating the ability to remove approximal dental plaque was also carried out in a total of 60 regular users of approximal cleaning aids. Plaque was scored before and after cleaning with a toothpick, dental floss or an interdental brush. The response rate was 82%, 79% and 68% for the three groups. The results reveal that dental hygienists give more detailed information about a majority of the aspects that are related to the use of approximal cleaning aids compared with dentists (P dental staff give recommendations to children and adolescents firstly to prevent dental caries and to older individuals to improve periodontal health. The use of different approximal cleaning aids on a daily basis varied with respect to age group (2% to 42%); dental floss dominated in the younger age groups and interdental brushes in the two oldest groups. In the clinical study, the largest plaque reduction was produced by the interdental brush (83%), followed by toothpicks (74%) and dental floss (73%). The present study indicated the importance of individual recommendations related to the use of approximal cleaning aids.

  11. Job demand-control and job stress at work: A cross-sectional study among prison staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Jafar; Akbari, Rouhollah; Shakerian, Mahnaz; Mahaki, Behzad

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Job stress can impose significant costs to the workplaces and organizations due to some issues such as absenteeism, less productivity, and medical costs. Job overload and lack of decision latitude can lead to job stress. The current study aimed to investigate the job demands and control as predictor of job stress and its relationship, with some of the demographic characteristics of Iranian prison staff. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on 171 male employees working in four prisons located in Ilam, Iran. The sampling method was census and all four prisons’ staff were selected to respond the Job Content Questionnaires. Finally, the data were analyzed using t-test or independent samples test as well as SPSS 20. Results: The highest amount of job demand (mean = 21.28) and the lowest amount of job control on average (9.76) were reported by those staff working in Darehshahr prison. There was also a significant relationship between job post and job control among the prison staff (β = −0.375, P = 0.001). Conclusion: The level of job stress reported by prison staff was high in this study mainly caused by high job demand and low job control, especially in Darehshahr prison staff. PMID:28546980

  12. Total and Compound Formation Cross Sections for Americium Nuclei: Recommendations for Coupled-Channels Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-04-11

    Calculations for total cross sections and compound-nucleus (CN) formation cross sections for americium isotopes are described, for use in the 2017 NA-22 evaluation effort. The code ECIS 2006 was used in conjunction with Frank Dietrich's wrapper `runtemplate'.

  13. Staff's person-centredness in dementia care in relation to job characteristics and job-related well-being: a cross-sectional survey in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemse, Bernadette M; De Jonge, Jan; Smit, Dieneke; Visser, Quirijn; Depla, Marja F I A; Pot, Anne Margriet

    2015-02-01

    To explore the role of nursing staff's person-centredness caring for people with dementia in relation to their work environment and job-related well-being. Given the development towards person-centred care and labour force issues, research has recently focused on the effect of person-centredness on nursing staff's well-being. Findings from occupational stress research suggest that employees' personal characteristics, such as person-centredness, can moderate the impact particular job characteristics have on their job-related well-being. Cross-sectional survey. A national survey was conducted among healthcare staff (n = 1147) in 136 living arrangements for people with dementia in the Netherlands (2008-2009). Hierarchical regression analyses were used. Person-centredness moderates the relationship between coworker support and three outcomes of job-related well-being and between supervisor support and two of these outcomes. For highly person-centred nursing staff, coworker support was found to have a weaker impact and supervisor support to have a stronger impact on their job-related well-being. In addition, direct effects showed that person-centredness was weakly associated with more job satisfaction, more emotional exhaustion and more strongly with more personal accomplishment. Nursing staff's person-centredness does play a modest role in relation to job characteristics and job-related well-being. Findings indicate that person-centredness is not only beneficial to residents with dementia as found earlier, but also for nursing staff themselves; specifically, in case nursing staff members feel supported by their supervisor. Since a more person-centred workforce feels more competent, further implementation of person-centred care might have a positive impact on the attractiveness of the profession. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. EORTC recommended protocol for melanoma sentinel lymph node sectioning misclassifies up to 50% of the patients compared with complete step sectioning. Danish Society for Pathological Anatomy and Clinical Cytology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber-Hansen, Rikke; Hastrup, N; Clemmensen, O.

    2010-01-01

    EORTC recommended protocol for melanoma sentinel lymph node sectioning misclassifies up to 50% of the patients compared with complete step sectioning. Danish Society for Pathological Anatomy and Clinical Cytology......EORTC recommended protocol for melanoma sentinel lymph node sectioning misclassifies up to 50% of the patients compared with complete step sectioning. Danish Society for Pathological Anatomy and Clinical Cytology...

  15. Willingness to provide behavioral health recommendations: a cross-sectional study of entering medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCurdy Stephen A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Behavioral factors contribute importantly to morbidity and mortality, and physicians are trusted sources for information on reducing associated risks. Unfortunately, many clinical encounters do not include prevention counseling, and medical school curriculum plays an important role in training and promoting such counseling among medical students. Methods We surveyed all 93 freshman medical students at entry to the University of California, Davis School of Medicine in 2009 to evaluate baseline knowledge of population health principles and examine their approach to clinical situations involving four common behavioral risk factors illustrated in brief clinical vignettes: smoking, alcohol use in a patient with indications of alcoholism, diet and exercise in an overweight sedentary patient, and a 16-year-old contemplating initiation of sexual intercourse. Based on vignette responses, we assessed willingness to (1 provide information on risks, (2 recommend elimination of the behavior as the most efficacious means for reducing risk, (3 include strategies apart from elimination of the behavior for lowering risk (i.e., harm reduction, and (4 assure of their intention to continue care whether or not recommendations are accepted. Results Students answered correctly 71.4 % (median; interquartile range 66.7 % - 85.7 % of clinical prevention and population health knowledge questions; men scored higher than women (median 83.3 % vs. 66.7 %, p Conclusion Students showed high willingness to educate and respect patient autonomy. There was high willingness to recommend elimination of risk behaviors for smoking, alcohol, and poor diet/exercise, but not for sexual intercourse in an adolescent considering sexual debut. Further research should address promoting appropriate science-based preventive health messages, and curriculum should include explicit discussion of content of recommendations.

  16. Quality of doctoral nursing education in the United Kingdom: exploring the views of doctoral students and staff based on a cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Hugh; Keeney, Sinead; Kim, Mi Ja; Park, Chang Gi

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the quality of doctoral education in nursing in the United Kingdom. In recent decades, doctoral education programmes in nursing are increasing worldwide. There are many reasons for this and concerns have been raised regarding the quality of provision in and across countries. To date, the quality of doctoral education on a global level has not been reported in the literature. This United Kingdom study is part of a seven country investigation into the quality of doctoral education in nursing (Australia, Japan, Korea, South Africa, Thailand, United Kingdom and United States of America). A quantitative study using a cross-sectional comparative survey design. An online survey was administered to collect the views of doctoral students and staff members on four domains: programme, faculty/staff, resource and evaluation. The study was carried out between 2010-2012. In most cases, staff perceived these more positively than students and the differences in perception were often statistically significant. Interestingly, many students rated the quality of supervision as excellent, whereas no staff member rated supervision this highly. The crucial importance of resources was confirmed in the path analysis of the four Quality of Doctoral Nursing Education domains. This demonstrates that investment in resources is much more cost-effective than investment in the other domains in relation to improving the overall quality of doctoral education in nursing. This study has wide-ranging implications for how the quality of doctoral education is monitored and enhanced. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Labour and Childbirth After Previous Caesarean Section: Recommendations of the Austrian Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (OEGGG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, P; Brezinka, C; Fischer, T; Husslein, P; Lang, U; Ramoni, A; Zeisler, H; Klaritsch, P

    2016-12-01

    The new expert recommendation from the Austrian Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (OEGGG) comprises an interpretation and summary of guidelines from the leading specialist organisations worldwide (RCOG, ACOG, SOGC, CNGOF, WHO, NIH, NICE, UpToDate). In essence it outlines alternatives to the direct pathway to elective repeat caesarean section (ERCS). In so doing it aligns with international trends, according to which a differentiated, individualised clinical approach is recommended that considers benefits and risks to both mother and child, provides detailed counselling and takes the patient's wishes into account. In view of good success rates (60-85 %) for vaginal birth after caesarean section (VBAC) the consideration of predictive factors during antenatal birth planning has become increasingly important. This publication provides a compact management recommendation for the majority of standard clinical situations. However it cannot and does not claim to cover all possible scenarios. The consideration of all relevant factors in each individual case, and thus the ultimate decision on mode of delivery, remains the discretion and responsibility of the treating obstetrician.

  18. Healthcare Providers’ Recommendations for Physical Activity among US Arthritis Population: A Cross-Sectional Analysis by Race/Ethnicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamly Austin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We examined racial/ethnic disparities in healthcare providers’ recommendations for physical activity among individuals with arthritis and evaluated this association among groups of individuals who adhered to physical activity guidelines and those who did not. Methods. With a cross-sectional design based on Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, we analyzed individuals with self-reported physician-diagnosed arthritis, ≥18 years of age (n = 83,376. Outcome variable was healthcare providers’ recommendations for physical activity. Race/ethnicity was categorized as African American, Hispanic, and White. Associations were examined using multivariate logistic regression. Results. African Americans (Adjusted OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.55–0.79 and Hispanics (Adjusted OR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.56–0.83 were less likely to receive providers’ recommendations. Conclusions. Although the importance of physical activity to improve health outcomes for adults with arthritis, as well as providers’ influence on individuals’ behavior change, is well established, providers are less likely to recommend physical activity to minorities. Further studies are required to identify the causes for this quality-of-care issue.

  19. Cross-Sectional Survey on the Dengue Knowledge, Attitudes and Preventive Practices Among Students and Staff of a Public University in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugova, H; Wallis, S

    2017-04-01

    Behavioural impact programmes are especially effective for dengue control and prevention. Universities are key settings for health promotion, so understanding factors that influence the practice of dengue prevention within a university community becomes important. This study aimed to examine the factors affecting dengue knowledge, attitude and preventive practices amongst students and staff of a public university. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A total of 372 students and staff of the NDUM were recruited by stratified sampling method. Data were collected via self-administered pre-tested structured questionnaires covering socio-demography and dengue KAP. Data were analysed descriptively. For bivariate analysis, Chi square test was applied. To explore the factors independently associated with the practice of dengue prevention, a logistic regression model was introduced. Overall, the participants had moderate dengue-related knowledge, good attitudes and good preventive practices. The majority had misconceptions about mosquito biting habits (83.8 %), seasonality of dengue epidemics (73.2 %), and mosquito breeding sites (70.3 %). Staff were more likely to have good dengue-related knowledge (p dengue knowledge and monthly average household income (p = 0.008), age (p dengue was associated with being a non-Malay (p = 0.034), having higher monthly average household income (p = 0.047) and tertiary education (p dengue knowledge and dengue attitudes were significantly and positively associated with practice of dengue prevention. Dengue preventive strategies amongst university students and staff should focus on maintaining good dengue-related preventive practices. Educational campaigns should mainly target students, young staff members, and those with lower level of education and income.

  20. Path modeling of knowledge, attitude and practice toward palliative care consultation service among Taiwanese nursing staff: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hsueh-Hsing; Shih, Hsiu-Ling; Wu, Li-Fen; Hung, Yu-Chun; Chu, Chi-Ming; Wang, Kwua-Yun

    2017-08-17

    The Taiwanese government has promoted palliative care consultation services (PCCS) to support terminally ill patients in acute ward settings to receive palliative care since 2005. Such an intervention can enhance the quality of life and dignity of terminally ill patients. However, research focusing on the relationship between the knowledge, attitude and practice of a PCCS using path modelling in nursing staff is limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of path modeling on the knowledge, attitude and practice toward PCCS in Taiwanese nursing staff. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study design using convenience sampling. Data collected included demographics, knowledge, attitude and practice as measured by the PCCS inventory (KAP-PCCSI). Two hundred and eighty-four nursing staff from a medical center in northern Taiwan participated in the study in 2013. We performed descriptive statistics, regression analysis, and path modeling using SPSS 19.0 and set p knowledge, attitude, and practice toward PCCS among nurses was the frequency of contact with PCCS. In addition, higher level of knowledge toward PCCS was associated with working in haematology and oncology wards, and participation in education related to palliative care. A more positive attitude toward PCCS was associated with working in a haematology and oncology ward, and experience of friends or relatives dying. Higher level of practice toward PCCS was associated with nurses who participated in education related to palliative care. In the path modeling, we found that holders of a master's degree indirectly positive affected practice toward PCCS. Possession of a bachelor degree or above, being single, working within a haematology and oncology ward, and frequency of contact with PCCS positively affected practice toward PCCS. Based on this study, it is proposed that consultation with PCCS has a positive impact on the care of terminally ill patients. Encouragement of staff to

  1. Perceptions of malaria control and prevention in an era of climate change: a cross-sectional survey among CDC staff in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Michael Xiaoliang; Hansen, Alana; Hanson-Easey, Scott; Cameron, Scott; Xiang, Jianjun; Liu, Qiyong; Liu, Xiaobo; Sun, Yehuan; Weinstein, Philip; Han, Gil-Soo; Williams, Craig; Bi, Peng

    2017-03-31

    Though there was the significant decrease in the incidence of malaria in central and southwest China during the 1980s and 1990s, there has been a re-emergence of malaria since 2000. A cross-sectional survey was conducted amongst the staff of eleven Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in China to gauge their perceptions regarding the impacts of climate change on malaria transmission and its control and prevention. Descriptive analysis was performed to study CDC staff's knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and suggestions for malaria control in the face of climate change. A majority (79.8%) of CDC staff were concerned about climate change and 79.7% believed the weather was becoming warmer. Most participants (90.3%) indicated climate change had a negative effect on population health, 92.6 and 86.8% considered that increasing temperatures and precipitation would influence the transmission of vector-borne diseases including malaria. About half (50.9%) of the surveyed staff indicated malaria had re-emerged in recent years, and some outbreaks were occurring in new geographic areas. The main reasons for such re-emergence were perceived to be: mosquitoes in high-density, numerous imported cases, climate change, poor environmental conditions, internal migrant populations, and lack of health awareness. This study found most CDC staff endorsed the statement that climate change had a negative impact on infectious disease transmission. Malaria had re-emerged in some areas of China, and most of the staff believed that this can be managed. However, high densities of mosquitoes and the continuous increase in imported cases of malaria in local areas, together with environmental changes are bringing about critical challenges to malaria control in China. This study contributes to an understanding of climate change related perceptions of malaria control and prevention amongst CDC staff. It may help to formulate in-house training guidelines, community health promotion

  2. Impaired mental well-being and psychosocial risk: a cross-sectional study in female nursing home direct staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pélissier, C; Fontana, L; Fort, E; Vohito, M; Sellier, B; Perrier, C; Glerant, V; Couprie, F; Agard, J P; Charbotel, B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The present study sought to quantify the impaired mental well-being and psychosocial stress experienced by nursing home staff and to determine the relationship between impaired mental well-being assessed on the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) and exposure to psychosocial stress assessed on Siegrist's effort/reward and overcommitment model. Methods A transverse study was conducted in France on 2471 female employees in 105 nursing homes for the elderly. Personal and occupational data were collected by questionnaire for 668 housekeepers, 1454 nursing assistants and 349 nurses. Results 36.8% of participants (n=896) showed impaired mental well-being, 42.7% (n=1039) overcommitment and 9% (n=224) effort/reward imbalance. Overcommitment (prevalence ratio (PR)=1.27; 95% CI (1.21 to 1.34)) and effort–reward imbalance (PR=1.19; 95% CI (1.12 to 1.27)) were significantly associated with presence of impaired mental well-being after adjustment for personal factors (age and private life events). Taking effort and reward levels into account, the frequency of impaired mental well-being was highest in case of exposure to great extrinsic effort and low rewards of any type: esteem, PR=3.53, 95% CI (3.06 to 4.08); earnings, PR=3.48, 95% CI (2.99 to 4.06); or job security, PR=3.30, 95% CI (2.88 to 3.78). Participants in situations of overcommitment and of effort/reward imbalance were at the highest risk of impaired mental well-being: PR=3.86, 95% CI (3.42 to 4.35). Conclusions Several changes in nursing home organisation can be suggested to reduce staff exposure to factors of psychosocial stress. Qualitative studies of the relation between impaired mental well-being and psychosocial stress in nursing home staff could guide prevention of impaired mental well-being at work. PMID:25829371

  3. Physiotherapy departments in Australian tertiary hospitals regularly participate in and disseminate research results despite a lack of allocated staff: a prospective cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Elizabeth H; Hough, Janet; Wang, Yi Tian; Hough, Catherine R; Southby, Alesha; Snowdon, David A; Sturgess, Tamica; Haines, Terry P

    2015-03-01

    To establish the level of research activity in physiotherapy departments of Australian tertiary hospitals. Prospective cross-sectional survey. Physiotherapy managers from 37 principal referral hospitals and specialist women's and children's hospitals as identified from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2011). A purpose-designed predominantly open-response questionnaire investigating site demographics, research activity and research support was developed, piloted and administered. Thirty-seven surveys were completed (54% response rate). Median [IQR] respondent equivalent full-time staffing was 23.8 (19-39). Respondents represented a median [IQR] 6.5 (3-20) publication output in the past 2 years. Twelve respondents (32%) reported that staff had completed a doctorate in the past 5 years and 49% of respondents reported no staff had completed higher degrees. A total of 71 grants had been received and 73% of respondents indicated they had no allocated staffing for research activity. The most common indicators of research culture were organization-led research dissemination events and research training (i.e. manager attending research events and celebrating research achievements). This is the first study to report on research activity in hospital-based Australian physiotherapy departments. Few sites allocate staff to conduct or support research. Despite this, physiotherapy departments regularly publish and present research results. Future studies could investigate how hospital-based physiotherapy departments can optimize research culture and output.

  4. Antibiotic use practices of pharmacy staff: a cross-sectional study in Saint Petersburg, the Russian Federation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, Tatiana; Duvanova, Natalia; Karbovskaja, Julia; Tebbens, Jurjen Duintjer; Vlcek, Jiri

    2017-02-14

    Non-prescription access to antimicrobials is common, and self-prescribing is increasingly popular in Russian society. The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes of community pharmacists regarding antibiotic use and self-medication. We conducted a cross-sectional study from September-December 2015 of community pharmacists in the Saint-Petersburg and Leningrad region, Russia. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess antibiotic use and self-medication practices. The data were analysed using logistic regression and Pearson chi-squared tests. Of the 316 pharmacists (77.07%) who completed the questionnaire, 230 (72.8%) self-medicated with antibiotics. Antibiotics were mostly used to self-treat upper (53.3%) and lower respiratory tract infections (19.3%), relying on their own knowledge (81.5%), previous treatment experience (49%) and patients' prescriptions (17%). The most commonly used antibiotics were macrolides (33.2%). Characteristics such as age, education and experience were related to antibiotic use and self-medication. The study confirmed that self-prescription of antibiotics is a common practice amongst pharmacists in Saint Petersburg and also identified personal and professional characteristics of pharmacists strongly associated with self-medication.

  5. New staff contract policy

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at TREF and on the recommendation of the Finance Committee, Council approved a new staff contract policy, which became effective on 1 January 2006. Its application is covered by a new Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) 'Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members'. The revised circular replaces the previous Circulars No. 9 (Rev. 3) 'Staff contracts' and No. 2 (Rev. 2) 'Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period for staff members'. The main features of the new contract policy are as follows: The new policy provides chances for long-term employment for all staff recruits staying for four years without distinguishing between those assigned to long-term or short-term activities when joining CERN. In addition, it presents a number of simplifications for the award of ICs. There are henceforth only 2 types of contract: Limited Duration (LD) contracts for all recruitment and Indefinite Contracts (IC) for...

  6. Hazardous alcohol use and cultural adjustment among U.S. college students abroad in Italy: Findings and recommendations for study abroad staff and researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael A; Poyrazli, Senel; Broyles, Lauren Matukaitis

    2016-01-01

    Italy is a top destination for U.S. college students studying abroad. Both international and local Italian media outlets, such as city newspapers, have cited the discordance between Italian cultural norms and U.S. college students' drinking behaviors. Hazardous alcohol consumption abroad, such as binge drinking, can result in individual- (e.g., physical injury) and social- (e.g., promotion of negative stereotypes) level adverse consequences. We assessed the prevalence of hazardous alcohol use and recent binge drinking in a sample of U.S. college students studying abroad in Italy (n = 111). We evaluated associations among drinking and cultural adjustment and determined which sociocultural factors predicted binge drinking for students abroad. Forty-six percent of students were classified as hazardous drinkers and 63% reported recent binge drinking. Socializing with American peers was a significant predictor for binge drinking abroad. Binge drinking was quite prevalent in our sample of students studying abroad in Italy. Study abroad advisors, instructors, and staff should consider diverse strategies to screen, educate, prevent, and/or intervene on alcohol misuse with their students. These strategies should be personalized to both the student as well as the host culture's norms.

  7. Polypharmacy and medication regimen complexity as factors associated with staff informant rated quality of life in residents of aged care facilities: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalic, Samanta; Jamsen, Kris M; Wimmer, Barbara C; Tan, Edwin C K; Hilmer, Sarah N; Robson, Leonie; Emery, Tina; Bell, J Simon

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the association between polypharmacy with health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and medication regimen complexity with HRQoL in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). A cross-sectional study of 383 residents from six Australian RACFs was conducted. The primary exposures were polypharmacy (≥9 regular medications) and the validated Medication Regimen Complexity Index (MRCI). The outcome measure was staff informant rated quality of life assessed using the Quality of Life Alzheimer's disease (QoL-AD) scale. Covariates included age, sex, Charlson's comorbidity index, activities of daily living, and dementia severity. Logistic quantile regression was used to characterize the association between polypharmacy and QoL-AD (model 1) and MRCI and QoL-AD (model 2). The median age of the 383 residents was 88 years and 297 (78 %) residents were female. In total, 63 % of residents were exposed to polypharmacy and the median MRCI score (range) was 43.5 (4-113). After adjusting for the covariates, polypharmacy was not associated with either higher or lower QoL-AD scores (estimate -0.02; 95 % confidence interval (CI) -0.165, 0.124; p = 0.78). Similarly, after adjusting for the covariates, MRCI was not associated with either higher or lower QoL-AD scores (estimate -0.0009, 95 % CI -0.005, 0.003; p = 0.63). These findings suggest that polypharmacy and medication regimen complexity are not associated with staff informant rated HRQoL. Further research is needed to investigate how specific medication classes may impact change in quality of life over time.

  8. Influence of gender, working field and psychosocial factors on the vulnerability for burnout in mental hospital staff: results of an Austrian cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadenhofer, Petra; Kundi, Michael; Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Stummer, Harald; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra

    2018-03-01

    According to the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA), hospitals represent a work environment with high job strain. Prolonged perceived occupational stress may result in symptoms of burnout, such as emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalisation (DP) and reduced personal accomplishment (PA). Understanding which factors may reduce vulnerability for burnout is an important requirement for well-targeted occupational stress prevention in mental hospital staff. To identify the influence of gender, age, working field, family structure, education, voluntarily occupational training during holidays and length of stay on job on occupational stress perception. In a cross-sectional design, 491 employees (311 female, 180 male) of an Austrian mental health centre participated in the study. The extent of perceived occupational stress was assessed by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) with the scales for emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishment. Participants were divided according to their working field in those working with/without patients. Prevalence of emotional exhaustion was higher in women working with patients compared to men working with patients (25% vs. 18%, p = 0.003). Age above 45 years was significantly associated with decreased vulnerability for burnout in men (EE p = 0.040, DP p = 0.010, PA p = 0.007), but not in women. A lower level of education had a significant impact on depersonalisation in both sexes (p = 0.001 for men, p = 0.048 for women). Length of stay on job showed a significant influence on emotional exhaustion. No significant relationship was found between family structure and vulnerability for burnout. Gender had a differential effect on perceived occupational stress indicating a need for gender-tailored preventive strategies. Age, working field, education, voluntarily occupational training during holidays and length of stay on job affect vulnerability for burnout in mental hospital staff.

  9. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense... Staff. (a) The Commission will have a support staff, which will include staff members sufficient to expeditiously and efficiently process the applications for payments under this part. All members of the staff...

  10. Characteristics of attitude and recommendation of oncologists toward exercise in South Korea: a cross sectional survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Hye; Oh, Minsuk; Yoon, Yong Jin; Lee, Chul Won; Jones, Lee W; Kim, Seung Il; Kim, Nam Kyu; Jeon, Justin Y

    2015-04-10

    The purpose of the present study was to examine 1) characteristics and attitudes of oncologists toward exercise and toward recommending exercise to their patients, 2) association among oncologists' own physical activity levels, exercise recommendations, and their attitudes toward recommending exercise. A total of 167 oncologists participated in this survey study (41 surgeons, 78 medical oncologists, 25 radiation oncologists, and 21 others). Most oncologists included in the study treat more than one type of cancer, including colorectal, gastric, breast, lung, and liver cancer. To analyze the data, the one-way ANOVA, and t-test were used. All data were indicated for mean, SD, and proportions. Most oncologists agreed that exercise is beneficial (72.8%) and important (69.6%), but only 39.2% of them agreed that exercise is safe, and only 7.2% believed that cancer patients manage to exercise during cancer treatment. Forty-six percentage of the surveyed oncologists recommended exercise to their patients during the past month. The average amount of participation in physical activity by oncologists who participated in the study was 139.5 ± 120.3 min per week, and 11.4% of the study participants met the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) guidelines. Oncologists' own physical activity levels were associated with their attitudes toward recommending exercise. Belief in the benefits of exercise in the performance of daily tasks, improvement of mental health, and the attenuation of physical decline from treatment were the three most prevalent reasons why oncologists recommend exercise to their patients. Barriers to recommending exercise to patients included lack of time, unclear exercise recommendations, and the safety of patients. Oncologists have favorable attitudes toward exercise and toward recommending exercise to their patients during treatment. However, they also experience barriers to recommending exercise, including lack of time, unclear exercise guidelines

  11. [Emergency department staff and the organ donation process: recommendations from the joint working group of the National Transplant Organization and the Spanish Society of Emergency Medicine (ONT-SEMES)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Soba, Fernando; Masnou Burrallo, Núria; de la Rosa Rodríguez, Gloria; Povar Marco, Javier

    2016-06-01

    Although 4769 transplants were performed in Spain in 2015 and the organ donor rate reached 39.7 per million population, thousands of patients remain on wait lists. Currently 65% of donors die from strokes and the mean donor age is 64 years. This profile calls for strategies to detect candidates outside the intensive care unit (ICU) and it justifies an ever stronger role for the participation of emergency services in the procurement process. Spain's National Transplant Organization (ONT) and the Spanish Society of Emergency Medicine (SEMES) have drafted recommendations whose purposes are to define the responsibilities of emergency staff in this process, to establish protocols for multidisciplinary cooperation that facilitate the identification of candidate donors, and to consolidate a new approach to patient care that will facilitate optimal management of the donor prior to ICU admission.

  12. Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Remove of the staff association office   The Staff Association offices are going to be renovated during the coming four months, February to May 2014. The physical move from our current premises 64/R-002 to our temporary office in  510/R-010 will take place on Friday January 31st, so the Secretariat will be closed on that day. Hence, from Monday February 3rd until the end of May 2014 the Staff Association Secretariat will be located in 510/R-010 (entrance just across the CERN Printshop).    

  13. The Performance of New Accrual Accounting Plan in Tehran University of Medical Sciences from Financial Staff Perspective: A Cross-sectional Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Mahboub Ahari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ​ Background and objectives : Accrual Accounting System was developed to determine the actual cost of organizational performance. This type of accounting approach is adopted as a main control lever for development and implementation of operational budget within public organizations. Since medical universities play a significant role in society's health and the major part of the country’s budget is devoted to it, the study was accomplished to study the main findings of Iranian New Financial Plan in a governmental medical university. Study will provide better insight on how the plan could meet supposed objectives. Material and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 46 accounting staffs of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS were selected by accidental sampling and studied by using a 22-item questionnaire. Respondents were asked to answer the questions about how the plan was performed in their departments and whether it was a success or a failure. We used T-Test and Analysis of Variance for mean comparison. Data were analyzed using SPSS16 software. Results: Most of the respondents were male (52.2% and graduated with bachelor degree in accounting and 65% of the respondents had at least a little knowledge of accrual accounting fundamentals. The study results showed that most of the respondents implied that the outcomes of the implemented plan were satisfying. Respondents who were graduated in financial majors had higher satisfaction rate than others. Conclusion: The role of a comprehensive information system as an underlying and challenging necessity should be emphasized in accrual accounting system. Performance based budgeting system as a frequently focused program in Iranian socio-economic public organizations and Iran’s Ministry of Health and Medical Education should be fitted with the settlement of new financial plan.

  14. Care staff and family member perspectives on quality of life in people with very severe dementia in long-term care: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Linda; Quinn, Catherine; Hoare, Zoe; Whitaker, Rhiannon; Woods, Robert T

    2014-12-09

    Little is known about the quality of life of people with very severe dementia in long-term care settings, and more information is needed about the properties of quality of life measures aimed at this group. In this study we explored the profiles of quality of life generated through proxy ratings by care staff and family members using the Quality of Life in Late-stage Dementia (QUALID) scale, examined factors associated with these ratings, and further investigated the psychometric properties of the QUALID. Proxy ratings of quality of life using the QUALID were obtained for 105 residents with very severe dementia, categorised as meeting criteria for Functional Assessment Staging (FAST) stages 6 or 7, from members of care staff (n = 105) and family members (n = 73). A range of resident and staff factors were also assessed. Care staff and family member ratings were similar but were associated with different factors. Care staff ratings were significantly predicted by resident mood and awareness/responsiveness. Family member ratings were significantly predicted by use of antipsychotic medication. Factor analysis of QUALID scores suggested a two-factor solution for both care staff ratings and family member ratings. The findings offer novel evidence about predictors of care staff proxy ratings of quality of life and demonstrate that commonly-assessed resident variables explain little of the variability in family members' proxy ratings. The findings provide further information about the psychometric properties of the QUALID, and support the applicability of the QUALID as a means of examining quality of life in very severe dementia.

  15. 22 CFR 902.3 - Board staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Board staff. 902.3 Section 902.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD ORGANIZATION § 902.3 Board staff. The chairperson shall select the Board's executive secretary and other staff provided for in the Act. The executive secretary and staff...

  16. The influence of staff nurse perception of leadership style on satisfaction with leadership: a cross-sectional survey of pediatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Diane Randall; Richard, David C S; Robinson, Patricia; Celano, Patricia; Hallaron, Jeanie

    2012-09-01

    There is evidence that transformational leadership style promotes nursing excellence. Differences in how supervisees and supervisors perceive the supervisor's leadership style may also be related to satisfaction with leadership. Research demonstrates that satisfaction with leadership is a critical element in the retention of nurses. To evaluate staff nurse and nurse leader perceptions of leadership style. 16 supervisors and 179 supervisees completed the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire and a demographic survey. Data were analyzed using parametric statistical techniques. Although staff perceived leaders as employing largely transformative leadership strategies, differences existed in leader-staff congruence in interpretation of leadership style and as related to the role of the leader. Differences in interpretation of leadership style between supervisors and supervisees were associated with diminished satisfaction with leadership. In addition, those serving in a direct operational role (assistant nurse manager) were viewed as less transformative than leaders who maintained broader administrative responsibilities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Subjective hardship and training by female staff working in direct contact with the elderly in nursing homes: a cross-sectional study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pélissier, Carole; Fontana, Luc; Fort, Emmanuel; Charbotel, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    To describe training given and training desired and to assess the relation between training and perceived hard working conditions as experienced by female staff working in direct contact with the elderly in nursing homes. A transverse descriptive study was conducted with the involvement of 78 occupational physicians, and included staff in 105 nursing homes in the Rhône-Alpes Region of France. Data on training received during the previous 5 years and on training needs were collected from staff by self-administered questionnaire. 1,446 nursing assistants, 667 housekeepers and 348 nurses were included. The most frequent form of training during the previous 5 years was in handling. Staff most frequently desired training in palliative care and psychological approaches to residents. Part-time workers had less frequently had training during the previous 5 years. Staff with daytime hours significantly more often had training in the reception of and activities for the elderly and in hygiene than did night-staff. Almost half of respondents reported very hard working conditions related to physical handling of residents or to the physical deterioration of elderly persons. More than two-thirds reported very hard working conditions related to death. In all occupational categories, respondents who had had training in palliative care less often reported experiencing very hard working conditions related to death. Better adaptation of the training offer to the needs expressed by employees could improve the experience of working conditions in nursing homes. A longitudinal study could assess the impact of training in palliative care on reported hard working conditions related to death.

  18. Person-centered care in Norwegian nursing homes and its relation to organizational factors and staff characteristics: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røen, Irene; Kirkevold, Øyvind; Testad, Ingelin; Selbæk, Geir; Engedal, Knut; Bergh, Sverre

    2017-12-04

    Person-centered care (PCC) is regarded as good quality care for persons with dementia. This study aimed to explore and understand the association between PCC and organizational, staff and unit characteristics in nursing homes (NHs). Staff from 175 NH units in Norway (n = 1,161) completed a survey, including measures of PCC and questions about staff characteristics and work-related psychosocial factors. In addition, data about organizational and structural factors and assessment of the physical environment in the units were obtained. The distribution of these factors in regular units (RUs) and special care units (SCUs) is described, and the differences between the two types of units are analyzed. Furthermore, multilevel linear regression analyses explored the extent to which variables were associated with PCC. Higher levels of PCC were associated with a greater job satisfaction, three years or more of health-related education, a lower level of quantitative demands and role conflict, a higher level of perception of mastery, empowering leadership, innovative climate and perception of group work, in addition to the type of unit and the physical environment in the NH unit designed for people with dementia. SCU and staff job satisfaction explained most of the variation in PCC. This study shows an association between PCC and organizational, staff and unit characteristics in NH. These findings indicate that providing PCC in NH care is closely linked to how the staff experiences their job situation in addition to both organizational and structural factors and the physical environment. Attention needs to be given to such factors when planning NH care.

  19. Training and Practices of Cannabis Dispensary Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Nancy A; Kieschnick, Dustin; Sottile, James E; Babson, Kimberly A; Vandrey, Ryan; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The proliferation of cannabis dispensaries within the United States has emerged from patient demand for the legalization of cannabis as an alternative treatment for a number of conditions and symptoms. Unfortunately, nothing is known about the practices of dispensary staff with respect to recommendation of cannabis strains/concentrations for specific patient ailments. To address this limitation, the present study assessed the training and practices of cannabis dispensary staff. Materials and Methods: Medical and nonmedical dispensary staff ( n =55) were recruited via e-mail and social media to complete an online survey assessing their demographic characteristics, dispensary features, patient characteristics, formal training, and cannabis recommendation practices. Results: Fifty-five percent of dispensary staff reported some formal training for their position, with 20% reporting medical/scientific training. A majority (94%) indicated that they provide specific cannabis advice to patients. In terms of strains, dispensary staff trended toward recommendations of Indica for anxiety, chronic pain, insomnia, nightmares, and Tourette's syndrome. They were more likely to recommend Indica and hybrid plants for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)/trauma and muscle spasms. In contrast, staff were less likely to recommend Indica for depression; hybrid strains were most often recommended for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In terms of cannabinoid concentrations, dispensary staff were most likely to recommend a 1:1 ratio of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC):cannabidiol (CBD) for patients suffering from anxiety, Crohn's disease, hepatitis C, and PTSD/trauma, while patients seeking appetite stimulation were most likely to be recommended THC. Staff recommended high CBD for arthritis and Alzheimer's disease and a high CBD or 1:1 ratio for ALS, epilepsy, and muscle spasms. Conclusions: Although many dispensary staff are making recommendations consistent with

  20. Following the terrorist attacks recently committed in the United States of America, and according to the recommendations of the Council of the European Union, the CERN staff observed 3 minutes of silence on Friday 14 September 2001 at 12h00, as a sign of deepest sympathy for all the victims and their families, and of solidarity with the American people

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2001-01-01

    Following the terrorist attacks recently committed in the United States of America, and according to the recommendations of the Council of the European Union, the CERN staff observed 3 minutes of silence on Friday 14 September 2001 at 12h00, as a sign of deepest sympathy for all the victims and their families, and of solidarity with the American people

  1. Cesarean sections among Syrian refugees in Lebanon from december 2012/january 2013 to june 2013: probable causes and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huster, Karin M J; Patterson, Njogu; Schilperoord, Marian; Spiegel, Paul

    2014-09-01

    There are nearly 3 million Syrian refugees, with more than 1 million in Lebanon. We combined quantitative and qualitative methods to determine cesarean section (CS) rates among Syrian refugees accessing care through United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)-contracted hospitals in Lebanon and possible driving factors. We analyzed hospital admission data from UNHCR's main partners from December 2012/January 1, 2013, to June 30, 2013. We collected qualitative data in a subset of hospitals through semi-structured informant interviews. Deliveries accounted for almost 50 percent of hospitalizations. The average CS rate was 35 percent of 6,366 deliveries. Women expressed strong preference for female providers. Clinicians observed that refugees had high incidence of birth and health complications diagnosed at delivery time that often required emergent CS. CS rates are high among Syrian refugee women in Lebanon. Limited access and utilization of antenatal care, privatized health care, and male obstetrical providers may be important drivers that need to be addressed.

  2. Factors associated with mothers' knowledge on infant and young child feeding recommendation in slum areas of Bahir Dar City, Ethiopia: cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demilew, Yeshalem Mulugeta

    2017-06-05

    Malnutrition is a public health concern in Ethiopia. This might be correlated with inappropriate infant and young child feeding practice. This in turn is affected by Mothers' knowledge on feeding practice. However, information on mothers' knowledge on infant and young child feeding recommendation was scarce in Ethiopia. Therefore, this study was designed to assess mothers' knowledge on infant and young child feeding recommendation and associated factors in slum areas of Bahir Dar City, Ethiopia. A community based cross-sectional study was conducted from May 1-26/2015. Systematic sampling technique was used to select respondents. Data were collected by pretested, structured, interviewer administered questionnaire. Data were entered and analyzed by SPSS version 20 software. Knowledge score was computed. Binary and multivariable logistic regression analysis were used to identify factors associated with maternal knowledge. Only 28.7% of mothers had sufficient knowledge on infant and young child feeding recommendation. Factors associated with mothers, knowledge were above primary education [AOR 2.5, 95% CI (1.5, 3.9)], possession of radio [AOR 1.7, 95% CI (1.1, 2.7)], attending antenatal care [AOR 2.4, 95% CI (1.5, 4.0)], and having employed husband [AOR 2.3, 95% CI (1.2, 4.4)]. Mothers' knowledge on infant and young child feeding recommendation was very low. Hence, education on infant and young child feeding recommendation should be strengthened during antenatal care visit and using mass media especially for mothers with lower educational status to fill up of this gap.

  3. Cesarean Sections Among Syrian Refugees in Lebanon from December 2012/January 2013 to June 2013: Probable Causes and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huster, Karin M.J.; Patterson, Njogu; Schilperoord, Marian; Spiegel, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: There are nearly 3 million Syrian refugees, with more than 1 million in Lebanon. We combined quantitative and qualitative methods to determine cesarean section (CS) rates among Syrian refugees accessing care through United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)-contracted hospitals in Lebanon and possible driving factors. Methods: We analyzed hospital admission data from UNHCR’s main partners from December 2012/January 1, 2013, to June 30, 2013. We collected qualitative data in a subset of hospitals through semi-structured informant interviews. Results: Deliveries accounted for almost 50 percent of hospitalizations. The average CS rate was 35 percent of 6,366 deliveries. Women expressed strong preference for female providers. Clinicians observed that refugees had high incidence of birth and health complications diagnosed at delivery time that often required emergent CS. Discussion: CS rates are high among Syrian refugee women in Lebanon. Limited access and utilization of antenatal care, privatized health care, and male obstetrical providers may be important drivers that need to be addressed. PMID:25191143

  4. SENIOR STAFF ADVANCEMENT COMMITTEE (SSAC)

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Composition and mandateThe Senior Staff Advancement Committee is composed of members nominated ad persona by the Director-General.The Committee examines proposals from Divisions concerning promotions to grade 13 in Career Path IX, changes of career path to Career Path IX and advancements to the exceptional grade in Career path VIII.The Director-General may consult the Committee on any matter related to senior staff careers.The Committee makes its recommendations to the Director-General.

  5. NRC staff site characterization analysis of the Department of Energy`s Site Characterization Plan, Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-08-01

    This Site Characterization Analysis (SCA) documents the NRC staff`s concerns resulting from its review of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Site Characterization Plan (SCP) for the Yucca Mountain site in southern Nevada, which is the candidate site selected for characterization as the nation`s first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. DOE`s SCP explains how DOE plans to obtain the information necessary to determine the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for a repository. NRC`s specific objections related to the SCP, and major comments and recommendations on the various parts of DOE`s program, are presented in SCA Section 2, Director`s Comments and Recommendations. Section 3 contains summaries of the NRC staff`s concerns for each specific program, and Section 4 contains NRC staff point papers which set forth in greater detail particular staff concerns regarding DOE`s program. Appendix A presents NRC staff evaluations of those NRC staff Consultation Draft SCP concerns that NRC considers resolved on the basis of the SCP. This SCA fulfills NRC`s responsibilities with respect to DOE`s SCP as specified by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) and 10 CFR 60.18. 192 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. 14 CFR 385.33 - Review by the staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Review by the staff. 385.33 Section 385.33...) ORGANIZATION STAFF ASSIGNMENTS AND REVIEW OF ACTION UNDER ASSIGNMENTS Procedure on Review of Staff Action § 385.33 Review by the staff. Where a petition for review is duly filed, the staff member may, upon...

  7. 34 CFR 75.519 - Dual compensation of staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dual compensation of staff. 75.519 Section 75.519... by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.519 Dual compensation of staff. A grantee may not use its grantee to pay a project staff member for time or work for which that staff member is compensated from some other...

  8. Intention to stay of nurses in current posts in difficult-to-staff areas of Yemen, Jordan, Lebanon and Qatar: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jardali, Fadi; Murray, Susan F; Dimassi, Hani; Jamal, Diana; Abualrub, Raeda; Al-Surimi, Khaled; Clinton, Michael; Dumit, Nuhad Y

    2013-11-01

    The nursing workforce shortages in difficult-to-staff areas have implications not only for quality of care but also for population health outcomes. An understanding of attrition and of retention is important to inform policies on the nursing workforce. This paper draws on questionnaire survey data from nurses working in difficult-to-staff areas in four countries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (Yemen, Jordan, Lebanon and Qatar). It aims to identify the specific and common factors associated with nurses' intention to stay in their current post for the coming 1-3 years in three countries with an internally trained nursing workforce and in a fourth where the workforce is externally recruited. Nurses working in 'difficult to staff' areas in Yemen, Jordan, Lebanon and Qatar were surveyed. A conceptual model composed of 6 dimensions based on that of the World Health Organization was constructed with 'intent to stay' (Career Decisions) as the main outcome. Regression models were constructed for each of the dimensions in the conceptual model with 'intent to stay' as the dependent variable for each of the study countries. Subsequently, a collective model that combined Lebanon, Jordan and Yemen was constructed to identify common factors that are associated with intent to stay. Factors associated with intent to stay differed for study countries. Marriage was positively associated with intent to stay in Lebanon and Jordan whereas years of experience were positively significant for Lebanon and Yemen. Shorter commuting time was significantly associated with intent to stay in Jordan whereas a preference for village life was significant for Lebanon. Job satisfaction was significantly associated with intent to stay in all study countries. Nurses in Lebanon, Jordan and Qatar who indicated that they would choose nursing if they had the opportunity to choose a career all over again were significantly more likely to intend to stay in their current post. Studies of nurses working in

  9. 77 FR 12086 - Final Staff Guidance, Revision 4 to Standard Review Plan; Section 8.1 on Electric Power-Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... Plan; Section 8.1 on Electric Power--Introduction AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. [[Page 12087... Nuclear Power Plants,'' Standard Review Plan (SRP) Section 8.1 on ``Electric Power--Introduction,'' (Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS) Accession No. ML113640121), and the Branch...

  10. 28 CFR 551.32 - Staff supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff supervision. 551.32 Section 551.32 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Inmate Organizations § 551.32 Staff supervision. (a) The Warden shall appoint a staff member as the...

  11. 13 CFR 400.105 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 400.105 Section 400.105... Board Procedures § 400.105 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director of the Board advises... with respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff, and...

  12. 13 CFR 500.105 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 500.105 Section 500.105... LOAN PROGRAM Board Procedures § 500.105 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director of the... direction with respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff...

  13. 20 CFR 900.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff. 900.5 Section 900.5 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION § 900.5 Staff. (a) The... the Act and performs such other functions as the Board may delegate to him. (b) Members of the staffs...

  14. 14 CFR 1310.6 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 1310.6 Section 1310.6 Aeronautics... GUARANTEED LOAN § 1310.6 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director advises and assists the Board... administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff, and performs such other duties as the...

  15. Staff Group Trainer: Development of a Computer-Driven, Structured, Staff Training Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koger, Milton

    1998-01-01

    .... The project produced two training support packages (TSP)--battalion and brigade--designed to train these staffs to more effectively and efficiently communicate within and between staff sections, command post, and the unit commander...

  16. The health beliefs of mothers about preventing cervical cancer and their intention to recommend the Pap test to their daughters: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Won Kim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mothers have a primary role in the prevention of cervical cancer in Korea. This study aimed to determine the awareness and health beliefs of mothers about preventing cervical cancer in their daughters, their intention to recommend the Pap test to their daughters, and the factors influencing this intention. Methods A cross-sectional survey design was employed, and the study enrolled mothers (n = 1,581 of pubescent girls aged 13 to 18 years who were living nationwide in Korea. The six health-beliefs variables related to preventing cervical cancer in their daughters, awareness of the importance of cervical cancer prevention methods, and the intention to recommend the Pap test to daughters were investigated. The impacts of these health beliefs of the mothers and the sociodemographic factors influencing their intention to recommend the Pap test to their daughters were assessed using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results Almost one-quarter (23.7 % of the mothers had talked about the Pap test, 69.2 % were intending to recommend the Pap test to their daughters, and 38.5 % considered that the Pap test could be necessary if their daughters became sexually active. The significant health beliefs influencing the intention to recommend the Pap test were the perceived barriers [odds ratio (OR = 1.47, 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI = 1.03–2.11] and benefits (OR = 2.25, 95 % CI = 1.55–3.25. The significant sociodemographic factors of mothers were their education (OR = 1.52, 95 % CI = 1.08–2.13, their experience of talking about the Pap test with their daughters (OR = 2.11, 95 % CI = 1.23–3.64, their regularity of undergoing the Pap test themselves (OR = 1.98, 95 % CI = 1.30–3.03, and their age when they first underwent the Pap test (OR = 1.60, 95 % CI = 1.43–0.82. Conclusions The mothers perceived HPV vaccination as the most important of the five methods

  17. The health beliefs of mothers about preventing cervical cancer and their intention to recommend the Pap test to their daughters: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae Won

    2016-05-03

    Mothers have a primary role in the prevention of cervical cancer in Korea. This study aimed to determine the awareness and health beliefs of mothers about preventing cervical cancer in their daughters, their intention to recommend the Pap test to their daughters, and the factors influencing this intention. A cross-sectional survey design was employed, and the study enrolled mothers (n = 1,581) of pubescent girls aged 13 to 18 years who were living nationwide in Korea. The six health-beliefs variables related to preventing cervical cancer in their daughters, awareness of the importance of cervical cancer prevention methods, and the intention to recommend the Pap test to daughters were investigated. The impacts of these health beliefs of the mothers and the sociodemographic factors influencing their intention to recommend the Pap test to their daughters were assessed using multiple logistic regression analysis. Almost one-quarter (23.7 %) of the mothers had talked about the Pap test, 69.2 % were intending to recommend the Pap test to their daughters, and 38.5 % considered that the Pap test could be necessary if their daughters became sexually active. The significant health beliefs influencing the intention to recommend the Pap test were the perceived barriers [odds ratio (OR) = 1.47, 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) = 1.03-2.11] and benefits (OR = 2.25, 95 % CI = 1.55-3.25). The significant sociodemographic factors of mothers were their education (OR = 1.52, 95 % CI = 1.08-2.13), their experience of talking about the Pap test with their daughters (OR = 2.11, 95 % CI = 1.23-3.64), their regularity of undergoing the Pap test themselves (OR = 1.98, 95 % CI = 1.30-3.03), and their age when they first underwent the Pap test (OR = 1.60, 95 % CI = 1.43-0.82). The mothers perceived HPV vaccination as the most important of the five methods for preventing cervical cancer in their daughters. Mothers perceived the

  18. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  19. Factors Related to Life satisfaction, Meaning of life, Religiosity and Death Anxiety in Health Care Staff and Students: A Cross Sectional Study from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha KS

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Death is beyond one's personal control, generates great concern and anxiety, among human beings. Studies exploring the association between religious attitudes and death attitudes in adolescents and young adults in postmodern society are scarce. This study examines the relationship between five dimensions of attitude toward death (fear of death, death avoidance, neutral acceptance, approach acceptance, and escape acceptance, death anxiety, life satisfaction and meaning, religiosity and selected personal factors among health care staff and students in three teaching hospitals. A total of 230 adolescents and adults both sexes who were willing participated. Diener et al Satisfaction with Life, Steger et al Meaning of Life Questionnaire; Templer's Death Anxiety Scale, Wong's Death Attitude Profile-R and a religious attitude scale were administered. Findings showed students' search for meaning was higher than faculty. An unusual finding of higher Approach acceptance death attitude in students emerged. Correlation analysis revealed that presence of meaning was related to greater life satisfaction in both groups. It was further related to higher religiosity in both groups and higher neutral acceptance of death and lesser death anxiety in students alone. In both groups search for meaning was positively associated with death anxiety. Faculty's search for meaning was positively associated with negative death attitudes and surprisingly one positive death attitude. Death anxiety was more with faculty's advancing age, and was also more when both groups held negative death attitudes. Religiosity was positively associated with death anxiety in students. Further, religiosity was not only positively associated with positive death attitudes of approach acceptance (both groups and neutral acceptance (faculty but also with negative attitude of death avoidance (faculty. Death anxiety was more despite both groups embracing approach acceptance death attitude indicating

  20. The diet of diabetic patients in Spain in 2008-2010: accordance with the main dietary recommendations--a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Muñoz-Pareja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: No previous study has assessed the diet of the diabetic patients in the general population of an entire country in Europe. This study evaluates accordance of the diet of diabetic adults in Spain with nutritional recommendations of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD, American Diabetes Association (ADA, and the Mediterranean diet (MD. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Cross-sectional study conducted in 2008-2010 among 12,948 persons representative of the population aged ≥18 years in Spain. Usual food consumption was assessed with a dietary history. EASD accordance was defined as ≥6 points on a score of 12 nutritional goals, ADA accordance as ≥3 points on a score of 6 goals, and MD accordance as ≥7 points on the Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener. In the 609 diagnosed diabetic individuals, the diet was rich in saturated fat (11.2% of total energy, but trans fat intake was relatively low (1.1% energy and monounsaturated fat intake was high (16.1% energy. Carbohydrate intake was relatively low (41.1% energy, but sugar intake was high (16.9% energy. Intake of cholesterol (322 mg/day and sodium (3.1 g/day was also high, while fiber intake was insufficient (23.8 g/day. EASD accordance was observed in 48.7% diabetic patients, ADA accordance in 46.3%, and MD accordance in 57.4%. The frequency of EASD, ADA and MD accordance was not statistically different between diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetic individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Only about half of diabetic patients in Spain have a diet that is consistent with the major dietary recommendations. The lack of dietary differences between diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetic individuals reflects deficiencies in diabetes management.

  1. Staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in South African public sector mental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To document staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in public. sector mental health services in South Africa. Design. Cross-sectional survey. Method. Aquestionnaire was distributed to provincial mental health co-ordinators requesting numbers of full-time equivalent (FTE) staff who provide mental health care at all ...

  2. Job Satisfaction Of Hospital Nursing Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Pietersen

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Health care managers realize that job satisfaction impacts on nursing staff retention. This study examined the job satisfaction of nursing staff (N = 109 at a government hospital. Just more than half of the respondents were generally satisfied. Feelings that nursing is worthwhile and satisfying, and financial stability at the hospital could promote staff retention. Specific intrinsic - (promotion, and extrinsic factors (routinization, working conditions, pay, interaction with supervisors, and organizational support could impact negatively on retention. Management should use these findings as a basis for staff consultation, developmental strategies, and interventions. Future research on other nursing populations is recommended.

  3. Improving staff selection processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerinus, Marie; Shannon, Marina

    2014-11-11

    This article, the second in a series of articles on Leading Better Care, describes the actions undertaken in recent years in NHS Lanarkshire to improve selection processes for nursing, midwifery and allied health professional (NMAHP) posts. This is an area of significant interest to these professions, management colleagues and patients given the pivotal importance of NMAHPs to patient care and experience. In recent times the importance of selecting staff not only with the right qualifications but also with the right attributes has been highlighted to ensure patients are well cared for in a safe, effective and compassionate manner. The article focuses on NMAHP selection processes, tracking local, collaborative development work undertaken to date. It presents an overview of some of the work being implemented, highlights a range of important factors, outlines how evaluation is progressing and concludes by recommending further empirical research.

  4. Staff working in hospital units with greater social capital experience less work-home conflict: Secondary analysis of a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzsche, Anika; Kuntz, Ludwig; Miedaner, Felix

    2017-10-01

    When the interplay between work and private life does not function correctly (work-home conflict), this constitutes a well-known risk factor for poorer health, increased absenteeism and lower work performance. Information about influencing factors of work-home conflict is therefore indispensable in order to avoid it. In this study, we analyse whether a good working atmosphere that fosters mutual trust, support and a 'sense of unity' (organizational social capital) can reduce an employee's conflict between work and private life. This study investigates the link between organizational social capital and work-home conflict in health professionals. This issue was investigated using a cross-sectional study conducted in 2013. Data from questionnaires completed by physicians and nurses (n=1733) were linked with structural data from 66 neonatal intensive care units in Germany. Using multi-level analyses, we investigated associations between organizational social capital at the ward level and work-home conflict at the level of individual employees, taking into account additional structural and individual characteristics. Employees on wards with greater social capital reported significantly less work-home conflict. Our results support the hypothesis that organizational social capital is an important collective resource. As such, more attention should be given to establishing a good working atmosphere that fosters mutual trust, support and a 'sense of unity', and this should be encouraged in a targeted fashion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Attachment and coping of dementia care staff: The role of staff attachment style, geriatric nursing self-efficacy, and approaches to dementia in burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkonen, Taru-Maija; Cheston, Richard I L; Dallos, Rudi; Smart, Cordet A

    2014-07-01

    Past research suggests that dementia care staff are vulnerable to the development of burnout, which has implications for staff well-being and hence the quality of care for people with dementia. Studying personal vulnerability factors in burnout is important as it can guide staff training and support. Attachment theory suggests that adult attachment styles affect caregiving relationships and individuals' responses to stress, providing a framework for understanding caregivers' styles of coping. This cross-sectional survey study examined relationships between staff attachment styles, geriatric nursing self-efficacy, and approaches to dementia in burnout. Seventy-seven members of dementia care staff working on inpatient wards for older people completed self-report questionnaires. Insecure attachment, lower levels of self-efficacy, and more optimistic attitudes in staff were related to higher levels of burnout. Staff training on the role of attachment in dementia care is recommended. Further research is required to explore mediating factors between adult attachment styles and burnout. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. 7 CFR 1700.27 - Chief of Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chief of Staff. 1700.27 Section 1700.27 Agriculture... GENERAL INFORMATION Agency Organization and Functions § 1700.27 Chief of Staff. The Chief of Staff aids and assists the Administrator and the Deputy Administrator. The Chief of Staff advises the...

  7. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The Water Resources Council Staff (hereinafter the Staff) serves the Council and the Chairman in the performance of...

  8. 10 CFR 2.709 - Discovery against NRC staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discovery against NRC staff. 2.709 Section 2.709 Energy... Rules for Formal Adjudications § 2.709 Discovery against NRC staff. (a)(1) In a proceeding in which the NRC staff is a party, the NRC staff will make available one or more witnesses, designated by the...

  9. 10 CFR 2.1505 - Role of the NRC staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Role of the NRC staff. 2.1505 Section 2.1505 Energy... Legislative Hearings § 2.1505 Role of the NRC staff. The NRC staff shall be available to answer any Commission or presiding officer's questions on staff-prepared documents, provide additional information or...

  10. Pandemic preparedness: perceptions of vulnerable migrants in Thailand towards WHO-recommended non-pharmaceutical interventions: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Jason; Gagnon, Anita J; Jitthai, Nigoon

    2014-06-28

    Non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) constituted the principal public health response to the previous influenza A (H1N1) 2009 pandemic and are one key area of ongoing preparation for future pandemics. Thailand is an important point of focus in terms of global pandemic preparedness and response due to its role as the major transportation hub for Southeast Asia, the endemic presence of multiple types of influenza, and its role as a major receiving country for migrants. Our aim was to collect information about vulnerable migrants' perceptions of and ability to implement NPIs proposed by the WHO. We hope that this information will help us to gauge the capacity of this population to engage in pandemic preparedness and response efforts, and to identify potential barriers to NPI effectiveness. A cross-sectional survey was performed. The study was conducted during the influenza H1N1 2009 pandemic and included 801 migrant participants living in border areas thought to be high risk by the Thailand Ministry of Public Health. Data were collected by Migrant Community Health Workers using a 201-item interviewer-assisted questionnaire. Univariate descriptive analyses were conducted. With the exception of border measures, to which nearly all participants reported they would be adherent, attitudes towards recommended NPIs were generally negative or uncertain. Other potential barriers to NPI implementation include limited experience applying these interventions (e.g., using a thermometer, wearing a face mask) and inadequate hand washing and household disinfection practices. Negative or ambivalent attitudes towards NPIs combined with other barriers identified suggest that vulnerable migrants in Thailand have a limited capacity to participate in pandemic preparedness efforts. This limited capacity likely puts migrants at risk of propagating the spread of a pandemic virus. Coordinated risk communication and public education are potential strategies that may reduce barriers to

  11. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Association will shortly be renewing the mandate of half of the Staff Council. This is an opportunity for you to become more directly involved in the Staff Association's work and help promote and defend the staff's interests and, more broadly, those of the Organization itself.

  12. NRC staff site characterization analysis of the Department of Energy's Site Characterization Plan, Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    This Site Characterization Analysis (SCA) documents the NRC staff's concerns resulting from its review of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Site Characterization Plan (SCP) for the Yucca Mountain site in southern Nevada, which is the candidate site selected for characterization as the nation's first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. DOE's SCP explains how DOE plans to obtain the information necessary to determine the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for a repository. NRC's specific objections related to the SCP, and major comments and recommendations on the various parts of DOE's program, are presented in SCA Section 2, Director's Comments and Recommendations. Section 3 contains summaries of the NRC staff's concerns for each specific program, and Section 4 contains NRC staff point papers which set forth in greater detail particular staff concerns regarding DOE's program. Appendix A presents NRC staff evaluations of those NRC staff Consultation Draft SCP concerns that NRC considers resolved on the basis of the SCP. This SCA fulfills NRC's responsibilities with respect to DOE's SCP as specified by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) and 10 CFR 60.18. 192 refs., 2 tabs

  13. Assessment of dog owner adherence to veterinarians' flea and tick prevention recommendations in the United States using a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavan, Robert P; Tunceli, Kaan; Zhang, Dongmu; Normile, Dorothy; Armstrong, Rob

    2017-06-06

    Adherence to a prescribed therapeutic regimen is a critical factor for achieving medication effectiveness and therefore treatment success. In the case of companion animal ectoparasite control, suboptimal owner adherence to medication recommendations is thought to be a common cause of treatment failure, and previous reports have found pet owners applying an average of 4.0-4.6 monthly flea and tick treatments per year to their dogs. This study investigated: US veterinary hospital self-reported flea and tick prevention recommendations; dog owner recollection of these recommendations; dog owner opinion on flea/tick recommendations and estimated owner flea and tick medication adherence based on veterinary hospital purchase records. Veterinarians at 24 veterinary hospitals in 4 United States regions provided their flea and tick prevention recommendations. Five hundred fifty-nine dog owners, clients of the 24 hospitals, completed a survey evaluating their recollection of the hospitals' recommendations and their opinions regarding required treatment frequency. Almost all veterinary hospitals in this study recommended 12 months of flea and tick prevention but only 62% of participating dog owners recalled this recommendation. The average owner response was that their dogs require 10.5 months of flea and tick prevention annually. Owner opinions were significantly different among U.S. regions with pet owners in the northeast U.S. believing that they needed significantly less canine flea and tick protection than pet owners in other parts of the United States. The estimated actual flea and tick prevention coverage was 6.1 months based on owner medication purchases over a 12-month period. In the United States, dog owner opinions and actions show that their flea and tick treatment adherence falls short of veterinarians' recommendations.

  14. 25 CFR 36.86 - Are there staff training requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... section before the first day of student occupancy for the year. (1) First Aid/Safety/Emergency & Crisis... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are there staff training requirements? 36.86 Section 36... Programs Staffing § 36.86 Are there staff training requirements? (a) All homeliving program staff as well...

  15. 20 CFR 638.801 - Staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff training. 638.801 Section 638.801 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Administrative Provisions § 638.801 Staff training. The...

  16. 40 CFR 1.25 - Staff Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff Offices. 1.25 Section 1.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters § 1.25 Staff Offices. (a) Office of Administrative Law Judges. The Office of...

  17. 29 CFR 511.7 - Committee staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Committee staff. 511.7 Section 511.7 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS WAGE ORDER PROCEDURE FOR AMERICAN SAMOA § 511.7 Committee staff. Each industry committee will be furnished a lawyer, to...

  18. 28 CFR 600.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 600.5 Section 600.5 Judicial Administration OFFICES OF INDEPENDENT COUNSEL, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL POWERS OF SPECIAL COUNSEL § 600.5 Staff. A Special Counsel may request the assignment of appropriate Department employees to assist the...

  19. E3 Staff Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E3 Staff database is maintained by E3 PDMS (Professional Development & Management Services) office. The database is Mysql. It is manually updated by E3 staff as...

  20. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Typically, ground staff scheduling is centrally planned for each terminal in an airport. The advantage of this is that the staff is efficiently utilized, but a disadvantage is that staff spends considerable time walking between stands. In this paper a decentralized approach for ground staff...... scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the staff scheduling is planned decentralized for each zone. The advantage of this approach is that the staff...... work in a smaller area of the terminal and thus spends less time walking between stands. When planning decentralized the allocation of stands to flights influences the staff scheduling since the workload in a zone depends on which flights are allocated to stands in the zone. Hence solving the problem...

  1. CHIEF OF STAFF FINANCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Internal Audit, Military. Museums, Documentation. Service, Language. Service, Financial Co-ordination, Chief Pay Mas- ter, Programming and Budget, Electronic Data. Processing and Expenditure Control. Chief of Staff Finance. With effect from 13 February 1978 Chief of Staff. Management Services became Chief of Staff.

  2. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2007-01-01

    The Staff Association will shortly be renewing the mandate of half of the Staff Council. This is an opportunity for you to become more directly involved in the Staff Association’s work and help promote and defend the staff’s interests and, more broadly, those of the Organization itself.

  3. Technology recommendations for pre-screening of IAEA swipe samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steeb, Jennifer L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Smith, Nicholas A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lee, Denise L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Huckabay, Heath A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ticknor, Brian W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Argonne and Oak Ridge National Laboratories have prepared an analysis of recommended, possible, and not recommended technologies for pre-screening and prioritizing IAEA swipes. The analytical techniques listed under the recommended technology list are the most promising techniques available to date. The recommended list is divided into two sections: Argonne’s recommended techniques and Oak Ridge’s recommended techniques. This list was divided based upon the expertise of staff in each subject area and/or the instrumentation available at each laboratory. The following section, titled Possible Techniques, is a list of analytical techniques that could be used for pre-screening and prioritizing swipes if additional instrumentation and effort were provided. These techniques are not necessarily top priority, but should not be discounted for future or expanded efforts. Lastly, a list of not recommended techniques is provided to outline the analytical methods and instrumentation that were investigated by each lab but deemed not suitable for this task. In addition to the recommendation list, a short procedure is provided outlining the steps followed for destructive analysis by the Network of Analytical Laboratories (NWAL) for determination of uranium concentrations, isotopic content of sample and swipe. Swipes generated for this project will be given to ORNL’s NWAL laboratory for analysis after analysis by other techniques at both laboratories.

  4. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  5. Should Physical Activity Recommendations for South Asian Adults Be Ethnicity-Specific? Evidence from a Cross-Sectional Study of South Asian and White European Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliodromiti, Stamatina; Ghouri, Nazim; Celis-Morales, Carlos A; Sattar, Naveed; Lumsden, Mary Ann; Gill, Jason M R

    2016-01-01

    International public health guidelines recommend that adults undertake at least 150 min.week-1 of moderate-intensity physical activity. However, the underpinning evidence has largely been obtained from studies of populations of white European descent. It is unclear whether these recommendations are appropriate for other ethnic groups, particularly South Asians, who have greater cardio-metabolic risk than white Europeans. The objective of our study was to determine the level of moderate-intensity physical activity required in South Asians adults to confer a similar cardio-metabolic risk profile to that observed in Europeans of similar age and body mass index (BMI) undertaking the currently recommended levels of 150 min.week-1. 148 South Asians and 163 white Europeans aged 18 to 70 years were recruited. Physical activity was measured objectively via vertical axis accelerations from hip-worn accelerometers. Factor analysis was used to summarize the measured risk biomarkers into a single underlying latent "factor" describing overall cardio-metabolic risk. Sex did not modify the association between physical activity and the cardio-metabolic risk factor, so data for both sexes were combined and models adjusted for age, sex, BMI and accelerometer wear time. We estimated that South Asian adults needed to undertake 232 (95% Confidence interval: 200 to 268) min.week-1 in order to obtain the same cardio-metabolic risk factor score as a white European undertaking 150 minutes of moderate-equivalent physical activity per week. The present findings suggest that South Asian men and women need to undertake ~230 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity per week. This equates to South Asians undertaking an extra 10-15 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity per day on top of existing recommendations.

  6. Summary (and) recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report looks at the Health and Safety record at the Atomic Weapons Establishment at Aldermaston. The last outside report was by Pochin in 1978 which recommended that staffing for health physicists and maintenance staff should be increased and that some buildings where solid and liquid radioactive wastes were processed should be replaced. A new facility to process contaminated heavy equipment was also recommended. This report finds that none of the recommendations have been fully implemented. It also lists accidents, fires and worker contamination. It is concluded that some of the problems are that nuclear weapons production is inherently unsafe and cannot be made safe, that the secrecy surrounding the establishments' safety record is not good for improving it and finally the report calls for production at Aldermaston to be halted. (UK)

  7. Oncology staff reflections about a 52-year-old staff Christmas choir: constructivist research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Clare C; Hornby, Colin J; Pearson, Elizabeth J M; Ball, David L

    2010-12-01

    Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre has one of the world's most enduring staff Christmas choirs. Commencing in 1956, the choir performs in a cafeteria, patient wards, and outpatient waiting areas before each Christmas. With recent emphasis on oncology staff support needs the choir's relevance warranted investigation. This constructivist research examined what effect the staff Christmas choir had on the choir members and staff bystanders in 2008. Sampling was convenience and purposive. Staff choir members were invited to participate during rehearsals, and staff bystanders were invited at seven choir performances in the hospital. Respondents completed anonymous and semistructured questionnaires and the conductor (of 29 years) was interviewed. The inductive, comparative, and cyclic data analyses were informed by grounded theory and qualitative interrater reliability was performed. Questionnaires from 64 staff were returned. The choir elicited positive emotions, memories, Christmas spirit, hospital community and/or work-life effects for many staff, in a cancer context described as sometimes "overwhelming" and "stressful." Choir members' reactions included stress relief, friendship and feeling rewarded. Bystanders' reactions included feeling uplifted, inspired and moved. Suggestions for future performances were offered, including musical acknowledgement of other religious festivals. Two respondents were concerned about intrusive effects on patients and work practices. A staff Christmas choir supported most choir member and staff bystander respondents in an oncology hospital and is recommended in comparable contexts. Further investigation is warranted to extend understanding about Christmas music's effects in palliative care settings.

  8. Do care homes deliver person-centred care? A cross-sectional survey of staff-reported abusive and positive behaviours towards residents from the MARQUE (Managing Agitation and Raising Quality of Life) English national care home survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Louise; Barber, Julie; Livingston, Deborah; Rapaport, Penny; Higgs, Paul; Livingston, Gill

    2018-01-01

    Background There are widespread concerns about abuse of care home residents. We report, in the largest care home survey, prevalence of staff anonymously-reported, perpetrated/witnessed abusive behaviours towards care home residents over 3 months. We also report positive care behaviours. Methods 1544 staff in 92 English care home units completed the revised Modified Conflict Tactics Scale and Maslach Burnout Inventory. Outcomes Most staff reported positive care behaviours, but specific person-centred activities were sometimes infrequent. Many care home staff were never or almost never aware of a resident being taken out of the home for their enjoyment (34%, n = 520); or an activity planned around a resident’s interests (15%, n = 234). 763 (51%; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 47% to 54%) of care home staff reported carrying out or observing potentially abusive or neglectful behaviours at least sometimes in the preceding 3 months; some abuse was reported as happening “at least sometimes” in 91/92 care homes. Neglect was most frequently reported: making a resident wait for care (n = 399, 26%), avoiding a resident with challenging behaviour (n = 391, 25%), giving residents insufficient time for food (n = 297, 19%), and taking insufficient care when moving residents (n = 169, 11%). 1.1% of staff reported physical and 5% verbal abuse. More staff reported abusive/neglectful behaviour in homes with higher staff burnout-depersonalisation scores (adjusted odds ratio 1.191, CI 1.052–1.349). Interpretation Staff anonymous reports of abusive behaviour and neglect could be used to monitor care quality, as cases currently reported are probably tip of the iceberg, and be an outcome in intervention studies. PMID:29561867

  9. Do care homes deliver person-centred care? A cross-sectional survey of staff-reported abusive and positive behaviours towards residents from the MARQUE (Managing Agitation and Raising Quality of Life) English national care home survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Claudia; Marston, Louise; Barber, Julie; Livingston, Deborah; Rapaport, Penny; Higgs, Paul; Livingston, Gill

    2018-01-01

    There are widespread concerns about abuse of care home residents. We report, in the largest care home survey, prevalence of staff anonymously-reported, perpetrated/witnessed abusive behaviours towards care home residents over 3 months. We also report positive care behaviours. 1544 staff in 92 English care home units completed the revised Modified Conflict Tactics Scale and Maslach Burnout Inventory. Most staff reported positive care behaviours, but specific person-centred activities were sometimes infrequent. Many care home staff were never or almost never aware of a resident being taken out of the home for their enjoyment (34%, n = 520); or an activity planned around a resident's interests (15%, n = 234). 763 (51%; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 47% to 54%) of care home staff reported carrying out or observing potentially abusive or neglectful behaviours at least sometimes in the preceding 3 months; some abuse was reported as happening "at least sometimes" in 91/92 care homes. Neglect was most frequently reported: making a resident wait for care (n = 399, 26%), avoiding a resident with challenging behaviour (n = 391, 25%), giving residents insufficient time for food (n = 297, 19%), and taking insufficient care when moving residents (n = 169, 11%). 1.1% of staff reported physical and 5% verbal abuse. More staff reported abusive/neglectful behaviour in homes with higher staff burnout-depersonalisation scores (adjusted odds ratio 1.191, CI 1.052-1.349). Staff anonymous reports of abusive behaviour and neglect could be used to monitor care quality, as cases currently reported are probably tip of the iceberg, and be an outcome in intervention studies.

  10. Diabetes, obesity, and recommended fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to food environment sub-types: a cross-sectional analysis of Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States Census, and food establishment data

    OpenAIRE

    Frankenfeld, Cara L; Leslie, Timothy F; Makara, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Background Social and spatial factors are an important part of individual and community health. The objectives were to identify food establishment sub-types and evaluate prevalence of diabetes, obesity, and recommended fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to these sub-types in the Washington DC metropolitan area. Methods A cross-sectional study design was used. A measure of retail food environment was calculated as the ratio of number of sources of unhealthier food options (fast food, ...

  11. 7 CFR 1700.33 - Financial Services Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial Services Staff. 1700.33 Section 1700.33... AGRICULTURE GENERAL INFORMATION Agency Organization and Functions § 1700.33 Financial Services Staff. The Financial Services Staff evaluates the financial condition of financially troubled borrowers in order to...

  12. 32 CFR 191.7 - Civilian EEO program staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civilian EEO program staff. 191.7 Section 191.7...) MISCELLANEOUS THE DOD CIVILIAN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY (EEO) PROGRAM § 191.7 Civilian EEO program staff. (a) EEO Managers, including SEP Managers and other staff who are responsible for EEO and affirmative...

  13. 32 CFR 1602.5 - Area office staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Area office staff. 1602.5 Section 1602.5....5 Area office staff. The compensated employees, civilian and military, of the Selective Service System employed in an area office will be referred to as the area office staff. ...

  14. 17 CFR 171.28 - Participation by Commission staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... staff. 171.28 Section 171.28 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION..., Membership Denial and Registration Actions § 171.28 Participation by Commission staff. The Division of.... The Commission shall by order establish a supplementary briefing schedule for the Commission staff and...

  15. 10 CFR 51.40 - Consultation with NRC staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consultation with NRC staff. 51.40 Section 51.40 Energy....40 Consultation with NRC staff. (a) A prospective applicant or petitioner for rulemaking is encouraged to confer with NRC staff as early as possible in its planning process before submitting...

  16. Should physical activity recommendations be ethnicity-specific? Evidence from a cross-sectional study of South Asian and European men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A Celis-Morales

    Full Text Available Expert bodies and health organisations recommend that adults undertake at least 150 min.week(-1 of moderate-intensity physical activity (MPA. However, the underpinning data largely emanate from studies of populations of European descent. It is unclear whether this level of activity is appropriate for other ethnic groups, particularly South Asians, who have increased cardio-metabolic disease risk compared to Europeans. The aim of this study was to explore the level of MPA required in South Asians to confer a similar cardio-metabolic risk profile to that observed in Europeans undertaking the currently recommended MPA level of 150 min.week(-1.Seventy-five South Asian and 83 European men, aged 40-70, without cardiovascular disease or diabetes had fasted blood taken, blood pressure measured, physical activity assessed objectively (using accelerometry, and anthropometric measures made. Factor analysis was used to summarise measured risk biomarkers into underlying latent 'factors' for glycaemia, insulin resistance, lipid metabolism, blood pressure, and overall cardio-metabolic risk. Age-adjusted regression models were used to determine the equivalent level of MPA (in bouts of ≥ 10 minutes in South Asians needed to elicit the same value in each factor as Europeans undertaking 150 min.week(-1 MPA.For all factors, except blood pressure, equivalent MPA values in South Asians were significantly higher than 150 min.week(-1; the equivalent MPA value for the overall cardio-metabolic risk factor was 266 (95% CI 185-347 min.week(-1.South Asian men may need to undertake greater levels of MPA than Europeans to exhibit a similar cardio-metabolic risk profile, suggesting that a conceptual case can be made for ethnicity-specific physical activity guidance. Further study is needed to extend these findings to women and to replicate them prospectively in a larger cohort.

  17. 32 CFR 700.710 - Organization of a staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organization of a staff. 700.710 Section 700.710... Commanders Staffs of Commanders § 700.710 Organization of a staff. (a) The term “staff” means those officers... operation of his or her command. (b) The officer detailed as chief of staff and aide to a fleet admiral or...

  18. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 31st of October to the 14th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months and will keep the next Staff Council very busy. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to vote * * * * * * * Vote Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the election...

  19. Recommender systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kembellec, Gérald; Saleh, Imad

    2014-01-01

    Acclaimed by various content platforms (books, music, movies) and auction sites online, recommendation systems are key elements of digital strategies. If development was originally intended for the performance of information systems, the issues are now massively moved on logical optimization of the customer relationship, with the main objective to maximize potential sales. On the transdisciplinary approach, engines and recommender systems brings together contributions linking information science and communications, marketing, sociology, mathematics and computing. It deals with the understan

  20. The Cross-Sectional Association between Consumption of the Recommended Five Food Group “Grain (Cereal)”, Dietary Fibre and Anthropometric Measures among Australian Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayet-Moore, Flavia; Petocz, Peter; McConnell, Andrew; Tuck, Kate; Mansour, Marie

    2017-01-01

    The Australian Dietary Guidelines recommended “grain (cereal)” core food group includes both refined and whole grain foods, but excludes those that are discretionary (i.e., cakes). We investigated the association between daily serves from the “grain (cereal)” group and its effect on fibre and adiposity. Data from Australian adults in the 2011–2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey were used (n = 9341). Participants were categorised by serves of core grain foods and general linear models were used to investigate the effect of demographic, socioeconomic, and dietary covariates on waist circumference, body mass index (BMI) and fibre intake. Compared to core grain avoiders (0 serves), high consumers (6+ serves/day) were: more likely male and socially advantaged, had a healthier dietary pattern, less likely dieting, overweight or obese, and were at lower risk of metabolic complications. After adjustment for age, sex and energy intake, there was an inverse relationship between core grain serves intake and BMI (p < 0.001), waist circumference (p = 0.001) and a positive relationship with fibre (p < 0.001). Model adjustments for diet and lifestyle factors resulted in a smaller difference in waist circumference (p = 0.006) and BMI (p = 0.006). Core grain serves was significantly associated with higher fibre, but marginally clinically significant for lower adiposity. PMID:28218715

  1. The Cross-Sectional Association between Consumption of the Recommended Five Food Group "Grain (Cereal)", Dietary Fibre and Anthropometric Measures among Australian Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayet-Moore, Flavia; Petocz, Peter; McConnell, Andrew; Tuck, Kate; Mansour, Marie

    2017-02-18

    The Australian Dietary Guidelines recommended "grain (cereal)" core food group includes both refined and whole grain foods, but excludes those that are discretionary (i.e., cakes). We investigated the association between daily serves from the "grain (cereal)" group and its effect on fibre and adiposity. Data from Australian adults in the 2011-2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey were used ( n = 9341). Participants were categorised by serves of core grain foods and general linear models were used to investigate the effect of demographic, socioeconomic, and dietary covariates on waist circumference, body mass index (BMI) and fibre intake. Compared to core grain avoiders (0 serves), high consumers (6+ serves/day) were: more likely male and socially advantaged, had a healthier dietary pattern, less likely dieting, overweight or obese, and were at lower risk of metabolic complications. After adjustment for age, sex and energy intake, there was an inverse relationship between core grain serves intake and BMI ( p < 0.001), waist circumference ( p = 0.001) and a positive relationship with fibre ( p < 0.001). Model adjustments for diet and lifestyle factors resulted in a smaller difference in waist circumference ( p = 0.006) and BMI ( p = 0.006). Core grain serves was significantly associated with higher fibre, but marginally clinically significant for lower adiposity.

  2. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 28 of October to the 11th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months, and in particular the Five-yearly-Review 2015, subject of the questionnaire that you probably recently filled out. All this will keep the next Staff Council very busy indeed. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to v...

  3. STAFF MARKETING IN MODERN RUSSIAN CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya N. Kretova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The conception of staff marketing, which was developed abroad, is effectively used in the developed countries for a long time. Its main advantage consists in the possibility of organizing some planning for the implementation of staff strategy: staff marketing provides the enterprise on the long-term basis with human resources capable of forming strategic potential, which would allow to implement the planned activities. Numerous problems of formation and development of civilized market relations in our country do not allow to fully implement the detailed models of staff marketing in domestic realities. On the basis of the analysis of theoretical developments and factors that have a practical impact on the implementation of marketing personnel in modern Russian conditions, the authors describe the essential elements of the conception. The primary purposes of staff marketing for domestic enterprises, grouped into the internal and external marketing are substantiated and disclosed. The special attention is paid to increasing the staff loyalty, which has dominant influence on business outcomes. The algorithm of events for the development of motivation system is proposed; at the stage of studying job satisfaction it is recommend to apply analytical calculations with the use of Shewhart control charts. Unlike traditional statistical tools based on the inspection of already implemented results, this approach is aimed at preventing negative tendencies and avoids losses associated with dissatisfaction with difficulty, as the individual employee and the team as a whole. Modern Russian enterprises can fully realize the conception of staff marketing only through rethinking of the consequences for all directions of work with the staff, as reflected in the definition of objectives, motivating staff and ensuring social responsibility of the enterprise.

  4. On the Issue of Labor Relations Discontinuance by Staff Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheveleva A. A.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to consideration of issues related to the procedure of labor law contract termination by staff reduction. The author, analyzing the judicial practice, gives practical recommendations on the procedure of employment relationships discontinuance

  5. Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and other Matter. The Definition Required by Annex I, paragraph 6 to the Convention and the Recommendations Required by Annex II, Section D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Paragraph 6 of Annex I to the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter provides for the Agency to define high-level radioactive wastes or other high-level radioactive matter as unsuitable for dumping at sea, and section D of Annex II provides for the Agency to make recommendations which the Contracting Parties to the Convention should take fully into account in issuing permits for the dumping at sea of radioactive wastes or other radioactive matter ''not included in Annex I''.

  6. Staff Association Cocktail

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    The Staff Association has been organising for many years a cocktail with delegates of the Member States participating in Finance Committees of March and September. This cocktail is held at the end of the day, after the Finance Committee meeting. This direct and regular communication helps establish an ongoing contact between the Staff Association and CERN Member States and, more recently, the Associate Member States. Ambassadors of the CERN Staff Association, who are Members of the Personnel, have the opportunity to meet their national delegation in an informal and friendly atmosphere. These exchanges, facilitated by the use of the national language, allow the personnel via the Staff Association to express its ideas and positions on current affairs and fundamental issues, and also to hear about those of the delegations in return.

  7. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the ...

  8. Emergency department staff preparedness for mass casualty events involving children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, Michal; Avraham, Miri; Nasi-Bashari, Anat; Idelman, Sigalit; Peretz, Yaniv; Morag, Shani; Silner, Dina; Weiss, Gali

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, the World Health Organization in general, and Israel in particular, have dealt with mass casualty events (MCEs) resulting from terrorism. Children are the casualties in many of these events-a reality that forces hospitals to prepare to deal with such a scenario. A literature review designed to identify unique recommendations regarding pediatric MCEs highlights both a lack of existing training programs and uncertainty on the part of health care staff when dealing with these events. The purpose of the study was to examine the preparedness level of emergency department staff to deal with MCEs involving pediatric casualties. The study included 104 physicians and nurses working in, or responding to, the emergency department at a hospital in Israel. The study included a 41-item questionnaire examining perception, approaches, and staff knowledge regarding dealing with pediatric MCEs versus those involving adults. The reliability of all sections of the questionnaire ranged between Chronbach's alpha coefficient 0.6 alpha-0.94. The preparedness levels for MCEs involving children were found to be low. Study participants ranked the likelihood of a pediatric MCE lower than one involving adults, while ranking significantly higher (P = .000) their ability to cope mentally and the knowledge and skills required when treating adults involved in MCEs. While nurses ranked higher than physicians regarding their knowledge and skills in dealing with pediatric MCE casualties, the level of knowledge for MCEs involving children was low in all subjects. Staff agreement for the parent of an MCE victim to be present during treatment was medium-low. On the basis of these findings, additional research involving a larger number of individuals and hospitals is indicated to determine if these results are consistent throughout the region.

  9. Staff Rules and Regulations - Modification N°10 to the 11th edition

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2016-01-01

    The Five-Yearly Review 2015 has concluded with the approval, by the Finance Committee and the Council on 16 and 17 December 2015, of the package of measures proposed by the Management (CERN/3213).   In accordance with the recommendations made and decisions taken at the Finance Committee and Council meetings relating to diversity-related aspects, which enter into force on 1 January 2016, the following pages of the Staff Rules and Regulations have been updated: Preamble, Contents – amendment on page iii.   Chapter II, Conditions of Employment and Association: - Section 1 (Employment and Association) - amendment on pages 11, 12, 14 and 15. - Section 4 (Leave) - amendment on pages 24, 25, 26 and 27. Chapter IV, Social Conditions: - Section 1 (Family, partners and family benefits) – amendment on page 37. - Section 2 (Social insurance cover) – amendment on page 39. Chapter V, Financial conditions: - Section 1 (Financ...

  10. Education and WHO Recommendations for Fruit and Vegetable Intake Are Associated with Better Cognitive Function in a Disadvantaged Brazilian Elderly Population: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor-Valero, Maria; Furlan-Viebig, Renata; Menezes, Paulo Rossi; da Silva, Simon Almeida; Vallada, Homero; Scazufca, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Brazil has one of the fastest aging populations in the world and the incidence of cognitive impairment in the elderly is expected to increase exponentially. We examined the association between cognitive impairment and fruit and vegetable intake and associated factors in a low-income elderly population. A cross-sectional population-based study was carried out with 1849 individuals aged 65 or over living in São Paulo, Brazil. Cognitive function was assessed using the Community Screening Instrument for Dementia (CSI-D). Fruit and vegetable intake was assessed with a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and categorized into quartiles of intake and into total daily fruit and vegetable intake using the cut-off points for the WHO recommendations (<400grams/day or ≥400 grams/day). The association between cognitive impairment and each quartile of intake, and WHO recommendation levels, was evaluated in two separate multivariate logistic models. The WHO recommendations for daily intakes ≥400 grams/day were significantly associated with 47% decreased prevalence of cognitive impairment. An effect modification was found in both models between cognitive impairment and “years of education and physical activity” and “years of education and blood levels of HDL” So that, having 1 or more years of education and being physically active or having 1 or more years of education and levels higher than 50 mg/dl of HDL-cholesterol strongly decreased the prevalence of cognitive impairment. In this socially deprived population with very low levels of education and physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake, those who attained WHO recommendations, had 1 year or more of education and were physically active had a significantly lower prevalence of cognitive impairment. A more comprehensive understanding of the social determinants of mental health is needed to develop effective public policies in developing countries. PMID:24736378

  11. A review of NRC staff uses of probabilistic risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The NRC staff uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management as important elements its licensing and regulatory processes. In October 1991, the NRC`s Executive Director for Operations established the PRA Working Group to address concerns identified by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards with respect to unevenness and inconsistency in the staff`s current uses of PRA. After surveying current staff uses of PRA and identifying needed improvements, the Working Group defined a set of basic principles for staff PRA use and identified three areas for improvements: guidance development, training enhancements, and PRA methods development. For each area of improvement, the Working Group took certain actions and recommended additional work. The Working Group recommended integrating its work with other recent PRA-related activities the staff completed and improving staff interactions with PRA users in the nuclear industry. The Working Group took two key actions by developing general guidance for two uses of PRA within the NRC (that is, screening or prioritizing reactor safety issues and analyzing such issues in detail) and developing guidance on basic terms and methods important to the staff`s uses of PRA.

  12. International recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, Bo

    1986-01-01

    Full text: This short presentation will indicate the general radiation protection background to protective measures against foodstuffs contaminated with radioactive substances. A number of international organizations are involved in various aspects of radiation protection, for example, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), and the World Health Organization (WHO). Two international organizations, however, provide the basic background. These are the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). UNSCEAR provides the scientific information on radiation levels and effects. It consists of 21 member countries, with truly international coverage. It issues reports to the UN General Assembly, including comprehensive scientific annexes. Its latest comprehensive report was issued in 1982, the next is expected to be published in 1988. That report will include an assessment of the radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident. The ICRP is a non-governmental organization. It has issued recommendations on radiation protection since 1928. The postulated biological basis for radiation protection recommendations involves two types of biological effects. The so-called non-stochastic effects, mainly due to cell death, appear only when the radiation doses exceed a certain threshold value. These effects, therefore, can only appear after high accidental exposures. After the Chernobyl accident, they only affected about 200 individuals involved in fire extinction and rescue work at the damaged nuclear power plant. Stochastic effects, with some simplification, may be seen as the result of initial changes in the genetic code of some surviving cells. If these cells are germ cells, this may lead to hereditary harm. If they are somatic cells, the result could be cancer

  13. Self-management-support in dementia care: A mixed methods study among nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkaik, Renate; van Antwerpen-Hoogenraad, Paulien; de Veer, Anke; Francke, Anneke; Huis In Het Veld, Judith

    2017-11-01

    Background Self-management in patients and family caregivers confronted with dementia is not self-evident. Self-management skills may be limited because of the progressive cognitive decline of the patient and because family caregivers are often also very aged. Self-management support by nursing staff is therefore of paramount importance. Objectives To gain insight into how nursing staff perceive their self-management support tasks, and how they put them into practice. Research questions are: 'What are the opinions and experiences of Dutch nursing staff working in home care or residential elderly care regarding self-management support for people with dementia and their family caregivers?' and 'Do nursing staff feel sufficiently trained and skilled for self-management support?'. Methods A mixed methods approach was used, combining cross-sectional quantitative survey data from 206 Dutch nursing professionals with qualitative interviews among 12 nursing staff working in home care or residential elderly care in The Netherlands. Results Nursing staff working in home care experienced self-management support of people with dementia as a part of their job and as an attractive task. They consider 'helping people with dementia to maintain control over their lives by involving them in decisions in daily care' the essence of self-management support. Nursing staff saw family caregivers as their main partners in providing self-management support to the patient. They were less aware that family caregivers themselves might also need self-management support. Nursing staff often felt insufficiently trained to give adequate self-management support. RN's and CNA's did not differ in their opinions, experiences and training needs. Conclusions Nursing staff in home care do consider self-management support an important and attractive task in dementia care. Their skills for providing self-management support to patients with dementia and family caregivers need improvement. Recommendations

  14. Integration of CERN staff

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    An example of the integration of CERN staff in the neighbouring communes is provided by the hamlet of Bugnon at St-Genis-Pouilly (Ain), FRance. The CERN installation on the Swiss site are visible on the left in the background. Behind them the Saleve mountain in Haute-Savoie.

  15. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the m...

  16. Systematic Staff Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Norman L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the process of staff selection for the general studies department at Piedmont Technical College. Makes suggestions on how to write a job description, establish selection criteria, develop the selection process, and make the selection itself. Includes sample forms used in the process. (DR)

  17. The Staff of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rebecca

    1994-01-01

    Some children have chronic illnesses that require diet modifications as part of their medical treatment. Advises school districts to hire a registered dietitian or look for resources at a local hospital or public health office. In addition, schools should work with parents, improve staff training, and conduct spot checks of school cafeterias. (MLF)

  18. [A staff development model in psychiatric nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koen, D; Muller, M; Poggenpoel, M

    1995-03-01

    The nursing service manager is accountable for the quality of nursing care delivered in the nursing service. It is therefore important that the nursing service manager facilitates staff development in the nursing service. It is not only the nursing service manager's responsibility to make provision for staff development--the nurse also has a responsibility in this regard. He/she should purposefully make an effort to keep up to date with the latest developments. This article focuses on the co-responsibility of the psychiatric nurse and nursing service manager regarding staff development. A model for staff development is described, in accordance with the guidelines of Dickoff, James & Wiedenbach for theory development. An inductive approach was primarily followed to describe the provisional model, after which a literature study was employed to refine and purify the model. This model was exposed to expert evaluation, after which the final model for staff development of psychiatric nurses was described. Recommendations include the testing of certain hypotheses and utilisation of this model in psychiatric nursing practice.

  19. [Improving nursing staff accuracy in administering chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Ying; Chu, Yun-Li; Chiou, Yen-Gan; Chiang, Ming-Chu

    2009-12-01

    As most anticancer drugs are cytotoxic, their safe and error-free application is important. We analyzed data from the hematology-oncology ward chemotherapy checklist dated January 13th through February 3rd, 2007 and found accuracy rates for chemotherapy drug usage as low as 68.4%. Possible causes identified for this poor result include incomplete chemotherapy standards protocols, lack of chemotherapy quality control, and insufficient chemotherapy knowledge amongst nursing staff. This project aimed to improve the accuracy of nursing staff in administering chemotherapy and to raise nursing staff knowledge regarding chemotherapy. Our strategies for improvement included completing a chemotherapy standards protocol, establishing a chemotherapy quality-control monitoring system, augmenting chemotherapy training and adding appropriate equipment and staff reminders. After strategies were implemented, accuracy in chemotherapy administration rose to 96.7%. Related knowledge amongst nursing staff also improved from an initial 77.5% to 89.2%. Implementing the recommended measures achieved a significant improvement in the accuracy and quality of chemotherapy administered by nursing personnel.

  20. Occupational hazards among clinical dental staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasunloro, Adebola; Owotade, Foluso John

    2004-05-15

    Although identification of risks to dental healthcare workers has been explored in several industrialized nations, very little data is available from developing countries. This paper examines the occupational hazards present in the dental environment and reports survey results concerning attitudes and activities of a group of Nigerian dental care providers. A survey on occupational hazards was conducted among the clinical dental staff at the Dental Hospital of the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife in Osun State, Nigeria. Thirty eight of the forty staff responded, yielding a response rate of 95%. Subject ages ranged from 26 to 56 years with approximately 25% in the 31-46 year old bracket. All of the staff were aware of the occupational exposure to hazards, and the majority had attended seminars/workshops on the subject. Only five staff members (13.2%) owned a health insurance policy and 26 (68.4%) had been vaccinated against Hepatitis B infection. All dentists (24) had been vaccinated compared with only two non-dentists; this relationship was significant (p= 30.07, chi2=0.000). Fourteen members of the clinical staff (36.8%) could recall a sharp injury in the past six months, and the majority (71.1%) had regular contact with dental amalgam. Wearing protective eye goggles was the least employed cross infection control measure, while backache was the most frequently experienced hazard in 47% of the subjects. The need for Hepatitis B vaccinations for all members of the staff was emphasized, and the enforcement of strict cross infection control measures was recommended. The physical activities and body positions that predispose workers to backaches were identified and staff education on the prevention of backaches was provided.

  1. Job satisfaction among emergency department staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, M; Asenjo, M; Sánchez, M

    2017-02-01

    To compare job satisfaction among nurses, physicians and administrative staff in an emergency department (ED). To analyse the relationship of job satisfaction with demographic and professional characteristics of these personnel. We performed a descriptive, cross-sectional study in an ED in Barcelona (Spain). Job satisfaction was evaluated by means of the Font-Roja questionnaire. Multivariate analysis determined relationship between the overall job satisfaction and the variables collected. Fifty-two nurses, 22 physicians and 30 administrative staff were included. Administrative staff were significantly more satisfied than physicians and nurses: 3.42±0.32 vs. 2.87±0.42 and 3.06±0.36, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed the following variables to be associated with job satisfaction: rotation among the different ED acuity levels (OR: 2.34; 95%CI: 0.93-5.89) and being an administrative staff (OR: 0.27; 95%CI: 0.09-0.80). Nurses and physicians reported greater stress and work pressure than administrative staff and described a worse physical working environment. Interpersonal relationships obtained the highest score among the three groups of professionals. Job satisfaction of nurses and physicians in an ED is lower than that of administrative staff with the former perceiving greater stress and work pressure. Conversely, interpersonal relationships are identified as strength. Being nurse or physician and not rotating among the different ED acuity levels increase dissatisfaction. Copyright © 2016 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Staff Exchange or Legal Alien Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rune Nørgaard

    2016-01-01

    SRA would very much like to support the exchange of best practice between members throughout the year and the Membership Committee is presently looking into the opportunities for a Staff Exchange or Legal Alien Program. However the International Section has already had the chance to provide...

  3. Occurrence of post traumatic stress symptoms and their relationship to professional quality of life (ProQoL in nursing staff at a forensic psychiatric security unit: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonstad Kåre

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Violence is frequent towards nurses in forensic mental health hospitals. Implications of this high risk environment have not been systematically explored. This paper explores occurrence of symptoms on post traumatic stress and their relationship to professional quality of life. Methods Self report questionnaires assessing symptoms of post traumatic stress and professional quality of life were distributed among psychiatric nurses in a high security forensic psychiatric unit with high frequency of violent behaviour. Relationships between post traumatic stress symptoms, forensic nursing experience, type of ward and compassion satisfaction, burnout and compassion fatigue were explored. Results The prevalence of post traumatic stress symptoms was low. Low scores were found on compassion satisfaction. Length of psychiatric nursing experience and low scores on compassion satisfaction were correlated to increased post traumatic stress symptoms. Conclusion Although high violence frequency, low rate of post traumatic stress symptoms and low compassion satisfaction scores was found. High staff/patient ratio and emotional distance between staff and patients are discussed as protective factors.

  4. Occurrence of post traumatic stress symptoms and their relationship to professional quality of life (ProQoL) in nursing staff at a forensic psychiatric security unit: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvrud, Christian; Nonstad, Kåre; Palmstierna, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Background Violence is frequent towards nurses in forensic mental health hospitals. Implications of this high risk environment have not been systematically explored. This paper explores occurrence of symptoms on post traumatic stress and their relationship to professional quality of life. Methods Self report questionnaires assessing symptoms of post traumatic stress and professional quality of life were distributed among psychiatric nurses in a high security forensic psychiatric unit with high frequency of violent behaviour. Relationships between post traumatic stress symptoms, forensic nursing experience, type of ward and compassion satisfaction, burnout and compassion fatigue were explored. Results The prevalence of post traumatic stress symptoms was low. Low scores were found on compassion satisfaction. Length of psychiatric nursing experience and low scores on compassion satisfaction were correlated to increased post traumatic stress symptoms. Conclusion Although high violence frequency, low rate of post traumatic stress symptoms and low compassion satisfaction scores was found. High staff/patient ratio and emotional distance between staff and patients are discussed as protective factors. PMID:19371413

  5. A crèche for CERN staff The Staff Association project

    CERN Document Server

    Association du personnel

    2006-01-01

    For many years, the Staff Association has supported the demand for the creation of a crèche for the children of CERN staff. Several studies have been carried out without leading to a concrete plan. The fact that the CERN population is getting younger and the shortage of local facilities have led to a more urgent demand for this type of social service over the past few years. Furthermore, the Equal Opportunities Panel had already recommended that crèche places be made available.

  6. 15 CFR 2002.2 - Trade Policy Staff Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trade Policy Staff Committee. 2002.2 Section 2002.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade Agreements OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE OPERATION OF COMMITTEES § 2002.2 Trade Policy Staff Committee. (a) The...

  7. 17 CFR 9.26 - Participation of Commission staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Participation of Commission staff. 9.26 Section 9.26 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION RULES... Respect to Appeals § 9.26 Participation of Commission staff. Within twenty days after receipt of the...

  8. 20 CFR 1001.142 - Stationing of DVOP staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stationing of DVOP staff. 1001.142 Section 1001.142 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR VETERANS' EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) § 1001.142 Stationing of DVOP staff. DVOP specialists shall be stationed...

  9. 20 CFR 1001.141 - Functions of DVOP staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Functions of DVOP staff. 1001.141 Section 1001.141 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR VETERANS' EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) § 1001.141 Functions of DVOP staff. Each DVOP specialist shall carry out...

  10. 28 CFR 42.414 - Federal agency staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal agency staff. 42.414 Section 42.414 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION; EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY... § 42.414 Federal agency staff. Sufficient personnel shall be assigned by a federal agency to its title...

  11. NICU consultants and support staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newborn intensive care unit - consultants and support staff; Neonatal intensive care unit - consultants and support staff ... a baby's nipple-feeding readiness and oral-motor skills. Speech therapists will also help with feeding skills ...

  12. Staff Rules and Regulations - Modification n°9 to the 11th edition

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    In accordance with CERN/3166 and recommendations made and decisions taken at the Finance Committee and Council meetings in March 2015, the following pages of the Staff Rules and Regulations have been updated with effect from 31 March 2015:   Contents list, page iii   Chapter I, General Provisions: o Section 3 (Conduct) - amendment on page 5   Chapter II, Conditions of Employment and Association: o Section 1 (Employment and association) - amendment on page 14 o Section 3 (Training) - amendment on pages 19 and 20 Chapter III, Working Conditions: o Section 1 (Working hours) - amendment on pages 31 and 32 Chapter VI, Settlement of Disputes and Discipline: o Section 1 (Settlement of disputes) - amendment on page 51 In addition, typographical errors have been corrected in the English version on page 12 (Articles R II 1.05 and 1.06) and page 78 (Annex R A 11, correction of the vertical axis definition). The complete updated electronic version of the Staff Rules an...

  13. Efficient leadership and staff motivation in a chosen firm

    OpenAIRE

    VLÁŠKOVÁ, Dagmar

    2010-01-01

    This bachelor work deals with the leadership and staff motivation. The main object was a detection of the mistakes which the managers in a chosen firm make in this sphere. The alternate targets were to analyse the staff satisfaction with their leaders and to detect the managers´ style of leading. The close of my work contains my own suggestions and recommendations how to eliminate the detected mistakes and how to improve current situation in a firm.

  14. Digital Proficiency Levels for the Brigade and Battalion Battle Staff

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leibrecht, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    .... A family of proficiency level matrixes is presented for six major staff sections. Finally, the report discusses implications of the findings for digital proficiency measurement and after action review...

  15. Information for contractors' staff

    CERN Multimedia

    The Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    We have observed a significant decrease in the number of completed Certificates for Work in Controlled Radiation Areas being submitted with applications for dosimeters for your staff. Henceforth, we shall no longer be able to issue dosimeters without a certificate, which must be signed by the employee and the contractor's radiation-protection expert. You can obtain the certificate form from the Dosimetry Service at Building 24/E-011 or from our Website: http://service-rp-dosimetry.web.cern.ch/service-rp-dosimetry/. Thank you for your understanding. The Dosimetry Service

  16. STAFF VACANCY LIST

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    For economy reasons, it has been decided to stop printing and distributing this list to Staff Members. It can be found on the Web (LIST). Divisional Administrative Officers will receive an updated printed copy on a monthly basis and are asked to display this in a public place in their division. Copies will also be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (No. 60) in the glass-fronted cabinet (close to the lifts) and also on the notice board close to the Post Office. A copy will also be given to the Reception (Building No. 33). Human Resources Division Tel. 74606

  17. Exposure of mental health nurses to violence associated with job stress, life satisfaction, staff resilience, and post-traumatic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzhaki, Michal; Peles-Bortz, Anat; Kostistky, Hava; Barnoy, Dor; Filshtinsky, Vivian; Bluvstein, Irit

    2015-10-01

    Workplace violence towards health workers in hospitals and in mental health units in particular is increasing. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of exposure to violence, job stress, staff resilience, and post-traumatic growth (PTG) on the life satisfaction of mental health nurses. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used. The sample consisted of mental health nurses (n = 118) working in a large mental health centre in Israel. Verbal violence by patients was reported by 88.1% of the nurses, and 58.4% experienced physical violence in the past year. Physical and verbal violence towards nurses was correlated with job stress, and life satisfaction was correlated with PTG and staff resilience. Linear regression analyses indicated that life satisfaction was mainly affected by PTG, staff resilience, and job stress, and less by exposure to verbal and physical violence. The present study is the first to show that, although mental health nurses are frequently exposed to violence, their life satisfaction is affected more by staff resilience, PTG, and job stress than by workplace violence. Therefore, it is recommended that intervention programmes that contribute to PTG and staff resilience, as well as those that reduce job stress among mental health nurses, be explored and implemented. © 2015 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  18. A review of NRC staff uses of probabilistic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The NRC staff uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management as important elements its licensing and regulatory processes. In October 1991, the NRC's Executive Director for Operations established the PRA Working Group to address concerns identified by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards with respect to unevenness and inconsistency in the staff's current uses of PRA. After surveying current staff uses of PRA and identifying needed improvements, the Working Group defined a set of basic principles for staff PRA use and identified three areas for improvements: guidance development, training enhancements, and PRA methods development. For each area of improvement, the Working Group took certain actions and recommended additional work. The Working Group recommended integrating its work with other recent PRA-related activities the staff completed and improving staff interactions with PRA users in the nuclear industry. The Working Group took two key actions by developing general guidance for two uses of PRA within the NRC (that is, screening or prioritizing reactor safety issues and analyzing such issues in detail) and developing guidance on basic terms and methods important to the staff's uses of PRA

  19. The Staff Association and you

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2013-01-01

    The Staff Association, your representative with the Management and the Member States The article VII 1.01 of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SR&R) provides that “the relations between the Director-General and the personnel shall be established either on an individual basis or on a collective basis with the Staff Association as intermediary”. This essential role of the Staff representatives, of being the spokesperson of the entire staff of the Organization vis-à-vis the Director-General and the Members States, is achieved through regular participation in the various joint advisory committees defined in the SR&R. The most important are the Standing Concertation Committee and the TREF, tripartite forum where your representatives meet with the Member States delegates, in the presence of the Management, to explain the position of the staff on the various issues concerning employment conditions. The Finance Committee also gives the opportunity to the Staff Association to ...

  20. Report to Congress: Coastal Barrier Resources System with recommendations as required by Section 10 of Public Law 97-348, the Coastal Barrier Resources Act of 1982. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. shoreline bordering the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico contains one of the longest and best defined chains of coastal barriers in the world. In recognition of the fact, the Coastal Barrier Resources Act (CBRA) (16 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.) was enacted in October 1982. The Act established the Coastal Barrier Resources System (CBRS) consisting of 186 coastal barrier units along 670 mi of shoreline on the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts. The philosophy behind the CBRA is that the risk associated with new development in these areas should be borne by those who choose to live and work along the coast, and not by all American taxpayers. By restricting Federal expenditures and financial assistance on specific undeveloped coastal barriers, the Federal Government can minimize the loss of human life, reduce the wasteful expenditure of Federal revenues, and reduce the damage to fish and wildlife and other natural resources that can accompany development of these fragile areas. Section 10 of the CBRA directs the Department of the Interior to study the CBRS and prepare for Congress a report which includes recommendations for changes in the CBRS based on an evaluation of management alternatives that would foster conservation of the natural resources of the CBRS

  1. Twitter accounts followed by Congressional health staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, David; Meisel, Zachary F; Merchant, Raina M; Seymour, Jane; Gollust, Sarah E

    2017-07-01

    Although health policy research should inform policy making, the communication gap between researchers and policy makers limits successful translation. Social media represents a new opportunity to connect researchers and policy makers. Our objective was to assess who Congressional health policy staff follow on a major social media platform. Cross-sectional study. Our study measured Congressional health policy staff's use of Twitter and the types of individuals and organizations they follow. To focus on more influential Twitter accounts, we restricted our sample to those followed by at least 3 individual Congressional staff members. Of the 30,843 accounts followed by the 115 Congressional health policy staff, 1273 were potentially policy-related and followed by 3 or more staff. Of these, few were academically affiliated (2.4%) or explicitly health-related (5.6%) sites; many were general news media sources (50.9%) and political and governmental sources (36.4%). Health-focused accounts were frequently connected to the news media or government rather than academia. Top accounts followed (ie, highest quintile) were most likely to be national news organizations (odds ratio [OR], 5.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.75-19.7) and elected officials (OR, 8.22; 95% CI, 1.75-38.6) compared with advocacy and interest groups. Health-related and academic sources are largely absent from the Twitter conversations with US Congressional health policy staff. Even within social media, traditional and political news media are important information intermediaries that researchers and journals should target to disseminate health policy evidence.

  2. [Catalogue of learning goals for pregraduate education in geriatric medicine. A recommendation of the German Geriatric Society (DGG), the German Society of Gerontology and Geriatrics (DGGG), the Austrian Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology (ÖGGG) and the Swiss Society of Geriatric Medicine (SFGG) on the basis of recommendations of the European Union of Medical Specialists Geriatric Medicine Section (UEMS-GMS) 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singler, K; Stuck, A E; Masud, T; Goeldlin, A; Roller, R E

    2014-11-01

    Sound knowledge in the care and management of geriatric patients is essential for doctors in almost all medical subspecialties. Therefore, it is important that pregraduate medical education adequately covers the field of geriatric medicine. However, in most medical faculties in Europe today, learning objectives in geriatric medicine are often substandard or not even explicitly addressed. As a first step to encourage undergraduate teaching in geriatric medicine, the European Union of Medical Specialists -Geriatric Medicine Section (UEMS-GMS) recently developed a catalogue of learning goals using a modified Delphi technique in order to encourage education in this field. This catalogue of learning objectives for geriatric medicine focuses on the minimum requirements with specific learning goals in knowledge, skills and attitudes that medical students should have acquired by the end of their studies.In order to ease the implementation of this new, competence-based curriculum among the medical faculties in universities teaching in the German language, the authors translated the published English language curriculum into German and adapted it according to medical language and terms used at German-speaking medical faculties and universities of Austria, Germany and Switzerland. This article contains the final German translation of the curriculum. The Geriatric Medicine Societies of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland formally endorse the present curriculum and recommend that medical faculties adapt their curricula for undergraduate teaching based on this catalogue.

  3. Assessing Job Satisfaction and Effective Factors In Health Centers Staff of Paveh, 1387

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Gharibi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available ​Background and Objectives : Human resource is the most important factor in the organization and job satisfaction of staff shows the access to their expectationsthrough their jobs. Since health services staff are directly in contact with people’s health, this study was conducted to determine the job satisfaction of governmental health centers staff and also individual, familial and occupational related factors in Paveh town in order to recommend  practical solutions to improve job satisfaction. Materials and Methods : This was a descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study. The target group was the staff of studied community in 1387. Questionnaire was used to collect data (Spearman, Man Whitney or Kruskall-Wallis. Data were tested through descriptive and analytical methods. For data analysis, SPSS 12 was employed. In analytical method, depending on the variables, proper tests were used. Results : Among 110 participants in this study, %48.2 were female and %51.8 were male. Results indicated that there is a significant statistical relationship between job satisfaction and spouse’s job (significantly 0.015, employment status (significantly 0.042 and staff income (significantly 0/006. The results showed that% 64.5 were moderately satisfied, %31.8 highly satisfied and %3.7 were unsatisfied.  The researcher achieved valuable results based on descriptive findings. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, by job satisfaction attitude in the studied centers, there is a notable gap between existing and optimum conditions which requires the attention of the organization managers. By using the results of this study, managers can design efficient and effective interventions to improve the level of job satisfaction.

  4. Solar Total Energy System: Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia. Final technical progress report. Volume I. Section 1. Conclusions and recommendations. Section 2. Systems requirements. [1. 72-MW thermal and 383. 6-kW electric power for 42,000 ft/sup 2/ knitwear plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1977-10-17

    The Stearns-Roger Engineering Company conceptual design of ERDA's Large Scale Experiment No. 2 (LSE No. 2) is described. The various LSE's are part of ERDA's Solar Total Energy Program (STES) and a separate activity of the National Solar Thermal Power Systems Program. The object of this LSE is to design, construct, test, evaluate and operate a STES for the purpose of obtaining experience with large scale hardware systems and to establish engineering capability for subsequent demonstration projects. This particular LSE is to be located at Shenandoah, Georgia and will provide power to the Bleyle knitwear factory. The Solar Total Energy system is sized to supply 1.720 MW thermal power (both space heating and process heat) and 383.6 KW electrical power. The STES is sized for the extended knitwear plant of 3902 M/sup 2/ (42,000 sq-ft) which will eventually employ 300 people. The section on conclusions and recommendations described the baseline design recommendation, facility requirements, the solar system, power conversion system, schedules and cost, and additional candidate systems. The systems requirements analysis includes detailed descriptions and analyses of the following subtasks: load analysis, energy displacement, local laws and ordinances, life cycle cost, health and safety, environmental assessment, reliability assessment, and utility interface. (WHK)

  5. Staff/population ratios in South African public sector mental health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To document existing staff/population ratios per 100 000 population in South African public sector mental health services. Design. Cross-sectional survey. ... The staff/population ratios per 100 000 population for selected personnel categories (with the interprovincial ranges in brackets) were as follows: total nursing staff 15.6 ...

  6. 10 CFR 2.1202 - Authority and role of NRC staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authority and role of NRC staff. 2.1202 Section 2.1202... ORDERS Informal Hearing Procedures for NRC Adjudications § 2.1202 Authority and role of NRC staff. (a) During the pendency of any hearing under this subpart, consistent with the NRC staff's findings in its...

  7. 10 CFR 2.1403 - Authority and role of the NRC staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authority and role of the NRC staff. 2.1403 Section 2.1403... ORDERS Expedited Proceedings with Oral Hearings § 2.1403 Authority and role of the NRC staff. (a) During the pendency of any hearing under this subpart, consistent with the NRC staff's findings in its own...

  8. 10 CFR 2.1316 - Authority and role of NRC staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authority and role of NRC staff. 2.1316 Section 2.1316... ORDERS Procedures for Hearings on License Transfer Applications § 2.1316 Authority and role of NRC staff. (a) During the pendency of any hearing under this subpart, consistent with the NRC staff's findings...

  9. The patient safety culture as perceived by staff at two different emergency departments before and after introducing a flow-oriented working model with team triage and lean principles: a repeated cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burström, Lena; Letterstål, Anna; Engström, Marie-Louise; Berglund, Anders; Enlund, Mats

    2014-07-09

    Patient safety is of the utmost importance in health care. The patient safety culture in an institution has great impact on patient safety. To enhance patient safety and to design strategies to reduce medical injuries, there is a current focus on measuring the patient safety culture. The aim of the present study was to describe the patient safety culture in an ED at two different hospitals before and after a Quality improvement (QI) project that was aimed to enhance patient safety. A repeated cross-sectional design, using the Hospital Survey On Patient Safety Culture questionnaire before and after a quality improvement project in two emergency departments at a county hospital and a university hospital. The questionnaire was developed to obtain a better understanding of the patient safety culture of an entire hospital or of specific departments. The Swedish version has 51 questions and 15 dimensions. At the county hospital, a difference between baseline and follow-up was observed in three dimensions. For two of these dimensions, Team-work within hospital and Communication openness, a higher score was measured at the follow-up. At the university hospital, a higher score was measured at follow-up for the two dimensions Team-work across hospital units and Team-work within hospital. The result showed changes in the self-estimated patient safety culture, mainly regarding team-work and communication openness. Most of the improvements at follow-up were seen by physicians, and mainly at the county hospital.

  10. Sizing of Staff of Neonatal Units in a University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Ramos Ferreira Curan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to evaluate the size of the nursing neonatal units of a university hospital regarding the education and professional experience of the nursing staff and the adequacy of existing legislation professional staff. Descriptive, quantitative study, conducted at the Intensive Care Unit and Neonatal Intermediate Care. We used two instruments to collect data with the nursing staff and the professional relationship and bed occupancy. Employees had an average experience in neonatal units of 14 years; most had more than one vocational training (59.3%. The number of nurses was below the recommended by current professional legislation (12.5% and nursing assistants above (56.2%; 51.9% were employees in other sectors doing overtime. It was concluded that although qualified, which can determine a differentiated service, the team does not meet the recommended sizing standards for professional assistance in these specialized units.

  11. The Practice of Physical Exercise among the Staff of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Physical exercise is important for good health. Moderate physical exercise for at least 30 minutes, five times a week is the minimum recommendation for adults. The objective of the study was to assess the level of physical exercise among the staff of an International research Institute in Ibadan, Nigeria.

  12. Staff Definitions of Challenging Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgie, Sarah; Hastings, Richard P.

    2002-01-01

    Fifty staff working with adults with mental retardation rated potentially challenging behaviors in terms of: (1) whether they thought the behaviors were challenging, and (2) whether the behaviors should be the focus of intervention. Results found that staff were less likely to identify as challenging those behaviors having negative effects on…

  13. The Universal Recommender

    OpenAIRE

    Kunegis, Jérôme; Said, Alan; Umbrath, Winfried

    2009-01-01

    We describe the Universal Recommender, a recommender system for semantic datasets that generalizes domain-specific recommenders such as content-based, collaborative, social, bibliographic, lexicographic, hybrid and other recommenders. In contrast to existing recommender systems, the Universal Recommender applies to any dataset that allows a semantic representation. We describe the scalable three-stage architecture of the Universal Recommender and its application to Internet Protocol Televisio...

  14. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Vote Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. Voting will begin on Monday 31 October. Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will  represent you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site. (http://association.web.cern.ch) Elections Timetable Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee. 

  15. Diabetes, obesity, and recommended fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to food environment sub-types: a cross-sectional analysis of Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States Census, and food establishment data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenfeld, Cara L; Leslie, Timothy F; Makara, Matthew A

    2015-05-14

    Social and spatial factors are an important part of individual and community health. The objectives were to identify food establishment sub-types and evaluate prevalence of diabetes, obesity, and recommended fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to these sub-types in the Washington DC metropolitan area. A cross-sectional study design was used. A measure of retail food environment was calculated as the ratio of number of sources of unhealthier food options (fast food, convenience stores, and pharmacies) to healthier food options (grocery stores and specialty food stores). Two categories were created: ≤ 1.0 (healthier options) and > 1.0 (unhealthier options). k-means clustering was used to identify clusters based on proportions of grocery stores, restaurants, specialty food, fast food, convenience stores, and pharmacies. Prevalence data for county-level diabetes, obesity, and consumption of five or more fruits or vegetables per day (FV5) was obtained from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Multiple imputation was used to predict block-group level health outcomes with US Census demographic and economic variables as the inputs. The healthier options category clustered into three sub-types: 1) specialty food, 2) grocery stores, and 3) restaurants. The unhealthier options category clustered into two sub-types: 1) convenience stores, and 2) restaurants and fast food. Within the healthier options category, diabetes prevalence in the sub-types with high restaurants (5.9 %, p = 0.002) and high specialty food (6.1 %, p = 0.002) was lower than the grocery stores sub-type (7.1 %). The high restaurants sub-type compared to the high grocery stores sub-type had significantly lower obesity prevalence (28.6 % vs. 31.2 %, p obesity, or higher FV5 prevalence across the two sub-types. However, restaurants (including fast food) sub-type was significantly associated with lower diabetes and obesity, and higher FV prevalence compared to grocery store sub-type. These

  16. Hygiene Knowledge of Food Staff in Catering Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya Yardımcı

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study, designed as a cross-sectional study, was carried out to determine the hygiene knowledge of the staff (N = 317 employed in kitchen and service departments of catering firms in Ankara. It was found that the mean scores of the staff with regard to personal hygiene, food hygiene, and kitchen and equipment hygiene were 10.7 ± 1.6, 19.8 ± 4.0, and 13.6 ± 2.0, respectively. Male staff achieved higher mean scores in personal hygiene knowledge test compared with female staff (p < .01. The staff receiving a hygiene training were determined to have higher mean scores in terms of hygiene knowledge tests compared with those who have not received, and the production staff had higher knowledge as to hygiene than the other groups (p < .01. The mean scores for hygiene knowledge tests were found to be increasing with age. Hygiene knowledge scores of the staff were quite lower than what must be taken. For that reason, periodical training programs should be organized to increase the awareness of the staff about hygiene.

  17. Mobbing behaviors encountered by nurse teaching staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Dilek; Yildirim, Aytolan; Timucin, Arzu

    2007-07-01

    The term 'mobbing' is defined as antagonistic behaviors with unethical communication directed systematically at one individual by one or more individuals in the workplace. This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted for the purpose of determining the mobbing behaviors encountered by nursing school teaching staff in Turkey, its effect on them, and their responses to them. A large percentage (91%) of the nursing school employees who participated in this study reported that they had encountered mobbing behaviors in the institution where they work and 17% that they had been directly exposed to mobbing in the workplace. The academic staff who had been exposed to mobbing behaviors experienced various physiological, emotional and social reactions. They frequently 'worked harder and [were] more organized and worked very carefully to avoid criticism' to escape from mobbing. In addition, 9% of the participants stated that they 'thought about suicide occasionally'.

  18. Job stress in the staff of a tire factory

    OpenAIRE

    marzieh torshizi; alireza saadatjoo

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: Occupational stress is a major problem in industrial societies. Its relationship with various diseases is increasing ,but it probably has vast socio-economic consequences manifested in the form of absenteeism, labour turnover, loss of productivity and disability pension costs. The present study aimed at determining stress in the staff of a tyre factory.   Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was done on 196 members of staff from various sections of a ti...

  19. Kingdom of the Netherlands—Aruba; Staff Report for the 2005 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2005-01-01

    The staff report for the 2005 Article IV Consultation on the Kingdom of the Netherlands—Aruba highlights the economic developments and policies. Meeting the challenges of population aging requires policies that create conditions for faster productivity growth. IMF Staff recommended applying the successful model of public-private sector cooperation developed in the tourism industry to promote diversification in other areas, in particular in financial services. Staff urged the authorities to sp...

  20. [Burnout syndrome among health staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiel-García, José Angel; Rodríguez-Morán, Martha; Guerrero-Romero, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of burnout syndrome components among the medical and nursing staff of the second care level hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social and Instituto de Seguridad Social al Servicio de los Trabajadores del Estado from Durango, Mexico. A cross-sectional comparative study was carried out among 73 physicians and 100 nurses randomly selected from both hospitals. The prevalence of burnout syndrome components was established by the Maslash Burnout Inventory, which determines the presence of physical/emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and labor performance. In addition, sociodemographic and labor information was collected. Prevalence was calculated with a reliability interval of 95% (CI 95%). 73 physicians and 100 nurses enrolled, corresponding to 22.8% and 14.5% of such personnel working in both institutions. Among the IMSS and ISSSTE workers respectively, the prevalence of depersonalization was 43.2% (34.4-52.9) and 14.5% (6.8-25.8), whereas the prevalence of physical/emotional exhaustion was 41.4% (32.7-51.1) and 19.4% (10.4-31.4). Pre-valence of labor performance was higher among the personnel of Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social: 99.1% (95.1-100) versus 96.8% (88.8-100). Severe depersonalization (p = 0.004), but not emotional exhaustion (p = 0.09) nor labor performance (p = 0.06) was significantly higher among personnel working at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. Prevalence of depersonalization and physical/emotional exhaustion was higher among physicians and nurses of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social; nonetheless, their labor performance was high. Our finding suggests that personnel working at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social make a greater effort to maintain the high labor performance that medical care requires.

  1. Rational-Emotive Staff Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Susan G.; Forman, Bruce D.

    1980-01-01

    The application of Rational-Emotive Therapy principles and techniques in in-service education for school personnel is discussed. Teacher and counselor participation in a staff development program is described. (Author)

  2. Why join the Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Becoming a member of the Staff Association (SA) is above all a personal choice, showing that the joining person’s commitment and adherence to values such as solidarity, social cohesion, etc.In September, the SA launches a membership campaign to convince a maximum number to join, to inform, arouse interest and support. Posters, emails and individual contacts are part of the campaign programme, just like this editorial. As far as individual contacts are concerned, we ask you to give time and lend an ear to the delegates of your department in the Staff Council, who will approach you, in order to make an open and constructive discussion possible. Do not hesitate to ask questions and let them know your thoughts about the SA, as (constructive) criticism enables us to progress. The Staff Association and its role of collective representation The Staff Association, via its delegates, represents collectively all staff of the Organization before the Director-General and Member States. To do this, staff rep...

  3. Preparing radiology staff to meet service goals: a training model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardone, E B; Stepanovich, P H; West, V T

    1994-01-01

    This article describes a model used to train radiology staff in customer service relations at a large southeastern medical center. Information about the needs of the radiology department and staff was acquired through quantitative and qualitative assessments. The primary goal of the training was twofold: 1) to develop employee awareness of customer expectations and 2) to develop problem-solving skills to respond to customer service related issues. Instructional methods compatible with adult learning were used and training results were assessed. Positive changes in employee attitudes and behaviors are described and recommendations for training development and implementation are discussed.

  4. Effective dose estimation to patients and staff during urethrography procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P. O- Box 422, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia); Barakat, H. [Neelain University, College of Science and Technology, Medical Physics Department, Khartoum (Sudan); Alkhorayef, M.; Babikir, E. [King Saud University, College of Applied Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P. O. Box 10219, Riyadh 11433 (Saudi Arabia); Dalton, A.; Bradley, D. [University of Surrey, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Medical-related radiation is the largest source of controllable radiation exposure to humans and it accounts for more than 95% of radiation exposure from man-made sources. Few data were available worldwide regarding patient and staff dose during urological ascending urethrography (ASU) procedure. The purposes of this study are to measure patient and staff entrance surface air kerma dose (ESAK) during ASU procedure and evaluate the effective doses. A total of 243 patients and 145 staff (Urologist) were examined in three Hospitals in Khartoum state. ESAKs were measured for patient and staff using thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). Effective doses (E) were calculated using published conversion factors and methods recommended by the national Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). The mean ESAK dose for patients and staff dose were 7.79±6.7 mGy and 0.161±0.30 mGy per procedures respectively. The mean and range of the effective dose was 1.21 mSv per procedure. The radiation dose in this study is comparable with previous studies except Hospital C. It is obvious that high patient and staff exposure is due to the lack of experience and protective equipment s. Interventional procedures remain operator dependent; therefore continuous training is crucial. (Author)

  5. Effective dose estimation to patients and staff during urethrography procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Barakat, H.; Alkhorayef, M.; Babikir, E.; Dalton, A.; Bradley, D.

    2015-10-01

    Medical-related radiation is the largest source of controllable radiation exposure to humans and it accounts for more than 95% of radiation exposure from man-made sources. Few data were available worldwide regarding patient and staff dose during urological ascending urethrography (ASU) procedure. The purposes of this study are to measure patient and staff entrance surface air kerma dose (ESAK) during ASU procedure and evaluate the effective doses. A total of 243 patients and 145 staff (Urologist) were examined in three Hospitals in Khartoum state. ESAKs were measured for patient and staff using thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). Effective doses (E) were calculated using published conversion factors and methods recommended by the national Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). The mean ESAK dose for patients and staff dose were 7.79±6.7 mGy and 0.161±0.30 mGy per procedures respectively. The mean and range of the effective dose was 1.21 mSv per procedure. The radiation dose in this study is comparable with previous studies except Hospital C. It is obvious that high patient and staff exposure is due to the lack of experience and protective equipment s. Interventional procedures remain operator dependent; therefore continuous training is crucial. (Author)

  6. Implications of research staff demographics for psychological science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Does, Serena; Ellemers, Naomi; Dovidio, John F; Norman, Jasmine B; Mentovich, Avital; van der Lee, Romy; Goff, Phillip Atiba

    2018-03-01

    Long-standing research traditions in psychology have established the fundamental impact of social categories, such as race and gender, on people's perceptions of themselves and others, as well as on the general human cognition and behavior. However, there is a general tendency to ignore research staff demographics (e.g., researchers' race and gender) in research development and research reports. Variation in research staff demographics can exert systematic and scientifically informative influences on results from psychological research. Consequently, research staff demographics need to be considered, studied, and/or reported, along with how these demographics were allowed to vary across participants or conditions (e.g., random assignment, matched with participant demographics, or included as a factor in the experimental design). In addition to providing an overview of multidisciplinary evidence of research staff demographics effects, we discuss how research staff demographics might influence research findings through (a) ingroup versus outgroup effects, (b) stereotype and (implicit) bias effects, and (c) priming and social tuning effects. Finally, an overview of recommended considerations is included (see the Appendix) to help illustrate how to systematically incorporate relevant research staff demographics in psychological science. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Towards culturally competent health care: language use of bilingual staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M; Noble, C; Matthews, C; Aguilar, N

    1998-01-01

    The presence of diverse language skills within health staff provides opportunities to better meet the needs of a multicultural population. A cross-sectional survey of all staff within the South Western Sydney Area Health Service was undertaken to compare language skills with population needs and examine the context of language use. Thirty-one per cent of staff (n = 964) were bilingual or multilingual, with the predominant languages spoken being Tagalog (Filipino), Cantonese, Hindi, Spanish, Vietnamese and Italian. Thirty-seven per cent of bilingual staff used their language skills at least weekly, predominantly in situations of simple conversation and giving directions. Bilingual staff are a valuable resource for the organisation and the presence of a similar overall proportion of bilingual and bicultural staff may engender tolerance and adaptability in providing care to a diverse population. However, supply does not directly match community demand. This mismatch will continue unless recruitment is focused towards identified language groups. The high proportion of staff who rarely used their language skills (37%) may be due to lack of opportunity or limited need, and suggests that further research needs to examine service models that locate bilingual workers close to client need. This study takes a crucial first step towards realising equitable and culturally appropriate care utilising the principles of productive diversity.

  8. Descriptive analysis of staff satisfaction and turnover intention in a Malaysian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidik, Mohamad Hazeem; Hamid, Mohd Rashid Ab; Ibrahim, Abdullah

    2017-05-01

    This paper discussed the descriptive analysis of staff satisfaction in education organisation. This study employed a cross-sectional study involving a total of 1042 of respondents from a university in east coast of Malaysia. The survey covers six dimensions of staff satisfaction which are leadership, staff involvement, workload, self-development, working environment and communication. From the analysis of the mean score, it reveals that the staff enjoyed moderate level of satisfaction and the findings of the study generally support the past findings in the literature. This study paved the way for in-depth investigation towards staff satisfaction at the university under study.

  9. Implications of staff 'churn' for nurse managers, staff, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine; Roche, Michael; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Catling-Paull, Christine

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the term "churn" is used not only because of the degree of change to staffing, but also because some of the reasons for staff movement are not classified as voluntary turnover. The difficulties for the nurse managing a unit with the degree of "churn" should not be under-estimated. Changes to skill mix and the proportions of full-time, agency, and temporary staff present challenges in providing clinical leadership, scheduling staff, performance management, and supervision. Perhaps more importantly, it is likely that there is an impact on the continuity of care provided in the absence of continuity of staffing. A greater understanding of the human and financial costs and consequences, and a willingness to change established practices at the institutional and ward level, are needed.

  10. Training of technical staff and technical staff managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, G.F.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of Technical Staff and Technical Staff Managers training is to provide job skills enhancement to individuals selected to fill key technical positions within a nuclear utility. This training is unique in that unlike other training programs accredited by the National Academy for Nuclear Training, it does not lead to specific task qualification. The problems encountered when determining the student population and curriculum are a direct result of this major difference. Major problems encountered are determining who should attend the training, what amount of training is necessary and sufficient, and how to obtain the best feedback in order to effect substantive program improvements. These topics will be explored and possible solutions discussed

  11. Radiation monitoring of PET staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trang, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Positron emission tomography (PET) is becoming a common diagnostic tool in hospitals, often located in and employing staff from the Nuclear Medicine or Radiology departments. Although similar in some ways, staff in PET departments are commonly found to have the highest radiation doses in the hospital environment due to unique challenges which PET tracers present in administration as well as production. The establishment of a PET centre with a dedicated cyclotron has raised concerns of radiation protection to the staff at the WA PET Centre and the Radiopharmaceutical Production and Development (RAPID) team. Since every PET centre has differing designs and practices, it was considered important to closely monitor the radiation dose to our staff so that improvements to practices and design could be made to reduce radiation dose. Electronic dosimeters (MGP DMC 2000XB), which have a facility to log time and dose at 10 second intervals, were provided to three PET technologists and three PET nurses. These were worn in the top pocket of their lab coats throughout a whole day. Each staff member was then asked to note down their duties throughout the day and also note the time they performed each duty. The duties would then correlate with the dose with which the electronic monitor recorded and an estimate of radiation dose per duty could be given. Also an estimate of the dose per day to each staff member could be made. PET nurses averaged approximately 20 μ8v per day getting their largest dose from caring for occasional problematic patients. Smaller doses of a 1-2 μ8v were recorded for injections and removing cannulas. PET technologists averaged approximately 15 μ8v per day getting their largest dose of 1-5μ8v mainly from positioning of patients and sometimes larger doses due to problematic patients. Smaller doses of 1-2 μ5v were again recorded for injections and removal of cannulas. Following a presentation given to staff, all WA PET Centre and RAPID staff

  12. COMPOSITION OF STAFF REVIEW ADVISORY BODIES - 2001

    CERN Multimedia

    Seamus Hegarty / HR; Tel. 74128

    2001-01-01

    For the present staff review, the advisory bodies set up to prepare recommendations are composed as follows : Senior Staff Advancement Committee (SSAC) David O. Williams/it (Convener) Cristoforo Benvenuti/est David Plane/ep Technical Engineers & Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) Sverre Jarp/it (Chairman) Flemming Pedersen/ps Robin Lauckner/sl Christian Roche/ett Lars Leistam/est Dietrich Schinzel/ep Long-term contract Boards (LTCBs) LTCB 1 (Categories 2 & 5a) Tiziano Camporesi/ep [Convener] - Florence Ranjard/ep [Alternate] Jacques Gruber/ps - Peter Sievers/lhc [Alternate] Thomas Pettersson/est - Michel Mayoud/est [Alternate] Sue Foffano/as - Thierry Lagrange/spl [Alternate] Werner Zapf/hr (Secretary) LTCB 2 (Categories 3, 4, 5b & 5c) Véronique Paris/sl [Convener] - Fabien Perriollat/ps [Alternate] Mats Wilhelmsson/st - Véronique Fassnacht/tis [Alternate] Lucie Linssen/ep - Alfredo Placci/ep [Alternate] Patrick Geeraert/fi - John Cuthb...

  13. Composition of Staff Review Advisory Bodies - 2003

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    For the present staff review, the advisory bodies set up to prepare recommendations are composed as follows : Senior Staff Advancement Committee (SSAC) David Plane/EP [Convener] Enrico Chiaveri/AB Peter Schmid/EP Technical Engineers & Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) Robin Lauckner/AB [Chairman]Marcel Mottier/EST Michael Letheren/EP Louis Walckiers/AT Lucie Linssen/EP Mats Wilhelmsson/ST Long-term contract Boards (LTCBs) LTCB 1 (Categories 2 & 5a) Tiziano Camporesi/EP [Convener]Florence Ranjard/EP [Alternate] Roger Bailey/ABPeter Sievers/AT " " Doris Forkel-Wirth/TISPierre Ninin/ST " " Rob Rayson/HRMaarten Wilbers/DSU " " Seamus Hegarty/HR [Secretary] LTCB 2 (Categories 3, 4, 5b & 5c) Véronique Paris/AB [Convener]Fabien Perriollat/AB [Alternate] Christian Lasseur/ESTRamon Folch/EST " " Lucie Linssen/EP Alfredo Placci/EP " " Mats Møller/ASLaszlo Abel/SPL " " Seamus Hegarty/HR [Secretary] Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  14. COMPOSITION OF STAFF REVIEW ADVISORY BODIES - 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    For the present staff review, the advisory bodies set up to prepare recommendations are composed as follows: Senior Staff Advancement Committee (SSAC) Cristoforo BENVENUTI/EST [Convener] David PLANE/EP Peter SCHMID/EP Technical Engineers & Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) Robin LAUCKNER/SL [Chairman] Flemming PEDERSEN/PS Lucie LINSSEN/EP Dietrich SCHINZEL/EP Marcel MOTTIER/EST Louis WALCKIERS/LHC Long-term contract Boards (LTCBs) (Categories 2 & 5a) Tiziano CAMPORESI/EP [Convener] Florence RANJARD/EP [Alternate] Jacques GRUBER/PS [until 30.6.2002] Roger BAILEY/SL [from 1.7. 2002] Peter SIEVERS/LHC [Alternate] Doris FORKEL-WIRTH/TIS Pierre NININ/ST [Alternate] Sue FOFFANO/AS Maarten WILBERS/DSU [Alternate] Werner ZAPF/HR[Secretary] LTCB 2 Categories 3, 4, 5b & 5c) Véronique PARIS/SL [Convener] Fabien PERRIOLLAT/PS [Alternate] Mats WILHELMSSON/ST Charles NUTTALL/TIS [Alternate] Lucie LINSSEN/EP Alfredo PLACCI/EP [Alternate] Patrick GEERAER...

  15. NO to sacrificing future staff!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    During our public meetings last week, we reviewed several subjects. However, the most urgent one today is the 2nd package of measures for our Pension Fund. In our previous issue, we devoted a long article to the Management’s plan for staff recruited from January 2012. A disaster! As we announced at our meetings, the Staff Association will organize a referendum at the beginning of April. For the message to be heard it is vital that as many staff as possible take part. By voting you will express your support to your staff representatives to stand in the way of these unacceptable measures. It is a matter of urgency that the staff makes their voice heard. Time is short, the decisions will be made in June. The future of our Organization is as stake. This is our future colleagues we are talking about. We must prevent this sacrifice. They must be welcomed in such a manner that there is no uneasiness between us. They must be made to feel welcome in their new family, CERN, our CERN. That they should pay an ...

  16. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! After verification by the Electoral Commission, all candidates for the elections to the Staff Council have been registered. It is now up to you, members of the Staff Association, to vote for the candidate(s) of your choice. We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. We are using an electronic voting system; all you need to do is click the link below and follow the instructions on the screen. https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017 The deadline for voting is Monday, 13 November at midday (12 pm). Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The ...

  17. Leadership styles in nursing management: implications for staff outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Avoka Asamani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing is a people-centred profession and therefore the issue of leadership is crucial for success. Nurse managers’ leadership styles are believed to be important determinant of nurses’ job satisfaction and retention. In the wake of a global nursing shortage, maldistribution of health workforce, increasing healthcare costs and expanding workload, it has become imperative to examine the role of nurse managers’ leadership styles on their staff outcomes. Using the Path-Goal Leadership theory as an organised framework, this study investigated the leadership styles of nurse managers and how they influence the nursing staff job satisfaction and intentions to stay at their current workplaces.Methods: The study employed a cross-sectional survey design to collect data from a sample of 273 nursing staff in five hospitals in the Eastern Region of Ghana. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed using SPSS version 18.0Results: Nurse managers used different leadership styles depending on the situation, but were more inclined to the supportive leadership style, followed by the achievement-oriented leadership style and participative leadership style. The nursing staff exhibited moderate levels of job satisfaction. The nurse managers’ leadership styles together explained 29% of the variance in the staff job satisfaction. The intention to stay at the current workplace was low (2.64 out of 5 among the nursing staff. More than half (51.7% of the nursing staff intended to leave their current workplaces, and 20% of them were actively seeking the opportunities to leave. The nurse managers’ leadership styles statistically explained 13.3% of the staff intention to stay at their current job position.Conclusions: These findings have enormous implications for nursing practice, management, education, and human resource for health policy that could lead to better staff retention and job satisfaction, and ultimately improve patient care.  

  18. Review of utility staff training and certification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    The Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety (ACNS) has reviewed the nuclear utility training programs in Canada and the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) certification program, to determine their effectiveness in meeting current and future needs. It has also looked briefly at the practices in other countries and in the aviation industry in Canada, by way of comparison. While a quantitative measure of effectiveness was beyond the scope of this review, on a purely qualitative basis the ACNS concludes that the current training and certification regime produces qualified operators, but not necessarily in the most effective way. The report makes five recommendations. The thrust of these recommendations is towards a more effective and streamlined training and certification regime based on strict adherence to the Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) methodology combined with independent verification through a peer review and accreditation process. The Committee believes that training and qualification of nuclear power plant operating staff is the complete responsibility of the utilities and that the role of the AECB is to audit the process to ensure that the utilities discharge their responsibility appropriately. In other words, the AECB should deal with operator training and certification in the same way that it deals with other aspects of nuclear power plant operation that are important to health, safety, security and the environment - by inspections and audits. The Committee believes that the proposed regulatory requirement for recertification of certain nuclear power plant operating staff, which would come into effect when the new Regulations are promulgated, is not consistent with the government's thrust and with how the AECB regulates other aspects of nuclear power plant operations. (author)

  19. The role of pain and functional impairment in the decision to recommend total joint replacement in hip and knee osteoarthritis: an international cross-sectional study of 1909 patients. Report of the OARSI-OMERACT Task Force on total joint replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gossec, L; Paternotte, S; Maillefert, J F

    2011-01-01

    : In all, 1909 patients were included (1130 knee/779 hip OA). Mean age was 66.4 [standard deviation (SD) 10.9] years, 58.1% were women; 628/1130 (55.6%) knee OA and 574/779 (73.7%) hip OA patients were recommended for TJR. Although patients recommended for TJR (yes vs no) had worse symptom levels [pain, 55......OBJECTIVE: To assess the pain and functional disability levels corresponding to an indication for total joint replacement (TJR) in hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Design: International cross-sectional study in 10 countries. Patients: Consecutive outpatients with definite hip or knee OA...... attending an orthopaedic outpatient clinic. Gold standard measure for recommendation for TJR: Surgeon's decision that TJR is justified. Outcome measures: Pain (ICOAP: intermittent and constant osteoarthritis pain, 0-100) and functional impairment (HOOS-PS/KOOS-PS: Hip/Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome...

  20. Disability on campus: a perspective from faculty and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigaki, Cheryl L; Anderson, Kim M; Howald, Carol L; Henson, Lee; Gregg, Bonnie E

    2012-01-01

    To identify employee perceptions regarding disability-related workplace issues in Institutions of Higher Education (IHE). Faculty and staff (N=1,144) at a large, Midwestern university. A voluntary on-line survey of disability-related employment issues was developed by the university's Chancellor's Committee of Persons with Disabilities. Item responses were analyzed using descriptive and Pearson chi-square statistical methods. Fifteen percent of faculty and staff respondents were found to have disabilities, with 26% reporting experience of job discrimination, and 20% reporting harassment because of their disability. Results indicated significant differences on gender, employment standing (i.e., faculty or staff) and disability status (i.e., with or without a disability), in regard to perceptions of disability acceptance, campus accessibility, disability awareness, ADA policy, and knowledge of work accommodation procedures. Recommendations for IHEs are provided to promote a welcoming and inclusive campus that ultimately supports work success for persons with a disability.

  1. Burnout among physicians and nursing staff working in the emergency hospital of Tanta University, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, S A M; El-Sallamy, R M; El-Sherbiny, A A M; Kabbash, I A

    2016-03-15

    Little is known about professional burnout among health-care workers in Egypt. The current study aimed to reveal the extent of burnout among physicians and nursing staff working in the emergency hospital of Tanta University and to identify some of its determinants. A cross-sectional study was carried out on all physicians (n = 266) and a systematic random sample of nurses (n = 284). Burnout was assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and its subscales. Most of the participants (66.0%)had a moderate level of burnout and 24.9% of them had high burnout. Multivariate analysis of variables affecting burnout showed that age, sex, frequency of exposure to work-related violence, years of experience, work burden, supervision and work activities were significant predictors of burnout among the respondents. The authors recommend health education interventions during pre-employment training programmes for prevention of burnout syndrome and periodic screening for early detection and management of burnout.

  2. Resolution of the Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    You were many to attend the public information meetings organised in October and we thank you for your interest. In this decision phase of the current Five-Yearly Review of our employment conditions they provided an opportunity to review the Management proposals in detail. They were a moment of exchange also on the various topics under review, and your comments were many and very valuable. Meeting on Thursday 29th October, the Staff Council discussed once more these proposals. It considered that the "package" of proposed measures is not balanced enough in its current form. It decided to formulate additional requests to the Management, relating mainly to the effects of the introduction of the proposed new career system. The resolution adopted this morning also implies that the consultation of staff, originally foreseen next week, is postponed. The staff Council will reconvene in a special session on Thursday, 5th November to reassess its position depending on the progress made regarding its d...

  3. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. The voting takes place from 23 October to 13 November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017. Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November and 5 December. Candidates for the 2017 Elections

  4. Supported Conversation for hospital staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Hysse B; Løvholt, Annelise P.; Mathiesen, Lone Lundbak

    in communication and interaction, Supported Conversation for Adults with Aphasia (SCA) was adapted and implemented in a large neurological department at Rigshospitalet-Glostrup in Copenhagen. Method 152 staff members representing different health professionals were assigned to one of eleven courses during a six...... month period. Each course had 10-12 participants and lasted 6 hours, including instruction in the SCA principles, video analysis, interdisciplinary group work, and practice sessions with PWAs. Self-assessed learning outcomes were evaluated with a brief questionnaire filled out by staff members...... in communication, also showed significant improvements across all staff groups. After the course, more time to spend with patients was perceived as the most important factor to further increase communication success with PWA. Conclusion The results show that interdisciplinary SCA-courses successfully increase...

  5. Factors related to adherence of recommendations for redose administration in clean surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Schmitt

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections (SSIs are one of the main adverse events among surgical patients, being responsible for 20% of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs. Surgical antibiotic prophylaxis is one of the practices used to prevent SSIs, however, compliance with recommendations is low. A retrospective observational cross-sectional study investigated the index of compliance with redose and its relationship to characteristics of the procedures and individuals. A total of 748 records of cardiac, orthopedic and neurological surgeries were assessed. Of these, 90 had an indication of redose, which was administered in 26.6% of the surgeries. Compliance was significantly higher in cardiac surgeries (34.3% and those of greater SSI risk index. In conclusion, compliance with recommendations for redose administration is low and improving the process of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis use is needed. The use of technologies in association with awareness, motivation of the teams and involvement of the nursing staff may constitute alternatives.

  6. Recommendations for mental health professionals in the NICU

    OpenAIRE

    Hynan, M T; Steinberg, Z; Baker, L; Cicco, R; Geller, P A; Lassen, S; Milford, C; Mounts, K O; Patterson, C; Saxton, S; Segre, L; Stuebe, A

    2015-01-01

    This article describes recommended activities of social workers, psychologists and psychiatric staff within the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). NICU mental health professionals (NMHPs) should interact with all NICU parents in providing emotional support, screening, education, psychotherapy and teleservices for families. NMHPs should also offer educational and emotional support for the NICU health-care staff. NMHPs should function at all levels of layered care delivered to NICU parents. M...

  7. Staff Development for School Improvement: An Illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelfelt, Roy A., Ed.

    This document contains 11 papers on school staff development: (1) "The Staff Development for School Improvement Program" (Winifred I. Warnat); (2) "A Teacher's View of a Staff Development Project" (Lynn Kleiman); (3) "Staff Development from the Principal's Perspective" (Dixie Hibner); (4) "Stepping-Stones to Success" (Barbara A. Skone); (5)…

  8. 17 CFR 8.05 - Enforcement staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enforcement staff. 8.05... staff. (a) Each exchange shall establish an adequate enforcement staff which shall be authorized by the... staff shall consist of employees of the exchange and/or persons hired on a contract basis. It may not...

  9. English for Airport Ground Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes part of a European Commission Leonardo project that aimed to design a multimedia course for English language learners seeking work as ground staff in European airports. The structural-functional analysis of the dialogues written from the course showed that, across the four trades explored (security guards, ground handlers,…

  10. Agency Directionality and Staff Individuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, James C.; And Others

    Psychologists who choose work as members of counseling agencies are likely to experience some dissonance between what their individual interests and skills would have them do professionally and what they are asked to do as a staff member of the agency. Conversely, as a component of a larger institution or community, an agency's very existence may…

  11. Creativity in nursing staff development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, K A; Korte, P D

    1990-01-01

    The use of creative teaching techniques in nursing staff development generates enthusiasm for learning in both the learner and the educator. We report the process used to develop alternative teaching approaches and examples of these programs. A cost analysis of a traditional versus an innovative program is provided. Advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are reviewed.

  12. Trust for intelligent recommendation

    CERN Document Server

    Bhuiyan, Touhid

    2013-01-01

    Recommender systems are one of the recent inventions to deal with the ever-growing information overload in relation to the selection of goods and services in a global economy. Collaborative Filtering (CF) is one of the most popular techniques in recommender systems. The CF recommends items to a target user based on the preferences of a set of similar users known as the neighbors, generated from a database made up of the preferences of past users. In the absence of these ratings, trust between the users could be used to choose the neighbor for recommendation making. Better recommendations can b

  13. Handbook of Student Journalism: A Guide for Staff and Advisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Edmund C.; Krieghbaum, Hillier

    Intended for student journalists and their advisers, this book surveys many aspects of scholastic and professional journalism: the nature and function of scholastic and professional journalism, the building of an effective staff, the language of the press, and the law and student journalists. Sections are also devoted to extensive discussion of…

  14. Prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors among staff of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The aim was to describe the frequency of occurrence of traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors among selected university workers in Ladoke Akintola University of Technology (LAUTECH) Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A cross‑sectional study of 206 staff of LAUTECH, Ogbomoso, Nigeria had an assessment for ...

  15. Delegation and Staff Commitment in the School of Finance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between Delegation of Authority and Staff Commitment in the School of Finance and Banking in Kigali Rwanda. A cross-sectional survey design was used with the target sample size of 97 out of 130 parent population. The total number of questionnaires that were ...

  16. 12 CFR 13.4 - Recommendations to customers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recommendations to customers. 13.4 Section 13.4... PRACTICES § 13.4 Recommendations to customers. In recommending to a customer the purchase, sale or exchange... reasonable grounds for believing that the recommendation is suitable for the customer upon the basis of the...

  17. Job satisfaction survey among health centers staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnazi, Hossein; Daniali, Seyede Shahrbanoo; Sharifirad, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Due to the importance of health care organizations with significant responsibility for prevention and care, assessment of job satisfaction among health care staff is essential. Quality of health services will be decreased provided they are not satisfied. This study was a cross-sectional analysis of health care staff in Khomeinishahr (centers, buildings, and networks) If they had at least 6 months work experience, they could enter the study. Data included a two-part questionnaire with a standardized questionnaire, demographic variables, and Smith job descriptive index, which is a questionnaire with six domains. Reliability was obtained for each domain and its validity was reported 0.93. The results showed an overall satisfaction score averages 43.55 ± 12.8 (from 100). Job satisfaction score was not significantly different between the sexes. However, within the current attitude toward job satisfaction, men scores was better than women (P = 0.001). Highest score in job satisfaction was related to relationships with colleagues and lowest score was related to the income, benefits, and job promotion. The more the years of work, the less the job satisfaction was. The attitude toward the current job had a direct relationship with income (P = 0.01). There was a significant inverse relationship between educational level and job satisfaction in domains promotion, income, and benefits (P = 0.01). The staff with higher education levels was less satisfied with income and job promotion qualification. Managers should focus on job qualification to increase job satisfaction and improve the quality of work.

  18. Staff

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    TÜ teadustöötajaist ja õppejõududest on 2/3 doktorikraadiga. TÜ rektor Jaak Aaviksoo ja teadusprprektor Ain Heinaru valiti Euroopa kõrghariduspoliitika juhtorganitesse. Sotsiaalteaduskonna prof. Wolfgang Drechsler sai Saksa-Eesti akadeemiliste suhete arendamise eest Saksamaa Liitvabariigi Teeneteristi

  19. Assessment of the effectiveness of ventilation types for reducing the occupational exposure to bioaerosols in health care staffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Jafari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives : Hospital indoor air contains a wide range of airborne pathogenic bioaerosols which have a significant impact on health care staff’ health and welfare. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of ventilation system types on occupational exposure of the health care staffs to airborne bioaerosols in the isolation room based on the patient bed arrangements and the standing locations of the health care staff. Methods: Personal exposures were measured based on five given types of ventilation system, 2 patient bed arrangements (at a corner and in the middle of the room, and two different standing locations for the health care staff (standing close to the patient’s bed, and down a side section of the bed. For personal sampling, filtration method recommended by th e American conference of governmental industrial hygienists(ACGIH was used. Result: The highest exposure to airborne bioaerosols was observed when the ventilation system was switched off. There were significant decreases in the bioaerosols concentration after using all types of ventilation system (P value 0.05. Conclusions : The most effective ventilation system for decreasing health care staff’ exposures in the isolation room was associated with supplying of air from a circular grill located on the northern wall and exhausting it through a linear slot located on the southern wall (type 1 with the ventilation rate of 12 air changes per hour.

  20. Development of Intention to Stay Model for Temporary Nursing Staff in RS UNAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ike Nesdia Rahmawati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intention to stay of nurses is important to reduce turnover rate and to improve the stability of hospital. Quality of nursing work life (QNWL has been found to influence intention to stay. However, reliable information of this effect is limited. The purpose of this study was to develop the model of intention to stay for temporary nursing staff in RS UNAIR. Method: Anexplanative cross-sectional survey design was used in this study. Data were collected by using questionnaire among 32 nurses working at different units in this hospital through simple random sampling and analyzed by partial least square (PLS. Result: QNWL affected job satisfaction but did not affect commitment. Commitment was significantly affected by job satisfaction. There was effect of job satisfaction on intention to stay. Commitment also significantly affected intention to stay Discussion: QNWL is a predictor of intention to stay trough job satisfaction and commitment. It is recommended that more focused interventions on QNWL, job satisfaction, and commitment developments may improve intention to stay. Recruitment of non-nursing staff to carry out billing and administrative tasks is urgently needed. Suggestions for further research is to analyze the effect of empowerment, remuneration, and career ladder on nurses’ intention to stay. Keywords: intention to stay, quality of nursing work life, job satisfaction, commitment.

  1. User Violence and Nursing Staff Burnout: The Modulating Role of Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galián-Muñoz, Inmaculada; Ruiz-Hernández, Jose Antonio; Llor-Esteban, Bartolomé; López-García, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to patient violence in health staff can lead to the onset of burnout in these workers. The main goal of this investigation is to study how exposure to this kind of violence affects onset of burnout and to appraise the role of job satisfaction as a modulating variable. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was carried out using a self-administered anonymous questionnaire with the nursing staff of all the public hospitals of the Region of Murcia (Spain), obtaining a sample of 1,489 health professionals. From the results obtained, we underline the modulating role of extrinsic job satisfaction in the relationship between nonphysical violence and emotional exhaustion, and the protective effect of job satisfaction on the impact of nonphysical violence and the level of cynicism. No effects of job satisfaction in the relationship between physical violence and burnout were observed. We therefore conclude that experiencing nonphysical aggression has a lower impact on the psychological health of workers who are satisfied with their job, and interventions aimed at increasing these workers' extrinsic job satisfaction are highly recommended. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Attitudes of Nursing Facilities' Staff Toward Pharmacy Students' Interaction with its Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Donna; Gavaza, Paul; Deel, Sharon

    2017-06-01

    All Appalachian College of Pharmacy second-year students undertake the longitudinal geriatric early pharmacy practice experiences (EPPE) 2 course, which involves interacting with geriatric residents in two nursing facilities over two semesters. The study investigated the nursing staff's perceptions about the rotation and the pharmacy students' interaction with nursing facility residents. Cross-sectional study. Academic setting. 63 nursing facility staff. A 10-item attitude survey administered to nursing staff. Nursing staff attitude toward pharmacy students' interaction with geriatric residents during the course. Sixty-three responses were received (84% response rate). Most respondents were female (95.2%), who occasionally interacted with pharmacy students (54.8%) and had worked at the facilities for an average of 6.8 years (standard deviation [SD] = 6.7) years. Staff reported that pharmacy students practiced interacting with geriatric residents and nursing facility staff, learned about different medications taken by residents as well as their life as a nursing facility resident. In addition, the student visits improved the mood of residents and staff's understanding of medicines, among others. Staff suggested that students spend more time with their residents in the facility as well as ask more questions of staff. The nursing facility staff generally had favorable attitudes about pharmacy students' visits in their nursing facility. Nursing facility staff noted that the geriatric rotation was a great learning experience for the pharmacy students.

  3. ESHRE guideline: routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction-a guide for fertility staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, S; Boivin, J; Dancet, E; de Klerk, C; Emery, M; Lewis-Jones, C; Thorn, P; Van den Broeck, U; Venetis, C; Verhaak, C M; Wischmann, T; Vermeulen, N

    2015-11-01

    Based on the best available evidence in the literature, what is the optimal management of routine psychosocial care at infertility and medically assisted reproduction (MAR) clinics? Using the structured methodology of the Manual for the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) Guideline Development, 120 recommendations were formulated that answered the 12 key questions on optimal management of routine psychosocial care by all fertility staff. The 2002 ESHRE Guidelines for counselling in infertility has been a reference point for best psychosocial care in infertility for years, but this guideline needed updating and did not focus on routine psychosocial care that can be delivered by all fertility staff. This guideline was produced by a group of experts in the field according to the 12-step process described in the ESHRE Manual for Guideline Development. After scoping the guideline and listing a set of 12 key questions in PICO (Patient, Intervention, Comparison and Outcome) format, thorough systematic searches of the literature were conducted; evidence from papers published until April 2014 was collected, evaluated for quality and analysed. A summary of evidence was written in a reply to each of the key questions and used as the basis for recommendations, which were defined by consensus within the guideline development group (GDG). Patient and additional clinical input was collected during the scoping and the review phase of the guideline development. The guideline group, comprising psychologists, two medical doctors, a midwife, a patient representative and a methodological expert, met three times to discuss evidence and reach consensus on the recommendations. 120 recommendations that aim at guiding fertility clinic staff in providing optimal evidence-based routine psychosocial care to patients dealing with infertility and MAR. The guideline is written in two sections. The first section describes patients' preferences regarding the psychosocial

  4. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAlindon, T. E.; Driban, J. B.; Henrotin, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this document is to update the original OARSI recommendations specifically for the design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). To develop recommendations for the design, conduct......, and reporting of clinical trials for knee OA we initially drafted recommendations through an iterative process. Members of the working group included representatives from industry and academia. After the working group members reviewed a final draft, they scored the appropriateness for recommendations. After...... and index knee, describing interventions, patient-reported and physical performance measures, structural outcome measures, biochemical biomarkers, and reporting recommendations. In summary, the working group identified 25 recommendations that represent the current best practices regarding clinical trials...

  5. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Asscociation

    2015-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! Be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will represent you over the next two years and they will without doubt appreciate your gratitude. The voting takes place from the 26th of October to the 9th of November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2015.   Elections Timetable Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 8 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. Candidates for the 2015 elections

  6. Towards mobile staff members management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encheva, Sylvia

    2017-07-01

    Todays project management requires a number of abilities which involve finding quick solutions to shortage of staff members with possession of specific qualities. When persons with team responsibilities are under pressure or due to various circumstances are unable to perform exhaustive search in databases, an interactive visualization tool can come in quite handy in finding good solutions unforeseen occurrences. In particular we propose application of selected graphs for facilitating mobile human resource management.

  7. Managing a multicultural radiology staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhizar, R; Dowd, S; Giger, J

    1997-01-01

    Opportunities for minorities in healthcare increased with the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s. More recently, funds from the U.S. Public Health Service have been targeted toward disadvantaged minorities. The workforce in healthcare, and in business in general, has become increasingly multicultural. Much of the literature in healthcare management lacks practical guidelines for managing a diverse workforce. Communication, both verbal and nonverbal, and culture are closely intertwined. Managers, as they develop multicultural teams, will need to understand how culture influences communication in their organizations. Space, spatial behavior, and cultural attitudes influence people's behavior. This is a particularly important consideration for a radiology staff, which must often work in close quarters. For some cultural groups, the family as an organization has more significance than even personal, work-related or national causes. People's orientation to time, whether for the past, present or future, is usually related to the culture in which they grew up. Again, this may become an important issue for a radiology administrator whose organization must run punctually and time-efficiently. How patients feel about their environment, whether they believe they are in control or believe in an external locus of control, is of particular interest to those who attempt therapeutic changes in a patient's healthcare. Does the patient believe that illness is divine will or that suffering is intrinsic to the human condition? There is increasing research in the United States to show that people do differ biologically according to race. Such differences exist among patients as well as among staff members. It has been popular to assume that differences among races do not exist. Unfortunately such an attitude does not allow for different attributes and responses of individuals. Managing a multicultural staff presents a challenge to administrators who must be skilled in working with

  8. Trust and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Patricia; de Cock, Martine; Cornelis, Chris

    Recommendation technologies and trust metrics constitute the two pillars of trust-enhanced recommender systems. We discuss and illustrate the basic trust concepts such as trust and distrust modeling, propagation and aggregation. These concepts are needed to fully grasp the rationale behind the trust-enhanced recommender techniques that are discussed in the central part of the chapter, which focuses on the application of trust metrics and their operators in recommender systems. We explain the benefits of using trust in recommender algorithms and give an overview of state-of-the-art approaches for trust-enhanced recommender systems. Furthermore, we explain the details of three well-known trust-based systems and provide a comparative analysis of their performance. We conclude with a discussion of some recent developments and open challenges, such as visualizing trust relationships in a recommender system, alleviating the cold start problem in a trust network of a recommender system, studying the effect of involving distrust in the recommendation process, and investigating the potential of other types of social relationships.

  9. Uncovering the emotional aspects of working on a clinical trial: a qualitative study of the experiences and views of staff involved in a type 1 diabetes trial

    OpenAIRE

    Lawton, Julia; Kirkham, Jackie; White, David; Rankin, David; Cooper, Cindy; Heller, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Background: The perspectives and experiences of trial staff are increasingly being investigated as these can be used to improve recruitment, adherence to trial protocols and support given to future staff. We interviewed staff working on a type 1 diabetes trial in order to aid interpretation of trial findings, inform recommendations for the rollout of the treatments investigated and provide recommendations for the conduct of future trials. However, our interviews uncovered aspects of trial wor...

  10. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   Global CERN Career paths AA - G 14     Number of seats for fellows representatives Global CERN 5 For more informat...

  11. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 21 September, at noon Start date for receipt of the application Friday 16 October, at noon Closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   ...

  12. 76 FR 24494 - Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff: Processing/Reprocessing Medical Devices in Health Care...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff: Processing/ Reprocessing Medical Devices in Health Care... Devices in Health Care Settings: Validation Methods and Labeling.'' The recommendations in this guidance... Staff: Processing/Reprocessing Medical Devices in Health Care Settings: Validation Methods and Labeling...

  13. Strategies and best practices for staff renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottingham, C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the strategies and best practices for staff renewal in the electricity sector. Strategic initiatives for staff renewal include strategic recruiting, succession planning, employee relations, knowledge management and strategic partnerships

  14. The Joint Staff Officer's Guide 2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    The Joint Forces Staff College (JFSC) educates staff officers and other leaders in joint operational-level planning and warfighting and instills a commitment to joint, multinational, and interagency teamwork, attitudes, and perspectives...

  15. Tuberculosis among prison staff in Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Busatto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the risk of infection and illness caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis among health care and security staff in prisons in two regions of Rio Grande do Sul (RS. Method: cross-sectional study involving prison staff. An interview and sputum smear microscopy and culture were performed. Latent infection was evaluated according to the result of the tuberculin test (TT, self-referred. Results: among staff who had a TT, 10 (83.3% in the central region and 2 (16.7% in the southern region were considered reactors. Length of employment among prison officers who reacted to TT was 15.3 years, and among health care workers, 4.1 years (p = 0.01. No cases of active tuberculosis (TB were identified. Conclusion: prevalence of latent TB was 27.9%. Length of employment between different professional categories and their working regions was considered a risk factor for latent TB.

  16. Turn to staff for dramatic improvement in wait times, productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Baylor Medical Center in Garland,TX, has been able to drastically reduce ED wait times, as well as the LWBS rate by streamlining the triage process and implementing a staff-driven improvement effort aimed at identifying inefficiencies and replacing them with solutions that work. The result is 11 beds of added capacity just from changes in patient flow. A cross section of volunteers from the ED staff reviewed metrics and devised solutions that they felt would work best to boost efficiency and eliminate bottlenecks. Solutions included letting low-acuity patients move themselves between care settings, freeing the charge nurse from patient care duties so that he or she could oversee patient flow, and empowering physician-nurse teams to see patients more quickly. ED managers say leadership is important, but letting staff drive the improvement process is key to their success.

  17. Research recommendations [Chapter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel G. Neary; Alvin L. Medina; John N. Rinne

    2012-01-01

    This chapter contains a number of research recommendations that have developed from the 15 years of research on the UVR conducted by the Southwest Watershed Science Team, as well as from insights from key cooperators and contacts. It is meant to be our best insight as to where efforts should go now. Achieving these recommendations will depend on a number of factors,...

  18. Knowledge, attitude and practice toward complementary and traditional medicine among Kashan health care staff, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Hoseinian, Masoumeh

    2014-02-01

    Studies show that medical staff in different countries have different attitudes toward traditional and complementary medicine. Therefore, the current study aimed to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practice of complementary and traditional medicine by medical staff of Kashan, Iran. A cross-sectional study was performed. A total of 378 questionnaires were distributed among health care team members in Kashan University of Medical Sciences in 2012. The questionnaire was consisted of 5 questions regarding demographic characteristics and 12 questions on knowledge, attitude and practice of traditional and complementary medicine. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. In total, 309 questionnaires were returned and 302 questionnaires were analyzed. Among the participants, 60.9% were female. The mean age of subjects was 29.70±9.28 years. Totally, 88.4% of the participants had no previous education on complementary and traditional medicine, and 77.8% showed interest to learn in this area. Also, 57.6% of participants had the experience of personal use of complementary and traditional therapies. The commonly used methods were: herbal therapy, cupping and traditional bathing. Participants used traditional medicine mostly for digestive diseases, colds, migraine and headaches, skin disorders, losing weight, and diabetes. Moreover, 56% of participants had recommended complementary and traditional therapies to the others. Most of the participants had low level knowledge on complementary and traditional medicine, but expressed their interest to learn in this field. Therefore, training health care team members and especially nurses and doctors on the applications, benefits and side effects of complementary and traditional medicine is recommended. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Staff perceptions of community health centre team function in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Jennifer; Muldoon, Laura

    2017-07-01

    To examine perceptions of different staff groups about team functioning in mature, community-governed, interprofessional primary health care practices. Cross-sectional online survey. The 75 community health centres (CHCs) in Ontario at the time of the study, which have cared for people with barriers to access to traditional health services in community-governed, interprofessional settings, providing medical, social, and community services since the 1970s. Managers and staff of primary care teams in the CHCs. Scores on the short version of the Team Climate Inventory (with subscales addressing vision, task orientation, support for innovation, and participative safety), the Organizational Justice Scale (with subscales addressing procedural justice and interactional justice), and the Organizational Citizenship Behavior Scale, stratified by staff group (clinical manager, FP, nurse practitioner [NP], registered nurse, medical secretary, social worker, allied health provider, counselor, outreach worker, and administrative assistant). A total of 674 staff members in 58 of 75 (77%) CHCs completed surveys. All staff groups generally reported positive perceptions of team function. The procedural justice subscale showed the greatest variation between groups. Family physicians and NPs rated procedural justice much lower than nurses and administrators did. This study provides a unique view of the perceptions of different groups of staff in a long-standing interprofessional practice model. Future research is needed to understand why FPs and NPs perceive procedural justice more negatively than other team members do, and whether such perceptions affect outcomes such as staff turnover and health outcomes for patients. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  20. Nursing teamwork, staff characteristics, work schedules, and staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Lee, Hyunhwa

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to explore whether and how staff characteristics, staffing, and scheduling variables are associated with the level of teamwork in nursing staff on acute care hospital patient units. This was a cross-sectional study with a sample of 1,758 nursing staff members from two different hospitals on 38 patient care units who completed the Nursing Teamwork Survey in 2008. This study focused on nursing teams who are stationed on a particular patient care unit (as opposed to visitors to the units). The return rate was 56.9%. The sample was made up of 77.4% nurses (registered nurses and licensed practical nurses), 11.9% assistive personnel, and 7.9% unit secretaries. Teamwork varied by unit and service type, with the highest scores occurring in pediatrics and maternity and the lowest scores on the medical-surgical and emergency units. Staff with less than 6 months of experience, those working 8- or 10-hour shifts (as opposed to 12 hours or a combination of 8 and 12 hours), part-time staff (as opposed to full time), and those working on night shift had higher teamwork scores. The higher teamwork scores were also associated with no or little overtime. The higher perception of the adequacy of staffing and the fewer patients cared for on a previous shift, the higher the teamwork scores. There is a relationship between selected staff characteristics, aspects of work schedules, staffing, and teamwork. Nursing staff want to work where teamwork is high, and perceptions of good staffing lead to higher teamwork. Higher teamwork scores correlated with those who worked less overtime.

  1. Staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimova, N.U.; Malisheva, E.Yu.; Shosafarova, Sh.G.

    2010-01-01

    Present article is devoted to staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics. Data on staff radiation exposure obtained during 2005-2008 years was analyzed. It was found that average individual doses of staff of various occupations in Dushanbe city for 2008 year are at 0.29-2.16 mSv range. They are higher than the average health indicators but lower than maximum permissible dose. It was defined that paramedical personnel receives the highest doses among the various categories of staff.

  2. Become a staff delegate: why not you?

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2009-01-01

    Following a decision taken at the Staff Association General Assembly in May 2008, staff delegates are elected in the autumn of odd-numbered years. The next elections which will lead to a total renewal of the Staff Council will thus take place in November 2009. Will you be a candidate?

  3. Get the Staff You Need This Summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Christy L.

    1997-01-01

    Strategies for recruiting camp staff include tailoring messages to the needs and interests of prospective staff; utilizing former staff; hiring older workers; encouraging parents, former campers, and special interest groups to volunteer; and offering competitive pay. Provides an example of a target population (Generation X, born 1963-83) and key…

  4. Strengthening Bullying Prevention through School Staff Connectedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2014-01-01

    The growing concern about bullying and school violence has focused national attention on various aspects of school climate and school connectedness. The current study examined dimensions of staff connectedness (i.e., personal, student, staff, and administration) in relation to staff members' comfort intervening in bullying situations (e.g.,…

  5. Self Efficacy among University Academic Staff

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was no significant difference between teaching staff and professional librarians on collective educators' self efficacy but significant difference existed between male and female academic staff on collective educators' self efficacy. The implication of the result in terms of collaborative work among academic staff was ...

  6. Short Communication Employee -Driven Staff Training and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the concept of staff training and development within the South African context. The changing labour legislation in South Africa makes it mandatory for the employer to provide training and development. However, staff have an important role to play in staff training and development. The paper gives an ...

  7. Improving Staff Productivity in Mental Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This guide is concerned with productivity measurement and improvement in mental health centers, and focuses on the relationship between service outputs and available clinical staff, i.e., staff productivity. Staff productivity measures are described as useful in identifying existing levels of productivity, making comparisons to determine the…

  8. Cultural Awareness Among Nursing Staff at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Jennifer; Smith-Miller, Cheryl A; Madigan, Catherine K; Li, Yin

    2016-03-01

    The goal is to identify areas for targeted improvement in regard to cultural awareness and competence among nursing staff and in the work environment. Many facilities have initiated programs to facilitate cultural competence development among nursing staff; however, there has been little examination of the effect of these initiatives, assessment of experienced nurses' cultural awareness, or investigation of nurse leader's role in promoting cultural competence in the literature. In this cross-sectional descriptive study, a cultural awareness survey was modified and electronically distributed to all registered nurses and assistive personnel at an academic medical center. The modified survey instrument showed good reliability and validity among the study population. Most nursing staff exhibited a moderate to high level of cultural awareness and held positive opinions about nursing leadership and the work environment with regard to cultural issues. In increasingly diverse work environments, assessing the cultural awareness of nursing staff enables nurse leaders to evaluate efforts in promoting cultural competence and to identify specific areas in which to target staff development efforts and leadership training.

  9. Examining the temporal relationship between psychological climate, work attitude, and staff turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R.; Hunter, Brooke D.

    2012-01-01

    Relative to the broader industrial-organizational (I-O) psychology field, research on the turnover of substance use disorder (SUD) treatment staff is in its infancy. Despite its long and rich history, recent reviews of the turnover literature within I-O psychology have noted there remains considerable room for improvement. In particular, recommendations have been made for research that considers time in the turnover process and explores more distal causes of staff turnover. Addressing these gaps, this paper examined the temporal relationship between latent measures of psychological climate, work attitude, and staff turnover. Using data from 95 SUD treatment staff clustered within 29 treatment organizations, multilevel discrete-time survival analyses revealed that a latent measure of work attitude (e.g., job satisfaction, pay satisfaction, turnover intentions) fully mediated the temporal relationship between latent measures of psychological climate (e.g., supervisor support, coworker support, role conflict) and subsequent staff turnover. PMID:22658290

  10. Nursing home staff perspectives on adoption of an innovation in goals of care communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Latarsha; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Rosemond, Cherie; McConnell, Eleanor; Weiner, Bryan J; Lin, Feng-Chang; Hanson, Laura

    2017-08-31

    Nursing homes (NH) are important settings for end-of-life care, but limited implementation may impede goals of care discussions. The purpose of this study was to understand NH staff perceptions of adoption and sustainability of the Goals of Care video decision aid for families of residents with advanced dementia. Study design was a cross-sectional survey of staff at 11 NHs in North Carolina who participated in the Goals of Care (GOC) cluster randomized clinical trial. Staff perceived the GOC decision aid intervention as a positive innovation; it was perceived as more compatible with current practices by male staff, nurses, and more experienced NH staff. Perceptions were correlated with experience, implying that experience with an innovative approach may help to promote improved GOC communication in nursing homes. Nurses and social work staff could be effective champions for implementing a communication technique, like the GOC intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Radiation dose measurement for patients and staff during cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joda, H. H. M.

    2009-07-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the patient and staff dose during cardiac catheterization procedures in Ahmed Gasim Hospital, Khartoum Bahry. A survey of patient and staff exposure was performed covered 2 Cath Lab units from 2 manufacturers. The measurements involved 50 operations. The medical staff was monitored using TLD chips (LiF: Mg, Cu, P). The main operator who was closer to the patient and the x-ray tube, was monitored at six positions (forehead, neck chest - over the lead apron, waist - under the lead apron, leg, and hand), while the exposure to the assistant was measured at two positions (chest - over the lead apron, and hand), where the technologist and the circulator were monitored at one position (chest - over the lead apron). patient exposure was measured using the DAP meter. The main operator and the rest of the staff received 0.14, 0.01 mSv/y respectively. The estimated patient dose rate was found to be 125 mGy/min which considered higher than the recommended DRL for the continuous high mode fluoroscopy used in interventional radiology (100 mGy/min). The study concluded to the fact that the main operator received relatively high dose which is a direct result to the poor radiation protection in the department. (Author)

  12. Review of WHO/PAHO/IAEA recommendations concerning radiotherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    Since the mid 1960s the World Health Organization, the Pan American Health Organization, and the International Atomic Energy Agency have provided recommendations concerning radiotherapy services, including organization, staff requirements and facilities. These are contained in various reports of WHO, PAHO and IAEA, which are reviewed and summarized. (author). 9 refs

  13. Recommender Systems for Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Manouselis, Nikos; Verbert, Katrien; Duval, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Technology enhanced learning (TEL) aims to design, develop and test sociotechnical innovations that will support and enhance learning practices of both individuals and organisations. It is therefore an application domain that generally covers technologies that support all forms of teaching and learning activities. Since information retrieval (in terms of searching for relevant learning resources to support teachers or learners) is a pivotal activity in TEL, the deployment of recommender systems has attracted increased interest. This brief attempts to provide an introduction to recommender systems for TEL settings, as well as to highlight their particularities compared to recommender systems for other application domains.

  14. The operating staff of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, G.; Christ, W.

    1988-01-01

    The training of its staff is one of the pillars of the safe and economical operation of a power plant. This is why power plant owners began to systematically train their staff already in the 50s, and why they created central training facilities. Staff members who have undergone this training make an indispensable contribution to the acceptedly high safety and availability of German power plants. The substantial cost of creating training facilities and of schooling plant staff is considered to be an investment for the future. Low labour turnover permits careful observation and development of staff and leads to a high standard of knowledge and experience. (orig./HSCH) [de

  15. Recommendations, requirements, and radioactive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    Hot particles consisting of activated metal debris and fuel fragments have received increased attention in the last five years. This increased attention resulted from the increased use of more sensitive whole body friskers at nuclear power plants, the relatively high local skin doses associated with the particles, and skin dose limits that were established before hot particles, and skin dose limits that were established before hot particles became a problem and before radiobiological effects data for the particles became available. The skin dose distribution and biological effects associated with hot particles differ from those associated with more uniform skin contamination and differences exist in the scientific community as to which effects should be protected against by a limit on exposures from particles. The NRC staff recognized the need for provisions in the Federal regulations specific to hot particle exposures and requested guidance from the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). NCRP Report No. 106 was provided to the NRC early in 1990. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is also developing recommendations for limits on exposures from hot particles. The NRC is supporting research on hot particle effects and will likely develop a rule for hot particle exposures

  16. Search and Recommendation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine

    2014-01-01

    In just a little over half a century, the field of information retrieval has experienced spectacular growth and success, with IR applications such as search engines becoming a billion-dollar industry in the past decades. Recommender systems have seen an even more meteoric rise to success with wide......-scale application by companies like Amazon, Facebook, and Netflix. But are search and recommendation really two different fields of research that address different problems with different sets of algorithms in papers published at distinct conferences? In my talk, I want to argue that search and recommendation...... are more similar than they have been treated in the past decade. By looking more closely at the tasks and problems that search and recommendation try to solve, at the algorithms used to solve these problems and at the way their performance is evaluated, I want to show that there is no clear black and white...

  17. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral colle...

  18. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 26 September, posters, etc. call for applications Wednesday 26 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the application Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November. In its meeting on 19 September 2011, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges 0.1 to 0.6: Sector Department Career path AA – A – B – C – D Career path E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 18 si&e...

  19. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 13 si&...

  20. User Evaluation of the NASA Technical Report Server Recommendation Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Bollen, Johan; Calhoun, JoAnne R.; Mackey, Calvin E.

    2004-01-01

    We present the user evaluation of two recommendation server methodologies implemented for the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS). One methodology for generating recommendations uses log analysis to identify co-retrieval events on full-text documents. For comparison, we used the Vector Space Model (VSM) as the second methodology. We calculated cosine similarities and used the top 10 most similar documents (based on metadata) as recommendations . We then ran an experiment with NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) staff members to gather their feedback on which method produced the most quality recommendations. We found that in most cases VSM outperformed log analysis of co-retrievals. However, analyzing the data revealed the evaluations may have been structurally biased in favor of the VSM generated recommendations. We explore some possible methods for combining log analysis and VSM generated recommendations and suggest areas of future work.

  1. Probabilistic approaches to recommendations

    CERN Document Server

    Barbieri, Nicola; Ritacco, Ettore

    2014-01-01

    The importance of accurate recommender systems has been widely recognized by academia and industry, and recommendation is rapidly becoming one of the most successful applications of data mining and machine learning. Understanding and predicting the choices and preferences of users is a challenging task: real-world scenarios involve users behaving in complex situations, where prior beliefs, specific tendencies, and reciprocal influences jointly contribute to determining the preferences of users toward huge amounts of information, services, and products. Probabilistic modeling represents a robus

  2. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emery, C. A.; Roos, Ewa M.; Verhagen, E.

    2015-01-01

    the design, conduct and analytical approaches to RCTs evaluating the preventative effect of joint injury prevention strategies. Recommendations regarding the design, conduct, and reporting of RCTs evaluating injury prevention interventions were established based on the consensus of nine researchers...... regarding the research question, research design, study participants, randomization, baseline characteristics, intervention, outcome measurement, analysis, implementation, cost evaluation, reporting and future considerations including the impact on development of PTOA. Methodological recommendations...

  3. A Hybrid Recommender System Based on User-Recommender Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Heng-Ru; Min, Fan; He, Xu; Xu, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Recommender systems are used to make recommendations about products, information, or services for users. Most existing recommender systems implicitly assume one particular type of user behavior. However, they seldom consider user-recommender interactive scenarios in real-world environments. In this paper, we propose a hybrid recommender system based on user-recommender interaction and evaluate its performance with recall and diversity metrics. First, we define the user-recommender interaction...

  4. Pediatric and staff dose evaluation in fluoroscopy upper gastrointestinal series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipov, Danielle; Nascimento, Eduarda X. do; Lacerda, Camila M., E-mail: diilipov@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UFTPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Schelin, Hugo R.; Ledesma, Jorge A.; Denyak, Valeriy; Legnani, Adriano, E-mail: ledesmajorgealberto@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisa Pele Pequeno Principe, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Fluoroscopy upper GI series are widely used for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children. Pediatric radiological procedures bring concern due to the high life expectancy and radiosensitivity on children, as well as the risks to the exposed staff Important studies present the mean KAP values on patients and the European Commission (EC) recommends specific techniques for these procedures. For the occupational expositions, staffs doses must be within the annual limit, according to the CNEN 3.01. Based on those data, the aims of the current study are: analyzing the upper GI procedure; determining the KAP on the patient and estimating the annual equivalent dose on the staff's crystalline. LiF :Mg,Ti TLDs were positioned on the patient upper chest center, so that the entrance surface air kerma could be determined. The field size on the patient s surface and the kerma were multiplied so that the KAP was obtained. LiF:Mg,Cu,P dosimeters were used to estimate the equivalent dose on the staff s crystalline. The results showed discrepancy in the kVp range and in the exposure time when compared to the EC data. The mean KAP values for the 0-1,1-3 and 3-10 years old patients were, respectively: 102 ± 19 cGy.cm2, 142 ± 25 cGy.cm2 and 323 ± 39 cGy.cm2; which are higher than the KAPs presented in the studies used for comparison. The estimated annual equivalent dose in the staff s crystalline would be approximately 85% higher than the limit set by the CNEN. Analyzing the data, it becomes clear that an optimization implementation is necessary in order to reduce the radiation levels. (author)

  5. Recommendations for intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touzet, R.; Descalzo, A.; Peralta, O.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is set a 'radiological protection criteria' for patients and staff involved for the purpose of the doses involved are as low as reasonably achievable considering the limitations that each technique and its objectives. Establish criteria for injury prevention in the patient's skin for long exposures and intense when complications arise in the process. Set levels for some well Dimensional procedures. Establish procedures for patient dosimetry control and operator personnel. These criteria will be established by the interventional radiology team with participation of specialists in radiation protection, medical physics, dosimetry and X rays equipment specialists

  6. Research staff and public engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    Public engagement plays an important role in the contemporary UK academy, and is promoted through initiatives such as Beacons of Public Engagement and research grant 'Pathways to Impact'. Relatively little is known, however, about academic experiences of such engagement activities. This study...... focuses on one staff group, contract researchers, to explore the perceived challenges and opportunities of public engagement. Qualitative and quantitative data-from a web-based survey and three focus groups-are used to show that, while engagement activities are often seen as rewarding, the challenges...... involved in participating in them are profound. While researchers report practical needs, such as for logistical support or communication training, key barriers relate to the conditions of contract research more generally, and specifically to job insecurity, transiency, and lack of autonomy....

  7. Distributed Deliberative Recommender Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio-García, Juan A.; Díaz-Agudo, Belén; González-Sanz, Sergio; Sanchez, Lara Quijano

    Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) is one of most successful applied AI technologies of recent years. Although many CBR systems reason locally on a previous experience base to solve new problems, in this paper we focus on distributed retrieval processes working on a network of collaborating CBR systems. In such systems, each node in a network of CBR agents collaborates, arguments and counterarguments its local results with other nodes to improve the performance of the system's global response. We describe D2ISCO: a framework to design and implement deliberative and collaborative CBR systems that is integrated as a part of jcolibritwo an established framework in the CBR community. We apply D2ISCO to one particular simplified type of CBR systems: recommender systems. We perform a first case study for a collaborative music recommender system and present the results of an experiment of the accuracy of the system results using a fuzzy version of the argumentation system AMAL and a network topology based on a social network. Besides individual recommendation we also discuss how D2ISCO can be used to improve recommendations to groups and we present a second case of study based on the movie recommendation domain with heterogeneous groups according to the group personality composition and a group topology based on a social network.

  8. 12 CFR 368.4 - Recommendations to customers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recommendations to customers. 368.4 Section 368... POLICY GOVERNMENT SECURITIES SALES PRACTICES § 368.4 Recommendations to customers. In recommending to a customer the purchase, sale or exchange of a government security, a bank that is a government securities...

  9. 7 CFR 900.12 - Administrator's recommended decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrator's recommended decision. 900.12 Section... Marketing Orders § 900.12 Administrator's recommended decision. (a) Preparation. As soon as practicable... findings and conclusions the Administrator shall file with the hearing clerk a recommended decision. (b...

  10. Archetypal Game Recommender Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sifa, Rafet; Bauckhage, C.; Drachen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary users (players, consumers) of digital games have thousands of products to choose from, which makes nding games that t their interests challenging. Towards addressing this challenge, in this paper two dierent formulations of Archetypal Analysis for Top-L recommender tasks using implicit...... feedback are presented: factor- and neighborhood-oriented models. These form the rst application of rec- ommender systems to digital games. Both models are tested on a dataset of 500,000 users of the game distribution platform Steam, covering game ownership and playtime data across more than 3000 games....... Compared to four other recommender models (nearest neighbor, two popularity mod- els, random baseline), the archetype based models provide the highest recall rates showing that Archetypal Analysis can be successfully applied for Top-L recommendation purposes...

  11. Recommending Multidimensional Queries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, Arnaud; Marcel, Patrick; Negre, Elsa

    Interactive analysis of datacube, in which a user navigates a cube by launching a sequence of queries is often tedious since the user may have no idea of what the forthcoming query should be in his current analysis. To better support this process we propose in this paper to apply a Collaborative Work approach that leverages former explorations of the cube to recommend OLAP queries. The system that we have developed adapts Approximate String Matching, a technique popular in Information Retrieval, to match the current analysis with the former explorations and help suggesting a query to the user. Our approach has been implemented with the open source Mondrian OLAP server to recommend MDX queries and we have carried out some preliminary experiments that show its efficiency for generating effective query recommendations.

  12. Impact of relational coordination on staff and patient outcomes in outpatient surgical clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittell, Jody Hoffer; Logan, Caroline; Cronenwett, Jack; Foster, Tina C; Freeman, Richard; Godfrey, Marjorie; Vidal, Dale Collins

    2018-01-05

    Pressures are increasing for clinicians to provide high-quality, efficient care, leading to increased concerns about staff burnout. This study asks whether staff well-being can be achieved in ways that are also beneficial for the patient's experience of care. It explores whether relational coordination can contribute to both staff well-being and patient satisfaction in outpatient surgical clinics where time constraints paired with high needs for information transfer increase both the need for and the challenge of achieving timely and accurate communication. We studied relational coordination among surgeons, nurses, residents, administrators, technicians, and secretaries in 11 outpatient surgical clinics. Data were combined from a staff and a patient survey to conduct a cross-sectional study. Data were analyzed using ordinary least squares and random effects regression models. Relational coordination among all workgroups was significantly associated with staff outcomes, including job satisfaction, work engagement, and burnout. Relational coordination was also significantly associated with patients' satisfaction with staff and their overall visit, though the association between relational coordination and patients' satisfaction with their providers did not reach statistical significance. Even when patient-staff interactions are relatively brief, as in outpatient settings, high levels of relational coordination among interdependent workgroups contribute to positive outcomes for both staff and patients, and low levels tend to have the opposite effect. Clinical leaders can increase the expectation of positive outcomes for both staff and their patients by implementing interventions to strengthen relational coordination.

  13. Staff Report to the Secretary on Electricity Markets and Reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-08-01

    Energy Secretary Rick Perry issued a memo in April of 2017 requesting a study and directing his staff to develop a report to include an assessment of the reliability and resilience of the electric grid and an overview of the evolution of electricity markets. Various factors have emerged over the past 15 years which have impacted power supply and demand in different ways. This study, prepared by experts throughout the Department, contains a comprehensive analysis of these factors and the corresponding data, and presents a series of recommendations meant to inform and guide policy makers, regulators, and the general public. Potential areas for further research are also presented.

  14. New Insulin Delivery Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Anders H; Kreugel, Gillian; Grassi, Giorgio; Halimi, Serge; Hicks, Debbie; Hirsch, Laurence J; Smith, Mike J; Wellhoener, Regine; Bode, Bruce W; Hirsch, Irl B; Kalra, Sanjay; Ji, Linong; Strauss, Kenneth W

    2016-09-01

    Many primary care professionals manage injection or infusion therapies in patients with diabetes. Few published guidelines have been available to help such professionals and their patients manage these therapies. Herein, we present new, practical, and comprehensive recommendations for diabetes injections and infusions. These recommendations were informed by a large international survey of current practice and were written and vetted by 183 diabetes experts from 54 countries at the Forum for Injection Technique and Therapy: Expert Recommendations (FITTER) workshop held in Rome, Italy, in 2015. Recommendations are organized around the themes of anatomy, physiology, pathology, psychology, and technology. Key among the recommendations are that the shortest needles (currently the 4-mm pen and 6-mm syringe needles) are safe, effective, and less painful and should be the first-line choice in all patient categories; intramuscular injections should be avoided, especially with long-acting insulins, because severe hypoglycemia may result; lipohypertrophy is a frequent complication of therapy that distorts insulin absorption, and, therefore, injections and infusions should not be given into these lesions and correct site rotation will help prevent them; effective long-term therapy with insulin is critically dependent on addressing psychological hurdles upstream, even before insulin has been started; inappropriate disposal of used sharps poses a risk of infection with blood-borne pathogens; and mitigation is possible with proper training, effective disposal strategies, and the use of safety devices. Adherence to these new recommendations should lead to more effective therapies, improved outcomes, and lower costs for patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The operational staff during exercise RESUME-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, J. [Jensen Consult, Virum (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    With more than 100 participants entering the exercise RESUME-95 the Exercise Planning Committee decided to establish an operational staff named Directing Staff (DISTAFF) to ensure that the exercise plan was followed, the planned activities were carried out and to intervene if anything went wrong. In general the duties of the operational staff involve tasks such as secretarial assistance, keeping log of the progress of the situation and gathering, updating and distributing information on all aspects of the situation. Throughout the entire event it is the staff`s responsibility to keep a general view of the current situation and to make the necessary plans for the progress of the situation based on the available information. Furthermore the staff should ensure necessary contact to the public and to the media. (au).

  16. Measuring hospital medical staff organizational structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortell, S M; Getzen, T E

    1979-01-01

    Based on organization theory and the work of Roemer and Friedman, seven dimensions of hospital medical staff organization structure are proposed and examined. The data are based on a 1973 nationwide survey of hospital medical staffs conducted by the American Hospital Association. Factor analysis yielded six relatively independent dimensions supporting a multidimensional view of medical staff organization structure. The six dimensions include 1) Resource Capability, 2) Generalist Physician Contractual Orientation, 3) Communication/Control, 4) Local Staff Orientation, 5) Participation in Decision Making, and 6) Hospital-Based Physician Contractual Orientation. It is suggested that these dimensions can be used to develop an empirical typology of hospital medical staff organization structure and to investigate the relationship between medical staff organization and public policy issues related to cost containment and quality assurance. PMID:511580

  17. Job Satisfaction Of Hospital Nursing Staff

    OpenAIRE

    Charlotte Pietersen

    2005-01-01

    Health care managers realize that job satisfaction impacts on nursing staff retention. This study examined the job satisfaction of nursing staff (N = 109) at a government hospital. Just more than half of the respondents were generally satisfied. Feelings that nursing is worthwhile and satisfying, and financial stability at the hospital could promote staff retention. Specific intrinsic - (promotion), and extrinsic factors (routinization, working conditions, pay, interaction with supervisors, a...

  18. The staff regulations of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Following the first comprehensive review of the Provisional Staff Regulations conducted by the Secretariat, the Board of Governors approved on 12 June 2002 amendments to the Provisional Staff Regulations including the removal of the attribute 'provisional' from their title. The revised Staff Regulations of the Agency are set forth in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. There is a subject index at the end of the document

  19. Recommended revised sections to line focus solar central power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-10-18

    The design requirements, subsystem characteristics, environmental requirements, and cost and performance evaluation techniques are defined for the Line Focus Solar Central Power Systems. Specific passages revised are enumerated. (LEW)

  20. The relationship between empowerment and effectiveness of staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effectiveness is one of the management concepts considered and studied always by management scientists and experts. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different dimensions of empowerment (servicing staff, staff monitoring, consulting staff, and training staff) on dimensions of effectiveness of staff (staff ...

  1. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows: as from 1 April 2003 • Article R II 1.19 - Types and duration of contracts of staff members (page 15) as from 1 July 2003 Implementation of the category of local staff members Copies of this update are available in the divisional secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  2. Recommendations for Alternative Credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenderman, Ed; And Others

    Following a review of the mathematics topics taught in accounting, electronics, auto, food and clothing, and metals courses at Linn-Benton Community College, Albany, Oregon, recommendations were made to grant one semester of mathematics credit for completing a two-year sequence of these courses. The other required semester of mathematics should be…

  3. Privacy in Recommender Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeckmans, Arjan; Beye, Michael; Erkin, Zekeriya; Erkin, Zekeriya; Hartel, Pieter H.; Lagendijk, Reginald; Tang, Qiang; Ramzan, Naeem; van Zwol, Roelof; Lee, Jong-Seok; Clüver, Kai; Hua, Xian-Sheng

    In many online applications, the range of content that is offered to users is so wide that a need for automated recommender systems arises. Such systems can provide a personalized selection of relevant items to users. In practice, this can help people find entertaining movies, boost sales through

  4. Privacy enhanced recommender system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkin, Zekeriya; Erkin, Zekeriya; Beye, Michael; Veugen, Thijs; Lagendijk, Reginald L.

    2010-01-01

    Recommender systems are widely used in online applications since they enable personalized service to the users. The underlying collaborative filtering techniques work on user’s data which are mostly privacy sensitive and can be misused by the service provider. To protect the privacy of the users, we

  5. Chapter 10: Management recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah M. Finch; Janie Agyagos; Tracy McCarthey; Robert M. Marshall; Scott H. Stoleson; Mary J. Whitfield

    2000-01-01

    This chapter was developed over a series of meetings using a group-consensus process. Our recommendations are based on published results, on information compiled in the previous chapters, on expert opinion, and on unpublished data of conservation team members. This chapter is available as temporary guidance until the Recovery Plan for the southwestern willow flycatcher...

  6. Operational Work System Design and Staff Performance in the Nigerian Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Ejikeme Isichei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study investigated the impact of operational work system design on staff performance in selected construction firms in Nigeria. Research Design & Methods: The study used primary data gathered with the use of a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire format administered to 138 respondents. A hypothesis was postulated to test the significance of the research problem. Data analysis was carried out using correlation and multiple regression analysis which proved the significance of the alternative hypothesis as a result of testing the hypothesis. Findings: The findings show that there is a significant relationship between operational work system design and staff performance. The study concludes that operational job design can be advanced as a motivation tool, which is non-monetary in nature, to improve staff performance. Implications & Recommendations: A key drive to improve performance is the satisfaction of staff coupled with an outstanding operational job design which takes into consideration the total physical and mental well-being of staff and its interaction with other organisational factors. The study recommends, among others, that there should be active participation of staff in the design of work in the organisation. Contribution & Value Added: The study provides an empirical approach to enhancing performance in the construction industry and thereby developing an indigenous firm to compete favourably on a growing market.

  7. The psychological impact of aggression on nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Gwen; McLaughlin, Sue

    Aggression and violence towards nursing staff in UK health care is a growing problem. While the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence's (NICE, 2005a) guidelines 'The Short-Term Management of Disturbed/Violent Behaviour in In-Patient Psychiatric Setting and Emergency Department' offer a way forward in managing aggression for healthcare staff, the psychological impact of aggression remains an area of concern. Post-incident review has been identified as an approach to considering untoward incidents of aggression, yet post-incident support and interventions for staff experiencing the psychological effects of aggression remain inconsistent and curtailed in many areas. This article discusses the care of a nurse who experienced post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of aggression in the workplace. The process of assessment and treatment is presented with underpinning theories of trauma used to illuminate the discussion. Practical use of current recommended treatments of cognitive behavioural therapy and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing is offered as a method of addressing a growing problem in UK health care.

  8. Presenteeism among emergency health care staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Zaballos, Marta; Baldonedo-Mosteiro, María; Mosteiro-Díaz, Mª Pilar

    2018-02-01

    To estimate the prevalence of presenteeism among different categories of hospital and pre-hospital emergency health care professionals in the Principality of Asturias, Spain, and to define the sociodemographic characteristics and workplace factors associated with presenteeism in all categories. Cross-sectional descriptive study carried out during the last half of 2014 and first half of 2015. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collecta data on sociodemographic and work-related variables and perception of work as stressful. The respondents, who answered voluntarily and anonymously, assessed themselves on the Stanford Presenteeism Scale-6 adapted for use in Spain. The prevalence of presenteeism was 52.9% among the 323 respondents. Presenteeism was associated with stress (P<.01), place of work (P=.004), and bearing responsibility for dependent persons (P=.034) in the group overall. The association between stress and presenteeism was clearly present in emergency physicians (P=.049) and in nurses with dependents under their care (P=.016). The prevalence of presenteeism is high among emergency staff in the Principality of Asturias. Presenteeism is associated with diverse factors.

  9. Well-being of nursing staff on specialized units for older patients with combined care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, J; de Vugt, M E; Schols, J M G A; Engelen, G J J A; Winkens, B; Verhey, F R J

    2018-03-01

    Working in long-term care is seen as a stressful, physically and mentally demanding occupation, and thus, nursing staff are at risk for work and stress-related diseases. In older patients, psychiatric illnesses often occur in combination with physical illnesses, requiring nursing care that is specific to these combined care needs. The impact of caring for these patients on the mental well-being of nurses is unknown. Nursing staff working on specialized units for patients with combined care needs experience high levels of self-efficacy in combination with strong feelings of self-rated competence. Although levels of burnout are relatively low, mental healthcare nursing staff is more at risk for burnout when working in specialized settings for patients with combined care needs than nursing home staff working in specialized settings for these patients. Nursing staff characteristics, such as years of working experience and age, seem more important in relation to staff well-being than patient characteristics in specialized settings for combined care needs. Staff well-being might benefit from specializing care, so that patients with similar care needs are placed together and care is focused. The presence of specialized care units for older patients with combined care needs can allow for both targeted and focused allocation of nursing staff to these units and provision of specific training. Introduction In older patients, psychiatric illnesses frequently exist in tandem with physical illnesses, requiring nursing care that is specific to these combined care needs. The impact of caring for these patients on the mental well-being of nursing staff is unknown. To investigate whether care characteristics of patients with combined care needs are related to the mental well-being of nursing staff. Well-being of nursing staff was studied within a larger exploratory observational cross-sectional study that examined the differences and similarities of specialized combined care units

  10. Can primary health care staff be trained in basic life-saving surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The following article by Leet et al advocates training rural PHC staff in basic emergency surgery in those areas of South Sudan where there is no access to secondary or tertiary level facilities (i.e. surgical task-shifting). Based on their experience, the authors describe and recommend the type of on-the-job training that they ...

  11. Guidelines for Professional Training of Junior Medical Staff in the Context of European Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnova, Myroslava

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with outlining guidelines for improving professional training of junior medical staff based on European experience. Consequently, guidelines and recommendations on enhancing the efficiency of medical education in general and junior medical specialists' professional training, in particular, published by European Union of Medical…

  12. STAFF DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP ON ADULT TRAINING PROGRAMS, REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS (OTTAWA, APRIL 18-19, 1966).

    Science.gov (United States)

    TURNER, W.S.

    REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FROM A STAFF DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE ON ADULT TRAINING PROGRAMS HELD IN OTTAWA, CANADA, 1966 ARE REPORTED. PARTICIPANTS INCLUDED TRADE AND OCCUPATIONAL INSTRUCTORS, BASIC EDUCATION INSTRUCTORS, AND TRAINERS IN INDUSTRY AND TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTES. THE FOLLOWING TOPICS WERE DISCUSSED--THE ROLE OF GOVERNMENT, INDUSTRY,…

  13. Code of Nursing Practice for Staff Exposed to Ionizing Radiation (1984)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This Code, published by the National Health and Medical Research Council and intended for nurses and auxiliary staff provides general guidance on radiation protection. The Code is supplementary to radiation control legislation relating to the use of ionizing radiation in medical practice. The principles established by the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) have been taken into account. (NEA) [fr

  14. The Domestic Telecommunications Carrier Industry. Part I. President's Task Force on Communications Policy. Staff Paper Five.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostow, Eugene V.

    A staff paper submitted to the President's Task Force on Communications Policy recommends that public policy ensure an integrated structure in the telecommunications industry, while fostering limited competition to keep the system responsive to new technology and to consumer demands. The present system of regulated monopoly for companies supplying…

  15. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, V B; Blanco, F J; Englund, M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to describe requirements for inclusion of soluble biomarkers in osteoarthritis (OA) clinical trials and progress toward OA-related biomarker qualification. The Guidelines for Biomarkers Working Group, representing experts in the field of OA biomarker research from...... both academia and industry, convened to discuss issues related to soluble biomarkers and to make recommendations for their use in OA clinical trials based on current knowledge and anticipated benefits. This document summarizes current guidance on use of biomarkers in OA clinical trials...... and their utility at five stages, including preclinical development and phase I to phase IV trials. As demonstrated by this summary, biomarkers can provide value at all stages of therapeutics development. When resources permit, we recommend collection of biospecimens in all OA clinical trials for a wide variety...

  16. An Epidemiological Approach to Staff Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamis, Edna

    This paper describes a conceptual model of staff burnout in terms of independent, intervening and dependent variables. Staff burnout is defined, symptoms are presented, and the epidemiological approach to burnout is descussed. Components of the proposed model, which groups determinants of mental health into three domains, consist of: (1)…

  17. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M. W. J.; Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; Bosman, Anna M. T.; Jahoda, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Background: A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about dealing with incidents and limit physical risk of…

  18. The Support Needs of Staff Developers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, David J.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a study conducted at an annual staff development conference to determine the needs of professional staff developers in British higher education. An overview of the research strategy, which was based on an action research model, is provided; the ranking of needs areas is discussed; and needs statements with justifications are appended.…

  19. Gaming: a creative strategy for staff education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartzendruber, D

    1994-02-01

    Providing staff development in a stimulating, innovative manner is the challenge of all nurse educators. This article discusses gaming, a creative teaching strategy that can help meet these needs. Games designed specifically for the education of dialysis staff will be reviewed. Advantages of the various games will also be examined.

  20. Futuristics: A Tool for Staff Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Margaret J.; Hurst, James C.

    1979-01-01

    Creative use of future planning as a staff development tool can have short- and long-term benefits for the individual and the organization. Its potential for stimulating creativity, reducing crisis management, and developing staff cohesion is unequaled. The individual, the organization, the technology and the manager are the important factors.…

  1. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background - A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about

  2. An Ivory Staff Terminal from Alcester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Heslop

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Alcester staff terminal is an outstanding example of late Anglo-Saxon carving on a small scale. It was supposedly discovered in 1873 in the garden of the rectory at Alcester (Warwickshire and comes from a pastoral staff that would have belonged to a bishop or abbot. This article contains a 3D visualisation of the terminal.

  3. Quality Control in Child Care Staff Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Merwin R.

    1975-01-01

    This paper focuses on the process of staff selection of child care staff at a residential treatment center for children, ages 8-16. Phases of candidate selection, an "open-door" interview procedure, the orientation of hired candidates and the agency's philosophy, procedures and practices are discussed. (GO)

  4. Staff attitudes towards patients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendsborg, Per; Bratbo, Johanne; Dannevang, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Stigmatizing attitudes have been reported in international studies among staff in psychiatry. The authors wanted to investigate if this was the case in Denmark.......Stigmatizing attitudes have been reported in international studies among staff in psychiatry. The authors wanted to investigate if this was the case in Denmark....

  5. Recommending audio mixing workflows

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, Christian; Roth-Berghofer, Thomas; Auricchio, Nino; Proctor, Sam

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes our work on Audio Advisor, a workflow recommender for audio mixing. We examine the process of eliciting, formalising and modelling the domain knowledge and expert’s experience. We are also describing the effects and problems associated with the knowledge formalisation processes. We decided to employ structured case-based reasoning using the myCBR 3 to capture the vagueness encountered in the audio domain. We detail on how we used extensive similarity measure modelling to ...

  6. Review article: Staff perception of the emergency department working environment: Integrative review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Louisa; Greenslade, Jaimi; Thom, Ogilvie; Carlstrom, Eric; Wallis, Marianne; Crilly, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Employees in EDs report increasing role overload because of critical staff shortages, budgetary cuts and increased patient numbers and acuity. Such overload could compromise staff satisfaction with their working environment. This integrative review identifies, synthesises and evaluates current research around staff perceptions of the working conditions in EDs. A systematic search of relevant databases, using MeSH descriptors ED/EDs, Emergency room/s, ER/s, or A&E coupled with (and) working environment, working condition/s, staff perception/s, as well as reference chaining was conducted. We identified 31 key studies that were evaluated using the mixed methods assessment tool (MMAT). These comprised 24 quantitative‐descriptive studies, four mixed descriptive/comparative (non‐randomised controlled trial) studies and three qualitative studies. Studies included varied widely in quality with MMAT scores ranging from 0% to 100%. A key finding was that perceptions of working environment varied across clinical staff and study location, but that high levels of autonomy and teamwork offset stress around high pressure and high volume workloads. The large range of tools used to assess staff perception of working environment limits the comparability of the studies. A dearth of intervention studies around enhancing working environments in EDs limits the capacity to recommend evidence‐based interventions to improve staff morale. © 2016 The Authors. Emergency Medicine Australasia published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine PMID:26784282

  7. Badali recommends simplified bills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2003-01-01

    A report on the variety of retail electricity bills across the province, authored by Salvatore Badali of Deloitte Consulting, was recently released by the Ontario Government. The report was commissioned by the Government to examine the underlying reasons for the significant format differences and the wide variation of fixed and variable charges among the approximately 95 local electricity distribution companies across the province. Regarding the appropriateness of the charges the report recommends common definitions for local distribution company (LDC) fixed and variable costs, and consideration of options for reducing LDC charges, mainly by consolidating the sector and sharing such services as customer billing, accounting and out sourcing operations. Seven recommendations deal with bill simplification. These include bills that are clear and easy to read and provide sufficient information for consumers to verify charges; promote energy conservation, e.g. by including historical information; allow comparisons between retail suppliers and distributors; accommodate revenue collection, marketing needs and other billing services. The report also recommends clearly defined and consistently used terminology for standardized line items, suggests ways to provide consumer information in a form useful for making energy conservation decisions, development of an LDC scorecard to enable stake holders to compare their own LDCs with LDCs around the province, creation of a conservation and bill calculation website, consideration of further use of shared services, and solutions to address the removal of line losses from invoices

  8. Remodeling Strategic Staff Safety and Security Risks Management in Nigerian Tertiary Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday S. AKPAN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined safety and security risk management in tertiary institutions in Nigeria. The frequent attacks at workplace, especially schools, have placed safety and security in the front burner of discussion in both business and political circles. This therefore, forms the imperative for the conduct of this study. The work adopted a cross sectional survey research design and collected data from respondents who are security personnel of the University of Uyo. Analysis of data was done with simple percentage statistics while the research hypotheses were tested with mean and simple regression and correlation statistics. The findings of the study revealed that assassination, kidnappings and bombings were principal risk incidents threatening the safety and security of staff in University of Uyo. A significant positive relationship was found between the funding of security management and workers’ performance. It was discovered specifically that employment screening, regular training of security personnel, regular safety and security meetings and strategic security policy formation were the main strategies for managing safety and security in University of Uyo. The paper concluded that safety and security management and control involves every worker (management and staff of University of Uyo. It was recommended, among others, that management should be more committed to safety and security management in the University by means of making safety and security issues an integral part of University’s strategic plan and also by adopting the management line model – one form of management structure-where safety and security are located, with other general management responsibilities. This way, the resurgent cases of kidnapping, hired assassination, etc. would be reduced if not completely eradicated in the University.

  9. The operational staff during exercise RESUME-95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, J.

    1997-01-01

    With more than 100 participants entering the exercise RESUME-95 the Exercise Planning Committee decided to establish an operational staff named Directing Staff (DISTAFF) to ensure that the exercise plan was followed, the planned activities were carried out and to intervene if anything went wrong. In general the duties of the operational staff involve tasks such as secretarial assistance, keeping log of the progress of the situation and gathering, updating and distributing information on all aspects of the situation. Throughout the entire event it is the staff's responsibility to keep a general view of the current situation and to make the necessary plans for the progress of the situation based on the available information. Furthermore the staff should ensure necessary contact to the public and to the media. (au)

  10. Secondhand smoke in psychiatric units: patient and staff misperceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballbè, Montse; Sureda, Xisca; Martínez-Sánchez, Jose M; Fu, Marcela; Saltó, Esteve; Gual, Antoni; Fernández, Esteve

    2015-10-01

    Mental health units have usually been exempted from complete smoke-free policies. The aim of this study was to compare the self-reported level of exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) of patients and staff in psychiatric units to objective measures, and examine preference for different types of smoking bans. Cross-sectional survey about ban preferences and self-reported exposure to SHS by means of a self-administered questionnaire administered to patients and staff from 65 inpatient psychiatric units in Catalonia (95.5% of all units). We measured air concentrations of particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5 in µg/m(3)) as a marker of SHS in these units. 600 patients and 575 professionals completed the questionnaire. 78.7% of them were objectively exposed to SHS (PM2.5>10 μm/m(3)) but 56.9% of patients and 33.6% of staff believed they were not exposed at all and 41.6% of patients and 28.4% of staff believed the environment was not at all unhealthy. Nurses had a higher smoking prevalence than psychiatrists (35.8% vs 17.2%; psmoke-free bans. It is particularly noteworthy that less that one-third of mental health staff supported smoke-free units, suggesting an urgent need for further education about the harmful health effects of SHS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. School staff perpetration of physical violence against students in Uganda: a multilevel analysis of risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Katherine G; Knight, Louise; Glynn, Judith R; Allen, Elizabeth; Naker, Dipak; Devries, Karen M

    2017-01-01

    Objective To conduct a multilevel analysis of risk factors for physical violence perpetration by school staff against Ugandan students. Design Multilevel logistic regression analysis of cross-sectional survey data from 499 staff and 828 caregivers of students at 38 primary schools, collected in 2012 and 2014 during the Good Schools Study. Setting Luwero District, Uganda. Main outcome measure Past-week use of physical violence by school staff against students was measured using the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect ‘Child Abuse Screening Tool- Child International’ and the WHO Multi-Country Study on Women’s Health and Domestic Violence against Women. Results Of 499 staff, 215 (43%) reported perpetration of physical violence against students in the past week. Individual risk factors associated with physical violence perpetration included being a teacher versus another type of staff member (pviolence against non-students (pviolence (IPV) (pviolence perpetration compared with male staff who had not been a victim of IPV. No evidence was observed for school- or community-level risk factors. Conclusions Physical violence perpetration from school staff is widespread, and interventions are needed to address this issue. Staff who have been victims of violence and who use violence against people other than students may benefit from additional interventions. Researchers should further investigate how school and community contexts influence staff’s physical violence usage, given a lack of associations observed in this study. PMID:28821514

  12. Nursing leadership practices as perceived by Finnish nursing staff: high ethics, less feedback and rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eneh, Victor Okey; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Kvist, Tarja

    2012-03-01

    The purpose was to examine the perceptions of Finnish nursing staff of their nursing leadership and how nurses' background variables are associated with their perceptions. Nursing leadership practices and behaviours influence nursing staff work performances. In Finland, studies examining leadership practices from the perspective of nursing staff are limited. This quantitative, cross-sectional study involved four hospitals in Eastern Finland. A total of 1497 nursing staff completed the structured electronic questionnaire. In general, seven out of 10 nursing staff held positive perceptions about leadership ethics and their professional development. Over one-third of nursing staff were dissatisfied with the nursing process and with their feedback and rewards, while only four out of 10 evaluated their nursing director either in a positive or negative way. There were no significant differences regarding their perceptions when different background variables were taken into account. Nursing leadership needs the opinion of nursing staff in order to help formulate a favourable work environment where they can utilize their full potential and improve nursing care. Nursing staff expect feedback and rewards, involvement in the decision making process, and clear vision from nurse leaders. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. The association between presenteeism and engagement of National Health Service staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admasachew, Lul; Dawson, Jeremy

    2011-04-01

    Although several studies have demonstrated a relationship between staff engagement and health and wellbeing, none has analysed the association with presenteeism in the National Health Service (NHS) context. Our aim is to determine whether there is a relationship between presenteeism and staff engagement. A hierarchical logistic multilevel modelling of cross-sectional data from the NHS staff survey (2009) was conducted. We controlled for a range of demographic and socioeconomic background variables, including ethnic group, gender, age and occupational group. The sample was 156,951 respondents across all 390 English NHS trusts, each providing a random sample of employees. Engagement was measured using three facets: motivation, advocacy and involvement, which were also used in a composite score. There was a low-to-moderate negative correlation between presenteeism and staff engagement: odds ratio 0.42 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.42-0.43) for overall staff engagement and 0.53 (95% CI 0.52-0.54) for staff advocacy of the trust; 0.53 (95% CI 0.52-0.54) for motivation and 0.50 (95% CI 0.49-0.51) for involvement. Putting pressure on health-care staff to come to work when unwell is associated with poorer staff engagement with their jobs.

  14. Productivity and turnover in PCPs: the role of staff participation in decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Dorothy Y; Rundall, Thomas G; Cohen, Deborah J; Tallia, Alfred F; Crabtree, Benjamin F

    2006-10-01

    Efforts to redesign primary care practices are beginning to address how decisions are made in the practice setting. This study contributes to these efforts by examining associations between staff participation in decision-making, productivity, and turnover in primary care practices. The study is informed by organizational theories of participation that emphasize cognitive and affective influences on employee output and behavior. This research used data collected from primary care practices involved in a national initiative sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Cross-sectional survey data on organizational structures and attributes among 49 practices were analyzed. Regression analysis was used to examine associations among practice productivity, staff participation in decision-making, and formal structures such as staff meetings. Associations between staff turnover and participative decision-making were also examined. Staff participation in decisions regarding quality improvement, practice change, and clinical operations was positively associated with practice productivity, whereas formal structures such as staff meetings were not. In addition, higher levels of participation in decision-making were associated with reduced turnover among nonclinicians and administrative staff. Examination of organizational features is increasingly recognized as a key to improving primary care performance. Study findings suggest that one important strategy may be implementation of a participative model emphasizing greater staff involvement in practice decisions. This may enhance information-sharing, work satisfaction, and commitment to organizational decisions, all of which can lead to beneficial outcomes such as increased productivity and stability in primary care practices.

  15. Workplace Bullying Among the Nursing Staff of Greek Public Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatza, Christine; Zyga, Sofia; Tziaferi, Styliani; Prezerakos, Panagiotis

    2017-02-01

    In this quantitative, cross-sectional study, the authors identified the impact of workplace bullying on nursing staff employed at select Greek public hospitals. They conducted the study using the Negative Acts Questionnaire with a convenience sample of 841 participants employed by five Greek hospitals in the 1st Regional Health Authority of Attica. One third of the respondents reported having been psychologically harassed at work in the past 6 months. According to the results, the impact workplace bullying has on nursing staff varies depending on the existence of a supportive familial or friend environment and if nurses parent children. These findings demonstrate the value of family and friend support when coping with workplace bullying.

  16. Recommendations of Transgender Students, Staff, and Faculty in the USA for Improving College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelman, Kristie L.

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that transgender individuals frequently experience marginalisation and interpersonal victimisation within college and university settings. Missing from the literature is a discussion of what can be done to address such patterns in higher education, based upon empirical data gathered from transgender and gender non-conforming…

  17. The Variance between Recommended and Nursing Staff Levels at Womack Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-07

    beneficiaries a vast array of services ranging from primary care to bariatric surgery and vascular surgery to intensive care including neonatal intensive care...over 700 radiological procedures. WAMC also averages 94 inpatients, 30 admissions, 21 surgeries , and 9 births during that same workday (WAMC, 2006a...throughout the provision of care, unexpected nursing care activities arise that are not captured by WMSN. Further complicating the issue, the method of

  18. 76 FR 6685 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Recommended Warning for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... as a cause of respiratory allergic reactions; (2) rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and dyspnea; (3... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration...; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug...

  19. 78 FR 15370 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Recommendations for Labeling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-11

    ... that there is an absence of the allergens associated with hypersensitivity reactions to natural rubber... products. At this time, there are no regulations requiring the labeling of a medical product to state that...

  20. 12 CFR 265.8 - Functions delegated to the Staff Director of the Division of International Finance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the Division of International Finance. 265.8 Section 265.8 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM... Functions delegated to the Staff Director of the Division of International Finance. The Board's Staff Director of the Division of International Finance (or the Director's delegee) is authorized: (a...

  1. 75 FR 22601 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g); Requests for... the Internet. To receive ``Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User... and Industry Procedures for Section 513(g) Requests for Information under the Federal Food, Drug, and...

  2. Staff Perspectives on the Use of a Computer-Based Concept for Lifestyle Intervention Implemented in Primary Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlfjord, Siw; Johansson, Kjell; Bendtsen, Preben; Nilsen, Per; Andersson, Agneta

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate staff experiences of the use of a computer-based concept for lifestyle testing and tailored advice implemented in routine primary health care (PHC). Design: The design of the study was a cross-sectional, retrospective survey. Setting: The study population consisted of staff at nine PHC units in the…

  3. 49 CFR 7.5 - Availability of opinions, orders, staff manuals, statements of policy, and interpretations and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Availability of opinions, orders, staff manuals... § 7.5 Availability of opinions, orders, staff manuals, statements of policy, and interpretations and indices. (a) This section implements 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2). It prescribes the rules governing the...

  4. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or staff members of civilian news media. 705.15 Section 705.15 National Defense Department of Defense... REGULATIONS § 705.15 Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media... personnel as the Secretary of the Navy may authorize can act as correspondents for civilian media. (b...

  5. ICRS Recommendation Document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Engelhart, Luella; Ranstam, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    and function evaluated for validity and psychometric properties in patients with articular cartilage lesions. Results: The knee-specific instruments, titled the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Form and the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis and Outcome Score, both fulfill the basic......, and confirmatory longitudinal studies are needed prior to recommending this scale for use in cartilage repair. Inclusion of a generic measure is feasible in cartilage repair studies and allows analysis of health-related quality of life and health economic outcomes. The Marx or Tegner Activity Rating Scales...

  6. The Staff Association and its history

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    The Staff Association will celebrate its 60th birthday in the spring of 2015. We are collecting all information about the sixty years of the Staff Association. In particular, we are looking at publications of the Staff Association, which started with the “Staff Association Journal”, in 1955, which later became “Le Proton déchainé”, then, more simply, “Proton” in 1982 (the figure on the left shows the different mutations of our magazine). In our collection we are missing a few issues, in particular № 1 (dated mid-1955).     Dear reader, if have any old issues of this magazine, or of Graviton (figure on the right), another magazine edited by the Staff Association, or any other material or information that might help us document the history of the Staff Association, we would very much like to have a copy of the material or your contribution (written or oral). Please contact the Staff Association Sec...

  7. Job and task analysis for technical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toline, B.C.

    1991-01-01

    In September of 1989 Cooper Nuclear Station began a project to upgrade the Technical Staff Training Program. This project's roots began by performing job and Task Analysis for Technical Staff. While the industry has long been committed to Job and Task Analysis to target performance based instruction for single job positions, this approach was unique in that it was not originally considered appropriate for a group as diverse as Tech Staff. Much to his satisfaction the Job and Task Analysis Project was much less complicated for Technical Staff than the author had imagined. The benefits of performing the Job and Task Analysis for Technical Staff have become increasingly obvious as he pursues lesson plan development and course revisions. The outline for this presentation will be as follows: philosophy adopted; preparation of the job survey document; performing the job analysis; performing task analysis for technical staff and associated pitfalls; clustering objectives for training and comparison to existing program; benefits now and in the future; final phase (comparison to INPO guides and meeting the needs of non-degreed engineering professionals); and conclusion. By focusing on performance based needs for engineers rather than traditional academics for training the author is confident the future Technical Staff Program will meet the challenges ahead and will exceed requirements for accreditation

  8. Cesarean Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Cesarean section (C-section) is surgery to deliver a baby. The baby is taken out through the mother's ... are able to have a vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC). NIH: National Institute of Child Health and ...

  9. Cooptation of Peer Support Staff: Quantitative Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Alberta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective In 2007, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS sent a letter to state Medicaid directors outlining requirements for implementing peer-based recovery support services (P-BRSS as a Medicaid-funded service. Since then, 30 states have implemented these services. Although the literature describing implementation of P-BRSS has identified the cooptation of peer support staff (PSS as a barrier to the effective provision of P-BRSS, the evidence for it remains anecdotal. This study attempts to determine if the context of employment in either a treatment organization or peer organization affected cooptation. Methods We conducted a survey of PSS in the fall of 2013. In all, 92 of the 181 respondents were working as PSS at the time, 53 in treatment organizations. Chi-square analysis was used to determine if the context of employment had an effect on the cooptation of peer staff. Results Peer staff working in treatment organizations reported that they were supervised by treatment staff and participated in employment-related training to improve their skills at providing treatment services more frequently than their counterparts in peer organizations. Peer staff working in treatment organizations also participated in training and education to prepare for employment as treatment professionals more frequently than peer staff working in peer organizations. Conclusions and Implications for Practice Peer staff members working in treatment organizations are subject to processes of acculturation into professional cultures that peer staff working in peer organizations are not. Effective implementation of P-BRSS should include specific efforts to minimize the cooptation of peer staff.

  10. Ebola virus: recommendations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Medical Service

    2014-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service has been closely following, in particular via the WHO, the development of the Ebola virus outbreak currently affecting some African countries. This infectious disease may be passed on through direct contact with the bodily fluids of a sick person.   Based on the recommendations of the WHO and the two Host States, Switzerland and France, as updated on their respective websites, so far there has been no ban on travel to the countries concerned. However, unless it is absolutely essential, you are advised not to visit any of the countries affected by Ebola (Guinea, Republic of Sierra Leone, Liberia, Nigeria). The two Host States have established an alert system, and a check is carried out on departure from the airports of those countries. It is strongly recommended that you contact the Medical Service if you are travelling to those countries. We remind you to observe the basic rules of hygiene such as frequent hand washing, whatever your destination. The Medical Service is...

  11. Mining and representing recommendations in actively evolving recommender systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assent, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Recommender systems provide an automatic means of filtering out interesting items, usually based on past similarity of user ratings. In previous work, we have suggested a model that allows users to actively build a recommender network. Users express trust, obtain transparency, and grow (anonymous......) recommender connections. In this work, we propose mining such active systems to generate easily understandable representations of the recommender network. Users may review these representations to provide active feedback. This approach further enhances the quality of recommendations, especially as topics...... of interest change over time. Most notably, it extends the amount of control users have over the model that the recommender network builds of their interests....

  12. Radiologic protection in pediatric radiology: ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Ramon; Khong, Pek-Lan; Ringertz, Hans

    2013-01-01

    ICRP has provided an updated overview of radiation protection principles in pediatric radiology. The authors recommend that staff, radiologists, medical physicists and vendors involved in pediatric radiology read this document. For conventional radiography, the report gives advice on patient positioning, immobilization, shielding and appropriate exposure conditions. It describes extensively the use of pulsed fluoroscopy, the importance of limiting fluoroscopy time, and how shielding and geometry must be used to avoid unnecessary radiation to the patient and operator. Furthermore, the use of fluoroscopy in interventional procedures with emphasis on dose reduction to patients and staff is discussed in light of the increasing frequency, complexity and length ofthe procedures. CT is the main reason that medical imaging in several developed countries is the highest annual per capita effective radiation dose from man-made sources. The ICRP report gives extensive descriptions of how CT protocols can be optimized to minimize radiation exposure in pediatric patients. The importance of balancing image quality with acceptable noise in pediatric imaging and the controversies regarding the use of protective shielding in CT are also discussed.

  13. Radiologic protection in pediatric radiology: ICRP recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Ramon [University of Michigan Hospital, Department of Radiology, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Khong, Pek-Lan [The University of Hong Kong, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (China); Ringertz, Hans [Linkoeping University Hospital, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    ICRP has provided an updated overview of radiation protection principles in pediatric radiology. The authors recommend that staff, radiologists, medical physicists and vendors involved in pediatric radiology read this document. For conventional radiography, the report gives advice on patient positioning, immobilization, shielding and appropriate exposure conditions. It describes extensively the use of pulsed fluoroscopy, the importance of limiting fluoroscopy time, and how shielding and geometry must be used to avoid unnecessary radiation to the patient and operator. Furthermore, the use of fluoroscopy in interventional procedures with emphasis on dose reduction to patients and staff is discussed in light of the increasing frequency, complexity and length ofthe procedures. CT is the main reason that medical imaging in several developed countries is the highest annual per capita effective radiation dose from man-made sources. The ICRP report gives extensive descriptions of how CT protocols can be optimized to minimize radiation exposure in pediatric patients. The importance of balancing image quality with acceptable noise in pediatric imaging and the controversies regarding the use of protective shielding in CT are also discussed.

  14. Recommendations for improvements to program and project management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has operated with a balanced matrix organization for over sixteen years. Much of the work at the Laboratory is accomplished with good customer satisfaction through programs, projects, and matrix management. During the past several years concerns about program and project management at ORNL have been expressed by both the Department of Energy and ORNL staff. In May 1993 the ORNL Division/Program/Office Directors Caucus chartered a ``fox team`` to identity and to recommend improvements to matrix management that would lead to resolution of these concerns. Nine experienced ORNL staff members served on this Matrix Management Upgrade Solutions Team (MMUST). The MMUST adopted a four-phase approach in which they first gathered information and then developed and proposed recommended actions. In the fourth phase the team was available to support implementation of the recommendations. They began work in June 1993, gathering and evaluating information in biweekly meetings for six months. Recommendations developed in October and November 1993 were presented to ORNL management in December. The MMUST issued three principal recommendations based on their evaluation of the information gathered. They are: Renew and enhance the ORNL management commitment to matrix management, program managers, and project managers; Implement actions to ensure career path parity between the program/project manager family of positions and the technical line manager family of positions across all directorates and divisions; and Clarify and document program/project manager roles, responsibilities, and authorities.

  15. Behavioral Emergency Response Team: Implementation Improves Patient Safety, Staff Safety, and Staff Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicko, Cdr Jennifer M; Schroeder, Lcdr Rebecca A; Byers, Cdr William S; Taylor, Lt Adam M; Spence, Cdr Dennis L

    2017-10-01

    Staff members working on our nonmental health (non-MH) units (i.e., medical-surgical [MS] units) were not educated in recognizing or deescalating behavioral emergencies. Published evidence suggests a behavioral emergency response team (BERT) composed of MH experts who assist with deescalating behavioral emergencies may be beneficial in these situations. Therefore, we sought to implement a BERT on the inpatient non-MH units at our military treatment facility. The objectives of this evidence-based practice process improvement project were to determine how implementation of a BERT affects staff and patient safety and to examine nursing staffs' level of knowledge, confidence, and support in caring for psychiatric patients and patients exhibiting behavioral emergencies. A BERT was piloted on one MS unit for 5 months and expanded to two additional units for 3 months. Pre- and postimplementation staff surveys were conducted, and the number of staff assaults and injuries, restraint usage, and security intervention were compared. The BERT responded to 17 behavioral emergencies. The number of assaults decreased from 10 (pre) to 1 (post); security intervention decreased from 14 to 1; and restraint use decreased from 8 to 1. MS staffs' level of BERT knowledge and rating of support between MH staff and their staff significantly increased. Both MS and MH nurses rated the BERT as supportive and effective. A BERT can assist with deescalating behavioral emergencies, and improve staff collaboration and patient and staff safety. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  16. Staff rotation: implications for occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A; Andriuk, M L; Langlois, P; Provost, E

    1995-10-01

    Occupational therapy departments of tertiary care hospitals can provide staff with opportunities to gain diverse clinical experience if they rotate through the various services such as surgery, medicine, geriatrics, plastic surgery and orthopaedics. The system of rotation offers both advantages and disadvantages for the staff and the institution. The Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, a large university teaching hospital, had traditionally offered staff the opportunity to rotate. Changes in staffing and their needs however, resulted in rotation becoming an important issue within the department. This article presents the pros and the cons of rotation and non-rotation systems as identified by therapists and administrators across Canada. Staff rotation was found to have an effect on job satisfaction and a therapist's career orientation. Given these findings, administrators may want to reconsider the role of the generalist and specialist in their facilities.

  17. Development of a Refined Staff Group Trainer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quensel, Susan

    1999-01-01

    .... As a follow-on effort to the previous SGT project, the goal was to refine a brigade-level staff training program to more effectively and efficiently coordinate the activities within and between the...

  18. Public Relations Strategies for Scholastic Publication Staffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkle, Bruce E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the importance to scholastic publications staffs of four public relations strategies: meticulous research, systematic planning, strengthening communication efforts, and evaluation. Notes internal and external factors crucial to good public relations. Lists activities to consider. (SR)

  19. Technique for determining training staff size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frye, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Determining an adequate training staff size is a vital function of a training manager. Today's training requirements and standards have dictated a more stringent work load than ever before. A trainer's role is more than just providing classroom lectures. In most organizations the instructor must develop programs, lesson plans, exercise guides, objectives, test questions, etc. The tasks of a training organization are never ending and the appropriate resources must be determined and allotted to do the total job. A simple method exists for determining an adequate staff. Although not perfect, this method will provide a realistic approach for determining the needed training staff size. This method considers three major factors: instructional man-hours; non-instructional man-hours; and instructor availability. By determining and adding instructional man-hours and non-instructional man-hours a total man-hour distribution can be obtained. By dividing this by instructor availability a staff size can be determined

  20. Meeting staff representatives of the European Agencies

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      The AASC (Assembly of Agency Staff Committee) held its 27th Meeting of the specialized European Agencies on 26 and 27 May on the premises of the OHIM (Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market) in Alicante, Spain. Two representatives of the CERN Staff Association, in charge of External Relations, attended as observers. This participation is a useful complement to regular contacts we have with FICSA (Federation of International Civil Servants' Associations), which groups staff associations of the UN Agencies, and the annual CSAIO conferences (Conference of Staff Associations of International Organizations), where each Autumn representatives of international organizations based in Europe meet to discuss themes of common interest to better promote and defend the rights of the international civil servants. All these meetings allow us to remain informed on items that are directly or indirectly related to employment and social conditions of our colleagues in other international and Europ...

  1. Does staff diversity imply openness to diversity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – Post-secondary educational organizations are currently some of the most diverse settings to be found. However, few educational studies have dealt with staff diversity and hardly any has looked outside the USA. The purpose of this paper is to present a study of members of international...... university departments in Denmark. The authors set out to investigate the relationship between different types of staff diversity and openness to diversity in terms of linguistic, visible, value, and informational heterogeneity. Design/methodology/approach – This study uses responses from 489 staff members......, was unrelated or negatively associated with positive diversity attitudes. Originality/value – Few studies deal with the role of staff diversity and no prior studies the authors know of have examined the link between diversity types and openness to diversity....

  2. Patient and staff doses in interventional neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bor, D.; Cekirge, S.; Tuerkay, T.; Turan, O.; Guelay, M.; Oenal, E.; Cil, B.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation doses for interventional examinations are generally high and therefore necessitate dose monitoring for patients and staff. Relating the staff dose to a patient dose index, such as dose-area product (DAP), could be quite useful for dose comparisons. In this study, DAP and skin doses of 57 patients, who underwent neuro-interventional examinations, were measured simultaneously with staff doses. Although skin doses were comparable with the literature data, higher DAP values of 215 and 188.6 Gy cm 2 were measured for the therapeutical cerebral and carotid examinations, respectively, owing to the use of biplane system and complexity of the procedure. Mean staff doses for eye, finger and thyroid were measured as 80.6, 77.6 and 28.8 μGy per procedure. The mean effective dose per procedure for the radiologists was 32 μSv. In order to allow better comparisons to be made, DAP normalised doses were also presented. (authors)

  3. Improvements in Productivity Through Staff Integration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kelly, David S

    1988-01-01

    .... The prognosis is not good. This paper addresses one facet of improving a shipyard's position in an increasingly competitive environment improvements in over-all productivity resulting from integration of the functions of the shipyard staff...

  4. "Highly recommended introduction"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ask Vest

    2009-01-01

    by detachment, normatively and morally. Besides researching the actual abuse, individually and in aggregate, they also study structural circumstances that promote the use of drugs in sports; besides evaluations of the efficacy of the anti-doping efforts, they consider the effects of various anti-doping schemes...... on the integrity and privacy of the athletes. Ask Vest Christiansen, himself an internationally renowned scholar in the field, has read a recent, thus detached, introduction to drug use in sports, An Introduction to Drugs in Sport: Addicted to Winning by Ivan Waddington and Andy Smith (Routledge). Christiansen...... finds much to appreciate in the book, and a couple of disconcerting mistakes and misjudgments notwithstanding, he recommends the book as a solid introduction to the problem of doping – knowledgeable, well written and easy to read....

  5. Conclusions and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The FAO/IAEA/GSF/SIDA Co-ordinated Research Programme on Cereal Grain Protein Improvement by Nuclear Techniques was a follow-up to the FAO/IAEA/GSF Co-ordinated Research Programme on the Use of Nuclear Techniques for Seed Protein Improvement. It was initiated in 1969 and ended in 1981. The objectives of the meeting were to review and evaluate the achievements of the current and previous programmes in order to draw conclusions on the possibility of genetic improvement of cereal grain protein using nuclear techniques, to identify unsolved problems and to discuss and propose possible approaches for their solution. Through reviews and discussions, conclusions and recommendations were made by the participants

  6. Psychological consultation in a paediatric setting: A qualitative analysis of staff experiences of a psychosocial forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Jessica L; Benson, Sally

    2015-07-01

    The use of psychosocial forums in paediatric settings has been recommended as a means of providing psychological consultancy. However, no research has explored staff perceptions of these meetings or whether they have a positive impact on patient care. In this study, six members of a paediatric gastroenterology multidisciplinary team were interviewed about their experience of a weekly psychosocial forum using a qualitative approach. The data revealed that staff regarded the forum as an essential and useful part of the service. Staff reported a number of benefits to their clinical work as a result of attending the forum, in addition to the general benefits of having a clinical psychologist available to see patients. However, staff also made recommendations for improving the forum. The results suggest that psychosocial forums may provide an efficient means of delivering specialist psychological consultation for patients with psychological difficulties, in line with Department of Health recommendations for paediatric services. Future research should aim to investigate the effectiveness of psychosocial forums in different settings and to establish the cost-effectiveness of these meetings. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Urgent recommendation. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Masayuki

    2000-01-01

    The Investigation Committee for Critical Accident at Uranium Processing Plant was founded immediately after the accident to investigate the cause of the accident and to establish measures to prevent the similar accident. On September 30, 1999 around 10:35, the Japan's first criticality accident occurred at JCO Co. Ltd. Uranium processing plant (auxiliary conversion plant) located at Tokai-mura Ibaraki-ken. The criticality continued on and off for approximately 20 hours after the first instantaneous criticality. The accident led the recommendation of tentative evacuation and sheltering indoors for residents living in the neighborhood. The serious exposure to neutrons happened to three workers. The dominant effect is dose due to neutrons and gamma rays from the precipitation tank. When the accident took place, three workers dissolved sequentially about 2.4 kg uranium powder with 18.8 % enrichment in the 10-litter bucket with nitric acid. The procedure of homogenization of uranium nitrate was supposed to be controlled using the shape-limited narrow storage column. Actually, however, the thick and large precipitation tank was used. As a result, about 16.6 kg of uranium was fed into the tank, which presumably caused criticality. The first notification by JCO was delayed and the following communication was not smooth. This led to the delay of correct understanding of the situation and made the initial proper response difficult, then followed by insufficient communication between the nation, prefecture, and local authority. Urgent recommendations were made on the following items; (1) Safety measures to be taken at the accident site, (2) health cares for residents and others, (3) Comprehensive safety securing at nuclear operators such as Establishment of the effective audit system, Safety education for employees and Qualification and licensing system, Safety related documents, etc. (4) Reconstruction of the government's safety regulations such as How safety regulation

  8. The Provisional Staff Regulations of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    In accordance with Article VII.E of the Statute and of the general principles approved by the General Conference in resolution GC.1(S)/RES/13, the Board of Governors has established 'the terms and conditions on which the Agency's staff shall be appointed, remunerated and dismissed.' The Provisional Staff Regulations thus approved and amended by the Board up to 15 January 1959 are reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency

  9. Training for staff who support students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Eleanor; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Hu, Wendy

    2016-02-01

    Front-line administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff often find themselves providing pastoral and learning support to students, but they are often not trained for this role, and this aspect of their work is under-acknowledged. Staff participating in an action research study at two medical schools identified common concerns about the personal impact of providing student support, and of the need for professional development to carry out this responsibility. This need is magnified in clinical placement settings that are remote from on-campus services. Informed by participatory action research, brief interactive workshops with multimedia training resources were developed, conducted and evaluated at eight health professional student training sites. These workshops were designed to: (1) be delivered in busy clinical placement and university settings; (2) provide a safe and inclusive environment for administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff to share experiences and learn from each other; (3) be publicly accessible; and (4) promote continued development and roll-out of staff training, adapted to each workplace (see http://www.uws.edu.au/meusupport). The workshops were positively evaluated by 97 participants, with both teaching and administrative staff welcoming the opportunity to discuss and share experiences. Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves. Participatory action research can be a means for producing and maintaining effective training resources as well as the conditions for change in practice. In our workshops, staff particularly valued opportunities for guided discussion using videos of authentic cases to trigger reflection, and to collaboratively formulate student support guidelines, customised to each site. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Staff rosters for 1979: environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The roster of the scientific and professional staffs of the Environmental Programs of the Department of Energy and Environment has been compiled as of December 1979. Staff members have been listed according to their organizational units, i.e., the Atmospheric Sciences Division, the Environmental Chemistry Division, the Oceanographic Sciences Division, and the Land and Freshwater Environmental Sciences Group. Educational background, research interests, professional activities, summary of experience at BNL, and selected publications have been included for each member listed.

  11. Organizational climate and self-efficacy as predictors of staff strain in caring for dementia residents: A mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karantzas, Gery C; McCabe, Marita P; Mellor, David; Von Treuer, Kathryn; Davison, Tanya E; O'Connor, Daniel; Haselden, Rachel; Konis, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    To date, no research has investigated how the organizational climate of aged care influences the self-efficacy of staff in caring for residents with dementia, or, how self-efficacy is associated with the strain experienced by staff. This study sought to investigate the extent to which the self-efficacy of aged care staff mediates the association between organizational climate variables (such as autonomy, trusting and supportive workplace relations, and the recognition of competence and ability, and perceptions of workplace pressure) and staff strain. A cross-sectional survey design was implemented in which 255 residential aged care staff recruited across aged care facilities in Melbourne, Australia. Staff completed self-report measures of organizational climate, self-efficacy, and strains in caring for residents with dementia. Indirect effects analyses using bootstrapping indicated that self-efficacy of staff mediated the association between the organizational climate variables of autonomy, trust, support, pressure, and staff strain. The findings of this study emphasize that the aged care sector needs to target organizational climate variables that enhance the self-efficacy of staff, and that this in turn, can help ameliorate the strain experienced by staff caring for residents experiencing dementia. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. Night nursing – staff's working experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Ann-Mari

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the duties and working conditions of registered, and enrolled nurses have previously been described from different perspectives, they have not been examined from the night nursing aspect. The aim of the study was to describe the night nursing staff's working experiences. Methods The design of the study is qualitative and descriptive. Interviews were conducted with 10 registered and 10 enrolled nurses working as night staff at a Swedish University Hospital. The interview guide was thematic and concerned the content of their tasks, as well as the working conditions that constitute night nursing. In addition, the interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis. Results The night duties have to be performed under difficult conditions that include working silently in dimmed lighting, and making decisions when fatigue threatens. According to the night staff, its main goals are to provide the patients with rest and simultaneously ensure qualified care. Furthermore, the night nursing staff must prepare the ward for the daytime activities. Conclusion The most important point is the team work, which developed between the registered and enrolled nurses and how necessary this team work is when working at night. In order for nurses working at night to be fully appreciated, the communication between day and night staff in health care organizations needs to be developed. Furthermore, it is important to give the night staff opportunities to use its whole field of competence.

  13. Oral health perceptions of paediatric palliative care nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Elizabeth; Mead, Jean Marie; Walsh, Margaret M

    2013-01-01

    Systematic oral care reduces oral complications among children in paediatric palliative care (PPC), yet little is known about the oral health perceptions of PPC nursing staff. This qualitative cross-sectional study used semi-structured interviews based on phenomenography to explore PPC nursing staff's perceptions of oral health and the relationship of oral care to comfort and quality of life. A purposive sample of nine nursing staff employed at a California PPC facility participated. Five themes emerged from the analysis of the interviews: signs of oral health, reasons for oral care, adaptation of oral care on a case-by-case basis, barriers to providing oral care, and facilitators of improving oral care. The perceived importance of oral health was the underlining similarity between the themes. A need for further research in the area of oral PPC is indicated. Collaboration with dental professionals may be needed to create oral PPC guidelines that fit the complex needs of children with life-limiting illnesses.

  14. Occupational injury history and universal precautions awareness: a survey in Kabul hospital staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garner Paul

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health staff in Afghanistan may be at high risk of needle stick injury and occupational infection with blood borne pathogens, but we have not found any published or unpublished data. Methods Our aim was to measure the percentage of healthcare staff reporting sharps injuries in the preceding 12 months, and to explore what they knew about universal precautions. In five randomly selected government hospitals in Kabul a total of 950 staff participated in the study. Data were analyzed with Epi Info 3. Results Seventy three percent of staff (72.6%, 491/676 reported sharps injury in the preceding 12 months, with remarkably similar levels between hospitals and staff cadres in the 676 (71.1% people responding. Most at risk were gynaecologist/obstetricians (96.1% followed by surgeons (91.1%, nurses (80.2%, dentists (75.4%, midwives (62.0%, technicians (50.0%, and internist/paediatricians (47.5%. Of the injuries reported, the commonest were from hollow-bore needles (46.3%, n = 361/780, usually during recapping. Almost a quarter (27.9% of respondents had not been vaccinated against hepatitis B. Basic knowledge about universal precautions were found insufficient across all hospitals and cadres. Conclusion Occupational health policies for universal precautions need to be implemented in Afghani hospitals. Staff vaccination against hepatitis B is recommended.

  15. Recommendation in evolving online networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao; Zeng, An; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Recommender system is an effective tool to find the most relevant information for online users. By analyzing the historical selection records of users, recommender system predicts the most likely future links in the user-item network and accordingly constructs a personalized recommendation list for each user. So far, the recommendation process is mostly investigated in static user-item networks. In this paper, we propose a model which allows us to examine the performance of the state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms in evolving networks. We find that the recommendation accuracy in general decreases with time if the evolution of the online network fully depends on the recommendation. Interestingly, some randomness in users' choice can significantly improve the long-term accuracy of the recommendation algorithm. When a hybrid recommendation algorithm is applied, we find that the optimal parameter gradually shifts towards the diversity-favoring recommendation algorithm, indicating that recommendation diversity is essential to keep a high long-term recommendation accuracy. Finally, we confirm our conclusions by studying the recommendation on networks with the real evolution data.

  16. A telephone survey of cancer awareness among frontline staff: informing training needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, N; Hart, A; Nuttall, K; Simpson, K; Turnill, N; Grant-Pearce, C; Damms, P; Allen, V; Slade, K; Dey, P

    2011-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown limited awareness about cancer risk factors among hospital-based staff. Less is known about general cancer awareness among community frontline National Health Service and social care staff. Methods: A cross-sectional computer-assisted telephone survey of 4664 frontline community-based health and social care staff in North West England. Results: A total of 671 out of 4664 (14.4%) potentially eligible subjects agreed to take part. Over 92% of staff recognised most warning signs, except an unexplained pain (88.8%, n=596), cough or hoarseness (86.9%, n=583) and a sore that does not heal (77.3%, n=519). The bowel cancer-screening programme was recognised by 61.8% (n=415) of staff. Most staff agreed that smoking and passive smoking ‘increased the chance of getting cancer.' Fewer agreed about getting sunburnt more than once as a child (78.0%, n=523), being overweight (73.5%, n=493), drinking more than one unit of alcohol per day (50.2%, n=337) or doing less than 30 min of moderate physical exercise five times a week (41.1%, n=276). Conclusion: Cancer awareness is generally good among frontline staff, but important gaps exist, which might be improved by targeted education and training and through developing clearer messages about cancer risk factors. PMID:21750554

  17. Health smart cards: differing perceptions of emergency department patients and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Rosli, Reizal; Taylor, David McD; Knott, Jonathan C; Das, Atandrila; Dent, Andrew W

    2009-02-01

    An analytical, cross-sectional survey of 270 emergency department patients and 92 staff undertaken in three tertiary referral hospital emergency departments was completed to compare the perceptions of patients and staff regarding the use of health smart cards containing patient medical records. The study recorded data on a range of health smart card issues including awareness, privacy, confidentiality, security, advantages and disadvantages, and willingness to use. A significantly higher proportion of staff had heard of the card. The perceived disadvantages reported by patients and staff were, overall, significantly different, with the staff reporting more disadvantages. A significantly higher proportion of patients believed that they should choose what information is on the card and who should have access to the information. Patients were more conservative regarding what information should be included, but staff were more conservative regarding who should have access to the information. Significantly fewer staff believed that patients could reliably handle the cards. Overall, however, the cards were considered acceptable and useful, and their introduction would be supported.

  18. The difficulties experienced by nurses and healthcare staff involved in the process of breaking bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Clare; Buchanan, Jean; Tod, Angela Mary

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the difficulties experienced by nurses and healthcare professionals when engaging in the process of breaking bad news. The challenges faced by staff when breaking bad news have previously been researched in relation to particular settings or participants. This study involved staff from diverse settings and roles to develop broader insights into the range of difficulties experienced in clinical practice. The study used a descriptive survey design involving self-reported written accounts and framework analysis. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire containing a free text section that asked participants to describe a difficult experience they had encountered when involved in the process of breaking bad news. Data were collected from healthcare staff from hospital, community, hospice and care home settings attending training days on breaking bad news between April 2011 and April 2014. Multiple inter-related factors presented challenges to staff engaging in activities associated with breaking bad news. Traditional subjects such as diagnostic and treatment information were described but additional topics were identified such as the impact of illness and care at the end of life. A descriptive framework was developed that summarizes the factors that contribute to creating difficult experiences for staff when breaking bad news. The framework provides insights into the scope of the challenges faced by staff when they engage in the process of breaking bad news. This provides the foundation for developing interventions to support staff that more closely matches their experiences in clinical practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Investigation of zoonotic infections among Auckland Zoo staff: 1991-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, M B; Morris, A J; Sinclair, D A; Pritchard, C P

    2012-12-01

    Investigation was undertaken to assess the occurrence of zoonotic infection among staff at Auckland Zoological Park, New Zealand, in 1991, 2002 and 2010. Serial cross-sectional health surveys in 1991, 2002 and 2010 comprising a health questionnaire, and serological, immunological and microbiological analysis for a range of potential zoonotic infections were performed. Laboratory results for zoo animals were also reviewed for 2004-2010 to assess the occurrence of potential zoonotic infections. Veterinary clinic, animal handler, grounds, maintenance and administrative staff participated in the surveys, with 49, 42 and 46 participants in the 1991, 2002 and 2010 surveys, respectively (29% of total zoo staff in 2010). A small number of staff reported work-related infections, including erysipelas (1), giardiasis (1) and campylobacteriosis (1). The seroprevalence of antibodies to hepatitis A virus and Toxoplasma gondii closely reflected those in the Auckland community. No carriage of hepatitis B virus (HBV) was detected, and most of those with anti-HBV antibodies had been vaccinated. Few staff had serological evidence of past leptospiral infection. Three veterinary clinic staff had raised Chlamydophila psittaci antibodies, all Auckland Zoo, this was uncommon and risks appear to be adequately managed under current policies and procedures. Nevertheless, ongoing assessment of risk factors is needed as environmental, human and animal disease and management factors change. Policies and procedures should be reviewed periodically in conjunction with disease monitoring results for both animals and staff to minimise zoonotic transmission. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Urgent recommendation. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Masayuki [International Affairs and Safeguards Division, Atomic Energy Bureau, Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-12-01

    The Investigation Committee for Critical Accident at Uranium Processing Plant was founded immediately after the accident to investigate the cause of the accident and to establish measures to prevent the similar accident. On September 30, 1999 around 10:35, the Japan's first criticality accident occurred at JCO Co. Ltd. Uranium processing plant (auxiliary conversion plant) located at Tokai-mura Ibaraki-ken. The criticality continued on and off for approximately 20 hours after the first instantaneous criticality. The accident led the recommendation of tentative evacuation and sheltering indoors for residents living in the neighborhood. The serious exposure to neutrons happened to three workers. The dominant effect is dose due to neutrons and gamma rays from the precipitation tank. When the accident took place, three workers dissolved sequentially about 2.4 kg uranium powder with 18.8 % enrichment in the 10-litter bucket with nitric acid. The procedure of homogenization of uranium nitrate was supposed to be controlled using the shape-limited narrow storage column. Actually, however, the thick and large precipitation tank was used. As a result, about 16.6 kg of uranium was fed into the tank, which presumably caused criticality. The first notification by JCO was delayed and the following communication was not smooth. This led to the delay of correct understanding of the situation and made the initial proper response difficult, then followed by insufficient communication between the nation, prefecture, and local authority. Urgent recommendations were made on the following items; (1) Safety measures to be taken at the accident site, (2) health cares for residents and others, (3) Comprehensive safety securing at nuclear operators such as Establishment of the effective audit system, Safety education for employees and Qualification and licensing system, Safety related documents, etc. (4) Reconstruction of the government's safety regulations such as How safety

  1. National Recommended Water Quality Criteria

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Recommended Water Quality Criteria is a compilation of national recommended water quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life and human health...

  2. Innovative public library services - staff-less or staff-intensive?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav Viggo

    2014-01-01

    materials from their home address. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether such developments will necessarily lead to a situation where public libraries become self-service institutions or to what extent self-service and innovative staff-intensive library services can develop and co...... that staff attitudes toward staff-less libraries, and – more surprising – also toward more staff-intensive practices have been somewhat reluctant and skeptical. The paper also presents leadership initiatives which have proved to handle such resistances constructively. Originality/value – The paper contains...

  3. German General Staff Officer Education and Current Challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Groeters, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    "German General Staff Officer Education and Current Challenges" examines the institutional education of German General Staff Officers, as experienced by the author, and offers a "Conceptual Competency...

  4. The effectiveness of staff training focused on increasing emotional intelligence and improving interaction between support staff and clients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlmans, L.J.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Derksen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed

  5. Site Recommendation Subsurface Layout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.L. Linden

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to develop a Subsurface Facility layout that is capable of accommodating the statutory capacity of 70,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU), as well as an option to expand the inventory capacity, if authorized, to 97,000 MTU. The layout configuration also requires a degree of flexibility to accommodate potential changes in site conditions or program requirements. The objective of this analysis is to provide a conceptual design of the Subsurface Facility sufficient to support the development of the Subsurface Facility System Description Document (CRWMS M andO 2000e) and the ''Emplacement Drift System Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 2000i). As well, this analysis provides input to the Site Recommendation Consideration Report. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Evaluation of the existing facilities and their integration into the Subsurface Facility design. (2) Identification and incorporation of factors influencing Subsurface Facility design, such as geological constraints, thermal loading, constructibility, subsurface ventilation, drainage control, radiological considerations, and the Test and Evaluation Facilities. (3) Development of a layout showing an available area in the primary area sufficient to support both the waste inventories and individual layouts showing the emplacement area required for 70,000 MTU and, if authorized, 97,000 MTU

  6. Parcels and Land Ownership, Square-mile, section-wide, property ownerhip parcel and lot-block boundaries. Includes original platted lot lines. These coverages are maintained interactively by GIS staff. Primary attributes include Parcel IDS (Control, Key, and PIN), platted lot and, Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Parcels and Land Ownership dataset current as of 2008. Square-mile, section-wide, property ownerhip parcel and lot-block boundaries. Includes original platted lot...

  7. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 4, Appendices E-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical, resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER consists of Appendices E through I (all ecological survey reports), which are summarized individually in the sections that follow. The following conclusions result from the completion of these surveys and the ER impact analysis: (1) Forest clearing should be limited as much as possible; (2) Disturbed areas should be replanted with native trees; (3) Drainages should be bridged rather than leveled with cut and fill; (4) For areas of steep slopes and potential erosion

  8. IAEA Nuclear Data Section: Progress Report, 2010/11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simakov, S.P.; Otsuka, N.; Zerkin, V.; Semkova, V.

    2011-01-01

    Summary of Nuclear Data Activity by Staff of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section from April 2010 - May 2011 including Staff Changes, Data Compilations (EXFOR transmission, EXFOR quality control, EXFOR coverage control, Workshops and Meetings in 2010/2011 relevant to EXFOR, CINDA, Evaluated data libraries, files and programs), Services, software and Nuclear Data Developments

  9. 40 CFR 57.816 - Effect of negative recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Reduction Technology § 57.816 Effect of negative recommendation. No waiver of the interim requirement for... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effect of negative recommendation. 57.816 Section 57.816 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  10. 45 CFR 1801.23 - Recommendation by panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recommendation by panel. 1801.23 Section 1801.23... HARRY S. TRUMAN SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM The Competition § 1801.23 Recommendation by panel. (a) Each Panel is... be appointed as a Truman Scholar. The Foundation may authorize each regional review panel to...

  11. Nutritional Recommendations for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Eilat-Adar, Sigal; Sinai, Tali; Yosefy, Chaim; Henkin, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Lifestyle factors, including nutrition, play an important role in the etiology of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD). This position paper, written by collaboration between the Israel Heart Association and the Israel Dietetic Association, summarizes the current, preferably latest, literature on the association of nutrition and CVD with emphasis on the level of evidence and practical recommendations. The nutritional information is divided into three main sections: dietary patterns, individual food it...

  12. Joint safety recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkhofer, A.; Cogne, F.X.

    1996-01-01

    In 1992, the French utility EdF, a consortium of German utilities, and the vendor NPI, a joint venture of Siemens and Framatome, joint the efforts in developing an advanced reactor concept called EPR (European Pressurized water Reactor). Therefore, the French and German safety authorities decided to work out a common safety approach which has been laid down in the form of recommendations firstly drawn up by GRS and IPSN and then reviewed by the French and German Nuclear Safety commissions GPR and RSK. The main objective of this approach is the strengthening of accident prevention through optimization of defense-in-depth. Particular objectives are the improvement of plant behavior during transients, especially by increasing thermal inertia and the grace periods for interventions by the control room personnel, the reduction of the possibility of common cause failures, a further improvement of the man-machine interface, the simplification of the systems configuration, and the use of advanced information technology. These objectives are similar to those of many other evolutionary rector concepts. Regarding severe accidents, the French-German approach surpasses current evolutionary developments. One of the fundamental aims is the practical elimination of accidents situations which would lead to large early releases such as containment bypass, shutdown states and open containment building, reactivity accidents, high pressure core melt, depressurization of the RPV or global hydrogen detonation. The dual concept of 'practical elimination' of scenarios or phenomena and of 'dealing with them' is essential for the consistency of the approach and the safety demonstration. This would be expressed by no permanent relocation, no need for emergency evacuation outside the immediate vicinity of the plant, limited sheltering and no long-term restriction in the consumption of food. Such a reduction of radioactive release implies a substantial improvement of the containment function

  13. [Recommendations for neonatal transport].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Hernando, J; Thió Lluch, M; Salguero García, E; Rite Gracia, S; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Echaniz Urcelay, I; Botet Mussons, F; Herranz Carrillo, G; Sánchez Luna, M

    2013-08-01

    During pregnancy, it is not always possible to identify maternal or foetal risk factors. Infants requiring specialised medical care are not always born in centres providing intensive care and will need to be transferred to a referral centre where intensive care can be provided. Therefore Neonatal Transport needs to be considered as part of the organisation of perinatal health care. The aim of Neonatal Transport is to transfer a newborn infant requiring intensive care to a centre where specialised resources and experience can be provided for the appropriate assessment and continuing treatment of a sick newborn infant. Intrauterine transfer is the ideal mode of transport when the birth of an infant with risk factors is diagnosed. Unfortunately, not all problems can be detected in advance with enough time to safely transfer a pregnant woman. Around 30- 50% of risk factors will be diagnosed during labour or soon after birth. Therefore, it is important to have the knowledge and resources to resuscitate and stabilise a newborn infant, as well as a specialised neonatal transport system. With this specialised transport it is possible to transfer newly born infants with the same level of care that they would receive if they had been born in a referral hospital, without increasing their risks or affecting the wellbeing of the newborn. The Standards Committee of the Spanish Society of Neonatology reviewed and updated recommendations for intrauterine transport and indications for neonatal transfer. They also reviewed organisational and logistic factors involved with performing neonatal transport. The Committee review included the type of personnel who should be involved; communication between referral and receiving hospitals; documentation; mode of transport; equipment to stabilise newly born infants; management during transfer, and admission at the referral hospital. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Understanding Job Stress among Healthcare Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dola Saha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Job life is an important part of a person’s daily life. There are many aspects of a job. A person may be satisfied with one or more aspects of his/her job but at the same time may be unhappy with other things related to the job. Objective: To evaluate the sources of job stress (stressful aspects of work among the staff of a super specialty hospital & to suggest measures to decrease level of job stress. Methodology: Descriptive study employing 381 staff members of a super specialty hospital using a structured personal interview questionnaire consisting of 21 sources of stress. The hospital staff was asked to rate each item according to the extent to which it had contributed to their stress as experienced in their jobs in the past few months on a scale of 0 (not at all,1(a little, 2(quite a bit, 3 (a lot. A global rating of stress was also obtained. Result: The prime sources of stress were found to be underpayment (76%, excessive workload (70.3%, inadequate staff (48.6, & being involved in the emotional distress of patients (46.7%. Conclusion: The staffs of the hospital were in moderate stress due to the prime stressors so adequate measures should be taken to alleviate these stressors. This could be achieved through workload management, job redesign, & by offering occupational health education.

  15. Sleep Quality among Female Hospital Staff Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Li Chien

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate sleep quality of hospital staff nurses, both by subjective questionnaire and objective measures. Methods. Female staff nurses at a regional teaching hospital in Northern Taiwan were recruited. The Chinese version of the pittsburgh sleep quality index (C-PSQI was used to assess subjective sleep quality, and an electrocardiogram-based cardiopulmonary coupling (CPC technique was used to analyze objective sleep stability. Work stress was assessed using questionnaire on medical worker’s stress. Results. A total of 156 staff nurses completed the study. Among the staff nurses, 75.8% (117 had a PSQI score of ≥5 and 39.8% had an inadequate stable sleep ratio on subjective measures. Nurses with a high school or lower educational degree had a much higher risk of sleep disturbance when compared to nurses with a college or higher level degree. Conclusions. Both subjective and objective measures demonstrated that poor sleep quality is a common health problem among hospital staff nurses. More studies are warranted on this important issue to discover possible factors and therefore to develop a systemic strategy to cope with the problem.

  16. Open educational resources: staff attitudes and awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Rolfe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Attitudes are changing in education globally to promote the open sharing of educational courses and resources. The aim of this study was to explore staff awareness and attitudes toward ‘open educational resources’ (OER as a benchmark for monitoring future progress. Faculty staff (n=6 were invited to participate in semi-structured interviews which facilitated the development of a questionnaire. Staff respondents (n=50 were not familiar with the term OER but had a clear notion of what it meant. They were familiar with open content repositories within the university but not externally. A culture of borrowing and sharing of resources exists between close colleagues, but not further a field, and whilst staff would obtain resources from the Internet they were reticent to place materials there. Drivers for mobilising resources included a strong belief in open education, the ability of OER to enhance individual and institutional reputations, and economic factors. Barriers to OER included confusion over copyright and lack of IT support. To conclude, there is a positive collegiate culture within the faculty, and overcoming the lack of awareness and dismantling the barriers to sharing will help advance the open educational practices, benefiting both faculty staff and the global community.

  17. Grief after patient death: direct care staff in nursing homes and homecare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, Kathrin; Burack, Orah R; Jopp, Daniela S; Mock, Steven E

    2015-02-01

    Patient death is common in long-term care (LTC). Yet, little attention has been paid to how direct care staff members, who provide the bulk of daily LTC, experience patient death and to what extent they are prepared for this experience. To 1) determine how grief symptoms typically reported by bereaved family caregivers are experienced among direct care staff, 2) explore how prepared the staff members were for the death of their patients, and 3) identify characteristics associated with their grief. This was a cross-sectional study of direct care staff experiencing recent patient death. Participants were 140 certified nursing assistants and 80 homecare workers. Standardized assessments and structured questions addressed staff (e.g., preparedness for death), institutional (e.g., support availability), and patient/relational factors (e.g., relationship quality). Data analyses included bivariate group comparisons and hierarchical regression. Grief reactions of staff reflected many of the core grief symptoms reported by bereaved family caregivers in a large-scale caregiving study. Feelings of being "not at all prepared" for the death and struggling with "acceptance of death" were prevalent among the staff. Grief was more intense when staff-patient relationships were closer, care was provided for longer, and staff felt emotionally unprepared for the death. Grief symptoms like those experienced by family caregivers are common among direct care workers after patient death. Increasing preparedness for this experience via better training and support is likely to improve the occupational experience of direct care workers and ultimately allow them to provide better palliative care in nursing homes and homecare. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Multi-Criteria Recommender Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adomavicius, Gediminas; Manouselis, Nikos; Kwon, Youngok

    This chapter aims to provide an overview of the class of multi-criteria recommender systems. First, it defines the recommendation problem as a multicriteria decision making (MCDM) problem, and reviews MCDM methods and techniques that can support the implementation of multi-criteria recommenders. Then, it focuses on the category of multi-criteria rating recommenders - techniques that provide recommendations by modelling a user's utility for an item as a vector of ratings along several criteria. A review of current algorithms that use multi-criteria ratings for calculating predictions and generating recommendations is provided. Finally, the chapter concludes with a discussion on open issues and future challenges for the class of multi-criteria rating recommenders.

  19. Qualifications and training of staff of the regulatory body for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared as part of the Agency's programme, referred to as the NUSS programme, for establishing Codes of Practice and Safety Guides relating to nuclear power plants. It supplements the Agency's Safety Series No.50-C-G, entitled ''Governmental Organization for the Regulation of Nuclear Power Plants: A Code of Practice'', and is mainly concerned with the qualifications and training requirements of the staff of bodies regulating nuclear power plants. It is not concerned with staff for regulating other phases of the fuel cycle, such as fuel fabrication and management. This Guide provides recommendations and guidance for establishing the qualifications required for the staff of the regulatory body. These requirements include academic training, work experience and other abilities. It also establishes the training programmes and activities necessary for personnel within the regulatory body

  20. Promoting Staff Health: A Survey of the Health and Wellbeing Division

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Evans, David S.

    2016-01-01

    n order to gain a measure of the health and wellbeing of staff in the Health and Wellbeing Division a survey was undertaken in late 2015 with results contained in this report. It highlights the areas that we are doing well in and identifies a number of areas where improvements are needed. The results and suggestions given provide a benchmark as to the current health and wellbeing status of those in our Division and pave the way for a set of recommendations which will be delivered through the action plan currently being developed. As a starting point and in recognition of the fact that many of our staff are based in other cross divisional worksites, the Staff Health and Wellbeing Funding Initiative 2016 was introduced.

  1. Radiation exposure for medical staff performing quantitative coronary perfusion PET with 13N-ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Ulrik Sloth; Borgwardt, Henrik Gutte; Skovgaard, Dorthe Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate radiation doses to medical staff performing quantitative (13)N-ammonia myocardial perfusion positron emission tomography (PET). METHODS: Seventeen PET examinations were performed. Nine examinations consisted of two PET scans (one during rest and one after pharmacological stress...... finger and wrist. RESULTS: The highest mean equivalent dose per examination for a staff member was 453 microSv (417-490 microSv) to the right index finger, 138 microSv (127-149 microSv) to the right wrist and 13 +/- 0.8 microSv to the chest. CONCLUSIONS: Myocardial perfusion PET with (13)N......-ammonia exposes the staff to radiation doses that are comparable to doses from (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose scans and the annual doses are well within the recommended upper limits for radiation workers....

  2. Multilevel Examination of Burnout among High School Staff: Importance of Staff and School Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brennan, Lindsey; Pas, Elise; Bradshaw, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have linked teacher burnout with job performance, satisfaction, and retention; however, there has been limited exploration of potential individual and school contextual factors that may influence burnout. The current study examined high school staff members' reports of burnout as they relate to staff demographics and perceptions…

  3. JOB CENTRE FOR DOMESTIC STAFF IN SWITZERLAND

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service; http://www.cern.ch/relations/

    2001-01-01

    The Permanent mission of Switzerland to the International Organisations in Geneva has informed CERN that the Geneva Welcome Centre has set up an employment registration desk for the domestic staff of international civil servants. The aim of this pilot project is, on the one hand, to help international civil servants find domestic staff and, on the other hand, to help domestic staff holding an 'F'-type carte de légitimation find employment within 30 days after the expiry of a contract. For more information, please contact the Geneva Welcome Centre, La Pastorale, 106, route de Ferney, Case postale 103, 1211 Genève 20, tel. (+41.22) 918 02 70, fax (+41.22) 918 02 79), http://geneva-international.org/Welcome.E.html.

  4. Staff Performance Evaluation in Public Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drumea C.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In public Organizations staff performance is difficult to measure in absence of overall quantitative performance indicators. There are also the qualitative indicators that give an overview on staff’s motivation, strive, ability, commitment to values, teamwork. These aspects are even less easy to illustrate, in private and public sectors equally. In both cases, measuring staff performance at work, as well as its input on the global performance of the organization is a difficult task which has in practice different approaches. Subsequently, this paper is discussing the system indicators and performance triggers used in International Organizations UN affiliated, in order to adjust staff classification and benefits to their staff’s performance.

  5. The different roles of the Staff association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2012-01-01

    The statutory role of the CERN Staff Association is defined in Chapter VII of the Staff Rules and Regulations. The means of the Association to realize its aims are described in Article I.1.3 of the Statutes of the CERN Staff Association. Generally speaking, its aims are “To serve and defend the economic, social, professional and moral interests of its members and all CERN staff“. Usually we deal with professional and social issues (employment conditions, defence of collective or individual rights, promotion of basic research...). But the Association also plays a role of integration (clubs promoting cultural, humanitarian, and sport or offering entertainment, organizing exhibitions and conferences) and it can promote actions to provide its members with material or social advantages (Interfon, commercial offers). Advantageous commercial offers In recent years the Association was able to negotiate with business or cultural partners benefits for its members. A full list can be found on our...

  6. Exposure of Medical Staff during Interventional Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osvay, M.; Turak, O.

    2013-01-01

    The medical staff during interventional procedures receives significant doses on their hands, or parts of their body not covered with protective shielding equipment, as they are close to X-rays field. It can be stated, that interventional radiology and cardiology have one of the highest doses among the X-ray diagnostic procedures. The radiologist use X-ray machine directly in the interventional procedures. The occupational dose is measured only by one Kodak film badge worn under the lead apron for the estimation of the effective dose in Hungary. Our lecture presents the results of dose measurements on eye lens, hands, knees using LiF thermoluminescent dosemeters on the medical staff of two Hungarian hospitals. Results suggest that wearing only one film badge (or other dosemeter system) under the lead apron does not provide proper information on the real occupational dose of medical staff.(author)

  7. Recommendation Process in SR1 Web Document Recommender System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan MUNTEANU

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a recommender system for web documents (given as bookmarks. The system uses for classification a combination of content, event and collaborative filters and for recommendation a modified Pearson-r algorithm. The algorithm for recommendation is using not only the correlation between users but also the similarity between classes. Some experimental results that support this approach are also presented.

  8. Mentoring--a staff retention tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaskie, Mary Louise

    2006-01-01

    Staff retention presents a common challenge for hospitals nationwide. Mentorship programs have been explored as one method of creating environments that promote staff retention. Successful achievement of nurse competencies identified in the Synergy Model for Patient Care can best be achieved in an environment that encourages and facilitates mentoring. Mentoring relationships in critical care provide the ongoing interactions, coaching, teaching, and role modeling to facilitate nurses' progression along this continuum. Mentoring relationships offer support and professional development for nurses at all levels within an organization as well as an optimistic outlook for the nursing profession.

  9. Outbreak of Mysterious Illness Among Hospital Staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Peter; Ebbehøj, Niels Erik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospitals are rarely reported as settings for mass psychogenic illness (MPI). The present report scrutinizes an outbreak of probable MPI among hospital staff, with medical intervention reinforcing the course of the illness. CASE REPORT: Four of seven staff members in an emergency...... the following 9 days, 14 possible poisoning victims were identified, 6 of whom were transferred for HBO. After hospital stays with repeated HBO treatment and examinations without identification of significant physical disease, the majority of the 10 HBO-treated victims remained symptomatic, some on prolonged....... Outbreaks of illness in a group of symptomatic victims without indication of significant physical disease should be managed by observation and limited intervention....

  10. Validation of the STAFF-5 computer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, J.F.; Fields, S.R.

    1981-04-01

    STAFF-5 is a dynamic heat-transfer-fluid-flow stress model designed for computerized prediction of the temperature-stress performance of spent LWR fuel assemblies under storage/disposal conditions. Validation of the temperature calculating abilities of this model was performed by comparing temperature calculations under specified conditions to experimental data from the Engine Maintenance and Dissassembly (EMAD) Fuel Temperature Test Facility and to calculations performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) using the HYDRA-1 model. The comparisons confirmed the ability of STAFF-5 to calculate representative fuel temperatures over a considerable range of conditions, as a first step in the evaluation and prediction of fuel temperature-stress performance

  11. Systemic Thinking and Partnership Working: A Cross Sectional Study in a Medical Sciences University in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khammarnia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Systemic thinking can provide practice in multidisciplinary team working and improve the organizational efficacy. This study aimed to determine the association between systemic thinking and partnership working in the employees of a medical sciences university in the south of Iran. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences (ZAUMS in 2015. The study population consisted of all employees in ZAUMS; 370 participants were selected through stratified random sampling. Two standard questionnaires were used for data gathering. The data were analyzed in SPSS (v21 using Pearson, One way ANOVA, and logistic regression. The level of significance was considered as 0.05. Results: In this study, 225 participants (60.8% were female and their mean age was 34.7±8.7. The score of partnership working for 362 participants was higher than the mean standard (40. Systemic thinking had a positive association with partnership working (p=0.001 and married status of the participants (p=0.04. Partnership working in male and older staff was more than others in ZAUMS (p<0.001 and p=0.01, respectively. Conclusion: Systematic thinking had a positive association with the employees’ working partnership. Moreover, the male staff had better systematic thinking. It is recommended that the managers should promote systematic thinking in staff, especially in females, for better partnership and efficacy in organizations.

  12. Recommendation systems in software engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Robillard, Martin P; Walker, Robert J; Zimmermann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    With the growth of public and private data stores and the emergence of off-the-shelf data-mining technology, recommendation systems have emerged that specifically address the unique challenges of navigating and interpreting software engineering data.This book collects, structures and formalizes knowledge on recommendation systems in software engineering. It adopts a pragmatic approach with an explicit focus on system design, implementation, and evaluation. The book is divided into three parts: "Part I - Techniques" introduces basics for building recommenders in software engineering, including techniques for collecting and processing software engineering data, but also for presenting recommendations to users as part of their workflow.?"Part II - Evaluation" summarizes methods and experimental designs for evaluating recommendations in software engineering.?"Part III - Applications" describes needs, issues and solution concepts involved in entire recommendation systems for specific software engineering tasks, fo...

  13. Air Force Critical Incident Stress Management outreach with Pentagon staff after the terrorist attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Anderson B

    2002-09-01

    This article describes the Critical Incident Stress Management outreach to Pentagon staff conducted after the terrorist attack by a team of Air Force mental health and chaplain personnel. Also discussed are lessons learned from the author's experience while leading the mental health component and working in a larger tri-service outreach. Finally, the observed impacts of the outreach effort are examined along with recommendations for future postcritical incident outreach efforts.

  14. Recommendation Sets and Choice Queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viappiani, Paolo Renato; Boutilier, Craig

    2011-01-01

    Utility elicitation is an important component of many applications, such as decision support systems and recommender systems. Such systems query users about their preferences and offer recommendations based on the system's belief about the user's utility function. We analyze the connection between...... the problem of generating optimal recommendation sets and the problem of generating optimal choice queries, considering both Bayesian and regret-based elicitation. Our results show that, somewhat surprisingly, under very general circumstances, the optimal recommendation set coincides with the optimal query....

  15. Staff Development: Your Most Important Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mary Alice

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the need for improved teacher training in the use of technology and considers the role of school media specialists. Topics include providing focused workshops on technology integration; promoting peer mentoring; partnerships with universities; using online staff development resources; and promoting technology in curriculum development…

  16. Between Education and Psychology: School Staff Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Tim; Finney, Dave

    2015-01-01

    When discussing contributions from psychology in/to educational practices like school-based mental health promotion, it is peculiar that psychologists (of an educational or clinical kind) or education-oriented sociologists, both not often based in schools or classrooms, dominate the topic. It has been acknowledged that school staff have been over…

  17. Staff Development in Light of Maslow's Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Christene K.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the teacher change process in an Oregon staff development program, examining faculty development within the framework of Maslow's theory that says people are motivated to satisfy physiological, safety/security, social, self-esteem, and self-actualization needs. Program evaluation demonstrated the interdependence of the cognitive and…

  18. Visit of the US Congressional Staff delegation

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    List of participants: Jon Kamarck, Chief Clerk, VA-HUD subcommittee, Senate Appropriations Committee; Cheh Kim, Professional Staff Member, VA-HUD subcommittee, Senate Appropriations Committee; David Schindel, Head, National Science Foundation, Europe Office; Terry Schaff, National Science Foundation, Office of Legislative & Public Affairs; Tim Clancy, National Science Foundation, Office of Legislative & Public Affairs; Ms Lynette Poulton, First Secretary, US Mission in Geneva

  19. Teaching Staff Advanced Training: European Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    The issue of teaching staff advanced training is paid much attention in many countries. In the Republic of Moldova progressive professional credits system is used. Credits are scored not only in assigning teaching degrees or issuing a certificate of continuing professional education, but also for teachers' evaluation at the educational…

  20. Use staff wisely to save NHS money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alison

    2015-12-09

    The NHS could save up to £ 2 billion a year by improving workflow and containing workforce costs, according to Labour peer Lord Carter's review of NHS efficiency. Changes in areas such as rostering and management of annual leave must avoid increasing the pressure on staff.

  1. Bridging Information and Communication Technology and Staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bridging Information and Communication Technology and Staff Professional Development: Case Study of Delta State Tertiary Institutions. ... Teachers are therefore faced with the formidable task of reinventing schools/classroom for a society and world transformed by ICT – because most of these children have grown with ...

  2. Are Students Customers? Perceptions of Academic Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomas, Laurie

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the notion of the student as a customer in a university, focusing on the perceptions of academic staff. Changes in the higher education sector in recent years have significantly reduced the differences between universities and other types of organisations and it has been argued that students have become "consumers" of…

  3. Staff Issue Paper on Institutional Arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of State, Washington, DC.

    Staff Issue Papers for the Secretary of State's Advisory Committee on the 1972 United Nations Conference on the Human Environment, Stockholm, Sweden, are summarized in this compendium. Papers developed by the various sub-committees are included for: (1) institutional arrangements; (2) development and the environment; (3) human settlements; (4)…

  4. Preceptor development. Use a staff development specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneller, S; Hoeppner, M

    1994-01-01

    Preceptor orientation is a well identified need. Less often identified is the critical role the staff development specialist plays in the ongoing support and development of preceptors. In this article, the authors explain activities of coaching, facilitating, mentoring, and consulting. These role components are essential in the ongoing development of preceptors. This support also may help retain preceptors.

  5. Implementation of Staff Recruitment Policies and Diversity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on the findings of a study that delved into these reasons, with specific reference to staff recruitment policies and their implementation. It reports that the fairness of the universities' employee recruitment guidelines and the way these are implemented are significantly and positively with the universities' ...

  6. Leisure Activities of University College Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernat, Elzbieta; Roguski, Karol

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the participation of academic teachers in leisure activities for that group contribute to shaping habits of a large percentage of young people. Material and methods: A group of 52 staff members (about 30%) of a private university college, aged 25-70 years, were interviewed with respect to their participation in sports,…

  7. Racism, Staff Development and Adult Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galliers, David

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses the use of racial awareness training in staff development programs. He describes the four types of racism: (1) overt institutional, (2) overt personal, (3) covert institutional, and (4) covert personal. He calls for better trainers and training programs. (CH)

  8. MEDICAL STAFF SCHEDULING USING SIMULATED ANNEALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Rosocha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The efficiency of medical staff is a fundamental feature of healthcare facilities quality. Therefore the better implementation of their preferences into the scheduling problem might not only rise the work-life balance of doctors and nurses, but also may result into better patient care. This paper focuses on optimization of medical staff preferences considering the scheduling problem.Methodology/Approach: We propose a medical staff scheduling algorithm based on simulated annealing, a well-known method from statistical thermodynamics. We define hard constraints, which are linked to legal and working regulations, and minimize the violations of soft constraints, which are related to the quality of work, psychic, and work-life balance of staff.Findings: On a sample of 60 physicians and nurses from gynecology department we generated monthly schedules and optimized their preferences in terms of soft constraints. Our results indicate that the final value of objective function optimized by proposed algorithm is more than 18-times better in violations of soft constraints than initially generated random schedule that satisfied hard constraints.Research Limitation/implication: Even though the global optimality of final outcome is not guaranteed, desirable solutionwas obtained in reasonable time. Originality/Value of paper: We show that designed algorithm is able to successfully generate schedules regarding hard and soft constraints. Moreover, presented method is significantly faster than standard schedule generation and is able to effectively reschedule due to the local neighborhood search characteristics of simulated annealing.

  9. Accommodations: Staff Identity and University Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Andrew; Herrick, Tim; Keating, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Space has been of growing significance in social theory in recent years, yet, explorations of it in the scholarship of higher education have been limited. This is surprising, given the critical role space has in shaping staff and students' engagement with the university. Taking a practice-based approach and focusing on academic identities, this…

  10. Radiation Safety Awareness Among Medical Staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szarmach, Arkadiusz; Piskunowicz, Maciej; Świętoń, Dominik; Muc, Adam; Mockałło, Gabor; Dzierżanowski, Jarosław; Szurowska, Edyta

    2015-01-01

    The common access to imaging methods based on ionizing radiation requires also radiation protection. The knowledge of ionizing radiation exposure risks among the medical staff is essential for planning diagnostic procedures and therapy. Evaluation of the knowledge of radiation safety during diagnostic procedures among the medical staff. The study consisted of a questionnaire survey. The questionnaire consisted of seven closed-ended questions concerning the knowledge of the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation as well as questions related to responder’s profession and work experience. The study group included a total of 150 individuals from four professional groups: nurses, doctors, medical technicians, support staff. The study was carried out in the three largest hospitals in Gdańsk between July and October 2013. The highest rates of correct answers to questions related to the issue of radiation protection were provided by the staff of radiology facilities and emergency departments with 1–5 years of professional experience. The most vulnerable group in terms of the knowledge of these issues consisted of individuals working at surgical wards with 11–15 years of professional experience. Education in the field of radiological protection should be a subject of periodic training of medical personnel regardless of position and length of service

  11. The Hazardous Waters of Staff Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoop, Robert J.; Dunklee, Dennis R.

    2001-01-01

    Understanding prospective employees' rights (under the 1964 Civil Rights Act and other federal legislation prohibiting discriminatory practices) can help principals protect themselves, their schools, and their districts from litigation. Scenarios are described, along with permissible staff-selection steps: position analysis, recruitment,…

  12. Selecting and Developing an A+ Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Vernon G.

    2008-01-01

    Because the demand for excellence in public education is ever present, this article explores the development of a professional enhancement program designed to select and develop a qualified, competent faculty and staff. The basis for the program is a strong educational philosophy, which leads to a vision of what schools can be. It stresses the…

  13. Staff Directory | Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program values the contributions of its fellows and works to provide relevant and useful experiences in research and education in return. Our staff is here to provide unwavering support and guidance to each fellow as they progress through the program.

  14. Staff Development: Creating a Community of Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Norman D.

    2004-01-01

    One of the most crucial roles of the school leader is to develop and maintain the professional level of the staff which he/she supervises. It is generally agreed upon that the desired school culture is one in which the focus is on the development of a community of learners. Consequently, intellectual growth can never happen for children unless it…

  15. Staff Development Resolutions for the Next Millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsh, Stephanie; Sparks, Dennis

    1999-01-01

    Initiating improved models of teacher practice requires a series of resolutions to guide staff-development efforts. The revamped scenario sets priorities among all the teacher's essential roles and responsibilities: learning, instructing, planning, writing, coaching, tutoring, and studying. Teacher competence and quality are also priorities. (MLH)

  16. Evaluation of doses to staff involved in interventional cardiology in two Khartoum hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, M. K. A.

    2009-11-01

    In interventional cardiac procedures, staff operates near the patient in a non-uniformly scattered radiation field. Consequently, workers may receive, over a period of time, relatively high radiation doses. The measurement of individual doses to personnel becomes critical due to the use of protective devices and, as a consequence of the large number of methods proposed to assess the effective dose, In this study, staff doses were measured in two cardiac centers: Ahmed Gasim Hospital and Cardiac Center, Khartoum. The objective was to measure personal dose equivalent and accordingly estimate the effective dose which is received by staff in interventional cardiology. Measurements were performed using electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) worn over lead apron during the examination and were read immediately following each examination. A total number of 40 radiation worker were monitored for a period of two weeks. The highest doses received by the cardiologist followed by nurses and then X-ray technicians. Staff received mean effective doses that ranged from 24 to 110 μSv estimated for four weeks. Recommendations on how to reduce staff doses in interventional cardiology are presented. (Author)

  17. The impact of staff training on staff outcomes in dementia care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Aimee; Revolta, Catherine; Orrell, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Caring for people with dementia can be emotionally challenging and is often linked to low job satisfaction and burnout in care staff. Staff training within care settings is potentially valuable in improving well-being and quality of care. This review aimed to (i) establish the impact of training on staff outcomes; (ii) compare the impact of different training approaches; (iii) explore the influence of training intensity; and (iv) explore potential barriers to success. A database search of staff training interventions revealed 207 papers, 188 of which were excluded based on prespecified criteria. Nineteen studies were included and appraised using a quality rating tool. Overall, the studies were found to be of variable quality; however, 16 studies found a significant change following training in at least one staff domain, with knowledge improving most frequently. Approaches focusing on managing challenging behaviours appeared to be the most effective. Training staff can be an effective method of improving well-being, and programmes helping staff to manage challenging behaviour appear to be the most beneficial. There is no clear relationship between training intensity and outcome. Most studies point to the importance of addressing organisational factors as a barrier to change. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Classification of Recommender Expertise in the Wikipedia Recommender System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian D.; Pilkauskas, Povilas; Lefévre, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    to the quality of articles. The Wikipedia Recommender System (WRS) was developed to help users determine the credibility of articles based on feedback from other Wikipedia users. The WRS implements a collaborative filtering system with trust metrics, i.e., it provides a rating of articles which emphasizes...... an evaluation of four existing knowledge classification schemes with respect to these requirements. This evaluation helped us identify a classification scheme, which we have implemented in the current version of the Wikipedia Recommender System....... feedback from recommenders that the user has agreed with in the past. This exposes the problem that most recommenders are not equally competent in all subject areas. The first WRS prototype did not include an evaluation of the areas of expertise of recommenders, so the trust metric used in the article...

  19. Classification of Recommender Expertise in the Wikipedia Recommender System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian D.; Pilkauskas, Povilas; Lefevre, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    to the quality of articles. The Wikipedia Recommender System (WRS) was developed to help users determine the credibility of articles based on feedback from other Wikipedia users. The WRS implements a collaborative filtering system with trust metrics, i.e., it provides a rating of articles "which emphasizes...... an evaluation of four existing knowledge classification schemes with respect to these requirements. This evaluation helped us identify a classification scheme, which we have implemented in the current version of the Wikipedia Recommender System....... feedback from recommenders that the user has agreed with in the past. This exposes the problem that most recommenders are not equally competent in all subject areas. The first WRS prototype did not include an evaluation of the areas of expertise of recommenders, so the trust metric used in the article...

  20. Iranian parent-staff communication and parental stress in the neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanpour, Marzieh; Alavi, Mousa; Azizi, Fatemeh; Als, Heidelise; Armanian, Amir Mohmmad

    2017-01-01

    The birth of an infant requiring hospitalization in the neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) uniformly is reported to be stressful for parents and family members. This study aimed to determine parent-staff communication in the NICU and its relationship to parent stress. Two hundred and three Iranian parents with preterm infants hospitalized in the NICU participated in this descriptive-correlational study. The participants were selected by the quota sampling method. Data collected included a three-part: questionnaire, the first part covered demographic parent and infant information, the second was the Parent-Staff Communication Scale (the score of which ranged from 0 to 180), and the third was the Parental Stress Scale (the score of which ranged from 0 to 102). Descriptive and inferential statistics including the Pearson's correlation coefficient test were applied to the data, using SPSS software Version 16. This study revealed that fathers and mothers' stress and communication scores were almost comparable and both higher than expected. The total mean score of the two main variables, i.e., parent-staff communication and parental stress were, respectively, 100.72 ± 18.89 and 75.26 ± 17.6. A significant inverse correlation was found between parental stress and parent-staff communication scores ( r = -0.144, P = 0.041). Based on this study finding showed that better parent-staff communication is related to lower parent stress scores, it is recommended that nurses and physicians receive specific skill training for the establishment of effective parent-staff communication. It is anticipated that such improved staff skills will help decrease parent stress and therewith likely promote parent and infant health in the NICU.

  1. Knowledge about epilepsy by students and staff of a school in Fortaleza-CE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvânia Maria Mendes Vasconcelos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the knowledge of teachers, students and employees of a school about epilepsy. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional, quantitative study held in a school in Fortaleza - CE. The universe consisted of all students and staff at the school who met the following inclusion criteria: to be a student or employee of the night shift, to be 18 years old or above. Data collection occurred in September 2007, by applying a structured questionnaire. From 69 questionnaires, 50 were completed by students, 11 by teachers and eight by other school employees. We divided the sample into two groups: staff (employees and teachers and students. Results: The results show that 22% of staff believed that one of the forms of epilepsy transmission occurred through saliva. It was found that 98% of staff and 94% of students said that epilepsy is a neurological disorder. Concerning the control of the disease, 94% of students and 78% of staff believed that it occurs by taking the medication daily. Among the respondents, 29% of staff and 22% of students felt that people with epilepsy have difficulty in school learning. It was also observed that most participants scored appropriate procedures to be adopted in the seizure. Conclusion: The research determined gaps in the knowledge about epilepsy in the studied sample.

  2. Conflict management style of Jordanian nurse managers and its relationship to staff nurses' intent to stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamdan, Zaid; Nussera, Hayat; Masa'deh, Rami

    2016-03-01

    To explore the relationship between conflict management styles used by nurse managers and intent to stay of staff nurses. Nursing shortages require managers to focus on the retention of staff nurses. Understanding the relationship between conflict management styles of nurse managers and intent to stay of staff nurses is one strategy to retain nurses in the workforce. A cross-sectional descriptive quantitative study was carried out in Jordan. The Rahim organization conflict inventory II (ROCI II) was completed by 42 nurse managers and the intent to stay scale was completed by 320 staff nurses from four hospitals in Jordan. The anova analysis was carried out. An integrative style was the first choice for nurse managers and the last choice was a dominating style. The overall level of intent to stay for nurses was moderate. Nurses tend to keep their current job for 2-3 years. There was a negative relationship between the dominating style as a conflict management style and the intent to stay for nurses. The findings of the present study support the claim that leadership practices affect the staff nurses' intent to stay and the quality of care. Nurse managers can improve the intent to stay for staff nurses if they use the appropriate conflict management styles. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Is culture associated with patient safety in the emergency department? A study of staff perspectives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek-van Noord, I.; Wagner, C.; Dyck, C. van; Twisk, J.W.R.; Bruijne, M.C. de

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the patient safety culture of Dutch emergency departments (EDs), to examine associations between safety culture dimensions and patient safety grades as reported by ED staff and to compare these associations between nurses and physicians. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey

  4. Occupational stress and strain of support staff at a higher education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the occupational stressors and strains for support staff at a higher education institution in the North West Province, and to assess the differences between the stressors and strains of different biographical groups. A cross-sectional survey design (N = 315) was used. The ASSET and a ...

  5. Assessment of obesity and dietary pattern of staff in a university in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Obesity is a major health problem resulting from unhealthy eating practices. Objective: This study was carried out to assess the prevalence of obesity and dietary pattern of staff of the University of Nigeria, Nsukka. Methods: The study employed a cross-sectional study design. Four hundred respondents were ...

  6. 76 FR 50740 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Procedures for Handling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0514] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Procedures for Handling Section 522 Postmarket Surveillance Studies; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice...

  7. 45 CFR 1608.5 - Prohibitions applicable to Corporation employees and to staff attorneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prohibitions applicable to Corporation employees and to staff attorneys. 1608.5 Section 1608.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION PROHIBITED POLITICAL ACTIVITIES § 1608.5 Prohibitions applicable to...

  8. Is culture associated with patient safety in the emergency department? A study of staff perspectives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noord, I.; Wagner, C.; van Dyck, C.; Twisk, J.; de Bruijne, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the patient safety culture of Dutch emergency departments (EDs), to examine associations between safety culture dimensions and patient safety grades as reported by ED staff and to compare these associations between nurses and physicians. Design: Cross-sectional survey

  9. Hospital reform and staff morale in South Africa: a case study of Dr ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Settings and subjects: This study included all medical and nursing staff working at the district hospital. Outcome measures: A semi-structured questionnaire coded for anonymity was used. It comprised three sections: the introduction, demographic information and a list of factors to which participants responded by indicating ...

  10. Staff Retention. Personnel Management Module. Operational Management Programme. Increasing Opportunities for Supervisors and Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jennifer

    This self-instructional unit for supervisors and managers in the British hotel and catering industry is based on the view that problems in staff recruitment and retention are directly linked to the level of job satisfaction. The document begins with an introduction and advice on how to use the unit. Five sections cover the following topics: (1)…

  11. 28 CFR 505.4 - Calculation of assessment by unit staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... 505.4 Section 505.4 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL... to or less than the poverty level, as established by the United States Department of Health and Human... above the poverty level, Unit Team staff are to impose a fee equal to the inmate's assets above the...

  12. 28 CFR 511.18 - When Bureau staff can arrest and detain a non-inmate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When Bureau staff can arrest and detain a non-inmate. 511.18 Section 511.18 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... secured, using minimally necessary force and restraints, in a private area of the facility away from...

  13. Cesarean Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... time. They'll get smaller and become a natural skin color in the weeks and months after delivery. And because incisions are often made in the "bikini" area, many C-section scars aren't even noticeable. What If I Don't Feel Better? Call your health care provider if you have: a fever signs of ...

  14. Nutritional recommendations for cardiovascular disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilat-Adar, Sigal; Sinai, Tali; Yosefy, Chaim; Henkin, Yaakov

    2013-09-17

    Lifestyle factors, including nutrition, play an important role in the etiology of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD). This position paper, written by collaboration between the Israel Heart Association and the Israel Dietetic Association, summarizes the current, preferably latest, literature on the association of nutrition and CVD with emphasis on the level of evidence and practical recommendations. The nutritional information is divided into three main sections: dietary patterns, individual food items, and nutritional supplements. The dietary patterns reviewed include low carbohydrate diet, low-fat diet, Mediterranean diet, and the DASH diet. Foods reviewed in the second section include: whole grains and dietary fiber, vegetables and fruits, nuts, soy, dairy products, alcoholic drinks, coffee and caffeine, tea, chocolate, garlic, and eggs. Supplements reviewed in the third section include salt and sodium, omega-3 and fish oil, phytosterols, antioxidants, vitamin D, magnesium, homocysteine-reducing agents, and coenzyme Q10.

  15. Nutritional Recommendations for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaakov Henkin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lifestyle factors, including nutrition, play an important role in the etiology of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD. This position paper, written by collaboration between the Israel Heart Association and the Israel Dietetic Association, summarizes the current, preferably latest, literature on the association of nutrition and CVD with emphasis on the level of evidence and practical recommendations. The nutritional information is divided into three main sections: dietary patterns, individual food items, and nutritional supplements. The dietary patterns reviewed include low carbohydrate diet, low-fat diet, Mediterranean diet, and the DASH diet. Foods reviewed in the second section include: whole grains and dietary fiber, vegetables and fruits, nuts, soy, dairy products, alcoholic drinks, coffee and caffeine, tea, chocolate, garlic, and eggs. Supplements reviewed in the third section include salt and sodium, omega-3 and fish oil, phytosterols, antioxidants, vitamin D, magnesium, homocysteine-reducing agents, and coenzyme Q10.

  16. Nutritional Recommendations for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilat-Adar, Sigal; Sinai, Tali; Yosefy, Chaim; Henkin, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Lifestyle factors, including nutrition, play an important role in the etiology of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD). This position paper, written by collaboration between the Israel Heart Association and the Israel Dietetic Association, summarizes the current, preferably latest, literature on the association of nutrition and CVD with emphasis on the level of evidence and practical recommendations. The nutritional information is divided into three main sections: dietary patterns, individual food items, and nutritional supplements. The dietary patterns reviewed include low carbohydrate diet, low-fat diet, Mediterranean diet, and the DASH diet. Foods reviewed in the second section include: whole grains and dietary fiber, vegetables and fruits, nuts, soy, dairy products, alcoholic drinks, coffee and caffeine, tea, chocolate, garlic, and eggs. Supplements reviewed in the third section include salt and sodium, omega-3 and fish oil, phytosterols, antioxidants, vitamin D, magnesium, homocysteine-reducing agents, and coenzyme Q10. PMID:24067391

  17. Mapping Staff Competencies for Information Literacy Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Corrall

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Information literacy (IL is a key strategic objective for academic libraries. Many academic librarians are involved in designing, developing and delivering IL programmes, using both classroom teaching and e-learning methods. IL has also become a priority at institutional level and some universities and colleges have formal policies and strategies to integrate and embed IL in the curriculum. IL interventions also happen informally at enquiry points and reference desks, when queries offer ‘teachable moments’ for library staff to help students develop information skills and understanding while solving their information problems. Research shows that such instruction features strongly in both face-to-face and virtual reference transactions, but few IL policies and strategies cover this frontline personalised IL support. Similarly, most discussion of staff training and development for IL education has centred on the teaching roles and pedagogical knowledge of professional librarians, with limited discussion of the competencies needed for frontline interventions by paraprofessionals or assistants. This workshop promotes an inclusive holistic model of IL education and library workforce development. It will investigate the skills and knowledge needed by frontline staff to contribute effectively to the IL mission of academic libraries. It will focus on the learning support needed by students from different educational, social, ethnic and cultural backgrounds, with particular reference to postgraduate students, as a group typifying this diversity. The facilitator will review IL interventions and library staff competencies discussed in the literature. Participants will discuss typical queries or problems presented by different categories of postgraduate students and then identify the skills, knowledge and understanding required by frontline staff to provide an appropriate service response. The skillsets identified will be compared with those of teaching

  18. A "Coach Approach" to Staff Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Macmillan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The speed of change is challenging libraries to redevelop themselves in ways we have never seen before. Rising costs and changing customer expectations are forcing staff to continuously learn new skills, adapt to new technologies and work more closely in collaboration with others in response to this unpredictable environment. At the same time library leaders need to communicate regularly with staff and to motivate them to dialogue with each other about the value of the library service that they provide to the community. A creative approach to building flexibility, resilience and staff engagement has become essential for survival. Coaching is a creative, innovative and effective communications tool that is now considered to be one of the most important ways to encourage employees to continue to learn and develop. Its greatest impact is in building leadership and staff engagement. Communicating with “a coach approach” or coaching mindset is a powerful way for library leaders to connect with others where the flow and exchange is positive and there is a mutual benefit of contribution and collaboration, expanded knowledge and innovation. The basics of fostering “a coach approach” with library staff requires an understanding of the importance of “reframing” one’s personal attitudes and perspectives, appreciating the art of focused listening and the impact of positive acknowledgement, learning to ask the right questions and formulating action plans for continued success. It is a learned skill that requires a commitment to practice but is one that will ultimately demonstrate positive results.

  19. Staff management, training and knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Hitoshi; Umeki, Hiroyuki; Capouet, M.; Depaus, C.; Berckmans, A.

    2014-01-01

    Staff management/training and knowledge management are organisational issues that are particularly sensitive in long-term projects stretching over decades like the development and operation of a geological repository. The IAEA has already issued several publications that deal with this issue (IAEA, 2006, 2008). Organisational aspects were also discussed in the framework of a topical session organised by the Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) at its annual meeting in 2009 and were regarded as a topic deserving future attention (NEA, 2009a). More recently, the Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) identified organisational, mission and behavioural features as attributes of confidence and trust (NEA, 2013). They also identified that aspects such as structural learning capacity, high levels of skill and competence in relevant areas, specific management plan, good operating records, transparency and consistency are associated with confidence building in a safety case. These aspects are considerably related to staff training/management and knowledge management. The IGSC has initiated a proposal of study dedicated to staff training/management and knowledge management with the objective to highlight how these recent concerns and the requirements issued by the IAEA are concretely implemented in the national programmes. The goal of this study is to acknowledge the differences of views and needs for staff management and knowledge management at different stages of individual programmes and between implementer and regulator. As a starting point to this study, the JAEA and ONDRAF/NIRAS prepared a draft questionnaire in order to succinctly capture processes and tools that the national organisations have implemented to meet the requirements and address the issues set out in the field of staff and knowledge management. For the purpose of this study, a questionnaire is now under development, which will be presented on the occasion of this symposium with guidance based on a

  20. Needs, conditions of intervention and staff in medical physics for medical imagery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvat, Cecile; Dieudonne, Arnaud; Guilhem, Marie-Therese; Le Du, Dominique; Pierrat, Noelle; Isambert, Aurelie; Valero, Marc; Blanchard, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    This guide proposes information on the types and quantification of medical physics tasks to be performed when performing medical imagery using ionizing radiations. It gives recommendations about the commitment of medical physicists (with or without support staff) and the required staff in nuclear medicine and, more generally in imagery (interventional radiology, scanography, conventional radiology). It first gives an overview of the situation in France in 2012 in terms of observations made by the ASN during inspections, and of results of a survey conducted among medical physicists involved in medical imagery. It indicates the current regulatory requirements, and international and national recommendations, and describes the commitment in imagery of medical physicists in three countries (Spain, Belgium and Germany). It analyses and describes the fields of intervention of medical physicists in imagery and identifies associated tasks in France (in equipment purchasing, equipment installation, equipment routine usage, patient care, nuclear medicine or internal vectorized radiotherapy, or staff training). Recommendations of a work-group about sizing criteria are proposed

  1. Health effects assessment of staff involved in medical practices of radiation exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, I.A.; Lacob, O. [Institute of Public Health Iasi, Radiation Hygiene Lab. (Romania); Roman, I.; Havarneanu, D. [Institute of Public Health Iasi, Occupational Medicine Dept. (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    This study aimed, starting from new national recommendation appearance, to detect health effects of medical staff from six counties of Moldavia region involved in radiation practices and to create a national register data for radiation-induce cancer. Staff involved in medical ionizing radiation uses in Romania - health care level I are monitored on recent new recommendations for three years. The micro nuclei high levels and morphological lymphocytes changes vs. clinical diagnostic can be considered as early possible malignant signs. The micro nuclei test, although unspecific, as a new exam in our legislation can bring useful information on staff exposure and provides a guidance to occupational physician in making his medical recommendations. This cytogenetic test does not seem to correlate with smoking habit or length of exposure. Micro nuclei test both in oral mucous epithelial cells and peripheral culture lymphocytes can be considered of much specificity and correlates with a recent acute exposure level. The conclusions of individual health status surveillance and assessment of personal dose equivalent are very useful data for recording in the radiation cancer-induced register.

  2. Health effects assessment of staff involved in medical practices of radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, I.A.; Lacob, O.; Roman, I.; Havarneanu, D.

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed, starting from new national recommendation appearance, to detect health effects of medical staff from six counties of Moldavia region involved in radiation practices and to create a national register data for radiation-induce cancer. Staff involved in medical ionizing radiation uses in Romania - health care level I are monitored on recent new recommendations for three years. The micro nuclei high levels and morphological lymphocytes changes vs. clinical diagnostic can be considered as early possible malignant signs. The micro nuclei test, although unspecific, as a new exam in our legislation can bring useful information on staff exposure and provides a guidance to occupational physician in making his medical recommendations. This cytogenetic test does not seem to correlate with smoking habit or length of exposure. Micro nuclei test both in oral mucous epithelial cells and peripheral culture lymphocytes can be considered of much specificity and correlates with a recent acute exposure level. The conclusions of individual health status surveillance and assessment of personal dose equivalent are very useful data for recording in the radiation cancer-induced register

  3. Internal marketing strategy: Focusing on staff orientation in health care in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. De Jager

    2008-12-01

    aims to present a comprehensive framework for Provincial Hospital Management to prioritise important staff related issues in order to satisfy their needs. The recommendations of this study need to be applied if acceptable health care is to be provided. Originality/Value: This study challenges existing internal marketing studies on health care services. Its significance lies in an attempt to establish the needs of diversified health care staff in a health care setting. It offers uniquely South African internal marketing framework that focuses on similarities and differences between medical and nursing staff in a Gauteng public hospital.

  4. Smoking and its treatment in addiction services: clients' and staff behaviour and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, Camilla; Strang, John; Ratschen, Elena; Sutherland, Gay; Finch, Emily; McNeill, Ann

    2014-07-14

    High smoking prevalence has been observed among those misusing other substances. This study aimed to establish smoking behaviours and attitudes towards nicotine dependence treatment among clients and staff in substance abuse treatment settings. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey of staff and clients in a convenience sample of seven community and residential addiction services in, or with links to, Europe's largest provider of mental health care, the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. Survey items assessed smoking behaviour, motivation to quit, receipt of and attitudes towards nicotine dependence treatment. Eighty five percent (n = 163) and 97% (n = 145) response rates of clients and staff were achieved. A high smoking prevalence was observed in clients (88%) and staff (45%); of current smokers, nearly all clients were daily smokers, while 42% of staff were occasional smokers. Despite 79% of clients who smoked expressing a desire to quit and 46% interested in receiving advice, only 15% had been offered support to stop smoking during their current treatment episode with 56% reported never having been offered support. Staff rated smoking treatment significantly less important than treatment of other substances (p < 0.001), and only 29% of staff thought it should be addressed early in a client's primary addiction treatment, compared with 48% of clients. A large unmet clinical need is evident with a widespread failure to deliver smoking cessation interventions to an extraordinarily high prevalence population of smokers in addiction services. This is despite the majority of smokers reporting motivation to quit. Staff smoking and attitudes may be a contributory factor in these findings.

  5. Engaging Frontline Leaders and Staff in Real-Time Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennifer; Hebish, Linda J; Mann, Sharon; Ching, Joan M; Blackmore, C Craig

    2016-04-01

    The relationship of staff satisfaction and engagement to organizational success, along with the integral influence of frontline managers on this dimension, is well established in health care and other industries. To specifically address staff engagement, Virginia Mason Medical Center, an integrated, single-hospital health system, developed an approach that involved leaders, through the daily use of standard work for leaders, as well as staff, through a Lean-inspired staff idea system. Kaizen Promotion Office (KPO) staff members established three guiding principles: (1) Staff engagement begins with leader engagement; (2) Integrate daily improve- ment (kaizen) as a habitual way of life not as an add-on; and (3) Create an environment in which staff feel psycho- logically safe and valued. Two design elements--Standard Work for Leaders (SWL) and Everyday Lean Ideas (ELIs) were implemented. For the emergency department (ED), an early adopter of the staff engagement work, the challenge was to apply the guiding principles to improve staff engagement while improving quality and patient and staff satisfaction, even as patient volumes were increasing. Daily huddles for the KPO staff members and weekly leader rounds are used to elicit staff ideas and foster ELIs in real time. Overall progress to date has been tracked in terms of staff satisfaction surveys, voluntary staff turnover, adoption of SWL, and testing and implementation of staff ideas. For example, voluntary turnover of ED staff decreased from 14.6% in 2011 to 7.5% in 2012, and 2.0% in 2013. Organizationwide, at least 800 staff ideas are in motion at any given time, with finished ones posted in an idea supermarket website. A leadership and staff engagement approach that focuses on SWL and on capturing staff ideas for daily problem solving and improvement can contribute to organization success and improve the quality of health care delivery.

  6. Association between Occupational Accidents and Sleep Apnea in Hospital Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Somayeh; Rahnama, Nooshin; Seyedmehdi, Seyed Mohammad; Yazdanparast, Taraneh; Roozbahani, Rahim; Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Adimi Naghan, Parisa; Jamaati, Hamidreza

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder in which instability of the upper airways leads to a reduction or cessation of airflow during sleep. Sleep disorders such as OSAS increase the risk of occupational accidents and impaired work performance. Sleep deprivation during shift increases the risk of occupational accidents among health care employees. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between occupational injuries in hospital staff and the risk of sleep apnea. This cross-sectional study was conducted on hospital staff of Masih Daneshvari Hospital in 2012. In this study, the hospital staff's (715) response to the Berlin questionnaire plus additional information including a history of an occupational accident, night shifts, less than four hours of night sleep, history of smoking, chronic disease and quality of sleep were assessed. Information obtained was analyzed using SPSS 15. In general, 27.6% reported a history of occupational accidents. The incidence of occupational accidents in the high-risk group for sleep apnea was significantly higher than the low-risk group (OR=2.736, CI=1.522-4.917, P=0.001). The results of logistic regression analysis also showed a statistically significant association between occupational accidents and risk of sleep apnea (OR = 2.247, CI = 1.194-4.231, P= 0.012). This study showed that the incidence of occupational accidents in the hospital employees is strongly related to the probability of OSA. Therefore, special attention should be directed to respiratory sleep disorders in order to reduce occupational injuries at hospitals.

  7. Job stress in the staff of a tire factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    marzieh torshizi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Occupational stress is a major problem in industrial societies. Its relationship with various diseases is increasing ,but it probably has vast socio-economic consequences manifested in the form of absenteeism, labour turnover, loss of productivity and disability pension costs. The present study aimed at determining stress in the staff of a tyre factory.   Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was done on 196 members of staff from various sections of a tire factory in 2008 through proportional classification and randomized sampling .Data was collected by means of Coudron two questionnaires "demographic" and "standardized job stress" . The obtained data was analyzed using SPSS software (v: 11.5, chi-square test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient (P ≤ 0.05.   Results: It was found that 49.5% of the staff had severe job stress .Severe job stress was 55.8% in the production unit (No. =53, 50% in the administrative unit (No. =16 and 40.6% supporting the backing unit (No=28.   There was a significant relationship between variables income and adequate sleep on one hand and level of job stress on the other (P < 0.001.However, no significant relationship was observed between job stress and age, marital status, education, working record ,and exercise.   Conclusion: Based on the results of the current study, more than half of the employees suffered from job stress. Compared with employees in other industrialized countries, Iranian employees appeared to have much higher prevalence of stress. Therefore, more studies are required in order to reduce the amount of stress and its consequences.

  8. [User violence towards nursing staff in public hospitals: Murcia, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galián Muñoz, Inmaculada; Llor Esteban, Bartolomé; Ruiz Hernández, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The workplace violence has special relevance for the health care workers. Nursing staff is one of the professions most affected by this risk. Our objective is to determine the prevalence during the past year of diverse hostile manifestations by users towards professional hospital nursing staff who depend on the "Servicio Murciano de Salud" [Health Service of Murcia] (SMS), as well as to detect the sociodemographic and occupational workers characteristics associated with higher exposure. A cross-sectional study carried out during the year 2010 of a random sample of nursing personnel from all the hospitals of SMS, through a self-administered and anonymous survey (Ecoh-U scale). The sample was stratified by hospitals and services (30% of the workers) and finally we got a sample of 1.489 workers (confidence level 99%; sampling error 1,75%). We compared the punctuation average obtained in the scale according to variables sociodemographics and laborables. We used the test t of student in variables dichotomous and ANOVA and Tukey in variables multi-response. The 21,8% of the surveyed people reported that they suffered from "anger due to assistential delay" at least once a month. The workers who obtained punctuations significantly larger were psychiatric hospital workers (19,7), emergency workers (20,60), temporary (16,38) and with old 6-10 years in the profession (17,20). Although nursing staff is one of the professions most exposed to violence, the risk distribution is not homogeneous. Significant differences were found according to marital status, age, hospital, service, profession, contract type, shift and seniority in the profession.

  9. Context-Aware Recommender Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adomavicius, Gediminas; Tuzhilin, Alexander

    The importance of contextual information has been recognized by researchers and practitioners in many disciplines, including e-commerce personalization, information retrieval, ubiquitous and mobile computing, data mining, marketing, and management. While a substantial amount of research has already been performed in the area of recommender systems, most existing approaches focus on recommending the most relevant items to users without taking into account any additional contextual information, such as time, location, or the company of other people (e.g., for watching movies or dining out). In this chapter we argue that relevant contextual information does matter in recommender systems and that it is important to take this information into account when providing recommendations. We discuss the general notion of context and how it can be modeled in recommender systems. Furthermore, we introduce three different algorithmic paradigms - contextual prefiltering, post-filtering, and modeling - for incorporating contextual information into the recommendation process, discuss the possibilities of combining several contextaware recommendation techniques into a single unifying approach, and provide a case study of one such combined approach. Finally, we present additional capabilities for context-aware recommenders and discuss important and promising directions for future research.

  10. A qualitative analysis of staff-client interactions within a breast cancer assessment clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nightingale, J.M.; Murphy, F.; Eaton, C.; Borgen, R.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Breast screening clients recalled to an assessment clinic experience high levels of anxiety. The culture of the assessment clinic may impact upon client experience, which may influence their future re-engagement in screening. This study aimed to explore the culture of staff-client interactions within a breast cancer assessment clinic. Materials and methods: Following an ethnographic approach, twenty-three client journeys were observed, followed by semi-structured interviews with the clients. The observation and interview data were analysed to produce research themes, which were then explored within two focus groups to add a practitioner perspective. Results: Multiple staff-client interaction events were observed over a period of several weeks. Client interview feedback was overwhelmingly positive. Three recurrent and sequential themes emerged: breaking down barriers, preparing the ground and sign-posting. These themes outline the changing focus of staff-client interactions during the client's clinic journey, encompassing how anxieties were expressed by clients, and responded to by practitioners. Conclusion: This study was the first to explore in depth the staff-client interaction culture within a breast assessment clinic using an ethnographic approach. A new perspective on professional values and behaviours has been demonstrated via a model of staff-client interaction. The model documents the process of guiding the client from initial confusion and distress to an enhanced clarity of understanding. A recommendation most likely to have a positive impact on the client experience is the introduction of a client navigator role to guide the clients through what is often a lengthy, stressful and confusing process. - Highlights: • This study was the first to explore staff-client interaction within breast assessment clinics. • Assessment clinic culture may affect client perceptions and future re-engagement in screening. • An ethnographic approach

  11. USGEO DMWG Cloud Computing Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Beaujardiere, J.; McInerney, M.; Frame, M. T.; Summers, C.

    2017-12-01

    The US Group on Earth Observations (USGEO) Data Management Working Group (DMWG) has been developing Cloud Computing Recommendations for Earth Observations. This inter-agency report is currently in draft form; DMWG hopes to have released the report as a public Request for Information (RFI) by the time of AGU. The recommendations are geared toward organizations that have already decided to use the Cloud for some of their activities (i.e., the focus is not on "why you should use the Cloud," but rather "If you plan to use the Cloud, consider these suggestions.") The report comprises Introductory Material, including Definitions, Potential Cloud Benefits, and Potential Cloud Disadvantages, followed by Recommendations in several areas: Assessing When to Use the Cloud, Transferring Data to the Cloud, Data and Metadata Contents, Developing Applications in the Cloud, Cost Minimization, Security Considerations, Monitoring and Metrics, Agency Support, and Earth Observations-specific recommendations. This talk will summarize the recommendations and invite comment on the RFI.

  12. Clinical research should be a priority in the NHS - but what do genito-urinary medicine clinic staff think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Rosa; Perry, Nicky; Phillips, Alan; Richardson, Daniel; Soni, Suneeta

    2015-02-01

    Clinical research improves patient care and is a government priority. We sought the opinions of genito-urinary medicine clinic staff regarding undertaking research, any barriers they perceived, and methods to optimise study recruitment. Questionnaires were offered to everyone working in the genito-urinary medicine clinic over a one-week period. In addition, four focus groups were held with genito-urinary medicine clinic staff. Forty-three questionnaires were completed. All respondents stated that research was important; however, 14.0% worried that it affected patient care and 16.3% would rather see patients without having to consider research. Doctors were more likely to enjoy discussing studies than other healthcare staff (p = 0.029) and were less likely to think that too many studies were being conducted at one time (p = 0.027). Forty staff attended the focus groups. Time, knowledge of studies, difficulty in broaching the topic of research and patient factors were cited as barriers to recruitment. Suggestions to improve recruitment included: greater multi-disciplinary team involvement; improving staff research knowledge; streamlining the research process; and patient education. Reasons for different attitudes between staff disciplines towards research included different training pathways and incentives to conduct research. The recommendations staff have made to help drive recruitment should be implemented in the genito-urinary medicine clinic. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. Development of Brigade Staff Tasks for the COBRAS II Brigade Staff Exercise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deter, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    ... and development of simulation-based training for the conventional mounted brigade staff. The work was performed under a project called Combined Arms Operations at Brigade Level, Realistically Achieved Through Simulation (COBRAS).

  14. SUPPORTING PRETERM INFANT ATTACHMENT AND SOCIOEMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT: STAFF PERCEPTIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twohig, Aoife; Reulbach, Udo; Figuerdo, Ricardo; McCarthy, Anthony; McNicholas, Fiona; Molloy, Eleanor Joan

    2016-01-01

    The infant-parent relationship has been shown to be of particular significance to preterm infant socioemotional development. Supporting parents and infants in this process of developing their relationships is an integral part of neonatal intensive care; however, there is limited knowledge of NICU staff perceptions about this aspect of care. To explore NICU staff perceptions about attachment and socioemotional development of preterm infants, experience of training in this area and the emotional impact of their work. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey of staff perceptions of the emotional experiences of parents and the developing parent-infant relationship in an NICU was conducted in a Level III NICU, after pilot testing, revision, and ethical approval. Fifty-seven (68%) of NICU staff responded to the survey. Respondents identified parents' emotional experiences such as "anxiety," "shock," "loss of control," and "lack of feelings of competence as parents" as highly prevalent. Infant cues of "responding to parent's voice" and "quieting-alerting" were ranked most highly; "crying" and "physiological changes" were ranked lowest. Preterm infant medical risk, maternal emotional state, and mental health are perceived to impact most highly on the developing relationship, as compared with infant state or behavior and socioeconomic factors. Fifty-three (93%) respondents felt confident, and 50 (87.8%) felt competent discussing their emotional experiences with parents. Fifty-four (95%) responded that attending to these areas was an integral part of their role; however, staff had seldom received education in this area. Respondents also perceived that specific psychological support for parents was lacking both during and after the infant's discharge. While all staff surveyed perceived the nature of their work to be emotionally stressful, there were differences among NICU staff disciplines and with years of experience in the NICU in terms of their perceptions about education in

  15. [Job satisfaction of nursing staff in Spanish prisons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Remartínez, E J; Mora Parra, L M; González Gómez, J A; García Jiménez, J; Garcés Pina, E; Domínguez Zamorano, J A; Borraz Fernández, J R; Blanco Quiroga, A; Armenteros López, B

    2009-02-01

    There are no available studies assessing job satisfaction amongst nursing staff in Spanish prisons. The aim of this study is to establish overall levels of job satisfaction and determine each of the components. Cross-sectional and multi-centre descriptive study conducted in Spanish prisons. A Font Roja satisfaction questionnaire adapted by J. Arranz for the study was used to measure degrees of job satisfaction using a Likert's scale. A parametric test was used and a regression model was constructed for predictive ends. 376 nurses answered the questionnaire (Participation Rate 62.7%; Response Rate 76.7%) 67 centres took part (91.8%). The average satisfaction mark was 2.84 (CL 95%: 2.81-2.87). The lowest ranked components were job variety 1.66 (CL 95%: 1.58-1.74), job-related stress 2.15 (CL 95%: 2.08-2.23) and control over job 2.77 (CL 95%: 2.73-2.82). The highest ranked aspect was job satisfaction, averaging 3.52 (CL 95%: 3.44-3.58). The average satisfaction mark for prison nursing staff was low when compared to other groups of health care professionals, which implies the need for corrective measures.

  16. Recommended Resources for Planning to Evaluate Program Improvement Efforts (Including the SSIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Systemic Improvement at WestEd, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a list of recommended existing resources for state Part C and Part B 619 staff and technical assistance (TA) providers to utilize to support evaluation planning for program improvement efforts (including the State Systemic Improvement Plan, SSIP). There are many resources available related to evaluation and evaluation…

  17. Draft area recommendation report for the Crystalline Repository Project: Comments: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The Mille Lacs Band conducted a review of the draft area recommendation report (ARR) and provided comments as outlined in the contract. It also had staff attending the necessary training and informational meeting established by the Department of Energy. This had met all the necessary objectives as outlined in the contract

  18. Exploring Weight Management Recommendations across Australian Community Pharmacies Using Case Vignettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakih, Souhiela; Marriott, Jennifer L.; Hussainy, Safeera Y.

    2014-01-01

    With the increase in the overweight and obese population, it is critical that pharmacy staff are able to provide weight management advice to women at different stages of their life. This study utilized case vignettes to identify pharmacists' and pharmacy assistants' current weight management recommendations to women of different ages, life stages…

  19. Predictors of staff-supportive organizational culture in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska-Simmons, Elzbieta

    2008-03-01

    This study examined predictors of staff-supportive organizational culture in assisted living settings. The sample included 294 staff members in 52 facilities. Organizational culture was assessed according to staff perceptions of teamwork, morale, information flow, involvement, supervision, and meetings. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to examine the effects of organizational factors (i.e., facility size, chain membership, ownership, level of care, level of residents' disability) on staff-supportive organizational culture. More staff-supportive culture was associated with smaller facility size, chain membership, and a higher level of care. These findings point to the importance of organizational factors in shaping a staff-supportive organizational culture.

  20. Avoiding congestion in recommender systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaolong; Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Runran; Zhang, Jianlin

    2014-06-01

    Recommender systems use the historical activities and personal profiles of users to uncover their preferences and recommend objects. Most of the previous methods are based on objects’ (and/or users’) similarity rather than on their difference. Such approaches are subject to a high risk of increasingly exposing users to a narrowing band of popular objects. As a result, a few objects may be recommended to an enormous number of users, resulting in the problem of recommendation congestion, which is to be avoided, especially when the recommended objects are limited resources. In order to quantitatively measure a recommendation algorithm's ability to avoid congestion, we proposed a new metric inspired by the Gini index, which is used to measure the inequality of the individual wealth distribution in an economy. Besides this, a new recommendation method called directed weighted conduction (DWC) was developed by considering the heat conduction process on a user-object bipartite network with different thermal conductivities. Experimental results obtained for three benchmark data sets showed that the DWC algorithm can effectively avoid system congestion, and greatly improve the novelty and diversity, while retaining relatively high accuracy, in comparison with the state-of-the-art methods.

  1. Avoiding congestion in recommender systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Xiaolong; Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Runran; Zhang, Jianlin

    2014-01-01

    Recommender systems use the historical activities and personal profiles of users to uncover their preferences and recommend objects. Most of the previous methods are based on objects’ (and/or users’) similarity rather than on their difference. Such approaches are subject to a high risk of increasingly exposing users to a narrowing band of popular objects. As a result, a few objects may be recommended to an enormous number of users, resulting in the problem of recommendation congestion, which is to be avoided, especially when the recommended objects are limited resources. In order to quantitatively measure a recommendation algorithm's ability to avoid congestion, we proposed a new metric inspired by the Gini index, which is used to measure the inequality of the individual wealth distribution in an economy. Besides this, a new recommendation method called directed weighted conduction (DWC) was developed by considering the heat conduction process on a user–object bipartite network with different thermal conductivities. Experimental results obtained for three benchmark data sets showed that the DWC algorithm can effectively avoid system congestion, and greatly improve the novelty and diversity, while retaining relatively high accuracy, in comparison with the state-of-the-art methods. (paper)

  2. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 January 2004: • Preliminary note - Terminology realignment following the restructuring of the Organization (page - i -) • Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73) • Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74) • Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81) • Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2003/2004, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2003 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 3/2004, are available in the departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  3. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows : as from 1 July 2002 Article R IV 1.41 - Method of adjustment of the amount of subsistence indemnity (page 53) as from 1 January 2003 Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73) Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74) Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81) Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2002/2003, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2002 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 4/2003, are available in the divisional secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at : http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  4. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 January 2005 : Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73) Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74) Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81) Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2004/2005, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2004 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 4/2005, are available in the departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  5. AMENDMENTS TO THE STAFF RULES AND REGULATIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 January 2002: Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73). Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74). Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81). Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2001/2002, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2001 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 4/2002, are available in the divisional secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web HERE Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  6. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 July 2006: The modifications are listed below: Financial and social conditions for Paid Associates, Fellows and Students (introduction of a new payment scheme for the Paid Scientific Associates Programme - reorganization of the Fellowship Programme - modification of the Student subsistence rates) Protection of members of the personnel against the financial consequences of illness, accident and disability (clarification of the scope of the relevant provisions - new definition of disability and associated benefits - revised role of the Joint Advisory Rehabilitation and Disability Board - bringing together the relevant provisions). Copies of this update (modification# 16) are available in departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at the following address: http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Administrative Circular ...

  7. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1st January 1996 are modified as follows as of 1st July 2006: Financial and social conditions for Paid Associates, Fellows and Students (introduction of a new payment scheme for the Paid Scientific Associates Programme-reorganisation of the Fellowship Programme-modification of Student subsistence rates) Protection of members of the personnel against the financial consequences of illness, accident and disability (clarification of the scope of the relevant provisions-new definition of disability and associated benefits-revised role of the Joint Advisory Rehabilitation and Disability Board-bringing together of the relevant provisions). Copies of this update (modification No.16) are available from Departmental secretariats. In addition, the Staff Rules and Regulations can be consulted on the Web at the following address: http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Administrative Circular No. 14 (Rev. 2)-July 2006 Protection of members o...

  8. Contract policy for CERN staff members

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Public information meeting on Monday 28 September 2009 at 10.00 a.m. With effect from 1 August 2009, new provisions regarding staff employment contract policy have entered into force. These provisions are set out in: The Staff Rules and Regulations and Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 4). Further details are available in: Frequently Asked Questions. The new provisions are outlined below: Limited-duration contracts From 1 August 2009, limited-duration contracts will be awarded for a maximum period of five years (instead of four years previously) and no extensions beyond five years will be granted. Contracts for periods shorter than five years can be exceptionally awarded, e.g. for a project whose mission or financial resources are time-limited. Indefinite contracts : award procedure A number of changes have been introduced regarding the procedure for the award of indefinite contracts. From now on, posts leading to the award of an indefinite contract will be opened at le...

  9. Results of the staff survey: your priorities

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    This is the first in a series of articles which will give some details about the results of the Staff Association staff survey To know your priorities and the evolution of your concerns over the last decade we study how, in each of our latest three surveys, you chose from a list of 15 items the five most important and classified them by assigning them a priority, from the most important to the fifth most important. The list of fifteen items, and a short description, follows. Career evolution (classification, level of recruitment, advancement, promotion) Salary level Family policy (recognition of partners, allowances, school fees, kindergarten, nursery, crèche, parental leave) Health insurance Non-residence and international indemnity Annual salary adjustment (cost variation index) Contract policy (duration, recruitment, award of IC, conditions of the beginning and ending of the contract) Motivation at work (interest, team, supervision, mobility, reward scheme) Pensions (retirement, disability, o...

  10. [Burnout syndrome among nursing staff at a hospital in Madrid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaladejo, Romana; Villanueva, Rosa; Ortega, Paloma; Astasio, P; Calle, M E; Domínguez, V

    2004-01-01

    The term "burnout" is related to a situation arising increasingly more often among the professionals performing their duties by way of a long-term, direct, people-to-people relationship, which includes all healthcare professionals. This study is aimed at determining the prevalence of the Burnout syndrome and of the three components involved therein (emotional exhaustion, impersonalization and lack of personal fulfillment) among the nursing staff at the "Hospital Clínico Universitario San Carlos" in Madrid and the relationship thereof to certain socio-demographic, job-related and institutional factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted among the professionals assigned to the nursing staff at the above-mentioned hospital. The variables involved were gathered by means of a questionnaire prepared by those conducting this study. The Burnout syndrome was measured by means of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, in the validated Spanish version thereof. The nursing staff is more impersonalized (p=0.004) and less fulfilled (p=0.036) than the nursing assistant/technician group. When the results of the four scales by units were analyzed, burnout was found to be greater among the nursing staff assigned to oncology and emergency care units (p=0.001), the impersonalization in the emergency rooms (p=0.007), and Burnout is once again greater in the oncology and emergency units (p=0.000). Those professionals who answered that there was little recognition of their nursing care scored worst regarding Burnout and the three aspects thereof (p =0.000). The lower the degree of on-the-job satisfaction, the higher the scores on the four scales (p=0.000). The conclusion which may be drawn from this study is that the profile of a person affected by Burnout is that of a professional with on-the-job experience who nevertheless considers very little recognition to be given to their caregiving and a high degree of dissatisfaction with the way in which their workplaces are managed.

  11. 75 FR 22599 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration and Industry Procedures for Section 513(g) Requests for Information Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic... and Industry Procedures for Section 513(g) Requests for Information Under the Federal Food, Drug, and...

  12. 75 FR 69709 - Office of New Reactors; Notice of Availability of the Final Staff Guidance; Standard Review Plan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... the Final Staff Guidance; Standard Review Plan, Section 13.6.6, Revision 0 on Cyber Security Plan... Reports for Nuclear Power Plants,'' Section 13.6.6, Revision 0 on ``Cyber Security Plan'' (Agencywide... reviews to amendments to licenses for operating reactors or for activities associated with review of...

  13. Marital Satisfaction: The Differential Impact of Social Support Dependent on Situation and Gender in Medical Staff in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Rostami, Arian; Ghazinour, Mehdi; Richter, J?rg

    2013-01-01

    Stress is unavoidable in everyday life and it can effect on marital relationship. Social support especially from emotionally closed persons as a protective factor can help individuals to deal with stress and buffers the negative effects of life stress on marital satisfaction. In the present cross-sectional study we investigated the relationship between social and spousal support and marital satisfaction in medical staff in Iran. Data collection was performed in 653 medical staff using socio-d...

  14. Do the supportive staff have enough oral health knowledge? - A study at a teaching health care institution in South India

    OpenAIRE

    Venumbaka Siva Kalyan; A S Kalyana Bhargava; T Madhavi Padma; KVNR Pratap; G Venkateswara Rao; Anitha Akkaloori

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Oral hygiene plays an imperative role in preventing oral diseases. The assessment of knowledge, attitude and practice in relation to oral hygiene among the supportive staff members would help the professional, to inculcate in their patients the acceptable oral habits to thwart oral diseases as these staff members are a bridge between healthcare professional and the patient. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted at a teaching health care...

  15. The Provisional Staff Regulations of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The Provisional Staff Regulations of the Agency, as amended up to 19 September 1975 by the Board of Governors, are set forth in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. When an individual provision of the Regulations and the Annexes thereto has been amended since their approval by the Board in 1957, this is indicated by a footnote giving the date on which the current text became effective. There is a subject index at the end of the document

  16. Cutting hospital costs without cutting staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, John P

    2011-10-01

    A hospital that is seeking ways to cut costs without compromising care should resist the temptation to lay off staff and instead make it a priority to improve efficiencies. This approach requires a formal program to identify and analyze all of the hospital's processes. The focus of the analysis should be to determine which activities are being performed efficiently, which are being performed inefficiently, and which are unnecessary. This effort will achieve the greatest success if it is customer-centric.

  17. Staff attitudes towards patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendsborg, Per; Bratbo, Johanne; Dannevang, Anders; Hagedorn-Møller, Julie; Kistrup, Kristen; Lindhardt, Anne; Nordentoft, Merete

    2013-10-01

    Stigmatizing attitudes have been reported in international studies among staff in psychiatry. The authors wanted to investigate if this was the case in Denmark. A survey of attitudes among staff at two psychiatric units in Copenhagen was performed using the Mental Illness: Clinicians' Attitudes scales. The scales have 16 questions to which another four questions were added by the authors. A total of 548 staff members answered the questions (61 doctors and 487 other professionals). The majority of the respondents believed in the possibility of recovery for patients and only a minority associated a high degree of dangerousness with schizophrenia. The cause of the illness was mainly regarded as being biological, but all agreed to a bio-psycho-social aetiological approach. The majority of the respondents believed that the illness was chronic and agreed on the need for staff to also be aware of patients' somatic illness. The doctors did not question their role as "real doctors" or the scientific basis for psychiatry. The majority would not mind working with a colleague with schizophrenia, but about half would hesitate to disclose if they themselves were diagnosed with the illness. Being a woman working in community psychiatry with long experience and participation in a recovery educational programme was associated with less stigmatizing attitudes. The survey showed a relatively low level of stigmatizing attitudes. This runs counter to the results from international investigation. This trend could be interpreted both as a result of a shift towards a more recovery-oriented approach to treatment as well as a reflection of political correctness.

  18. Production, staff, working time and financial planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Boiteux

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate planning can be a tool for coordinating the tactical decisions belonging to some functional areas of a company. This potential has been limited due to methodological and technical reasons, but nowadays it is possible to solve very sophisticated models integrating, with a high level of detail, a great number of decisions of several functional areas and that permit to include new management schemes. In this paper, a production, staff, working time and cash management model is introduced.

  19. CORBEL Pilot courses and staff exchange provided

    OpenAIRE

    Matser, Vera; Battaglia, Serena; Amaral, Ana Margarida

    2017-01-01

    The main target audience of the CORBEL training programme is technical operators of Research Infrastructures (RIs) in biological and medical RI hubs and nodes. The CORBEL course syllabi for a modular curriculum for piloting in RIs involves the following types of training activities: webinar programme, training courses and workshops, a knowledge/staff exchange programme and a fellowship scheme. The content of the curriculum has been based on the development of the CORBEL competency profile (D9...

  20. The new ICRP general recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Y.; Lochard, J.; Holm, L.E.; Niwa, O.; Ishigure, N.; Kosako, T.; Kai, M.

    2007-01-01

    The new draft ICRP recommendations was presented by the ICRP chair, Professor Lars-Eric Holm. His presentation was followed by presentations by Japanese members of the various (CRP committees, discussing their views of the draft recommendations based on their own technical experience. After these presentations, questions from the floor raised many of the key issues of the conference: dose constrains, the LNT hypothesis, dose bands, etc. This showed that the conference participants had carefully and completely read the draft, and were very interested in building a final ICRP recommendation that appropriately addresses all their concerns. These issues were also discussed throughout the entire conference. (author)