WorldWideScience

Sample records for staff rated organizations

  1. Treatment staff turnover in organizations implementing evidence-based practices: turnover rates and their association with client outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D; Modisette, Kathryn C; Ihnes, Pamela C; Godley, Susan H

    2012-03-01

    High staff turnover has been described as a problem for the substance use disorder treatment field. This assertion is based primarily on the assumption that staff turnover adversely impacts treatment delivery and effectiveness. This assumption, however, has not been empirically tested. In this study, we computed annualized rates of turnover for treatment staff (N = 249) participating in an evidence-based practice implementation initiative and examined the association between organizational-level rates of staff turnover and client-level outcomes. Annualized rates of staff turnover were 31% for clinicians and 19% for clinical supervisors. In addition, multilevel analyses did not reveal the expected relationship between staff turnover and poorer client-level outcomes. Rather, organizational-level rates of staff turnover were found to have a significant positive association with two measures of treatment effectiveness: less involvement in illegal activity and lower social risk. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Staff Performance Evaluation in Public Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drumea C.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In public Organizations staff performance is difficult to measure in absence of overall quantitative performance indicators. There are also the qualitative indicators that give an overview on staff’s motivation, strive, ability, commitment to values, teamwork. These aspects are even less easy to illustrate, in private and public sectors equally. In both cases, measuring staff performance at work, as well as its input on the global performance of the organization is a difficult task which has in practice different approaches. Subsequently, this paper is discussing the system indicators and performance triggers used in International Organizations UN affiliated, in order to adjust staff classification and benefits to their staff’s performance.

  3. 32 CFR 700.710 - Organization of a staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organization of a staff. 700.710 Section 700.710... Commanders Staffs of Commanders § 700.710 Organization of a staff. (a) The term “staff” means those officers... operation of his or her command. (b) The officer detailed as chief of staff and aide to a fleet admiral or...

  4. Impact Of Staff Morale On Performance In School Organizations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationship between the morale of staff (i.e. teachers' morale) and performance in school organizations was looked at in this study. The research was carried out on a randomly selected sample of one hundred and twenty (120) students and teaching staff from the three colleges in Covenant University, Ota, Ogun State.

  5. EIROStaff serving the staff of the European scientific organizations

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2009-01-01

    By analogy with the EIROforum meetings, where the administrations of seven European scientific organizations (CERN, EFDA, EMBL, ESA, ESO, ESRF, ILL) have been meeting since 2002, the staff associations of these same organizations grouped under the name “EIROStaff” met on Thursday 27 and Friday 28 May 2009 at CERN. Staff representatives of GSI, which is not a member of EIROforum at present, also attended.

  6. Conflict Management Styles and Staff' Job Satisfaction at Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrad, Aida

    2015-01-01

    One of the main organizational factors among staff is job satisfaction. This inner feeling assumed as basic factor that emerged by various elements at workplace. According to the different role of elements that effect on job satisfaction, organization€™s managers should be consider the correct styles of management. In reality, lack of consideration to this human need leads to appear various abnormal behaviors at organization. The main purpose of present literature review is focused on the vit...

  7. Organ donation after cardiac death in children: acceptance of a protocol by multidisciplinary staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowl, Allison S; Cummings, Brian M; Yager, Phoebe H; Miller, Brenda; Noviski, Natan

    2012-09-01

    Organ donation after cardiac death is increasingly implemented, with outcomes similar to those of organ donation after brain death. Many hospitals hesitate to implement a protocol for donation after cardiac death because of the potential negative reactions among health care providers. To determine the acceptance of a protocol for donation after cardiac death among multidisciplinary staff in a pediatric intensive care unit. An anonymous, 15-question, Likert-scale questionnaire (scores 1-5) was used to determine the opinions of staff about donation after brain death and after cardiac death in a pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary-care university hospital. Survey response rate was 67% (n = 60). All physicians, 89% of nurses, and 82% of the remaining staff members stated that they understood the difference between donation after brain death and donation after cardiac death; staff supported both types of donation, at rates of 90% and 85%, respectively. Staff perception was the same for each type of donation (ρ = 0.82; r = 0.92; P death considered such donation worthwhile. However, 60% of those providers offered suggestions to improve the established protocol for donation. The multidisciplinary staff has accepted organ donation after cardiac death and has fully integrated this kind of donation without reported differences from their acceptance of donation after brain death.

  8. Sensors: Views of Staff of a Disability Service Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Wolbring

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Sensors have become ubiquitous in their reach and scope of application. They are a technological cornerstone for various modes of health surveillance and participatory medicine—such as quantifying oneself; they are also employed to track people with certain as impairments perceived ability differences. This paper presents quantitative and qualitative data of an exploratory, non-generalizable study into the perceptions, attitudes and concerns of staff of a disability service organization, that mostly serve people with intellectual disabilities, towards the use of various types of sensor technologies that might be used by and with their clients. In addition, perspectives of various types of privacy issues linked to sensors, as well data regarding the concept of quantified self were obtained. Our results highlight the need to involve disabled people and their support networks in sensor and quantified-self discourses, in order to prevent undue disadvantages.

  9. [Nursing staff absenteeism rates as a personnel management indicator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancinetti, Tânia Regina; Soares, Alda Valéria Neves; Lima, Antonio Fernandes Costa; Santos, Nanci Cristiano; Melleiro, Marta Maria; Fugulin, Fernanda Maria Togeiro; Gaidzinski, Raquel Rapone

    2011-08-01

    Absenteeism in nursing is a difficult problem for health organizations; hence it is an indicator that must be monitored. The objective of this study was to analyze the absenteeism rate of nursing professionals in a public hospital. Absenteeism data were collected monthly, from January to July 2008, and calculated by means of an electronic program. The mean absenteeism index for nurses varied from 5.6% to 9.7% for technicians/nursing aides. Sick leaves were the most prevalent reason for absences. The data revealed the major cause of absenteeism and pointed at the need to change policies for hiring nursing professionals, in addition to reviewing the working processes in order to improve the workers' health conditions.

  10. Effects of a Staff Training Intervention on Seclusion Rates on an Adult Inpatient Psychiatric Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Julie; Paun, Olimpia; Fogg, Louis

    2018-02-15

    The current article presents the effects of a 90-minute staff training intervention aimed at reducing inpatient psychiatric seclusion rates through strengthened staff commitment to seclusion alternatives and improved de-escalation skills. The intervention occurred at an 18-bed adult inpatient psychiatric unit whose seclusion rates in 2015 were seven times the national average. Although the project's primary outcome compared patient seclusion rates before and after the intervention, anonymous staff surveys measured several secondary outcomes. Seclusion rates were reduced from a 6-month pre-intervention average of 2.95 seclusion hours per 1,000 patient hours to a 6-month post-intervention average of 0.29 seclusion hours per 1,000 patient hours, a 90.2% reduction. Completed staff surveys showed significant staff knowledge gains, non-significant changes in staff attitudes about seclusion, non-significant changes in staff de-escalation skill confidence, and use of the new resource sheet by only 17% of staff. The key study implication is that time-limited, focused staff training interventions can have a measurable impact on reducing inpatient seclusion rates. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. [Attitudes of medical staff potentially participating in the organ donation process towards organ donation and transplantation in Bavaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammenos, D; Bein, T; Briegel, J; Eckardt, K-U; Gerresheim, G; Lang, C; Nieß, C; Zeman, F; Breidenbach, T

    2014-06-01

    Organ donation rates in Germany are lower than in other countries and have declined further after manipulations of the waiting lists in some German transplant centers became public. Attitudes and commitment of medical personnel are crucial for successful organ donation. Therefore, we studied the attitudes of hospital staff towards organ donation and transplantation. In 50 Bavarian hospitals, medical professionals working in units relevant to organ donation were asked to respond to an anonymous questionnaire. 2983 questionnaires could be evaluated. The majority of all respondents had a positive attitude towards organ donation; 71 % were willing to donate their organs after brain death and 57 % were willing to accept a transplant in case of organ failure. Rates of positive attitude were lower among nurses than among physicians. 28 % indicated that recent developments had a negative impact on their attitude and of those approximately half evaluated the work of transplant centers negatively. Overall only 23 % considered organ allocation as fair. The majority of nurses and a large proportion of physicians considered themselves as not well informed. The current loss of confidence into organ donation and transplantation also affects the attitude of medical personnel. Intensified measures of information and full transparency of all procedures are urgently needed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Staff background paper on performance-based rate making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, J.; Brownell, B.

    1998-10-01

    An alternative to the traditional cost of service (COS) regulation for electric utilities in British Columbia has been proposed. The alternative to pure COS regulation is performance-based rate making (PBR). PBR partially decouples a utility's rates from its costs and ties utility profits to performance relative to specific benchmarks. The motivation underlying PBR is that ideally, it provides incentives for utilities to cost-effectively achieve pre-defined goals. This report describes the design of PBR mechanisms, base rate PBR formulas, base rate PBR in other jurisdictions including New York, California, Maine and New Jersey. The report also describes gas procurement PBR in other jurisdictions, as well as British Columbia Utilities' Commission's own experience with PBR. In general, PBR has the potential to provide resource efficiency, allocative efficiency, support for introduction of new services, and reduced regulatory administrative costs. 15 refs., 4 tabs

  13. Second Conference of Staff Associations of International Organizations held at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Representatives from the twenty organizations that attended the staff associations conference. The second Conference of Staff Associations of International Organizations (CSAIO2) just took place here at CERN on Thursday and Friday, the 25th-26th of October. Associations and Unions of twenty two organizations of greatly varying sizes were present, from the gargantuan European Commission to the smaller Commonwealth Secretariat. But size mattered not at all once the conference got under way and everyone started sharing ideas and experiences regarding the promotion and defense of staff interests. In fact, differences in size, mission and history made the Conference all the more interesting. Specific topics which the conference covered were internal appeal and grievance procedures, working time, and advancement & promotion systems. 'The information exchanged was of very high value' said Jean-Pol Matheys, President of the CERN Staff Association, which organized this event, 'I think participants left very...

  14. 78 FR 75562 - Zero Rate Reactive Power Rate Schedules; Notice of Staff Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    ..., DC 20426. The workshop will be led by Commission staff, with presentations from panelists. The.... Anyone with Internet access who wants to listen can do so by navigating to the Calendar of Events at www...

  15. An analysis of knowledge and attitudes of hospice staff towards organ and tissue donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wale, J; Arthur, A; Faull, C

    2014-03-01

    Only a minority of hospice patients eligible to donate tissue and organs choose to do so. Hospice care staff play a key role in discussions about donation, but their willingness to engage in these discussions and their understanding of issues around tissue and organ donation is poorly understood. To (i) identify factors associated with the wish of hospice doctors, nurses and healthcare assistants to donate their own organs after death; (ii) survey the experience of discussing the subject with patients; (iii) determine staff members' knowledge of organ and tissue donation and (iv) identify factors associated with knowledge of organ and tissue donation. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey of hospice care staff. 76 of the 94 care staff of one large UK hospice completed and returned the questionnaire. Staff wishing to donate their organs after death (43/76 56.6%) were more likely to be doctors or nurses than healthcare assistants (p=0.011) and more likely to have discussed organ or tissue donation with their family (pdonation with patients had more years' experience (p=0.045) and had similarly discussed donation with their own family (p=0.039). Those with greater knowledge were more likely to have discussed organ or tissue donation with a patient (p=0.042). A reluctance to instigate discussions about organ and tissue donation may prevent palliative patients and their families being allowed the opportunity to donate. Suboptimal knowledge among hospice staff suggests the need for greater liaison between hospice staff, and the organ and tissue donation teams.

  16. Organization and duties of the site supervisory staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macqueron, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    There are two distinct phases in building a nuclear power station: The first involves the choice of the site, and the second is building the power station on the site chosen. The decision as to the site requires a long series of studies undertaken by the electricity-producing authority in France (Electricite de France) in close liaison with the government and the public, its elected representatives and municipalities. The building of a power station takes place according to the following procedure: The general, installation and operational studies and the accident-simulation studies are carried out by the planning departments of the Regional Equipment Organizations; the works department of the Regional Equipment Organizations controls and follows up the manufacture of equipment in the factory; coordination of on-site erection, trials on site and start-up of the installations are carried out by the development section of the works department. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Attitude of health care professionals to organ donation: two surveys among the staff of a German university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radunz, S; Hertel, S; Schmid, K W; Heuer, M; Stommel, P; Frühauf, N R; Saner, F H; Paul, A; Kaiser, G M

    2010-01-01

    The persistent shortage of organs for transplantation could be minimized by increasing the number of potential donors. The opinion of the staff of a university hospital toward organ donation is of special interest because they are directly involved in solid organ transplantation. In 2007, we conducted a first voluntary survey concerning organ donation among the staff of the university hospital of Essen. A short information campaign and further opinion poll among staff as well as visitors was performed in 2009 to compare professional and public attitudes toward organ donation. The first poll comprised 242 questionnaires showing 55% of the hospital staff carrying organ donor cards, particularly more women (60%) than men (46%). After this survey, an additional 19% of the hospital staff imagined they might carrying an organ donor card in the future. In the second survey, we analyzed 151 questionnaires, showing 66% of staff members carrying an organ donor card, an incidence significantly greater than among visitors (48%). The need for information regarding organ donation was greater among visitors (35%). However, 21% of the hospital staff still also need education concerning organ donation. More education and increased transparency of transplantation practice are necessary for hospital staff to act successfully as initiators. Hospital staff with positive attitudes toward organ donation may have a positive impact on the attitudes of the general public toward organ donation.

  18. Respiratory rates measured by a standardised clinical approach, ward staff, and a wireless device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granholm, A; Pedersen, N E; Lippert, A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory rate is among the first vital signs to change in deteriorating patients. The aim was to investigate the agreement between respiratory rate measurements by three different methods. METHODS: This prospective observational study included acutely admitted adult patients...... in a medical ward. Respiratory rate was measured by three methods: a standardised approach over 60 s while patients lay still and refrained from talking, by ward staff and by a wireless electronic patch (SensiumVitals). The Bland-Altman method was used to compare measurements and three breaths per minute (BPM...... of agreement were -13.3 (95% CI: -17.2 to -9.5) BPM and 16.8 (95% CI: 13.0 to 20.6) BPM. CONCLUSION: A concerning lack of agreement was found between a wireless monitoring system and a standardised clinical approach. Ward staff's measurements also seemed to be inaccurate....

  19. Subjective happiness levels of staff working in provincial organization of general directorate of sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer YAZICI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was investigate to level of subjective happiness levels of staff who works in provincial organization of General Directorate of Sport. Material and Methods: The study group of the research consisted of 400 staff (164 female, 236 male who works in General Directorate of Sport’s İstanbul, Trabzon, Malatya and Tokat Youth Services and Sport provincial directorates. In the study as data collection tool; Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS which developed by Lyubomirsky & Lepper (1999 and adapted to Turkish by Akın and Satıcı (2011 was used. And also “personal data form” which created by the researchers was used. The data analyzed by descriptive statistics, T-test and Anova test. Also, Scheffe test was used to find out the significant differences of groups. Results: In accordance with t-test results obtained from the present study, there are significant differences with respect to variables such as marital status, income state and sport participation (p<0.05. Conclusion: As a result, it was determined that married staff is happier than single staff. Also, the staff who determined themselves in moderate income level is happier than the staff who determined themselves in lower income level.

  20. [A project to improve the validity rate for nursing staff operating single door autoclave sterilizers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Hung; Li, Cheng-Chang; Chou, Chuan-Yu; Chen, Shu-Hwa

    2009-08-01

    This project was designed to improve the low validity rate for nurses responsible to operate single door autoclave sterilizers in the operating room. By investigating the current status, we found that the nursing staff validity rate of cognition on the autoclave sterilizer was 85%, and the practice operating check validity rate was only 80%. Such was due to a lack of in-service education. Problems with operation included: 1. Unsafe behaviors - not following standard procedure, lacking relevant operating knowledge and absence of a check form; 2. Unsafe environment - the conveying steam piping was typically not covered and lacked operation marks. Recommended improvement measures included: 1. holding in-service education; 2. generating an operation procedure flow chart; 3. implementing obstacle eliminating procedures; 4. covering piping to prevent fire and burns; 5. performing regular checks to ensure all procedures are followed. Following intervention, nursing staff cognition rose from 85% to 100%, while the operation validity rate rose from 80% to 100%. These changes ensure a safer operating room environment, and helps facilities move toward a zero accident rate in the healthcare environment.

  1. Focused group discussion with health care staff improves breastfeeding rates in hospitalized infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Yunie Purwita Sari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Improving breastfeeding in sick infants is essential. During the neonatal care, health care staff play an important role in promoting breastfeeding. Therefore, it is important to study in depth how healthcare staff can improve breastfeeding practice in sick neonates. Objective To compare breastfeeding rates in sick infants before and after a focused group discussion (FGD of health care staff on how to improve breastfeeding. Methods This study was an operational study using FGD and in-depth interviews as an intervention. A fish bone diagram was used to assess problems that may prevent mothers from breastfeeding their sick infants. Breastfeeding achievement was compared before and after the FGD. Results Of 257 sick infants, 177 subjects were in the before FGD group and 80 subjects were in the after FGD group. Significantly more after FGD subjects were breastfed during hospitalization than before FGD subjects [97.5% vs. 82.9%, respectively; (x2 =9.43; P=0.002]. Breastfeeding initiation within 0-4 hours of birth was also significantly higher in the after FGD group [10 (12.5% vs. 6 (3.5%, respectively; (x2 = 52.5; P<0.001]. The solutions for breastfeeding problems were: 1 support of hospital management, 2 support of healthcare workers for breastfeeding mothers, 3 support of husbands and families for breastfeeding mothers, 4 financial support, 5 other factors such as level of care and consistent FGD events, and 6 a prospective cohort study. Conclusion The FGD with health care staff significantly increases breastfeeding achievement during infant hospitalization, and accelerated breastfeeding initiation. A fish bone diagram is used to effectively assess the problems with breastfeeding programs for sick babies.

  2. CSAIO – a progressive tool at the service of staff associations of international organizations and European agencies

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Every year in autumn, a two-day CSAIO (Conference of Staff Associations of International Organizations) conference is organized for staff associations of international organizations based mainly in Europe, as well as European agencies. Creation, objectives and progress CSAIO, created by the staff associations of CERN and OECD in 2000, invites about 30 staff associations to share their experiences and ideas to better identify the expectations and aspirations of a personnel evolving at the heart of international and European organizations. Over time, the preparation of the conference has evolved to better accommodate the requests of the staff representatives coming from different horizons. For two years, there has been an initiative to institutionalize the informal follow-up, during the first half-day of the conference, of themes discussed the previous year. This follow-up allows participants to share their experience on the implementation and impacts of certain propositions as reflected in their organizations ...

  3. Organ transplantation scandal influencing corneal donation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Röck

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the majority of countries, there is a shortage of donor corneas for corneal transplantations. This study investigated the impact of organ transplantation scandals on corneal donation rate at the University Hospital Tübingen. Each deceased patient was considered as a potential corneal donor. An ophthalmic resident handled with stable methods of procedures the corneal donor procurement from 2009 to 2015. The rates of corneal donation were examined and analyzed. Among the 5712 hospital deaths, consent for corneal donation was obtained in 711 cases. The mean annual corneal donation rate was 12.4%. Since 2009, the donation rate per year could be increased with exception of 2013 and 2015. In the end of 2012 and 2014 two huge organ donation scandals were known in Germany. In the following years 2013 and 2015 corneal donation rate decreased significantly (P=0.0181 and P=0.0006. We concluded that transplantation scandals have a significant impact on corneal donation rate. Improving professional's performance through full transparency and honesty is very important to earn trust of potential donors and their families.

  4. Organ transplantation scandal influencing corneal donation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röck, Tobias; Bramkamp, Matthias; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Röck, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In the majority of countries, there is a shortage of donor corneas for corneal transplantations. This study investigated the impact of organ transplantation scandals on corneal donation rate at the University Hospital Tübingen. Each deceased patient was considered as a potential corneal donor. An ophthalmic resident handled with stable methods of procedures the corneal donor procurement from 2009 to 2015. The rates of corneal donation were examined and analyzed. Among the 5712 hospital deaths, consent for corneal donation was obtained in 711 cases. The mean annual corneal donation rate was 12.4%. Since 2009, the donation rate per year could be increased with exception of 2013 and 2015. In the end of 2012 and 2014 two huge organ donation scandals were known in Germany. In the following years 2013 and 2015 corneal donation rate decreased significantly ( P =0.0181 and P =0.0006). We concluded that transplantation scandals have a significant impact on corneal donation rate. Improving professional's performance through full transparency and honesty is very important to earn trust of potential donors and their families.

  5. Present state of nuclear regulation organizations of main countries in the world. Importance of regulation staffs and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    After Fukushima accident, NRA (Nuclear Regulation Authority) was established in Japan as an independent organization from promotion. In order to perform effective and reliable nuclear regulation, it was important management organization such as nuclear regulation commission worked efficiently, and also requirements for nuclear regulation staffs engaged in actual regulatory works were of importance so as for appropriate decision making or judgments of management organization. Since regulation staffs needed professional expertise and technical judgment capabilities in wide areas including other than nuclear energy, various efforts had been done to get able regulation staffs in US, France and UK nuclear regulation organizations concerned, which became clarified after overseas investigation for this article. Since knowledge in nuclear industry could be used for effective regulation, mid-career recruitment had been employed in regulation organization of each country so as to take such knowledge and so it was important how to utilize industrial knowledge under appropriate conditions compatible with independence of regulation organization. (T. Tanaka)

  6. Performance Indicators: Sickness and Absence Rates as Indicators of Staff Morale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Sandra

    Employee absenteeism is a problem faced by all library and information service managers as it erodes both salary budgets and productivity. It can have an undermining effect on staff morale, and may be an indicator of low staff motivation levels. There are two types of absence, unavoidable and avoidable, which can be measured using lost time and…

  7. Beyond the Staff: “Alternative” Systems in the Graphical Representation of Organized Sound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Cámara de Landa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a reflection on the limits of the staff in the representation of organized sound is briefly presented, followed by the consideration of the proposals that some ethnomusicologists have developed to highlight particular aspects of music. Some antecedents are provided, such as the synoptic transcription (Constantin Brăiloiu and the paradigmatic transcription (Nicolas Ruwet. Other proposals will be discussed, like the graphical representation of musical structure (Bernard Lortat-Jacob, Hugo Zemp or the use of spectrograms (Charles Seeger, Mireille Hellfer, Lortat-Jacob, Grazia Tuzi, graphic devices (Charles Adams, musemes (Philip Tagg, sonograms (Enrique Cámara, frame by frame musical transcription (Gerhard Kubik, and local systems of notation. According to these proposals, the graphical representation of music beyond the staff maintains its efficiency in current ethnomusicology (with different objectives and even different targets. Moreover, I will argue that it is necessary to take into consideration the place occupied by the use of these tools in the tensions and interactions between etic and emic perspectives, and the need to reconcile the internal consistency required for any system of visual representation of sound, with the need to make permanently flexible proposals based on intercultural dialogue.

  8. Measuring the Empowerment of International Organizations: The Evolution of Financial and Staff Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldt, Eugénia; Schmidtke, Henning

    2017-08-01

    International organizations' (IOs) power in shaping global governance outcomes is not only determined by the formal delegation of tasks and issue areas but also by the necessary capabilities to fulfill these tasks. Yet, extant research on the delegation of power to IOs gives few insights into the financial and staff capabilities of IOs and focuses mainly on the formal rules that specify IOs' tasks and issue scope. To address these limitations, this paper makes three contributions. First, we propose a more encompassing concept of IO power which incorporates three principal components: tasks, issue scope, and capabilities. Second, we introduce a new concept - IO empowerment (IOE) - which encapsulates formal and informal changes in IO power over time. Third, we introduce a novel dataset on IO capabilities, which measures the formal rules governing IO staff and financial resources as well as the actual capabilities available to six well-known IOs over 65 years. These original data show that capabilities vary not only across IOs but also over time.

  9. Management of academic staff activity: modeling and prediction of rating system indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Logunova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the problem of constructing a system of rating indicators for stimulating the work of the academic staff in higher educational institution. Many areas of teacher activity (for example, educational, scientific, international, etc. laid the basis of selection the groups of indicators in the system. Social challenge in improving the quality of educational services determines the relevance of research in the field of modeling and prediction of indicators which characterize the work of high school teacher. To predict the dynamics of the structure of the rating indicators in the system, the authors introduced the concept of drift and variability of each group. Using informational hypercube for the structure of input data allowed authors to take into account the individual characteristics of each parameter included in a mathematical model to describe the rating indicators. To make the prediction of the structure and values of rating system indicators the authors introduced the concept of drift. Drift of indicators takes into account the introduction of new indicators, the removal of existing indicators, and movement of indicators between the groups. In the article, authors introduced a novel quantitative indicator of group variability. The value of this indicator determines the prediction strategy of the teacher work in higher school in the future period. To predict the total amount of stimulating, the complex technique offered and it includes four modules: modeling values within the existing range in the previous period; modeling new index value based on the assumptions introduced using a random number generator; exclusion a range of values of deleted indicators; modeling new values based on the study of the modern trend of indicators. The presence of flexible information structure in the form of a hypercube and complex mathematical model allowed authors to carry out numerical simulation for predicting the values of individual

  10. THE ASSOCIATION OF ISLAMIC BASED CARING MODEL AND COMMITMENT TO ORGANIZATION IN STAFF NURSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuda Ayu Timorita

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Strong organizational commitment is needed by hospitals to attract and retain nursing staffs in order to consistently deliver good quality of nursing services. The decrease in organizational commitment among nurses can cause many losses to the organization, including increased organizational spending, breakdown in patient care, and cause performance trends that appear not for the benefit of the organization or unit, but more for personal self-interest. Objective: To analyze the relationship of the application of Islamic Based Caring (IBC model with organizational commitment among nurses. Methods: This was a correlation analytic research with cross sectional design. There were 108 nurses selected using a propotionate stratified random sampling. Islamic Based Caring was measured using a questionnaire developed based on the theory of Suhartini Ismail (2016, and organizational commitment was measured using a questionnaire developed based on the concept of Caldwell, O’Reilly & Chatmann (1990 and Mowday, Porter dan Steers (1982 in Asmaningrum (2009. Logistic regression and forward stepwise (conditional method were used for data analysis. Results: There was a statistically significant correlation of a healing presence (p=0.000, caring relationship (p=0.010, caring environment (p=0.045 and belief in God (p=0.000. Belief in God (Allah SWT has the highest correlation (OR=6.660 with organizational commitment among nurses. Conclusion: There is a positive and significant relationship between the implementation of Islamic Based Caring with the organization's commitment among nurses.

  11. Improving the rate of organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, M; Wasler, A; Prenner, G; Tripolt, M; Zink, M; Duller, D; Schwarz, M; Tscheliessnigg, K H

    2004-11-01

    Organ shortage is a major problem in transplantation. Many potential donors are still lost due to a lack of information and communication. Many transplantation centers report a major donor increase after introducing new donor policies. The aim of this study was to evaluate in retrospective fashion a new donor policy in our region. For the past 10 years all reported donors from intensive care units (ICUs) in our region were evaluated. Our new policy had 2 main steps: accepting more marginal grafts and using a transplantation representative. The goal was the improved communication with ICUs to support physicians involved in donor care. A public information program was also implemented. In the first year, numbers of donors obviously improved (+60.5%) and remained stable the following year. The mean donor age increased to 41.56 years. The donor pool showed mainly an improved kidney-donation rate (+53%) with also an increase in multiorgan donation (+37%). One year posttransplantation survival was not negatively influenced by this donor pool. As expected, transplantation activities increased notably, particularly liver transplantation (+31.11%) but also kidney transplantation (+26.73%). Many donors are lost because physicians in charge of brain dead patients are not fully informed about modified donation criteria. The reason for this is a lack of information and communication by transplantation units. Improved surgical techniques and better preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative treatment have yielded better results with marginal grafts. Immediate graft function in recipients of suboptimal grafts may be delayed, but without a significantly negative impact on patient and graft survival. Because the age of organ recipients is steadily increasing with fewer contraindications for transplants, more organs will be needed.

  12. Provider and Staff Perceptions and Experiences Implementing Behavioral Health Integration in Six Low-Income Health Care Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farb, Heather; Sacca, Katie; Variano, Margaret; Gentry, Lisa; Relle, Meagan; Bertrand, Jane

    2018-01-01

    Behavioral health integration (BHI) is a proven, effective practice for addressing the joint behavioral health and medical health needs of vulnerable populations. As part of the New Orleans Charitable Health Fund (NOCHF) program, this study addressed a gap in literature to better understand factors that impact the implementation of BHI by analyzing perceptions and practices among staff at integrating organizations. Using a mixed-method design, quantitative results from the Levels of Integration Measure (LIM), a survey tool for assessing staff perceptions of BHI in primary care settings (n=86), were analyzed alongside qualitative results from in-depth interviews with staff (n=27). Findings highlighted the roles of strong leadership, training, and process changes on staff collaboration, relationships, and commitment to BHI. This study demonstrates the usefulness of the LIM in conjunction with in-depth interviews as an assessment tool for understanding perceptions and organizational readiness for BHI implementation.

  13. Relationship between staff-reported culture change and occupancy rate and organizational commitment among nursing homes in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minhong; Choi, Jae-Sung; Lim, Jinseop; Kim, Young Sun

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to examine culture change in nursing homes in South Korea and to identify the outcomes of culture change implementation. Data were taken from survey responses from 223 top- or mid-level staff among nursing homes in South Korea that were selected through a proportionate random-stratified sampling method from four regions nationwide. Culture change in nursing homes was operationalized by five person-directed care (PDC) constructs and three organizational environment constructs, and outcome quality was indicated by changes to occupancy rate and organizational commitment. After controlling for facility characteristics, the effect of staff-reported culture change on occupancy rate and organizational commitment was analyzed through the multiple-regression method. Consistent with previous research, this study revealed positive effects of culture change for nursing homes in South Korea. The study found that staff-reported culture change correlated with occupancy rate and organizational commitment. Given that culture change variables were significantly related to occupancy rate and organizational commitment, the findings of the study provide a persuasive argument that policies and/or programs to support culture change in nursing homes should be enhanced. Management-level workers in these facilities should have the skills and knowledge to foster more PDC and a more person-directed environment.

  14. 76 FR 33419 - Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... 232, 240, 249, et al. Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organizations; Proposed Rule #0;#0...-11] RIN 3235-AL15 Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organizations AGENCY: Securities and... rating organizations (``NRSROs''). In addition, in accordance with the Dodd-Frank Act, the Commission is...

  15. Vaccination against influenza at a European pediatric cancer center: immunization rates and attitudes among staff, patients, and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettke, Aleksandra; Jocham, Sophie; Wiener, Andreas; Löcken, Andreas; Groenefeld, Judith; Ahlmann, Martina; Groll, Andreas H

    2017-12-01

    Influenza is an important cause of infectious morbidity in pediatric cancer patients. We conducted a single-center survey to explore adherence and attitudes towards the recommended annual influenza vaccination. Self-administered, standardized questionnaires were distributed to 143 staff members and 264 families. Items analyzed included demographic data, knowledge about influenza, history of prior influenza infections and vaccinations, routes of information and education, and attitudes towards the recommended influenza. Variables associated with vaccination were explored by univariate and multivariate analyses. One hundred six staff members with patient contact and 139 primary caretakers completed the questionnaire. Fifty-nine percent of staff members and 60% of the caretakers provided correct answers to all four knowledge questions; 32 and 54% reported a history of prior influenza, and 61 and 47% had received at least one influenza vaccination in the past. Vaccination rates for the previous season were 47, 34, 30, 25, and 29% in staff members, primary caretakers, their partners, diseased children, and their siblings, respectively. Main motivations (>75% in ≥ 1 cohort) for vaccination were prevention of influenza disease and concerns to transmit it to others (77-100%) and reasons for not being immunized concerns of adverse effects and use of alternative protection (33-83%). Variables significantly associated with vaccination by multivariate analysis included receipt of influenza vaccinations in the past (OR 2.2-20.5), recommendations by health care providers (OR 4.8-45.5), a lower level of education (caretakers; OR 2.2), and younger age (children; OR 0.9). The results of this survey indicate insufficient vaccination rates and provide potential approaches for improved vaccination strategies in the setting of pediatric cancer care.

  16. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Association will shortly be renewing the mandate of half of the Staff Council. This is an opportunity for you to become more directly involved in the Staff Association's work and help promote and defend the staff's interests and, more broadly, those of the Organization itself.

  17. Does formal education and training of staff reduce the operation rate for fractures of the distal radius?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kyle; Murphy, Lynn; Gallagher, Brendan; Eames, Niall

    2013-12-01

    Fractures of the distal radius are one of the most common extremity fractures, and operation rates are increasing. Staff within our unit felt that formal teaching, particularly of new medical staff, with regards to fracture reduction and appropriate cast application could result in a reduction in operation rates. Retrospective data was extracted from FORD (Fracture Outcome and Research Database), including: number of fractures, number of fractures undergoing ORIF, fracture configuration, patient demographics, and mechanism of injury. All patients undergoing ORIF had their radiographs assessed by two separate reviewers. Information regarding adequate fracture reduction, adequate cast application (using Gap Index), and appropriate plaster cast moulding was recorded. Formal teaching was then given to the next group of medical staff rotating through the unit, and the same data was collected prospectively for that six-month period. Exclusion criteria included bilateral injuries, and polytrauma patients. A total of 1623 distal radial fractures were treated in our unit over the 12-month period, with 71 undergoing ORIF in the first 6 months and 39 in the second 6 months, this was statistically significant (p = 0.0009). Our study found that formal teaching and education significantly reduced the operation rate for distal radial fractures. This effect was most significant for extra-articular, dorsally angulated fractures of the distal radius. Our study proves that just 1 h of basic training at the beginning of an attachment can have significant benefits to both the unit and, more importantly, the patients. Copyright © 2013 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Perceptions of Nongovernmental Organization (NGO Staff about Water Privatization in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis A. Adams

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Almost a billion people globally lack access to potable water. In the early 1990’s, attempts to improve potable water access in the global south included a massive push for water services privatization, often involving the transfer of public water services to private companies. Critics of water privatization claim it rarely improves access to water, and in most cases, unfairly affect poor people. Proponents on the other hand argue that it is necessary for efficient management and capital investment in the water sector. Although development NGOs play an important role in developing country water provision, hardly any studies have sought to understand their perceptions about the potential role of water privatization towards improving access to potable water in developing countries. We interviewed the key staff among 28 international and national NGO staff about water privatization, its opportunities and constraints. Their perceptions were mixed. While most criticized water privatization as increasing water costs to the poor, some noted that privatization is necessary for improving water access through increased capital investment. We present the findings and discuss larger implications for water policies and reforms in developing countries.

  19. Giving the gift of life: increasing Canada's organ donation rate

    OpenAIRE

    Poitras, Fancy Christine

    2010-01-01

    Canada has one of lowest rates of organ donation among the industrialized nations. Through an analysis of the knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of people living in Canada, this study examines effective ways to increase rates of organ donation in Canada, using a policy analysis approach to address the problem of low organ donation rates. A survey completed by 155 people over the age of 19 and living in Canada reveals potential gaps in people’s understanding of the consent process in each j...

  20. Impact of Group Clinical Supervision on Patient Education Process: A Comprehensive Assessment of Patients, Staff, and Organization Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Jafari Moghadam

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most important barriers to patient education are nurses’ poor motivation and training, and poor quality of managerial supervision. Clinical supervision could be a powerful tool for overcoming these barriers. However, the associated patient, staff, and organization-related outcomes still require further research. Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the patient-, staff-, and organization-related outcomes of group clinical supervision with the goal of improving patient education. Method: This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 35 nurses and mothers of 94 children admitted to the surgery and nephrology wards of Dr. Sheikh Hospital, Mashhad, Iran, in 2016. A 3-month clinical supervision program consisting of support, education, feedback, and facilitation stages was implemented with the assistance of education facilitators. The data were collected using the questionnaire of patient’s satisfaction with nurses’ education, Herzberg’s job motivation questionnaire, and the checklists of nurses’ education performance and quality of education documentation. Data analysis was performed by Mann-Whitney U test, Fisher’s exact test, and independent-t test in SPSS, version 14. Results: The mean ages of the nurses, patients, and mothers were 30.3±6.7, 5.2±3.8, and 32.2±6.2, respectively. Mann-Whitney U test showed a significant improvement in patients’ satisfaction with nurses’ education performance (P

  1. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2007-01-01

    The Staff Association will shortly be renewing the mandate of half of the Staff Council. This is an opportunity for you to become more directly involved in the Staff Association’s work and help promote and defend the staff’s interests and, more broadly, those of the Organization itself.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A SIX SIGMA RATING SCALE FOR MEASURING THE QUALITY OF WORK LIFE OF TEACHING STAFF WORKING IN SAUDI UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Vijay Subbarayalu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Higher Education institutions in Saudi Arabia is currently performing several evaluations by both students and teaching staff as a measure to improve the quality by understanding the perception of its stakeholders. In order to retain the best and efficient work force to carry out the teaching roles in these universities, the Quality of Work Life (QoWL prevailing in these Educational institutions needs to be studied. Accordingly, this study was conducted among the teaching staff of the University of Dammam [UOD] to capture their experiences related to various aspects of the QoWL. The teaching staff opinion was captured through a pre-tested QoWL questionnaire and the data were analyzed through six sigma analytical tool using the Poisson distribution model. From the non-conformance level captured through the responses from the faculty/teaching staff about the various aspects of quality of work life prevailing in their respective colleges, the corresponding sigma rating for each component of QoWL was calculated. Subsequently, an innovative six point quality rating system was established for each sigma values. The overall opinion of teaching staff about the QoWL prevailing at UOD is rated as "Adaptable" signifying that there is room for further improvement and appropriate strategies need to be employed to improve it.

  3. METHODOLODICAL TOOLS FOR ORGANIZING THE PROCESS OF STAFF1 SEARCH AND SELECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bilorus

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The relevance and the basic stages to meet the demand in personnel in the contemporary economy were determined. The necessity and requirements for the formation of maps of competencies as tools for personnel selection were proved and generalized. The algorithm of choosing the sources of candidates search for the vacant position was developed. Practical recommendations of candidates selection procedure for the organization were provided using the method of “ideal point”.

  4. Safety Culture and Senior Leadership Behavior: Using Negative Safety Ratings to Align Clinical Staff and Senior Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Shawn; Carlson, Elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    This report describes how staff-designed behavior changes among senior leaders can have a positive impact on clinical nursing staff and enhance the culture of safety in a community hospital. A positive culture of safety in a hospital improves outcomes for patients and staff. Senior leaders are accountable for developing an environment that supports a culture of safety. At 1 community hospital, surveys demonstrated that staff members did not view senior leaders as supportive of or competent in creating a culture of safety. After approval from the hospital's institutional review board was obtained, clinical nurses generated and selected ideas for senior leader behavior change. The new behaviors were assessed by a convenience sample survey of clinical nurses. In addition, culture of safety survey results were compared. Risk reports and harm events were also measured before and after behavior changes. The volume of risk and near-miss reports increased, showing that clinical staff were more inclined to report events after senior leader communication, access, and visibility increased. Harm events went down. The culture of safety survey demonstrated an improvement in the senior leadership domain in 4 of 6 units. The anonymous convenience survey demonstrated that staff members recognized changes that senior leaders had made and felt that these changes positively impacted the culture of safety. By developing skills in communication, advocacy, visibility, and access, senior leaders can enhance a hospital's culture of safety and create stronger ties with clinical staff.

  5. [Emergency department staff and the organ donation process: recommendations from the joint working group of the National Transplant Organization and the Spanish Society of Emergency Medicine (ONT-SEMES)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Soba, Fernando; Masnou Burrallo, Núria; de la Rosa Rodríguez, Gloria; Povar Marco, Javier

    2016-06-01

    Although 4769 transplants were performed in Spain in 2015 and the organ donor rate reached 39.7 per million population, thousands of patients remain on wait lists. Currently 65% of donors die from strokes and the mean donor age is 64 years. This profile calls for strategies to detect candidates outside the intensive care unit (ICU) and it justifies an ever stronger role for the participation of emergency services in the procurement process. Spain's National Transplant Organization (ONT) and the Spanish Society of Emergency Medicine (SEMES) have drafted recommendations whose purposes are to define the responsibilities of emergency staff in this process, to establish protocols for multidisciplinary cooperation that facilitate the identification of candidate donors, and to consolidate a new approach to patient care that will facilitate optimal management of the donor prior to ICU admission.

  6. Perspectives on multidrug-resistant organisms at the end of life : A focus group study of staff members and institutional stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Franziska A; Heckel, Maria; Tiedtke, Johanna M; Adelhardt, Thomas; Sturm, Alexander; Stiel, Stephanie; Ostgathe, Christoph

    2018-03-16

    There is a lack of research into how hospital staff and institutional stakeholders (i. e. institutional representatives from public health authorities, hospital hygiene, and the departments of microbiology, palliative care, and geriatrics) engage with patients who are carriers of multidrug-resistant organisms and receiving end-of-life care. Knowledge of their experiences, workload, and needs should be considered in dealing with hospitalized carriers of multidrug-resistant organisms as well as staff education. This study explored and compared staff members' and stakeholders' perspectives on multidrug-resistant organisms and on provision of end-of-life care to carrier patients. In this study four focus groups consisting of hospital staff members and institutional stakeholders were formed within a mixed-methods parent study in a palliative care unit at a university clinic and a geriatric ward of a Catholic and academic teaching hospital. Participants discussed results from staff and stakeholder interviews from a former study phase. Data were analyzed according to Grounded Theory and perspectives of staff members and institutional stakeholders were compared and contrasted. Key issues debated by staff members (N = 19) and institutional stakeholders (N = 10) were 1) the additional workload, 2) reasons for uncertainty about handling carrier patients, 3) the format of continuing education, and 4) the preferred management approach for dealing with multidrug-resistant organism carrier patients. Although similar barriers (e. g. colleagues' ambiguous opinions) were identified, both groups drew different conclusions concerning the management of these barriers. While institutional stakeholders recommended making decisions on hygiene measures under consideration of the specific patient situation, staff members preferred the use of standardized hygiene measures which should be applied uniformly to all patients. Staff members and institutional stakeholders

  7. We cannot staff for 'what ifs': the social organization of rural nurses' safeguarding work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Karen

    2012-09-01

    Rural nurses play an important role in the provision of maternity care for Canadian women. This care is an important part of how rural nurses safeguard the patients who receive care in small rural hospitals. This study utilized institutional ethnography as an approach for describing rural nursing work and for exploring how nurses' work experiences are socially organized. Rural nurses advocated for safe healthcare environments by ensuring that skilled nurses were available for every shift, day and night, at their local hospital. Rural nurses noted that this work was particularly difficult for the provision of maternity care. This article explores two threads or cues to institutional organization that were identified in our interviews and observations; namely staffing and safety standards, and the need for flexibility in staffing in small rural hospitals. Rural nurses' concerns about ensuring that skilled nurses are available in small rural hospitals do not enter into current management discourses that focus on efficiency and cost savings or find a home within current discourses of patient safety 'competencies'. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Causal model of safety-checking action of the staff of nuclear power plants and the organization climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Hirokazu; Yoshida, Michio; Yamaura, Kazuho

    2000-01-01

    For those who run an organization, it is critical to identify the causal relationship between the organization's characteristics and the safety-checking action of its staff, in order to effectively implement activities for promoting safety. In this research. a causal model of the safety-checking action was developed and factors affecting it were studied. A questionnaire survey, which includes safety awareness, attitude toward safety, safety culture and others, was conducted at three nuclear power plants and eight factors were extracted by means of factor analysis of the questionnaire items. The extracted eight interrelated factors were as follows: work norm, supervisory action, interest in training, recognition of importance, safety-checking action, the subject of safety, knowledge/skills, and the attitude of an organization. Among them, seven factors except the recognition of importance were defined as latent variables and a causal model of safety-checking action was constructed. By means of covariance structure analysis, it was found that the three factors: the attitude of an organization, supervisory action and the subject of safety, have a significant effect on the safety-checking action. Moreover, it was also studied that workplaces in which these three factors are highly regarded form social environment where safety-checking action is fully supported by the workplace as a whole, while workplaces in which these three factors are poorly regarded do not fully form social environment where safety-checking action is supported. Therefore, the workplaces form an organizational environment where safety-checking action tends to depend strongly upon the knowledge or skills of individuals. On top of these, it was noted that the attitude of an organization and supervisory action are important factors that serve as the first trigger affecting the formation of the organizational climate for safety. (author)

  9. Maximum organic carbon limits at different melter feed rates (U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, A.S.

    1995-01-01

    This report documents the results of a study to assess the impact of varying melter feed rates on the maximum total organic carbon (TOC) limits allowable in the DWPF melter feed. Topics discussed include: carbon content; feed rate; feed composition; melter vapor space temperature; combustion and dilution air; off-gas surges; earlier work on maximum TOC; overview of models; and the results of the work completed

  10. Correlation of Leadership Style with Job Satisfaction and Happiness among the Staff of Petroleum Industry Health Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Zamanzadeh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Expert human resources have a key role in development of the community; among the multiple factors influencing this development, the community leaders who are organizing the resources have the most prominent role. This study aimed to investigate the relationship of leadership style with job satisfaction and happiness among the health personnel of the Oil Industry Health Organization. Methods: The present applied study is a descriptive-analytical one which was implemented cross- sectionally on all 290 health personnel of the Oil Industry working in the Provinces of Markazi and Lorestan. The Fiedler Leadership Style questionnaire, Chrome's Job Satisfaction questionnaire, and Oxford Happiness questionnaire were used to gather the data. The data were then analyzed by Pierson's correlation test. Results: The correlation-oriented leadership (66.15 ± 22.04 was the dominant leadership style which had a significant association with job satisfaction (176.58 ± 32.49 of the rehabilitation, treatment, and care staffs of oil industry in Markazi and Lorestan provinces, (r = 0.579, p < 0.01. Conclusion: The relationship-oriented leadership style has a significant association with job satisfaction. So, designing and implementing interventions to promote relationship – oriented style of leadership is recommended. More extended studies in the similar contexts could be helpful.

  11. Organ donation in Switzerland--an analysis of factors associated with consent rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Weiss

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Switzerland has a low post mortem organ donation rate. Here we examine variables that are associated with the consent of the deceased's next of kin (NOK for organ donation, which is a prerequisite for donation in Switzerland. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: During one year, we registered information from NOK of all deceased patients in Swiss intensive care units, who were approached for consent to organ donation. We collected data on patient demographics, characteristics of NOK, factors related to the request process and to the clinical setting. We analyzed the association of collected predictors with consent rate using univariable logistic regression models; predictors with p-values <0.2 were selected for a multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: Of 266 NOK approached for consent, consent was given in 137 (51.5% cases. In multivariable analysis, we found associations of consent rates with Swiss nationality (OR 3.09, 95% CI: 1.46-6.54 and German language area (OR 0.31, 95% CI: 0.14-0.73. Consent rates tended to be higher if a parent was present during the request (OR 1.76, 95% CI: 0.93-3.33 and if the request was done before brain death was formally declared (OR 1.87, 95% CI: 0.90-3.87. CONCLUSION: Establishing an atmosphere of trust between the medical staff putting forward a request and the NOK, allowing sufficient time for the NOK to consider donation, and respecting personal values and cultural differences, could be of importance for increasing donation rates. Additional measures are needed to address the pronounced differences in consent rates between language regions.

  12. Relationship between Staff-Reported Culture Change and Occupancy Rate and Organizational Commitment among Nursing Homes in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minhong; Choi, Jae-Sung; Lim, Jinseop; Kim, Young Sun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine culture change in nursing homes in South Korea and to identify the outcomes of culture change implementation. Design and Methods: Data were taken from survey responses from 223 top- or mid-level staff among nursing homes in South Korea that were selected through a proportionate random-stratified sampling method…

  13. A Report To The Superintendent Regarding the Progress of Venice Junior High School Towards Flexible Instructional Organization (F10), or Staff Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Fenwick W.

    This report determined the results of the implementation of flexible instructional organization (F10) or staff differentiation at Venice Junior High School, Sarasota, Florida. The introductory portion concerns the report purpose, procedures and scope as well as background material. Results of interviews, conferences, surveys, observations, and…

  14. Impact of a Computer System and the Encoding Staff Organization on the Encoding Stays and on Health Institution Financial Production in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazin, Marianne; El Merini, Amine; Staccini, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    In France, medicalization of information systems program (PMSI) is an essential tool for the management planning and funding of health. The performance of encoding data inherent to hospital stays has become a major challenge for health institutions. Some studies have highlighted the impact of organizations set up on encoding quality and financial production. The aim of this study is to evaluate a computerized information system and new staff organization impact for treatment of the encoded information.

  15. [Role of the hospital emergency department staff in the organ donation process: opinions of professionals working in the Spanish autonomous community of Aragon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povar Marco, Javier; Javierre Loris, María Ángeles; Garcés Sanjosé, Cristina; Sánchez Miret, José Ignacio

    2015-02-01

    To determine the opinion of hospital emergency department staff on their involvement in the process of organ and tissue procurement and on aspects that might improve their participation. Emergency department physicians and nurses responded to a questionnaire during a course on the procurement of organ and tissue donations in the emergency setting. A total of 149 questionnaires were received from 78 nurses (52%) and 71 emergency physicians (48%) from 10 hospitals. Sixty-three percent of the respondents worked in hospitals with intensive care units and 37% in centers without such units. The respondents felt that the greatest difficulties in the donation process are related to communication and conveyance of information to the patient's families (39.6%) and to the assessment of prognosis (29.2%). The physicians felt that evaluating prognosis was the main hurdle, whereas the nurses thought that communication with the family presented the greatest problem (P=.021). They also felt that the health care professional's involvement in the donation process was the key to improving organ procurement (83.1%). The availability of protocols (47.2%) and the need for training opportunities (31%) were considered necessary for increasing the involvement of emergency department staff in the process. The attitudes of hospital emergency department staff to organ and tissue donation are very positive, as suggested by their opinion that their own involvement in the process is the most important factor to target for improvement. These emergency physicians and nurses would like relevant protocols and training in the organ donation process.

  16. Emission rates of organics from vegetation in California's Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, Arthur M.; Arey, Janet; Atkinson, Roger; Aschmann, Sara M.; Long, William D.; Morrison, C. Lynn; Olszyk, David M.

    Rates of emission of speciated hydrocarbons have been determined for more than 30 of the most dominant (based on acreage) agricultural and natural plant types found in California's Central Valley. These measurements employed flow-through Teflon chambers, sample collection on solid adsorbent and thermal desorption gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry analysis to identify more than 40 individual organic compounds. In addition to isoprene and the monoterpenes, we observed sesquiterpenes, alcohols, acetates, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, esters, alkanes, alkenes and aromatics as emissions from these plant species. Mean emission rates for total monoterpenes ranged from none detected in the case of beans, grapes, rice and wheat, to as high as 12-30 μg h -1 g -1 for pistachio and tomato (normalized to dry leaf and total biomass, respectively). Other agricultural species exhibiting substantial rates of emission of monoterpenes included carrot, cotton, lemon, orange and walnut. All of the plant species studied showed total assigned compound emission rates in the range between 0.1 and 36 νg h -1 g -1.

  17. Changing Metrics of Organ Procurement Organization Performance in Order to Increase Organ Donation Rates in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, D; Kallan, M J; Fu, L; Ciccarone, M; Ramirez, J; Rosenberg, P; Arnold, J; Segal, G; Moritsugu, K P; Nathan, H; Hasz, R; Abt, P L

    2017-12-01

    The shortage of deceased-donor organs is compounded by donation metrics that fail to account for the total pool of possible donors, leading to ambiguous donor statistics. We sought to assess potential metrics of organ procurement organizations (OPOs) utilizing data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) from 2009-2012 and State Inpatient Databases (SIDs) from 2008-2014. A possible donor was defined as a ventilated inpatient death ≤75 years of age, without multi-organ system failure, sepsis, or cancer, whose cause of death was consistent with organ donation. These estimates were compared to patient-level data from chart review from two large OPOs. Among 2,907,658 inpatient deaths from 2009-2012, 96,028 (3.3%) were a "possible deceased-organ donor." The two proposed metrics of OPO performance were: (1) donation percentage (percentage of possible deceased-donors who become actual donors; range: 20.0-57.0%); and (2) organs transplanted per possible donor (range: 0.52-1.74). These metrics allow for comparisons of OPO performance and geographic-level donation rates, and identify areas in greatest need of interventions to improve donation rates. We demonstrate that administrative data can be used to identify possible deceased donors in the US and could be a data source for CMS to implement new OPO performance metrics in a standardized fashion. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  18. The independence of international civil servants during the neoliberal decades: implications of the work stoppage involving 700 staff of the World Health Organization in November 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Alison

    2008-01-01

    The independence of international civil servants is critical to the fulfillment of their organizations' mandates, but it has been seriously undermined during 25 years of neoliberal influence in U.N. agencies, including the World Health Organization. In November 2005, 700 staff at WHO headquarters participated in a one-hour work stoppage--the first industrial action in the organization's history. Hierarchical and arbitrary management, abuse of rules and procedures, nepotism and harassment, and undue influence of international financial institutions, powerful member states, and transnational corporations have exhausted morale and motivation, creating a conformist environment and interfering with technical health work. In the neoliberal era, WHO staff confront conflicting duties of loyalty to a handful of member states and their private interests and loyalty to WHO's constitutional mandate. International civil servants need support from governing bodies and from the world's people in finding the correct balance. A first essential step would be respect for international labor standards within the U.N. family and, in particular, negotiation status and collective bargaining--human rights in the workplace and prerequisites for staff independence, integrity, and competence, qualities required to serve the world's people.

  19. Staff Knowledge, Adherence to Infection Control Recommendations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staff Knowledge, Adherence to Infection Control Recommendations and Seroconversion Rates in Hemodialysis Centers in Khartoum. ... Adherence of staff members to infection control recommendations was evaluated by direct observation. Results: ... A structured training program for HD staff members is urgently required.

  20. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 31st of October to the 14th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months and will keep the next Staff Council very busy. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to vote * * * * * * * Vote Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the election...

  1. Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Remove of the staff association office   The Staff Association offices are going to be renovated during the coming four months, February to May 2014. The physical move from our current premises 64/R-002 to our temporary office in  510/R-010 will take place on Friday January 31st, so the Secretariat will be closed on that day. Hence, from Monday February 3rd until the end of May 2014 the Staff Association Secretariat will be located in 510/R-010 (entrance just across the CERN Printshop).    

  2. NSF Funding Rate History By State and Organization

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Science Foundation — Contains FY 2006-FY 2015 National Science Foundation (NSF) funding rates for competitive research proposals by organizational unit. The funding rate is calculated by...

  3. Attitudes of medical students and staff toward organ donation in cases of brain death: a survey at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahmatkeshan, Mozhgan; Fallahzadeh, Ebrahim; Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Najib, Khadijeh-Sadat; Farjadian, Shirin

    2014-03-01

    Organ transplant is one of the most important management strategies for end-of-life patients. The demand for organs in patients awaiting transplant is increasing, and many of these patients die before a donor is found. To determine the attitudes of medical students and staff at clinical institutions affiliated with a large medical university in the Eastern Mediterranean region toward organ donation in cases of brain death. A total of 500 medical students, physicians, and nurses recruited at hospitals and medical centers affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in Shiraz, Iran.Design and Setting-Information about participants' demographic characteristics, knowledge of organ donation, and willingness to donate their own organs after death was collected by using self-administered questionnaires. Most participants (78%) had favorable attitudes toward donating their own organs after brain death. However, only about 25% of them carried an organ donation card. In addition to public media, the main sources of information about organ donation after brain death were their professors and textbooks. An association in charge of improving public awareness and facilitating the process of registration and issuance of donation cards appears to be necessary.

  4. Effectiveness of team nursing compared with total patient care on staff wellbeing when organizing nursing work in acute care wards: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Allana; Long, Lesley; Lisy, Karolina

    2015-11-01

    The organization of the work of nurses, according to recognized models of care, can have a significant impact on the wellbeing and performance of nurses and nursing teams. This review focuses on two models of nursing care delivery, namely, team and total patient care, and their effect on nurses' wellbeing. To examine the effectiveness of team nursing compared to total patient care on staff wellbeing when organizing nursing work in acute care wards. Participants were nurses working on wards in acute care hospitals.The intervention was the use of a team nursing model when organizing nursing work. The comparator was the use of a total patient care model.This review considered quantitative study designs for inclusion in the review.The outcome of interest was staff wellbeing which was measured by staff outcomes in relation to job satisfaction, turnover, absenteeism, stress levels and burnout. The search strategy aimed to find both published and unpublished studies from 1995 to April 21, 2014. Quantitative papers selected for retrieval were assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological validity prior to inclusion in the review using standardized critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute. Data was extracted from papers included in the review using the standardized data extraction tool from the Joanna Briggs Institute. The data extracted included specific details about the interventions, populations, study methods and outcomes of significance to the review question and its specific objectives. Due to the heterogeneity of the included quantitative studies, meta-analysis was not possible. Results have been presented in a narrative form. The database search returned 10,067 records. Forty-three full text titles were assessed, and of these 40 were excluded, resulting in three studies being included in the review. Two of the studies were quasi experimental designs and the other was considered an uncontrolled before and after experimental study

  5. Integrating team resource management program into staff training improves staff's perception and patient safety in organ procurement and transplantation: the experience in a university-affiliated medical center in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ya-Chi; Jerng, Jih-Shuin; Chang, Ching-Wen; Chen, Li-Chin; Hsieh, Ming-Yuan; Huang, Szu-Fen; Liu, Yueh-Ping; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2014-08-11

    The process involved in organ procurement and transplantation is very complex that requires multidisciplinary coordination and teamwork. To prevent error during the processes, teamwork education and training might play an important role. We wished to evaluate the efficacy of implementing a Team Resource Management (TRM) program on patient safety and the behaviors of the team members involving in the process. We implemented a TRM training program for the organ procurement and transplantation team members of the National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH), a teaching medical center in Taiwan. This 15-month intervention included TRM education and training courses for the healthcare workers, focused group skill training for the procurement and transplantation team members, video demonstration and training, and case reviews with feedbacks. Teamwork culture was evaluated and all procurement and transplantation cases were reviewed to evaluate the application of TRM skills during the actual processes. During the intervention period, a total of 34 staff members participated the program, and 67 cases of transplantations were performed. Teamwork framework concept was the most prominent dimension that showed improvement from the participants for training. The team members showed a variety of teamwork behaviors during the process of procurement and transplantation during the intervention period. Of note, there were two potential donors with a positive HIV result, for which the procurement processed was timely and successfully terminated by the team. None of the recipients was transplanted with an infected organ. No error in communication or patient identification was noted during review of the case records. Implementation of a Team Resource Management program improves the teamwork culture as well as patient safety in organ procurement and transplantation.

  6. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 28 of October to the 11th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months, and in particular the Five-yearly-Review 2015, subject of the questionnaire that you probably recently filled out. All this will keep the next Staff Council very busy indeed. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to v...

  7. Addiction treatment provider attitudes on staff capacity and evidence-based clinical training: results from a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Lena; Amodeo, Maryann; Krull, Ivy; Chassler, Deborah; Weidenfeld, Rachel; de Saxe Zerden, Lisa; Gowler, Rebekah; Lederer, Jaime; Cohen, Alexander; Beltrame, Clelia

    2011-01-01

    This national study of addiction-treatment organizations' implementation of evidence-based practices examines: (1) organizational/leadership factors associated with director (n = 212) attitudes regarding staff resistance to organizational change, and (2) organizational/staff factors associated with staff (n = 312) attitudes regarding evidence-based clinical training. Linear regression analyses, controlling for type of treatment unit, leadership/staff characteristics and organizational readiness to change, identified that directors who perceived their organization needed more guidance and had less staff cohesion and autonomy rated staff resistance to organizational change significantly higher. Staff with higher levels of education and greater agreement that their organization supported change had greater preference for evidence-based trainings. Federal addiction treatment policy should both promote education and training of treatment staff and organizational development of treatment CBOs.  © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  8. Rate of family refusal of organ donation in dead-brain donors: the Iranian tissue bank experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi-Mazdeh, M; Khodadadi, A; Tirgar, N; Riazi, N

    2013-01-01

    The growing gap between organ supply and demand remains a worldwide serious problem. Losing dead-brain donor organs can be attributed to several reasons including un-recognition of potential donor by ICU staff, death before official declaration of brain death and high refusal rate of deceased donors' families. To study the trend of dead-brain patients' relatives refusal of organ donation from 2007 to 2011. This study was a retrospective review of all patients who had been introduced as brain death to the organ procurement unit (OPU) of Iranian Tissue Bank between April 2007 and April 2012 according to preliminary neurological exam performed in the hospital of origin. The refusal rate of dead-brain patients' families and its reasons was evaluated. A total of 874 ICU admitted patients with severe brain injury (Glasgow coma score donation according to the approved medical protocols (n=205) and not fulfilling the brain death criteria (n=66). The families of the remaining cases (n=462) had been interviewed 343 (74.2%) of whom permitted donation. The mean±SD age of donors was 29.8±13.2 years; the male/female ratio was almost 2. The most common reason of brain death was traffic collision (n=120; 56.3%) and cerebrovascular accidents (n=40; 18.8%). The refusal rate from 2007 to 2011 has decreased respectively, from 30.4% to 20% in Tehran, and from 57.1% to 51.6% in other cities. The overall refusal rate was 25.8%. Our study confirmed that more level of expertise of the coordinator team and continuous public education, would result in higher rate of consent to organ donation.

  9. Polypharmacy and medication regimen complexity as factors associated with staff informant rated quality of life in residents of aged care facilities: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalic, Samanta; Jamsen, Kris M; Wimmer, Barbara C; Tan, Edwin C K; Hilmer, Sarah N; Robson, Leonie; Emery, Tina; Bell, J Simon

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the association between polypharmacy with health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and medication regimen complexity with HRQoL in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). A cross-sectional study of 383 residents from six Australian RACFs was conducted. The primary exposures were polypharmacy (≥9 regular medications) and the validated Medication Regimen Complexity Index (MRCI). The outcome measure was staff informant rated quality of life assessed using the Quality of Life Alzheimer's disease (QoL-AD) scale. Covariates included age, sex, Charlson's comorbidity index, activities of daily living, and dementia severity. Logistic quantile regression was used to characterize the association between polypharmacy and QoL-AD (model 1) and MRCI and QoL-AD (model 2). The median age of the 383 residents was 88 years and 297 (78 %) residents were female. In total, 63 % of residents were exposed to polypharmacy and the median MRCI score (range) was 43.5 (4-113). After adjusting for the covariates, polypharmacy was not associated with either higher or lower QoL-AD scores (estimate -0.02; 95 % confidence interval (CI) -0.165, 0.124; p = 0.78). Similarly, after adjusting for the covariates, MRCI was not associated with either higher or lower QoL-AD scores (estimate -0.0009, 95 % CI -0.005, 0.003; p = 0.63). These findings suggest that polypharmacy and medication regimen complexity are not associated with staff informant rated HRQoL. Further research is needed to investigate how specific medication classes may impact change in quality of life over time.

  10. Which Measures of Health Status Assessment are the Most Significant in Organized Cohorts with Low Current Cardiovascular Risk? The Screening Study of Penitentiary Staff in Saratov Region, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Anton R; Balashov, Sergey V; Posnenkova, Olga M; Prokhorov, Mikhail D; Gridnev, Vladimir I

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare different methods of health status assessment in organized cohort of penitentiary employees in Saratov Region, Russian Federation. 1,014 penitentiary employees (81.8% male) aged 33.4±6.8 years were included in the cohort study. All participants underwent an annual preventive health examination in the Center of Medical and Social Rehabilitation of Russian Federal Penitentiary Service in Saratov Region. The prevalence of common cardiovascular risk factors was assessed. Risk Score and the number of fulfilled health metrics proposed by American Heart Association (AHA) were calculated for each participant. It is shown that penitentiary staff in Saratov Region is characterized by low current risk score (1.2±0.8%), but high prevalence of such risk factors as increased body weight and obesity (51%), tobacco use or passive smoking (81%), and unhealthy diet (55%). 98.4% of participants had the Score level of ≤5%, but only 4.5% of penitentiary staff met the ideal cardiovascular health (they met all seven AHA health metrics). One fifth of the participants met three or less AHA health metrics. A statistically significant correlation between the risk Score and the number of fulfilled AHA health metrics is revealed (Chi-square = 5.1, p=0.024). The probability of fulfilment of less than 5 AHA health metrics in subjects with medium risk score is shown to be almost twofold greater than in subjects with low risk Score. However, there are a lot of differences in the assessment of cardiovascular health by risk Score and AHA health metrics. AHA health metrics are more preferable than the risk Score or assessment of separate cardiovascular risk factors for preventive management in organized cohorts with low current cardiovascular risk such as penitentiary staff in Saratov Region.

  11. 22 CFR 902.3 - Board staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Board staff. 902.3 Section 902.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD ORGANIZATION § 902.3 Board staff. The chairperson shall select the Board's executive secretary and other staff provided for in the Act. The executive secretary and staff...

  12. A Comparison of the Attitudes of the Michigan Cooperative Extension Staff Toward Marketing, Agricultural Policy, and Farm Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Herbert Harlan

    Comparisons were made of commercial farmers' and Extension agents' views of the general farm situation; the effects of government price supports on farm prices; the existing market structure and acceptable ways of bargaining for increased farm product prices; and views of the general farm organizations and how they should be organized and run.…

  13. The contribution of staff call light response time to fall and injurious fall rates: an exploratory study in four US hospitals using archived hospital data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzeng Huey-Ming

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fall prevention programs for hospitalized patients have had limited success, and the effect of programs on decreasing total falls and fall-related injuries is still inconclusive. This exploratory multi-hospital study examined the unique contribution of call light response time to predicting total fall rates and injurious fall rates in inpatient acute care settings. The conceptual model was based on Donabedian's framework of structure, process, and health-care outcomes. The covariates included the hospital, unit type, total nursing hours per patient-day (HPPDs, percentage of the total nursing HPPDs supplied by registered nurses, percentage of patients aged 65 years or older, average case mix index, percentage of patients with altered mental status, percentage of patients with hearing problems, and call light use rate per patient-day. Methods We analyzed data from 28 units from 4 Michigan hospitals, using archived data and chart reviews from January 2004 to May 2009. The patient care unit-month, defined as data aggregated by month for each patient care unit, was the unit of analysis (N = 1063. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used. Results Faster call light response time was associated with lower total fall and injurious fall rates. Units with a higher call light use rate had lower total fall and injurious fall rates. A higher percentage of productive nursing hours provided by registered nurses was associated with lower total fall and injurious fall rates. A higher percentage of patients with altered mental status was associated with a higher total fall rate but not a higher injurious fall rate. Units with a higher percentage of patients aged 65 years or older had lower injurious fall rates. Conclusions Faster call light response time appeared to contribute to lower total fall and injurious fall rates, after controlling for the covariates. For practical relevance, hospital and nursing executives should consider

  14. The Staff Association and you

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2013-01-01

    The Staff Association, your representative with the Management and the Member States The article VII 1.01 of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SR&R) provides that “the relations between the Director-General and the personnel shall be established either on an individual basis or on a collective basis with the Staff Association as intermediary”. This essential role of the Staff representatives, of being the spokesperson of the entire staff of the Organization vis-à-vis the Director-General and the Members States, is achieved through regular participation in the various joint advisory committees defined in the SR&R. The most important are the Standing Concertation Committee and the TREF, tripartite forum where your representatives meet with the Member States delegates, in the presence of the Management, to explain the position of the staff on the various issues concerning employment conditions. The Finance Committee also gives the opportunity to the Staff Association to ...

  15. 75 FR 3225 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance at Organization of MISO States and Midwest ISO Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... Independent Transmission System Operator, Inc.-related and Organization of MISO States (OMS) meetings... 20, 2010, Tuesday, Carmel, IN; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET OMS Cost Allocation and Regional Planning January...

  16. Life concerns of elderly people living at home determined as by Community General Support Center staff: implications for organizing a more effective integrated community care system. The Kurihara Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Junko; Meguro, Kenichi; Sato, Yuko; Chiba, Yumiko

    2014-09-01

    In Japan, the integrated community care system aims to enable people to continue to live in their homes. Based on the concept, one of the activities of a Community General Support Center (CGSC) is to provide preventive intervention based on a Community Support Program. Currently, a Basic Checklist (BC) is sent to elderly people to identify persons appropriate for a Secondary Prevention Program. To find people who had not responded to the BC, CGSC staff evaluated the files of 592 subjects who had participated in the Kurihara Project to identify activities they cannot do that they did in the past, decreased activity levels at home, loss of interaction with people other than their family, and the need for medical interventions. This information was classified, when applicable, into the following categories: (A) 'no life concerns'; (B) 'undecided'; and (C) 'life concerns'. The relationships between these classifications and clinical information, certified need for long-term care, and items on the BC were examined. The numbers of subjects in categories A, B, and C were 291, 42, and 186, respectively. Life concerns were related to scores on the Clinical Dementia Rating, global cognitive function, depressive state, and apathy. Most items on the BC were not associated with classification into category C, but ≥25% of the subjects had life concerns related to these items. Assessment of life concerns by the CGSC staff has clinical validity. The results suggest that there are people who do not respond to the checklist or apply for Long-Term Care Insurance, meaning that they 'hide' in the community, probably due to apathy or depressive state. To organize a more effective integrated community care system, the CGSC staff should focus mainly on preventive care. © 2014 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2014 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  17. NETWORK COOPERATION OF EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS FOR BUILDING A CULTURE OF HEALTHY AND SAFE LIFESTYLE: THEORETICAL-METHODOLOGICAL ASPECT OF VOCATIONAL STAFF TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana N. Levan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to consider network cooperation as a resource of the renewal and innovative development of education.Methods. Systemization of existing practices of network partnership in the sphere of education for decision of pupils’ health protection problems; monitoring of health and physical readiness of the trainees of general educational establishments; modelling of network interaction.Results and scientific novelty. It is shown that network cooperation in the field of building a culture of healthy and safe lifestyle of pupils has a considerable potential. If educational organizations are closed to cooperation, isolated on the infrastructure in their district, city, region, the task of building a healthy lifestyle of pupils can not be solved. In general, teaching staff is unprepared for this activity and require additional preparation, methodological and methodical information materials on its realisation. The author theoretically proves and describes substantive provisions of network interaction of the educational establishments with social partners aimed at pupils’ health culture formation, which is presented as one of socialisation directions, i.e. realisation of social function of education – especially organized educational activity that is directed on development of pupils’ social competence. Thus, the model of network cooperation of educational organizations for building a culture of healthy and safe lifestyle (as one of the areas of socialization of pupils is presented in the presented study. It is considered as a theoretical and methodological basis for the development of process of establishing partnerships of educational organizations not only with other organizations of the education system (basic, professional and additional, but also with organizations of health care, physical culture and sport, culture and recreation, and other social spheres.Practical significance. Results of research will help the

  18. The Impact of Race on Organ Donation Rates in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Ali; Berry, Cherisse; Ley, Eric J; Schulman, Danielle; Desai, Chirag; Navarro, Sonia; Malinoski, Darren

    2010-01-01

    Background The Organ Donation Breakthrough Collaborative began in 2003 to address and alleviate the shortage of organs available for transplantation. This study investigated the patterns of organ donation by race to determine if the Collaborative had an impact on donation rates amongst ethnic minorities. Study Design The following data from the Southern California regional organ procurement organization, were reviewed between 2004 and 2008: age, race (White, African American, Asian, Hispanic, and Other), the numbers of eligible referrals for organ donation and actual donors, types of donors, consent rates, conversion rates, organs procured per donor (OPPD), and organs transplanted per donor (OTPD). Logistic regression was utilized to determine independent predictors of ≥ 4 OTPD. Results There were 1776 actual donors out of 2760 eligible deaths (conversion rate 64%). Hispanics demonstrated a significantly lower conversion rate than Whites (64% vs. 77%, p0.05). Conclusions The conversion rates amongst all ethnic minorities were significantly lower than the rates observed in Whites. However, when controlling for other factors, race was not a significant risk factor for the number of organs transplanted per donor. The Collaborative has not had an identifiable effect on race conversion rates during the 5 years since its implementation. Further intervention is necessary to improve the conversion rate in ethnic minorities in Southern California. PMID:20829076

  19. Donor conversion rates depend on the assessment tools used in the evaluation of potential organ donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.J. de Groot (Yorick); E.F.M. Wijdicks (Eelco); M. van der Jagt (Mathieu); J. Bakker (Jan); B. Roozenbeek (Bob); J.N.M. IJzermans (Jan); E.J.O. Kompanje (Erwin)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: It is desirable to identify a potential organ donor (POD) as early as possible to achieve a donor conversion rate (DCR) as high as possible which is defined as the actual number of organ donors divided by the number of patients who are regarded as a potential organ donor. The

  20. Staff Definitions of Challenging Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgie, Sarah; Hastings, Richard P.

    2002-01-01

    Fifty staff working with adults with mental retardation rated potentially challenging behaviors in terms of: (1) whether they thought the behaviors were challenging, and (2) whether the behaviors should be the focus of intervention. Results found that staff were less likely to identify as challenging those behaviors having negative effects on…

  1. An investigation of relation between organizational justice and professional commitment of staff: A case study of public organization in Kermanshah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Emami

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical study to investigate the relationship between organizational justice and professional commitment in Kermanshah official organizations. The study uses 20 questions to measure professional commitment from a questionnaire originally developed by Spell et al. (2007 [Spell, C. S., & Arnold, T. J. (2007. A multi-level analysis of organizational justice climate, structure, and employee mental health. Journal of Management, 33(5, 724-751.]. In addition, the study adopts 12 questions from another questionnaire developed by Vallas (1999 [Vallas, S. P. (1999. Rethinking post‐Fordism: The meaning of workplace flexibility. Sociological theory, 17(1, 68-101.] to measure organizational justice. Cronbach alpha for organizational justice questionnaire and professional commitment are 0.81 and 0.89, respectively, which are well above the minimum acceptable level. Based on the results of this survey, there is a positive and meaningful relationship between organizational justice and professional commitment. The implementation of the linear regression analysis also reveals that there is a positive and meaningful relationship between inter-organizational justice and professional commitment. The study performs Freedman test to rank three components of organizational justice and the results indicate that interactional justice maintains the highest level of importance while distributive justice comes last in terms of priority.

  2. [Work-to-family influence and social supports: job satisfaction in a north-Italy public health organization --differences between medical and administrative staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Lara; Zito, Margherita; Ghislieri, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the interest in the well-being at work has grown considerably, also considering the latest law directives. Several scholars have devoted particular attention to the topic of the work-to-family influence and of social supports, as elements able to affect the perceived well-being. The well-being in health care has to consider the particular nature of work and the relevant relational dimensions that require special attention for the emotional side. The research was promoted by the Committee for Equal Opportunities of a public health organization in the North-West Italy. Referring to the job demands-resources theoretical model, this study investigated the role of organizational and family supports, work-to-family spillover (positive and negative) and family workload as possible determinants of job satisfaction, intended as an indicator of psychological well-being at work. Respondents to the questionnaire are 541 (55% of the total employees), their average age is 43 and they are mostly women (80%). Data analysis showed the central role of supervisors supports, of the co-workers supports and, to a lesser extent, the role of the work-to-family spillover in influencing job satisfaction. Moreover, significant differences between medical and administrative staff were detected. The centrality of supports, especially those of supervisors in determining job satisfaction, is in line with studies indicating that a supportive leadership and a family-friendly culture can facilitate the arise of positive outcomes for both workers and organizations.

  3. 14 CFR 385.33 - Review by the staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Review by the staff. 385.33 Section 385.33...) ORGANIZATION STAFF ASSIGNMENTS AND REVIEW OF ACTION UNDER ASSIGNMENTS Procedure on Review of Staff Action § 385.33 Review by the staff. Where a petition for review is duly filed, the staff member may, upon...

  4. Hospital characteristics associated with increased conversion rates among organ donors in New England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Diaz, Arturo J; Olufajo, Olubode A; Stinebring, Jill; Endicott, Samantha; McKown, Brandon T; Metcalfe, David; Zogg, Cheryl K; Salim, Ali

    2017-10-01

    It is unknown whether hospital characteristics affect institutional performance with regard to organ donation. We sought to determine which hospital- and patient-level characteristics are associated with high organ donor conversion rates after brain death (DBD). Data were extracted from the regional Organ Procurement Organization (2011-2014) and other sources. Hospitals were stratified into high-conversion hospitals (HCH; upper-tertile) and low-conversion hospitals (LCH; lower-tertile) according to conversion rates. Hospital- and patient-characteristics were compared between groups. There were 564 potential DBD donors in 27 hospitals. Conversion rates differed between hospitals in different states (p donors differed between HCH and LCH in race (p organ donor conversion rates. This suggests that there is a pool of potential donors in large specialized hospitals that are not successfully converted to DBD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 28 CFR 551.32 - Staff supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff supervision. 551.32 Section 551.32 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Inmate Organizations § 551.32 Staff supervision. (a) The Warden shall appoint a staff member as the...

  6. 20 CFR 900.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff. 900.5 Section 900.5 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION § 900.5 Staff. (a) The... the Act and performs such other functions as the Board may delegate to him. (b) Members of the staffs...

  7. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  8. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Vote Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. Voting will begin on Monday 31 October. Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will  represent you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site. (http://association.web.cern.ch) Elections Timetable Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee. 

  9. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The Water Resources Council Staff (hereinafter the Staff) serves the Council and the Chairman in the performance of...

  10. Relation between the location of elements in the periodic table and various organ-uptake rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, A; Ando, I; Hiraki, T; Hisada, K

    1989-01-01

    Fifty four elements and 65 radioactive compounds were examined to determine the organ uptake rates for rats 3, 24 and 48 h after i.v. injection of these compounds. They were prepared as carrier free nuclides, or containing a small amount of stable nuclide. Generally speaking, behaviors of K, Rb, Cs and Tl in all the organs were very similar to one another, but they differed from that of Na. Bivalent hard acids were avidly taken up into bone; therefore, uptake rates in soft tissues were very small. Hard acids of tri-, quadri- and pentavalence which were taken up into the soft tissue organs decreased more slowly from these organs than other ions. Soft acids such as Hg2+ were bound very firmly to the component in the kidney. Anions (with few exceptions), GeCl4 and SbCl3 were rapidly excreted in urine, so that the uptake rates in organs were low.

  11. Measuring hospital medical staff organizational structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortell, S M; Getzen, T E

    1979-01-01

    Based on organization theory and the work of Roemer and Friedman, seven dimensions of hospital medical staff organization structure are proposed and examined. The data are based on a 1973 nationwide survey of hospital medical staffs conducted by the American Hospital Association. Factor analysis yielded six relatively independent dimensions supporting a multidimensional view of medical staff organization structure. The six dimensions include 1) Resource Capability, 2) Generalist Physician Contractual Orientation, 3) Communication/Control, 4) Local Staff Orientation, 5) Participation in Decision Making, and 6) Hospital-Based Physician Contractual Orientation. It is suggested that these dimensions can be used to develop an empirical typology of hospital medical staff organization structure and to investigate the relationship between medical staff organization and public policy issues related to cost containment and quality assurance. PMID:511580

  12. Influence of the organic loading rate on the growth of Galactomyces geotrichum in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Maria; Pereira, Maria A; Nicolau, Ana; Rodrigues, Alexandrina L; Brito, António G; Nogueira, Regina

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies reporting on the useful implementation of fungi in wastewater treatment plants triggered the need to improve fungi based systems. Therefore, it is crucial to investigate the conditions that promote their selection. The present work aims to study the effect of the organic loading rate on the growth of filamentous fungi. Three sequencing batch reactors (SBR), fed with an easily biodegradable substrate (acetate), were operated at different organic loading rates: 4.3 g COD L(-1) day(-1) (SBR1), 1.0 g COD L(-1) day(-1) (SBR2) and 0.5 g COD L(-1) day(-1) (SBR3). High amounts of fungal filaments were observed in the SBR operating at higher organic loading rate, as ascertained by direct microscopic inspection, while, at lower organic loading rates, overabundance of fungal filaments was not observed. Sequence retrieved from the isolated fungal filaments presented high similarity (99 %) to Galactomyces geotrichum.

  13. Assessing the effect of dissolved organic ligands on mineral dissolution rates: An example from calcite dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMaio, T.; Grandstaff, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments suggest that dissolved organic ligands may primarily modify mineral dissolution rates by three mechanisms: (1) metal-ligand (M-L) complex formation in solution, which increases the degree of undersaturation, (2) formation of surface M-L complexes that attack the surface, and (3) formation of surface complexes which passivate or protect the surface. Mechanisms (1) and (2) increase the dissolution rate and the third decreases it compared with organic-free solutions. The types and importance of these mechanisms may be assessed from plots of dissolution rate versus degree of undersaturation. To illustrate this technique, calcite, a common repository cementing and vein-filling mineral, was dissolved at pH 7.8 and 22 C in Na-Ca-HCO 3 -Cl solutions with low concentrations of three organic ligands. Low citrate concentrations (50 microM) increased the dissolution rate consistent with mechanism (1). Oxalate decreased the rate, consistent with mechanism (3). Low phthalate concentration (<50 microM) decreased calcite dissolution rates; however, higher concentrations increased the dissolution rates, which became faster than in inorganic solutions. Thus, phthalate exhibits both mechanisms (2) and (3) at different concentrations. In such cases linear extrapolations of dissolution rates from high organic ligand concentrations may not be valid

  14. A plea for uniform European definitions for organ donor potential and family refusal rates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, N.E.; Haase-Kromwijk, B.J.; Leiden, H.A. van; Weimar, W.; Hoitsma, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Conversion of potential organ donors to actual donors is negatively influenced by family refusals. Refusal rates differ strongly among countries. Is it possible to compare refusal rates in order to be able to learn from countries with the best practices? We searched in the literature for reviews of

  15. Expanding the donor pool: regional variation in pediatric organ donation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godown, Justin; McKane, Meghann; Wujcik, Kari; Mettler, Bret A; Dodd, Debra A

    2016-12-01

    There are limited published data on pediatric organ donation rates. The aim of this study was to describe the trends in pediatric organ donation over time and to assess the regional variation in pediatric deceased organ donation. OPTN data were utilized to assess the trends in pediatric organ donation over time. The number of deceased pediatric organ donors was indexed using regional mortality data obtained from the National Center for Health Statistics and compared across UNOS regions and two different eras. The number of pediatric deceased organ donors has declined in the recent era, largely driven by fewer adolescent donors. For all age groups, there is significant regional variation in organ donation rates, with identifiable high- and low-performing regions. Expansion of the donor pool may be possible by optimizing organ donation in regions demonstrating lower recruitment of pediatric donors. Using the region with the highest donation rate for each age group as the gold standard, we estimate a potential 24% increase in the number of donors if all regions performed comparably, equating to 215 new pediatric donors annually. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A plea for uniform European definitions for organ donor potential and family refusal rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Nichon E; Haase-Kromwijk, Bernadette J J M; van Leiden, Hendrik A; Weimar, Willem; Hoitsma, Andries J

    2009-11-01

    Conversion of potential organ donors to actual donors is negatively influenced by family refusals. Refusal rates differ strongly among countries. Is it possible to compare refusal rates in order to be able to learn from countries with the best practices? We searched in the literature for reviews of donor potential and refusal rates for organ donation in intensive care units. We found 14 articles pertinent to this study. There is an enormous diversity among the performed studies. The definitions of potential organ donors and family refusal differed substantially. We tried to re-calculate the refusal rates. This method failed because of the influence caused by the registered will on donation in the Donor Register. We therefore calculated the total refusal rate. This strategy was also less satisfactory considering possible influence of the legal consent system on the approach of family. Because of lack of uniform definitions, we can conclude that the refusal rates for organ donation can not be used for a sound comparison among countries. To be able to learn from well-performing countries, it is necessary to establish uniform definitions regarding organ donation and registration of all intensive care deaths.

  17. The influence of age on the composting rate of organic material by Eisenia fetida (Oligochaeta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the main objectives of a vermicomposting plant is to achieve a maximum composting rate of organic waste. Apart from population densities, substrate characteristics and environmental factors, age structure of the population is expected to affect the rate of composting. The composting rate of worms was studied in the laboratory under optimal conditions over a period of 55 days. Growth and sexual maturity were monitored as well as the composting rate during various stages of the life-cycle of Eisenia fetida. The composting rate was initially slow and reached a maximum peak when the worms were pre-clitellate.

  18. Organ Donation in Switzerland - An Analysis of Factors Associated with Consent Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, Isabelle; Immer, Franz F.; Jüni, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim Switzerland has a low post mortem organ donation rate. Here we examine variables that are associated with the consent of the deceased’s next of kin (NOK) for organ donation, which is a prerequisite for donation in Switzerland. Methods and Analysis During one year, we registered information from NOK of all deceased patients in Swiss intensive care units, who were approached for consent to organ donation. We collected data on patient demographics, characteristics of NOK, factors related to the request process and to the clinical setting. We analyzed the association of collected predictors with consent rate using univariable logistic regression models; predictors with p-values donation, and respecting personal values and cultural differences, could be of importance for increasing donation rates. Additional measures are needed to address the pronounced differences in consent rates between language regions. PMID:25208215

  19. EFFECT OF SULFATE LOADING RATE AND ORGANIC LOADING RATE ON ANAEROBIC BAFFLED REACTORS USED FOR TREATMENT OF SANITARY LANDFILL LEACHATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Burbano-Figueroa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThis study investigated the effect of organic loading rate (OLR and sulfate loading rate (SLR on landfill leachate treatment by a lab-scale anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR. Landfill leachate contained a concentration of organic matter between 3966 and 5090 mg COD.L-1 and no detectable amounts of sulfate. Reactors were started-up by feeding them with iron-sulfate at a SLR of 0.05 g SO42-.L-1.day-1 (4 weeks. Factorial design and response surface techniques were used to evaluate and optimize the effects of these operating variables on COD removal. ABRs were operated at OLRs ranging from 0.30 up to 6.84 g COD.L-1.day-1 by changes in influent volumetric flow. SO42- was added to the influent at a SRL from 0.06 to 0.13 g SO42-.L-1.day-1. The highest value of COD removal (66% was reached at an OLR of 3.58 g COD.L-1.day-1 and SLR of 0.09 g SO4-2.L-1.day-1 with a COD/SO4-2 ratio of 40. Under these conditions sulfate is mainly used for molecular hydrogen consumption while organic matter is preferentially degraded via methanogesis.

  20. Effect of Organic Amendment Application Rate on Greenhouse Gas Emissions at an Organic Farm in Santa Barbara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyewole, M.; King, J. Y.; Cleveland, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Though greenhouse gas emissions (GHGEs) from mineral fertilizer application in agriculture have been well studied, the effect of organic amendment (OA) application rate on GHGEs is not yet understood. Application of multiple OAs can improve different properties that control soil fertility, including nutrient availability, aggregate stability, and water-holding capacity. We measured nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) flux at an organic farm in Goleta, CA in order to understand how OA application rate affects GHGEs and crop yield from agricultural soils. Based on management practices in the region, we asked farm managers to establish high compost (HC) and low compost (LC) treatments during the growing season of an annual crop (18.2, 9.13 Mg ha-1, respectively), and we measured GHGEs in beds and furrows using static chambers. Organic fertilizer (672 kg ha-1) was applied equally to HC and LC beds six weeks after compost application. Overall, emissions of N2O and CO2 were higher in HC than LC, but yield-scaled emissions were higher in LC. Importantly, treatment differences in both N2O and CO2 emissions were not apparent until after mid-season fertilizer application. Net CH4 uptake was higher in HC than LC in the furrows, but there was no difference in the beds. Our data suggest that high compost application rates likely increased SOM mineralization, soil water content, and nitrification and denitrification rates in HC relative to LC, which led to higher N2O emissions during the growing season. Fertilization primed SOM decomposition and increased soil respiration, which led to increased CO2 emissions. Our results suggest that improved management of application rate and timing during use of multiple OAs could reduce GHGEs while maintaining high crop yield. Understanding the mechanisms by which OA application rates alter the balance between GHGEs and yield is an important step toward reducing agriculture's contribution to climate change through

  1. Futuristics: A Tool for Staff Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Margaret J.; Hurst, James C.

    1979-01-01

    Creative use of future planning as a staff development tool can have short- and long-term benefits for the individual and the organization. Its potential for stimulating creativity, reducing crisis management, and developing staff cohesion is unequaled. The individual, the organization, the technology and the manager are the important factors.…

  2. 17 CFR 240.17g-3 - Annual financial reports to be furnished by nationally recognized statistical rating organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... financial statements of the nationally recognized statistical rating organization or audited consolidated financial statements of its parent if the nationally recognized statistical rating organization is a...) of this section are consolidated financial statements of the parent of the nationally recognized...

  3. Increasing the Number of Organ Transplants in the United States by Optimizing Donor Authorization Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, D S; French, B; Abt, P L; Gilroy, R K

    2015-08-01

    While recent policies have focused on allocating organs to patients most in need and lessening geographic disparities, the only mechanism to increase the actual number of transplants is to maximize the potential organ supply. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using OPTN data on all "eligible deaths" from 1/1/08 to 11/1/13 to evaluate variability in donor service area (DSA)-level donor authorization rates, and to quantify the potential gains associated with increasing authorization rates. Despite adjustments for donor demographics (age, race/ethnicity, cause of death) and geographic factors (rural/urban status of donor hospital, statewide participation in deceased-donor registries) among 52 571 eligible deaths, there was significant variability (p donor authorization rates across the 58 DSAs. Overall DSA-level adjusted authorization rates ranged from 63.5% to 89.5% (median: 72.7%). An additional 773-1623 eligible deaths could have been authorized, yielding 2679-5710 total organs, if the DSAs with authorization rates below the median and 75th percentile, respectively, implemented interventions to perform at the level of the corresponding reference DSA. Opportunities exist within the current organ acquisition framework to markedly improve DSA-level donor authorization rates. Such initiatives would mitigate waitlist mortality while increasing the number of transplants. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  4. Experiments probing the influence of air exchange rates on secondary organic aerosols derived from indoor chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Shields, H.C.

    2003-01-01

    with eight-channels ranging from 0.1-0.2 to$GRT@2.0$mu@m diameter. The air exchange rates during the experiments were either high (working hours) or low (non-working hours) and ranged from 1.6 to$GRT@12h $+-1$/, with intermediate exchange rates. Given the emission rates of ozone and d-limonene used....... There was evidence for coagulation among particles in the smallest size-range at low air exchange rates (high particle concentrations) but no evidence of coagulation was apparent at higher air exchange rates (lower particle concentrations). At higher air exchange rates the particle count or size distributions were......Reactions between ozone and terpenes have been shown to increase the concentrations of submicron particles in indoor settings. The present study was designed to examine the influence of air exchange rates on the concentrations of these secondary organic aerosols as well as on the evolution...

  5. Organic carbon sedimentation rates in Asian mangrove coastal ecosystems estimated by 210PB chronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tateda, Y.; Wattayakorn, G.; Nhan, D.D.; Kasuya, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Organic carbon balance estimation of mangrove coastal ecosystem is important for understanding of Asian coastal carbon budget/flux calculation in global carbon cycle modelling which is powerful tool for the prediction of future greenhouse gas effect and evaluation of countermeasure preference. Especially, the organic carbon accumulation rate in mangrove ecosystem was reported to be important sink of carbon as well as that in boreal peat accumulation. For the estimation of 10 3 years scale organic carbon accumulation rates in mangrove coastal ecosystems, 14 C was used as long term chronological tracer, being useful in pristine mangrove forest reserve area. While in case of mangrove plantation of in coastal area, the 210 Pb is suitable for the estimation of decades scale estimation by its half-life. Though it has possibility of bio-/physical- turbation effect in applying 210 Pb chronology that is offset in case of 10 3 years scale estimation, especially in Asian mangrove ecosystem where the anthropogenic physical turbation by coastal fishery is vigorous.In this paper, we studied the organic carbon and 210 Pb accumulation rates in subtropical mangrove coastal ecosystems in Japan, Vietnam and Thailand with 7 Be analyses to make sure the negligible effect of above turbation effects on organic carbon accumulation. We finally concluded that 210 Pb was applicable to estimate organic carbon accumulation rates in these ecosystems even though the physical-/bio-turbation is expected. The measured organic carbon accumulation rates using 210 Pb in mangrove coastal ecosystems of Japan, Vietnam and Thailand were 0.067 4.0 t-C ha -1 y -1 . (author)

  6. Free Energy Rate Density and Self-organization in Complex Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Georgiev, Georgi Yordanov; Gombos, Erin; Bates, Timothy; Henry, Kaitlin; Casey, Alexander; Daly, Michael

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important tasks in science is to understand the self-organization's arrow of time. To attempt this we utilize the connection between self-organization and non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Eric Chaisson calculated an exponential increase of Free Energy Rate Density (FERD) in Cosmic Evolution, from the Big Bang until now, paralleling the increase of system's structure. We term these studies "Devology". We connect FERD to the principle of least action for complex systems, driving ...

  7. Do medical students have the knowledge needed to maximize organ donation rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardell, Trevor; Hunter, Duncan J W; Kent, William D T; Jain, Minto K

    2003-12-01

    The chronic shortage of organs for donation could be improved by increasing the numbers of potential and actual donors. Physicians can play a key role in solving this problem but may miss opportunities because they lack knowledge about organ donation to answer questions or concerns. Education of physicians early in their careers may lead to better procurement rates for donor organs. We carried out a study at Queen's University in Kingston, Ont., to determine whether medical students have sufficient knowledge of topics shown to affect organ donation rates. Medical students from years 1-4 completed a self-administered questionnaire. Section 1 tested general knowledge about organ donation; section 2 tested the students' ability to identify potential donors; and section 3 dealt with the approach to the potential donor's family. Univariate predictors of mean test scores were assessed using the t-test. Of 322 medical students who received the questionnaire, 260 (81%) responded. The mean age of the students was 25 years and 54% were men. The mean knowledge score was 6.7 out of a possible score of 14. Third-year students had the best knowledge scores (7.6), followed by fourth- (7.4), second- (6.6) and first-year students (5.7). Teaching about organ donation and a student's comfort with approaching a family for organ donation were also predictive of higher knowledge scores. There was no correlation between knowledge score and age, gender or whether the student was carrying a signed donor card. Knowledge scores were low in all 3 sections. Thirty-six percent of students did not know that brain death means that the patient is dead rather than in a coma. Half the medical students believed that people of certain religious groups should not be approached about organ donation. Medical students possess limited knowledge about organ donation topics important for maximizing procurement rates. A teaching intervention designed to target these shortcomings may be beneficial.

  8. Deceased Donor Organs: What Can Be Done to Raise Donation Rates Using Evidence From Malaysia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasiah, R; Manikam, R; Chandrasekaran, S K; Naghavi, N; Mubarik, S; Mustafa, R; Pushparajan, S

    2016-05-01

    Organ donation rates have continued to fall seriously short of needs worldwide, with the lowest rates recorded among developing economies. This study seeks to analyze evidence from a developing economy to explore the usefulness of social psychological theory to solve the problem. The study deployed a large survey (n = 10 412) using a convenience sampling procedure targeted at increasing the number of Malaysians registered with the Ministry of Health, Malaysia who are willing to donate organs upon death. Structural equation modeling was deployed to estimate simultaneously the relative influence of cognitive and noncognitive variables on willingness to donate deceased organs. The cognitive factors of donation perception, socioeconomic status and financial incentives, and the noncognitive factors of demography and fear showed a high statistically significant (1%) relationship with willingness to donate organs after death. While financial incentives were significant, cash rewards showed the least impact. Donation perception showed the highest impact, which shows that the development of effective pedagogic programs with simultaneous improvements to the quality of services provided by medical personnel engaged in retrieving and transplanting deceased donor organs can help raise organ donation rates. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  9. Initial water repellency affected organic matter depletion rates of manure amended soils in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leelamanie D.A.L.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The wetting rate of soil is a measure of water repellency, which is a property of soils that prevents water from wetting or penetrating into dry soil. The objective of the present research was to examine the initial water repellency of organic manure amended soil, and its relation to the soil organic matter (SOM depletion rates in the laboratory. Soil collected from the Wilpita natural forest, Sri Lanka, was mixed with organic manure to prepare soil samples with 0, 5, 10, 25, and 50% organic manure contents. Locally available cattle manure (CM, goat manure (GM, and Casuarina equisetifolia leaves (CE were used as the organic manure amendments. Organic matter content of soils was measured in 1, 3, 7, 14, and 30 days intervals under the laboratory conditions with 74±5% relative humidity at 28±1°C. Initial water repellency of soil samples was measured as the wetting rates using the water drop penetration time (WDPT test. Initial water repellency increased with increasing SOM content showing higher increasing rate for hydrophobic CE amended samples compared with those amended with CM and GM. The relation between water repellency and SOM content was considered to be governed by the original hydrophobicities of added manures. The SOM contents of all the soil samples decreased with the time to reach almost steady level at about 30 d. The initial SOM depletion rates were negatively related with the initial water repellency. However, all the CE amended samples initially showed prominent low SOM depletion rates, which were not significantly differed with the amended manure content or the difference in initial water repellency. It is explicable that the original hydrophobicity of the manure as well has a potentially important effect on initiation of SOM decomposition. In contrast, the overall SOM depletion rate can be attributed to the initial water repellency of the manure amended sample, however, not to the original hydrophobicity of the amended manure

  10. 7 CFR 1700.27 - Chief of Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chief of Staff. 1700.27 Section 1700.27 Agriculture... GENERAL INFORMATION Agency Organization and Functions § 1700.27 Chief of Staff. The Chief of Staff aids and assists the Administrator and the Deputy Administrator. The Chief of Staff advises the...

  11. The use of interest rate swaps by nonprofit organizations: evidence from nonprofit health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Louis J; Trussel, John

    2006-01-01

    Although the use of derivatives, particularly interest rate swaps, has grown explosively over the past decade, derivative financial instrument use by nonprofits has received only limited attention in the research literature. Because little is known about the risk management activities of nonprofits, the impact of these instruments on the ability of nonprofits to raise capital may have significant public policy implications. The primary motivation of this study is to determine the types of derivatives used by nonprofits and estimate the frequency of their use among these organizations. Our study also extends contemporary finance theory by an empirical examination of the motivation for interest rate swap usage among nonprofits. Our empirical data came from 193 large nonprofit health care providers that issued debt to the public between 2000 and 2003. We used a univariate analysis and a multivariate analysis relying on logistic regression models to test alternative explanations of interest rate swaps usage by nonprofits, finding that more than 45 percent of our sample, 88 organizations, used interest rate swaps with an aggregate notional value in excess of $8.3 billion. Our empirical tests indicate the primary motive for nonprofits to use interest rate derivatives is to hedge their exposure to interest rate risk. Although these derivatives are a useful risk management tool, under conditions of falling bond market interest rates these derivatives may also expose a nonprofit swap user to the risk of a material unscheduled termination payment. Finally, we found considerable diversity in the informativeness of footnote disclosure among sample organizations that used interest rate swaps. Many nonprofits did not disclose these risks in their financial statements. In conclusion, we find financial managers in large nonprofits commonly use derivative financial instruments as risk management tools, but the use of interest rate swaps by nonprofits may expose them to other risks

  12. Mineralization Rate Constants, Half-Lives and Effects of Two Organic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agro-Science Journal of Tropical Agriculture, Food, Environment and Extension. Volume 14 Number 3 September, ... Key words: cattle dung, swine waste, mineralization rate constants, soil organic carbon, maize yield. INTRODUCTION. Low soil fertility is ..... Principles and proceedures of statistics. A biometric approach.

  13. Experiments probing the influence of air exchange rates on secondary organic aerosols derived from indoor chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Shields, H.C.

    2003-01-01

    Reactions between ozone and terpenes have been shown to increase the concentrations of submicron particles in indoor settings. The present study was designed to examine the influence of air exchange rates on the concentrations of these secondary organic aerosols as well as on the evolution...

  14. Volatile organic compound emmission rates from mixed deciduous and coniferous foest in Northern Wisconsin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. G. Isebrands; A. B. Guenther; P. Harley; D. Helmig; L. Klinger; L. Vierling; P. Zimmerman; C. Geron

    1999-01-01

    Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds {VOC) from forests play an important role in regulating the atmospheric trace gas composition including global tropospheric ozone concentrations. However, more information is needed on VOC emission rates from different forest regions of the world to understand regional and global impacts and to implement possible...

  15. Effects of castration on growth rate, body and visceral organ weights ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of castration on growth rate, body and visceral organ weights of pigs were investigated using data from intact males, intact females of Large White pigs full or half castrated at 2, 4, or 6 weeks of age. Body weights and feed intake were recorded to the nearest 0.1 kg at weekly intervals from birth, while weights of ...

  16. The impact of sea-level rise on organic matter decay rates in Chesapeake Bay brackish tidal marshes

    OpenAIRE

    Kirwan, M. L.; Langley, J. A.; Guntenspergen, G. R.; Megonigal, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    The balance between organic matter production and decay determines how fast coastal wetlands accumulate soil organic matter. Despite the importance of soil organic matter accumulation rates in influencing marsh elevation and resistance to sea-level rise, relatively little is known about how decomposition rates will respond to sea-level rise. Here, we estimate the sensitivity of decomposition to flooding by measuring rates of decay in 87 bags filled with milled sedge peat, including soil organ...

  17. Factors influencing the contamination rate of human organ-cultured corneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röck, Daniel; Wude, Johanna; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl U; Yoeruek, Efdal; Thaler, Sebastian; Röck, Tobias

    2017-12-01

    To assess the influence of donor, environment and storage factors on the contamination rate of organ-cultured corneas, to consider the microbiological species causing corneal contamination and to investigate the corresponding sensitivities. Data from 1340 consecutive donor corneas were analysed retrospectively. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the influence of different factors on the contamination rate of organ-cultured corneas for transplantation. The mean annual contamination rate was 1.8 ± 0.4% (range: 1.3-2.1%); 50% contaminations were of fungal origin with exclusively Candida species, and 50% contaminations were of bacterial origin with Staphylococcus species being predominant. The cause of donor death including infection and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome increased the risk of bacterial or fungal contamination during organ culture (p = 0.007 and p = 0.014, respectively). Differentiating between septic and aseptic donors showed an increased risk of contamination for septic donors (p = 0.0020). Mean monthly temperature including warmer months increased the risk of contamination significantly (p = 0.0031). Sex, donor age, death to enucleation, death to corneoscleral disc excision and storage time did not increase the risk of contamination significantly. The genesis of microbial contamination in organ-cultured donor corneas seems to be multifactorial. The main source of fungal or bacterial contamination could be resident species from the skin flora. The rate of microbial contamination in organ-cultured donor corneas seems to be dependent on the cause of donor death and mean monthly temperature. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Why join the Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Becoming a member of the Staff Association (SA) is above all a personal choice, showing that the joining person’s commitment and adherence to values such as solidarity, social cohesion, etc.In September, the SA launches a membership campaign to convince a maximum number to join, to inform, arouse interest and support. Posters, emails and individual contacts are part of the campaign programme, just like this editorial. As far as individual contacts are concerned, we ask you to give time and lend an ear to the delegates of your department in the Staff Council, who will approach you, in order to make an open and constructive discussion possible. Do not hesitate to ask questions and let them know your thoughts about the SA, as (constructive) criticism enables us to progress. The Staff Association and its role of collective representation The Staff Association, via its delegates, represents collectively all staff of the Organization before the Director-General and Member States. To do this, staff rep...

  19. Soluble carbon in oxisol under the effect of organic residue rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Lúcia Pinheiro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The application of organic residues to the soil can increase soluble organic carbon (SOC and affect the pH and electrolytic conductivity (EC of the soil. However, the magnitude of these changes depends on the type of residue and the applied dose. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of increasing C rates contained in organic residue on the pH, EC, water-extractable total carbon (WETC, water-extractable organic carbon (WEOC, and water-extractable inorganic carbon (WEIC in soil treated with manure (chicken, swine, and quail, sawdust, coffee husk, and sewage sludge. The levels of total C (TC- KH2PO4, organic carbon (OC- KH2PO4, and inorganic C (IC- KH2PO4 extractable by a 0.1 mol L-1 KH2PO4 solution were also quantified in soil under the effect of increasing rates of chicken and quail manures. The following rates of organic residue C were applied to a dystrophic Red Latosol (Oxisol sample: 0, 2,000, 5,000, 10,000, and 20,000 mg kg-1. The addition of organic residues to the soil increased pH, except in the case of sewage sludge, which acidified the soil. The acidity correction potential of chicken and quail manure was highest, dependent on the manure rate applied; regardless of the dose used, sawdust barely alters the soil pH. At all tested rates, the EC of the soil treated with swine manure, coffee husk, and sawdust remained below 2.0 dS m-1, which is a critical level for salinity-sensitive crops. However, the application of chicken or quail manure and sewage sludge at certain rates increased the EC to values above this threshold level. Highest levels of WETC, WEOC, and WEIC were obtained when chicken and quail manure and coffee husk were applied to the Oxisol. The quantities of SOC extracted by KH2PO4 were higher than the quantities extracted by water, demonstrating the ability of soil to adsorb C into its colloids.

  20. DATA ANALYSIS BY FORMAL METHODS OF ESTIMATION OF INDEXES OF RATING CRITERION IN PROCESS OF ACCUMULATION OF DATA ABOUT WORKING OF THE TEACHING STAFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey E. Fedoseev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the development of formal methods of assessing the rating criterion exponents. The article deals with the mathematical model, which allows to connect together quantitative rating criterion characteristics, measured in various scales, with intuitive idea of them. The solution to the problem of rating criterion estimation is proposed.

  1. NO to sacrificing future staff!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    During our public meetings last week, we reviewed several subjects. However, the most urgent one today is the 2nd package of measures for our Pension Fund. In our previous issue, we devoted a long article to the Management’s plan for staff recruited from January 2012. A disaster! As we announced at our meetings, the Staff Association will organize a referendum at the beginning of April. For the message to be heard it is vital that as many staff as possible take part. By voting you will express your support to your staff representatives to stand in the way of these unacceptable measures. It is a matter of urgency that the staff makes their voice heard. Time is short, the decisions will be made in June. The future of our Organization is as stake. This is our future colleagues we are talking about. We must prevent this sacrifice. They must be welcomed in such a manner that there is no uneasiness between us. They must be made to feel welcome in their new family, CERN, our CERN. That they should pay an ...

  2. Composition of structural fragments and the mineralization rate of organic matter in zonal soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionova, A. A.; Zolotareva, B. N.; Kolyagin, Yu. G.; Kvitkina, A. K.; Kaganov, V. V.; Kudeyarov, V. N.

    2015-10-01

    Comparative analysis of the climatic characteristics and the recalcitrance against decomposition of organic matter in the zonal soil series of European Russia, from peat surface-gley tundra soil to brown semidesert soil, has assessed the relationships between the period of biological activity, the content of chemically stable functional groups, and the mineralization of humus. The stability of organic matter has been determined from the ratio of functional groups using the solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy of soil samples and the direct measurements of organic matter mineralization from CO2 emission. A statistically significant correlation has been found between the period of biological activity and the humification indices: the CHA/CFA ratio, the aromaticity, and the alkyl/ O-alkyl ratio in organic matter. The closest correlation has been observed between the period of biological activity and the alkyl/ O-alkyl ratio; therefore, this parameter can be an important indicator of the soil humus status. A poor correlation between the mineralization rate and the content of chemically stable functional groups in soil organic matter has been revealed for the studied soil series. At the same time, the lowest rate of carbon mineralization has been observed in southern chernozem characterized by the maximum content of aromatic groups (21% Corg) and surface-gley peat tundra soil, where an extremely high content of unsubstituted CH2 and CH3 alkyl groups (41% Corg) has been noted.

  3. Is There a Chronic Elevation in Organ-Tissue Sleeping Metabolic Rate in Very Fit Runners?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taishi Midorikawa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available It is unclear whether the resting metabolic rate of individual organ-tissue in adults with high aerobic fitness is higher than that in untrained adults; in fact, this topic has been debated for years using a two-component model. To address this issue, in the present study, we examined the relationship between the measured sleeping energy expenditure (EE by using an indirect human calorimeter (IHC and the calculated resting EE (REE from organ-tissue mass using magnetic resonance imaging, along with the assumed metabolic rate constants in healthy adults. Seventeen healthy male long-distance runners were recruited and grouped according to the median \\(\\dot{\\text{V}}\\O2peak: very fit group (>60 mL/min/kg; n = 8 and fit group (<60 mL/min/kg; n = 9. Participants performed a graded exercise test for determining \\(\\dot{\\text{V}}\\O2peak; X-ray absorptiometry and magnetic resonance imaging were used to determine organ-tissue mass, and IHC was used to determine sleeping EE. The calculated REE was estimated as the sum of individual organ-tissue masses multiplied by their metabolic rate constants. No significant difference was observed in the measured sleeping EE, calculated REE, and their difference, as well as in the slopes and intercepts of the two regression lines between the groups. Moreover, no significant correlation between \\(\\dot{\\text{V}}\\O2peak and the difference in measured sleeping EE and calculated REE was observed for all subjects. Thus, aerobic endurance training does not result in a chronic elevation in the organ-tissue metabolic rate in cases with \\(\\dot{\\text{V}}\\O2peak of approximately 60 mL/min/kg.

  4. Organic Carbon, Nitrogen and Phosphorus Accumulation Rates in the Soils of the Everglades Mangrove Ecotone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoak, J. M.; Breithaupt, J. L.; Sanders, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    One of the fundamental questions with regard to coastal ecotones relates to their role in the transformation, transport and storage of biogeochemically important constituents and how that role may be altered by climate change. Coastal wetlands provide a range of valuable ecosystem services including sequestering organic carbon (OC) and nutrients in their soils at rates greater than terrestrial ecosystems on a per area basis. As such the Everglades mangrove ecotone, the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America, is a biogeochemical "hotspot" at the interface of freshwater marsh and the Gulf of Mexico. Over the last one hundred years this region has been impacted by a reduction in freshwater flow and a sea-level rise (SLR) of 2.3 mm/yr which combined to cause a landward shift in the ecotone. This creates an ideal setting to examine climate induced alterations in the mangrove-ecotone biogeochemical cycle. The ability of the Everglades mangrove forest to keep pace with SLR depends largely on the rate of organic matter accumulation as that accumulation is a key contributor to accretion. However, the basic threat from SLR can be exacerbated in some areas by accelerating organic matter mineralization due to increasing salinity. The increase in salinity supplies sulfate which functions as a terminal electron acceptor that soil microbes can utilize to enhance mineralization in the brackish ecotone regions of coastal wetlands. To investigate these processes, we measured mangrove forest soil accretion, OC, N and P accumulation rates over the most recent 10, 50 and 100 year periods (via 210Pb dating) from the Gulf of Mexico to the upper freshwater reaches of the mangrove forest within Everglades National Park. Lower organic carbon accumulation rates compared to the rest of the system were found in the ecotone region most susceptible to enhanced organic matter mineralization.

  5. Cooptation of Peer Support Staff: Quantitative Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Alberta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective In 2007, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS sent a letter to state Medicaid directors outlining requirements for implementing peer-based recovery support services (P-BRSS as a Medicaid-funded service. Since then, 30 states have implemented these services. Although the literature describing implementation of P-BRSS has identified the cooptation of peer support staff (PSS as a barrier to the effective provision of P-BRSS, the evidence for it remains anecdotal. This study attempts to determine if the context of employment in either a treatment organization or peer organization affected cooptation. Methods We conducted a survey of PSS in the fall of 2013. In all, 92 of the 181 respondents were working as PSS at the time, 53 in treatment organizations. Chi-square analysis was used to determine if the context of employment had an effect on the cooptation of peer staff. Results Peer staff working in treatment organizations reported that they were supervised by treatment staff and participated in employment-related training to improve their skills at providing treatment services more frequently than their counterparts in peer organizations. Peer staff working in treatment organizations also participated in training and education to prepare for employment as treatment professionals more frequently than peer staff working in peer organizations. Conclusions and Implications for Practice Peer staff members working in treatment organizations are subject to processes of acculturation into professional cultures that peer staff working in peer organizations are not. Effective implementation of P-BRSS should include specific efforts to minimize the cooptation of peer staff.

  6. Heart-rate variability depression in porcine peritonitis-induced sepsis without organ failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarkovska, Dagmar; Valesova, Lenka; Chvojka, Jiri; Benes, Jan; Danihel, Vojtech; Sviglerova, Jitka; Nalos, Lukas; Matejovic, Martin; Stengl, Milan

    2017-05-01

    Depression of heart-rate variability (HRV) in conditions of systemic inflammation has been shown in both patients and experimental animal models and HRV has been suggested as an early indicator of sepsis. The sensitivity of HRV-derived parameters to the severity of sepsis, however, remains unclear. In this study we modified the clinically relevant porcine model of peritonitis-induced sepsis in order to avoid the development of organ failure and to test the sensitivity of HRV to such non-severe conditions. In 11 anesthetized, mechanically ventilated and instrumented domestic pigs of both sexes, sepsis was induced by fecal peritonitis. The dose of feces was adjusted and antibiotic therapy was administered to avoid multiorgan failure. Experimental subjects were screened for 40 h from the induction of sepsis. In all septic animals, sepsis with hyperdynamic circulation and increased plasma levels of inflammatory mediators developed within 12 h from the induction of peritonitis. The sepsis did not progress to multiorgan failure and there was no spontaneous death during the experiment despite a modest requirement for vasopressor therapy in most animals (9/11). A pronounced reduction of HRV and elevation of heart rate developed quickly (within 5 h, time constant of 1.97 ± 0.80 h for HRV parameter TINN) upon the induction of sepsis and were maintained throughout the experiment. The frequency domain analysis revealed a decrease in the high-frequency component. The reduction of HRV parameters and elevation of heart rate preceded sepsis-associated hemodynamic changes by several hours (time constant of 11.28 ± 2.07 h for systemic vascular resistance decline). A pronounced and fast reduction of HRV occurred in the setting of a moderate experimental porcine sepsis without organ failure. Inhibition of parasympathetic cardiac signaling probably represents the main mechanism of HRV reduction in sepsis. The sensitivity of HRV to systemic inflammation may allow

  7. Staff development and employee welfare practices and their effect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Every organization primarily needs committed and dedicated staff that will help the organization to meet its tactical and strategic objectives. The study examines whether staff development policies exist in three special libraries in Ghana, and whether training programmes are being offered to increase staff competence, ...

  8. Effect of body size on organ-specific mitochondrial respiration rate of the largemouth bronze gudgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yiping; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Yurong; Huang, Qingda

    2013-06-01

    The effects of body size on the mitochondrial respiration rate were assessed in the heart, brain, gill, liver, and red muscle of largemouth bronze gudgeon, Coreius guichenoti, from the Yangtze River. Body mass had a significant influence on the state 3 oxygen consumption rate of the mitochondria from the heart, gill, and red muscle. The relationships between body mass (M, g) and state 3 oxygen consumption rate (V(state 3), nmol O min(-1) mg(-1)) of the mitochondria were represented by the following: V(state 3) = 3.56M(0.71) for heart, V(state 3) = 4.64M(0.50) for red muscle, and V(state 3) = 473.73M(-0.82) for gill. There was a significant difference in V(state 3), V(state 4), and respiratory control ratio among organs and all were highest in the heart. Our results suggest that the relationship between mitochondrial respiratory rate and body size varies among organs. The high mitochondrial respiratory rate in the heart of the largemouth gudgeon suggests that it has the highest oxidative capacity.

  9. 40 CFR 1.25 - Staff Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff Offices. 1.25 Section 1.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters § 1.25 Staff Offices. (a) Office of Administrative Law Judges. The Office of...

  10. E3 Staff Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E3 Staff database is maintained by E3 PDMS (Professional Development & Management Services) office. The database is Mysql. It is manually updated by E3 staff as...

  11. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Typically, ground staff scheduling is centrally planned for each terminal in an airport. The advantage of this is that the staff is efficiently utilized, but a disadvantage is that staff spends considerable time walking between stands. In this paper a decentralized approach for ground staff...... scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the staff scheduling is planned decentralized for each zone. The advantage of this approach is that the staff...... work in a smaller area of the terminal and thus spends less time walking between stands. When planning decentralized the allocation of stands to flights influences the staff scheduling since the workload in a zone depends on which flights are allocated to stands in the zone. Hence solving the problem...

  12. ESTIMATION OF FLEXIBILITY OF AN ORGANIZATION ON THE GROUND OF THE CALCULATION OF PROFIT MARGIN RATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Gennadevna Rybakova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of the flexibility of an organization as the ability to adapt effectively to the external environment. The authors have identified and investigated different approaches to estimating the flexibility of an organization on the ground of flexibility grading, calculation of the general index of flexibility as well as the calculation of flexibility’s ranking score. We have identified the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches. A new method of the estimation of an organization’s flexibility on the ground of the calculation of relative profit margin has been developed. This method is the multifunctional assessment tool of enterprise’s functionability in the current context of difficult and volatile economic environment. It allows in the early stage to identify negative trends in the production and financial figures and thus, it enables the organizational leadership to take steps in advance in order to avert a crisis in its activity. Keeping the profit margin at the same rate at the forced contraction of output, because of the negative impact of external factors, will confirm that the organization has adapted to the external environment and, therefore, it is flexible. The organization can be considered with margin rate beginning to low up to zero value as an organization with an insufficient level of flexibility that is at the “zone of crisis” and it is characterized by the depletion of reserved funds and reduction of current assets. Loss-maker is nonflexible and the presence of loss means that the organization has an evident sign of crisis and it can be bankrupt.

  13. Influence of the organic matter and soil water deficit on the castor bean absolute growth rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Rogerio Dantas de; Guerra, Hugo O. Carvallo; Chaves, Lucia Helena G. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UAEAg/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia Agricola; Araujo, Ester Luiz de; Nascimento, Elka Costa Santos; Barros Junior, Genival [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Even when under low precipitations conditions, the castor bean production decrease, it constitutes a very good alternative. It has an elevated economical importance, because from the plant it is used their leaves, stem and seeds. From the stem it is obtained cellulose for the paper industry, from the leaves textile products and from the seeds oil and tort. The oil is the only glycerin soluble in alcohol and the base for several industrial products such as the biodiesel. The objective of the present work was to study the effect of different soil water and soil organic matter on the castor bean, BRS 188 cultivar rate growth. The experiment was conducted from April to August 2006 under greenhouse conditions using a randomized block 2x4 factorial design with two soil organic mater content (5.0 g.kg{sup -1} e 25.0 g.kg{sup -1}), four levels of available water (100, 90, 80 e 70% ) and three replicates. For this, 24 plastic containers, 75 kg capacity, were used on which was grown one plant 120 days after the seedling. At regular intervals the plant height was measured and the results analyzed statistically. For the qualitative treatments (with and without organic matter) the treatment means were compared through the Tukey test. For the quantitative ones (water levels) regressions were used. It was observed that both, organic matter and available water for plants proportionated benefit effects to the growth rate of the plant. (author)

  14. Organizational climate partially mediates the effect of culture on work attitudes and staff turnover in mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; Sawitzky, Angelina C

    2006-05-01

    Staff turnover in mental health service organizations is an ongoing problem with implications for staff morale, productivity, organizational effectiveness, and implementation of innovation. Recent studies in public sector services have examined the impact of organizational culture and climate on work attitudes (i.e., job satisfaction and organizational commitment) and, ultimately, staff turnover. However, mediational models of the impact of culture and climate on work attitudes have not been examined. The present study examined full and partial mediation models of the effects of culture and climate on work attitudes and the subsequent impact of work attitudes on staff turnover. Multilevel structural equation models supported a partial mediation model in which organizational culture had both direct influence on work attitudes and indirect influence through organizational climate. Work attitudes significantly predicted one-year staff turnover rates. These findings support the contention that both culture and climate impact work attitudes and subsequent staff turnover.

  15. Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Employees Turnover Rate in FMCG Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razi Sultan Siddiqui

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The study has been designed to determine the impact of emotional intelligence on turnover rate of first line managers of FMCG organizations in Karachi. It is generally believed that low emotional intelligence is a determinant of high turnover rate in first line managers of the FMCG organization. A sample of 40 employees from different FMCG organizations of Karachi who are performing their duties at first line management level falling within the age range of 20–40 years, with education level from Intermediate to Masters has been drawn randomly. Personal information of the participants is collected through demographic information sheet. TEIQue (Petrides and Furnhm, 2003 questionnaire is used to measure the variables of employees’ turnover and trait emotional intelligence. All participants have to respond on a seven point Likert scale. A higher score on this scale indicates higher level of emotional intelligence. In order to analyze the data, Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS, V, 12 is applied. Descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation is applied to study the sample characteristics and linear regression analysis and Karl Pearson’s Coefficient of Correlation (Pearson’s product moment correlation coefficient is calculated. This analysis shows strong relation of low emotional intelligence with increased employee job turnover rate.

  16. CHIEF OF STAFF FINANCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Internal Audit, Military. Museums, Documentation. Service, Language. Service, Financial Co-ordination, Chief Pay Mas- ter, Programming and Budget, Electronic Data. Processing and Expenditure Control. Chief of Staff Finance. With effect from 13 February 1978 Chief of Staff. Management Services became Chief of Staff.

  17. Dynamic changes of dissolved organic matter in membrane bioreactors at different organic loading rates: Evidence from spectroscopic and chromatographic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Tahir; Cho, Jinwoo; Hur, Jin

    2017-06-01

    Excitation emission matrix-parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) were utilized to explore the dynamics in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), soluble microbial products (SMP), and effluent for the membrane bioreactors at two different organic loading rates (OLRs). Combination of three different fluorescent components explained the compositional changes of dissolved organic matter. The lower OLR resulted in a higher production of tryptophan-like component (C1) in EPS, while the opposite trends were found for the other two components (humic-like C2 and tyrosine-like C3), signifying the role of C1 in the endogenous condition. Larger sized molecules were more greatly produced in EPS at the lower OLR. Meanwhile, all the size fractions of SMP were more abundant at the higher OLR particular for the early phase of the operation. Irrespective of the OLR, the higher degrees of the membrane retention were found for relatively large sized and protein-like molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Methane production rates from natural organics of glacial lake clay and granitic groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, M.I.; Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Hawkins, J.L.; Hamon, C.J.; Motycka, M.

    1996-05-01

    Engineered barrier materials are an integral part of the proposed Canadian concept for the disposal of used nuclear fuel or high level waste. Components of these barriers, such as the buffer and backfill clays surrounding the waste containers in a vault, and granitic groundwater, naturally contain small quantities of organic material (up to about 1.2 wt%). Despite high temperatures, space and water limitations and radiation effects, the question remains whether gas could be produced from these organics as a result of biological processes. Degradation of organic carbon by microbes can produce gases such as carbon dioxide (C0 2 ) and methane (CH 4 ). This work demonstrates that methane is produced in natural systems containing 2 . In deep fracture zone groundwater, the largest methane production rate was 0.19 mole %/day or 5 μg CH 4 /L groundwater per day, at STP. This can be compared with the methane production rate of 1 μg CH 4 /(kg clay · day) at STP in an earlier experiment containing added organic material. Using this rate of 5 pg CH 4 /(L groundwater · day) (3.75 μg C/(L groundwater · day)), all of the organic C in the groundwater, assuming it is equally bioavailable, would have been converted to CH 4 during the timeframe of this experiment. Enhanced methane production occurred with an increase in natural organic carbon, an increase in the microbe population and with the addition of Fe. Steady-state methane production rates of 10 to 25 μg CH 4 / L groundwater per day have been repeatedly observed in clay-free systems. The effects of microbial metabolism, the requirement for a facilitating consortium, the Eh, the pH, the salinity, the groundwater sulphate concentration, the presence of methanotrophs and the sorption effects of clay interlayers are discussed as possible explanations for the inhibition of methanogenesis and methane production in the presence of clay and crushed granite. (author). 49 refs., 11 tabs., 12 figs

  19. An international comparison of the effect of policy shifts to organ donation following cardiocirculatory death (DCD on donation rates after brain death (DBD and transplantation rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aric Bendorf

    Full Text Available During the past decade an increasing number of countries have adopted policies that emphasize donation after cardiocirculatory death (DCD in an attempt to address the widening gap between the demand for transplantable organs and the availability of organs from donation after brain death (DBD donors. In order to examine how these policy shifts have affected overall deceased organ donor (DD and DBD rates, we analyzed deceased donation rates from 82 countries from 2000-2010. On average, overall DD, DBD and DCD rates have increased over time, with the proportion of DCD increasing 0.3% per year (p = 0.01. Countries with higher DCD rates have, on average, lower DBD rates. For every one-per million population (pmp increase in the DCD rate, the average DBD rate decreased by 1.02 pmp (95% CI: 0.73, 1.32; p<0.0001. We also found that the number of organs transplanted per donor was significantly lower in DCD when compared to DBD donors with 1.51 less transplants per DCD compared to DBD (95% CI: 1.23, 1.79; p<0.001. Whilst the results do not infer a causal relationship between increased DCD and decreased DBD rates, the significant correlation between higher DCD and lower DBD rates coupled with the reduced number of organs transplanted per DCD donor suggests that a national policy focus on DCD may lead to an overall reduction in the number of transplants performed.

  20. Research on release rate of volatile organic compounds in typical vessel cabin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Jinlan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC should be efficiently controlled in vessel cabins to ensure the crew's health and navigation safety. As an important parameter, research on release rate of VOCs in cabins is required. [Methods] This paper develops a method to investigate this parameter of a ship's cabin based on methods used in other closed indoor environments. A typical vessel cabin is sampled with Tenax TA tubes and analyzed by Automated Thermal Desorption-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (ATD-GC/MS. The lumped mode is used and the release rate of Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene and Xylene (BTEX, the typical representatives of VOCs, is obtained both in closed and ventilated conditions. [Results] The results show that the content of xylene and Total Volatile Organic Compounds (TVOC exceed the indoor environment standards in ventilated conditions. The BTEX release rate is similar in both conditions except for the benzene. [Conclusions] This research builds a method to measure the release rate of VOCs, providing references for pollution character evaluation and ventilation and purification system design.

  1. Nutrient and Organic Carbon Losses, Enrichment Rate, and Cost of Water Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildegardis Bertol

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Soil erosion from water causes loss of nutrients and organic carbon, enriches the environment outside the erosion site, and results in costs. The no-tillage system generates increased nutrient and C content in the topsoil and, although it controls erosion, it can produce a more enriched runoff than in the conventional tillage system. This study was conducted in a Humic Cambisol in natural rainfall from 1997 to 2012 to quantify the contents and total losses of nutrients and organic C in soil runoff, and to calculate the enrichment rates and the cost of these losses. The treatments evaluated were: a soil with a crop, consisting of conventional tillage with one plowing + two harrowings (CT, minimum tillage with one chisel plowing + one harrowing (MT, and no tillage (NT; and b bare soil: one plowing + two harrowings (BS. In CT, MT, and NT, black oat, soybean, vetch, corn, turnip, and black beans were cultivated. Over the 15 years, 15.5 Mg ha-1 of limestone, 525 kg ha-1 of N (urea, 1,302 kg ha-1 of P2O5 (triple superphosphate, and 1,075 kg ha-1 of K2O (potassium chloride were used in the soil. The P, K, Ca, Mg, and organic C contents in the soil were determined and also the P, K, Ca, and Mg sediments in the runoff water. From these contents, the total losses, the enrichment rates (ER, and financial losses were calculated. The NT increased the P, K, and organic C contents in the topsoil. The nutrients and organic C content in the runoff from NT was greater than from CT, showing that NT was not a fully conservationist practice for soil. The linear model y = a + bx fit the data within the level of significance (p≤0.01 when the values of P, K, and organic C in the sediments from erosion were related to those values in the soil surface layer. The nutrient and organic C contents were higher in the sediments from erosion than in the soil where the erosion originated, generating values of ER>1 for P, K, and organic C. The value of the total losses

  2. Impact of a Bereavement and Donation Service incorporating mandatory 'required referral' on organ donation rates: a model for the implementation of the Organ Donation Taskforce's recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, F; Cochran, D; Thornton, S

    2009-08-01

    In 2008 the Organ Donation Taskforce published its recommendations for increasing organ donation in the UK by 50% over 5 years. Bolton NHS Trust has addressed the problem of low rates of organ donation by amalgamating Bereavement and Donation Services and introducing a trigger to refer automatically all potential organ donors to the regional transplant donor co-ordinators. We audited the ability of the new service to deliver the aims and recommendations of the Organ Donation Taskforce. Following the changes in service provision the number of tissue donors rose from six in 2002 to 246 in 2007. In the same period solid organ donation rates remained unchanged. The introduction of an automatic trigger for referral of potential donors in 2007 resulted in 31 referrals and 11 successful multi-organ donors. The current service exceeds the aims of the Taskforce and offers the potential to meet UK organ donation targets without resorting to an 'opt out' system of presumed consent.

  3. Improvement in Device Performance and Reliability of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes through Deposition Rate Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Wei Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated a fabrication technique to reduce the driving voltage, increase the current efficiency, and extend the operating lifetime of an organic light-emitting diode (OLED by simply controlling the deposition rate of bis(10-hydroxybenzo[h]qinolinato beryllium (Bebq2 used as the emitting layer and the electron-transport layer. In our optimized device, 55 nm of Bebq2 was first deposited at a faster deposition rate of 1.3 nm/s, followed by the deposition of a thin Bebq2 (5 nm layer at a slower rate of 0.03 nm/s. The Bebq2 layer with the faster deposition rate exhibited higher photoluminescence efficiency and was suitable for use in light emission. The thin Bebq2 layer with the slower deposition rate was used to modify the interface between the Bebq2 and cathode and hence improve the injection efficiency and lower the driving voltage. The operating lifetime of such a two-step deposition OLED was 1.92 and 4.6 times longer than that of devices with a single deposition rate, that is, 1.3 and 0.03 nm/s cases, respectively.

  4. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  5. Rating

    OpenAIRE

    Karas, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Charakteristika ratingu. Dělení a druhy ratingu (rating emise × rating emitenta; dlouhodobý rating × krátkodobý rating; mezinárodní rating × lokální rating). Obecné požadavky kladené na rating. Proces tvorby ratingu. Vyžádaný rating. Nevyžádaný rating. Ratingový proces na bázi volně přístupných informací. Uplatňované ratingové systémy. Ratingová kriteria. Využití a interpretace ratingové známky. Funkce ratingu. Rating v souvislosti s BASEL II. Rating v souvislosti s hospodářskými krizemi....

  6. Workplace violence against medical staff in healthcare facilities in Barbados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, M; Morris, E; Sobers-Grannum, N

    2016-10-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests increasing workplace violence against healthcare workers in the Caribbean, but the prevalence is largely undocumented. To determine the prevalence of workplace violence reported by medical staff at primary care clinics in Barbados. A study utilizing a modified version of the standard World Health Organization Workplace Violence Questionnaire, designed to assess the incidence, types and features of workplace violence. All nursing and physician staff on duty at the island's eight primary care clinics during the study period were invited to participate. Of the 102 respondents (72% response rate), 63% of nursing and physician staff at the polyclinics in Barbados reported at least one episode of violence in the past year. The majority reported being exposed to verbal abuse (60%) and 19% reported being exposed to bullying. Seven percent of the staff reported incidents of sexual harassment, 3% physical violence and another 3% reported racial harassment. Patients emerged as the main perpetrators of violence (64%). Logistic regression showed statistically significant associations between gender and workplace violence. Females and nurses were more predisposed to experience violent incidents than males and physicians. Over a half of medical staff surveyed reported experiencing some type of violence in the past year, female gender being a significant predictor of abuse. Adequate documentation and implementing clear policies and violence prevention programmes in health institutions are crucial steps towards addressing this issue. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Performance and behaviour of chickens with different growing rate reared according to the organic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Bernardini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance and the behaviour of three different chicken strains, reared according to the EEC-Regulation 1804/1999  on organic system, were compared. The strains had very slow (Robusta maculata, slow (Kabir and fast (Ross growing  rates, respectively. The trial was carried out on 200 chickens (male and female per strain. Rearing lasted 81 days as  required by the EEC Regulation. At slaughter age, 20 birds per group were killed. Robusta maculata and Kabir chickens  showed more intense walking activity and better foraging aptitude; their antioxidant capacity was also superior. Ross  chickens had a good growth rate and feed conversion index, reaching an excellent body weight, but the mortality and  the culling rate were high indicating that fast-growing strains do not adapt well to organic production. Robusta macula-  ta showed the worst productive performance although the mortality was low and Kabir birds gave intermediate results.  The carcass traits were the best in Ross and the poorest in Robusta maculata. Male chickens were heavier and leaner  than females. 

  8. Food composition influences metabolism, heart rate and organ growth during digestion in Python regius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Poul Secher; Enok, Sanne; Overgaard, Johannes; Wang, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    Digestion in pythons is associated with a large increase in oxygen consumption (SDA), increased cardiac output and growth in visceral organs assisting in digestion. The processes leading to the large postprandial rise in metabolism in snakes is subject to opposing views. Gastric work, protein synthesis and organ growth have each been speculated to be major contributors to the SDA. To investigate the role of food composition on SDA, heart rate (HR) and organ growth, 48 ball pythons (Python regius) were fed meals of either fat, glucose, protein or protein combined with carbonate. Our study shows that protein, in the absence or presence of carbonate causes a large SDA response, while glucose caused a significantly smaller SDA response and digestion of fat failed to affect metabolism. Addition of carbonate to the diet to stimulate gastric acid secretion did not increase the SDA response. These results support protein synthesis as a major contributor to the SDA response and show that increased gastric acid secretion occurs at a low metabolic cost. The increase in metabolism was supported by tachycardia caused by altered autonomic regulation as well as an increased non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) tone in response to all diets, except for the lipid meal. Organ growth only occurred in the small intestine and liver in snakes fed on a high protein diet. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Flow Rate Control Approach on Off-Design Analysis of an Organic Rankine Cycle System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben-Ran Fu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study explored effects of off-design heat source temperature (TW,in or flow rate (mW on heat transfer characteristics and performance of an organic Rankine cycle system by controlling the flow rate of working fluid R245fa (i.e., the operation flow rate of R245fa was controlled to ensure that R245fa reached saturation liquid and vapor states at the outlets of the preheater and evaporator, respectively. The results showed that the operation flow rate of R245fa increased with TW,in or mW; higher TW,in or mW yielded better heat transfer performance of the designed preheater and required higher heat capacity of the evaporator; heat transfer characteristics of preheater and evaporator differed for off-design TW,in and mW; and net power output increased with TW,in or mW. The results further indicated that the control strategy should be different for various off-design conditions. Regarding maximum net power output, the flow rate control approach is optimal when TW,in or mW exceeds the design point, but the pressure control approach is better when TW,in or mW is lower than the design point.

  10. Increasing organ donation rates by revealing recipient details to families of potential donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, David; Gardiner, Dale

    2018-02-01

    Many families refuse to consent to donation from their deceased relatives or over-rule the consent given before death by the patient, but giving families more information about the potential recipients of organs could reduce refusal rates. In this paper, we analyse arguments for and against doing so, and conclude that this strategy should be attempted. While it would be impractical and possibly unethical to give details of actual potential recipients, generic, realistic information about the people who could benefit from organs should be provided to families before they make a decision about donation or attempt to over-rule it. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Stress, Visual and Musculoskeletal Complaints in Open Plan Office Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vangelova K.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to identify the main ergonomic and organizational risks contributing to stress, visual and musculoskeletal disorders in open plan office workers. A total of 73 subjects of mean age 28.3 ±4.7 years were studied. Measurements of salivary cortisol and self-ratings for strain, fatigue, stress symptoms, visual and musculoskeletal complaints were performed. The work places were organized well, but the studied staff reported high work load and time pressure. The data showed higher cortisol levels during the workday under time pressure. High incidence of visual and musculoskeletal complaints mainly in the region of the back and the neck were found, associated with flickering and blinks on the screen monitors and overtime. Optimizing workplace organization could help reduce stress and health complaints of office staff.

  12. Enhancement of the rate of solar photocatalytic mineralization of organic pollutants by inorganic oxidizing species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malato, S.; Blanco, J.; Richter, C.; Braun, B.; Maldonado, M.I. [Plataforma Solar de Almeria PSA, Crta Senes s/n, Tabernas, Almeriav 04200 (Spain)

    1998-08-31

    Particulate suspensions of TiO{sub 2} irradiated with natural solar light in a large experimental plant catalyze the oxidation of a typical organic contaminant: pentachlorophenol (PCP). The addition of oxidants, concentration of which is kept constant during treatment, such as hydrogen peroxide, peroxymonosulphate (oxone) and peroxydisulphate increases the rate of photodegradation of PCP in the following order: S{sub 2}O{sup 2-}{sub 8}->Oxone->H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Peroxydisulphate (10mM), selected as the best oxidant studied, has been applied to the development of a solar photocatalytic plant for the treatment of commercial pesticide rinsates found in the wastewater produced by a pesticide container recycling plant, which includes the correct treatment of this highly contaminating effluent. The first results, without process or hardware optimisation, show that peroxydisulphate enhances the photocatalytic mineralization rate at least five times

  13. Growth rate characteristics of acidophilic heterotrophic organisms from mine waste rock piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacob, T. W.; Silverstein, J.; Jenkins, J.; Andre, B. J.; Rajaram, H.

    2010-12-01

    Autotrophic iron oxidizing bacteria play a key role in pyrite oxidation and generation of acid mine drainage AMD. Scarcity of organic substrates in many disturbed sites insures that IOB have sufficient oxygen and other nutrients for growth. It is proposed that addition of organic carbon substrate to waste rock piles will result in enrichment of heterotrophic microorganisms limiting the role of IOB in AMD generation. Previous researchers have used the acidophilic heterotroph Acidiphilium cryptum as a model to study the effects of organic substrate addition on the pyrite oxidation/AMD cycle. In order to develop a quantitative model of effects such as competition for oxygen, it is necessary to use growth and substrate consumption rate expressions, and one approach is to choose a model strain such as A. cryptum for kinetic studies. However we have found that the growth rate characteristics of A. cryptum may not provide an accurate model of the remediation effects of organic addition to subsurface mined sites. Fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) assays of extracts of mine waste rock enriched with glucose and yeast extract did not produce countable numbers of cells in the Acidiphilium genus, with a detection limit of3 x 104 cells/gram rock, despite evidence of the presence of well established heterotrophic organisms. However, an MPN enrichment produced heterotrophic population estimates of 1x107 and 1x109 cells/gram rock. Growth rate studies of A. cryptum showed that cultures took 120 hours to degrade 50% of an initial glucose concentration of 2,000 mg/L. However a mixed culture enriched from mine waste rock consumed 100% of the same amount of glucose in 24 hours. Substrate consumption data for the mixed culture were fit to a Monod growth model: {dS}/{dt} = μ_{max}S {( {X_0}/{Y} + S_0 -S )}/{(K_s +S)} Kinetic parameters were estimated utilizing a non linear regression method coupled with an ODE solver. The maximum specific growth rate of the mixed population with

  14. Examination of Environmental Factors Influencing the Emission Rates of Semivolatile Organic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunwoo Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Some types of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs that are emitted from plastics used in building materials and household appliances have been associated with health risks, even at low concentrations. It has been reported that di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP—one of the most commonly used plasticizers—causes asthma and allergic symptoms in children at home. The amount of emitted DEHP, which is classified as a SVOC, can be measured using a microchamber by the thermal desorption test chamber method. To accurately measure the SVOC emission rates, the relation between SVOC and environmental factors should be clarified. Herein, we examined the effects of the temperature, relative humidity, concentration of airborne particles, and flow field in the microchamber on SVOC emission rates. The flow fields inside the microchamber were analyzed via computational fluid dynamics (CFD. The emission rate of SVOC released from PVC flooring increased under high temperatures and at high concentrations of airborne particles but did not depend on the relative humidity. From an evaluation performed using an index of air change efficiency, such as the air age and the coefficient of air change performance, we found that a fixed air exchange rate of 1.5 h−1 in the microchamber is desirable.

  15. Assessing the Role of Dissolved Organic Phosphate on Rates of Microbial Phosphorus Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, A. C.; Popendorf, K. J.; Duhamel, S.

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an element crucial to life, and it is limiting in many parts of the ocean. In oligotrophic environments, the dissolved P pool is cycled rapidly through the activity of microbes, with turnover times of several hours or less. The overarching aim of this study was to assess the flux of P from picoplankton to the dissolved pool and the role this plays in fueling rapid P cycling. To determine if specific microbial groups are responsible for significant return of P to the dissolved pool during cell lifetime, we compared the rate of cellular P turnover (cell-Pτ, the rate of cellular P uptake divided by cellular P content) to the rate of cellular biomass turnover (cellτ). High rates of P return to the dissolved pool during cell lifetime (high cell-Pτ/cellτ) indicate significant P regeneration, fueling more rapid turnover of the dissolved P pool. We hypothesized that cell-Pτ/cellτ varies widely across picoplankton groups. One factor influencing this variation may be each microbial group's relative uptake of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) versus dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP). As extracellular hydrolysis is necessary for P incorporation from DOP, this process may return more P to the dissolved pool than DIP incorporation. This leads to the question: does a picoplankton's relative uptake of DOP (versus DIP) affect the rate at which it returns phosphorus to the dissolved pool? To address this question, we compared the rate of cellular P turnover based on uptake of DOP and uptake DIP using cultured representatives of three environmentally significant picoplankton groups: Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus, and heterotrophic bacteria. These different picoplankton groups are known to take up different ratios of DOP to DIP, and may in turn make significantly different contributions to the regeneration and cycling phosphorus. These findings have implications towards our understanding of the timeframes of biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus in the

  16. The impact of sea-level rise on organic matter decay rates in Chesapeake Bay brackish tidal marshes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Kirwan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The balance between organic matter production and decay determines how fast coastal wetlands accumulate soil organic matter. Despite the importance of soil organic matter accumulation rates in influencing marsh elevation and resistance to sea-level rise, relatively little is known about how decomposition rates will respond to sea-level rise. Here, we estimate the sensitivity of decomposition to flooding by measuring rates of decay in 87 bags filled with milled sedge peat, including soil organic matter, roots and rhizomes. Experiments were located in field-based mesocosms along 3 mesohaline tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Mesocosm elevations were manipulated to influence the duration of tidal inundation. Although we found no significant influence of inundation on decay rate when bags from all study sites were analyzed together, decay rates at two of the sites increased with greater flooding. These findings suggest that flooding may enhance organic matter decay rates even in water-logged soils, but that the overall influence of flooding is minor. Our experiments suggest that sea-level rise will not accelerate rates of peat accumulation by slowing the rate of soil organic matter decay. Consequently, marshes will require enhanced organic matter productivity or mineral sediment deposition to survive accelerating sea-level rise.

  17. Nitrogen Addition Changes the Stoichiometry and Growth Rate of Different Organs in Pinus tabuliformis Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Jing

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nitrogen (N deposition could influence plant stoichiometry and growth rate and thus alter the structure and function of the ecosystem. However, the mechanism by which N deposition changes the stoichiometry and relative growth rate (RGR of plant organs, especially roots with different diameters, is unclear.Methods: We created a gradient of N availability (0–22.4 g N m-2 year-1 for Pinus tabuliformis seedlings for 3 years and examined changes in the carbon (C:N:phosphorus (P ratios and RGRs of the leaves, stems, and roots with four diameter classes (finest roots, <0.5 mm; finer roots, 0.5–1 mm; middle roots, 1–2 mm; and coarse roots, >2 mm.Results: (1 N addition significantly increased the C and N contents of the leaves and whole roots, the C content of the stems, the N:P ratios of the leaves and stems, and the C:P ratio of the whole roots. (2 In the root system, the C:N ratio of the finest roots and the C:P ratios of the finest and finer roots significantly changed with N addition. The N:P ratios of the finest, finer, and middle roots significantly increased with increasing amount of N added. The stoichiometric responses of the roots were more sensitive to N addition than those of the other organs (3 The RGR of all the organs significantly increased at low N addition levels (2.8–11.2 g N m-2 year-1 but decreased at high N addition levels (22.4 g N m-2 year-1. (4 The RGRs of the whole seedlings and leaves were not significantly correlated with their N:P ratios at low and high N addition levels. By contrast, the RGRs of the stems and roots showed a significantly positive correlation with their own N:P ratio only at low N addition level.Conclusion: Addition of N affected plant growth by altering the contents of C and N; the ratios of C, N, and P; and the RGRs of the organs. RGR is correlated with the N:P ratios of the stems and roots at low N addition level but not at high N addition level. This finding is inconsistent with the

  18. Influences of Organic Carbon Supply Rate on Uranium Bioreduction in Initially Oxidizing, Contaminated Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Daly, Rebecca A.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Herman, Don; Firestone, Mary K.

    2008-06-10

    Remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sediments through in-situ stimulation of bioreduction to insoluble UO{sub 2} is a potential treatment strategy under active investigation. Previously, we found that newly reduced U(IV) can be reoxidized under reducing conditions sustained by a continuous supply of organic carbon (OC) because of residual reactive Fe(III) and enhanced U(VI) solubility through complexation with carbonate generated through OC oxidation. That finding motivated this investigation directed at identifying a range of OC supply rates that is optimal for establishing U bioreduction and immobilization in initially oxidizing sediments. The effects of OC supply rate, from 0 to 580 mmol OC (kg sediment){sup -1} year{sup -1}, and OC form (lactate and acetate) on U bioreduction were tested in flow-through columns containing U-contaminated sediments. An intermediate supply rate on the order of 150 mmol OC (kg sediment){sup -1} year{sup -1} was determined to be most effective at immobilizing U. At lower OC supply rates, U bioreduction was not achieved, and U(VI) solubility was enhanced by complexation with carbonate (from OC oxidation). At the highest OC supply rate, resulting highly carbonate-enriched solutions also supported elevated levels of U(VI), even though strongly reducing conditions were established. Lactate and acetate were found to have very similar geochemical impacts on effluent U concentrations (and other measured chemical species), when compared at equivalent OC supply rates. While the catalysts of U(VI) reduction to U(IV) are presumably bacteria, the composition of the bacterial community, the Fe reducing community, and the sulfate reducing community had no direct relationship with effluent U concentrations. The OC supply rate has competing effects of driving reduction of U(VI) to low solubility U(IV) solids, as well as causing formation of highly soluble U(VI)-carbonato complexes. These offsetting influences will require careful control of OC

  19. Evaluating the methane generation rate constant (k value) of low-organic waste at Danish landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Zishen; Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The methane (CH4) generation rate constant (k value, yr(-1)) is an essential parameter when using first-order decay (FOD) landfill gas (LFG) generation models to estimate CH4 generation from landfills. Four categories of waste (street cleansing, mixed bulky, shredder, and sludge waste) with a low-organic content, as well as temporarily stored combustible waste, were sampled from four Danish landfills. Anaerobic degradation experiments were set up in duplicate for all waste samples and incubated for 405 days, while the cumulative CH4 generation was continuously monitored. Applying FOD equations to the experimental results, half-life time values (t½, yr) and k values of various waste categories were determined. In general, similar waste categories obtained from different Danish landfills showed similar results. Sludge waste had the highest k values, which were in the range 0.156-0.189 yr(-1). The combustible and street cleansing waste showed k values of 0.023-0.027 yr(-1) and 0.073-0.083 yr(-1), respectively. The lowest k values were obtained for mixed bulky and shredder wastes ranging from 0.013 to 0.017 yr(-1). Most low-organic waste samples showed lower k values in comparison to the default numeric values in current FOD models (e.g., IPCC, LandGEM, and Afvalzorg). Compared with the k values reported in the literature, this research determined low-organic waste for the first time via reliable large-scale and long-term experiments. The degradation parameters provided in this study are valuable when using FOD LFG generation models to estimate CH4 generation from modern landfills that receive only low-organic waste. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 7 CFR 1700.33 - Financial Services Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial Services Staff. 1700.33 Section 1700.33... AGRICULTURE GENERAL INFORMATION Agency Organization and Functions § 1700.33 Financial Services Staff. The Financial Services Staff evaluates the financial condition of financially troubled borrowers in order to...

  1. Methods for diagnosing the level of preparedness of future specialists of physical education and sports unto the organization labour staff of youth sports school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perepletchikov D.A.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical questions of determination of level of readiness of future specialists are examined to organization of activity of child's sporting schools. The plan of creation of structural functional model of readiness of specialists is presented to organization of activity of child's sporting schools. Procedure of determination of specific gravity of factors of professional readiness of specialists is described to organization of activity of child's sporting schools. The qualimetry vehicle of determination of level of their professional readiness is given. The general view of form of expert estimation of this readiness is presented.

  2. Comparison of organic versus inorganic trace minerals on rate and efficiency of gain and pregnancy rates in beef heifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives of this experiment were to compare rate and efficiency of gain, and conception rates of yearling heifers supplemented with Cu, Zn and Mn in either a methionine chelated form (ORG) or the same trace minerals in a SO4 form. The experimental design utilized 3 ranches, each having 2 replicati...

  3. Managing a multicultural radiology staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhizar, R; Dowd, S; Giger, J

    1997-01-01

    Opportunities for minorities in healthcare increased with the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s. More recently, funds from the U.S. Public Health Service have been targeted toward disadvantaged minorities. The workforce in healthcare, and in business in general, has become increasingly multicultural. Much of the literature in healthcare management lacks practical guidelines for managing a diverse workforce. Communication, both verbal and nonverbal, and culture are closely intertwined. Managers, as they develop multicultural teams, will need to understand how culture influences communication in their organizations. Space, spatial behavior, and cultural attitudes influence people's behavior. This is a particularly important consideration for a radiology staff, which must often work in close quarters. For some cultural groups, the family as an organization has more significance than even personal, work-related or national causes. People's orientation to time, whether for the past, present or future, is usually related to the culture in which they grew up. Again, this may become an important issue for a radiology administrator whose organization must run punctually and time-efficiently. How patients feel about their environment, whether they believe they are in control or believe in an external locus of control, is of particular interest to those who attempt therapeutic changes in a patient's healthcare. Does the patient believe that illness is divine will or that suffering is intrinsic to the human condition? There is increasing research in the United States to show that people do differ biologically according to race. Such differences exist among patients as well as among staff members. It has been popular to assume that differences among races do not exist. Unfortunately such an attitude does not allow for different attributes and responses of individuals. Managing a multicultural staff presents a challenge to administrators who must be skilled in working with

  4. Justification of the conceptual construct "readiness to the labour organization staff sports schools" in the context of vocational training future professionals of physical culture and sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perepletchikov D.A.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Was analyzed literature devoted to the preparation of students of physical education to administrative activities. In the context of their training we held a comparative analysis of the approaches to organize the pedagogical process. As a reference point for the formation of professional preparedness specialist physical education and sports identified qualifying characteristics posts in this industry. Based on the analysis of literature given the definition of the concept of "readiness for organization of the Youth sports school.

  5. Soil Fertility and Electrical Conductivity Affected by Organic Waste Rates and Nutrient Inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi Lopes do Carmo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The composition of organic waste (OW and its effect on soil processes may change soil fertility and electrical conductivity (EC. The side effects of waste use in crop fertilization are poorly understood for Brazilian soils. This study examined the effect of the addition of 15 different organic wastes to Oxisols and a Neosol on pH, base saturation, EC, cation exchange capacity (CEC at pH 7, and the availability of Al, macro (P, K, Ca2+, Mg2+ and S and micronutrients (B, Fe2+, Mn2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+. Soil samples (150 g were treated with chicken, pig, horse, cattle, and quail manures, sewage sludge 1 and 2, eucalyptus sawdust, plant substrate, coconut fiber, pine bark, coffee husk, peat, limed compost, and biochar. Wastes were added considering a fixed amount of C (2 g kg-1, which resulted in waste rates ranging from 2.5 to 25.6 Mg ha-1. The soil-waste mixtures were incubated for 330 days in laboratory conditions. The waste liming or acidification values were soil-dependent. The use of some manures and compost increased the pH to levels above of those considered adequate for plant growth. The soil EC was slightly increased in the Neosol and in the medium textured Oxisol, but it was sharply changed (from 195 to 394 µS cm-1 by the addition of organic wastes in the clayey Oxisol, although the EC values were below the range considered safe for plant growth. Changes in the soil availability of P, K+, Ca2+ and Zn2+ were highly related to the inputs of these nutrients by the wastes, and other factors in soil changed due to waste use. Organic waste use simultaneously affects different soil fertility attributes; thus, in addition to the target nutrient added to the soil, the soil acidity buffering capacity and the waste liming and agronomic value must be taken into account in the waste rate definition.

  6. Behavioral Emergency Response Team: Implementation Improves Patient Safety, Staff Safety, and Staff Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicko, Cdr Jennifer M; Schroeder, Lcdr Rebecca A; Byers, Cdr William S; Taylor, Lt Adam M; Spence, Cdr Dennis L

    2017-10-01

    Staff members working on our nonmental health (non-MH) units (i.e., medical-surgical [MS] units) were not educated in recognizing or deescalating behavioral emergencies. Published evidence suggests a behavioral emergency response team (BERT) composed of MH experts who assist with deescalating behavioral emergencies may be beneficial in these situations. Therefore, we sought to implement a BERT on the inpatient non-MH units at our military treatment facility. The objectives of this evidence-based practice process improvement project were to determine how implementation of a BERT affects staff and patient safety and to examine nursing staffs' level of knowledge, confidence, and support in caring for psychiatric patients and patients exhibiting behavioral emergencies. A BERT was piloted on one MS unit for 5 months and expanded to two additional units for 3 months. Pre- and postimplementation staff surveys were conducted, and the number of staff assaults and injuries, restraint usage, and security intervention were compared. The BERT responded to 17 behavioral emergencies. The number of assaults decreased from 10 (pre) to 1 (post); security intervention decreased from 14 to 1; and restraint use decreased from 8 to 1. MS staffs' level of BERT knowledge and rating of support between MH staff and their staff significantly increased. Both MS and MH nurses rated the BERT as supportive and effective. A BERT can assist with deescalating behavioral emergencies, and improve staff collaboration and patient and staff safety. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  7. Biotransformation of trace organic chemicals during groundwater recharge: How useful are first-order rate constants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnery, J; Wing, A D; Alidina, M; Drewes, J E

    2015-08-01

    This study developed relationships between the attenuation of emerging trace organic chemicals (TOrC) during managed aquifer recharge (MAR) as a function of retention time, system characteristics, and operating conditions using controlled laboratory-scale soil column experiments simulating MAR. The results revealed that MAR performance in terms of TOrC attenuation is primarily determined by key environmental parameters (i.e., redox, primary substrate). Soil columns with suboxic and anoxic conditions performed poorly (i.e., less than 30% attenuation of moderately degradable TOrC) in comparison to oxic conditions (on average between 70-100% attenuation for the same compounds) within a residence time of three days. Given this dependency on redox conditions, it was investigated if key parameter-dependent rate constants are more suitable for contaminant transport modeling to properly capture the dynamic TOrC attenuation under field-scale conditions. Laboratory-derived first-order removal kinetics were determined for 19 TOrC under three different redox conditions and rate constants were applied to MAR field data. Our findings suggest that simplified first-order rate constants will most likely not provide any meaningful results if the target compounds exhibit redox dependent biotransformation behavior or if the intention is to exactly capture the decline in concentration over time and distance at field-scale MAR. However, if the intention is to calculate the percent removal after an extended time period and subsurface travel distance, simplified first-order rate constants seem to be sufficient to provide a first estimate on TOrC attenuation during MAR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Organic carbon burial rates in mangrove sediments: Strengthening the global budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breithaupt, Joshua L.; Smoak, Joseph M.; Smith, Thomas J., III; Sanders, Christian J.; Hoare, Armando

    2012-09-01

    Mangrove wetlands exist in the transition zone between terrestrial and marine environments and as such were historically overlooked in discussions of terrestrial and marine carbon cycling. In recent decades, mangroves have increasingly been credited with producing and burying large quantities of organic carbon (OC). The amount of available data regarding OC burial in mangrove soils has more than doubled since the last primary literature review (2003). This includes data from some of the largest, most developed mangrove forests in the world, providing an opportunity to strengthen the global estimate. First-time representation is now included for mangroves in Brazil, Colombia, Malaysia, Indonesia, China, Japan, Vietnam, and Thailand, along with additional data from Mexico and the United States. Our objective is to recalculate the centennial-scale burial rate of OC at both the local and global scales. Quantification of this rate enables better understanding of the current carbon sink capacity of mangroves as well as helps to quantify and/or validate the other aspects of the mangrove carbon budget such as import, export, and remineralization. Statistical analysis of the data supports use of the geometric mean as the most reliable central tendency measurement. Our estimate is that mangrove systems bury 163 (+40; -31) g OC m-2 yr-1 (95% C.I.). Globally, the 95% confidence interval for the annual burial rate is 26.1 (+6.3; -5.1) Tg OC. This equates to a burial fraction that is 42% larger than that of the most recent mangrove carbon budget (2008), and represents 10-15% of estimated annual mangrove production. This global rate supports previous conclusions that, on a centennial time scale, 8-15% of all OC burial in marine settings occurs in mangrove systems.

  9. Organic carbon burial rates in mangrove sediments: strengthening the global budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breithaupt, J.; Smoak, Joseph M.; Smith, Thomas J.; Sanders, Christian J.; Hoare, Armando

    2012-01-01

    Mangrove wetlands exist in the transition zone between terrestrial and marine environments and as such were historically overlooked in discussions of terrestrial and marine carbon cycling. In recent decades, mangroves have increasingly been credited with producing and burying large quantities of organic carbon (OC). The amount of available data regarding OC burial in mangrove soils has more than doubled since the last primary literature review (2003). This includes data from some of the largest, most developed mangrove forests in the world, providing an opportunity to strengthen the global estimate. First-time representation is now included for mangroves in Brazil, Colombia, Malaysia, Indonesia, China, Japan, Vietnam, and Thailand, along with additional data from Mexico and the United States. Our objective is to recalculate the centennial-scale burial rate of OC at both the local and global scales. Quantification of this rate enables better understanding of the current carbon sink capacity of mangroves as well as helps to quantify and/or validate the other aspects of the mangrove carbon budget such as import, export, and remineralization. Statistical analysis of the data supports use of the geometric mean as the most reliable central tendency measurement. Our estimate is that mangrove systems bury 163 (+40; -31) g OC m-2 yr-1 (95% C.I.). Globally, the 95% confidence interval for the annual burial rate is 26.1 (+6.3; -5.1) Tg OC. This equates to a burial fraction that is 42% larger than that of the most recent mangrove carbon budget (2008), and represents 10–15% of estimated annual mangrove production. This global rate supports previous conclusions that, on a centennial time scale, 8–15% of all OC burial in marine settings occurs in mangrove systems.

  10. Biotransformation of trace organic chemicals during groundwater recharge: How useful are first-order rate constants?

    KAUST Repository

    Regnery, J.

    2015-05-29

    This study developed relationships between the attenuation of emerging trace organic chemicals (TOrC) during managed aquifer recharge (MAR) as a function of retention time, system characteristics, and operating conditions using controlled laboratory-scale soil column experiments simulating MAR. The results revealed that MAR performance in terms of TOrC attenuation is primarily determined by key environmental parameters (i.e. redox, primary substrate). Soil columns with suboxic and anoxic conditions performed poorly (i.e. less than 30% attenuation of moderately degradable TOrC) in comparison to oxic conditions (on average between 70-100% attenuation for the same compounds) within a residence time of three days. Given this dependency on redox conditions, it was investigated if key parameter-dependent rate constants are more suitable for contaminant transport modeling to properly capture the dynamic TOrC attenuation under field-scale conditions. Laboratory-derived first-order removal kinetics were determined for 19 TOrC under three different redox conditions and rate constants were applied to MAR field data. Our findings suggest that simplified first-order rate constants will most likely not provide any meaningful results if the target compounds exhibit redox dependent biotransformation behavior or if the intention is to exactly capture the decline in concentration over time and distance at field-scale MAR. However, if the intention is to calculate the percent removal after an extended time period and subsurface travel distance, simplified first-order rate constants seem to be sufficient to provide a first estimate on TOrC attenuation during MAR.

  11. New staff contract policy

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at TREF and on the recommendation of the Finance Committee, Council approved a new staff contract policy, which became effective on 1 January 2006. Its application is covered by a new Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) 'Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members'. The revised circular replaces the previous Circulars No. 9 (Rev. 3) 'Staff contracts' and No. 2 (Rev. 2) 'Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period for staff members'. The main features of the new contract policy are as follows: The new policy provides chances for long-term employment for all staff recruits staying for four years without distinguishing between those assigned to long-term or short-term activities when joining CERN. In addition, it presents a number of simplifications for the award of ICs. There are henceforth only 2 types of contract: Limited Duration (LD) contracts for all recruitment and Indefinite Contracts (IC) for...

  12. Pyrolysis characteristics of organic components of municipal solid waste at high heating rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiao; Jin, Yu-Qi; Chi, Yong; Wen, Jun-Ming; Jiang, Xu-Guang; Ni, Ming-Jiang

    2009-03-01

    The pyrolysis characteristics of six representative organic components of municipal solid waste (MSW) and their mixtures were studied in a specially designed thermogravimetric analysis apparatus with a maximum recorded heating rate of 864.8 degrees Cmin(-1). The pyrolysis behavior of individual components was described by the Avrami-Erofeev equation. The influence of final temperature on individual components was studied, and it was concluded that final temperature was a factor in reaction speed and intensity, but that it played only a limited role in determining the reaction mechanism. The interactions between different components were evaluated, and it was concluded that the interaction between homogeneous materials was minimal, whereas the interaction between polyethylene and biomass was significant.

  13. Effect of viscosity on photodegradation rates in complex secondary organic aerosol materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinks, Mallory L.; Brady, Monica V.; Lignell, Hanna; Song, Mijung; Grayson, James W.; Bertram, Allan K.; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    This work explores the effect of environmental conditions on the photodegradation rates of atmospherically relevant, photolabilie, organic molecules embedded in a film of secondary organic material (SOM). Three types of SOM were studied: a-pinene/O3 SOM (PSOM), limonene/O3 SOM (LSOM), and aged limonene/O3 obtained by exposure of LSOM to ammonia (brown LSOM). PSOM and LSOM were impregnated with 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP), an atmospherically relevant molecule that photodegrades faster than either PSOM or LSOM alone, to serve as a probe of SOM matrix effects on photochemistry. Brown LSOM contains an unidentified chromophore that absorbs strongly at 510 nm and photobleaches upon irradiation. This chromophore served as a probe molecule for the brown LSOM experiments. In all experiments, the temperature and relative humidity (RH) surrounding the SOM films were varied. The extent of photochemical reaction in the samples was monitored using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. For all three model systems examined, the observed photodegradation rates were slower at lower temperatures and lower RH, under conditions that make SOM more viscous. Additionally, the activation energies for photodegradation of each system were positively correlated with the viscosity of the SOM matrix as measured in poke-flow experiments. These activation energies were calculated to be 50, 24, and 17 kJ/mol for 2,4-DNP in PSOM, 2,4-DNP in LSOM, and brown LSOM, respectively and PSOM was found to be the most viscous of the three. These results suggest that the increased viscosity is hindering the motion of the molecules in SOM and is slowing down photochemical reactions in which they participate.

  14. Technique for determining training staff size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frye, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Determining an adequate training staff size is a vital function of a training manager. Today's training requirements and standards have dictated a more stringent work load than ever before. A trainer's role is more than just providing classroom lectures. In most organizations the instructor must develop programs, lesson plans, exercise guides, objectives, test questions, etc. The tasks of a training organization are never ending and the appropriate resources must be determined and allotted to do the total job. A simple method exists for determining an adequate staff. Although not perfect, this method will provide a realistic approach for determining the needed training staff size. This method considers three major factors: instructional man-hours; non-instructional man-hours; and instructor availability. By determining and adding instructional man-hours and non-instructional man-hours a total man-hour distribution can be obtained. By dividing this by instructor availability a staff size can be determined

  15. Meeting staff representatives of the European Agencies

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      The AASC (Assembly of Agency Staff Committee) held its 27th Meeting of the specialized European Agencies on 26 and 27 May on the premises of the OHIM (Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market) in Alicante, Spain. Two representatives of the CERN Staff Association, in charge of External Relations, attended as observers. This participation is a useful complement to regular contacts we have with FICSA (Federation of International Civil Servants' Associations), which groups staff associations of the UN Agencies, and the annual CSAIO conferences (Conference of Staff Associations of International Organizations), where each Autumn representatives of international organizations based in Europe meet to discuss themes of common interest to better promote and defend the rights of the international civil servants. All these meetings allow us to remain informed on items that are directly or indirectly related to employment and social conditions of our colleagues in other international and Europ...

  16. Shifts in mass-scaling of respiration, feeding, and growth rates across life-form transitions in marine pelagic organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Hirst, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic rate of organisms may be viewed as a basic property from which other vital rates and many ecological patterns emerge and that follows a universal allometric mass scaling law, or it may be considered a property of the organism that emerges as a result of the adaptation to the environ...... life-form-dependent allometries that have similar scaling but different intercepts, such that the mass-specific rates converge on a rather narrow size-independent range. In contrast, ingestion and growth rates follow a near-universal taxa-independent ~3/4 mass scaling power law.We argue...

  17. Engaging Frontline Leaders and Staff in Real-Time Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennifer; Hebish, Linda J; Mann, Sharon; Ching, Joan M; Blackmore, C Craig

    2016-04-01

    The relationship of staff satisfaction and engagement to organizational success, along with the integral influence of frontline managers on this dimension, is well established in health care and other industries. To specifically address staff engagement, Virginia Mason Medical Center, an integrated, single-hospital health system, developed an approach that involved leaders, through the daily use of standard work for leaders, as well as staff, through a Lean-inspired staff idea system. Kaizen Promotion Office (KPO) staff members established three guiding principles: (1) Staff engagement begins with leader engagement; (2) Integrate daily improve- ment (kaizen) as a habitual way of life not as an add-on; and (3) Create an environment in which staff feel psycho- logically safe and valued. Two design elements--Standard Work for Leaders (SWL) and Everyday Lean Ideas (ELIs) were implemented. For the emergency department (ED), an early adopter of the staff engagement work, the challenge was to apply the guiding principles to improve staff engagement while improving quality and patient and staff satisfaction, even as patient volumes were increasing. Daily huddles for the KPO staff members and weekly leader rounds are used to elicit staff ideas and foster ELIs in real time. Overall progress to date has been tracked in terms of staff satisfaction surveys, voluntary staff turnover, adoption of SWL, and testing and implementation of staff ideas. For example, voluntary turnover of ED staff decreased from 14.6% in 2011 to 7.5% in 2012, and 2.0% in 2013. Organizationwide, at least 800 staff ideas are in motion at any given time, with finished ones posted in an idea supermarket website. A leadership and staff engagement approach that focuses on SWL and on capturing staff ideas for daily problem solving and improvement can contribute to organization success and improve the quality of health care delivery.

  18. Sediment-Deposition Rates and Organic Compounds in Bottom Sediment at Four Sites in Lake Mead, Nevada, May 1998

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Covay, Kenneth J; Beck, David A

    2001-01-01

    In May 1998 the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the University of Nevada Las Vegas investigated rates of sediment deposition and concentrations of selected synthetic organic compounds at four sites in Lake Mead...

  19. The Effect of Organic Loading Rate on Milk WastewaterTreatment Using Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Hajiabadi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs were operated under the same conditions for the treatment of milk wastewater at different organic loading rates (OLRs. Cylindrical Plexiglas reactors were run for 56 days (including 21 days of acclimatization and 35 days of data gathering. Effective volume, influent wastewater flowrate, and sludge retention time (SRT of reactors were 5.5 L, 3.5 L/d, and 10 d, respectively. The average COD removal efficiency for the reactors R1, R2, R3, and R4 with influent OLRave values of 633, 929, 1915, and 3261 gCOD/m3d were 95, 96, 95, and 82 percent, respectively. The average effluent suspended solid (SS for all reactors was lower than 44 mg/L. Also, except for R4 with an average effluent turbidity of 270 NTU, other reactors met the Iranian wastewater emission standard (50 NTU. In addition, the average sludge volume index of reactors R1 to R3 was found to be lower than 67 mL/g. According to the results, the overall variation of COD removal efficiency versus influent OLR shows a decreasing rate with a correlation factor of 0.8 (R2.

  20. Organ burdens and excretion rates of inhaled uranium - computations using ICRP model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abani, M.C.; Murthy, K.B.S.; Sunta, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Uranium being a highly toxic material, proper estimation of the body burden is very important. During manufacture of uranium fuel, it is likely to enter the body by inhalation. By the body burden and excretion measurements, one should be able to assess whether the intake is within the safe limits or not. This is possible if one performs theoretical calculations and estimates the amount of uranium which builds up in the body as a function of time. Similarly theoretical estimates in case of excretion have to be made. For this purpose, a computer programme has been developed to find out organ burdens and excretion rates resulting from exposure to a radioactive nuclide. ICRP-30 lung model has been used and cases of single instantaneous inhalation of 1 ALI as well as inhalation at a steady rate of ALI/365 per day have been considered. Using this programme, results for uranium aerosols of classes D, W and Y and sizes 0.2, 1 and 5 microns are generated by ND computers in tabular as well as graphical forms. These will be useful in conjunction with body burden measurements by direct counting or excretion analysis. (author). 7 tabs., 56 figs

  1. Preliminary Design and Simulation of a Turbo Expander for Small Rated Power Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Capata

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC system, which operates with organic fluids, is one of the leading technologies for “waste energy recovery”. It works as a conventional Rankine Cycle but, as mentioned, instead of steam/water, an organic fluid is used. This change allows it to convert low temperature heat into electric energy where required. Large numbers of studies have been carried out to identify the most suitable fluids, system parameters and the various configurations. In the present market, most ORC systems are designed and manufactured for the recovery of thermal energy from various sources operating at “large power rating” (exhaust gas turbines, internal combustion engines, geothermal sources, large melting furnaces, biomass, solar, etc.; from which it is possible to produce a large amount of electric energy (30 kW ÷ 300 kW. Such applications for small nominal power sources, as well as the exhaust gases of internal combustion engines (car sedan or town, ships, etc. or small heat exchangers, are very limited. The few systems that have been designed and built for small scale applications, have, on the other hand, different types of expander (screw, scroll, etc.. These devices are not adapted for placement in small and restricted places like the interior of a conventional car. The aim of this work is to perform the preliminary design of a turbo-expander that meets diverse system requirements such as low pressure, small size and low mass flow rates. The expander must be adaptable to a small ORC system utilizing gas of a diesel engine or small gas turbine as thermal source to produce 2–10 kW of electricity. The temperature and pressure of the exhaust gases, in this case study (400–600 °C and a pressure of 2 bar, imposes a limit on the use of an organic fluid and on the net power that can be produced. In addition to water, fluids such as CO2, R134a and R245fa have been considered. Once the operating fluids has been chosen

  2. Characteristics of microbial volatile organic compound flux rates from soil and plant litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, C. M.; Fierer, N.

    2013-12-01

    Our knowledge of microbial production and consumption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from soil and litter, as well as which microorganisms are involved, is relatively limited compared to what we know about VOC emissions from terrestrial plants. With climate change expecting to alter plant community composition, nitrogen (N) deposition rates, mean annual temperatures, precipitation patterns, and atmospheric VOC concentrations, it is unknown how microbial production and consumption of VOCs from litter and soil will respond. We have spent the last 5 years quantifying VOC flux rates in decaying plant litter, mineral soils and from a subalpine field site using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Microbial production, relative to abiotic sources, accounted for 78% to 99% of the total VOC emissions from decomposing litter, highlighting the importance of microbial metabolisms in these systems. Litter chemistry correlated with the types of VOCs emitted, of which, methanol was emitted at the highest rates from all studies. The net emissions of carbon as VOCs was found to be up to 88% of that emitted as CO2 suggesting that VOCs likely represent an important component of the carbon cycle in many terrestrial systems. Nitrogen additions drastically reduced VOC emissions from litter to near zero, though it is still not understood whether this was due to an increase in consumption or a decrease in production. In the field, the root system contributed to 53% of the carbon that was emitted as VOCs from the soil with increasing air temperatures correlating to an increase in VOC flux rates from the soil system. Finally, we are currently utilizing next generation sequencing techniques (Illumina MiSeq) along with varying concentrations of isoprene, the third most abundant VOC in the atmosphere behind methane and methanol, above soils in a laboratory incubation to determine consumption rates and the microorganisms (bacteria, archaea and fungi) associated with the

  3. Optimization of Rated Officer Staff Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    determinant +1, -1 or 0, which holds for the assignment problem (Bazaraa et al., 1990). The Unimodularity Theorem states for an integer matrix A with...The constraints of the assignment problem, in matrix notation, are defined as in part (b) of the Unimodularity Theorem , therefore since the coefficient...ABM Match Flow output for cA Ac C∈ N = 1 2( , ),NCN N ,...,N where is the navigator Match Flow output for cN Nc C∈ P = 1 2( , ), PCP P ,...,P

  4. Rate of Decomposition of Organic Matter in Soil as Influenced by Repeated Air Drying-Rewetting and Repeated Additions of Organic Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1974-01-01

    Repeated air drying and rewetting of three soils followed by incubation at 20°C resulted in an increase in the rate of decomposition of a fraction of 14C labeled organic matter in the soils. The labeled organic matter originated from labeled glucose, cellulose and straw, respectively, metabolized...... of the treatment was least in the soil which had been incubated with the labeled material for the longest time. Additions of unlabeled, decomposable organic material also increased the rate of decomposition of the labeled organic matter. The evolution of labeled CO2 during the 1st month of incubation after...... in the soils during previous incubation periods ranging from 1.5 to 8 years. Air drying and rewetting every 30th day over an incubation period of 260–500 days caused an increase in the evolution of labeled CO2 ranging from 16 to 121 per cent as compared to controls kept moist continuously. The effect...

  5. Staff Association Cocktail

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    The Staff Association has been organising for many years a cocktail with delegates of the Member States participating in Finance Committees of March and September. This cocktail is held at the end of the day, after the Finance Committee meeting. This direct and regular communication helps establish an ongoing contact between the Staff Association and CERN Member States and, more recently, the Associate Member States. Ambassadors of the CERN Staff Association, who are Members of the Personnel, have the opportunity to meet their national delegation in an informal and friendly atmosphere. These exchanges, facilitated by the use of the national language, allow the personnel via the Staff Association to express its ideas and positions on current affairs and fundamental issues, and also to hear about those of the delegations in return.

  6. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the ...

  7. Factors affecting the deceased organ donation rate in the Chinese community: an audit of hospital medical records in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, C Y; Pong, M L; Au Yeung, S F; Chau, K F

    2016-12-01

    The number of actual donors per million population is the most commonly used metric to measure organ donation rates worldwide. It is deemed inadequate, however, because it does not take into account the potential donor pool. The aim of this study was to determine the true potential for solid organ donation from deceased brain-dead donors and the reasons for non-donation from potential donors in the Chinese community. Medical records of all hospital deaths between 1 January and 31 December 2014 at a large regional hospital in Hong Kong were reviewed. Those who were on mechanical ventilation with documented brain injury and aged ≤75 years were classified as possible organ donors. The reasons why some potential organ donors did not become utilised organ donors were recorded and evaluated. Among 3659 patient deaths, 121 were classified as possible organ donors. The mean age of the possible organ donors was 59.4 years and 72.7% of them were male. The majority (88%) were from non-intensive care units. Of the 121 possible organ donors, 108 were classified as potential organ donors after excluding 13 unlikely to fulfil brain death criteria. Finally 11 patients became actual organ donors with an overall conversion rate of 10%. Reasons for non-donation included medical contra-indication (46%), failure to identify and inform organ donation coordinators (14%), failure of donor maintenance (11%), brain death diagnosis not established (18%), and refusal by relatives (11%). It is possible to increase the organ donation rate considerably by action at different stages of the donation process. Ongoing accurate audit of current practice is necessary.

  8. Impact of Organic Loading Rate on Psychrophilic Anaerobic Digestion of Solid Dairy Manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noori M. Cata Saady

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the feed total solids to anaerobic digester improves the process economics and decreases the volume of liquid effluent from current wet anaerobic digestion. The objective of this study was to develop a novel psychrophilic (20 °C anaerobic digestion technology of undiluted cow feces (total solids of 11%–16%. Two sets of duplicate laboratory-scale sequence batch bioreactors have been operated at organic loading rates (OLR of 6.0 to 8.0 g total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD kg−1 inoculum day−1 (d−1 during 210 days. The results demonstrated that the process is feasible at treatment cycle length (TCL of 21 days; however, the quality of cow feces rather than the OLR had a direct influence on the specific methane yield (SMY. The SMY ranged between 124.5 ± 1.4 and 227.9 ± 4.8 normalized liter (NL CH4 kg−1 volatile solids (VS fed d−1. Substrate-to-inoculum mass ratio (SIR was 0.63 ± 0.05, 0.90 ± 0.09, and 1.06 ± 0.07 at OLR of 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0 g TCOD kg−1 inoculum d−1, respectively. No volatile fatty acids (VFAs accumulation has been observed which indicated that hydrolysis was the rate limiting step and VFAs have been consumed immediately. Bioreactors performance consistency in terms of the level of SMYs, VFAs concentrations at end of the TCL, pH stability and volatile solids reduction indicates a stable and reproducible process during the entire operation.

  9. Global changes alter soil fungal communities and alter rates of organic matter decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J.; Frey, S. D.

    2016-12-01

    Global changes - such as warming, more frequent and severe droughts, increasing atmospheric CO2, and increasing nitrogen (N) deposition rates - are altering ecosystem processes. The balance between soil carbon (C) accumulation and decomposition is determined in large part by the activity and biomass of detrital organisms, namely soil fungi, and yet their sensitivity to global changes remains unresolved. We present results from a meta-analysis of 200+ studies spanning manipulative and observational field experiments to quantify fungal responses to global change and expected consequences for ecosystem C dynamics. Warming altered the functional soil microbial community by reducing the ratio of fungi to bacteria (f:b) total fungal biomass. Additionally, warming reduced lignolytic enzyme activity generally by one-third. Simulated N deposition affected f:b differently than warming, but the effect on fungal biomass and activity was similar. The effect of N-enrichment on f:b was contingent upon ecosystem type; f:b increased in alpine meadows and heathlands but decreased in temperate forests following N-enrichment. Across ecosystems, fungal biomass marginally declined by 8% in N-enriched soils. In general, N-enrichment reduced fungal lignolytic enzyme activity, which could explain why soil C accumulates in some ecosystems following warming and N-enrichment. Several global change experiments have reported the surprising result that soil C builds up following increases in temperature and N deposition rates. While site-specific studies have examined the role of soil fungi in ecosystem responses to global change, we present the first meta-analysis documenting general patterns of global change impacts on soil fungal communities, biomass, and activity. In sum, we provide evidence that soil microbial community shifts and activity plays a large part in ecosystem responses to global changes, and have the potential to alter the magnitude of the C-climate feedback.

  10. Measurement of loss rates of organic compounds in snow using in situ experiments and isotopically labelled compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika von Schneidemesser

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Organic molecular marker compounds are widely used to identify emissions from anthropogenic and biogenic air pollution sources in atmospheric samples and in deposition. Specific organic compounds have been detected in polar regions, but their fate after deposition to snow is poorly characterized. Within this context, a series of exposure experiments were carried out to observe the post-depositional processing of organic compounds under real-world conditions in snow on the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet, at the Summit research station. Snow was prepared from water spiked with isotopically labelled organic compounds, representative of typical molecular marker compounds emitted from anthropogenic activities. Reaction rate constants and reaction order were determined based on a decrease in concentration to a stable, non-zero, threshold concentration. Fluoranthene-d10, docosane-d46, hexadecanoic acid-d31, docosanoic acid-d43 and azelaic acid-d14 were estimated to have first order loss rates within surface snow with reaction rate constants of 0.068, 0.040, 0.070, 0.067 and 0.047 h−1, respectively. No loss of heptadecane-d36 was observed. Overall, these results suggest that organic contaminants are archived in polar snow, although significant post-depositional losses of specific organic compounds occur. This has implications for the environmental fate of organic contaminants, as well as for ice-core studies that seek to use organic molecular markers to infer past atmospheric loadings, and source emissions.

  11. Effects of organic loading rate on biogas production from macroalgae: Performance and microbial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng-Ting; Fan, Xiao-Lei; Zhao, Xiao-Xian; Fu, Shan-Fei; He, Shuai; Manasa, M R K; Guo, Rong-Bo

    2017-07-01

    Macroalgae biomass has been considered as a promising feedstock for biogas production. In order to improve the efficiency of anaerobic digestion (AD) of macroalgae, semi-continuous fermentation was conducted to examine the effects of organic loading rate (OLR) on biogas production from Macrocystis pyrifer. Results showed that, under OLRs of 1.37, 2.74, 4.12 and 6.85kgVS substrate /(m 3 ·d), the average unit biogas yields were 438.9, 477.3, 480.1 and 188.7mL/(gVS substrate d), respectively. It indicated that biogas production was promoted by the increased OLR in an appropriate range while inhibited by the OLR beyond the appropriate range. The investigation on physical-chemical parameters revealed that unfavorable VFAs concentration, pH and salinity might be the main causes for system failure due to the overrange OLR, while the total phenols failed to reach the inhibitory concentration. Microbial community analysis demonstrated that several bacterial and archaeal phyla altered with increase in OLR apparently. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Estimating dose rates to organs as a function of age following internal exposure to radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, R.W.; Eckerman, K.F.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Cristy, M.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Williams, L.R.

    1984-03-01

    The AGEDOS methodology allows estimates of dose rates, as a function of age, to radiosensitive organs and tissues in the human body at arbitrary times during or after internal exposure to radioactive material. Presently there are few, if any, radionuclides for which sufficient metabolic information is available to allow full use of all features of the methodology. The intention has been to construct the methodology so that optimal information can be gained from a mixture of the limited amount of age-dependent, nuclide-specific data and the generally plentiful age-dependent physiological data now available. Moreover, an effort has been made to design the methodology so that constantly accumulating metabolic information can be incorporated with minimal alterations in the AGEDOS computer code. Some preliminary analyses performed by the authors, using the AGEDOS code in conjunction with age-dependent risk factors developed from the A-bomb survivor data and other studies, has indicated that the doses and subsequent risks of eventually experiencing radiogenic cancers may vary substantially with age for some exposure scenarios and may be relatively invariant with age for other scenarios. We believe that the AGEDOS methodology provides a convenient and efficient means for performing the internal dosimetry.

  13. Estimating dose rates to organs as a function of age following internal exposure to radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.W.; Eckerman, K.F.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Cristy, M.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Williams, L.R.

    1984-03-01

    The AGEDOS methodology allows estimates of dose rates, as a function of age, to radiosensitive organs and tissues in the human body at arbitrary times during or after internal exposure to radioactive material. Presently there are few, if any, radionuclides for which sufficient metabolic information is available to allow full use of all features of the methodology. The intention has been to construct the methodology so that optimal information can be gained from a mixture of the limited amount of age-dependent, nuclide-specific data and the generally plentiful age-dependent physiological data now available. Moreover, an effort has been made to design the methodology so that constantly accumulating metabolic information can be incorporated with minimal alterations in the AGEDOS computer code. Some preliminary analyses performed by the authors, using the AGEDOS code in conjunction with age-dependent risk factors developed from the A-bomb survivor data and other studies, has indicated that the doses and subsequent risks of eventually experiencing radiogenic cancers may vary substantially with age for some exposure scenarios and may be relatively invariant with age for other scenarios. We believe that the AGEDOS methodology provides a convenient and efficient means for performing the internal dosimetry

  14. Disruption rates for one vulnerable soil in Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Robert H.; Esque, Todd C.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Sturm, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Rates of soil disruption from hikers and vehicle traffic are poorly known, particularly for arid landscapes. We conducted an experiment in Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (ORPI) in western Arizona, USA, on an air-dry very fine sandy loam that is considered to be vulnerable to disruption. We created variable-pass tracks using hikers, an all-terrain vehicle (ATV), and a four-wheel drive vehicle (4WD) and measured changes in cross-track topography, penetration depth, and bulk density. Hikers (one pass = 5 hikers) increased bulk density and altered penetration depth but caused minimal surface disruption up to 100 passes; a minimum of 10 passes were required to overcome surface strength of this dry soil. Both ATV and 4WD traffic significantly disrupted the soil with one pass, creating deep ruts with increasing passes that rendered the 4WD trail impassable after 20 passes. Despite considerable soil loosening (dilation), bulk density increased in the vehicle trails, and lateral displacement created berms of loosened soil. This soil type, when dry, can sustain up to 10 passes of hikers but only one vehicle pass before significant soil disruption occurs; greater disruption is expected when soils are wet. Bulk density increased logarithmically with applied pressure from hikers, ATV, and 4WD.

  15. Action of bromazepam on sleep of children with night terrors. I. Sleep organization and heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, A; Dobladez, B; Rubio, M E; Ramos, M; Suengas, A; Bujan, M; Arrigain, S

    1982-01-01

    Bromazepam was administered in a single dose of 1.5 mg one-half hour before bedtime to study its short-term action and the effect of its discontinuation on the sleep of 6 children suffering from night terrors. On the third night of the drug's administration, a statistically significant reduction in slow-wave sleep was observed which was maintained after the drug had been discontinued. The other sleep parameters were not significantly affected, although a slight increase in REM sleep was seen after discontinuation of bromazepam, with a statistically significant increase in the second third of the night on the first 2 nights 'off medication'. A comparison of the individual nights yielded no significant change in heart rate, although certain internal changes were observed during the second night 'on medication' and during the nights 'off medication'. These changes can be explained by the changing relationship between cardiac variability and sleep organization. There were insufficient episodes of night terror during the short duration of the study to allow any conclusions to be drawn on the effect of the drug on this aspect.

  16. The Rating System for Assessing the Performance of Employees in Terms of the Quality Assurance of Activity of Educational Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stankevych Iryna V.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at improving and developing a rating system for assessment of employees, in particular scientific and pedagogical workers, as an instrument to ensure the quality of activity of educational organization. The author has substantiated that a rating system both encourages the activities of higher education workers to provide quality training to higher education applicants and coordinates their efforts to raise the level of loyalty to the educational organization of consumers together with other parties interested, as well as to enhance its image in the market for educational services. The development of a rating system for an employee’s performance, as proposed by the author, should be accomplished not only at the expense of the assessment indicators, but also of the incentive methods, both direct and indirect. The publication provides an example of the practical application of the provisions of the rating system for assessing the performance of employees of educational organization, as proposed by the author.

  17. Effect of Aeration Rates on Removals of Organic Carbon and Nitrogen in Small Onsite Wastewater Treatment System (Johkasou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldilla Fajri Joni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Onsite application of oxygen supply in domestic wastewater system may be influenced by several factors that can inhibit the oxidation and nitrification processes. In this study, the influence of aeration rate on the Johkasou performance was focused using two Johkasou facilities serving up to five persons household. In the Johkasou A (JO-A system, we increased the aeration rate from 30 to 63 L.min-1 whereas, in the Johkasou B (JO-B, it was decreased from 59 to 34 L.min-1. Water and sludge samples were collected from the anaerobic-anoxic-oxic zones before and after adjustment of the aeration rate measured for organic matters and nitrogen parameters. Increasing the aeration rate in JO-A resulted in a high removal of organic matter (82.5% and nitrogen (60.3% compared to decreasing of aeration rate in JO-B (52.0% and 33.0%, respectively. Simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND exhibited a maximum percentage when the aeration rate was increased compared to decreasing of aeration rate. These results indicate that application of a high aeration rate increases removal of organic matter and nitrogen and enhances ammonia transformation. It is therefore recommended to apply high aeration rates in Johkasou system.

  18. Effectiveness of two contrasting mulching rates to reduce post-fire soil and organic matter losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Flavio; Prats, Sergio; Vieira, Diana; Puga, João; Lopes, Rita; Gonzaléz-Pelayo, Oscar; Caetano, Ana; Campos, Isabel; Keizer, Jacob

    2017-04-01

    Wildfire-affected soils can reveal strong responses in runoff generation and associated soil (fertility) losses, thereby constituting a major threat to the typically shallow and poor forest soils of the Portuguese mountain areas. Mulching with logging residues from these forests has proven to provide a protective soil cover that is highly effective in reducing post-fire runoff and especially erosion (Prats et al., 2012, 2014, 2016a, 2016b). However, these past experiments have all applied comparatively large amounts of forest residues, in the order of 10 Mg ha-1, so that the relationship between application rate and effectiveness is still poorly known. Such relationship would nonetheless be of crucial importance for the employment of forest residue mulching in practice, as one of the possible emergency stabilization measures to be contemplated in post-fire land management of a recently-burned area. Further research gaps that exist in relation to post-fire forest residue mulching include its effectiveness in reducing soil fertility losses (C, N, P; Ferreira et al., 2016a, 2016b) and in minimizing export of contaminants (especially PAHs and metals; Campos et al., 2016), and its (secondary) impacts on soil biological activity and diversity (Puga et al., 2016) and on forest productivity (including through the addition of organic matter to the soil surface, partially replacing the burned litter layer; Prats et al. 2016b). In the framework of the EU-project RECARE, the effectiveness of two contrasting mulching rates with forest logging residues has been tested following a wildfire that on August 9th - 10th 2015 consumed some 715 ha of eucalypt plantations in the Semide municipality, central Portugal. Commercially-available logging residues (chopped bark and twigs) from eucalypt plantations were purchased, transported to the study site and applied to six out of nine 16 m2 erosion bounded plots that had been installed in a burned eucalypt plantation using a randomized

  19. Rate of formation and dissolution of mercury sulfide nanoparticles: The dual role of natural organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowey, Aaron J.

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is a global contaminant of concern due to its transformation by microorganisms to form methylmercury, a toxic species that accumulates in biological tissues. The effect of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from natural waters on reactions between mercury(II) (Hg) and sulfide (S(-II)) to form HgS(s) nanoparticles across a range of Hg and S(-II) concentrations was investigated. Hg was equilibrated with DOM, after which S(-II) was added. Dissolved Hg (Hgaq) was periodically quantified using ultracentrifugation and chemical analysis following the addition of S(-II). Particle size and identity were determined using dynamic light scattering and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. S(-II) reacts with Hg to form 20 to 200nm aggregates consisting of 1-2 nm HgS(s) subunits that are more structurally disordered than metacinnabar in the presence of 2 x 10-9 to 8 x 10-6M Hg and 10 (mg C)L-1 DOM. Some of the HgS(s) nanoparticle aggregates are subsequently dissolved by DOM and (re)precipitated by S(-II) over periods of hours to days. At least three fractions of Hg-DOM species were observed with respect to reactivity toward S(-II): 0.3 μmol reactive Hg per mmol C (60 percent), 0.1 μmol per mmol C (20 percent) that are kinetically hindered, and another 0.1 μmol Hg per mmol C (20 percent) that are inert to reaction with S(-II). Following an initial S(-II)-driven precipitation of HgS(s), HgS(s) was dissolved by DOM or organic sulfur compounds. HgS(s) formation during this second phase was counterintuitively favored by lower S(-II) concentrations, suggesting surface association of DOM moieties that are less capable of dissolving HgS(s). DOM partially inhibits HgS(s) formation and mediates reactions between Hg and S(-II) such that HgS(s) is susceptible to dissolution. These findings indicate that Hg accessibility to microorganisms could be controlled by kinetic (intermediate) species in the presence of S(-II) and DOM, undermining the premise that equilibrium Hg species

  20. Does staff diversity imply openness to diversity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – Post-secondary educational organizations are currently some of the most diverse settings to be found. However, few educational studies have dealt with staff diversity and hardly any has looked outside the USA. The purpose of this paper is to present a study of members of international...... university departments in Denmark. The authors set out to investigate the relationship between different types of staff diversity and openness to diversity in terms of linguistic, visible, value, and informational heterogeneity. Design/methodology/approach – This study uses responses from 489 staff members......, was unrelated or negatively associated with positive diversity attitudes. Originality/value – Few studies deal with the role of staff diversity and no prior studies the authors know of have examined the link between diversity types and openness to diversity....

  1. Intraspecific variation in aerobic metabolic rate of fish: relations with organ size and enzyme activity in brown trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norin, Tommy; Malte, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Highly active animals require a high aerobic capacity (i.e., a high maximum metabolic rate [MMR]) to sustain such activity, and it has been speculated that a greater capacity for aerobic performance is reflected in larger organs, which serve as energy processors but are also expensive to maintain and which increase the minimal cost of living (i.e., the basal or standard metabolic rate [SMR]). In this study, we assessed the extent of intraspecific variation in metabolic rate within a group of brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) and tested whether the observed variation in residual (body-mass-corrected) SMR, MMR, and absolute aerobic scope could be explained by variations in the residual size (mass) of metabolically active internal organs. Residual SMR was found to correlate positively with residual MMR, indicating a link between these two metabolic parameters, but no relationship between organ mass and metabolic rate was found for liver, heart, spleen, intestine, or stomach. Instead, activity in the liver of two aerobic mitochondrial enzymes, cytochrome c oxidase and, to a lesser extent, citrate synthase, was found to correlate with whole-animal metabolic rate, indicating that causes for intraspecific variation in the metabolic rate of fish can be found at a lower organizational level than organ size.

  2. STAFF MARKETING IN MODERN RUSSIAN CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya N. Kretova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The conception of staff marketing, which was developed abroad, is effectively used in the developed countries for a long time. Its main advantage consists in the possibility of organizing some planning for the implementation of staff strategy: staff marketing provides the enterprise on the long-term basis with human resources capable of forming strategic potential, which would allow to implement the planned activities. Numerous problems of formation and development of civilized market relations in our country do not allow to fully implement the detailed models of staff marketing in domestic realities. On the basis of the analysis of theoretical developments and factors that have a practical impact on the implementation of marketing personnel in modern Russian conditions, the authors describe the essential elements of the conception. The primary purposes of staff marketing for domestic enterprises, grouped into the internal and external marketing are substantiated and disclosed. The special attention is paid to increasing the staff loyalty, which has dominant influence on business outcomes. The algorithm of events for the development of motivation system is proposed; at the stage of studying job satisfaction it is recommend to apply analytical calculations with the use of Shewhart control charts. Unlike traditional statistical tools based on the inspection of already implemented results, this approach is aimed at preventing negative tendencies and avoids losses associated with dissatisfaction with difficulty, as the individual employee and the team as a whole. Modern Russian enterprises can fully realize the conception of staff marketing only through rethinking of the consequences for all directions of work with the staff, as reflected in the definition of objectives, motivating staff and ensuring social responsibility of the enterprise.

  3. Volatile organic compound concentrations and emission rates measured over one year in a new manufactured house

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Nabinger, Steven J.; Persily, Andrew K.

    2004-09-01

    A study to measure indoor concentrations and emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including formaldehyde, was conducted in a new, unoccupied manufactured house installed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) campus. The house was instrumented to continuously monitor indoor temperature and relative humidity, heating and air conditioning system operation, and outdoor weather. It also was equipped with an automated tracer gas injection and detection system to estimate air change rates every 2 h. Another automated system measured indoor concentrations of total VOCs with a flame ionization detector every 30 min. Active samples for the analysis of VOCs and aldehydes were collected indoors and outdoors on 12 occasions from August 2002 through September 2003. Individual VOCs were quantified by thermal desorption to a gas chromatograph with a mass spectrometer detector (GC/MS). Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Weather conditions changed substantially across the twelve active sampling periods. Outdoor temperatures ranged from 7 C to 36 C. House air change rates ranged from 0.26 h{sup -1} to 0.60 h{sup -1}. Indoor temperature was relatively constant at 20 C to 24 C for all but one sampling event. Indoor relative humidity (RH) ranged from 21% to 70%. The predominant and persistent indoor VOCs included aldehydes (e.g., formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, pentanal, hexanal and nonanal) and terpene hydrocarbons (e.g., a-pinene, 3-carene and d-limonene), which are characteristic of wood product emissions. Other compounds of interest included phenol, naphthalene, and other aromatic hydrocarbons. VOC concentrations were generally typical of results reported for other new houses. Measurements of total VOCs were used to evaluate short-term changes in indoor VOC concentrations. Most of the VOCs probably derived from indoor sources. However, the wall cavity was an apparent source of

  4. Quantitative correlation of absolute hydroxyl radical rate constants with non-isolated effluent organic matter bulk properties in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando L; Mezyk, Stephen P; Doud, Devin F R; Snyder, Shane A

    2008-08-15

    Absolute second-order rate constants for the reaction between the hydroxyl radical (*OH) and eight water samples containing non-isolated effluent organic matter (EfOM) collected at different wastewater and reclamation sites were measured by electron pulse radiolysis. The measured rate constants ranged from 0.27 to 1.21 x 10(9) Mc(-1) s(-1), with an average value of 0.86 (+/-0.35) x 10(9) Mc(-1) s(-1). These absolute values were 3-5 times faster than previously reported values using natural organic matter and wastewater isolates. The obtained rate constants were correlated (R2 > 0.99) to bulk EfOM properties through an empirical equation that included terms relating to the polarity, apparent molecular weight, and fluorescence index of the effluent organic matter. The obtained data were used to model steady state *OH concentrations during UV advanced oxidation. The steady-state *OH concentration was lower than that obtained using previously reported values for the reaction with dissolved organic matter, indicating that accurate measurement of reaction rate constants at specific sites would greatly improve the design and prediction of the removal of organic contaminants. These results will improve the ability of researchers to accurately model scavenging capacities during the advanced oxidation processtreatment of wastewaters.

  5. Thin film organic photodetectors for indirect X-ray detection demonstrating low dose rate sensitivity at low voltage operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkenburg, Daken J.; Johns, Paul M.; Baciak, James E.; Nino, Juan C.; Xue, Jiangeng

    2017-12-01

    Developments in the field of organic semiconductors have generated organic photodetectors with high quantum efficiency, wide spectral sensitivity, low power consumption, and unique form factors that are flexible and conformable to their substrate shape. In this work, organic photodetectors coupled with inorganic CsI(Tl) scintillators are used to showcase the low dose rate sensitivity that is enabled when high performance organic photodetectors and scintillator crystals are integrated. The detection capability of these organic-inorganic coupled systems to high energy radiation highlights their potential as an alternative to traditional photomultiplier tubes for nuclear spectroscopy applications. When exposed to Bremsstrahlung radiation produced from an X-ray generator, SubPc:C60, AlPcCl:C70, and P3HT:PC61BM thin film photodetectors with active layer thicknesses less than 100 nm show detection of incident radiation at low and no applied bias. Remarkably low dose rates, down to at least 0.18 μGy/s, were detectable with a characteristic linear relationship between exposure rate and photodetector current output. These devices also demonstrate sensitivities as high as 5.37 mC Gy-1 cm-2 when coupled to CsI(Tl). Additionally, as the tube voltage across the X-ray generator was varied, these organic-inorganic systems showed their ability to detect a range of continuous radiation spectra spanning several hundred keV.

  6. Thin film organic photodetectors for indirect X-ray detection demonstrating low dose rate sensitivity at low voltage operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkenburg, Daken J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Johns, Paul M. [Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Detection Systems Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, USA; Baciak, James E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Nino, Juan C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Xue, Jiangeng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA

    2017-12-14

    Developments in the field of organic semiconductors have generated organic photodetectors with high quantum efficiency, wide spectral sensitivity, low power consumption, and unique form factors that are flexible and conformable to their substrate shape. In this work, organic photodetectors coupled with inorganic CsI(Tl) scintillators are used to showcase the low dose rate sensitivity that is enabled when high performance organic photodetectors and scintillator crystals are integrated. The detection capability of these organic-inorganic coupled systems to high energy radiation highlights their potential as an alternative to traditional photomultiplier tubes for nuclear spectroscopy applications. When exposed to Bremsstrahlung radiation produced from an X-ray generator, SubPc:C60, AlPcCl:C70, and P3HT:PC61BM thin film photodetectors with active layer thicknesses less than 100 nm show detection of incident radiation at low and no applied bias. Remarkably low dose rates, down to at least 0.28 µGy/s, were detectable with a characteristic linear relationship between exposure rate and photodetector current output. These devices also demonstrate sensitivities as high as 5.37 mC Gy-1 cm-2 when coupled to CsI(Tl). Additionally, as the tube voltage across the X-ray generator was varied, these organic-inorganic systems showed their ability to detect a range of continuous radiation spectra spanning several hundred keV.

  7. Warming and organic matter sources impact the proportion of dissolved to total activities in marine extracellular enzymatic rates

    KAUST Repository

    Baltar, Federico

    2017-04-19

    Extracellular enzymatic activities (EEAs) are the rate-limiting step in the degradation of organic matter. Extracellular enzymes can be found associated to cells or dissolved in the surrounding water. The proportion of cell-free EEA constitutes in many marine environments more than half of the total activity. This high proportion causes an uncoupling between hydrolysis rates and the actual bacterial activity. However, we do not know what factors control the proportion of dissolved relative to total EEA, nor how this may change in the future ocean. To resolve this, we performed laboratory experiments with water from the Great Barrier Reef (Australia) to study the effects of temperature and dissolved organic matter sources on EEA and the proportion of dissolved EEA. We found that warming increases the rates of organic matter hydrolysis and reduces the proportion of dissolved relative to total EEA. This suggests a potential increase of the coupling between organic matter hydrolysis and heterotrophic activities with increasing ocean temperatures, although strongly dependent on the organic matter substrates available. Our study suggests that local differences in the organic matter composition in tropical coastal ecosystems will strongly affect the proportion of dissolved EEA in response to ocean warming.

  8. Tuber growth rate and P-content of potato applied with fermented organic matter Azospirillum sp., and N-fertilizer

    OpenAIRE

    Nurmayulis; Maryati

    2011-01-01

    A research was conducted to study P-uptake of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) responding to application of fermented organic matter and also to determine tuber growth rate. Field experiment was carried out in Pangalengan and Cisarua, Lembang, from June to November 2003. It was set up in a 3-factor randomized complete block design with three replications. First factor was rate of fermented organic matter (0, 7.5, 15.0, and 22.5 t ha-1). Second one was Azospirillum sp. (no and with...

  9. The impact of building recirculation rates on secondary organic aerosols generated by indoor chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuraimi, M.S.; Weschler, Charles J.; Tham, K.W.

    2007-01-01

    reactions between indoor limonene and ozone. The experiments were conducted in a large environmental chamber using four recirculation rates (11, 14, 19 and 24 air change per hour (ACH)) and a constant outdoor air exchange rate (I ACH) as well as constant emission rates for limonene and ozone....... As the recirculation rates increased, the deposition velocities of ozone and SOA increased. As a consequence of reduced production rates (due to less ozone) and larger surface removal rates, number and mass concentrations of SOA in different size ranges decreased significantly at higher recirculation rates. Enhanced...... coagulation at higher recirculation rates also reduced particle number concentrations, while shifting size-distributions towards larger particles. The results have health implications beyond changes in exposures, since particle size is a factor that determines where a particle deposits in the respiratory...

  10. Estimating soil labile organic carbon and potential turnover rates using a sequential fumigation–incubation procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    X.M. Zoua; H.H. Ruanc; Y. Fua; X.D. Yanga; L.Q. Sha

    2005-01-01

    Labile carbon is the fraction of soil organic carbon with most rapid turnover times and its oxidation drives the flux of CO2 between soils and atmosphere. Available chemical and physical fractionation methods for estimating soil labile organic carbon are indirect and lack a clear biological definition. We have modified the well-established Jenkinson and Powlson’s...

  11. Data compilation of respiration, feeding, and growth rates of marine pelagic organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    's adaptation to the environment, with consequently less universal mass scaling properties. Data on body mass, maximum ingestion and clearance rates, respiration rates and maximum growth rates of animals living in the ocean epipelagic were compiled from the literature, mainly from original papers but also from...

  12. Leadership: a key strategy in staff nurse retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Carol S

    2004-01-01

    Nursing administrators are challenged to recruit and retain staff nurses in the midst of increasing job vacancies and staff nurse turnover rates averaging 21%. The prevailing issues related to staff nurse recruitment and retention in the current healthcare environment are briefly reviewed as introductory content. The article outlines the case from nursing administration literature that effective leadership styles of nurse managers and nurse administrators enhance staff nurse retention. As nurse administrators continue to struggle with staff nurse recruitment and retention, evidenced-based strategies are discussed that address leader preparation and organizational leadership structure including advanced education, leadership training, and shared leadership models.

  13. Method for calculation of upper limit internal alpha dose rates to aquatic organisms with application of plutonium-239 in plankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.; Baptista, G.B.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the calculation of upper limit internal alpha dose rates to aquatic organisms is presented. The mean alpha energies per disintegration of radionuclides of interest are listed to be used in standard methodologies to calculate dose to aquatic biota. As an application, the upper limits for the alpha dose rates from 239 Pu to the total body of plankton are estimated based on data available in open literature [pt

  14. Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Emission Rates From Urban Vegetation in Southeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, B.; Graessli, M.; Bai, J.; Huang, A.; Li, N.; Guenther, A.

    2005-12-01

    Currently, the country of China is growing economically at an extraordinary pace. With this growth comes an increase in emissions of anthropogenic pollutants such as hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides from factories and vehicles. To accurately determine the effects of these pollutants on regional ozone production, and to best determine mitigation strategies, biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions must be considered in regional atmospheric chemistry models. To date, few studies have been carried out to determine BVOC emission factors for plant species that occur in China. Considering that approximately 20% of the world's population resides in this region, it is important to develop accurate databases for BVOC emissions for the country of China. This experiment took place during May and June of 2005 and was based in the Fairy Lake Botanical Gardens (FLBG) located to the northeast of the city of Shenzhen. The city of Shenzhen is located in southeast China in Guangdong province. The city was designated a 'special economic zone' in 1980 and has experienced intense population and economic growth ever since. The dense city is surrounded by hilly rural areas of forest on three sides, and Hong Kong to the south. The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate emissions of BVOC from plants that are important to the Shenzhen region as well as to southeastern China. Over 150 species of plants were screened for emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes. These species include most of the dominant trees and shrubs planted in the Shenzhen area. Samples were collected at the FLBG as well as at various locations around the city of Shenzhen. BVOC emission samples were collected and analyzed in one of two ways. First, a Teflon enclosure was placed over a plant's branch with a constant flow of ambient air passing through the enclosure. Samples were then pumped into a Teflon bag for analysis. Samples were analyzed within 30 minutes by gas chromatography (GC) with either a photo

  15. Integration of CERN staff

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    An example of the integration of CERN staff in the neighbouring communes is provided by the hamlet of Bugnon at St-Genis-Pouilly (Ain), FRance. The CERN installation on the Swiss site are visible on the left in the background. Behind them the Saleve mountain in Haute-Savoie.

  16. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the m...

  17. Systematic Staff Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Norman L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the process of staff selection for the general studies department at Piedmont Technical College. Makes suggestions on how to write a job description, establish selection criteria, develop the selection process, and make the selection itself. Includes sample forms used in the process. (DR)

  18. The Staff of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rebecca

    1994-01-01

    Some children have chronic illnesses that require diet modifications as part of their medical treatment. Advises school districts to hire a registered dietitian or look for resources at a local hospital or public health office. In addition, schools should work with parents, improve staff training, and conduct spot checks of school cafeterias. (MLF)

  19. Real-world volatile organic compound emission rates from seated adults and children for use in indoor air studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stönner, C; Edtbauer, A; Williams, J

    2018-01-01

    Human beings emit many volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of both endogenous (internally produced) and exogenous (external source) origin. Here we present real-world emission rates of volatile organic compounds from cinema audiences (50-230 people) as a function of time in multiple screenings of three films. The cinema location and film selection allowed high-frequency measurement of human-emitted VOCs within a room flushed at a known rate so that emissions rates could be calculated for both adults and children. Gas-phase emission rates are analyzed as a function of time of day, variability during the film, and age of viewer. The average emission rates of CO 2 , acetone, and isoprene were lower (by a factor of ~1.2-1.4) for children under twelve compared to adults while for acetaldehyde emission rates were equivalent. Molecules influenced by exogenous sources such as decamethylcyclopentasiloxanes and methanol tended to decrease over the course of day and then rise for late evening screenings. These results represent average emission rates of people under real-world conditions and can be used in indoor air quality assessments and building design. Averaging over a large number of people generates emission rates that are less susceptible to individual behaviors. © 2017 The Authors. Indoor Air published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Surfactant effects on desorption rate of nonionic organic compounds from soils to water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesare, David Di; Smith, James A.

    1994-01-01

    The widespread occurrence of organic contamination in groundwater systems has become an important environmental concern. Of particular interest are nonionic organic compounds, which sorb strongly to natural soil as a result of their characteristic low aqueous solubilities and hydrophobic nature. Consequently, the remediation of nonionic organic contamination in groundwater systems is often highly dependent on contaminant desorption from the sorbed to aqueous phase. The kinetics of desorption will significantly influence the extraction efficiency of pump-and-treat remedial methods that are capable of removing only dissolved phase contaminants.

  1. Night nursing – staff's working experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Ann-Mari

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the duties and working conditions of registered, and enrolled nurses have previously been described from different perspectives, they have not been examined from the night nursing aspect. The aim of the study was to describe the night nursing staff's working experiences. Methods The design of the study is qualitative and descriptive. Interviews were conducted with 10 registered and 10 enrolled nurses working as night staff at a Swedish University Hospital. The interview guide was thematic and concerned the content of their tasks, as well as the working conditions that constitute night nursing. In addition, the interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis. Results The night duties have to be performed under difficult conditions that include working silently in dimmed lighting, and making decisions when fatigue threatens. According to the night staff, its main goals are to provide the patients with rest and simultaneously ensure qualified care. Furthermore, the night nursing staff must prepare the ward for the daytime activities. Conclusion The most important point is the team work, which developed between the registered and enrolled nurses and how necessary this team work is when working at night. In order for nurses working at night to be fully appreciated, the communication between day and night staff in health care organizations needs to be developed. Furthermore, it is important to give the night staff opportunities to use its whole field of competence.

  2. An Extension and Test of Sutherland's Concept of Differential Social Organization: The Geographic Clustering of Japanese Suicide and Homicide Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baller, Robert D.; Shin, Dong-Joon; Richardson, Kelly K.

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to explain the spatial patterning of violence, we expanded Sutherland's (1947) concept of differential social organization to include the level of deviance exhibited by neighboring areas. To test the value of this extension, the geographic clustering of Japanese suicide and homicide rates is assessed using 1985 and 1995 data for…

  3. Classification of Fetal Heart Rate Tracings Based on Wavelet-Transform & Self-Organizing-Map Neural Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vasios, G

    2001-01-01

    ...). We focus on the values of the standard deviation of the wavelet components (up to scale index 5) and we apply Self-Organizing-Map in order to investigate the relationship between the fetal heart rate variability in different scales and FSpO2...

  4. Classification of Fetal Heart Rate Tracings Based on Wavelet-Transform & Self-Organizing Map Neural Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vasios, G

    2001-01-01

    ...). We focus on the values of the standard deviation of the wavelet components (up to scale index 5) and we apply Self-Organizing-Map in order to investigate the relationship between the fetal heart rate variability in different scales and FSpO2...

  5. Anaerobic co-digestion of food waste and dairy manure: effects of food waste particle size and organic loading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyeman, Fred O; Tao, Wendong

    2014-01-15

    This study was to comprehensively evaluate the effects of food waste particle size on co-digestion of food waste and dairy manure at organic loading rates increased stepwise from 0.67 to 3 g/L/d of volatile solids (VS). Three anaerobic digesters were fed semi-continuously with equal VS amounts of food waste and dairy manure. Food waste was ground to 2.5 mm (fine), 4 mm (medium), and 8 mm (coarse) for the three digesters, respectively. Methane production rate and specific methane yield were significantly higher in the digester with fine food waste. Digestate dewaterability was improved significantly by reducing food waste particle size. Specific methane yield was highest at the organic loading rate of 2g VS/L/d, being 0.63, 0.56, and 0.47 L CH4/g VS with fine, medium, and coarse food waste, respectively. Methane production rate was highest (1.40-1.53 L CH4/L/d) at the organic loading rate of 3 g VS/L/d. The energy used to grind food waste was minor compared with the heating value of the methane produced. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Coke, char and organic waste behaviour in the blast furnace with high injection rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudenau, H. W.

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Blast furnace operation with low coke rate, high amount of auxiliary hydrocarbons and use of nut coke causes a change in coke quality requirements. In particular, not burned in the raceway residues of injected substances (char and ash can influence the coke behaviour. Therefore combustion efficiency of various organic wastes with and without pulverized coal injection (PCI and coal char has been investigated under the raceway simulation conditions. Mixing of various substances improves their combustion efficiency. Study on coke gasification by carbon dioxide in the presence of char showed that with the increase of char concentration, coke strength reduction becomes smaller. The reactivity of char with CO2 is higher than that of coke. Therefore char is consumed preferentially. In presence of injected char, total pore volume in coke and its wear resistance were increased. Coke reactivity and microstructure in the presence of various kinds of ash has been studied. Many ash spheres were observed on the surface of coke matrix and its size was dependent on ash properties.

    La operación del horno alto con una tasa baja de coque, una cantidad elevada de hidrocarburos auxiliares y el empleo de coque calibrado, origina un cambio en las necesidades de calidad del coque. En particular, pueden influir en el comportamiento del coque los residuos inquemados en el raceway (cavidad enfrente a las toberas del horno de las sustancias que se inyectan (char y cenizas. El char es el residuo de carbón que se origina después que el carbón libera sus sustancias volátiles. Por tanto, se ha investigado la eficiencia de la combustión de varios residuos orgánicos con y sin inyección de carbón pulverizado (ICP y char, bajo las condiciones de simulación del raceway. La mezcla de varias sustancias mejora la eficiencia a la combustión. El estudio de la gasificación del coque por el dióxido de carbono en la

  7. Higher refusal rates for organ donation among older potential donors in the Netherlands: impact of the donor register and relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leiden, Hendrik A; Jansen, Nichon E; Haase-Kromwijk, Bernadette J J M; Hoitsma, Andries J

    2010-09-27

    The availability of donor organs is considerably reduced by relatives refusing donation after death. There is no previous large-scale evaluation of the influence of the Donor Register (DR) consultation and the potential donor's age on this refusal in The Netherlands. This study examines 2101 potential organ donors identified in intensive care units between 2005 and 2008 and analyzes the association of DR consultation and subsequent refusal by relatives and the relationship with the potential donor's age. Of the 1864 potential donor cases where the DR was consulted, the DR revealed no registration in 56%, 20% registration of consent, and 18% objection. In the other 6.5% of cases, where the DR indicated that relatives had to decide, the relatives' refusal rate was significantly lower than in the absence of a DR registration (46% vs. 63%). In 6% of the cases where the DR recorded donation consent, relatives still refused donation. DR registration, objection in the DR, and the relatives' refusal rate if the DR was not decisive increased with donor age. Despite the introduction of a DR, relatives still play an equally important role in the final decision for organ donation. The general public should be encouraged to register their donation preferences in the DR and also to discuss their preferences with their families. The higher refusal rate of older potential donors means that this group should receive more information about organ donation, especially because the cohort of available donors is ageing.

  8. Mentoring--a staff retention tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaskie, Mary Louise

    2006-01-01

    Staff retention presents a common challenge for hospitals nationwide. Mentorship programs have been explored as one method of creating environments that promote staff retention. Successful achievement of nurse competencies identified in the Synergy Model for Patient Care can best be achieved in an environment that encourages and facilitates mentoring. Mentoring relationships in critical care provide the ongoing interactions, coaching, teaching, and role modeling to facilitate nurses' progression along this continuum. Mentoring relationships offer support and professional development for nurses at all levels within an organization as well as an optimistic outlook for the nursing profession.

  9. Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations and Emission Rates in New Manufactured and Site-Built Houses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armin Rudd

    2008-10-30

    This study was conducted with the primary objective of characterizing and comparing the airborne concentrations and the emission rates of total VOCs and selected individual VOCs, including formaldehyde, among a limited number of new manufactured and site-built houses.

  10. How to face organ shortage in liver transplantation in an area with low rate of deceased donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Pagano, Duilio; Echeverri, Gabriel J; Cintorino, Davide; Spada, Marco; Gridelli, Bruno G

    2010-12-01

    Despite advances in patient selection, surgical technique, immunosuppression, and peri-operative management, the need for liver replacement exceeds organ availability. Moreover, in Italy, where the overall rate of cadaver donation is 21 donors per million per year, there are areas of the country, such as Sicily, where the rate of cadaver donation is 9.3 donors per million per year. In fact, this ongoing shortage of organs has led surgeons to develop innovative techniques in an attempt to expand the donor pool, and clinicians are continually modifying criteria to accept organs, particularly the previously defined expanded or marginal donor organs, which are now defined as extended criteria donor. Rarely, in certain specific settings alternative strategies based on the appropriate donor-recipient match allowed the use of grafts that otherwise would have been discarded due to anatomic anomalies. The organ shortage becomes more problematic in the scenario of re-transplantation where the use of a limited resource such as a liver graft must be weighed against the risk of a more difficult surgery.

  11. Intrinsic rates of petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in Gulf of Mexico intertidal sandy sediments and its enhancement by organic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortazavi, Behzad; Horel, Agota; Beazley, Melanie J.; Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    The rates of crude oil degradation by the extant microorganisms in intertidal sediments from a northern Gulf of Mexico beach were determined. The enhancement in crude oil degradation by amending the microbial communities with marine organic matter was also examined. Replicate mesocosm treatments consisted of: (i) controls (intertidal sand), (ii) sand contaminated with crude oil, (iii) sand plus organic matter, and (iv) sand plus crude oil and organic matter. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) production was measured daily for 42 days and the carbon isotopic ratio of CO 2 (δ 13 CO 2 ) was used to determine the fraction of CO 2 derived from microbial respiration of crude oil. Bacterial 16S rRNA clone library analyses indicated members of Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Chloroflexi occurred exclusively in control sediments whereas Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes occurred in both control and oil contaminated sediments. Members of the hydrocarbon-degrading genera Hydrocarboniphaga, Pseudomonas, and Pseudoxanthomonas were found primarily in oil contaminated treatments. Hydrocarbon mineralization was 76% higher in the crude oil amended with organic matter treatment compared to the rate in the crude oil only treatment indicating that biodegradation of crude oil in the intertidal zone by an extant microbial community is enhanced by input of organic matter

  12. Intrinsic rates of petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in Gulf of Mexico intertidal sandy sediments and its enhancement by organic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortazavi, Behzad, E-mail: bmortazavi@ua.edu [University of Alabama, Department of Biological Sciences, Box 870344, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Dauphin Island Sea Lab, 101 Bienville Boulevard, Dauphin Island, AL, 36528 (United States); Horel, Agota [University of Alabama, Department of Biological Sciences, Box 870344, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Dauphin Island Sea Lab, 101 Bienville Boulevard, Dauphin Island, AL, 36528 (United States); Beazley, Melanie J.; Sobecky, Patricia A. [University of Alabama, Department of Biological Sciences, Box 870344, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    The rates of crude oil degradation by the extant microorganisms in intertidal sediments from a northern Gulf of Mexico beach were determined. The enhancement in crude oil degradation by amending the microbial communities with marine organic matter was also examined. Replicate mesocosm treatments consisted of: (i) controls (intertidal sand), (ii) sand contaminated with crude oil, (iii) sand plus organic matter, and (iv) sand plus crude oil and organic matter. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) production was measured daily for 42 days and the carbon isotopic ratio of CO{sub 2} (δ{sup 13}CO{sub 2}) was used to determine the fraction of CO{sub 2} derived from microbial respiration of crude oil. Bacterial 16S rRNA clone library analyses indicated members of Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Chloroflexi occurred exclusively in control sediments whereas Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes occurred in both control and oil contaminated sediments. Members of the hydrocarbon-degrading genera Hydrocarboniphaga, Pseudomonas, and Pseudoxanthomonas were found primarily in oil contaminated treatments. Hydrocarbon mineralization was 76% higher in the crude oil amended with organic matter treatment compared to the rate in the crude oil only treatment indicating that biodegradation of crude oil in the intertidal zone by an extant microbial community is enhanced by input of organic matter.

  13. Accumulation rates of soil organic matter in wet dune slacks on the Dutch Wadden Sea islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahrudin, Rohani; Dullo, Bikila; Woudwijk, Wilmer; de Hoop, Pieter; Kooijman, Annemieke; Grootjans, Albert Pieter

    A long-term monitoring program (ranging from 16 to 77 years) on the Dutch Wadden Sea Islands provided well-documented examples of vegetation succession in wet dune slacks. We used this opportunity to study soil organic matter (SOM) accumulation in relation to vegetation succession. The aim of this

  14. Accumulation rates of soil organic matter in wet dune slacks on the Dutch Wadden Sea islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharudin, R.; Dullo, B.; Woudwijk, W.; de Hoop, P.; Kooijman, A.; Grootjans, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims A long-term monitoring program (ranging from 16 to 77 years) on the Dutch Wadden Sea Islands provided well-documented examples of vegetation succession in wet dune slacks.We used this opportunity to study soil organic matter (SOM) accumulation in relation to vegetation

  15. Glomerular Filtration Rate Estimation in Renal and Non-Renal Solid Organ Transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, Mads; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    hypertension, hypotension, drugs and infections may play a causative role as well. Organ-specific causes include hepatorenal syndrome, cirrhosis, low cardiac function, low respiratory function and diabetes developed both before and after TX. It is important to be able to perform precise and valid measurements...

  16. The Relationship of Test Performance to ISDP Rating in Organic Chemistry Texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Young; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes the Instructional Strategy Diagnostic Profile (ISDP)--an analytic tool that facilitates the evaluation and revision of existing instruction and the design of new instruction--and recounts its use in comparing two textbooks to determine the most appropriate for an organic chemistry course. (JEG)

  17. Effect of organic loading rate and feedstock composition on foaming in manure-based biogas reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kougias, Panagiotis; Boe, Kanokwan; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    composition, such as content of proteins or lipids were factors that in combination with the organic loading were triggering foaming. More specifically, gelatine could initiate foam formation at a lower OLR than sodium oleate. Moreover, the volume of foam produced by gelatine was relatively stable...... and was not increased when further increasing either OLR or gelatine concentration in the feed. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd....

  18. Nitrogen fertiliser replacement values for organic amendments appear to increase with N application rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijbeek, R.; Berge, ten H.F.M.; Whitmore, A.P.; Barkusky, D.; Schroder, J.J.; Ittersum, van M.K.

    2018-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) supply from organic amendments [such as farmyard manure (FYM), slurries or crop residues] to crops is commonly expressed in the amendment’s Nitrogen Fertiliser Replacement Value (NFRV). Values for NFRV can be determined by comparison of crop yield or N uptake in amended plots against

  19. Higher organ donation consent rates by relatives of potential uncontrolled donors versus potential controlled donors after death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Jentina; van Mook, Walther N K A; Willems, Monique E C; van Heurn, L W Ernest

    2012-11-01

    Refusal to consent to organ donation is an important cause of the persisting gap between the number of potential organ donors and effectuated donors. In the Netherlands, organ donors include both uncontrolled donors: donors who die unexpectedly after cardiac death (DCD), after failed resuscitation and donors in whom death can be expected and donors after brain death, and controlled DCD donors: those who die after the withdrawal of treatment. Different donor type implies a different setting in which relatives are requested to consent to organ donation. It is unknown whether the setting influences the eventual decision for donation or not. Therefore, we compared the consent rate in potential donors who died unexpectedly (UD group) and in whom death was expected. A total of 523 potential organ donors between 2003 and 2011 in the 715-bed Maastricht University Medical Centre, the Netherlands were included. Both the patients' registration in the national donor register (DR) and the relatives' refusal rate in the two groups were retrospectively assessed using data from the donation application database. There were 109 unexpected and 414 expected potential donors The potential donors in the UD group were younger (mean age 52 versus 55 years, P = 0.032) and more often male (68 versus 52%, P = 0.003). There were no significant differences in registration in the DR between the groups. The relatives' consent rate in non-registered potential donors, or those who mandated the relatives for that decision, was higher in the UD group (53 versus 29%, P organ donation. The relatives of potential donors who died unexpectedly consented more often to donation than those in whom death was expected.

  20. Organic carbon stocks and sequestration rates of forest soils in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüneberg, Erik; Ziche, Daniel; Wellbrock, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    The National Forest Soil Inventory (NFSI) provides the Greenhouse Gas Reporting in Germany with a quantitative assessment of organic carbon (C) stocks and changes in forest soils. Carbon stocks of the organic layer and the mineral topsoil (30 cm) were estimated on the basis of ca. 1.800 plots sampled from 1987 to 1992 and resampled from 2006 to 2008 on a nationwide grid of 8 × 8 km. Organic layer C stock estimates were attributed to surveyed forest stands and CORINE land cover data. Mineral soil C stock estimates were linked with the distribution of dominant soil types according to the Soil Map of Germany (1 : 1 000 000) and subsequently related to the forest area. It appears that the C pool of the organic layer was largely depending on tree species and parent material, whereas the C pool of the mineral soil varied among soil groups. We identified the organic layer C pool as stable although C was significantly sequestered under coniferous forest at lowland sites. The mineral soils, however, sequestered 0.41 Mg C ha−1 yr−1. Carbon pool changes were supposed to depend on stand age and forest transformation as well as an enhanced biomass input. Carbon stock changes were clearly attributed to parent material and soil groups as sandy soils sequestered higher amounts of C, whereas clayey and calcareous soils showed small gains and in some cases even losses of soil C. We further showed that the largest part of the overall sample variance was not explained by fine-earth stock variances, rather by the C concentrations variance. The applied uncertainty analyses in this study link the variability of strata with measurement errors. In accordance to other studies for Central Europe, the results showed that the applied method enabled a reliable nationwide quantification of the soil C pool development for a certain period. PMID:24616061

  1. Organic carbon stocks and sequestration rates of forest soils in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüneberg, Erik; Ziche, Daniel; Wellbrock, Nicole

    2014-08-01

    The National Forest Soil Inventory (NFSI) provides the Greenhouse Gas Reporting in Germany with a quantitative assessment of organic carbon (C) stocks and changes in forest soils. Carbon stocks of the organic layer and the mineral topsoil (30 cm) were estimated on the basis of ca. 1.800 plots sampled from 1987 to 1992 and resampled from 2006 to 2008 on a nationwide grid of 8 × 8 km. Organic layer C stock estimates were attributed to surveyed forest stands and CORINE land cover data. Mineral soil C stock estimates were linked with the distribution of dominant soil types according to the Soil Map of Germany (1 : 1 000 000) and subsequently related to the forest area. It appears that the C pool of the organic layer was largely depending on tree species and parent material, whereas the C pool of the mineral soil varied among soil groups. We identified the organic layer C pool as stable although C was significantly sequestered under coniferous forest at lowland sites. The mineral soils, however, sequestered 0.41 Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1) . Carbon pool changes were supposed to depend on stand age and forest transformation as well as an enhanced biomass input. Carbon stock changes were clearly attributed to parent material and soil groups as sandy soils sequestered higher amounts of C, whereas clayey and calcareous soils showed small gains and in some cases even losses of soil C. We further showed that the largest part of the overall sample variance was not explained by fine-earth stock variances, rather by the C concentrations variance. The applied uncertainty analyses in this study link the variability of strata with measurement errors. In accordance to other studies for Central Europe, the results showed that the applied method enabled a reliable nationwide quantification of the soil C pool development for a certain period. © 2014 The Authors. Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Information Systems and Corporate Memory: design for staff turn-over

    OpenAIRE

    Colin Sharp; Neil Lewis

    1993-01-01

    The "information age" is reliant upon the information skill-base of people and the storage and access of complete data. Staff turn-over and "down-sizing" as well as the rate of organisational change places increased pressure on the designers of corporate information systems to keep up with the organizational demands. Especially relevant are the "soft" aspects of the corporate information needs of organizations. The term "corporate memory" is introduced to explain the relatively informal colle...

  3. Professional Training of Junior Medical Staff: European Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliasova, Yuliia

    2017-01-01

    The article covers current problems of professional training of junior medical staff. The main disadvantages of Ukrainian system of medical education that impede the intention of improving quality of professional training of junior medical staff have been analyzed. European experience in organizing medical education, namely, in Great Britain,…

  4. Identification of Domains for Malaysian University Staff Happiness Index Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Sulaiman Md.

    2014-01-01

    Without any doubt happiness among staff in any organization is pertinent to ensure continued growth and development. However, not many studies were carried out to determine the domains that will be able to measure the level of happiness among staff in universities. Thus, the aim of this study is to elicit the domains that explain the overall…

  5. Mind Map: a new way to teach patients and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, C A

    2000-05-01

    As home care agencies look for new ways to achieve patient outcomes and staff competencies in a cost-effective manner, Mind Map is a method that can be used to quickly organize patient and staff education while evaluating the learner's comprehension of critical information.

  6. Understanding Job Stress among Healthcare Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dola Saha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Job life is an important part of a person’s daily life. There are many aspects of a job. A person may be satisfied with one or more aspects of his/her job but at the same time may be unhappy with other things related to the job. Objective: To evaluate the sources of job stress (stressful aspects of work among the staff of a super specialty hospital & to suggest measures to decrease level of job stress. Methodology: Descriptive study employing 381 staff members of a super specialty hospital using a structured personal interview questionnaire consisting of 21 sources of stress. The hospital staff was asked to rate each item according to the extent to which it had contributed to their stress as experienced in their jobs in the past few months on a scale of 0 (not at all,1(a little, 2(quite a bit, 3 (a lot. A global rating of stress was also obtained. Result: The prime sources of stress were found to be underpayment (76%, excessive workload (70.3%, inadequate staff (48.6, & being involved in the emotional distress of patients (46.7%. Conclusion: The staffs of the hospital were in moderate stress due to the prime stressors so adequate measures should be taken to alleviate these stressors. This could be achieved through workload management, job redesign, & by offering occupational health education.

  7. NICU consultants and support staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newborn intensive care unit - consultants and support staff; Neonatal intensive care unit - consultants and support staff ... a baby's nipple-feeding readiness and oral-motor skills. Speech therapists will also help with feeding skills ...

  8. Training to raise staff awareness about safeguarding children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jane

    2015-04-01

    To improve outcomes for children and young people health organisations are required to train all staff in children's safeguarding. This creates difficulties for large complex organisations where most staff provide services to the adult population. Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust is a large acute and community trust that had difficulties in engaging staff in children's safeguarding training. Compliance rates for clinical staff who were trained in children's safeguarding were low and needed to be addressed. This article sets out why safeguarding training is important for all staff and how the trust achieved staff engagement and improved compliance rates. To evaluate, maintain and develop safeguarding knowledge, understanding, skills, attitude and behaviour further resources are planned to allow access to learning resources in a variety of formats.

  9. Use of mobile phones by medical staff at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Barbados: evidence for both benefit and harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, J; Carter, A O; Campbell, M H; Gibbons, N; Powlett, C; Moseley, H; Lewis, D; Carter, T

    2008-10-01

    All members of medical staff, including students, were asked to participate in a self-administered questionnaire concerning patterns of mobile phone use and care. Participants' phones were cultured for micro-organisms. Healthcare professionals working in close proximity to sensitive equipment were surveyed concerning adverse events associated with mobile phones. Telephone operators were asked to monitor time elapsed as they attempted to contact medical staff by various methods. Of 266 medical staff and students at the time of the study, 116 completed questionnaires (response rate=44%). Almost all (98%) used mobile phones: 67% used their mobile phones for hospital-related matters; 47% reported using their phone while attending patients. Only 3% reported washing their hands after use and 53% reported never cleaning their phone. In total, 101 mobile phones were cultured for micro-organisms; 45% were culture-positive and 15% grew Gram-negative pathogens. The survey of staff working in close proximity to sensitive equipment revealed only one report of minor interference with life-saving equipment. Telephone operators were able to contact medical staff within 2 min most easily by mobile phone. Mobile phones were used widely by staff and were considered by most participants as a more efficient means of communication. However, microbial contamination is a risk associated with the infrequent cleaning of phones. Hospitals should develop policies to address the hygiene of mobile phones.

  10. Experiments probing the influence of air exchange rates on secondary organic aerosols derived from indoor chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Shields, H.C.

    2003-01-01

    of their particle size distributions. The experiments were performed in a manipulated office setting containing a constant source of d-limonene and an ozone generator that was remotely turned "on" or "off" at 6h intervals. The particle number concentrations were monitored using an optical particle counter...... with eight-channels ranging from 0.1-0.2 to$GRT@2.0$mu@m diameter. The air exchange rates during the experiments were either high (working hours) or low (non-working hours) and ranged from 1.6 to$GRT@12h $+-1$/, with intermediate exchange rates. Given the emission rates of ozone and d-limonene used...

  11. Quantitative and qualitative processes of change during staff-coaching sessions : An exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oorsouw, W.M.W.J.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2013-01-01

    Staff training is one of the interventions that managers can embed in their organizations to help staff improve their professional competences related to challenging behaviour of clients with intellectual disabilities. Individual coaching adds learning opportunities that are feasible but difficult

  12. Quantitative and qualitative processes of change during staff-coaching sessions: An exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2013-01-01

    Staff training is one of the interventions that managers can embed in their organizations to help staff improve their professional competences related to challenging behaviour of clients with intellectual disabilities. Individual coaching adds learning opportunities that are feasible but difficult

  13. SNP discovery in nonmodel organisms: strand bias and base-substitution errors reduce conversion rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves da Silva, Anders; Barendse, William; Kijas, James W; Barris, Wes C; McWilliam, Sean; Bunch, Rowan J; McCullough, Russell; Harrison, Blair; Hoelzel, A Rus; England, Phillip R

    2015-07-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have become the marker of choice for genetic studies in organisms of conservation, commercial or biological interest. Most SNP discovery projects in nonmodel organisms apply a strategy for identifying putative SNPs based on filtering rules that account for random sequencing errors. Here, we analyse data used to develop 4723 novel SNPs for the commercially important deep-sea fish, orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus), to assess the impact of not accounting for systematic sequencing errors when filtering identified polymorphisms when discovering SNPs. We used SAMtools to identify polymorphisms in a velvet assembly of genomic DNA sequence data from seven individuals. The resulting set of polymorphisms were filtered to minimize 'bycatch'-polymorphisms caused by sequencing or assembly error. An Illumina Infinium SNP chip was used to genotype a final set of 7714 polymorphisms across 1734 individuals. Five predictors were examined for their effect on the probability of obtaining an assayable SNP: depth of coverage, number of reads that support a variant, polymorphism type (e.g. A/C), strand-bias and Illumina SNP probe design score. Our results indicate that filtering out systematic sequencing errors could substantially improve the efficiency of SNP discovery. We show that BLASTX can be used as an efficient tool to identify single-copy genomic regions in the absence of a reference genome. The results have implications for research aiming to identify assayable SNPs and build SNP genotyping assays for nonmodel organisms. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The different roles of the Staff association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2012-01-01

    The statutory role of the CERN Staff Association is defined in Chapter VII of the Staff Rules and Regulations. The means of the Association to realize its aims are described in Article I.1.3 of the Statutes of the CERN Staff Association. Generally speaking, its aims are “To serve and defend the economic, social, professional and moral interests of its members and all CERN staff“. Usually we deal with professional and social issues (employment conditions, defence of collective or individual rights, promotion of basic research...). But the Association also plays a role of integration (clubs promoting cultural, humanitarian, and sport or offering entertainment, organizing exhibitions and conferences) and it can promote actions to provide its members with material or social advantages (Interfon, commercial offers). Advantageous commercial offers In recent years the Association was able to negotiate with business or cultural partners benefits for its members. A full list can be found on our...

  15. Organ and effective dose rate coefficients for submersion exposure in occupational settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K.G. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dewji, S.A.; Hiller, M.M. [Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-11-15

    External dose coefficients for environmental exposure scenarios are often computed using assumption on infinite or semi-infinite radiation sources. For example, in the case of a person standing on contaminated ground, the source is assumed to be distributed at a given depth (or between various depths) and extending outwards to an essentially infinite distance. In the case of exposure to contaminated air, the person is modeled as standing within a cloud of infinite, or semi-infinite, source distribution. However, these scenarios do not mimic common workplace environments where scatter off walls and ceilings may significantly alter the energy spectrum and dose coefficients. In this paper, dose rate coefficients were calculated using the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantoms positioned in rooms of three sizes representing an office, laboratory, and warehouse. For each room size calculations using the reference phantoms were performed for photons, electrons, and positrons as the source particles to derive mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Since the voxel phantoms lack the resolution to perform dose calculations at the sensitive depth for the skin, a mathematical phantom was developed and calculations were performed in each room size with the three source particle types. Coefficients for the noble gas radionuclides of ICRP Publication 107 (e.g., Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) were generated by folding the corresponding photon, electron, and positron emissions over the mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Results indicate that the smaller room sizes have a significant impact on the dose rate per unit air concentration compared to the semi-infinite cloud case. For example, for Kr-85 the warehouse dose rate coefficient is 7% higher than the office dose rate coefficient while it is 71% higher for Xe-133. (orig.)

  16. Organ and effective dose rate coefficients for submersion exposure in occupational settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veinot, K.G.; Dewji, S.A.; Hiller, M.M.; Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E.

    2017-01-01

    External dose coefficients for environmental exposure scenarios are often computed using assumption on infinite or semi-infinite radiation sources. For example, in the case of a person standing on contaminated ground, the source is assumed to be distributed at a given depth (or between various depths) and extending outwards to an essentially infinite distance. In the case of exposure to contaminated air, the person is modeled as standing within a cloud of infinite, or semi-infinite, source distribution. However, these scenarios do not mimic common workplace environments where scatter off walls and ceilings may significantly alter the energy spectrum and dose coefficients. In this paper, dose rate coefficients were calculated using the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantoms positioned in rooms of three sizes representing an office, laboratory, and warehouse. For each room size calculations using the reference phantoms were performed for photons, electrons, and positrons as the source particles to derive mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Since the voxel phantoms lack the resolution to perform dose calculations at the sensitive depth for the skin, a mathematical phantom was developed and calculations were performed in each room size with the three source particle types. Coefficients for the noble gas radionuclides of ICRP Publication 107 (e.g., Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) were generated by folding the corresponding photon, electron, and positron emissions over the mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Results indicate that the smaller room sizes have a significant impact on the dose rate per unit air concentration compared to the semi-infinite cloud case. For example, for Kr-85 the warehouse dose rate coefficient is 7% higher than the office dose rate coefficient while it is 71% higher for Xe-133. (orig.)

  17. Impact of the Introduction of Digital Mammography in an Organized Screening Program on the Recall and Detection Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campari, Cinzia; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo; Mori, Carlo Alberto; Ravaioli, Sara; Nitrosi, Andrea; Vacondio, Rita; Mancuso, Pamela; Cattani, Antonella; Pattacini, Pierpaolo

    2016-04-01

    In 2012, the Reggio Emilia Breast Cancer Screening Program introduced digital mammography in all its facilities at the same time. The aim of this work is to analyze the impact of digital mammography introduction on the recall rate, detection rate, and positive predictive value. The program actively invites women aged 45-74 years. We included women screened in 2011, all of whom underwent film-screen mammography, and all women screened in 2012, all of whom underwent digital mammography. Double reading was used for all mammograms, with arbitration in the event of disagreement. A total of 42,240 women underwent screen-film mammography and 45,196 underwent digital mammography. The recall rate increased from 3.3 to 4.4% in the first year of digital mammography (relative recall adjusted by age and round 1.46, 95% CI = 1.37-1.56); the positivity rate for each individual reading, before arbitration, rose from 3 to 5.7%. The digital mammography recall rate decreased during 2012: after 12 months, it was similar to the recall rate with screen-film mammography. The detection rate was similar: 5.9/1000 and 5.2/1000 with screen-film and digital mammography, respectively (adjusted relative detection rate 0.95, 95% CI = 0.79-1.13). The relative detection rate for ductal carcinoma in situ remained the same. The introduction of digital mammography to our organized screening program had a negative impact on specificity, thereby increasing the recall rate. The effect was limited to the first 12 months after introduction and was attenuated by the double reading with arbitration. We did not observe any relevant effects on the detection rate.

  18. Planetary quarantine in the solar system. Survival rates of some terrestrial organisms under simulated space conditions by proton irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, J.; Oshima, T.

    We have been studying the survival rates of some species of terrestrial unicellular and multicellular organism (viruses, bacteria, yeasts, fungi, algae, etc.) under simulated interstellar conditions, in connection with planetary quarantine. The interstellar environment in the solar system has been simulated by low temperature, high vacuum (77 K, 4 × 10 -8 torr), and proton irradiation from a Van de Graaff generator. After exposure to a barrage of protons corresponding to about 250 years of irradiation in solar space, tobacco mosaic virus, Bacillus subtilis spores, Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus flavus, Aspergillus niger spores, and Clostridium mangenoti spores showed survival rates of 82, 45, 74, 13, 28, and 25%, respectively.

  19. Anaerobic digester foaming in full-scale cylindrical digesters--effects of organic loading rate, feed characteristics, and mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Bhargavi; Pagilla, Krishna R

    2014-05-01

    Cylindrical anaerobic digesters (AD) were investigated to determine the causes and contributors of AD foaming due to the following: organic loading rate (OLR) and mixing effects, waste activated sludge (WAS) storage effects and foam suppression mixing at the surface of AD, and the effects of primary sludge (PS) solids fraction in the feed sludge. No foaming was observed over the duration of the study, indicating absence of a primary foaming cause even though the suspected contributors to AD foaming were present. Total solids and temperature profiles showed that reducing mixing frequency did not significantly impact digester performance or the homogeneity of the digester contents. The results showed that high organic loading rates, reduced mixing, and feed sludge storage by themselves do not cause foaming in most ADs when the primary foaming cause is absent. Reduced mixing and surface sludge sprays are practical strategies to control AD foaming. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of the rate and temperature sensitivities of bacterial remineralization of dissolved organic phosphorus by natural populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelicque E. White

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Production, transformation, and degradation are the principal components of the cycling of dissolved organic matter (DOM in marine systems. Heterotrophic Bacteria (and Archaea play a large part in this cycling via enzymatic decomposition and intracellular transformations of organic material to inorganic carbon (C, nitrogen (N , and phosphorus (P. The rate and magnitude of inorganic nutrient regeneration from DOM is related to the elemental composition and lability of DOM substrates as well as the nutritional needs of the mediating organisms. While many previous efforts have focused on C and N cycling of DOM, less is known in regards to the controls of organic P utilization and remineralization by natural populations of bacteria. In order to constrain the relative time scales and degradation of select dissolved organic P (DOP compounds we have conducted a series of experiments focused on (1 assessment of the short-term lability of a range of DOP compounds, (2 characterization of labile DOP remineralization rates and (3 examination of temperature sensitivities of labile DOP remineralization for varying bacterial populations. Results reinforce previous findings of monoester and polyphosphate lability and the relative recalcitrance of a model phosphonate: 2-aminoethylphosphonate. High resolution time-series of P monoester remineralization indicates decay constants on the order of 0.67-7.04 d-1 for bacterial populations isolated from coastal and open ocean surface waters. The variability of these rates is predictably related to incubation temperature and initial concentrations of heterotrophic bacteria. Additional controls on DOP hydrolysis included seasonal shifts in bacterial populations and the physiological state of bacteria at the initiation of DOP addition experiments. Composite results indicate that bacterial hydrolysis of P-monoesters exceeds bacterial P demand and thus DOP remineralization efficiency may control P availability to autotrophs.

  1. Socioeconomic inequalities in mortality rates in old age in the World Health Organization Europe Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, M.; Read, S.; Towriss, C.A.; Deeg, D.J.H.; Grundy, E.

    2013-01-01

    Socioeconomic adversity is among the foremost fundamental causes of human suffering, and this is no less true in old age. Recent reports on socioeconomic inequalities in mortality rate in old age suggest that a low socioeconomic position continues to increase the risk of death even among the oldest

  2. Disposal rate in different age groups of Karan Fries (Crossbred) males in organized herd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panmei, Achun; Gupta, A K; Shivahre, P R; Bhakat, M; Singh, K Mahesh

    2015-02-01

    The present study was carried out to analyze the disposal rate in different age groups of Karan Fries (KF) males in National Dairy Research Institute herd. Records on 1740 KF crossbred bulls born during the period 1997-2012 were collected with an objective to ascertain the effect of genetic and non-genetic (Period of birth and season of birth) factors on the disposal pattern of KF males. The percent of animals disposed from the herd due to mortality and culling was calculated by proportion using descriptive statistics. The data were subjected to Chi-square test to test the difference due to different factors. Overall disposal rate for the different age groups of 0-1 m, 1-2 m, 2-3 m, 3-6 m, 6-18 m, 18 m-3 year and 3-5 year were calculated as 17.9, 16.3, 14.2, 25.8, 49.0, 37.6 and 51.65%, respectively. In the age groups, 3-6 m, 6-18 m and 3-5 year, effect of periods of birth were found to be statistically significant (page group except in 3-5 year age group. Differences in overall disposal rate due to genetic group were statistically significant (page groups. Overview of the results indicated that higher overall disposal rate in age group of 1 month was due to mortality while, in the age groups of >1 month, culling was the primary cause.

  3. Twitter accounts followed by Congressional health staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, David; Meisel, Zachary F; Merchant, Raina M; Seymour, Jane; Gollust, Sarah E

    2017-07-01

    Although health policy research should inform policy making, the communication gap between researchers and policy makers limits successful translation. Social media represents a new opportunity to connect researchers and policy makers. Our objective was to assess who Congressional health policy staff follow on a major social media platform. Cross-sectional study. Our study measured Congressional health policy staff's use of Twitter and the types of individuals and organizations they follow. To focus on more influential Twitter accounts, we restricted our sample to those followed by at least 3 individual Congressional staff members. Of the 30,843 accounts followed by the 115 Congressional health policy staff, 1273 were potentially policy-related and followed by 3 or more staff. Of these, few were academically affiliated (2.4%) or explicitly health-related (5.6%) sites; many were general news media sources (50.9%) and political and governmental sources (36.4%). Health-focused accounts were frequently connected to the news media or government rather than academia. Top accounts followed (ie, highest quintile) were most likely to be national news organizations (odds ratio [OR], 5.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.75-19.7) and elected officials (OR, 8.22; 95% CI, 1.75-38.6) compared with advocacy and interest groups. Health-related and academic sources are largely absent from the Twitter conversations with US Congressional health policy staff. Even within social media, traditional and political news media are important information intermediaries that researchers and journals should target to disseminate health policy evidence.

  4. pH and Organic Carbon Dose Rates Control Microbially Driven Bioremediation Efficacy in Alkaline Bauxite Residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Talitha C; Malcolm, Laura I; Tyson, Gene W; Warren, Lesley A

    2016-10-18

    Bioremediation of alkaline tailings, based on fermentative microbial metabolisms, is a novel strategy for achieving rapid pH neutralization and thus improving environmental outcomes associated with mining and refining activities. Laboratory-scale bioreactors containing bauxite residue (an alkaline, saline tailings material generated as a byproduct of alumina refining), to which a diverse microbial inoculum was added, were used in this study to identify key factors (pH, salinity, organic carbon supply) controlling the rates and extent of microbially driven pH neutralization (bioremediation) in alkaline tailings. Initial tailings pH and organic carbon dose rates both significantly affected bioremediation extent and efficiency with lower minimum pHs and higher extents of pH neutralization occurring under low initial pH or high organic carbon conditions. Rates of pH neutralization (up to 0.13 mM H + produced per day with pH decreasing from 9.5 to ≤6.5 in three days) were significantly higher in low initial pH treatments. Representatives of the Bacillaceae and Enterobacteriaceae, which contain many known facultative anaerobes and fermenters, were identified as key contributors to 2,3-butanediol and/or mixed acid fermentation as the major mechanism(s) of pH neutralization. Initial pH and salinity significantly influenced microbial community successional trajectories, and microbial community structure was significantly related to markers of fermentation activity. This study provides the first experimental demonstration of bioremediation in bauxite residue, identifying pH and organic carbon dose rates as key controls on bioremediation efficacy, and will enable future development of bioreactor technologies at full field scale.

  5. The impact of staff training on staff outcomes in dementia care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Aimee; Revolta, Catherine; Orrell, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Caring for people with dementia can be emotionally challenging and is often linked to low job satisfaction and burnout in care staff. Staff training within care settings is potentially valuable in improving well-being and quality of care. This review aimed to (i) establish the impact of training on staff outcomes; (ii) compare the impact of different training approaches; (iii) explore the influence of training intensity; and (iv) explore potential barriers to success. A database search of staff training interventions revealed 207 papers, 188 of which were excluded based on prespecified criteria. Nineteen studies were included and appraised using a quality rating tool. Overall, the studies were found to be of variable quality; however, 16 studies found a significant change following training in at least one staff domain, with knowledge improving most frequently. Approaches focusing on managing challenging behaviours appeared to be the most effective. Training staff can be an effective method of improving well-being, and programmes helping staff to manage challenging behaviour appear to be the most beneficial. There is no clear relationship between training intensity and outcome. Most studies point to the importance of addressing organisational factors as a barrier to change. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Soil surface organic layers in Arctic Alaska: spatial distribution, rates of formation, and microclimatic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, Carson A.; Mann, Daniel H.; Verbyla, David L.; Kunz, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Organic layers of living and dead vegetation cover the ground surface in many permafrost landscapes and play important roles in ecosystem processes. These soil surface organic layers (SSOLs) store large amounts of carbon and buffer the underlying permafrost and its contained carbon from changes in aboveground climate. Understanding the dynamics of SSOLs is a prerequisite for predicting how permafrost and carbon stocks will respond to warming climate. Here we ask three questions about SSOLs in a representative area of the Arctic Foothills region of northern Alaska: (1) What environmental factors control the thickness of SSOLs and the carbon they store? (2) How long do SSOLs take to develop on newly stabilized point bars? (3) How do SSOLs affect temperature in the underlying ground? Results show that SSOL thickness and distribution correlate with elevation, drainage area, vegetation productivity, and incoming solar radiation. A multiple regression model based on these correlations can simulate spatial distribution of SSOLs and estimate the organic carbon stored there. SSOLs develop within a few decades after a new, sandy, geomorphic surface stabilizes but require 500–700 years to reach steady state thickness. Mature SSOLs lower the growing season temperature and mean annual temperature of the underlying mineral soil by 8 and 3°C, respectively. We suggest that the proximate effects of warming climate on permafrost landscapes now covered by SSOLs will occur indirectly via climate's effects on the frequency, extent, and severity of disturbances like fires and landslides that disrupt the SSOLs and interfere with their protection of the underlying permafrost.

  7. Meteor wake in high frame-rate images--implications for the chemistry of ablated organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Stenbaek-Nielsen, Hans C

    2004-01-01

    Extraterrestrial organic matter may have been chemically altered into forms more ameanable for prebiotic chemistry in the wake of a meteor after ablation. We measured the rate of cooling of the plasma in the meteor wake from the intensity decay just behind a meteoroid by freezing its motion in high frame-rate 1000 frames/s video images, with an intensified camera that has a short phosphor decay time. Though the resulting cooling rate was found to be lower than theoretically predicted, our calculations indicated that there would have been insufficient collisions to break apart large organic compounds before most reactive radicals and electrons were lost from the air plasma. Organic molecules delivered from space to the early Earth via meteors might therefore have survived in a chemically altered form. In addition, we discovered that relatively small meteoroids generated far-ultraviolet emission that is absorbed in the immediate environment of the meteoroid, which may chemically alter the atmosphere over a much larger region than previously recognized.

  8. Information for contractors' staff

    CERN Multimedia

    The Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    We have observed a significant decrease in the number of completed Certificates for Work in Controlled Radiation Areas being submitted with applications for dosimeters for your staff. Henceforth, we shall no longer be able to issue dosimeters without a certificate, which must be signed by the employee and the contractor's radiation-protection expert. You can obtain the certificate form from the Dosimetry Service at Building 24/E-011 or from our Website: http://service-rp-dosimetry.web.cern.ch/service-rp-dosimetry/. Thank you for your understanding. The Dosimetry Service

  9. STAFF VACANCY LIST

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    For economy reasons, it has been decided to stop printing and distributing this list to Staff Members. It can be found on the Web (LIST). Divisional Administrative Officers will receive an updated printed copy on a monthly basis and are asked to display this in a public place in their division. Copies will also be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (No. 60) in the glass-fronted cabinet (close to the lifts) and also on the notice board close to the Post Office. A copy will also be given to the Reception (Building No. 33). Human Resources Division Tel. 74606

  10. THE STAFF ASSOCIATION'S INTERNAL COMMISSIONS A source of innovative ideas

    CERN Multimedia

    STAFF ASSOCIATION

    2010-01-01

    In the heart of the Staff Association, internal commissions carry out preparatory work which is indispensable for productive discussions in Staff Council and Executive Committee meetings. These working groups, composed of staff delegates and interested staff members, are think tanks for all subjects in the area assigned to them. Five commissions are active in 2010 : The “In-Form-Action” Commission develops a communication strategy (Information), organizes staff mobilization and action (Action) and promotes delegate training (Formation [training]), in order to enhance, support and professionalize the activities of the Staff Association. The Commission for “Employment Conditions” deals with remuneration, the advancement system, working hours, recruitment, and retention, among other things. It gives its opinion on proposals by the Management or elaborates its own proposals. The Commission for “Health and Safety” examines all aspec...

  11. In vitro to in vivo extrapolation of biotransformation rates for assessing bioaccumulation of hydrophobic organic chemicals in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yung-Shan; Lo, Justin C; Otton, S Victoria; Moore, Margo M; Kennedy, Chris J; Gobas, Frank A P C

    2017-07-01

    Incorporating biotransformation in bioaccumulation assessments of hydrophobic chemicals in both aquatic and terrestrial organisms in a simple, rapid, and cost-effective manner is urgently needed to improve bioaccumulation assessments of potentially bioaccumulative substances. One approach to estimate whole-animal biotransformation rate constants is to combine in vitro measurements of hepatic biotransformation kinetics with in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) and bioaccumulation modeling. An established IVIVE modeling approach exists for pharmaceuticals (referred to in the present study as IVIVE-Ph) and has recently been adapted for chemical bioaccumulation assessments in fish. The present study proposes and tests an alternative IVIVE-B technique to support bioaccumulation assessment of hydrophobic chemicals with a log octanol-water partition coefficient (K OW ) ≥ 4 in mammals. The IVIVE-B approach requires fewer physiological and physiochemical parameters than the IVIVE-Ph approach and does not involve interconversions between clearance and rate constants in the extrapolation. Using in vitro depletion rates, the results show that the IVIVE-B and IVIVE-Ph models yield similar estimates of rat whole-organism biotransformation rate constants for hypothetical chemicals with log K OW  ≥ 4. The IVIVE-B approach generated in vivo biotransformation rate constants and biomagnification factors (BMFs) for benzo[a]pyrene that are within the range of empirical observations. The proposed IVIVE-B technique may be a useful tool for assessing BMFs of hydrophobic organic chemicals in mammals. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1934-1946. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  12. Effect of small-dose levosimendan on mortality rates and organ functions in Chinese elderly patients with sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang X

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Xin Wang,1,* Shikui Li2,* 1Intensive Care Unit, 2Cardiothoracic Surgery, Daqing Oilfield General Hospital, Daqing, Heilongjiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Aim: As a primary cause of death not only in Western countries but also in the People’s Republic of China, sepsis is diagnosed as abnormal organ functions as a result of a disordered response to a severe infection. This study was designed to assess the effect of small-dose levosimendan without a loading dose on mortality rates and organ functions in Chinese elderly patients with sepsis.Methods: Following a prospective, randomized, and double-blinded design, 240 Chinese elderly patients with sepsis shock were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU. All patients were randomly and evenly assigned into a levosimendan group (number of patients =120 and a control group (number of patients =120. The control group underwent standard care, and the levosimendan group was administered levosimendan in addition to standard care.Results: All participants, comprising 134 males (55.8% and 106 females (44.2%, were 70 (67–73 years old. Baseline characteristics, preexisting illnesses, initial infections, organ failures, and additional agents and therapies showed no significant difference between the two groups (P>0.05 for all. There were no significant differences in mortality rates at 28 days, at ICU discharge, and at hospital discharge between the two groups (P>0.05 for all. The number of days of ICU and hospital stay in the levosimendan group was significantly less than for those in the control group (P<0.05 for all. Mean daily total sequential organ failure assessment score and all organ scores except the cardiovascular scores showed no significant difference between the two groups (P>0.05 for all. Cardiovascular scores in the levosimendan group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05 for all.Conclusion: Small

  13. Occupational hazards among clinical dental staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasunloro, Adebola; Owotade, Foluso John

    2004-05-15

    Although identification of risks to dental healthcare workers has been explored in several industrialized nations, very little data is available from developing countries. This paper examines the occupational hazards present in the dental environment and reports survey results concerning attitudes and activities of a group of Nigerian dental care providers. A survey on occupational hazards was conducted among the clinical dental staff at the Dental Hospital of the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife in Osun State, Nigeria. Thirty eight of the forty staff responded, yielding a response rate of 95%. Subject ages ranged from 26 to 56 years with approximately 25% in the 31-46 year old bracket. All of the staff were aware of the occupational exposure to hazards, and the majority had attended seminars/workshops on the subject. Only five staff members (13.2%) owned a health insurance policy and 26 (68.4%) had been vaccinated against Hepatitis B infection. All dentists (24) had been vaccinated compared with only two non-dentists; this relationship was significant (p= 30.07, chi2=0.000). Fourteen members of the clinical staff (36.8%) could recall a sharp injury in the past six months, and the majority (71.1%) had regular contact with dental amalgam. Wearing protective eye goggles was the least employed cross infection control measure, while backache was the most frequently experienced hazard in 47% of the subjects. The need for Hepatitis B vaccinations for all members of the staff was emphasized, and the enforcement of strict cross infection control measures was recommended. The physical activities and body positions that predispose workers to backaches were identified and staff education on the prevention of backaches was provided.

  14. A Staff Education Consortium: One Model for Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetler, Cheryl Beth; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the development, organization, activities, problems, and future of a staff education consortium of five medical center hospitals in Boston. The purposes of the consortium are mutual sharing, reduction in duplication, and cost containment of educational programing. (JOW)

  15. Removal Rate of Organic Matter Using Natural Cellulose via Adsorption Isotherm and Kinetic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Mohd Fadhil Md; Ponraj, Mohanadoss; Low, Wen-Pei; Fulazzaky, Mohamad Ali; Iwao, Kenzo; Songip, Ahmad Rahman; Chelliapan, Shreeshivadasan; Ismail, Zulhilmi; Jamal, Mohamad Hidayat

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the removal of natural organic matter (NOM) using coconut fiber (CF) and palm oil fiber (POF) was investigated. Preliminary analysis was performed using a jar test for the selection of optimal medium before the fabricated column model experiment. The equilibrium studies on isotherms and kinetic models for NOM adsorption were analyzed using linearized correlation coefficient. Results showed that the equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir isotherm model for both CF and POF. The most suitable adsorption model was the pseudo-first-order kinetic model for POF and pseudo-second-order kinetic model for CF. The adsorption capacities achieved by the CF and POF were 15.67 and 30.8 mg/g respectively. Based on this investigation, it can be concluded that the POF is the most suitable material for the removal of NOM in semi polluted river water.

  16. Aggregate organ failure rates among dengue patients in Malaysia: Five years' risk analysis (2010–2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahir Mehmood Khan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To estimate the incidence of dengue-induced organ failure form 2010–2015 in Malaysia. Methods: Data were extracted from the Malaysian Registry of Intensive Care published in June 2016. Analysis of proportions was carried out using StatsDirect software. Binary data for the outcomes available from the included studies were analyzed using StatsDirect software, using random effect model. Results: It is noteworthy that there was a drop in all complications among dengue patients at 2011. Except in year 2011, 52% [0.52 (CI 95% 0.49–0.56] of the patients with dengue developed hematological failure. Conclusions: The statistics indicate that dengue has increasingly led to cardiovascular, neurological, renal and hematological failure, as indicated from an increasing trend from year 2011–2015.

  17. Predict Resiliency Based On the Rate Of Emotional Intelligence In Public Organizations In Yasuj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Karimi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: resiliency is the human ability in dealing with high-risk and traumatic conditions. Nevertheless, not all individuals are equally abiding, and resiliency can be increased or decreased by various factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of emotional intelligence in the level of resiliency among employees in public organizations of Yasuj, Iran. Methods: In the current correlational study, 382 state employees of Yasuj (221 males and 161 females were selected using multistage cluster sampling. For variable measurement, the Emotional Intelligence Scale and Connor-Davidson resilience scale were used. The collected data were analyzed by the correlation coefficient and regression methods. Results: Total score of emotional intelligence with resiliency revealed a significant positive relationship. Emotional intelligence can predict some degree of resilience. Emotional intelligence and resiliency among men is more than women. Conclusion: If the level of emotional intelligence goes higher, the possibility of employee’s resiliency in risky circumstances also increases.

  18. [Improving nursing staff accuracy in administering chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Ying; Chu, Yun-Li; Chiou, Yen-Gan; Chiang, Ming-Chu

    2009-12-01

    As most anticancer drugs are cytotoxic, their safe and error-free application is important. We analyzed data from the hematology-oncology ward chemotherapy checklist dated January 13th through February 3rd, 2007 and found accuracy rates for chemotherapy drug usage as low as 68.4%. Possible causes identified for this poor result include incomplete chemotherapy standards protocols, lack of chemotherapy quality control, and insufficient chemotherapy knowledge amongst nursing staff. This project aimed to improve the accuracy of nursing staff in administering chemotherapy and to raise nursing staff knowledge regarding chemotherapy. Our strategies for improvement included completing a chemotherapy standards protocol, establishing a chemotherapy quality-control monitoring system, augmenting chemotherapy training and adding appropriate equipment and staff reminders. After strategies were implemented, accuracy in chemotherapy administration rose to 96.7%. Related knowledge amongst nursing staff also improved from an initial 77.5% to 89.2%. Implementing the recommended measures achieved a significant improvement in the accuracy and quality of chemotherapy administered by nursing personnel.

  19. Effect of organic loading rate on the performance of two-stage anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pimentel, Reyna I; Rodríguez-Pérez, Suyen; Monroy-Hermosillo, Oscar; Ramírez-Vives, Florina

    2015-01-01

    Two-stage anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) was carried out: hydrolysis and acidogenesis in a continuous anaerobic hydrolytic leach bed (AHLB) reactor loaded at different rates (Bv = 3.8-7 gVSSL⁻¹d⁻¹) and methanogenesis of leachates, diluted with municipal wastewater in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor at organic loading rates of 6.6-13 gCODLr⁻¹d⁻¹. In the AHLB reactor, 51-76% and 58-71% volatile solids and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies were obtained. During the hydrolysis and acidogenesis phases, the effluents were at pH 4.93, the leachate had a volatile fatty acids concentration of 35 g/L and the biogas was composed only of CO₂. The average methane production in the UASB in the load of 4.4 gVS L⁻¹ d⁻¹ in the AHLB was 3.32 LCH4Lr⁻¹d⁻¹ (yCH4 = 80%), with COD removal efficiency of 95% and methane yield 279 LCH4KgVS⁻¹OFMSW degraded.

  20. Peer versus staff tutoring in problem-based learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.G. Schmidt (Henk); A. van der Arend (Arie); I. Kokx (Irma); L. Boon (Louis)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractEffects of student versus staff tutoring on student learning in a problem-based, health sciences curriculum were studied. Academic achievement of 334 tutorial groups guided by staff tutors was compared with achievement of 400 groups guided by student tutors. In addition, students rated

  1. Mental healthcare staff well-being and burnout: A narrative review of trends, causes, implications, and recommendations for future interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Judith; Hall, Louise H; Berzins, Kathryn; Baker, John; Melling, Kathryn; Thompson, Carl

    2018-02-01

    Rising levels of burnout and poor well-being in healthcare staff are an international concern for health systems. The need to improve well-being and reduce burnout has long been acknowledged, but few interventions target mental healthcare staff, and minimal improvements have been seen in services. This review aimed to examine the problem of burnout and well-being in mental healthcare staff and to present recommendations for future research and interventions. A discursive review was undertaken examining trends, causes, implications, and interventions in burnout and well-being in healthcare staff working in mental health services. Data were drawn from national surveys, reports, and peer-reviewed journal articles. These show that staff in mental healthcare report poorer well-being than staff in other healthcare sectors. Poorer well-being and higher burnout are associated with poorer quality and safety of patient care, higher absenteeism, and higher turnover rates. Interventions are effective, but effect sizes are small. The review concludes that grounding interventions in the research literature, emphasizing the positive aspects of interventions to staff, building stronger links between healthcare organizations and universities, and designing interventions targeting burnout and improved patient care together may improve the effectiveness and uptake of interventions by staff. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  2. Characteristic pathological changes of main organs of rates after inhalation of depleted uranium aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Zhenshan; Zhu Maoxiang; Yang Zhihua; Pan Xiujie; Li Yuanmin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the pathological and morphometric alteration of main organs of rat after inhalation of depleted uranium (DU) aerosole in order to provide information for medical protection against DU weapons. Methods: Routine pathological technique and morphometric measurements were used to observe histopathological and morphological changes in lung, kidney, spleen, liver, brain of rats 1-14 months after inhalation of DU aerosol. Results: After inhalation of DU aerosol, lymphocytic infiltration in the pulmonary parenchyma, serious bronchitis, pulmonary hemorrhage and abscess formation were seen in some of the rats; distinct dilatation of tubules in renal cortex and papillae, casts in some tubules of the cortex, medulla and papillae, and interstitial hemorrhage were found in some other rats; diminution of the area of splenic white pulp, reduction of megakaryocytic mitosis were also observed, the incidence and severity of above changes in the lung and kidney, but not in the liver and brain, showed dependance on the length of time after inhalation or the dose of DU inhaled. Conclusion There are evident injurious effects on rat lung, kidney and spleen by inhalation of DU aerosol. (authors)

  3. Mineralization rate of eroded organic C in Andosols of the Canary Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Juan Luis; Guerra, José Asterio; Armas, Cecilia María; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Antonio; Arbelo, Carmen Dolores; Notario, Jesús Santiago

    2007-05-25

    The aim of this paper is to determine the biological dynamism of the organic C forms bonded to soil particles mobilized by water erosion in Andosols of the Canary Islands, to evaluate their susceptibility towards mineralization processes and the role of sediments as sources or sinks of atmospheric CO(2) in these soils. The study was carried out in Tenerife (Canary Islands) on three 200 m(2) experimental plots of the RESEL Programme on silic Andosols under forest, 3 years after being subjected to clear-cutting. Eroded sediments were collected for analysis from five significant winter rainfall episodes. For each event, samples of surface (0-5 cm) soil in situ were also collected. CO(2)-C was measured by incubation in all the samples, as well as microbial biomass-linked C. The results obtained show an enrichment in the eroded sediments of microbial biomass (7.5+/-1.6 g kg(-1) vs. 3.8+/-1.5 g kg(-1)) and of potentially mineralizable C (1419 mg CO(2)-C kg(-1) vs. 386 mg CO(2)-C kg(-1)). In addition, there was twice as much mineralization of C compounds in eroded sediments as in the soil surface horizon.

  4. Nozzle Printed-PEDOT:PSS for Organic Light Emitting Diodes with Various Dilution Rates of Ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Geon Yoon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the ink formulation of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS as the hole injection layer (HIL in an organic light emitting diode (OLED structure. Generally, in a PEDOT:PSS solution, water is incorporated in the solution for the solution process. However, the fabrication of thin film which contained the water, main solvent, could not easily form by using printing technology except spin-coating process because of the high surface tension of water. On the other hand, mixing PEDOT:PSS solution and ethanol (EtOH, a dilution solvent, could restrain the non-uniform layer that forms by the high surface tension and low volatility of water. Therefore, we printed a PEDOT:PSS solution with various concentrations of EtOH by using a nozzle printer and obtained a uniform pattern. The line width of PEDOT:PSS diluted with 90% (volume ratio ehtanol was measured as about 4 mm with good uniformity with a 0.1 mm nozzle. Also, imaging software and a scanning electron microscope (SEM were used to measure the uniformity of PEDOT:PSS coated on a substrate. Finally, we fabricated a green phosphorescent OLED device with printed-PEDOT:PSS with specific concentrations of EtOH and we achieved a current efficiency of 27 cd/A with uniform quality of luminance in the case of device containing 90% EtOH.

  5. Education in geriatric medicine for community hospital staff.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hanlon, Shane

    2010-12-01

    Community hospitals provide many services for older people. They are mainly managed by nursing staff, with some specialist input. Little is known about education provided in these facilities. Most education in geriatric medicine is provided in hospitals, despite most elderly care being provided in the community. The authors surveyed senior nursing staff in Irish community hospitals to examine this area in more detail. Staff in all 18hospitals in the Health Service Executive (South) area were invited to participate. The response rate was 100%. Sixteen of the 18 respondents (89%) felt staff did not have enough education in geriatric medicine. Just over half of hospitals had regular staff education sessions in the area, with a minority of sessions led by a geriatrician, and none by GPs. Geriatrician visits were valued, but were requested only every 1-3 months. Staff identified challenging behaviour and dementia care as the areas that posed most difficulty.

  6. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: I. Lymphocytes and lymphoid organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecaut, M. J.; Nelson, G. A.; Gridley, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    The major goal of part I of this study was to compare varying doses and dose rates of whole-body gamma-radiation on lymphoid cells and organs. C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy gamma-rays (60Co) at 1 cGy/min (low-dose rate, LDR) and 80 cGy/min (high-dose rate, HDR) and euthanized 4 days later. A significant dose-dependent loss of spleen mass was observed with both LDR and HDR irradiation; for the thymus this was true only with HDR. Decreasing leukocyte and lymphocyte numbers occurred with increasing dose in blood and spleen at both dose rates. The numbers (not percentages) of CD3+ T lymphocytes decreased in the blood in a dose-dependent manner at both HDR and LDR. Splenic T cell counts decreased with dose only in HDR groups; percentages increased with dose at both dose rates. Dose-dependent decreases occurred in CD4+ T helper and CD8+ T cytotoxic cell counts at HDR and LDR. In the blood the percentages of CD4+ cells increased with increasing dose at both dose rates, whereas in the spleen the counts decreased only in the HDR groups. The percentages of the CD8+ population remained stable in both blood and spleen. CD19+ B cell counts and percentages in both compartments declined markedly with increasing HDR and LDR radiation. NK1.1+ natural killer cell numbers and proportions remained relatively stable. Overall, these data indicate that the observed changes were highly dependent on the dose, but not dose rate, and that cells in the spleen are more affected by dose rate than those in blood. The results also suggest that the response of lymphocytes in different body compartments may be variable.

  7. Improving staff selection processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerinus, Marie; Shannon, Marina

    2014-11-11

    This article, the second in a series of articles on Leading Better Care, describes the actions undertaken in recent years in NHS Lanarkshire to improve selection processes for nursing, midwifery and allied health professional (NMAHP) posts. This is an area of significant interest to these professions, management colleagues and patients given the pivotal importance of NMAHPs to patient care and experience. In recent times the importance of selecting staff not only with the right qualifications but also with the right attributes has been highlighted to ensure patients are well cared for in a safe, effective and compassionate manner. The article focuses on NMAHP selection processes, tracking local, collaborative development work undertaken to date. It presents an overview of some of the work being implemented, highlights a range of important factors, outlines how evaluation is progressing and concludes by recommending further empirical research.

  8. A variable reaction rate model for chlorine decay in drinking water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Pei; Vasyukova, Ekaterina; Uhl, Wolfgang

    2015-05-15

    A second order kinetic model for simulating chlorine decay in bulk water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter (DOM) was developed. It takes into account the decreasing reactivity of dissolved organic matter using a variable reaction rate coefficient (VRRC) which decreases with an increasing conversion. The concentration of reducing species is surrogated by the maximum chlorine demand. Temperature dependency, respectively, is described by the Arrhenius-relationship. The accuracy and adequacy of the proposed model to describe chlorine decay in bulk water were evaluated and shown for very different waters and different conditions such as water mixing or rechlorination by applying statistical tests. It is thus very well suited for application in water quality modeling for distribution systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. THE MANY ROLES OF THE CERN STAFF ASSOCIATION

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    The Staff Association represents all staff Article VII 1.01 of the Staff Rules & Regulations (SR&R) stipulates that “[…] the relations between the Director-General and the personnel shall be established either on an individual basis or on a collective basis with the Staff Association as intermediary.” The role of the Staff Association delegates as representatives of all staff of the Organization before the Director-General and Member States is demonstrated by its participation in different joint committees defined in the SR&R and by TREF. This role was particularly visible in 2009 and 2010 with demonstrations of between one and two thousand participants, first for our Pension Fund in December 2009 and March 2010, then for basic research in August 2010. The presence of the Staff Association was also evident with its public meetings, staff votes in the framework of the 2010 five-yearly review, and other actions. But the Staff Association is also The CERN Nu...

  10. EARTHWORM PONTOSCOLEXCORETHRURUS AND NITROGEN MINERALIZATION RATE IN INCUBATION EXPERIMENT WITH DIFFERENT QUALITY ORGANIC MATTERS FROM SUGARAGRO-INDUSTRY WASTE

    OpenAIRE

    J.B.Naik; S.P.Zine

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of earthworm inoculation on N mineralization rates of different quality organic matters from sugar agro-industry waste, we conducted a green house incubation experiment for 14 weeks in pots containing 7 kg dry soil. There are 12 treatment combinations.Factor I waswith (P) and without inoculation of P.corethrurus (N). Factor II was the type of OM which consisted of six levels: (1) without application of OM (control), (2) cow manure (CM), (3) filter cake (FC), (4) suga...

  11. Assessment of organic compound exposures, thermal comfort parameters, and HVAC system-driven air exchange rates in public school portable classrooms in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shendell, Derek Garth [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The prevalence of prefabricated, portable classrooms (portables, relocatables, RCs) has increased due to class size reduction initiatives and limited resources. Classroom mechanical wall-mount heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems may function improperly or not be maintained; lower ventilation rates may impact indoor air and environmental quality (IEQ). Materials in portables may off-gas volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including formaldehyde, as a function of age, temperature, and humidity. For a pilot study, public K-12 schools located in or serving target areas within five Los Angeles County communities were identified. In two communities where school districts (SD) consented, 1-3 randomly selected portables, one newer and one older, and one main building control classroom from each participating school were included. Sampling was conducted over a five-day school week in the cooling and heating seasons, or repeated twice in the cooling season. Measurements included passive samplers for VOCs, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, and air exchange rate (AER) calculation; indoor air temperature and humidity; technician walk-through surveys; an interview questionnaire above HVAC system operation and maintenance (O and M). For an intervention study evaluating advanced HVAC technologies in comparison to the common conventional technology, and materials for source reduction of VOCs, four RC were manufactured and located in pairs at two schools in two recruited Northern California SD in different climate zones. RCs were built with the two HVAC systems, cabinetry and conduit for monitoring equipment, and standard or advanced interior finish materials. Each RC was its own control in a case-crossover design--HVAC systems alternately operated for 1-2 week intervals in the 2001-02 school year, with IEQ monitoring including aldehyde and indoor air temperature and humidity data. Measured classroom AER were low, formaldehyde concentrations were below the state

  12. [Effect of Different Purple Parent Rock on Removal Rates of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Organics in Landscape Water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xue-jiao; Liu, Xiao-chen; Li, Zhen-lun; Shi, Wen-hao; Yang, Shan

    2015-05-01

    In order to understand the impacts of physicochemical properties of purple parent rock on the removal rates of nitrogen, phosphorus and organics in landscape water systems, four types of purple parent rocks including Peng-lai-zhen Formation (S1) , Sha-xi-miao Formation (S2) , Fei-xian-guan Formation (S3) and Sui-ning Formation (S4) , which distribute widely in Chongqing, were selected and autoclaved, and added to unsterile landscape water collected from Chong-de Lake in Southwest University, and the landscape water only was used as control. And several indicators such as total nitrogen and phosphorus and so on of every disposal were investigated periodically. The results indicated that: (1) The highest removal rates of total nitrogen, total phosphorus and Ammonia nitrogen were observed in Sl, which were 45.1%, 62.3% and 90%, respectively; the highest removal rate of COD was 94.5% in S4; the ammonia nitrogen content in the purple parent rocks was not obviously changed before and after the experiments, which indicated that the adsorption of ammonia nitrogen on purple parent rock surface was not the main reason for the decrease of ammonia nitrogen in water. (2) Arsenate had inhibitory effect on the sulfate-reducing bacteria, while copper and magnesium had promoting effect on gram-negative bacteria. (3) The microbial diversity was positively correlated to total nitrogen in water. (4) Based on the PCA analyses of microbial community structure and environmental factors, the mineral elements released from parent rock affected the structure and composition of microbial community in the test water, and then influenced the removal rates of nitrogen, phosphorus and organics in water systems.

  13. Hydrogen production from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in anaerobic thermophilic acidogenesis: influence of organic loading rate and microbial content of the solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, S; Sales, D; Romero, L I; Solera, R

    2013-02-01

    Hydrogen production (HP) from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) under thermophilic acidogenic conditions was studied. The effect of nine different organic loading rates (OLRs) (from 9 to 220 g TVS/l/d) and hydraulic retention times (HRTs) (from 10d to 0.25 d) was investigated. Normally, butyrate was the main acid product. The biogas produced was methane- and sulfide-free at all tested OLR. Increasing the OLR resulted in an increase in both the quantity and quality of hydrogen production, except at the maximum OLR tested (220 g TVS/l/d). The maximum hydrogen content was 57% (v/v) at an OLR of 110 g TVS/l/d (HRT=0.5 d). HP was in the range of 0.1-5.7 l H2/l/d. The results have clearly shown that the increase in OLR was directly correlated with HP and microbial activity. The bacterial concentration inside the reactor is strongly influenced by the content of microorganisms in the OFMSW. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Interplay of Natural Organic Matter with Flow Rate and Particle Size on Colloid Transport: Experimentation, Visualization, and Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinyao; Zhang, Yimeng; Chen, Fangmin; Yang, Yuesuo

    2015-11-17

    The investigation on factors that affect the impact of natural organic matter (NOM) on colloid transport in complex hydraulic flow systems remains incomplete. Using our previously established approach, the interplay of flow rate and particle size on the NOM effect was quantified, using flow rates of 1 and 2 mL/min and particle sizes of 50 and 200 nm to represent small nanoparticles (1-100 nm) and large non-nano-microspheres (100-1000 nm) in the low-flow groundwater environment. Latex particles, Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA), and iron oxide-coated sand were used as model particles, NOM, and the aquifer medium, respectively. The quantitative results show NOM blocked more sites for large particles at a high flow rate: 1 μg of SRHA blocked 5.95 × 10(9) microsphere deposition sites at 2 mL/min but only 7.38 × 10(8) nanoparticle deposition sites at 1 mL/min. The particle size effect dominated over the flow rate, and the overall effect of the two is antagonistic. Granule-scale visualization of the particle packing on the NOM-presented sand surface corroborates the quantification results, revealing a more dispersed status of large particles at a high flow rate. We interpret this phenomenon as a polydispersivity effect resulting from the differential size of the particles and NOM: high flow and a high particle size enlarge the ratio of particle-blocked to NOM-blocked areas and thus the NOM blockage. To our knowledge, this is the first model-assisted quantification on the interplay of NOM, flow rate, and particle size on colloid transport. These findings are significant for nanorisk assessment and nanoremediation practices.

  15. 32 CFR 1605.8 - Staff of Region Headquarters for Selective Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff of Region Headquarters for Selective... SERVICE SYSTEM SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM ORGANIZATION Region Administration § 1605.8 Staff of Region..., the staff of each region for Selective Service shall consist of as many officers, either military or...

  16. Organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  17. Organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a…

  18. Organic carbon mass accumulation rate regulates the flux of reduced substances from the sediments of deep lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinsberger, Thomas; Schmid, Martin; Wüest, Alfred; Schwefel, Robert; Wehrli, Bernhard; Müller, Beat

    2017-07-01

    The flux of reduced substances, such as methane and ammonium, from the sediment to the bottom water (Fred) is one of the major factors contributing to the consumption of oxygen in the hypolimnia of lakes and thus crucial for lake oxygen management. This study presents fluxes based on sediment porewater measurements from different water depths of five deep lakes of differing trophic states. In meso- to eutrophic lakes Fred was directly proportional to the total organic carbon mass accumulation rate (TOC-MAR) of the sediments. TOC-MAR and thus Fred in eutrophic lakes decreased systematically with increasing mean hypolimnion depth (zH), suggesting that high oxygen concentrations in the deep waters of lakes were essential for the extent of organic matter mineralization leaving a smaller fraction for anaerobic degradation and thus formation of reduced compounds. Consequently, Fred was low in the 310 m deep meso-eutrophic Lake Geneva, with high O2 concentrations in the hypolimnion. By contrast, seasonal anoxic conditions enhanced Fred in the deep basin of oligotrophic Lake Aegeri. As TOC-MAR and zH are based on more readily available data, these relationships allow estimating the areal O2 consumption rate by reduced compounds from the sediments where no direct flux measurements are available.

  19. Organic carbon mass accumulation rate regulates the flux of reduced substances from the sediments of deep lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Steinsberger

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The flux of reduced substances, such as methane and ammonium, from the sediment to the bottom water (Fred is one of the major factors contributing to the consumption of oxygen in the hypolimnia of lakes and thus crucial for lake oxygen management. This study presents fluxes based on sediment porewater measurements from different water depths of five deep lakes of differing trophic states. In meso- to eutrophic lakes Fred was directly proportional to the total organic carbon mass accumulation rate (TOC-MAR of the sediments. TOC-MAR and thus Fred in eutrophic lakes decreased systematically with increasing mean hypolimnion depth (zH, suggesting that high oxygen concentrations in the deep waters of lakes were essential for the extent of organic matter mineralization leaving a smaller fraction for anaerobic degradation and thus formation of reduced compounds. Consequently, Fred was low in the 310 m deep meso-eutrophic Lake Geneva, with high O2 concentrations in the hypolimnion. By contrast, seasonal anoxic conditions enhanced Fred in the deep basin of oligotrophic Lake Aegeri. As TOC-MAR and zH are based on more readily available data, these relationships allow estimating the areal O2 consumption rate by reduced compounds from the sediments where no direct flux measurements are available.

  20. Reduced Water Vapor Transmission Rate of Graphene Gas Barrier Films for Flexible Organic Field-Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoungjun; Nam, Sooji; Lee, Youngbin; Lee, Mijin; Jang, Jaeyoung; Kim, Sang Jin; Jeong, Yong Jin; Kim, Hyeongkeun; Bae, Sukang; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Cho, Sung M; Choi, Jae-Boong; Chung, Ho Kyoon; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Park, Chan Eon; Hong, Byung Hee

    2015-06-23

    Preventing reactive gas species such as oxygen or water is important to ensure the stability and durability of organic electronics. Although inorganic materials have been predominantly employed as the protective layers, their poor mechanical property has hindered the practical application to flexible electronics. The densely packed hexagonal lattice of carbon atoms in graphene does not allow the transmission of small gas molecules. In addition, its outstanding mechanical flexibility and optical transmittance are expected to be useful to overcome the current mechanical limit of the inorganic materials. In this paper, we reported the measurement of the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) through the 6-layer 10 × 10 cm(2) large-area graphene films synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The WVTR was measured to be as low as 10(-4) g/m(2)·day initially, and stabilized at ∼0.48 g/m(2)·day, which corresponds to 7 times reduction in WVTR compared to bare polymer substrates. We also showed that the graphene-passivated organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) exhibited excellent environmental stability as well as a prolonged lifetime even after 500 bending cycles with strain of 2.3%. We expect that our results would be a good reference showing the graphene's potential as gas barriers for organic electronics.

  1. Increasing plant use of organic nitrogen with elevation is reflected in nitrogen uptake rates and ecosystem delta15N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averill, Colin; Finzi, Adrien

    2011-04-01

    It is hypothesized that decreasing mean annual temperature and rates of nitrogen (N) cycling causes plants to switch from inorganic to organic forms of N as the primary mode of N nutrition. To test this hypothesis, we conducted field experiments and collected natural-abundance delta15N signatures of foliage, soils, and ectomycorrhizal sporocarps along a steep elevation-climate gradient in the White Mountains, New Hampshire, USA. Here we show that with increasing elevation organic forms of N became the dominant source of N taken up by hardwood and coniferous tree species based on dual-labeled glycine uptake analysis, an important confirmation of an emerging theory for the biogeochemistry of the N cycle. Variation in natural abundance foliar delta15N with elevation was also consistent with increasing organic N uptake, though a simple, mass balance model demonstrated that the uptake of delta15N depleted inorganic N, rather than fractionation upon transfer of N from mycorrhizal fungi, best explains variations in foliar delta15N with elevation.

  2. Intramural Staff Handbook. Student Staff Personnel Manual from the Office of Intramural/Recreational Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudenhoeffer, Frances Tomlin; Fedak, Joseph F.

    This student staff personnel manual is designed to orient student employees of the New Mexico State University (Las Cruces) Office of Intramural/Recreational Sports to their duties and responsibilities and to provide personnel policies and standard operating procedures. Topics include: student employment procedures, pay rates for job…

  3. Medicaid program; third party liability for medical assistance; FFP rates for skilled professional medical personnel and supporting staff; and sources of state share of financial participation--HCFA. Proposed rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-04

    These proposed regulations would--(1) Broaden the scope of services for which a State must collect from third parties the cost of medical assistance furnished to Medicaid recipients, remove the specific requirements for the terms of cooperative agreements for third party collections, and revise the methods of paying claims involving third party liability; (2) Clarify criteria used in determining whether skilled professional medical personnel and supporting staff involved in the administration of the Medicaid program quality for 75 percent Federal matching; and (3) Clarify policy to permit public and private donations to be used as a State's share of financial participation in the entire Medicaid program, instead of only for training expenditures. The proposed amendments would clarify policy and reduce program expenditures.

  4. Radiation Safety Awareness Among Medical Staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szarmach, Arkadiusz; Piskunowicz, Maciej; Świętoń, Dominik; Muc, Adam; Mockałło, Gabor; Dzierżanowski, Jarosław; Szurowska, Edyta

    2015-01-01

    The common access to imaging methods based on ionizing radiation requires also radiation protection. The knowledge of ionizing radiation exposure risks among the medical staff is essential for planning diagnostic procedures and therapy. Evaluation of the knowledge of radiation safety during diagnostic procedures among the medical staff. The study consisted of a questionnaire survey. The questionnaire consisted of seven closed-ended questions concerning the knowledge of the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation as well as questions related to responder’s profession and work experience. The study group included a total of 150 individuals from four professional groups: nurses, doctors, medical technicians, support staff. The study was carried out in the three largest hospitals in Gdańsk between July and October 2013. The highest rates of correct answers to questions related to the issue of radiation protection were provided by the staff of radiology facilities and emergency departments with 1–5 years of professional experience. The most vulnerable group in terms of the knowledge of these issues consisted of individuals working at surgical wards with 11–15 years of professional experience. Education in the field of radiological protection should be a subject of periodic training of medical personnel regardless of position and length of service

  5. Biogas-pH automation control strategy for optimizing organic loading rate of anaerobic membrane bioreactor treating high COD wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dawei; Liu, Jibao; Sui, Qianwen; Wei, Yuansong

    2016-03-01

    Control of organic loading rate (OLR) is essential for anaerobic digestion treating high COD wastewater, which would cause operation failure by overload or less efficiency by underload. A novel biogas-pH automation control strategy using the combined gas-liquor phase monitoring was developed for an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treating high COD (27.53 g·L(-1)) starch wastewater. The biogas-pH strategy was proceeded with threshold between biogas production rate >98 Nml·h(-1) preventing overload and pH>7.4 preventing underload, which were determined by methane production kinetics and pH titration of methanogenesis slurry, respectively. The OLR and the effluent COD were doubled as 11.81 kgCOD·kgVSS(-1)·d(-1) and halved as 253.4 mg·L(-1), respectively, comparing with a constant OLR control strategy. Meanwhile COD removal rate, biogas yield and methane concentration were synchronously improved to 99.1%, 312 Nml·gCODin(-1) and 74%, respectively. Using the biogas-pH strategy, AnMBR formed a "pH self-regulation ternary buffer system" which seizes carbon dioxide and hence provides sufficient buffering capacity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo

    Most of us recognize that organizations are everywhere. You meet them on every street corner in the form of families and shops, study in them, work for them, buy from them, pay taxes to them. But have you given much thought to where they came from, what they are today, and what they might become...... and considers many more. Mary Jo Hatch introduces the concept of organizations by presenting definitions and ideas drawn from the a variety of subject areas including the physical sciences, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, literature, and the visual and performing arts. Drawing on examples from...... prehistory and everyday life, from the animal kingdom as well as from business, government, and other formal organizations, Hatch provides a lively and thought provoking introduction to the process of organization....

  7. Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo

    and considers many more. Mary Jo Hatch introduces the concept of organizations by presenting definitions and ideas drawn from the a variety of subject areas including the physical sciences, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, literature, and the visual and performing arts. Drawing on examples from......Most of us recognize that organizations are everywhere. You meet them on every street corner in the form of families and shops, study in them, work for them, buy from them, pay taxes to them. But have you given much thought to where they came from, what they are today, and what they might become...... prehistory and everyday life, from the animal kingdom as well as from business, government, and other formal organizations, Hatch provides a lively and thought provoking introduction to the process of organization....

  8. Workplace violence against nursing staff in a Saudi university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorashy, Hanan A Ezzat; Al Moalad, Fawziah Bakheet

    2016-06-01

    Violence against nurses is a major challenge for healthcare administrators. It is gaining more attention because it has a negative impact on nurses, the quality of health care and health organization. Common types of violence include physical harassment, sexual abuse, aggression, mobbing and bullying. Patients, their relatives and co-workers are considered the main perpetrators. To determine the prevalence rate of workplace violence against nursing professionals in a university hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, most frequent type and perpetrators as well as the contributing factors. This quantitative cross-sectional study adapted a survey questionnaire from the Massachusetts Nurses Association Survey on Workplace Violence/Abuse to collect data from a quota sample of 370 nursing personnel. Almost half of the participants had experienced violence in the professional setting during the 12 months prior to the study. The majority of subjects perceived workplace violence as verbal abuse. Nearly all nursing professionals identified patients as the leading cause. Slightly more than half mentioned understaffing, misunderstandings, long waits for service and lack of staff training and policies for preventing crisis as contributing factors. The prevalence rate is extremely high among nurses in the targeted Saudi university hospital. Saudi health as well as university hospitals' administration and policy makers should adopt and introduce a 'zero tolerance policy', set standards and develop practical measures for preventing the incidence and for controlling the prevalence of violence against nurses. Besides, healthcare organizations, particularly hospitals, can fulfil their obligations to provide both staff and patients with more secure environment. Further research on the topic is needed. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  9. Nurse executive transformational leadership found in participative organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham-Taylor, J

    2000-05-01

    The study examined a national sample of 396 randomly selected hospital nurse executives to explore transformational leadership, stage of power, and organizational climate. Results from a few nurse executive studies have found nurse executives were transformational leaders. As executives were more transformational, they achieved better staff satisfaction and higher work group effectiveness. This study integrates Bass' transformational leadership model with Hagberg's power stage theory and Likert's organizational climate theory. Nurse executives (396) and staff reporting to them (1,115) rated the nurse executives' leadership style, staff extra effort, staff satisfaction, and work group effectiveness using Bass and Avolio's Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire. Executives' bosses (360) rated executive work group effectiveness. Executives completed Hagberg's Personal Power Profile and ranked their organizational climate using Likert's Profile of Organizational Characteristics. Nurse executives used transformational leadership fairly often; achieved fairly satisfied staff levels; were very effective according to bosses; were most likely at stage 3 (power by achievement) or stage 4 (power by reflection); and rated their hospital as a Likert System 3 Consultative Organization. Staff satisfaction and work group effectiveness decreased as nurse executives were more transactional. Higher transformational scores tended to occur with higher educational degrees and within more participative organizations. Transformational qualities can be enhanced by further education, by achieving higher power stages, and by being within more participative organizations.

  10. Hygiene Knowledge of Food Staff in Catering Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya Yardımcı

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study, designed as a cross-sectional study, was carried out to determine the hygiene knowledge of the staff (N = 317 employed in kitchen and service departments of catering firms in Ankara. It was found that the mean scores of the staff with regard to personal hygiene, food hygiene, and kitchen and equipment hygiene were 10.7 ± 1.6, 19.8 ± 4.0, and 13.6 ± 2.0, respectively. Male staff achieved higher mean scores in personal hygiene knowledge test compared with female staff (p < .01. The staff receiving a hygiene training were determined to have higher mean scores in terms of hygiene knowledge tests compared with those who have not received, and the production staff had higher knowledge as to hygiene than the other groups (p < .01. The mean scores for hygiene knowledge tests were found to be increasing with age. Hygiene knowledge scores of the staff were quite lower than what must be taken. For that reason, periodical training programs should be organized to increase the awareness of the staff about hygiene.

  11. Predictors of organizational commitment among staff in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska-Simmons, Elzbieta

    2005-04-01

    This study examines the role of organizational culture, job satisfaction, and sociodemographic characteristics as predictors of organizational commitment among staff in assisted living. It is particularly important to examine organizational commitment, because of its close links to staff turnover. Data were collected from 317 staff members in 61 facilities, using self-administered questionnaires. The facilities were selected from licensed assisted living programs and were stratified into small, traditional, and new-model homes. Staff questionnaires were distributed by a researcher during 1-day visits to each facility. Organizational commitment was measured by the extent of staff identification, involvement, and loyalty to the organization. Organizational culture, job satisfaction, and education were strong predictors of commitment, together explaining 58% of the total variance in the dependent variable. Higher levels of organizational commitment were associated with more favorable staff perceptions of organizational culture and greater job satisfaction. In addition, more educated staff members tended to report higher levels of organizational commitment. Other than education, sociodemographic characteristics failed to account for a significant amount of variance in organizational commitment. Because job satisfaction and organizational culture were strong predictors of commitment, interventions aimed at increasing job satisfaction and creating an organizational culture that values and respects staff members could be most effective in producing higher levels of organizational commitment.

  12. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 January 2004: • Preliminary note - Terminology realignment following the restructuring of the Organization (page - i -) • Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73) • Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74) • Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81) • Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2003/2004, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2003 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 3/2004, are available in the departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  13. Mobbing behaviors encountered by nurse teaching staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Dilek; Yildirim, Aytolan; Timucin, Arzu

    2007-07-01

    The term 'mobbing' is defined as antagonistic behaviors with unethical communication directed systematically at one individual by one or more individuals in the workplace. This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted for the purpose of determining the mobbing behaviors encountered by nursing school teaching staff in Turkey, its effect on them, and their responses to them. A large percentage (91%) of the nursing school employees who participated in this study reported that they had encountered mobbing behaviors in the institution where they work and 17% that they had been directly exposed to mobbing in the workplace. The academic staff who had been exposed to mobbing behaviors experienced various physiological, emotional and social reactions. They frequently 'worked harder and [were] more organized and worked very carefully to avoid criticism' to escape from mobbing. In addition, 9% of the participants stated that they 'thought about suicide occasionally'.

  14. Poor organ quality and donor-recipient age mismatch rather than poor donation rates account for the decrease in deceased kidney transplantation rates in a Germany Transplant Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittelbach-Helmrich, Dietlind; Thurow, Christian; Arwinski, Stephan; Schleicher, Christina; Hopt, Ulrich T; Bausch, Dirk; Drognitz, Oliver; Pisarski, Przemyslaw

    2015-02-01

    Kidney transplantation is limited not by technical or immunological challenges but by lack of donor organs. Whereas the number of patients on waiting list increased, the transplantation rate decreased. We analyzed the development of decline rates and reasons as well as the fate of declined organs. In total, 1403 organs offered to 1950 patients between 2001 and 2010 were included. Of 440 organs offered between 2009 and 2011 that were declined, we investigated whether these organs were transplanted elsewhere and requested delayed graft function, creatinine, graft and patient survival. Data were compared to results of transplantations at the same time at our center. Decline rate increased from 47% to 87%. Main reasons were poor organ quality and donor-recipient age or size mismatch. Of the rejected organs, 55% were transplanted at other centers with function, graft and patient survival equivalent to patients transplanted at our center during that period. The number of decline has increased over time mainly due to a growing number of marginal donors accounting for poor organ quality or a mismatch of donor and recipient. If proper donor-recipient selection is performed, many organs that would otherwise be discarded can be transplanted successfully. © 2014 Steunstichting ESOT.

  15. ¿Cómo perciben las enfermeras de transplantes las causas del estrés laboral? How do organ transplantes nursing staff preceive the causes of the job stress?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicenta Escribà-Agüir

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar los estresores laborales percibidos por las enfermeras que trabajan en áreas dedicadas al trasplante de órganos y las fuentes de recompensa profesional. Participantes y métodos: Estudio cualitativo, realizado con seis grupos de discusión (64 participantes en total de enfermeras, que trabajaban en distintos hospitales del Estado. Las conversaciones fueron grabadas, transcritas y se realizó un análisis del discurso. Resultados: Los principales estresores identificados son los relacionados con la sobrecarga de trabajo, la presión de tiempo, el contacto con la muerte y sufrimiento, la falta de apoyo por parte de los compañeros y otros profesionales sanitarios, los problemas de interrelación con los pacientes y sus familiares. Se evidencia una falta de información adecuada para dar respuesta a las preguntas formuladas por los pacientes y familiares, sobre su estado clínico y pronóstico. Así como la falta de formación específica para prestar los cuidados necesarios al paciente pre y trasplantado. La fuente de recompensa profesional es el agradecimiento, por los cuidados prestados, mostrado por los pacientes y sus familiares. Conclusión: El personal de enfermería hospitalario está sometido a un gran número de estresores en su trabajo, la mayoría intrínsecos a su profesión.Objective: To determine the workplace stress factors perceived by the nurses, both male and female, who work in those areas of the hospital concerned with organ transplants and the sources of professional job satisfaction. Methods: Qualitative study, carried out with six discussion groups (64 participants in all of male and female nurses, who work in different Spanish state run hospitals. Their conversations were recorded and then transcribed, and an analysis of the discourse was undertaken. Results: The main stress factors which were identified relate to: work overload and the time pressures, contact with death and suffering, a lack of

  16. Strategies to reduce short-chain organic acids and synchronously establish high-rate composting in acidic household waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergersen, Ove; Bøen, Anne S; Sørheim, Roald

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to document whether addition of lime or increased amount of bulking agent would ensure, efficiently, a predictable composting process in acidic SSOW applicable in full scale plants. The results show that both lime addition and increasing the amount of bulking agent relative to waste support the development of high-rate respiration in composting. Both strategies are considered efficient in establishing desired microbial composting processes of acid household waste. Reduction in the content of different organic acids and loss on ignition were higher when more bulking agent was used compared with adding 5% lime to the acidic SSOW. Respiration was completely repressed in samples with 10% lime, where pH remained high. In addition fat and protein seem to degrade faster with increasing amount of bulking agent.

  17. Influence of organic loading rate and solid retention time on polyhydroxybutyrate production from hybrid poplar hydrolysates using mixed microbial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jing; Gliniewicz, Karol; Settles, Matthew L; Coats, Erik R; McDonald, Armando G

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of using wood hydrolysates (enzymatically hydrolyzed from hybrid poplar) as substrate to produce polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) using mixed microbial cultures. The optimal operational conditions for fed-batch bioreactors were 4d solid retention time with an organic loading rate of 2.5g/Ld. The maximum PHB accumulated was 27% of cell dry weight with a yield of 0.32g/g (g PHB produced per g sugars consumed). Microbial community analysis was done at the genus level by 16S rRNA sequencing on an Illumina system and community evolution was observed among different samples and initial seed. Actinobacteria, Alpha- and Beta-proteobacteria were found to be the dominant groups in all the bioreactors. Several PHB-storing microorganisms were characterized belonging to Alpha- and Beta-proteobacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mice divergently selected for high and low basal metabolic rates evolved different cell size and organ mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciak, S; Bonda-Ostaszewska, E; Czarnołęski, M; Konarzewski, M; Kozłowski, J

    2014-03-01

    Evolution of metabolic rates of multicellular organisms is hypothesized to reflect the evolution of their cell architecture. This is likely to stem from a tight link between the sizes of cells and nuclei, which are expected to be inversely related to cell metabolism. Here, we analysed basal metabolic rate (BMR), internal organ masses and the cell/nucleus size in different tissues of laboratory mice divergently selected for high/low mass-corrected BMR and four random-bred mouse lines. Random-bred lines had intermediate levels of BMR as compared to low- and high-BMR lines. Yet, this pattern was only partly consistent with the between-line differences in cell/nucleus sizes. Erythrocytes and skin epithelium cells were smaller in the high-BMR line than in other lines, but the cells of low-BMR and random-bred mice were similar in size. On the other hand, the size of hepatocytes, kidney proximal tubule cells and duodenum enterocytes were larger in high-BMR mice than other lines. All cell and nucleus sizes were positively correlated, which supports the role of the nucleus in cell size regulation. Our results suggest that the evolution of high BMR involves a reduction in cell size in specialized tissues, whose functions are primarily dictated by surface-to-volume ratios, such as erythrocytes. High BMR may, however, also incur an increase in cell size in tissues with an intense transcription and translation, such as hepatocytes. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  19. Amplitude modulation rate dependent topographic organization of the auditory steady-state response in human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, Nathan; Lithari, Chrysoula

    2017-10-01

    Periodic modulations of an acoustic feature, such as amplitude over a certain frequency range, leads to phase locking of neural responses to the envelope of the modulation. Using electrophysiological methods this neural activity pattern, also called the auditory steady-state response (aSSR), is visible following frequency transformation of the evoked response as a clear spectral peak at the modulation frequency. Despite several studies employing the aSSR that show, for example, strongest responses for ∼40 Hz and an overall right-hemispheric dominance, it has not been investigated so far to what extent within auditory cortex different modulation frequencies elicit aSSRs at a homogenous source or whether the localization of the aSSR is topographically organized in a systematic manner. The latter would be suggested by previous neuroimaging works in monkeys and humans showing a periodotopic organization within and across distinct auditory fields. However, the sluggishness of the signal from these neuroimaging works prohibit inferences with regards to the fine-temporal features of the neural response. In the present study, we employed amplitude-modulated (AM) sounds over a range between 4 and 85 Hz to elicit aSSRs while recording brain activity via magnetoencephalography (MEG). Using beamforming and a fine spatially resolved grid restricted to auditory cortical processing regions, our study revealed a topographic representation of the aSSR that depends on AM rate, in particular in the medial-lateral (bilateral) and posterior-anterior (right auditory cortex) direction. In summary, our findings confirm previous studies that showing different AM rates to elicit maximal response in distinct neural populations. They extend these findings however by also showing that these respective neural ensembles in auditory cortex actually phase lock their activity over a wide modulation frequency range. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Organic Carbon Burial Rates in Mangrove Soils Along Florida's Coast from Tampa Bay to Biscayne National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoak, J. M.; Breithaupt, J. L.; Moyer, R. P.; Sanders, C. J.; Proctor, M. R.; Jacobs, J. A.; Chappel, A. R.; Comparetto, K. R.

    2016-12-01

    Mangrove forests provide a range of valuable ecosystem services including sequestering organic carbon (OC) in their soils at rates much greater on a per area basis than those found in other types of forests. This restricts a large quantity of OC to a relatively small area along tropical and sub-tropical coastal margins, where dramatic climate-driven impacts are expected. Hence this small yet highly-vulnerable area will have a disproportionally large impact on global carbon cycling. One of the fundamental climate-related questions in mangrove systems is whether their soils will continue to function as a globally significant OC sink or become a source as previously buried OC is oxidized and returned to the atmosphere. While changes to precipitation, temperature, cyclone activity, etc. may influence this sink capacity, it is accelerating sea-level rise (SLR) that is of greatest immediate concern because if mangrove peat formation fails to keep pace then all ecosystem services, including carbon burial, will collapse. Mangroves that receive minimal terrigenous sediments (such as those in South Florida) are largely dependent on the rate of OC accumulation as a key contributor to accretion. To investigate these processes, we measured OC burial and accretion rates over the last 100 years (via 210Pb dating) from sites in Tampa Bay, Charlotte Harbor, Ten Thousand Islands, Everglades National Park, Biscayne National Park, and the Lower Florida Keys. The mean 100-year burial rate over all sites is 119 ± 33 (SD) g m-2 yr-1 which is lower than the global mean. Mean accretion rates were found to match (within error) the relatively modest average SLR over the last 100 years, but rates may not have kept pace with the substantially higher SLR in the last decade. This investigation contributes to establishing regional-scale Blue Carbon budgets, and examines how OC burial in mangroves has changed over the last 100 years. This improved understanding of past mangrove OC burial response

  1. 3D Polyaniline Architecture by Concurrent Inorganic and Organic Acid Doping for Superior and Robust High Rate Supercapacitor Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawli, Yogesh; Banerjee, Abhik; Dhakras, Dipti; Deo, Meenal; Bulani, Dinesh; Wadgaonkar, Prakash; Shelke, Manjusha; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2016-02-12

    A good high rate supercapacitor performance requires a fine control of morphological (surface area and pore size distribution) and electrical properties of the electrode materials. Polyaniline (PANI) is an interesting material in supercapacitor context because it stores energy Faradaically. However in conventional inorganic (e.g. HCl) acid doping, the conductivity is high but the morphological features are undesirable. On the other hand, in weak organic acid (e.g. phytic acid) doping, interesting and desirable 3D connected morphological features are attained but the conductivity is poorer. Here the synergy of the positive quality factors of these two acid doping approaches is realized by concurrent and optimized strong-inorganic (HCl) and weak-organic (phytic) acid doping, resulting in a molecular composite material that renders impressive and robust supercapacitor performance. Thus, a nearly constant high specific capacitance of 350 F g(-1) is realized for the optimised case of binary doping over the entire range of 1 A g(-1) to 40 A g(-1) with stability of 500 cycles at 40 A g(-1). Frequency dependant conductivity measurements show that the optimized co-doped case is more metallic than separately doped materials. This transport property emanates from the unique 3D single molecular character of such system.

  2. Measuring the absorbed dose in critical organs during low rate dose brachytherapy with 137 Cs using thermoluminescent dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, A.; Gonzalez, P.R.; Furetta, C.; Azorin, J.; Andres, U.; Mendez, G.

    2003-01-01

    Intracavitary Brachytherapy is one of the most used methods for the treatment of the cervical-uterine cancer. This treatment consists in the insertion of low rate dose 137 Cs sources into the patient. The most used system for the treatment dose planning is that of Manchester. This planning is based on sources, which are considered fixed during the treatment. However, the experience has shown that, during the treatment, the sources could be displaced from its initial position, changing the dose from that previously prescribed. For this reason, it is necessary to make measurements of the absorbed dose to the surrounding organs (mainly bladder and rectum). This paper presents the results of measuring the absorbed dose using home-made LiF: Mg, Cu, P + Ptfe thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Measurements were carried out in-vivo during 20 minutes at the beginning and at the end of the treatments. Results showed that the absorbed dose to the critical organs vary significantly due to the movement of the patient during the treatment. (Author)

  3. Key role of staff competencies for patient and donor safety in a bone marrow transplantation unit: design and implementation of an accredited training and self-assessment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamanna, C; Baroni, M; Bisin, S; Gianassi, S; Bambi, F; Caselli, D; Aricò, M

    2010-01-01

    Human resources represent at the moment the most critical factor in an hospital setting characterized by a high rate of staff turnover. It is important to ensure a consistent level of expertise and knowledge of professionals who work in health care facilities to provide quality services and simultaneously support the implementation of strategies for patient safety. Unfortunately, the development of effective interventions for training newly added staff and self-evaluation of skills possessed by trained staff are closely related to understanding critical aspects of the organization. At the new Center for Bone Marrow Transplantation and Blood Transfusion Service in Meyer Hospital, during the last year, a group of professional nurses and technicians completed a specific plan to train new staff and, at the same time, a program of self-assessment of skills for experienced staff. The main purpose of this project was to promote skills development by newly added as well as experienced staff, to identify areas of weaknesses, and to correct them with training (organized by the hospital, departmental, or individual) designed to improve performance. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense... Staff. (a) The Commission will have a support staff, which will include staff members sufficient to expeditiously and efficiently process the applications for payments under this part. All members of the staff...

  5. Different organic loading rates on the biogas production during the anaerobic digestion of rice straw: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Yang, Jun; Yu, Qing; Yong, Xiaoyu; Xie, Xinxin; Zhang, Lijuan; Wei, Ping; Jia, Honghua

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the mesophilic methane fermentation of rice straw at different organic loading rates (OLRs) in a 300m 3 bioreactor. It was found that biogas production increased when the OLR was below 2.00kg VS substrate /(m 3 ·d). The average volumetric biogas production reached 0.86m 3 /(m 3 ·d) at an OLR of 2.00kg VS substrate /(m 3 ·d). Biogas production rate was 323m 3 /t dry rice straw over the whole process. The pH, chemical oxygen demand, volatile fatty acid, and NH 4 + -N concentrations were all in optimal range at different OLRs. High-throughput sequencing analysis indicated that Firmicutes, Fibrobacteres, and Spirochaetes predominated in straw samples. Chloroflexi, Proteobacteria, and Planctomycetes were more abundant in the slurry. The hydrogenotrophic pathway was the main biochemical pathway of methanogenesis in the reactor. This study provides new information regarding the OLR and the differences in the spatial distribution of specific microbiota in a rice straw biogas plant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Soil organic carbon sequestration rate and its influencing factors in farmland of Guanzhong Plain: a case study in Wugong County, Shannxi Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Xu, Ming-Xiang

    2013-07-01

    Take Wugong County as an example, soil carbon storage and soil carbon sequestration rate were calculated, the change law of farmland soil organic carbon was explored, and the relationship of farmland soil organic carbon and natural factors, human factors was further revealed. The results of the study showed that: (1) The soil organic carbon contents in 80% of the sampling sites were in the range of 8.0-12.0 g x kg(-1), and the organic carbon contents in 0-20 cm soils showed a normal distribution. (2) In 2011, the organic carbon density of the 0-20 cm farmland soil was 26.3 t x hm(-2), below the national average soil organic carbon density (33.45 t x hm(-2)) of the arable layer. In the last 30 years, the soil carbon sequestration rate in the 0-20 cm layer was 71.3 kg x (hm2 x a)(-1), and in the past five years, the carbon sequestration rate was 480 kg x (hm x a)(-1). The recent carbon sequestration rate was higher than the national average soil carbon sequestration rate of the arable layer [380.78 kg x (hm2 x a)(-1)]. (3) In the semi-humid plain region, soil organic carbon was mainly affected by soil types, landform types, organic fertilizer. Soil types accounted for 30.2% of the organic carbon variability; the landform types and the organic fertilizer could explain 37.7% and 32.1%, respectively. The results of the comprehensive analysis showed that the farmland soil organic carbon density of Wugong County in the past 30 years is increasing, and this probably relies on the utilization of chemical fertilizer and the returning straw. Further study should be conducted on the impact of the chemical fertilizer and returning straw.

  7. Specific metabolic rates of major organs and tissues across adulthood: evaluation by mechanistic model of resting energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zimian; Ying, Zhiliang; Bosy-Westphal, Anja; Zhang, Junyi; Schautz, Britta; Later, Wiebke; Heymsfield, Steven B; Müller, Manfred J

    2010-12-01

    The specific resting metabolic rates (K(i); in kcal · kg(-1 )· d(-1)) of major organs and tissues in adults were suggested by Elia (in Energy metabolism: tissue determinants and cellular corollaries. New York, NY: Raven Press, 1992) to be as follows: 200 for liver, 240 for brain, 440 for heart and kidneys, 13 for skeletal muscle, 4.5 for adipose tissue, and 12 for residual organs and tissues. However, Elia's K(i) values have never been fully evaluated. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the applicability of Elia's K(i) values across adulthood and to explore the potential influence of age on the K(i) values. A new approach was developed to evaluate the K(i) values of major organs and tissues on the basis of a mechanistic model: REE = Σ(K(i) × T(i)), where REE is whole-body resting energy expenditure measured by indirect calorimetry, and T(i) is the mass of individual organs and tissues measured by magnetic resonance imaging. With measured REE and T(i), marginal 95% CIs for K(i) values were calculated by stepwise univariate regression analysis. An existing database of nonobese, healthy adults [n = 131; body mass index (in kg/m²) middle-age, n = 51), and > 50 y (n = 37). Elia's K(i) values were within the range of 95% CIs in the young and middle-age groups. However, Elia's K(i) values were outside the right boundaries of 95% CIs in the >50-y group, which indicated that Elia's study overestimated K(i) values by 3% in this group. Age-adjusted K(i) values for adults aged >50 y were 194 for liver, 233 for brain, 426 for heart and kidneys, 12.6 for skeletal muscle, 4.4 for adipose tissue, and 11.6 for residuals. The general applicability of Elia's K(i) values was validated across adulthood, although age adjustment is appropriate for specific applications.

  8. Joint Staff Study, ICEBERG

    Science.gov (United States)

    1944-12-21

    AP A ( AP- APH - LS V ) AKA(AK) Assigned 7th Fleet for LINGAYEN 70 19 LSM AGO 12O 10 30 4 10st. overhaul required’ after LINGAYEN To be made...LINGAYEN and after selected ships are returned to the West Coast for overhaul, the remaining 60 troop ships (APA-AP- APH -LSV) will be organized in 4...A17 11-217 11-500 11-500 11-67 GARRISON Mounting Army Navy Marine From REMARKS 1-U7 1- 52 2,266 1- 2222 Departs with Atsault Div. less nurses . 1

  9. Rational-Emotive Staff Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Susan G.; Forman, Bruce D.

    1980-01-01

    The application of Rational-Emotive Therapy principles and techniques in in-service education for school personnel is discussed. Teacher and counselor participation in a staff development program is described. (Author)

  10. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 July 2006: The modifications are listed below: Financial and social conditions for Paid Associates, Fellows and Students (introduction of a new payment scheme for the Paid Scientific Associates Programme - reorganization of the Fellowship Programme - modification of the Student subsistence rates) Protection of members of the personnel against the financial consequences of illness, accident and disability (clarification of the scope of the relevant provisions - new definition of disability and associated benefits - revised role of the Joint Advisory Rehabilitation and Disability Board - bringing together the relevant provisions). Copies of this update (modification# 16) are available in departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at the following address: http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Administrative Circular ...

  11. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1st January 1996 are modified as follows as of 1st July 2006: Financial and social conditions for Paid Associates, Fellows and Students (introduction of a new payment scheme for the Paid Scientific Associates Programme-reorganisation of the Fellowship Programme-modification of Student subsistence rates) Protection of members of the personnel against the financial consequences of illness, accident and disability (clarification of the scope of the relevant provisions-new definition of disability and associated benefits-revised role of the Joint Advisory Rehabilitation and Disability Board-bringing together of the relevant provisions). Copies of this update (modification No.16) are available from Departmental secretariats. In addition, the Staff Rules and Regulations can be consulted on the Web at the following address: http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Administrative Circular No. 14 (Rev. 2)-July 2006 Protection of members o...

  12. SENIOR STAFF ADVANCEMENT COMMITTEE (SSAC)

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Composition and mandateThe Senior Staff Advancement Committee is composed of members nominated ad persona by the Director-General.The Committee examines proposals from Divisions concerning promotions to grade 13 in Career Path IX, changes of career path to Career Path IX and advancements to the exceptional grade in Career path VIII.The Director-General may consult the Committee on any matter related to senior staff careers.The Committee makes its recommendations to the Director-General.

  13. A new logo for the Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    On 3rd December 2012 the Staff Association launched a competition open to all to design a new logo, which should not contain the official CERN logo, reserved by CERN’s new graphic charter to the official use by the Organization. We are pleased that this competition sparked a strong interest. A total of 57 proposals were received within the time limits, some submitted from far away: Poland, Czech Republic, Turkey and even Cameroon! The selection of the winning logo was made in two steps: first the pre-selection of six finalists, followed by the final choice of the winning logo by members of the Staff Association.  Winning logo The pre-selection was made in two stages. Three of the six finalists were nominated by a jury consisting of seven members of the Staff Association, including communication professionals. In parallel, from 4 to 15 February CERN employed members of the personnel were able to visit the exhibition of all the logo proposals on the 1st floor of the Main Building and ...

  14. Effects of different tree species on soil organic matter composition, decomposition rates and temperature sensitivities in boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Javier; Nilsson, Mats B.; Erhagen, Björn; Sparrman, Tobias; Ilstedt, Ulrik; Schleucher, Jürgen; Öquist, Mats

    2017-04-01

    High-latitude ecosystems store a large proportion of the global soil organic matter (SOM) and its mineralization constitutes a major carbon flux to the atmosphere. It has been suggested that different tree species can significantly influence organo-chemical composition of SOM, and rate and temperature sensitivity of SOM decomposition. In this study we used surface soil samples (top 5 cm) from a field experiment where five different tree species (Pinus silvestrys L, Picea abies (L.) H. Karst., Larix decidua Mill., Betula pendula Roth, and Pinus contorta Douglas) were planted on a grass meadow in a randomized block design (n=3) ca. 40 years ago. The samples were incubated at 4, 9, 14, and 19 °C at a soil water potential of -25 kPa (previously determined as optimal water content for decomposition). CO2 production rates were measured hourly for 13 days. CO2 production rates were consequently lowest in the control plots and increased in the order Meadow< Contorta < Betula < Larix < Pinus < Picea. The values ranged between 0.03-0.1, 0.06-0.154, 0.1-0.24 and 0.13-0.36 mg CO2 g-1 OM (dw) h-1 at 4, 9, 14 and 19°C respectively. The temperature response of CO2 production corresponded to Q10s of 2.22 (±0.11), 2.22(±0.15), 2.66 (±0.18), 2.09 (±0.33), 2.38 (±0.31) and 2.31 (±0.09) for meadow, contorta, betula, larix, pinus and picea respectively. Only betula resulted in significantly higher Q10s as compared to the control plots, picea, contorta and larix treatments. These differences in tree species effects on SOM decomposition and its temperature sensitivity will be further discussed in relation to the organo-chemical composition of SOM as determined by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) techniques. We conclude that the temperature response of SOM decomposition rates is likely coupled to tree species composition and may have important implications for soil C dynamics. This finding can have

  15. Consequences of Fatherhood in the Biparental California Mouse (Peromyscus californicus): Locomotor Performance, Metabolic Rate, and Organ Masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Jacob R; Saltzman, Wendy; Chappell, Mark A; Garland, Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Although effects of motherhood on mothers have been well documented in mammals, the effects of fatherhood on fathers are not well known. We evaluated effects of being a father on key metabolic and performance measures in the California mouse, Peromyscus californicus. California mice are genetically monogamous in the wild, and fathers show similar parental behavior to mothers, with the exception of lactation. To investigate the impact of fatherhood on fathers, focal males were paired with an intact female (breeding males), a tubally ligated female (nonbreeding males), or another male (virgins). Starting 3-5 d after the birth of each breeding pair's first litter, males were tested for locomotor performance (maximum sprint speed, treadmill endurance), basal metabolic rate (BMR), and maximum oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]). At the end of the 11-d test period, mice were euthanized, hematocrit was determined, and organs were weighed. Speed, endurance, and [Formula: see text] were significantly repeatable between two replicate measurement days but did not differ among groups, nor did BMR. Breeding males had significantly larger hind limb muscles than did nonbreeding males, whereas virgin males had heavier subcutaneous fat pads than did nonbreeding and breeding males. Several correlations were observed at the level of individual variation (residuals from ANCOVA models), including positive correlations for endurance with [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] with testes mass, and some of the digestion-related organs with each other. These results indicate that fatherhood may not have pronounced performance, metabolic, or morphological effects on fathers, at least under standard laboratory conditions and across a single breeding cycle.

  16. Volatile organic compounds from vegetation in southern Yunnan Province, China: Emission rates and some potential regional implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geron, Chris; Owen, Sue; Guenther, Alex; Greenberg, Jim; Rasmussen, Rei; Hui Bai, Jian; Li, Qing-Jun; Baker, Brad

    Little information is currently available regarding emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) in southern Asia. To address the need for BVOC emission estimates in regional atmospheric chemistry simulations, 95 common plant species were screened for emissions of BVOC in and near the Xishuangbanna Tropical Biological Gardens in southern Yunnan Province, Peoples' Republic of China in February 2003. In situ measurements with leaf cuvettes and branch bag enclosures were used in combination with portable gas chromatography, flame ionization, photoionization, and mass spectral detection to identify and quantify BVOC emissions. Forty-four of the species examined emitted isoprene at rates exceeding 20 μg C g -1 (leaf dry weight) h -1. An emphasis was placed on the genus Ficus, which is important in the region and occupies a wide range of ecological niches. Several species in the footprint of a nearby flux tower were also examined. Several palm species and an abundant fern ( Cyclosorus parasiticus) emitted substantial amounts of isoprene, and probably accounted for observed daytime mean isoprene fluxes from the understory of a Hevea brasiliensis plantation of 1.0 and 0.15 mg C m -2 h -1 during the wet and dry seasons, respectively. These measurements verify that both the forest floor and canopy in this region can be sources of isoprene. Monoterpene emissions exceeded 1.0 μg-C g -1 (leaf dry weight) h -1 from only 4 of 38 species surveyed, including some Ficus species and H. brasiliensis. However most of the trees of the latter species were sparsely foliated due to dry season senescence, and emission factors are approximately an order of magnitude lower than those reported during the wet season. BVOC emission rates and physiology of many species are impacted by reduced moisture availability, especially Mangifera indica. South Asia is a region undergoing rapid landuse change and forest plantation establishment, with large increases in area of high BVOC

  17. Smaller size of high metabolic rate organs explains lower resting energy expenditure in Asian-Indian Than Chinese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, L L T; Venkataraman, K; Gluckman, P; Chong, Y S; Chee, M-W L; Khoo, C M; Leow, M-Ks; Lee, Y S; Tai, E S; Khoo, E Y H

    2016-04-01

    In Singapore, the obesity prevalence is disproportionately higher in the Asian-Indians and Malays than the Chinese. Lower resting energy expenditure (REE) may be a contributory factor. We explored the association between ethnicity and REE in Chinese, Asian-Indian and Malay men living in Singapore and determined the influence of body composition, mass/volume of high metabolic rate organs, represented by brain volume and trunk fat-free mass (FFM), and physical activity on ethnic differences. Two hundred and forty-four men from Singapore (n=100 Chinese, 70 Asian-Indians and 74 Malays), aged 21-40 years and body mass index of 18.5-30.0 kg m(-2), were recruited in this cross-sectional study. REE was assessed by indirect calorimetry and body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Brain volume was measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Physical activity was assessed by the Singapore Prospective Study Program Physical Activity Questionnaire. REE was significantly lower in Asian-Indians compared with that in Chinese after adjusting for body weight. FFM (total, trunk and limb) and total fat mass were important predictors of REE across all ethnic groups. Brain volume was positively associated with REE only in Malays. Moderate and vigorous physical activity was positively associated with REE only in Asian-Indians and Malays. The difference in REE between Asian-Indians and Chinese was attenuated but remained statistically significant after adjustment for total FFM (59±20 kcal per day), fat mass (67±20 kcal per day) and brain volume (54±22 kcal per day). The association between REE and ethnicity was no longer statistically significant after total FFM was replaced by trunk FFM (which includes heart, liver, kidney and spleen) but not when it was replaced by limb FFM (skeletal muscle). We have demonstrated a lower REE in Asian-Indians compared with Chinese who may contribute to the higher rates of obesity in the former. This difference could be accounted for

  18. Staff numbers: from words to action!

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2006-01-01

    2006 is a decisive year for the definition of needs for human resources and long-term budget for the Organization. The LHC is officially programmed for 31 August 2007; the Director-General has to draw up a â€ワLong-term Plan” (LTP) by the end of the year. This projected programme will specify the needs for staff fron now until 2010 and beyond, in particular in the framework of the completion and running of this unique machine.

  19. Temporal repeatability of metabolic rate and the effect of organ mass and enzyme activity on metabolism in European eel (Anguilla anguilla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldsen, Martin Maagaard; Norin, Tommy; Malte, Hans

    2013-05-01

    Intraspecific variation in metabolic rate of fish can be pronounced and have been linked to various fitness-related behavioural and physiological traits, but the underlying causes for this variation have received far less attention than the consequences of it. In the present study we investigated whether European eels (Anguilla anguilla) displayed temporal repeatability of body-mass-corrected (residual) metabolic rate over a two-month period and if variations in organ mass and enzyme activity between individual fish could be the cause for the observed variation in metabolic rate. Both standard metabolic rate (SMR; Pearson's r=0.743) and routine metabolic rate (RMR; r=0.496) were repeatable over the two-month period. Repeatability of RMR is an interesting finding as it indicates that the level of spontaneous activity in respirometer-confined fish is not random. Cumulative organ mass (liver, heart, spleen and intestine; mean 1.6% total body mass) was found to explain 38% of the variation in SMR (r=0.613) with the liver (one of the metabolically most active organs) being the driver for the correlation between organ mass and metabolic rate. No relationships were found for either liver citrate synthase or cytochrome oxidase activity and metabolic rate in the European eels. Reasons for, and contributions to, the observed variation in metabolic rate are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Discrimination Factors and Incorporation Rates for Organic Matrix in Shark Teeth Based on a Captive Feeding Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeichner, S S; Colman, A S; Koch, P L; Polo-Silva, C; Galván-Magaña, F; Kim, S L

    Sharks migrate annually over large distances and occupy a wide variety of habitats, complicating analysis of lifestyle and diet. A biogeochemical technique often used to reconstruct shark diet and environment preferences is stable isotope analysis, which is minimally invasive and integrates through time and space. There are previous studies that focus on isotopic analysis of shark soft tissues, but there are limited applications to shark teeth. However, shark teeth offer an advantage of multiple ecological snapshots and minimum invasiveness during removal because of their distinct conveyor belt tooth replacement system. In this study, we analyze δ 13 C and δ 15 N values of the organic matrix in leopard shark teeth (Triakis semifasciata) from a captive experiment and report discrimination factors as well as incorporation rates. We found differences in tooth discrimination factors for individuals fed different prey sources (mean ± SD; Δ 13 C squid = 4.7‰ ± 0.5‰, Δ 13 C tilapia = 3.1‰ ± 1.0‰, Δ 15 N squid = 2.0‰ ± 0.7‰, Δ 15 N tilapia = 2.8‰ ± 0.6‰). In addition, these values differed from previously published discrimination factors for plasma, red blood cells, and muscle of the same leopard sharks. Incorporation rates of shark teeth were similar for carbon and nitrogen (mean ± SE; λ C = 0.021 ± 0.009, λ N = 0.024 ± 0.007) and comparable to those of plasma. We emphasize the difference in biological parameters on the basis of tissue substrate and diet items to interpret stable isotope data and apply our results to stable isotope values from blue shark (Prionace glauca) teeth to illustrate the importance of biological parameters to interpret the complex ecology of a migratory shark.

  1. Implications of staff 'churn' for nurse managers, staff, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine; Roche, Michael; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Catling-Paull, Christine

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the term "churn" is used not only because of the degree of change to staffing, but also because some of the reasons for staff movement are not classified as voluntary turnover. The difficulties for the nurse managing a unit with the degree of "churn" should not be under-estimated. Changes to skill mix and the proportions of full-time, agency, and temporary staff present challenges in providing clinical leadership, scheduling staff, performance management, and supervision. Perhaps more importantly, it is likely that there is an impact on the continuity of care provided in the absence of continuity of staffing. A greater understanding of the human and financial costs and consequences, and a willingness to change established practices at the institutional and ward level, are needed.

  2. The reliability of grazing rate estimates from dilution experiments: Have we over-estimated rates of organic carbon consumption by microzooplankton?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Dolan,

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available According to a recent global analysis, microzooplankton grazing is surprisingly invariant, ranging only between 59 and 74% of phytoplankton primary production across systems differing in seasonality, trophic status, latitude, or salinity. Thus an important biological process in the world ocean, the daily consumption of recently fixed carbon, appears nearly constant. We believe this conclusion is an artefact because dilution experiments are 1 prone to providing over-estimates of grazing rates and 2 unlikely to furnish evidence of low grazing rates. In our view the overall average rate of microzooplankton grazing probably does not exceed 50% of primary production and may be even lower in oligotrophic systems.

  3. Explaining failure through success: a critical analysis of reduction in road and stroke deaths as an explanation for Australia's low deceased organ donation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendorf, A; Kerridge, I H; Kelly, P J; Pussell, B; Guasch, X

    2012-08-01

    During the past two decades, Australian federal and state governments have funded many initiatives to bolster organ donation. Despite large investments of time, effort and money, Australia's deceased donation rate is in the bottom half of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries and has only marginally increased from 11.9 donors per million people (pmp) in 1990 to 14.9 donors pmp in 2011. An often-cited explanation for this situation is that Australia's success in increasing levels of public health and safety through reduced traffic and stroke fatalities has reduced its number of potential deceased organ donors. We refer to this as the 'Failure Because of Success' hypothesis. Although commonly accepted, this hypothesis is largely untested. By analysing data from international donation and transplantation organisations and international public health and safety organisations, we compared historical deceased organ donation rates with traffic and stroke fatality rates in Australia and the seven countries with the world's highest deceased organ donation rates (Spain, Portugal, France, USA, Belgium, Austria and Italy). Traffic fatality rates across all countries in the study have fallen dramatically during the time period, with Spain having the lowest traffic fatality rates. Stroke fatality rates demonstrate similar reductions, with France showing the lowest cerebral vascular accident mortality rates. When compared with countries with the world's highest deceased donation rates, Australia's improvements to public health and safety through reductions in traffic and stroke fatalities were neither unique nor exemplary and do not provide an adequate explanation for its low organ donor rates. © 2012 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  4. Comparison of entropy production rates in two different types of self-organized flows: Benard convection and zonal flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawazura, Y.; Yoshida, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Two different types of self-organizing and sustaining ordered motion in fluids or plasmas--one is a Benard convection (or streamer) and the other is a zonal flow--have been compared by introducing a thermodynamic phenomenological model and evaluating the corresponding entropy production rates (EP). These two systems have different topologies in their equivalent circuits: the Benard convection is modeled by parallel connection of linear and nonlinear conductances, while the zonal flow is modeled by series connection. The ''power supply'' that drives the systems is also a determinant of operating modes. When the energy flux is a control parameter (as in usual plasma experiments), the driver is modeled by a constant-current power supply, and when the temperature difference between two separate boundaries is controlled (as in usual computational studies), the driver is modeled by a constant-voltage power supply. The parallel (series)-connection system tends to minimize (maximize) the total EP when a constant-current power supply drives the system. This minimum/maximum relation flips when a constant-voltage power supply is connected.

  5. Organic loading rate effect on the acidogenesis of cheese whey: a comparison between UASB and SBR reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, R; Iglesias-Iglesias, R; Kennes, C; Veiga, M C

    2017-09-16

    Volatile fatty acids (VFA) production and degree of acidification (DA) were investigated in the anaerobic treatment of cheese whey by comparison of two processes: a continuous process using a laboratory upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and a discontinuous process using a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The main purpose of this work was to study the organic loading rate (OLR) effect on the yield of VFA in two kinds of reactors. The predominant products in the acidogenic process in both reactors were: acetate, propionate, butyrate and valerate. The maximum DA obtained was 98% in an SBR at OLR of 2.7 g COD L -1 d -1 , and 97% in the UASB at OLR at 15.1 g COD L -1 d -1 . The results revealed that the UASB reactor was more efficient at a medium OLR with a higher VFA yield, while with the SBR reactor, the maximum acidification was obtained at a lower OLR with changes in the VFA profile at different OLRs applied.

  6. Sustainable organic loading rate and energy recovery potential of mesophilic anaerobic membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Chunhai

    2014-08-01

    The overall performance of a mesophilic anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) for synthetic municipal wastewater treatment was investigated under a range of organic loading rate (OLR). A very steady and high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal (around 98%) was achieved over a broad range of volumetric OLR of 0.8-10gCOD/L/d. The sustainable volumetric and sludge OLR satisfying a permeate COD below 50mg/L for general reuse was 6gCOD/L/d and 0.63gCOD/gMLVSS (mixed liquor volatile suspended solids)/d, respectively. At a high sludge OLR of over 0.6gCOD/gMLVSS/d, the AnMBR achieved high methane production of over 300ml/gCOD (even approaching the theoretical value of 382ml/gCOD). A low biomass production of 0.015-0.026gMLVSS/gCOD and a sustainable flux of 6L/m2/h were observed. The integration of a heat pump and forward osmosis into the mesophilic AnMBR process would be a promising way for net energy recovery from typical municipal wastewater in a temperate area. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Volatile fatty acids production from food waste: effects of pH, temperature, and organic loading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianguo; Zhang, Yujing; Li, Kaimin; Wang, Quan; Gong, Changxiu; Li, Menglu

    2013-09-01

    The effects of pH, temperature, and organic loading rate (OLR) on the acidogenesis of food waste have been determined. The present study investigated their effects on soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs), volatile solids (VS), and ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N). Both the concentration and yield of VFAs were highest at pH 6.0, acetate and butyrate accounted for 77% of total VFAs. VFAs concentration and the VFA/SCOD ratio were highest, and VS levels were lowest, at 45 °C, but the differences compared to the values at 35 °C were slight. The concentrations of VFAs, SCOD, and NH4(+)-N increased as OLR increased, whereas the yield of VFAs decreased from 0.504 at 5 g/Ld to 0.306 at 16 g/Ld. Acetate and butyrate accounted for 60% of total VFAs. The percentage of acetate and valerate increased as OLR increased, whereas a high OLR produced a lower percentage of propionate and butyrate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Flow pattern analysis of a full-scale expanded granular sludge bed-type reactor under different organic loading rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, M X; Wang, K J; Zuo, J E; Yan, Z; Fang, H; Yu, J W

    2012-03-01

    The hydraulic characteristics of a lab-scale and a full-scale (275 m(3)) expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB)-type reactor under different organic loading rates varying from 10 kg COD m(-3)d(-1) to 45 kg COD m(-3)d(-1) were investigated. A modified combined model composed of two completely mixing regions and a plug flow region was sufficient for simulating the flow pattern of a full-scale EGSB-type reactor. Moreover, the outputs fitted the measured tracer distribution results well. The simplified model structure was in very good agreement with the physical structure of a full-scale EGSB-type reactor. The upflow (liquid+gas) velocity, high concentration of granular sludge, and gas hold-up effect may contribute to the generation of dead spaces (maximum of 19.5%). The bed expansion characteristics indicated that the sludge bed of the EGSB-type reactor performed as a suspended bed, in which the bed expansion was controlled between 20% and 30%, rather than the usually considered expanded bed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. On-Line Measurement of The Shape and Growth Rates of Organic Crystals in Reactors: Advances and Perspectives for Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xue Z.

    2007-01-01

    Organic crystals grown from solution are known to exhibit multiple morphology and habits which are of great importance to the end use property of the product such as the bioavailability and down stream processing such as in filtration and drying. The crystal morphology can also dictate other quality measures such as the size. This paper reviews recent developments in on-line crystal morphology measurement and control using various techniques including on-line imaging and image analysis, and XRD. On-line imaging was found to be the most promising technique in capturing with high fidelity crystal shape and polymorphic transitions in real-time. Process in imaging and image analysis techniques will also be reviewed for extracting the crystals from the image background especially for images with uneven background intensity, of needle-like crystals and of high concentration slurries. Discussion will be given to shape descriptors and automatic shape recognition. Preliminary results and challenges for estimating crystal growth rates and kinetics parameters for different crystal facets will also be discussed. Future research directions for obtaining 3D instead of 2D dimensional information using imaging and image analysis techniques will be explored. Finally a framework integrating morphology modeling, multi-dimensional population balance and computational fluid dynamics, with 3D imaging and image analysis will be presented which provides the basis for model predictive automatic control of the morphology of growing crystals

  10. Rate of change in concentration of organic compounds and nutrients in municipal and dairy wastewater treated in full technical SBR scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Struk-Sokolowska Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Municipal WWTP often receive the industrial wastewater, including dairy sewage. The problem of sewage treatment from this sector of economy is not completely solved, especially in plants of medium and small milk processing capacity. The aim of the study was to determine the rate of change in organic compounds and nutrients in municipal wastewater with the participation of dairy products during the processing phases of SBR-type reactor in a technical scale. The study was conducted in WWTP in Sokolka. Rate of changes in the concentrations of organic compounds, nitrogen and phosphorus in wastewater during the processing phases of SBR reactor was determined. Presence of dairy sewage (13% volume participation affected the decrease in the rate of changes in organic compounds concentrations defined as BOD5 during all processing phases of SBR reactor. Significant influence of dairy sewage on rates of change in nitrogen and phosphorus compounds concentrations during filling, aeration, stirring, sedimentation and decantation phases, was found.

  11. To Assess the Rate for Affecting the Structural Dimensions of Governmental Organizations on their Agility (Case Study: Isfahan Province Jihad Agriculture Organization)

    OpenAIRE

    Rashidi Fatemeh; Rashidpoor Ali; Alinaghiyan Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    This research has been performed in the direction of making agile the governmental organizations at Isfahan Province Jihad Agriculture Organization. In this research the structural dimensions were eight dimensions (formalization, specialization, standardization, hierarchy of authorities, complexity, centralization, professionalism, personnel rations). In order to assess the variables for testing the research hypotheses, a standard questionnaire was built in the dimension of the organizational...

  12. What is the limiting factor for organ procurement in Belgium: donation or detection ? What can be done to improve organ procurement rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gelder, E; de Roey, J; Desschans, B; Van Hees, D; Aerts, R; Monbaliu, D; De Pauw, L; Coosemans, W; Pirenne, J

    2008-01-01

    In trying to overcome the growing gap between demand and offer of organs for transplantation, solutions are usually searched for by comparing successful and unsuccessful models in different countries. In particular, one element in the more successful countries such as for instance presumed consent, or one element in the less successful countries such as for instance refusal by relatives, are seen as possible reasons for these differences. This article tackles the problem of organ donor shortage through a new multi-level approach. Organ donation can indeed be analyzed on three different levels: the macro-level, the meso-level and the micro-level. The macro-level refers to the governmental structure where legislation, policies and funding are three essential elements necessary to make donation possible. The meso-level refers to the health care organization and the professionals who surround the process of organ donation and transplantation. Facilitating this process through standardized protocols and improving detection of organ donors are the two major elements. The micro-level refers to the individual believes and personal attitudes towards organ donation. This new multi-level approach gives a thorough and complete analysis of problems and allows to propose potential solutions to try to overcome the chronic organ shortage.

  13. Environmental Performance Information Use by Conservation Agency Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardropper, Chloe Bradley

    2018-04-01

    Performance-based conservation has long been recognized as crucial to improving program effectiveness, particularly when environmental conditions are dynamic. Yet few studies have investigated the use of environmental performance information by staff of conservation organizations. This article identifies attitudinal, policy and organizational factors influencing the use of a type of performance information—water quality information—by Soil and Water Conservation District staff in the Upper Mississippi River Basin region. An online survey ( n = 277) revealed a number of important variables associated with greater information use. Variables included employees' prosocial motivation, or the belief that they helped people and natural resources through their job, the perceived trustworthiness of data, the presence of a U.S. Clean Water Act Total Maximum Daily Load standard designation, and staff discretion to prioritize programs locally. Conservation programs that retain motivated staff and provide them the resources and flexibility to plan and evaluate their work with environmental data may increase conservation effectiveness under changing conditions.

  14. Training of technical staff and technical staff managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, G.F.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of Technical Staff and Technical Staff Managers training is to provide job skills enhancement to individuals selected to fill key technical positions within a nuclear utility. This training is unique in that unlike other training programs accredited by the National Academy for Nuclear Training, it does not lead to specific task qualification. The problems encountered when determining the student population and curriculum are a direct result of this major difference. Major problems encountered are determining who should attend the training, what amount of training is necessary and sufficient, and how to obtain the best feedback in order to effect substantive program improvements. These topics will be explored and possible solutions discussed

  15. Radiation monitoring of PET staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trang, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Positron emission tomography (PET) is becoming a common diagnostic tool in hospitals, often located in and employing staff from the Nuclear Medicine or Radiology departments. Although similar in some ways, staff in PET departments are commonly found to have the highest radiation doses in the hospital environment due to unique challenges which PET tracers present in administration as well as production. The establishment of a PET centre with a dedicated cyclotron has raised concerns of radiation protection to the staff at the WA PET Centre and the Radiopharmaceutical Production and Development (RAPID) team. Since every PET centre has differing designs and practices, it was considered important to closely monitor the radiation dose to our staff so that improvements to practices and design could be made to reduce radiation dose. Electronic dosimeters (MGP DMC 2000XB), which have a facility to log time and dose at 10 second intervals, were provided to three PET technologists and three PET nurses. These were worn in the top pocket of their lab coats throughout a whole day. Each staff member was then asked to note down their duties throughout the day and also note the time they performed each duty. The duties would then correlate with the dose with which the electronic monitor recorded and an estimate of radiation dose per duty could be given. Also an estimate of the dose per day to each staff member could be made. PET nurses averaged approximately 20 μ8v per day getting their largest dose from caring for occasional problematic patients. Smaller doses of a 1-2 μ8v were recorded for injections and removing cannulas. PET technologists averaged approximately 15 μ8v per day getting their largest dose of 1-5μ8v mainly from positioning of patients and sometimes larger doses due to problematic patients. Smaller doses of 1-2 μ5v were again recorded for injections and removal of cannulas. Following a presentation given to staff, all WA PET Centre and RAPID staff

  16. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! After verification by the Electoral Commission, all candidates for the elections to the Staff Council have been registered. It is now up to you, members of the Staff Association, to vote for the candidate(s) of your choice. We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. We are using an electronic voting system; all you need to do is click the link below and follow the instructions on the screen. https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017 The deadline for voting is Monday, 13 November at midday (12 pm). Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The ...

  17. Higher organ donation consent rates by relatives of potential uncontrolled donors versus potential controlled donors after death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, J.; Mook, W.N. van; Willems, M.E.; Heurn, L.W. van

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Refusal to consent to organ donation is an important cause of the persisting gap between the number of potential organ donors and effectuated donors. In the Netherlands, organ donors include both uncontrolled donors: donors who die unexpectedly after cardiac death (DCD), after failed

  18. Guidelines for the assessment and acceptance of potential brain-dead organ donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Glauco Adrieno; Garcia, Valter Duro; de Souza, Rafael Lisboa; Franke, Cristiano Augusto; Vieira, Kalinca Daberkow; Birckholz, Viviane Renata Zaclikevis; Machado, Miriam Cristine; de Almeida, Eliana Régia Barbosa; Machado, Fernando Osni; Sardinha, Luiz Antônio da Costa; Wanzuita, Raquel; Silvado, Carlos Eduardo Soares; Costa, Gerson; Braatz, Vera; Caldeira Filho, Milton; Furtado, Rodrigo; Tannous, Luana Alves; de Albuquerque, André Gustavo Neves; Abdala, Edson; Gonçalves, Anderson Ricardo Roman; Pacheco-Moreira, Lúcio Filgueiras; Dias, Fernando Suparregui; Fernandes, Rogério; Giovanni, Frederico Di; de Carvalho, Frederico Bruzzi; Fiorelli, Alfredo; Teixeira, Cassiano; Feijó, Cristiano; Camargo, Spencer Marcantonio; de Oliveira, Neymar Elias; David, André Ibrahim; Prinz, Rafael Augusto Dantas; Herranz, Laura Brasil; de Andrade, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Organ transplantation is the only alternative for many patients with terminal diseases. The increasing disproportion between the high demand for organ transplants and the low rate of transplants actually performed is worrisome. Some of the causes of this disproportion are errors in the identification of potential organ donors and in the determination of contraindications by the attending staff. Therefore, the aim of the present document is to provide guidelines for intensive care multi-professional staffs for the recognition, assessment and acceptance of potential organ donors. PMID:27737418

  19. Pore-scale insights to the rate of organic carbon degradation and biofilm formation under variable hydro-biogeochemical conditions in soils and sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Yan, Z.; Liu, Y.; Li, M.; Bailey, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    Biogeochemical processes that control microbial growth, organic carbon degradation, and CO2 production and migration are fundamentally occur at the pore scale. In this presentation, we will describe our recent results of a pore-scale simulation research to investigate: 1) how moisture content and distribution affects oxygen delivery, organic carbon availability, and microbial activities that regulate the rate of organic carbon degradation and CO2 production in aerobic systems; and 2) how pore-scale reactive transport processes affect local microbial growth, biofilm formation, and overall rate of microbial reactions in anoxic systems. The results revealed that there is an optimal moisture content for aerobic bacterial respiration and CO2 production. When moisture is below the optimal value, organic carbon availability limits its degradation due to diffusion and osmotic stress to bacterial reactivity; and when moisture is above the optimal value, oxygen delivery limits microbial respiration. The optimal moisture condition is, however, a function of soil texture and physical heterogeneity, bioavailable soil organic carbon, and microbial community function. In anoxic and saturated system, simulation results show that biofilm preferentially forms in concave areas around sand particles and macro aggregates where cross-directional fluxes of organic carbon and electron acceptors (e.g., nitrate) favor microbial growth and attachment. The results provide important insights to the establishment of constitutive relationships between the macroscopic rates of soil organic carbon degradation and moisture content, and to the development of biogeochemical reactive transport models that incorporate biofilm structures and physio-chemical heterogeneity in soils and sediments.

  20. Resolution of the Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    You were many to attend the public information meetings organised in October and we thank you for your interest. In this decision phase of the current Five-Yearly Review of our employment conditions they provided an opportunity to review the Management proposals in detail. They were a moment of exchange also on the various topics under review, and your comments were many and very valuable. Meeting on Thursday 29th October, the Staff Council discussed once more these proposals. It considered that the "package" of proposed measures is not balanced enough in its current form. It decided to formulate additional requests to the Management, relating mainly to the effects of the introduction of the proposed new career system. The resolution adopted this morning also implies that the consultation of staff, originally foreseen next week, is postponed. The staff Council will reconvene in a special session on Thursday, 5th November to reassess its position depending on the progress made regarding its d...

  1. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. The voting takes place from 23 October to 13 November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017. Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November and 5 December. Candidates for the 2017 Elections

  2. Supported Conversation for hospital staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Hysse B; Løvholt, Annelise P.; Mathiesen, Lone Lundbak

    in communication and interaction, Supported Conversation for Adults with Aphasia (SCA) was adapted and implemented in a large neurological department at Rigshospitalet-Glostrup in Copenhagen. Method 152 staff members representing different health professionals were assigned to one of eleven courses during a six...... month period. Each course had 10-12 participants and lasted 6 hours, including instruction in the SCA principles, video analysis, interdisciplinary group work, and practice sessions with PWAs. Self-assessed learning outcomes were evaluated with a brief questionnaire filled out by staff members...... in communication, also showed significant improvements across all staff groups. After the course, more time to spend with patients was perceived as the most important factor to further increase communication success with PWA. Conclusion The results show that interdisciplinary SCA-courses successfully increase...

  3. Effects of changing hydraulic and organic loading rates on pollutant reduction in bark, charcoal and sand filters treating greywater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalahmeh, Sahar S; Pell, Mikael; Hylander, Lars D; Lalander, Cecilia; Vinnerås, Björn; Jönsson, Håkan

    2014-01-01

    Greywater flows and concentrations vary greatly, thus evaluation and prediction of the response of on-site treatment filters to variable loading regimes is challenging. The performance of 0.6 m × 0.2 m (height × diameter) filters of bark, activated charcoal and sand in reduction of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (Tot-N) and total phosphorus (Tot-P) under variable loading regimes was investigated and modelled. During seven runs, the filters were fed with synthetic greywater at hydraulic loading rates (HLR) of 32-128 L m(-2) day(-1) and organic loading rates (OLR) of 13-76 g BOD5 m(-2) day(-1). Based on the changes in HLR and OLR, the reduction in pollutants was modelled using multiple linear regression. The models showed that increasing the HLR from 32 to 128 L m(-2) day(-1) decreased COD reduction in the bark filters from 74 to 40%, but increased COD reduction in the charcoal and sand filters from 76 to 90% and 65 to 83%, respectively. Moreover, the models showed that increasing the OLR from 13 to 76 g BOD5 m(-2) day(-1) enhanced the pollutant reduction in all filters except for Tot-P in the bark filters, which decreased slightly from 81 to 73%. Decreasing the HLR from 128 to 32 L m(-2) day(-1) enhanced the pollutant reduction in all filters, but decreasing the OLR from 76 to 14 g BOD5 m(-2) day(-1) detached biofilm and decreased the Tot-N and Tot-P reduction in the bark and sand filters. Overall, the bark filters had the capacity to treat high OLR, while the charcoal filters had the capacity to treat high HLR and high OLR. Both bark and charcoal filters had higher capacity than sand filters in dealing with high and variable loads. Bark seems to be an attractive substitute for sand filters in settings short in water and its effluent would be valuable for irrigation, while charcoal filters should be an attractive alternative for settings both rich and short in water supply and when

  4. Staff Development for School Improvement: An Illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelfelt, Roy A., Ed.

    This document contains 11 papers on school staff development: (1) "The Staff Development for School Improvement Program" (Winifred I. Warnat); (2) "A Teacher's View of a Staff Development Project" (Lynn Kleiman); (3) "Staff Development from the Principal's Perspective" (Dixie Hibner); (4) "Stepping-Stones to Success" (Barbara A. Skone); (5)…

  5. 17 CFR 8.05 - Enforcement staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enforcement staff. 8.05... staff. (a) Each exchange shall establish an adequate enforcement staff which shall be authorized by the... staff shall consist of employees of the exchange and/or persons hired on a contract basis. It may not...

  6. Effects of Organic Loading Rate on the Performance of a Pressurized Anaerobic Filter in Two-Phase Anaerobic Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuling Chen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of organic loading rate (OLR on a pressurized anaerobic filter was studied in a laboratory two-phase anaerobic digestion system. The anaerobic filter was operated successively at two working pressures (9 bar and 1.5 bar. The OLR(COD for each pressure was increased from 5 to 17.5 kg·m−3·day−1. The best performance of the reactor at 9 bar was observed at OLR(COD of 12.5 kg·m−3·day−1 and hydraulic retention time (HRT of 1.8 day, with specific biogas productivity (SBP of 5.3 L·L−1·day−1 and COD degradation grade of 90.6%. At higher OLRs and shorter HRTs, the process became unstable. In contrast, there was no indication of digester failure during the experiments at 1.5 bar. The SBP peaked at OLR(COD of 17.5 kg·m−3·day−1 with 8.2 L·L−1·day−1, where COD degradation grade was 90.4%. The biogas collected from the reactor at 9 bar and 1.5 bar contained approximately 74.5% CH4 and 66.2% CH4, respectively, regardless of OLR variation. At OLR(COD of 5–12.5 kg·m−3·day−1, the reactor at 9 bar had the same specific methane yield as at 1.5 bar, which was in the range of 0.31–0.32 LN·g−1COD. Raising the working pressure in the reactor resulted in an increase of methane content of the produced biogas. However, the low pH value (approximately 6.5 inside the reactor, induced by high CO2 partial pressure seemed to limit the reactor performance at high OLRs and short HRT.

  7. Pecuniary and non-pecuniary incentives to increase the rate of organ donations from the living: a moral exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilan, Michael Y

    2011-04-01

    This paper examines the morality of schemes of payment to live donors/sellers of organs for transplantation. Following empirical and historical evidence, it is argued that consent to sell organs is substantially different from consent to ordinary business transactions and that legalization of exchanges of organs with financial benefits deviates significantly from the scope of liberal toleration and liberal conceptions of human rights. Although altruistic giving is commendable, it is immoral for society to benefit from them without conferring to the donors benefits such as health and nursing insurance for life. Non-alienable and non-fungible benefits of this kind are moral as incentives to organ donation/giving.

  8. Soil redistribution rate and its relationship with soil organic carbon and total nitrogen using 137Cs technique in a cultivated complex hillslope in western Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afshar, Farideh Abbaszadeh; Ayoubi, Shamsollah; Jalalian, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    The spatial pattern of soil redistribution rate was investigated using cesium-137 ( 137 Cs) within a cultivated complex hillslope in western Iran. The relationship between soil redistribution rate and soil organic carbon and total nitrogen pattern were studied using co-regionalization analysis. Ninety-one soil cores were sampled for 137 Cs, total nitrogen, and soil organic carbon measurements. The simplified mass balance model estimated a gross erosion rate of 29.8 t ha -1 yr -1 and a net soil deposition rate of 21.8 t ha -1 yr -1 ; hence, a net soil loss rate of 8 t ha -1 yr -1 . This magnitude of soil erosion rate is higher than the acceptable rate in semiarid regions. Co-regionalization analysis and co-dispersive coefficients among the selected variables showed that only a small fraction of the variability in total nitrogen and soil organic carbon could be explained by soil redistribution and that the remaining might be the result of different management practices by local farmers.

  9. The latest on the recent HR staff survey

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The data collected in the framework of the staff survey sent out by the Human Resources (HR) Department in March this year are currently being analysed. The first results concern the response rate and the breakdown of participants. 1328 staff members replied to the questionnaire, representing a response rate of close to 60%. Marie-Luce Falipou, who is in charge of the project within the HR Department, is evidently satisfied with the result: "The high response rate shows that the staff appreciated HR’s efforts to sound out their opinions and felt concerned by the subjects covered in the questionnaire". All the data are now being processed by the team led by Philippe Sarnin, Director of the Social Psychology Department at the University of Lyon2. "The number of responses submitted during the 15 days the form was available on line was very satisfactory. This is a vital factor in ensuring that we are able to build up an accurate pictu...

  10. English for Airport Ground Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes part of a European Commission Leonardo project that aimed to design a multimedia course for English language learners seeking work as ground staff in European airports. The structural-functional analysis of the dialogues written from the course showed that, across the four trades explored (security guards, ground handlers,…

  11. Agency Directionality and Staff Individuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, James C.; And Others

    Psychologists who choose work as members of counseling agencies are likely to experience some dissonance between what their individual interests and skills would have them do professionally and what they are asked to do as a staff member of the agency. Conversely, as a component of a larger institution or community, an agency's very existence may…

  12. Creativity in nursing staff development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, K A; Korte, P D

    1990-01-01

    The use of creative teaching techniques in nursing staff development generates enthusiasm for learning in both the learner and the educator. We report the process used to develop alternative teaching approaches and examples of these programs. A cost analysis of a traditional versus an innovative program is provided. Advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are reviewed.

  13. STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT IN THE ROMANIAN ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen NOVAC

    2016-12-01

    In the activity field where personnel fluctuation can be sometimes overwhelming as in trade marketing, the effectiveness of these processes controls turn-over rate of staff and also provide certainty to employees that they will have access to higher positions by promoting the talents in the organization.

  14. Decadal analysis of deceased organ donation in Spain and the United States linking an increased donation rate and the utilization of older donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorson, Jeff; Roberts, John Paul

    2013-09-01

    After the foundation of the National Transplant Organization, Spanish rates of deceased donor donation rapidly outpaced US growth over the decade from 1989 to 1999. An analysis of the following decade, 1999-2009, demonstrated a markedly flattened growth curve for Spanish deceased donor organ procurement, which increased only 2.4% from 33.6 to 34.4 donors per million population (pmp). In comparison, over the same decade in the United States, the rate of deceased donation increased from 20.9 to 26.3 donors pmp (25.8%). An age group comparison demonstrated a much higher donation rate among older donors in Spain. For example, the number of donors older than 70 years increased from 3.8 to 8.8 pmp (a 132% increase), and they now constitute 25.4% of all Spanish organ donors. In contrast, the number of US donors older than 70 years increased from 1.0 to 1.3 pmp, and they constitute only 4.4% of total deceased donors. Over the same decade, the number of younger donors (15-30 years old) decreased from 6.6 to 2.5 pmp (a 62% decrease) in Spain, and this contrasted with a slightly increased US donation rate for the same age subgroup (a 15.5% increase from 5.8 to 6.7 pmp). Although older donors were more rarely used in the United States, growth in donation over the 2 decades (1989-2009) was strongly associated with the utilization of donors aged 65 or older (P < 0.01). United Network for Organ Sharing regions demonstrated significant differences in utilization rates for older donors. In conclusion, strategies aimed toward achieving US donation rates equivalent to the Spanish benchmark should target improved utilization rates for older donors in the United States instead of emulating elements of the Spanish organ procurement system. © 2013 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  15. Portrait: Yves Sillanoli, Staff Association delegate since 2004

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Yves Sillanoli - Staff Association delegate. I worked at CERN as Contractor’s personnel for 18 years, and in 2003, I became a staff member. By nature, I am someone who enjoys getting involved in associations. For 35 years, I was a member of a sports association in my community. Therefore, for me it was natural to want to reach out and help my colleagues, especially those with professional experiences similar to mine. Moreover, even though both my father and my brother had worked at CERN before me, I really wanted to understand the inner functioning of the Organization. To this end, I decided to run for staff delegate and was elected to the Staff Association in 2004. Joining the Staff Association has been, above all, a chance to meet people: Gianni Deroma, former President of the Staff Association, and Philippe Defert, who passed away in 2013, were great listeners and had a real sense of mutual help. Philippe Defert influenced greatly my decision take part in the Association and, over time, a rema...

  16. CERN to introduce new Local Staff employment category

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    At the June meeting of CERN Council, a new Local Staff employment category was approved. This will cover some 250-300 people in technical and administrative positions between now and 2010, satisfying an urgent need for manpower over the coming years. This article explains the main features of this new category. The Local Staff employment category is an important building block in CERN's new Human Resources Plan, and is essential in the run-up to the LHC. In the immediate future, it will allow some Industrial Services activities to be insourced - corresponding to about 150 additional CERN staff positions. In the longer run, it will allow the Organization to replace more retiring staff members than formerly foreseen - corresponding to 100-150 staff positions. The activities that will lead to Local Staff vacancies were identified at last year's resources planning exercise (the "Morges-III" meetings) as those which could not be outsourced in a Field Support Unit or other type of result-oriented Industrial Serv...

  17. The Staff Association: because you’re worth it

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    A new logo, a new website and now we’re on Facebook: the members of the rejuvenated Staff Association of CERN want to take this opportunity to remind you that the SA is open to everyone. All you have to do is join.   Every ordinary or associated member of the personnel of the Organization and — through GAC-EPA, the CERN-ESO Pensioners’ Association — every retiree, is entitled to join the CERN Staff Association. The goal of the SA is to defend the collective and individual rights of CERN staff members and members of their families, in matters relating to both their material interests and their well-being. With its independant ideas and its constructive work, the SA also plays an important role as a source of new proposals. The more CERN staff members join the Staff Association, the more respect it commands as a social partner. Currently, 1,355 people are members — that’s over half of the total staff. So, why not join? To find out mor...

  18. The effect of carrier gas flow rate and source cell temperature on low pressure organic vapor phase deposition simulation by direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takao; Ueda, Noriaki

    2013-04-01

    The process of low pressure organic vapor phase deposition (LP-OVPD) controls the growth of amorphous organic thin films, where the source gases (Alq3 molecule, etc.) are introduced into a hot wall reactor via an injection barrel using an inert carrier gas (N2 molecule). It is possible to control well the following substrate properties such as dopant concentration, deposition rate, and thickness uniformity of the thin film. In this paper, we present LP-OVPD simulation results using direct simulation Monte Carlo-Neutrals (Particle-PLUS neutral module) which is commercial software adopting direct simulation Monte Carlo method. By estimating properly the evaporation rate with experimental vaporization enthalpies, the calculated deposition rates on the substrate agree well with the experimental results that depend on carrier gas flow rate and source cell temperature.

  19. Effective rate constants and uptake coefficients for the reactions of organic molecular markers (n-alkanes, hopanes, and steranes) in motor oil and diesel primary organic aerosols with hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Andrew T; Miracolo, Marissa A; Hennigan, Christopher J; Robinson, Allen L; Donahue, Neil M

    2009-12-01

    Hydroxyl radical (OH) uptake by organic aerosols, followed by heterogeneous oxidation, happens nearly at the collision frequency. Oxidation complicates the use of organic molecular markers such as hopanes for source apportionment, since receptor models assume markers are stable during transport. We report the oxidation kinetics of organic molecular markers (C(25)-C(32) n-alkanes, hopanes and steranes) in motor oil and primary organic aerosol emitted from a diesel engine at atmospherically relevant conditions inside a smog chamber. A thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (TAG) and Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) were used to measure the changes in molecular comosition and bulk primary organic aerosol. From the measured changes in molecular composition, we calculated effective OH rate constants, effective relative rate constants, and effective uptake coefficients for molecular markers. Oxidation rates varied with marker volatility, with more volatile markers being oxidized at rates much faster than could be explained from heterogeneous oxidation. This rapid oxidation can be explained by significant gas-phase OH oxidation that dominates heterogeneous oxidation, resulting in overall oxidation lifetimes of 1 day or less. Based on our results, neglecting oxidation of molecular markers used for source apportionment could introduce significant error, since many common markers such as norhopane appear to be semivolatile under atmospheric conditions.

  20. Sinking rates and ballast composition of particles in the Atlantic Ocean: implications for the organic carbon fluxes to the deep ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, G.; Karakaş, G.

    2009-01-01

    The flux of materials to the deep sea is dominated by larger, organic-rich particles with sinking rates varying between a few meters and several hundred meters per day. Mineral ballast may regulate the transfer of organic matter and other components by determining the sinking rates, e.g. via particle density. We calculated particle sinking rates from mass flux patterns and alkenone measurements applying the results of sediment trap experiments from the Atlantic Ocean. We have indication for higher particle sinking rates in carbonate-dominated production systems when considering both regional and seasonal data. During a summer coccolithophorid bloom in the Cape Blanc coastal upwelling off Mauritania, particle sinking rates reached almost 570 m per day, most probably due the fast sedimentation of densely packed zooplankton fecal pellets, which transport high amounts of organic carbon associated with coccoliths to the deep ocean despite rather low production. During the recurring winter-spring blooms off NW Africa and in opal-rich production systems of the Southern Ocean, sinking rates of larger particles, most probably diatom aggregates, showed a tendency to lower values. However, there is no straightforward relationship between carbonate content and particle sinking rates. This could be due to the unknown composition of carbonate and/or the influence of particle size and shape on sinking rates. It also remains noticeable that the highest sinking rates occurred in dust-rich ocean regions off NW Africa, but this issue deserves further detailed field and laboratory investigations. We obtained increasing sinking rates with depth. By using a seven-compartment biogeochemical model, it was shown that the deep ocean organic carbon flux at a mesotrophic sediment trap site off Cape Blanc can be captured fairly well using seasonal variable particle sinking rates. Our model provides a total organic carbon flux of 0.29 Tg per year down to 3000 m off the NW African upwelling

  1. Extra-team Connections for Knowledge Transfer between Staff Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanadhan, Shoba; Wiecha, Jean L.; Emmons, Karen M.; Gortmaker, Steven L.; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2009-01-01

    As organizations implement novel health promotion programs across multiple sites, they face great challenges related to knowledge management. Staff social networks may be a useful medium for transferring program-related knowledge in multi-site implementation efforts. To study this potential, we focused on the role of extra-team connections (ties…

  2. Funding Staff Development for School Improvement and Student Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applewhite, Ann Simpson

    1999-01-01

    When Thornton (Colorado) High School organized for site-based management, the structuring committee understood the importance of providing a professional-development fund for staff members. The school decided to restructure with one central umbrella committee for site-based governance and several subcommittees reporting to the main committee. (MLH)

  3. Staff training and development, enhancement of job performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The success of any organization/institution lies on the ability of its workforce to deliver. This ability/skill is acquired through training, which enhances job performance. In essence, the research examined the training and development programmes enjoyed by all senior staff of FUTO library with the aim of finding out its effects ...

  4. Recruitment and quality academic staff selection: the case study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sources from which organizations decide to select personnel from are central to its ability to survive, adapt, and grow (Noe et al, 2004:171). The paper examines a case study of recruitment and selection of quality academic staff into Covenant University. The paper addresses the factors that could affect recruitment ...

  5. Assessment of staff ICT literacy competence in Nigerian federal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discussed information communication technology (ICT) literacy as the relative measure of library staff's capacity to make appropriate use of ICTs for information acquisition, organization, retrieval and dissemination. It also examined the impact of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) literacy on the ...

  6. Staff

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    TÜ teadustöötajaist ja õppejõududest on 2/3 doktorikraadiga. TÜ rektor Jaak Aaviksoo ja teadusprprektor Ain Heinaru valiti Euroopa kõrghariduspoliitika juhtorganitesse. Sotsiaalteaduskonna prof. Wolfgang Drechsler sai Saksa-Eesti akadeemiliste suhete arendamise eest Saksamaa Liitvabariigi Teeneteristi

  7. Strategies for changing negative public attitudes toward organ donation in the People's Republic of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumin, Xie; Woo, Stephanie Mu-Lian; Lei, Zhang

    2013-12-16

    In recent decades, the demand for organ transplantation has risen rapidly worldwide, due to an increased incidence of vital organ failure. However, the scarcity of organs appropriate for transplantation has led to an organ shortage crisis. This article retrospectively reviews strategies to change negative public attitudes toward organ donation in the People's Republic of China. We strongly believe that efforts to publicize knowledge of organ donation, promote family discussions, train medical staff and students, establish incentive systems, and implement regulatory oversight may combat unfavorable Chinese public opinion toward organ donation and transplantation, thus potentially increasing the organ donation rate in the People's Republic of China.

  8. Job satisfaction survey among health centers staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnazi, Hossein; Daniali, Seyede Shahrbanoo; Sharifirad, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Due to the importance of health care organizations with significant responsibility for prevention and care, assessment of job satisfaction among health care staff is essential. Quality of health services will be decreased provided they are not satisfied. This study was a cross-sectional analysis of health care staff in Khomeinishahr (centers, buildings, and networks) If they had at least 6 months work experience, they could enter the study. Data included a two-part questionnaire with a standardized questionnaire, demographic variables, and Smith job descriptive index, which is a questionnaire with six domains. Reliability was obtained for each domain and its validity was reported 0.93. The results showed an overall satisfaction score averages 43.55 ± 12.8 (from 100). Job satisfaction score was not significantly different between the sexes. However, within the current attitude toward job satisfaction, men scores was better than women (P = 0.001). Highest score in job satisfaction was related to relationships with colleagues and lowest score was related to the income, benefits, and job promotion. The more the years of work, the less the job satisfaction was. The attitude toward the current job had a direct relationship with income (P = 0.01). There was a significant inverse relationship between educational level and job satisfaction in domains promotion, income, and benefits (P = 0.01). The staff with higher education levels was less satisfied with income and job promotion qualification. Managers should focus on job qualification to increase job satisfaction and improve the quality of work.

  9. Growth and Survival Rate of Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus Larvae Fed by Daphnia magna Cultured With Organic Fertilizer Resulted From Probiotic Bacteria Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivi Endar Herawati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Daphnia magna is a potential feed for fish. The aim of this research was to find the best treatment and effect of D. magna culture addition from fermented organic fertilizer, to growth and survival rate of Oreochromis niloticus larvae. There were five treatments, each with three repetitions used in the study. All treatments used chicken dung, and different combinations of rice bran, coconut oilcake waste and tilapia larvae. Feeding on tilapia was given by ad libitum method for five times a day until 14 days. Water quality during the research was maintained at temperature 28–29°C, DO 0.3 ppm and pH 8.1–8.2. Observed variables include relative growth rate, survival rate, food consumption rate and water quality. Our results showed that D. magna cultured by fermented organic fertilizer for tilapia larvae (O. niloticus had high significant effect (p < 0.01 on the relative growth rate and survival rate. Treatment of D. magna cultured by 1.2 g/L chicken manure, 0.9 g/L rice bran and 0.3 g/L coconut oilcake showed the highest value on the relative growth rate (10.86%; survival rate (98.46% and food consumption at first week (106.43% and second week (152.76%.

  10. Measures for Assessing the Readiness of Back-office Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devender Maheshwari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—Public organizations deploy state-of-the-art technological advancements to facilitate sophisticated services to the citizens, businesses, and employees. The maturity of backoffice staff to adapt, use, and utilize these technological changes at the organizational level is a prerequisite to introduce cutting-edge services. This paper investigates the maturity of backoffice staff and proposes a conceptual framework, measurement constructs, and subsequent measures for the assessment.Methodology/Design/Research—Design methodology focuses on combining research with practice. An initial framework and measurement constructs are developed based on the literature review, which are further investigated by conducting a case study at Inland Revenue, Karachi to test the usability in practice using the directive content analysis qualitative method.Findings—the outcome of measurement reveals that though the proposed framework and measurement constructs i.e. roles; responsibilities; trainings; capacity building; capabilities; and attitude are relevant and useful to assess the back-office staff readiness, the measures to assess the constructs may vary in practice depending on the size, scope, and type of the public organizations.Research limitations/implications—although the proposed measurement constructs and measures proved to be useful for assessing the back-office staff maturity, the relationships among different measures and constructs affecting the staff readiness require further research.Practical implications—the case study was conducted at single public organization, which will be extended to multiple public organizations in practice. The extension will not to allow effective testing of the usability of the proposed conceptual framework and constructs, but will also broaden the benchmarking scope.Originality/Value—back-office staff education is discussed and described in the literature as well practice, but there is hardly any

  11. Measures for Assessing the Readiness of Back-office Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devender Maheshwari

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—Public organizations deploy state-of-the-art technological advancements to facilitate sophisticated services to the citizens, businesses, and employees. The maturity of backoffice staff to adapt, use, and utilize these technological changes at the organizational level is a prerequisite to introduce cutting-edge services. This paper investigates the maturity of backoffice staff and proposes a conceptual framework, measurement constructs, and subsequent measures for the assessment. Methodology/Design/Research—Design methodology focuses on combining research with practice. An initial framework and measurement constructs are developed based on the literature review, which are further investigated by conducting a case study at Inland Revenue, Karachi to test the usability in practice using the directive content analysis qualitative method. Findings—the outcome of measurement reveals that though the proposed framework and measurement constructs i.e. roles; responsibilities; trainings; capacity building; capabilities; and attitude are relevant and useful to assess the back-office staff readiness, the measures to assess the constructs may vary in practice depending on the size, scope, and type of the public organizations. Research limitations/implications—although the proposed measurement constructs and measures proved to be useful for assessing the back-office staff maturity, the relationships among different measures and constructs affecting the staff readiness require further research. Practical implications—the case study was conducted at single public organization, which will be extended to multiple public organizations in practice. The extension will not to allow effective testing of the usability of the proposed conceptual framework and constructs, but will also broaden the benchmarking scope. Originality/Value—back-office staff education is discussed and described in the literature as well practice, but there is hardly any

  12. Enhancing rock phosphate integration rate for fast bio-transformation of cow-dung waste-paper mixtures to organic fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unuofin, F O; Siswana, M; Cishe, E N

    2016-01-01

    Rock phosphate (RP) addition in cow-dung waste-paper mixtures at rates above 2% P has been reported to increase the rate of bio-transformation and humification of organic waste mixtures during vermicomposting to produce organic fertilizer for organic farming. However, the optimization of RP for vermicomposting was not established. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal amount of RP integration rates for effective bio-transformation of cow-dung waste-paper mixtures. Arrays of RP integration degrees (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, and 4% P as RP) were thoroughly mixed with cow- dung waste-paper mixtures to achieve an optimized C:N ratio of 30 and allowed to vermidegrade following the introduction of earthworms at a stocking mass of 12.5 g-worms kg -1 . The bio-transformation of the waste mixtures was examined by measuring C:N ratios and humification index (HI) and per cent ash and volatile solids. Application of 1% P as RP resulted in fast bio-transformation and maturation of cow-dung waste-paper mixtures. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the morphological properties of the different vermicomposts affected by rates of RP showing the degree of degradation of initial compacted aggregates of cellulose and protein fibres in the mixtures at maturity. A germination test was used to further determine phytotoxicity of the final composts and microbial biomass assessment. The final vermicompost (organic fertilizer) had a C:N ratio of 7, MBC of 900 mg kg -1 and HI of 27.1%. The RP incorporation rate of 1% P of RP investigated is therefore, recommended for efficient vermidegradation and humification of cow-dung waste-paper mixtures. However, higher rates of RP incorporation should be considered where greater P enrichment of the final vermicompost (organic fertilizer) is desired.

  13. Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Incentives to Increase the Rate of Organ Donations from the Living: A Moral Exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Y. Barilan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the morality of schemes of payment to live donors/sellers of organs for transplantation. Following empirical and historical evidence, it is argued that consent to sell organs is substantially different from consent to ordinary business transactions and that legalization of exchanges of organs with financial benefits deviates significantly from the scope of liberal toleration and liberal conceptions of human rights. Although altruistic giving is commendable, it is immoral for society to benefit from them without conferring to the donors benefits such as health and nursing insurance for life. Non-alienable and non-fungible benefits of this kind are moral as incentives to organ donation/giving.

  14. Effects of energy, distance and orientation on electron transfer rates studied by pulse radiolysis in organic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    In the past few years the methods of radiation chemistry in organic media have made an enormous change in how we view electron transfer processes, as these media have proved the most useful for studying long distance electron transfer between molecules. This paper briefly summarizes a few of the aspects of this area and discusses some of the attributes and limitations of radiation tehniques, particularly pulse radiolysis, in organic solvents. 14 refs., 2 figs

  15. An inductively-coupled 64b organic RFID tag operating at 13.56MHz with a data rate of 787b/s

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myny, K.; Winckel, S. van; Steudel, S.; Vicca, P.; Jonge, S. de; Beenhakkers, M.J.; Sele, C.W.; Aerle, N.A.J.M. van; Gelinck, G.H.; Genoe, J.; Heremans, P.L.

    2008-01-01

    A 64b inductively coupled organic RFID tag on foil is demonstrated at 13.56MHz. The digital logic foil comprises 414 pentacene transistors and is powered by a pentacene double half-wave rectifier, connected to an inductive antenna. The data rate is 787b/s with load modulation behind the rectifier

  16. The impact of bullying on health care administration staff: reduced commitment beyond the influences of negative affectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwell, John; Demir, Defne; Parris, Melissa; Steane, Peter; Noblet, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Investigations of workplace bullying in health care settings have tended to focus on nurses or other clinical staff. However, the organizational and power structures enabling bullying in health care are present for all employees, including administrative staff. : The purpose of this study was to specifically focus on health care administration staff and examine the prevalence and consequences of workplace bullying in this occupational group. A cross-sectional study was conducted based on questionnaire data from health care administration staff who work across facilities within a medium to large health care organization in Australia. The questionnaire included measures of bullying, negative affectivity (NA), job satisfaction, organizational commitment, well-being, and psychological distress. The three hypotheses of the study were that (a) workplace bullying will be linked to negative employee outcomes, (b) individual differences on demographic factors will have an impact on these outcomes, and (c) individual differences in NA will be a significant covariate in the analyses. The hypotheses were tested using t tests and analyses of covariances. A total of 150 health care administration staff completed the questionnaire (76% response rate). Significant main effects were found for workplace bullying, with lower organizational commitment and well-being with the effect on commitment remaining over and above NA. Main effects were found for age on job satisfaction and for employment type on psychological distress. A significant interaction between bullying and employment type for psychological distress was also observed. Negative affectivity was a significant covariate for all analyses of covariance. The applications of these results include the need to consider the occupations receiving attention in health care to include administration employees, that bullying is present across health care occupations, and that some employees, particularly part-time staff, may need to be

  17. Systematic Management of Change Is the Key to Successful Staff Development. An Initial Study of the Bloomfield Public Schools Staff Development Project. Teacher Essentials, Styles & Strategies (TESS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celso, Nicholas; Morris, Harold

    Confronted by a maturing staff, lower teacher turnover rates, declining enrollments, and more sophisticated instructional methods, the Bloomfield (New Jersey) Public School District adopted an ambitious staff development initiative in 1983. This paper describes the planning and implementation strategies used to launch Bloomfield's Teaching…

  18. Staff happiness and work satisfaction in a tertiary psychiatric centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, Y; Swartz, M; Sirkis, S; Mirecki, I; Barak, Y

    2013-09-01

    Mental health professionals are at a high risk of burnout. Positive psychology outcomes of staff in acute in-patient psychiatric wards are poorly researched and unclear. To quantify the satisfaction with life and work-life satisfaction of mental health staff at a large university-affiliated tertiary psychiatric centre. We utilized the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) and the Work-Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (WLSQ). Two hundred and nine out of 450 staff members (46%) participated; mean age 48.2 + 9.9 years; 63% were male. On average the participants had been practising their speciality for 21.1 + 9.8 years (range: 2-48). The mean total SWLS scores differed significantly between professions (P happiness were reported by psychologists and social workers, followed by the administrative staff, the psychiatrists and finally the nursing staff. Staff scored the highest for work as a 'calling' followed by work as a 'career' and the lowest rating for work as a 'job'. The mean total WLSQ score differed between professions, (P happiness may contribute to increase in moral and counter burnout.

  19. Rhenium Concentration Variations in the Non-flood Period of the Yangtze River Water and Estimation of the Oxidation Rate of Organic Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, P.; Chen, Y.; Li, S.; Wang, K.

    2017-12-01

    In geological history, the uplift of the Tibet plateau has accelerated the silicate weathering and organic carbon burial at the same time, which made great influence on the global carbon cycle by increasing the carbon sink. Because of the vital connection between tectonic uplift and carbon cycle, more and more attention was casted on rivers originating from orogens. The Yangtze River, as an important large river in the world, is one of them. However, although silicate weathering has been studied thoroughly, researches on organic carbon cycle are much less, and oxidation of fossil organic carbon remained poorly constrained. In this study, we try to use rhenium(Re) as a proxy to estimate the oxidation rate of fossil organic carbon and thus proceed our understanding towards the carbon cycle, the silicate weathering. This is because Re has a close relationship with organic carbon in the sediments and will be released into hydrological network in the mountain river catchments by being oxidized and exist as soluble ReO4-, so that we can use Re concentration in river water to estimate the oxidation rate of organic carbon. We collected water samples from the Yangtze River fortnightly at Banqiao Ferry and the sampling date cover the non-flood period. In this way, we are able to have a rough estimate of the amount of carbon dioxide that released to the atmosphere by the oxidation of organic carbon, using the data of non-flood period we got. We found that Re concentration in Yangtze River ranges approximately from 45 to 85 pmol/L. The rate of organic carbon weathering is estimated using the expression, ΦCO2,fossil=[Re]×runoff×[OC/Re]rock, and according to researches on the black shale of Yangtze River, the value 2.86×106 is chosen as the ratio OC(organic carbon) to Re in the black shale. The result is a really high flux, up to 152×109mol/y, just a little less than of the CO2 consumption rates from silicate weathering which is 191×109mol/y and about 166×109mol/y in non

  20. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Asscociation

    2015-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! Be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will represent you over the next two years and they will without doubt appreciate your gratitude. The voting takes place from the 26th of October to the 9th of November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2015.   Elections Timetable Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 8 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. Candidates for the 2015 elections

  1. Using a nursing productivity committee to achieve cost savings and improve staffing levels and staff satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Erin; Clement, Kristina; Thompson, Elizabeth; Haas, Kathy; Weber, William; Wallace, Michelle; Stauffer, Cindy; Frailey, Jan; Anderson, Aimee; Deascenti, Missy; Hershiser, Lisa; Roda, Patricia Inama

    2011-12-01

    Challenged by rising costs, higher registered nurse vacancy rates and declining staff morale, a Nursing Productivity Committee was formed to analyze productive and nonproductive hours and seek improvements in our staffing models and scheduling processes. The changes implemented led to lower nurse to patient ratios, better control of labor costs, elimination of agency staff, greater staff satisfaction, and introduction of new technologies. Nurse managers, nursing supervisors, and frontline staff are now more knowledgeable and empowered to use creative solutions to manage their budgets and schedules in these times of fluctuating census and varying vacancy rates.

  2. Towards mobile staff members management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encheva, Sylvia

    2017-07-01

    Todays project management requires a number of abilities which involve finding quick solutions to shortage of staff members with possession of specific qualities. When persons with team responsibilities are under pressure or due to various circumstances are unable to perform exhaustive search in databases, an interactive visualization tool can come in quite handy in finding good solutions unforeseen occurrences. In particular we propose application of selected graphs for facilitating mobile human resource management.

  3. Long-term effects of different type and rates of organic amendments on reclamation of copper mine tailing in Central Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Eduardo; Garreton, Bruna; Ginocchio, Rosanna

    2016-04-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the long-term effects of a single application of organic amendments on a copper mine tailings. Seven years after seeding of a mix of herbaceous plant and planting of ten native trees, and the application of organic amendment, plant community and soil fertility was measured in replicated plots that received six different treatments of waste water treatment plant biosolids (100 ton/ha, and 200 ton/ha), olive oil waste (100 ton/ha, and 200 ton/ha) and pisco grapes waste (90 ton/ha, and 200 ton/ha). A control treatment that received no organic amendment was also measured after seven years. Field measurements demonstrated that application of biosolids and pisco grapes waste, at both rates significantly improved vegetation coverage in comparison to the control treatment (80 and 100% vs control, 25%). The high rates of pisco waste had the highest vegetation diversity and survival in comparison to the other treatments. The high rate of olive oil waste had a negative effect on vegetation development in comparison to the control treatment. The application of organic amendment improved soil fertility in the long-term. All the treatments had a significant higher nitrogen concentration in comparison to the control treatment. The high rates of biosolids and pisco grape waste had a significantly effect of soil carbon concentration. Soil macro-aggregate in the high rate of pisco grape waste were also higher than the control, showing a positive relation between soil recover and vegetation development. We can conclude assisted phytostabilization of mine tailings is likely a technically effective solution for the valorisation of organic residues.

  4. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   Global CERN Career paths AA - G 14     Number of seats for fellows representatives Global CERN 5 For more informat...

  5. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 21 September, at noon Start date for receipt of the application Friday 16 October, at noon Closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   ...

  6. From the chronicle of training of Dukovany NPP staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The long way the Dukovany NPP had to go before the plant staff was fully qualified and skilled is described. First the training concept was prepared, then the necessary training facilities were set up, lecturers and instructors were hired and trained, training programmes and training materials were developed, and ultimately the first training course was launched in 1979. A training NPP was constructed and a full-scope simulator of the Dukovany NPP was set up. The current status of organization of NPP staff training by the CEZ utility is highlighted. (author)

  7. CSAIO: exchanging experience to better defend the interests of the staff

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Two representatives of the CERN Staff Association took part in the 15th Annual Conference of Staff Associations of International Organizations (CSAIO), which took place on Thursday 16th and Friday 17th of October in one of the centres of the European Space Agency (ESA) in Frascati (Italy). The CSAIO brings together staff representatives from international organizations based in Europe, as well as institutions of the European Union, in order to promote and defend the interests of their personnel. This allows the CERN Staff Association to follow the evolution of working and social conditions in other organizations. This year, 51 delegates from about 30 organizations travelled to Frascati to attend the conference. Themes addressed at the conference were: Salary adjustment method presentations: European Commission, CERN, European Council, and FICSA (Federation of International Civil Servants’ Association). Performance evaluation presentations: OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and...

  8. Does Finnish hospital staff job satisfaction vary across occupational groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Job satisfaction of staff is an essential outcome variable in research when describing the work environment of successful hospitals. Numerous studies have evaluated the topic, but few previous studies have assessed the job satisfaction of all staff in hospital settings. It is important to discover if there are any unsatisfied groups of people working in hospitals, the aspects they are unsatisfied with and why. The aim of this study was to evaluate job satisfaction of all staff working at a Finnish university hospital, identify differences in job satisfaction between staff groups, and explore the relationship between their self-evaluated quality of work and job satisfaction. Methods Data were collected from 1424 employees of the hospital using the web-based Kuopio University Job Satisfaction Scale survey instrument in autumn 2010. The research data were analysed by using SPSS 19.0 for Windows. Frequency and percentage distributions, as well as mean values, were used to describe the data. A non-parametric test (Kruskal–Wallis test) was used to determine the significance of differences in scores between different groups of staff members and between quality evaluations. Results The overall job satisfaction of the employees was good. They rated both motivating factors of their work and work welfare as excellent. The areas causing most dissatisfaction were work demands and participation in decision making. Physicians formed the most satisfied group, nurses and maintenance staff were the least satisfied, and office and administrative staff were fairly satisfied. Staff who rated the quality of work in their units as high usually also considered their job satisfaction to be excellent. Conclusions Every staff member has an influence on job satisfaction in her/his unit. A culture of participation should be developed and maintained in the units and the whole hospital to ensure that all staff feel they play important roles in the hospital. A university hospital is

  9. National staff exercise in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, L.J.W.M.; Dal, A.H.

    1993-01-01

    In mid 1990, with the implementation of the National Plan for Nuclear Emergency Planning and Response in its final phase, it was decided to conduct a National Staff Exercise (NSE) on 14th November 1991, focused on an accident at the nuclear power plant in Borssele. In preparing the exercise a workplan was developed and a task force was formed. The task force was responsible for implementing all activities listed in the workplan. Approximately 450 persons participated in the exercise, including an extensive control organization. For evaluation purposes several evaluation reports were drawn up. An international group of experts observed the exercise, visited several participating locations and evaluated the performance of participants. In general the exercise was judged as realistic and successful. Both participants as well as controllers expressed opinions that it was a very instructive exercise and the scenario contained enough elements to perform their tasks as well as provide a realistic assessment of the plan and the procedures

  10. Women in the Academy: The Impact of Culture, Climate and Policies on Female Classified Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Carla A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain an understanding of the impact of gendered organizations on female classified staff and their perception of climate and culture on advancement opportunities. The findings shed light on critical factors affecting the work experiences of female classified staff. The findings also offer a variety of ways…

  11. A note on some behavioral aspects of radiation protection staff working in hospitals around Delhi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    A questionnaire was used to collect information concerning radiation protection staff working in hospitals in and around Delhi. The information included the organization of the department, the status and involvement of the radiation protection staff and their performance and job satisfaction. Answers received from departments of Radiotherapy, Radiology and Nuclear Medicine were used to assess the relationship between involvement, performance and job satisfaction. (author)

  12. Creating an Excellent Patient Experience Through Service Education: Content and Methods for Engaging and Motivating Front-Line Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Denise M

    2017-12-01

    Service quality and patient satisfaction affect an organization's value-based payments. This new value paradigm calls for a new approach to service education and training for front-line staff. Thoughtfully conceived, department-specific content, infused with patient feedback, value creation, and science of service quality principles, was developed to give front-line staff a deeper understanding of the impact of their performance on patient experience, value creation, and value-based revenue. Feedback from nearly 1500 trainees in 60 educational sessions delivered over 7 years indicates good understanding of the content and appreciation of the targeted approach. On a 5-point scale ranging from 1 (least effective) to 5 (most effective), trainees' ratings of their understanding of service quality concepts and impact on value ranged from 4.7 to 4.9. Verbatim comments showed a positive impact on staff. Employee feedback suggests that value-based service education may be useful in motivating front-line staff, improving service quality, and creating value.

  13. Knowledge and Attitude of Primary School Staff to Management of Dental Trauma in North-east of Iran in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armita Rouhani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to assess the level of primary Knowledge among school staffs in Iran with regards to the immediate management of dental trauma. Methods: The data, from 160 participants, were collected using questionnaire, which surveyed staff’s background, attitude and knowledge of dental trauma management. Results: The total number of school staff who responded to all of the questions in the questionnaire was 138; the response rate was 86%. 91.3% of the participants had more than 10 years of teaching experience. Only 24 cases (17.4% have participated in training courses in regards to the dental trauma. 46.4% of the participants estimated their level of knowledge regarding the dental trauma as moderate and 42.8% as low and 7.2% without knowledge, however, 56.5% of them were highly interested in attending the training courses. Overall, the teachers’ knowledge on emergency management of the dental trauma cases presented in this study was deficient, especially in avulsed tooth management. Chi-square test showed that there was no statistically significant difference in the responses to the knowledge part of the questionnaire on age, gender, teaching experience and responsibility in school. Conclusion: The present report indicated the lack of knowledge among school staff on dental injuries managements. Organizing educational courses to improve the knowledge and awareness of school staff, as the first encounters of dental trauma in schools, seems necessary.

  14. Study of heterogeneous and homogeneous electron transfer rate constants of some nitrogen containing organic radicals. Master's thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasmeen, S.

    1992-01-01

    In the present work electrochemical (cyclic voltammetric) studies of methyl viologen in THF + H2O at mercury electrode and TEMPOL in three different solvents (DMF, CH3CN and DMSO) at two different platinum electrodes have been carried out at 22.5 C. Heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants for the above two systems have been calculated by using Gileadi's method. Similarly electron spin resonance (ESR) studies have also been carried out in THF + H2O. Comparison of heterogeneous and homogeneous rate constants have also been carried out. The rate constants were calculated in terms of free energy of activation using Marcus formula.

  15. Strategies and best practices for staff renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottingham, C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the strategies and best practices for staff renewal in the electricity sector. Strategic initiatives for staff renewal include strategic recruiting, succession planning, employee relations, knowledge management and strategic partnerships

  16. The Joint Staff Officer's Guide 2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    The Joint Forces Staff College (JFSC) educates staff officers and other leaders in joint operational-level planning and warfighting and instills a commitment to joint, multinational, and interagency teamwork, attitudes, and perspectives...

  17. Attitudes of Nursing Facilities' Staff Toward Pharmacy Students' Interaction with its Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Donna; Gavaza, Paul; Deel, Sharon

    2017-06-01

    All Appalachian College of Pharmacy second-year students undertake the longitudinal geriatric early pharmacy practice experiences (EPPE) 2 course, which involves interacting with geriatric residents in two nursing facilities over two semesters. The study investigated the nursing staff's perceptions about the rotation and the pharmacy students' interaction with nursing facility residents. Cross-sectional study. Academic setting. 63 nursing facility staff. A 10-item attitude survey administered to nursing staff. Nursing staff attitude toward pharmacy students' interaction with geriatric residents during the course. Sixty-three responses were received (84% response rate). Most respondents were female (95.2%), who occasionally interacted with pharmacy students (54.8%) and had worked at the facilities for an average of 6.8 years (standard deviation [SD] = 6.7) years. Staff reported that pharmacy students practiced interacting with geriatric residents and nursing facility staff, learned about different medications taken by residents as well as their life as a nursing facility resident. In addition, the student visits improved the mood of residents and staff's understanding of medicines, among others. Staff suggested that students spend more time with their residents in the facility as well as ask more questions of staff. The nursing facility staff generally had favorable attitudes about pharmacy students' visits in their nursing facility. Nursing facility staff noted that the geriatric rotation was a great learning experience for the pharmacy students.

  18. Classification of Fetal Heart Rate Tracings Based on Wavelet-Transform & Self-Organizing Map Neural Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vasios, G

    2001-01-01

    .... We demonstrate that it is possible to distinguish between healthy subjects and acidemic fetuses by way of wavelet transform analysis of the fetal heart rate recordings and fetal pulse oximetry (FSpO2...

  19. Higher refusal rates for organ donation among older potential donors in the Netherlands: impact of the donor register and relatives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leiden, H.A. van; Jansen, N.E.; Haase-Kromwijk, B.J.; Hoitsma, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The availability of donor organs is considerably reduced by relatives refusing donation after death. There is no previous large-scale evaluation of the influence of the Donor Register (DR) consultation and the potential donor's age on this refusal in The Netherlands. METHODS: This study

  20. Quantifying abortion rates of reproductive organs and effects of contributing factors using time-to-event analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubs, A.M.; Heuvelink, E.; Marcelis, L.F.M.; Hemerik, L.

    2011-01-01

    Time-to-event analysis, or survival analysis, is a method to analyse the timing of events and to quantify the effects of contributing factors. We apply this method to data on the timing of abortion of reproductive organs. This abortion often depends on source and sink strength. We hypothesise that

  1. Staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimova, N.U.; Malisheva, E.Yu.; Shosafarova, Sh.G.

    2010-01-01

    Present article is devoted to staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics. Data on staff radiation exposure obtained during 2005-2008 years was analyzed. It was found that average individual doses of staff of various occupations in Dushanbe city for 2008 year are at 0.29-2.16 mSv range. They are higher than the average health indicators but lower than maximum permissible dose. It was defined that paramedical personnel receives the highest doses among the various categories of staff.

  2. The Staff Association, TREF, Finance Committee and CERN Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    The Staff Association, following its participatory and consensual approach, always tries to find the best possible agreements for the Organization and its staff. For this our main assets are in discussion and consultation with the management, explanatory work and persuasion at TREF, and in other meetings, with delegates from Member States. TREF (Tripartite Employment Conditions Forum), a forum for exchange and discussion "The objective of the Forum is to improve the decision-making process by giving those concerned the opportunity and time to understand fully the positions of all participants." (CERN / RTG / 8) The Tripartite Forum on Employment Conditions (TREF) was created by CERN Council in June 1994 and is composed of representatives of the Member States, the Management and the Staff Association. The forum is tasked with the studies of remuneration and employment conditions at CERN and does not have decision authority. As its name suggests, TREF allows an exchange of views between the th...

  3. Meaningfully incorporating staff input to enhance frontline engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumwasser, Sarah; Virkstis, Katherine

    2015-04-01

    Nurses play a critical role in care transformation. To achieve transformation, frontline staff must be engaged in their work, committed to their organization's mission, and capable of delivering high-quality care. Data from the Advisory Board Survey Solutions show that nurses are both the least engaged and most disengaged among all frontline staff. To identify the most promising opportunities for driving engagement, researchers from The Advisory Board Company analyzed engagement survey responses from more than 343,000 employees at 575 healthcare organizations. This article describes 3 strategies for addressing 1 of the greatest opportunities identified from the data: ensuring that nurses feel that their ideas and suggestions are valued by the organization.

  4. Become a staff delegate: why not you?

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2009-01-01

    Following a decision taken at the Staff Association General Assembly in May 2008, staff delegates are elected in the autumn of odd-numbered years. The next elections which will lead to a total renewal of the Staff Council will thus take place in November 2009. Will you be a candidate?

  5. Get the Staff You Need This Summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Christy L.

    1997-01-01

    Strategies for recruiting camp staff include tailoring messages to the needs and interests of prospective staff; utilizing former staff; hiring older workers; encouraging parents, former campers, and special interest groups to volunteer; and offering competitive pay. Provides an example of a target population (Generation X, born 1963-83) and key…

  6. Strengthening Bullying Prevention through School Staff Connectedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2014-01-01

    The growing concern about bullying and school violence has focused national attention on various aspects of school climate and school connectedness. The current study examined dimensions of staff connectedness (i.e., personal, student, staff, and administration) in relation to staff members' comfort intervening in bullying situations (e.g.,…

  7. Self Efficacy among University Academic Staff

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was no significant difference between teaching staff and professional librarians on collective educators' self efficacy but significant difference existed between male and female academic staff on collective educators' self efficacy. The implication of the result in terms of collaborative work among academic staff was ...

  8. Short Communication Employee -Driven Staff Training and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the concept of staff training and development within the South African context. The changing labour legislation in South Africa makes it mandatory for the employer to provide training and development. However, staff have an important role to play in staff training and development. The paper gives an ...

  9. 13 CFR 400.105 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 400.105 Section 400.105... Board Procedures § 400.105 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director of the Board advises... with respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff, and...

  10. 13 CFR 500.105 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 500.105 Section 500.105... LOAN PROGRAM Board Procedures § 500.105 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director of the... direction with respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff...

  11. 14 CFR 1310.6 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 1310.6 Section 1310.6 Aeronautics... GUARANTEED LOAN § 1310.6 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director advises and assists the Board... administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff, and performs such other duties as the...

  12. Improving Staff Productivity in Mental Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This guide is concerned with productivity measurement and improvement in mental health centers, and focuses on the relationship between service outputs and available clinical staff, i.e., staff productivity. Staff productivity measures are described as useful in identifying existing levels of productivity, making comparisons to determine the…

  13. Perception of library staff on the preservation and conservation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perception of library staff on the preservation and conservation of library resources in the Federal University of Agriculture Library, Abeokuta. ... Availability of fire extinguisher in each unit was rated high as one of the preservative measure in place in the library. The challenges faced were lack of preservation policy as well as ...

  14. Working with Staff Using Baumrind's Parenting Styles Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuis, Hollace Anne

    2012-01-01

    The author's presentation at the staff meeting centered on Diana Baumrind's parenting styles framework (Baumrind, 1967). Baumrind believed that there were four requirements for effective guidance: nurturing, communication, maturity demands, and control. She rated parents on these four dimensions and identified the pattern of parenting that…

  15. Nursing unit managers, staff retention and the work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine M; Roche, Michael A; Blay, Nicole; Stasa, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This paper examined the impact of leadership characteristics of nursing unit managers, as perceived by staff nurses, on staff satisfaction and retention. A positive work environment will increase levels of job satisfaction and staff retention. Nurse leaders play a critical role in creating a positive work environment. Important leadership characteristics of the front-line nurse manager include visibility, accessibility, consultation, recognition and support. Secondary analysis of data collected on 94 randomly selected wards in 21 public hospitals across two Australian states between 2004-2006. All nurses (n = 2488, 80·3% response rate) on the selected wards were asked to complete a survey that included the 49-item Nursing Work Index-Revised [NWI-R] together with measures of job satisfaction, satisfaction with nursing and intention to leave. Subscales of the NWI-R were calculated. Leadership, the domain of interest, consisted of 12 items. Wards were divided into those reporting either positive or negative leadership. Data were analysed at the nurse level using spss version 16. A nursing manager who was perceived to be a good leader, was visible, consulted with staff, provided praise and recognition and where flexible work schedules were available was found to distinguish the positive and negative wards. However, for a ward to be rated as positive overall, nurse leaders need to perform well on all the leadership items. An effective nursing unit manager who consults with staff and provides positive feedback and who is rated highly on a broad range of leadership items is instrumental in increasing job satisfaction and satisfaction with nursing. Good nurse managers play an important role in staff retention and satisfaction. Improved retention will lead to savings for the organisation, which may be allocated to activities such as training and mentorship to assist nurse leaders in developing these critical leadership skills. Strategies also need to be put in place to

  16. Influence of the interface on growth rates in AlN/GaN short period superlattices via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, L. E.; Korakakis, D.

    2011-11-01

    AlN/GaN short period superlattices are well suited for a number of applications including, but not limited to, digital alloys, intersubband devices, and emitters. In this work, AlN/GaN superlattices with periodicities ranging from 10 to 20 Å have been grown via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy in order to investigate the influence of the interface on the binary alloy growth rates. The GaN growth rate at the interface was observed to decrease with increasing GaN thickness while the AlN growth rate remained constant. This has been attributed to a decrease in the decomposition rate of GaN at the hetero-interface as seen in other III-V hetero-structures.

  17. Film mass transfer coefficient for the prediction of volatile organic compound evaporation rate from open water basin

    OpenAIRE

    Charun Bunyakan; Preyaporn Tongsoi; Chakrit Tongurai

    2001-01-01

    The evaporation of volatile organic compounds(VOCs) from treatment, storage, disposal facility(TSDF) is an important air pollution issue because of the evaporation quantity and toxicity and/or carcinogenicity. This paper concerns VOC evaporation from open water basins such as the equalization basin and nonaerate surface impoundments in a wastewater treatment plant. The amount of VOCs evaporation from open water basins can be predicted by using the two-film model that requires two mass transfe...

  18. The operating staff of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, G.; Christ, W.

    1988-01-01

    The training of its staff is one of the pillars of the safe and economical operation of a power plant. This is why power plant owners began to systematically train their staff already in the 50s, and why they created central training facilities. Staff members who have undergone this training make an indispensable contribution to the acceptedly high safety and availability of German power plants. The substantial cost of creating training facilities and of schooling plant staff is considered to be an investment for the future. Low labour turnover permits careful observation and development of staff and leads to a high standard of knowledge and experience. (orig./HSCH) [de

  19. Effects of organic loading rates on reactor performance and microbial community changes during thermophilic aerobic digestion process of high-strength food wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun Min; Lee, Jae Won; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the applicability of single-stage thermophilic aerobic digestion (TAD) process treating high-strength food wastewater (FWW), TAD process was operated at four organic loading rates (OLRs) from 9.2 to 37.2 kg COD/m(3)d. The effects of OLRs on microbial community changes were also examined. The highest volumetric removal rate (13.3 kg COD/m(3)d) and the highest thermo-stable protease activity (0.95 unit/mL) were detected at OLR=18.6 kg COD/m(3)d. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles and quantitative PCR (qPCR) results showed significant microbial community shifts in response to changes in OLR. In particular, DGGE and phylogenetic analysis demonstrate that the presence of Bacillus sp. (phylum of Firmicutes) was strongly correlated with efficient removal of organic particulates from high-strength food wastewater. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Rate of uptake and distribution of Hg in dissolved organic carbon compounds in darkwater ecosystems by ICP-MS and enriched stable isotope spiking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telmer, Kevin; Dario Bermudez, Rafael; Veiga, Marcello M.; Souza, Terezinha Cid da

    2001-01-01

    The role of natural organic acids on mercury binding, transportation, net uptake rates and possibly net methylation rates will be evaluated by tracing these processes with isotope enriched mercury and ICP-MS technology. The correlation between dissolved organic matter and Hg in waters is well documented. It appears that organic acids can react with mercury residing in or emitted from different sources such as soils (particularly hydromorphic soils), laterites, natural degassing, forest fires, fuel combustion, gold mining activities, etc. to form soluble Hg-organo-complexes. The formation of these complexes is believed to greatly enhance Hg transport and be an important preliminary step in the formation of Methyl-Hg and biological uptake. The rates of these reactions and the key organic compounds involved in mercury binding will be determined by reacting isotopically-enriched Hg with samples containing a variety of concentrations and types of organic acids and subsequently analysing both reactants and organisms exposed to the reactants (bioassays) for Hg isotopes by ICP-MS. The Hg spike will allow the precise determination of rates of uptake and the most active agents of uptake. Initially, the method will be used to examine total Hg uptake and distribution but if technological limitations are overcome, this same approach can be used to determine net rates of methylation and net MeHg uptake. After the method is validated the experimental design can be altered to test the relative effects of such things as the addition of CO 2 (pH change), or adding a substrate such as Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides. The addition of synthetic materials such as mulched automobile tires, can also be tested with the goal developing a pragmatic remedial method for Hg containment. Ultimately, this research should contribute to an understanding of mercury mobilization, transport and bio-concentration mechanisms, and provide a basis for developing management and treatment strategies. Emphasis will be

  1. Staff perceptions of community health centre team function in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Jennifer; Muldoon, Laura

    2017-07-01

    To examine perceptions of different staff groups about team functioning in mature, community-governed, interprofessional primary health care practices. Cross-sectional online survey. The 75 community health centres (CHCs) in Ontario at the time of the study, which have cared for people with barriers to access to traditional health services in community-governed, interprofessional settings, providing medical, social, and community services since the 1970s. Managers and staff of primary care teams in the CHCs. Scores on the short version of the Team Climate Inventory (with subscales addressing vision, task orientation, support for innovation, and participative safety), the Organizational Justice Scale (with subscales addressing procedural justice and interactional justice), and the Organizational Citizenship Behavior Scale, stratified by staff group (clinical manager, FP, nurse practitioner [NP], registered nurse, medical secretary, social worker, allied health provider, counselor, outreach worker, and administrative assistant). A total of 674 staff members in 58 of 75 (77%) CHCs completed surveys. All staff groups generally reported positive perceptions of team function. The procedural justice subscale showed the greatest variation between groups. Family physicians and NPs rated procedural justice much lower than nurses and administrators did. This study provides a unique view of the perceptions of different groups of staff in a long-standing interprofessional practice model. Future research is needed to understand why FPs and NPs perceive procedural justice more negatively than other team members do, and whether such perceptions affect outcomes such as staff turnover and health outcomes for patients. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  2. Nursing teamwork, staff characteristics, work schedules, and staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Lee, Hyunhwa

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to explore whether and how staff characteristics, staffing, and scheduling variables are associated with the level of teamwork in nursing staff on acute care hospital patient units. This was a cross-sectional study with a sample of 1,758 nursing staff members from two different hospitals on 38 patient care units who completed the Nursing Teamwork Survey in 2008. This study focused on nursing teams who are stationed on a particular patient care unit (as opposed to visitors to the units). The return rate was 56.9%. The sample was made up of 77.4% nurses (registered nurses and licensed practical nurses), 11.9% assistive personnel, and 7.9% unit secretaries. Teamwork varied by unit and service type, with the highest scores occurring in pediatrics and maternity and the lowest scores on the medical-surgical and emergency units. Staff with less than 6 months of experience, those working 8- or 10-hour shifts (as opposed to 12 hours or a combination of 8 and 12 hours), part-time staff (as opposed to full time), and those working on night shift had higher teamwork scores. The higher teamwork scores were also associated with no or little overtime. The higher perception of the adequacy of staffing and the fewer patients cared for on a previous shift, the higher the teamwork scores. There is a relationship between selected staff characteristics, aspects of work schedules, staffing, and teamwork. Nursing staff want to work where teamwork is high, and perceptions of good staffing lead to higher teamwork. Higher teamwork scores correlated with those who worked less overtime.

  3. Strategies for changing negative public attitudes toward organ donation in the People’s Republic of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumin, Xie; Woo, Stephanie Mu-Lian; Lei, Zhang

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, the demand for organ transplantation has risen rapidly worldwide, due to an increased incidence of vital organ failure. However, the scarcity of organs appropriate for transplantation has led to an organ shortage crisis. This article retrospectively reviews strategies to change negative public attitudes toward organ donation in the People’s Republic of China. We strongly believe that efforts to publicize knowledge of organ donation, promote family discussions, train medical staff and students, establish incentive systems, and implement regulatory oversight may combat unfavorable Chinese public opinion toward organ donation and transplantation, thus potentially increasing the organ donation rate in the People’s Republic of China. PMID:24368880

  4. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral colle...

  5. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 26 September, posters, etc. call for applications Wednesday 26 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the application Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November. In its meeting on 19 September 2011, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges 0.1 to 0.6: Sector Department Career path AA – A – B – C – D Career path E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 18 si&e...

  6. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 13 si&...

  7. Impact of Socioeconomic and Health System Factors on Infant Mortality Rate in Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC: Evidence from 2004 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satar Rezaei

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: infant mortality rate is one of the main health indicators for assessing the health system’s performance over the world. We aim to examine the socioeconomic and health system factors affect infant mortality in OPEC from 2004 to 2013. Methods: was used to examine the effects of some of the key explanatory factors (total fertility rate per women, GDP per capita (current US$, public health expenditure as % of total health expenditure and female labor force participation rate on infant mortality in OPEC from 2004 to 2013.  These data were obtained from World Bank and World Health Organization data bank. Results: our results showed the total fertility rate had a positive and significant impact on infant mortality in the studied period. Also, there are negative significant associations between GDP per capita and public health expenditure with infant mortality. We did not observe any relationship between infant mortality and female labour force participation rate in the studied countries from 2004 to 2013. Conclusion: total fertility rate per women, GDP per capita (current US$, public health expenditure as % of total health expenditure were identified as the main factors affecting on infant mortality in OPEC over the ten years (2004-2013. This study enables health policy-makers to better understand the factors affecting on infant mortality and thereby take necessary steps in managing and decreasing the infant mortality rate in the studied countries.

  8. Workplace incivility and productivity losses among direct care staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Scott; Gates, Donna

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine incivility experienced by direct health care staff in their workplaces. The sample (N = 184) was 91% female and 77% White, with 71% of the participants having earned an associate degree or above and 81% being registered nurses. The Work Limitations Questionnaire and the Incivility in Healthcare Survey were distributed to all direct care staff at a major metropolitan hospital (22% response rate). Correlations were found between workplace incivility from direct supervisors and productivity (r = 0.284, p = .000) and workplace incivility from patients and productivity (r = 0.204, p = .006). Incivility from physicians, incivility from other direct care staff, and general environmental incivility were not shown to be significantly related to productivity. Demographics were not related to levels of workplace incivility. Workplace incivility from patients and management appears to have a greater impact on employees' productivity than workplace incivility from other sources.

  9. Turn to staff for dramatic improvement in wait times, productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Baylor Medical Center in Garland,TX, has been able to drastically reduce ED wait times, as well as the LWBS rate by streamlining the triage process and implementing a staff-driven improvement effort aimed at identifying inefficiencies and replacing them with solutions that work. The result is 11 beds of added capacity just from changes in patient flow. A cross section of volunteers from the ED staff reviewed metrics and devised solutions that they felt would work best to boost efficiency and eliminate bottlenecks. Solutions included letting low-acuity patients move themselves between care settings, freeing the charge nurse from patient care duties so that he or she could oversee patient flow, and empowering physician-nurse teams to see patients more quickly. ED managers say leadership is important, but letting staff drive the improvement process is key to their success.

  10. Response of removal rates to various organic carbon and ammonium loads in laboratory-scale constructed wetlands treating artificial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shubiao; Kuschk, Peter; Wiessner, Arndt; Kästner, Matthias; Pang, Changle; Dong, Renjie

    2013-01-01

    High levels (92 and 91%) of organic carbon were successfully removed from artificial wastewater by a laboratory-scale constructed wetland under inflow loads of 670 mg/m2 x d (100 mg/d) and 1600 mg/m2d (240 mg/d), respectively. Acidification to pH 3.0 was observed at the low organic carbon load, which further inhibited the denitrification process. An increase in carbon load, however, was associated with a significant elevation of pH to 6.0. In general, sulfate and nitrate reduction were relatively high, with mean levels of 87 and 90%, respectively. However, inhibition of nitrification was initiated with an increase in carbon loads. This effect was probably a result of competition for oxygen by heterotrophic bacteria and an inhibitory effect of sulfide (S2) toxicity (concentration approximately 3 mg/L). In addition, numbers of healthy stalks of Juncus effusus (common rush) decreased from 14 000 to 10 000/m2 with an increase of sulfide concentration, indicating the negative effect of sulfide toxicity on the wetland plants.

  11. Toxic effects of chlorinated organic compounds and potassium dichromate on growth rate and photosynthesis of marine phytoplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Kresten Ole; Nyholm, Niels

    1992-01-01

    EC50) were found within relatively narrow ranges of 3.3–7.2 mg/l and 1.5–12 mg/l for DCA and DCP respectively, whereas the sensitivities towards K2Cr2O7 varied much more. The effects of DCA and DCP on the growth rate of some species were also investigated. EC50 values for DCP and DCA were found...

  12. Staff Training for Nanoindustry in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorov Sergey Grigoryevich

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The nanotechnology industry represents such a direction of the development of science, technologies and industries by means of which Russia will be able to achieve advanced positions in the world. For the last decade the necessary regulatory base for nanotech industry development was created in the country, beginning with the concept of nanotechnological works, and the strategy of nanotech industry development, and finishing by the program of nanotech industry development in Russia till 2015. The special place is allocated for education in the field of nanotechnologies and nanomaterials. The system of staff training for nanotech industry is developing very quickly. The departments of nanotechnologies are established almost in all leading higher education institutions of Russia, the institutes of scientific and educational centers as well as the centers of collective use are introduced in the country, the national nanotechnological network is functioning. RUSNANO State Corporation of Nanotechnologies makes significant contribution to the training of innovation staff. The corporation is planning to create at least 100 educational programs of staff training and retraining for the needs of nanotech industry. The fund of infrastructure and educational programs was established in RUSNANO which in 2012 launched the project on creation of training system in the field of nanotechnology in the e-Learning mode. In 2013 the fund created the autonomous non-profit organization “Electronic Education for Nanotech Industry” (“eNano” which became the leading developer of innovative branch educational resources and the operator on rendering educational services for nanotech industry. Since 2011 in RUSNANO there is a School League which set for itself the task to make the contribution to improvement of the situation in teaching naturalscience disciplines at schools. At the same time, according to the results of students enrolment in Russia in 2011-2014, the

  13. Perceptions of staff at Eastern Cape Technikon on the value and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was performed to determine the perceptions of staff at Eastern Cape Technikon on the value and effectiveness of linkage partnerships. Academic staff indicated that the main reason for their involvement in these projects is capacity building. Apart from the development of skills and competencies they also rate ...

  14. Effect of constitution on mass of individual organs and their association with metabolic rate in humans--a detailed view on allometric scaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred J Müller

    Full Text Available Resting energy expenditure (REE-power relationships result from multiple underlying factors including weight and height. In addition, detailed body composition, including fat free mass (FFM and its components, skeletal muscle mass and internal organs with high metabolic rates (i.e. brain, heart, liver, kidneys, are major determinants of REE. Since the mass of individual organs scales to height as well as to weight (and, thus, to constitution, the variance in these associations may also add to the variance in REE. Here we address body composition (measured by magnetic resonance imaging and REE (assessed by indirect calorimetry in a group of 330 healthy volunteers differing with respect to age (17-78 years, sex (61% female and BMI (15.9-47.8 kg/m(2. Using three dimensional data interpolation we found that the inter-individual variance related to scaling of organ mass to height and weight and, thus, the constitution-related variances in either FFM (model 1 or kidneys, muscle, brain and liver (model 2 explained up to 43% of the inter-individual variance in REE. These data are the first evidence that constitution adds to the complexity of REE. Since organs scale differently as weight as well as height the "fit" of organ masses within constitution should be considered as a further trait.

  15. Temperature Shift Experiments Suggest That Metabolic Impairment and Enhanced Rates of Photorespiration Decrease Organic Acid Levels in Soybean Leaflets Exposed to Supra-Optimal Growth Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Sicher

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Elevated growth temperatures are known to affect foliar organic acid concentrations in various plant species. In the current study, citrate, malate, malonate, fumarate and succinate decreased 40 to 80% in soybean leaflets when plants were grown continuously in controlled environment chambers at 36/28 compared to 28/20 °C. Temperature effects on the above mentioned organic acids were partially reversed three days after plants were transferred among optimal and supra-optimal growth temperatures. In addition, CO2 enrichment increased foliar malate, malonate and fumarate concentrations in the supra-optimal temperature treatment, thereby mitigating effects of high temperature on respiratory metabolism. Glycerate, which functions in the photorespiratory pathway, decreased in response to CO2 enrichment at both growth temperatures. The above findings suggested that diminished levels of organic acids in soybean leaflets upon exposure to high growth temperatures were attributable to metabolic impairment and to changes of photorespiratory flux. Leaf development rates differed among temperature and CO2 treatments, which affected foliar organic acid levels. Additionally, we report that large decreases of foliar organic acids in response to elevated growth temperatures were observed in legume species.

  16. Pharmacy staff perceptions and self-reported behaviors related to providing contraceptive information and counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Peter; Aquilino, Mary L; Farris, Karen B

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate pharmacy staff perspectives of a 2-year pharmacy intervention aimed at reducing unintended pregnancy in 18- to 30-year-old women. Pharmacy staff completed a 48-item, self-administered paper survey consisting of scaled and open-ended questions. 55 community pharmacies in 12 Iowa counties. All pharmacy staff participated, including pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, and other pharmacy employees. Online continuing education (CE) training was made available to all pharmacy staff. Promotional materials including posters, brochures, and shelf talkers were displayed in all of the pharmacies. Pharmacy staff perceptions and self-reported behaviors related to displaying posters, brochures, and shelf talkers in their pharmacies and providing contraceptive information and counseling to patients/customers. A total of 192 (43% return rate) pharmacy staff responded. Only 44% of respondents consistently provided contraceptive information and counseling, yet more than 90% felt that talking with patients/customers about contraceptives was easy, and more than 50% could do so privately. The study showed increased pharmacy staff desire to make this topic a priority. Community pharmacy staff can play a key role in educating and counseling young adult women about contraceptive health and pregnancy planning. This study indicates that staff are comfortable providing this service and that patients/customers are open to receiving guidance from pharmacists. However, pharmacy staff are missing additional opportunities to provide information and counseling. There is also a need for greater attention to provision of nonprescription contraceptive education.

  17. Short-term Influence of Two Types of Drilling Fluids on Wastewater Treatment Rate and Eukaryotic Organisms of Activated Sludge in Sequencing Batch Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babko, Roman; Jaromin-Gleń, Katarzyna; Łagód, Grzegorz; Danko, Yaroslav; Kuzmina, Tatiana; Pawłowska, Małgorzata; Pawłowski, Artur

    2017-07-01

    This work presents the results of studies on the impact of spent drilling fluids cotreated with municipal wastewater on the rate of the wastewater treatment process and the structure of the community of eukaryotic organisms inhabiting an activated sludge. The studies were conducted under laboratory conditions in sequencing batch reactors. The effect of added polymer-potassium drilling fluid (DF1) and polymer drilling fluid (DF2) at dosages of 1 and 3% of wastewater volume on the rate of removal of total suspended solids, turbidity, chemical oxygen demand, and the content of total and ammonium nitrogen were analyzed, taking into account the values of these parameters measured at the end of each operating cycle. In addition to the impacts on the aforementioned physicochemical indices, the influence of drilling fluid on the biomass of various groups of eukaryotes in activated sludge was analyzed. The impact of the drilling fluid was highly dependent on its type and dosage. A noticeable slowdown in the rate of the wastewater treatment process and a negative effect on the organisms were observed after the addition of DF2. This effect intensified after an increase in fluid dose. However, no statistically significant negative changes were observed after the introduction of DF1. Conversely, the removal rate of some of the analyzed pollutant increased. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  18. Room-temperature and temperature-dependent QSRR modelling for predicting the nitrate radical reaction rate constants of organic chemicals using ensemble learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Basant, N; Mohan, D; Singh, K P

    2016-07-01

    Experimental determinations of the rate constants of the reaction of NO3 with a large number of organic chemicals are tedious, and time and resource intensive; and the development of computational methods has widely been advocated. In this study, we have developed room-temperature (298 K) and temperature-dependent quantitative structure-reactivity relationship (QSRR) models based on the ensemble learning approaches (decision tree forest (DTF) and decision treeboost (DTB)) for predicting the rate constant of the reaction of NO3 radicals with diverse organic chemicals, under OECD guidelines. Predictive powers of the developed models were established in terms of statistical coefficients. In the test phase, the QSRR models yielded a correlation (r(2)) of >0.94 between experimental and predicted rate constants. The applicability domains of the constructed models were determined. An attempt has been made to provide the mechanistic interpretation of the selected features for QSRR development. The proposed QSRR models outperformed the previous reports, and the temperature-dependent models offered a much wider applicability domain. This is the first report presenting a temperature-dependent QSRR model for predicting the nitrate radical reaction rate constant at different temperatures. The proposed models can be useful tools in predicting the reactivities of chemicals towards NO3 radicals in the atmosphere, hence, their persistence and exposure risk assessment.

  19. The Contribution of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability Following Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Gamma and Proton Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheryl G. Burrell, Ph.D.

    2012-05-14

    The formation of functional tissue units is necessary in maintaining homeostasis within living systems, with individual cells contributing to these functional units through their three-dimensional organization with integrin and adhesion proteins to form a complex extra-cellular matrix (ECM). This is of particular importance in those tissues susceptible to radiation-induced tumor formation, such as epithelial glands. The assembly of epithelial cells of the thyroid is critical to their normal receipt of, and response to, incoming signals. Traditional tissue culture and live animals present significant challenges to radiation exposure and continuous sampling, however, the production of bioreactor-engineered tissues aims to bridge this gap by improve capabilities in continuous sampling from the same functional tissue, thereby increasing the ability to extrapolate changes induced by radiation to animals and humans in vivo. Our study proposes that the level of tissue organization will affect the induction and persistence of low dose radiation-induced genomic instability. Rat thyroid cells, grown in vitro as 3D tissue analogs in bioreactors and as 2D flask grown cultures were exposed to acute low dose (1, 5, 10 and 200 cGy) gamma rays. To assess immediate (6 hours) and delayed (up to 30 days) responses post-irradiation, various biological endpoints were studied including cytogenetic analyses, apoptosis analysis and cell viability/cytotoxicity analyses. Data assessing caspase 3/7 activity levels show that, this activity varies with time post radiation and that, overall, 3D cultures display more genomic instability (as shown by the lower levels of apoptosis over time) when compared to the 2D cultures. Variation in cell viability levels were only observed at the intermediate and late time points post radiation. Extensive analysis of chromosomal aberrations will give further insight on the whether the level of tissue organization influences genomic instability patterns after

  20. An Association Between Implementing Trauma-Informed Care and Staff Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis W. Hales

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite its widespread adoption there is limited research on the influence of trauma-informed care (TIC. The current study examined the impact of implementing TIC on the satisfaction of agency staff by comparing the results of a satisfaction survey taken in January of 2014, a month prior to the agency's implementation of TIC, and again twelve months later. As collaboration, empowerment, and self-care are primary components of a TIC organizational approach, its implementation was expected to increase staff satisfaction. Following the implementation of TIC, agency staff reported higher scores on all but one of the six satisfaction survey factors. Increases in staff satisfaction have been associated with better staff retention rates, increased organizational commitment and better performance. In consequence, TIC implementation is associated with increased staff satisfaction, and may positively influence organizational characteristics of significance to social service agencies.

  1. [Analysis on work related fatigue among prison police and mental medical staffs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jia-Ling; Pan, Kui-Qiong; Liu, Shi-Hua

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the work related fatigue among prison police and mental medical staffs; to compare the social support between two groups; to develop specific intervention strategies in the future. The Chinese Maslach Burnout Inventory (CMBI) and the Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS) were applied to 100 prison police and 100 mental medical staffs respectively. Their status of work related fatigue and relevant social support were analyzed accordingly. 1) The level of fatigue among prison police was higher than mental medical staffs (P prison police were higher than that among mental medical staffs (P 0.05); 3) The level of social support in the prison police was higher than that in the mental medical staffs (P prison police and mental medical staffs were vulnerable to suffering from fatigue. However, the details and relevant social support between these two groups were different. Active intervention should be taken for different occupation.

  2. A simulation-based training program improves emergency department staff communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Lynn A; Warren, Otis; Gardner, Liz; Rojek, Adam; Lindquist, David G

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of Project CLEAR!, a novel simulation-based training program designed to instill Crew Resource Management (CRM) as the communication standard and to create a service-focused environment in the emergency department (ED) by standardizing the patient encounter. A survey-based study compared physicians' and nurses' perceptions of the quality of communication before and after the training program. Surveys were developed to measure ED staff perceptions of the quality of communication between staff members and with patients. Pretraining and posttraining survey results were compared. After the training program, survey scores improved significantly on questions that asked participants to rate the overall communication between staff members and between staff and patients. A simulation-based training program focusing on CRM and standardizing the patient encounter improves communication in the ED, both between staff members and between staff members and patients.

  3. Estimation of organ-absorbed radiation doses during 64-detector CT coronary angiography using different acquisition techniques and heart rates: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubara, Kosuke; Koshida, Kichiro; Kawashima, Hiroko (Dept. of Quantum Medical Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Kanazawa Univ., Kanazawa (Japan)), email: matsuk@mhs.mp.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Noto, Kimiya; Takata, Tadanori; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki (Dept. of Radiological Technology, Kanazawa Univ. Hospital, Kanazawa (Japan)); Shimono, Tetsunori (Dept. of Radiology, Hoshigaoka Koseinenkin Hospital, Hirakata (Japan)); Matsui, Osamu (Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kanazawa Univ., Kanazawa (Japan))

    2011-07-15

    Background: Though appropriate image acquisition parameters allow an effective dose below 1 mSv for CT coronary angiography (CTCA) performed with the latest dual-source CT scanners, a single-source 64-detector CT procedure results in a significant radiation dose due to its technical limitations. Therefore, estimating the radiation doses absorbed by an organ during 64-detector CTCA is important. Purpose: To estimate the radiation doses absorbed by organs located in the chest region during 64-detector CTCA using different acquisition techniques and heart rates. Material and Methods: Absorbed doses for breast, heart, lung, red bone marrow, thymus, and skin were evaluated using an anthropomorphic phantom and radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLDs). Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated helical and ECG-triggered non-helical acquisitions were performed by applying a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute (bpm) and ECG-gated helical acquisitions using ECG modulation (ECGM) of the tube current were performed by applying simulated heart rates of 40, 60, and 90 bpm after placing RPLDs on the anatomic location of each organ. The absorbed dose for each organ was calculated by multiplying the calibrated mean dose values of RPLDs with the mass energy coefficient ratio. Results: For all acquisitions, the highest absorbed dose was observed for the heart. When the helical and non-helical acquisitions were performed by applying a simulated heart rate of 60 bpm, the absorbed doses for heart were 215.5, 202.2, and 66.8 mGy for helical, helical with ECGM, and non-helical acquisitions, respectively. When the helical acquisitions using ECGM were performed by applying simulated heart rates of 40, 60, and 90 bpm, the absorbed doses for heart were 178.6, 139.1, and 159.3 mGy, respectively. Conclusion: ECG-triggered non-helical acquisition is recommended to reduce the radiation dose. Also, controlling the patients' heart rate appropriately during ECG-gated helical acquisition with

  4. High growth rate GaN on 200 mm silicon by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy for high electron mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, M.; Baines, Y.; Bavard, A.; Bouveyron, R.

    2018-02-01

    It is increasingly important to reduce the cycle time of epitaxial growth, in order to reduce the costs of device fabrication, especially for GaN based structures which typically have growth cycles of several hours. We have performed a comprehensive study using metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) investigating the effects of changing GaN growth rates from 0.9 to 14.5 μm/h. Although there is no significant effect on the strain incorporated in the layers, we have seen changes in the surface morphology which can be related to the change in dislocation behaviour and surface diffusion effects. At the small scale, as seen by AFM, increased dislocation density for higher growth rates leads to increased pinning of growth terraces, resulting in more closely spaced terraces. At a larger scale of hundreds of μm observed by optical profiling, we have related the formation of grains to the rate of surface diffusion of adatoms using a random walk model, implying diffusion distances from 30 μm for the highest growth rates up to 100 μm for the lowest. The increased growth rate also increases the intrinsic carbon incorporation which can increase the breakdown voltage of GaN films. Despite an increased threading dislocation density, these very high growth rates of 14.5 μm/hr by MOVPE have been shown to be appealing for reducing epitaxial growth cycle times and therefore costs in High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) structures.

  5. Research staff and public engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    Public engagement plays an important role in the contemporary UK academy, and is promoted through initiatives such as Beacons of Public Engagement and research grant 'Pathways to Impact'. Relatively little is known, however, about academic experiences of such engagement activities. This study...... focuses on one staff group, contract researchers, to explore the perceived challenges and opportunities of public engagement. Qualitative and quantitative data-from a web-based survey and three focus groups-are used to show that, while engagement activities are often seen as rewarding, the challenges...... involved in participating in them are profound. While researchers report practical needs, such as for logistical support or communication training, key barriers relate to the conditions of contract research more generally, and specifically to job insecurity, transiency, and lack of autonomy....

  6. Oxidation and reduction rates for organic carbon in the Amazon mainstream tributary and floodplain, inferred from distributions of dissolved gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, Jeffrey E.; Devol, Allan H.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Victoria, Reynaldo; Riberio, Maria N. G.

    1986-01-01

    Concentrations of CO2, O2, CH4, and N2O in the Amazon River system reflect an oxidation-reduction sequence in combination with physical mixing between the floodplain and the mainstem. Concentrations of CO2 ranged from 150 microM in the Amazon mainstem to 200 to 300 microM in aerobic waters of the floodplain, and up to 1000 microM in oxygen-depleted environments. Apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) ranged from 80 to 250 microM. Methane was highly supersaturated, with concentrations ranging from 0.06 microM in the mainstem to 100 microM on the floodplain. Concentrations of N2O were slightly supersaturated in the mainstem, but were undersaturated on the floodplain. Fluxes calculated from these concentrations indicated decomposition of 1600 g C sq m y(-1) of organic carbon in Amazon floodplain waters. Analysis of relationships between CH4, O2, and CO2 concentrations indicated that approximately 50 percent of carbon mineralization on the floodplain is anaerobic, with 20 percent lost to the atmoshphere as CH4. The predominance of anaerobic metabolism leads to consumption of N2O on the flood plane. Elevated concentrations of CH4 in the mainstem probably reflect imput from the floodplain, while high levels of CO2 in the mainstem are derived from a combination of varzea drainage and in situ respiration.

  7. Study of dosimetric variation due to interfraction organ movement in High Dose Rate Interstital (MUPIT) brachytherapy for gynecologic malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmurugan, Thanigaimalai; Sukumar, Prabakar; Krishnappan, Chokkalingam; Boopathy, Raghavendiran

    2010-01-01

    Ten patients with cancer of uterine cervix who underwent interstitial brachytherapy using MUPIT templates were CT scanned (CT1) using which bladder, rectum and CTV were delineated. The treatment plan PCT1 was generated and optimized geometrically on the volume. CT scan (CT2) was repeated before the second fraction of the treatment CTV and critical organs were delineated. The plan (PCT2) was created by reproducing the Plan PCT1 in the CT2 images and compared with PCT1. Bladder, Rectum and CTV percentage volume variation ranges from +28.6% to -34.3%, 38.4% to -14.9% and 8.5% to -15.2% respectively. Maximum dose variation in bladder was +17.1%, in rectum was up to +410% and in CTV was -13.0%. The dose to these structures varies independently with no strong correlation with the volume variation. Hence it is suggested that repeat CT and re-planning is mandatory before second fraction execution.

  8. Pilot-scale anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste and waste activated sludge in China: Effect of organic loading rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiao; Wang Wei; Shi Yunchun; Zheng Lei; Gao Xingbao; Qiao Wei; Zhou Yingjun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Co-digestion of municipal biomass waste (MBW) and waste activated sludge (WAS) was examined on a pilot-scale reactor. ► System performance and stability under OLR of 1.2, 2.4, 3.6, 4.8, 6.0 and 8.0 kg VS (m 3 d) −1 were analyzed. ► A maximum methane production rate of 2.94 m 3 (m 3 d) −1 was achieved at OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m 3 d) −1 and HRT of 15d. ► With the increasing OLRs, pH values, VS removal rate and methane concentration decreased and VFA increased. ► The changing of biogas production rate can be a practical approach to monitor and control anaerobic digestion system. - Abstract: The effects of organic loading rate on the performance and stability of anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste (MBW) and waste activated sludge (WAS) were investigated on a pilot-scale reactor. The results showed that stable operation was achieved with organic loading rates (OLR) of 1.2–8.0 kg volatile solid (VS) (m 3 d) −1 , with VS reduction rates of 61.7–69.9%, and volumetric biogas production of 0.89–5.28 m 3 (m 3 d) −1 . A maximum methane production rate of 2.94 m 3 (m 3 d) −1 was achieved at OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m 3 d) −1 and hydraulic retention time of 15 days. With increasing OLRs, the anaerobic reactor showed a decrease in VS removal rate, average pH value and methane concentration, and a increase of volatile fatty acid concentration. By monitoring the biogas production rate (BPR), the anaerobic digestion system has a higher acidification risk under an OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m 3 d) −1 . This result remarks the possibility of relating bioreactor performance with BPR in order to better understand and monitor anaerobic digestion process.

  9. Information Systems and Corporate Memory: design for staff turn-over

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Sharp

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available The "information age" is reliant upon the information skill-base of people and the storage and access of complete data. Staff turn-over and "down-sizing" as well as the rate of organisational change places increased pressure on the designers of corporate information systems to keep up with the organizational demands. Especially relevant are the "soft" aspects of the corporate information needs of organizations. The term "corporate memory" is introduced to explain the relatively informal collective and individual knowledge of employees gained through their experience and position in the organization. This paper elaborates the issues concerned with the "corporate soft data", and makes suggestions for research, as well as for planners of corporate information systems in organizations facing major down-sizing or related changes. It is concluded that there are a number of readily obtainable sources of soft data in the organization and these data should be analysed for inclusion in system development. If organizations are to become learning systems and not just keep repeating the same mistakes, they need to review all aspects of corporate memory, especially the soft data sources and losses.

  10. The operational staff during exercise RESUME-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, J. [Jensen Consult, Virum (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    With more than 100 participants entering the exercise RESUME-95 the Exercise Planning Committee decided to establish an operational staff named Directing Staff (DISTAFF) to ensure that the exercise plan was followed, the planned activities were carried out and to intervene if anything went wrong. In general the duties of the operational staff involve tasks such as secretarial assistance, keeping log of the progress of the situation and gathering, updating and distributing information on all aspects of the situation. Throughout the entire event it is the staff`s responsibility to keep a general view of the current situation and to make the necessary plans for the progress of the situation based on the available information. Furthermore the staff should ensure necessary contact to the public and to the media. (au).

  11. Job Satisfaction Of Hospital Nursing Staff

    OpenAIRE

    Charlotte Pietersen

    2005-01-01

    Health care managers realize that job satisfaction impacts on nursing staff retention. This study examined the job satisfaction of nursing staff (N = 109) at a government hospital. Just more than half of the respondents were generally satisfied. Feelings that nursing is worthwhile and satisfying, and financial stability at the hospital could promote staff retention. Specific intrinsic - (promotion), and extrinsic factors (routinization, working conditions, pay, interaction with supervisors, a...

  12. The staff regulations of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Following the first comprehensive review of the Provisional Staff Regulations conducted by the Secretariat, the Board of Governors approved on 12 June 2002 amendments to the Provisional Staff Regulations including the removal of the attribute 'provisional' from their title. The revised Staff Regulations of the Agency are set forth in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. There is a subject index at the end of the document

  13. The relationship between empowerment and effectiveness of staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effectiveness is one of the management concepts considered and studied always by management scientists and experts. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different dimensions of empowerment (servicing staff, staff monitoring, consulting staff, and training staff) on dimensions of effectiveness of staff (staff ...

  14. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows: as from 1 April 2003 • Article R II 1.19 - Types and duration of contracts of staff members (page 15) as from 1 July 2003 Implementation of the category of local staff members Copies of this update are available in the divisional secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  15. Job Satisfaction Of Hospital Nursing Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Pietersen

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Health care managers realize that job satisfaction impacts on nursing staff retention. This study examined the job satisfaction of nursing staff (N = 109 at a government hospital. Just more than half of the respondents were generally satisfied. Feelings that nursing is worthwhile and satisfying, and financial stability at the hospital could promote staff retention. Specific intrinsic - (promotion, and extrinsic factors (routinization, working conditions, pay, interaction with supervisors, and organizational support could impact negatively on retention. Management should use these findings as a basis for staff consultation, developmental strategies, and interventions. Future research on other nursing populations is recommended.

  16. Coping patterns in special school staff: demographic and organizational factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Dudenhöffer, S; Claus, M; Kimbel, R; Letzel, S; Rose, D-M

    2016-03-01

    Teachers' mental health is commonly discussed in organizational health studies, but studies in special schools are rare. Work-related coping and experience patterns (WCEPs) have been shown to be associated with mental health and intentions to leave. The influence of organizational factors on coping patterns has not been examined. To assess the distribution of WCEPs in special school staff and to identify potential influencing factors. We surveyed a sample of teachers and educational staff in 13 German special schools using the WCEP questionnaire and COPSOQ (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire). Of 245 teachers and 417 educational staff contacted, 114 teachers (47%) and 252 educational staff (60%) responded, an overall response rate of 55% (366/662). Coping patterns of special school staff were classified as unambitious (30%), excessively ambitious (7%), resigned (17%), healthy-ambitious (12%) or unclassifiable (34%). Furthermore we found several significant relations with demographic and organizational factors. For example, the resigned pattern is associated with age [Exp(B) 1.12; 95% CI 1.05-1.19], emotional demands [Exp(B) 1.07; 95% CI 1.01-1.12], work-family conflict [Exp(B) 1.07; 95% CI 1.03-1.10] and bullying [Exp(B) 1.04; 95% CI 1.00-1.08]. Since emotional and social factors are associated with risky (excessively ambitious or resigned) and unambitious coping patterns in special school teachers and educational staff, interventions should focus on them. Further research could explore causal relations and observe the development of coping styles over time. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Preliminary Studies to Characterize the Temporal Variation of Micronutrient Composition of the Above Ground Organs of Maize and Correlated Uptake Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Vilaça Martins

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of agronomic practices and the use of high technology in field crops contributes for significant increases in maize productivity, and may have altered the dynamics of nutrient uptake and partition by the plant. Official recommendations for fertilizer applications to the maize crop in Brazil and in many countries are based on critical soil nutrient contents and are relatively outdated. Since the factors that interact in an agricultural production system are dynamic, mathematical modeling of the growth process turns out to be an appropriate tool for these studies. Agricultural modeling can expand our knowledge about the interactions prevailing in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. The objective of this study is to propose a methodology for characterizing the micronutrient composition of different organs and their extraction, and export during maize crop development, based on modeling nutrient uptake, crop potential evapotranspiration and micronutrient partitioning in the plant, considering the production environment. This preliminary characterization study (experimental growth analysis considers the temporal variation of the micronutrient uptake rate in the aboveground organs, which defines crop needs and the critical nutrient content of the soil solution. The methodology allowed verifying that, initially, the highest fraction of dry matter, among aboveground organs, was assigned to the leaves. After the R1 growth stage, the largest part of dry matter was partitioned to the stalk, which in this growth stage is the main storage organ of the maize plant. During the reproductive phase, the highest fraction of dry matter was conferred to the reproductive organs, due to the high demand for carbohydrates for grain filling. The micronutrient (B, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn content follows a power model, with higher values for the initial growth stages of development and leveling off to minimum values at the R6 growth stage. The proposed model

  18. Environmental Performance Information Use by Conservation Agency Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardropper, Chloe Bradley

    2018-04-01

    Performance-based conservation has long been recognized as crucial to improving program effectiveness, particularly when environmental conditions are dynamic. Yet few studies have investigated the use of environmental performance information by staff of conservation organizations. This article identifies attitudinal, policy and organizational factors influencing the use of a type of performance information-water quality information-by Soil and Water Conservation District staff in the Upper Mississippi River Basin region. An online survey (n = 277) revealed a number of important variables associated with greater information use. Variables included employees' prosocial motivation, or the belief that they helped people and natural resources through their job, the perceived trustworthiness of data, the presence of a U.S. Clean Water Act Total Maximum Daily Load standard designation, and staff discretion to prioritize programs locally. Conservation programs that retain motivated staff and provide them the resources and flexibility to plan and evaluate their work with environmental data may increase conservation effectiveness under changing conditions.

  19. Physiotherapist's role in the NASF: perception of coordinators and staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Cristina Braghini

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The work process in the Nucleus of Support for Family Health (NASF assumes the integration of its professionals with the family health staff. Objective: To present the perceptions of staff, coordinators of the Family Health Centers (CSF of reference, and NASF about the physiotherapist's role in the centers. Methods: This is a qualitative research guided by the case study method. The studied population was composed of the four coordinators of the CSF, the general coordinator of the centers, and eight members of NASF staff. Data collection consisted of semi-structured interviews with coordinators and focal group for the staff members. Data was analyzed using thematic content analysis. Results: The physiotherapist's role at NASF consists of actions about health education and disease prevention, organization and management of the flow of users with rehabilitation demand, prevention and treatment of occupational diseases and the development of complementary and integrative practices. The existence of obstacles in the work process of physiotherapists at NASF as disjointed planning of the Family Health Strategy (FHS and the prioritization of health rehabilitation activities was also highlighted. Conclusion: It is evident that the physiotherapist at NASF has an important role with the health teams, regarding the attention to demands of the municipality; however, the need to consolidate the matrix support and the collective action planning became evident.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF PROPOSALS ON RATING EVALUATION OF SELF-REGULATING ORGANIZATIONS OF ARBITRATION MANAGERS AND RELEVANT INDICATORS FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Alferov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with topical issues of the effectiveness of self-regulatory organizations of arbitration managers (SRO AU and the arbitration managers playing a key role in the bankruptcy law and financial restructuring of Russian enterprises. Despite the increasing demands imposed on the arbitration managers, professionalism and quality of their work remains low, the number of administrative offenses is not reduced. The article discusses various approaches to build-rated activities of CPO AU and the corresponding figures for the implementation of the evaluation.

  1. Mapping growth and mortality rates of crevice-dwelling organisms onto a perforated surface: The relevance of `cover' to the carrying capacity of natural and artificial habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caddy, J. F.; Stamatopoulos, C.

    1990-07-01

    A theoretical basis is suggested for examining habitat limitations of artificial surfaces for population enhancement of crevice-dwelling, or territorial organisms such as reef fish or lobsters, that takes into account known growth and mortality rates. This approach is compared with the crevice frequency at size in a 'natural' substrate, which, it is assumed, corresponds to fractal expectation. With naturally dissected surfaces, fractal expectation predicts that crevice availability declines with size, so that a 'bottleneck', limits the population of larger-sized individuals, but that natural mortality, or rate of loss of individuals displaced from crevices, will also decline with age. The paper considers a surface perforated with circular niches of a limited number of discrete radii, distributed at random over a surface, without overlap, and considers what is the size frequency of hole radii needed to complete the life history of an infaunal organism with a given mortality and growth schedule, and a constant occupancy rate. Determining a priori crevice frequency at size before constructing an artificial surface, and for a given packing density, distributing the crevices over it in two dimensions, is referred to as 'mapping' the growth and mortality rates onto the surface. Sample calculations are described either for continuous recruitment or where recruitment occurs as a 'pulse' during a specific season, and subsequent cohort growth obeys a common scheduling. It is shown that fractal surfaces limit the production of larger individuals unless migration intervenes, but are more suitable for recruitment enhancement. Using units with a limited size range of perforations is biologically inefficient, and depends on natural recruitment elsewhere for stock replenishment by migration. These calculations are relevant to the design of artificial surfaces, throw light on mechanisms limiting productivity of dissected surfaces, and point to effects of individual niche size on

  2. Pulsed-dose-rate peri-operative brachytherapy as an interstitial boost in organ-sparing treatment of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Serkies

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate peri-operative multicatheter interstitial pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDR-BT with an intra-operative catheter placement to boost the tumor excision site in breast cancer patients treated conservatively. Material and methods: Between May 2002 and October 2008, 96 consecutive T1-3N0-2M0 breast cancer patients underwent breast-conserving therapy (BCT including peri-operative PDR-BT boost, followed by whole breast external beam radiotherapy (WBRT. The BT dose of 15 Gy (1 Gy/pulse/h was given on the following day after surgery. Results: No increased bleeding or delayed wound healing related to the implants were observed. The only side effects included one case of temporary peri-operative breast infection and 3 cases of fat necrosis, both early and late. In 11 patients (11.4%, subsequent WBRT was omitted owing to the final pathology findings. These included eight patients who underwent mastectomy due to multiple adverse prognostic pathological features, one case of lobular carcinoma in situ, and two cases with no malignant tumor. With a median follow-up of 12 years (range: 7-14 years, among 85 patients who completed BCT, there was one ipsilateral breast tumor and one locoregional nodal recurrence. Six patients developed distant metastases and one was diagnosed with angiosarcoma within irradiated breast. The actuarial 5- and 10-year disease free survival was 90% (95% CI: 84-96% and 87% (95% CI: 80-94%, respectively, for the patients with invasive breast cancer, and 91% (95% CI: 84-97% and 89% (95% CI: 82-96%, respectively, for patients who completed BCT. Good cosmetic outcome by self-assessment was achieved in 58 out of 64 (91% evaluable patients. Conclusions : Peri-operative PDR-BT boost with intra-operative tube placement followed by EBRT is feasible and devoid of considerable toxicity, and provides excellent long-term local control. However, this strategy necessitates careful patient selection and histological confirmation

  3. Optimization of Inter-Row Spacing and Nitrogen Rate for the Application of Vision Guided Inter-Row weeding in Organic Spring Cereals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melander, Bo; Green, O.; Znova, L.

    2016-01-01

    spacing can make enough room for implementing automatically steered inter-row hoeing. Experiences from practice have shown that camera-based steering systems can guide a hoe blade accurately in a 20-25 cm wide inter-row space. The steering systems have also improved work rates by increasing implement...... width and forward speeds and the technology is gradually being employed on an increasing number of organic farms. Growers claim that crop injuries are negligible and weeding effectiveness against problematic weed species has improved compared with weed harrowing. However, the cereal cropping system has...... increasing row spacing was important for preserving crop yields. The best results in terms of weeding effectiveness and crop yield were achieved with 15 and 20 cm row spacing and high N rate; most evident in spring barley. It was seen that the traditional ‘Ducksfoot’ blade is not an optimal solution...

  4. Evaluating the implementation of a multicomponent asthma education program for Head Start staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruvalcaba, Elizabeth; Chung, Shang-En; Rand, Cynthia; Riekert, Kristin A; Eakin, Michelle

    2018-03-15

    Asthma disproportionately affects minority groups, low income populations, and young children under 5. Head Start (HS) programs predominantly serve this high-risk population, yet staff are not trained on asthma management. The objective of this study was to assess a 5-year, multicomponent HS staff asthma education program in Baltimore City HS programs. All HS programs were offered annual staff asthma education by a medical research team that included didactic lectures and hands-on training. Attendees received continuing education credits. HS staff were anonymously surveyed on asthma knowledge and skills and asthma medication management practices in Year 1 (preimplementation) and Year 5. There was an estimated response rate of 94% for Year 1 and 82% for Year 5. Compared to staff in Year 1, Year 5 staff were significantly more likely to report they had very good knowledge and skills related to asthma [odds ratio (OR) 1.63; p staff reported higher self-assessed knowledge and skills, self-reports of asthma medication management practices, and self-reports of asthma activities compared to Year 1 staff. HS serves high-risk children with asthma, and a multicomponent program can adequately prepare staff to manage asthma in the child care setting. Our results indicate the feasibility of providing efficacious health skill education into child care provider training to reduce asthma knowledge gaps.

  5. Effects of different types and rates of organic manures on Egyptian broomrape (Orobanche aegyptiaca Perss. control in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Orooji

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effect of different types and rates of animal manure and spent mushroom compost on controlling Egyptian broomrape (Orobanche aegyptiaca Perss. in tomato (Mill. Lycopersicon esculentum, two studies were conducted on randomized complete block design with three replications at Research green house, College of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad and Nemooneh field of Astane Ghods Razavi during two years of 2009 and 2010. Greenhouse study treatments were consist of poultry, cow, sheep manure and spent mushroom compost, which each one applied at four rates (10, 20, 30 and 40 t.ha-1. Field experiment treatments were included of poultry, cow and sheep manure that each one applied at two rates (20 and 40 t.ha-1. Result of the greenhouse study indicated that poultry manure significantly reduced orobanch infestation and increase tomato dry weight compared to control. But in the field experiment, the maximum fruit yield (68 t.ha-1 with the minimum orobanch dry weight were obtained with sheep manure. The effect of cow manure was similar to poultry manure in all measured traits. In the field study, rates of manure application had no significant effect on orobanch fresh and dry weights. The findings indicated that all treatments of animal manure reduced orobanch infestation. But the mechanism of orobanch growth suppression due to animal manures application is unknown. It seems fermentation of different organic matters can produced heat and the resulting toxic compounds such as certain organic acids, ammonia and ammonium salts that may reduce orobanch growth at proper concentrations.

  6. Staff Group Trainer: Development of a Computer-Driven, Structured, Staff Training Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koger, Milton

    1998-01-01

    .... The project produced two training support packages (TSP)--battalion and brigade--designed to train these staffs to more effectively and efficiently communicate within and between staff sections, command post, and the unit commander...

  7. Drug abuse staff and clients smoking together: A shared addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guydish, Joseph; Le, Thao; Campbell, Barbara; Yip, Deborah; Ji, Suzhe; Delucchi, Kevin

    2017-05-01

    Smoking is endemic in drug abuse treatment populations, and smoking prevalence in this population appears unresponsive to existing tobacco control strategies. Clinical and policy guidelines encourage programs to address smoking among clients, and research has identified key barriers to doing so. This report explores the practice of staff and clients smoking together in drug treatment programs, and how this practice is associated with other tobacco-related measures. Clients (N=1113) were surveyed and program directors were interviewed in a national sample of 24 drug abuse treatment programs affiliated with the NIDA Clinical Trials Network. Clients were asked whether they observed staff and clients smoking together in their program and, using program as the unit of analysis, this measure was tested for its association with client-level and program-level tobacco-related outcomes. Higher rates of staff and client smoking together were associated with higher staff smoking prevalence (p=0.006), lower rates of client thoughts about quitting in the next 30days (p=0.027), more negative client attitudes toward quitting smoking (p=0.004), and with clients receiving fewer tobacco-related services (p=0.024). These findings illuminate an actionable, low cost policy intervention to address smoking in drug abuse treatment, which is to prohibit the practice of staff smoking together with clients. In the interest of the health of clients whom they serve, counselors, program directors, state regulatory agencies, and federal funding agencies should act to end this practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Examining the temporal relationship between psychological climate, work attitude, and staff turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R.; Hunter, Brooke D.

    2012-01-01

    Relative to the broader industrial-organizational (I-O) psychology field, research on the turnover of substance use disorder (SUD) treatment staff is in its infancy. Despite its long and rich history, recent reviews of the turnover literature within I-O psychology have noted there remains considerable room for improvement. In particular, recommendations have been made for research that considers time in the turnover process and explores more distal causes of staff turnover. Addressing these gaps, this paper examined the temporal relationship between latent measures of psychological climate, work attitude, and staff turnover. Using data from 95 SUD treatment staff clustered within 29 treatment organizations, multilevel discrete-time survival analyses revealed that a latent measure of work attitude (e.g., job satisfaction, pay satisfaction, turnover intentions) fully mediated the temporal relationship between latent measures of psychological climate (e.g., supervisor support, coworker support, role conflict) and subsequent staff turnover. PMID:22658290

  9. Accident and emergency staff's perceptions of deliberate self-harm: attributions, emotions and willingness to help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Nadine; Barrowclough, Christine

    2005-06-01

    The study applied Weiner's (1980, 1986) attributional model of helping behaviour to Accident and Emergency (A&E) staff's care of patients presenting with deliberate self-harm. It was hypothesized that where staff attributed precipitants of the act of deliberate self-harm to controllable, internal, and stable patient factors, then staff would display greater negative affect, less optimism, and less willingness to help the patient. Using four hypothetical scenarios in a two-factor between-subjects design, contextual factors describing a self-harm patient were manipulated. Participants were 89 A&E medical and nursing staff. They were asked to rate attributions for the cause of the deliberate self-harm and their emotional responses, optimism for change, and willingness to help change the behaviour. Their general attitudes towards deliberate self-harm patients and perceived needs for training in the care of these patients were also assessed. The findings were consistent with Weiner's attributional model of helping. The greater attributions of controllability, the greater the negative affect of staff towards the person, and the less the propensity to help. The higher the ratings of stability of outcome, the less staff optimism for the success of their input. Male staff and medical staff had more negative attitudes, and medical staff saw less need for further training. Formulating A&E staff's responses to deliberate self-harm using a cognitive-emotional model offers the possibility of working with staffs' beliefs, emotions, and behaviour to improve the care and treatment of deliberate self-harm patients.

  10. Long-Term Impact of Universal Contact Precautions on Rates of Multidrug-Resistant Organisms in ICUs: A Comparative Effectiveness Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, E Yoko; Cohen, Bevin; Jia, Haomiao; Larson, Elaine L

    2018-03-22

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the impact of universal contact precautions (UCP) on rates of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) in intensive care units (ICUs) over 9 years DESIGN Retrospective, nonrandomized observational study SETTING An 800-bed adult academic medical center in New York City PARTICIPANTS All patients admitted to 6 ICUs, 3 of which instituted UCP in 2007 METHODS Using a comparative effectiveness approach, we studied the longitudinal impact of UCP on MDRO incidence density rates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. Data were extracted from a clinical research database for 2006-2014. Monthly MDRO rates were compared between the baseline period and the UCP period, utilizing time series analyses based on generalized linear models. The same models were also used to compare MDRO rates in the 3 UCP units to 3 ICUs without UCPs. RESULTS Overall, MDRO rates decreased over time, but there was no significant decrease in the trend (slope) during the UCP period compared to the baseline period for any of the 3 intervention units. Furthermore, there was no significant difference between UCP units (6.6% decrease in MDRO rates per year) and non-UCP units (6.0% decrease per year; P=.840). CONCLUSION The results of this 9-year study suggest that decreases in MDROs, including multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli, were more likely due to hospital-wide improvements in infection prevention during this period and that UCP had no detectable additional impact. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;1-7.

  11. School climate: perceptual differences between students, parents, and school staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Christine M.; Spira, Adam P.; Parisi, Jeanine M.; Rebok, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that school climate can have a great impact on student, teacher, and school outcomes. However, it is often assessed as a summary measure, without taking into account multiple perspectives (student, teacher, parent) or examining subdimensions within the broader construct. In this study, we assessed school climate from the perspective of students, staff, and parents within a large, urban school district using multilevel modeling techniques to examine within- and between-school variance. After adjusting for school-level demographic characteristics, students reported worse perceptions of safety and connectedness compared to both parent and staff ratings (all p climate ratings within a school. Understanding how perceptions differ between informants can inform interventions to improve perceptions and prevent adverse outcomes. PMID:28642631

  12. An Epidemiological Approach to Staff Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamis, Edna

    This paper describes a conceptual model of staff burnout in terms of independent, intervening and dependent variables. Staff burnout is defined, symptoms are presented, and the epidemiological approach to burnout is descussed. Components of the proposed model, which groups determinants of mental health into three domains, consist of: (1)…

  13. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M. W. J.; Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; Bosman, Anna M. T.; Jahoda, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Background: A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about dealing with incidents and limit physical risk of…

  14. 20 CFR 638.801 - Staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff training. 638.801 Section 638.801 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Administrative Provisions § 638.801 Staff training. The...

  15. The Support Needs of Staff Developers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, David J.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a study conducted at an annual staff development conference to determine the needs of professional staff developers in British higher education. An overview of the research strategy, which was based on an action research model, is provided; the ranking of needs areas is discussed; and needs statements with justifications are appended.…

  16. Gaming: a creative strategy for staff education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartzendruber, D

    1994-02-01

    Providing staff development in a stimulating, innovative manner is the challenge of all nurse educators. This article discusses gaming, a creative teaching strategy that can help meet these needs. Games designed specifically for the education of dialysis staff will be reviewed. Advantages of the various games will also be examined.

  17. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background - A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about

  18. An Ivory Staff Terminal from Alcester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Heslop

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Alcester staff terminal is an outstanding example of late Anglo-Saxon carving on a small scale. It was supposedly discovered in 1873 in the garden of the rectory at Alcester (Warwickshire and comes from a pastoral staff that would have belonged to a bishop or abbot. This article contains a 3D visualisation of the terminal.

  19. Quality Control in Child Care Staff Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Merwin R.

    1975-01-01

    This paper focuses on the process of staff selection of child care staff at a residential treatment center for children, ages 8-16. Phases of candidate selection, an "open-door" interview procedure, the orientation of hired candidates and the agency's philosophy, procedures and practices are discussed. (GO)

  20. Staff attitudes towards patients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendsborg, Per; Bratbo, Johanne; Dannevang, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Stigmatizing attitudes have been reported in international studies among staff in psychiatry. The authors wanted to investigate if this was the case in Denmark.......Stigmatizing attitudes have been reported in international studies among staff in psychiatry. The authors wanted to investigate if this was the case in Denmark....