WorldWideScience

Sample records for staff inclusion attitudes

  1. Measuring Attitudes toward Inclusive Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczenski, Felicia L.

    1992-01-01

    Developed scale to measure attitudes toward inclusive education, in which disabled students are responsibility of regular teacher supported by specialists. Administered scale to 301 elementary and secondary teachers and to 144 undergraduate elementary education majors. Analysis yielded four discrete dimensions of inclusive education with…

  2. Inclusion in the East: Chinese Students' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, Olli-Pekka; Savolainen, Hannu

    2008-01-01

    A sample of 523 Chinese university students was given a questionnaire on their attitudes towards the inclusion of children with disabilities into regular classrooms. Factor analysis, analysis of variance, t-test and correlations were used to assess the respondents' general attitude towards inclusion, the factor structure of the attitudes, the…

  3. Staff attitudes towards patients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendsborg, Per; Bratbo, Johanne; Dannevang, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Stigmatizing attitudes have been reported in international studies among staff in psychiatry. The authors wanted to investigate if this was the case in Denmark.......Stigmatizing attitudes have been reported in international studies among staff in psychiatry. The authors wanted to investigate if this was the case in Denmark....

  4. Irish Mathematics Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitty, Elaine; Clarke, Marie

    2012-01-01

    This paper through the theoretical framework of constructive attitude theory explores mathematics teachers' attitudes and pedagogical strategies with reference to inclusive practice. The authors argue that though teachers may have formed positive inclusive attitudes, the translation of these into practice does not always occur and poses…

  5. Elementary supervision and the supervisor: Teacher attitudes and inclusive education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Ryan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence has emerged which suggests that as a supervisor, the importance of knowing oneself, and knowing those that he or she is supervising, is vital to the success of the group. We argue that when conflicting values, attitudes, and beliefs are present amongst the members of the group over an issue (inclusion, or over the behaviours of a member (non-inclusive, the entire group can break down. Therefore, to successfully implement a program, such as inclusion, knowing the attitudes of the staff is vital as a program such as this cannot be successful without positive support.

  6. Secondary General Education Teachers' Attitudes toward Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Valerie A.

    2014-01-01

    Since the inception of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, educators have struggled with including students with disabilities in the general education classroom with their nondisabled peers. The inclusion educational model was utilized in this study to explore secondary teachers' attitudes toward inclusive educational…

  7. Attitudes of German Student Teachers on Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baar, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The contribution discusses attitudes of German Teacher Training Students on Inclusion based on an empirical analysis containing three elements: Evaluation of students' written exams, results of a survey with closed as open questions and the interpretation of group discussions among students about inclusion. One can see that, though the found-out…

  8. Open educational resources: staff attitudes and awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Rolfe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Attitudes are changing in education globally to promote the open sharing of educational courses and resources. The aim of this study was to explore staff awareness and attitudes toward ‘open educational resources’ (OER as a benchmark for monitoring future progress. Faculty staff (n=6 were invited to participate in semi-structured interviews which facilitated the development of a questionnaire. Staff respondents (n=50 were not familiar with the term OER but had a clear notion of what it meant. They were familiar with open content repositories within the university but not externally. A culture of borrowing and sharing of resources exists between close colleagues, but not further a field, and whilst staff would obtain resources from the Internet they were reticent to place materials there. Drivers for mobilising resources included a strong belief in open education, the ability of OER to enhance individual and institutional reputations, and economic factors. Barriers to OER included confusion over copyright and lack of IT support. To conclude, there is a positive collegiate culture within the faculty, and overcoming the lack of awareness and dismantling the barriers to sharing will help advance the open educational practices, benefiting both faculty staff and the global community.

  9. Tracing Inclusion: Determining Teacher Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Brenda E.; Wimer, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Though there appears to be an onslaught of No Child Left Behind, there is still more emphasis on testing than ever before. With the new implementation of national common-core standards, many school districts have moved towards full inclusive classrooms. However, it is rare that teachers have any input on whether such major decisions are apropos…

  10. Factors Associated with Staff Perceptions towards Inclusive Education in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Kenneth K.; Ng, Zijia; Wong, Meng Ee; Kaur, Sarinajit

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we sought to examine the perceptions of teachers and other school professionals towards the inclusion of secondary school students with special educational needs (SEN), and the associated factors. The Sentiments, Attitudes and Concerns about Inclusive Education Revised scale (SACIE-R) was completed by 131 teachers and school…

  11. Staff attitudes towards people with intellectual disabilities in Japan and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner-Johnson, W; Keys, C B; Henry, D; Yamaki, K; Watanabe, K; Oi, F; Fujimura, I; Graham, B C; Shimada, H

    2015-10-01

    Staff attitudes may affect choices available to persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). This study examined attitudes towards people with ID among staff working with people with ID in Japan and the United States. Attitudes of staff working with people with ID in Japan and the United States were compared using the Community Living Attitudes Scale, Intellectual Disabilities Form. Responses were examined via multivariate analysis of variance. In unadjusted analyses, Japanese staff exhibited a greater tendency towards Sheltering and Exclusion of people with ID and lower endorsement of Empowerment and Similarity of people with ID. After controlling for covariates, the country effect was no longer significant for Sheltering and Exclusion. Age and education were significantly associated with attitudes in the adjusted model. While attitudes in Japan appeared less supportive of community inclusion of people with ID, some of the differences between countries were attributable to other staff characteristics such as age and education. Findings provide new information about how attitudes of staff in each country compare with each other. © 2015 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Development of a Scale to Measure Attitudes toward Inclusive Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczenski, Felicia L.

    1995-01-01

    The Attitudes toward Inclusive Education Scale (ATIES) is a measure of positive and negative attitudes toward integrating children with disabilities into regular classes. Results with 445 teachers show that the ATIES defines a unidimensional attitudinal variable and yields interval measures of attitudes toward inclusive education. (SLD)

  13. Examining Teachers' Concerns and Attitudes to Inclusive Education in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbenyega, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that examined teachers' concerns and attitude toward inclusive education of students with disabilities in Ghana. A 20 item Attitudes Toward Inclusion in Africa Scale (ATIAS) was completed by 100 teachers from five "Inclusive Project" schools and five Non-Project coeducational basic schools in three different…

  14. Teachers' knowledge, attitude and practices of inclusive education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to investigate teachers' knowledge, attitude, and practices of inclusive education in Nekemte town and its surrounding government primary schools; and how their knowledge and attitude towards inclusion affect the practice of inclusive education. The participants of the study were primary school ...

  15. A Survey into Czech Teachers'Attitude towards Inclusive Education

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, Luo

    2006-01-01

    Teachers are considered the key elements in promoting inclusive education and their attitude toward inclusion may influence school learning environment and the availability of equal educational opportunities for all students. The survey was carried out in Prague, Czech Republic to examine teachers' attitude toward inclusive education and the sample comprised of 104 regular and speciál school teachers. The analysis of data confirmed findings of many previous studies on teacher attitude toward ...

  16. The Relationship between Staff Religiosity and Attitudes toward Elderly Sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Bonnie L.

    The relationship between religiosity and the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of long-term care staff related to elderly sexuality was investigated. Participants were 127 long-term care staff recruited at 8 sites in Oklahoma, Michigan, Virginia, California, and Maryland. Participants' positions included nurses, housekeepers, administrators, and…

  17. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of nursing staff regarding the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to assess nursing staff knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI); to assess the knowledge of maternity obstetric unit (MOU) managers regarding BFHI principles and their attitude towards BFHI implementation; and to describe the ...

  18. Pre-Service Secondary Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Shane; Boyle, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The attitudes held by pre-service teachers have been shown to affect their willingness and ability to implement an inclusive approach to education. A sample consisting of 193 pre-service secondary teachers enrolled in secondary education courses at an Australian university were surveyed to determine their attitudes towards inclusive education,…

  19. Pre-Service Primary Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varcoe, Linda; Boyle, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that an important factor in the success of inclusive education is dependent upon teachers' attitudes. Based on this evidence, the present study investigated the impact of a range of teacher variables in association with training on primary pre-service teachers' attitudes by examining total inclusion scores, positive…

  20. General Education and Special Education Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, David A.; Hueck, Susan; Charley, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the difference in general education and special education teachers' attitudes towards inclusion of students with disabilities and to ascertain if levels of self-efficacy, teacher type, and education level were predictors of teachers' attitudes towards inclusion. Data were collected from 118 elementary and…

  1. Variables Affecting Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmmed, Masud; Sharma, Umesh; Deppeler, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    Inclusive education is a worldwide reform strategy intended to include students with different abilities in mainstream regular schools. Evidence from previous research shows that success in implementing effective inclusive teaching practices in the school is contingent on teachers' positive attitudes towards inclusive education. This study was…

  2. Pre-Service Educators' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdikana, Andile; Ntshangase, Sibusiso; Mayekiso, Tokozile

    2007-01-01

    The inclusion of learners with special educational needs in general education is becoming more prevalent. As a result various special education researchers have begun to examine the success of inclusion, as well as the attitudes and beliefs of general educators towards the inclusion of learners with disabilities in the general education classroom.…

  3. Youth Justice staff attitudes towards screening for self-harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Sarah E; Townsend, Ellen; Anderson, Martin P

    2012-09-01

    Young offenders are recognised as a high-risk group for suicidal behaviour. It is essential that the screening used to identify those at risk and refer them to mental health services is effective, especially in community settings where service utilisation is low. Staff attitudes towards screening for suicide and self-harm are likely to influence how a young offender engages with the screening process. Our study is the first to explore community youth justice staff attitudes towards, and perceptions of, screening for self-harmful behaviour. Eight semi-structured interviews were conducted at an English Youth Offending Team in June 2006 with staff who had used the suicide screening tool with young offenders. Data were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Staff attitudes towards working within the screening system varied along two dimensions. The first 'active/passive' dimension related to perceived confidence in dealing with self-harm. The second 'positive/negative' dimension related to perceptions of the benefits of screening and the effectiveness of mental health provision for young offenders. Results indicate that barriers to effective screening must be tackled at both individual and organisational levels. The model of attitudes presented here could be used to increase understanding of how staff can be supported to engage effectively with the screening system. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. The Attitudes of Teachers towards Inclusive Education in Vojvodina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galovic, Dragana; Brojcin, Branislav; Glumbic, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the attitudes of preschool, primary, secondary and high school teachers towards inclusive education of children with special educational needs. In addition, the study established the correlation between these attitudes and gender, education level, teaching experience, formal training in the special education…

  5. Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education in Jordanian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zyoudi, Mohammed

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate teachers' attitudes towards inclusive education in Jordan, and the factors that influenced such attitudes. Qualitative research was used to gather information from all general education and special education teachers. The sample consisted of 90 teachers at 7 schools. The results of this study showed…

  6. Urban Early Childhood Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wu-Ying; Hsieh, Chang-Ming

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between urban early childhood teachers' attitudes towards inclusive education and personal characteristics, professional background, and programme context. Questionnaires were completed by teachers (n = 130) who taught preschool children in primarily low-income, urban neighbourhoods. Attitude ratings were…

  7. Improving Nursing Home Staff Knowledge and Attitudes about Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Katherine R.; Fink, Regina; Pepper, Ginny; Hutt, Eveyln; Vojir, Carol P.; Scott, Jill; Clark, Lauren; Mellis, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Effective pain management remains a serious problem in the nursing home setting. Barriers to achieving optimal pain practices include staff knowledge deficits, biases, and attitudes that influence assessment and management of the residents' pain. Design and Methods: Twelve nursing homes participated in this intervention study: six…

  8. Beliefs and attitudes of paramedical college staff towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Beliefs and attitudes of paramedical college staff towards complementary and alternate medicine. ... As the use of healing practices outside of CM rise among patients, ignorance of CAM by future medical practitioners can cause a communication gap between people and the profession that serves them. It is encouraging ...

  9. Knowledge, attitude and practice of maternity unit staff in Jos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Health care workers in maternity units are exposed to potentially infectious body fluids in the course of their duties. The study assessed the knowledge, attitude and practice of maternity unit staff in Jos Metropolis regarding Universal Precautions (UP) against the background of the high HIV seroprevalence in ...

  10. The role of support staff in promoting the social inclusion of persons with an intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConkey, R; Collins, S

    2010-08-01

    Past studies have found that people supported in more individualised housing options tend to have levels of community participation and wider social networks than those in other accommodation options. Yet, the contribution of support staff in facilitating social inclusion has received relatively scant attention. In all 245 staff working in either supported living schemes, or shared residential and group homes, or in day centres completed a written questionnaire in which they rated in terms of priority to their job, 16 tasks that were supportive of social inclusion and a further 16 tasks that related to the care of the person they supported. In addition staff identified those tasks that they considered were not appropriate to their job. Across all three service settings, staff rated more care tasks as having higher priority than they did the social inclusion tasks. However, staff in supported living schemes rated more social inclusion tasks as having high priority than did staff in the other two service settings. Equally the staff who were most inclined to rate social inclusion tasks as not being applicable to their job were those working day centres; female rather than male staff, those in front-line staff rather than senior staff, and those in part-time or relief positions rather than full-time posts. However, within each service settings, there were wide variations in how staff rated the social inclusion tasks. Staff working in more individualised support arrangements tend to give greater priority to promoting social inclusion although this can vary widely both across and within staff teams. Nonetheless, staff gave greater priority to care tasks especially in congregated service settings. Service managers may need to give more emphasis to social inclusion tasks and provide the leadership, training and resources to facilitate support staff to re-assess their priorities.

  11. Principals' and Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusion in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Itay; Zamir, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to determine whether, in schools that practice inclusion, there is a correlation between the attitudes of school principals and teachers in their schools, towards inclusion of student with special needs. For this purpose, 38 schools were sampled in each of which the school principal and five teachers who work with…

  12. International Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusion in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursley, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The inclusion of students with disabilities in the general education classroom has become a universally debated topic in education. More schools all over the world are seeking to use inclusion as their main service delivery model for students with disabilities. Much research has been conducted globally to gain insights into general education…

  13. Effects of Staff Training on Staff Knowledge and Attitudes about Sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Bonnie L.; Harrington, Donna

    2002-01-01

    Four learning modules on elderly sexuality were pilot tested with 109 long-term care staff. On pretests men and whites scored higher than women and African-Americans. Knowledge and attitude improvements resulted from use of modules on the need for sexuality/intimacy, sex and dementia, and sex and aging, but not the family/personal issues module.…

  14. TEACHERS’ COMPREHENSIONS, PERCEPTIONS, AND ATTITUDES TOWARDS INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruwandi Ruwandi

    2012-12-01

    Elementary School Teachers (MI in Salatiga to inclusive education; 2 their perceptions; and 3 their attitudes to the inclusive education. This is a survey research. The primary data collection method used in this research was questionnaires, besides structural interviews. Based upon the calculation of the questionnaires, the writer found out that 1 the teachers’ comprehension to inclusive education is still low (88.1 % and only 4.7 % feels having a little knowledge about it. In addition, 50.02 % have negative perceptions, and are only 21.46 % who have positive perceptions to it. Even though, 43.89 % have positive attitudes and 37.81 have negative attitudes to the inclusive education.

  15. Attitudes of Preschool and Primary School Pre-Service Teachers towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraska, Jake; Boyle, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Teachers' attitudes towards inclusion are important as they have the primary responsibility of implementing inclusive education. Attitudes at the beginning of teaching careers are likely to predict future attitudes. Some studies show a drop in attitudes after leaving university education. Using the Teachers' Attitudes Towards Inclusion (Amended)…

  16. An empirical study on primary school teachers’ attitudes towards inclusive education in Jakarta, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurniawati, Farida; Minnaert, A.E.M.G.; Mangunsong, F.; Ahmed, W.

    2012-01-01

    Empirical research revealed that teachers’ attitudes play a crucial role in successful implementation of inclusive education. This study aimed to examine primary school teachers’ attitudes towards inclusive education in Jakarta, Indonesia. Respondents completed the attitude scale which comprised the

  17. Attitudes to Normalisation and Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanagi, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to clarify the features of teachers' image on normalisation and inclusive education. The participants of the study were both mainstream teachers and special teachers. One hundred and thirty-eight questionnaires were analysed. (1) Teachers completed the questionnaire of SD (semantic differential) images on…

  18. Health service staff's attitudes towards patients with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvaniti, Aikaterini; Samakouri, Maria; Kalamara, Eleni; Bochtsou, Valentini; Bikos, Constantinos; Livaditis, Miltos

    2009-08-01

    Stereotypes and prejudices against patients with mental illness are widespread in many societies. The aim of the present study is to investigate such attitudes among the staff and medical students, including employees and trainees, in a general university hospital. Six hundred individuals (361 employees, 231 students) completed the following questionnaires: Level of Contact Report (LCR), Authoritarianism Scale (AS), and Opinion about Mental Illness (OMI), a scale yielding five factors (social discrimination, social restriction, social care, social integration, and aetiology). Multivariate linear regression models were applied in order to search for the simultaneous effect of many variables on the scores of OMI factors. An important part of the sample held negative attitudes especially concerning social discrimination and restriction of the patients. Women, older and less educated staff, nursing staff, and people scoring higher on authoritarianism were more prejudiced. Higher scores on familiarity were associated with less negative attitudes. The results indicate the need to develop sensitisation and training programs considering mental health topics among health service employees.

  19. PARENTS ATTITUDE: INCLUSIVE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Blagoj Dimitrova-Radojicic

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the findings of a study designed to investigate the attitudes of parents of “normal” developing children toward the inclusion of children with disabilities into mainstream education in Macedonia. Specifically, the study was aimed to explore the similarities and differences in the attitudes of two groups of parents: a group of parents of preschool children and a group of parents of school age children. Participants included 88 parents. Generally, many of the parents accept inclusive education, but most of them still think the special school is better place for education of children with disability.

  20. An exploratory study on attitudes toward inclusive education in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martz, Erin

    2005-06-01

    This exploratory study examined the attitudes toward inclusive education among Russian teachers, administrators and parents of students with and without disabilities (n=176). The results indicated that while there were no significant differences among teachers, administrators and parents of students with and without disabilities on overall attitudes toward inclusive education, there were significant differences in perspectives about the possible time-frame for implementing inclusive education. Generally speaking, school administrators and teachers tended to express the belief that inclusive education could be a reality even today, though many of this group thought that it might be a question of the near future or undefined future. Both groups of parents tended to think that inclusive education could occur in an undefined future. There were significant differences among the three groups about perceptions of responsibility for implementing inclusive education. Administrators, teachers and parents of students with disabilities viewed it as a responsibility of the school, while parents of students without disabilities viewed it as the government's duty. Further, the majority of respondents reported the lack of necessary conditions in schools and the lack of government policies and finances as the main barriers to inclusive education. These findings suggest two areas of intervention to promote the implementation of inclusive education in Russia: physical accessibility of schools and government support.

  1. Attitudes towards preventive tuberculosis treatment among hospital staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Pathak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Healthcare workers have an increased risk of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI, but previous studies suggested that they might be reluctant to accept preventive tuberculosis (TB treatment. We aimed to examine doctors’ and nurses’ experience of TB screening and to explore their attitudes towards preventive TB treatment. Methods. We conducted a survey among randomly selected healthcare workers at a tertiary hospital in Sydney, Australia, using a paper-based questionnaire. Results. A total of 1,304 questionnaires were distributed and 311 (24% responses were received. The majority of hospital staff supported preventive TB treatment in health care workers with evidence of latent TB infection (LTBI in general (74%, 164/223 and for them personally (81%, 198/244 while 80 and 53 healthcare workers respectively had no opinion on the topic. Staff working in respiratory medicine were significantly less likely to support preventive TB treatment in health care workers in general or for them personally if they would have evidence of LTBI compared to other specialties (p = 0.001. Only 13% (14/106 of respondents with evidence of LTBI indicated that they had been offered preventive TB treatment. Twenty-one percent (64/306 of respondents indicated that they did not know the difference between active and latent TB. Among staff who had undergone testing for LTBI, only 33% (75/230 felt adequately informed about the meaning of their test results. Discussion. Hospital staff in general had positive attitudes towards preventive TB treatment, but actual treatment rates were low and perceived knowledge about LTBI was insufficient among a significant proportion of staff. The gap between high support for preventive TB treatment among staff and low treatment rates needs to be addressed. Better education on the concept of LTBI and the meaning of screening test results is required.

  2. Inclusive Education for Pupils with Autistic Spectrum Disorders in Secondary Mainstream Schools: Teacher Attitudes, Experience and Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Neil; Symes, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the experience, attitudes and knowledge of school staff in relation to inclusive education for pupils with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) in mainstream secondary schools. Fifty-three participants from 11 secondary schools in the north-west of England completed a survey that covered socio-demographic…

  3. Parents' Attitudes toward Comprehensive and Inclusive Sexuality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Christina R.; Tasker, Timothy B.; Horn, Stacey S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Parents are sometimes perceived as barriers to providing comprehensive and inclusive sexuality education to young people. However, little is known about parents' actual attitudes towards providing such broad information to young people. The purpose of this paper is to examine two different approaches to measuring parents' attitudes…

  4. Determinants of Differing Teacher Attitudes towards Inclusive Education Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyimah, Emmanuel K.; Ackah, Francis R., Jr.; Yarquah, John A.

    2010-01-01

    An examination of literature reveals that teacher attitude is fundamental to the practice of inclusive education. In order to verify the extent to which the assertion is applicable in Ghana, 132 teachers were selected from 16 regular schools in the Cape Coast Metropolis using purposive and simple random sampling techniques to respond to a four…

  5. Impacting Pre-Service Teachers' Attitudes toward Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Roben W.; Ringlaben, Ravic P.

    2012-01-01

    Despite federal mandates to educate students with disabilities in the least restrictive environment, teachers continue to have mixed feelings about their own preparedness to educate students with disabilities in the general education setting. However, research has documented that teachers with more positive attitudes toward inclusion are more…

  6. An empirical study on primary school teachers’ attitudes towards inclusive education in Jakarta, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Kurniawati, Farida; Minnaert, A.E.M.G.; Mangunsong, F.; Ahmed, W.

    2012-01-01

    Empirical research revealed that teachers’ attitudes play a crucial role in successful implementation of inclusive education. This study aimed to examine primary school teachers’ attitudes towards inclusive education in Jakarta, Indonesia. Respondents completed the attitude scale which comprised the theory-driven cognitive, affective and behavioral components of attitude. The findings show that teachers are in favor of inclusion and their attitudes seem to be related to their teaching experie...

  7. Confidence in Their Own Ability: Postgraduate Early Childhood Students Examining Their Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cologon, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    This study explores reflections of a group of postgraduate early childhood students in relation to their self-reported attitudes towards inclusive education. Participant self-reported attitudes towards inclusive education were measured using an adapted version of the Attitudes Toward Inclusive Education Scale (ATIES) and an adapted version of the…

  8. Effects of Personal and Professional Factors on Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusion in Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Paulo C.; Cadime, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Attitudes towards inclusive education have a crucial place in the effective implementation of inclusion practices. The aim of this study was to explore teachers' attitudes towards inclusive education in preschool education in Portugal and to identify teachers' personal and professional variables that influence these attitudes. The data were…

  9. Exploratory study of Australian aged care staff knowledge and attitudes of later life sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yung-Hui; Jones, Cindy; Osborne, Debora

    2017-06-01

    To explore aged care staff knowledge and attitudes towards later life sexuality and attitudes about intimacy in people with dementia. Fifty-two care staff working in two aged care facilities with secure dementia care units were recruited. Knowledge and attitudes on later life sexuality and attitudes towards later life sexuality in people with dementia were surveyed using the Aging Sexual Knowledge and Attitudes Scale and the selected eight items of the Staff Attitudes about Intimacy and Dementia, respectively. The results indicated that aged care staff knowledge of later life sexuality is inadequate, but attitudes towards later life sexuality and about intimacy and dementia were relatively permissive. Improving aged care staff knowledge of later life sexuality is needed. Continuing education and training should provide to support the expression of later life sexuality including those with dementia. © 2017 AJA Inc.

  10. Attitudes of teachers education centers to special education inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.ª del Carmen PEGALAJAR PALOMINO

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to analyze the attitudes and perceptions towards inclusive education teacher that practices in special education centers in Andalusia. The paper has used a descriptive methodology, a total of 428 participating teachers and using data collection a semi structured questionnaire developed ad hoc. The results show how teachers of special education centers in Andalusia consider inclusive education as a pillar in education, while defining the mode of schooling in special education institutions as an educational response to students aimed at improving their quality of life and achieve greater personal independence and function in daily life activities. They also consider that the students enrolled in these schools has higher educational needs in the field of health, cognitive and social. It stands out even the existence of statistically significant differences in attitudes and perceptions of teachers as they have developed or no practical training related to the field of inclusive education during their initial training, being more favorable in the case of those without such training. Thus, we want to know the perceptions of these teachers on inclusive education to establish proposals for improvement in teacher education that lead to the development of a process of quality teaching and learning for pupils with severe and permanent disabilities.

  11. Inclusive Education in Japan and Korea--Japanese and Korean Teachers' Self-Efficacy and Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jia

    2016-01-01

    The current study aims to evaluate teachers' self-efficacy and attitudes towards inclusive classrooms in Japan and Korea. Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES; Tschannen-Moran and Woolfolk, [Tschannen-Moran, M., 2001]) and Scale of Teachers' Attitudes Towards Inclusive Classrooms (STATIC; Cochran, [Cochran, H., 1998]) were completed by 191…

  12. Can Teachers' Self-Reported Efficacy, Concerns, and Attitudes toward Inclusion Scores Predict Their Actual Inclusive Classroom Practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Umesh; Sokal, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This research was undertaken to determine if significant relationships exist between teachers' self-reported attitudes, concerns, and efficacy to teach in inclusive classrooms and their actual classroom behaviour in Winnipeg, Canada. Five teachers completed 3 scales measuring their attitudes to inclusion, their level of concerns about teaching in…

  13. Staff Attitudes to Talking Openly About Ethical Dilemmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Leila

    2011-01-01

    , research on business ethics communication and behavior indicates a relatively clear, positive link between open workplace dialogue about ethical issues and ethical conduct. In this paper, I therefore address the question: What influences employee attitudes to talking openly about ethical issues? Answers...... are proposed on the basis of focus group interviews with staff at the Denmark and Brazil affiliates of the global healthcare company Novo Nordisk. It was found that interest in discussing ethical issues was influenced by two main factors: employee conceptualizations of business ethics, and the level of inter......-collegial trust, credibility, and confidence. In this paper, by examining these phenomena, I am at providing insight that can both inform scholars in these fields as well as help managers in their attempts to promote open workplace dialogue about ethical issues....

  14. Measuring Implicit Attitudes with the Inclusion ST-IAT: A Replication and Further Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, Sergej; Sahli Lozano, Caroline

    2018-01-01

    Assessment of attitudes in inclusive education research is almost exclusively based on self-report scales. This may lead to overestimation of positive attitudes due to social desirability bias, and self-reported attitudes may not capture all relevant aspects of attitudes. Recently, Lüke and Grosche (2018a) proposed a new attitude test based on a…

  15. Regular Primary Schoolteachers' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Anke; Pijl, Sip Jan; Minnaert, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Teachers are seen as key persons to implement inclusive education. Positive attitudes are therefore argued as playing a considerable role in implementing this educational change successfully. The aim of this study is to examine what attitudes teachers hold towards inclusive education, which variables are related to their attitudes and if these…

  16. Exploring the Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education System: A Study of Indian Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the attitudes of university and school teachers towards inclusive education system. One hundred teachers having equal number of male and female population was included in the study. Participants were administered an attitude scale namely--Attitudes toward Inclusive Education Scale (ATIE), developed by Wilczenski (1992) to…

  17. Attitude towards Inclusive Education: The Perspective of Slovenian Preschool and Primary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štemberger, Tina; Kiswarday, Vanja Riccarda

    2018-01-01

    The paper is built on premises that teachers' attitude is one of the most important factors of implementing inclusive education and it focuses on preschool and primary school teachers' attitudes towards inclusive education. The purpose of the study was to establish what attitude Slovenian preschool and primary school teachers hold towards…

  18. Attitudes on Inclusion of a Player with Disabilities in a Regular Softball League.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Martin E.; Malloy, Mike

    1998-01-01

    A study examined the attitudes of 88 girls (ages 10-12) without disabilities, parents, and coaches toward the inclusion of a child with a disability in a regular fast-pitch softball league. Players and parents had a favorable attitude toward inclusion and modifying game rules. Coaches were undecided about inclusion and rule modifications.…

  19. The Development of a Psychometrically-Sound Instrument to Measure Teachers' Multidimensional Attitudes toward Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahat, Marian

    2008-01-01

    The "Multidimensional Attitudes toward Inclusive Education Scale" (MATIES) was developed to effectively measure affective, cognitive and behavioural aspects of attitudes, within the realm of inclusive education that includes physical, social and curricular inclusion. Models within Item Response Theory and Classical Test Theory were used…

  20. The Impact of Training on Pre-Service Teacher Attitudes, Concerns, and Efficacy towards Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Umesh; Nuttal, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Thirty pre-service teachers took part in a nine-week university course focussed on the benefits of inclusive education and the techniques needed to successfully implement it. The Teachers' Attitudes Toward Inclusion Scale (TATIS), Concerns about Inclusive Education Scale (CIES), and Teacher's Efficacy in Implementing Inclusive Practices (TEIP)…

  1. Organizational culture and work-related attitudes among staff in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska-Simmons, Elzbieta

    2006-02-01

    In this study, the author examines the relationship between staff perceptions of organizational culture and their work-related attitudes in assisted living. Data were collected from 317 staff in 61 facilities using self-administered questionnaires. Staff who had more favorable perceptions of organizational culture reported greater job satisfaction, coworker satisfaction, and organizational commitment. Among the dimensions of organizational culture, perceptions of teamwork had the strongest influence on satisfaction with coworkers, and perceptions of organizational morale had the strongest influence on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Those who want to improve staff attitudes should focus on creating organizational cultures that promote teamwork and high organizational morale.

  2. Attitudes of Nursing Facilities' Staff Toward Pharmacy Students' Interaction with its Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Donna; Gavaza, Paul; Deel, Sharon

    2017-06-01

    All Appalachian College of Pharmacy second-year students undertake the longitudinal geriatric early pharmacy practice experiences (EPPE) 2 course, which involves interacting with geriatric residents in two nursing facilities over two semesters. The study investigated the nursing staff's perceptions about the rotation and the pharmacy students' interaction with nursing facility residents. Cross-sectional study. Academic setting. 63 nursing facility staff. A 10-item attitude survey administered to nursing staff. Nursing staff attitude toward pharmacy students' interaction with geriatric residents during the course. Sixty-three responses were received (84% response rate). Most respondents were female (95.2%), who occasionally interacted with pharmacy students (54.8%) and had worked at the facilities for an average of 6.8 years (standard deviation [SD] = 6.7) years. Staff reported that pharmacy students practiced interacting with geriatric residents and nursing facility staff, learned about different medications taken by residents as well as their life as a nursing facility resident. In addition, the student visits improved the mood of residents and staff's understanding of medicines, among others. Staff suggested that students spend more time with their residents in the facility as well as ask more questions of staff. The nursing facility staff generally had favorable attitudes about pharmacy students' visits in their nursing facility. Nursing facility staff noted that the geriatric rotation was a great learning experience for the pharmacy students.

  3. Smoking behavior among hospital staff still influences attitudes and counseling on smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willaing, Ingrid; Ladelund, Steen

    2004-01-01

    individual smoking behavior among hospital staff and (a). smoking-related knowledge, (b). attitudes toward counseling on smoking, and (c). self-reported smoking-related counseling provided by the staff. The study was based on a survey using self-administered questionnaires given to all hospital staff...... in a large university hospital in Denmark. Altogether, 82% of staff (2561) returned a completed questionnaire. Analyses focused on a subsample consisting of health professionals in the clinical wards (1429). Multivariate analyses were performed in which smoking-related knowledge, attitudes toward smoking...... qualified to counsel patients about smoking than did never-smokers (ex-smokers, OR=1.8, 95% CI=1.3-2.5; smokers, OR=1.4, 95% CI=1.0-1.9). Individual smoking behavior among hospital staff was strongly associated with smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and counseling practices. Lack of self...

  4. Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education: A Critical Review of Published Questionnaires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Donna L.; Monsen, Jeremy J.; Kielblock, Stephan

    2018-01-01

    Teachers' attitudes towards inclusive education affect its successful implementation within mainstream schools. This paper reviews nine questionnaires which capture primary school teachers' attitudes towards inclusion, with the aim to support researchers in selecting the most appropriate measure according to the purpose of their study. Most of the…

  5. Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusion, Perceived Adequacy of Support and Classroom Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsen, Jeremy J.; Ewing, Donna L.; Kwoka, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Inclusive education has become a cornerstone of many government policies in an increasing number of countries, yet teachers have been found to hold mixed attitudes towards its implementation and usefulness. This article, using English terminology and thinking, aims to extend previous research on the effect of teacher attitudes towards inclusion in…

  6. Regular primary school teachers’ attitudes towards inclusive education : A review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Anke; Pijl, Sip-Jan; Minnaert, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Teachers are seen as key persons to implement inclusive education. Positive attitudes are therefore argued as playing a considerable role in implementing this educational change successfully. The aim of this study is to examine what attitudes teachers hold towards inclusive education, which

  7. Analysis of the survey results for the safety culture attitudes of HANARO management division staff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.; Hwang, S. Y.; Lim, I. C.; Kang, T. J.; Choi, H. Y

    2003-12-01

    This report provides the that analysis results of the surveys on the safety culture attitude and related topics for the HANARO Management Division staff. The survey form consisted of the questionnaire on the safety culture attitude, happiness and life style, drinking habit and traffic safety attitude. The key information drawn from the analysis are as follow; First, the level of safety culture attitude of the staff was confirmed and it was found that the attitude improved when the present analysis results were compared with them for the survey in 1998. Second, the degree of happiness that the staff feel is higher than the average Korean and they enjoy more leisure time than the average Korean. Third, the staff drink more alcohol than the average Korean. Thus, the drinking habit must be improved for the health of the staff. Fourth, the questionnaire of the happiness and the traffic safety attitude should be improved to verify the hypotheses on the relation between them and the safety culture attitude.

  8. Analysis of the survey results for the safety culture attitudes of HANARO management division staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.; Hwang, S. Y.; Lim, I. C.; Kang, T. J.; Choi, H. Y.

    2003-12-01

    This report provides the that analysis results of the surveys on the safety culture attitude and related topics for the HANARO Management Division staff. The survey form consisted of the questionnaire on the safety culture attitude, happiness and life style, drinking habit and traffic safety attitude. The key information drawn from the analysis are as follow; First, the level of safety culture attitude of the staff was confirmed and it was found that the attitude improved when the present analysis results were compared with them for the survey in 1998. Second, the degree of happiness that the staff feel is higher than the average Korean and they enjoy more leisure time than the average Korean. Third, the staff drink more alcohol than the average Korean. Thus, the drinking habit must be improved for the health of the staff. Fourth, the questionnaire of the happiness and the traffic safety attitude should be improved to verify the hypotheses on the relation between them and the safety culture attitude

  9. Factors Associated with Primary School Teachers' Attitudes Towards the Inclusion of Students with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Sharmila; Wilson, Nathan; Falkmer, Marita; Sim, Angela; Scott, Melissa; Cordier, Reinie; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' attitudes toward inclusion are often based on the practical implementation of inclusive education rather than a specific ideology and understanding of inclusiveness. This study aimed to identify the factors associated with primary school teachers' attitudes towards inclusion of students with all disabilities in regular schools. Seventy four primary school teachers participated in a cross-sectional survey conducted in Western Australia. Teachers' attitudes and efficacy toward integration of students with disabilities were measured using the Opinions Relative to Integration of Students with Disabilities scale and Bandura's Teacher Efficacy scale respectively. Four teacher attributes-age, gender, teaching self-efficacy and training collectively explained 42% of the variability in teachers' attitude toward including students with disabilities. The current study further contributes to the accumulation of knowledge that can unpack the complex pattern of factors that should be considered to promote positive attitudes towards inclusive schools.

  10. Factors Associated with Primary School Teachers' Attitudes Towards the Inclusion of Students with Disabilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila Vaz

    Full Text Available Teachers' attitudes toward inclusion are often based on the practical implementation of inclusive education rather than a specific ideology and understanding of inclusiveness. This study aimed to identify the factors associated with primary school teachers' attitudes towards inclusion of students with all disabilities in regular schools.Seventy four primary school teachers participated in a cross-sectional survey conducted in Western Australia. Teachers' attitudes and efficacy toward integration of students with disabilities were measured using the Opinions Relative to Integration of Students with Disabilities scale and Bandura's Teacher Efficacy scale respectively.Four teacher attributes-age, gender, teaching self-efficacy and training collectively explained 42% of the variability in teachers' attitude toward including students with disabilities.The current study further contributes to the accumulation of knowledge that can unpack the complex pattern of factors that should be considered to promote positive attitudes towards inclusive schools.

  11. Factors Associated with Primary School Teachers’ Attitudes Towards the Inclusion of Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Sharmila; Wilson, Nathan; Falkmer, Marita; Sim, Angela; Scott, Melissa; Cordier, Reinie; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    Objective Teachers' attitudes toward inclusion are often based on the practical implementation of inclusive education rather than a specific ideology and understanding of inclusiveness. This study aimed to identify the factors associated with primary school teachers' attitudes towards inclusion of students with all disabilities in regular schools. Method Seventy four primary school teachers participated in a cross-sectional survey conducted in Western Australia. Teachers' attitudes and efficacy toward integration of students with disabilities were measured using the Opinions Relative to Integration of Students with Disabilities scale and Bandura's Teacher Efficacy scale respectively. Results Four teacher attributes—age, gender, teaching self-efficacy and training collectively explained 42% of the variability in teachers' attitude toward including students with disabilities. Conclusion The current study further contributes to the accumulation of knowledge that can unpack the complex pattern of factors that should be considered to promote positive attitudes towards inclusive schools. PMID:26317862

  12. Adolescents Who Self-Harm: Professional Staff Knowledge, Attitudes and Training Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timson, Debbie; Priest, Helena; Clark-Carter, David

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate professional staff attitudes and knowledge about adolescents who engage in self-harming behaviour and to identify training needs. Previous research has suggested that medical and health care staff perceptions may reinforce the stigma associated with such behaviour and therefore jeopardise the effectiveness of…

  13. Attitudes of basic school teachers towards inclusive education in the southern province of Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Muleya, Edmond Moses

    2006-01-01

    Review of literature indicates that successful implementation of inclusion in regular schools is enhanced when regular class teachers have positive attitudes towards inclusion. This investigation explored teachers attitude toward including children with special education needs in the regular classroom. A questionnaire survey was administered to 300 teachers from 3 zones in three different districts in southern province of Zambia. In general it was found that teachers had negative attitudes t...

  14. Attitudes toward the use of gender-inclusive language among residency trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyatt, G H; Cook, D J; Griffith, L; Walter, S D; Risdon, C; Liutkus, J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore postgraduate medical trainees' attitudes toward the use of gender-inclusive language. DESIGN: Self-administered questionnaire. SETTING: Seven residency training programs at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., from July 1993 to June 1994. PARTICIPANTS: Of 225 residents in the programs, 186 responded to the survey, for a response rate of 82.7%. Men and women were equally represented among the respondents. OUTCOME MEASURES: Categorization of attitudes about the use of language as gender-inclusive or gender-exclusive; characteristics predicting a gender-inclusive attitude. RESULTS: Factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha (0.90) supported the existence of a construct related to attitudes about language use, the poles of which were categorized as gender-inclusive and gender-exclusive. The authors classified residents with respect to their attitudes to language use from their responses to the questionnaire. In univariate analyses, sex, residency program and country of graduation significantly predicted a gender-inclusive attitude (p < 0.01). Only the first 2 variables were significant in a multivariate model; residency program explained 18% of the variance and sex 3%. Residents in obstetrics and gynecology and psychiatry had the most gender-inclusive attitudes, whereas residents in surgery and anesthesia had the most gender-exclusive attitudes. CONCLUSIONS: Residents' values are reflected in the language they choose to use. Language use may provide an index of underlying attitudes that may create hostile environments for female trainees. PMID:9145055

  15. Effectiveness of a Psycho-Educational Staff Training Program on Attitudes of Staff in a Long-Term Care Facility: A Pilot Study and Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elpers, Kathy; Amano, Takashi; DeCoster, Vaughn; Johnson, Missy

    2017-01-01

    Managing Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) is a significant challenge for staff working in long-term care facilities. This study examines the effectiveness of a psycho-educational training aimed at changing staff's attitudes. The results indicated that participants' attitudes toward dementia were more positive,…

  16. First-Year University Students of Educational Sciences on Inclusive Education: Attitudes and Convictions in Flanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderfaeillie, Johan; De Fever, Frank; Lombaerts, Koen

    2003-01-01

    Assessed the attitudes toward inclusive education of college students at a Flemish college that had a new curriculum designed to familiarize first year educational psychology and special education students with inclusive education. Surveys of students who took introductory courses on inclusion indicated that students neither advocated for nor…

  17. Organizational climate partially mediates the effect of culture on work attitudes and staff turnover in mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; Sawitzky, Angelina C

    2006-05-01

    Staff turnover in mental health service organizations is an ongoing problem with implications for staff morale, productivity, organizational effectiveness, and implementation of innovation. Recent studies in public sector services have examined the impact of organizational culture and climate on work attitudes (i.e., job satisfaction and organizational commitment) and, ultimately, staff turnover. However, mediational models of the impact of culture and climate on work attitudes have not been examined. The present study examined full and partial mediation models of the effects of culture and climate on work attitudes and the subsequent impact of work attitudes on staff turnover. Multilevel structural equation models supported a partial mediation model in which organizational culture had both direct influence on work attitudes and indirect influence through organizational climate. Work attitudes significantly predicted one-year staff turnover rates. These findings support the contention that both culture and climate impact work attitudes and subsequent staff turnover.

  18. Attitudes of palliative care clinical staff toward prolonged grief disorder diagnosis and grief interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Esther L; Deane, Frank P; Barclay, Gregory D; Bourne, Joan; Connolly, Vivienne

    2017-07-03

    The provision of psychological support to caregivers is an important part of the role of the clinical staff working in palliative care. Staff knowledge and attitudes may determine their openness to referring caregivers to a psychological intervention. We recently developed a self-help intervention for grief and psychological distress among caregivers and were interested in exploring the extent to which staff knowledge and attitudes might affect future implementation. The aims of our study were to: (1) examine the acceptability of self-help psychological intervention for caregivers among palliative care clinical staff; (2) examine potential attitudinal barriers toward prolonged grief disorder (PGD) as a diagnosis and interventions for grief; and (3) bolster staff confidence in skills and knowledge in identifying and managing caregiver psychological distress. An anonymous survey was distributed among clinical staff at two inpatient units and two community health services that assessed the acceptability of self-help interventions for caregivers, attitudes about PGD diagnosis and grief intervention, and staff confidence in skills and knowledge in assessing caregiver psychological distress. Overall, clinical staff were positively oriented toward self-help for caregivers and intervention for grief. They were also basically confident in their skills and knowledge. While it was positive PGD attitudes that were associated with acceptability of self-help for caregivers, it was both positive and negative PGD attitudes that were associated more specifically with a willingness to refer caregivers to such an intervention. Our findings are useful in highlighting the issues to be considered in the implementation of a self-help intervention within the healthcare service. Clinical staff seemed positively oriented toward engaging with a psychological intervention for caregivers and likely to act as key allies in implementation.

  19. Examining the temporal relationship between psychological climate, work attitude, and staff turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R.; Hunter, Brooke D.

    2012-01-01

    Relative to the broader industrial-organizational (I-O) psychology field, research on the turnover of substance use disorder (SUD) treatment staff is in its infancy. Despite its long and rich history, recent reviews of the turnover literature within I-O psychology have noted there remains considerable room for improvement. In particular, recommendations have been made for research that considers time in the turnover process and explores more distal causes of staff turnover. Addressing these gaps, this paper examined the temporal relationship between latent measures of psychological climate, work attitude, and staff turnover. Using data from 95 SUD treatment staff clustered within 29 treatment organizations, multilevel discrete-time survival analyses revealed that a latent measure of work attitude (e.g., job satisfaction, pay satisfaction, turnover intentions) fully mediated the temporal relationship between latent measures of psychological climate (e.g., supervisor support, coworker support, role conflict) and subsequent staff turnover. PMID:22658290

  20. Importance of social attitudes towards people with disabilities in the realization of educational inclusion in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimoski Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the social attitude towards persons with disabilities and the importance of this relationship for the implementation of educational inclusion in Serbia. The society attitude is discussed through the attitudes towards persons with disabilities, and attitudes towards educational inclusion. Persons with disabilities occupy a marginalized position that is a multiple determined. Education of this group have a significant impact on the process of marginalization - poor education deepens, quality education helps to overcome marginalized social positions. Attitude towards persons with disabilities are characterized by the presence of bias, lack of information and rare contacts. Research in our community do not give consistent results, and there is also tendency of respondents to give socially acceptable answers. Assessment of attitudes and work on the development of more tolerant attitudes towards persons with disabilities is are essential in creating the conditions for the implementation of educational inclusion. Educational inclusion, embedded in the philosophy of social model of disability, implies environment that adapts to persons with disabilities. These environmental preparations lacked during the process of introducing inclusive education in our country. In the implementation of educational inclusion is necessary to work on the conditions for adequate reception of such children to regular school system, which includes work on the development of tolerant attitudes towards persons with disabilities.

  1. Attitudes and beliefs towards methadone maintenance treatment among Australian prison health staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjersing, Linn R; Butler, Tony; Caplehorn, John R M; Belcher, Josephine M; Matthews, Richard

    2007-09-01

    Justice Health NSW has one of the most extensive prison-based methadone programmes in the world. We examine prison health staff attitudes towards methadone treatment and compare these with community methadone staff. A cross-sectional survey of 202 staff employed by Justice Health New South Wales was undertaken in 2003. Results. The mean scores on the various sub-scales were: abstinence-orientation (AO) 2.9 (95% CI 2.8 - 3.0); disapproval of drug use (DDU) 3.3 (95% CI 3.2 - 3.4); knowledge (Know) 2.7 (95% CI 2.4 - 2.9); and toxicity 4.6 (95% CI 4.2 - 5.0). Both the AO and DDU score were correlated negatively with the Know score (r = -0.37 and r = -0.13, respectively). Prison health staff had higher AO (2.9 vs. 2.6, p US community methadone staff about the toxicity of methadone (4.6 vs. 0.0, p prison health staff attitudes to methadone treatment. Correctional health staff tend to be more abstinence-orientated, more likely to disapprove of drug use, and less knowledgeable about the risks and benefits of methadone than Australian community methadone staff. The findings have important implications for training health staff working in the prison environment with regard to client retention on methadone treatment.

  2. Smoking and its treatment in addiction services: clients' and staff behaviour and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, Camilla; Strang, John; Ratschen, Elena; Sutherland, Gay; Finch, Emily; McNeill, Ann

    2014-07-14

    High smoking prevalence has been observed among those misusing other substances. This study aimed to establish smoking behaviours and attitudes towards nicotine dependence treatment among clients and staff in substance abuse treatment settings. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey of staff and clients in a convenience sample of seven community and residential addiction services in, or with links to, Europe's largest provider of mental health care, the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. Survey items assessed smoking behaviour, motivation to quit, receipt of and attitudes towards nicotine dependence treatment. Eighty five percent (n = 163) and 97% (n = 145) response rates of clients and staff were achieved. A high smoking prevalence was observed in clients (88%) and staff (45%); of current smokers, nearly all clients were daily smokers, while 42% of staff were occasional smokers. Despite 79% of clients who smoked expressing a desire to quit and 46% interested in receiving advice, only 15% had been offered support to stop smoking during their current treatment episode with 56% reported never having been offered support. Staff rated smoking treatment significantly less important than treatment of other substances (p smoking cessation interventions to an extraordinarily high prevalence population of smokers in addiction services. This is despite the majority of smokers reporting motivation to quit. Staff smoking and attitudes may be a contributory factor in these findings.

  3. The Influence of Gender and Special Education Training on Attitudes towards Inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şenol Orakcı

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Inclusive education practices on special education are quite important and discussed intensively. Within this context, teachers’ viewpoints and attitudes towards inclusive education practices are of great importance. There are many publications about special education practices in the literature review. In this article, it has been focused on inclusive education practices in special education and synthesizing the findings of studies examining teachers’ attitudes towards special education. Teachers’ attitudes towards inclusive education practices have been examined in terms of gender and special education training. There are 28 studies that met the criteria listed including the sample about the influence of the gender on the attitudes towards inclusive education and 23 studies meeting the inclusion criteria including the sample about the influence of special education training on teachers’ or prospective teachers’ attitudes. The findings of the study indicated that gender and special education training did not affect the attitudes towards inclusive education significantly. Of the moderating factors observed in the study, only the differences in teachers’ branches were seen to be of significance.

  4. The role of cross-group friendship and emotions in adolescents' attitudes towards inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grütter, Jeanine; Gasser, Luciano; Malti, Tina

    2017-03-01

    Most countries have started to educate students with special educational needs (SEN) in mainstream schools, but it remains unclear how inclusive attitudes towards students with SEN can be promoted. This study investigated the role of adolescents' friendships and socio-moral competencies for their attitudes towards the inclusion of students with SEN. Specifically, we studied whether adolescents without SEN would develop more inclusive attitudes if they had close friendships with SEN students and if they expressed negative emotions about social exclusion. Adolescents' inclusive attitudes and their emotions were gathered from survey data of 1225 Swiss students aged 11-13. Social network data were collected to assess adolescents' friendship relationships. The results indicated that adolescents' friendship closeness with SEN students positively related to their inclusive attitudes. However, this was only true for adolescents who anticipated more negative than positive emotions if a student with SEN was excluded. These findings highlight the role of friendship relationships between adolescents with and without SEN and adolescents' socio-moral experiences for their attitudes towards the inclusion of peers with SEN. Thus, inclusive education may benefit from promoting friendships among students with and without SEN as well as adolescents' socio-moral competencies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Knowledge and attitude of primary health care staff screening and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Husniyah D. Qasem

    2012-08-23

    Aug 23, 2012 ... Attitude and knowledge of the primary health care ... ference was the psychological sub-domain (78.4 ± 20.3 compared with 69.4 ± 26.3%, P = 0.004). ... depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and substance abuse.

  6. Gender difference of knowledge and attitude of primary health care staff towards domestic violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadoun F. Alazmi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cultural and traditional norms in the community can have an impact on gender equity. This can be reflected on attitude of both men and women towards domestic violence against women. Gender differences in knowledge and attitude of medical staff about domestic violence can affect their role dealing with battered women. Objective: The current study was formulated to compare knowledge and attitude of male and female medical staff about domestic violence against women. Methods: To achieve this aim, a sample of 1553 health care workers was interviewed out of 2516 allocated for this study with an overall response rate of 61.7%. The target population for this study was all physicians and nurses in the primary health care centers in Kuwait. Results: The results of the current study revealed that female medical primary health care workers tended to have a higher knowledge score about violence against women than male staff (72.8 + 9.8% compared with 68.6 + 10.3%. They also had a higher overall attitude score than males (59.9 + 13.7% compared with 57.8 + 22.4%. Multivariate analysis showed that gender was a significant predictor, after adjusting for other confounding factors, of the overall knowledge, attitude and outcome scores of violence against women. No significant difference was revealed between gender and the barrier domain of violence. Conclusion: Female health care workers tended to have a better knowledge score about definition of domestic violence against women than male medical staff. Females also tended to accept hitting of wives by their husbands if there was a good reason more than males. There is a need to improve both knowledge and attitude of primary health care workers about domestic violence against women. Keywords: Domestic violence, Primary care staff, Knowledge, Attitude gender difference

  7. Awareness and Attitudes of Primary Grade Teachers (1-4thGrade) towards Inclusive Education

    OpenAIRE

    P. Maheshwari; M. Shapurkar

    2015-01-01

    The present research aimed at studying the awareness and attitudes of teachers towards inclusive education. The sample consisted of 60 teachers, teaching in the primary section (1st – 4th) of regular schools affiliated to the SSC board in Mumbai. Sample was selected by Multi-stage cluster sampling technique. A semi-structured self-constructed interview schedule and a self-constructed attitude scale was used to study the awareness of teachers about disability and Inclusive...

  8. Staff attitudes and reactions towards residents' masturbation in Spanish long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Feliciano; Serrat, Rodrigo; Celdrán, Montserrat; Fabà, Josep

    2016-03-01

    To explore staff attitudes and reactions towards masturbation in long-term care facilities. Staff attitudes and reactions towards the expression of sexuality in long-term care facilities may be influenced by the nature of the sexual behaviour being expressed. Staff attitudes towards masturbation, a common sexual behaviour in such settings, have gone largely unexplored so far. An exploratory, descriptive, qualitative research design. Fifty-three staff members working in five different long-term care facilities participated in the study. They were asked about what they would think, how they would react, and what possible reactions they might expect from workmates if they entered a room and found a resident masturbating. The majority of participants considered that masturbation was acceptable and avoiding interference was by far the most common reaction, although other reactions also arose. When asked about reactions attributed to workmates, mentions to reprimanding the resident and gossiping/joking about the issue were more frequent than acceptance. The discrepancy between professionals' own reported attitudes and those attributed to workmates suggests the existence of widespread negative reactions towards sexual activity in later life. In the light of these results, we underline the necessity of developing explicit policies regarding sexual issues. Formal training offered to staff would also help to recognise and preserve resident's sexual rights and needs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Interprofessional staff development: changing attitudes and winning hearts and minds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Elizabeth Susan; Thorpe, Lucy Nichola; Hammick, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    As more educators are involved in interprofessional education (IPE) it is important to consider how participation affects those who are sceptical about IPE. We report a prospective study in which the attitudes of 13 educators, unfamiliar with IPE, were compared before and after facilitating their first IPE. Their views, obtained as personal stories, were analysed through cognitive dissonance theory. Prior to teaching, all novice educators had concerns about IPE. Post-facilitation all were more positive about the value and meaning of IPE.

  10. Occupational therapy students' attitudes towards inclusion education in Australia, United Kingdom, United States and Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Keli; Brown, Ted; Peyton, Claudia G; Rodger, Sylvia; Huang, Yan-Hua; Wu, Chin-Yu; Watson, Callie; Stagnitti, Karen; Hutton, Eve; Casey, Jackie; Hong, Chia Swee

    2010-03-01

    This international, cross-cultural study investigated the attitudes of occupational therapy students from Australia, United Kingdom, United States and Taiwan towards inclusive education for students with disabilities. The possible impact of professional education on students' attitudes was also explored. A total of 485 students from 11 entry-level occupational therapy education programmes from Australia, the United Kingdom, the United States and Taiwan participated in the study. Among them, 264 were freshmen (first-year students) and 221 were seniors (final-year students). Data collected from a custom-designed questionnaire were analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively. In general, the occupational therapy students reported having positive attitudes towards inclusion. Considerable differences, however, existed among the student groups from the four countries. Professional education appeared to have a significant impact on students' attitudes towards inclusion from first year to senior year. Although students were in favour of inclusion, they also cautioned that their support for inclusive practices depended on various factors such as adequate preparation, support and assistance to students with disabilities. Limitations of the study included the small, convenience sample and different degree structures of the participating programmes. Future research studies need to compare occupational therapy students' attitudes with students from other health care professions. A longitudinal study on the impact of the professional education programme on students' attitudes towards inclusive education is warranted.

  11. Employer Attitudes towards the Work Inclusion of People with Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nota, Laura; Santilli, Sara; Ginevra, Maria C.; Soresi, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study examines the importance of work in life of people with disability and then focuses on employer attitudes towards these people. In the light of Stone and Colella's model, the study examines the employer attitudes and the role of variables such as type of disability, employer experience in the hiring of persons with…

  12. South African Teachers' Attitudes toward the Inclusion of Learners with Different Abilities in Mainstream Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Dana K.; Bornman, Juan

    2015-01-01

    This research sought to examine South African teachers' attitudes toward the inclusion of learners with different abilities in their hypothetical mainstream classrooms. Participants were 93 South African teachers who responded to the Teachers' Attitudes and Expectations Scale, a measure developed for this study, regarding four vignettes depicting…

  13. Preservice Teachers' Attitudes toward Inclusive Education Policy in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajuwon, Paul M.; Laman, Effie; Earle, John Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The attitudes of 224 preservice teachers from eight universities in the United States were measured to determine if participants' sentiments, attitudes, and concerns about inclusion can be positively affected through a single course, i.e., using pre and post data gathered with one instrument. There were significant differences between a number of…

  14. Attitudes of Parents towards Inclusive Education: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Anke; Pijl, Sip Jan; Minnaert, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review literature about parents' attitudes towards inclusive education. Special attention is paid to parents' attitudes and to the effect of these on the social participation of children with special needs in regular schools. A review of the literature resulted in 10 studies showing that the majority of parents hold…

  15. Teacher Attitudes on Including Students with Behavior Intervention Plans in a High-School Inclusive Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Thurman D.

    2017-01-01

    This research examined attitudes to determine factors influencing teachers' attitudes toward including students with behavior intervention plans in inclusive high-school classrooms. For Research Question 1 one-way ANOVAs analyzed quantitative data with no significant differences found and qualitative data discovered common patterns that BIPs are…

  16. Preservice Teachers' Attitudes toward Inclusion and toward Students with Special Educational Needs from Different Ethnic Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, Maria; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine; Glock, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on social cognition frameworks, we experimentally examined preservice teachers' implicit attitudes toward students with special educational needs (SEN) from different ethnic backgrounds and preservice teachers' explicit attitudes toward inclusive education. Preservice teachers (N = 46) completed an evaluative priming task and…

  17. Sentiments, Attitudes, and Concerns about Inclusion: Early Years in Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansiz, Mustafa; Cansiz, Nurcan

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to examine preservice teachers' sentiments toward students with special needs, attitudes, and concerns about inclusive education in terms of a number of demographic variables. These demographics included major area, grade level, gender, interaction with disabled people, training for inclusive education, self-confidence for teaching…

  18. The Influence of Gender and Special Education Training on Attitudes Towards Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orakci, Senol; Aktan, Osman; Toraman, Çetin; Çevik, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive education practices on special education are quite important and discussed intensively. Within this context, teachers' viewpoints and attitudes towards inclusive education practices are of great importance. There are many publications about special education practices in the literature review. In this article, it has been focused on…

  19. Teacher Attitudes towards Inclusive Education in Finland and Brandenburg, Germany and the Issue of Extra Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saloviita, Timo; Schaffus, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Positive teacher attitudes are considered an important prerequisite for the successful inclusion of students with special educational needs in the mainstream classrooms. This study surveyed teacher opinions about inclusion in Finland (N = 298) and Brandenburg, Germany (N = 163), two educational systems in which the number of students transferred…

  20. Primary School Teachers' Knowledge, Attitudes and Views on Barriers to Inclusion in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amr, Muna; Al-Natour, Mayada; Al-Abdallat, Bassam; Alkhamra, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    This study explores teachers' knowledge and attitudes toward the inclusion of students with special education needs (SEN) in mainstream schools in Jordan. It also examines the barriers the teachers perceived to hinder successful inclusions. The study sample consisted of 87 primary school teachers who responded to an open-ended questionnaire asking…

  1. Attitudes of Teachers and Headteachers towards Inclusion in Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khochen, Maha; Radford, Julie

    2012-01-01

    In the Arabic region, the drive towards inclusive practices in mainstream schools is at a relatively early stage, although, in Lebanon, the recent initiative of the National Inclusion Project (NIP), a project managed by a consortium of four organisations aimed at addressing the exclusion experienced by people with a disability, has the potential…

  2. Preparing for the Inclusive Classroom: Changing Teachers' Attitudes and Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Meenakshi; de Boer, Anke A.; Pijl, Sip Jan

    2017-01-01

    India's educational policy on inclusive education for students with disabilities is in sync with general global developments. Especially in the last couple of years there have been significant legislative achievements towards this endeavour. However, the implementation of inclusive education remains elusive. Besides this, teachers' preparedness…

  3. Preschool education studentsʼ attitude towards inclusion in preschool educational context

    OpenAIRE

    Skubic, Darija; Vidrih, Alenka

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the attitudes of preschool education students regarding inclusive teaching/inclusive practices. As a research instrument a questionnaire with 17 statements, referred to education, practices and policies of inclusion was developed. 118 students of the preschool education study programme at the Faculty of Education in Ljubljana participated in the study. There were 3 different groups of students: 25 students of the 2nd year of preschool educat...

  4. Gender, the Labour Market, the Workplace and Policy in Children's Services: Parent, Staff and Student Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Michael; Quinn, Andrea; Sumsion, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the attitudes of parents, staff and teacher education students towards the employment of men in the children's services "industry". The attitudinal survey questions were grouped around four distinct issues: gender roles, labour market behaviour, workplace behaviour and policy. Surprisingly, all three stakeholder groups…

  5. The Association between Attitude towards the Implementation of Staff Development Training and the Practice of Knowledge Sharing among Lecturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Abd. Latif; Raman, Arumugam; Don, Yahya; Daud, Yaakob; Omar, Mohd Sofian

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to identify the association of teachers' attitude towards the implementation of Staff Development Training with Knowledge Sharing Practices among the lecturers of the Teacher Training Institution (TTI). In addition, this study was also to examine the differences in attitudes towards the implementation of Staff Development…

  6. Staff attitudes to talking openly about ethical dilemmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Leila

    2010-01-01

    on business ethics communication and behavior reveals that a good predictor of ethical conduct is open workplace dialogue about ethics.  In this paper, I therefore address the question: What influences employee attitudes to talking openly about ethical issues? Answers are proposed on the basis of focus group...... interviews at the healthcare company Novo Nordisk.   It was found that interest in discussing ethical issues was influenced by two main factors: employee conceptualizations of business ethics, and the level of inter-collegial trust, credibility, and confidence. In this paper, by examining these phenomena, I...... aim at providing insight that can help managers in their attempts to promote open workplace dialogue about ethical issues....

  7. The attitudes of health care staff to information technology: a comprehensive review of the research literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Rod; Stevens, Christine; Brentnall, Philip; Briddon, Jason

    2008-06-01

    What does the publicly available literature tell us about the attitudes of health care staff to the development of information technology in practice, including the factors which influence them and the factors which may be used to change these attitudes? Twelve databases were searched for literature published between 2000 and 2005 that identified research related to information technology (IT), health professionals and attitude. English language studies were included which described primary research relating to the attitudes of one or more health care staff groups towards IT. Letters, personal viewpoints, reflections and opinion pieces were not included. Complex factors contribute to the formation of attitudes towards IT. Many of the issues identified were around the flexibility of the systems and whether they were 'fit for purpose', along with the confidence and experience of the IT users. The literature suggests that attitudes of practitioners are a significant factor in the acceptance and efficiency of use of IT in practice. The literature also suggested that education and training was a factor for encouraging the use of IT systems. A range of key issues, such as the need for flexibility and usability, appropriate education and training and the need for the software to be 'fit for purpose', showed that organizations need to plan carefully when proposing the introduction of IT-based systems into work practices. The studies reviewed did suggest that attitudes of health care professionals can be a significant factor in the acceptance and efficiency of use of IT in practice. Further qualitative and quantitative research is needed into the approaches that have most effect on the attitudes of health care staff towards IT.

  8. What Do I Think about Inclusive Education? It Depends on Who Is Asking. Experimental Evidence for a Social Desirability Bias in Attitudes towards Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüke, Timo; Grosche, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Recently, research has focused on attitudes towards inclusive education, and the majority of studies use questionnaires to measure this vital variable. In two consecutive experiments, we showed that attitudes towards inclusive education are not stable but instead are significantly influenced by social context. We manipulated information on the…

  9. Staff attitudes towards sexuality in relation to gender of people with intellectual disability: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rhea; Gore, Nick; McCarthy, Michelle

    2012-12-01

    Research has found staff attitudes regarding the sexuality of people with intellectual disability (ID) to be negative but influenced by several factors. The current study aimed to examine whether gender of people with ID affects such attitudes. Semistructured interviews were completed with 10 staff members and analysed using thematic analysis. Results indicated 3 themes: Women are perceived as sexually innocent, men as more sexually motivated, and motivations for sexual relationships are perceived to differ between men and women with ID. The study indicates unfavourable attitudes towards sexuality in individuals with ID that correlate with traditional, restricted gender stereotypes. The identification of these themes highlights the importance of considering gender when supporting the sexuality of people with ID.

  10. An Analysis of Pre-School Teachers' and Student Teachers' Attitudes to Inclusion and Their Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Hakan; Celikoz, Nadir; Secer, Zarife

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate what the self-efficacy and attitudes of pre-school teachers and student teachers towards inclusive education were and to elucidate the relationship between self-efficacy and the attitudes on inclusion. Therefore, the present study investigated the self-efficacy perceptions and attitudes of student teachers…

  11. Awareness, attitudes toward epilepsy, and first aid knowledge of seizures of hospital staff in Henan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ting; Gao, Yajuan; Zhu, Xuerui; Wang, Na; Chen, Yanan; Zhang, Jiahui; He, Guinv; Feng, Yan; Xu, Jun; Han, Xiong; Zhang, Jiewen

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate awareness of, attitudes toward, and first aid knowledge of seizures of hospital staff in Henan, China. Two hundred nineteen hospital staff, including doctors, nurses, medical technicians, logisticians, and executives working at tertiary hospitals in Henan, China, completed the survey from March to September in 2016. The data comprised the demographic data section, awareness of epilepsy section, attitude toward epilepsy section, and first aid knowledge of seizure attack section. The participants obtained a mean score of 7.48±1.705 on the awareness of epilepsy section, and a mean score of 5.32±1.165 on the first aid knowledge of seizure attacks section. There were significant correlations between educational level (r=0.187, P=0.006), occupation (r=-0.244, P=0.000), and attitudes toward patients with epilepsy (r=0.351, P=0.000) with the awareness of epilepsy. There were significant correlations between age (r=0.170, P=0.014), educational status (r=0.139, P=0.040), and professional titles (r=0.197, P=0.004) with the first aid knowledge of seizures. The study showed that hospital staff had a moderate level of knowledge regarding epilepsy, and they generally displayed a positive attitude. It was also determined that as the awareness of epilepsy increased, they displayed more positive attitudes toward patients with epilepsy. The study also suggests that specialists working on epilepsy should provide more lectures and educational sessions to improve the knowledge of and attitude toward epilepsy and first aid knowledge of seizures among hospital staff. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Supporting the Transition to Inclusive Education: Teachers' Attitudes to Inclusion in the Seychelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Susan; Chambers, Dianne J.; Sarah, Paulette

    2016-01-01

    The inclusion of children with disability in regular classroom settings has been identified worldwide as crucial to the provision of effective education for all children and to the creation of more inclusive societies. To this end there has been significant focus on pre-service and in-service teacher education to ensure that teachers are…

  13. Employer attitudes towards the work inclusion of people with disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nota, Laura; Santilli, Sara; Ginevra, Maria C; Soresi, Salvatore

    2014-11-01

    This study examines the importance of work in life of people with disability and then focuses on employer attitudes towards these people. In the light of Stone and Colella's model, the study examines the employer attitudes and the role of variables such as type of disability, employer experience in the hiring of persons with disabilities, the description of hypothetical hirees with disabilities, the ways in which employers evaluate work performance and social acceptability, and the work tasks that they consider appropriate for workers with disability. Eighty employers were randomly assigned to standard condition (candidates with disability were presented by referring to the disability they presented) or positive condition (candidates were presented with reference to their strengths). It was found that the type of disability and its presentation influence employer attitudes. In addition, realistic and conventional tasks were considered appropriate for hirees with disabilities. Implications were discussed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Attitudes of Malaysian general hospital staff towards patients with mental illness and diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midin Marhani

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The context of the study is the increased assessment and treatment of persons with mental illness in general hospital settings by general health staff, as the move away from mental hospitals gathers pace in low and middle income countries. The purpose of the study was to examine whether general attitudes of hospital staff towards persons with mental illness, and extent of mental health training and clinical experience, are associated with different attitudes and behaviours towards a patient with mental illness than towards a patients with a general health problem - diabetes. Methods General hospital health professionals in Malaysia were randomly allocated one of two vignettes, one describing a patient with mental illness and the other a patient with diabetes, and invited to complete a questionnaire examining attitudes and health care practices in relation to the case. The questionnaires completed by respondents included questions on demographics, training in mental health, exposure in clinical practice to people with mental illness, attitudes and expected health care behaviour towards the patient in the vignette, and a general questionnaire exploring negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Questionnaires with complete responses were received from 654 study participants. Results Stigmatising attitudes towards persons with mental illness were common. Those responding to the mental illness vignette (N = 356 gave significantly lower ratings on care and support and higher ratings on avoidance and negative stereotype expectations compared with those responding the diabetes vignette (N = 298. Conclusions Results support the view that, in the Malaysian setting, patients with mental illness may receive differential care from general hospital staff and that general stigmatising attitudes among professionals may influence their care practices. More direct measurement of clinician behaviours than able to be implemented

  15. Attitude of Regular and Itinerant Teachers Towards the Inclusion of Hearing Impairment Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Parhoon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Inclusive education is a process of enabling all children to learn and participate effectively within mainstream school systems. It does not segregate children who have different abilities or needs. This article explores the attitudes of regular and itinerant teachers about inclusion of hearing impairment children in their schools in general education. Methods: In a descriptive Survey research design, the sample included 100 teachers (50 regular and 50 itinerant who were selected randomly, according to a multistage sampling method. Data was collected by using questionnaire with 32 questions regarding their attitudes. One-way Analysis of Variance and t-test were performed to obtain between- group comparisons. Results: The results indicated that the teacher's positive attitudes towards inclusive educational system of students with hearing impairment. Significant difference in attitudes was observed, based on the teaching experience, gender, level of teaching. The results also indicate that most teachers are agreeable to the inclusion of students with hearing impairment in their classrooms. Discussion: successful inclusion for hearing impairment children in regular classrooms entails the positive attitudes of Regular and itinerant teachers through a systematic programming within the classroom.

  16. Stigma, public awareness about intellectual disability and attitudes to inclusion among different ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scior, K; Addai-Davis, J; Kenyon, M; Sheridan, J C

    2013-11-01

    Attitudes to the inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities (IDs) have been studied extensively, yet evidence on public awareness about ID and stigma is limited. The relationship between attitudes, knowledge and stigma associated with ID is poorly understood. The present study examined these factors and the relationships between them in the context of a multicultural society. UK residents of working age (n = 1002) were presented with a diagnostically unlabelled vignette of someone with a mild ID. They were asked to label the difficulties presented and to complete measures of social distance and attitudes to the inclusion of people with IDs. While attitudes to the inclusion of people with IDs were relatively positive overall, social contact was viewed with ambivalence. Inclusion attitudes and social distance were only moderately correlated. Across the whole sample 28% recognised typical symptoms of mild ID. Recognition of ID was associated with lower stigma and more positive attitudes than attribution of the difficulties presented to other causes. White Westerners showed increased knowledge, lower stigma and favoured inclusion more than participants from ethnic minorities. Among the latter group, Asians showed lower stigma and attitudes more in line with inclusion policies than participants of Black African/Caribbean backgrounds. Once a host of contextual factors were considered jointly, only contact was consistently associated with the variables measured. Stigma associated with ID is of concern across all ethnic groups, although it appears to be increased among the public from ethnic minorities. Given that contact and awareness are associated with reduced stigma, they should be considered as prime foci for efforts to tackle ID stigma. The current findings serve as baseline for attempts to increase public awareness and tackle stigma. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, MENCAP & IASSID.

  17. Attitudes towards patient gender among psychiatric hospital staff: results of a case study with focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumm, Silvia; Kilian, Reinhold; Becker, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    There is an increasing awareness of gender-related issues in psychiatry. However, empirical findings on attitudes of psychiatric staff towards patient gender are limited. Gender-related issues are particularly relevant in the debate about mixed versus segregated sex wards, yet while the appropriateness of mixed-sex wards is questioned in Great Britain this is not the case in Germany. To investigate attitudes of psychiatric staff towards both patient gender and mixed versus segregated sex wards, we conducted a case study using focus groups with members of professional teams. We evaluated the transition process from two single-sex wards to two mixed-sex wards in a 330-bed psychiatric hospital in a rural area in south Germany. Staff described female patients as more externally oriented, motivating of others, demanding, and even sexually aggressive. Male patients, on the other hand, were described as more quiet, modest, or lazy. Furthermore, participants described the mixing process as a positive development whereas they did not see a need for gender-separated wards in order to protect vulnerable female patients. Some gender descriptions by professionals are "reversed" in comparison with gender stereotypes supposed to be present in wider society. The perception of crossed gender norms may affect staff attitudes towards the vulnerability of female patients in psychiatric settings and the provision of single-sex wards in in-patient psychiatric care. Practical implications are discussed against the background of a high rate of female patients with sexual abuse histories.

  18. Psychometric Properties of the Revised Teachers' Attitude toward Inclusion Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsen, Jeremy J.; Ewing, Donna L.; Boyle, James

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the psychometric properties of a questionnaire measure that updates and extends Larrivee and Cook's (1979) Opinions Relative to Mainstreaming Scale in terms of structure, terminology, and language. The revised scale was tested using a sample of 106 teachers based in inclusive mainstream schools. Using Principal Component…

  19. Enhancing knowledge and attitudes in pain management: a pain management education program for nursing home staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Mimi Mun Yee; Ho, Suki S K

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effectiveness of a pain management program (PMP) in enhancing the knowledge and attitudes of health care workers in pain management. Many nursing home residents suffer from pain, and treatment of pain is often inadequate. Failure of health care workers to assess pain and their insufficient knowledge of pain management are barriers to adequate treatment. It was a quasiexperimental pretest and posttest study. Four nursing homes were approached, and 88 staff joined the 8-week PMP. Demographics and the knowledge and attitudes regarding pain were collected with the use of the Nurse's Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain-Chinese version (NKASRP-C) before and after the PMP. A deficit in knowledge and attitudes related to pain management was prominent before the PMP, and there was a significant increase in pain knowledge and attitudes from 7.9 ± SD 3.52 to 19.2 ± SD4.4 (p nursing staff and enable them to provide adequate and appropriate care to older persons in pain. PMPs for nurses and all health care professionals are important in enhancing care for older adults and to inform policy on the provision of pain management. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Montessori and Non-Montessori Early Childhood Teachers’ Attitudes Towards Inclusion and Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Danner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Montessori and non-Montessori general education early childhood teachers were surveyed about their attitudes towards including children with disabilities and providing access in their classrooms.  Both groups reported similar and positive supports for inclusion within their schools. Montessori teachers reported having less knowledge about inclusion and less special education professional development than their non-Montessori counterparts.   Implications for professional development and teacher preparation are described.

  1. Food Allergy Knowledge and Attitudes of Restaurant Managers and Staff: An EHS-Net Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, Taylor J.; Brown, Laura G.; Hoover, E. Rickamer; Faw, Brenda V.; Reimann, David; Wong, Melissa R.; Nicholas, David; Barkley, Jonathan; Ripley, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Dining outside of the home can be difficult for persons with food allergies who must rely on restaurant staff to properly prepare allergen-free meals. The purpose of this study was to understand and identify factors associated with food allergy knowledge and attitudes among restaurant managers, food workers, and servers. This study was conducted by the Environmental Health Specialists Network (EHS-Net), a collaborative forum of federal, state, and local environmental health specialists working to understand the environmental factors associated with food safety issues. EHS-Net personnel collected data from 278 randomly selected restaurants through interviews with restaurant managers, food workers, and servers. Results indicated that managers, food workers, and servers were generally knowledgeable and had positive attitudes about accommodating customers’ food allergies. However, we identified important gaps, such as more than 10% of managers and staff believed that a person with a food allergy can safely consume a small amount of that allergen. Managers and staff also had lower confidence in their restaurant’s ability to properly respond to a food allergy emergency. The knowledge and attitudes of all groups were higher at restaurants that had a specific person to answer food allergy questions and requests or a plan for answering questions from food allergic customers. However, food allergy training was not associated with knowledge in any of the groups but was associated with manager and server attitudes. Based on these findings, we encourage restaurants to be proactive by training staff about food allergies and creating plans and procedures to reduce the risk of a customer having a food allergic reaction. PMID:28221943

  2. Food Allergy Knowledge and Attitudes of Restaurant Managers and Staff: An EHS-Net Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, Taylor J; Brown, Laura G; Hoover, E Rickamer; Faw, Brenda V; Reimann, David; Wong, Melissa R; Nicholas, David; Barkley, Jonathan; Ripley, Danny

    2016-09-01

    Dining outside of the home can be difficult for persons with food allergies who must rely on restaurant staff to properly prepare allergen-free meals. The purpose of this study was to understand and identify factors associated with food allergy knowledge and attitudes among restaurant managers, food workers, and servers. This study was conducted by the Environmental Health Specialists Network (EHS-Net), a collaborative forum of federal, state, and local environmental health specialists working to understand the environmental factors associated with food safety issues. EHS-Net personnel collected data from 278 randomly selected restaurants through interviews with restaurant managers, food workers, and servers. Results indicated that managers, food workers, and servers were generally knowledgeable and had positive attitudes about accommodating customers' food allergies. However, we identified important gaps, such as more than 10% of managers and staff believed that a person with a food allergy can safely consume a small amount of that allergen. Managers and staff also had lower confidence in their restaurant's ability to properly respond to a food allergy emergency. The knowledge and attitudes of all groups were higher at restaurants that had a specific person to answer food allergy questions and requests or a plan for answering questions from food allergic customers. However, food allergy training was not associated with knowledge in any of the groups but was associated with manager and server attitudes. Based on these findings, we encourage restaurants to be proactive by training staff about food allergies and creating plans and procedures to reduce the risk of a customer having a food allergic reaction.

  3. Language barriers in medical education and attitudes towards Arabization of medicine: student and staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbour, S M; Dewedar, S A; Kandil, S K

    2012-12-04

    Students and staff perspectives on language barriers in medical education in Egypt and their attitude towards Arabization of the medical curriculum were explored in a questionnaire survey of 400 medical students and 150 staff members. Many students (56.3%) did not consider learning medicine in English an obstacle, and 44.5% of staff considered it an obstacle only in the 1st year of medical school. Many other barriers to learning other than language were mentioned. However, 44.8% of students translated English terms to Arabic to facilitate studying and 70.6% of students in their clinical study years would prefer to learn patient history-taking in Arabic. While Arabization in general was strongly declined, teaching in Arabic language was suggested as appropriate in some specialties.

  4. Casemix in the Islamic Republic of Iran: current knowledge and attitudes of health care staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, S; Doran, C M; Wilson, A

    2008-01-01

    Casemix is a tool that classifies patients according to their clinical similarity and the homogeneity of resources required. A descriptive study was conducted to assess the level of knowledge and attitude toward the casemix-based funding system among staff working in the Iranian Social Security Organization in Tehran. The survey showed that knowledge of casemix and diagnosis-related groups (DRG) was poor among the study group and any attempt to implement the casemix system--which about three-quarters of high-level staff had never heard of--would be likely to fail. This highlights the necessity for creating awareness of the casemix and DRG systems among the hospital staff before any action takes place.

  5. "My Attitude, My Responsibility" Investigating the Attitudes and Intentions of Pre-Service Teachers toward Inclusive Education between Teacher Preparation Cohorts in Melbourne and Pretoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subban, Pearl; Mahlo, Dikeledi

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the attitudes and intentions of pre-service teachers towards inclusive education, across two teacher preparation institutions in Australia and South Africa. There were multiple aims to the study: among these was a need to explore the impact of contextual factors on pre-service teacher attitudes towards inclusive education, and…

  6. [Opinions and attitudes of clinical staff on systems for the assessment and treatment of children's pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullan, A M; Fernández, E; Badia, M; Lorente, F; Malmierca, F; Zapatero, I

    2013-08-01

    Many factors affect the assessment and treatment of pain, among them being the knowledge and attitudes of clinical staff. The goal of this work was to determine the opinions and attitudes of clinical staff from two hospitals on the different aspects of the assessment and treatment of children's pain. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire issued to clinical staff. The questionnaire was given to the professionals, doctors, and nursing staff of the paediatric services of two hospitals, and to an incidental sample of paediatric doctors. Of the 146 questionnaires sent out, 105 were completed. Participants indicated that standardised scales and physiological recordings were the least frequently used methods to assess children's pain. Participants considered that pharmacological techniques for the treatment of pain were used more frequently than non-pharmacological techniques, at all ages. Participants acknowledged being significantly more knowledgeable about pharmacological methods to relieve paediatric pain than about non-pharmacological methods. There is margin for improvement in systems for the assessment and treatment of children's pain as regards the more frequent and standardised use of techniques and standardised tools for the assessment of pain, and the greater administration of non-pharmacological strategies for its treatment. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Pediatric first aid knowledge and attitudes among staff in the preschools of Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Jiang, Fan; Jin, Xingming; Qiu, Yulan; Shen, Xiaoming

    2012-08-14

    Unintentional injury remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among children worldwide. The aims of this study were to assess a baseline level of first aid knowledge and overall attitudes regarding first aid among staff members in Shanghai preschools. A cross-sectional study was carried out among the staff members at selected preschools. A stratified random sampling method was first used to identify suitable subjects. Data were obtained using a multiple-choice questionnaire. A standardized collection of demographics was performed and participants were given the aforementioned questionnaire to indicate knowledge of and attitudes toward first aid. 1067 subjects completed the questionnaire. None of the surveyed employees answered all questions correctly; only 39 individuals (3.7%) achieved passing scores. The relative number of correct answers to specific questions ranged from 16.5% to 90.2%. In particular, subjects lacked knowledge regarding first aid for convulsive seizures (only 16.5% answered correctly), chemical injuries to the eye (23%), inhaled poison (27.6%), and choking and coughing (30.1%). A multiple linear regression analysis showed scores were significantly higher among staff members with more education, those who had received first aid training before or were already healthcare providers, younger employees, and staff members from rural districts. Most employees agreed that giving first aid was helpful; the vast majority felt that it was important and useful for them to learn pediatric first aid. The level of first-aid knowledge among preschool staffs in Shanghai was low. There is an urgent need to educate staff members regarding first aid practices and the various risk factors relating to specific injuries.

  8. Montessori and Non-Montessori Early Childhood Teachers' Attitudes toward Inclusion and Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Natalie; Fowler, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Montessori and non-Montessori general education early childhood teachers were surveyed about their attitudes toward including children with disabilities and providing these students access to the curriculum. Both groups reported similar and positive system-wide supports for inclusion within their schools. Montessori teachers reported having less…

  9. Mainstream Students' Attitudes to Possible Inclusion in Unified Sports with Students Who Have an Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Michael; Hassall, John

    2007-01-01

    Background: Schools in New Zealand do not normally include students with intellectual disability in their sports programmes. This study examined regular students' attitudes towards the possible inclusion of students with an intellectual disability in an integrated sports programme within their school. Materials and Methods: A total of 170 school…

  10. Relations between Secondary Art Teachers' Personal Education Theories and Attitudes about Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjack, Sharon Kay

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was multifold: to define secondary art teachers. personal practical theories about the purposes of art education; to examine teachers. attitudes toward the inclusion of students with learning disabilities (LD) and those with emotional/behavioral disabilities (EBD) into their classrooms; and to determine the relation between…

  11. The Relationship between Teacher Attitude and Self-Efficacy for Inclusive Practices in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özokcu, Osman

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the relationship between Turkish teachers' attitudes and their self-efficacy for inclusive practices using a relational survey design. Study participants included a total of 1163 preschool, classroom, subject-matter, and special-education teachers from four different geographical regions in Turkey. The data was…

  12. Impact of Single-Case Pupil Descriptions on Student Teacher Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhm, Alexander; Schnöring, Annika; Hastall, Matthias R.

    2018-01-01

    Institutional and individual stigmatization are still major barriers for children with disabilities to access education. Teacher attitudes towards inclusive education play a crucial role in this regard, and are shaped by single-case descriptions from mass media or other sources. Building on exemplification theory and priming, two experiments with…

  13. Attitudes of Secondary School Teachers towards Inclusive Education in New Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Nisha; Das, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the attitudes of secondary regular schoolteachers towards the inclusion of students with disabilities in New Delhi. A total of 470 teachers, working in schools managed by a private organisation in Delhi, returned the completed survey. A two-part questionnaire was used in this study. Part one gathered…

  14. The psychometric evaluation of a questionnaire to measure attitudes towards inclusive education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Anke; Timmerman, Marieke; Pijl, Sip Jan; Minnaert, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    In many countries, there has been a development towards the inclusion of students with special educational needs in regular education. Over the past decade, this has resulted in an increased interest in attitudes towards this educational change of those directly involved. This current study aims at

  15. The Psychometric Evaluation of a Questionnaire to Measure Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Anke; Timmerman, Marieke; Pijl, Sip Jan; Minnaert, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    In many countries, there has been a development towards the inclusion of students with special educational needs in regular education. Over the past decade, this has resulted in an increased interest in attitudes towards this educational change of those directly involved. This current study aims at the development, psychometric evaluation, and…

  16. Content Validation of the Scale of Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusive Classrooms (STATIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Trisha Sugita; Busse, R. T.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the content validity of the Scale of Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusive Classrooms (STATIC). An expert panel of 20 special education teachers and five university faculty members provided individual item ratings on a five-point scale regarding wording and content, along with comments. Item and comment…

  17. Teachers’ Attitudes and Self-Efficacy Towards Inclusion of Pupils with Disabilities in Tanzanian Schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, Roelande H.; Kilimo, Judith S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study in to investigate factors that are related to teachers’ attitudes and perception of self-efficacy towards pupils with disabilities and the problems teachers experienced in the implementation of inclusive primary education in Tanzania. The study involved a sample of 100

  18. Building Alliance for Preschool Inclusion: Parents of Typically Developing Children, Attitudes and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sira, Natalia; Maine, Erica; McNeil, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    The current study investigated perceptions, thoughts, and attitudes of parents of typically developing children enrolled in inclusive 3-year-old and 4-year-old preschool classrooms. Using a qualitative approach, guided by ecological system theory semi-structured interviews with parents (N = 7) were completed. Several common themes related to…

  19. Attitudes of stakeholders in psychiatry towards the inclusion of children in genomic research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundby, Anna; Boolsen, Merete Watt; Burgdorf, Kristoffer Sølvsten

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genomic sequencing of children in research raises complex ethical issues. This study aims to gain more knowledge on the attitudes towards the inclusion of children as research subjects in genomic research and towards the disclosure of pertinent and incidental findings to the parents a...

  20. Attitudes of nursing staff towards involvement in medical end-of-life decisions: a national survey study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, G.; Francke, A.L.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Bilsen, J.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate nursing staff attitudes towards involvement and role in end-of-life decisions (ELD) and the relationships with sociodemographic and work-related characteristics. Methods: Survey study among nationally representative Dutch research sample consisting of care professionals.

  1. Attitudes of nursing staff towards involvement in medical end-of-life decisions: A national survey study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, G.; Francke, A.L.; de Veer, A.J.E.; Bilsen, J.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate nursing staff attitudes towards involvement and role in end-of-life decisions (ELDs) and the relationships with sociodemographic and work-related characteristics. Methods: Survey study among nationally representative Dutch research sample consisting of care professionals.

  2. What's so Inclusive about an Inclusion Room? Staff Perspectives on Student Participation, Diversity and Equality in an English Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Gwen

    2012-01-01

    This article by Gwen Gilmore, a lecturer in the School of Curriculum and Pedagogy at Massey University, draws on a research project which explored the nature, extent and characteristics of a disciplinary inclusion room (IR) in a secondary school in the south-west of England using a Cultural Historical Activity Theory framework. In five years to…

  3. Teachers' Attitudes toward the Inclusion of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in Regular Education Classrooms in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseery, Fahad. A.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated teachers attitudes toward including Deaf and hard of hearing (D/hh) students in regular education classrooms in Saudi Arabia. In addition, the study analyzed how the teachers' attitudes toward inclusion were influenced by the following variables: teaching position, training on inclusion the teachers had received, years of…

  4. Inclusion of Children with Hearing Impairment in Schools: A Survey on Teachers’ Attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Santhi S Prakash

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Inclusion of children with disabilities in mainstream classrooms has become the focus of extensive research in education. It has both academic and social benefits for all students, such as providing opportunities for communication and social interaction. The evaluation of teachers’ attitudes towards inclusion appears to be a good method to determine the success of the programme. Although this has been widely researched in many countries, the available evidence is not consistent. This study was undertaken in the state of Andhra Pradesh in India, to measure and compare teachers’ attitudes towards the inclusion of children with hearing impairment in schools.Method: A questionnaire developed by Giles and Tanner (1995 measuring three domains - (1 effective strategies for meeting the needs of all students, (2 the support for educational change in their district, and (3 inclusive education - was modified in keeping with cultural and geographical variations and used as the test tool. A hundred teachers of various Government and non-Government schools in 2 districts of Andhra Pradesh, India, participated in the study.Results: Higher scores on domain 1 indicate that teachers feel effective strategies to benefit students with disabilities should be implemented in schools. The results also indicate that most teachers are agreeable to the inclusion of students with disabilities in their classrooms. Significant difference in attitudes was observed, based on the teachers’ qualifications, teaching experience, gender, level of teaching and management.Conclusion: The study concludes that there is a need for intervention to foster more positive attitudes among teachers, if the implementation of inclusive education is to succeed. It also has implications for the framing of laws and policies for children with hearing impairments.doi: 10.5463/dcid.v23i3.117

  5. The predictors of students' attitude towards inclusion of children with disabilities in physical education classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlić Ana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Positive attitude towards inclusion of children with disabilities in Physical Education (PE classes is one quite important factor for successful implementation of inclusive education. The aim of this study was to examine the predictors of attitude of the students as future PE teachers towards inclusion in PE. In this study, the predictors in the field of personality, professional competences for working with children with disabilities and certain personal characteristics (gender were included. The sample included 221 students of the final year of studies at the Faculty of Sport and Physical Education in Belgrade, Niš and Novi Sad. In order to measure the attitude towards inclusion in PE, the instrument of Attitude Toward Inclusive Physical Education was used. In the field of personality, a trait of openness to experience was examined, which was measured using the HEXACO PI-R instrument. An additional questionnaire was also designed by which the students were asked to indicate their gender and professional competences for working with children with disabilities: their average mark during the studies, subjective assessment of the level of knowledge and skills required for working with children with disabilities acquired in the course of their studies (self-assessment of professional competence and experience in working with children with disabilities during their professional practice. The results of multiple regression analysis showed that openness to experience, self-assessment of professional competence and gender were significant predictors. The results indicate that, during the training for teaching profession, it is necessary to develop students' specific competences required for the work in inclusive education as well as to create the teaching atmosphere which will enhance inquisitiveness and creativity as significant determinants of the trait of openness to experience.

  6. Paramedical staffs knowledge and attitudes towards antimicrobial resistance in Dire Dawa, Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafa, Belay; Endale, Adugna; Bekele, Desalegn

    2017-09-19

    The continuing emergence, development and spread of pathogenic organisms that are resistant to antimicrobials are a cause of increasing concern. The control of antimicrobial resistance requires knowledge of factors causing antimicrobial resistance, good attitudes towards the intervention strategies as well as changes in antibiotic prescribing behavior of health workers. Hence, this study was aimed to assess paramedical staffs' knowledge and attitudes towards antimicrobial resistance and their antibiotics prescription practices in Dire Dawa, Ethiopia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among paramedical staffs working in hospitals and health centers. A total of 218 paramedical staffs were participated and a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20. Chi square/Fisher's exact tests were used for comparison of data and a p value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Out of the total, 137 (62.8%) of paramedical staffs had good knowledge on the factors causing antimicrobial resistance. The most common causes of antimicrobial resistance reported were patients' poor adherence (96.5%), self prescription (95%), and empiric choice of antibiotics (94.5%). In general, more than 80% of the respondents had positive attitudes towards the antimicrobials resistance intervention strategies. Relatively less proportion of participants recognized that antimicrobial resistance as a problem in their local institutions. The most perceived driving forces for unnecessary antibiotics prescriptions were treatment failure (67.7%) and patient push (53.3%). The majority, 76.9% of the prescribers mentioned that standard treatment guidelines were available in their institutions though only 15.7% of them reported referring the guidelines on the daily basis. Among the prescribers, 85.8% never attended formal trainings on antibiotics prescriptions. As this study generated important information on knowledge and attitudes

  7. Knowledge and attitudes regarding neonatal pain among nursing staff of pediatric department: an Indian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimbalkar, Archana S; Dongara, Ashish R; Phatak, Ajay G; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M

    2014-03-01

    Neonates receiving care in intensive care units are highly likely to experience pain due to investigations and/or treatments carried out by the health care providers. Neonates are a vulnerable population because they are unable to vocalize their pain. Unaddressed and mismanaged pain can not only affect the child's comfort, but also may alter the development and cognitive abilities of the child in a later part of his/her life. Therefore it is entirely the caregiver's responsibility to accurately assess and manage neonatal pain. We assessed and compared the knowledge and attitudes regarding neonatal pain among the nurses posted in the various units of a pediatric department [pediatric ward, pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)]. An appropriately modified Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain questionnaire was consensually validated, pretested, and then administered to the nursing staff of the pediatric department at a department at a hospital in Gujarat. Data were entered in Epi-Info and analyzed with the use of SPSS 14.0. The questionnaire was administered to 41 nurses working in the Department of Pediatrics, and the response rate was 97.5%. Mean age of the nurses in the study sample was 25.75 years (SD 5.513). The mean total score of the participants was 8.75 out of 17 (SD 2.549), which was unsatisfactory. The mean correct answer rate was 49.67% among the staff of NICU and 48.67% among the pediatric ward and PICU staff. The attitudes among the nurses were assessed. It was concluded that the nurses lack knowledge and that their attitudes also were hindering pain management. One of the barriers identified by the nurses was that physicians do not prescribe analgesics for managing neonatal pain. So not only the nursing staff, but all of the caregivers involved in neonatal care may be lacking in knowledge and hold perceptions and attitudes that hamper neonatal pain management. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain

  8. The Effect of School-Based Practice on Student Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education in Northern Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Jackie; Bones, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This study seeks to discover the attitudes to inclusion of those about to embark on initial teacher education in Northern Ireland and the extent to which an extended teaching practice in a non-selective placement school can influence attitude change. A cohort of 125 student teachers responded to a survey that explored their attitudes towards a…

  9. Effects of Exposure to Inclusion and Socioeconomic Status on Parental Attitudes towards the Inclusion of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Tova; Ingber, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the attitudes of parents of normal hearing (NH) children towards the inclusion of deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children in the educational setting of their child. In particular, it examined the effect of parental socio economic status (SES) and exposure to inclusion (whether their child was in a class…

  10. Attitudes toward the use of gender-inclusive language among residency trainees. The McMaster Residency Training Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyatt, G H; Cook, D J; Griffith, L; Walter, S D; Risdon, C; Liutkus, J

    1997-05-01

    To explore postgraduate medical trainees' attitudes toward the use of gender-inclusive language. Self-administered questionnaire. Seven residency training programs at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., from July 1993 to June 1994. Of 225 residents in the programs, 186 responded to the survey, for a response rate of 82.7%. Men and women were equally represented among the respondents. Categorization of attitudes about the use of language as gender-inclusive or gender-exclusive; characteristics predicting a gender-inclusive attitude. Factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha (0.90) supported the existence of a construct related to attitudes about language use, the poles of which were categorized as gender-inclusive and gender-exclusive. The authors classified residents with respect to their attitudes to language use from their responses to the questionnaire. In univariate analyses, sex, residency program and country of graduation significantly predicted a gender-inclusive attitude (p inclusive attitudes, whereas residents in surgery and anesthesia had the most gender-exclusive attitudes. Residents' values are reflected in the language they choose to use. Language use may provide an index of underlying attitudes that may create hostile environments for female trainees.

  11. Attitudes of Students towards Peers with Disability in an Inclusive School in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omolara Olaleye

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The majority of children and young people with disabilities live in developing countries where they face inequalities in education and other opportunities. Negative attitudes constitute one of the major barriers to the development of their potential. This study aimed to describe the attitudes of students without disability towards their peers with disability, and to assess the role that gender and interpersonal contact play in shaping these attitudes. Method: A cross-sectional study involving 107 students was carried out at an inclusive secondary school located in a peri-urban area in South Western Nigeria. Participants were recruited from a group of 118 students in the three junior classes and senior class one (JSS 1 to SSS 1. A semi-structured questionnaire containing items on the “Chedoke-McMaster Attitudes Towards Children with Handicaps (CATCH scale”, which elicits responses on a Likert scale numbered 0 to 4 (0-strongly disagree, 4-strongly agree, was administered. Data analysis was done using Stata version 12. Descriptive analysis was carried out and association between variables was  determined using independent two-tailed t-tests.Results: The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of the scale was 0.83. The attitudes of students in the school were generally positive (M = 22.55, SD = 3.79. Female students had higher total scores (M = 24.76, SD = 2.78 than their male contemporaries (M = 19.84, SD = 3.05, t (103 = 8.55, p = .000. Having a friend/relative with a disability was associated with more positive attitudes among female students.Conclusions: In this inclusive setting, the attitudes of students towards their peers with disability were generally positive. Since interpersonal contact was associated with positive attitudes towards students with disabilities, interventions should be directed towards promoting interpersonal relationships in order to build an integrated society.doi: 10.5463/dcid.v23i3.136

  12. Evaluation of a Staff Training Programme using Positive Psychology coaching with film and theatre elements in care homes: views and attitudes of residents, staff and relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Azucena; Wenborn, Jennifer; Ledgerd, Ritchard; Orrell, Martin

    2017-03-01

    There is a recognised need to improve staff training in care homes. The aim of this study was to conduct a qualitative evaluation of the Ladder to the Moon Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme (CCSEP), a staff training programme aimed at enhancing staff-resident communication. Focus groups were conducted with residents able to provide consent; staff and relatives and managers were interviewed in two care homes. A theoretical framework was developed to interpret the impact of CCSEP using Framework Analysis. Residents noted that the programme appeared to result in staff interacting more with them, as well as enjoying working together as a team. Staff reported an improved sense of teamwork, developing more positive attitudes towards residents, as well as their concerns about using theatrical techniques in the care setting. Relatives identified care home organisational aspects as being barriers to implementation, and some regarded CCSEP simply as 'entertainment' rather than 'creative care'. This study provides an insight into the potential of this staff training programme to improve staff-resident interactions. However, participants' varying views of CCSEP highlight the need to brief staff, residents and relatives before implementation so as to enable full understanding of the aim. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Knowledge of and Attitudes Regarding Postoperative Pain among the Pediatric Cardiac Nursing Staff: An Indian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongara, Ashish R; Shah, Shail N; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M; Phatak, Ajay G; Nimbalkar, Archana S

    2015-06-01

    Pain following cardiac intervention in children is a common, but complex phenomenon. Identifying and reporting pain is the responsibility of the nursing staff, who are the primary caregivers and spend the most time with the patients. Inadequately managed pain in children may lead to multiple short- and long-term adverse effects. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes regarding postoperative pain in children among the nursing staff at B.M. Patel Cardiac Center, Karamsad, Anand, Gujarat, India. The study included 42 of the 45 nurses employed in the cardiac center. The nurses participating in the study were responsible for the care of the pediatric patients. A modified Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain and a sociodemographic questionnaire were administered after obtaining written informed consent. The study was approved by the institutional Human Research Ethics Committee. Mean (SD) experience in years of the nursing staff was 2.32 (1.69) years (range 1 month to 5 years). Of the nurses, 67% were posted in the cardiac surgical intensive care unit (ICU). The mean (SD) score for true/false questions was 11.48 (2.95; range 7,19). The average correct response rate of the true/false questions was 45.9%. Knowledge about pain was only affected by the ward in which the nurse was posted. In first (asymptomatic) and second (symptomatic) case scenarios, 78.6% and 59.5% underestimated pain, respectively. Knowledge and attitudes regarding pain and its management is poor among nurses. Targeted training sessions and repeated reinforcement sessions are essential for holistic patient care. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Utilizing doctors' attitudes toward staff training to inform a chiropractic technology curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart, Catherine A; Martel, Stacie S

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine attitudes of doctors of chiropractic regarding the importance of staff training in specific skill areas to inform the curriculum management process of a chiropractic technology program. A survey was distributed to registrants of a chiropractic homecoming event. On a 5-point Likert scale, respondents were asked to rate the degree of importance that staff members be trained in specific skills. Descriptive statistics were derived, and a 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test differences between groups based on years in practice and level of staff training. Doctors place a high level of importance on oral communication skills and low importance on nutrition and physical examinations. Comparing groups based on years in practice revealed differences in the areas of passive physiotherapies (F = 3.61, p = .015), legal issues/regulations (F = 3.01, p = .032), occupational safety and health regulation (F = 4.27, p = .006), and marketing (F = 2.67, p = .049). Comparing groups based on level of staff training revealed differences in the areas of occupational safety and health regulations (F = 4.56, p = .005) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (F = 4.91, p = .003). With regard to their assistants, doctors of chiropractic tend to place high importance on office skills requiring effective communication and place less importance on clinical skills such as physical examinations and physiotherapy.

  15. The impact of educational interventions on attitudes of emergency department staff towards patients with substance-related presentations: a quantitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Miriam; Clarke, Diana E; Pereira, Asha; Boyce-Gaudreau, Krystal; Waldman, Celeste; Demczuk, Lisa; Legare, Carol

    2017-08-01

    Visits to emergency departments for substance use/abuse are common worldwide. However, emergency department health care providers perceive substance-using patients as a challenging group to manage which can lead to negative attitudes. Providing education or experience-based exercises may impact positively on behaviors towards this patient population. Whether staff attitudes are similarly impacted by knowledge acquired through educational interventions remains unknown. To synthesize available evidence on the relationship between new knowledge gained through substance use educational interventions and emergency department health care providers' attitudes towards patients with substance-related presentations. Health care providers working in urban and rural emergency departments of healthcare facilities worldwide providing care to adult patients with substance-related presentations. Quantitative papers examining the impact of substance use educational interventions on health care providers' attitudes towards substance using patients. Experimental and non-experimental study designs. Emergency department staff attitudes towards patients presenting with substance use/abuse. A three-step search strategy was conducted in August 2015 with a search update in March 2017. Studies published since 1995 in English, French or Spanish were considered for inclusion. Two reviewers assessed studies for methodological quality using critical appraisal checklists from the Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-MAStARI). Reviewers agreed on JBI-MAStARI methodological criteria a study must meet in order to be included in the review (e.g. appropriate use of statistical analysis). The data extraction instrument from JBI-MAStARI was used. As statistical pooling of the data was not possible, the findings are presented in narrative form. A total of 900 articles were identified as relevant for this review. Following abstract and full text

  16. Smoking in hospital: a survey of attitudes of staff, patients, and visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, D J; Gough, N A; Taylor, E J; Banks, M H; Sönksen, P H

    1978-01-01

    A survey was carried out on attitudes to smoking in hospital. Analysis of 411 interviews showed that the majority (64%) of those questioned approved of some restrictions on patients smoking in the wards. Eighteen per cent would have liked to see a complete ban on smoking, while an identical number favoured no restrictions at all. Smoking habit influenced response; only 8% of smokers, compared with 25% of non-smokers, would have liked to see a total ban on smoking. Attitudes to smoking varied according to the status of the persons interviewed; only 6% of visitors and 7% of nurses approved of a complete ban on smoking, compared with 32% of medical students and 27% of doctors. The results suggest that the introduction of smoking and non-smoking areas in hospital wards would be approved by the majority of patients, staff, and visitors. PMID:711983

  17. Design and validation of a questionnaire to measure the attitudes of hospital staff concerning pandemic influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghavi, Seyed Hamid Reza; Shabestari, Omid; Roudsari, Abdul V; Harrison, John

    2012-03-01

    When pandemics lead to a higher workload in the healthcare sector, the attitude of healthcare staff and, more importantly, the ability to predict the rate of absence due to sickness are crucial factors in emergency preparedness and resource allocation. The aim of this study was to design and validate a questionnaire to measure the attitude of hospital staff toward work attendance during an influenza pandemic. An online questionnaire was designed and electronically distributed to the staff of a teaching medical institution in the United Kingdom. The questionnaire was designed de novo following discussions with colleagues at Imperial College and with reference to the literature on the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic. The questionnaire included 15 independent fact variables and 33 dependent measure variables. A total of 367 responses were received in this survey. The data from the measurement variables were not normally distributed. Three different methods (standardized residuals, Mahalanobis distance and Cook's distance) were used to identify the outliers. In all, 19 respondents (5.17%) were identified as outliers and were excluded. The responses to this questionnaire had a wide range of missing data, from 1 to 74 cases in the measured variables. To improve the quality of the data, missing value analysis, using Expectation Maximization Algorithm (EMA) with a non-normal distribution model, was applied to the responses. The collected data were checked for homoscedasticity and multicollinearity of the variables. These tests suggested that some of the questions should be merged. In the last step, the reliability of the questionnaire was evaluated. This process showed that three questions reduced the reliability of the questionnaire. Removing those questions helped to achieve the desired level of reliability. With the changes proposed in this article, the questionnaire for measuring staff attitudes concerning pandemic influenza can be converted to a

  18. Can staff attitudes to team working in stroke care be improved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon, Bernard; Watkins, Caroline; Barer, David; Waters, Karen; Davies, Steve; Lightbody, Liz; Leathley, Michael

    2002-10-01

    Teamwork is regarded as the cornerstone of rehabilitation. It is recognized that the skills of a multiprofessional team are required to provide the care and interventions necessary to maximize the patient's potential to recover from his/her stroke. Critical evaluation of team working is lacking in the literature. Indeed, there is no consensus on a precise definition of teamwork or on the best way of implementing it, beyond a general exhortation to members to work to the same therapeutic plan in a cohesive manner. The literature has highlighted many problems in team working, including petty jealousies, ignorance and a perceived loss of autonomy and threat to professional status. To determine if the use of team co-ordinated approaches to stroke care and rehabilitation would improve staff attitudes to team working. A pre-post design was adopted using 'The Team Climate Inventory' to explore attitudes to team working before and after introducing the interventions. Local Research Ethics Committee approval was obtained. Improvements in attitudes towards team working suggest that the introduction of team co-ordinated approaches (integrated care pathways and team notes) did not result in greater team working. The introduction of an integrated care pathway and team notes is based on an assumption that they would enhance team working. The results suggest that the introduction of team co-ordinated approaches (team notes and care pathways) do not improve attitudes to team working, teams appear to take a long time to establish cohesion and develop shared values.

  19. Attitudes of stakeholders in psychiatry towards the inclusion of children in genomic research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundby, Anna; Boolsen, Merete Watt; Burgdorf, Kristoffer Sølvsten

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genomic sequencing of children in research raises complex ethical issues. This study aims to gain more knowledge on the attitudes towards the inclusion of children as research subjects in genomic research and towards the disclosure of pertinent and incidental findings to the parents...... age. Having children does not affect the stakeholder's attitudes towards the inclusion of children as research subjects in genomic research. CONCLUSION: Our findings illustrate that both the child's right to autonomy and the parents' interest to be informed are important factors that are found...... disclosing genetic information. Other important aspects were the child's right to an autonomous choice, the emotional burden of knowing imposed on both the child and the parents, and the possibility of receiving beneficial clinical information regarding the future health of the child. Nevertheless...

  20. The Impact of Paralympic School Day on Student Attitudes Toward Inclusion in Physical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Cathy; Block, Martin; Park, Jung Yeon

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if Paralympic School Day (PSD), a published disability awareness program, would have a positive impact on the attitudes of students without disabilities toward the inclusion of students with disabilities in physical education classes. Participants were 143 sixth-grade students who were divided into 2 groups (experimental n = 71, control n = 72), with the experimental group receiving the PSD treatment. Participants responded 2 times to Siperstein's Adjective Checklist and Block's Children's Attitudes Toward Integrated Physical Education-Revised (CAIPE-R) questionnaire. Four ANCOVA tests were conducted. Results indicated a significant PSD treatment effect across all 4 measures: Adjective Checklist (p = .046, η² = .03), CAIPE-R (p = .002, η² = .04), inclusion subscale (p = .001, η² = .05), and sport-modification subscale (p = .027, η² = .02).

  1. MANAGERS’ ATTITUDES TOWARDS GENDER HIRING STAFF FOR A CHILD-CARE ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raminta Bardauskienė

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to investigate the attitudes of the managers towards gender hiring staff for a chidl-care institution. The subject of the research is the attitude of the managers towards gender. The scientific problem is formulated on the question: What are the manager’s attitudes towards gender ghiring staff for a chidl-care institution? A qualitative research strategy was used. The data were collected through semi structured interview. The results are analysed using the content analysis method. The study was carried out in 2015-2016 at the 5 units of the child-care organization. By applying a criterion sampling 5 managers who have not less than 3 years of senior management experience were chosen to participate in the study. One participant in has acquired a social work qualification and the majority of participant has had considerable work experience in the field of social work (the average of the work at the child-care organization was 13 years. The age of the participants is from 35 to 55 years. The average length of the interview is 40 minutes. The results indicate that the high profile of gender-based attitudes of managers are manifested through the traditional approach to men and women and defines the criteria used to shape the workforce in a child care organization. Participants in the study confirm the stereotypical attitude towards the emerging traditions of gender roles as self-existent, distinguishing the nature of men and women, for which one or another gender “naturally” is better able to realize themselves in different spheres of professional activity. A female employee is still traditionally seen as a guardian of the children, so men in this area are treated as incapable, too weak to handle their duties. On the other hand, men who do not conform to the dominant masculine model in society are also not desirable in the child-care organization. Those men who work as social workers tend to take leadership

  2. Job satisfaction and attitudes of restaurant staff regarding the smoking ban – a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljudevit Pranić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available While extant research on the impacts of smoke-free legislation on hospitality employees and industries has centered on developed countries, the research on the effects of smoking bans in transition countries has received very little attention. Hoping to assist in filling this void, this research empirically explores the relationships among restaurant employees’ attitudes, demographics, work-related variables (WRV, and job satisfaction after the introduction of a smoke-free legislation in one transition economy, i.e. Croatia. Results revealed that gender, education, age, restaurant seating allocation, hospitality work experience, smoking status, average weekly workload, and the restaurant area served were for the most part not significant in explaining different perceptions toward a smoking ban. However, the respondents’ preferred restaurant smoking policy somewhat influenced how respondents view the smoking ban. In terms of the respondents’ preferred restaurant smoking policy, results revealed no significant differences in regards to demographics and WRV. With regard to job satisfaction, staff with more positive post-implementation attitudes towards the ban exhibit somewhat higher levels of satisfaction with the current job. Overall, respondents appear willing to make concessions for both pro- and anti-smoking patrons, staff, and owners/managers. Therefore, lawmakers should consider population characteristics, seating allocation, and the combination thereof when devising restaurant smoking policies.

  3. Knowledge on, and attitude toward, HIV/AIDS among staff of an international organization in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Tajul; Mostafa, Golam; Bhuiya, Abbas Uddin; Hawkes, Sarah; de Francisco, Andres

    2002-09-01

    Two hundred and ninety-three randomly-selected members of the staff of ICDDR,B: Centre for Health and Population Research were surveyed anonymously in June 1998, using a pre-tested and self-administered questionnaire, to assess their knowledge on, and attitude toward, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). All except 4 (1.4%) heard of AIDS. Main sources of information were radio and television (93%), newspapers and magazines (84.8%), posters and leaflets (70.2%), and friends (59.2%). About 94% of the respondents believed that HIV might spread in Bangladesh. Only 61.6% knew about the causative agent for AIDS. More than 96% had knowledge that HIV could be detected through blood test. The respondents were aware that unprotected sexual intercourse (92%), transfusion of blood and blood components (93.8%), sharing unsterile needles for injections (94.1%), and delivery of babies by infected mothers (82.7%) could transmit HIV. Similarly, the respondents had the knowledge that HIV infection could be prevented by using condom during sexual intercourse (85.5%), having sex only with an HIV-negative faithful partner (87.2%), avoiding transfusion of blood not screened for HIV (88.9%), and taking injections with sterile needles (86.5%). However, only 33.0% had the knowledge that HIV-infected persons can look healthy, and 56.4% were unaware of transmission through breastmilk. Most members of the staff, particularly at lower level, had misconceptions about transmission and prevention of HIV/AIDS. More than 40% of the respondents had the attitude that HIV-infected persons should not be allowed to work, while another 10% did not have any idea about it. The findings of the study suggest that the members of the Centre's staff have a satisfactory level of essential knowledge on HIV/AIDS, although half of them have poor attitudes toward persons with HIV/AIDS. Therefore, preventive strategy for the staff should be directed toward behaviour change

  4. Attitude of staff of Kashan university of medical sciences concerning their annual performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ahmad Hosseini Golafshani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Performance assessment in organizations can lead to healthy relationships in the workplace, and it also pays grounds for intellectual growth and improvement of staff performance. This study examines the attitudes of Staff of Kashan University of Medical Sciences and Health Services about their annual performance. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, 714 staff were randomly selected. The data of this study were collected by a questionnaire, whose validity and credit were tested. Then, in two stages, samples of 52 and 56 persons were taken and by two-half method and calculating the homogeneity coefficient and the Cronbach's coefficient alpha and Kuder-Richardson coefficients in the second step get to the Cronbach's coefficient alpha 93% that final validity was acceptable. The collected data were analyzed using the SPSS Inc. Released 2007. SPSS for Windows, Version 16.0. (Chicago, SPSS Inc.. Results: The results of this study showed that the mean and standard deviation of age of the employees were 37.16 ± 7.1 years and their working history was 12.4 ± 7.7 years. A total of 256 participants (35.8% considered the current evaluation as inappropriate or completely inappropriate performance assessment, 303 participants (42.4% almost appropriate, 155 participants (21.7% suitable or perfectly suitable. About 47.9% of participants rated the best period of evaluation yearly, and 552 participants (77.3% of the statistical society were considered assessment in the presence of the employee appropriate. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that the attitude of more than 50% of employees was positive about the annual performance assessment.

  5. The attitudes of undergraduate students and staff to the use of electronic learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, B; White, D A; Walmsley, A D

    2004-04-24

    Computer-aided learning (CAL) offers advantages over traditional methods of learning as it allows students to work in their own time and pace. The School of Dentistry at the University of Birmingham has created an electronic learning website, named the Ecourse. This is designed to be a web-based supplement to the dental undergraduate curriculum. The aim of this study was to determine the attitudes of third year dental students and members of staff about the Ecourse website. A questionnaire was produced and piloted before being distributed to all 65 third year dental students to obtain their opinions about the Ecourse website. The views of Ecourse were sought from four members of staff by performing qualitative, semi-structured interviews. Lecture handouts and textbooks were reported as the sources used most often, by 96% of students. Eighty-six per cent of students are accessing the Ecourse mainly at the School of Dentistry, but 53% are also accessing it at home. Students liked the multiple-choice questions, downloading extra notes and looking at pictures and animation to explain clinical procedures. The majority of the students (79%) want the Ecourse to be used as a supplement to the undergraduate programme and 7% wanted it to replace formal lectures. Staff recognised the benefits of the Ecourse but were concerned about plagiarism, the effect on lecture attendance and the lack of feedback from students on existing CAL material. Students consider the Ecourse as a positive method of supplementing traditional methods of learning in the dental undergraduate programme. However in contrast teaching staff expressed negative views on the use of e-learning.

  6. INCLUSION OF CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS IN REGULAR SCHOOLS: STUDENTS ATTITUDES AND PERCEPTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila MALCOCI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Republic of Moldova started the process of deinstitutionalization of children with disabilities/and special educational needs and their inclusion in biological families and mainstream community based services. Alongside with the deinstitutionalization, inclusion of children with special educational needs in regular community schools became a strategic direction of the educational policies in Moldova. In 2014, the Alliance of NGOs in the field of Social Protection of Family and Child conducted a research on assessment of inclusive education models implemented in pilot schools with the aim to identify positive practices, learned lessons and challenges in developing policies in the field of evidence-based education2 The research was conducted in 20 pilot schools from 12 counties. There were interviewed 200 teachers, 20 school managers, 360 students (162 pupils with SEN, 112 students studying in classes with children with SEN and 86 children studying in classes with no students having SEN. 10 focus group discussions with caregivers, students, teachers, parents (all in total 100 participants and 6 interviews with the general directorates of education and mayors were conducted. The article is focused on comparative analysis of perceptions, attitudes and behaviors of students with SEN and typical students regarding the inclusion of children with SEN in regular schools. The author concluded that the implementation of inclusive education resulted in rather positive changes in respective schools: provision with materials, modern devices, improvement of teaching quality and methods, change in the behaviors of children with SEN and in typical children; the typical children have positive attitudes and perceptions regarding the inclusion of children with SEN in their regular community schools; the level of school satisfaction of both: children with SEN and typical children is pretty high; the social and learning environment in pilot schools is friendly

  7. [総説]Aging and Sexuality : Knowledge, Attitudes, and Image of Care Staff in Nursing Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Akamine, Yoriko; Division of Adult Nursing II, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus

    2006-01-01

    In this descriptive study, I examined the nursing home care staffs knowledge, attitudes, and image of elderly sexuality and the determination of a possible relationship among them. Nurses and care workers from five nursing homes in Okinawa, Japan volunteered to participate the study. One hundred fifty-two care staffs answered and returned the self-administered packet for a response rate of 74.5%, with 126 of the respondents completing the questions appropriately. The packet included questionn...

  8. Assessing Perceived Agency Adherence to the Values of Community Inclusion: Implications for Staff Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcazar, Fabricio; MacKay-Murphy, Marie; Keys, Christopher; Henry, David; Bryant, Fred

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 518 service providers found high levels of knowledge and adherence to values of inclusion regarding the need to provide opportunities for engaging consumers with disabilities in community daily activities and rights for services. Employees had less knowledge of activities intended to provide opportunities to make choices. (Author/CR)

  9. Pre-Service Education and Attitudes towards Inclusion: The Role of the Teacher Educator within a Permeated Teaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Jackie

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the role of teacher educators working within a permeated teaching model in Northern Ireland, and student teachers' attitudes towards special educational needs (SEN) and inclusion. A cohort of 125 student teachers representing eight subject areas responded to a survey exploring attitudes towards issues relating to inclusive…

  10. A Comparative Perspective on Teacher Attitude-Constructs That Impact on Inclusive Education in South Africa and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Norma; Müller, Hélène; Hugo, Anna; Helldin, Rolf; Bäckmann, Örjan; Dwyer, Helen; Skarlind, Anders

    2011-01-01

    This article is based on joint research, between academics from South Africa and Sweden, comparing the influence of South African and Swedish teachers' attitudes towards the practical application of inclusive education (IE) in the classroom. The aim of the study was to identify and investigate problem areas pertaining to teachers' attitudes to IE.…

  11. ICT and inclusive education: Attitudes of the teachers in secondary education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Maria Fernandez-Batanero

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The inclusion and the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT configure a field of great scientific interest in the current society. In this context, the attitudes of the teachers towards the ICT play an important role. The present article gathers the results of a study whose purpose was to determine how a teacher will use and integrate the ‘Information and Communication Technologies’ (ICT in inclusive classrooms. This will also identify the factors that promote good educational practices supported by ICT. Towards this we prepared a case study of multiple cases. The questionnaire and group discussion are the techniques that are used for collecting required information. To validate the questionnaire, it was used the expert judgment method selected by the “Coefficient expert Competence” procedure or also named “K coefficient”. The Reliability was established by Cronbach’s Alfa method with a value of 0.87. The result shows that teachers in general have a positive attitude towards ICT, especially the male teachers with greater possibilities of interaction with ICT. This will also promote inclusive and cultures policies between networks of schools and it is presented as an important factor in developing good educational practice with the support of ICT.

  12. Smoking behavior among hospital staff still influences attitudes and counseling on smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willaing, Ingrid; Ladelund, Steen

    2004-01-01

    as a risk factor. Nonsmokers might overestimate smoking as a risk factor. Nonsmokers gave patients advice on smoking cessation significantly more often than did current smokers (ex-smokers, OR=2.5, 95% CI=1.8-3.4; never-smokers, OR=1.5, 95% CI=1.1-2.0). Ex-smokers and smokers felt significantly more...... qualified to counsel patients about smoking than did never-smokers (ex-smokers, OR=1.8, 95% CI=1.3-2.5; smokers, OR=1.4, 95% CI=1.0-1.9). Individual smoking behavior among hospital staff was strongly associated with smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and counseling practices. Lack of self......-related counseling, smoking-related counseling practices, and self-rated qualifications for counseling were main outcome measures. Health professionals who were current smokers systematically underestimated the health consequences of smoking and differed significantly from nonsmokers in their assessments of smoking...

  13. Comparison of cigarette smoking knowledge, attitudes, and practices among staff in perinatal and other substance abuse treatment settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Thomas, Tonya; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Terplan, Mishka; Brigham, Emily P; Chisolm, Margaret S

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence and known morbidity and mortality caused by cigarette smoking, 60% to 70% of substance abuse treatment programs lack smoking cessation counseling or fail to offer pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation, including those programs designed to meet the needs of drug-dependent pregnant patients. Previous studies of staff knowledge, attitudes, and practices (S-KAP) at general substance abuse/HIV treatment programs have suggested that staff may contribute to the deficiency in smoking cessation treatment in these settings. It is not known whether similar deficiencies exist at perinatal substance abuse treatment programs. This study compared cigarette S-KAP in perinatal substance abuse (n = 41) and general substance abuse/HIV treatment (Veterans Affairs [VA] medical center, hospital-, and community-based) workforce samples (n = 335). Significant differences were seen between the 2 groups on all measures, but perinatal staff compared favorably to general staff only on measures of barriers to smoking cessation services. Perinatal staff compared unfavorably on all other measures: knowledge, beliefs/attitudes, self-efficacy, and smoking cessation practices. Pair-wise comparisons of knowledge and beliefs/attitudes revealed a significant difference between perinatal and VA staff; of self-efficacy, between perinatal and staff at all other settings; and of smoking cessation practices, between perinatal and VA and community-based staff. These results-showing deficiencies of perinatal staff on most S-KAP measures-are concerning and suggest that identifying gaps in and improving S-KAP in perinatal substance abuse programs is urgently needed, for which the VA may provide an efficacious model.

  14. Brazilian Physical Education Teachers' Attitudes toward Inclusion before and after Participation in a Professional Development Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegele, Justin A.; Hodge, Samuel; Filho, Paulo José Barbosa Gutierres; de Rezende, Alexandre Luiz Gonçalves

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the attitudes of physical education teachers about inclusion and teaching students with disabilities in Brazil before and after they participated in a professional development workshop focused on inclusive ideology and strategies. The participants were Brazilian physical education teachers (pretest sample,…

  15. An Enquiry into the Professional Competence of Inclusive Education Teachers in Beijing: Attitudes, Knowledge, Skills, and Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Guanglun Michael; Wang, Yan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Feng, Yajing; Deng, Meng; Liang, Songmei

    2015-01-01

    Attitudes, knowledge, and skills are widely recognised as the three pillars of professional competence of inclusive education teachers. Studies emerging from the Chinese context consider these three pillars important for the practice of Learning in Regular Classrooms--an idiosyncratic Chinese form of inclusive education. Our mixed methods study…

  16. Principals' and Teachers' Attitudes and Knowledge of Inclusive Education as Predictors of Effective Teaching Practices in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyini, Ahmed Bawa; Desai, Ishwar

    2007-01-01

    Surveys and observations were undertaken in selected primary schools in Ghana to determine whether principals' and teachers' attitudes towards and knowledge of inclusive education, as well as principals' expectations of teachers in implementing inclusion, were predictors of effective teaching practices in their classrooms. The sample of 128…

  17. Exploring Pre-Service Teachers' Perceived Teaching-Efficacy, Attitudes and Concerns about Inclusive Education in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, M. Tariq; Sharma, Umesh; Deppeler, Joanne M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on pre-service teachers' preparedness for inclusive education in Bangladesh through measuring their perceived teaching-efficacy, concerns and attitudes towards inclusive education and identifying predictor variables that contribute to those three variables. Using two standardized scales with 1,623 pre-service teachers from 16…

  18. Trainee teachers' attitudes to inclusive education for children with Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishart, J G; Manning, G

    1996-02-01

    The attitudes of 231 trainee teachers towards inclusive education for children with Down's syndrome were surveyed in two UK colleges of education, one in Scotland and one in Northern Ireland. While the right to educational integration for children with special educational needs was widely endorsed, considerable reservations were expressed about its implementation in practice. Only 13% of respondents indicated that they would welcome the opportunity to teach in an integrated setting and 96% felt that their professional training did not prepare them to meet this challenge. Many underestimated potential levels of achievement in children with Down's syndrome and over half wrongly associated the condition with very short life expectancy.

  19. To Include or Not to Include--This Is the Question: Attitudes of Inclusive Teachers toward the Inclusion of Pupils with Intellectual Disabilities in Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malki, Sharon; Einat, Tomer

    2018-01-01

    Numerous studies have emphasized the relationship between success of policies of inclusion and acceptance and accommodation of students with intellectual disabilities in mainstream settings and teachers' positive attitudes toward them. Using semi-structured interviews and interpretive and constructivist strategies, the present study qualitatively…

  20. Research on opinions and attitudes of bookseller and increasing retail sales in the sales of books, through staff training

    OpenAIRE

    Hristina Mihaleva

    2011-01-01

    During the economic crisis, retail sales in the book sales dropped sharply. Businesses are not many options. Costs must be reduced quickly, due to reduced turnover. Very often this means the release of personnel and cost reduction benefits and salary. This analysis aims to explore attitudes, professional competence and motivation of staff and to provide evidence of the need to further their education.

  1. The Role of School Design in Shaping Healthy Eating-Related Attitudes, Practices, and Behaviors among School Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, Leah; Brittin, Jeri; Intolubbe-Chmil, Loren; Trowbridge, Matthew; Sorensen, Dina; Huang, Terry T.-K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Schools have increasing responsibility to address healthy eating, but physical barriers influence their ability to adopt and sustain recommended strategies. We took advantage of a natural experiment to investigate the role of the physical environment in shaping healthy eating attitudes and practices among school staff members. Methods:…

  2. "…Their Opinions Mean Something": Care Staff's Attitudes to Health Research Involving People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Natalie; Durand, Marie-Anne; Mengoni, Silvana E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Despite experiencing health inequalities, people with intellectual disabilities are under-represented in health research. Previous research has identified barriers but has typically focused on under-recruitment to specific studies. This study aimed to explore care staff's attitudes to health research involving people with intellectual…

  3. Attitudes of Staff Nurse Preceptors Related to the Education of Nurses with Learning Disabilities in Clinical Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Ecuyer, Kristine Marie

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation presents a quantitative study of the attitudes of staff nurse preceptors toward nursing students with learning disabilities. There are an increased number of nursing students with learning disabilities. These students may have additional challenges in clinical settings, particularly if clinical settings do not understand or…

  4. Using a book chat to improve attitudes and perceptions of long-term care staff about dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocque, Natasha; Schotsman, Chloe; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Crawshaw, Diane; McAiney, Carrie; Brazil, Emma

    2014-05-01

    This study sought to evaluate a book chat intervention based on Lisa Genova's novel, Still Alice, to influence long-term care (LTC) staff perceptions and attitudes when caring for individuals with dementia. A qualitative descriptive design was used. Eleven participants partook in a 2.5-hour book chat at a southern Ontario LTC facility. Following the book chat, participants answered two open-ended questions to assess how the book chat influenced their views on dementia. Thematic content analysis was used to analyze the qualitative questionnaire. Content analysis of the participants' responses revealed that the book chat positively influenced their attitudes and perceptions toward dementia, particularly by providing more insight into the individual's personal struggle with the disease. Furthermore, participants found that the book chat influenced their care practices. By creating innovative learning opportunities, attitudes and perceptions about dementia care can be transcended and greatly benefit staff, family, and residents. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Attitudes of a group of primary school teachers towards the educational inclusion of hearing-impaired learners in regular classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, K; Ross, E

    1998-01-01

    Research has clearly demonstrated a link between the attitudes of regular education teachers and the success of inclusion of learners with special educational needs. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the attitudes of a group of junior primary school teachers from the Gauteng area towards the inclusion of hearing-impaired children into regular classes. A survey research design was employed which utilized a questionnaire as the research tool. Analysis of results indicated that the teachers surveyed were relatively positive in their attitudes towards inclusion. Greater exposure to disability in terms of training and experience was related to more positive attitudes. Similarly, more positive attitudes were related to greater perceived competence in teaching hearing-impaired pupils. All of the teachers surveyed felt that speech-language pathologists and audiologists (SLPs & As) should be involved in facilitating inclusion of hearing-impaired children. Many of the respondents expressed concern regarding their lack of training, knowledge and skills. The findings from the research project highlight the need for an adequate training and support system for teachers prior to the implementation of an inclusive educational policy, and the potential role of SLPs & As in this regard.

  6. A comparative perspective on teacher attitude-constructs that impact on inclusive education in South Africa and Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Nel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on joint research, between academics from South Africa and Sweden, comparing the influence of South African and Swedish teachers' attitudes towards the practical application of inclusive education (IE in the classroom. The aim of the study was to identify and investigate problem areas pertaining to teachers' attitudes to IE. Attitudes often relate to interaction with others. This study departs from Festiger's theory of cognitive dissonance, which deals with the influence of people's attitudes and attitude change. In this research teachers from South Africa and Sweden completed the same questionnaire on perceptions pertaining to IE in their school system. A number of attitude-constructs were derived from the data via exploratory factor analysis methodology. Attitude-constructs included policy issues and specialised support; practical implementation of IE; teacher support structures; teachers' receptiveness of IE implementation; feasibility of proposed IE practices; and role of special schools in an IE environment. Negative responses to some of the attitude constructs identified problem areas in Swedish and South African inclusive systems. The comparative nature of the work enabled the researchers to suggest remedial action within each country'ssocio-economic setting, and in this way affect change in teacher attitudes.

  7. Changes in knowledge and attitudes of hospital environmental services staff: The Researching Effective Approaches to Cleaning in Hospitals (REACH) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Brett G; White, Nicole; Farrington, Alison; Allen, Michelle; Page, Katie; Gardner, Anne; Halton, Kate; Riley, Thomas V; Gericke, Christian A; Paterson, David L; Graves, Nicholas; Hall, Lisa

    2018-03-14

    The Researching Effective Approaches to Cleaning in Hospitals (REACH) study tested a multimodal cleaning intervention in Australian hospitals. This article reports findings from a pre/post questionnaire, embedded into the REACH study, that was administered prior to the implementation of the intervention and at the conclusion of the study. A cross-sectional questionnaire, nested within a stepped-wedge trial, was administered. The REACH intervention was a cleaning bundle comprising 5 interdependent components. The questionnaire explored the knowledge, reported practice, attitudes, roles, and perceived organizational support of environmental services staff members in the hospitals participating in the REACH study. Environmental services staff members in 11 participating hospitals completed 616 pre- and 307 post-test questionnaires (n = 923). Increases in knowledge and practice were seen between the pre-and post-test questionnaires. Minimal changes were observed in attitudes regarding the role of cleaning and in perceived organizational support. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report changes in knowledge, attitudes, and perceived organizational support in environmental services staff members, in the context of a large multicenter clinical trial. In this underexplored group of hospital workers, findings suggest that environmental services staff members have a high level of knowledge related to cleaning practices and understand the importance of their role. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Outcomes in knowledge, attitudes and confidence of nursing staff working in nursing and residential care homes following a dementia training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Anthony; Scerri, Charles

    2017-11-08

    Dementia training programmes for staff working in long-term care settings have been found to be effective in improving staff outcomes. This study investigated the impact of a dementia training programme for all Maltese nursing staff working in public nursing/residential homes on their knowledge, attitudes and confidence. Additionally, we identified the predictors of these domains before and after the programme. A 14-hour training programme focusing on dementia management, care and policy was developed for all nursing staff working in public nursing and residential homes in Malta. A pretest-posttest design was used to evaluate the participants' knowledge of dementia, attitudes and confidence in working with residents with dementia using validated tools. Demographic variables were measured and compared with each staff domain. The majority of nursing staff attended the training programme with 261 fully completed questionnaires being collected pre-training and 214 post-training. The programme significantly improved nursing staff knowledge, attitudes and confidence. Stepwise regression analysis of each staff domain showed that the strongest predictor in all models at pre-training was the intensity of previous training programmes. Furthermore, staff who attended previous training continued to improve in their attitudes and confidence following programme completion. The study continues to shed further evidence on the impact of dementia training programs on staff outcomes. It also indicated that the intensity of previous participation in dementia training programmes was related to the participants' knowledge, attitudes and confidence and that continual exposure to training had a cumulative effect.

  9. Professional and private experience with persons with special needs and attitudes of teachers of regular schools towards inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajović Vera

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we seek for the factors of formation of attitudes of primary school teachers towards inclusion of children who due to some sensory, bodily, mental disability or social deprivation have the need for additional support in development and learning. Research on attitudes towards inclusive education of children with special needs so far indicates that teachers of regular schools 'hesitate' in accepting children with special needs, stating as a reason the fact that they do not feel competent enough to work with them. However, the increase in teacher readiness to work with these children can be seen from the projects for the inclusion of these children that educate the teachers and envisage the support of the school expert team. This study was conducted with the aim of determining whether teacher's experience - either private or professional - with persons with disabilities distinguishes the respondents who exhibit more favourable attitudes towards inclusive education of these children from those with less favourable attitudes. The sample consisted of 105 teachers from five regular primary schools at the territory of Belgrade, 44.2% of whom declared that they had professional experience in working with students with special needs, while 40% of respondents had private experience with persons with developmental disabilities. The results (ANOVA indicate that professional experience with working with children with special needs does not significantly affect the formation and changing of attitudes of teachers of regular schools towards inclusive education. On the other hand, private experience with persons with developmental disabilities has a significant influence both on the attitude towards inclusion as a whole and towards all its components (cognitive, conative, the feeling of competence. Based on the obtained results, implications for the development of the curriculum for educating teachers for working with children with developmental

  10. Beliefs in social inclusion: Invariance in associations among hope, dysfunctional attitudes, and social inclusion across adolescence and young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Clio; Greenwood, Kathryn

    2017-09-19

    Social disability in youth is an important precursor of long-term social and mental health problems. Social inclusion is a key policy driver and fits well within a new paradigm of health and well-being rather than illness-oriented services, yet little is known about social inclusion and its facilitators for "healthy" young people. We present a novel exploratory structural analysis of social inclusion using measures from 387 14- to 36-year-olds. Our model represents social inclusion as comprising social activity and community belonging, with both domains predicted by hopeful and dysfunctional self-beliefs but hopefulness more uniquely predicting social inclusion in adolescence. We conclude that social inclusion can be modeled for meaningful comparison across spectra of development, mental health, and functioning.

  11. Attitudes of stakeholders in psychiatry towards the inclusion of children in genomic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundby, Anna; Boolsen, Merete Watt; Burgdorf, Kristoffer Sølvsten; Ullum, Henrik; Hansen, Thomas Folkmann; Mors, Ole

    2018-03-05

    Genomic sequencing of children in research raises complex ethical issues. This study aims to gain more knowledge on the attitudes towards the inclusion of children as research subjects in genomic research and towards the disclosure of pertinent and incidental findings to the parents and the child. Qualitative data were collected from interviews with a wide range of informants: experts engaged in genomic research, clinical geneticists, persons with mental disorders, relatives, and blood donors. Quantitative data were collected from a cross-sectional web-based survey among 1227 parents and 1406 non-parents who were potential stakeholders in psychiatric genomic research. Participants generally expressed positive views on children's participation in genomic research. The informants in the qualitative interviews highlighted the age of the child as a critical aspect when disclosing genetic information. Other important aspects were the child's right to an autonomous choice, the emotional burden of knowing imposed on both the child and the parents, and the possibility of receiving beneficial clinical information regarding the future health of the child. Nevertheless, there was no consensus whether the parent or the child should receive the findings. A majority of survey stakeholders agreed that children should be able to participate in genomic research. The majority agreed that both pertinent and incidental findings should be returned to the parents and to the child when of legal age. Having children does not affect the stakeholder's attitudes towards the inclusion of children as research subjects in genomic research. Our findings illustrate that both the child's right to autonomy and the parents' interest to be informed are important factors that are found valuable by the participants. In future guidelines governing children as subjects in genomic research, it would thus be essential to incorporate the child's right to an open future, including the right to receive

  12. Direct and indirect associations between dysfunctional attitudes, self-stigma, hopefulness and social inclusion in young people experiencing psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Clio; Greenwood, Kathryn

    2018-03-01

    Social inclusion and vocational activity are central to personal recovery for young people with psychosis. Studies with people experiencing long term psychosis suggest negative self-beliefs are important, but less is known about whether this association is present for young service users or about the potential influence of positive self-beliefs such as hopefulness. The aim of the current paper was to investigate the direct and indirect associations between dysfunctional attitudes, self-stigma, hopefulness, social inclusion and vocational activity for young people with psychosis. A 5-month longitudinal study was conducted with young psychosis service users. Measures of dysfunctional attitudes and self-stigma and vocational activity were obtained at baseline. Measures of hopefulness, social inclusion and vocational activity were obtained at follow-up. Hopefulness mediates the associations between self-stigma, social inclusion and vocational activity. Self-stigma may have a greater influence on social inclusion with age. Dysfunctional attitudes do not significantly predict social inclusion or change in vocational activity status. Findings suggest that the impact of self-stigma may extend beyond social and occupational withdrawal and undermine subjective community belonging. Findings encourage an increased emphasis on facilitating hopefulness for young people who experience psychosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Attitude Assessment of Managers and Staffs About Urban Modification for People With Disabilities in Municipality of Tehran City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Nafiseh Askarinejad

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion This study showed that there is a significant difference in the attitude of managers and staff of municipality regarding urban modification. Recruiting people with higher educational qualifications and awareness or familiarity with the phenomenon of disability could help in the process of urban modification in the community. It is recommended to utilize the findings of this study to formulate urban modification programs across communities for the benefit of the disabled.

  14. The effects of a non-smoking policy on nursing staff smoking behaviour and attitudes in a psychiatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloor, R N; Meeson, L; Crome, I B

    2006-04-01

    The UK Department of Health required that by April 2001, all NHS bodies would have implemented a smoking policy. It has been suggested that the best demonstration a hospital can make of its commitment to health is to ban smoking on its premises. This paper reports on an evaluation of the effectiveness of a non-smoking policy in a newly opened NHS psychiatric hospital. Questionnaires were sent to all 156 nursing staff in a psychiatric hospital to assess the effectiveness of the policy in terms of staff smoking behaviour, attitudes to the restriction and compliance with the policy. Of the 156 questionnaires distributed, 92 (58%) were returned; smokers, former smokers and those who have never smoked were quite evenly represented at 34.78%, 34.78% and 30.43%, respectively. Of eight critical success factors for the policy, only one, staff not smoking in Trust public areas, had been achieved. A non-smoking policy was generally accepted as necessary by nursing staff working in a mental health setting. Staff felt that the policy was not effective in motivating smoking nurses to stop and that insufficient support was given to these nurses. The study highlights the importance of introducing staff support systems as an integral part of smoking policies and the role of counterintuitive behaviour in the effectiveness of smoking policy introduction in healthcare settings.

  15. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of neonatal staff concerning neonatal pain management

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    Sizakele L.T. Khoza

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neonatal pain management has received increasing attention over the past four decades. Research into the effects of neonatal pain emphasises the professional, ethical and moral obligations of staff to manage pain for positive patient outcomes. However, evaluation studies continuously report evidence of inadequate neonate pain management and a gap between theory and practice. Objective: This study reviewed current practice in neonatal pain management to describe the knowledge, attitudes and practices of nurses and doctors regarding pain management for neonates in two academic hospitals. Method: A non-experimental, prospective quantitative survey, the modified Infant Pain Questionnaire, was used to collect data from 150 nurses and doctors working in the neonatal wards of two academic hospitals in central Gauteng. Results: The response rate was 35.33% (n = 53, most respondents being professional nurses (88.68%; n = 47 working in neonatal intensive care units (80.77%; n = 42; 24 (45.28% had less than 5 years’ and 29 respondents 6 or more years’ working experience in neonatal care. A review of pain management in the study setting indicated a preference for pharmacological interventions to relieve moderate to severe pain. An association (p < 0.05 was found between pain ratings on 5 procedures and frequency of administration of pharmacological pain management. Two-thirds of respondents (64% reported that there were no pain management guidelines in the neonatal wards in which they worked. Conclusion: The interventions to manage moderate neonatal pain are in line with international guidelines. However, neonatal pain management may not occur systematically based on prior assessment of neonatal pain, choice of most appropriate intervention and evaluation. This study recommends implementation of a guideline to standardise practice and ensure consistent and adequate pain management in neonates.

  16. Cervical cancer screening: knowledge, attitude and practices among nursing staff in a tertiary level teaching institution of rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Shashank; Sharma, Chanderdeep; Thakur, Sita; Raina, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of the nursing staff knowledge, attitude and practices about cervical cancer screening in a tertiary care teaching institute of rural India. A cross sectional, descriptive, interview- based survey was conducted with a pretested questionnaire among 262 staff nurses of a tertiary care teaching and research institute. In this study 77% respondents knew that Pap smear is used for detection of cervical cancer, but less than half knew that Pap smear can detect even precancerous lesions of cervix. Only 23.4% knew human papilloma virus infection as a risk factor. Only 26.7% of the respondents were judged as having adequate knowledge based on scores allotted for questions evaluating knowledge about cervical cancer and screening. Only 17 (7%) of the staff nurses had themselves been screened by Pap smear, while 85% had never taken a Pap smear of a patient. Adequate knowledge of cervical cancer and screening, higher parity and age >30 years were significantly associated with self screening for cervical cancer. Most nurses held a view that Pap test is a doctor procedure, and nearly 90% of nurses had never referred a patient for Pap testing. The majority of nursing staff in rural India may have inadequate knowledge about cervical cancer screening, and their attitude and practices towards cervical cancer screening could not be termed positive.

  17. Effect of Exposure to Special Olympic Games on Attitudes of Volunteers towards Inclusion of People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunxiao; Wang, Chee Keng John

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of volunteering for Special Olympics Games (SOG) on the attitudes of volunteers towards inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities. Method: A repeated measures design with 3-week follow-up was used. There were 100 volunteers recruited for the study and 90 of them completed the…

  18. Pre-Service Teachers' Attitude towards Inclusive Education for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Hui Min; Lee, Lay Wah; Che Ahmad, Aznan

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the pre-service teachers' attitudes towards the educational inclusion for students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) were investigated to identify their attitudinal patterns and predictors. An attitudinal survey was conducted with 264 pre-service teachers in a teacher training programme in Malaysia. The study involved 151 special…

  19. The Validity and Reliability Study of Turkish Version of the Sentiments, Attitudes, and Concerns about Inclusive Education Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansiz, Nurcan; Cansiz, Mustafa

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to translate and adapt the Sentiments Attitudes and Concerns about Inclusive Education Scale (SACIE) for use in the Turkish context. For this purpose, translated version of SACIE was administered to 304 and 368 preservice teachers (PTs) to perform exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis respectively. The result of…

  20. Factors Influencing Arab Nursing Students' Attitudes toward Climate Change and Environmental Sustainability and their Inclusion in Nursing Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonas Preposi; Felicilda-Reynaldo, Rhea Faye D; Alshammari, Farhan; Alquwez, Nahed; Alicante, Jerico G; Obaid, Khamees B; Rady, Hanan Ebrahim Abd El Aziz; Qtait, Mohammad; Silang, John Paul Ben T

    2018-05-17

    To assess the factors influencing the attitudes of Bachelor of Science in Nursing students toward climate change and environmental sustainability and the inclusion of these concepts in the nursing curricula of four Arab countries. A convenience sample of 1,059 students from four Arab countries was surveyed using the Environmental Sustainability Attitudes in Nursing Survey-2 (SANS-2) questionnaire in this descriptive-comparative study. The majority of the respondents exhibited positive attitudes toward the five items of SANS-2, with "Environmental sustainability is an important issue for nursing" receiving the lowest mean score and "Issues about climate change should be included in the nursing curriculum" receiving the highest mean score. Saudi students had more positive attitudes toward environmental sustainability in health care compared with students from Iraq, Egypt, and the Palestinian Territories. Country of residence, type of community, and knowledge about environmental issues and their impact on health in any nursing course were significant factors that influenced attitudes toward environmental sustainability. The inclusion of climate change and environmental sustainability in nursing curricula in the Arab region was emphasized by the findings. Including environmental sustainability practices in nursing education will help student nurses develop critical thinking and skills in the adaptive delivery of health care, especially when resources are scarce. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Training, Understanding, and the Attitudes of Primary School Teachers Regarding Inclusive Education in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Chi-hung; Mak, Kit-ying

    2010-01-01

    Inclusive education is one of the most important issues in education in Hong Kong, China. Because the role of teachers is critical to the success of inclusive education, this study investigated some of the elements that determine the success of implementing inclusive education. Teachers' perceived definition of inclusive education, the…

  2. Knowledge and Attitude of Primary School Staff to Management of Dental Trauma in North-east of Iran in 2015

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    Armita Rouhani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to assess the level of primary Knowledge among school staffs in Iran with regards to the immediate management of dental trauma. Methods: The data, from 160 participants, were collected using questionnaire, which surveyed staff’s background, attitude and knowledge of dental trauma management. Results: The total number of school staff who responded to all of the questions in the questionnaire was 138; the response rate was 86%. 91.3% of the participants had more than 10 years of teaching experience. Only 24 cases (17.4% have participated in training courses in regards to the dental trauma. 46.4% of the participants estimated their level of knowledge regarding the dental trauma as moderate and 42.8% as low and 7.2% without knowledge, however, 56.5% of them were highly interested in attending the training courses. Overall, the teachers’ knowledge on emergency management of the dental trauma cases presented in this study was deficient, especially in avulsed tooth management. Chi-square test showed that there was no statistically significant difference in the responses to the knowledge part of the questionnaire on age, gender, teaching experience and responsibility in school. Conclusion: The present report indicated the lack of knowledge among school staff on dental injuries managements. Organizing educational courses to improve the knowledge and awareness of school staff, as the first encounters of dental trauma in schools, seems necessary.

  3. Inclusive Training in Fencing as a Means of Changing Attitude to People with Disabilities

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    Р. Ю. Свічкар

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Research objective: to develop and improve the training of fencers using inclusive training in order to increase sport results and shape a positive attitude to people with disabilities. Methods. The co-training of the “Unifekht” Sports Club fencers and wheelchair fencers lasted for three months.  The athletes underwent the preliminary and the final testing on the target that showed a number of hits. Besides, during the individual lesson, the coach tested the athlete for the quality of performing attacking and defensive techniques. The preliminary and the final questionnaires revealed the opinions of the coaches, instructors of the Department of Fencing, fencers and wheelchair fencers and the students of the School of Physical Education and Sports of H. S. Skovoroda Kharkiv National Pedagogical University as to the attitude of the athletes of both categories to sports and “Invasport” in Ukraine. There were 40 respondents taking the questionnaires: 3rd-year students (10 people, fencers (10 people, instructors of the Department of Fencing (5 persons, wheelchair fencers (8 people, fencing coaches (5 persons, wheelchair fencing coaches (2 persons. Results. The study shows that, despite the high results of the athletes with disabilities, there exist certain problems in Ukraine that affect the willingness of people with disabilities to go in for sports. The main causes thereof are the low level of financial support and the low quality of medical care. By the research results, the respondents indicate the main criterion motivating people with special needs to do wheelchair fencing to be: self-expression and self-realization (68%, an opportunity to communicate (21%, and financial support (11%. The factors of low interest in wheelchair fencing are: lack of motivation to training people with special needs (26%; social policy of the state (23%; poor facilities and resources in the specialized institutions (20% of the respondents. At the same time

  4. INCLUSIVE CULTURE IN PRE-SCHOOL INSTITUTIONS

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    Irena NOVACHEVSKA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Inclusive education is a rational concept that refers to the overall and long-term transformation of institutional systems in society, especially in education. Along with the transformation, a number of important and unresolved issues still appear in both theory and practice, as the duty of pre-school institutions and schools is to educate every student in the mainstream education system. One of the most important aspects of inclusion is the inclusive culture. Regardless of the good inclusive policy and practice, one cannot talk about successful inclusion without a properly developed inclusive institutional culture.This paper is a contribution to the research considering the development of inclusive culture in three preschool institutions. It is based on the thinking and attitudes of the pre­school staff toward the necessity of developing and nurturing an inclusive culture. Successful inclusion of pupils with special needs in the mainstream school system cannot be conceived without an inclusive culture.

  5. Attitudes toward inter-hospital electronic patient record exchange: discrepancies among physicians, medical record staff, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jong-Yi; Ho, Hsiao-Yun; Chen, Jen-De; Chai, Sinkuo; Tai, Chih-Jaan; Chen, Yung-Fu

    2015-07-12

    In this era of ubiquitous information, patient record exchange among hospitals still has technological and individual barriers including resistance to information sharing. Most research on user attitudes has been limited to one type of user or aspect. Because few analyses of attitudes toward electronic patient records (EPRs) have been conducted, understanding the attitudes among different users in multiple aspects is crucial to user acceptance. This proof-of-concept study investigated the attitudes of users toward the inter-hospital EPR exchange system implemented nationwide and focused on discrepant behavioral intentions among three user groups. The system was designed by combining a Health Level 7-based protocol, object-relational mapping, and other medical informatics techniques to ensure interoperability in realizing patient-centered practices. After implementation, three user-specific questionnaires for physicians, medical record staff, and patients were administered, with a 70 % response rate. The instrument showed favorable convergent construct validity and internal consistency reliability. Two dependent variables were applied: the attitudes toward privacy and support. Independent variables comprised personal characteristics, work characteristics, human aspects, and technology aspects. Major statistical methods included exploratory factor analysis and general linear model. The results from 379 respondents indicated that the patients highly agreed with privacy protection by their consent and support for EPRs, whereas the physicians remained conservative toward both. Medical record staff was ranked in the middle among the three groups. The three user groups demonstrated discrepant intentions toward privacy protection and support. Experience of computer use, level of concerns, usefulness of functions, and specifically, reason to use electronic medical records and number of outpatient visits were significantly associated with the perceptions. Overall, four

  6. An analysis of knowledge and attitudes of hospice staff towards organ and tissue donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wale, J; Arthur, A; Faull, C

    2014-03-01

    Only a minority of hospice patients eligible to donate tissue and organs choose to do so. Hospice care staff play a key role in discussions about donation, but their willingness to engage in these discussions and their understanding of issues around tissue and organ donation is poorly understood. To (i) identify factors associated with the wish of hospice doctors, nurses and healthcare assistants to donate their own organs after death; (ii) survey the experience of discussing the subject with patients; (iii) determine staff members' knowledge of organ and tissue donation and (iv) identify factors associated with knowledge of organ and tissue donation. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey of hospice care staff. 76 of the 94 care staff of one large UK hospice completed and returned the questionnaire. Staff wishing to donate their organs after death (43/76 56.6%) were more likely to be doctors or nurses than healthcare assistants (p=0.011) and more likely to have discussed organ or tissue donation with their family (pdonation with patients had more years' experience (p=0.045) and had similarly discussed donation with their own family (p=0.039). Those with greater knowledge were more likely to have discussed organ or tissue donation with a patient (p=0.042). A reluctance to instigate discussions about organ and tissue donation may prevent palliative patients and their families being allowed the opportunity to donate. Suboptimal knowledge among hospice staff suggests the need for greater liaison between hospice staff, and the organ and tissue donation teams.

  7. Knowledge of HIV/AIDS and attitudes towards people living with HIV among the general staff of a public university in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Yvonne; Huang, Mary

    2009-12-01

    Stigma and discrimination towards people living with HIV have been widely documented, and have extended their impact into the workplace. Stigmatising attitudes towards people living with HIV (PLHIV) in the workplace significantly hinder HIV prevention efforts and indirectly affect national development. This cross-sectional study was designed to determine the level of knowledge about HIV and AIDS and assess attitudes towards PLHIV among the general staff of Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), as well as to identify factors that are associated with it. Self-administered questionnaires were posted to a total of 344 general staff from six randomly selected faculties, and they were a given a week to return the questionnaires. The response rate was 38%. Data were analysed using Pearson's correlation, independent t-test and multiple linear regression. The respondents showed a considerably high level of knowledge about HIV/AIDS (mean knowledge score of 15.57+/-1.93 out of 18 points) although there were some misconceptions (N=129). Likert scale responses to 20 attitude statements revealed that respondents generally had moderately positive attitudes toward PLHIV (average score of 69.65+/-10.08 out of 100 points). Attitudes were inconsistent when it involved direct contact and interaction with PLHIV. Factors significantly associated with level of knowledge and attitudes included age, education and income. There was no difference in mean score for knowledge and attitudes by gender. Further efforts are necessary to improve attitudes of the general staff towards PLHIV, particularly in areas of direct contact with PLHIV.

  8. Impact of an intervention programme on knowledge, attitude and practice of healthcare staff regarding pharmaceutical waste management, Gaza, Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabash, M I; Hussein, R A; Mahmoud, A H; El-Borgy, M D; Abu-Hamad, B A

    2016-09-01

    To assess knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of healthcare staff regarding pharmaceutical waste management; and to determine the impact of an educational programme on the KAP survey items. Pre-post-test intervention study. The pre-intervention phase was performed using a sample of 530 out of 1500 healthcare workers. A predesigned interview questionnaire was used to assess KAP. Next, an educational programme was designed and offered to a subsample of 69 healthcare workers. KAP were re-assessed for the programme attendees using the same interview questionnaire, both immediately (post-test) and six months after the end of the programme (follow-up test). The parametric paired sample t-test was used to assess the difference between pre-test and follow-up test results. Poor knowledge and poor practice levels (scores 50%) detected in the pre-intervention phase were found to improve to satisfactory levels (scores ≥75%) in the follow-up phase. Attitude was found to be positive (score ≥75%) in all phases of the study. The educational programme led to a significant improvement in KAP of healthcare staff regarding pharmaceutical waste management (P<0.001). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. From Attitudes to Practice: Utilising Inclusive Teaching Strategies in Kenyan Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Brent C.; Damiani, Michelle L.; Oswago, Benson O.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide evidence of Kenyan primary school teachers using inclusive teaching strategies in a rural setting with many known barriers to the development of a sustainable inclusive education system. This qualitative study examines teachers' uses of inclusive teaching strategies in primary schools following a series of…

  10. Effect of Selected Variables on Regular School Teachers Attitude towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshini, S. Saradha; Thangarajathi, S.

    2017-01-01

    Inclusive education is a means of creating effective classrooms where educational needs of all children including children with special needs are addressed. The concept of inclusion is still emerging as far as India is concerned. In the recent years, there is a growing awareness about inclusive education among educators. Government of India had…

  11. Adequacy of benefits, distributive justice and individual attitudes and behaviors: A case of public community colleges staff Adequacy of benefits, distributive justice and individual attitudes and behaviors: A case of public community colleges staff

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    Tan Cheekiong

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to examine the indirect effect of distributive justice in the relationship between adequacy of benefits and individual attitudes and behaviors (i.e., job satisfaction and organizational commitment using 190 usable questionnaires gathered from employees in Malaysian public community colleges (MPCOLLEGE sector. The outcome of stepwise regression analysis showed that the inclusion of distributive justice in the analysis had increased the effect of adequacy of benefits on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Furthermore, this finding confirms that distributive justice does act as a full mediating variable in the benefits program model of the organizational sector sample. In addition, implications and limitations of this study, as well as directions for future research are discussed.This study was conducted to examine the indirect effect of distributive justice in the relationship between adequacy of benefits and individual attitudes and behaviors (i.e., job satisfaction and organizational commitment using 190 usable questionnaires gathered from employees in Malaysian public community colleges (MPCOLLEGE sector. The outcome of stepwise regression analysis showed that the inclusion of distributive justice in the analysis had increased the effect of adequacy of benefits on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Furthermore, this finding confirms that distributive justice does act as a full mediating variable in the benefits program model of the organizational sector sample. In addition, implications and limitations of this study, as well as directions for future research are discussed.

  12. Food safety in hospital: knowledge, attitudes and practices of nursing staff of two hospitals in Sicily, Italy

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    La Guardia Maurizio

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Food hygiene in hospital poses peculiar problems, particularly given the presence of patients who could be more vulnerable than healthy subjects to microbiological and nutritional risks. Moreover, in nosocomial outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease, the mortality risk has been proved to be significantly higher than the community outbreaks and highest for foodborne outbreaks. On the other hand, the common involvement in the role of food handlers of nurses or domestic staff, not specifically trained about food hygiene and HACCP, may represent a further cause of concern. The purpose of this study was to evaluate knowledge, attitudes, and practices concerning food safety of the nursing staff of two hospitals in Palermo, Italy. Association with some demographic and work-related determinants was also investigated. Methods The survey was conducted, by using a semi-structured questionnaire, in March-November 2005 in an acute general hospital and a paediatric hospital, where nursing staff is routinely involved in food service functions. Results Overall, 401 nurses (279, 37.1%, of the General Hospital and 122, 53.5%, of the Paediatric Hospital, respectively answered. Among the respondents there was a generalized lack of knowledge about etiologic agents and food vehicles associated to foodborne diseases and proper temperatures of storage of hot and cold ready to eat foods. A general positive attitude towards temperature control and using clothing and gloves, when handling food, was shared by the respondents nurses, but questions about cross-contamination, refreezing and handling unwrapped food with cuts or abrasions on hands were frequently answered incorrectly. The practice section performed better, though sharing of utensils for raw and uncooked foods and thawing of frozen foods at room temperatures proved to be widely frequent among the respondents. Age, gender, educational level and length of service were inconsistently

  13. Food safety in hospital: knowledge, attitudes and practices of nursing staff of two hospitals in Sicily, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccheri, Cecilia; Casuccio, Alessandra; Giammanco, Santo; Giammanco, Marco; La Guardia, Maurizio; Mammina, Caterina

    2007-01-01

    Background Food hygiene in hospital poses peculiar problems, particularly given the presence of patients who could be more vulnerable than healthy subjects to microbiological and nutritional risks. Moreover, in nosocomial outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease, the mortality risk has been proved to be significantly higher than the community outbreaks and highest for foodborne outbreaks. On the other hand, the common involvement in the role of food handlers of nurses or domestic staff, not specifically trained about food hygiene and HACCP, may represent a further cause of concern. The purpose of this study was to evaluate knowledge, attitudes, and practices concerning food safety of the nursing staff of two hospitals in Palermo, Italy. Association with some demographic and work-related determinants was also investigated. Methods The survey was conducted, by using a semi-structured questionnaire, in March-November 2005 in an acute general hospital and a paediatric hospital, where nursing staff is routinely involved in food service functions. Results Overall, 401 nurses (279, 37.1%, of the General Hospital and 122, 53.5%, of the Paediatric Hospital, respectively) answered. Among the respondents there was a generalized lack of knowledge about etiologic agents and food vehicles associated to foodborne diseases and proper temperatures of storage of hot and cold ready to eat foods. A general positive attitude towards temperature control and using clothing and gloves, when handling food, was shared by the respondents nurses, but questions about cross-contamination, refreezing and handling unwrapped food with cuts or abrasions on hands were frequently answered incorrectly. The practice section performed better, though sharing of utensils for raw and uncooked foods and thawing of frozen foods at room temperatures proved to be widely frequent among the respondents. Age, gender, educational level and length of service were inconsistently associated with the answer pattern

  14. Diabetes and Diabetic Retinopathy Management in East Africa: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Hospital Staff in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupitz, David G; Fenwick, Eva; Kollmann, K H Martin; Holz, Frank G; Finger, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    Good diabetes mellitus (DM) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) management depends largely on involved medical staff, prompting us to investigate knowledge, attitudes, and practices about DM and DR at a tertiary referral center in Kenya. The design for this study is exploratory qualitative using semistructured interviews. Data from eye and diabetes clinic staff were collected until thematic saturation was reached, transcribed, and iteratively analyzed for relevant themes based on the constant comparative method. Among 46 participants (mean age, 38 years; 54% females), most were physicians (n = 25, 54%), followed by nurses (n = 14, 30%) and clinical officers (n = 6, 13%). Diabetes mellitus and DR were seen as urgent health problems (n = 42, 91%), and regular ophthalmic screening of diabetic patients was universally recommended. Two thirds (n = 32, 70%) were unaware of DM and DR management guidelines at the hospital. Participants identified training of staff in diagnosing (n = 30, 65%), efficient detection and referral of diabetic patients (n = 24, 52%), and improved outreach services (n = 14, 30%) as most pressing areas of need. Communication among hospital departments was found to be suboptimal. Reported barriers to good DR management were lack of retinal laser treatment and costs. Management outcomes for DM and DR may be improved by implementing integrated service provision, direct ophthalmological involvement in diabetic clinics, endorsement and effective distribution of guidelines, an increase in screening capacity, and the introduction of ongoing medical education covering DM and DR.

  15. Research awareness, attitudes and barriers among clinical staff in a regional cancer centre. Part 1: a quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, B; Coltart, K; Hutchison, C; McJury, M; Morrison, A; Paterson, C; Thomson, M

    2017-09-01

    Research is of key importance in delivering high-quality patient care through evidence-based practice. Attitude towards research and barriers to research can have an impact on research activity. A survey was conducted to establish the levels of research awareness and attitudes among clinical staff groups in this regional cancer centre and identify any barriers to participation in research. The survey consisted of 26 questions and was distributed electronically and completed online. The response rate was 22.3% (n = 123). All participants felt that clinical research will help the regional cancer centre develop and progress treatments in the future. A positive attitude towards research was evident and consistent across professional groups. The main identified barriers to research included lacking the required knowledge, skills and training, lacking support from managers, and lack of opportunity or time to be involved in research, in particular for allied health professionals. However, there appears to be the foundation of a healthy research culture for nurses supported by management. The results of the survey support the implementation of an action plan based on the recommendations of this journal article. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Attitudes of nursing staff towards electronic patient records: a questionnaire survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Francke, A.L.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A growing number of health care organizations are implementing a system of electronic patient records (EPR). This implies a change in work routines for nursing staff, but it could also be regarded as an opportunity to improve the quality of care. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this paper is

  17. Is It Bullying or Sexual Harassment? Knowledge, Attitudes, and Professional Development Experiences of Middle School Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmaraman, Linda; Jones, Ashleigh E.; Stein, Nan; Espelage, Dorothy L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study fills a gap in the literature by examining how school staff members view bullying and sexual harassment and their role in preventing both. Given recent legislation, increasingly more attention is paid to bully prevention; however, student-on-student sexual harassment is less addressed. Methods: Four focus groups were…

  18. Atitudes parentais em relação à educação inclusiva Parental attitudes toward inclusive education

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    Altemir José Gonçalves Barbosa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de descrever as atitudes parentais em relação à inclusão escolar, 445 pais de alunos de primeira à quarta série do ensino fundamental de duas escolas municipais da cidade de São Paulo, responderam um questionário e uma escala de atitudes tipo Likert denominada Inventário Geral de Atitudes quanto à Educação Inclusiva (IGAEI. Participaram do estudo 169 (37,98% pais de alunos com necessidades educacionais especiais em processo de inclusão (G1 e 276 (62,02% progenitores de discentes que, de acordo com as instituições, não possuíam tal característica (G2. Os instrumentos foram aplicados coletivamente em reunião de pais e mestres com resposta individual. Os resultados obtidos revelam que ambos os grupos de pais tendiam a possuir atitudes favoráveis em relação à educação inclusiva. Porém, as atitudes dos pais de estudantes com necessidades educacionais especiais eram mais favoráveis à inclusão. São apresentados, ainda, resultados referentes a outras variáveis pesquisadas, como, por exemplo, tipos de necessidades educacionais em processo de inclusão. O estudo tende a corroborar resultados obtidos em pesquisas realizadas em outros países, ainda que algumas discrepâncias tenham sido percebidas. Conclui-se enfatizando a necessidade de mais pesquisas sobre o tema no contexto brasileiro e ressaltando a importância dos pais no desenvolvimento de sistemas educacionais inclusivos.In order to describe parental attitudes toward school inclusion, 445 parents of elementary school students from first to fourth grade of two municipal schools of the city of São Paulo answered a questionnaire and the Likert scale General Inventory of Attitudes toward Inclusive Education (IGAEI for assessing attitudes. The participants were 169 (37,98% parents of students with special educational needs included in regular schools (G1 and 276 (62,02% parents of students the school directors said did not have special needs (G2. The

  19. Nursing home staff members' attitudes and knowledge about urinary incontinence: the impact of technology and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlman, Katie; Wilson, Amy; Dugger, Renee; Eggleston, Brandon; Coudret, Nadine; Mathis, Sherri

    2012-01-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) poses challenges for nursing home personnel. The authors of this study explored differences in attitude and knowledge about UI among registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified nursing assistants working in skilled nursing homes before and after study interventions.

  20. Pedagogic Barriers in Cameroon Inclusive Classrooms: The Impact of Curriculum, Teachers' Attitudes and Classroom Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyi, Maureen Ebanga

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to examine if the curriculum, infrastructures and teachers' attitudes may influence school exclusion amongst disabled pupils. Three hypotheses were formulated based on the three variables: curriculum (teaching programmes), infrastructures and teachers' attitudes. 150 public primary school personnel from 12 primary schools in…

  1. Attitudes towards the Inclusion of University Students with Disabilities: Development and Validation of a Scale Based on the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Faúndez, Eva María

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: The focus of our research converges on the analysis of attitudes and the prediction of the behavior of university students towards the inclusion of students with disabilities in university. The evaluation of attitudes and the prediction of behavior are complex, but it is fundamental because of the decisive impact they have on the…

  2. Inclusive Elementary Classroom Teacher Knowledge of and Attitudes toward Applied Behavior Analysis and Autism Spectrum Disorder and Their Use of Applied Behavior Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine inclusive elementary teacher knowledge and attitude toward Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and applied behavior analysis (ABA) and their use of ABA. Furthermore, this study examined if knowledge and attitude predicted use of ABA. A survey was developed and administered through a web-based program. Of the…

  3. Education and training of healthcare staff in the knowledge, attitudes and skills needed to work effectively with breastfeeding women: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavine, Anna; MacGillivray, Steve; Renfrew, Mary J; Siebelt, Lindsay; Haggi, Haggi; McFadden, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that women need effective support to breastfeed, but many healthcare staff lack the necessary knowledge, attitudes and skills. There is therefore a need for breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff. The primary aim of this review is to determine whether education and training programs for healthcare staff have an effect on their knowledge and attitudes about supporting breastfeeding women. The secondary aim of this review was to identify whether any differences in type of training or discipline of staff mattered. A systematic search of the literature was conducted using the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's trial register. Randomised controlled trials comparing breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff with no or usual training and education were included if they measured the impact on staff knowledge, attitudes or compliance with the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI). From the 1192 reports identified, four distinct studies were included. Three studies were two-arm cluster-randomised trials and one was a two-arm individual randomised trial. Of these, three contributed quantitative data from a total of 250 participants. Due to heterogeneity of outcome measures meta-analysis was not possible. Knowledge was included as an outcome in two studies and demonstrated small but significant positive effects. Attitudes towards breastfeeding was included as an outcome in two studies, however, results were inconsistent both in terms of how they were measured and the intervention effects. One study reported a small but significant positive effect on BFHI compliance. Study quality was generally deemed low with the majority of domains being judged as high or unclear risk of bias. This review identified a lack of good evidence on breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff. There is therefore a critical need for research to address breastfeeding education and training needs of multidisciplinary

  4. Examining the Attitudes and Concerns of the Kenyan Teachers toward the Inclusion of Children with Disabilities in the General Education Classroom: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odongo, George; Davidson, Roseanna

    2016-01-01

    The philosophy of inclusive education aims at enabling all children to learn in the regular education classrooms. It is widely believed that the successful implementation of any inclusive policy is largely influenced by teachers being positive about the expectations. Grounded in Positioning Theory, this study was conducted to examine the attitude,…

  5. Attitudes towards Disability and Inclusion in Bangladesh: From Theory to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siska, Jan; Habib, Ahsan

    2013-01-01

    Along with the development of global consciousness, the campaign for an inclusive society is gaining momentum. An inclusive society based on social justice ensures individual rights and social welfare for each and everybody. On the contrary, the conventional disability paradigm categorizes people with many different labels which exclude people…

  6. Support, Inclusion, and Special Education Teachers' Attitudes toward the Education of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Isabel R.; Saldaña, David; Moreno, F. Javier

    2012-01-01

    This study is aimed at assessing special education teachers' attitudes toward teaching pupils with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and at determining the role of variables associated with a positive attitude towards the children and their education. Sixty-nine special education teachers were interviewed. The interview included two multiple-choice Likert-type questionnaires, one about teachers' attitude, and another about teachers' perceived needs in relation to the specific education of the pupil with ASD. The study shows a positive view of teachers' expectations regarding the education of pupils with ASD. A direct logistic regression analysis was performed testing for experience with the child, school relationship with an ASD network and type of school (mainstream or special) as potential predictors. Although all three variables are useful in predicting special education teachers' attitudes, the most relevant was the relationship with an ASD network. Need for information and social support are the relatively highest needs expressed by teachers. PMID:22934171

  7. Staff attitude and experience in dealing with rational nursing home patients who refuse to eat and drink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiasson, A C; Andersson, L

    1994-11-01

    This paper describes the personal attitudes of nursing home staff and their experience of coping with rational nursing home patients who refused to eat and drink. Professional caregivers in 13 nursing homes and nursing home units in the county of Stockholm, Sweden, were asked to judge an ethical conflict involving a situation in which a patient of sound mind refused to eat and drink. Two questions were raised: (a) What would your unit's decision be in this case? (b) What is your personal opinion in this case? Answers to question (a) showed that 20% believed that the patient's autonomy would be respected, i.e. the patient would be allowed to die without medical intervention. Concerning question (b), the results showed that approximately 50% believed that the patient's wishes regarding food refusal must be respected. Furthermore, the results suggested that both professional category and number of years' service made a difference to the staff views on patient autonomy. Finally, the findings indicated that the nursing homes included in the study did not show any distinct policy with regard to the autonomy of elderly nursing home patients in refusing to eat and drink.

  8. Perceptions and attitudes of hospital staff toward paging system and the use of mobile phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroon, Muhammad; Yasin, Faiza; Eckel, Rachael; Walker, Frank

    2010-10-01

    Our objective was to document the pattern of mobile phone usage by medical staff in a hospital setting, and to explore any perceived benefits (such as improved communications) associated with mobile phones. This cross-sectional survey was conducted in Waterford Regional Hospital, Ireland, where bleep is the official system of communication. All non-consultant hospital doctors, of medical disciplines only, were asked to participate. The questionnaire was designed to explore the pattern and different aspects of mobile phone usage. At the time of study, there were sixty medical junior doctors, and the response rate was 100 percent. All participants used mobile phones while at work, and also for hospital-related work. For 98.3 percent the mobile phone was their main mode of communication while in the hospital. Sixty-two percent (n = 37) made 6-10 calls daily purely for work-related business, and this comprised of ≥ 80 percent of their daily usage of mobile phones. For 98 percent of participants, most phone calls were work-related. Regarding reasons for using mobile phones, all reported that using mobile phone is quicker for communication. Mobile phone usage is very common among the medical personnel, and this is regarded as a more efficient means of communication for mobile staff than the hospital paging system.

  9. Perceptions and attitudes of hospital staff toward paging system and the use of mobile phones.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: Our objective was to document the pattern of mobile phone usage by medical staff in a hospital setting, and to explore any perceived benefits (such as improved communications) associated with mobile phones. METHODS: This cross-sectional survey was conducted in Waterford Regional Hospital, Ireland, where bleep is the official system of communication. All non-consultant hospital doctors, of medical disciplines only, were asked to participate. The questionnaire was designed to explore the pattern and different aspects of mobile phone usage. RESULTS: At the time of study, there were sixty medical junior doctors, and the response rate was 100 percent. All participants used mobile phones while at work, and also for hospital-related work. For 98.3 percent the mobile phone was their main mode of communication while in the hospital. Sixty-two percent (n = 37) made 6-10 calls daily purely for work-related business, and this comprised of >\\/= 80 percent of their daily usage of mobile phones. For 98 percent of participants, most phone calls were work-related. Regarding reasons for using mobile phones, all reported that using mobile phone is quicker for communication.Conclusions: Mobile phone usage is very common among the medical personnel, and this is regarded as a more efficient means of communication for mobile staff than the hospital paging system.

  10. Healthcare staff attitudes towards the use of electronic cigarettes ('e-cigarettes') compared with a local trust policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippard, Benjamin J; Shipley, Mark D

    2017-07-01

    E-cigarette use has risen dramatically in recent years, despite uncertainty over long-term health effects and concerns regarding efficacy as a smoking cessation device. Currently, there is no legislation prohibiting use in public, though many trusts have extended the NHS Smokefree policy to include e-cigarettes. The successful implementation of such policy is, however, unclear. This study examined staff attitudes towards the use of e-cigarettes in a hospital environment with respect to enforcement of a local trust smoking policy. A total of 79 healthcare professionals working at South Tyneside District Hospital, South Shields, completed a written questionnaire regarding use of e-cigarettes, particularly views on use in public and on hospital premises. Factors influencing the likelihood of individuals to challenge the use of e-cigarettes were assessed. In all, 45% of respondents thought that e-cigarettes should be allowed in public places, though a majority (62%) favoured use on hospital grounds compared to within hospital buildings (18%). Over 50% of respondents were unaware of trust policy relating to e-cigarettes and only 25% had ever challenged someone using a device. Roughly, one-third reported that they would still not challenge someone in future, despite being informed of trust policy. Fear of abuse was the most cited reason for not challenging. Expressed concerns of e-cigarette use related to fire risk, 'normalising' smoking behaviour and uncertainty of long-term effects. Most staff do not enforce trust policy regarding e-cigarette use. This reflects variation in opinion over use, poor awareness of the policy itself and perceived barriers to implementation, including fear of abuse. Addressing these issues through staff education sessions may help successful future implementation.

  11. Smoking habits and attitudes toward tobacco bans among United Kingdom hospital staff and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, K E; Shin, D; Davies, G

    2011-08-01

    A group of United Kingdom (UK) hospitals. To estimate the current smoking habits of health care professionals (HCPs) in a country with active tobacco control measures, and to record their attitudes to national and hospital tobacco bans. A cross-sectional survey of 500 HCPs. HCPs reported a lower rate of current smoking (7%) than the general population (24%). Doctors (2.6%) and medical students (3.8%) were less likely to be current smokers than both nurses (8.7%) and allied health professionals (10.9%, P smoking in health care premises. A higher proportion of UK doctors (69%) than nurses (52%) favoured a complete ban (odds ratio 2.01, 95% confidence interval 1.14-3.56). Self-reported smoking patterns in UK health professionals are lower than previously and compared to other industrialised and developing countries. Support for bans is very high, but differences remain in behaviour and especially attitudes to local bans according to professional status, although this gap is also narrowing.

  12. Attitudes of Academic Staff towards Their Own Work and towards External Evaluation, from the Perspective of Self-Determination Theory: Estonian Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seema, Riin; Udam, Maiki; Mattisen, Heli

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the attitudes of academic staff towards their own work as well as towards external evaluations. The study was based on (1) an analysis of assessment reports of institutional accreditations conducted by the Estonian Quality Agency for Higher and Vocational Education and (2) self-determination theory on…

  13. Community-Based Addiction Treatment Staff Attitudes about the Usefulness of Evidence-Based Addiction Treatment and CBO Organizational Linkages to Research Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Lena; Krull, Ivy; Zerden, Lisa de Saxe; McCarty, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    This national study of community-based addiction-treatment organizations' (CBOs) implementation of evidence-based practices explored CBO Program Directors' (n = 296) and clinical staff (n = 518) attitudes about the usefulness of science-based addiction treatment. Through multivariable regression modeling, the study identified that identical…

  14. Study of Attitude staff in the Field of Total Quality Management by using Fuzzy Logic, Case Study in Teaching Hospitals in Yazd

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    M ArabBanadaki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Total Quality Management, Quality is not only an admirable phenomenon but also is a customer inalienable right and will be created through the involvement and participation of all employees, managers and customers of an organization. This study was designed to evaluate staff attitudes in teaching hospitals of Yazd in the field of Total Quality Management by using fuzzy logic. Methods: This was a descriptive, analytical, cross – sectional study. Research population, were all staff in teaching hospitals of Yazd that among them 235 people were randomly Stratified, selected and studied. Data for this study were collected through a questionnaire. Since the theory of fuzzy is more suitable approach for measuring linguistic variables, so this paper determines the attitude of staff in the field of Quality Management by the use of fuzzy logic. Results: Results showed that the dimensions of the “Identification and training of staff," "empowerment and teamwork of Employees" and "support and leadership of the top management organization" respectively ranked first, second and third importance In terms of staff. Conclusion: Criteria of identification and training of staff and teamwork and support and leadership of the top management organization are Important in motivating Total Quality Management. So in total quality management improve programs, these aspects should be prioritized according to the degree of importance and effort to improve the quality of service.

  15. Knowledge and Perceived Social Norm Predict Parents' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Ming; Sin, Kuen-Fung; Yang, Lan; Forlin, Chris; Ho, Fuk-Chuen

    2015-01-01

    Parents are key stakeholders in education and their support is pivotal to policy implementation. Through a large-scale survey, the present study investigated the validity of a structural model describing the relationship between attitude, knowledge, and perceived social norm among parents of children with special needs. Results revealed that…

  16. Estonian Vocational Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education for Students with Special Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Richard; Kaikkonen, Leena; Koiv, Kristi

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from research conducted with two samples of teachers from Estonian Vocational Schools. The first sample comprised a group of teachers who had received professional development directly related to the management of students with special educational needs in vocational education settings. Their attitudes and…

  17. Attitudes and education of pediatric house staff concerning breast-feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, G L; Jones, T M; Fraley, J K

    1992-05-01

    Pediatricians are expected to offer information and advice on breast-feeding to expectant and lactating mothers, but the educational experience for pediatric residents may not adequately prepare them for this responsibility. To examine knowledge and confidence regarding breast-feeding gained by pediatric house staff during their residency, a survey was administered to pediatric residents in a large, hospital-based training program. Of 108 program residents, 87 (81%) participated. Forty-one percent of the respondents were postgraduate level I (PL-I), 29% were PL-II, and 30% were PL-III. There was no evidence that PL-III residents were more competent or comfortable with routine breast-feeding counseling or intervention than their PL-I counterparts. Residents who had breast-fed, those with spouses who had breast-fed, and those with children of their own had the greatest knowledge and confidence base in several areas, such as their ability to teach breast-feeding techniques and to treat cracked nipples. They were also more familiar with different types of breastpumps. There were no significant differences among those who were or were not breast-fed as a child nor among men versus women. Residency programs must provide comprehensive education on breast-feeding to prepare future pediatricians to meet the needs of patients and their parents.

  18. How do faculty conceptions on reading, writing and their role in the teaching of academic literacies influence their inclusive attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Colombo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2016v69n3p115 This study explored faculty conceptions about reading and writing, the student body, reasons for student low-performance as well as their declared teaching practices aimed at helping students to better understand readings and write academic texts. The objective was to understand what type of professors´ conceptions contributed with a more inclusive attitude towards first-year students. Content analysis from data gathered from in-depth interviews indicates that professors who acknowledged the complexity of the reading and writing processes tend to be more inclusive and to use reading and writing to teach and not just to evaluate. Those who taught writing courses tended to consider writing as a general skill, transferable to other contexts and spheres of knowledge. Less-inclusive teachers, explaining why they did not offer guidance or proposed remedial solutions, claimed that students should already have mastered academic reading and writing when entering the university and that teaching these skills implied being overprotective and not allowing them to mature.

  19. How do faculty conceptions on reading, writing and their role in the teaching of academic literacies influence their inclusive attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Colombo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study explored faculty conceptions about reading and writing, the student body, reasons for student low-performance as well as their declared teaching practices aimed at helping students to better understand readings and write academic texts. The objective was to understand what type of professors´ conceptions contributed with a more inclusive attitude towards first-year students. Content analysis from data gathered from in-depth interviews indicates that professors who acknowledged the complexity of the reading and writing processes tend to be more inclusive and to use reading and writing to teach and not just to evaluate. Those who taught writing courses tended to consider writing as a general skill, transferable to other contexts and spheres of knowledge. Less-inclusive teachers, explaining why they did not offer guidance or proposed remedial solutions, claimed that students should already have mastered academic reading and writing when entering the university and that teaching these skills implied being overprotective and not allowing them to mature.

  20. Laparoscopic simulation training in gynaecology: Current provision and staff attitudes - a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Christy; Fox, Robert; Hinshaw, Kim; Draycott, Timothy J; James, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore current provision of laparoscopic simulation training, and to determine attitudes of trainers and trainees to the role of simulators in surgical training across the UK. An anonymous cross-sectional survey with cluster sampling was developed and circulated. All Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) Training Programme Directors (TPD), College Tutors (RCT) and Trainee representatives (TR) across the UK were invited to participate. One hundred and ninety-six obstetricians and gynaecologists participated. Sixty-three percent of hospitals had at least one box trainer, and 14.6% had least one virtual-reality simulator. Only 9.3% and 3.6% stated that trainees used a structured curriculum on box and virtual-reality simulators, respectively. Respondents working in a Large/Teaching hospital (p = 0.008) were more likely to agree that simulators enhance surgical training. Eighty-nine percent agreed that simulators improve the quality of training, and should be mandatory or desirable for junior trainees. Consultants (p = 0.003) and respondents over 40 years (p = 0.011) were more likely to hold that a simulation test should be undertaken before live operation. Our data demonstrated, therefore, that availability of laparoscopic simulators is inconsistent, with limited use of mandatory structured curricula. In contrast, both trainers and trainees recognise a need for greater use of laparoscopic simulation for surgical training.

  1. A Quasi-Experimental Study of the Effects of Teacher Training on Attitudes towards Inclusion Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Jillian

    2017-01-01

    Least restrictive environment (LRE) is defined as teaching children with disabilities alongside non-disabled children; these children have not been identified as students with disabilities. An inclusion setting is the integration of students with disabilities in the general education setting to provide the least restrictive environment. Inclusion…

  2. Northern Ireland Student Teachers' Changing Attitudes towards Inclusive Education during Initial Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Jackie

    2007-01-01

    With the passing of the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Act into law alongside the move away from academic selection for post-primary pupils by 2008 and a far reaching review of the curriculum, education in Northern Ireland is about to face its most radical change in fifty years. Issues relating to Inclusive Education are now pressing…

  3. Factors Influencing Belize District Primary School Teachers' Attitudes toward Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Maxine

    2012-01-01

    Inclusive education continues to be a reoccurring challenge as various factors affect to what extent teachers or educators are willing to educate children with disabilities in the regular education setting alongside their non-disabled peers. This quantitative study examined factors influencing Belize District Primary School teachers' attitudes…

  4. Beijing In-Service Teachers' Self-Efficacy and Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, Olli-Pekka; Savolainen, Hannu; Xu, Jiacheng

    2012-01-01

    Four-hundred-and-fifty-one in-service teachers from the Beijing municipality filled in a questionnaire containing a Teacher Efficacy for Inclusive Practices (TEIP) scale. The aim was to examine the factor structure of the TEIP scale among mainland Chinese in-service teachers, and to investigate the relationship between self-efficacy for inclusive…

  5. Factors Related to Pre-Service Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusion: A Case for Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muwana, Florence Chuzu; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.

    2014-01-01

    Inclusive education has become a global trend in the provision of services for students with disabilities. In Zambia and other developing nations, international initiatives from UNESCO and other nongovernmental organisations have contributed to the consensus that all children have a right to a free and appropriate education and that all students…

  6. Influence of Teacher Preparation Programmes on Preservice Teachers' Attitudes toward Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Ryun

    2011-01-01

    With the increased implementation of inclusive education, teacher educators have been challenged to make changes in programmes to prepare preservice teachers to educate diverse learners. These changes are reflected in various types of teacher preparation programmes that are transformations of traditional general education and special education…

  7. Social Inclusion of Children With Down Syndrome: Jewish and Muslim Mothers' Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs, and Behavioral Intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnoy, Sivia; Biton, Anna; Itzhaki, Michal

    The current study examined mothers' knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, and intention to socially integrate children with Down syndrome (DS) in the family, with children without disabilities and school system. A questionnaire based on a descriptive, cross-sectional design was administered to Jewish and Muslim mothers. The questionnaire included demographics, knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, and intention to integrate children with DS. Analysis included a regression test of intention to integrate children with DS and a one-way ANOVA for differences between Jewish and Muslim mothers. Nearly all the Jewish mothers (93.7%) and about half the Muslim mothers (52.8%) had performed screening tests for DS during their pregnancy. All mothers displayed low knowledge level about DS. Being Jewish (t=2.89; p=0.005) and holding more positive beliefs (t=3.39; p=0.001) were associated with a higher intention to socially integrate children with DS. Significant positive correlations were found between beliefs and attitudes (r=0.65; psocially integrate children with DS (r=0.39; psocial inclusion of children with DS are quite positive and the intention to integrate children with DS in the family, with children without disabilities, and in the mainstream school system is high. However, their level of knowledge about DS is low. Nurses, as a critical source of information about DS, should develop an ethno-cultural sensitivity to diverse populations in order to influence attitudes and beliefs regarding the social integration of children with DS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effectiveness of pharmacovigilance: multifaceted educational intervention related to the knowledge, skills and attitudes of multidisciplinary hospital staff

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    Fabiana Rossi Varallo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Most educational interventions in pharmacovigilance are designed to encourage physicians to report adverse drug reactions. However, multidisciplinary teams may play an important role in reporting drug-related problems. This study assessed the impact of a multifaceted educational intervention in pharmacovigilance on the knowledge, skills and attitudes of hospital professionals. METHOD: This prospective, open-label, non-randomized study was performed in a medium-complexity hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. The intervention involved four activities: 1 an interactive lecture, 2 a practical class, 3 a pre-post questionnaire administered to professionals on a multidisciplinary team, and 4 educational material. The intervention’s impact on the professionals’ knowledge and skills was assessed using the World Health Organization’s definitions. The intervention’s effect on the professionals’ attitudes was analysed by the prevalence of adverse drug event reports (adverse drug reactions, medication errors, therapeutic failure and drug quality deviations and the relevance (seriousness and expectancy of the events. RESULTS: One hundred seventy-three professionals were enrolled. A 70-fold increase in the number of adverse drug event reports was observed during the 12 months post-intervention. The intervention improved the professionals’ form-completion skills (p<0.0001 and their knowledge of pharmacovigilance (p<0.0001. The intervention also contributed to detecting serious drug-induced events. The nursing staff reported medication errors, and pharmacists and physiotherapists recognized serious adverse drug reactions. Physicians communicated suspicions of therapeutic failure. CONCLUSIONS: A multidisciplinary approach to drug-safety assessments contributes to identifying new, relevant drug-related problems and improving the rate of adverse drug event reporting. This strategy may therefore be applied to improve risk communication in

  9. Awareness of Stress-Reduction Interventions on Work Attitudes: The Impact of Tenure and Staff Group in Australian Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignata, Silvia; Winefield, Anthony H; Provis, Chris; Boyd, Carolyn M

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the impact of staff group role and length of organizational tenure in the relationship between the awareness of stress interventions (termed intervention awareness: IA) and the work-related attitudinal outcomes of university employees. A two-wave longitudinal study of a sample of 869 employees from 13 universities completed a psychosocial work factors and health questionnaire. Hierarchical regression analyses examined the contribution of staff role and different lengths of organizational tenure with IA and employees' reports of job satisfaction, affective organizational commitment, trust in senior management, and perceived procedural justice. Employees' length of tenure affected the relation between IA and work attitudes, and there were also differences between academic and non-academic staff groups. For non-academic employees, IA predicted job satisfaction, affective organizational commitment, trust in senior management, and perceived procedural justice. However, for academics, IA only predicted job satisfaction and trust which identifies a need to increase the visibility of organizational interventions. Across the tenure groups, IA predicted: (1) perceived procedural justice for employees with five or less years of tenure; (2) job satisfaction for employees with 0-19 years of tenure; (3) trust in senior management for employees with 6-19 years of tenure; and (4) affective organizational commitment for employees with a tenure length of 6-10 years. Employees working at the university for an intermediate period had the most positive perceptions of their organization in terms of IA, job satisfaction, trust in senior management, and affective organizational commitment, whereas employees with 20-38 years of tenure had the least positive perceptions. Results suggest that employees in the middle of their careers report the most positive perceptions of their university. The findings highlight the need to attend to contextual issues in organizational

  10. Awareness of stress-reduction interventions on work attitudes: the impact of tenure and staff group in Australian universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pignata

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the impact of staff group role and length of organizational tenure in the relationship between the awareness of stress interventions (termed intervention awareness: IA and the work-related attitudinal outcomes of university employees. A two-wave longitudinal study of a sample of 869 employees from 13 universities completed a psychosocial work factors and health questionnaire. Hierarchical regression analyses examined the contribution of staff role and different lengths of organizational tenure with IA and employees’ reports of job satisfaction, affective organizational commitment, trust in senior management, and perceived procedural justice. Employees' length of tenure affected the relation between IA and work attitudes, and there were also differences between academic and non-academic staff groups. For non-academic employees, IA predicted job satisfaction, affective organizational commitment, trust in senior management, and perceived procedural justice. However, for academics, IA only predicted job satisfaction and trust which identifies a need to increase the visibility of organizational interventions. Across the tenure groups, IA predicted: (1 perceived procedural justice for employees with five or less years of tenure; (2 job satisfaction for employees with 0–19 years of tenure; (3 trust in senior management for employees with 6–19 years of tenure; and (4 affective organizational commitment for employees with a tenure length of 6–10 years. Employees working at the university for an intermediate period had the most positive perceptions of their organization in terms of IA, job satisfaction, trust in senior management, and affective organizational commitment, whereas employees with 20–38 years of tenure had the least positive perceptions. Results suggest that employees in the middle of their careers report the most positive perceptions of their university. The findings highlight the need to attend to contextual

  11. Impact of a person-centred dementia care training programme on hospital staff attitudes, role efficacy and perceptions of caring for people with dementia: A repeated measures study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surr, C A; Smith, S J; Crossland, J; Robins, J

    2016-01-01

    People with dementia occupy up to one quarter of acute hospital beds. However, the quality of care delivered to this patient group is of national concern. Staff working in acute hospitals report lack of knowledge, skills and confidence in caring for people with dementia. There is limited evidence about the most effective approaches to supporting acute hospital staff to deliver more person-centred care. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a specialist training programme for acute hospital staff regarding improving attitudes, satisfaction and feelings of caring efficacy, in provision of care to people with dementia. A repeated measures design, with measures completed immediately prior to commencing training (T1), after completion of Foundation level training (T2: 4-6 weeks post-baseline), and following Intermediate level training (T3: 3-4 months post-baseline). One NHS Trust in the North of England, UK. 40 acute hospital staff working in clinical roles, the majority of whom (90%) were nurses. All participants received the 3.5 day Person-centred Care Training for Acute Hospitals (PCTAH) programme, comprised of two levels, Foundation (0.5 day) and Intermediate (3 days), delivered over a 3-4 months period. Staff demographics and previous exposure to dementia training were collected via a questionnaire. Staff attitudes were measured using the Approaches to Dementia Questionnaire (ADQ), satisfaction in caring for people with dementia was captured using the Staff Experiences of Working with Demented Residents questionnaire (SEWDR) and perceived caring efficacy was measured using the Caring Efficacy Scale (CES). The training programme was effective in producing a significant positive change on all three outcome measures following intermediate training compared to baseline. A significant positive effect was found on the ADQ between baseline and after completion of Foundation level training, but not for either of the other measures. Training acute hospital staff in

  12. Construction of a Scale-Questionnaire on the Attitude of the Teaching Staff as Opposed to the Educative Innovation by Means of Techniques of Cooperative Work (CAPIC

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    Joan Andrés Traver Martí

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the construction process of a scale-questionnaire is described to measure the attitude of the teaching staff as opposed to the educational innovation by means of techniques of cooperative work (CAPIC.  In order to carry out its design and elaboration we need on the one hand a model of analysis of the attitudes and an instrument of measurement of the same ones capable of guiding its practical dynamics.  The Theory of the Reasoned Action of Fisbhein and Ajzen (1975, 1980 and the summative scales (Likert have fulfilled, in both cases, this paper.

  13. Intentions to Move from Homelessness to Social Inclusion: The Role of Participation Beliefs, Attitudes and Prior Behaviour

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    Julie Christian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A key aim of homelessness services is not only to ensure that homeless people attain a secure home, but that this is a pathway to wider social inclusion. However, relatively little is known about the psychological elements that are essential for homeless people to engage with these pathways, nor whether these elements combine in ways that are predictable from previous research. In the present work, we examined both demographic and behavioural precursors, and contemporaneous psychological predictors, of a set of 49 homeless men’s intentions to engage with a programme to move them toward long-term housing and social inclusion. Contrary to predictions based on subjective utility and rational choice theories, we found that normative pressure and did not directly predict the men’s intentions. Instead, we found that intentions were predicted by their attitudes towards the services, and their specific beliefs about the benefits of particular courses of action (efficacy beliefs, and to a more restricted extent their experience (sociodemographics; and in those with high prior service use histories, only participatory beliefs guided future service use intentions. These findings suggest that it is important to focus on intentions as a highly relevant outcome of interventions, because beliefs about interventions can break the link between past behaviour or habitual service use and future service use. Such interventions may be particularly effective if they focus on the evaluative and efficacy-related aspects of behaviour over time and better understand the benefits the men evaluated the services as offering them.

  14. An exploration of the experience, confidence and attitudes of staff to the provision of palliative care to people with intellectual disabilities.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Karen

    2010-09-01

    Research suggests that shortcomings exist in the provision of palliative care to people with intellectual disabilities. This mixed-methods study aimed to describe the experience, confidence and attitudes of staff to the provision of palliative care to people with intellectual disabilities. The sample was drawn from the population of one Health Service Executive area in Ireland. Staff from intellectual disability and palliative care services completed surveys and participated in focus group discussions. Three hundred and eighty-nine questionnaires were distributed and 16 focus groups were held. Fifty-nine per cent of palliative care staff and 67% of intellectual disability services staff had cared for someone with intellectual disability who had died but level of experience was low. Both palliative care and intellectual disability services staff lacked confidence in their ability to provide palliative care. Staff were challenged by perceived \\'differences\\' and \\'difficulties\\' in the provision of care. They endorsed a partnership approach to care but focus group discussions revealed that a shared desire to cooperate was insufficient to guarantee effective collaboration.

  15. Interacting in the Smog Factors that Shape Faculty Attitudes and Beliefs about Race and Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodari, Apriel K.

    2006-03-01

    Many faculty members realize that we must interact productively with diverse colleagues and students, and we must find ways to benefit from the talents of all members of our intellectual community. Put simply, we must aim for the ceiling rather than the floor. This means that we approach our work informed that engaging diversity in our classrooms will increase our success and the success of all our students. But in physics, it is often difficult to measure and address diversity issues because doing so is not perceived as central to our discipline. To address this apparent disconnection, we present some ideas on race [1] and inclusion [2] within the context of the physics instruction. Specifically, we speak to how university faculty might use inclusive pedagogy in physics education research and curriculum. Our goal here is to open a frank dialogue and present concrete avenues to explore as you create activities that serve your classroom best. *Tatum, Beverly Daniel. (2004). Changing demographics and challenges of the future. Draft Proceedings of the National Science Board Workshop on Broadening the Participation in Science and Engineering Research and Education. Arlington, VA: National Science Board; Tatum, Beverly Daniel. (1997). Why are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? And Other Conversations about Race. New York: Basic Books. *Bonilla-Silva, Eduardo. (2003). Racism without Racists: Color-blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States. Lanham, MD: Rowan & Littlefield; Thiederman, Sondra. (2003). Making Diversity Work: 7 Steps for Defeating Bias in the Workplace. Chicago: Dearborn Trade Publishing.

  16. Attitude of Academic Community towards Physically Challenged Students in the University of Maiduguri: Implications for Financing Inclusive Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamiteko, Racheal Modupe; Ibi, Mustapha Baba; Bukar, Ibrahim Bulama

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the attitude of academic community towards physically challenged students in the University of Maiduguri as it affect the financing of inclusive education for sustainable development in Nigeria. Four objectives, two research questions and two hypotheses were set and tested for the study. Descriptive survey was adopted as a…

  17. The Effect of a Disability Camp Program on Attitudes towards the Inclusion of Children with Disabilities in a Summer Sport and Leisure Activity Camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Christina; Evaggelinou, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of a specific Disability Camp Program (DCP) in the attitudes of children without disabilities toward the inclusion of children with disabilities in a summer sport and leisure activity camp. Three hundred eighty-seven campers without disabilities participated in the study and were divided into…

  18. Examining the Attitudes of Secondary General Education and Special Education Teachers toward Inclusion of Children with Autism in General Education Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Morghan E.

    2016-01-01

    Academic environments, such as general education classrooms, have increasingly become important learning environments for children with autism. The purpose of the study was to examine the attitudes of secondary general education and special education teachers toward inclusion of children with autism in general education classrooms. The research…

  19. A multi-component patient-handling intervention improves attitudes and behaviors for safe patient handling and reduces aggression experienced by nursing staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Bettina Wulff; Casper, Sven Dalgas; Andersen, Lars L.

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated an intervention for patient-handling equipment aimed to improve nursing staffs' use of patient handling equipment and improve their general health, reduce musculoskeletal problems, aggressive episodes, days of absence and work-related accidents. As a controlled before......-after study, questionnaire data were collected at baseline and 12-month follow-up among nursing staff at intervention and control wards at two hospitals. At 12-month follow-up, the intervention group had more positive attitudes towards patient-handling equipment and increased use of specific patient......-handling equipment. In addition, a lower proportion of nursing staff in the intervention group had experienced physically aggressive episodes. No significant change was observed in general health status, musculoskeletal problems, days of absence or work-related accidents. The intervention resulted in more positive...

  20. The Impact of Knowledge of Suicide Prevention and Work Experience among Clinical Staff on Attitudes towards Working with Suicidal Patients and Suicide Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramberg, Inga-Lill; Di Lucca, Maria Anna; Hadlaczky, Gergö

    2016-02-04

    Suicide-preventive training has shown to influence attitudes. This study aimed at investigating what impact other factors than knowledge might have on attitudes towards work with suicidal patients and suicide prevention. In 2007, 500 health-care staff working in a psychiatric clinic in Stockholm received a questionnaire with items concerning work with suicidal patients to which 358 (71.6%) responded. A set of attitude items were tested using structural equation modelling (LISREL). Three models were found to be satisfactory valid and reliable: Job clarity, Job confidence and Attitudes towards prevention. These were then used in regression analyses as dependent variables with predictors such as experience of work with suicidal patients, perceived sufficient training, age and gender. Perceived sufficient training was consistently the most important predictor for all three attitude concepts (p prevention). Age was another significant predictor for Job clarity (p suicide for Job confidence (p suicide preventive education is likely to improve attitudes towards the prevention of suicide, clarity and confidence regarding their role in the care for suicidal patients. These improvements may contribute to the prevention of suicide in health care settings.

  1. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of Caregivers of People with Disabilities in Processes of Social Inclusion in the Municipality Madrid, Cundinamarca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Camargo Rojas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The social inclusion of people with disabilities (PWD, dependent on many economic, social, political and cultural factors that affect their social development. One factor that generates greater social exclusion, corresponding to attitudinal barriers identified in the immediate environment. Objective: To identify knowledge, attitudes and practices of primary caregivers, about disability and care they provide to PcD linked to services Outpatient Gustavo Escallon Cayzedo of Santa Fe de Bogota Foundation (CAGEC, municipality of Madrid, Cundinamarca. Material and methods: Research with mixed approach, descriptive study aimed at caregivers of PcD, whom a semi-structured interview was applied. The quantitative analysis was performed using descriptive statistics and qualitative analysis was performed by generating an array of established and emerging categories. Results: economic and labor conditions affecting significantly the lives of caregivers, who spend more than 10 hours a day to care PcD, resulting in some symptoms of “caregiver syndrome” are evident. Most caregivers do not know the rights and duties of the population, and those who know they associate with the access to services. Participation is associated with assistance to certain activities, and not from his political notion. These skills relate to the practices of caregivers which are oriented on the biomedical model. Discussion: Being studied the conditions of the caregiver barriers, attitudes and support networks, observed how are you affecting your life project. Despite this, the activities of public and private entities are directed to the PcD, so the implementation of actions that promote the health of the caregiver is suggested.

  2. Smoking Behaviors and Attitudes Among Clients and Staff at New York Addiction Treatment Programs Following a Smoking Ban: Findings After 5 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Anna; Guydish, Joseph; Le, Thao; Tajima, Barbara; Passalacqua, Emma; Soto-Nevarez, Arturo; Brown, Lawrence S; Delucchi, Kevin L

    2016-05-01

    Addiction treatment clients are more likely to die of tobacco-related diseases than of alcohol or illicit drug-related causes. We aimed to assess smoking behavior, and smoking-related attitudes and services, in New York addiction treatment programs before a statewide smoking ban in treatment facilities was implemented (2008), 1 year (2009) and 5 years after implementation (2013). We conducted surveys at each time point with clients (N = 329, 341, and 353, respectively) and staff (N = 202, 203, and 166, respectively) from five residential and two methadone maintenance programs in New York State. At each data collection wave, questionnaires measured smoking behavior as well as smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and experiences with tobacco cessation services as part of addiction treatment. Staff smoking prevalence decreased from 35.2% in 2008 to 21.8% in 2013 (P = .005) while client smoking prevalence over the same period was unchanged (68.1% vs. 66.0%, P = .564). Among clients who smoked, mean cigarettes per day decreased from 13.7 (SD = 8.38) to 10.2 (SD = 4.44; P attitudes and cessation services received; and for staff self-efficacy and cessation services provided. In residential programs, scores for most items decreased (became less positive) in 2009 followed by a partial rebound in 2013. Methadone program scores tended to rise (become more positive) throughout the study period. Staff and clients may respond differentially to tobacco-free policies depending on type of treatment program, and this finding may help to inform the implementation of tobacco-free policies in other statewide addiction treatment systems. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Investigation of knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of nursing staff in oncology hospital regarding the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Vangelatou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Approximately 300 million people, 3% of the world population, need palliative care or terminal care each year, including prevention and care of pressure ulcers. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge, practices and attitudes of nurses of an oncology hospital in Greece on the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. Methodology: This is a cross-sectional study in an Oncology Hospital of Athens. The study population was nurses and their assistants working in the particular hospital. Data collection was conducted by using a specially designed research tool. In total, 150 questionnaires were distributed and 115 were collected (response rate 76.7%. The study lasted 6 months (from July 2016 to December 2016. The statistical analysis was performed with the statistical program SPSS for Windows (version 21 statistical software. Results: The study sample consisted of 115 nurses and their assistants, age 41.6 (±6.8 years old. The average length of employment of the participants was 17.1(±7.5 years. Of the total sample, 16 (13.9% participants reported that the hospital they work organize training seminars/courses for the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. Almost all participants (99.1% answered correctly to the definition of pressure ulcers. Only 42.6% of the respondents answered correctly for the best position to prevent pressure sores, while most answered correctly to the questions concerning the risk factors for the development of pressure ulcers. About half of participants (48 reported that the clinic they work use an assessment scale for pressure ulcers and 35 (72.9% participants completed it once a day. On the total of 27 questions, the correct answers given by respondents were 20.9 (±2.8 or 77.7% with a minimum of 8 (29.6% and maximum 27 (100% correct answers. Conclusions: Although oncology patients often experience problems with depression, however, the hospital did not seem to systematically

  4. Baseline evidence-based practice use, knowledge, and attitudes of allied health professionals: a survey to inform staff training and organisational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Shelley A; Hinchliffe, Fiona; Hough, Judith; Chang, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is fundamental to improving patient outcomes. Universal adoption of EBP into the allied health clinical setting has not yet occurred. The primary aim of this project was to capture baseline measurements of the level of EBP self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, knowledge and use at our health service prior to training and organisational changes to support EBP. All allied health staff (n=252) employed across the campus were invited to participate in an online survey consisting of a battery of validated and reliable survey tools. Professional background, knowledge and previous training in EBP and research processes were collected. One hundred eighty-two allied health staff completed the survey (response rate 72%). One-way ANOVAs were used to compare levels of self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, knowledge and use, according to allied health discipline and experience with EBP and research processes. Mean scores for EBP attitudes (self-efficacy and outcome expectancy) and knowledge were higher than for use. Professional group differences were noted in the post-hoc analysis of the significant EBP constructs. Regression analyses indicated that EBP course attendance as well as training in research design and analysis impacted positively on EBP construct scores. Despite positive attitudes about, a belief in and knowledge of EBP, self-reports of EBP processes do not indicate systematic application in the allied health workplace. The results of this research will inform a targeted intervention to foster ongoing training in EBP and research activity for allied health staff.

  5. Repository of AGH University of Science and Technology – experiences and attitudes of research staff of AGH University of Science and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Maria Strejczek-Jaźwińska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the stude is presentation of research conclusions concerning experiences and attitudes of members of research staff of AGH academic circles towards already existing repositories and bases of publications, as well as their attitude to the Repositoryof AGH, currently under construction. The research is based on electronic surveys, designed to study also the academic circles’ expectations of the system and its interface. The survey was prepared and designed used Lime Survey, a tool that enables disclosing it on-line in an electronic form; afterwards it was e-mailed to chosen research groups. The e-mail contained invitation to cooperation with the constructed Repository, a link to the survey and a link to educational materials about bases of publications. This article presents results, observations and conclusions drawn from analysis of gathered data.

  6. Effects of the implementation of the web-based patient support system on staff's attitudes towards computers and IT use: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Välimäki, Maritta; Patel, Anita; Knapp, Martin; Hätönen, Heli; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Pitkänen, Anneli; Anttila, Minna; Katajisto, Jouko

    2010-09-01

    Utilisation of information technology (IT) in the treatment of people with severe mental health problems is an unknown area in Europe. Use of IT and guiding patients to relevant sources of health information requires that nursing staff have positive attitudes toward computers and accept IT use as a part of daily practises. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of the implementation of a web-based patient support system on staff's attitudes towards computers and IT use on psychiatric wards. Hundred and forty-nine nurses in two psychiatric hospitals in Finland were randomised to two groups to deliver patient education for patients with schizophrenia and psychosis with a web-based system (n = 76) or leaflets (n = 73). After baseline nurses were followed-up for 18 months after the introduction of the system. The primary outcome was nurses' motivation to utilise computers, and the secondary outcomes were nurses' beliefs in and satisfaction with computers, and use of computer and internet. There were no statistically significant differences between study groups in attitudes towards computers (motivation p = 0.936, beliefs p = 0.270, satisfaction p = 0.462) and internet use (p = 0.276). However, nurses' general computer use (p = 0.029) increased more in the leaflet group than in the IT intervention group. We can conclude that IT has promise as an alternative method in patient education, as the implementation of the web-based patient support system in daily basis did not have a negative effect on nurses' attitudes towards IT. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  7. 'I never even gave it a second thought': PGCE students' attitudes towards the inclusion of children with speech and language impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Julie; Stojanovik, Vesna; Ralph, Sue

    2002-01-01

    Approximately 7% of young school-aged children have specific language impairments. Many such children are now being educated in mainstream settings. However, there is a dearth of up-to-date and valid research that considers UK (student) teachers' attitudes towards such children. This study aimed to investigate trainee teachers' attitudes towards teaching children with speech and language impairments, to investigate the reported effects of those attitudes on participants' acceptance of teaching such children, and to consider any implications for speech and language therapy (SLT) services and inclusive education. Nineteen trainee teachers (PGCE students) from a university in the North West of England took part in semistructured group interviews. The data were transcribed and analysed qualitatively, and recurrent themes identified. A range of attitudes was expressed, and six major themes were identified from the data. Participants discussed concerns about the resources and knowledge they considered necessary to support fully children with specific language impairments. There was some differentiation of attitudes related to the types of disability that a child may have and the subject being taught. Much of the discussion was about disabilities in general rather than specific to speech and language impairments. Many of the participants reflected on their own previous experiences to inform their opinions. Although many of the participants expressed positive attitudes, some had concerns about workload and at least one was openly hostile to the idea of teaching children with disabilities within mainstream settings. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to previous research, the quantitative data obtained in this project, SLT services and the increases in the inclusion of children with specific language impairments into mainstream educational settings.

  8. Pre-Service Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusion of Students with High Support Needs in Regular Classrooms in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Tariq; Sharma, Umesh

    2018-01-01

    In the process of educational reforms for promoting equity and inclusion in education, pre-service teacher preparedness has been identified as a vital factor that has an impact on the success of inclusive education. Bangladesh, like other parts of the world, has taken various initiatives to promote inclusive education in the country context. This…

  9. Teacher Attitudes & Beliefs toward Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in Early Childhood Programs: Impacts on Assessment Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorca-Nunez, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests preschool age students with disabilities (SWD) benefit from inclusive settings. Inclusive education has positive impacts on students' social-emotional, language, and cognitive skills. Yet, preschool age SWD continue to have limited access to inclusive education, and research suggests numerous reasons, including teacher practice.…

  10. Actitudes del profesorado de chile y costa rica hacia la inclusión educativa Chilean and Costa Rican teacher's attitudes towards inclusive education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Sanhueza Henríquez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El estudio analiza las actitudes de profesores de Chile (N = 92 y Costa Rica (N = 126 hacia la educación inclusiva. Para ello, plantea como objetivos: a. identificar las medidas que favorecen la educación inclusiva en ambos colectivos de profesorado; b. conocer los recursos y apoyos con que cuenta el profesorado para favorecer la educación inclusiva; y c. valorar los principios de la educación inclusiva que subyacen a sus prácticas docentes. Adoptamos un enfoque cuantitativo a través de un diseño descriptivo de tipo encuesta. Los resultados indican que, en general, los profesores participantes presentan una actitud positiva hacia la inclusión, incorporando diferentes medidas para atender las necesidades educativas especiales del alumnado. Los recursos materiales y el tiempo continúan siendo percibidos por el profesorado como una limitante para el desarrollo de prácticas inclusivas.This study analyses the attitude of teachers from Chile (N = 92 and Costa Rica (N = 126 towards inclusive education. For that purpose, it establishes the following objectives: a. identify those measures facilitating inclusive education with both teachers groups; b. get to know the resources teacher count on to make inclusive education possible; and c. value the principles of inclusive education underlying their teaching practice. We adopted a quantitative approach through a descriptive design consisting of a survey. Results show that in general teachers of this study have a positive attitude towards the inclusion of different measures to attend the students Special Educative Needs. Resources and time continue to be perceived by teachers as restraining the development of inclusive practices.

  11. Impact of a smoke-free policy in a large psychiatric hospital on staff attitudes and patient behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voci, Sabrina; Bondy, Susan; Zawertailo, Laurie; Walker, Louise; George, Tony P; Selby, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to examine changes over time in degree of staff support for the implementation of a smoke-free policy in Canada's largest public mental health and addiction teaching hospital and to assess the impact of the policy on patient behavior. Staff completed an anonymous survey, which assessed views toward the smoke-free policy and perceived change in patient behavior, 2-7 and 31-33 months after an indoor smoke-free policy was implemented (September 21, 2005). Objective indicators of patient behavior were also collected in the form of number of emergency code whites (aggressive behavior) and that of code reds (fire) called 1 year prior to and 2 years following policy implementation. Survey response rates were 19.0% (n=481) and 18.1% (n=500) at 2-7 and 31-33 months, respectively. The proportion of staff who supported the policy increased from pre-implementation (82.6%) to post-implementation (89.1%), and a high level of support was maintained 2 years after policy enactment (90.1%). The number of emergency codes did not significantly change after policy implementation, and staff did not perceive a change in most forms of patient behavior. A smoke-free policy can be implemented in a large psychiatric hospital with a high degree of support from staff and no substantial negative impact on patient behavior. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Smoking habits, exposure to passive smoking and attitudes to a non-smoking policy among hospital staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, F; Gambi, A; Bergamaschi, A; Gentilini, F; De Luca, G; Monti, C; Stampi, S

    1998-01-01

    A survey was carried out into the smoking habits and exposure to passive smoking among health staff in the hospitals of Faenza, Forli and Rimini (Emilia-Romagna, Northern Italy), 2453 subjects answered anonymously a 41 question questionnaire. 53% of the subjects were professionals nurses, 16% doctors, 15% maintenance staff, 10% ancillary staff, 1% non-medical graduates, 2% were administrators and 3% were assigned to the category ¿other'. Of the subjects answering the questionnaire 39% were smokers, 19% ex-smokers and 42% non smokers. The highest number of smokers was found among women (41%) compared to men (37%) and among ancillary staff (48%) compared to nurses (41%) and doctors (31%). The males were mostly heavy smokers (> or = 20 cigarettes/d) and smoked strong cigarettes (> or = 12 mg/cig condensate content). The females were mostly light smokers (< 10 cigarettes/d) and smoked light cigarettes (1-6 mg/cig condensate content). A high percentage of subjects (87%) smoked at work especially in areas reserved for staff. 43% and 26% of shift workers and non-shift workers tended not to modify their habit when on morning or afternoon shifts. During night shifts the majority of them increased their tobacco consumption. Around 87% of hospital employees stated they were exposed to passive smoking inside the hospital especially in cooking areas, at information desks and corridors. Nurses, ancillaries and maintenance staff were those most exposed and for a greater number of hours per day compared to doctors. Almost all subjects were aware of the harm caused by passive smoking. 56% of smokers, 65% of ex-smokers and 72% of non smokers said they were willing to participate in future campaigns to limit smoking in their hospitals.

  13. Religious and secular students' sense of self-efficacy and attitudes towards inclusion of pupils with intellectual disability and other types of needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshitz, H; Glaubman, R

    2002-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether Judaism's positive attitudes toward people with disabilities would influence greater willingness towards inclusion of such people in regular classes and a greater sense of self-efficacy in working with them. The present authors compared religious (n = 175) and secular (n = 420) Jewish students at a teacher's college with regard to these variables. The authors used the Regular Education Initiative questionnaire, which investigates teachers' self-efficacy and attitudes towards including pupils with different types of disabilities in regular education. They analysed the results according to the college students' major and the type of disability (five types at three levels of severity). The results indicate that religious students are more willing than non-religious students to consider the inclusion of people with four types of disabilities and have a greater sense of efficacy for dealing with all types of disabilities. The hypothesis that the milder the disability, the higher would be the teacher's sense of self-efficacy and her/his willingness for such children to be included in a regular class was sustained. The religious special education students were the only ones who exhibited willingness to include pupils with intellectual disability, and moderate and severe emotional disturbances. Students who majored in special education scored higher than all their counterparts on both measures. The results also sustain the hypothesis that there would be a positive correlation between both measures. To facilitate inclusive education amongst teachers and students, the present authors recommend an intervention programme designed to help students acquire knowledge and strategies about inclusion. They also suggest enriching this programme with Jewish religious sources, which reflect positive attitudes toward people with disabilities.

  14. Sexuality & Dementia: An eLearning Resource to Improve Knowledge and Attitudes of Aged-Care Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cindy; Moyle, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Expression of sexuality by older people, particularly those with dementia, can be challenging and confronting for aged-care staff. Education on this topic is often a low priority area for aged-care organizations, and there appears to be limited training programs available. Results from our study highlighted the value of an eLearning education…

  15. Attitudes Towards the Sexuality of Adults with an Intellectual Disability: Parents, Support Staff, and a Community Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuskelly, Monica; Bryde, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Attitudes toward the sexuality of adults with intellectual disability were assessed in parents and carers of adults with intellectual disability and in a community sample. An instrument that contained items relating to eight aspects of sexuality (sexual feelings, sex education, masturbation, personal relationships, sexual intercourse,…

  16. Attitudes on Barriers and Benefits of Distance Education among Mississippi Delta Allied Health Community College Faculty, Staff, and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield-Johnson, Susan; Mohn, Richard S.; Mitra, Amal K.; Young, Rebekah; McCullers, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Online distance education creates increased opportunities for continuing education and advanced training for allied health professionals living in underserved and geographically isolated areas. The purpose of this article was to explore attitudes on barriers and benefits of distance education technology among underrepresented minority allied…

  17. Assessment of Attitudes Regarding Tobacco-Free Campus Policy and Secondhand Smoke Exposure among College Students, Faculty, and Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael E.; Williams, Ronald D., Jr.; Hunt, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently there has been a push to implement tobacco-free policies on college campuses. Policies creating tobacco-free college campuses have increased with changes in social norms. The campus environment provides a setting for individuals to express their attitudes regarding tobacco use. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess…

  18. Addressing Potential Challenges in Co-Creating Learning and Teaching: Overcoming Resistance, Navigating Institutional Norms and Ensuring Inclusivity in Student-Staff Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovill, C.; Cook-Sather, A.; Felten, P.; Millard, L.; Moore-Cherry, N.

    2016-01-01

    Against a backdrop of rising interest in students becoming partners in learning and teaching in higher education, this paper begins by exploring the relationships between student engagement, co-creation and student-staff partnership before providing a typology of the roles students can assume in working collaboratively with staff. Acknowledging…

  19. A multicenter questionnaire investigation of attitudes toward hand hygiene, assessed by the staff in fifteen hospitals in Denmark and Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimakoff, J; Kjelsberg, A B; Larsen, S O

    1992-01-01

    A questionnaire survey was carried out anonymously among 2557 health care workers in Denmark and Norway to identify and quantify factors that affect the handwashing behavior of physicians, nurses, and other staff groups who perform direct patient care. For number of daily patient contacts...... and discouraging HH. The main motivating factor for all groups, however, was an awareness that HH is important for the prevention of infection. Skin problems from frequent handwashing and the use of agents that irritate and dry the skin were the main reasons for disinclination toward HH. The number of points given...... to these statements correlated well with the stated frequency of HH in staff groups with relatively many (9 to 24) patient contacts per day. Many studies have revealed low standards of HH in health care settings. Whenever HH is taught, the significance of HH for the prevention of infection is always stressed...

  20. A Comparative Study of the Attitude, Concern, and Interaction Levels of Elementary School Teachers and Teacher Candidates towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokdere, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Inclusion is an educational approach providing students with special needs with education in normal classrooms, which is the least restrictive educational environment for them by offering the necessary services for full time or part time. Although the necessary laws and regulations appear to execute this inclusive practice properly in Turkey,…

  1. Investigation and Comparison of Turkish and American Preschool Teacher Candidates' Attitudes towards Inclusion of Young Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakap, Salih; Parlak-Rakap, Asiye; Aydin, Burak

    2016-01-01

    Inclusion of young children with disabilities into general education classrooms is a common practice that has been implemented for many years in developed countries around the world and many developing countries have been creating and implementing laws and regulations to support inclusive education in early years. Although extant literature…

  2. Impact of School Principals' Leadership Self-Efficacy on Their Attitude about Special Education Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Problem. As inclusion becomes more of a mainstay in our educational system, educational leaders from all levels seek methods of training and retaining administrators to create successful outcomes for students in an inclusive environment. Purpose. The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to examine the impact of principals'…

  3. University life and pandemic influenza: Attitudes and intended behaviour of staff and students towards pandemic (H1N1 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacIntyre C Raina

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a pandemic young adults are more likely to be infected, increasing the potential for Universities to be explosive disease outbreak centres. Outbreak management is essential to reduce the impact in both the institution and the surrounding community. Through the use of an online survey, we aimed to measure the perceptions and responses of staff and students towards pandemic (H1N1 2009 at a major university in Sydney, Australia. Methods The survey was available online from 29 June to 30 September 2009. The sample included academic staff, general staff and students of the University. Results A total of 2882 surveys were completed. Nearly all respondents (99.6%, 2870/2882 were aware of the Australian pandemic situation and 64.2% (1851/2882 reported either "no anxiety" or "disinterest." Asian-born respondents were significantly (p Conclusions Responses to a pandemic are subject to change in its pre-, early and mid-outbreak stages. Lessons for these institutions in preparation for a second wave and future disease outbreaks include the need to promote positive public health behaviours amongst young people and students.

  4. Effectiveness of the ‘Who’s Challenging Who’ support staff training intervention to improve attitudes and empathy towards adults with intellectual disability and challenging behaviours: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Randell, Elizabeth; Hastings, Richard P.; McNamara, Rachel; Knight, Roseanna; Gillespie, David; Taylor, Zachary

    2017-01-01

    Background Findings suggest approximately one in six people with intellectual disability engage in ‘challenging behaviours’, which include aggression towards others/property and self-injurious actions. In residential settings, actions of staff members can make challenging behaviours more likely to occur, or make these behaviours worse. In particular, negative attitudes from members of staff and lack of understanding about the reasons for challenging behaviour are contributory factors. ‘Who’s ...

  5. The impact of staff training on special educational needs professionals' attitudes toward and understanding of applied behavior analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Sinéad; Reading, Benjamin E; McDowell, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Research-based evidence points to the efficacy and value of applied behavior analysis (ABA) in meeting the needs of individuals with learning disabilities and autism. Nonetheless, public, government, and professional perception of ABA can be negative. The current study was designed to measure the impact of a short intervention on professionals' attitudes toward, and knowledge of, ABA. Teachers and classroom assistants from two separate schools for children with severe learning difficulties completed a self-report survey on knowledge of and attitudes toward ABA. They were then presented with a 90-min training module designed to increase their knowledge of the history of ABA and their functional assessment skills. Following training, the self-report was readministered. The mean scores for each group increased only after the training had been delivered. Further research is needed to address the impact of training on classroom practice.

  6. Knowledge, attitude, and performance of medical staff of teaching healthcare settings about hepatitis B and C in Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz Ataei

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Due to excessive contact with patients, a paramedic-educated society is expected to have an optimal level of knowledge, attitude, and performance related to viral hepatitis. Our results from the checklists showed that medical personnel are not appropriately aware of viral hepatitis and their performance, too, is not satisfactory. Further continuous training is required and there needs to be more emphasis on actions regarding behaviors with high risk of infection transmission.

  7. Convergence and translation: attitudes to inter-professional learning and teaching of creative problem-solving among medical and engineering students and staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare worldwide needs translation of basic ideas from engineering into the clinic. Consequently, there is increasing demand for graduates equipped with the knowledge and skills to apply interdisciplinary medicine/engineering approaches to the development of novel solutions for healthcare. The literature provides little guidance regarding barriers to, and facilitators of, effective interdisciplinary learning for engineering and medical students in a team-based project context. Methods A quantitative survey was distributed to engineering and medical students and staff in two universities, one in Ireland and one in Belgium, to chart knowledge and practice in interdisciplinary learning and teaching, and of the teaching of innovation. Results We report important differences for staff and students between the disciplines regarding attitudes towards, and perceptions of, the relevance of interdisciplinary learning opportunities, and the role of creativity and innovation. There was agreement across groups concerning preferred learning, instructional styles, and module content. Medical students showed greater resistance to the use of structured creativity tools and interdisciplinary teams. Conclusions The results of this international survey will help to define the optimal learning conditions under which undergraduate engineering and medicine students can learn to consider the diverse factors which determine the success or failure of a healthcare engineering solution. PMID:24450310

  8. Convergence and translation: attitudes to inter-professional learning and teaching of creative problem-solving among medical and engineering students and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoelstra, Howard; Stoyanov, Slavi; Burgoyne, Louise; Bennett, Deirdre; Sweeney, Catherine; Drachsler, Hendrik; Vanderperren, Katrien; Van Huffel, Sabine; McSweeney, John; Shorten, George; O'Flynn, Siun; Cantillon-Murphy, Padraig; O'Tuathaigh, Colm

    2014-01-22

    Healthcare worldwide needs translation of basic ideas from engineering into the clinic. Consequently, there is increasing demand for graduates equipped with the knowledge and skills to apply interdisciplinary medicine/engineering approaches to the development of novel solutions for healthcare. The literature provides little guidance regarding barriers to, and facilitators of, effective interdisciplinary learning for engineering and medical students in a team-based project context. A quantitative survey was distributed to engineering and medical students and staff in two universities, one in Ireland and one in Belgium, to chart knowledge and practice in interdisciplinary learning and teaching, and of the teaching of innovation. We report important differences for staff and students between the disciplines regarding attitudes towards, and perceptions of, the relevance of interdisciplinary learning opportunities, and the role of creativity and innovation. There was agreement across groups concerning preferred learning, instructional styles, and module content. Medical students showed greater resistance to the use of structured creativity tools and interdisciplinary teams. The results of this international survey will help to define the optimal learning conditions under which undergraduate engineering and medicine students can learn to consider the diverse factors which determine the success or failure of a healthcare engineering solution.

  9. Attitudes of Veterinary Teaching Staff and Exposure of Veterinary Students to Early-Age Desexing, with Review of Current Early-Age Desexing Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupe, Alannah; Rand, Jacquie; Morton, John; Fleming, Sophie

    2017-12-25

    Approximately 50% of cats admitted to Australian shelters are kittens, and 26% of dogs are puppies, and, particularly for cats, euthanasia rates are often high. Cats can be pregnant by 4 months of age, yet the traditional desexing age is 5-6 months, and studies in Australasia and Nth America reveal that only a minority of veterinarians routinely perform early age desexing (EAD) of cats or dogs, suggesting they are not graduating with these skills. This study aimed to describe the attitudes of veterinary teaching staff in Australian and New Zealand universities towards EAD, and to determine if these changed from 2008 to 2015. It also aimed to identify students' practical exposure to EAD. Most (64%) of the 25 participants in 2015 did not advocate EAD in their teaching and, in their personal opinion, only 32% advocated it for cats. Concerns related to EAD cited by staff included anesthetic risk, orthopedic problems, hypoglycemia, and, in female dogs, urinary incontinence. Those who advocated EAD cited benefits of population control, ease of surgery and behavioral benefits. Only three of the eight universities provided a majority of students with an opportunity to gain exposure to EAD procedures before graduation, and in two of these, most students had an opportunity to perform EAD. In conclusion, most veterinary students in Australia and New Zealand are not graduating with the knowledge or skills to perform EAD, and have little opportunity while at university to gain practical exposure. Welfare agencies could partner with universities to enable students to experience EAD.

  10. A Qualitative Exploration of the DIGCOMP Digital Competence Framework: Attitudes of students, academics and administrative staff in the health faculty of a UK HEI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Evangelinos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports upon findings of a series of semi-structured interviews with students, academics and administrative staff from a health care faculty in a UK Higher Education Institution (HEI. Exploring their experiences of mapping to the EU DIGCOMP Digital Competence Framework, a hermeneutic lens enables a more nuanced approach to attitudes towards Digital Competence (DC. One of the eight lifelong learning key-competences required for managers, doctors, nurses and other health-related professionals, DC is crucial to professional development. Defined by 14 themes, the findings express the participants’ experiences, knowledge and level of comprehension of the subject. Our findings indicate students are conflating digital social media skills with their skills for the workplace, resulting in over-confidence; academics raising concerns about work/private life balance offered by the affordances of handheld devices; administrative staff that are far more confident and managing a range of technology’s effectively. The research further reveals that the DIGICOMP framework is applicable as a generic framework for professional practice.

  11. "Challenging Disabling Attitudes, Building an Inclusive Society": Considering the Role of Education in Encouraging Non-Disabled Children to Develop Positive Attitudes towards Disabled People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Angharad E.

    2009-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, the introduction of the Disability Equality Duty 2006 has provided a new window of opportunity to promote the idea that education has a role to play in changing non-disabled children/young people's attitudes towards disabled people. This article explores the issues raised by the application of the Disability Equality Duty to…

  12. It's off to Work We Go: Attitude toward Disability at Vocational Training Programs at Jewish Summer Camps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Baglieri and Shapiro (2012) argue that considering attitudes toward disability is an important step toward building a more inclusive society. This study examines attitudes toward disability of staff members of vocational and independent living skills programs for young adults with disabilities in four Jewish summer camps. McDermott and Varenne's…

  13. The impact of health promotion on trachoma knowledge, attitudes and practice (KAP of staff in three work settings in remote Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona D Lange

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Globally, trachoma is the leading cause of infectious blindness and Australia is the only developed country with endemic trachoma. It is found in remote Indigenous communities burdened with poverty, overcrowding and poor hygiene. Lack of culturally appropriate health promotion, a small trachoma workforce and lack of awareness and support for trachoma elimination in general, were early barriers.A cross-sectional pre-post study using a convenience sample, was conducted in clinics, schools and community work-settings from 63 of the 82 remote Aboriginal communities identified as being at risk of trachoma in the Northern Territory (NT. The study assessed the effect of a multi-component health promotion strategy aimed at increasing knowledge, attitude and practice amongst health, education and community support settings staff. Data were collected between 2010 and 2012. The health promotion initiatives were introduced in communities in staggered delivery over a one-year period; 272 participants were surveyed at baseline and 261 at follow-up.Trachoma related knowledge, attitudes and practice increased across all settings and for all primary outcome measures. Across all settings, there was a significant increase in the proportion of participants reporting the most important thing to do if a child has a 'dirty' face is to 'wash it every time its dirty' (61.6% cf 69.7%; X2p = 0.047, a significant reduction in the proportion of respondents answering 'no' to the question "Is it normal for kids to have dirty faces in your community' (40.5% cf 29.6%; X2p = 0.009 and a significant increase in reported capacity to teach others about trachoma prevention (70.8% cf 83.3%; X2p <0.001.Health promotion was associated with increased trachoma knowledge, attitude and practice amongst health, education and community support staff working with children and in remote NT communities. In the early stages of the trachoma health promotion program, this increased trachoma

  14. Survey of U.S. zoo and aquarium animal care staff attitudes regarding humane euthanasia for population management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, David M; Ardaiolo, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    The humane euthanasia of animals for population management, or culling, has been suggested as one possible tool for managing animal populations for sustainability, and recent, highly publicized euthanasia of zoo animals in Copenhagen has stimulated global conversation about population management in zoos. We conducted a nationwide survey of U.S. zoo and aquarium personnel, including keepers, managers, and leaders of AZA animal programs, to assess their overall attitudes regarding population management euthanasia. The surveyed populations were generally very aware of the concept of population management euthanasia. Managers and animal program leaders were more supportive of euthanasia than keepers. We found that regardless of role, men were more supportive of euthanasia than women. Those personnel who were aware of instances of population management euthanasia at their institutions before were more supportive of it than those who were not. Support for culling varied with the kind of animal being considered for it, with three general taxon acceptability groupings emerging. Education, tenure in the profession, taxonomic expertise, and whether or not the responder took the survey before or after the Copenhagen events were not strong predictors of attitudes. Overall, the surveyed populations were approximately evenly split in terms of being in favor of euthanasia, not supporting euthanasia, or being unsure. Most responders indicated that they would be more likely to accept culling if more information was provided on its rationale. These results will form the basis for further discussions on the role of humane euthanasia for population management. Zoo Biol. 35:187-200, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Knowledge, attitudes and practices towards patients with HIV/AIDS in staff nurses in one university hospital in Sicily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Marranzano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: nurses’ knowledge, attitudes and practices towards patients with HIV/AIDS are of ongoing interest, especially in developing countries. Nothing or very little is known about Italian nurses.Methods: HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of the nurses (n=107 from one university hospital inCatania,Sicily, were documented. Comparisons among nurses belonging to different Operative Units (O.U. were conducted by the chi-square test (P<0.05.Results: although HIV was nurses’ main concern in regard to contracting infections in the workplace (54%, the vast majority of them (98% had never refused an HIV/AIDS patient care assignment. Moreover, despite their concern of being more at risk of contracting HIV than the general population (41%, a not negligible percentage of nurses did not use gloves routinely (21% and only a few treated all patients as potentially HIV-positive (9%. The vast majority of the respondents knew the meaning of AIDS (87% and of a positive serological test (78%. On the contrary, a relatively low percentage of them knew what is the ‘window period’ (62% and were acquainted with HIV pathophysiology (65%. No statistically significant differences in terms of risk perception were found between nurses who had previously attended an HIV/AIDS workshop, lecture or specific course (43% and nurses who did not (57%. Level of knowledge was positively associated to age (P=0.000 and to education (P=0.016, and it was found higher in nurses working in a O.U. of Infectious Diseases.Conclusions: data from our study show that also in developed countries, such as Italy, nurses could have some misconceptions and concerns about HIV/AIDS. The importance of examining the impact of continuing education on nurses’ preparedness to care for patients with HIV/AIDS and to prevent the risks of occupational HIV transmission is discussed. 

  16. Attitudes of teachers towards inclusion of students with disabilities in physical education: Validity of the ATIPDPE-R instrument in Polish cultural context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Cyran

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Following the inclusion of children with disabilities in mainstream schools worldwide, legislative changes have recently been introduced in Poland, facilitating educational inclusion of individuals with disabilities. However, practical implementation still requires further action. Attitudes are a major determinant of teachers' behavior. Therefore, based on the Theory of Planned Behavior, the instrument Attitudes Toward Teaching Individuals with Physical Disabilities in Physical Education (ATIPDPE has been developed, and adapted to cultural contexts in several countries (e.g. South Africa, Slovenia, and Greece. Objectives: The aim of this study was to estimate construct validity of the revised ATIPDPE-R instrument to the Polish cultural context (ATIPDPE-R-PL, in order to prepare a reliable scale to measure the attitudes of physical education (PE teachers towards teaching students with physical disabilities in general PE classes.Methods: Participants were 158 in-service PE teachers (100 women and 58 men, range of age from 25 to 60, from primary and secondary schools from Polish schools. Construct validity was obtained throughout the principal component analysis method (PCA. Reliability was estimated through Cronbach's alpha coefficient, where the value of at least .7 was accepted as satisfactory.Results: Based on the analysis, the attitudinal scale of ATIPDPE-R-PL measured three psychological components, which came from the PCA, and explained 66% of the variance similar to the original scale.Conclusions: The three components were positive and negative outcomes for students and negative outcomes for teachers, however items in each component varied from the original scale.

  17. The Inclusion of Children with ASD: Using the Theory of Planned Behaviour as a Theoretical Framework to Explore Peer Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Sara; Dunsmuir, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    This study used the Theory of Planned Behaviour to explore the attitudes, behavioural intentions and behaviour of 318 mainstream primary school children in an urban East London borough towards peers with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Pupils were presented with a vignette about a hypothetical peer with ASD then completed self-report…

  18. Early Exposure to People with Physical and Sensory Disabilities and Later Attitudes toward Social Interactions and Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Emily M.; Seekins, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the relationship between exposure to classmates with visible impairments in primary and secondary schools with later attitudes toward people with disabilities. Fifty college students (mean age = 20.28 years; 76% female) completed measures assessing the extent and quality of recalled exposure to classmates with disabilities in…

  19. A Graduate Course on Inclusion: Four Elementary/General Music Educators' Perceived Attitudes and Applications in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Giovanna Adelia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine four elementary/general music educators (EGME) enrolled in a music and special education graduate course, on their attitudes toward teaching children with disabilities and how they applied knowledge gained from the course in their classrooms. Data collection began on the first class session, February 9th,…

  20. Knowledge, attitude and practice for breast cancer risk factors and screening modalities in staff nurses of Ayub teaching hospital Abbottabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.; Riaz, A.; Rizwan, M.; Qureshi, N.A.; Atta, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the commonest cancer modality in female worldwide. Avoiding the risk factors can reduce its incidence and adhering to screening and early detection can reduce its mortality. A sufficient knowledge regarding the risk factors and screening modalities is therefore essential. We assessed the knowledge level about these parameters in our staff nurses. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire survey was performed. Knowledge regarding the risk factors and screening modalities were categorised into good, fair, poor and very poor categories. Results: Knowledge regarding most of the factors was found to be fair. A few things were termed as good knowledge like role of breast-feeding in protecting against breast cancer. Practice regarding the screening modalities was not satisfactory. Only a few nurses had good knowledge of the risk factors and screening modalities. Practice of the Screening modalities was also poor. Conclusion: There is a need to improve the nursing curriculum, training at the workplace and motivate them for screening practices. They should be encouraged to talk to their patients and their female attendants about prevention and early detection of breast cancer. (author)

  1. Teachers’ attitudes, knowledge, and teaching strategies towards students with special educational needs in primary inclusive education in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Kurniawati, Farida

    2014-01-01

    De opname van leerlingen met beperkingen in het reguliere onderwijs (ook wel inclusief onderwijs genoemd) is een internationale trend en dient het recht op onderwijs voor iedereen, ongeacht beperking, te garanderen. De trend naar inclusief onderwijs is in 2003 formeel geïntroduceerd in Indonesië. Leerkrachten spelen een belangrijke rol in het succes van de implementatie van inclusief onderwijs. De attitudes, kennis over beperkingen, en onderwijsstrategieën van leerkrachten worden gezien als b...

  2. Knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and behaviour intentions for three bowel management practices in intensive care: effects of a targeted protocol implementation for nursing and medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Serena; Lam, Lawrence T; McInnes, Elizabeth; Elliott, Doug; Hardy, Jennifer; Middleton, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Bowel management protocols have the potential to minimize complications for critically ill patients. Targeted implementation can increase the uptake of protocols by clinicians into practice. The theory of planned behaviour offers a framework in which to investigate clinicians' intention to perform the behaviour of interest. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of implementing a bowel management protocol on intensive care nursing and medical staffs' knowledge, attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control, behaviour intentions, role perceptions and past behaviours in relation to three bowel management practices. A descriptive before and after survey using a self-administered questionnaire sent to nursing and medical staff working within three intensive care units before and after implementation of our bowel management protocol (pre: May - June 2008; post: Feb - May 2009). Participants had significantly higher knowledge scores post-implementation of our protocol (pre mean score 17.6; post mean score 19.3; p = 0.004). Post-implementation there was a significant increase in: self-reported past behaviour (pre mean score 5.38; post mean score 7.11; p = 0.002) and subjective norms scores (pre mean score 3.62; post mean score 4.18; p = 0.016) for bowel assessment; and behaviour intention (pre mean score 5.22; post mean score 5.65; p = 0.048) for administration of enema. This evaluation, informed by the theory of planned behaviour, has provided useful insights into factors that influence clinician intentions to perform evidence-based bowel management practices in intensive care. Addressing factors such as knowledge, attitudes and beliefs can assist in targeting implementation strategies to positively affect clinician behaviour change. Despite an increase in clinicians' knowledge scores, our implementation strategy did not, however, significantly change clinician behaviour intentions for all three bowel management practices. Further research is

  3. Attitudes of Veterinary Teaching Staff and Exposure of Veterinary Students to Early-Age Desexing, with Review of Current Early-Age Desexing Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alannah Jupe

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 50% of cats admitted to Australian shelters are kittens, and 26% of dogs are puppies, and, particularly for cats, euthanasia rates are often high. Cats can be pregnant by 4 months of age, yet the traditional desexing age is 5–6 months, and studies in Australasia and Nth America reveal that only a minority of veterinarians routinely perform early age desexing (EAD of cats or dogs, suggesting they are not graduating with these skills. This study aimed to describe the attitudes of veterinary teaching staff in Australian and New Zealand universities towards EAD, and to determine if these changed from 2008 to 2015. It also aimed to identify students’ practical exposure to EAD. Most (64% of the 25 participants in 2015 did not advocate EAD in their teaching and, in their personal opinion, only 32% advocated it for cats. Concerns related to EAD cited by staff included anesthetic risk, orthopedic problems, hypoglycemia, and, in female dogs, urinary incontinence. Those who advocated EAD cited benefits of population control, ease of surgery and behavioral benefits. Only three of the eight universities provided a majority of students with an opportunity to gain exposure to EAD procedures before graduation, and in two of these, most students had an opportunity to perform EAD. In conclusion, most veterinary students in Australia and New Zealand are not graduating with the knowledge or skills to perform EAD, and have little opportunity while at university to gain practical exposure. Welfare agencies could partner with universities to enable students to experience EAD.

  4. An Assessment of Teachers Attitudes and Their Commitment to Inclusive Educational Settings in Bahati Sub-County, Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Wanderi, Priscilla Gathoni

    2015-01-01

    Education of children with disabilities has shifted from segregated special schools to inclusion in mainstream education schools and classrooms. As people with disabilities challenged the stigmatizing and limiting nature of segregated education, and gave voice to their anger and dissatisfaction, issues of equality of access and educational opportunity gained impetus and integration became center stage. Children with or without disabilities have the same rights to educational opportunities und...

  5. Multidisciplinary Training on Spiritual Care for Patients in Palliative Care Trajectories Improves the Attitudes and Competencies of Hospital Medical Staff: Results of a Quasi-Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Geer, Joep; Veeger, Nic; Groot, Marieke; Zock, Hetty; Leget, Carlo; Prins, Jelle; Vissers, Kris

    2018-02-01

    Patients value health-care professionals' attention to their spiritual needs. However, this is undervalued in health-care professionals' education. Additional training is essential for implementation of a national multidisciplinary guideline on spiritual care (SC) in palliative care (PC). Aim of this study is to measure effects of a training program on SC in PC based on the guideline. A pragmatic multicenter trial using a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design as part of an action research study. Eight multidisciplinary teams in regular wards and 1 team of PC consultants, in 8 Dutch teaching hospitals, received questionnaires before training about perceived barriers for SC, spiritual attitudes and involvement, and SC competencies. The effect on the barriers on SC and SC competencies were measured both 1 and 6 months after the training. For nurses (n = 214), 7 of 8 barriers to SC were decreased after 1 month, but only 2 were still after 6 months. For physicians (n = 41), the training had no effect on the barriers to SC. Nurses improved in 4 of 6 competencies after both 1 and 6 months. Physicians improved in 3 of 6 competencies after 1 month but in only 1 competency after 6 months. Concise SC training programs for clinical teams can effect quality of care, by improving hospital staff competencies and decreasing the barriers they perceive. Differences in the effects of the SC training on nurses and physicians show the need for further research on physicians' educational needs on SC.

  6. A Walk in My Shoes: A Mixed-Method Study of the Role of Interprofessional Job Shadowing in Shaping Staff Attitudes at a Large Acute Care Hospital in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechnik, Melinda; Dempster, Linda

    2018-01-01

    Poor hospital unit culture and staff morale, and dysfunctional multidisciplinary cooperation leads to worse patient safety and satisfaction. The Walk in My Shoes research project aimed to understand how interprofessional job shadowing impacts the attitudes of colleagues. Thirty-three registered nurses at an acute care hospital observed the daily work of social workers. Nurses' attitudes towards social workers were measured by surveys and interviews. Quantitative data indicated a change in nurses' perception of social workers' communication, teamwork and autonomy. Qualitative data indicate that job shadowing helped participants identify personal misperceptions, provided new understanding of roles and gave insight into co-worker job similarities. © 2018 Longwoods Publishing.

  7. Attitudes and opinions of nursing and medical staff regarding the supply and storage of medicinal products before and after the installation of a drawer-based automated stock-control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardern-Jones, Joanne; Hughes, Donald K; Rowe, Philip H; Mottram, David R; Green, Christopher F

    2009-04-01

    This study assessed the attitudes of Emergency Department (ED) staff regarding the introduction of an automated stock-control system. The objectives were to determine attitudes to stock control and replenishment, speed of access to the system, ease of use and the potential for future uses of the system. The study was carried out in the Countess of Chester Hospital NHS Foundation Trust (COCH) ED, which is attended by over 65,000 patients each year. All 68 ED staff were sent pre-piloted, semi-structured questionnaires and reminders, before and after automation of medicines stock control. Pre-implementation, 35 staff (66.1% of respondents) reported that problems occurred with access to medicine storage keys 'very frequently' or 'frequently'. Twenty-eight (52.8%) respondents 'agreed' or 'strongly agreed' that medicines were quickly accessed, which rose to 41 (77%) post-automation (P fluids and refrigerated items. Twenty-seven (51.9%) staff reported access to the system within 1 min and 17 (32.7%) staff reported access within 1-2 min. The majority of staff found the system 'easy' or 'very easy' to use and there was a non-significant relationship between previous use of information technology and acceptance of the system. From a staff satisfaction perspective, automation improved medicines storage, security and stock control, and addressed the problem of searching for keys to storage areas. Concerns over familiarity with computers, queuing, speed of access and an improved audit trail do not appear to have been issues, when compared with the previous manual storage of medicines.

  8. How to Identify Negative Attitudes towards Inclusive Education: Critical Discourse Analysis of Russian Transcripts Using Role and Reference Grammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariia Rubtcova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the Role and Reference Grammar (RRG analysis that aims to reveal possibilities required for carrying out the interdisciplinary research development within Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA. It takes a closer look at conflicts, considering the example of a conflict situation occurred in reaction to the opening of the inclusive academic programme at one of St. Petersburg’s secondary schools. Role and Reference Grammar application demonstrates that the use of different verb types and macroroles has led to the various interpretations. These findings confirm that RRG could influence the increase of objectivity of the transcript analysis in qualitative social research. RRG provides new information which in combination with other methods can help us to understand the positions of participants involved into conflicts

  9. Supporting Regional Aged Care Nursing Staff to Manage Residents' Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia, in Real Time, Using the Nurses' Behavioural Assistant (NBA): A Pilot Site 'End-User Attitudes' Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Britt; Clinnick, Lisa; Chesler, Jessica; Stranieri, Andrew; Bignold, Adam; Dazeley, Richard; McLaren, Suzanne; Lauder, Sue; Balasubramanian, Venki

    2018-01-01

    This regional pilot site 'end-user attitudes' study explored nurses' experiences and impressions of using the Nurses' Behavioural Assistant (NBA) (a knowledge-based, interactive ehealth system) to assist them to better respond to behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) and will be reported here. Focus groups were conducted, followed by a four-week pilot site 'end-user attitudes' trial of the NBA at a regional aged care residential facility (ACRF). Brief interviews were conducted with consenting nursing staff. Focus group feedback (N = 10) required only minor cosmetic changes to the NBA prototype. Post pilot site end-user interview data (N = 10) indicated that the regional ACRF nurses were positive and enthusiastic about the NBA, however several issues were also identified. Overall the results supported the utility of the NBA to promote a person centred care approach to managing BPSD. Slight modifications may be required to maximise its uptake across all ACRF nursing staff.

  10. Use of a virtual learning environment for training in maxillofacial emergencies: impact on the knowledge and attitudes of staff in accident and emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elledge, Ross; McAleer, Sean; Thakar, Meera; Begum, Fathema; Singhota, Sanjeet; Grew, Nicholas

    2016-02-01

    Many graduates will take up junior roles in accident and emergency (A&E) departments to which a large proportion of patients present with facial injuries caused by interpersonal violence. However, it is widely recognised that undergraduates and postgraduates have few opportunities for training in oral and maxillofacial surgery. We aimed to assess the impact of a specifically designed maxillofacial emergencies virtual learning environment (VLE) on the knowledge and confidence of junior doctors in two A&E departments. They were given free access to the VLE for one month, and were asked to complete multiple choice questions and to rate their confidence to deal with 10 common situations on visual analogue scales (VAS) at baseline and one month after training. A total of 29 doctors agreed to pilot the website, 21 (72%) completed both sets of questions, and 18 (62%) completed both VAS assessments. The mean (SD) multiple choice score improved from 10 (2.52) to 13 (3.56) out of a maximum of 20 (p=0.004) and the mean (SD) VAS improved from 29.2 (19.2) mm to 45.7 (16.6) mm out of a maximum of 100 mm (p=0.007). This was a small pilot study with limited numbers, but it showed improvements in the knowledge of maxillofacial emergencies and in confidence, although the latter remained low. Further work is needed to examine how these brief educational interventions affect the attitudes of frontline staff to maxillofacial emergencies. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. attitudes of teachers towards

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Ethiopia. A limited understanding of the concept disability, negative attitudes towards .... impairment and mental retardation in ... on the attitudes of the people” Taking part ... feelings about inclusion. ... Brahmnorwich(2002) , younger teachers.

  12. Does clinical experience help oncology nursing staff to deal with patient pain better than nurses from other displines? Knowledge and attitudes survey amongst nurses in a tertiary care in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaakup, Hayati; Eng, Tan Chai; Shah, Shamsul Azhar

    2014-01-01

    Successful implementation of pain management procedures and guidelines in an institution depends very much on the acceptance of many levels of healthcare providers. The main purpose of this study was to determine the level of knowledge and attitudes regarding pain among nurses working in tertiary care in a local setting and the factors that may be associated with this. This cross-sectional research study used a modified version of the Nurses' Knowledge and Attitudes Survey (NKAS) regarding pain. Basic demographic data were obtained for further correlation with the level of pain knowledge. A total of 566 nurses, 34 male and 532 female, volunteered to participate in this study. The response rate (RR) was 76%, with an overall mean percentage score of 42.7±10.9 (range: 5-92.5). The majority of participants were younger nurses below 40 years of age and more than 70% had worked for less than 10 years (6.6±4.45). Up to 92% had never had any formal education in pain management in general. The total mean score of correct answers was 58.6±9.58, with oncology nursing staff scoring a higher percentage when compared with nurses from other general and critical care wards (63.52±9.27, pnurses achieved the expected competency level (pnurses related to the optimal management of pain. The results indicated that neither number of years working nor age influenced the level of knowledge or attitudes of the practising nurses. Oncology nursing staff consistently scored better than the rest of the cohort. This reflects that clinical experience helps to improve attitudes and knowledge concerning better pain management.

  13. Assessment of the Primary and Intermediate School Staffs' Knowledge, Attitude and Practice on Care of Children with Type 1 Diabetes at School, Al-Jouf, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Duraywish A. A.

    2017-05-01

    Conclusion: Diabetes care training programs for school teachers and staffs, availability of school nurses and instigating collaboration between the diabetic center and the school is essential for safety of such diabetes student patients in the schools.

  14. Improving the health of mental health staff through exercise interventions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibbins, Hamish; Ward, Philip B; Watkins, Andrew; Curtis, Jackie; Rosenbaum, Simon

    2018-04-01

    Exercise interventions are efficacious in reducing cardiometabolic risk and improving symptoms in people with severe mental illness, yet evidence guiding the implementation and scalability of such efforts is lacking. Given increasing efforts to address the disparity in physical health outcomes facing people with a mental illness, novel approaches to increasing adoption of effective interventions are required. Exercise interventions targeting mental health staff may improve staff health while also creating more positive attitudes towards the role of lifestyle interventions for people experiencing mental illness. We aimed to determine the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of exercise interventions delivered to staff working in mental health services. A systematic review was conducted from database inception, until November 2017. Studies recruiting staff participants to receive an exercise intervention were eligible for inclusion. Five studies met the inclusion criteria. Physical health interventions for mental health staff were feasible and acceptable with low dropout rates. Reductions in anthropometric measures and work-related stress were reported. Limited evidence suggests that exercise interventions targeting mental health staff are feasible and acceptable. Further research is required to determine the efficacy of such interventions and the impact such strategies may have on staff culture and patient outcomes.

  15. Effectiveness of the 'Who's Challenging Who' support staff training intervention to improve attitudes and empathy towards adults with intellectual disability and challenging behaviours: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randell, Elizabeth; Hastings, Richard P; McNamara, Rachel; Knight, Roseanna; Gillespie, David; Taylor, Zachary

    2017-10-05

    Findings suggest approximately one in six people with intellectual disability engage in 'challenging behaviours', which include aggression towards others/property and self-injurious actions. In residential settings, actions of staff members can make challenging behaviours more likely to occur, or make these behaviours worse. In particular, negative attitudes from members of staff and lack of understanding about the reasons for challenging behaviour are contributory factors. 'Who's Challenging Who?' (WCW) training is designed to emphasise the role of staff in residential settings as a challenge also to people with intellectual disability. The course is delivered jointly by a trainer with intellectual disability who has been labelled as having challenging behaviour, along with a trainer without intellectual disability. This is a cluster randomised two-arm trial of WCW training versus a waiting list control. Overall, 118 residential settings will be recruited and randomised on a 1:1 ratio. Within each setting, two members of staff will be invited to take part in the trial. Participants will complete assessments at baseline and at 6 and 20 weeks. WCW is a half day initial training course with some follow-on coaching to ensure implementation. The primary outcome is changes in staff empathy towards people with challenging behaviour. Secondary outcomes at the staff level include confidence, attitudes and work-related well-being. Secondary outcomes at the residential setting level include recorded incidents of aggressive challenging behaviour, and use of any restrictive practices. If the results of the cluster randomised trial are positive, we will disseminate the findings widely and make all training manuals and materials freely available for anyone in intellectual disability services (and beyond) to use. Our training approach may have wider implications in other areas of social care. It may also provide a generally applicable model for how to train people with

  16. A Study to Assess Knowledge and Attitude Regarding Hand Hygiene amongst Residents and Nursing Staff in a Tertiary Health Care Setting of Bhopal City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Veena; Kaore, Navin Chandra M; Ramnani, Vijay Kumar; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Borle, Amod; Kaushal, Rituja

    2014-08-01

    Infection due to hospital-acquired microbes is an evolving problem worldwide, and horizontal transmission of bacterial organism continues to cause a high nosocomial infection rate in health care settings. Most nosocomial infections are thought to be transmitted by the hands of health care workers.The application of hand hygiene is effective in reducing infection rates. To assess the level of knowledge and attitude regarding hand hygiene practices amongst the health care professionals and to identify areas of gaps in their knowledge and attitude. A cross-sectional study. A total 160 respondents were studied about their knowledge and attitude towards hand hygiene practices and significant difference with a p-value of 0.0025 was observed regarding most frequent source of germs responsible for health care associated infections among resident and nurses. A significant difference with p-value of 0.0001 & 0.04 was observed in colonization due to jewellery and artificial nail among the study groups. The attitude regarding correct hand hygiene practices to be followed at all times was found to be better among nurses (62.5%) as compared to residents (21.3%) which was found to be highly significant with p-value hand hygiene practices among the health care workers to provide the current knowledge in the area with a behavioral change in attitudes and practices leading to reduction of nosocomial infections.

  17. Adopting an Active Learning Approach to Teaching in a Research-Intensive Higher Education Context Transformed Staff Teaching Attitudes and Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paul J.; Larson, Ian; Styles, Kim; Yuriev, Elizabeth; Evans, Darrell R.; Rangachari, P. K.; Short, Jennifer L.; Exintaris, Betty; Malone, Daniel T.; Davie, Briana; Eise, Nicole; Mc Namara, Kevin; Naidu, Somaiya

    2016-01-01

    The conventional lecture has significant limitations in the higher education context, often leading to a passive learning experience for students. This paper reports a process of transforming teaching and learning with active learning strategies in a research-intensive educational context across a faculty of 45 academic staff and more than 1,000…

  18. Nursing staff and euthanasia in the Netherlands. A nation-wide survey on attitudes and involvement in decision making and the performance of euthanasia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, A.L.; Albers, G.; Bilsen, J.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To give insight into Dutch nursing staff’s attitudes and involvement regarding euthanasia. Methods: The sample was recruited from a nation-wide existent research panel of registered nurses and certified nursing assistants. Descriptive analyses and multivariate logistic regression

  19. Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Remove of the staff association office   The Staff Association offices are going to be renovated during the coming four months, February to May 2014. The physical move from our current premises 64/R-002 to our temporary office in  510/R-010 will take place on Friday January 31st, so the Secretariat will be closed on that day. Hence, from Monday February 3rd until the end of May 2014 the Staff Association Secretariat will be located in 510/R-010 (entrance just across the CERN Printshop).    

  20. The Validity and Reliability Characteristics of the M-BACK Questionnaire to Assess the Barriers, Attitudes, Confidence, and Knowledge of Mental Health Staff Regarding Metabolic Health of Mental Health Service Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Watkins

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAddressing the burden of poor physical health and the subsequent gap in life expectancy experienced by people with mental illness is a major priority in mental health services. To equip mental health staff with the competence to deliver evidence-based interventions, targeted staff training regarding metabolic health is required. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of staff training regarding metabolic health, we aimed to develop a succinct measure to determine the barriers, attitudes, confidence, and knowledge of health practitioners through the development and test–retest reliability of the Metabolic-Barriers, Attitudes, Confidence, and Knowledge Questionnaire (M-BACK.MethodsThe M-BACK questionnaire was developed to evaluate the impact of specialized training in metabolic health care for mental health nurses. Content of the M-BACK was developed from a literature review and refined by an expert review panel and validated via a piloting process. To determine the test–retest reliability of the M-BACK, 31 nursing students recruited from the University of Notre Dame, Sydney completed the questionnaire on two separate occasions, 7 days apart. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs were calculated for the total score, as well as each of the four domains.ResultsPilot testing was undertaken with a sample of 106 mental health nurses with a mean age 48.2, ranging from 24 to 63 years of age, who participated in six training courses. Questionnaire development resulted in a 16-item instrument, with each item is scored on a five-point Likert scale ranging from “strongly disagree” to “strongly agree.” Test–retest reliability of the M-BACK was completed by 30 of 31 nursing students recruited, ICCs ranged from 0.62 to 0.96.ConclusionThe M-BACK is a reliable measure of the key elements of practitioner perceptions of barriers, and their knowledge, attitudes, and confidence regarding metabolic monitoring in people with mental

  1. A multi-center study on the attitudes of Malaysian emergency health care staff towards allowing family presence during resuscitation of adult patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Chew Keng; Lim, Chee Kean; Rashidi, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Abstracts Background The practice of allowing family members to witness on-going active resuscitation has been gaining ground in many developed countries since it was first introduced in the early 1990s. In many Asian countries, the acceptability of this practice has not been well studied. Aim We conducted a multi-center questionnaire study to determine the attitudes of health care professionals in Malaysia towards family presence to witness ongoing medical procedures during resuscitation. Me...

  2. A multi-center study on the attitudes of Malaysian emergency health care staff towards allowing family presence during resuscitation of adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Chew Keng; Lim, Chee Kean; Rashidi, Ahmad

    2010-08-21

    The practice of allowing family members to witness on-going active resuscitation has been gaining ground in many developed countries since it was first introduced in the early 1990s. In many Asian countries, the acceptability of this practice has not been well studied. We conducted a multi-center questionnaire study to determine the attitudes of health care professionals in Malaysia towards family presence to witness ongoing medical procedures during resuscitation. Using a bilingual questionnaire (in Malay and English language), we asked our respondents about their attitudes towards allowing family presence (FP) as well as their actual experience of requests from families to be allowed to witness resuscitations. Multiple logistic regression was used to analyze the association between the many variables and a positive attitude towards FP. Out of 300 health care professionals who received forms, 270 responded (a 90% response rate). Generally only 15.8% of our respondents agreed to allow relatives to witness resuscitations, although more than twice the number (38.5%) agreed that relatives do have a right to be around during resuscitation. Health care providers are significantly more likely to allow FP if the procedures are perceived as likely to be successful (e.g., intravenous cannulation and blood taking as compared to chest tube insertion). Doctors were more than twice as likely as paramedics to agree to FP (p-value = 0.002). This is probably due to the Malaysian work culture in our health care systems in which paramedics usually adopt a 'follow-the-leader' attitude in their daily practice. The concept of allowing FP is not well accepted among our Malaysian health care providers.

  3. Sexuality and gender identity teaching within preclinical medical training in New Zealand: content, attitudes and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Oscar; Rapsey, Charlene M; Treharne, Gareth J

    2018-06-22

    To investigate inclusion of sexuality and gender identity content, attitudes and barriers to inclusion of content in preclinical curricula of New Zealand medical schools from the perspective of key teaching staff. Staff responsible for curriculum oversight at New Zealand's two medical schools were invited to complete a mixed-methods survey about sexuality and gender identity content in their modules. Of 24 respondents, the majority included very little content relating to sexuality or gender identity (33%) or none at all (54%). This content was deemed important by most participants (69%), and none believed there should be less such content in their curriculum. Time was reported to be the main barrier limiting inclusion of such content. Our finding of limited content is consistent with international literature. Our findings extend the literature by revealing that barriers to greater inclusion of content are not due to overt negative attitudes. Staff responsible for preclinical medical curriculum oversight have positive attitudes about content relating to sexuality and gender identity but perceive curriculum space to be a limiting barrier. This is important as it informs approaches to change. Future interventions with medical schools should focus on methods to increase diverse content as part of existing teaching, education to increase knowledge of LGBTQI relevant material and potentially incorporate strategies used to address unconscious bias. Addressing the perceived barriers of time constraints and lack of relevance is required to ensure medical students receive training to develop the competencies to provide positive healthcare experiences for all patients regardless of sexuality and gender identity.

  4. Staff-family relationships in nursing home care: a typology of challenging behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Aim.  This paper draws on data from a study which investigated how Australian nursing home staff constructed staff-family relationships. Background.  Working with the family in aged care to provide the best care possible is consistent with modern nursing philosophy which espouses holistic care. The quality and enjoyment of the experience however, is frequently fraught with problems and challenges for both the staff and the family involved. Design.  A qualitative constructivist design as described by Guba and Lincoln [Fourth Generation Evaluation. Sage Publications, London.] was used. Method.  Thirty paid caregivers drawn from eight nursing homes were interviewed about their experiences of working with residents' families. A constant comparative method of data analysis was used to arrive at the findings. Results.  This paper reports on seven themes under the category of 'unacceptable behaviours'. These themes describe a range of attitudes and behaviours exhibited by families which staff members found undesirable. Conclusions.  Staff members found a number of family behaviours challenging. Nursing home staff perceives the family as subordinate to their needs and want to retain control of the work environment. Relevance to clinical practice.  Nursing home staff need to move away from custodial models of care focused on 'getting the work done' and develop more family friendly work practices that are inclusive of the needs of the family and view them as equal partners in care.

  5. Make Us Question, Think, Reflect and Understand: Secondary Students' Beliefs and Attitudes towards the Inclusion of LGBTQ Themed Literature in the English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greathouse, Paula

    2016-01-01

    There are innumerable subcultures within American society, all of which come to interact within the walls of a school and all of which should be recognized and valued by the classroom teacher. This article shares secondary students' beliefs and attitudes about reading and studying lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and/or questioning (LGBTQ)…

  6. The Impact of Teaching Academic Education Course of Children with Special Needs in the Ordinary Schools on Students' Attitudes toward Inclusion of Disabled Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Abdelbaky Arafa

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed at identifying the attitudes of the teacher student towards including students with special needs with the ordinary ones. Also, to determine whether there are statistically significant differences between students who have studied the academic education course of children with special needs in the ordinary schools and the…

  7. Teacher Attitudes and Behavior toward the Inclusion of Children with Social, Emotional and Behavioral Difficulties in Mainstream Schools: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, Kate; Woolfson, Lisa Marks

    2013-01-01

    The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) was used to examine relationships between teacher attitudes and behavior toward children with social, emotional and behavioral difficulties (SEBD). One hundred and eleven elementary school teachers completed questionnaires. Teacher perception of their school principals' expectations (subjective norm) predicted…

  8. An Investigation of the Attitudes Held by General Education Teachers toward Students with Disabilities in a Pilot Inclusive Education Program in Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mngo, Agnes Y.

    2017-01-01

    Problem Statement: The literature from Cameroon depicts that the implementation of inclusive education is not only in its embryonic stage but faces resistance from educators who are still not accepting of the presence of students with disabilities in general education classrooms. This resistance has been attributed to several factors ranging from…

  9. Long-Term Effectiveness of Two Educational Methods on Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice Toward Palliative Care Consultation Services Among Nursing Staff: A Longitudinal Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hsueh-Hsing; Wu, Li-Fen; Hung, Yu-Chun; Chu, Chi-Ming; Wang, Kwua-Yun

    2018-05-01

    This experimental study investigated long-term effectiveness of two educational methods on knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) about palliative care consultation services (PCCS) among nurses, recruited from a medical center located in Northern Taiwan in 2015, using a stratified cluster sampling method, with 88 participants in multimedia (experimental) and 92 in traditional paper education (control) group. Data were collected using KAP-PCCS questionnaire before education, immediately after, and 3rd and 6th month after education. Results showed that both K-PCCSI and P-PCCSI significantly increased immediately after, and at the 3rd month after education for the experimental group; the K-PCCSI remained significantly higher for the experimental group at the 6th month. The highest increase in scores for both K-PCCSI and P-PCCSI was observed at the 3rd month. There was no significant change in A-PCCS in both groups after follow-up periods, when compared before education. Therefore, using multimedia every 3 months to continue strengthening their knowledge may increase the referrals of terminal patients to PCCS.

  10. What are the beliefs, attitudes and practices of front-line staff in long-term care (LTC facilities related to osteoporosis awareness, management and fracture prevention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adachi Jonathan D

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compared to the general elderly population, those institutionalized in LTC facilities have the highest prevalence of osteoporosis and subsequently have higher incidences of vertebral and hip fractures. The goal of this study is to determine how well nurses at LTC facilities are educated to properly administer bisphosphonates. A secondary question assessed was the nurse's and PSW's attitudes and beliefs regarding the role and benefits of vitamin D for LTC patients. Methods Eight LTC facilities in Hamilton were surveyed, and all nurses were offered a survey. A total 57 registered nurses were surveyed. A 21 item questionnaire was developed to assess existing management practices and specific osteoporosis knowledge areas. Results The questionnaire assessed the nurse's and personal support worker's (PSWs education on how to properly administer bisphosphonates by having them select all applicable responses from a list of options. These options included administering the drug before, after or with meals, given with or separate from other medications, given with juice, given with or without water, given with the patient sitting up, or finally given with the patient supine. Only 52% of the nurses and 8.7% of PSWs administered the drug properly, where they selected the options: (given before meals, given with water, given separate from all other medications, and given in a sitting up position. If at least one incorrect option was selected, then it was scored as an inappropriate administration. Bisphosphonates were given before meals by 85% of nurses, given with water by 90%, given separately from other medication by 71%, and was administered in an upright position by 79%. Only 52% of the nurses and 8.7% of PSWs surveyed were administering the drug properly. Regarding the secondary question, of the 57 nurses surveyed, 68% strongly felt their patients should be prescribed vitamin D supplements. Of the 124 PSWs who completed the survey

  11. Inclusive pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Morten Timmermann; Skov Mortensen, Stig

    This article will present a case for a shift in perspective in inclusive education research towards a continentally inspired approach. Drawing on the age old distinction between continental and Anglo-American educational research the aim is to flesh out what a shift to a continental approach...... will entail, and why it might be beneficial to research in inclusive education...

  12. Social inclusion and inclusive education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsela Robo

    2014-07-01

    In line with global debate on social inclusion and exclusion, the author brings the way this debate has now pervaded both the official and development policy discourse in Albania.Social inclusion is considered as one of the priorities of the current government, with poverty reduction as its main focus, which will be ensured not only through economic development. In the end, the article focuses on the role of education as a very important and useful tool for ensuring social inclusion.Social inclusion through education, in particular through vocational education, considered by the author as the only way towards sustainable development of Albanian society.

  13. Diseño y aplicación de un programa de intervención de práctica deportiva inclusiva y su efecto sobre la actitud hacia la discapacidad: El Campus Inclusivo de Baloncesto. (Design and implementation of an intervention program of inclusive sport and its effect on attitudes toward disability: The Inclusive Basketball Campus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Ocete

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente estudio fue diseñar y aplicar un programa de intervención como modelo de práctica deportiva inclusiva, analizando el impacto que ejerce en la actitud hacia la discapacidad en chicos que no la tienen. Para ello, se puso en práctica el “Campus Inclusivo de Baloncesto”, organizado por la Fundación Real Madrid, como actividad deportiva inclusiva donde la práctica del baloncesto sirve de contexto para una práctica normalizadora, ya que a él asisten participantes con y sin discapacidad física. El diseño del estudio fue de tipo experimental, utilizando el "Cuestionario de actitudes hacia las personas con discapacidad" (Reina, López, Jiménez, García-Calvo, y Hutzler, 2011 aplicándolo antes de la intervención, después y pasados 9 meses de la misma, a los 21 participantes sin discapacidad (17 hombres y 4 mujeres, con edades comprendidas entre los 8 y los 14 años. Se aplicó la prueba de Wilcoxon y ANOVA de medidas repetidas, estableciendo el nivel de confianza en p≤0,05. Los resultados muestran que se registran cambios significativos en positivo tras la actividad a favor de la actitud hacia las personas con discapacidad, además de mantenerse dichos cambios en el tiempo. Por tanto, podemos afirmar que el diseño propuesto, llevado a cabo en este Campus Inclusivo de Baloncesto, se muestra eficaz a la hora de favorecer los beneficios de la inclusión en contextos de iniciación deportiva.AbstractThe aim of this study was to design and to implement an intervention program as a model of inclusive sport, analyzing its impact on the attitude towards disability in children who have no disability. For this purpose, was implemented the "Inclusive Basketball Campus", organized by the Real Madrid Foundation, where basketball as inclusive sport provides a context for normalizing practice, since to this activity is attended by participants with and without physical disabilities. The study design was experimental, using

  14. Inclusive pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Morten Timmermann; Mortensen, Stig Skov

    of education. The article explores the relationship between Continental and Anglo-American educational theory, and why they seem to have developed in such distinct directions. Beginning with the Anglo-American perspective it is outlined how pedagogy and the so called educational interest became replaced...... and the politicisation of inclusive education, and a positive aim in the form of an argument for a move towards constructing a pedagogical ideal of inclusion....

  15. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  16. Inclusive education: Ideas vs reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović-Popadić Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses some of the key factors significant for the process of implementation of inclusive education in Serbia. After a brief review of the legal provisions regulating inclusive education in our country, the results of the research of attitudes towards inclusive education of teachers from six primary schools and one school for students with disabilities, as well as their experience, competencies, working conditions and opinions on consequences of inclusive education and education of children with developmental disabilities in specialized educational institutions are shown. Research was conducted in Krusevac, on a random sample of 60 teachers (51 teachers from primary schools and 9 special education teachers from schools for students with disabilities. We used two forms of questionnaires with twenty questions, and the results show predominantly negative attitudes towards inclusion in the majority of teachers in the sample. A significant percentage of respondents in both sub-samples considered that education of children with developmental disorders in specialized institutions (schools may give better results, primarily due to a lack of systematic support to teachers of primary schools in the process of implementing educational inclusion. The conclusion provides a critical overview of the current situation and presents the potential solutions to the problems that were identified during the research, and refer to the unsustainability of the current practice of inclusive education in Serbia.

  17. Thinking About Challenging Behavior: A Repertory Grid Study of Inpatient Staff Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Dougal Julian; Durand, Marianne; Hendy, Steve; Wittkowski, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Studies examining staff attitudes toward people with intellectual disability have traditionally used pre-determined categories and models or been open to researcher bias. The use of methods derived from personal construct psychology permits an objective investigation of staff views and attitudes without such limitations. Fourteen staff from an…

  18. Inclusive Partnership: Enhancing Student Engagement in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Cherry, Niamh; Healey, Ruth; Nicholson, Dawn T.; Andrews, Will

    2016-01-01

    Partnership is currently the focus of much work within higher education and advocated as an important process to address a range of higher education goals. In this paper, we propose the term "inclusive partnership" to conceptualise a non-selective staff-student relationship. While recognising the challenges of inclusive partnership…

  19. Teacher Educators’ Views on Inclusive Education and Teacher Preparation in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Nketsia, William; Saloviita, Timo; Gyimah, Emmanuel Kofi

    2016-01-01

    The crucial role of initial teacher education programmes and teacher educators in preparing effective inclusive practitioners has been universally acknowledged. This study explored the attitudes of 125 teacher educators from four colleges of education towards inclusive education, their views and concerns about teacher preparation and the implementation of inclusive education in Ghana. The study found positive attitudes and considerable support for inclusive education. However, ...

  20. inclusions revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Migórski

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we confirm the validity of some recent results of Hu, Lakshmikantham, Papageorgiou [4] and Papageorgiou [13] concerning the existence and relaxation for nonlinear evolution inclusions. We fill a gap in the proofs of these results due to the use of incorrect Nagy's compactness embedding theorem.

  1. Teachers' Misunderstanding: The Concept of Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanagi, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Teachers' misunderstanding the concept of inclusive education will not lead to good practices, rather make an exclusive environment for pupils with special educational needs in mainstream schools. This study clarified teachers' attitudes towards the image of inclusive education with conjoint analysis and cluster analysis. The participants for this…

  2. Personal Staff - Joint Staff - The National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    the ARNG Deputy Director of the ARNG Chief of Staff of the ARNG Command Chief Warrant Officer of the Site Maintenance Battle Focused Training Strategy Battle Staff Training Resources News Publications March Today in Guard History Leadership CNGB VCNGB SEA DANG DARNG Joint Staff J-1 J-2 J-3 J-4 J-5 J-6 J

  3. Translating Inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallov, Mia Arp; Birk, Rasmus

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how practices of translation shape particular paths of inclusion for people living in marginalized residential areas in Denmark. Inclusion, we argue, is not an end-state, but rather something which must be constantly performed. Active citizenship, today......, is not merely a question of participation, but of learning to become active in all spheres of life. The paper draws on empirical examples from a multi-sited field work in 6 different sites of local community work in Denmark, to demonstrate how different dimensions of translation are involved in shaping active...... citizenship. We propose the following different dimensions of translation: translating authority, translating language, translating social problems. The paper takes its theoretical point of departure from assemblage urbanism, arguing that cities are heterogeneous assemblages of socio-material interactions...

  4. Teaching Style and Attitudes towards Facebook as an Educational Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Julie

    2014-01-01

    There is a distinct lack of research that has considered university staff use of and attitudes towards Facebook. The aim of this study was to gain an understanding of how teaching staff at one UK university use Facebook, and their attitudes towards Facebook and online professionalism, in terms of the student-staff relationship. An online survey…

  5. Attitudes and attitude change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohner, Gerd; Dickel, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Attitudes and attitude change remain core topics of contemporary social psychology. This selective review emphasizes work published from 2005 to 2009. It addresses constructionist and stable-entity conceptualizations of attitude, the distinction between implicit and explicit measures of attitude, and implications of the foregoing for attitude change. Associative and propositional processes in attitude change are considered at a general level and in relation to evaluative conditioning. The role of bodily states and physical perceptions in attitude change is reviewed. This is followed by an integrative perspective on processing models of persuasion and the consideration of meta-cognitions in persuasion. Finally, effects of attitudes on information processing, social memory, and behavior are highlighted. Core themes cutting across the areas reviewed are attempts at integrative theorizing bringing together formerly disparate phenomena and viewpoints.

  6. Staff and Student Perceptions of Plagiarism and Cheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    Cheating, plagiarism, and other forms of academic misconduct are a significant issue in higher education. In this study, the attitudes of academic staff and students in a 3 year undergraduate nursing program to various forms of academic misconduct were assessed and compared. Forty-nine percent of staff and 39% of students thought that cheating on…

  7. A Measure of Staff Burnout among Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John W.

    Staff burnout among health professionals refers to a syndrome of physical and emotional exhaustion involving the development of negative job attitudes, a poor professional self-concept, and a loss of empathic concern for clients. The Staff Burnout Scale for Health Professionals (SBS-HP) is a 20-item inventory assessing cognitive, affective,…

  8. Attitudes and attitude change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    An attitude can be defined as the evaluation of an object as positive or negative. The term "object" in this definition should be understood in a broad sense; an attitude object may be any concrete or abstract entity that is in some way represented in our thoughts and memory. In other words......, attitude objects are simply the things we like or dislike. Consumer researchers are mainly interested in attitude objects of two classes, products and services, including the attributes, issues, persons, communications, situations, and behaviours related to them. Research on consumer attitudes takes two...... perspectives: Understanding attitude structure: how is an attitude cognitively represented in a consumer's mind, including its components (intra-attitudinal structure) and its associations with other psychological variables (inter-attitudinal structure)? Understanding information processing: what...

  9. Attitudes and Attitude Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracin, Dolores; Shavitt, Sharon

    2018-01-04

    This review covers research on attitudes and attitude change published between 2010 and 2017. We characterize this period as one of significant progress toward an understanding of how attitudes form and change in three critical contexts. The first context is the person, as attitudes change in connection to values, general goals, language, emotions, and human development. The second context is social relationships, which link attitude change to the communicator of persuasive messages, social media, and culture. The third context is sociohistorical and highlights the influence of unique events, including sociopolitical, economic, and climatic occurrences. In conclusion, many important recent findings reflect the fact that holism, with a focus on situating attitudes within their personal, social, and historical contexts, has become the zeitgeist of attitude research during this period.

  10. Evaluating staff training : Taking account of interactions between staff and clients with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oorsouw, W.M.W.J.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hastings (2010) has recently emphasised 3 aspects in the training of staff who serve clients with mild to moderate intellectual disability and challenging behaviour (CB): Staff attitudes, self-awareness, and clients' perspectives. This study investigates whether programs include these

  11. An Empirical Study on Teachers' Perceptions towards Inclusive Education in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Manisah Mohd; Mustapha, Ramlee; Jelas, Zalizan Mohd

    2006-01-01

    The hallmark of inclusive education is the teachers' willingness to accept students with special needs. Their attitudes and knowledge about inclusive education are important as these are indicators of such willingness. The purpose of this study was to examine teachers' attitudes and their perceived knowledge towards inclusive education in…

  12. Does staff diversity imply openness to diversity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – Post-secondary educational organizations are currently some of the most diverse settings to be found. However, few educational studies have dealt with staff diversity and hardly any has looked outside the USA. The purpose of this paper is to present a study of members of international...... university departments in Denmark. The authors set out to investigate the relationship between different types of staff diversity and openness to diversity in terms of linguistic, visible, value, and informational heterogeneity. Design/methodology/approach – This study uses responses from 489 staff members......, was unrelated or negatively associated with positive diversity attitudes. Originality/value – Few studies deal with the role of staff diversity and no prior studies the authors know of have examined the link between diversity types and openness to diversity....

  13. Research Staff | Buildings | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Photo of Roderick Jackson Roderick Jackson Laboratory Program Manager -related research at NREL. He works closely with senior laboratory management to set the strategic agenda for NREL's buildings portfolio, including all research, development, and market implementation

  14. E3 Staff Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E3 Staff database is maintained by E3 PDMS (Professional Development & Management Services) office. The database is Mysql. It is manually updated by E3 staff as...

  15. Research Staff | Wind | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Learn more about the expertise and technical skills of the wind power research team and staff at NREL. Name Position Email Phone Anstedt, Sheri Professional III-Writer/Editor /Web Content Sheri.Anstedt@nrel.gov 303-275-3255 Baker, Donald Research Technician V-Electrical

  16. CBE Faculty and Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Us Research Staff Edward Arens Fred Bauman Gail Brager Darryl Dickerhoff Ali Ghahramani Partners Facilities Graduate Programs Visiting Scholar Program Careers CBE Faculty and Staff CBE is an performance of buildings. The core research group for CBE includes faculty and research staff members

  17. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  18. Attitudes of Health Professionals towards Mental Disorders: Studies in Turkey during the Last Decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zekiye Cetinkaya Duman

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available People with mental disorders often manifest their extraordinary characters through their speech and behavior, which in turn creates reactionary attitudes in society. In the same manner, health professionals, as members of the society, can express negative attitudes towards psychiatry patients. Since they provide health services and serve as “consultants” and “role models” for the well-being of people, their discriminating and stigmatizing attitudes may also preclude the involvement of these patients in medical care. Therefore, attitude researches today primarily focus on to analyze the attitudes of health professionals. While a majority of the studies include psychiatrists, general practitioners, specialists and medical students, only a limited number of studies refer to staff nurses and nursing students. The review of literature in this study, therefore, was limited with the researches carried out in the last decade. The aim of this study was to analyze the attitude researches focused on the attitudes of health professionals, especially those of nursing and nursing students in Turkey, and to clarify the similarities and differences with relevant studies. The results of the review illustrated that the attitudes of health professionals towards psychiatry patients and psychiatric disorders have not changed for the last ten years and remained fundamentally discriminating and refusing. The medical curricula in Turkey should be redesigned so as to raise awareness in the course contents of medicine and nursing schools against the negative attitudes during both undergraduate and postgraduate education. Moreover, a more inclusive review of the factors that may have influenced the attitudes towards mental illnesses should be carried out and specially designed education and research programs should be implemented.

  19. A review of social inclusion measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Tim; Nicholas, Angela; Pirkis, Jane

    2013-10-01

    Social inclusion is crucial to mental health and well-being and is emphasised in Australia's Fourth National Mental Health Plan. There is a recognition that a measure of social inclusion would complement the suite of outcome measures that is currently used in public sector mental health services. This paper is an initial scope of candidate measures of social inclusion and considers their suitability for this purpose. We identified potential measures through searches of PsycINFO and Medline and a more general Internet search. We extracted descriptive and evaluative information on each measure identified and compared this information with a set of eight criteria. The criteria related to the measure's inclusion of four domains of social inclusion outlined in Australia's Fourth National Mental Health Plan, its usability within the public mental health sector and its psychometric properties. We identified 10 candidate measures of social inclusion: the Activity and Participation Questionnaire (APQ-6); the Australian Community Participation Questionnaire (ACPQ); the Composite Measure of Social Inclusion (CMSI); the EMILIA Project Questionnaire (EPQ); the Evaluating Social Inclusion Questionnaire (ESIQ); the Inclusion Web (IW); the Social and Community Opportunities Profile (SCOPE); the Social Inclusion Measure (SIM); the Social Inclusion Questionnaire (SIQ); and the Staff Survey of Social Inclusion (SSSI). After comparison with the eight review criteria, we determined that the APQ-6 and the SCOPE-short form show the most potential for further testing. Social inclusion is too important not to measure. This discussion of individual-level measures of social inclusion provides a springboard for selecting an appropriate measure for use in public sector mental health services. It suggests that there are two primary candidates, but neither of these is quite fit-for-purpose in their current form. Further exploration will reveal whether one of these is suitable, whether another

  20. Reimagining the Role of Human Services Workers: Staff Experiences of a Social Change Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer-Cavaliere, Nancy; Kingsley, Bethan C.; Norris, Carmen

    2018-01-01

    Despite recognition that social inclusion is a primary goal within the field of human services, people with disabilities continue to live lives of clienthood, marginalisation, and exclusion and human services staff struggle to make social inclusion a priority. The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of human services staff about…

  1. Confronting New Demands : Inclusive Growth, Inclusive Trade ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Confronting New Demands : Inclusive Growth, Inclusive Trade. Policymakers, businesspeople and civil society advocates need evidence-based research to react ... understood implications, such as labour standards and intellectual property; ...

  2. Inclusive practices in teacher training in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasthi Jocabed Flores Barrera

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Inclusive practices include diversity as a resource that favors teaching-learning processes in the classroom, although they focus on the most vulnerable people by offering them higher-quality education. This descriptive study sought to identify the inclusive practices of teachers who train teachers in an Escuela Normal (teachers’ college in Mexico. Eight teachers and 247 students participated in the study; the Guidelines for the Evaluation of Inclusive Practices in the Classroom (observation formats and students, the Learning Strategies Questionnaire, and semi-structured interviews were used. The results suggest that, although the general perception is that participating teachers have high inclusive practices, they need greater support in the physical conditions of the classroom, methodology and teacher-student relationship. It was also identified the need for a refresher program for teachers to conceptually enrich the teaching staff and encourage the implementation of inclusive education within the Escuela Normal.

  3. CANCER SCREENING AWARENESS AMONG NURSING STAFF IN GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Shanthilal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cervical and breast cancers are the common malignancies among female population in India. Though there are approved screening methods available to prevent and detect these cancers at an early stage, there is a lack of awareness about cancer screening among general public as well as the health care professionals. This study is aimed to identify the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP among the nursing staff regarding cancer screening in these two diseases. METHOD A cross-sectional interview based survey was conducted among 303 female nursing staff working in a government medical college hospital from November 2015 to December 2015. Ethical committee approval was taken. Verbal informed consent was sought from the study subjects. Nursing staff who gave consent to participate in the study were enrolled. There were no specific inclusion or exclusion criteria for the study subjects. A structured pretested questionnaire regarding knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP was used to collect the data. The questions were open-ended. Recall and recognition type of questions were used. The data was entered into MS Excel worksheet and analysed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS Total of 303 nurses included in the study. The age ranged from 21 to 64 years. Median age is 38 years. Only 24.4% (74/303 of Nurses were aware of cancer screening and many of them were aware of Pap smear (55.1%, 167/303 and mammogram (66.3%, 201/303 as investigational tools in diagnosing cancer. Only 17 out of 303 (5.6% nurses had Pap smear test done with an average of 1.23% Pap smear per individual. Mammogram screening was done in 13% (15/115 of the eligible nurses with an average of 1.2% mammogram per individual. The most common reason for not undergoing screening as expressed was they did not feel the need to be screened unless they were symptomatic (55%, they are too young for screening (14.8%, shyness (11.1%, fear (11.1% and lack of time (7.4%. However, 90% of them

  4. Research Staff | Bioenergy | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Photo of Adam Bratis, Ph.D. Adam Bratis Associate Lab Director-Bio research to accomplish the objectives of the Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office, and to serve as a spokesperson for the bioenergy research effort at NREL, both internally and externally. This

  5. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 31st of October to the 14th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months and will keep the next Staff Council very busy. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to vote * * * * * * * Vote Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the election...

  6. Training to raise staff awareness about safeguarding children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jane

    2015-04-01

    To improve outcomes for children and young people health organisations are required to train all staff in children's safeguarding. This creates difficulties for large complex organisations where most staff provide services to the adult population. Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust is a large acute and community trust that had difficulties in engaging staff in children's safeguarding training. Compliance rates for clinical staff who were trained in children's safeguarding were low and needed to be addressed. This article sets out why safeguarding training is important for all staff and how the trust achieved staff engagement and improved compliance rates. To evaluate, maintain and develop safeguarding knowledge, understanding, skills, attitude and behaviour further resources are planned to allow access to learning resources in a variety of formats.

  7. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the staff scheduling is planned decentralized for each zone. The advantage of this approach is that the staff...... work in a smaller area of the terminal and thus spends less time walking between stands. When planning decentralized the allocation of stands to flights influences the staff scheduling since the workload in a zone depends on which flights are allocated to stands in the zone. Hence solving the problem...... depends on the actual stand allocation but also on the number of zones and the layout of these. A mathematical model of the problem is proposed, which integrates the stand allocation and the staff scheduling. A heuristic solution method is developed and applied on a real case from British Airways, London...

  8. New staff contract policy

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at TREF and on the recommendation of the Finance Committee, Council approved a new staff contract policy, which became effective on 1 January 2006. Its application is covered by a new Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) 'Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members'. The revised circular replaces the previous Circulars No. 9 (Rev. 3) 'Staff contracts' and No. 2 (Rev. 2) 'Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period for staff members'. The main features of the new contract policy are as follows: The new policy provides chances for long-term employment for all staff recruits staying for four years without distinguishing between those assigned to long-term or short-term activities when joining CERN. In addition, it presents a number of simplifications for the award of ICs. There are henceforth only 2 types of contract: Limited Duration (LD) contracts for all recruitment and Indefinite Contracts (IC) for...

  9. Improving Elderly's Dental Hygiene Through Nursing Home Staff's Dental Health Education at the Nursing Home

    OpenAIRE

    Santoso, Bedjo; Eko Ningtyas, Endah Aryati; Fatmasari, Diyah

    2017-01-01

    Stomatitis often occurs in elderly at nursing home. They need nursing home staff assistance to maintain their dental and oral health. Therefore, nursing home staff need dental health education. Lecture or discussion methods, which are more effective to improve knowledge, attitude and skill of nursing home staff was the purpose of this research. The research design was quasi-experiment research and pretest-posttest with control group. The sample was 42 nursing home staffs and 74 elderlies, div...

  10. Training for staff who support students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Eleanor; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Hu, Wendy

    2016-02-01

    Front-line administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff often find themselves providing pastoral and learning support to students, but they are often not trained for this role, and this aspect of their work is under-acknowledged. Staff participating in an action research study at two medical schools identified common concerns about the personal impact of providing student support, and of the need for professional development to carry out this responsibility. This need is magnified in clinical placement settings that are remote from on-campus services. Informed by participatory action research, brief interactive workshops with multimedia training resources were developed, conducted and evaluated at eight health professional student training sites. These workshops were designed to: (1) be delivered in busy clinical placement and university settings; (2) provide a safe and inclusive environment for administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff to share experiences and learn from each other; (3) be publicly accessible; and (4) promote continued development and roll-out of staff training, adapted to each workplace (see http://www.uws.edu.au/meusupport). The workshops were positively evaluated by 97 participants, with both teaching and administrative staff welcoming the opportunity to discuss and share experiences. Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves. Participatory action research can be a means for producing and maintaining effective training resources as well as the conditions for change in practice. In our workshops, staff particularly valued opportunities for guided discussion using videos of authentic cases to trigger reflection, and to collaboratively formulate student support guidelines, customised to each site. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Limits to Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Janne Hedegaard

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I will argue that a theoretical identification of the limit to inclusion is needed in the conceptual identification of inclusion. On the one hand, inclusion is formulated as a vision that is, in principle, limitless. On the other hand, there seems to be an agreement that inclusion has a limit in the pedagogical practice. However,…

  12. Inclusive School Is (Not) Possible--Pupil's Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive education has been the focus of a number of research studies in Bosnia and Herzegovina. However, most of the research was based on the teachers and to a lesser extent on parents' attitudes towards inclusive education, while pupils' views and voice were mainly neglected. The core of this paper is survey research on primary school pupils'…

  13. Reclaiming Teacher Intellectualism through and for Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlessinger, Sarah L.

    2018-01-01

    Inclusive education, understood as a pedagogical commitment to schooling experiences that value diversity and promote equitable participation for all students, has not been broadly taken up in practice in the United States. Much of the research in this field suggests that teachers' attitudes towards inclusive education are the primary barrier to…

  14. Inclusion in Early Childhood Education: Pre-Service Teachers Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majoko, Tawanda

    2016-01-01

    This study examined pre-service teachers' understanding, attitudes, preparation and concerns regarding inclusion in early childhood education (ECE) in Zimbabwe. Entrenched within inclusive pedagogy, this descriptive study draws on a sample of 24 pre-service teachers purposively selected from the largest teachers' college with the oldest…

  15. Family inclusion in mental health services: Reality or rhetoric?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Robyn M; Ridley, Sophie C; Gillieatt, Sue J

    2017-09-01

    Contemporary mental health policies require family inclusion in the design, implementation and evaluation of services. This scoping review considers the factors in mental health practice which either mediate or promote family inclusion. A wide range of factors are reported to obstruct family inclusion, while a smaller number of studies report that meaningful family inclusion rests on a partnership approach which values the input of families and services users. When it comes to family inclusion, there is a gap between policy and service delivery practice. Changes in service delivery attitudes, values and culture are necessary to meaningfully and systematically include families and service users.

  16. Optimisation of staff protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Marshall, N.W.; Rawlings, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    It is important to minimize the radiation dose received by staff, but it is particularly important in interventional radiology. Staff doses may be reduced by minimizing the fluoroscopic screening time and number of images, compatible with the clinical objective of the procedure. Staff may also move to different positions in the room in an attempt to reduce doses. Finally, staff should wear appropriate protective clothing to reduce their occupational doses. This paper will concentrate on the optimization of personal shielding in interventional radiology. The effect of changing the lead equivalence of various protective devices on effective dose to staff has been studied by modeling the exposure of staff to realistic scattered radiation. Both overcouch x-ray tube/undercouch image intensified and overcouch image intensifier/undercouch x-ray tube geometries were simulated. It was deduced from this simulation that increasing the lead apron thickness from 0.35 mm lead to 0.5 mm lead had only a small reducing effect. By contrast, wearing a lead rubber thyroid shield or face mask is a superior means of reducing the effective dose to staff. Standing back from the couch when the x-ray tube is emitting radiation is another good method of reducing doses, being better than exchanging a 0.35 mm lead apron for a 0.5 mm apron. In summary, it is always preferable to shield more organs than to increase the thickness of the lead apron. (author)

  17. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 28 of October to the 11th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months, and in particular the Five-yearly-Review 2015, subject of the questionnaire that you probably recently filled out. All this will keep the next Staff Council very busy indeed. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to v...

  18. Perception of Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital Emergency Centre staff on acuity of patients” presentation and appropriateness of attendance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Forson

    2013-06-01

    Discussion: Staff in this study were not unanimous on the acuity of presentation of walk-in patients and referred patients. Walk-in patients were more likely turned away from the EC. Though perception of staff may hold inherent weakness of objectiveness, this may inform staff attitudes to care for walk-in patients. Negative perceptions of staff on overcrowding in EC could be addressed through staff training and policy directed at reducing EC overcrowding.

  19. JOB SATISFACTION SURVEY OF STAFF NURSES WORKING IN THE HOSPITALS.

    OpenAIRE

    Sheeja. C. V; K. Reddemma.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Satisfaction of the nurses are key component in delivering inviolable health care in the country. Multiple factors are responsible for nurses? job satisfaction. Satisfied nurses are able to provide quality nursing care for their patients. Staff Nurses? Job satisfaction are influenced by extrinsic and intrinsic factors. The staff nurses attitude towards their job can be measured through the job satisfaction scale. This study has been undertaken in an attempt to explore and descri...

  20. Transitioning From Perioperative Staff Nurse to Perioperative Educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mower, Juliana

    2017-08-01

    Perioperative nurses who enjoy teaching may wish to become staff development educators. The shift to this new role requires a transition period during which the new educator acquires the knowledge, skills, and attitudes integral to mastering the job. A systematic approach to achieving baseline competencies in the educator role helps to ensure a successful conversion from providing direct patient care to supporting the educational needs of staff members. Copyright © 2017 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Computer-based medical education in Benha University, Egypt: knowledge, attitude, limitations, and suggestions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayomy, Hanaa; El Awadi, Mona; El Araby, Eman; Abed, Hala A

    2016-12-01

    Computer-assisted medical education has been developed to enhance learning and enable high-quality medical care. This study aimed to assess computer knowledge and attitude toward the inclusion of computers in medical education among second-year medical students in Benha Faculty of Medicine, Egypt, to identify limitations, and obtain suggestions for successful computer-based learning. This was a one-group pre-post-test study, which was carried out on second-year students in Benha Faculty of Medicine. A structured self-administered questionnaire was used to compare students' knowledge, attitude, limitations, and suggestions toward computer usage in medical education before and after the computer course to evaluate the change in students' responses. The majority of students were familiar with use of the mouse and keyboard, basic word processing, internet and web searching, and e-mail both before and after the computer course. The proportion of students who were familiar with software programs other than the word processing and trouble-shoot software/hardware was significantly higher after the course (Pcomputer (P=0.008), the inclusion of computer skills course in medical education, downloading lecture handouts, and computer-based exams (Pcomputers limited the inclusion of computer in medical education (Pcomputer labs, lack of Information Technology staff mentoring, large number of students, unclear course outline, and lack of internet access were more frequently reported before the course (Pcomputer labs, inviting Information Technology staff to support computer teaching, and the availability of free Wi-Fi internet access covering several areas in the university campus; all would support computer-assisted medical education. Medical students in Benha University are computer literate, which allows for computer-based medical education. Staff training, provision of computer labs, and internet access are essential requirements for enhancing computer usage in medical

  2. When Attitudes Don't Predict Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacherjee, Anol; Sanford, Clive Carlton

    2006-01-01

    This study introduces the concept of "attitude strength" to explain why some IT users' attitudes are not strongly related to their usage behaviors. We review the attitude strength literature, employ the elaboration likelihood model to theorize personal relevance and related expertise as two salient...... dimensions of attitude strength in the IT usage context, and postulate a research model to capture the moderating effects of these constructs on the attitude-behavior relationship. The hypothesized effects are empirically tested using a longitudinal survey of document management system usage among staff...

  3. Disaster Preparedness among Health Professionals and Support Staff: What is Effective? An Integrative Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowing, Jeremy R; Walker, Kim N; Elmer, Shandell L; Cummings, Elizabeth A

    2017-06-01

    Introduction It is important that health professionals and support staff are prepared for disasters to safeguard themselves and the community during disasters. There has been a significantly heightened focus on disasters since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 in New York (USA); however, despite this, it is evident that health professionals and support staff may not be adequately prepared for disasters. Report An integrative literature review was performed based on a keyword search of the major health databases for primary research evaluating preparedness of health professionals and support staff. The literature was quality appraised using a mixed-methods appraisal tool (MMAT), and a thematic analysis was completed to identify current knowledge and gaps. Discussion The main themes identified were: health professionals and support staff may not be fully prepared for disasters; the most effective content and methods for disaster preparedness is unknown; and the willingness of health professionals and support staff to attend work and perform during disasters needs further evaluation. Gaps were identified to guide further research and the creation of new knowledge to best prepare for disasters. These included the need for: high-quality research to evaluate the best content and methods of disaster preparedness; inclusion of the multi-disciplinary health care team as participants; preparation for internal disasters; the development of validated competencies for preparedness; validated tools for measurement; and the importance of performance in actual disasters to evaluate preparation. The literature identified that all types of disaster preparedness activities lead to improvements in knowledge, skills, or attitude preparedness for disasters. Most studies focused on external disasters and the preparedness of medical, nursing, public health, or paramedic professionals. There needs to be a greater focus on the whole health care team, including allied health

  4. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the ...

  5. Staff Association Cocktail

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    The Staff Association has been organising for many years a cocktail with delegates of the Member States participating in Finance Committees of March and September. This cocktail is held at the end of the day, after the Finance Committee meeting. This direct and regular communication helps establish an ongoing contact between the Staff Association and CERN Member States and, more recently, the Associate Member States. Ambassadors of the CERN Staff Association, who are Members of the Personnel, have the opportunity to meet their national delegation in an informal and friendly atmosphere. These exchanges, facilitated by the use of the national language, allow the personnel via the Staff Association to express its ideas and positions on current affairs and fundamental issues, and also to hear about those of the delegations in return.

  6. Staff Performance Analysis: A Method for Identifying Brigade Staff Tasks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ford, Laura

    1997-01-01

    ... members of conventional mounted brigade staff. Initial analysis of performance requirements in existing documentation revealed that the performance specifications were not sufficiently detailed for brigade battle staffs...

  7. Attitudes toward expanding nurses' authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzman, Hana; Van Dijk, Dina; Eizenberg, Limor; Khaikin, Rut; Phridman, Shoshi; Siman-Tov, Maya; Goldberg, Shoshi

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of care procedures previously under the physician's authority have been placed in the hands of registered nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of nurses towards expanding nurses' authority and the relationships between these attitudes and job satisfaction facets, professional characteristics, and demographics. A cross-sectional study was conducted between 2010 and 2011 in three major medical centers in Israel. Participants included 833 nurses working in 89 departments. Attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority were assessed by self-report questionnaire, as well as job satisfaction facets including perception of professional autonomy, nurse-physician working relations, workload and burnout, perceptions of quality of care, and nursing staff satisfaction at work. Nurses reported positive attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority and moderate attitudes for interpretation of diagnostic tests in selected situations. The results of multivariate regression analyses demonstrate that the nurses' satisfaction from professional autonomy and work relations were the most influential factors in explaining their attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority. In addition, professionally young nurses tend to be more positive regarding changes in nurses' authority. In the Israeli reality of a nurse's shortage, we are witnessing professional transitions toward expansion of the scope of nurses' accountability and decision-making authority. The current research contributes to our understanding of attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority among the nursing staffs. The findings indicate the necessity of redefining the scope of nursing practice within the current professional context.

  8. Social imaginaries and inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Janne Hedegaard

    2016-01-01

    that inclusion on the one hand may be seen to be about human rights, solidarity, and democracy, and on the other hand, it is about ensuring the cohesion of neoliberal society by means of every person’s obligation to realize one’s potential through learning, development, and education regardless of one’s needs......, the development of inclusive schools and inclusive learning environments will involve both inclusion and exclusion processes. With this starting point, international educational research knowledge about inclusive schools and inclusive learning environments in general will be related to the fundamental dilemma...

  9. Nurses' attitudes to the use of seclusion: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Harrow, Alison

    2010-06-01

    Seclusion is now widely recognized as a coercive strategy with negative consequences for the consumers and staff involved. Nevertheless, this intervention continues to be used frequently in mental health services internationally. Due to their direct care role, nurses are commonly involved in the initiation or management of seclusion. Understanding nurses' attitudes to seclusion is therefore essential for the success of any attempts to reduce its use. A review of the literature was conducted using the search terms 'patient', 'seclusion', 'attitudes', 'nurses' and 'containment'. Twenty-eight articles which met the inclusion criteria were identified. Analysis of these articles identified six main themes: a necessary intervention; workplace culture; staff composition and experience; conflict; ethical considerations; and consumer characteristics. An overview of the literature is presented according to these main themes. The research suggests that most nurses support the continued use of seclusion as a strategy for the management of violence and aggression. A deeper understanding of the factors that influence attitudes is necessary if seclusion rates are to be effectively reduced.

  10. Roadmap for Inclusive Innovation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Roadmap for Inclusive Innovation data set shares the status of action items under the Roadmap for Inclusive Innovation. Each action or project has been assigned...

  11. Teachers becoming inclusive practitioners

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , construct their identities in the light of inclusive education, and how they negotiate the tensions and contradictions emerging from the processof becoming inclusive practitioners. Central to this discussion is the understanding that teachers' ...

  12. Role Perceptions of School Administration Team Members Concerning Inclusion of Children with Disabilities in Elementary General Schools in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shani, Michal; Koss, Cathie

    2015-01-01

    In an ideal school, where inclusion is implemented successfully, staff members collaborate and create an inclusive environment in their schools. In order to achieve such a sustainable environment of inclusion, pedagogical, organisational and psychological restructuring should occur, and a strong inclusion-oriented leadership has to be activated.…

  13. Attitudes of the Macedonian Preschool Teachers toward Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova-Radojichikj, Daniela Blagoj; Chichevska-Jovanova, Natasha; Rashikj-Canevska, Olivera

    2016-01-01

    Preschool teachers are seen as key persons to implement inclusive education. Positive attitudes are therefore argued as playing a considerable role in implementing this educational change successfully. The aim of this study was to examine what attitudes Macedonian preschool teachers hold towards early inclusive education; which variables are…

  14. Delimiting Inclusive Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herriott, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This paper was written as an answer to the question raised by my PhD dissertation on accessibility through user-centred and Inclusive Design (ID) methods: can Inclusive Design be delimited? The literature on Inclusive Design deals almost entrirely with consumer product design and assistive...

  15. Footstep towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Faiza; Zafar, Aneeka; Naz, Tayyaba

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive education is a rising trend in the world. The first step towards inclusive education is providing the awareness to the general education teachers. This study focused to investigate the general education teachers of primary and secondary level awareness about the special education and inclusive education. This study is descriptive method…

  16. Inclusion: Conceptualization and measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, W.S.; Otten, S.; Van der Zee, K.I.; Jans, L.

    2014-01-01

    n the present research, we introduced a conceptual framework of inclusion and subsequently used this as a starting point to develop and validate a scale to measure perceptions of inclusion. Departing from existing work on inclusion and complementing this with theoretical insights from optimal

  17. Inclusion : Conceptualization and measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Wiebren S.; Otten, Sabine; van der Zee, Karen I.; Jans, Lise

    In the present research, we introduced a conceptual framework of inclusion and subsequently used this as a starting point to develop and validate a scale to measure perceptions of inclusion. Departing from existing work on inclusion and complementing this with theoretical insights from optimal

  18. Inclusion: Conceptualization and measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansens, Wiebren S.; Otten, Sabine; van der Zee, Karen; Jans, Lise

    2014-01-01

    In the present research, we introduced a conceptual framework of inclusion and subsequently used this as a starting point to develop and validate a scale to measure perceptions of inclusion. Departing from existing work on inclusion and complementing this with theoretical insights from optimal

  19. Shifting the Blame in Higher Education--Social Inclusion and Deficit Discourses

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Sarah; Lysaght, Pauline; Roberts, Jen; Harwood, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    The principles of social inclusion have been embraced by institutions across the higher education sector but their translation into practice through pedagogy is not readily apparent. This paper examines perceptions of social inclusion and inclusive pedagogies held by academic staff at an Australian university. Of specific interest were the…

  20. Attitude Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Lauren C; Krosnick, Jon A

    2017-01-03

    Attitude strength has been the focus of a huge volume of research in psychology and related sciences for decades. The insights offered by this literature have tremendous value for understanding attitude functioning and structure and for the effective application of the attitude concept in applied settings. This is the first Annual Review of Psychology article on the topic, and it offers a review of theory and evidence regarding one of the most researched strength-related attitude features: attitude importance. Personal importance is attached to an attitude when the attitude is perceived to be relevant to self-interest, social identification with reference groups or reference individuals, and values. Attaching personal importance to an attitude causes crystallizing of attitudes (via enhanced resistance to change), effortful gathering and processing of relevant information, accumulation of a large store of well-organized relevant information in long-term memory, enhanced attitude extremity and accessibility, enhanced attitude impact on the regulation of interpersonal attraction, energizing of emotional reactions, and enhanced impact of attitudes on behavioral intentions and action. Thus, important attitudes are real and consequential psychological forces, and their study offers opportunities for addressing behavioral change.

  1. Research Staff | Photovoltaic Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff desc Greg Wilson Center Director Dr. Greg Wilson is the Director of @nrel.gov 303-384-6649 Bosco, Nicholas Staff Scientist Nick.Bosco@nrel.gov 303-384-6337 Braunecker, Wade IV-Physics Michael.Deceglie@nrel.gov 303-384-6104 Deline, Chris Staff Engineer Chris.Deline@nrel.gov

  2. Inclusive Instruction: Perceptions of Community College Faculty and Students Pertaining to Universal Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawronski, Michael; Kuk, Linda; Lombardi, Allison R.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined community college faculty (n = 179) and student (n = 449) attitudes and actions toward inclusive teaching practices based on tenets of Universal Design. Two online surveys, the Inclusive Teaching Strategies Inventory (ITSI) and the Inclusive Teaching Strategies Inventory-Student (ITSI-S), were administered at a medium-sized…

  3. Social inclusion affects elderly suicide mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yur'yev, Andriy; Leppik, Lauri; Tooding, Liina-Mai; Sisask, Merike; Värnik, Peeter; Wu, Jing; Värnik, Airi

    2010-12-01

    National attitudes towards the elderly and their association with elderly suicide mortality in 26 European countries were assessed, and Eastern and Western European countries compared. For each country, mean age-adjusted, gender-specific elderly suicide rates in the last five years for which data had been available were obtained from the WHO European Mortality Database. Questions about citizens' attitudes towards the elderly were taken from the European Social Survey. Correlations between attitudes and suicide rates were analyzed using Pearson's test. Differences between mean scores for Western and Eastern European attitudes were calculated, and data on labor-market exit ages were obtained from the EUROSTAT database. Perception of the elderly as having higher status, recognition of their economic contribution and higher moral standards, and friendly feelings towards and admiration of them are inversely correlated with suicide mortality. Suicide rates are lower in countries where the elderly live with their families more often. Elderly suicide mortality and labor-market exit age are inversely correlated. In Eastern European countries, elderly people's status and economic contribution are seen as less important. Western Europeans regard the elderly with more admiration, consider them more friendly and more often have elderly relatives in the family. The data also show gender differences. Society's attitudes influence elderly suicide mortality; attitudes towards the elderly are more favorable among Western European citizens; and extended labor-market inclusion of the elderly is a suicide-protective factor.

  4. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the m...

  5. CHIEF OF STAFF FINANCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fifth Chief of Staff Division, namely Finance, is the end result of ... 1946 was able to report in 1948 that there had ... the same time however, the Secretary referred ... mended that because 'the existing dual arrange- ... tigate the division of functions in the Department. ... randum discussing the different arguments sur-.

  6. Staff Development Redesigned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Linda

    1988-01-01

    Contends that staff development, supposedly designed to assist teachers, has instead colluded with forces to continue their colonization. Since teachers are not taking charge of their profession and participating actively in educational change, certain actions must be taken to lighten their nonprofessional workload and to build a professional…

  7. Integration of CERN staff

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    An example of the integration of CERN staff in the neighbouring communes is provided by the hamlet of Bugnon at St-Genis-Pouilly (Ain), France. The CERN installation on the Swiss site are visible on the left in the background. Behind them the Saleve mountain in Haute-Savoie.

  8. Institutionalizing Staff Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawl, William F.

    Three years ago, Golden West College (GWC) decided to make a major commitment to staff development as a means of revitalizing the college. This commitment was evidenced through the creation of the position of Dean of Educational Development, who is responsible solely for serving faculty needs; the Educational Development Center, which houses the…

  9. The Staff of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rebecca

    1994-01-01

    Some children have chronic illnesses that require diet modifications as part of their medical treatment. Advises school districts to hire a registered dietitian or look for resources at a local hospital or public health office. In addition, schools should work with parents, improve staff training, and conduct spot checks of school cafeterias. (MLF)

  10. Readiness of educational activity subjects for results-oriented cooperation in the inclusive educational practice of higher school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Ts. Tsyrenov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the research is due to the necessity of integration of persons with health limitations and disabilities into the educational space of higher education institutions. With regard to this, the paper is aimed at finding out the extent of readiness of the educational activity subjects for results-oriented cooperation in inclusive educational practice of the higher school. The leading approach to studying this problem is the retrospective interdisciplinary analysis that allows an integrated consideration of the universities' readiness for full-fledged integration of people with health limitations and disabilities into the educational process. In the paper, the results of research into students' attitude toward the disabled and HL people and their readiness for results-oriented cooperation are presented, and the specific problems of psychological and social support rendering are described. The value references system of students with health limitations and disabilities has been found out, and grounds have been provided for having to include the subjects that form a tolerant attitude to special needs people into the student-training content. It has also been proven that qualified professional training has to be ensured for the academic teaching staff, infrastructure has to be provided, and an integrated program has to be developed that would allow personifying the academic process adjusted for the development particularities of students with health limitations. The materials of the paper are of practical importance for educational activity subjects involved into the higher-school inclusive educational practice.

  11. Ameliorating Patient Stigma Amongst Staff Working With Personality Disorder: Randomized Controlled Trial of Self-Management Versus Skills Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Sue; Taylor, Georgina; Bolderston, Helen; Lancaster, Joanna; Remington, Bob

    2015-11-01

    Patients diagnosed with a personality disorder (PD) are often stigmatized by the healthcare staff who treat them. This study aimed to compare the impact on front-line staff of a self-management Acceptance and Commitment Therapy-based training intervention (ACTr) with a knowledge- and skills-based Dialectical Behaviour Training intervention (DBTr). A service-based randomized controlled trial was conducted comparing the effects of 2-day ACTr (N = 53) and DBTr (N = 47) staff workshops over 6 months. Primary outcome measures were staff attitudes towards patients and staff-patient relationships. For both interventions, staff attitudes, therapeutic relationship, and social distancing all improved pre- to postintervention, and these changes were maintained at 6-month follow-up. Although offering different resources to staff, both ACTr and DBTr were associated with an improved disposition towards PD patients. Future research could evaluate a combined approach, both for staff working with PD patients and those working with other stigmatized groups.

  12. Training the Staff of a Drug Addiction Treatment Facility: A Case Study of Hogar De Encuentro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Andrew A.; Leske, M. Cristina

    1977-01-01

    This paper, presented at the American Public Health Association meeting; Chicago, November 1975, discusses a staff training program at a drug addiction treatment facility established for Spanish-speaking (and other) drug addicts. Staff improved counseling skills and knowledge of drug addiction, but changed little in attitudes toward drug use and…

  13. Testing a Mediational Model of Communication Among Medical Staff and Families of Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gionta, Dana A.; Harlow, Lisa L.; Loitman, Jane E.; Leeman, Joanne M.

    2005-01-01

    Three structural equation models of communication between family members and medical staff were examined to understand relations among staff accessibility, inhibitory family attitudes, getting communication needs met, perceived stress, and satisfaction with communication. Compared to full and direct models, a mediational model fit best in which…

  14. Foresighting for Inclusive Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Allan Dahl; Andersen, Per Dannemand

    2017-01-01

    of policymaking processes affects the actual process with a focus on inclusion, and we discuss how it affects policy effectiveness and innovation system transformation. Our argument is that processes of policymaking must be inclusive to affect and transform innovation systems because a set of distributed actors...... in foresight cases in two emerging economies: Brazil and South Korea. We conclude that better systemic and innovation oriented foresight is needed to enhance inclusive development....

  15. INCLUSIVE EDUCATION IN ITALY

    OpenAIRE

    Voitkāne, Vita

    2017-01-01

    European member States implement Inclusive Education policies thus contributing to a sustainable, inclusive society, although each country is at a different stage in this process. Italy, one of the first countries to launch integrative learning, has set an example since the 1970s, although the quality of inclusive education is unpredictable due to many issues. Authors Cantoni and Panetta (2006) emphasize that, although the culture of integration in Italy exists, much needs to be done to impro...

  16. SUPPORT IN INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Belma Čičkušić; Ševala Tulumović; Selma Bakić; Salem Bakić

    2016-01-01

    In order for inclusive class to be successful, associates are of great help to teachers. Besides associates, teachers' specialization can be accomplished through educational seminars on the inclusion topic. However, information about inclusion, working with children with special needs, can also be found in scientific journals that offer more information on methods of working with children with special needs, didactic materials customized according to abilities of children. Aim of ...

  17. A "Coach Approach" to Staff Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Macmillan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The speed of change is challenging libraries to redevelop themselves in ways we have never seen before. Rising costs and changing customer expectations are forcing staff to continuously learn new skills, adapt to new technologies and work more closely in collaboration with others in response to this unpredictable environment. At the same time library leaders need to communicate regularly with staff and to motivate them to dialogue with each other about the value of the library service that they provide to the community. A creative approach to building flexibility, resilience and staff engagement has become essential for survival. Coaching is a creative, innovative and effective communications tool that is now considered to be one of the most important ways to encourage employees to continue to learn and develop. Its greatest impact is in building leadership and staff engagement. Communicating with “a coach approach” or coaching mindset is a powerful way for library leaders to connect with others where the flow and exchange is positive and there is a mutual benefit of contribution and collaboration, expanded knowledge and innovation. The basics of fostering “a coach approach” with library staff requires an understanding of the importance of “reframing” one’s personal attitudes and perspectives, appreciating the art of focused listening and the impact of positive acknowledgement, learning to ask the right questions and formulating action plans for continued success. It is a learned skill that requires a commitment to practice but is one that will ultimately demonstrate positive results.

  18. Aquatic Instructors' Beliefs Toward Inclusion: The Theory of Planned Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conatser, Phillip; Block, Martin; Gansneder, Bruce

    2002-04-01

    The purpose was to (a) examine aquatic instructors' beliefs (female, n = 82; male, n = 29) about teaching swimming to individuals with disabilities in inclusive settings and (b) test the theory of planned behavior model (Ajzen, 1985, 1988, 2001). Aquatic instructors from 25 states representing 122 cities across the U.S. participated in this study. The instrument, named Aquatic Instructors' Beliefs Toward Inclusion (AIBTI), was an extended version of the Physical Educators' Attitudes Toward Teaching Individuals with Disabilities- Swim (Conatser, Block, & Lepore, 2000). A correlated t test showed aquatic instructors' beliefs (attitudes toward the behavior, normative beliefs, perceived behavioral control, intention, behavior) were significantly more favorable toward teaching aquatics to individuals with mild disabilities than individuals with severe disabilities. Stepwise multiple regression showed perceived behavioral control and attitude significantly predicted intention, and intention predicted instructors' inclusive behavior for both disability groups. Further, results indicated the theory of planned behavior predicts aquatic instructors' behavior better than the theory of reasoned action.

  19. Perinatal staff perceptions of safety and quality in their service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinni, Suzanne V; Wallace, Euan M; Cross, Wendy M

    2014-11-28

    Ensuring safe and appropriate service delivery is central to a high quality maternity service. With this in mind, over recent years much attention has been given to the development of evidence-based clinical guidelines, staff education and risk reporting systems. Less attention has been given to assessing staff perceptions of a service's safety and quality and what factors may influence that. In this study we set out to assess staff perceptions of safety and quality of a maternity service and to explore potential influences on service safety. The study was undertaken within a new low risk metropolitan maternity service in Victoria, Australia with a staffing profile comprising midwives (including students), neonatal nurses, specialist obstetricians, junior medical staff and clerical staff. In depth open-ended interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire were conducted with 23 staff involved in the delivery of perinatal care, including doctors, midwives, nurses, nursing and midwifery students, and clerical staff. Data were analyzed using naturalistic interpretive inquiry to identify emergent themes. Staff unanimously reported that there were robust systems and processes in place to maintain safety and quality. Three major themes were apparent: (1) clinical governance, (2) dominance of midwives, (3) inter-professional relationships. Overall, there was a strong sense that, at least in this midwifery-led service, midwives had the greatest opportunity to be an influence, both positively and negatively, on the safe delivery of perinatal care. The importance of understanding team dynamics, particularly mutual respect, trust and staff cohesion, were identified as key issues for potential future service improvement. Senior staff, particularly midwives and neonatal nurses, play central roles in shaping team behaviors and attitudes that may affect the safety and quality of service delivery. We suggest that strategies targeting senior staff to enhance their performance in

  20. If Science Teachers Are Positively Inclined Toward Inclusive Education, Why Is It So Difficult?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spektor-Levy, Ornit; Yifrach, Merav

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes the unique challenges that students with learning disabilities (LD) experience in science studies and addresses the question of the extent to which science teachers are willing and prepared to teach in inclusive classrooms. We employed the theory of planned behavior (TPB), according to which behavioral intentions are a function of individuals' attitudes toward the behavior, their subjective norms, and their perceived control—i.e., their perception of the simplicity and benefits of performing the behavior. The study comprised 215 junior high school science teachers, who answered a TPB-based quantitative questionnaire. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to support and enrich the findings and conclusions. We found that teachers held positive attitudes and were willing to adapt their teaching methods (perceived control), which correlated and contributed to their behavioral intention. In terms of subjective norms, however, they felt a lack of support and ongoing guidance in providing the appropriate pedagogy to meet the needs of students with LD. We therefore recommend that educational policy makers and school management devote attention and resources to providing professional training and appropriate instructional materials and to establishing frameworks for meaningful cooperation between the science teachers and special education staff. This could ensure the efficient cooperation and coordination of all the involved parties and send a positive message of support to the science teachers who are the actual implementers of change.

  1. Directorate of Management - Special Staff - Joint Staff - Leadership - The

    Science.gov (United States)

    NGB Official March Today in Guard History Leadership CNGB VCNGB SEA DANG DARNG Joint Staff J-1 J-2 J-3 J-4 J-5 J-6 J-7 J-8 Personal Staff Inspector General Judge Advocate General Officer Management Public Affairs Executive Support Services Legislative Liaison Special Staff Directorate of Management

  2. Special Staff - Joint Staff - Leadership - The National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    the ARNG Deputy Director of the ARNG Chief of Staff of the ARNG Command Chief Warrant Officer of the Site Maintenance Battle Focused Training Strategy Battle Staff Training Resources News Publications March Today in Guard History Leadership CNGB VCNGB SEA DANG DARNG Joint Staff J-1 J-2 J-3 J-4 J-5 J-6 J

  3. Mapping Staff Competencies for Information Literacy Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Corrall

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Information literacy (IL is a key strategic objective for academic libraries. Many academic librarians are involved in designing, developing and delivering IL programmes, using both classroom teaching and e-learning methods. IL has also become a priority at institutional level and some universities and colleges have formal policies and strategies to integrate and embed IL in the curriculum. IL interventions also happen informally at enquiry points and reference desks, when queries offer ‘teachable moments’ for library staff to help students develop information skills and understanding while solving their information problems. Research shows that such instruction features strongly in both face-to-face and virtual reference transactions, but few IL policies and strategies cover this frontline personalised IL support. Similarly, most discussion of staff training and development for IL education has centred on the teaching roles and pedagogical knowledge of professional librarians, with limited discussion of the competencies needed for frontline interventions by paraprofessionals or assistants. This workshop promotes an inclusive holistic model of IL education and library workforce development. It will investigate the skills and knowledge needed by frontline staff to contribute effectively to the IL mission of academic libraries. It will focus on the learning support needed by students from different educational, social, ethnic and cultural backgrounds, with particular reference to postgraduate students, as a group typifying this diversity. The facilitator will review IL interventions and library staff competencies discussed in the literature. Participants will discuss typical queries or problems presented by different categories of postgraduate students and then identify the skills, knowledge and understanding required by frontline staff to provide an appropriate service response. The skillsets identified will be compared with those of teaching

  4. Inclusive Services Innovation Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdheide, Lynn R.; Reschly, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Teacher preparation to deliver inclusive services to students with disabilities is increasingly important because of changes in law and policy emphasizing student access to, and achievement in, the general education curriculum. This innovation configuration identifies the components of inclusive services that should be incorporated in teacher…

  5. Testing and Inclusive Schooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morin, Anne; Hamre, Bjørn; Ydesen, Christian

    Testing and Inclusive Schooling provides a comparative on seemingly incompatible global agendas and efforts to include all children in the general school system, Thus reducing exclusion. With an examination of the international testing culture and the politics of inclusion currently permeating...

  6. Understanding Inclusion in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamas, Christoforos

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a framework for understanding inclusion in Cyprus. The evidence base is the result of a six-month qualitative research study in five Cypriot mainstream primary schools. Despite the rhetoric in favour of inclusion, it seems that the Cypriot educational system is still highly segregating in its philosophy and does not fully…

  7. Jet inclusive cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.

    1992-11-01

    Minijet production in jet inclusive cross sections at hadron colliders, with large rapidity intervals between the tagged jets, is evaluated by using the BFKL pomeron. We describe the jet inclusive cross section for an arbitrary number of tagged jets, and show that it behaves like a system of coupled pomerons

  8. Inclusive outreach practices in Palaeontology: Inclusive-Coworking

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Frank, Alejandra; Gomez-Heras, Miguel; Fesharaki, Omid

    2017-04-01

    Previous experiences with people with both physical and intellectual functional diversity around palaeontological issues have demonstrated the important value of science outreach directed to people with disabilities. The aforementioned practices act twofold: as a learning tool and also improving the quality of life of the participants and thus, their self-image. All these pioneer experiences were the first step in a process of developing new attitudes contributing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development of United Nations, where among the 17 goals proposed an effective social inclusion of people with disabilities is required. For this, real inclusive practices in geological outreach are imperious. A close cooperation with all the parts (researchers and participants), in a kind of coworking attitude is needed. This Inclusive-Coworking is considered in the sense of social gathering in order to share equal values and look for the synergy that this different outlook implies. And what is more important: the change of role of the previously learners into an active part of the scientific outreach, providing the adequate methodology for that. The offer of non-formal learning activities normally includes the participation of university professors and researchers in Science Week editions. During the 2016 session in Madrid, four adults with intellectual disability who were participants in the previous edition, contributed in the palaeontological workshop. They were in charge of four of the eight modules explaining the origin of fossils and how to collect them, the evolution of equids' limbs, and the main dentition types in vertebrates to the twenty 16 year old secondary students who attended the workshop. During the development of the experience all the students were pleased with the inclusive approach, and the interaction of all participants was fruitful. Although the explanations took a bit more time when made by our functional diverse fellows, all the abstracts concepts

  9. Students' Attitudes towards Peers with Disabilities : A review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Anke; Pijl, Sip Jan; Minnaert, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The trend towards inclusive education has led to an increase of studies focusing on peer attitudes. This review study presents an overview of studies describing attitudes of students, variables relating to students' attitudes, and the relationship between students' attitudes and the social

  10. Job satisfaction survey among health centers staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnazi, Hossein; Daniali, Seyede Shahrbanoo; Sharifirad, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Due to the importance of health care organizations with significant responsibility for prevention and care, assessment of job satisfaction among health care staff is essential. Quality of health services will be decreased provided they are not satisfied. This study was a cross-sectional analysis of health care staff in Khomeinishahr (centers, buildings, and networks) If they had at least 6 months work experience, they could enter the study. Data included a two-part questionnaire with a standardized questionnaire, demographic variables, and Smith job descriptive index, which is a questionnaire with six domains. Reliability was obtained for each domain and its validity was reported 0.93. The results showed an overall satisfaction score averages 43.55 ± 12.8 (from 100). Job satisfaction score was not significantly different between the sexes. However, within the current attitude toward job satisfaction, men scores was better than women (P = 0.001). Highest score in job satisfaction was related to relationships with colleagues and lowest score was related to the income, benefits, and job promotion. The more the years of work, the less the job satisfaction was. The attitude toward the current job had a direct relationship with income (P = 0.01). There was a significant inverse relationship between educational level and job satisfaction in domains promotion, income, and benefits (P = 0.01). The staff with higher education levels was less satisfied with income and job promotion qualification. Managers should focus on job qualification to increase job satisfaction and improve the quality of work.

  11. Research Staff | Water Power | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Learn more about the expertise and technical skills of the water power research team and staff at NREL. Name Position Email Phone Anstedt, Sheri Professional III-Writer /Editor/Web Content Sheri.Anstedt@nrel.gov 303-275-3255 Baker, Donald Research Technician V-Electrical

  12. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice in First Aid Management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge, Attitude and Practice in First Aid Management of Epistaxis by ... A vast majority of these patients settle with simple standard first aid measures. ... The principal researcher administered a questionnaire to the clinical staffs who were ...

  13. From the Pure “We-Relationship” in Schütz to “What Happens Between Us” in Waldenfels: Open Possibilities for an Inclusive Attitude in Relation to the Other

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Junglos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to compare the pure We-relationship in Schütz to what happens between us in Waldenfels. Schütz criticizes Weber’s basic methodological concepts: behavior and rationalism. For Schütz it is impossible through rational observance on relational behavior to guarantee the objectivism of sociology as a science. Schütz tries to prove that only a sociological theory that shows the different realms/worlds from which the interpretation of a product is built, with its obvious limitation of grasping the real meaning, while also clarifying the deep relationship with others, can in fact illustrate its relative anonymity or concreteness. This task involves a sense of searching for concreteness instead of taking for granted its objectiveness. For Waldenfels, the pure We-relationship is too fixed in the subjectivity that is based on one-sided understanding, and decreases possibilities of the event occurring between us. For Schütz, one deals with an eternal paradox of interpretation that will not make us acquainted completely with the other’s mind. The lack of fissure in the We-relationship does not leave space for the possibilities of what happens between us, in other words, the meaning is arrested in subjectivity in an attempt to make meaning as concrete as possible. Waldenfels will not say that the meaning in its integrality can be found, but he will open ways, which lead to a threshold where/elsewhere one will find fissures, new possibilities that first penetrate the body and after can take place in attitudes towards the other.

  14. Nursing staff-led behavioural group intervention in psychiatric in-patient care: Patient and staff experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salberg, Johanna; Folke, Fredrik; Ekselius, Lisa; Öster, Caisa

    2018-02-15

    A promising intervention in mental health in-patient care is behavioural activation (BA). Interventions based on BA can be used by mental health nurses and other staff members. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients' and staff members' experiences of a nursing staff-led behavioural group intervention in mental health in-patient care. The intervention was implemented at three adult acute general mental health in-patient wards in a public hospital setting in Sweden. A self-administrated questionnaire, completed by 84 patients and 34 nurses and nurse assistants, was administered, and nonparametric data analysed using descriptive statistics. Our findings revealed that both patients and nursing staff ranked nursing care and care environment as important aspects in the recovery process. Patients and staff members reported overall positive experiences of the group sessions. Patients with higher frequencies of attendance and patients satisfied with overall care had a more positive attitude towards the intervention. A more positive experience of being a group leader was reported by staff members who had been leading groups more than ten times. The most common impeding factor during implementation, reported by staff members, was a negative attitude to change. Conducive factors were having support from a psychologist and the perception that patients were showing interest. These positive experiences reported by patients and nursing staff, combined with previous research in this field, are taking us one step further in evaluating group sessions based on BA as a meaningful nursing intervention in mental health in-patient care. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  15. The effect of aggression management training programmes for nursing staff and students working in an acute hospital setting. A narrative review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckemann, B; Zeller, A; Hahn, S; Dassen, T; Schols, J M G A; Halfens, R J G

    2015-01-01

    Patient aggression is a longstanding problem in general hospital nursing. Staff training is recommended to tackle workplace aggression originating from patients or visitors, yet evidence on training effects is scarce. To review and collate current research evidence on the effect of aggression management training for nurses and nursing students working in general hospitals, and to derive recommendations for further research. Systematic, narrative review. Embase, MEDLINE, the Cochrane library, CINAHL, PsycINFO, pubmed, psycArticles, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection were searched for articles evaluating training programs for staff and students in acute hospital adult nursing in a 'before/after' design. Studies published between January 2000 and September 2011 in English, French or German were eligible of inclusion. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed with the 'Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies'. Main outcomes i.e. attitudes, confidence, skills and knowledge were collated. Nine studies were included. Two had a weak, six a moderate, and one a strong study design. All studies reported increased confidence, improved attitude, skills, and knowledge about risk factors post training. There was no significant change in incidence of patient aggression. Our findings corroborate findings of reviews on training in mental health care, which point to a lack of high quality research. Training does not reduce the incidence of aggressive acts. Aggression needs to be tackled at an organizational level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Information for contractors' staff

    CERN Multimedia

    The Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    We have observed a significant decrease in the number of completed Certificates for Work in Controlled Radiation Areas being submitted with applications for dosimeters for your staff. Henceforth, we shall no longer be able to issue dosimeters without a certificate, which must be signed by the employee and the contractor's radiation-protection expert. You can obtain the certificate form from the Dosimetry Service at Building 24/E-011 or from our Website: http://service-rp-dosimetry.web.cern.ch/service-rp-dosimetry/. Thank you for your understanding. The Dosimetry Service

  17. STAFF VACANCY LIST

    CERN Document Server

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    For economy reasons, it has been decided to stop printing and distributing this list to Staff Members. It can be found on the Web (LIST). Divisional Administrative Officers will receive an updated printed copy on a monthly basis and are asked to display this in a public place in their division. Copies will also be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (No. 60) in the glass-fronted cabinet (close to the lifts) and also on the notice board close to the Post Office. A copy will also be given to the Reception (Building No. 33). Human Resources Division Tel. 74606

  18. The Specialized school in time of inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseli Albino dos Santos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study has the objective to investigate the meanings about school inclusion and disability, produced by a group of professionals engaged in a specialized school located in a city in the state of São Paulo. The metodology used was semi-structured and structured interviews with the director of the institution, two pedagogical coordinators and five teachers. Data were subjected to a descriptive-interpretative analysis. The results indicated that professionals attribute the responsibility for self development, only to students with intellectual disabilities . The emphasis of the speeches falls on the inability of the student and the immutability of disability. It is observed that the narratives do not reveal critical positioning of professional educational processes involving this population. The professionals who work in specialized institution still have a conception of disability based on the inability of the student and, despite defending the right of these students to school inclusion, these professionals still manifest fear of what they will find outside the walls of the institution, revealing attitudes and overprotection ignorance of the role of specialized institution in times of inclusion. We conclude that the conceptions about intellectual disability and inclusive education presented by professionals can contribute much more to the reiteration of school exclusion, historically focused on this population than for its actual inclusion in the school system of education.

  19. An Inclusive Secondary School in Bratislava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajdošová Eva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study presents a characterization of an inclusive secondary school in Bratislava and provides information about the forms and methods used in the work of the teachers, school psychologists, special teachers with regard to students with special needs (students with Attention and Hyperactivity Disorder, i.e. ADHD, with learning difficulties, with emotional and behaviour difficulties, etc., who are educated together with mainstream students. It also provides information on the first results of the measurements of the socio-emotional health of the students in the inclusive school, both as to its overall level (covitality index and as to the level of the four psychological dimensions of mental health. The pilot project of the inclusive school confirms that inclusive secondary schools and inclusive education operating within the intentions of positive psychology help the students to develop their cognitive and socio-emotional competences, to create favourable attitudes to diversity, to form the students’ scale of positive values and to encourage positive interpersonal relationships, social cohesion and social classroom climate.

  20. Job Satisfaction and Attitude to Work of Cross River State College of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the relationship between job satisfaction and attitude to work of staff in Cross River State College of Education, Akamkpa. The study went on to find out the relationship between job satisfaction and attitude to work due to gender of Cross River State College of Education staff. Two research questions ...

  1. Who's Challenging Who? Changing Attitudes towards Those Whose Behaviour Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, L. M.; Hastings, R. P.; Hunt, P. H.; Bowler, C. L.; Banks, M. E.; Totsika, V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although staff attitudes towards individuals with intellectual disability (ID) whose behaviour challenges may be an important part of a positive support culture, very little research has focused on the development of training specifically designed to change staff attitudes. Positive contact is hypothesised to be an effective way to…

  2. Inclusion in Elementary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Allan Galis

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available This study of reform policy focused on inclusive education in the 1990s in the state of Georgia, United States of America. Program modifications including, individualizing instructional methods, adapting the instructional environment, and lowering maximum class size emerged as significant issues. We found that policies related to these areas were compounded by the less experienced educators not readily accepting change strategies for serving students. Apparently younger educators are engrossed in surviving daily routine and have difficulty coping with the complex demands of change. Regular education teachers have difficulty with the idea of inclusion. Legal aspects dealing inclusion need clarification, especially for regular education teachers.

  3. Assessment of inclusive education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the way teachers, in teams can work with assessing the inclusive practice in their own classes. In 2012 a joint effort between CEPRA, teachers and school administrators from the municipality of Hjørring developed a dialog based model for continually assessing...... the quality of the learning environment in regard to inclusion – this model draws heavily on the logic and mindset of ECERS (Early child environment program). This article will relate the rationale of the assessment model called “Dialoger om Kvalitet” (dialogues on quality) to LSP’s definition of inclusion...

  4. Fluid inclusion geothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, C.G.

    1977-01-01

    Fluid inclusions trapped within crystals either during growth or at a later time provide many clues to the histories of rocks and ores. Estimates of fluid-inclusion homogenization temperature and density can be obtained using a petrographic microscope with thin sections, and they can be refined using heating and freezing stages. Fluid inclusion studies, used in conjunction with paragenetic studies, can provide direct data on the time and space variations of parameters such as temperature, pressure, density, and composition of fluids in geologic environments. Changes in these parameters directly affect the fugacity, composition, and pH of fluids, thus directly influencing localization of ore metals. ?? 1977 Ferdinand Enke Verlag Stuttgart.

  5. Preparing radiology staff to meet service goals: a training model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardone, E B; Stepanovich, P H; West, V T

    1994-01-01

    This article describes a model used to train radiology staff in customer service relations at a large southeastern medical center. Information about the needs of the radiology department and staff was acquired through quantitative and qualitative assessments. The primary goal of the training was twofold: 1) to develop employee awareness of customer expectations and 2) to develop problem-solving skills to respond to customer service related issues. Instructional methods compatible with adult learning were used and training results were assessed. Positive changes in employee attitudes and behaviors are described and recommendations for training development and implementation are discussed.

  6. The Staff Association and you

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2013-01-01

    The Staff Association, your representative with the Management and the Member States The article VII 1.01 of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SR&R) provides that “the relations between the Director-General and the personnel shall be established either on an individual basis or on a collective basis with the Staff Association as intermediary”. This essential role of the Staff representatives, of being the spokesperson of the entire staff of the Organization vis-à-vis the Director-General and the Members States, is achieved through regular participation in the various joint advisory committees defined in the SR&R. The most important are the Standing Concertation Committee and the TREF, tripartite forum where your representatives meet with the Member States delegates, in the presence of the Management, to explain the position of the staff on the various issues concerning employment conditions. The Finance Committee also gives the opportunity to the Staff Association to ...

  7. Supporting successful inclusive practices for learners with disabilities in high schools: a multisite, mixed method collective case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciver, Donald; Hunter, Cathleen; Adamson, Amanda; Grayson, Zoe; Forsyth, Kirsty; McLeod, Iona

    2018-07-01

    The increase in the number of individuals with disabilities in general education has led to an increased interest in how to best provide support. Despite an emphasis on inclusion and participation in policy and practice, defining and describing the support provided for these learners is still an important task. This multisite, mixed method collective case study reports on 125 education and other staff from seven schools who took part in interviews and focus groups to reflect on a range of topics related to learners with disabilities in high schools. We focused on what the participants did, what they considered to be successful and what their "best" practices were. Descriptions of practices were rich, nuanced and complex. The analysis identified over 200 "strategies" which were synthesized into two meta-themes and eight subthemes. We discuss the results in the context of an ecological perspective, and the importance of focusing on the full range of influences and outcomes for young people in designing supports. We have drawn on evidence from this study as a basis for professional development activities and identified that focusing on the environment and the role of practitioners has a potential to improve the inclusion outcomes for older learners with disabilities. Implications for Rehabilitation Inclusion is influenced by the physical environment, attitudes, expectations and opportunities, in addition to a learner's skills and abilities. Schools should focus on the environment and teachers' practices, rather than on what an individual learner can or cannot do. The practices discussed in this study reflect those that a range of educators and related services personnel agree are realistic, appropriate and effective. Change may be led by the school management team; however, there are many ways in which all staff can contribute; indeed, approaches will not work effectively unless they are understood and implemented by everyone.

  8. Association between addiction treatment staff professional and educational levels and perceptions of organizational climate and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Ivy; Lundgren, Lena; Beltrame, Clelia

    2014-01-01

    Research studies have identified addiction treatment staff who have higher levels of education as having more positive attitudes about evidence-based treatment practices, science-based training, and the usefulness of evidence-based practices. This study examined associations between addiction treatment staff level of education and their perceptions of 3 measures of organizational change: organizational stress, training resources and staffing resources in their treatment unit. The sample included 588 clinical staff from community-based substance abuse treatment organizations who received Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) funding (2003-2008) to implement evidence-based practices (EBPs). Bivariate analysis and regression modeling methods examined the relationship between staff education level (no high school education, high school education, some college, associate's degree, bachelor's degree, master's degree, doctoral degree, and other type of degree such as medical assistant, registered nurse [RN], or postdoctoral) and attitudes about organizational climate (stress), training resources, and staffing resources while controlling for staff and treatment unit characteristics. Multivariable models identified staff with lower levels of education as having significantly more positive attitudes about their unit's organizational capacity. These results contradict findings that addiction treatment staff with higher levels of education work in units with greater levels of organizational readiness for change. It cannot be inferred that higher levels of education among treatment staff is necessarily associated with high levels of organizational readiness for change.

  9. Leading-for-Inclusion: Transforming Action through Teacher Talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristol, Laurette

    2015-01-01

    In Australia, recent policies for educational development have emphasised the importance of stakeholder involvement and advocacy in the promotion of student outcomes. There is robust support for the promotion and development of inclusive educational communities able to respond to the various educational needs of students, communities and staff.…

  10. Can we build inclusion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Inge Mette; Grangaard, Sidse

    2016-01-01

    of some children with special needs. Hence the title – can we build inclusion? In the literature of Universal Design, accommodation and design features seldom reflect the less visible disabilities. The paper is based on a research project initiated to investigate how more or less space influences daily......Inclusion of children with special needs in kindergartens and preschools may be approached from different angles. This paper raises the question of whether the physical framework of kindergartens makes any difference for daily life at the kindergarten at all, and whether it can support inclusion...... on the answers in the interviews, we found support for answering the question in the title in the affirmative; we can build inclusion! This is because the teachers' experience indicated that, if there was sufficient space per child, there were fewer conflicts and the children managed to stay in the same activity...

  11. Evidence on Inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyssegaard, Camilla Brørup; Larsen, Michael Søgaard

    The purpose of this publication is to examine existing research on inclusion to identify strategies of inclusion that have generated positive effects. To do so it is necessary to understand the effect of the applied strategies. One approach, which is being discussed, is to use evidence to determine...... which methods have proven more effective than others. The desire to gain insight into research on inclusion forms the basis of the current systematic review. The task was to determine which strategies primary research has found to be most effective for inclusion purposes. We have solved this task...... by addressing the existing research with the following question: What is the effect of including children with special needs in mainstream teaching in basic school, and which of the applied educational methods have proved to have a positive effect?...

  12. Melt inclusions: Chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Melt inclusions are small droplets of silicate melt that are trapped in minerals during their growth in a magma. Once formed, they commonly retain much of their initial composition (with some exceptions) unless they are re-opened at some later stage. Melt inclusions thus offer several key advantages over whole rock samples: (i) they record pristine concentrations of volatiles and metals that are usually lost during magma solidification and degassing, (ii) they are snapshots in time whereas whole rocks are the time-integrated end products, thus allowing a more detailed, time-resolved view into magmatic processes (iii) they are largely unaffected by subsolidus alteration. Due to these characteristics, melt inclusions are an ideal tool to study the evolution of mineralized magma systems. This chapter first discusses general aspects of melt inclusions formation and methods for their investigation, before reviewing studies performed on mineralized magma systems.

  13. RISKS OF INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    M. R. Husnutdinova

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Inclusion is a new and unfamiliar phenomenon for most of the Russians which is treated as ensuring equal access to education for all students taking into account a variety of their special educational needs and individual capabilities. Inclusive educational model began to take root in Russia without a broad public debate and today’s parents and teachers were not ready to the cardinal changes caused by transition to the new model of education. In this regard, the studying of dire...

  14. Limitations of inclusive fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Benjamin; Nowak, Martin A; Wilson, Edward O

    2013-12-10

    Until recently, inclusive fitness has been widely accepted as a general method to explain the evolution of social behavior. Affirming and expanding earlier criticism, we demonstrate that inclusive fitness is instead a limited concept, which exists only for a small subset of evolutionary processes. Inclusive fitness assumes that personal fitness is the sum of additive components caused by individual actions. This assumption does not hold for the majority of evolutionary processes or scenarios. To sidestep this limitation, inclusive fitness theorists have proposed a method using linear regression. On the basis of this method, it is claimed that inclusive fitness theory (i) predicts the direction of allele frequency changes, (ii) reveals the reasons for these changes, (iii) is as general as natural selection, and (iv) provides a universal design principle for evolution. In this paper we evaluate these claims, and show that all of them are unfounded. If the objective is to analyze whether mutations that modify social behavior are favored or opposed by natural selection, then no aspect of inclusive fitness theory is needed.

  15. Staff knowledge, attitudes and practices in public sector primary care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    d S years, years ceptible). luation of frican tudy. The are higher f exposures .... PHCNs 40%, RNs 43 % and SNs 50%), 23% prevention of ..... Mea 1990. 7: 360 ... Improvong Health Care '''rough CI,mcal AUd,t CIT'Cl1ester- John W'ley ana Sons.

  16. Attitudes of Emergency Department Staff towards the Role of Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    participation of future Pharm-D graduates in direct patient care in the Saudi health care system. Keywords: Clinical ... errors [3]. According to the findings of the. U.S. Institute of Medicine, ED has the highest ..... human: Building a safer health system. Washington, DC: ... department: A systems approach to minimizing risk.

  17. Attitudes of mothers and staff towards treatment and possible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects. Mothers of very low-birth-weight (VLBW) babies and children with multiple disabilities; paediatricians (including registrars) and nurses working in these units. Outcome measures. The preferences for developmental outcomes were compared between four groups: nurses, paediatricians, mothers of VLBW infants, ...

  18. Knowledge and attitudes of nursing staff and mothers towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-03

    Feb 3, 2011 ... In other words, the mother acts as an incubator, and the .... almost always due to local cultural factors.19 ..... They did not think that KMC would increase their workload, .... Bigelow AE, Littlejohn M, Bergman N, McDonald C. The relation between early ... Global report on preterm birth and stillbirth (4 of 7):.

  19. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of nursing staff regarding the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-08-05

    Aug 5, 2010 ... and this has prompted the need for research to be able to address barriers and .... could correctly define exclusive breastfeeding, demand feeding and ... agreed that the benefits of breastfeeding outweighed any difficulties.

  20. RISKS OF INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Husnutdinova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Inclusion is a new and unfamiliar phenomenon for most of the Russians which is treated as ensuring equal access to education for all students taking into account a variety of their special educational needs and individual capabilities. Inclusive educational model began to take root in Russia without a broad public debate and today’s parents and teachers were not ready to the cardinal changes caused by transition to the new model of education. In this regard, the studying of directly educational process by consequences of inclusive training and education is urgent now.The aims of the research are the following: to identify the major risks that characterize the current stage of the implementation process of inclusion in the Russian educational organizations; to consider the main causes that lead to their occurrence; to present a comparative analysis of the views of respondents in comprehensive, inclusive and correctional schools. Methodology and research methods. The Sector Monitoring Studies of Moscow State University of Psychology & Education in 2010 and 2014 implemented a sociological study on the process of introduction of inclusion in the Russian schools. 200 teachers and 244 parents were interviewed in 2010; in 2014, in addition, 178 teachers and 386 parents were interviewed; 47 senior students including those with disabilities were interviewed too.Results. According to the results, the main concerns of the parents of students of comprehensive, inclusive and correctional schools are reduced to a few basic risks: lack of individual approach while teaching children with different educational needs, increased emotional pressure on the child, and child’s perception of the complexity of disability as an equal. These risks arise primarily because of the acute shortage of especially prepared-governmental teachers and socio-cultural, psychological unpreparedness of most contemporary children with disabilities to the perception of

  1. Attitudes toward depression among Japanese non-psychiatric medical doctors: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohtsuki Tsuyuka

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Under-recognition of depression is common in many countries. Education of medical staff, focusing on their attitudes towards depression, may be necessary to change their behavior and enhance recognition of depression. Several studies have previously reported on attitudes toward depression among general physicians. However, little is known about attitudes of non-psychiatric doctors in Japan. In the present study, we surveyed non-psychiatric doctors’ attitude toward depression. Methods The inclusion criteria of participants in the present study were as follows: 1 Japanese non-psychiatric doctors and 2 attendees in educational opportunities regarding depression care. We conveniently approached two populations: 1 a workshop to depression care for non-psychiatric doctors and 2 a general physician-psychiatrist (G-P network group. We contacted 367 subjects. Attitudes toward depression were measured using the Depression Attitude Questionnaire (DAQ, a 20-item self-report questionnaire developed for general physicians. We report scores of each DAQ item and factors derived from exploratory factor analysis. Results We received responses from 230 subjects, and we used DAQ data from 187 non-psychiatric doctors who met the inclusion criteria. All non-psychiatric doctors (n = 187 disagreed with "I feel comfortable in dealing with depressed patients' needs," while 60 % (n = 112 agreed with "Working with depressed patients is heavy going." Factor analysis indicated these items comprised a factor termed "Depression should be treated by psychiatrists" - to which 54 % of doctors (n = 101 agreed. Meanwhile, 67 % of doctors (n = 126 thought that nurses could be useful in depressed patient support. The three factors derived from the Japanese DAQ differed from models previously derived from British GP samples. The attitude of Japanese non-psychiatric doctors concerning whether depression should be treated by psychiatrists was markedly

  2. Attitudes toward depression among Japanese non-psychiatric medical doctors: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Tsuyuka; Kodaka, Manami; Sakai, Rumi; Ishikura, Fuminobu; Watanabe, Yoichiro; Mann, Anthony; Haddad, Mark; Yamada, Mitsuhiko; Inagaki, Masatoshi

    2012-08-16

    Under-recognition of depression is common in many countries. Education of medical staff, focusing on their attitudes towards depression, may be necessary to change their behavior and enhance recognition of depression. Several studies have previously reported on attitudes toward depression among general physicians. However, little is known about attitudes of non-psychiatric doctors in Japan. In the present study, we surveyed non-psychiatric doctors' attitude toward depression. The inclusion criteria of participants in the present study were as follows: 1) Japanese non-psychiatric doctors and 2) attendees in educational opportunities regarding depression care. We conveniently approached two populations: 1) a workshop to depression care for non-psychiatric doctors and 2) a general physician-psychiatrist (G-P) network group. We contacted 367 subjects. Attitudes toward depression were measured using the Depression Attitude Questionnaire (DAQ), a 20-item self-report questionnaire developed for general physicians. We report scores of each DAQ item and factors derived from exploratory factor analysis. We received responses from 230 subjects, and we used DAQ data from 187 non-psychiatric doctors who met the inclusion criteria. All non-psychiatric doctors (n = 187) disagreed with "I feel comfortable in dealing with depressed patients' needs," while 60 % (n = 112) agreed with "Working with depressed patients is heavy going." Factor analysis indicated these items comprised a factor termed "Depression should be treated by psychiatrists" - to which 54 % of doctors (n = 101) agreed. Meanwhile, 67 % of doctors (n = 126) thought that nurses could be useful in depressed patient support. The three factors derived from the Japanese DAQ differed from models previously derived from British GP samples. The attitude of Japanese non-psychiatric doctors concerning whether depression should be treated by psychiatrists was markedly different to that of British GPs. Japanese non

  3. Difficulties and barriers to transition to inclusive education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiperi Nadejda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article stressed the importance of overcoming obstacles and resistance from teachers and their importance to the organizational climate changes have on attitudes and move towards inclusive practices. Support this model has a high degree of applicability regarding attenuation and resistance from the community because it allows the application of this approach to the context and specific needs.

  4. Preparing Teachers for Inclusive Education: Some Reflections from the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijl, Sip Jan

    2010-01-01

    Teachers in the Netherlands hesitate to accept responsibility for students with special needs in regular education. They generally do not have positive attitudes towards inclusive education, citing a lack of personal knowledge and skill for teaching students with special needs, an area that was not sufficiently covered in their basic teacher…

  5. Inclusion Professional Development Model and Regular Middle School Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royster, Otelia; Reglin, Gary L.; Losike-Sedimo, Nonofo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a professional development model on regular education middle school teachers' knowledge of best practices for teaching inclusive classes and attitudes toward teaching these classes. There were 19 regular education teachers who taught the core subjects. Findings for Research Question 1…

  6. Early Childhood Educators' Perspectives and Practices about Inclusion of Children with Special Needs in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Simmi; Bose, Kabita; Chadha, Neerja

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate perspectives of Early Childhood Educators (ECEds) about inclusion of Children With Special Needs (CWSN) by examining their attitudes, training needs, and inclusive practices used in the inclusive classroom. One hundred twenty-eight ECEds completed a questionnaire that included the Scale of Teachers'…

  7. Ambiguity attitudes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trautmann, Stefan; van de Kuilen, Gijs; Keren, Gideon; Wu, George

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews the experimental literature on ambiguity attitudes, focusing on three topics. First, it considers various approaches to operationalize ambiguity in experiments. Second, the chapter reviews basic findings in the field regarding the prevalence of ambiguity aversion and ambiguity

  8. Child with autism in inclusive educational setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomić Katarina N.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the possibility of including children with autistic spectrum disorders in mainstream groups in kindergartens, but from the perspective of preschool educators in inclusive educational groups, examining their attitudes to the problem concerned, and knowledge of the basic aspects of the disorder and effective methodological solutions, which were used in their work. The research conducted in Preschool institution 'Nata Veljkovic' in Krusevac, on a sample of 36 preschool teachers selected randomly, with the request to have more than five years of working experience, has shown that most teachers expressed concern and fear of the inclusion of children with autism and that there was a need for additional education in the field of developmental disabilities, that would make them better equipped to work and give them more confidence.

  9. Inclusive Education at Primary Level: Reality or Phantasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itfaq Khaliq Khan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to assess the impacts of Inclusive Education (IE Project implemented in government schools of Islamabad and anticipate its practicability for public schools. Quantitative and qualitative methods were applied for data collection. Study instruments were structured interviews, unstructured focus group discussions, and questionnaire. The study revealed that Students with Disabilities (SWDs carrypositive attitudes about their mainstreaming and promote friendships among them. The accessibility of school infrastructure normally addresses the needs of all students, but curriculum, equipment, teaching, learning aids, and assessment methods need to be adjusted. Principals in the schools have a positive attitude towards IE and suggested the government take more concrete measures toward mobilizing financial and technical resources for the training of teachers and providing them with technological support. Teachers involved in IE practices have a positive attitude for inclusion of SWDs and they proposed that it can be replicated in all public schools.

  10. Providing a Full Circle of Support to Teachers in an Inclusive Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Nancy L.; Redd, Lacy

    2011-01-01

    Providing a full circle of support to teachers in an inclusive elementary school, the Newberry Elementary School (NES) principal and staff have worked for 5 years to ensure the inclusion of students with disabilities in general education classrooms. The authors would like to share their perceptions of how this full circle (the multiple systems) of…

  11. Multilingualism and Social Inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    This is a thematic issue on the relation between multilingualism and social inclusion. Due to globalization, Europeanization, supranational and transnational regulations linguistic diversity and multilingualism are on the rise. Migration and old and new forms of mobility play an important role...... in these processes. As a consequence, English as the only global language is spreading around the world, including Europe and the European Union. Social and linguistic inclusion was accounted for in the pre-globalization age by the nation-state ideology implementing the ‘one nation-one people-one language’ doctrine...... in governance and daily life protected by a legal framework. This does not mean that there is full equality of languages. This carries over to the fair and just social inclusion of the speakers of these weaker, dominated languages as well. There is always a power question related to multilingualism. The ten...

  12. TOWARDS AN INCLUSIVE SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía López Menéndez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays schools have to direct all efforts towards the comprehensive development of all students whatever their individual characteristics and their environment; they have to give a quality educational attention a qualified educational attention to the diversity in all their schools. This article presents an approach on the possibilities of developing a self-assessment using the Guide: "Index for Inclusion": “Index for Inclusion” published in the United kingdom by Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education (CSIE Tony Booth - Mel Ainscow (2002. This guide is a simple tool intended for schools to evaluate their reality in relation to important aspects of school organization and teaching-learning from the perspective of inclusion. From this self-assessment they can design specific programs to guide their educacional practice.

  13. Emergency staff reactions to suicidal and self-harming patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Maurizio; Girardi, Paolo; Ruberto, Amedeo; Kotzalidis, Giorgio D; Tatarelli, Roberto

    2005-08-01

    Staff in the emergency departments of hospitals are reported as being negative or ambivalent toward suicidal or self-harming individuals. According to the literature, these patients are subjected to stigmatization and lack of empathy. This phenomenon has been linked to a decreased quality of care offered to these individuals and to missing an important opportunity to prevent further suicidal behavior or repetition of deliberate self-harm. Also, protocols, proper guidelines and education for the emergency staff call for a revision and an implementation. In this paper, evidence suggesting staff attitudes toward suicidal and self-harming patients is reviewed. An overview of related issues such as clinical judgment, the use of scales and nurses' role is also included in this report.

  14. Inclusive Education in Israel

    OpenAIRE

    O. V. Mayzel

    2013-01-01

    To get acquainted with the practice of inclusive education in mainstream schools, with professionals who work with special children, to visit the specialist centers to share experiences - all of this was part of an internship program «Early Childhood Education for Children with Special Needs», held in Israel (April 8 -02 May 2013) this year. The country has been selected for an internship, because the practice of inclusive education has been used for over 20 years in Israel. Moreover, a lot ...

  15. Creative activity and inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shemanov A.Yu.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article was to analyze the inclusion potential of art creative activity, namely of theatre performance, in people with disabilities. The article provides examples of disagreements in understanding the significance of these art activities for exercising the rights of people with disabilities to contribute to culture and art and some problems arising here. The conclusion is made that theatre art performed by people with disabilities is gradually changing its function: from being a means of self-affirmation to the determination of its specific place in overall theatre process. These changes confirm the inclusion potential of theatre art activity.

  16. Lead inclusions in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.; Johansen, A.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.; Andersen, H.H.; Grabaek, L.; Bohr, J.

    1990-01-01

    Ion implantation at room temperature of lead into aluminum leads to spontaneous phase separation and formation of lead precipitates growing topotactically with the matrix. Unlike the highly pressurized (∼ 1-5 GPa) solid inclusions formed after noble gas implantations, the pressure in the lead precipitates is found to be less than 0.12 GPa. Recently the authors have observed the result that the lead inclusions in aluminum exhibit both superheating and supercooling. In this paper they review and elaborate on these results. Small implantation-induced lead precipitates embedded in an aluminum matrix were studied by x-ray diffraction

  17. Expectations of hospital treatment. Conflicting views of patients and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skodol, A E; Plutchik, R; Karasu, T B

    1980-02-01

    A 40-item therapeutic community questionnaire, developed from a survey of experts, was used to assess the treatment needs and expectations of a group of 30 hospitalized psychiatric patients. The patients' attitudes regarding an ideal ward atmosphere were compared to those, as measured previously by the identical instrument, of the treating staff. The results indicated that psychiatric inpatients found the therapeutic community modality consistent with their needs and expectations. However, staff and patients were divided in attitude toward the therapeutic community concept. The staff's definition of therapeutic community was broad and exceeded the principles of the therapeutic community experts. The patients desired a more conservative approach which combined respect and responsibility with a ward structure that was unambiguous and less democratic. Studies of ward atmosphere as well as premature termination in psychotherapy indicate that such conflicts in viewpoint between patients and staff might have detrimental effects on hospital outcome. A negotiated approach to inpatient treatment is suggested as a means to establish greater autonomy, growth in self-esteem, sense of responsibility, and increased trust on the part of hospitalized patients.

  18. Psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the Attitude Towards Deliberate Self-Harm Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, N.; van Meijel, B.; van der Bijl, J.; Koekkoek, B.; Kerkhof, A.

    2015-01-01

    The attitude of nurses and treatment staff is crucial in the treatment of patients who self-harm. However, many patients experience that attitude as negative. The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the Attitude Towards Deliberate Self-Harm

  19. Developing a financial inclusion index and inclusive growth in India

    OpenAIRE

    Susanta Kumar SETHY

    2016-01-01

    Financial inclusion is one of the systems through which Inclusive Growth can be achieved in developing countries like India where large sections are unable or hopeless to contribute in the financial system. An inclusive financial system mobilizes more resources for productive purposes leading to higher economic growth, better opportunities and reduction of poverty. This study, proposed an Index of financial inclusion – a multidimensional measure. The Financial Inclusion Index c...

  20. Implementation of Mindfulness Training for Mental Health Staff: Organizational Context and Stakeholder Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Gerard; Ziedonis, Douglas M; McGrath, Caroline; Frazier, Jean A; deTorrijos, Fernando; Fulwiler, Carl

    2015-08-01

    Occupational stress and burnout adversely impacts mental health care staff well-being and patient outcomes. Mindfulness training reduces staff stress and may improve patient care. However, few studies explore mental health setting implementation. This qualitative study used focus groups to evaluate stakeholders' perceptions of organizational factors affecting implementation of an adapted version of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) for staff on adolescent mental health units. Common facilitators included leadership securing buy-in with staff, allocating staff time to participate, and quiet space for training and practice. Other facilitators were past staff knowledge of mindfulness, local champions, and acculturating staff with mindfulness through a non-mandatory training attendance policy. Common barriers were limited staff time to attend training sessions and insufficient training coverage for some staff. Staff also reported improved focus when interacting with adolescents and improved social cohesion on the units. We conclude that a mindfulness-based program for reducing occupational stress can be successfully implemented on adolescent mental health units. Implementation appeared to change the social context of the units, including staff and patient interactions. More broadly, our findings highlight the importance of environmental factors in shaping attitudes, diffusion of innovation, and acculturation of wellness program implementations.

  1. Attitudes to and beliefs about animal assisted therapy for children with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Esther; Scheinberg, Adam; Williams, Katrina

    2017-02-01

    This study assessed the attitudes and beliefs surrounding animal-assisted therapy (AAT) for the rehabilitation of children with disabilities at the Royal Children's Hospital (RCH), focusing specifically on cerebral palsy (CP), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and acquired brain injury (ABI). This was an initial step to inform future AAT research and to understand the feasibility of interventions. An online survey asking participants their opinions about the inclusion of AAT, and potential barriers to its introduction in a tertiary hospital setting was advertised on the RCH Intranet from 3 March 2015 to 3 April 2015. A total of 128 participants responded to the survey request, from a range of specialties and departments. Almost all survey respondents reported that animal-assisted therapy would be helpful in the physical or behavioral management of children affected by CP (98%), ASD (99%) and ABI (96%), and 98% of survey respondents supported the inclusion of AAT in the RCH. Ninety-two percent recommended AAT in the inpatient setting and 52% of the respondents suggest that it should be administered as a pre-determined program with set activities. Additionally, qualitative responses provided suggestions that AAT should be used to provide comfort in high stress environments such as prior to medical and surgical procedures. The majority of staff are supportive of the inclusion of AAT in the RCH, indicating more research is needed to establish whether AAT is acceptable to children and families as part of their care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Linguistic Diversity and Social Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piller, Ingrid; Takahashi, Kimie

    2011-01-01

    This introduction provides the framework for the special issue by describing the social inclusion agenda of neoliberal market democracies. While the social inclusion agenda has been widely adopted, social inclusion policies are often blind to the ways in which language proficiency and language ideologies mediate social inclusion in linguistically…

  3. Relationships in Inclusive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Graça Duarte; Sardinha, Susana; Reis, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Climate in the classroom is one of the determining factors in the development of practices in Inclusive Education. Many factors contribute to the climate in the classroom. However, there are predominance on affective-relational factors, with impact on action, norms and values, social interactions and learning processes. In this paper, the authors…

  4. Inclusion on the Bookshelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Camille

    2009-01-01

    Three decades have passed since federal law mandated inclusion--ending, officially at least, a system that segregated students with disabilities from the rest of the student population. The publishing world has yet to catch up. In children's books, characters with disabilities often inhabit their own separate world, where disability is the only…

  5. Mathematics Teaching and Inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 3rd Nordic Research Conference on Special Needs Education in Mathematics, which took place in Rebild organised by Aalborg University in November 23-25, 2005. The theme of the conference was Mathematics Education and Inclusion. The conference theme...

  6. Multilingualism and social inclusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marácz, L.; Adamo, S.

    2017-01-01

    This is a thematic issue on the relation between multilingualism and social inclusion. Due to globalization, Europeanization, supranational and transnational regulations linguistic diversity and multilingualism are on the rise. Migration and old and new forms of mobility play an important role in

  7. Inclusion's Confusion in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilham, Chris; Williamson, W. John

    2014-01-01

    This hermeneutic paper interprets a recent series of reforms to inclusive education policy undertaken by the ministry of education in the province of Alberta, Canada. A 2007 Alberta Education review of the 16,000 student files in the province that school boards had claimed met the criteria for severe disability codification status -- the level of…

  8. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Vote Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. Voting will begin on Monday 31 October. Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will  represent you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site. (http://association.web.cern.ch) Elections Timetable Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee. 

  9. Disability on campus: a perspective from faculty and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigaki, Cheryl L; Anderson, Kim M; Howald, Carol L; Henson, Lee; Gregg, Bonnie E

    2012-01-01

    To identify employee perceptions regarding disability-related workplace issues in Institutions of Higher Education (IHE). Faculty and staff (N=1,144) at a large, Midwestern university. A voluntary on-line survey of disability-related employment issues was developed by the university's Chancellor's Committee of Persons with Disabilities. Item responses were analyzed using descriptive and Pearson chi-square statistical methods. Fifteen percent of faculty and staff respondents were found to have disabilities, with 26% reporting experience of job discrimination, and 20% reporting harassment because of their disability. Results indicated significant differences on gender, employment standing (i.e., faculty or staff) and disability status (i.e., with or without a disability), in regard to perceptions of disability acceptance, campus accessibility, disability awareness, ADA policy, and knowledge of work accommodation procedures. Recommendations for IHEs are provided to promote a welcoming and inclusive campus that ultimately supports work success for persons with a disability.

  10. A System-Wide Professional Learning Approach about Inclusion for Teachers in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlin, Chris; Loreman, Tim; Sharma, Umesh

    2014-01-01

    This study examines changes in attitudes, teaching efficacy, and concerns about inclusive education in a sample of 2361 teachers in Hong Kong who took a professional learning course about inclusive education. Participants completed a questionnaire seeking demographic information and their perceptions about these three aspects of inclusive…

  11. Teacher Educators' Views on Inclusive Education and Teacher Preparation in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nketsia, William; Saloviita, Timo; Gyimah, Emmanuel Kofi

    2016-01-01

    The crucial role of initial teacher education programmes and teacher educators in preparing effective inclusive practitioners has been universally acknowledged. This study explored the attitudes of 125 teacher educators from four colleges of education towards inclusive education, their views and concerns about teacher preparation and the…

  12. Preparing Preschool Teacher Candidates for Inclusion: Impact of Two Special Education Courses on Their Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakap, Salih; Cig, Oguzcan; Parlak-Rakap, Asiye

    2017-01-01

    Successful implementation of inclusive practices depends mainly on teachers' attitudes towards children with special needs and their inclusion, and teachers' willingness to work with children with special needs in their classrooms. Experiences teacher candidates have during pre-service stage might influence their perceptions towards children with…

  13. Preservice Teachers' Beliefs about Inclusive Education: What Should Teacher Educators Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garriott, Pamela Pruitt; Snyder, Lynne; Miller, Maurice

    2003-01-01

    Examined preservice teachers' beliefs about inclusive education for students with mild disabilities. Surveys of 239 undergraduate and graduate students indicated that while many preservice teachers held positive attitudes toward inclusive education, nearly half considered the special education classroom to be the optimum placement for students…

  14. Preparing Teachers for Inclusion in Mexico: How Effective is This Process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Contreras, Silvia; Garcia-Cedillo, Ismael; Forlin, Chris; Lomelí-Hernández, Karla Abril

    2013-01-01

    Inclusive education is the most advanced form of recognition of the right to education. Mexico has made important legal and administrative changes to foster inclusion since the end of the twentieth century. This research assesses the impact of the Mexican pre-service teacher curriculum on 813 pre-service teachers' sentiments, attitudes and…

  15. A brief, standardized tool for measuring HIV-related stigma among health facility staff: results of field testing in China, Dominica, Egypt, Kenya, Puerto Rico and St. Christopher & Nevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyblade, Laura; Jain, Aparna; Benkirane, Manal; Li, Li; Lohiniva, Anna-Leena; McLean, Roger; Turan, Janet M; Varas-Díaz, Nelson; Cintrón-Bou, Francheska; Guan, Jihui; Kwena, Zachary; Thomas, Wendell

    2013-11-13

    Within healthcare settings, HIV-related stigma is a recognized barrier to access of HIV prevention and treatment services and yet, few efforts have been made to scale-up stigma reduction programs in service delivery. This is in part due to the lack of a brief, simple, standardized tool for measuring stigma among all levels of health facility staff that works across diverse HIV prevalence, language and healthcare settings. In response, an international consortium led by the Health Policy Project, has developed and field tested a stigma measurement tool for use with health facility staff. Experts participated in a content-development workshop to review an item pool of existing measures, identify gaps and prioritize questions. The resulting questionnaire was field tested in six diverse sites (China, Dominica, Egypt, Kenya, Puerto Rico and St. Christopher & Nevis). Respondents included clinical and non-clinical staff. Questionnaires were self- or interviewer-administered. Analysis of item performance across sites examined both psychometric properties and contextual issues. The key outcome of the process was a substantially reduced questionnaire. Eighteen core questions measure three programmatically actionable drivers of stigma within health facilities (worry about HIV transmission, attitudes towards people living with HIV (PLHIV), and health facility environment, including policies), and enacted stigma. The questionnaire also includes one short scale for attitudes towards PLHIV (5-item scale, α=0.78). Stigma-reduction programmes in healthcare facilities are urgently needed to improve the quality of care provided, uphold the human right to healthcare, increase access to health services, and maximize investments in HIV prevention and treatment. This brief, standardized tool will facilitate inclusion of stigma measurement in research studies and in routine facility data collection, allowing for the monitoring of stigma within healthcare facilities and evaluation of

  16. Teachers' knowledge, attitude and practices of inclusive education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 1 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Inclusive Physical Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Charlotte; Rostbøll, Solveig Fogh

    2015-01-01

    EN317 - Inclusive Physical Education - with a focus on active and successful participation Charlotte Østergaard, Solveig Fogh Rostbøll, Department of School and Learning, Metropolitan University College (DK) chao@phmetropol.dk The Danish School Reform 2014 intends to raise the amount and intensity...... and is often a bad experience for students who do not have the required skills or the necessary competitive mentality. The purpose of the study is to generate increased knowledge of how to work with inclusive education in PE in schools. The aims of the study are to identify groups of “outsiders” and to find...... and ability to participate in PE must be understood in specific socio-cultural and socio-economic conditions. The hypothesis of the study is that the experience of being acknowledged for your efforts in physical education by significant others can form the basis for the construction of physical capital. EN323...

  18. Inclusive differentiated instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerković Ljiljana S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusive differentiated instruction is a new model of didactic instruction, theoretically described and established in this paper for the first time, after being experimentally verified through teaching of the mother tongue (instruction in reading and literature. Inclusive individually planned instruction is based on a phenomenological and constructivist didactic instructional paradigm. This type of teaching is essentially developmental and person-oriented. The key stages of inclusive differentiated instruction of literature are: 1 recognition of individual students' potential and educational needs regarding reading and work on literary texts; 2 planning and preparation of inclusive individually planned instruction in reading and literature; 3 actual class teaching of lessons thus prepared; and 4 evaluation of the student achievement following inclusive differentiated instruction in reading and literature. A highly important element of the planning and preparation of inclusive differentiated instruction is the creation of student profiles and inclusive individualized syllabi. Individualized syllabi specify the following: 1. a brief student profile; 2. the student position on the continuum of the learning outcomes of instruction in the Serbian language; 3. reverse-engineered macro-plan stages of instruction in the Serbian language (3.1. identifying expected outcomes and fundamental qualities of learners' work, 3.2. defining acceptable proofs of their realisation, 3.3. planning learning and teaching experiences, and 3.4. providing material and technical requisites for teaching; 4 the contents and procedure of individualized lessons targeting the student; 5 a plan of syllabus implementation monitoring and evaluation. The continuum of the learning outcomes of inclusive differentiated instruction in literature exists at three main levels, A, B and C. The three levels are: A reading techniques and learning about the main literary theory concepts; B

  19. Inclusive Flavour Tagging Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Derkach, Denis; Rogozhnikov, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the flavour of neutral B mesons production is one of the most important components needed in the study of time-dependent CP violation. The harsh environment of the Large Hadron Collider makes it particularly hard to succeed in this task. We present an inclusive flavour-tagging algorithm as an upgrade of the algorithms currently used by the LHCb experiment. Specifically, a probabilistic model which efficiently combines information from reconstructed vertices and tracks using machine learning is proposed. The algorithm does not use information about underlying physics process. It reduces the dependence on the performance of lower level identification capacities and thus increases the overall performance. The proposed inclusive flavour-tagging algorithm is applicable to tag the flavour of B mesons in any proton-proton experiment. (paper)

  20. Are all pharmacy staff interested in potential future roles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braund, Rhiannon; Chesney, Kate Marie; Keast, Emilia Paulina; Ng, Lye Jinn; Qi, Sarah; Samaranayaka, Sashika; Wang, Eddie

    2012-12-01

    To determine the current perceived roles and responsibilities of pharmacy staff in community pharmacies in New Zealand, and attitudes to proposed new advanced roles for pharmacy staff. Structured interviews were conducted within five community pharmacies, including at least two pharmacists, two dispensary staff and two pharmacy assistants. The interviews were structured to determine previous experience, current roles and responsibilities and the perceived future roles of pharmacy staff within a community pharmacy setting. Thematic analysis from 27 interviews identified key findings. Current roles appeared to be fairly well defined. Pharmacy assistants listed key roles as customer interactions and sales focus, noting that the dispensary was outside their area of responsibility. Technicians identified their role as being dispensary focused while pharmacists saw their role as the 'final check' to ensure accuracy as well as providing dispensing, counselling and managerial roles. With potential future roles, the assistants were less interested than the other groups, citing contentment with current situation and training as a barrier. Some technicians indicated an interest in furthering their roles, but many were reluctant and saw that additional training was too time consuming. Whilst pharmacists appeared to be interested in further scopes of practice, they appeared more reluctant to do this at the expense of handing dispensing responsibility to a non-pharmacist. Whilst there is a push for pharmacists to provide advanced clinical services, it is important to acknowledge that many staff working within community pharmacies are satisfied with their current role. © 2012 The Authors. IJPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.