WorldWideScience

Sample records for staff ems providers

  1. CORBEL Pilot courses and staff exchange provided

    OpenAIRE

    Matser, Vera; Battaglia, Serena; Amaral, Ana Margarida

    2017-01-01

    The main target audience of the CORBEL training programme is technical operators of Research Infrastructures (RIs) in biological and medical RI hubs and nodes. The CORBEL course syllabi for a modular curriculum for piloting in RIs involves the following types of training activities: webinar programme, training courses and workshops, a knowledge/staff exchange programme and a fellowship scheme. The content of the curriculum has been based on the development of the CORBEL competency profile (D9...

  2. Relationship between Provider Stigma and Predictors of Staff Turnover among Addiction Treatment Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulesza, Magdalena; Hunter, Sarah B; Shearer, Amy L; Booth, Marika

    2017-01-01

    To further our knowledge about feasible targets for improving quality of addiction treatment services, the current study provides preliminary assessment of the relationship between provider stigma and indicators of staff turnover. As predicted, results suggest that higher provider stigma was significantly related to lower ratings of job satisfaction and workplace climate. However, provider stigma was not significantly related to burnout. Our preliminary findings, if replicated, suggest the importance of considering provider stigma as a risk factor for future staff turnover and job dissatisfaction. Promising provider stigma interventions do exist and offer viable opportunity for improving quality of addiction treatment.

  3. Pharmacy staff perceptions and self-reported behaviors related to providing contraceptive information and counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Peter; Aquilino, Mary L; Farris, Karen B

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate pharmacy staff perspectives of a 2-year pharmacy intervention aimed at reducing unintended pregnancy in 18- to 30-year-old women. Pharmacy staff completed a 48-item, self-administered paper survey consisting of scaled and open-ended questions. 55 community pharmacies in 12 Iowa counties. All pharmacy staff participated, including pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, and other pharmacy employees. Online continuing education (CE) training was made available to all pharmacy staff. Promotional materials including posters, brochures, and shelf talkers were displayed in all of the pharmacies. Pharmacy staff perceptions and self-reported behaviors related to displaying posters, brochures, and shelf talkers in their pharmacies and providing contraceptive information and counseling to patients/customers. A total of 192 (43% return rate) pharmacy staff responded. Only 44% of respondents consistently provided contraceptive information and counseling, yet more than 90% felt that talking with patients/customers about contraceptives was easy, and more than 50% could do so privately. The study showed increased pharmacy staff desire to make this topic a priority. Community pharmacy staff can play a key role in educating and counseling young adult women about contraceptive health and pregnancy planning. This study indicates that staff are comfortable providing this service and that patients/customers are open to receiving guidance from pharmacists. However, pharmacy staff are missing additional opportunities to provide information and counseling. There is also a need for greater attention to provision of nonprescription contraceptive education.

  4. 78 FR 11654 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Providing Information About...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Providing Information About... Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Providing Information About Pediatric Uses of...ComplianceRegulatoryInformation/default.htm . To receive ``Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug...

  5. Providing Staff Training and Programming to Support People with Disabilities: An Academic Library Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannen, Michelle H.; Milewski, Steven; Mack, Thura

    2017-01-01

    This case study explores services academic libraries provide to students with disabilities and the impact these can have on the success and experience of these students. The study focuses on staff training and outreach programming. The authors examine the academic library literature surrounding these topics, provide examples of programming…

  6. Community health center provider and staff's Spanish language ability and cultural awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Arshiya A; Benitez, Amanda; Locklin, Cara A; Campbell, Amanda; Schaefer, Cynthia T; Heuer, Loretta J; Lee, Sang Mee; Solomon, Marla C; Quinn, Michael T; Burnet, Deborah L; Chin, Marshall H

    2014-05-01

    Many community health center providers and staff care for Latinos with diabetes, but their Spanish language ability and awareness of Latino culture are unknown. We surveyed 512 Midwestern health center providers and staff who managed Latino patients with diabetes. Few respondents had high Spanish language (13%) or cultural awareness scores (22%). Of respondents who self-reported 76-100% of their patients were Latino, 48% had moderate/low Spanish language and 49% had moderate/low cultural competency scores. Among these respondents, 3% lacked access to interpreters and 27% had neither received cultural competency training nor had access to training. Among all respondents, Spanish skills and Latino cultural awareness were low. Respondents who saw a significant number of Latinos had good access to interpretation services but not cultural competency training. Improved Spanish-language skills and increased access to cultural competency training and Latino cultural knowledge are needed to provide linguistically and culturally tailored care to Latino patients.

  7. Perceptions of homelessness in older homeless veterans, VA homeless program staff liaisons, and housing intervention providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Victor A; Brown, Lisa M; Frahm, Kathryn A; Schinka, John A; Casey, Roger

    2013-05-01

    To understand the needs and challenges encountered by older homeless veterans. We conducted six focus groups of older veterans, two focus groups, and one semi-structured interview of VA staff liaisons, and two focus groups and one semi-structured interview of housing intervention providers. Major themes for older veterans: 1) negative homelessness experience; 2) benefits of the structured transitional housing program; 3) importance of peer outreach; and 4) need for age-tailored job placement programs. Major themes for VA staff liaison/housing intervention providers: 1) belief that the transitional housing program has made a positive change; 2) need for individualized criteria to address the unique needs of veterans; 3) distinct differences between older and younger homeless veterans; 4) outreach services; 5) permanent housing issues; and 6) coordination of services. Compared with younger veterans, older veterans have less social support, greater employment and health challenges, and, perhaps greater motivation to change.

  8. Barriers to Providing Health Education During Primary Care Visits at Community Health Centers: Clinical Staff Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea-Planas, Jessica; Pose, Alix; Smith, Linda

    2016-04-01

    The rapid increase of diverse patients living in the US has created a different set of needs in healthcare, with the persistence of health disparities continuing to challenge the current system. Chronic disease management has been discussed as a way to improve health outcomes, with quality patient education being a key component. Using a community based participatory research framework, this study utilized a web-based survey and explored clinical staff perceptions of barriers to providing patient education during primary care visits. With a response rate of nearly 42 %, appointment time allotment seemed to be one of the most critical factors related to the delivery of health education and should be considered key. The importance of team-based care and staff training were also significant. Various suggestions were made in order to improve the delivery of quality patient education at community health centers located in underserved areas.

  9. Experiences of providing prosthetic and orthotic services in Sierra Leone--the local staff's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Lina; Ahlström, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    In Sierra Leone, West Africa, there are many people with disabilities in need of rehabilitation services after a long civil war. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of prosthetic and orthotic service delivery in Sierra Leone from the local staff's perspective. Fifteen prosthetic and orthotic technicians working at all the rehabilitation centres providing prosthetic and orthotic services in Sierra Leone were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed and subjected to latent content analysis. One main theme emerged: sense of inability to deliver high-quality prosthetic and orthotic services. This main theme was generated from eight sub-themes: Desire for professional development; appraisals of work satisfaction and norms; patients neglected by family; limited access to the prosthetic and orthotic services available; problems with materials and machines; low public awareness concerning disabilities; marginalisation in society and low priority on the part of government. The findings illustrated traditional beliefs about the causes of disability and that the public's attitude needs to change to include and value people with disabilities. Support from international organisations was considered necessary as well as educating more prosthetic and orthotic staff to a higher level.

  10. Sources of moral distress for nursing staff providing care to residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spenceley, Shannon; Witcher, Chad Sg; Hagen, Brad; Hall, Barry; Kardolus-Wilson, Arron

    2017-10-01

    The World Health Organization estimates the number of people living with dementia at approximately 35.6 million; they project a doubling of this number by 2030 and tripling by 2050. Although the majority of people living with a dementia live in the community, residential facility care by nursing care providers is a significant component of the dementia journey in most countries. Research has also shown that caring for persons with dementia can be emotionally, physically, and ethically challenging, and that turnover in nursing staff in residential care settings tends to be high. Moral distress has been explored in a variety of settings where nurses provide acute or intensive care. The concept, however, has not previously been explored in residential facility care settings, particularly as related to the care of persons with dementia. In this paper, we explore moral distress in these settings, using Nathaniel's definition of moral distress: the pain or anguish affecting the mind, body, or relationships in response to a situation in which the person is aware of a moral problem, acknowledges moral responsibility, makes a moral judgment about the correct action and yet, as a result of real or perceived constraints, cannot do what is thought to be right. We report findings from a qualitative study of moral distress in a single health region in a Canadian province. Our aim in this paper is to share findings that elucidate the sources of moral distress experienced by nursing care providers in the residential care of people living with dementia.

  11. Extending Our Understanding of Burnout and Its Associated Factors: Providers and Staff in Primary Care Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, William M; Fernstrom, Karl M; Galos, Dylan L; Britt, Heather R

    2016-09-01

    Burnout has been identified as an occupational hazard in the helping professions for many years and is often overlooked, as health-care systems strive to improve cost and quality. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and the Areas of Worklife Survey (AWS) are tools for assessing burnout prevalence and its associated factors. We describe how we used them in outpatient clinics to assess burnout for multiple job types. Traditional statistical techniques and seemingly unrelated regression were used to describe the sample and evaluate the association between work life domains and burnout. Of 838 eligible participants, 467 (55.7%) were included for analysis. Burnout prevalence varied across three job categories: providers (37.5%), clinical assistants (24.6%), and other staff (28.0%). It was not related to age, gender, or years of tenure but was lower in part-time workers (24.6%) than in full-time workers (33.9%). Analysis of the AWS subscales identified organizational correlates of burnout. Accurately identifying and defining the operative system factors associated with burnout will make it possible to create successful interventions. Using the MBI and the AWS together can highlight the relationship between system work experiences and burnout. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Training Direct-Care Staff to Provide Communication Intervention to Adults With Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Larah; Matthews, Tamyra; Ogilvie, Emily; Berry, Alice; Waddington, Hannah; Balandin, Susan; O'Reilly, Mark F; Lancioni, Giulio; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2017-11-08

    The aim of this review was to summarize and evaluate studies on training direct-care staff to provide communication intervention to adults with intellectual disability. Systematic searches identified 22 studies. These were summarized and evaluated in terms of (a) participants; (b) settings; (c) training aims and procedures; (d) research designs; (e) reliability, integrity, and social validity; (f) outcomes; (g) generalization and follow-up; and (h) certainty of evidence. A total of 437 staff and 254+ adults with intellectual disability participated. Staff training most frequently involved combinations of verbal instruction, role play, modeling, practice, and feedback. Reliability was assessed in 18 studies with acceptable standards for most of these studies. Treatment integrity and social validity were assessed in 1 and 3 studies, respectively, with positive outcomes. Generalization and maintenance were assessed in 5 and 8 studies, respectively, with predominantly positive outcomes. Most studies reported positive outcomes for staff and positive or mixed outcomes for the adults with intellectual disability. Certainty of evidence was rated as conclusive in 1 study, suggestive in 14 studies, and inconclusive in 7 studies. There is sufficient evidence to conclude that direct-care staff can be taught to provide effective communication intervention to adults with intellectual disability. Professionals involved in providing training and support to direct-care staff could expect positive outcomes from multicomponent training programs that include opportunities for practice and feedback.

  13. Providing Logistics Support to CDC-Deployed Staff for the Ebola Response in Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopson, Stephanie A; Rodriguez, Rockie; Rouse, Edward N

    2015-11-01

    The first Ebola cases in West Africa were reported by the Guinea Ministry of Health on March 23, 2014, and by June it became the largest recorded Ebola outbreak. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention field teams were deployed to West Africa, including in-country logistics staff who were critical for ensuring the movement of staff, equipment, and supplies to locations where public health knowledge and experience were applied to meet mission-related requirements. The logistics role was critical to creating the support for epidemiologists, medical doctors, laboratory staff, and health communicators involved in health promotion activities to successfully respond to the epidemic, both in the capital cities and in remote villages. Logistics personnel worked to procure equipment, such as portable video projectors, and have health promotion materials printed. Logistics staff also coordinated delivery of communication and health promotion materials to the embassy and provided assistance with distribution to various partners. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  14. Partnership working and improved service delivery: views of staff providing sexual health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pow, Janette; Elliott, Lawrie; Raeside, Robert; Themessl-Huber, Markus; Claveirole, Anne

    2013-07-01

    Successful partnership working has theoretically been linked to improvements in service delivery and is dependent on the strength of the partnership, trust, communication, professional roles and resource sharing. Empirical evidence to confirm the relationships between these factors and improved service provision, however, is lacking. Our aim was to assess the views of staff as to the conditions required for partnership working. This study was a cross-sectional survey of 687 staff offering sexual health education, information or support to young people in the Healthy Respect intervention area in Scotland. Views of each variable were scored and structural equation modelling was used to assess the theoretical model. Responses were received from 284 (41%) staff. Greater strength of partnership was directly associated with increasing the number of referrals. Establishing professional roles between organizations was also associated with increasing the number of referrals. Strength of partnership was indirectly associated with working more effectively with young people and this relationship depended on clear communication, trust, established professional roles and shared resources. Effective partnership working depends on a number of interdependent relationships between organizations, which act synergistically to improve organizational outcomes. Effective partnership working leads to improved service delivery though there is a need for better controlled studies which demonstrate the effect on health outcomes.

  15. A novel system for providing compatible blood to patients during surgery: "self-service" electronic blood banking by nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, G; Chiu, D S; Chung, A S; Wong, H F; Chan, M W; Lui, Y K; Choy, F M; Chan, J C; Chan, A H; Lam, S T; Fan, T C

    1996-04-01

    A good blood bank must be able to provide compatible blood units promptly to operating room patients with minimal wastage. A "self-service" by nursing staff blood banking system that is safe, efficient, and well-accepted has been developed. Specific blood units are no longer assigned to surgical patients who have a negative pretransfusion antibody screen, irrespective of the type of surgery. A computer-generated list of the serial numbers of all group-identical blood units currently in the blood bank inventory is provided for each patient. The units themselves are not labeled with a patient's name. The group O list will be provided for group O patients, the group A list for group A patients, and so forth. Should the patient require transfusion during surgery, the operating room nurses go to the refrigerator, remove any group-identical unit, and check the serial number of the unit against the serial numbers on the patient's list. If the serial number is on that list, the blood bank will accept responsibility for compatibility. The system was implemented in 1995. Since implementation, a total of 2154 patients have undergone operations at this hospital. Thirty-two patients received more than 10 units of red cells each. There were no transfusion errors. The crossmatch-to-transfusion ratio was reduced from 1.67 to 1.12. Turnaround time for supplying additional or urgent units to patients in operating room was shortened from 33 to 2.5 minutes. There was no incidence of a blood unit's serial number not being on the list. Work by nurses and technical staff was reduced by nearly 50 percent. The "self-service" (by nursing staff) blood banking system described is safe and efficient. It saves staff time and can be easily set up.

  16. Expectativas da equipe de enfermagem em relação à liderança Expectations of the nursing staff in relation to the leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Maria Schebella Souto de Moura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Identificar as expectativas da equipe de enfermagem em relação à liderança do futuro chefe. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de pesquisa exploratória, descritiva, realizada em hospital universitário. Os dados foram coletados por meio de entrevistas semiestruturadas com 62 profissionais da área de enfermagem. Os depoimentos transcritos foram analisados de acordo com o referencial da análise de conteúdo. RESULTADOS: Da análise emergiram quatro categorias de expectativas: comportamento do futuro chefe, trabalho com a equipe de enfermagem, trabalho com outras equipes e ambiente de trabalho. Os resultados evidenciaram que a equipe de enfermagem preocupa-se com as habilidades e características do futuro chefe frente às atribuições nos serviços de saúde. CONCLUSÃO: As equipes de enfermagem esperam que os futuros chefes de enfermagem tenham habilidades para liderar uma equipe e proporcionar um ambiente favorável ao trabalho.OBJECTIVES: To identify the expectations of the nursing staff in relation to the leadership of a future manager. METHODS: This was an exploratory, descriptive research study, conducted in a university hospital. Data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews with 62 professionals in the field of nursing. The transcribed interviews were analyzed according to the reference of content analysis. RESULTS: Four categories of expectations emerged from the analysis: the behavior of the future manager, working with the nursing staff, working with other teams, and the work environment. The results showed that the nursing staff is concerned with the abilities and characteristics of the future manager facing the assignments in health services. CONCLUSION: The nursing staff expected that the future nursing managers would have the abilities for leading a team and providing a favorable work environment.

  17. The effect of providing resuscitation training to front- line staff on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trauma management (HOT) training program evolved over a number of years to provide knowledge and ... lecture topics are described in Table 3, and the small group discussion topics are in Table 4. In addition the .... mass casualty management; team work and organizational prioritization. All participants also recorded ...

  18. Auditing the needs of recovery room staff providing care for the child in an acute hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas-Holley, J

    2016-05-01

    This article examines the results of an audit into recovery nurse knowledge and understanding of paediatric care standards. It will critically analyse the availability of current standards for children's services in the recovery room and discuss the need for a national document specifically dedicated to standards of practise for the care of the child in the recovery room providing immediate post operative care. The article will also look at the development of such a document.

  19. Addiction treatment provider attitudes on staff capacity and evidence-based clinical training: results from a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Lena; Amodeo, Maryann; Krull, Ivy; Chassler, Deborah; Weidenfeld, Rachel; de Saxe Zerden, Lisa; Gowler, Rebekah; Lederer, Jaime; Cohen, Alexander; Beltrame, Clelia

    2011-01-01

    This national study of addiction-treatment organizations' implementation of evidence-based practices examines: (1) organizational/leadership factors associated with director (n = 212) attitudes regarding staff resistance to organizational change, and (2) organizational/staff factors associated with staff (n = 312) attitudes regarding evidence-based clinical training. Linear regression analyses, controlling for type of treatment unit, leadership/staff characteristics and organizational readiness to change, identified that directors who perceived their organization needed more guidance and had less staff cohesion and autonomy rated staff resistance to organizational change significantly higher. Staff with higher levels of education and greater agreement that their organization supported change had greater preference for evidence-based trainings. Federal addiction treatment policy should both promote education and training of treatment staff and organizational development of treatment CBOs.  © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  20. Development of a hospital reiki training program: training volunteers to provide reiki to patients, families, and staff in the acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Julie; Reilly, Patricia M; Buchanan, Teresa M

    2014-01-01

    Creating a healing and healthy environment for patients, families, and staff is an ongoing challenge. As part of our hospital's Integrative Care Program, a Reiki Volunteer Program has helped to foster a caring and healing environment, providing a means for patients, family, and staff to reduce pain and anxiety and improve their ability to relax and be present. Because direct care providers manage multiple and competing needs at any given time, they may not be available to provide Reiki when it is needed. This program demonstrates that a volunteer-based program can successfully support nurses in meeting patient, family, and staff demand for Reiki services.

  1. Treating pediatric obesity in the primary care setting to prevent chronic disease: perceptions and knowledge of providers and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberberg, Mina; Carter-Edwards, Lori; Murphy, Gwen; Mayhew, Meghan; Kolasa, Kathryn; Perrin, Eliana M; Armstrong, Sarah; Graham, Cameron; Menon, Nidu

    2012-01-01

    The national and international epidemic of chronic disease, including among children, is largely fueled by increasing obesity. It is recommended that primary care play a key role in the treatment of pediatric obesity. A written survey was administered to providers and staff at 13 primary care practices across North Carolina, assessing perceptions on multiple dimensions of pediatric obesity treatment and knowledge of dietitian services. The response rate for the survey was 66.9% (n = 273). Although providers reported feeling comfortable and confident in many areas of childhood obesity, perceived effectiveness was low. Moreover, comfort and confidence were lower for non-primary care providers (PCPs) involved in obesity treatment than for PCPs, and PCP comfort and confidence levels were low for the ability to conduct motivational interviewing and for knowledge of billing for obesity as a diagnosis. Personnel perceived that there were benefits to having a registered dietitian (RD) in their practice and generally understood RD capacity. Survey results provided no evidence that integration of an RD into the practice changed perceptions or knowledge over the course of 1 year. The present study included only 13 practices, mostly rural and all of at least moderate size. Significant change is required if primary care practices are to play the role envisioned for them in stemming childhood obesity and chronic disease. Change will require identifying and addressing specific knowledge and skill gaps, such as those identified in this study. Respondents' positive perceptions of the benefits of RD integration suggest the importance of exploring this clinical model.

  2. Neotenic Phenotype and Sex Ratios Provide Insight into Developmental Pathways in <em>Reticulitermes flavipesem> (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian T. Forschler

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Several thousand <em>Reticulitermes flavipesem> (Kollar including worker, nymph, soldier, neotenic and alate castes were collected from three pine logs brought into the laboratory on dates five years apart. The neotenics, all nymphoid, were divided into three groups based on the extent of cuticle pigmentation and termed regular neotenics (RN, black-headed neotenics (BHN or black neotenics (BN. All castes, from Log A, in 2008, provided a neutral sex ratio except BHN (N = 378 and BN (N = 51 which were exclusively male while the soldiers (N = 466 were female-biased. This information suggests that there is a sex-linked bifurcation along the path for termite development with a male-biased neotenic or female-biased soldier as the choice. In contrast, termites collected in 2004 from Log B provided sex ratios that included a female biased RN (N = 1017, a neutral soldier (N = 258 and male biased BHN (N = 99 and workers (N = 54. Log C, collected in 2009, provided female biased soldiers (N = 32, RNs (N = 18 and BHNs (N = 4 and only male BN (N = 5. Eight laboratory cultures, ranging in age from five to 14 years old, also were sampled and all castes sexed. The census included a 14-year old queen-right colony, an 8-year old polyandrous colony and six colonies provided nymphs and male-biased worker populations. Together these data indicate a flexible caste determination system providing a unique opportunity for a better understanding of the flexible developmental options available in <em>R. flavipes em>that we discuss relative to the literature on <em>Reticulitermes> ontogeny.

  3. Provider and Staff Perceptions and Experiences Implementing Behavioral Health Integration in Six Low-Income Health Care Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farb, Heather; Sacca, Katie; Variano, Margaret; Gentry, Lisa; Relle, Meagan; Bertrand, Jane

    2018-01-01

    Behavioral health integration (BHI) is a proven, effective practice for addressing the joint behavioral health and medical health needs of vulnerable populations. As part of the New Orleans Charitable Health Fund (NOCHF) program, this study addressed a gap in literature to better understand factors that impact the implementation of BHI by analyzing perceptions and practices among staff at integrating organizations. Using a mixed-method design, quantitative results from the Levels of Integration Measure (LIM), a survey tool for assessing staff perceptions of BHI in primary care settings (n=86), were analyzed alongside qualitative results from in-depth interviews with staff (n=27). Findings highlighted the roles of strong leadership, training, and process changes on staff collaboration, relationships, and commitment to BHI. This study demonstrates the usefulness of the LIM in conjunction with in-depth interviews as an assessment tool for understanding perceptions and organizational readiness for BHI implementation.

  4. Supply-related drivers of staff motivation for providing intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mubyazi, Godfrey M; Bloch, Paul; Byskov, Jens

    2012-01-01

    for HW career development; and poor (HF) infrastructure and staff houses. Data also suggest that poor working conditions negatively affect health workers' motivation to perform for ANC (including IPTp) services. Similarities and differences were noted in terms of motivational factors for ANC service...... delivery between the HWs employed in private HFs and those in public HFs: those in private facilities were more comfortable with staff residential houses, HF buildings, equipment, availability of water, electricity and cups for clients to use while taking doses under direct observed therapy than...

  5. Training Sessional Academic Staff to Provide Quality Feedback on University Students' Assessment: Lessons from a Faculty of Law Learning and Teaching Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Kelly; Bell, Tamara; Dwyer, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The quality of feedback provided to university students has long been recognised as the most important predictor of student learning and satisfaction. However, providing quality feedback to students is challenging in the current context, in which universities increasingly rely on casualised and inexperienced academic staff to assess undergraduate…

  6. Staff preparedness for providing palliative and end-of-life care in long-term care homes: Instrument development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Helen Yl; Chun, Gloria Km; Man, C W; Leung, Edward Mf

    2018-01-16

    Although much attention has been on integrating the palliative care approach into services of long-term care homes for older people living with frailty and progressive diseases, little is known about the staff preparedness for these new initiatives. The present study aimed to develop and test the psychometric properties of an instrument for measuring care home staff preparedness in providing palliative and end-of-life care. A 16-item instrument, covering perceived knowledge, skill and psychological readiness, was developed. A total of 247 staff members of different ranks from four care homes participated in the study. Exploratory factor analysis using the principal component analysis extraction method with varimax rotation was carried out for initial validation. Known group comparison was carried out to examine its discriminant validity. Reliability of the instrument was assessed based on test-retest reliability of a subsample of 20 participants and the Cronbach's alpha of the items. Exploratory factor analysis showed that the instrument yielded a three-factor solution, which cumulatively accounted for 68.5% of the total variance. Three subscales, namely, willingness, capability and resilience, showed high internal consistency and test-retest reliability. It also showed good discriminant validity between staff members of professional and non-professional groups. This is a brief, valid and reliable scale for measuring care home staff preparedness for providing palliative and end-of-life care. It can be used to identify their concerns and training needs in providing palliative and end-of-life care, and as an outcome measure to evaluate the effects of interventional studies for capacity building in this regard. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; ••: ••-••. © 2018 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  7. EMS providers' perceptions of safety climate and adherence to safe work practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseo, Laura J; Murray, Kate A; White, Laura F; Dyer, Sophia; Mitchell, Patricia A; Fernandez, William G

    2012-01-01

    Occupational injuries are an important source of morbidity for emergency medical services (EMS) providers. Previous work has shown that employee perceptions of an organization's commitment to safety (i.e., safety climate) correlate with adherence to safe practices. To assess the association between perceived safety climate and compliance with safety procedures in an urban EMS system with >100,000 calls/year. EMS providers were issued a self-administered survey that included questions on demographics, years of experience, perceived safety climate, and adherence to safety procedures. Safety climate was assessed with a 20-item validated instrument. Adherence to safety procedures was assessed with a nine-item list of safety behaviors. Strict adherence to safety procedures was defined as endorsing "agree" or "strongly agree" on 80% of items. The effect of safety climate on compliance with safe practices was estimated using multiple logistic regression. One hundred ninety-six of 221 providers (89%) completed surveys; 74% were male; the median age was 36-40 years; and the median amount of experience was 8 years. One hundred twenty-seven of 196 respondents (65%) reported strict adherence to safe work practice. Factor analysis confirmed the original six-factor grouping of questions; frequent safety-related feedback/training was significantly associated with safe practices (odds ratio [OR] = 2.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-4.51). EMS workers perceiving a high degree of perceived safety climate was associated with twofold greater odds of self-reported level of strict adherence to safe work practices. Frequent safety-related feedback/training was the one dimension of safety climate that had the strongest association with adherence to safe workplace behaviors.

  8. Knowledge and Beliefs of EMS Providers toward Lights and Siren Transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tennyson, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of warning lights and siren (WLS increases the risk of ambulance collisions. Multiple studies have failed to demonstrate a clinical benefit to the patients. We sought to investigate the degree to which providers understand the data and incorporate it into their practice. Methods: The authors distributed an anonymous survey to prehospital providers under their medical direction at staff and quality assurance meetings. The surveys asked the providers’ degree of agreement with four statements: transport with lights and siren shortens transport times; transport with lights and siren improves patient outcome; transport with lights and siren increases the risk of collision during transport; and transport with lights and siren reduces the utilization of “mutual aid” service. We compared responses between providers who had been in prior ambulance collisions and those who had not. Results: Few responses reached statistical significance, but respondents tended towards agreement that WLS use shortens transport times, that it does not improve outcomes, and that it increases the risk of collision. Despite the overall agreement with the published literature, respondents report >80% of transports are conducted using WLS. Conclusion: The data demonstrate the surveyed providers are aware of the risk posed by WLS to themselves, their patients, and the public. Nevertheless, their practice in the absence of rigid protocols suggests they disregard this knowledge. Despite a large number of prior ambulance collisions among the surveyed group, a high number of transports are conducted using WLS. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(3:464–471.

  9. The Education of Homeless Children: Rules, Rights and Practical Solutions. A Training Manual for Shelter Providers, Staff, Advocates and Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heybach, Laurene M.; Nix-Hodes, Patricia; Price, Sarah

    These training materials provide advocates with the tools needed to help families obtain a stable and effective education for their children despite the condition of homelessness and the trauma that accompanies it. Nine sections include: (1) "Introduction"; (2) "How Mobility Hurts Homeless Children and Schools"; (3) "Laws…

  10. Program evaluation of Sea Mar’s Chronic Care Program for Latino and Caucasian patients with type 2 diabetes: providers and staff perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bond GE

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gail E Bond,1 Laurie Rechholtz,1 Christina Bosa,1 Celine Impert,1,2 Sara Barker21College of Nursing, Seattle University, Seattle WA, USA; 2Sea Mar Community Health Center, Seattle, WA, USAProblem statement: Unprecedented consumption of health care resources in the USA coupled with increasing rates of chronic disease has fueled pursuit of improved models of health care delivery. The Chronic Care Model provides an organizational framework for chronic care management and practice improvement. Sea Mar, a community health care organization in Washington state, implemented the Chronic Care Model, but has not evaluated the outcomes related to provider and staff satisfaction. The specific aim of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Chronic Care Model with the addition of the Chronic Care Coordinator role.Approach: A descriptive method was used, which incorporated quantitative, and qualitative data from providers and clinic staff collected through a Web-based survey consisting of Likert-type questions sent via an electronic link.Results: This evaluation identified the strengths of and barriers to the chronic care model with a focus on provider and staff satisfaction regarding patient care since the addition of the Chronic Care Coordinator role. We found a high appreciation (94% and acceptance of the role; 80% agreed that the Chronic Care Coordinator was well-integrated into clinic operations. Major strengths of the program included more patient education, better follow-up, and improved team communications. Barriers to success included limited provider access, confusion regarding role expectations of the Chronic Care Coordinator, inconsistent communications, and Chronic Care Coordinator turnover.Conclusions/recommendations: Our findings help to validate the importance of community health organizations such as Sea Mar, the utility of the chronic care model, and the potential value for specific roles such as the Chronic Care Coordinator to

  11. Should we provide oral health training for staff caring for people with intellectual disabilities in community based residential care? A cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Giolla Phadraig, Caoimhin; Nunn, June; Guerin, Suzanne; Normand, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Oral health training is often introduced into community-based residential settings to improve the oral health of people with intellectual disabilities (ID). There is a lack of appropriate evaluation of such programs, leading to difficulty in deciding how best to allocate scarce resources to achieve maximum effect. This article reports an economic analysis of one such oral health program, undertaken as part of a cluster randomized controlled trial. Firstly, we report a cost-effectiveness analysis of training care-staff compared to no training, using incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). Effectiveness was measured as change in knowledge, reported behaviors, attitude and self-efficacy, using validated scales (K&BAS). Secondly, we costed training as it was scaled up to include all staff within the service provider in question. Data were collected in Dublin, Ireland in 2009. It cost between €7000 and €10,000 more to achieve modest improvement in K&BAS scores among a subsample of 162 care-staff, in comparison to doing nothing. Considering scaled up first round training, it cost between €58,000 and €64,000 to train the whole population of staff, from a combined dental and disability service perspective. Less than €15,000-€20,000 of this was additional to the cost of doing nothing (incremental cost). From a dental perspective, a further, second training cycle including all staff would cost between €561 and €3484 (capital costs) and €5815 (operating costs) on a two yearly basis. This study indicates that the program was a cost-effective means of improving self-reported measures and possibly oral health, relative to doing nothing. This was mainly due to low cost, rather than the large effect. In this instance, the use of cost effectiveness analysis has produced evidence, which may be more useful to decision makers than that arising from traditional methods of evaluation. There is a need for CEAs of effective interventions to allow comparison

  12. Professional Quality of Life of Veterans Affairs Staff and Providers in a Patient-Centered Care Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Sara M; LaVela, Sherri L

    2015-01-01

    Changes to the work environment prompted by the movement toward patient-centered care have the potential to improve occupational stress among health care workers by improving team-based work activities, collaboration, and employee-driven quality improvement. This study was conducted to examine professional quality of life among providers at patient-centered care pilot facilities. Surveys were conducted with 76 Veterans Affairs employees/providers at facilities piloting patient-centered care interventions, to assess demographics, workplace practices and views (team-based environment, employee voice, quality of communication, and turnover intention), and professional quality of life (compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress).Professional quality-of-life subscales were not related to employee position type, age, or gender. Employee voice measures were related to lower burnout and higher compassion satisfaction. In addition, employees who were considering leaving their position showed higher burnout and lower compassion satisfaction scores. None of the work practices showed relationships with secondary traumatic stress.

  13. Disruptive staff interactions: a serious source of inter-provider conflict and stress in health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Mona; Stecker, Mark M

    2014-07-01

    This study sought to explore the prevalence of workplace stress, gender differences, and the relationship of workplace incivility to the experience of stress. Effects of stress on performance have been explored for many years. Work stress has been at the root of many physical and psychological problems and has even been linked to medical errors and suboptimal patient outcomes. In this study, 617 respondents completed a Provider Conflict Questionnaire (PCQ) as well as a ten-item stress survey. Work was the main stressor according to 78.2% of respondents. The stress index was moderately high, ranging between 10 and 48 (mean = 25.5). Females demonstrated a higher stress index. Disruptive behavior showed a significant positive correlation with increased stress. This study concludes that employees of institutions with less disruptive behavior exhibited lower stress levels. This finding is important in improving employee satisfaction and reducing medical errors. It is difficult to retain experienced nurses, and stress is a significant contributor to job dissatisfaction. Moreover, workplace conflict and its correlation to increased stress levels must be managed as a strategy to reduce medical errors and increase job satisfaction.

  14. Perceptions of paramedics and emergency staff about the care they provide to people who self-harm: Constructivist metasynthesis of the qualitative literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Nigel; Rapport, Frances; Snooks, Helen

    2015-06-01

    Presentations of self-harm to paramedic and emergency staff are increasing, and despite being the first professionals encountered, patients who self-harm report the quality of care and attitudes from these staff are unsatisfactory. Understanding this care may provide opportunities to improve services. The aim of this study is to enhance knowledge building and theory generation in order to develop practice and policy through a metasynthesis of qualitative research relating to perceptions of paramedic and emergency care for people who self-harm. The metasynthesis draws on Evolved Grounded Theory Methodology (EGTM). A search was undertaken of CINAHL, MEDLINE, OVID and Psych INFO, and grey literature. Subject headings of 'self-harm' were used alongside key words 'suicide', 'paramedic' 'emergency', 'overdose', 'pre-hospital' mental health, ambulance, perceptions of care, emergency. A total of 1103 papers were retrieved; 12 were finally included. No papers investigated paramedic care for self-harm. The following metaphors emerged: (a) frustration, futility and legitimacy of care; (b) first contact in the pre-hospital environment: talking, immediate and lasting implications of the moral agent; (c) decision making in self-harm: balancing legislation, risk and autonomy; (d) paramedics' perceptions: harnessing professionalism and opportunities to contribute to the care of self-harm. Paramedics are often the first health professional contact following self-harm, yet limited qualitative literature has explored this encounter. Metaphors revealed in this paper highlight challenges in decision making and legislation, also opportunities to improve care through professionalization and tailored education. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of provider type (nurse anesthetist or resident physician), staff assignments, and other covariates on daily evaluations of anesthesiologists' quality of supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Ledolter, Johannes; Smith, Thomas C; Griffiths, David; Hindman, Bradley J

    2014-09-01

    At many U.S. healthcare facilities, supervision of anesthesiology residents and/or Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) is a major daily responsibility of anesthesiologists. Our department implemented a daily process by which the supervision provided by each anesthesiologist working in operating rooms was evaluated by the anesthesiology resident(s) and CRNA(s) with whom they worked the previous day. Requests for evaluation were sent daily via e-mail to each resident and CRNA after working in an operating room. Supervision scores were analyzed after 6 months, and aligned with the cases' American Society of Anesthesiologists Relative Value Guide units. (1) Mean monthly evaluation completion rates exceeded 85% (residents P = 0.0001, CRNAs P = 0.0005). (2) Pairwise by anesthesiologist, residents and CRNAs mean supervision scores were correlated (P supervision scores provided by residents were: (a) greater when a resident had more units of work that day with the rated anesthesiologist (P supervision" significantly share commonalities, supervision scores should be analyzed separately for residents and CRNAs. Although mean supervision scores differ markedly among anesthesiologists, supervision scores are influenced negligibly by staff assignments (e.g., how busy the anesthesiologist is with other operating rooms).

  16. O atendimento do doente mental em pronto-socorro geral: sentimentos e ações dos membros da equipe de enfermagem Caring of the mental ill patient in the emergency room: feelings and attitudes from nurse's staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudinei José Gomes Campos

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Estuda-se aqui o cotidiano de assistência ao doente mental apresentado pelos membros da equipe de enfermagem de um Pronto-Socorro Geral. Os objetivos foram descrever os sentimentos destes indivíduos em relação ao doente mental e seu atendimento naquele local e analisar como é oferecida esta assistência. A relação dinâmica entre pensar, sentir e agir, demonstrou que a maioria dos indivíduos estudados apresentava fortes concepções de senso comum. Os sentimentos variavam entre pena, medo e raiva, dependendo do tipo de comportamento apresentado pelos pacientes. O atendimento prestado foi quase exclusivamente voltado aos aspectos técnicos da profissão, em uma vertente organicista/biológica.This work is based upon a day-by-day study of the services provid by a nurse team at a mentally impaired emergency room. Our aim is to study staff's reactions toward the patients as well as service itself We could feel the dynamic relation among thinking, feeling and performance created strong conceptions on individuals based upon a common sense The feelings noticed are: pity, scare and rage depending upon behavior. The assistance given to the mentally impaired is, at large, based exclusively on technical data resorted to organic/biological aspects.

  17. A Descriptive Analysis of Care Provided by Law Enforcement Prior to EMS Arrival in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Aaron B; Core, S Brent; Lohse, Christine M; Sztajnkrycer, Matthew D

    2018-04-01

    Study Objectives Law enforcement is increasingly viewed as a key component in the out-of-hospital chain of survival, with expanded roles in cardiac arrest, narcotic overdose, and traumatic bleeding. Little is known about the nature of care provided by law enforcement prior to the arrival of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) assets. The purpose of the current study was to perform a descriptive analysis of events reported to a national EMS database. This study was a descriptive analysis of the 2014 National Emergency Medical Services Information System (NEMSIS) public release research data set, containing EMS emergency response data from 41 states. Code E09_02 1200 specifically identifies care provided by law enforcement prior to EMS arrival. A total of 25,835,729 unique events were reported. Of events in which pre-arrival care was documented, 2.0% received prior aid by law enforcement. Patients receiving law enforcement care prior to EMS arrival were more likely to be younger (52.8 [SD=23.3] years versus 58.7 [SD=23.3] years), male (54.8% versus 46.7%), and white (80.3% versus 77.5%). Basic Life Support (BLS) EMS response was twice as likely in patients receiving prior aid by law enforcement. Multiple-casualty incidents were five times more likely with prior aid by law enforcement. Compared with prior aid by other services, law enforcement pre-arrival care was more likely with motor vehicle accidents, firearm assaults, knife assaults, blunt assaults, and drug overdoses, and less likely at falls and childbirths. Cardiac arrest was significantly more common in patients receiving prior aid by law enforcement (16.5% versus 2.6%). Tourniquet application and naloxone administration were more common in the law enforcement prior aid group. Where noted, law enforcement pre-arrival care occurs in 2.0% of EMS patient encounters. The majority of cases involve cardiac arrest, motor vehicle accidents, and assaults. Better understanding of the nature of law enforcement care is

  18. Tanning salons in Santiago, Chile: the knowledge of the staff in charge and the quality of information provided to potential clients before and after a new regulatory law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomone, Claudia; Majerson, Daniela; Molgó, Montserrat; de Santa María, Mariá Luisa Sáenz; Romero, William

    2009-04-01

    In recent years, the use of artificial tanning devices has become very popular in Chile. In April, 2007, a new law was established to regulate the non-medical use of tanning beds and tanning booths. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level and quality of information provided by tanning salon staff to clients before deciding on using the services. This information was collected before and 6 months after the law was enacted by researchers visiting tanning salons posing as potential clients. Using a previously designed questionnaire, 24 tanning salons in Santiago, Chile, were evaluated by researchers acting as potential customers without experience with artificial tanning devices. Employees were questioned using a hidden questionnaire before and 6 months after enactment of the law. Before the law, 25% of the establishments gave spontaneous information about the risks of using tanning beds, which increased to 45.8% after enactment of the law. Clients never received written information, either before or after enactment of the law. On both evaluations, more than 1/3 of the employees affirmed that there were no risks in using tanning beds. Before enactment of the law, only 12.5% of the tanning salons required the use of goggles, while after the law, this increased to 25% (P=NS). Only two establishments required that clients sign an informed consent form after enactment of the law. The level of knowledge among employees in tanning salons was very low and the quality of the information they provided to the clients was very poor. It was important to legislate on ultraviolet tanning services, but at present, the impact of the law has been very limited.

  19. Medical Oversight, Educational Core Content, and Proposed Scopes of Practice of Wilderness EMS Providers: A Joint Project Developed by Wilderness EMS Educators, Medical Directors, and Regulators Using a Delphi Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millin, Michael G; Johnson, David E; Schimelpfenig, Tod; Conover, Keith; Sholl, Matthew; Busko, Jonnathan; Alter, Rachael; Smith, Will; Symonds, Jennifer; Taillac, Peter; Hawkins, Seth C

    2017-01-01

    A disparity exists between the skills needed to manage patients in wilderness EMS environments and the scopes of practice that are traditionally approved by state EMS regulators. In response, the National Association of EMS Physicians Wilderness EMS Committee led a project to define the educational core content supporting scopes of practice of wilderness EMS providers and the conditions when wilderness EMS providers should be required to have medical oversight. Using a Delphi process, a group of experts in wilderness EMS, representing educators, medical directors, and regulators, developed model educational core content. This core content is a foundation for wilderness EMS provider scopes of practice and builds on both the National EMS Education Standards and the National EMS Scope of Practice Model. These experts also identified the conditions when oversight is needed for wilderness EMS providers. By consensus, this group of experts identified the educational core content for four unique levels of wilderness EMS providers: Wilderness Emergency Medical Responder (WEMR), Wilderness Emergency Medical Technician (WEMT), Wilderness Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (WAEMT), and Wilderness Paramedic (WParamedic). These levels include specialized skills and techniques pertinent to the operational environment. The skills and techniques increase in complexity with more advanced certification levels, and address the unique circumstances of providing care to patients in the wilderness environment. Furthermore, this group identified that providers having a defined duty to act should be functioning with medical oversight. This group of experts defined the educational core content supporting the specific scopes of practice that each certification level of wilderness EMS provider should have when providing patient care in the wilderness setting. Wilderness EMS providers are, indeed, providing health care and should thus function within defined scopes of practice and with

  20. Percepção dos efeitos do trabalho em turnos sobre a saúde e a vida social em funcionários da enfermagem em um hospital universitário do Estado de São Paulo Nursing staff perceptions of the effects of shift work on health and social life at the São Paulo State University hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester de S. Costa

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho em turnos existe desde o início da vida social dos homens, sendo utilizado em diferentes setores, como na indústria de produção de bens de consumo e de serviços. A área da saúde exige o sistema em turnos para manutenção de atividades durante 24 horas. Teve-se como objetivo identificar os sistemas de turnos em funcionários de enfermagem em um hospital universitário, avaliar a percepção sobre os prováveis efeitos do trabalho em turnos em sua saúde e vida social e o grau de participação desses funcionários na forma de organização de sua jornada. Trata-se de uma pesquisa descritiva e exploratória, cujos resultados foram obtidos mediante questionário aplicado a 348 funcionários da enfermagem do Hospital de Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, São Paulo. Dentre os resultados, observou-se que, em sua maioria, eles tinham menos de 40 anos, eram casados, do sexo feminino, com um filho pelo menos, cumprindo uma escala de turnos alternados, com freqüência de revezamento superior a quinze dias e referindo queixas de caráter neuro-psíquico, gastrintestinal e cardiovascular. Houve ainda queixas sobre relacionamento e tempo de convivência. Na maioria das vezes, era pouca a participação do funcionário na forma de organização de sua escala de trabalho.There is a relationship between shift work and the beginning of organized life. Health services require shift work to keep activities running twenty-four hours a day. This study thus aimed to identify nursing staff shift work systems in a university hospital, evaluate health workers' perceptions of the possible effects of shift work on their health and social life, and assess workers' participation in preparing nursing schedules. In terms of materials and methods, this was an exploratory and descriptive study with a sample of 348 nursing staff members, using an appropriate questionnaire. Most were married women under 40 with at least one child, working on

  1. Subcontracting in electronics : from contract manufacturers to providers of electronic manufacturing services (EMS)

    OpenAIRE

    Liemt van, Gijsbert

    2007-01-01

    Discusses how the top contract manufacturers in the electronics industry try to become providers of electronic manufacturing services by deepening and broadening the rage of services that they offer and by diversifying into markets other than computing and telecommunications.

  2. Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Remove of the staff association office   The Staff Association offices are going to be renovated during the coming four months, February to May 2014. The physical move from our current premises 64/R-002 to our temporary office in  510/R-010 will take place on Friday January 31st, so the Secretariat will be closed on that day. Hence, from Monday February 3rd until the end of May 2014 the Staff Association Secretariat will be located in 510/R-010 (entrance just across the CERN Printshop).    

  3. New staff contract policy

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at TREF and on the recommendation of the Finance Committee, Council approved a new staff contract policy, which became effective on 1 January 2006. Its application is covered by a new Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) 'Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members'. The revised circular replaces the previous Circulars No. 9 (Rev. 3) 'Staff contracts' and No. 2 (Rev. 2) 'Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period for staff members'. The main features of the new contract policy are as follows: The new policy provides chances for long-term employment for all staff recruits staying for four years without distinguishing between those assigned to long-term or short-term activities when joining CERN. In addition, it presents a number of simplifications for the award of ICs. There are henceforth only 2 types of contract: Limited Duration (LD) contracts for all recruitment and Indefinite Contracts (IC) for...

  4. Monolayer-crystal streptavidin support films provide an internal standard of cryo-EM image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Bong-Gyoon [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Watson, Zoe [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Cate, Jamie H. D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Glaeser, Robert M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Analysis of images of biotinylated Escherichia coli 70S ribosome particles, bound to streptavidin affinity grids, demonstrates that the image-quality of particles can be predicted by the image-quality of the monolayer crystalline support film. Also, the quality of the Thon rings is a good predictor of the image-quality of particles, but only when images of the streptavidin crystals extend to relatively high resolution. When the estimated resolution of streptavidin was 5 Å or worse, for example, the ribosomal density map obtained from 22,697 particles went to only 9.5 Å, while the resolution of the map reached 4.0 Å for the same number of particles, when the estimated resolution of streptavidin crystal was 4 Å or better. It thus is easy to tell which images in a data set ought to be retained for further work, based on the highest resolution seen for Bragg peaks in the computed Fourier transforms of the streptavidin component. The refined density map obtained from 57,826 particles obtained in this way extended to 3.6 Å, a marked improvement over the value of 3.9 Å obtained previously from a subset of 52,433 particles obtained from the same initial data set of 101,213 particles after 3-D classification. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that interaction with the air-water interface can damage particles when the sample becomes too thin. Finally, streptavidin monolayer crystals appear to provide a good indication of when that is the case.

  5. Supply-related drivers of staff motivation for providing intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy in Tanzania: evidence from two rural districts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mubyazi Godfrey M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since its introduction in the national antenatal care (ANC system in Tanzania in 2001, little evidence is documented regarding the motivation and performance of health workers (HWs in the provision of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp services in the national ANC clinics and the implications such motivation and performance might have had on HWs and services' compliance with the recommended IPTp delivery guidelines. This paper describes the supply-related drivers of motivation and performance of HWs in administering IPTp doses among other ANC services delivered in public and private health facilities (HFs in Tanzania, using a case study of Mkuranga and Mufindi districts. Methods Interviews were conducted with 78 HWs participating in the delivery of ANC services in private and public HFs and were supplemented by personal communications with the members of the district council health management team. The research instrument used in the data collection process contained a mixture of closed and open-ended questions. Some of the open-ended questions had to be coded in the form that allowed their analysis quantitatively. Results In both districts, respondents acknowledged IPTp as an essential intervention, but expressed dissatisfaction with their working environments constraining their performance, including health facility (HF unit understaffing; unsystematic and unfriendly supervision by CHMT members; limited opportunities for HW career development; and poor (HF infrastructure and staff houses. Data also suggest that poor working conditions negatively affect health workers' motivation to perform for ANC (including IPTp services. Similarities and differences were noted in terms of motivational factors for ANC service delivery between the HWs employed in private HFs and those in public HFs: those in private facilities were more comfortable with staff residential houses, HF buildings, equipment

  6. Supply-related drivers of staff motivation for providing intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy in Tanzania: evidence from two rural districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Since its introduction in the national antenatal care (ANC) system in Tanzania in 2001, little evidence is documented regarding the motivation and performance of health workers (HWs) in the provision of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) services in the national ANC clinics and the implications such motivation and performance might have had on HWs and services' compliance with the recommended IPTp delivery guidelines. This paper describes the supply-related drivers of motivation and performance of HWs in administering IPTp doses among other ANC services delivered in public and private health facilities (HFs) in Tanzania, using a case study of Mkuranga and Mufindi districts. Methods Interviews were conducted with 78 HWs participating in the delivery of ANC services in private and public HFs and were supplemented by personal communications with the members of the district council health management team. The research instrument used in the data collection process contained a mixture of closed and open-ended questions. Some of the open-ended questions had to be coded in the form that allowed their analysis quantitatively. Results In both districts, respondents acknowledged IPTp as an essential intervention, but expressed dissatisfaction with their working environments constraining their performance, including health facility (HF) unit understaffing; unsystematic and unfriendly supervision by CHMT members; limited opportunities for HW career development; and poor (HF) infrastructure and staff houses. Data also suggest that poor working conditions negatively affect health workers' motivation to perform for ANC (including IPTp) services. Similarities and differences were noted in terms of motivational factors for ANC service delivery between the HWs employed in private HFs and those in public HFs: those in private facilities were more comfortable with staff residential houses, HF buildings, equipment, availability of water

  7. Challenges to providing quality substance abuse treatment services for American Indian and Alaska native communities: perspectives of staff from 18 treatment centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Substance abuse continues to exact a significant toll, despite promising advancements in treatment, and American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities remain disproportionately impacted. Understanding the challenges to providing quality substance abuse treatment to AI/AN communities could ultimately result in more effective treatment interventions, but no multi-site studies have examined this important issue. Methods This qualitative study examined the challenges of providing substance abuse treatment services for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. We conducted key informant interviews and focus groups at 18 substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities. Seventy-six service participants (21 individuals in clinical administrative positions and 55 front-line clinicians) participated in the project. Interview transcripts were coded to identify key themes. Results We found that the challenges of bringing effective substance abuse treatment to AI/AN communities fell into three broad categories: challenges associated with providing clinical services, those associated with the infrastructure of treatment settings, and those associated with the greater service/treatment system. These sets of challenges interact to form a highly complex set of conditions for the delivery of these services. Conclusions Our findings suggest that substance abuse treatment services for AI/AN communities require more integrated, individualized, comprehensive, and longer-term approaches to care. Our three categories of challenges provide a useful framework for eliciting challenges to providing quality substance abuse treatment in other substance abuse treatment settings. PMID:24938281

  8. Job satisfaction and turnover intentions among health care staff providing services for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naburi, Helga; Mujinja, Phares; Kilewo, Charles; Orsini, Nicola; Bärnighausen, Till; Manji, Karim; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Sando, David; Geldsetzer, Pascal; Chalamila, Guerino; Ekström, Anna Mia

    2017-09-06

    Option B+ for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV (i.e., lifelong antiretroviral treatment for all pregnant and breastfeeding mothers living with HIV) was initiated in Tanzania in 2013. While there is evidence that this policy has benefits for the health of the mother and the child, Option B+ may also increase the workload for health care providers in resource-constrained settings, possibly leading to job dissatisfaction and unwanted workforce turnover. From March to April 2014, a questionnaire asking about job satisfaction and turnover intentions was administered to all nurses at 36 public-sector health facilities offering antenatal and PMTCT services in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with job dissatisfaction and intention to quit one's job. Slightly over half (54%, 114/213) of the providers were dissatisfied with their current job, and 35% (74/213) intended to leave their job. Most of the providers were dissatisfied with low salaries and high workload, but satisfied with workplace harmony and being able to follow their moral values. The odds of reporting to be globally dissatisfied with one's job were high if the provider was dissatisfied with salary (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 5.6, 95% CI 1.2-26.8), availability of protective gear (aOR 4.0, 95% CI 1.5-10.6), job description (aOR 4.3, 95% CI 1.2-14.7), and working hours (aOR 3.2, 95% CI 1.3-7.6). Perceiving clients to prefer PMTCT Option B+ reduced job dissatisfaction (aOR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1-0.8). The following factors were associated with providers' intention to leave their current job: job stability dissatisfaction (aOR 3.7, 95% CI 1.3-10.5), not being recognized by one's superior (aOR 3.6, 95% CI 1.7-7.6), and poor feedback on the overall unit performance (aOR 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.8). Job dissatisfaction and turnover intentions are comparatively high among nurses in Dar es Salaam's public-sector maternal care

  9. The Staff Association and you

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2013-01-01

    The Staff Association, your representative with the Management and the Member States The article VII 1.01 of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SR&R) provides that “the relations between the Director-General and the personnel shall be established either on an individual basis or on a collective basis with the Staff Association as intermediary”. This essential role of the Staff representatives, of being the spokesperson of the entire staff of the Organization vis-à-vis the Director-General and the Members States, is achieved through regular participation in the various joint advisory committees defined in the SR&R. The most important are the Standing Concertation Committee and the TREF, tripartite forum where your representatives meet with the Member States delegates, in the presence of the Management, to explain the position of the staff on the various issues concerning employment conditions. The Finance Committee also gives the opportunity to the Staff Association to ...

  10. TERRITORIAL DISPARITIES REGARDING THE DISTRIBUTION OF HEALTH SERVICE PROVIDERS IN ROMANIA AFTER JOINING THE EUROPEAN UNION STUDY CASE: MEDICAL STAFF WITH TERTIARY LEVEL OF EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babucea Ana-Gabriela

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In Romania 90ˈs, there was a relatively low level of regional disparities compared with western economies in all fields, but inequalities have emerged and widened rapidly because only certain areas, especially urban areas have benefited from inflows of capital and specialized human resources. Currently, Romania has a low level of development between EU countries, five of the eight NUTS 2 regions being the most underdeveloped in Europe. The aim of this research is a comparative analysis of developments and trends manifested in the public health system in terms of distribution of health services providers at the regional level in Romania. For the analysis of regional disparities, the research seeks to highlight a comprehensive image of the level and dynamics of the Romania territorial inequalities regarding the personnel with tertiary education, which includes physicians, dentists, and pharmaceutical chemists, as professional providers of the health services. Were took into account statistical indicators that describe the distribution of such as healthcare providers, at level of the eight Romanian NUTS2 regions, highlighting inequalities in access to health services for the population. We used available data, accessed from National Institute of Statistics of Romania, regarding Romania, and itˊs eight regions. We appeal also to statistical publications at the national and European level, other data analysis, and experts' opinions expressed in recent articles in the field. In order to identify the factors that can reduce the disparities, and ensure the equity for disadvantaged population, in terms of ensuring the health system of medical services in parallel with a homogeneous distribution of resources and services in this area, we apply specific statistics for territorial analysis and comparisons.

  11. 22 CFR 902.3 - Board staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Board staff. 902.3 Section 902.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD ORGANIZATION § 902.3 Board staff. The chairperson shall select the Board's executive secretary and other staff provided for in the Act. The executive secretary and staff...

  12. Integration of CERN staff

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    An example of the integration of CERN staff in the neighbouring communes is provided by the hamlet of Bugnon at St-Genis-Pouilly (Ain), FRance. The CERN installation on the Swiss site are visible on the left in the background. Behind them the Saleve mountain in Haute-Savoie.

  13. Compreendendo as intenções das ações de um corpo docente multiprofissional em um curso de graduação em enfermagem Comprendiendo las intenciones de las acciones de un cuerpo docente multiprofesional en un curso de pregrado en enfermería Understanding the intentions of actions of a multiprofessional teaching staff at a nursing undergraduate course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Prado

    2010-08-01

    la vida personal y profesional de los mismos.The objective of this study was to understand the intentions of actions of a nursing teaching staff and the ones from other healthcare areas at a nursing undergraduate course. Four teachers from each category were interviewed using the guiding question: What do you expect from your teaching action in this nursing course? It was used the social phenomenology by Alfred Schütz as the referential of analysis. It was revealed that the intention of actions from the teaching staff are working with the students seeing them as future professionals trying to make them reflect on their knowledge, attitudes and behaviors, hoping them to think in a critical way, make decisions and be technically competent. They also want to collaborate for the students' self-growth, believing that being a teaching staff member is being a researcher helping students to acquire investigative view and having intention to provide meaningful contends to students' personal and professional lives.

  14. Estimating the nursing staff required in a new hospital Estimación de personal de enfermería en un hospital nuevo Estimativa do quadro de pessoal de enfermagem em um novo hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Rossetti

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Opening a new hospital poses a complex and consequential set of challenges. One of these challenges is to estimate the nursing staff. The aim of this article is to report the entire process adopted to estimate the required nursing staff for a new Hospital in Brazil. The nursing staff was projected according to the Brazilian Federal Nursing Council (Cofen. We applied an equation to estimate nursing staff and compared the results with two other existing hospitals. A significant difference (pAbrir un nuevo hospital es un asunto complejo y sujeto a consecuencias. Uno de los desafíos es estimar el personal de enfermería. El objetivo de este trabajo es describir el proceso adoptado para estimar el personal de enfermería en un hospital nuevo en Brasil. El número de enfermeras del nuevo Hospital fue calculado de acuerdo con el método recomendado por el Consejo Federal de Enfermería de Brasil (Cofen. Los resultados se compararon con dos hospitales similares, ya en funcionamiento. Se encontró una diferencia significativa (p Abrir um novo hospital é desafio complexo e passível de consequências. Um desses desafios é estimar o quadro de pessoal de enfermagem. O objetivo deste artigo foi relatar o processo adotado para estimar o quadro de pessoal de enfermagem em um novo hospital, no Brasil. O quadro de enfermagem desse hospital foi projetado segundo o método recomendado pelo Conselho Federal de Enfermagem (COFEN. Os resultados foram comparados com o dimensionamento de dois hospitais semelhantes, já em funcionamento. Houve diferença significativa (p<0,05 quando se comparou a relação enfermeiro/técnico/auxiliar de enfermagem, recomendada pelo COFEN, nos três hospitais. Essa diferença, estatisticamente significante, foi decorrente do reduzido quadro de enfermeiros, nas unidades de terapia intensiva. Após um ano de sua inauguração, foi necessário rever o quadro de enfermagem projetado, considerando as informações reais para justificar o

  15. New National Cryo-EM Facility Provides Access to Cutting-Edge Technology for Cancer Research Community | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer researchers nationwide now have access to the latest technology in the field of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM)—the study of protein structures at atomic resolution—at the Frederick National Lab for Cancer Research. The emerging technol

  16. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  17. A construção do Estado-Providência em Portugal: evolução da despesa social de 1935 a 2003

    OpenAIRE

    Pereirinha, José A.; Carolo, Daniel F.

    2009-01-01

    Durante o período do Estado Novo, com a criação do sistema da Previdência Social, formam-se as bases institucionais em que assenta o actual Estado-providência em Portugal. As decisões políticas sobre a previdência tomadas no período entre 1935 e 1973, em particular a Reforma da Previdência de 1962, constituíram marcos significativos na história dessa construção. Neste artigo apresentam-se séries estatísticas que foram construídas, para o período do Estado Novo, com o objectivo de caracterizar...

  18. Readiness of hospitals to provide Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) and documentation of KMC service delivery: Analysis of Malawi 2014 Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care (EmONC) survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavula, Kondwani; Likomwa, Dyson; Valsangkar, Bina; Luhanga, Richard; Chimtembo, Lydia; Dube, Queen; Gobezie, Wasihun Andualem; Guenther, Tanya

    2017-12-01

    Malawi introduced Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) in 1999 as part of its efforts to address newborn morbidity and mortality and has continued to expand KMC services across the country. Yet, data on availability of KMC services and routine service provision are limited. Data from the 2014 Emergency Obstetric Newborn Care (EmONC) survey, which was a census of all 87 hospitals in Malawi, were analyzed. The WHO service availability and readiness domains were used to generate indicators for KMC service readiness and an additional domain for documentation of KMC services was included. Levels of KMC service delivery were quantified using data extracted from a 12-month register review and a KMC initiation rate was calculated for each facility by dividing the reported number of babies initiated on KMC by the number of live births at facility. We defined three levels of KMC readiness and two levels of KMC operational status. 79% of hospitals (69/87) reported providing inpatient KMC services. More than half of the hospitals (62%; 54/87) met the most basic definition of readiness (staff, space for KMC and functional weighing scale) and 35% (30/87) met an expanded definition of readiness (guidelines, staff, space, scale and register in use). Only 15 % (13/87) of hospitals had all KMC tracer items. Less than half of the hospitals (43%; 37/87) met criteria for KMC operational status at minimum levels (≥1/100 live births), and just 16% (14/87) met criteria for KMC operational status at routine levels (≥5/100 live births). Our study found large differences between reported levels of KMC services and documented levels of KMC readiness and service provision among hospitals in Malawi. It is recommended that facility assessments of services such as KMC include record reviews to better estimate service availability and delivery. Further efforts to strengthen the capacity of Malawian hospitals to deliver KMC are needed.

  19. Get the Staff You Need This Summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Christy L.

    1997-01-01

    Strategies for recruiting camp staff include tailoring messages to the needs and interests of prospective staff; utilizing former staff; hiring older workers; encouraging parents, former campers, and special interest groups to volunteer; and offering competitive pay. Provides an example of a target population (Generation X, born 1963-83) and key…

  20. Short Communication Employee -Driven Staff Training and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the concept of staff training and development within the South African context. The changing labour legislation in South Africa makes it mandatory for the employer to provide training and development. However, staff have an important role to play in staff training and development. The paper gives an ...

  1. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Association will shortly be renewing the mandate of half of the Staff Council. This is an opportunity for you to become more directly involved in the Staff Association's work and help promote and defend the staff's interests and, more broadly, those of the Organization itself.

  2. Composição da equipe de enfermagem em Unidades de Terapia Intensiva Composición del equipo de enfermería en Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos Composition of the nursing staff in Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Galan Perroca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever a composição e distribuição da equipe de enfermagem em Unidades de Terapia Intensiva (UTI. METODO: Estudo descritivo, exploratório, realizado em 17 UTIs de seis instituições hospitalares localizadas na Região Noroeste do Estado de São Paulo. RESULTADOS: Foram encontrados, em média, os seguintes percentuais: 13,1% de enfermeiros, 11,2% técnicos e 75,7% auxiliares de enfermagem. A relação enfermeiro/leito apresentou variação de 0,08 a 0,80 (Md 0,31(0,27;0,41 e a enfermagem/leito de 1,36 a 4,0 (Md 2,45(1,62;2,91. CONCLUSÃO: a composição quanti-qualitativa da equipe de enfermagem nas Unidades de Terapia Intensiva investigadas não se encontra em concordância com os valores recomendados pelo Conselho Federal de Enfermagem (COFEN, no que ser refere a pacientes críticos.OBJETIVO: Describir la composición y distribución del equipo de enfermería en Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos (UCI. METODO: Estudio descriptivo, exploratorio, realizado en 17 UCIs de seis instituciones hospitalarias localizadas en la Región Nor Oeste del Estado de Sao Paulo. RESULTADOS: Fueron encontrados, en promedio, los siguientes porcentajes: 13,1% de enfermeros, 11,2% de técnicos y 75,7% auxiliares de enfermería. La relación enfermero/cama presentó variación de 0,08 a 0,80 (Md 0,31(0,27;0,41 y la enfermería/cama de 1,36 a 4,0 (Md 2,45(1,62;2,91. CONCLUSION: la composición cuanti-cualitativa del equipo de enfermería en las Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos investigadas no se encuentra en concordancia con los valores recomendados por el Consejo Federal de Enfermería (COFEN, en lo que se refiere a pacientes críticos.OBJECTIVE: To describe the composition and distribution of nursing staff in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU. METHOD: This exploratory study was conducted in 17 ICUs within six hospitals located in the northwestern region of São Paulo. RESULTS: We found on average the following percentages: 13.1% professional nurses

  3. E3 Staff Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E3 Staff database is maintained by E3 PDMS (Professional Development & Management Services) office. The database is Mysql. It is manually updated by E3 staff as...

  4. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Typically, ground staff scheduling is centrally planned for each terminal in an airport. The advantage of this is that the staff is efficiently utilized, but a disadvantage is that staff spends considerable time walking between stands. In this paper a decentralized approach for ground staff...... scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the staff scheduling is planned decentralized for each zone. The advantage of this approach is that the staff...... work in a smaller area of the terminal and thus spends less time walking between stands. When planning decentralized the allocation of stands to flights influences the staff scheduling since the workload in a zone depends on which flights are allocated to stands in the zone. Hence solving the problem...

  5. Staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in South African public sector mental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To document staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in public. sector mental health services in South Africa. Design. Cross-sectional survey. Method. Aquestionnaire was distributed to provincial mental health co-ordinators requesting numbers of full-time equivalent (FTE) staff who provide mental health care at all ...

  6. CHIEF OF STAFF FINANCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Internal Audit, Military. Museums, Documentation. Service, Language. Service, Financial Co-ordination, Chief Pay Mas- ter, Programming and Budget, Electronic Data. Processing and Expenditure Control. Chief of Staff Finance. With effect from 13 February 1978 Chief of Staff. Management Services became Chief of Staff.

  7. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2007-01-01

    The Staff Association will shortly be renewing the mandate of half of the Staff Council. This is an opportunity for you to become more directly involved in the Staff Association’s work and help promote and defend the staff’s interests and, more broadly, those of the Organization itself.

  8. Delivery, immediate newborn and cord care practices in Pemba Tanzania: a qualitative study of community, hospital staff and community level care providers for knowledge, attitudes, belief systems and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Usha; Gittelsohn, Joel; Suleiman, Atifa Moh'd; Suleiman, Shekhia Moh'd; Dutta, Arup; Ali, Said Mohammed; Gupta, Shilpi; Black, Robert E; Sazawal, Sunil

    2014-05-22

    Deaths during the neonatal period account for almost two-thirds of all deaths in the first year of life and 40 percent of deaths before the age of five. Most of these deaths could be prevented through proven cost-effective interventions. Although there are some recent data from sub-Saharan Africa, but there is paucity of qualitative data from Zanzibar and cord care practices data from most of East Africa. We undertook a qualitative study in Pemba Island as a pilot to explore the attitudes, beliefs and practices of the community and health workers related to delivery, newborn and cord care with the potential to inform the main chlorhexidine (CHX) trial. 80 in-depth interviews (IDI) and 11 focus group discussions (FGD) involving mothers, grandmothers, fathers, traditional birth attendants and other health service providers from the community were undertaken. All IDIs and FGDs were audio taped, transcribed and analyzed using ATLAS ti 6.2. Poor transportation, cost of delivery at hospitals, overcrowding and ill treatment by hospital staff are some of the obstacles for achieving higher institutional delivery. TBAs and health professionals understand the need of using sterilized equipments to reduce risk of infection to both mothers and their babies during delivery. Despite this knowledge, use of gloves during delivery and hand washing before delivery were seldom reported. Early initiation of breastfeeding and feeding colostrum was almost universal. Hospital personnel and trained TBAs understood the importance of keeping babies warm after birth and delayed baby's first bath. The importance of cord care was well recognized in the community. Nearly all TBAs counseled the mothers to protect the cord from dust, flies and mosquitoes or any other kind of infections by covering it with cloth. There was consensus among respondents that CHX liquid cord cleansing could be successfully implemented in the community with appropriate education and awareness. The willingness of

  9. Implications of staff 'churn' for nurse managers, staff, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine; Roche, Michael; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Catling-Paull, Christine

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the term "churn" is used not only because of the degree of change to staffing, but also because some of the reasons for staff movement are not classified as voluntary turnover. The difficulties for the nurse managing a unit with the degree of "churn" should not be under-estimated. Changes to skill mix and the proportions of full-time, agency, and temporary staff present challenges in providing clinical leadership, scheduling staff, performance management, and supervision. Perhaps more importantly, it is likely that there is an impact on the continuity of care provided in the absence of continuity of staffing. A greater understanding of the human and financial costs and consequences, and a willingness to change established practices at the institutional and ward level, are needed.

  10. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  11. 10 CFR 2.1505 - Role of the NRC staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Role of the NRC staff. 2.1505 Section 2.1505 Energy... Legislative Hearings § 2.1505 Role of the NRC staff. The NRC staff shall be available to answer any Commission or presiding officer's questions on staff-prepared documents, provide additional information or...

  12. Training of technical staff and technical staff managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, G.F.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of Technical Staff and Technical Staff Managers training is to provide job skills enhancement to individuals selected to fill key technical positions within a nuclear utility. This training is unique in that unlike other training programs accredited by the National Academy for Nuclear Training, it does not lead to specific task qualification. The problems encountered when determining the student population and curriculum are a direct result of this major difference. Major problems encountered are determining who should attend the training, what amount of training is necessary and sufficient, and how to obtain the best feedback in order to effect substantive program improvements. These topics will be explored and possible solutions discussed

  13. Creativity in nursing staff development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, K A; Korte, P D

    1990-01-01

    The use of creative teaching techniques in nursing staff development generates enthusiasm for learning in both the learner and the educator. We report the process used to develop alternative teaching approaches and examples of these programs. A cost analysis of a traditional versus an innovative program is provided. Advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are reviewed.

  14. Resolution of the Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    You were many to attend the public information meetings organised in October and we thank you for your interest. In this decision phase of the current Five-Yearly Review of our employment conditions they provided an opportunity to review the Management proposals in detail. They were a moment of exchange also on the various topics under review, and your comments were many and very valuable. Meeting on Thursday 29th October, the Staff Council discussed once more these proposals. It considered that the "package" of proposed measures is not balanced enough in its current form. It decided to formulate additional requests to the Management, relating mainly to the effects of the introduction of the proposed new career system. The resolution adopted this morning also implies that the consultation of staff, originally foreseen next week, is postponed. The staff Council will reconvene in a special session on Thursday, 5th November to reassess its position depending on the progress made regarding its d...

  15. Dimensionamento de pessoal de enfermagem em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva para adultos Dimensionamiento del personal de enfermería en una Unidad de Terapia Intensiva para adultos Sizing the nursing staff in an Intensive Care Unit for Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Cristina Inoue

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar o dimensionamento do pessoal de enfermagem da Unidade de Terapia Intensiva de Adultos (UTI-A através da aplicação do Nursing Activities Score (NAS e da Resolução COFEN n.º 293/2004. MÉTODOS: Pesquisa descritiva, exploratória realizada na UTI-A de um hospital-escola do Paraná, entre novembro/2007 e maio/2008. A população constituiu-se de 107 pacientes que permaneceram mais de 24 horas nessa unidade. RESULTADOS: De acordo com os resultados, a média do NAS (697,3 pontos aponta para alta carga de trabalho de enfermagem; a equipe de enfermagem do setor deve contar com 40 profissionais em ao invés de 28; a proporção de 35,7% de enfermeiros não corresponde com o recomendado que é de 52,5%. CONCLUSÃO: Apesar de algumas limitações do instrumento NAS para mensurar a carga de trabalho de enfermagem em UTI e do Índice de Segurança Técnica empírico, recomendado nacionalmente, concluiu-se que os dois métodos utilizados contribuem para um dimensionamento do pessoal de enfermagem mais adequado às necessidades desse serviço.OBJETIVO: Analizar el dimensionamiento del personal de enfermería de la Unidad de Terapia Intensiva para Adultos (UTI-A por medio del Nursing Activities Score (NAS y de la Resolución COFEN Nº 293/2004. MÉTODOS: Estudio descriptivo y exploratorio realizado en la UTI-A, de un hospital escuela de Paraná, entre Noviembre/2007 y Mayo/2008. La población estuvo constituida por 107 pacientes que permanecieron más de 24 horas en dicha unidad. RESULTADOS: De acuerdo a los resultados, la media del NAS (697,3 puntos apunta para: Una alta carga de trabajo de la enfermería; el equipo de enfermería del sector debe contar con 40 profesionales en lugar de los 28 actuales; la proporción de 35,7% enfermeros no corresponde con lo recomendado, que es de 52,5%. CONCLUSIÓN: A pesar de algunas limitaciones del instrumento NAS para medir la carga de trabajo de enfermería en la UTI-A y del Índice de Seguridad

  16. Provider Beliefs Regarding Early Mobilization in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Christine L; Taipe, Cosme; Sobin, Brittany; Spadaro, Marissa; Gutwirth, Batsheva; Elgin, Larissa; Silver, Gabrielle; Greenwald, Bruce M; Traube, Chani

    Critically ill patients are at risk for short and long term morbidity. Early mobilization (EM) of critically ill adults is safe and feasible, with improvement in outcomes. There are limited studies evaluating EM in pediatric critical care patients. Provider beliefs and concerns must be evaluated prior to EM implementation in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). A survey was distributed to PICU providers assessing beliefs and concerns with regards to EM of PICU patients. Seventy-one providers responded. Most staff believed EM would be beneficial. The largest perceived benefits were decreased length of both stay and mechanical ventilation. The largest perceived concerns were risk of both endotracheal tube and central venous catheter dislodgement. Surveyed clinicians felt significantly more comfortable mobilizing the oldest as compared to the youngest patients (p<0.0001). Clinicians also felt significantly more comfortable mobilizing patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation in the oldest as compared to the youngest patients (p<0.0001). There is clear benefit to the EM of adult ICU patients, with evidence supporting its safety and feasibility. As pediatric patients pose different challenges, it is imperative to understand provider concerns prior to the implementation of EM. Our research demonstrates similar concerns between adult and pediatric programs, with the addition of significant concern surrounding EM in very young children. Understanding pediatric specific concerns with regards to EM will allow for the proper development and implementation of pediatric EM programs, allowing us to assess safety, feasibility, and ultimately outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation monitoring of PET staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trang, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Positron emission tomography (PET) is becoming a common diagnostic tool in hospitals, often located in and employing staff from the Nuclear Medicine or Radiology departments. Although similar in some ways, staff in PET departments are commonly found to have the highest radiation doses in the hospital environment due to unique challenges which PET tracers present in administration as well as production. The establishment of a PET centre with a dedicated cyclotron has raised concerns of radiation protection to the staff at the WA PET Centre and the Radiopharmaceutical Production and Development (RAPID) team. Since every PET centre has differing designs and practices, it was considered important to closely monitor the radiation dose to our staff so that improvements to practices and design could be made to reduce radiation dose. Electronic dosimeters (MGP DMC 2000XB), which have a facility to log time and dose at 10 second intervals, were provided to three PET technologists and three PET nurses. These were worn in the top pocket of their lab coats throughout a whole day. Each staff member was then asked to note down their duties throughout the day and also note the time they performed each duty. The duties would then correlate with the dose with which the electronic monitor recorded and an estimate of radiation dose per duty could be given. Also an estimate of the dose per day to each staff member could be made. PET nurses averaged approximately 20 μ8v per day getting their largest dose from caring for occasional problematic patients. Smaller doses of a 1-2 μ8v were recorded for injections and removing cannulas. PET technologists averaged approximately 15 μ8v per day getting their largest dose of 1-5μ8v mainly from positioning of patients and sometimes larger doses due to problematic patients. Smaller doses of 1-2 μ5v were again recorded for injections and removal of cannulas. Following a presentation given to staff, all WA PET Centre and RAPID staff

  18. Dimensionamento de pessoal de enfermagem em um hospital universitário Cálculo del personal de enfermería en un hospital universitario Nursing staff dimensioning at a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Velloso Antunes

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo apresenta o dimensionamento de pessoal de enfermagem realizado em um hospital universitário. Teve como objetivos: estipular o número de enfermeiros, técnicos e auxiliares para os diversos setores, definir o Índice de Segurança Técnica que reflita a realidade do Hospital, verificar a adequação de um Sistema de Classificação de Pacientes e verificar se o método utilizado para os setores de internação é adequado. Na metodologia, utilizamos uma fórmula que considera o cuidado progressivo, calculamos o Índice de Segurança Técnica, adaptamos e testamos um Sistema de Classificação de Pacientes e aplicamos um questionário para avaliar a metodologia utilizada. As conclusões foram as seguintes: o estudo nos permitiu alcançar o número de pessoal necessário para cada um dos setores do hospital, o Índice de Segurança Técnica atendeu à finalidade de cobrir as ausências, o Sistema de Classificação de Pacientes usado é adequado, exceto para dois setores, e a fórmula empregada para os setores de internação é adequada.Este estudio presenta el cálculo del personal de enfermería en un hospital universitario. Tuvo como objetivos: estipular el numero de enfermeros, técnicos y auxiliares para los diferentes sectores, definir el índice de seguridad técnica que refleje la realidad del hospital, verificar la adecuación de un sistema de clasificación de pacientes y observar si el método usado para los sectores de hospitalización es adecuado. En la metodología utilizamos una formula que lleva en cuenta el cuidado progresivo, calculamos el índice de seguridad técnica con base en las características de la institución, adaptamos y probamos un sistema de clasificación de pacientes y aplicamos un cuestionario para evaluar la metodología utilizada. Las conclusiones fueron las siguientes: el estudio nos permitió llegar a la cantidad necesaria de personal para cada uno de los sectores del hospital, el sistema de

  19. The Support Needs of Staff Developers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, David J.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a study conducted at an annual staff development conference to determine the needs of professional staff developers in British higher education. An overview of the research strategy, which was based on an action research model, is provided; the ranking of needs areas is discussed; and needs statements with justifications are appended.…

  20. Gaming: a creative strategy for staff education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartzendruber, D

    1994-02-01

    Providing staff development in a stimulating, innovative manner is the challenge of all nurse educators. This article discusses gaming, a creative teaching strategy that can help meet these needs. Games designed specifically for the education of dialysis staff will be reviewed. Advantages of the various games will also be examined.

  1. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 31st of October to the 14th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months and will keep the next Staff Council very busy. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to vote * * * * * * * Vote Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the election...

  2. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 28 of October to the 11th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months, and in particular the Five-yearly-Review 2015, subject of the questionnaire that you probably recently filled out. All this will keep the next Staff Council very busy indeed. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to v...

  3. Staff Association Cocktail

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    The Staff Association has been organising for many years a cocktail with delegates of the Member States participating in Finance Committees of March and September. This cocktail is held at the end of the day, after the Finance Committee meeting. This direct and regular communication helps establish an ongoing contact between the Staff Association and CERN Member States and, more recently, the Associate Member States. Ambassadors of the CERN Staff Association, who are Members of the Personnel, have the opportunity to meet their national delegation in an informal and friendly atmosphere. These exchanges, facilitated by the use of the national language, allow the personnel via the Staff Association to express its ideas and positions on current affairs and fundamental issues, and also to hear about those of the delegations in return.

  4. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the ...

  5. Training and Practices of Cannabis Dispensary Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Nancy A; Kieschnick, Dustin; Sottile, James E; Babson, Kimberly A; Vandrey, Ryan; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The proliferation of cannabis dispensaries within the United States has emerged from patient demand for the legalization of cannabis as an alternative treatment for a number of conditions and symptoms. Unfortunately, nothing is known about the practices of dispensary staff with respect to recommendation of cannabis strains/concentrations for specific patient ailments. To address this limitation, the present study assessed the training and practices of cannabis dispensary staff. Materials and Methods: Medical and nonmedical dispensary staff ( n =55) were recruited via e-mail and social media to complete an online survey assessing their demographic characteristics, dispensary features, patient characteristics, formal training, and cannabis recommendation practices. Results: Fifty-five percent of dispensary staff reported some formal training for their position, with 20% reporting medical/scientific training. A majority (94%) indicated that they provide specific cannabis advice to patients. In terms of strains, dispensary staff trended toward recommendations of Indica for anxiety, chronic pain, insomnia, nightmares, and Tourette's syndrome. They were more likely to recommend Indica and hybrid plants for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)/trauma and muscle spasms. In contrast, staff were less likely to recommend Indica for depression; hybrid strains were most often recommended for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In terms of cannabinoid concentrations, dispensary staff were most likely to recommend a 1:1 ratio of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC):cannabidiol (CBD) for patients suffering from anxiety, Crohn's disease, hepatitis C, and PTSD/trauma, while patients seeking appetite stimulation were most likely to be recommended THC. Staff recommended high CBD for arthritis and Alzheimer's disease and a high CBD or 1:1 ratio for ALS, epilepsy, and muscle spasms. Conclusions: Although many dispensary staff are making recommendations consistent with

  6. Meeting the challenge of providing flexible learning opportunities: Considerations for technology adoption amongst academic staff | Relever le défi de fournir des occasions d’apprentissage flexibles : considérations pour l’adoption de la technologie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Mirriahi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a subset of findings from a larger study investigating resistance from academic staff to the integration of technology with on-campus foreign language teaching at one North American higher education institution. The study revealed that the factors influencing technology adoption paralleled Davis’ Technology Acceptance Model’s tenets of perceived usefulness and ease of use. Further, this study supports Lai and Savage’s (2013 assertion of a lack of attention to the pedagogical affordances of technology when adoption decisions are made by instructors, thus we highlight the need for higher education leaders to determine strategies promoting awareness of the benefits technology-enabled teaching and learning can bring to advance educationally-rich flexible learning opportunities. Cet article traite d’un sous-ensemble de résultats provenant d’une étude plus vaste ayant enquêté sur la résistance des universitaires envers l’intégration de la technologie à l’enseignement en langue étrangère sur le campus dans un établissement nord-américain d’études supérieures. L’étude a révélé que les facteurs ayant une influence sur l’adoption de la technologie coïncident avec les principes du modèle d’acceptation de la technologie de Davis sur l’utilité perçue et la facilité d’utilisation. De plus, cette étude appuie l’assertion de Lai et Savage (2013 d’un manque d’attention envers les affordances pédagogiques de la technologie lorsque les décisions d’adoption sont prises par les formateurs. Nous soulignons donc le besoin, pour les meneurs de l’éducation supérieure, de déterminer les stratégies qui favorisent la connaissance des avantages de l’enseignement et de l’apprentissage que permet la technologie pour faire progresser les occasions d’apprentissage flexibles et riches sur le plan éducatif.

  7. Interactional patterns between staff and clients with borderline to mild intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuzel, E.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; van Nieuwenhuizen, A.; Jahoda, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Client-centred models of care imply that clients should have a collaborative relationship with staff providing support. This study investigates whether dialogues between staff and clients in naturally occurring contexts reflect this collaborative ideal. Methods Nineteen staff members

  8. As expectativas de pais e profissionais de enfermagem em relação ao trabalho da enfermeira em UTIN Las expectativas de los padres y profesionales de enfermería en relación al trabajo de la enfermera en UCIN Parents and nursing staff's expectations regarding the nurse's work in a NICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivone Kamada

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo geral foi identificar as expectativas dos pais e da equipe de enfermagem relativas ao trabalho da enfermeira pela ótica em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal. Foi realizada uma pesquisa descritiva por meio de uma abordagem qualitativa com 30 entrevistas entre pais, enfermeiras, técnicas e auxiliares de enfermagem de uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal do interior do Estado de São Paulo. Os resultados demonstraram novas expectativas por parte de pais e profissionais em relação ao desempenho dos profissionais de enfermagem. Os conhecimentos evidenciados como necessários para a atuação da enfermagem foram: abordagem centrada na família, técnicas de relações interpessoais e diferenciação entre tecnologia e conhecimento científico. Concluiu-se ser necessário uma atuação mais incisiva da enfermeira no cuidado de enfermagem, adequando a utilização dos avanços tecnológicos com conhecimentos humanos, sobretudo nas relações interpessoais entre familiares e equipe; contemplando atividades de educação continuada, a exemplo de curso de especialização.El objetivo general de esta investigación fue identificar las expectativas relacionadas al trabajo de la enfermera a partir de la óptica de los padres y del equipo de enfermería en Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos Neonatal. Realizamos una investigación descriptiva a partir de un enfoque cualitativo con 30 entrevistas a padres, enfermeras y técnicas de enfermería. Las entrevistas fueron realizadas en una Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos Neonatal, del interior del Estado de Sao Paulo. Los resultados demostraron las nuevas expectativas por parte de los padres y profesionales con relación al desempeño del profesional de enfermería. Los conocimientos necesarios evidenciados fueron: abordaje centrado en la familia, técnicas de relaciones interpersonales, diferenciación entre tecnología y conocimiento científico. Se concluye que es necesario una actuación m

  9. The Soils and Groundwater – EM-20 S&T Roadmap Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-02-11

    The Soils and Groundwater – EM-20 Science and Technology Roadmap Project is a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management-funded initiative designed to develop new methods, strategies and technology for characterizing, modeling, remediating, and monitoring soils and groundwater contaminated with metals, radionuclides, and chlorinated organics. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by EM-20 Roadmap Project staff.

  10. Technique for determining training staff size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frye, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Determining an adequate training staff size is a vital function of a training manager. Today's training requirements and standards have dictated a more stringent work load than ever before. A trainer's role is more than just providing classroom lectures. In most organizations the instructor must develop programs, lesson plans, exercise guides, objectives, test questions, etc. The tasks of a training organization are never ending and the appropriate resources must be determined and allotted to do the total job. A simple method exists for determining an adequate staff. Although not perfect, this method will provide a realistic approach for determining the needed training staff size. This method considers three major factors: instructional man-hours; non-instructional man-hours; and instructor availability. By determining and adding instructional man-hours and non-instructional man-hours a total man-hour distribution can be obtained. By dividing this by instructor availability a staff size can be determined

  11. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the m...

  12. Systematic Staff Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Norman L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the process of staff selection for the general studies department at Piedmont Technical College. Makes suggestions on how to write a job description, establish selection criteria, develop the selection process, and make the selection itself. Includes sample forms used in the process. (DR)

  13. The Staff of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rebecca

    1994-01-01

    Some children have chronic illnesses that require diet modifications as part of their medical treatment. Advises school districts to hire a registered dietitian or look for resources at a local hospital or public health office. In addition, schools should work with parents, improve staff training, and conduct spot checks of school cafeterias. (MLF)

  14. Training for staff who support students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Eleanor; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Hu, Wendy

    2016-02-01

    Front-line administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff often find themselves providing pastoral and learning support to students, but they are often not trained for this role, and this aspect of their work is under-acknowledged. Staff participating in an action research study at two medical schools identified common concerns about the personal impact of providing student support, and of the need for professional development to carry out this responsibility. This need is magnified in clinical placement settings that are remote from on-campus services. Informed by participatory action research, brief interactive workshops with multimedia training resources were developed, conducted and evaluated at eight health professional student training sites. These workshops were designed to: (1) be delivered in busy clinical placement and university settings; (2) provide a safe and inclusive environment for administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff to share experiences and learn from each other; (3) be publicly accessible; and (4) promote continued development and roll-out of staff training, adapted to each workplace (see http://www.uws.edu.au/meusupport). The workshops were positively evaluated by 97 participants, with both teaching and administrative staff welcoming the opportunity to discuss and share experiences. Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves. Participatory action research can be a means for producing and maintaining effective training resources as well as the conditions for change in practice. In our workshops, staff particularly valued opportunities for guided discussion using videos of authentic cases to trigger reflection, and to collaboratively formulate student support guidelines, customised to each site. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Cooptation of Peer Support Staff: Quantitative Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Alberta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective In 2007, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS sent a letter to state Medicaid directors outlining requirements for implementing peer-based recovery support services (P-BRSS as a Medicaid-funded service. Since then, 30 states have implemented these services. Although the literature describing implementation of P-BRSS has identified the cooptation of peer support staff (PSS as a barrier to the effective provision of P-BRSS, the evidence for it remains anecdotal. This study attempts to determine if the context of employment in either a treatment organization or peer organization affected cooptation. Methods We conducted a survey of PSS in the fall of 2013. In all, 92 of the 181 respondents were working as PSS at the time, 53 in treatment organizations. Chi-square analysis was used to determine if the context of employment had an effect on the cooptation of peer staff. Results Peer staff working in treatment organizations reported that they were supervised by treatment staff and participated in employment-related training to improve their skills at providing treatment services more frequently than their counterparts in peer organizations. Peer staff working in treatment organizations also participated in training and education to prepare for employment as treatment professionals more frequently than peer staff working in peer organizations. Conclusions and Implications for Practice Peer staff members working in treatment organizations are subject to processes of acculturation into professional cultures that peer staff working in peer organizations are not. Effective implementation of P-BRSS should include specific efforts to minimize the cooptation of peer staff.

  16. STAFF MARKETING IN MODERN RUSSIAN CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya N. Kretova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The conception of staff marketing, which was developed abroad, is effectively used in the developed countries for a long time. Its main advantage consists in the possibility of organizing some planning for the implementation of staff strategy: staff marketing provides the enterprise on the long-term basis with human resources capable of forming strategic potential, which would allow to implement the planned activities. Numerous problems of formation and development of civilized market relations in our country do not allow to fully implement the detailed models of staff marketing in domestic realities. On the basis of the analysis of theoretical developments and factors that have a practical impact on the implementation of marketing personnel in modern Russian conditions, the authors describe the essential elements of the conception. The primary purposes of staff marketing for domestic enterprises, grouped into the internal and external marketing are substantiated and disclosed. The special attention is paid to increasing the staff loyalty, which has dominant influence on business outcomes. The algorithm of events for the development of motivation system is proposed; at the stage of studying job satisfaction it is recommend to apply analytical calculations with the use of Shewhart control charts. Unlike traditional statistical tools based on the inspection of already implemented results, this approach is aimed at preventing negative tendencies and avoids losses associated with dissatisfaction with difficulty, as the individual employee and the team as a whole. Modern Russian enterprises can fully realize the conception of staff marketing only through rethinking of the consequences for all directions of work with the staff, as reflected in the definition of objectives, motivating staff and ensuring social responsibility of the enterprise.

  17. Staff rotation: implications for occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A; Andriuk, M L; Langlois, P; Provost, E

    1995-10-01

    Occupational therapy departments of tertiary care hospitals can provide staff with opportunities to gain diverse clinical experience if they rotate through the various services such as surgery, medicine, geriatrics, plastic surgery and orthopaedics. The system of rotation offers both advantages and disadvantages for the staff and the institution. The Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, a large university teaching hospital, had traditionally offered staff the opportunity to rotate. Changes in staffing and their needs however, resulted in rotation becoming an important issue within the department. This article presents the pros and the cons of rotation and non-rotation systems as identified by therapists and administrators across Canada. Staff rotation was found to have an effect on job satisfaction and a therapist's career orientation. Given these findings, administrators may want to reconsider the role of the generalist and specialist in their facilities.

  18. Education in geriatric medicine for community hospital staff.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hanlon, Shane

    2010-12-01

    Community hospitals provide many services for older people. They are mainly managed by nursing staff, with some specialist input. Little is known about education provided in these facilities. Most education in geriatric medicine is provided in hospitals, despite most elderly care being provided in the community. The authors surveyed senior nursing staff in Irish community hospitals to examine this area in more detail. Staff in all 18hospitals in the Health Service Executive (South) area were invited to participate. The response rate was 100%. Sixteen of the 18 respondents (89%) felt staff did not have enough education in geriatric medicine. Just over half of hospitals had regular staff education sessions in the area, with a minority of sessions led by a geriatrician, and none by GPs. Geriatrician visits were valued, but were requested only every 1-3 months. Staff identified challenging behaviour and dementia care as the areas that posed most difficulty.

  19. NICU consultants and support staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newborn intensive care unit - consultants and support staff; Neonatal intensive care unit - consultants and support staff ... a baby's nipple-feeding readiness and oral-motor skills. Speech therapists will also help with feeding skills ...

  20. Percepções da equipe de enfermagem sobre seu trabalho em uma unidade de queimados La percepción del personal de enfermería de su trabajo en una unidad de quemados How the nursing staff perceives work in a burn unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Custódio Duarte

    2012-03-01

    analyze nurses' perception regarding their work in a Burn Unit of a public hospital in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. This is a study with a qualitative approach, developed from semi-structured interviews with 20 professionals of the hospital's nursing staff. From the data analysis three categories emerged: The meaning of work in a Burn Unit; Difficulties encountered in daily work; Strategies used by nurses in their work performance. We conclude that it is the duty of the institutions where Burn Units are located to provide spaces for psychological support in attending the demands of professionals who assist victims of thermal trauma. We emphasize the need for educational institutions to place a greater emphasis in this area during the training of future professionals.

  1. Staff Directory | Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program values the contributions of its fellows and works to provide relevant and useful experiences in research and education in return. Our staff is here to provide unwavering support and guidance to each fellow as they progress through the program.

  2. Night nursing – staff's working experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Ann-Mari

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the duties and working conditions of registered, and enrolled nurses have previously been described from different perspectives, they have not been examined from the night nursing aspect. The aim of the study was to describe the night nursing staff's working experiences. Methods The design of the study is qualitative and descriptive. Interviews were conducted with 10 registered and 10 enrolled nurses working as night staff at a Swedish University Hospital. The interview guide was thematic and concerned the content of their tasks, as well as the working conditions that constitute night nursing. In addition, the interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis. Results The night duties have to be performed under difficult conditions that include working silently in dimmed lighting, and making decisions when fatigue threatens. According to the night staff, its main goals are to provide the patients with rest and simultaneously ensure qualified care. Furthermore, the night nursing staff must prepare the ward for the daytime activities. Conclusion The most important point is the team work, which developed between the registered and enrolled nurses and how necessary this team work is when working at night. In order for nurses working at night to be fully appreciated, the communication between day and night staff in health care organizations needs to be developed. Furthermore, it is important to give the night staff opportunities to use its whole field of competence.

  3. Implantação do Programa Saúde na escola em Fortaleza-CE: atuação de equipe da Estratégia Saúde da Família Implantación del Programa de Salud Escolar en Fortaleza-CE: desempeño de equipo de la Estrategia Salud de la Familia School Health Program implementation in Fortaleza-CE: performance of the Family Health Strategy staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindelvania Matias de Santiago

    2012-12-01

    professionals to perceive their social role as educators and provided adolescents a greater contact with the staff from FHS. The rapprochement between the school and the FHS is crucial to help teenagers to transform scientific knowledge into healthy behaviors.

  4. Information for contractors' staff

    CERN Multimedia

    The Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    We have observed a significant decrease in the number of completed Certificates for Work in Controlled Radiation Areas being submitted with applications for dosimeters for your staff. Henceforth, we shall no longer be able to issue dosimeters without a certificate, which must be signed by the employee and the contractor's radiation-protection expert. You can obtain the certificate form from the Dosimetry Service at Building 24/E-011 or from our Website: http://service-rp-dosimetry.web.cern.ch/service-rp-dosimetry/. Thank you for your understanding. The Dosimetry Service

  5. STAFF VACANCY LIST

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    For economy reasons, it has been decided to stop printing and distributing this list to Staff Members. It can be found on the Web (LIST). Divisional Administrative Officers will receive an updated printed copy on a monthly basis and are asked to display this in a public place in their division. Copies will also be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (No. 60) in the glass-fronted cabinet (close to the lifts) and also on the notice board close to the Post Office. A copy will also be given to the Reception (Building No. 33). Human Resources Division Tel. 74606

  6. Occupational hazards among clinical dental staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasunloro, Adebola; Owotade, Foluso John

    2004-05-15

    Although identification of risks to dental healthcare workers has been explored in several industrialized nations, very little data is available from developing countries. This paper examines the occupational hazards present in the dental environment and reports survey results concerning attitudes and activities of a group of Nigerian dental care providers. A survey on occupational hazards was conducted among the clinical dental staff at the Dental Hospital of the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife in Osun State, Nigeria. Thirty eight of the forty staff responded, yielding a response rate of 95%. Subject ages ranged from 26 to 56 years with approximately 25% in the 31-46 year old bracket. All of the staff were aware of the occupational exposure to hazards, and the majority had attended seminars/workshops on the subject. Only five staff members (13.2%) owned a health insurance policy and 26 (68.4%) had been vaccinated against Hepatitis B infection. All dentists (24) had been vaccinated compared with only two non-dentists; this relationship was significant (p= 30.07, chi2=0.000). Fourteen members of the clinical staff (36.8%) could recall a sharp injury in the past six months, and the majority (71.1%) had regular contact with dental amalgam. Wearing protective eye goggles was the least employed cross infection control measure, while backache was the most frequently experienced hazard in 47% of the subjects. The need for Hepatitis B vaccinations for all members of the staff was emphasized, and the enforcement of strict cross infection control measures was recommended. The physical activities and body positions that predispose workers to backaches were identified and staff education on the prevention of backaches was provided.

  7. Rede própria ou rede credenciada: análise comparativa de custos em uma operadora brasileira de planos de saúde Self-owned versus accredited network: comparative cost analysis in a Brazilian health insurance provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Antônio de Souza

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar os custos da rede própria de uma operadora brasileira de planos de saúde comparativamente com o preço cobrado pela rede credenciada, visando a identificar se a opção estratégica da operadora em ter rede própria representou vantagem econômica. MÉTODOS: Este estudo exploratório foi desenvolvido mediante pesquisa nos relatórios gerenciais da empresa. O custo da rede própria foi calculado com base nas consultas médicas e odontológicas e nos exames diagnósticos e laboratoriais realizados em uma unidade representativa da operadora. Os custos com terceirizados foram obtidos da tabela de preços praticados pela rede credenciada para os mesmos serviços analisados na rede própria. Para a quantificação dos custos foi utilizado o método de custeio pleno. Os custos são apresentados em termos absolutos (em R$ e em percentuais dos custos próprios em relação aos da rede credenciada. RESULTADOS: De modo geral há vantagem para a operadora em utilizar sua própria rede. Isso é verdadeiro para consultas médicas, odontológicas e exames. São exceções as consultas nas especialidades de pediatria e medicina do trabalho e os exames de raio-X. CONCLUSÕES: A opção da operadora pela verticalização do serviço apresenta vantagens econômicas para a empresa em relação à terceirização.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the cost of a self-owned network maintained by a Brazilian health insurance provider as compared to the price charged by accredited service providers, so as to identify whether or not the self-owned network is economically advantageous. METHODS: For this exploratory study, the company's management reports were reviewed. The cost associated with the self-owned network was calculated based on medical and dental office visits and diagnostic/laboratory tests performed at one of the company's most representative facilities. The costs associated with third parties were derived from price tables used by the accredited

  8. Revelando fatos, sentidos, afetos e providências sobre o trote em uma faculdade de medicina: narrativa de uma experiência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Akerman

    Full Text Available O presente artigo narra um conjunto de fatos relacionados à recepção aos calouros de um curso de medicina, indica as mudanças que foram adotadas para a recepção dos ingressantes no ano seguinte e apresenta os resultados obtidos com essas intervenções. O desafio presente durante todo o trabalho foi fazer com que os incidentes ocorridos durante a recepção aos calouros não se repetissem mais. Muita discussão e muito diálogo precederam a formulação do plano de ação. Como pressuposto básico, defendeu-se a ideia de que a diretoria da faculdade em questão tinha de liderar esse processo e que a tarefa de receber o calouro não era atribuição exclusiva do veterano, e sim de toda a comunidade acadêmica, sob a tutelada Diretoria. Ainda não se pode afirmar que a cultura que permeia o trote foi modificada, mas é possível identificar sinais e indícios de que houve melhora importante na relação entre os estudantes da faculdade no processo de recepção aos novos estudantes que ingressaram no curso de medicina.

  9. Improving staff selection processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerinus, Marie; Shannon, Marina

    2014-11-11

    This article, the second in a series of articles on Leading Better Care, describes the actions undertaken in recent years in NHS Lanarkshire to improve selection processes for nursing, midwifery and allied health professional (NMAHP) posts. This is an area of significant interest to these professions, management colleagues and patients given the pivotal importance of NMAHPs to patient care and experience. In recent times the importance of selecting staff not only with the right qualifications but also with the right attributes has been highlighted to ensure patients are well cared for in a safe, effective and compassionate manner. The article focuses on NMAHP selection processes, tracking local, collaborative development work undertaken to date. It presents an overview of some of the work being implemented, highlights a range of important factors, outlines how evaluation is progressing and concludes by recommending further empirical research.

  10. The caregiver's careshop. A renewal experience for nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, M J; Bunevich, S; Jones, S

    2001-01-01

    What are some creative methodologies that staff development educators can use to nurture nursing staff while promoting caring and compassionate behaviors? The authors describe an innovative process used during a 1-day workshop designed to convey caring to nursing staff through a variety of experiences. The overall goal of the session is to provide caregivers with a variety of new "tools" to care for themselves as they deal with multiple stressors in their personal and professional lives.

  11. Rotatividade da equipe de enfermagem: estudo em hospital-escola Rotación del equipo de enfermería: estudio en un hospital universitario Nursing staff turnover: a study at a school-hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felícia Hiromi Nomura

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo é do tipo exploratório-descritivo de caráter retrospectivo, e teve o objetivo de mensurar e comparar as taxas de rotatividade da equipe de enfermagem do Hospital Universitário da Universidade de São Paulo. A população constituiu-se de 255 trabalhadores de enfermagem - 78 enfermeiras, 20 técnicos e 156 auxiliares que se desligaram do hospital no período de 1997 a 2000. Para mensurar a rotatividade foram utilizados indicadores globais, taxa de admissão e desligamento, taxa líquida de substituição e taxa de variação do número das posições de trabalho. A análise quantitativa dos dados permitiu concluir que a equipe de enfermagem, nesse hospital, apresenta baixa rotatividade.Este estudio es de tipo exploratorio-descriptivo de carácter retrospectivo y tuvo como objetivo medir y comparar las tasas de rotación del equipo de enfermería del Hospital Universitario de la Universidad de São Paulo. La población se constituyó de 255 trabajadores de enfermería - 78 enfermeras, 20 técnicos y 156 auxiliares que salieron del hospital en el período de 1997 a 2000. Para la mensuración de la rotación se utilizó indicadores globales, tasa de admisión y renuncia, tasa líquida de substitución y tasa de variación. El desarrollo de esta investigación permitió concluir que el equipo de enfermería en ese hospital presenta baja rotación.The goal of this exploratory-descriptive study was to measure and compare nursing staff turnover levels at the University Hospital of São Paulo University. The population consisted of 255 nursing workers - 78 nurses, 20 technicians and 156 auxiliaries - who resigned from the hospital between 1997 and 2000. Turnover levels were measured by means of global indicators, admission and resignation, net replacement on the job and variation rates. Quantitative data analysis indicated a low nursing staff turnover rate at this hospital.

  12. Staff Development: Your Most Important Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mary Alice

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the need for improved teacher training in the use of technology and considers the role of school media specialists. Topics include providing focused workshops on technology integration; promoting peer mentoring; partnerships with universities; using online staff development resources; and promoting technology in curriculum development…

  13. Staff Exchange or Legal Alien Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rune Nørgaard

    2016-01-01

    SRA would very much like to support the exchange of best practice between members throughout the year and the Membership Committee is presently looking into the opportunities for a Staff Exchange or Legal Alien Program. However the International Section has already had the chance to provide...

  14. Mentoring--a staff retention tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaskie, Mary Louise

    2006-01-01

    Staff retention presents a common challenge for hospitals nationwide. Mentorship programs have been explored as one method of creating environments that promote staff retention. Successful achievement of nurse competencies identified in the Synergy Model for Patient Care can best be achieved in an environment that encourages and facilitates mentoring. Mentoring relationships in critical care provide the ongoing interactions, coaching, teaching, and role modeling to facilitate nurses' progression along this continuum. Mentoring relationships offer support and professional development for nurses at all levels within an organization as well as an optimistic outlook for the nursing profession.

  15. The different roles of the Staff association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2012-01-01

    The statutory role of the CERN Staff Association is defined in Chapter VII of the Staff Rules and Regulations. The means of the Association to realize its aims are described in Article I.1.3 of the Statutes of the CERN Staff Association. Generally speaking, its aims are “To serve and defend the economic, social, professional and moral interests of its members and all CERN staff“. Usually we deal with professional and social issues (employment conditions, defence of collective or individual rights, promotion of basic research...). But the Association also plays a role of integration (clubs promoting cultural, humanitarian, and sport or offering entertainment, organizing exhibitions and conferences) and it can promote actions to provide its members with material or social advantages (Interfon, commercial offers). Advantageous commercial offers In recent years the Association was able to negotiate with business or cultural partners benefits for its members. A full list can be found on our...

  16. Exposure of Medical Staff during Interventional Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osvay, M.; Turak, O.

    2013-01-01

    The medical staff during interventional procedures receives significant doses on their hands, or parts of their body not covered with protective shielding equipment, as they are close to X-rays field. It can be stated, that interventional radiology and cardiology have one of the highest doses among the X-ray diagnostic procedures. The radiologist use X-ray machine directly in the interventional procedures. The occupational dose is measured only by one Kodak film badge worn under the lead apron for the estimation of the effective dose in Hungary. Our lecture presents the results of dose measurements on eye lens, hands, knees using LiF thermoluminescent dosemeters on the medical staff of two Hungarian hospitals. Results suggest that wearing only one film badge (or other dosemeter system) under the lead apron does not provide proper information on the real occupational dose of medical staff.(author)

  17. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus infection and seroconvertion to anti-HBsAg in laboratory staff in Goiânia, Goiás Soroprevalência da infecção pelo vírus da hepatite B e soroconversão para anti-HBsAg em profissionais de laboratório em Goiânia, Goiás

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Andréia Silva

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Were analyzed 648 serum samples from laboratory staff in Goiânia, Goiás aiming detection of three serological markers of HBV: HBsAg, anti-HBsAg and anti-HBcAg. The HBsAg and anti-HBcAg positive samples were also analyzed for HBeAg, anti-HBeAg and anti-HBcAgIgM markers. HBV infection rate of 24.1% was observed and, from them, 0.7% were positive for HBsAg. Viral DNA was detected by PCR in two HBsAg positive samples. A vaccination index of 74.5% and a global index of 89.9% of serological response to vaccination were observed. The direct work with biological fluids as well as cleaning workers represented significant risks for acquisition of HBV infection. The data from the present study showed an increase of the vaccination index among laboratory staff but the rates of HBV infection did not change through the years in the region.Neste estudo, foram analisadas 648 amostras de soro, provenientes de profissionais de laboratório de Goiânia-Goiás, visando a detecção de três marcadores sorológicos do VHB: HBsAg, anti-HBsAg e anti-HBcAg. As amostras HBsAg e anti-HBcAg positivas foram também analisadas para os marcadores HBeAg, anti-HBeAg e anti-HBcAgIgM. Foi observado um percentual de soropositividade para infecção pelo VHB de 24,1% sendo que 0,7% destes foram positivos para o HBsAg. O DNA viral foi detectado por PCR nas duas amostras HBsAg positivas. Dos 648 profissionais, 74,5% relataram vacinação para o VHB e, destes, 89,9% apresentaram soroconversão. Trabalho direto com fluidos biológicos bem como trabalho em serviços gerais representaram risco significativo para aquisição da infecção pelo VHB. Os resultados do estudo mostram que embora tenha havido um aumento no índice de vacinação entre os trabalhadores de laboratório, o índice de infecção pelo VHB manteve-se inalterado em relação ao tempo na região.

  18. Principals Can Increase Leadership Effectiveness by Knowing Staff Personalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberds-Baxter, Sharon

    1986-01-01

    An essential ingredient of good school administrators is understanding the differences among people. Provides a simplified outline of Carl Jung's typology of personality differences to provide administrators a better understanding of staff behavior. (MD)

  19. Training to raise staff awareness about safeguarding children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jane

    2015-04-01

    To improve outcomes for children and young people health organisations are required to train all staff in children's safeguarding. This creates difficulties for large complex organisations where most staff provide services to the adult population. Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust is a large acute and community trust that had difficulties in engaging staff in children's safeguarding training. Compliance rates for clinical staff who were trained in children's safeguarding were low and needed to be addressed. This article sets out why safeguarding training is important for all staff and how the trust achieved staff engagement and improved compliance rates. To evaluate, maintain and develop safeguarding knowledge, understanding, skills, attitude and behaviour further resources are planned to allow access to learning resources in a variety of formats.

  20. Staff and Educational Development Case Studies, Experiences & Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K PULIST

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Staff and educational development is relatively a new field in higher education. It has recently been emerging as a systematic activity in higher education. The staff and educational development as a professional function includes teaching and training, human resource development and management, organizational development, management and implementation of policy and strategy on teachingand learning. Though earlier, it had been limited to a few common activities like workshop, training programme for new teaching staff and the provision of written and multimedia material. Different authors have tried to provide a direction to the activity of staff and educational development.

  1. Utilization of electronic information resources by academic staff at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the utilization of Electronic Information resources by the academic staff of Makerere University in Uganda. It examined the academic staff awareness of the resources available, the types of resources provided by the Makerere University Library, the factors affecting resource utilization. The study was ...

  2. A integralidade no cuidado à saúde materno-infantil em um contexto rural: um relato de experiência Integrality in the care provided for maternal and child health in a rural context: an experience report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Rocha Beheregaray

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de um relato de experiência sobre a prática da integralidade em saúde na assistência à população materno-infantil do meio rural em um município do sul do Brasil. As reflexões são oriundas de uma pesquisa sobre a saúde nutricional e o contexto de vida do universo de crianças menores de cinco anos residentes nesse contexto. Tem como base as anotações em diário de campo. Constatou-se que a população rural vive em condição de desvantagem, uma vez que os serviços e a atenção à saúde são quase exclusivamente projetados para a população urbana. Ainda, o modelo assistencial e o processo de trabalho desenvolvido dificultam a prática da integralidade. Essa situação é traduzida por questões que envolvem o acesso, o acolhimento, o vínculo e a responsabilização por parte dos profissionais. Dessa forma, parece necessário repensar a saúde da população rural desenvolvendo políticas específicas às peculiaridades epidemiológicas e culturais, serviços acessíveis geograficamente e atendidos por equipes que desempenham cuidado acolhedor e resolutivo.This is an experience report on the practice of integrality in health in the assistance provided for the mother-child population in the rural area of a city in south Brazil. The reflections come from research on the nutritional health and context of life in the universe of children who are under five years old and live in the countryside. It is mainly based on field notes. It was observed that the rural population lives in conditions of disadvantage, since the healthcare services and assistance are designed almost exclusively for the urban population. Also, the assistance model and the developed working process hinder the practice of integrality. This situation is translated by questions that involve the access, sheltering, bond and responsibility on the part of professionals. Thus, it is necessary to re-think the rural population's health, developing specific

  3. Staff Definitions of Challenging Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgie, Sarah; Hastings, Richard P.

    2002-01-01

    Fifty staff working with adults with mental retardation rated potentially challenging behaviors in terms of: (1) whether they thought the behaviors were challenging, and (2) whether the behaviors should be the focus of intervention. Results found that staff were less likely to identify as challenging those behaviors having negative effects on…

  4. Language services in hospitals: discordance in availability and staff use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschurtz, Brette A; Koss, Richard G; Kupka, Nancy J; Williams, Scott C

    2011-01-01

    Despite efforts to advance effective patient-provider communication, many patients' language needs continue to be unmet or inappropriately addressed by healthcare providers (Wielawski 2010; Patek et al. 2009; Wilson-Stronks and Galvez 2007). This study presents a picture of the language resources currently provided by hospitals and those resources practitioners actually use. Questionnaire data were collected from 14 hospitals in Florida's Palm Beach, St. Lucie, and Martin counties on availability, staff awareness, and staff use of linguistic resources and services. Inconsistencies were identified between the language tools, services, and resources hospitals provide and those staff use. In addition, a large majority of staff respondents still rely upon someone accompanying the patient for communication with patients who have limited English proficiency, despite evidence that this practice contributes to miscommunication and serious medical errors (Flores et al. 2003; Flores 2005; HHS OMH 2001; Patek et al. 2009). Hospitals that use bilingual staff as interpreters often do not test the competency of these staff, nor do they assess the utilization or effectiveness of the tools and resources they provide. Hospitals can improve the cultural and linguistic care they provide if they (1) address the practice of using ad hoc interpreters, (2) effectively disseminate information to hospital staff regarding how and when to access available resources, and (3) collect patient population data and use it to plan for and evaluate the language services they provide to their patients.

  5. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Vote Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. Voting will begin on Monday 31 October. Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will  represent you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site. (http://association.web.cern.ch) Elections Timetable Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee. 

  6. A equipe de enfermagem e o mito do trabalho em grupo El equipo de enfermeria yel mito del trabajo en grupo The nursing staff and the myth of group work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueli Moreira Pirolo

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo tem como objetivos: análise dos comportamentos individuais no transcorrer da "passagem de plantão"; e análise do comportamento grupal na realização da referida tarefa, a partir da observação cenas filmadas da equipe de enfermagem, recebendo e passando o plantão. Na análise dos comportamentos individuais, foi utilizada uma lista de indicadores de comunicação não -verbal. Na análise dos comportamentos grupais foi utilizada uma lista de indicadores, considerando os conceitos de processo grupal. Os resultados mostraram que os indicadores não -verbais ineficazes predominaram, e os indicadores grupais inadequados foram mais expressivos. Com base nesses resultados, pode-se concluir que a "passagem de plantão" não se constituiu como uma atividade grupal.Este estudio tiene como objetivos: análisis de los comportamientos individuales en el desarrollar del "cambio de turno ", y análisis del comportamiento grupal y la realización de dicha tarea. En el análisis de los comportamientos individuales, fue utilizada una lista de indicadores de comunicación no verbal. En el análisis de los comportamientos grupales, fue utilizada una lista de indicadores, considerando los conceptos del proceso grupal. Los resultados enseñaron que los indicadores no verbales ineficaces predominan, y los indicadores grupales inadecuados fueron más expresivos, se puede concluir que le "cambio de turno" no se constituyó en una actividad grupal.This paper has two objectives: the first one is analyzing the individual behaviors indicated by non-verbal communication during shist exchanges; the second one is analyzing group behavior during shist exchanges based on the observation the videotaped scenes of a nursing staff during a shist exchange. A list of non-verbal communication signs was used to analyze individual behaviors. The concepts group were used to analyze group behaviors. The results showed that ineffective non verbal signs prevailed over

  7. The relationship between managerial leadership behaviors and staff nurse retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Carol

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe perceptions of managerial leadership behaviors associated with staff nurse turnover and to compare nurse manager leadership behaviors as perceived by managers and their staff nurses. Effective leadership styles among nurse managers have been associated with staff nurse job satisfaction and retention. Although both transformational and transactional leadership styles have been described as effective, it is unclear which nurse manager leadership behaviors contribute most to staff nurse retention. This descriptive, correlational study was conducted at a 465-bed community hospital in the northeastern United States. All staff nurses and nurse managers employed in both ambulatory and acute care nursing units were invited to participate in the study. The study sample comprised 79 staff nurses and 10 nurse managers, who completed demographic forms and the 45-item Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, which measures 12 dimensions of leadership style. Data were collected from July through September 2003. Active management by exception as perceived by staff nurses was the only managerial leadership style associated with staff nurse turnover (r = .26, p = .03). Compared with the perceptions among their staff nurses, nurse managers consistently perceived that they demonstrated a higher mean frequency of transformational leadership behaviors. The transactional leadership style of active management by exception not only appeared to be a deterrent to staff nurse retention but also reflected leadership perceptions among staff nurses who work evening and night shifts. This study also provides further evidence regarding a trend in which nurse managers and staff nurses do not concur on the frequency of transformational leadership behaviors but do demonstrate agreement on the frequency of transactional leadership behaviors.

  8. Reduction of levels of radiation exposure over patients and medical staff by using additional filters of copper and aluminum on the outputs of X-ray tubes in hemodynamic equipment; Reducao da dose de radiacao em pacientes e equipes medicas pelo uso de filtros adicionais de cobre e aluminio nas saidas de tubos de raios X em equipamentos de hemodinamica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Guilherme L.; Müller, Felipe M.; Schuch, Luiz A., E-mail: glweis@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2013-12-15

    Radioprotection in hemodynamic services is extremely important. Decrease of total exposition time, better positioning of medical staff in the room, use of individual and collective protection equipment and shorter distance between the patient and the image intensifier tube are, among others, some ways to reduce the levels of radiation. It is noted that these possible forms of reducing the radiation exposition varies depending on the medical staff. Hence, the purpose of the present paper is to reduce such levels of radiation exposition in a way apart from medical staffs. It is proposed, therefore, the use of additional filters on the output of the X-ray tube in three hemodynamic equipment from different generations: detector with a flat panel of amorphous selenium, image intensifier tube with charge coupled device, and image intensifier tube with video camera. In order to quantify the quality of the images generated, a simulator made of aluminum plates and other devices was set up, so it was possible to measure and compare the acquired images. Methods of images analysis (threshold, histogram, 3D surface) were used to measure the signal/noise ratio, the spatial resolution, the contrast and the definition of the signal area, thus doubts regarding the analysis of the images among observers (inter-observers) and even for a single observer (intra-observer) can be avoided. Ionization chambers were also used in order to quantify the doses of radiation that penetrated the skin of the patients with and without the use of the filters. In all cases was found an arrangement of filters that combines quality of the images with a significant reduction of the levels of exposure to ionizing radiation, concerning both the patient and the medical staff. (author)

  9. Staff Acquisition -- Agencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — Job vacancy and organizational information from customer agencies sufficient to provide requested services: examining, strategic staffing, recruitment and branding,...

  10. Government Buildings, Leased, County leased properties within Sedgwick County. This layer is maintained interactively by GIS staff using lease information provided by DIO Facilities Project Services. Primary attributes include property lease and group ID, building, address, parcel I, Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Government Buildings, Leased dataset current as of 2008. County leased properties within Sedgwick County. This layer is maintained interactively by GIS staff using...

  11. A Survey of Violence Against Staff Working in the Emergency Department in Ankara, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Serpil Talas, RN, PhD

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: Based on results of the study, it is suggested that every hospital institute reliable reporting procedures that staff members feel comfortable using, and also provide a comprehensive program of support services for staff that has been assaulted.

  12. Radiation Safety Awareness Among Medical Staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szarmach, Arkadiusz; Piskunowicz, Maciej; Świętoń, Dominik; Muc, Adam; Mockałło, Gabor; Dzierżanowski, Jarosław; Szurowska, Edyta

    2015-01-01

    The common access to imaging methods based on ionizing radiation requires also radiation protection. The knowledge of ionizing radiation exposure risks among the medical staff is essential for planning diagnostic procedures and therapy. Evaluation of the knowledge of radiation safety during diagnostic procedures among the medical staff. The study consisted of a questionnaire survey. The questionnaire consisted of seven closed-ended questions concerning the knowledge of the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation as well as questions related to responder’s profession and work experience. The study group included a total of 150 individuals from four professional groups: nurses, doctors, medical technicians, support staff. The study was carried out in the three largest hospitals in Gdańsk between July and October 2013. The highest rates of correct answers to questions related to the issue of radiation protection were provided by the staff of radiology facilities and emergency departments with 1–5 years of professional experience. The most vulnerable group in terms of the knowledge of these issues consisted of individuals working at surgical wards with 11–15 years of professional experience. Education in the field of radiological protection should be a subject of periodic training of medical personnel regardless of position and length of service

  13. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense... Staff. (a) The Commission will have a support staff, which will include staff members sufficient to expeditiously and efficiently process the applications for payments under this part. All members of the staff...

  14. Rational-Emotive Staff Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Susan G.; Forman, Bruce D.

    1980-01-01

    The application of Rational-Emotive Therapy principles and techniques in in-service education for school personnel is discussed. Teacher and counselor participation in a staff development program is described. (Author)

  15. SENIOR STAFF ADVANCEMENT COMMITTEE (SSAC)

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Composition and mandateThe Senior Staff Advancement Committee is composed of members nominated ad persona by the Director-General.The Committee examines proposals from Divisions concerning promotions to grade 13 in Career Path IX, changes of career path to Career Path IX and advancements to the exceptional grade in Career path VIII.The Director-General may consult the Committee on any matter related to senior staff careers.The Committee makes its recommendations to the Director-General.

  16. Why join the Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Becoming a member of the Staff Association (SA) is above all a personal choice, showing that the joining person’s commitment and adherence to values such as solidarity, social cohesion, etc.In September, the SA launches a membership campaign to convince a maximum number to join, to inform, arouse interest and support. Posters, emails and individual contacts are part of the campaign programme, just like this editorial. As far as individual contacts are concerned, we ask you to give time and lend an ear to the delegates of your department in the Staff Council, who will approach you, in order to make an open and constructive discussion possible. Do not hesitate to ask questions and let them know your thoughts about the SA, as (constructive) criticism enables us to progress. The Staff Association and its role of collective representation The Staff Association, via its delegates, represents collectively all staff of the Organization before the Director-General and Member States. To do this, staff rep...

  17. Mapping Staff Competencies for Information Literacy Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Corrall

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Information literacy (IL is a key strategic objective for academic libraries. Many academic librarians are involved in designing, developing and delivering IL programmes, using both classroom teaching and e-learning methods. IL has also become a priority at institutional level and some universities and colleges have formal policies and strategies to integrate and embed IL in the curriculum. IL interventions also happen informally at enquiry points and reference desks, when queries offer ‘teachable moments’ for library staff to help students develop information skills and understanding while solving their information problems. Research shows that such instruction features strongly in both face-to-face and virtual reference transactions, but few IL policies and strategies cover this frontline personalised IL support. Similarly, most discussion of staff training and development for IL education has centred on the teaching roles and pedagogical knowledge of professional librarians, with limited discussion of the competencies needed for frontline interventions by paraprofessionals or assistants. This workshop promotes an inclusive holistic model of IL education and library workforce development. It will investigate the skills and knowledge needed by frontline staff to contribute effectively to the IL mission of academic libraries. It will focus on the learning support needed by students from different educational, social, ethnic and cultural backgrounds, with particular reference to postgraduate students, as a group typifying this diversity. The facilitator will review IL interventions and library staff competencies discussed in the literature. Participants will discuss typical queries or problems presented by different categories of postgraduate students and then identify the skills, knowledge and understanding required by frontline staff to provide an appropriate service response. The skillsets identified will be compared with those of teaching

  18. A "Coach Approach" to Staff Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Macmillan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The speed of change is challenging libraries to redevelop themselves in ways we have never seen before. Rising costs and changing customer expectations are forcing staff to continuously learn new skills, adapt to new technologies and work more closely in collaboration with others in response to this unpredictable environment. At the same time library leaders need to communicate regularly with staff and to motivate them to dialogue with each other about the value of the library service that they provide to the community. A creative approach to building flexibility, resilience and staff engagement has become essential for survival. Coaching is a creative, innovative and effective communications tool that is now considered to be one of the most important ways to encourage employees to continue to learn and develop. Its greatest impact is in building leadership and staff engagement. Communicating with “a coach approach” or coaching mindset is a powerful way for library leaders to connect with others where the flow and exchange is positive and there is a mutual benefit of contribution and collaboration, expanded knowledge and innovation. The basics of fostering “a coach approach” with library staff requires an understanding of the importance of “reframing” one’s personal attitudes and perspectives, appreciating the art of focused listening and the impact of positive acknowledgement, learning to ask the right questions and formulating action plans for continued success. It is a learned skill that requires a commitment to practice but is one that will ultimately demonstrate positive results.

  19. Intramural Staff Handbook. Student Staff Personnel Manual from the Office of Intramural/Recreational Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudenhoeffer, Frances Tomlin; Fedak, Joseph F.

    This student staff personnel manual is designed to orient student employees of the New Mexico State University (Las Cruces) Office of Intramural/Recreational Sports to their duties and responsibilities and to provide personnel policies and standard operating procedures. Topics include: student employment procedures, pay rates for job…

  20. Staff Knowledge, Adherence to Infection Control Recommendations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staff Knowledge, Adherence to Infection Control Recommendations and Seroconversion Rates in Hemodialysis Centers in Khartoum. ... Adherence of staff members to infection control recommendations was evaluated by direct observation. Results: ... A structured training program for HD staff members is urgently required.

  1. A staff allocation model for mental health facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, J P; Young, J P

    1976-01-01

    This article describes a model for allocating staff within a large psychiatric hospital. The model provides an objective framework within which one can test alternative staff operating policies before making critical decisions concerning the employment of one category of personnel as opposed to another. It is based on objective data describing patient needs and staff functioning patterns, rather than subjective opinions concerning staff deployment. Besides being useful for the short-term deployment of staff and budgetary resources, it can also be used as a long-range planning tool for testing modifications in policy decisions and budget proposals. The algorithm employed, mixed-integer linear programming, is readily available; computer costs and running time are relatively minimal.

  2. Booking staff online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    For those still using agency nurses and midwives, online booking could become a convenient option if a new website is successful, writes Steven Black. Newcross Healthcare Solutions, a company that provides temporary staffing solutions for NHS trusts and private hospitals, and for public and private care homes, has launched a UK wide online booking system.

  3. Staff and advisers

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    a former Deputy Director of the United. Nations Environment Programme. (UNEP) Division of Environmental. Law and Conventions, he provided policy advice on climate change and supported the work of the. IPCC, the Commission on Sustainable Development, and UN mechanisms to promote implementation of.

  4. Health physics training of plant staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heublein, R.M. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The scope of this document entitled Health Physics Training of Plant Staff addresses those critical elements common to all health physics training programs. The incorporation of these elements in a health physics training program will provide some assurances that the trainees are competent to work in the radiological environment of a nuclear plant. This paper provides sufficient detail for the health physicist to make managerial decisions concerning the planning, development, implementation, and evaluation of health physics training programs. Two models are provided in the appendices as examples of performance based health physics training programs

  5. Coping with Challenging Behaviours of Children with Autism: Effectiveness of Brief Training Workshop for Frontline Staff in Special Education Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, C. Y. M.; Mak, W. W. S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The present study examined the effectiveness of three staff training elements: psychoeducation (PE) on autism, introduction of functional behavioural analysis (FBA) and emotional management (EM), on the reaction of challenging behaviours for frontline staff towards children with autism in Hong Kong special education settings. Methods:…

  6. NO to sacrificing future staff!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    During our public meetings last week, we reviewed several subjects. However, the most urgent one today is the 2nd package of measures for our Pension Fund. In our previous issue, we devoted a long article to the Management’s plan for staff recruited from January 2012. A disaster! As we announced at our meetings, the Staff Association will organize a referendum at the beginning of April. For the message to be heard it is vital that as many staff as possible take part. By voting you will express your support to your staff representatives to stand in the way of these unacceptable measures. It is a matter of urgency that the staff makes their voice heard. Time is short, the decisions will be made in June. The future of our Organization is as stake. This is our future colleagues we are talking about. We must prevent this sacrifice. They must be welcomed in such a manner that there is no uneasiness between us. They must be made to feel welcome in their new family, CERN, our CERN. That they should pay an ...

  7. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! After verification by the Electoral Commission, all candidates for the elections to the Staff Council have been registered. It is now up to you, members of the Staff Association, to vote for the candidate(s) of your choice. We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. We are using an electronic voting system; all you need to do is click the link below and follow the instructions on the screen. https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017 The deadline for voting is Monday, 13 November at midday (12 pm). Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The ...

  8. 42 CFR 432.31 - Training and use of subprofessional staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Training and use of subprofessional staff. 432.31...; Subprofessional and Volunteer Programs § 432.31 Training and use of subprofessional staff. (a) State plan requirement. A State plan must provide for the training and effective use of subprofessional staff as...

  9. Staff and Client Perspectives on the Journey Mapping Online Evaluation Tool in a Drug Court Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crunkilton, Dhira D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess staff and client perspectives on the Internet-based Journey Mapping program evaluation tool. A drug court program was chosen for a case study research design. Six staff and 10 clients participated in interviews and observations, and also responded to a questionnaire. A staff survey provided additional data.…

  10. 76 FR 17649 - Science Advisory Board Staff Office; Request for Nominations; SAB Mercury Review Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    ... background information independently gathered by the SAB Staff Office. Selection criteria to be used for... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9288-2] Science Advisory Board Staff Office; Request for...: The EPA Science Advisory Board (SAB) Staff Office provides notice that the SAB will form a panel to...

  11. Towards culturally competent health care: language use of bilingual staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M; Noble, C; Matthews, C; Aguilar, N

    1998-01-01

    The presence of diverse language skills within health staff provides opportunities to better meet the needs of a multicultural population. A cross-sectional survey of all staff within the South Western Sydney Area Health Service was undertaken to compare language skills with population needs and examine the context of language use. Thirty-one per cent of staff (n = 964) were bilingual or multilingual, with the predominant languages spoken being Tagalog (Filipino), Cantonese, Hindi, Spanish, Vietnamese and Italian. Thirty-seven per cent of bilingual staff used their language skills at least weekly, predominantly in situations of simple conversation and giving directions. Bilingual staff are a valuable resource for the organisation and the presence of a similar overall proportion of bilingual and bicultural staff may engender tolerance and adaptability in providing care to a diverse population. However, supply does not directly match community demand. This mismatch will continue unless recruitment is focused towards identified language groups. The high proportion of staff who rarely used their language skills (37%) may be due to lack of opportunity or limited need, and suggests that further research needs to examine service models that locate bilingual workers close to client need. This study takes a crucial first step towards realising equitable and culturally appropriate care utilising the principles of productive diversity.

  12. Medicare Provider Data - Hospice Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Hospice Utilization and Payment Public Use File provides information on services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by hospice providers. The Hospice PUF...

  13. The administrative staff recruitment and selection in Romanian public higher education institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Luminita Mihaela Strajeri

    2009-01-01

    Administrative staff, it will be argued, is essential to the activity of higher education. Adminis-trative staff make up about 44% of the Romanian public higher education workforce, working directly with students and providing services that allow schools to function. There is a major shortfall in the effort and attention now being devoted to the administrative staff of all kinds, despite the workload and importance of this staff. The paper looks at some of the challenges facing higher educati...

  14. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. The voting takes place from 23 October to 13 November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017. Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November and 5 December. Candidates for the 2017 Elections

  15. Supported Conversation for hospital staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Hysse B; Løvholt, Annelise P.; Mathiesen, Lone Lundbak

    in communication and interaction, Supported Conversation for Adults with Aphasia (SCA) was adapted and implemented in a large neurological department at Rigshospitalet-Glostrup in Copenhagen. Method 152 staff members representing different health professionals were assigned to one of eleven courses during a six...... month period. Each course had 10-12 participants and lasted 6 hours, including instruction in the SCA principles, video analysis, interdisciplinary group work, and practice sessions with PWAs. Self-assessed learning outcomes were evaluated with a brief questionnaire filled out by staff members...... in communication, also showed significant improvements across all staff groups. After the course, more time to spend with patients was perceived as the most important factor to further increase communication success with PWA. Conclusion The results show that interdisciplinary SCA-courses successfully increase...

  16. Customer care a training manual for library staff

    CERN Document Server

    Gannon-Leary, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Customer Care provides a detailed course suitable for delivery to library staff at all levels. It can be used as a stand-alone reference work for customer care processes and procedures or, alternatively, it can be used by library staff to tailor a customer care course to suit the requirements and training needs of their own staff.Dual use - reference work and/or training manualPotential as a text bookApplicable to a wider context than LIS - could be used for a whole HEI institutional approach to customer care or in local authorities/public services

  17. Meeting the Challenge of Providing Flexible Learning Opportunities: Considerations for Technology Adoption amongst Academic Staff (Relever le défi de fournir des occasions d'apprentissage flexibles: considérations pour l'adoption de la technologie par le personnel universitaire)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirriahi, Negin; Vaid, Bhuvinder S.; Burns, David P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a subset of findings from a larger study investigating resistance from academic staff to the integration of technology with on-campus foreign language teaching at one North American higher education institution. The study revealed that the factors influencing technology adoption paralleled Davis' Technology Acceptance Model's…

  18. Staff Development for School Improvement: An Illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelfelt, Roy A., Ed.

    This document contains 11 papers on school staff development: (1) "The Staff Development for School Improvement Program" (Winifred I. Warnat); (2) "A Teacher's View of a Staff Development Project" (Lynn Kleiman); (3) "Staff Development from the Principal's Perspective" (Dixie Hibner); (4) "Stepping-Stones to Success" (Barbara A. Skone); (5)…

  19. 17 CFR 8.05 - Enforcement staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enforcement staff. 8.05... staff. (a) Each exchange shall establish an adequate enforcement staff which shall be authorized by the... staff shall consist of employees of the exchange and/or persons hired on a contract basis. It may not...

  20. JOB SATISFACTION SURVEY OF STAFF NURSES WORKING IN THE HOSPITALS.

    OpenAIRE

    Sheeja. C. V; K. Reddemma.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Satisfaction of the nurses are key component in delivering inviolable health care in the country. Multiple factors are responsible for nurses? job satisfaction. Satisfied nurses are able to provide quality nursing care for their patients. Staff Nurses? Job satisfaction are influenced by extrinsic and intrinsic factors. The staff nurses attitude towards their job can be measured through the job satisfaction scale. This study has been undertaken in an attempt to explore and descri...

  1. English for Airport Ground Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes part of a European Commission Leonardo project that aimed to design a multimedia course for English language learners seeking work as ground staff in European airports. The structural-functional analysis of the dialogues written from the course showed that, across the four trades explored (security guards, ground handlers,…

  2. Agency Directionality and Staff Individuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, James C.; And Others

    Psychologists who choose work as members of counseling agencies are likely to experience some dissonance between what their individual interests and skills would have them do professionally and what they are asked to do as a staff member of the agency. Conversely, as a component of a larger institution or community, an agency's very existence may…

  3. Staff perceptions of challenging parent-staff interactions and beneficial strategies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Joshua; Friedman, Susan Hatters; Collin, Marc; Martin, Richard J

    2018-01-01

    To characterise neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) staff perceptions regarding factors which may lead to more challenging staff-parent interactions, and beneficial strategies for working with families with whom such interactions occur. A survey of 168 physician and nursing staff at two NICUs in American teaching hospitals inquired about their perceptions of challenging parent-staff interactions and situations in which such interactions were likely to occur. From a medical perspective, staff perceptions of challenging interactions were noted when infants had recent decompensation, high medical complexity, malformations or long duration of stay in the NICU. From a psychological/social perspective, a high likelihood of challenging interactions was noted with parents who were suspicious, interfere with equipment, or parents who hover in the NICU, express paranoid or delusional thoughts, repeat questions, perceive the staff as inaccessible, are managing addictions, or who require child protective services involvement. Frequent family meetings, grieving opportunities, education of parents, social work referrals, clearly defined rules, partnering in daily care and support groups were perceived as the most beneficial strategies for improving difficult interactions. This study delineates what staff perceive as challenging interactions and provides support for an educational and interventional role that incorporates mental health professionals. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Staff

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    TÜ teadustöötajaist ja õppejõududest on 2/3 doktorikraadiga. TÜ rektor Jaak Aaviksoo ja teadusprprektor Ain Heinaru valiti Euroopa kõrghariduspoliitika juhtorganitesse. Sotsiaalteaduskonna prof. Wolfgang Drechsler sai Saksa-Eesti akadeemiliste suhete arendamise eest Saksamaa Liitvabariigi Teeneteristi

  5. Environmental Performance Information Use by Conservation Agency Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardropper, Chloe Bradley

    2018-04-01

    Performance-based conservation has long been recognized as crucial to improving program effectiveness, particularly when environmental conditions are dynamic. Yet few studies have investigated the use of environmental performance information by staff of conservation organizations. This article identifies attitudinal, policy and organizational factors influencing the use of a type of performance information—water quality information—by Soil and Water Conservation District staff in the Upper Mississippi River Basin region. An online survey ( n = 277) revealed a number of important variables associated with greater information use. Variables included employees' prosocial motivation, or the belief that they helped people and natural resources through their job, the perceived trustworthiness of data, the presence of a U.S. Clean Water Act Total Maximum Daily Load standard designation, and staff discretion to prioritize programs locally. Conservation programs that retain motivated staff and provide them the resources and flexibility to plan and evaluate their work with environmental data may increase conservation effectiveness under changing conditions.

  6. Síndrome de Burnout em trabalhadores de enfermagem de um pronto socorro de hospital universitário Síndrome de Burnout en trabajadores de enfermería del servicio de emergencia de un hospital universitario Burnout Syndrome among nursing staff from an emergency department of a hniversity hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Albieri Jodas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar sinais e sintomas de burnout em trabalhadores de enfermagem de um Pronto Socorro de Hospital Universitário correlacionando-os com fatores preditores. MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo quantitativo, com 61 trabalhadores de enfermagem. Utilizou-se um questionário estruturado, auto-aplicável, acrescido do instrumento Maslach Burnout Inventory. A análise dos dados foi feita através do Epiinfo 2004. RESULTADOS: Dos 61 trabalhadores que participaram do estudo, 8,2% apresentavam manifestações de burnout, todos do sexo feminino, 54,1% possuiam alto risco para manifestação de burnout e 37,7% eram de baixo risco de manifestação da doença. Fatores como o não reconhecimento e incentivo ao desenvolvimento profissional estão relacionados com este diagnóstico. CONCLUSÕES: A dinâmica organizacional de um Pronto Socorro gera uma sobrecarga e tensão ocupacional sendo necessário desenvolver estratégias de reorganização do processo de trabalho diminuindo fontes de estresse.OBJETIVO: Investigar signos y síntomas de burnout en trabajadores de enfermería del servicio de emergencia de un Hospital Universitario correlacionándolos con factores de predicción. MÉTODOS: Se trata de un estudio descriptivo cuantitativo, realizado con 61 trabajadores de enfermería. Se utilizó un cuestionario estructurado, auto-aplicable, además del instrumento Maslach Burnout Inventory. El análisis de los datos se realizó por medio del Epiinfo 2004. RESULTADOS: De los 61 trabajadores que participaron en el estudio, el 8,2% presentaba manifestaciones de burnout, todos del sexo femenino, el 54,1% poseía alto riesgo para manifestación de burnout y el 37,7% era de bajo riesgo de manifestación de la enfermedad. Factores como la falta de reconocimiento e incentivo al desarrollo profesional están relacionados con este diagnóstico. CONCLUSIONES: La dinámica organizacional de un servicio de emergencia genera sobrecarga y tensión ocupacional siendo

  7. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Asscociation

    2015-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! Be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will represent you over the next two years and they will without doubt appreciate your gratitude. The voting takes place from the 26th of October to the 9th of November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2015.   Elections Timetable Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 8 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. Candidates for the 2015 elections

  8. Preparing Dedicated Education Unit Staff Nurses for the Role of Clinical Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Susan A; Bonham, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Dedicated Education Units optimize the expertise of staff nurses to provide clinical instruction to nursing students, thereby creating a need to prepare staff nurses for the teaching role and educate them about clinical teaching strategies. A curriculum to educate Dedicated Education Unit staff nurses in the art of clinical instruction was created to fill this gap in staff development. This article describes the development of an innovative, interactive, evidence-based curriculum to prepare Dedication Education Unit staff nurses and strengthen an academic-practice partnership.

  9. Provider Health and Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Anil; Wasan, Anita; Sussman, James

    Provider health and wellness is a significant issue and can impact patient care, including patient satisfaction, quality of care, medical errors, malpractice risk, as well as provider and office staff turnover and early retirement. Health and wellness encompasses various areas including burnout, depression, divorce, and suicide and affects providers of all specialties and at all levels of training. Providers deal with many everyday stresses, including electronic health records, office politics, insurance and billing issues, dissatisfied patients, and their own personal and family issues. Approximately half of all physicians suffer from burnout, and the rate of burnout among physicians of all specialties is increasing. An important first step in dealing with burnout is recognition and then seeking assistance. Strategies to prevent and treat burnout include increasing provider resiliency as well as implementing practical changes in the everyday practice of medicine. There is currently very little data regarding health and wellness specifically in the field of allergy and immunology, and studies are necessary to determine the prevalence of burnout and related issues in this field. Many medical specialties as well as state and national medical associations have health and wellness committees and other resources, which are essential for providers. Health and wellness programs should be introduced early in a provider's training and continued throughout a provider's career. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Towards mobile staff members management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encheva, Sylvia

    2017-07-01

    Todays project management requires a number of abilities which involve finding quick solutions to shortage of staff members with possession of specific qualities. When persons with team responsibilities are under pressure or due to various circumstances are unable to perform exhaustive search in databases, an interactive visualization tool can come in quite handy in finding good solutions unforeseen occurrences. In particular we propose application of selected graphs for facilitating mobile human resource management.

  11. Managing a multicultural radiology staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhizar, R; Dowd, S; Giger, J

    1997-01-01

    Opportunities for minorities in healthcare increased with the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s. More recently, funds from the U.S. Public Health Service have been targeted toward disadvantaged minorities. The workforce in healthcare, and in business in general, has become increasingly multicultural. Much of the literature in healthcare management lacks practical guidelines for managing a diverse workforce. Communication, both verbal and nonverbal, and culture are closely intertwined. Managers, as they develop multicultural teams, will need to understand how culture influences communication in their organizations. Space, spatial behavior, and cultural attitudes influence people's behavior. This is a particularly important consideration for a radiology staff, which must often work in close quarters. For some cultural groups, the family as an organization has more significance than even personal, work-related or national causes. People's orientation to time, whether for the past, present or future, is usually related to the culture in which they grew up. Again, this may become an important issue for a radiology administrator whose organization must run punctually and time-efficiently. How patients feel about their environment, whether they believe they are in control or believe in an external locus of control, is of particular interest to those who attempt therapeutic changes in a patient's healthcare. Does the patient believe that illness is divine will or that suffering is intrinsic to the human condition? There is increasing research in the United States to show that people do differ biologically according to race. Such differences exist among patients as well as among staff members. It has been popular to assume that differences among races do not exist. Unfortunately such an attitude does not allow for different attributes and responses of individuals. Managing a multicultural staff presents a challenge to administrators who must be skilled in working with

  12. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   Global CERN Career paths AA - G 14     Number of seats for fellows representatives Global CERN 5 For more informat...

  13. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 21 September, at noon Start date for receipt of the application Friday 16 October, at noon Closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   ...

  14. The Prussian German General Staff System and Its Impact on the General and Admiral Staff Officers of the Federal Armed Forces of Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-15

    manual the description of General Staff officer insignia reads as follows: Dull grey embroidery , stitched by hand, on a crimson underground, 2 x 11...small prongs on either side. The angles of the V-shaped embroidery point downwards. The epaulettes have a crimson underlay. 2 1 General Staff officers...insubordination. Even the French General Staff system does not provide for a jointly responsible adviser. In his Reflexions sur 1 ’ art de la querre, General

  15. Proposta de modelo para dimensionamento do pessoal de enfermagem em assistência domiciliária Propuesta de modelo para la provisión de personal de enfermería en asistencia domiciliaria Proposal for a model for calculating the size of nursing staff in home care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Watanabe Dal Ben

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A assistência domiciliária (AD suscita questionamentos sobre a necessidade do número de horas diárias e dos dias de assistência de enfermagem por parte dos compradores da prestação de serviços à saúde em domicílio. Identificar os critérios adotados por gerentes e enfermeiras para o dimensionamento do pessoal de enfermagem. Os dados foram coletados por meio de entrevista semi-estruturada e analisados segundo o método de análise de conteúdo. Identificaram-se três categorias: elegibilidade do paciente; tempo despendido na assistência e perfil de competência do profissional. As etapas consideradas foram: identificação da carga média diária de trabalho; determinação da proporção das categorias profissionais; jornada de trabalho dos profissionais de enfermagem e identificação do índice de segurança técnica para cobertura de ausências previstas e de não previstas. Com base nessas variáveis, propusemos um modelo para calcular o quadro de profissionais de enfermagem em AD, agilizando o processo de tomada de decisão.La asistencia domiciliaria (AD suscita interrogantes sobre la necesidad del número de horas diarias y de los días de asistencia de enfermería por parte de los compradores de prestación de servicios a la salud en domicilio. Tuvo por objetivo identificar los criterios adoptados por gerentes y enfermeras para el cálculo del personal de enfermería. Los datos fueron recolectados por medio de una entrevista semi-estructurada y analizados según el método de análisis de contenido. Se identificaron tres categorías: elegibilidad del paciente, tiempo invertido en la asistencia y perfil de competencia del profesional. Las etapas consideradas fueron: identificación de la carga promedio diario de trabajo; determinación de la proporción de las categorías profesionales; jornada de trabajo de los profesionales de enfermería e identificación del índice de seguridad técnica para la cobertura de ausencias

  16. Violência de gênero contra trabalhadoras de enfermagem em hospital geral de São Paulo (SP Violencia de género contra trabajadoras de enfermería en hospital general de São Paulo, Brasil Gender-violence against the female nursing staff of a Brazilian hospital in São Paulo City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane R Oliveira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estimar a ocorrência de violência psicológica, física e sexual em profissionais de enfermagem. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com amostra de 179 profissionais (50 enfermeiras e 129 auxiliares/técnicas de enfermagem de um hospital geral do município de São Paulo, SP, entre 2005 e 2006. Utilizou-se questionário aplicado face a face por entrevistadoras treinadas. A violência foi abordada em suas formas psicológica, física e sexual para agressores homens e mulheres, agrupados em: parceiros íntimos, familiares e outros agressores como conhecidos e estranhos. Procedeu-se a uma análise descritiva, calculando-se as freqüências dos tipos de violência com intervalo de confiança de 95%. RESULTADOS: A violência por parceiro íntimo foi a mais freqüente (63,7%; IC 95%:55,7;70,4 seguida pela violência perpetrada por outros (pacientes/acompanhantes, colegas de trabalho da área da saúde, estranhos, chefia de enfermagem e conhecidos; 45,8%; IC 95%: 38,3;53,4. A violência por familiares ocupou o terceiro lugar (41,3%; IC 95%: 34,0;48,9 e foi cometida, principalmente, por pai, irmãos (homens, tios e primos. Em geral, poucas profissionais de enfermagem que sofreram violência buscaram ajuda: 29,7% para a violência por parceiro íntimo; 20,3% para a violência por outros e 29,3% para a violência por familiares. Não perceberam o vivido como violento, 31,9% das entrevistadas. CONCLUSÕES: As taxas de violência de gênero entre mulheres profissionais de saúde foram significativas, principalmente para a violência cometida por parceiros íntimos e familiares. Entretanto, a busca de ajuda frente aos agravos sofridos foi baixa, considerando ser um grupo de escolaridade significativa.OBJETIVO: Estimar la ocurrencia de violencia psicológica, física y sexual en profesionales de enfermería. MÉTODOS: Se realizó estudio transversal con muestra de 179 profesionales (50 enfermeras y 129 auxiliares técnicas de enfermería de un hospital

  17. Strategies and best practices for staff renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottingham, C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the strategies and best practices for staff renewal in the electricity sector. Strategic initiatives for staff renewal include strategic recruiting, succession planning, employee relations, knowledge management and strategic partnerships

  18. The Joint Staff Officer's Guide 2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    The Joint Forces Staff College (JFSC) educates staff officers and other leaders in joint operational-level planning and warfighting and instills a commitment to joint, multinational, and interagency teamwork, attitudes, and perspectives...

  19. Staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimova, N.U.; Malisheva, E.Yu.; Shosafarova, Sh.G.

    2010-01-01

    Present article is devoted to staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics. Data on staff radiation exposure obtained during 2005-2008 years was analyzed. It was found that average individual doses of staff of various occupations in Dushanbe city for 2008 year are at 0.29-2.16 mSv range. They are higher than the average health indicators but lower than maximum permissible dose. It was defined that paramedical personnel receives the highest doses among the various categories of staff.

  20. Implications of research staff demographics for psychological science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Does, Serena; Ellemers, Naomi; Dovidio, John F; Norman, Jasmine B; Mentovich, Avital; van der Lee, Romy; Goff, Phillip Atiba

    2018-03-01

    Long-standing research traditions in psychology have established the fundamental impact of social categories, such as race and gender, on people's perceptions of themselves and others, as well as on the general human cognition and behavior. However, there is a general tendency to ignore research staff demographics (e.g., researchers' race and gender) in research development and research reports. Variation in research staff demographics can exert systematic and scientifically informative influences on results from psychological research. Consequently, research staff demographics need to be considered, studied, and/or reported, along with how these demographics were allowed to vary across participants or conditions (e.g., random assignment, matched with participant demographics, or included as a factor in the experimental design). In addition to providing an overview of multidisciplinary evidence of research staff demographics effects, we discuss how research staff demographics might influence research findings through (a) ingroup versus outgroup effects, (b) stereotype and (implicit) bias effects, and (c) priming and social tuning effects. Finally, an overview of recommended considerations is included (see the Appendix) to help illustrate how to systematically incorporate relevant research staff demographics in psychological science. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Staff perceptions of community health centre team function in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Jennifer; Muldoon, Laura

    2017-07-01

    To examine perceptions of different staff groups about team functioning in mature, community-governed, interprofessional primary health care practices. Cross-sectional online survey. The 75 community health centres (CHCs) in Ontario at the time of the study, which have cared for people with barriers to access to traditional health services in community-governed, interprofessional settings, providing medical, social, and community services since the 1970s. Managers and staff of primary care teams in the CHCs. Scores on the short version of the Team Climate Inventory (with subscales addressing vision, task orientation, support for innovation, and participative safety), the Organizational Justice Scale (with subscales addressing procedural justice and interactional justice), and the Organizational Citizenship Behavior Scale, stratified by staff group (clinical manager, FP, nurse practitioner [NP], registered nurse, medical secretary, social worker, allied health provider, counselor, outreach worker, and administrative assistant). A total of 674 staff members in 58 of 75 (77%) CHCs completed surveys. All staff groups generally reported positive perceptions of team function. The procedural justice subscale showed the greatest variation between groups. Family physicians and NPs rated procedural justice much lower than nurses and administrators did. This study provides a unique view of the perceptions of different groups of staff in a long-standing interprofessional practice model. Future research is needed to understand why FPs and NPs perceive procedural justice more negatively than other team members do, and whether such perceptions affect outcomes such as staff turnover and health outcomes for patients. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  2. Become a staff delegate: why not you?

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2009-01-01

    Following a decision taken at the Staff Association General Assembly in May 2008, staff delegates are elected in the autumn of odd-numbered years. The next elections which will lead to a total renewal of the Staff Council will thus take place in November 2009. Will you be a candidate?

  3. Strengthening Bullying Prevention through School Staff Connectedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2014-01-01

    The growing concern about bullying and school violence has focused national attention on various aspects of school climate and school connectedness. The current study examined dimensions of staff connectedness (i.e., personal, student, staff, and administration) in relation to staff members' comfort intervening in bullying situations (e.g.,…

  4. Self Efficacy among University Academic Staff

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was no significant difference between teaching staff and professional librarians on collective educators' self efficacy but significant difference existed between male and female academic staff on collective educators' self efficacy. The implication of the result in terms of collaborative work among academic staff was ...

  5. 28 CFR 551.32 - Staff supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff supervision. 551.32 Section 551.32 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Inmate Organizations § 551.32 Staff supervision. (a) The Warden shall appoint a staff member as the...

  6. 13 CFR 400.105 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 400.105 Section 400.105... Board Procedures § 400.105 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director of the Board advises... with respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff, and...

  7. 13 CFR 500.105 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 500.105 Section 500.105... LOAN PROGRAM Board Procedures § 500.105 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director of the... direction with respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff...

  8. 20 CFR 900.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff. 900.5 Section 900.5 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION § 900.5 Staff. (a) The... the Act and performs such other functions as the Board may delegate to him. (b) Members of the staffs...

  9. 14 CFR 1310.6 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 1310.6 Section 1310.6 Aeronautics... GUARANTEED LOAN § 1310.6 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director advises and assists the Board... administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff, and performs such other duties as the...

  10. Improving Staff Productivity in Mental Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This guide is concerned with productivity measurement and improvement in mental health centers, and focuses on the relationship between service outputs and available clinical staff, i.e., staff productivity. Staff productivity measures are described as useful in identifying existing levels of productivity, making comparisons to determine the…

  11. Job satisfaction survey among health centers staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnazi, Hossein; Daniali, Seyede Shahrbanoo; Sharifirad, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Due to the importance of health care organizations with significant responsibility for prevention and care, assessment of job satisfaction among health care staff is essential. Quality of health services will be decreased provided they are not satisfied. This study was a cross-sectional analysis of health care staff in Khomeinishahr (centers, buildings, and networks) If they had at least 6 months work experience, they could enter the study. Data included a two-part questionnaire with a standardized questionnaire, demographic variables, and Smith job descriptive index, which is a questionnaire with six domains. Reliability was obtained for each domain and its validity was reported 0.93. The results showed an overall satisfaction score averages 43.55 ± 12.8 (from 100). Job satisfaction score was not significantly different between the sexes. However, within the current attitude toward job satisfaction, men scores was better than women (P = 0.001). Highest score in job satisfaction was related to relationships with colleagues and lowest score was related to the income, benefits, and job promotion. The more the years of work, the less the job satisfaction was. The attitude toward the current job had a direct relationship with income (P = 0.01). There was a significant inverse relationship between educational level and job satisfaction in domains promotion, income, and benefits (P = 0.01). The staff with higher education levels was less satisfied with income and job promotion qualification. Managers should focus on job qualification to increase job satisfaction and improve the quality of work.

  12. Service quality improvement of ground staff at Don Mueang International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sittichai Sricharoenpramong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this research were to: 1 evaluate the service quality of the ground staff at Don Mueang International Airport (DMK, 2 compare the ground staff quality service perception of Thai passengers at DMK, and 3 provide guidelines for service quality improvement of the DMK airlines ground staff. A sample size of 400 Thai domestic passengers was accidentally selected at DMK. A questionnaire was used as a research tool for data collection. Five dimensions of service quality were evaluated: reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy, and tangibles. It was found that the service quality of ground staff was moderate. The highest dimension of service quality realization was tangibles, followed successively by reliability, assurance, empathy, and responsiveness. The passengers' perception of the ground staff's service quality varied by gender and age group. Guidelines were proposed for the improvement of ground staff service quality at DMK based on the findings. Keywords: airport, ground staff, quality of service

  13. The Influence of Nurse Manager Leadership Style on Staff Nurse Work Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Jennifer

    2016-09-01

    Nursing literature supports the importance of an engaged nursing workforce as a means to positively influence performance. Nurse manager leadership style plays a critical role in engaging staff nurses. These relationships have been minimally studied in nurse managers and staff nurses. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of nurse manager leadership style factors on staff nurse work engagement. Using a descriptive correlational research design, 441 staff nurses working in 3 acute care hospitals were surveyed. Survey instruments included the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale and the Multifactorial Leadership Questionnaire 5X short form. Transactional and transformational leadership styles in nurse managers positively influenced staff nurse work engagement. Passive-avoidant leadership style in nurse managers negatively influenced staff nurse work engagement. Nurse managers who provide support and communication through transformational and transactional leadership styles can have a positive impact on staff nurse work engagement and ultimately improve organizational outcomes.

  14. Evaluation of a Staff Training Programme using Positive Psychology coaching with film and theatre elements in care homes: views and attitudes of residents, staff and relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Azucena; Wenborn, Jennifer; Ledgerd, Ritchard; Orrell, Martin

    2017-03-01

    There is a recognised need to improve staff training in care homes. The aim of this study was to conduct a qualitative evaluation of the Ladder to the Moon Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme (CCSEP), a staff training programme aimed at enhancing staff-resident communication. Focus groups were conducted with residents able to provide consent; staff and relatives and managers were interviewed in two care homes. A theoretical framework was developed to interpret the impact of CCSEP using Framework Analysis. Residents noted that the programme appeared to result in staff interacting more with them, as well as enjoying working together as a team. Staff reported an improved sense of teamwork, developing more positive attitudes towards residents, as well as their concerns about using theatrical techniques in the care setting. Relatives identified care home organisational aspects as being barriers to implementation, and some regarded CCSEP simply as 'entertainment' rather than 'creative care'. This study provides an insight into the potential of this staff training programme to improve staff-resident interactions. However, participants' varying views of CCSEP highlight the need to brief staff, residents and relatives before implementation so as to enable full understanding of the aim. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The operating staff of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, G.; Christ, W.

    1988-01-01

    The training of its staff is one of the pillars of the safe and economical operation of a power plant. This is why power plant owners began to systematically train their staff already in the 50s, and why they created central training facilities. Staff members who have undergone this training make an indispensable contribution to the acceptedly high safety and availability of German power plants. The substantial cost of creating training facilities and of schooling plant staff is considered to be an investment for the future. Low labour turnover permits careful observation and development of staff and leads to a high standard of knowledge and experience. (orig./HSCH) [de

  16. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral colle...

  17. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 26 September, posters, etc. call for applications Wednesday 26 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the application Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November. In its meeting on 19 September 2011, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges 0.1 to 0.6: Sector Department Career path AA – A – B – C – D Career path E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 18 si&e...

  18. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 13 si&...

  19. Training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    A training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff personnel has been developed and implemented. The program is compliant with requirements and provides evidence that a systematic approach has been taken to indoctrinate new technical staff. Development involved task analysis to determine activities where training was necessary and the standard which must be attained to qualify. Structured mentoring is used where experienced personnel interact with candidates using checksheets to guide candidates through various steps and to provide evidence that steps have been accomplished. Credit can be taken for the previous experience of personnel by means of evaluation boards which can credit or modify checksheet steps. Considering just the wealth of business practice and site specific information a new person at a facility needs to assimilate, the program has been effective in indoctrinating new technical staff personnel and integrating them into a productive role. The program includes continuing training

  20. Are all pharmacy staff interested in potential future roles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braund, Rhiannon; Chesney, Kate Marie; Keast, Emilia Paulina; Ng, Lye Jinn; Qi, Sarah; Samaranayaka, Sashika; Wang, Eddie

    2012-12-01

    To determine the current perceived roles and responsibilities of pharmacy staff in community pharmacies in New Zealand, and attitudes to proposed new advanced roles for pharmacy staff. Structured interviews were conducted within five community pharmacies, including at least two pharmacists, two dispensary staff and two pharmacy assistants. The interviews were structured to determine previous experience, current roles and responsibilities and the perceived future roles of pharmacy staff within a community pharmacy setting. Thematic analysis from 27 interviews identified key findings. Current roles appeared to be fairly well defined. Pharmacy assistants listed key roles as customer interactions and sales focus, noting that the dispensary was outside their area of responsibility. Technicians identified their role as being dispensary focused while pharmacists saw their role as the 'final check' to ensure accuracy as well as providing dispensing, counselling and managerial roles. With potential future roles, the assistants were less interested than the other groups, citing contentment with current situation and training as a barrier. Some technicians indicated an interest in furthering their roles, but many were reluctant and saw that additional training was too time consuming. Whilst pharmacists appeared to be interested in further scopes of practice, they appeared more reluctant to do this at the expense of handing dispensing responsibility to a non-pharmacist. Whilst there is a push for pharmacists to provide advanced clinical services, it is important to acknowledge that many staff working within community pharmacies are satisfied with their current role. © 2012 The Authors. IJPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  1. Conhecimento da equipe de enfermagem sobre higiene oral em pacientes criticamente enfermos El conocimiento del equipo de enfermería sobre higiene oral en pacientes críticamente enfermos Nursing staff's knowledge about oral care in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielli Mottes Orlandini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar o conhecimento dos profissionais de enfermagem, que realizam ou supervisionam os cuidados de higiene oral em pacientes críticos e, secundariamente, verificar como julgam o cuidado prestado. Estudo exploratório, descritivo, com abordagem quantitativa, por meio de instrumento elaborado pelos autores, aplicado a enfermeiros e técnicos que atuam em uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva (UTI de médio porte de Porto Alegre. Os resultados mostram que 50% dos enfermeiros e 72,8% dos técnicos concordam que a higiene oral no paciente crítico é importante, mas não há relação com a pneumonia associada à ventilação mecânica (PAVM. Da amostra, 16,6% dos enfermeiros e 66,6% dos técnicos de enfermagem concordam que a rotina da instituição é adequada, sendo que 66,6% dos enfermeiros e 30,7% dos técnicos indicam novas práticas. Isso nos sugere que a higiene oral em pacientes internados não tem constituído uma preocupação evidente, tanto na assistência quanto nas práticas de educação em saúde.El objetivo fue evaluar el conocimiento de los profesionales de enfermería que realizan o supervisan el cuidado de la higiene oral en pacientes críticos y, en segundo lugar, para ver cómo juzgar la atención proporcionada. Estudio exploratorio descriptivo con enfoque cuantitativo, usando un instrumento desarrollado por los autores, aplicado a los enfermeros y técnicos que trabajan en la Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos (UCI de un hospital de tamaño mediano de la ciudad de Porto Alegre. Los resultados muestran que el 50% de los enfermeros y el 72,8% de los técnicos concuerdan que la higiene bucal en los pacientes críticos es importante, pero no hay ninguna relación con la neumonía asociada al ventilador (NAV. De la muestra, el 16,6% de los enfermeros y el 66,6% de los técnicos de enfermería concuerdan que la rutina de la institución es adecuada, mientras que el 66,6% de los enfermeros y el 30,7% de los técnicos indican

  2. Chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear preparedness training for emergency medical services provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollek, Daniel; Wanger, Karen; Welsford, Michelle

    2009-07-01

    We assessed the self-reported theoretical and practical preparedness training of Canadian emergency medical services (EMS) providers in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) events. We designed an online survey to address the theoretical and practical CBRN training level of prehospital providers. Emergency medical services staff in British Columbia and Ontario were invited to participate. Of the 1028 respondents, 75% were male, and the largest demographic groups were front-line personnel with more than 15 years of experience. Only 63% of respondents indicated they had received either theoretical or practical training to work in a contaminated environment, leaving 37% who indicated they had received neither type of training. Of those that had received any training, 61% indicated they had received "hands-on" or practical training and 82% indicated they had received some training in identification of a possibly contaminated scene. Only 42% had received training for symptoms of nerve agents, 37% had received training for symptoms of blister agents and 46% had received training for symptoms of asphyxiants. Thirty-two percent had received training for the treatment of patients exposed to nerve agents, and 30% had received training for the treatment of patients exposed to blister agents. Only 31% of all respondents had received training for detecting radiation. CBRN events involve unique hazards and require specific education and training for EMS providers. A large proportion of Canadian EMS providers report not having received the training to identify and work in contaminated environments.

  3. Predictors of Nursing Staff Voluntary Termination in Nursing Homes: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Punnett, Laura; Gore, Rebecca

    2017-08-01

    Workforce instability in the long-term care sector has raised wide attention about nursing staff turnover. Most attention has been devoted to understanding the relationship between facility's characteristics and organizational turnover. This case-control study examined the contribution of work characteristics to individual staff turnover. Surveys were collected with nursing staff in 18 for-profit nursing homes on up to five occasions between 2006 and 2012. A list of nursing staff voluntarily terminating jobs was provided by the company. Cases and controls (628 of each) were selected from survey respondents by matching on age, job category, and survey occasion. Multiple predictor conditional logistic regression models showed that evening shift work (hazards ratio [HR] = 2.00, p 8 hr (HR = 1.42, p voluntary termination. This study provides different perspectives of nursing staff voluntary termination in nursing homes. Future qualitative research would be valuable to explore and understand nursing staff turnover in the health care industry.

  4. Instrumentos da Contabilidade Gerencial utilizados em micro e pequenas empresas comerciais e disponibilizados por empresas de serviços contábeis = Managerial Accounting instruments used in micro and small commercial businesses services provided by accounting services companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderlei dos Santos

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo é verificar os instrumentos da contabilidade gerencial utilizados em micro e pequenas empresas comerciais na tomada de decisão e a disponibilização desses instrumentos por parte das empresas de serviços contábeis. Realizou-se pesquisa descritiva, de abordagem quantitativa e por meio de uma survey. Para a coleta dos dados foram aplicados dois questionários,um direcionado às empresas comerciais e o outro aos escritórios prestadores de serviços contábeis.De 77 empresas comerciais cadastradas na prefeitura do município de Presidente Getúlio/SC,obteve-se o retorno de 16 delas, constituindo-se assim uma amostra por acessibilidade. Quanto às empresas de serviços contábeis, obteve-se um retorno de 100% da população, totalizando 7 escritórios de contabilidade. Os resultados monstram que os instrumentos da contabilidade gerencial mais utilizados pelas empresas são a formação do preço de venda e o fluxo de caixa,enquanto os menos utilizados são, a análise das demonstrações contábeis e análise do custo/volume/lucro e ponto de equilíbrio. Conclui-se que há necessidade de mudança na relação das micro e pequenas empresas com a contabilidade e o aperfeiçoamento dos serviços oferecidos pelos profissionais das empresas de serviços contábeis.The objective of the study is to examine the instruments of managerial accounting used in microand small commercial businesses in decision making and the availability of these instruments byaccounting services companies. A descriptive research was done using a quantitative approachand a survey. Two questionnaires were applied to collect the data, one directed to commercialenterprises and other to the accounting service providers office. Out of the 77 commercialcompanies registered in President Getúlio / SC city hall, was obtained the return of 16 of them,being a sample of accessibility. As for accounting services companies, we obtained 100% ofreturn from the

  5. Research staff and public engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    Public engagement plays an important role in the contemporary UK academy, and is promoted through initiatives such as Beacons of Public Engagement and research grant 'Pathways to Impact'. Relatively little is known, however, about academic experiences of such engagement activities. This study...... focuses on one staff group, contract researchers, to explore the perceived challenges and opportunities of public engagement. Qualitative and quantitative data-from a web-based survey and three focus groups-are used to show that, while engagement activities are often seen as rewarding, the challenges...... involved in participating in them are profound. While researchers report practical needs, such as for logistical support or communication training, key barriers relate to the conditions of contract research more generally, and specifically to job insecurity, transiency, and lack of autonomy....

  6. National staff exercise in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, L.J.W.M.; Dal, A.H.

    1993-01-01

    In mid 1990, with the implementation of the National Plan for Nuclear Emergency Planning and Response in its final phase, it was decided to conduct a National Staff Exercise (NSE) on 14th November 1991, focused on an accident at the nuclear power plant in Borssele. In preparing the exercise a workplan was developed and a task force was formed. The task force was responsible for implementing all activities listed in the workplan. Approximately 450 persons participated in the exercise, including an extensive control organization. For evaluation purposes several evaluation reports were drawn up. An international group of experts observed the exercise, visited several participating locations and evaluated the performance of participants. In general the exercise was judged as realistic and successful. Both participants as well as controllers expressed opinions that it was a very instructive exercise and the scenario contained enough elements to perform their tasks as well as provide a realistic assessment of the plan and the procedures

  7. Survey of how staff commute to work

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    A survey was initiated by the Canton of Geneva (Direction Générale des Transports) and the Swiss Permanent Mission to the United Nations, and is aimed at better understanding how staff in International Organisations commute to/from work so as to better plan future works (road access, public transport, etc.). The ILO, WHO, UNAIDs, Global Fund, IFRC, CERN and UNOG are taking part in this important survey.   People living in Switzerland or France are invited to respond to this survey. The purpose of this survey is to better understand: - your commuting habits, - your willingness to explore alternative commuting options, - your expectations and needs. All data provided to this external company (www.mobilidee.ch) will be kept confidential and will only be used for this particular study. CERN has received all guarantees of confidentiality from this company. Many thanks for your collaboration! GS Department

  8. [Quality of work life in nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, María Olga Quintana; Klijn, Tatiana Maria Paravic

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with aspects that are related to work, quality of life, and its relationship with the nursing staff within the Mexican context. Professionals in health areas present alterations that are commonly overlooked and barely dealt with, especially when the person is a woman and, the care they give to patients, families, and/or friends, or community members, precede their own self care. In the case of institutions or work areas, even when the job provides human beings with several benefits, it usually lacks the proper conditions to perform the job, carries negatives aspects or pathological conditions, all which can relate to poor levels of Quality of Life at Work. Members of the nursing team need to perform their work in the best possible conditions in order to maintain their physical and mental health.

  9. Setting the Standards for Sessional Staff: Quality Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Across the Australian Higher Education sector a focus on quality is driving a new paradigm for learning and teaching: quality standards. One challenge is to engage all academics with this progress towards systematic quality enhancement and assurance. Sessional staff, who provide most of the face-to-face teaching in Australian universities, remain…

  10. Funding Staff Development for School Improvement and Student Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applewhite, Ann Simpson

    1999-01-01

    When Thornton (Colorado) High School organized for site-based management, the structuring committee understood the importance of providing a professional-development fund for staff members. The school decided to restructure with one central umbrella committee for site-based governance and several subcommittees reporting to the main committee. (MLH)

  11. Burnout and Work Stress among Disability Centers Staff in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ahmed Hassan Hemdan

    2015-01-01

    Extensive efforts have been made to maximize the potential of children with disabilities in Oman. The establishment of Al-Wafaa centers of disabilities served as a channel to help families secure a variety of services provided to children with different disabling conditions. The purpose of this study was to explore the burnout of staff working in…

  12. Stress and Caregiver Sensitivity among Childcare Staff in Santiago, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santelices, Maria Pia

    2014-01-01

    Background: This exploratory study examines the relationship between stress and caregiver sensitivity among non-parental childcare centre staff who attend Chilean daycare centres serving low-income children between 12- and 24-months-old. Method: Participants were 23 childcare providers (nine teachers and 14 childcare technicians) who were…

  13. Head Start Participants, Programs, Families and Staff in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Head Start programs provide poor children and their families with comprehensive early education and support services. Each year, programs are required to submit a Program Information Report (PIR) to the Office of Head Start on participating children, pregnant women, and families, as well as the staff serving the Head Start population. In 2013, the…

  14. Building Multicultural Residential Communities: A Model for Training Student Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryk, Taryn; Thompson, Monita C.; Boynton, Trelawny

    2013-01-01

    The growing diversity and changing demographics within the United States increases the importance of students developing skills to engage across identity difference. The purpose of this chapter is to describe how a pre-employment course for student staff members is used as a multicultural intervention training to provide students with the…

  15. Report on the Implementation of a Local Staff (LS) Category

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    At its meeting on 22 June 2003, Council approved a revised proposal by the Management (document CERN/2499/Rev.) concerning the introduction of Local Staff (LS). During the preceding discussions by Finance Committee and TREF, it was agreed that the management would present an implementation report summarising the recruitment process and first experience. The present report provides the requested information with emphasis on recruitment and retention aspects. The review of employment conditions for Local Staff is the subject of a separate report to be prepared in the framework of the 5-yearly review. The Finance Committee is invited to take note of this report, which was presented at TREF on 16 February 2006.

  16. Capital humano e sua relação com o desempenho organizacional em empresas prestadoras de serviços contábeis = Human capital and its relationship with the organizational performance in accounting services providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzete Antonieta Lizote

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Na atualidade o valor das empresas não pode ser estimado apenas pelos seus ativos tangíveis. A geração e aquisição de conhecimento são fundamentais para a obtenção de vantagens competitivas, pelo que cresce a importância do capital intelectual da organização. Nesse contexto a pesquisa objetiva analisar se o capital humano (CH que as empresas prestadoras de serviços contábeis dispõem se relaciona positivamente com seu desempenho organizacional (DO. Metodologicamente, a pesquisa se caracteriza como quantitativa e de natureza aplicada, com os dados empíricos obtidos com questionário numa amostra intencional. Levantaram-se dados de ambos os constructos e dos respondentes e suas empresas. Os métodos estatísticos foram o teste t e a análise de variância para as comparações de médias. Empregou-se também a análise fatorial exploratória e confirmatória e a modelagem em equações estruturais para avaliar a relação conjecturada. Os resultados obtidos mostraram que os respondentes têm percepções estatisticamente iguais para ambos os constructos ao considerar o gênero e o tipo de gestão que a firma possui, mas houve diferenças para a percepção do desempenho segundo seu tamanho. Empresas maiores declaram ter maior desempenho. A hipótese que o CH se relaciona positiva e significativamente com o DO foi confirmada. Currently the value of companies cannot only be estimated by their tangible assets. The generation and acquisition of knowledge are key for obtaining competitive advantages, reason for which the importance of the intellectual capital of the organization grows. In this context the research aims to analyze whether the human capital (CH held by companies providing accounting services are positively related to their organizational performance (DO. Methodologically, the research is characterized as quantitative and of an applied nature, with the empirical data obtained from a questionnaire in intentional sample. Data

  17. The operational staff during exercise RESUME-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, J. [Jensen Consult, Virum (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    With more than 100 participants entering the exercise RESUME-95 the Exercise Planning Committee decided to establish an operational staff named Directing Staff (DISTAFF) to ensure that the exercise plan was followed, the planned activities were carried out and to intervene if anything went wrong. In general the duties of the operational staff involve tasks such as secretarial assistance, keeping log of the progress of the situation and gathering, updating and distributing information on all aspects of the situation. Throughout the entire event it is the staff`s responsibility to keep a general view of the current situation and to make the necessary plans for the progress of the situation based on the available information. Furthermore the staff should ensure necessary contact to the public and to the media. (au).

  18. Measuring hospital medical staff organizational structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortell, S M; Getzen, T E

    1979-01-01

    Based on organization theory and the work of Roemer and Friedman, seven dimensions of hospital medical staff organization structure are proposed and examined. The data are based on a 1973 nationwide survey of hospital medical staffs conducted by the American Hospital Association. Factor analysis yielded six relatively independent dimensions supporting a multidimensional view of medical staff organization structure. The six dimensions include 1) Resource Capability, 2) Generalist Physician Contractual Orientation, 3) Communication/Control, 4) Local Staff Orientation, 5) Participation in Decision Making, and 6) Hospital-Based Physician Contractual Orientation. It is suggested that these dimensions can be used to develop an empirical typology of hospital medical staff organization structure and to investigate the relationship between medical staff organization and public policy issues related to cost containment and quality assurance. PMID:511580

  19. Nursing staff perceptions of student contributions in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter-Smith, Cheryl; Helms, Jennifer E; Burris, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Because nursing is a practice discipline, students are placed in clinical settings to collaborate with professional nurses in caring for patients. This descriptive study aimed to explore the benefits and limitations of undergraduate nursing students in the clinical setting. A 54-item instrument, Nursing Students' Contributions to Clinical Agencies, was used to collect data from staff nurses (N = 84) at three hospitals. The instrument also provided space for participants to share qualitative data, which revealed perceptions with which staff nurses were likely to agree and three key themes: Eager to Learn, Willing to Help, and Serving Their Time. The major implication for students is that they are often judged on their assertiveness skills and should offer assistance so they appear eager to learn. Faculty must ascertain that students understand their objectives for the clinical rotation and share those objectives with the staff nurses to enhance their learning experience. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Disability on campus: a perspective from faculty and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigaki, Cheryl L; Anderson, Kim M; Howald, Carol L; Henson, Lee; Gregg, Bonnie E

    2012-01-01

    To identify employee perceptions regarding disability-related workplace issues in Institutions of Higher Education (IHE). Faculty and staff (N=1,144) at a large, Midwestern university. A voluntary on-line survey of disability-related employment issues was developed by the university's Chancellor's Committee of Persons with Disabilities. Item responses were analyzed using descriptive and Pearson chi-square statistical methods. Fifteen percent of faculty and staff respondents were found to have disabilities, with 26% reporting experience of job discrimination, and 20% reporting harassment because of their disability. Results indicated significant differences on gender, employment standing (i.e., faculty or staff) and disability status (i.e., with or without a disability), in regard to perceptions of disability acceptance, campus accessibility, disability awareness, ADA policy, and knowledge of work accommodation procedures. Recommendations for IHEs are provided to promote a welcoming and inclusive campus that ultimately supports work success for persons with a disability.

  1. Medical Students and Staff Physicians: The Question of Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noller, Michael; Mai, Johnny P; Zapanta, Philip E; Camacho, Macario

    2017-07-01

    Social media's prevalence among the professional world is rapidly increasing. Its use among medical personnel-specifically, medical students, resident physicians, and staff physicians-could compromise personal-professional boundaries. Could the acceptance or lack of acceptance of a friend request bias the medical student application process? If friend requests are accepted, then medical students, resident physicians, and staff physicians are provided access to very personal aspects of one another's lives, which may not have been the intent. The question remains whether the separation of one's personal life from work is necessary. Should medical students restrict social media relationships with residents and staff physicians to professional social media networks? The suitability and opportunities of social media among medical professionals is an ongoing issue for research that needs continued evaluation.

  2. Job Satisfaction Of Hospital Nursing Staff

    OpenAIRE

    Charlotte Pietersen

    2005-01-01

    Health care managers realize that job satisfaction impacts on nursing staff retention. This study examined the job satisfaction of nursing staff (N = 109) at a government hospital. Just more than half of the respondents were generally satisfied. Feelings that nursing is worthwhile and satisfying, and financial stability at the hospital could promote staff retention. Specific intrinsic - (promotion), and extrinsic factors (routinization, working conditions, pay, interaction with supervisors, a...

  3. The staff regulations of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Following the first comprehensive review of the Provisional Staff Regulations conducted by the Secretariat, the Board of Governors approved on 12 June 2002 amendments to the Provisional Staff Regulations including the removal of the attribute 'provisional' from their title. The revised Staff Regulations of the Agency are set forth in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. There is a subject index at the end of the document

  4. A participative management approach for improving direct-care staff performance in an institutional setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgio, L D; Whitman, T L; Reid, D H

    1983-01-01

    The present study evaluated a participative management approach for increasing the frequency of interactions between institutional staff and severely/profoundly retarded residents. The participative management approach involved teaching staff how to use self-monitoring, standard setting, self-evaluation, and self-reinforcement procedures. These procedures were then used by staff with minimal involvement of supervisory personnel. Although supervisors provided feedback and praise to staff for using these self-management behaviors, feedback and praise were never dispensed contingent on staff interactions with residents. Results indicated that during the participative management program there was an increase in staff interactions that were contingent on appropriate resident behavior. The increase in this type of staff interaction was accompanied by an increase in appropriate resident behavior. Follow-up data on both staff and resident behaviors, although showing moderating trends, suggested generally good maintenance of the initial behavior changes. Acceptability data suggested that staff were quite receptive to the program. The advantages of participative management procedures for improving staff performance in residential settings are discussed. PMID:6833168

  5. The relationship between empowerment and effectiveness of staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effectiveness is one of the management concepts considered and studied always by management scientists and experts. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different dimensions of empowerment (servicing staff, staff monitoring, consulting staff, and training staff) on dimensions of effectiveness of staff (staff ...

  6. Nursing unit managers, staff retention and the work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine M; Roche, Michael A; Blay, Nicole; Stasa, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This paper examined the impact of leadership characteristics of nursing unit managers, as perceived by staff nurses, on staff satisfaction and retention. A positive work environment will increase levels of job satisfaction and staff retention. Nurse leaders play a critical role in creating a positive work environment. Important leadership characteristics of the front-line nurse manager include visibility, accessibility, consultation, recognition and support. Secondary analysis of data collected on 94 randomly selected wards in 21 public hospitals across two Australian states between 2004-2006. All nurses (n = 2488, 80·3% response rate) on the selected wards were asked to complete a survey that included the 49-item Nursing Work Index-Revised [NWI-R] together with measures of job satisfaction, satisfaction with nursing and intention to leave. Subscales of the NWI-R were calculated. Leadership, the domain of interest, consisted of 12 items. Wards were divided into those reporting either positive or negative leadership. Data were analysed at the nurse level using spss version 16. A nursing manager who was perceived to be a good leader, was visible, consulted with staff, provided praise and recognition and where flexible work schedules were available was found to distinguish the positive and negative wards. However, for a ward to be rated as positive overall, nurse leaders need to perform well on all the leadership items. An effective nursing unit manager who consults with staff and provides positive feedback and who is rated highly on a broad range of leadership items is instrumental in increasing job satisfaction and satisfaction with nursing. Good nurse managers play an important role in staff retention and satisfaction. Improved retention will lead to savings for the organisation, which may be allocated to activities such as training and mentorship to assist nurse leaders in developing these critical leadership skills. Strategies also need to be put in place to

  7. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows: as from 1 April 2003 • Article R II 1.19 - Types and duration of contracts of staff members (page 15) as from 1 July 2003 Implementation of the category of local staff members Copies of this update are available in the divisional secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  8. Job Satisfaction Of Hospital Nursing Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Pietersen

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Health care managers realize that job satisfaction impacts on nursing staff retention. This study examined the job satisfaction of nursing staff (N = 109 at a government hospital. Just more than half of the respondents were generally satisfied. Feelings that nursing is worthwhile and satisfying, and financial stability at the hospital could promote staff retention. Specific intrinsic - (promotion, and extrinsic factors (routinization, working conditions, pay, interaction with supervisors, and organizational support could impact negatively on retention. Management should use these findings as a basis for staff consultation, developmental strategies, and interventions. Future research on other nursing populations is recommended.

  9. Direct care staff perspectives related to physical activity in mental health group homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Shari L

    2013-12-01

    Sedentary lifestyle is a modifiable risk factor that contributes to health disparities in individuals with serious mental illness. Direct care staff in mental health group homes were surveyed to determine barriers and resource needs related to conducting physical activity interventions with individuals. An investigator-designed survey was used. The most significant barriers cited by staff were individuals did not want to engage in physical activity and staff needed more information about how to conduct physical activity interventions. Resource needs cited by staff included engagement strategies to gain and maintain individual interest as well as resource acquisition. Direct care staff are well positioned to deliver physical activity interventions but need support and direction to engage individuals in safe and effective exercise. Mental health nurses are well placed to provide support and direction to staff for these interventions. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. HIV Stigma in Prisons and Jails: Results from a Staff Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenko, Steven; Dembo, Richard; Copenhaver, Michael; Hiller, Matthew; Swan, Holly; Albizu Garcia, Carmen; O'Connell, Daniel; Oser, Carrie; Pearson, Frank; Pankow, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    With numerous HIV service gaps in prisons and jails, there has been little research on HIV stigma attitudes among correctional staff. Such attitudes may undermine HIV services for inmates at risk of or infected with HIV. This HIV stigma attitudes survey among 218 correctional staff in 32 US facilities (1) provides an overview of staff's stigma attitudes, (2) reports psychometric analyses of domains in Earnshaw and Chaudoir's HIV Stigma Framework (HSF), and (3) explores differences in stigma attitudes among different staff types. Overall, correctional and medical staff expressed non stigmatizing attitudes toward people living with HIV/AIDS, but perceived that stigma and discrimination exist in others. Factor analyses revealed a three factor structure capturing two mechanisms of the HSF (prejudice, discrimination). Few factor score differences were found by staff type or setting. Implications for correctional HIV services and future research on HIV stigma attitudes are discussed.

  11. Applying equity theory to staff working with individuals with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disley, Philip; Hatton, Chris; Dagnan, Dave

    2009-03-01

    This paper provides an overview of the empirical research on equity theory amongst staff working in services for individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). Relevant articles were identified by using the PsycINFO computerised database and by conducting manual searches of reference lists. Six studies were identified and reviewed. Staff often report that they feel under-benefited in their work-based relationships. Associations were found between staff equity perceptions and staff outcomes such as burnout, absenteeism and intention to leave. Previous research findings on staff outcomes are discussed within the context of equity theory. The implications of staff equity perceptions for ID services are discussed and possible directions for future research are forwarded. It is suggested that equity theory may have some utility as a theoretical starting point from which to develop a comprehensive theory to integrate various strands of research on staffing.

  12. Impact of relational coordination on staff and patient outcomes in outpatient surgical clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittell, Jody Hoffer; Logan, Caroline; Cronenwett, Jack; Foster, Tina C; Freeman, Richard; Godfrey, Marjorie; Vidal, Dale Collins

    2018-01-05

    Pressures are increasing for clinicians to provide high-quality, efficient care, leading to increased concerns about staff burnout. This study asks whether staff well-being can be achieved in ways that are also beneficial for the patient's experience of care. It explores whether relational coordination can contribute to both staff well-being and patient satisfaction in outpatient surgical clinics where time constraints paired with high needs for information transfer increase both the need for and the challenge of achieving timely and accurate communication. We studied relational coordination among surgeons, nurses, residents, administrators, technicians, and secretaries in 11 outpatient surgical clinics. Data were combined from a staff and a patient survey to conduct a cross-sectional study. Data were analyzed using ordinary least squares and random effects regression models. Relational coordination among all workgroups was significantly associated with staff outcomes, including job satisfaction, work engagement, and burnout. Relational coordination was also significantly associated with patients' satisfaction with staff and their overall visit, though the association between relational coordination and patients' satisfaction with their providers did not reach statistical significance. Even when patient-staff interactions are relatively brief, as in outpatient settings, high levels of relational coordination among interdependent workgroups contribute to positive outcomes for both staff and patients, and low levels tend to have the opposite effect. Clinical leaders can increase the expectation of positive outcomes for both staff and their patients by implementing interventions to strengthen relational coordination.

  13. Evaluating the implementation of a multicomponent asthma education program for Head Start staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruvalcaba, Elizabeth; Chung, Shang-En; Rand, Cynthia; Riekert, Kristin A; Eakin, Michelle

    2018-03-15

    Asthma disproportionately affects minority groups, low income populations, and young children under 5. Head Start (HS) programs predominantly serve this high-risk population, yet staff are not trained on asthma management. The objective of this study was to assess a 5-year, multicomponent HS staff asthma education program in Baltimore City HS programs. All HS programs were offered annual staff asthma education by a medical research team that included didactic lectures and hands-on training. Attendees received continuing education credits. HS staff were anonymously surveyed on asthma knowledge and skills and asthma medication management practices in Year 1 (preimplementation) and Year 5. There was an estimated response rate of 94% for Year 1 and 82% for Year 5. Compared to staff in Year 1, Year 5 staff were significantly more likely to report they had very good knowledge and skills related to asthma [odds ratio (OR) 1.63; p staff reported higher self-assessed knowledge and skills, self-reports of asthma medication management practices, and self-reports of asthma activities compared to Year 1 staff. HS serves high-risk children with asthma, and a multicomponent program can adequately prepare staff to manage asthma in the child care setting. Our results indicate the feasibility of providing efficacious health skill education into child care provider training to reduce asthma knowledge gaps.

  14. Staff Group Trainer: Development of a Computer-Driven, Structured, Staff Training Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koger, Milton

    1998-01-01

    .... The project produced two training support packages (TSP)--battalion and brigade--designed to train these staffs to more effectively and efficiently communicate within and between staff sections, command post, and the unit commander...

  15. Increasing Direct Care Staff Compliance to Individualized Physical Therapy Body Positioning Prescriptions: Prescriptive Checklists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattimore, Jennifer; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The study confirmed previous research indicating that workshop training by itself is an ineffective method of increasing direct care staff compliance to treatment prescriptions, and that providing direct staff supervisors with a training and management tool (prescriptive checklists) may be an effective alternative for serving multihandicapped…

  16. Pilot Training Project. Community-Based Criminal Justice Staff Development Project, Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massachusetts Residential Programs, Inc., Cambridge.

    This report on the pilot training phase of the Community-Based Criminal Justice Staff Development Project represents an attempt to describe and document project efforts during the months between October, 1975 and June, 1976 with a view toward providing a detailed guide for future implementation of staff development activities for community-based…

  17. Provision of Support for Psychological Distress by University Staff, and Receptiveness to Mental Health Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margrove, K. L.; Gustowska, M.; Grove, L. S.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing concern over the number of university students and university staff who require psychological support; however, little is known about the impact of this on higher education (HE) staff. University employees (n = 91) from two UK universities completed an anonymous survey which explored their experience of providing support for…

  18. Star: A Dementia-Specific Training Program for Staff in Assisted Living Residences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teri, Linda; Huda, Piruz; Gibbons, Laura; Young, Heather; van Leynseele, June

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes, and provides data on, an innovative, comprehensive, dementia-specific training program designed to teach direct care staff in assisted living residences to improve care and reduce problems in residents with dementia. Design and Methods: STAR--which stands for Staff Training in Assisted living Residences- provides…

  19. Stress, Depression, Workplace and Social Supports and Burnout in Intellectual Disability Support Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutkins, E.; Brown, R. F.; Thorsteinsson, E. B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Staff providing support to people with intellectual disabilities are exposed to stressful work environments which may put them at an increased risk of burnout. A small prior literature has examined predictors of burnout in disability support staff, but there is little consensus. In this study, we examined direct and indirect…

  20. Developing an Education Intervention for Staff Supporting Persons with an Intellectual Disability and Advanced Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey-McCarthy, Elizabeth; McCarron, Mary; Connaire, Kevin; McCallion, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Generally, staff working in settings that provide care for adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) have not received specific education with respect to extended care for terminal illnesses or late-stage dementia. Equally, staff working in specialist palliative care often are not familiar with the unique issues of supporting persons with…

  1. An Epidemiological Approach to Staff Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamis, Edna

    This paper describes a conceptual model of staff burnout in terms of independent, intervening and dependent variables. Staff burnout is defined, symptoms are presented, and the epidemiological approach to burnout is descussed. Components of the proposed model, which groups determinants of mental health into three domains, consist of: (1)…

  2. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M. W. J.; Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; Bosman, Anna M. T.; Jahoda, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Background: A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about dealing with incidents and limit physical risk of…

  3. 20 CFR 638.801 - Staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff training. 638.801 Section 638.801 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Administrative Provisions § 638.801 Staff training. The...

  4. Futuristics: A Tool for Staff Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Margaret J.; Hurst, James C.

    1979-01-01

    Creative use of future planning as a staff development tool can have short- and long-term benefits for the individual and the organization. Its potential for stimulating creativity, reducing crisis management, and developing staff cohesion is unequaled. The individual, the organization, the technology and the manager are the important factors.…

  5. 40 CFR 1.25 - Staff Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff Offices. 1.25 Section 1.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters § 1.25 Staff Offices. (a) Office of Administrative Law Judges. The Office of...

  6. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background - A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about

  7. An Ivory Staff Terminal from Alcester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Heslop

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Alcester staff terminal is an outstanding example of late Anglo-Saxon carving on a small scale. It was supposedly discovered in 1873 in the garden of the rectory at Alcester (Warwickshire and comes from a pastoral staff that would have belonged to a bishop or abbot. This article contains a 3D visualisation of the terminal.

  8. Quality Control in Child Care Staff Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Merwin R.

    1975-01-01

    This paper focuses on the process of staff selection of child care staff at a residential treatment center for children, ages 8-16. Phases of candidate selection, an "open-door" interview procedure, the orientation of hired candidates and the agency's philosophy, procedures and practices are discussed. (GO)

  9. Staff attitudes towards patients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendsborg, Per; Bratbo, Johanne; Dannevang, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Stigmatizing attitudes have been reported in international studies among staff in psychiatry. The authors wanted to investigate if this was the case in Denmark.......Stigmatizing attitudes have been reported in international studies among staff in psychiatry. The authors wanted to investigate if this was the case in Denmark....

  10. 29 CFR 511.7 - Committee staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Committee staff. 511.7 Section 511.7 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS WAGE ORDER PROCEDURE FOR AMERICAN SAMOA § 511.7 Committee staff. Each industry committee will be furnished a lawyer, to...

  11. 28 CFR 600.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 600.5 Section 600.5 Judicial Administration OFFICES OF INDEPENDENT COUNSEL, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL POWERS OF SPECIAL COUNSEL § 600.5 Staff. A Special Counsel may request the assignment of appropriate Department employees to assist the...

  12. Continue to Vaccinate Patients and Staff Against the Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-08

    This podcast is a reminder to health care providers about the importance of annual flu vaccination—it’s not too late! Health care providers should get their flu vaccine and continue offering and encouraging flu vaccination among their staff, colleagues, and patients.  Created: 2/8/2012 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 2/14/2012.

  13. The operational staff during exercise RESUME-95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, J.

    1997-01-01

    With more than 100 participants entering the exercise RESUME-95 the Exercise Planning Committee decided to establish an operational staff named Directing Staff (DISTAFF) to ensure that the exercise plan was followed, the planned activities were carried out and to intervene if anything went wrong. In general the duties of the operational staff involve tasks such as secretarial assistance, keeping log of the progress of the situation and gathering, updating and distributing information on all aspects of the situation. Throughout the entire event it is the staff's responsibility to keep a general view of the current situation and to make the necessary plans for the progress of the situation based on the available information. Furthermore the staff should ensure necessary contact to the public and to the media. (au)

  14. [Burnout syndrome among health staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiel-García, José Angel; Rodríguez-Morán, Martha; Guerrero-Romero, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of burnout syndrome components among the medical and nursing staff of the second care level hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social and Instituto de Seguridad Social al Servicio de los Trabajadores del Estado from Durango, Mexico. A cross-sectional comparative study was carried out among 73 physicians and 100 nurses randomly selected from both hospitals. The prevalence of burnout syndrome components was established by the Maslash Burnout Inventory, which determines the presence of physical/emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and labor performance. In addition, sociodemographic and labor information was collected. Prevalence was calculated with a reliability interval of 95% (CI 95%). 73 physicians and 100 nurses enrolled, corresponding to 22.8% and 14.5% of such personnel working in both institutions. Among the IMSS and ISSSTE workers respectively, the prevalence of depersonalization was 43.2% (34.4-52.9) and 14.5% (6.8-25.8), whereas the prevalence of physical/emotional exhaustion was 41.4% (32.7-51.1) and 19.4% (10.4-31.4). Pre-valence of labor performance was higher among the personnel of Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social: 99.1% (95.1-100) versus 96.8% (88.8-100). Severe depersonalization (p = 0.004), but not emotional exhaustion (p = 0.09) nor labor performance (p = 0.06) was significantly higher among personnel working at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. Prevalence of depersonalization and physical/emotional exhaustion was higher among physicians and nurses of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social; nonetheless, their labor performance was high. Our finding suggests that personnel working at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social make a greater effort to maintain the high labor performance that medical care requires.

  15. Measures for Assessing the Readiness of Back-office Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devender Maheshwari

    2012-12-01

    existing framework for the assessment and benchmarking of staff maturity. Often viewed in isolation, the practitioners hardly realize the long term intangible objectives to understand how research (literature can help improve the maturity. Similarly, the academics also describe staff education at generic level, which may or may not be applicable to the different types of organizations. Therefore, we propose a conceptual measurement framework with constructs and subsequent measures and show that combining the research (literature and practice (Inland Revenue, Karachi provides deeper insights.Research type: Conceptual paper, Case study, Literature review

  16. Measures for Assessing the Readiness of Back-office Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devender Maheshwari

    2013-02-01

    existing framework for the assessment and benchmarking of staff maturity. Often viewed in isolation, the practitioners hardly realize the long term intangible objectives to understand how research (literature can help improve the maturity. Similarly, the academics also describe staff education at generic level, which may or may not be applicable to the different types of organizations. Therefore, we propose a conceptual measurement framework with constructs and subsequent measures and show that combining the research (literature and practice (Inland Revenue, Karachi provides deeper insights. Research type: Conceptual paper, Case study, Literature review

  17. Nursing staff shortage and in-hospital informal care in an oncology hospital in Greece: the nursing staff's perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapountzi-Krepia, Despina; Lavdaniti, Maria; Psychogiou, Maria; Arsenos, Panagiotis; Paralikas, Theodossios; Triantafylidou, Paraskevi; Georgiadou, Charikleia

    2008-06-01

    There is a broad variety of factors that are contributing to the nursing staff shortage. They include low wages, poor image of nursing, job satisfaction, ageing of the nursing workforce and cost reductions. In the Greek National Health System, there is a policy of open-visiting hours in hospitals. Family members stay with the patients for many hours and provide in-hospital informal care. The purpose of this study is to describe the perceptions of nursing staff about the nursing staff shortage and the in-hospital informal care in a Greek oncology hospital. For the data collection we used a 30-item questionnaire. The majority of the participants (82.9%) stated that most patients have a family member staying longer than the official visiting hours for assisting with care. A main reason according to the nurses' opinion (37.4%) is the nursing staff shortage. In addition, most nurses disagree with relatives providing some of the informal caregiving activities. The findings are consistent with the findings of other studies. They might be of interest to Greek health authorities, to nurses and to Greek citizens in order to implement possible solutions to improve the hospitalization in Greek hospitals.

  18. Issues facing families of infants discharged after cardiac surgery: the perceptions of charity helpline staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Jo; Tregay, Jenifer; Bull, Catherine; Knowles, Rachel L; Crowe, Sonya; Brown, Katherine

    2018-03-05

    To elicit the perceptions of helpline staff who talk to parents of children discharged after cardiac surgery in infancy about parents' key concerns. A qualitative study involving semistructured interviews with 10 staff at four heart charities. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using Framework analysis. Staff identified the knowledge, communication and support needs of parents which they described in terms of the impact of patient and family factors, sources of support and systems. Staff perceptions of helplines, in terms of the function of a helpline and the roles of its staff, together with staff's personal views based on their experience of multiple encounters with many families, influenced how they viewed families' needs and responded to their requests. Helpline staff provided important, previously uncaptured evidence about the challenges faced by parents of children discharged after cardiac surgery in infancy. Staff have an important role in supporting communication, in terms of speaking to families about how to talk to professionals and talking to professionals directly to get or give information when parents are unable to do so. Capturing the perspective of helpline staff about communication issues has highlighted the need for interventions with professionals as well as parents. ©2018 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Protection of staff in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melkamu, M. A.

    2013-04-01

    This project focuses on the interventional radiology. The main objective of this project work was to provide a guidance and advice for occupational exposure and hospital management to optimize radiation protection safety and endorse safety culture. It provides practical information on how to minimize occupational exposure in interventional radiology. In the literature review all considerable parameters to reduce dose to the occupationally exposed are well discussed. These parameters include dose limit, risk estimation, use of dosimeter, personal dose record keeping, analysis of surveillance of occupational dose, investigation levels, and proper use of radiation protection tools and finally about scatter radiation dose rate. In addition the project discusses the ways to reduce occupational exposure in interventional radiology. The methods for dose reduction are minimizing fluoroscopic time, minimizing the number of fluoroscopic image, use of patient dose reduction technologies, use of collimation, planning interventional procedures, positioning in low scattered areas, use of protective shielding, use of appropriate fluoroscopic imaging equipment, giving training for the staff, wearing the dosimeters and know their own dose regularly, and management commitment to quality assurance and quality control system and optimization of radiation protection of safety. (author)

  20. Performance planning and measurement for DOE EM-International Technology Integration Program. A report on a performance measurement development workshop for DOE's environmental management international technology integration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, G.B.; Reed, J.H.; Wyler, L.D.

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the process and results from an effort to develop metrics for program accomplishments for the FY 1997 budget submission of the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management International Technology Integration Program (EM-ITI). The four-step process included interviews with key EM-ITI staff, the development of a strawman program logic chart, and all day facilitated workshop with EM-ITI staff during which preliminary performance plans and measures were developed and refined, and a series of follow-on discussions and activities including a cross-organizational project data base. The effort helped EM-ITI to crystallize and develop a unified vision of their future which they can effectively communicate to their own management and their internal and external customers. The effort sets the stage for responding to the Government Performance and Results Act. The metrics developed may be applicable to other international technology integration programs. Metrics were chosen in areas of eight general performance goals for 1997-1998: (1) number of forums provided for the exchange of information, (2) formal agreements signed, (3) new partners identified, (4) customers reached and satisfied, (5, 6) dollars leveraged by EM technology focus area and from foreign research, (7) number of foreign technologies identified for potential use in remediation of DOE sites, and (8) projects advanced through the pipeline

  1. The Staff Association and its history

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    The Staff Association will celebrate its 60th birthday in the spring of 2015. We are collecting all information about the sixty years of the Staff Association. In particular, we are looking at publications of the Staff Association, which started with the “Staff Association Journal”, in 1955, which later became “Le Proton déchainé”, then, more simply, “Proton” in 1982 (the figure on the left shows the different mutations of our magazine). In our collection we are missing a few issues, in particular № 1 (dated mid-1955).     Dear reader, if have any old issues of this magazine, or of Graviton (figure on the right), another magazine edited by the Staff Association, or any other material or information that might help us document the history of the Staff Association, we would very much like to have a copy of the material or your contribution (written or oral). Please contact the Staff Association Sec...

  2. Job and task analysis for technical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toline, B.C.

    1991-01-01

    In September of 1989 Cooper Nuclear Station began a project to upgrade the Technical Staff Training Program. This project's roots began by performing job and Task Analysis for Technical Staff. While the industry has long been committed to Job and Task Analysis to target performance based instruction for single job positions, this approach was unique in that it was not originally considered appropriate for a group as diverse as Tech Staff. Much to his satisfaction the Job and Task Analysis Project was much less complicated for Technical Staff than the author had imagined. The benefits of performing the Job and Task Analysis for Technical Staff have become increasingly obvious as he pursues lesson plan development and course revisions. The outline for this presentation will be as follows: philosophy adopted; preparation of the job survey document; performing the job analysis; performing task analysis for technical staff and associated pitfalls; clustering objectives for training and comparison to existing program; benefits now and in the future; final phase (comparison to INPO guides and meeting the needs of non-degreed engineering professionals); and conclusion. By focusing on performance based needs for engineers rather than traditional academics for training the author is confident the future Technical Staff Program will meet the challenges ahead and will exceed requirements for accreditation

  3. Effectiveness of behavioral skills training on staff performance in a job training setting for high-functioning adolescents with autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palmen, A.M.J.W.; Didden, H.C.M.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have focused on improving staff performance in naturalistic training settings for high-functioning adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. Behavioral skills training, consisting of group instruction and supervisory feedback, was used to improve staff performance on (a) providing

  4. Environmental Performance Information Use by Conservation Agency Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardropper, Chloe Bradley

    2018-04-01

    Performance-based conservation has long been recognized as crucial to improving program effectiveness, particularly when environmental conditions are dynamic. Yet few studies have investigated the use of environmental performance information by staff of conservation organizations. This article identifies attitudinal, policy and organizational factors influencing the use of a type of performance information-water quality information-by Soil and Water Conservation District staff in the Upper Mississippi River Basin region. An online survey (n = 277) revealed a number of important variables associated with greater information use. Variables included employees' prosocial motivation, or the belief that they helped people and natural resources through their job, the perceived trustworthiness of data, the presence of a U.S. Clean Water Act Total Maximum Daily Load standard designation, and staff discretion to prioritize programs locally. Conservation programs that retain motivated staff and provide them the resources and flexibility to plan and evaluate their work with environmental data may increase conservation effectiveness under changing conditions.

  5. When goals diverge: Staff consensus and the organizational climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Gerald; Ulaszek, Wendy R; Lin, Hsiu-Ju; Wexler, Harry K

    2009-08-01

    A sample of correctional officers and prison substance abuse treatment staff collected by the National Criminal Justice Treatment Practices Survey is used to provide an exploratory study of an aspect of organizational culture consisting of consensus (agreement) among prison personnel regarding their beliefs about rehabilitation in the presence of conflicting organizational goals and aspects of the organizational climate important to change. Findings show that among those staff members responding to the survey, the belief in rehabilitation scale mean score was associated with higher levels of organizational commitment, and interdepartmental coordination. However, an hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analysis that used an index score derived from the standard deviation for staff consensus regarding these same beliefs about rehabilitation produced a different pattern of results, showing that high levels of consensus were associated with job frustration, cynicism towards the ability of the institution to change, and lower levels of organizational commitment. The authors conclude that, although the sample may not express the beliefs of corrections officers or prison-based treatment staff at large, within the sample, consensus appeared to play a unique role in evaluating the effect of divergent goals on organizational climate as it relates to change, and warrants consideration when considering the effects of organizational climate.

  6. Emotional intelligence, performance, and retention in clinical staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codier, Estelle; Kamikawa, Cindy; Kooker, Barbara M; Shoultz, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Emotional intelligence has been correlated with performance, retention, and organizational commitment in professions other than nursing. A 2006 pilot study provided the first evidence of a correlation between emotional intelligence and performance in clinical staff nurses. A follow-up study was completed, the purpose of which was to explore emotional intelligence, performance level, organizational commitment, and retention. A convenience sample of 350 nurses in a large medical center in urban Hawaii participated in this study. This article reports the findings pertaining to the subset of 193 clinical staff nurses who responded. The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test instrument was used to measure emotional intelligence abilities. Performance was defined as ranking on a clinical ladder. Commitment was scored on a Likert scale. The following variables measured retention: total years in nursing, years in current job, total years anticipated in current job, and total anticipated career length. Emotional intelligence scores in clinical staff nurses correlated positively with both performance level and retention variables. Clinical staff nurses with higher emotional intelligence scores demonstrated higher performance, had longer careers, and greater job retention.

  7. TERAPI RUMATAN METADONE: KETANGGAPAN PASIEN, SIKAP STAFF DAN PENERIMAAN MASYARAKAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Isfandari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available To minimize impact of injection drug use on HIV/AIDS transmission, known as Harm Reduction, a longitudinal study on methadone maintenance substitution (MMS trial was conducted in Drug Dependence Hospital, Jakarta in November 2003 and Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar in Januury 2004. Respondents of the study were 58 methadone clients From Jakarta and 22 from Denpasar, as well as 11 RSKO's staffs and seven staffs from Sanglah Hospital. Data were collected by questionnaires, interviews and focus group discussion in the third and sixth month from the client admission. In addition to minimize HIV/AIDS transmission, other benefit of the program is to increase productivity and social participation of the MMS participants. Applying the WHO responsiveness concept for health service performance, we measured the performance of MMS. Both In the first three and six month, patients had positif responsiveness with total and component average score not less than 30. But there was no significant change comparing responsiveness in the third and sixth month. Among the components of responsiveness, information and communication received most positif evaluation from patients, while regulation received the lowest evaluation. Generally, all patients support the MMS program. Staffs of MMS had neutral attitude toward the program, try their best to perform their job and learn to understand more on their clients world. The conclusionis that MMS indeed provide positive impact to the clients, and further understanding from staffs toward their clients is necessary for better communication with the clients.

  8. 14 CFR 385.33 - Review by the staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Review by the staff. 385.33 Section 385.33...) ORGANIZATION STAFF ASSIGNMENTS AND REVIEW OF ACTION UNDER ASSIGNMENTS Procedure on Review of Staff Action § 385.33 Review by the staff. Where a petition for review is duly filed, the staff member may, upon...

  9. 34 CFR 75.519 - Dual compensation of staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dual compensation of staff. 75.519 Section 75.519... by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.519 Dual compensation of staff. A grantee may not use its grantee to pay a project staff member for time or work for which that staff member is compensated from some other...

  10. Visualizing Keyword Distribution across Multidisciplinary C-Space; Google Meets eBay: What Academic Librarians Can Learn from Alternative Information Providers; Trends in Use of Electronic Journals in Higher Education in the UK-Views of Academic Staff and Students; DOI: A 2003 Progress Report; Understanding the International Audiences for Digital Cultural Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beagle, Donald; Kenney, Anne R.; McGovern, Nancy Y.; Martinez, Ida T.; Heidig, Lance J.; Bonthron, Karen; Urquhart, Christine; Thomas, Rhian; Ellis, David; Everitt, Jean; Lonsdale, Ray; McDermott, Elizabeth; Morris, Helen; Phillips, Rebecca; Spink, Sian; Yeoman, Alison; Armstrong, Chris; Fenton, Roger; Paskin, Norman; Miller, Paul; Dawson, David; Perkins, John

    2003-01-01

    Includes five articles that discusses c-space as a visualization schema related to keyword distribution in information retrieval; academic librarians and alternative information providers, such as Google and eBay; electronic journal use in higher education in the United Kingdom; digital object identifiers; and international audiences for digital…

  11. Oncology staff reflections about a 52-year-old staff Christmas choir: constructivist research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Clare C; Hornby, Colin J; Pearson, Elizabeth J M; Ball, David L

    2010-12-01

    Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre has one of the world's most enduring staff Christmas choirs. Commencing in 1956, the choir performs in a cafeteria, patient wards, and outpatient waiting areas before each Christmas. With recent emphasis on oncology staff support needs the choir's relevance warranted investigation. This constructivist research examined what effect the staff Christmas choir had on the choir members and staff bystanders in 2008. Sampling was convenience and purposive. Staff choir members were invited to participate during rehearsals, and staff bystanders were invited at seven choir performances in the hospital. Respondents completed anonymous and semistructured questionnaires and the conductor (of 29 years) was interviewed. The inductive, comparative, and cyclic data analyses were informed by grounded theory and qualitative interrater reliability was performed. Questionnaires from 64 staff were returned. The choir elicited positive emotions, memories, Christmas spirit, hospital community and/or work-life effects for many staff, in a cancer context described as sometimes "overwhelming" and "stressful." Choir members' reactions included stress relief, friendship and feeling rewarded. Bystanders' reactions included feeling uplifted, inspired and moved. Suggestions for future performances were offered, including musical acknowledgement of other religious festivals. Two respondents were concerned about intrusive effects on patients and work practices. A staff Christmas choir supported most choir member and staff bystander respondents in an oncology hospital and is recommended in comparable contexts. Further investigation is warranted to extend understanding about Christmas music's effects in palliative care settings.

  12. Behavioral Emergency Response Team: Implementation Improves Patient Safety, Staff Safety, and Staff Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicko, Cdr Jennifer M; Schroeder, Lcdr Rebecca A; Byers, Cdr William S; Taylor, Lt Adam M; Spence, Cdr Dennis L

    2017-10-01

    Staff members working on our nonmental health (non-MH) units (i.e., medical-surgical [MS] units) were not educated in recognizing or deescalating behavioral emergencies. Published evidence suggests a behavioral emergency response team (BERT) composed of MH experts who assist with deescalating behavioral emergencies may be beneficial in these situations. Therefore, we sought to implement a BERT on the inpatient non-MH units at our military treatment facility. The objectives of this evidence-based practice process improvement project were to determine how implementation of a BERT affects staff and patient safety and to examine nursing staffs' level of knowledge, confidence, and support in caring for psychiatric patients and patients exhibiting behavioral emergencies. A BERT was piloted on one MS unit for 5 months and expanded to two additional units for 3 months. Pre- and postimplementation staff surveys were conducted, and the number of staff assaults and injuries, restraint usage, and security intervention were compared. The BERT responded to 17 behavioral emergencies. The number of assaults decreased from 10 (pre) to 1 (post); security intervention decreased from 14 to 1; and restraint use decreased from 8 to 1. MS staffs' level of BERT knowledge and rating of support between MH staff and their staff significantly increased. Both MS and MH nurses rated the BERT as supportive and effective. A BERT can assist with deescalating behavioral emergencies, and improve staff collaboration and patient and staff safety. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. Development of a Refined Staff Group Trainer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quensel, Susan

    1999-01-01

    .... As a follow-on effort to the previous SGT project, the goal was to refine a brigade-level staff training program to more effectively and efficiently coordinate the activities within and between the...

  14. Public Relations Strategies for Scholastic Publication Staffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkle, Bruce E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the importance to scholastic publications staffs of four public relations strategies: meticulous research, systematic planning, strengthening communication efforts, and evaluation. Notes internal and external factors crucial to good public relations. Lists activities to consider. (SR)

  15. Meeting staff representatives of the European Agencies

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      The AASC (Assembly of Agency Staff Committee) held its 27th Meeting of the specialized European Agencies on 26 and 27 May on the premises of the OHIM (Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market) in Alicante, Spain. Two representatives of the CERN Staff Association, in charge of External Relations, attended as observers. This participation is a useful complement to regular contacts we have with FICSA (Federation of International Civil Servants' Associations), which groups staff associations of the UN Agencies, and the annual CSAIO conferences (Conference of Staff Associations of International Organizations), where each Autumn representatives of international organizations based in Europe meet to discuss themes of common interest to better promote and defend the rights of the international civil servants. All these meetings allow us to remain informed on items that are directly or indirectly related to employment and social conditions of our colleagues in other international and Europ...

  16. Does staff diversity imply openness to diversity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – Post-secondary educational organizations are currently some of the most diverse settings to be found. However, few educational studies have dealt with staff diversity and hardly any has looked outside the USA. The purpose of this paper is to present a study of members of international...... university departments in Denmark. The authors set out to investigate the relationship between different types of staff diversity and openness to diversity in terms of linguistic, visible, value, and informational heterogeneity. Design/methodology/approach – This study uses responses from 489 staff members......, was unrelated or negatively associated with positive diversity attitudes. Originality/value – Few studies deal with the role of staff diversity and no prior studies the authors know of have examined the link between diversity types and openness to diversity....

  17. Patient and staff doses in interventional neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bor, D.; Cekirge, S.; Tuerkay, T.; Turan, O.; Guelay, M.; Oenal, E.; Cil, B.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation doses for interventional examinations are generally high and therefore necessitate dose monitoring for patients and staff. Relating the staff dose to a patient dose index, such as dose-area product (DAP), could be quite useful for dose comparisons. In this study, DAP and skin doses of 57 patients, who underwent neuro-interventional examinations, were measured simultaneously with staff doses. Although skin doses were comparable with the literature data, higher DAP values of 215 and 188.6 Gy cm 2 were measured for the therapeutical cerebral and carotid examinations, respectively, owing to the use of biplane system and complexity of the procedure. Mean staff doses for eye, finger and thyroid were measured as 80.6, 77.6 and 28.8 μGy per procedure. The mean effective dose per procedure for the radiologists was 32 μSv. In order to allow better comparisons to be made, DAP normalised doses were also presented. (authors)

  18. Improvements in Productivity Through Staff Integration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kelly, David S

    1988-01-01

    .... The prognosis is not good. This paper addresses one facet of improving a shipyard's position in an increasingly competitive environment improvements in over-all productivity resulting from integration of the functions of the shipyard staff...

  19. The Provisional Staff Regulations of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    In accordance with Article VII.E of the Statute and of the general principles approved by the General Conference in resolution GC.1(S)/RES/13, the Board of Governors has established 'the terms and conditions on which the Agency's staff shall be appointed, remunerated and dismissed.' The Provisional Staff Regulations thus approved and amended by the Board up to 15 January 1959 are reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency

  20. Staff rosters for 1979: environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The roster of the scientific and professional staffs of the Environmental Programs of the Department of Energy and Environment has been compiled as of December 1979. Staff members have been listed according to their organizational units, i.e., the Atmospheric Sciences Division, the Environmental Chemistry Division, the Oceanographic Sciences Division, and the Land and Freshwater Environmental Sciences Group. Educational background, research interests, professional activities, summary of experience at BNL, and selected publications have been included for each member listed.

  1. Uganda; Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper: Joint Staff Advisory Note

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2005-01-01

    This Joint Staff Advisory Note discusses key priorities for strengthening Uganda’s Poverty Eradication Action Plan (PEAP) and for ensuring its effective implementation. PEAP 2004 describes the participatory process underpinning the development of the PEAP strategy, provides a poverty diagnosis, and presents policy measures, sector plans, costing, and a result-oriented policy matrix for sustainable economic growth and poverty reduction over the 2004/05–2007/08 period. It argues for a shift of ...

  2. Attachment and coping of dementia care staff: The role of staff attachment style, geriatric nursing self-efficacy, and approaches to dementia in burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkonen, Taru-Maija; Cheston, Richard I L; Dallos, Rudi; Smart, Cordet A

    2014-07-01

    Past research suggests that dementia care staff are vulnerable to the development of burnout, which has implications for staff well-being and hence the quality of care for people with dementia. Studying personal vulnerability factors in burnout is important as it can guide staff training and support. Attachment theory suggests that adult attachment styles affect caregiving relationships and individuals' responses to stress, providing a framework for understanding caregivers' styles of coping. This cross-sectional survey study examined relationships between staff attachment styles, geriatric nursing self-efficacy, and approaches to dementia in burnout. Seventy-seven members of dementia care staff working on inpatient wards for older people completed self-report questionnaires. Insecure attachment, lower levels of self-efficacy, and more optimistic attitudes in staff were related to higher levels of burnout. Staff training on the role of attachment in dementia care is recommended. Further research is required to explore mediating factors between adult attachment styles and burnout. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Job satisfaction among emergency department staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, M; Asenjo, M; Sánchez, M

    2017-02-01

    To compare job satisfaction among nurses, physicians and administrative staff in an emergency department (ED). To analyse the relationship of job satisfaction with demographic and professional characteristics of these personnel. We performed a descriptive, cross-sectional study in an ED in Barcelona (Spain). Job satisfaction was evaluated by means of the Font-Roja questionnaire. Multivariate analysis determined relationship between the overall job satisfaction and the variables collected. Fifty-two nurses, 22 physicians and 30 administrative staff were included. Administrative staff were significantly more satisfied than physicians and nurses: 3.42±0.32 vs. 2.87±0.42 and 3.06±0.36, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed the following variables to be associated with job satisfaction: rotation among the different ED acuity levels (OR: 2.34; 95%CI: 0.93-5.89) and being an administrative staff (OR: 0.27; 95%CI: 0.09-0.80). Nurses and physicians reported greater stress and work pressure than administrative staff and described a worse physical working environment. Interpersonal relationships obtained the highest score among the three groups of professionals. Job satisfaction of nurses and physicians in an ED is lower than that of administrative staff with the former perceiving greater stress and work pressure. Conversely, interpersonal relationships are identified as strength. Being nurse or physician and not rotating among the different ED acuity levels increase dissatisfaction. Copyright © 2016 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of staff training on radiation dose in pediatric CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojreh, Azadeh; Weber, Michael; Homolka, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pediatric patient CT doses were compared before and after staff training. • Staff training increasing dose awareness resulted in patient dose reduction. • Application of DRL reduced number of CT's with unusually high doses. • Continuous education and training are effective regarding dose optimization. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of staff training on radiation doses applied in pediatric CT scans. Methods: Pediatric patient doses from five CT scanners before (1426 scans) and after staff training (2566 scans) were compared statistically. Examinations included cranial CT (CCT), thoracic, abdomen–pelvis, and trunk scans. Dose length products (DLPs) per series were extracted from CT dose reports archived in the PACS. Results: A pooled analysis of non-traumatic scans revealed a statistically significant reduction in the dose for cranial, thoracic, and abdomen/pelvis scans (p < 0.01). This trend could be demonstrated also for trunk scans, however, significance could not be established due to low patient frequencies (p > 0.05). The percentage of scans performed with DLPs exceeding the German DRLs was reduced from 41% to 7% (CCT), 19% to 5% (thorax-CT), from 9% to zero (abdominal–pelvis CT), and 26% to zero (trunk; DRL taken as summed DRLs for thorax plus abdomen–pelvis, reduced by 20% accounting for overlap). Comparison with Austrian DRLs – available only for CCT and thorax CT – showed a reduction from 21% to 3% (CCT), and 15 to 2% (thorax CT). Conclusions: Staff training together with application of DRLs provide an efficient approach for optimizing radiation dose in pediatric CT practice

  5. Effect of staff training on radiation dose in pediatric CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojreh, Azadeh, E-mail: azadeh.hojreh@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biological Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Paediatric Radiology, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Weber, Michael, E-mail: michael.Weber@Meduniwien.Ac.At [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Paediatric Radiology, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Homolka, Peter, E-mail: peter.Homolka@Meduniwien.Ac.At [Medical University of Vienna, Centre for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Pediatric patient CT doses were compared before and after staff training. • Staff training increasing dose awareness resulted in patient dose reduction. • Application of DRL reduced number of CT's with unusually high doses. • Continuous education and training are effective regarding dose optimization. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of staff training on radiation doses applied in pediatric CT scans. Methods: Pediatric patient doses from five CT scanners before (1426 scans) and after staff training (2566 scans) were compared statistically. Examinations included cranial CT (CCT), thoracic, abdomen–pelvis, and trunk scans. Dose length products (DLPs) per series were extracted from CT dose reports archived in the PACS. Results: A pooled analysis of non-traumatic scans revealed a statistically significant reduction in the dose for cranial, thoracic, and abdomen/pelvis scans (p < 0.01). This trend could be demonstrated also for trunk scans, however, significance could not be established due to low patient frequencies (p > 0.05). The percentage of scans performed with DLPs exceeding the German DRLs was reduced from 41% to 7% (CCT), 19% to 5% (thorax-CT), from 9% to zero (abdominal–pelvis CT), and 26% to zero (trunk; DRL taken as summed DRLs for thorax plus abdomen–pelvis, reduced by 20% accounting for overlap). Comparison with Austrian DRLs – available only for CCT and thorax CT – showed a reduction from 21% to 3% (CCT), and 15 to 2% (thorax CT). Conclusions: Staff training together with application of DRLs provide an efficient approach for optimizing radiation dose in pediatric CT practice.

  6. Microworld Simulations for Command and Control Training of Theater Logistics and Support Staffs A Curriculum Strategy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bondanella, John

    1998-01-01

    ...) command and control (C2). These challenges and changes to how CSS management will occur in an increasingly information-rich and distributed environment provide the opportunity to reexamine training for support staffs...

  7. Nursing care of prisoners: staff views and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jane; Harris, Francesca; Condon, Louise; Kemple, Terry

    2010-06-01

    This paper is a report of a study of the views and experiences of nurses and other prison healthcare staff about their roles and the nursing care they provide to prisoners. Nurses have become the key providers of healthcare in prison settings in England, replacing the previous prison service-run system. However, there is very little evidence about the health services they provide to meet the health needs of prisoners. A ethnographic study was conducted. Participants were 80 healthcare staff working in 12 prisons of all security categories in England. Twelve individual interviews with general healthcare managers and 12 key informant focus group discussions with healthcare staff were undertaken in 2005 using a semi-structured interview schedule. Issues investigated included participants' thoughts and experiences of nursing roles and delivery of primary healthcare. The group discussions and interviews were analysed to identify emerging themes. Participants gave accounts of day-to-day processes and the healthcare routine. They saw their work as identifying and meeting the health needs of prisoners and maintaining their health, and identified major influences that shaped their daily work, including new ways of working in primary care. They identified how policy and organizational changes were affecting their roles, and acknowledged the conflict between the custody regime and healthcare delivery. The move towards a NHS-led primary healthcare service within prisons, predominantly delivered by nurses, has made positive changes to healthcare. Healthcare managers have benefited from the involvement of the local NHS in improving the health of prisoners.

  8. HIV Stigma in Prisons and Jails: Results from a Staff Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembo, Richard; Copenhaver, Michael; Hiller, Matthew; Swan, Holly; Garcia, Carmen Albizu; O’Connell, Daniel; Oser, Carrie; Pearson, Frank; Pankow, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    With numerous HIV service gaps in prisons and jails, there has been little research on HIV stigma attitudes among correctional staff. Such attitudes may undermine HIV services for inmates at risk of or infected with HIV. This HIV stigma attitudes survey among 218 correctional staff in 32 US facilities (1) provides an overview of staff’s stigma attitudes, (2) reports psychometric analyses of domains in Earnshaw and Chaudoir’s HIV Stigma Framework (HSF), and (3) explores differences in stigma attitudes among different staff types. Overall, correctional and medical staff expressed non stigmatizing attitudes toward people living with HIV/AIDS, but perceived that stigma and discrimination exist in others. Factor analyses revealed a three factor structure capturing two mechanisms of the HSF (prejudice, discrimination). Few factor score differences were found by staff type or setting. Implications for correctional HIV services and future research on HIV stigma attitudes are discussed. PMID:26036464

  9. Use of digital dosemeters for supporting staff radiation safety in paediatric interventional radiology suites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Sarah M; Lai, Priscilla; Connolly, Bairbre L; Gordon, Christopher L

    2013-12-01

    Modern-day interventional radiology (IR) procedures impart a wide range of occupational radiation doses to team members. Unlike thermoluminescent badges, digital dosemeters provide real-time dose readings, making them ideal for identifying different components during IR procedures, which influence staff radiation safety. This study focused solely on paediatric IR (PIR) cases. Digital dosemeters measured the impact of imaging modality, shielding, patient and operator specific factors, on the radiation dose received during various simulated and real live PIR procedures. They recorded potential dose reductions of 10- to 100-fold to each staff member with appropriate use of shielding, choice of imaging method, staff position in the room and complex interplay of other factors. The digital dosemeters were well tolerated by staff. Results highlight some unique radiation safety challenges in PIR that arise from dose increases with magnification use and close proximity of staff to the X-ray beam.

  10. Using life history narratives to educate staff members about personhood in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammonley, Denise; Lester, Connie L; Fleishman, Daniel; Duran, Lloyd; Cravero, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Oral life history narratives are a promising method to promote person-centered values of personhood and belonging. This project used resident oral history interviews to educate staff members in an assisted-living setting about personhood. A single group pre-post test design evaluated impacts on 37 staff members to assess their use of resident videotaped oral history interviews and impacts on their perceived knowledge of residents. Perceived knowledge of residents declined (p = .003) between pretest and posttest. Older staff members were less likely to view a video. Staff members are interested in resident oral history biographies and identify them as helpful for delivering care. Oral history methods might provide an opportunity for staff members to promote personhood by allowing them to expand their understanding of resident preferences, values, and experiences.

  11. Use of digital dosemeters for supporting staff radiation safety in paediatric interventional radiology suites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeil, S. M.; Lai, P.; Connolly, B. L.; Gordon, C. L.

    2013-01-01

    Modern-day interventional radiology (IR) procedures impart a wide range of occupational radiation doses to team members. Unlike thermoluminescent badges, digital dosemeters provide real-time dose readings, making them ideal for identifying different components during IR procedures, which influence staff radiation safety. This study focused solely on paediatric IR (PIR) cases. Digital dosemeters measured the impact of imaging modality, shielding, patient and operator specific factors, on the radiation dose received during various simulated and real live PIR procedures. They recorded potential dose reductions of 10-to 100-fold to each staff member with appropriate use of shielding, choice of imaging method, staff position in the room and complex interplay of other factors. The digital dosemeters were well tolerated by staff. Results highlight some unique radiation safety challenges in PIR that arise from dose increases with magnification use and close proximity of staff to the X-ray beam. (authors)

  12. Training and Support of Sessional Staff to Improve Quality of Teaching and Learning at Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Gillian; Crane, Linda; Heslop, Ian; Glass, Beverley D

    2015-06-25

    Sessional staff is increasingly involved in teaching at universities, playing a pivotal role in bridging the gap between theory and practice for students, especially in the health professions, including pharmacy. Although sessional staff numbers have increased substantially in recent years, limited attention has been paid to the quality of teaching and learning provided by this group. This review will discuss the training and support of sessional staff, with a focus on Australian universities, including the reasons for and potential benefits of training, and structure and content of training programs. Although sessional staff views these programs as valuable, there is a lack of in-depth evaluations of the outcomes of the programs for sessional staff, students and the university. Quality assurance of such programs is only guaranteed, however, if these evaluations extend to the impact of this training and support on student learning.

  13. Interim staff position on environmental qualification of safety-related electrical equipment: including staff responses to public comments. Regulatory report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szukiewicz, A.J.

    1981-07-01

    This document provides the NRC staff positions regarding selected areas of environmental qualification of safety-related electrical equipment, in the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-24, 'Qualification of Class IE Safety-Related Equipment.' The positions herein are applicable to plants that are or will be in the construction permit (CP) or operating license (OL) review process and that are required to satisfy the requirements set forth in either the 1971 or the 1974 version of IEEE-323 standard

  14. The association between presenteeism and engagement of National Health Service staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admasachew, Lul; Dawson, Jeremy

    2011-04-01

    Although several studies have demonstrated a relationship between staff engagement and health and wellbeing, none has analysed the association with presenteeism in the National Health Service (NHS) context. Our aim is to determine whether there is a relationship between presenteeism and staff engagement. A hierarchical logistic multilevel modelling of cross-sectional data from the NHS staff survey (2009) was conducted. We controlled for a range of demographic and socioeconomic background variables, including ethnic group, gender, age and occupational group. The sample was 156,951 respondents across all 390 English NHS trusts, each providing a random sample of employees. Engagement was measured using three facets: motivation, advocacy and involvement, which were also used in a composite score. There was a low-to-moderate negative correlation between presenteeism and staff engagement: odds ratio 0.42 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.42-0.43) for overall staff engagement and 0.53 (95% CI 0.52-0.54) for staff advocacy of the trust; 0.53 (95% CI 0.52-0.54) for motivation and 0.50 (95% CI 0.49-0.51) for involvement. Putting pressure on health-care staff to come to work when unwell is associated with poorer staff engagement with their jobs.

  15. Feasibility of a web-based dementia feeding skills training program for nursing home staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor-Murphy, Melissa; Amella, Elaine J; Zapka, Jane; Mueller, Martina; Beck, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Nursing home (NH) staff do not receive adequate training for providing feeding assistance to residents with dementia who exhibit aversive feeding behaviors (e.g., clamping mouth shut). The result is often low meal intake for these residents. This feasibility study tested a web-based dementia feeding skills program for staff in two United States NHs. Randomly assigned, the intervention staff received web-based dementia feeding skills training with coaching. Both groups participated in web-based pre-/post-tests assessing staff knowledge and self-efficacy; and meal observations measured NH staff and resident feeding behaviors, time for meal assistance, and meal intake. Aversive feeding behaviors increased in both groups of residents; however, the intervention NH staff increased the amount of time spent providing assistance and meal intake doubled. In the control group, less time was spent providing assistance and meal intake decreased. This study suggests that training staff to use current clinical practice guidelines improves meal intake. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hospital staff experiences of their relationships with adults who self-harm: A meta-synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Sophie; Glover, Lesley

    2017-09-01

    This review aimed to synthesize qualitative literature exploring inpatient hospital staff experiences of their relationships with people who self-harm. Nine studies were identified from a systematic search of five research databases. Papers included the experiences of physical health and mental health staff working in inpatient settings. The studies employed various qualitative research methods and were appraised using an adapted quality assessment tool (Tong, Sainsbury, & Craig, 2007). A meta-synthesis was conducted using traditional qualitative analysis methods including coding and categorizing data into themes. Three main themes derived from the data. 'The impact of the system' influenced the extent to which staff were 'Fearing the harm from self-harm', or were 'Working alongside the whole person'. A fear-based relationship occurred across mental health and physical health settings despite differences in training; however, 'Working alongside the whole person' primarily emerged from mental health staff experiences. Systemic factors provided either an inhibitory or facilitative influence on the relational process. Staff experiences of their relationship with people who self-harm were highlighted to have an important impact on the delivery and outcome of care. Increasing support for staff with a focus on distress tolerance, managing relational issues, and developing self-awareness within the relationship may lead to a more mutually beneficial experience of care. Equally, structure, clarity, and support within inpatient systems may empower staff to feel more confident in utilizing their existing skills. Working with people who self-harm can be emotionally challenging and how staff cope with this can significantly impact on the engagement of staff and patients. Increasing the skills of staff in managing relational issues and tolerating distress, as well as providing support and reflective practice groups may be useful in managing emotional responses to working with

  17. Innovative public library services - staff-less or staff-intensive?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav Viggo

    2014-01-01

    materials from their home address. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether such developments will necessarily lead to a situation where public libraries become self-service institutions or to what extent self-service and innovative staff-intensive library services can develop and co...... that staff attitudes toward staff-less libraries, and – more surprising – also toward more staff-intensive practices have been somewhat reluctant and skeptical. The paper also presents leadership initiatives which have proved to handle such resistances constructively. Originality/value – The paper contains...

  18. German General Staff Officer Education and Current Challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Groeters, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    "German General Staff Officer Education and Current Challenges" examines the institutional education of German General Staff Officers, as experienced by the author, and offers a "Conceptual Competency...

  19. The effectiveness of staff training focused on increasing emotional intelligence and improving interaction between support staff and clients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlmans, L.J.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Derksen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed

  20. Better protecting staff working alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindlehurst, Darren

    2016-08-01

    Established four and a half years ago as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Dutch-headquartered personal security and critical communications solutions provider, Atus BV, Hereford-based Atus Systems has since established a strong UK-wide client base supplying personal pagers, wireless personal alarm units, and the associated infrastructure, predominantly to high secure mental health facilities, prisons, and detention centres. Recent months, however, mark a new chapter for it, with the launch of a 'unique' lone worker protection system able to identify such personnel's location even when they are indoors and out of range of GPS coverage, and a sophisticated two-way enterprise critical messaging system. As HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, discovered from MD, Darren Swindlehurst, the company will target both systems squarely at the NHS and private healthcare providers, as well as at its more 'traditional' customers.

  1. Staff Judge Advocate Deskbook. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    habitual residence without inquiring into the merits of competing parental claims. Central authorities may order the return of children without judicial... Domicile ; 2. physical presence and / or activities in the state (the "statutory resident " or " resident for tax purposes"); or 3. location where income is...provides that military members do not gain or lose a domicile or residence solely by reason of compliance with military orders, and that military

  2. Managerial instrument for didactic staff structure optimization for Distance Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrus Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Distance learning is a modern system for providing educational services and is relatively new in Romania, if related to the date of its emergence in Europe. More and more active working people are interested in this form of education, paying of course a special attention to its quality. It is quite difficult to appraise the quality of educational programs but several instruments and criteria have been developed over time. The present paper proposes an original mathematical instrument that is aiming at human resources, this type of resources being considered extremely important in case of providing educational service. The number of teachers is crucial for a distance learning program study, because the didactic staff must cover a number of didactic classes that take place on weekends. Concretely, this paper is focused on finding an algorithm that allows the didactic staff structure optimization. For accomplishing this objective, two managerial instruments were use. One of them is mathematical linear programing technique, that develops a mathematical model for didactic staff structure and the other one is WinQSB software package that tests the mathematical model.

  3. Training Nonnursing Staff to Assist with Nutritional Care Delivery in Nursing Homes: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Sandra F; Hollingsworth, Emily K; Long, Emily A; Liu, Xulei; Shotwell, Matthew S; Keeler, Emmett; An, Ruopeng; Silver, Heidi J

    2017-02-01

    To determine the effect and cost-effectiveness of training nonnursing staff to provide feeding assistance for nutritionally at-risk nursing home (NH) residents. Randomized, controlled trial. Five community NHs. Long-stay NH residents with an order for caloric supplementation (N = 122). Research staff provided an 8-hour training curriculum to nonnursing staff. Trained staff were assigned to between-meal supplement or snack delivery for the intervention group; the control group received usual care. Research staff used standardized observations and weighed-intake methods to measure frequency of between-meal delivery, staff assistance time, and resident caloric intake. Fifty staff (mean 10 per site) completed training. The intervention had a significant effect on between-meal caloric intake (F = 56.29, P frequency and number of snack items given per person per day and the associated staff time to provide assistance. It is cost effective to train nonnursing staff to provide caloric supplementation, and this practice has a positive effect on residents' between-meal intake. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  4. Understanding Job Stress among Healthcare Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dola Saha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Job life is an important part of a person’s daily life. There are many aspects of a job. A person may be satisfied with one or more aspects of his/her job but at the same time may be unhappy with other things related to the job. Objective: To evaluate the sources of job stress (stressful aspects of work among the staff of a super specialty hospital & to suggest measures to decrease level of job stress. Methodology: Descriptive study employing 381 staff members of a super specialty hospital using a structured personal interview questionnaire consisting of 21 sources of stress. The hospital staff was asked to rate each item according to the extent to which it had contributed to their stress as experienced in their jobs in the past few months on a scale of 0 (not at all,1(a little, 2(quite a bit, 3 (a lot. A global rating of stress was also obtained. Result: The prime sources of stress were found to be underpayment (76%, excessive workload (70.3%, inadequate staff (48.6, & being involved in the emotional distress of patients (46.7%. Conclusion: The staffs of the hospital were in moderate stress due to the prime stressors so adequate measures should be taken to alleviate these stressors. This could be achieved through workload management, job redesign, & by offering occupational health education.

  5. Sleep Quality among Female Hospital Staff Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Li Chien

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate sleep quality of hospital staff nurses, both by subjective questionnaire and objective measures. Methods. Female staff nurses at a regional teaching hospital in Northern Taiwan were recruited. The Chinese version of the pittsburgh sleep quality index (C-PSQI was used to assess subjective sleep quality, and an electrocardiogram-based cardiopulmonary coupling (CPC technique was used to analyze objective sleep stability. Work stress was assessed using questionnaire on medical worker’s stress. Results. A total of 156 staff nurses completed the study. Among the staff nurses, 75.8% (117 had a PSQI score of ≥5 and 39.8% had an inadequate stable sleep ratio on subjective measures. Nurses with a high school or lower educational degree had a much higher risk of sleep disturbance when compared to nurses with a college or higher level degree. Conclusions. Both subjective and objective measures demonstrated that poor sleep quality is a common health problem among hospital staff nurses. More studies are warranted on this important issue to discover possible factors and therefore to develop a systemic strategy to cope with the problem.

  6. Open educational resources: staff attitudes and awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Rolfe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Attitudes are changing in education globally to promote the open sharing of educational courses and resources. The aim of this study was to explore staff awareness and attitudes toward ‘open educational resources’ (OER as a benchmark for monitoring future progress. Faculty staff (n=6 were invited to participate in semi-structured interviews which facilitated the development of a questionnaire. Staff respondents (n=50 were not familiar with the term OER but had a clear notion of what it meant. They were familiar with open content repositories within the university but not externally. A culture of borrowing and sharing of resources exists between close colleagues, but not further a field, and whilst staff would obtain resources from the Internet they were reticent to place materials there. Drivers for mobilising resources included a strong belief in open education, the ability of OER to enhance individual and institutional reputations, and economic factors. Barriers to OER included confusion over copyright and lack of IT support. To conclude, there is a positive collegiate culture within the faculty, and overcoming the lack of awareness and dismantling the barriers to sharing will help advance the open educational practices, benefiting both faculty staff and the global community.

  7. [A staff development model in psychiatric nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koen, D; Muller, M; Poggenpoel, M

    1995-03-01

    The nursing service manager is accountable for the quality of nursing care delivered in the nursing service. It is therefore important that the nursing service manager facilitates staff development in the nursing service. It is not only the nursing service manager's responsibility to make provision for staff development--the nurse also has a responsibility in this regard. He/she should purposefully make an effort to keep up to date with the latest developments. This article focuses on the co-responsibility of the psychiatric nurse and nursing service manager regarding staff development. A model for staff development is described, in accordance with the guidelines of Dickoff, James & Wiedenbach for theory development. An inductive approach was primarily followed to describe the provisional model, after which a literature study was employed to refine and purify the model. This model was exposed to expert evaluation, after which the final model for staff development of psychiatric nurses was described. Recommendations include the testing of certain hypotheses and utilisation of this model in psychiatric nursing practice.

  8. [Improving nursing staff accuracy in administering chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Ying; Chu, Yun-Li; Chiou, Yen-Gan; Chiang, Ming-Chu

    2009-12-01

    As most anticancer drugs are cytotoxic, their safe and error-free application is important. We analyzed data from the hematology-oncology ward chemotherapy checklist dated January 13th through February 3rd, 2007 and found accuracy rates for chemotherapy drug usage as low as 68.4%. Possible causes identified for this poor result include incomplete chemotherapy standards protocols, lack of chemotherapy quality control, and insufficient chemotherapy knowledge amongst nursing staff. This project aimed to improve the accuracy of nursing staff in administering chemotherapy and to raise nursing staff knowledge regarding chemotherapy. Our strategies for improvement included completing a chemotherapy standards protocol, establishing a chemotherapy quality-control monitoring system, augmenting chemotherapy training and adding appropriate equipment and staff reminders. After strategies were implemented, accuracy in chemotherapy administration rose to 96.7%. Related knowledge amongst nursing staff also improved from an initial 77.5% to 89.2%. Implementing the recommended measures achieved a significant improvement in the accuracy and quality of chemotherapy administered by nursing personnel.

  9. Availability of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) among public and private health facilities in rural northwest Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikder, Shegufta S; Labrique, Alain B; Ali, Hasmot; Hanif, Abu A M; Klemm, Rolf D W; Mehra, Sucheta; West, Keith P; Christian, Parul

    2015-01-31

    Although safe motherhood strategies recommend that women seek timely care from health facilities for obstetric complications, few studies have described facility availability of emergency obstetric care (EmOC). We sought to describe and compare availability and readiness to provide EmOC among public and private health facilities commonly visited for pregnancy-related complications in two districts of northwest Bangladesh. We also described aspects of financial and geographic access to healthcare and key constraints to EmOC provision. Using data from a large population-based community trial, we identified and surveyed the 14 health facilities (7 public, 7 private) most frequently visited for obstetric complications and near misses as reported by women. Availability of EmOC was based on provision of medical services, assessed through clinician interviews and record review. Levels of EmOC availability were defined as basic or comprehensive. Readiness for EmOC provision was based on scores in four categories: staffing, equipment, laboratory capacity, and medicines. Readiness scores were calculated using unweighted averages. Costs of C-section procedures and geographic locations of facilities were described. Textual analysis was used to identify key constraints. The seven surveyed private facilities offered comprehensive EmOC compared to four of the seven public facilities. With 100% representing full readiness, mean EmOC readiness was 81% (range: 63%-91%) among surveyed private facilities compared to 67% (range: 48%-91%) in public facilities (p = 0.040). Surveyed public clinics had low scores on staffing and laboratory capacity (69%; 50%). The mean cost of the C-section procedure in private clinics was $77 (standard deviation: $16) and free in public facilities. The public sub-district facilities were the only facilities located in rural areas, with none providing comprehensive EmOC. Shortages in specialized staff were listed as the main barrier to EmOC provision in

  10. Grief after patient death: direct care staff in nursing homes and homecare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, Kathrin; Burack, Orah R; Jopp, Daniela S; Mock, Steven E

    2015-02-01

    Patient death is common in long-term care (LTC). Yet, little attention has been paid to how direct care staff members, who provide the bulk of daily LTC, experience patient death and to what extent they are prepared for this experience. To 1) determine how grief symptoms typically reported by bereaved family caregivers are experienced among direct care staff, 2) explore how prepared the staff members were for the death of their patients, and 3) identify characteristics associated with their grief. This was a cross-sectional study of direct care staff experiencing recent patient death. Participants were 140 certified nursing assistants and 80 homecare workers. Standardized assessments and structured questions addressed staff (e.g., preparedness for death), institutional (e.g., support availability), and patient/relational factors (e.g., relationship quality). Data analyses included bivariate group comparisons and hierarchical regression. Grief reactions of staff reflected many of the core grief symptoms reported by bereaved family caregivers in a large-scale caregiving study. Feelings of being "not at all prepared" for the death and struggling with "acceptance of death" were prevalent among the staff. Grief was more intense when staff-patient relationships were closer, care was provided for longer, and staff felt emotionally unprepared for the death. Grief symptoms like those experienced by family caregivers are common among direct care workers after patient death. Increasing preparedness for this experience via better training and support is likely to improve the occupational experience of direct care workers and ultimately allow them to provide better palliative care in nursing homes and homecare. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The difficulties experienced by nurses and healthcare staff involved in the process of breaking bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Clare; Buchanan, Jean; Tod, Angela Mary

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the difficulties experienced by nurses and healthcare professionals when engaging in the process of breaking bad news. The challenges faced by staff when breaking bad news have previously been researched in relation to particular settings or participants. This study involved staff from diverse settings and roles to develop broader insights into the range of difficulties experienced in clinical practice. The study used a descriptive survey design involving self-reported written accounts and framework analysis. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire containing a free text section that asked participants to describe a difficult experience they had encountered when involved in the process of breaking bad news. Data were collected from healthcare staff from hospital, community, hospice and care home settings attending training days on breaking bad news between April 2011 and April 2014. Multiple inter-related factors presented challenges to staff engaging in activities associated with breaking bad news. Traditional subjects such as diagnostic and treatment information were described but additional topics were identified such as the impact of illness and care at the end of life. A descriptive framework was developed that summarizes the factors that contribute to creating difficult experiences for staff when breaking bad news. The framework provides insights into the scope of the challenges faced by staff when they engage in the process of breaking bad news. This provides the foundation for developing interventions to support staff that more closely matches their experiences in clinical practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Patient and staff dosimetry in neuroradiological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, N.W.; Faulkner, K.; Noble, J.

    1995-01-01

    Cerebral angiography provides valuable information for use in the clinical management of patients but can result in relatively high radiation doses to patients and staff due to the extended fluoroscopy time and number of images acquired during an examination. In this study, extremity doses to radiologists and scrub nurses working in a neuroradiological centre were monitored during a 3 month period using thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). Electronic personal dosemeters were also used to monitor doses above the lead apron at chest height to the radiologists, radiographers and the scrub nurses. Patient doses were recorded using a dose-area product meter whilst patient thyroid dose was measured using TLDs. Two types of examination were studied: cerebral angiography and arterial embolization. It was deduced from the results of the study that the radiologist may expect to receive a mean dose above the lead apron at chest height of 11 μSv and 25 μSv per examination when performing cerebral angiography and arterial embolization, respectively. A radiologist mean hand dose of 19.3 μSv per examination was found, whilst the average eye dose for both radiologist and scrub nurse was 13.4 μSv per examination. The patient dosimetry results revealed a mean thyroid dose of 1.7 mSv and a dose-area product of 48.5 Gy cm 2 for cerebral angiography. Average dose-area product for arterial embolization was 122.2 Gy cm 2 along with a mean patient thyroid dose of 3.3 mSv. More detailed patient dosimetry was also performed using a Rando anthropomorphic phantom loaded with TLDs to measure organ doses and hence estimate effective dose. A typical four vessel angiogram was found to result in a patient effective dose of 3.6 mSv. (author)

  13. Multilevel Examination of Burnout among High School Staff: Importance of Staff and School Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brennan, Lindsey; Pas, Elise; Bradshaw, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have linked teacher burnout with job performance, satisfaction, and retention; however, there has been limited exploration of potential individual and school contextual factors that may influence burnout. The current study examined high school staff members' reports of burnout as they relate to staff demographics and perceptions…

  14. JOB CENTRE FOR DOMESTIC STAFF IN SWITZERLAND

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service; http://www.cern.ch/relations/

    2001-01-01

    The Permanent mission of Switzerland to the International Organisations in Geneva has informed CERN that the Geneva Welcome Centre has set up an employment registration desk for the domestic staff of international civil servants. The aim of this pilot project is, on the one hand, to help international civil servants find domestic staff and, on the other hand, to help domestic staff holding an 'F'-type carte de légitimation find employment within 30 days after the expiry of a contract. For more information, please contact the Geneva Welcome Centre, La Pastorale, 106, route de Ferney, Case postale 103, 1211 Genève 20, tel. (+41.22) 918 02 70, fax (+41.22) 918 02 79), http://geneva-international.org/Welcome.E.html.

  15. Staff Performance Evaluation in Public Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drumea C.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In public Organizations staff performance is difficult to measure in absence of overall quantitative performance indicators. There are also the qualitative indicators that give an overview on staff’s motivation, strive, ability, commitment to values, teamwork. These aspects are even less easy to illustrate, in private and public sectors equally. In both cases, measuring staff performance at work, as well as its input on the global performance of the organization is a difficult task which has in practice different approaches. Subsequently, this paper is discussing the system indicators and performance triggers used in International Organizations UN affiliated, in order to adjust staff classification and benefits to their staff’s performance.

  16. Consolidating staff augmentation contracts improves teamwork and reduces costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, J.; Sibilla, L.; Gregovich, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power plants have traditionally used multiple contracting firms to provide temporary staff augmentation personnel primarily because of two perceptions: (1) managers believe they have greater access to a higher quality, readily available pool of applicants. (2) using multiple contractors inherently keeps costs down as a result of several competitors submitting resumes for the same position. This paper provides information, based on the experiences of a leading nuclear power plant, that disproves these perceptions. It explains why consolidating several contracts for professional and technical classifications (excluding craft labor and refueling personnel) and competitively bidding and awarding the contract to a single contracting firm promotes teamwork and reduces costs

  17. Information-seeking among chronic disease prevention staff in state health departments: use of academic journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jenine K; Allen, Peg; Jacob, Rebekah R; Elliott, Lindsay; Brownson, Ross C

    2014-08-14

    Use of scientific evidence aids in ensuring that public health interventions have the best possible health and economic return on investment. We describe use of academic journals by state health department chronic disease prevention staff to find public health evidence. We surveyed more than 900 state health department staff from all states and the District of Columbia. Participants identified top journals or barriers to journal use. We used descriptive statistics to examine individual and aggregate state health department responses. On average, 45.7% of staff per state health department use journals. Common barriers to use included lack of time, lack of access, and expense. Strategies for increasing journal use are provided.

  18. Twitter accounts followed by Congressional health staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, David; Meisel, Zachary F; Merchant, Raina M; Seymour, Jane; Gollust, Sarah E

    2017-07-01

    Although health policy research should inform policy making, the communication gap between researchers and policy makers limits successful translation. Social media represents a new opportunity to connect researchers and policy makers. Our objective was to assess who Congressional health policy staff follow on a major social media platform. Cross-sectional study. Our study measured Congressional health policy staff's use of Twitter and the types of individuals and organizations they follow. To focus on more influential Twitter accounts, we restricted our sample to those followed by at least 3 individual Congressional staff members. Of the 30,843 accounts followed by the 115 Congressional health policy staff, 1273 were potentially policy-related and followed by 3 or more staff. Of these, few were academically affiliated (2.4%) or explicitly health-related (5.6%) sites; many were general news media sources (50.9%) and political and governmental sources (36.4%). Health-focused accounts were frequently connected to the news media or government rather than academia. Top accounts followed (ie, highest quintile) were most likely to be national news organizations (odds ratio [OR], 5.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.75-19.7) and elected officials (OR, 8.22; 95% CI, 1.75-38.6) compared with advocacy and interest groups. Health-related and academic sources are largely absent from the Twitter conversations with US Congressional health policy staff. Even within social media, traditional and political news media are important information intermediaries that researchers and journals should target to disseminate health policy evidence.

  19. Outbreak of Mysterious Illness Among Hospital Staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Peter; Ebbehøj, Niels Erik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospitals are rarely reported as settings for mass psychogenic illness (MPI). The present report scrutinizes an outbreak of probable MPI among hospital staff, with medical intervention reinforcing the course of the illness. CASE REPORT: Four of seven staff members in an emergency...... the following 9 days, 14 possible poisoning victims were identified, 6 of whom were transferred for HBO. After hospital stays with repeated HBO treatment and examinations without identification of significant physical disease, the majority of the 10 HBO-treated victims remained symptomatic, some on prolonged....... Outbreaks of illness in a group of symptomatic victims without indication of significant physical disease should be managed by observation and limited intervention....

  20. Validation of the STAFF-5 computer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, J.F.; Fields, S.R.

    1981-04-01

    STAFF-5 is a dynamic heat-transfer-fluid-flow stress model designed for computerized prediction of the temperature-stress performance of spent LWR fuel assemblies under storage/disposal conditions. Validation of the temperature calculating abilities of this model was performed by comparing temperature calculations under specified conditions to experimental data from the Engine Maintenance and Dissassembly (EMAD) Fuel Temperature Test Facility and to calculations performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) using the HYDRA-1 model. The comparisons confirmed the ability of STAFF-5 to calculate representative fuel temperatures over a considerable range of conditions, as a first step in the evaluation and prediction of fuel temperature-stress performance

  1. 7 CFR 1700.27 - Chief of Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chief of Staff. 1700.27 Section 1700.27 Agriculture... GENERAL INFORMATION Agency Organization and Functions § 1700.27 Chief of Staff. The Chief of Staff aids and assists the Administrator and the Deputy Administrator. The Chief of Staff advises the...

  2. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The Water Resources Council Staff (hereinafter the Staff) serves the Council and the Chairman in the performance of...

  3. 10 CFR 2.709 - Discovery against NRC staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discovery against NRC staff. 2.709 Section 2.709 Energy... Rules for Formal Adjudications § 2.709 Discovery against NRC staff. (a)(1) In a proceeding in which the NRC staff is a party, the NRC staff will make available one or more witnesses, designated by the...

  4. 7 CFR 1945.35 - Special EM loan training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., District and County employees, provided there has not been a recent training meeting in that State. (b... County personnel properly trained in the current methods of processing EM loan applications and EM loan... employees in administering the EM loan program. (d) Comprehensive EM loan training package. A comprehensive...

  5. Contemporary women's secure psychiatric services in the United Kingdom: A qualitative analysis of staff views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, T; Edge, D; Shaw, J; Wilson, H; McNair, L; Mitchell, H; Gutridge, K; Senior, J; Sutton, M; Meacock, R; Abel, K

    2017-11-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Three pilot UK-only Women's Enhanced Medium Secure Services (WEMSS) was opened in 2007 to support women's movement from high secure care and provide a bespoke, women-only service. Evidence suggests that women's secure services are particularly challenging environments to work in and staffing issues (e.g., high turnover) can cause difficulties in establishing a therapeutic environment. Research in this area has focused on the experiences of service users. Studies which have examined staff views have focused on their feelings towards women in their care and the emotional burden of working in women's secure services. No papers have made a direct comparison between staff working in different services. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This is the first study to explore the views and experiences of staff in the three UK WEMSS pilot services and contrast them with staff from women's medium secure services. Drawing upon data from eighteen semi-structured interviews (nine WEMSS, nine non-WEMSS), key themes cover staff perceptions of factors important for women's recovery and their views on operational aspects of services. This study extends our understanding of the experiences of staff working with women in secure care and bears relevance for staff working internationally, as well as in UK services. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: The study reveals the importance of induction and training for bank and agency staff working in women's secure services. Further, regular clinical supervision should be mandatory for all staff so they are adequately supported. Introduction Women's Enhanced Medium Secure Services (WEMSS) is bespoke, gender-sensitive services which opened in the UK in 2007 at three pilot sites. This study is the first of its kind to explore the experiences of WEMSS staff, directly comparing them to staff in a standard medium secure service for women. The literature to date has focused on the experiences of

  6. Satisfaction with information provided to Danish cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2013-01-01

    To validate five items (CPWQ-inf) regarding satisfaction with information provided to cancer patients from health care staff, assess the prevalence of dissatisfaction with this information, and identify factors predicting dissatisfaction.......To validate five items (CPWQ-inf) regarding satisfaction with information provided to cancer patients from health care staff, assess the prevalence of dissatisfaction with this information, and identify factors predicting dissatisfaction....

  7. Effect of staff training on radiation dose in pediatric CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojreh, Azadeh; Weber, Michael; Homolka, Peter

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of staff training on radiation doses applied in pediatric CT scans. Pediatric patient doses from five CT scanners before (1426 scans) and after staff training (2566 scans) were compared statistically. Examinations included cranial CT (CCT), thoracic, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk scans. Dose length products (DLPs) per series were extracted from CT dose reports archived in the PACS. A pooled analysis of non-traumatic scans revealed a statistically significant reduction in the dose for cranial, thoracic, and abdomen/pelvis scans (p0.05). The percentage of scans performed with DLPs exceeding the German DRLs was reduced from 41% to 7% (CCT), 19% to 5% (thorax-CT), from 9% to zero (abdominal-pelvis CT), and 26% to zero (trunk; DRL taken as summed DRLs for thorax plus abdomen-pelvis, reduced by 20% accounting for overlap). Comparison with Austrian DRLs - available only for CCT and thorax CT - showed a reduction from 21% to 3% (CCT), and 15 to 2% (thorax CT). Staff training together with application of DRLs provide an efficient approach for optimizing radiation dose in pediatric CT practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Oral health perceptions of paediatric palliative care nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Elizabeth; Mead, Jean Marie; Walsh, Margaret M

    2013-01-01

    Systematic oral care reduces oral complications among children in paediatric palliative care (PPC), yet little is known about the oral health perceptions of PPC nursing staff. This qualitative cross-sectional study used semi-structured interviews based on phenomenography to explore PPC nursing staff's perceptions of oral health and the relationship of oral care to comfort and quality of life. A purposive sample of nine nursing staff employed at a California PPC facility participated. Five themes emerged from the analysis of the interviews: signs of oral health, reasons for oral care, adaptation of oral care on a case-by-case basis, barriers to providing oral care, and facilitators of improving oral care. The perceived importance of oral health was the underlining similarity between the themes. A need for further research in the area of oral PPC is indicated. Collaboration with dental professionals may be needed to create oral PPC guidelines that fit the complex needs of children with life-limiting illnesses.

  9. Role of a service corridor in ICU noise control, staff stress, and staff satisfaction: environmental research of an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Downs, Betsy; Farell, Ashley; Cook, Kimberly; Hourihan, Peter; McCreery, Shimby

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the role of a dedicated service corridor in intensive care unit (ICU) noise control and staff stress and satisfaction. Shared corridors immediately adjacent to patient rooms are generally noisy due to a variety of activities, including service deliveries and pickups. The strategy of providing a dedicated service corridor is thought to reduce noise for patient care, but the extent to which it actually contributes to noise reduction in the patient care environment and in turn improves staff performance has not been previously documented. A before-and-after comparison was conducted in an adult cardiac ICU. The ICU was relocated from a traditional hospital environment to a new addition with a dedicated service corridor. A total of 118 nursing staff participated in the surveys regarding pre-move and post-move environmental comfort, stress, and satisfaction in the previous and new units. Acoustical measures of noise within the new ICU and a control environment of the previous unit were collected during four work days, along with on-site observations of corridor traffic. Independent and paired sample t-tests of survey data showed that the perceived noise level was lower and staff reported less stress and more satisfaction in the new ICU (p noise control and staff stress and satisfaction. Critical care/intensive care, noise, satisfaction, staff, work environment.

  10. Interventions to improve teamwork and communications among healthcare staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, P; Rathbone, J; Catchpole, K

    2011-04-01

    Concern over the frequency of unintended harm to patients has focused attention on the importance of teamwork and communication in avoiding errors. This has led to experiments with teamwork training programmes for clinical staff, mostly based on aviation models. These are widely assumed to be effective in improving patient safety, but the extent to which this assumption is justified by evidence remains unclear. A systematic literature review on the effects of teamwork training for clinical staff was performed. Information was sought on outcomes including staff attitudes, teamwork skills, technical performance, efficiency and clinical outcomes. Of 1036 relevant abstracts identified, 14 articles were analysed in detail: four randomized trials and ten non-randomized studies. Overall study quality was poor, with particular problems over blinding, subjective measures and Hawthorne effects. Few studies reported on every outcome category. Most reported improved staff attitudes, and six of eight reported significantly better teamwork after training. Five of eight studies reported improved technical performance, improved efficiency or reduced errors. Three studies reported evidence of clinical benefit, but this was modest or of borderline significance in each case. Studies with a stronger intervention were more likely to report benefits than those providing less training. None of the randomized trials found evidence of technical or clinical benefit. The evidence for technical or clinical benefit from teamwork training in medicine is weak. There is some evidence of benefit from studies with more intensive training programmes, but better quality research and cost-benefit analysis are needed. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Competencies Setup for Nuclear Regulatory Staff in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pingish, Panupong; Siripirom, Lopchai; Nakkaew, Pongpan; Manuwong, Theerapatt; Wongsamarn, Vichian

    2010-01-01

    Competencies setup for regulatory bodies oversee a research reactor and nuclear power reactors in Thailand, concentrating on staff development in areas of review and assessment, inspection and enforcement, authorization, and development of regulations and guides. The regulatory body in Thailand is the Bureau of Nuclear Safety Regulation (BNSR) which belongs to the Office of Atoms for Peace (OAP). The BNSR is divided into 4 groups according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). These groups are the nuclear safety administration group, nuclear safety technical support group, nuclear safety assessment and licensing group, and the nuclear installations inspection group. Each group is divided into senior and junior positions. The competencies model was used for implementation of staff qualification, career planning and professional progression by BNSR. Competencies are related to knowledge, skills and attitudes (KSAs) needed to perform their job. A key issue is obtaining competencies for the regulatory bodies. The systematic approach to training (SAT) has been used in several countries for improvement regulator performance. The SAT contains 5 steps, including analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation, to achieve competencies. The SAT provides a logical progression from the identification of competencies required to perform a job to the design, development and implementation of training using the competencies model. In the first step, BNSR performs an operating analysis of training needs assessment (TNA) by using gap analysis technique, as suggested by IAEA. Individual regulatory bodies address the gap using appropriate training program, after comparing the actual and desired competency profiles to determine the gap. This paper examines competencies setup for regulatory staff of BNSR as a result of gaps analysis to establish a scheme for design characteristics of regulatory staff and training courses, thereby enhancing the regulatory

  12. Nursing students’ perception of clinical learning experiences as provided by the nursing staff in the wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. C. TIakula

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available A descriptive survey was carried out, using convenience and systematic sampling in order to better understand the manner in which student nurses perceive their clinical experience in the hospital. Data were collected from 80 subjects in 4 nursing colleges using a critical incident technique. Positive and negative experiences are described,

  13. 38 CFR 21.382 - Training and staff development for personnel providing assistance under Chapter 31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Personnel Training and Development § 21... the most advanced knowledge, methods, and techniques available for the rehabilitation of disabled... disability; (4) Counseling theory and techniques; (5) Personal and vocational adjustment; (6) Occupational...

  14. Nursing students’ perception of clinical learning experiences as provided by the nursing staff in the wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. C. TIakula

    1993-05-01

    Full Text Available A descriptive survey was carried out, using convenience and systematic sampling in order to better understand the manner in which student nurses perceive their clinical experience in the hospital. Data were collected from 80 subjects in 4 nursing colleges using a critical incident technique. Positive and negative experiences are described,

  15. Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Utilization by Syrian Refugees Residing in Ankara, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altıner, Ali Osman; Yeşil, Sıdıka Tekeli

    2018-04-01

    Introduction Many Syrians have left their country and migrated to other countries since March 2011, due to the civil war. As of March 2016, a total of 2,747,946 Syrian refugees had immigrated to Turkey. Some Syrian refugees have been living in camps, while 2,475,134 have been living in metropolitan areas, such as Ankara. Study Objective This study investigated Emergency Medical Service (EMS) utilization among Syrian refugees residing in Ankara. This study was a descriptive, cross-sectional database analysis using data obtained from the Department of EMS of the Ankara Provincial Health Directorate. Five stations in the Altındağ region of Ankara responded to 42% of all calls from Syrian refugees. Prehospital EMS in Ankara have been used mostly by Syrian refugees younger than 18-years-old. Study findings also suggest that medical staff in regions where Syrian refugees are likely to be treated should be supported and provided with the ability to overcome language barriers and cultural differences. Altıner AO , Tekeli Yeşil S . Emergency Medical Service (EMS) utilization by Syrian refugees residing in Ankara, Turkey. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2018;33(2):160-164.

  16. 'Poppets and parcels': the links between staff experience of work and acutely ill older peoples' experience of hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maben, Jill; Adams, Mary; Peccei, Riccardo; Murrells, Trevor; Robert, Glenn

    2012-06-01

    Few empirical studies have directly examined the relationship between staff experiences of providing healthcare and patient experience. Present concerns over the care of older people in UK acute hospitals - and the reported attitudes of staff in such settings - highlight an important area of study. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES. To examine the links between staff experience of work and patient experience of care in a 'Medicine for Older People' (MfOP) service in England. A mixed methods case study undertaken over 8 months incorporating a 149-item staff survey (66/192 - 34% response rate), a 48-item patient survey (26/111 - 23%), 18 staff interviews, 18 patient and carer interviews and 41 hours of non-participant observation. Variation in patient experience is significantly influenced by staff work experiences. A high-demand/low-control work environment, poor staffing, ward leadership and co-worker relationships can each add to the inherent difficulties staff face when caring for acutely ill older people. Staff seek to alleviate the impact of such difficulties by finding personal satisfaction from caring for 'the poppets'; those patients they enjoy caring for and for whom they feel able to 'make a difference'. Other patients - noting dehumanising aspects of their care - felt like 'parcels'. Patients are aware of being seen by staff as 'difficult' or 'demanding' and seek to manage their relationships with nursing staff accordingly. The work experiences of staff in a MfOP service impacted directly on patient care experience. Poor ward and patient care climates often lead staff to seek job satisfaction through caring for 'poppets', leaving less favoured - and often more complex patients - to receive less personalised care. Implications for practice. Investment in staff well-being and ward climate is essential for the consistent delivery of high-quality care for older people in acute settings. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Between Education and Psychology: School Staff Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Tim; Finney, Dave

    2015-01-01

    When discussing contributions from psychology in/to educational practices like school-based mental health promotion, it is peculiar that psychologists (of an educational or clinical kind) or education-oriented sociologists, both not often based in schools or classrooms, dominate the topic. It has been acknowledged that school staff have been over…

  18. Staff Development in Light of Maslow's Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Christene K.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the teacher change process in an Oregon staff development program, examining faculty development within the framework of Maslow's theory that says people are motivated to satisfy physiological, safety/security, social, self-esteem, and self-actualization needs. Program evaluation demonstrated the interdependence of the cognitive and…

  19. Visit of the US Congressional Staff delegation

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    List of participants: Jon Kamarck, Chief Clerk, VA-HUD subcommittee, Senate Appropriations Committee; Cheh Kim, Professional Staff Member, VA-HUD subcommittee, Senate Appropriations Committee; David Schindel, Head, National Science Foundation, Europe Office; Terry Schaff, National Science Foundation, Office of Legislative & Public Affairs; Tim Clancy, National Science Foundation, Office of Legislative & Public Affairs; Ms Lynette Poulton, First Secretary, US Mission in Geneva

  20. Teaching Staff Advanced Training: European Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    The issue of teaching staff advanced training is paid much attention in many countries. In the Republic of Moldova progressive professional credits system is used. Credits are scored not only in assigning teaching degrees or issuing a certificate of continuing professional education, but also for teachers' evaluation at the educational…

  1. Use staff wisely to save NHS money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alison

    2015-12-09

    The NHS could save up to £ 2 billion a year by improving workflow and containing workforce costs, according to Labour peer Lord Carter's review of NHS efficiency. Changes in areas such as rostering and management of annual leave must avoid increasing the pressure on staff.

  2. Bridging Information and Communication Technology and Staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bridging Information and Communication Technology and Staff Professional Development: Case Study of Delta State Tertiary Institutions. ... Teachers are therefore faced with the formidable task of reinventing schools/classroom for a society and world transformed by ICT – because most of these children have grown with ...

  3. Are Students Customers? Perceptions of Academic Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomas, Laurie

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the notion of the student as a customer in a university, focusing on the perceptions of academic staff. Changes in the higher education sector in recent years have significantly reduced the differences between universities and other types of organisations and it has been argued that students have become "consumers" of…

  4. Staff Issue Paper on Institutional Arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of State, Washington, DC.

    Staff Issue Papers for the Secretary of State's Advisory Committee on the 1972 United Nations Conference on the Human Environment, Stockholm, Sweden, are summarized in this compendium. Papers developed by the various sub-committees are included for: (1) institutional arrangements; (2) development and the environment; (3) human settlements; (4)…

  5. Preceptor development. Use a staff development specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneller, S; Hoeppner, M

    1994-01-01

    Preceptor orientation is a well identified need. Less often identified is the critical role the staff development specialist plays in the ongoing support and development of preceptors. In this article, the authors explain activities of coaching, facilitating, mentoring, and consulting. These role components are essential in the ongoing development of preceptors. This support also may help retain preceptors.

  6. Implementation of Staff Recruitment Policies and Diversity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on the findings of a study that delved into these reasons, with specific reference to staff recruitment policies and their implementation. It reports that the fairness of the universities' employee recruitment guidelines and the way these are implemented are significantly and positively with the universities' ...

  7. Leisure Activities of University College Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernat, Elzbieta; Roguski, Karol

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the participation of academic teachers in leisure activities for that group contribute to shaping habits of a large percentage of young people. Material and methods: A group of 52 staff members (about 30%) of a private university college, aged 25-70 years, were interviewed with respect to their participation in sports,…

  8. Racism, Staff Development and Adult Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galliers, David

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses the use of racial awareness training in staff development programs. He describes the four types of racism: (1) overt institutional, (2) overt personal, (3) covert institutional, and (4) covert personal. He calls for better trainers and training programs. (CH)

  9. MEDICAL STAFF SCHEDULING USING SIMULATED ANNEALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Rosocha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The efficiency of medical staff is a fundamental feature of healthcare facilities quality. Therefore the better implementation of their preferences into the scheduling problem might not only rise the work-life balance of doctors and nurses, but also may result into better patient care. This paper focuses on optimization of medical staff preferences considering the scheduling problem.Methodology/Approach: We propose a medical staff scheduling algorithm based on simulated annealing, a well-known method from statistical thermodynamics. We define hard constraints, which are linked to legal and working regulations, and minimize the violations of soft constraints, which are related to the quality of work, psychic, and work-life balance of staff.Findings: On a sample of 60 physicians and nurses from gynecology department we generated monthly schedules and optimized their preferences in terms of soft constraints. Our results indicate that the final value of objective function optimized by proposed algorithm is more than 18-times better in violations of soft constraints than initially generated random schedule that satisfied hard constraints.Research Limitation/implication: Even though the global optimality of final outcome is not guaranteed, desirable solutionwas obtained in reasonable time. Originality/Value of paper: We show that designed algorithm is able to successfully generate schedules regarding hard and soft constraints. Moreover, presented method is significantly faster than standard schedule generation and is able to effectively reschedule due to the local neighborhood search characteristics of simulated annealing.

  10. Accommodations: Staff Identity and University Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Andrew; Herrick, Tim; Keating, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Space has been of growing significance in social theory in recent years, yet, explorations of it in the scholarship of higher education have been limited. This is surprising, given the critical role space has in shaping staff and students' engagement with the university. Taking a practice-based approach and focusing on academic identities, this…

  11. The Hazardous Waters of Staff Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoop, Robert J.; Dunklee, Dennis R.

    2001-01-01

    Understanding prospective employees' rights (under the 1964 Civil Rights Act and other federal legislation prohibiting discriminatory practices) can help principals protect themselves, their schools, and their districts from litigation. Scenarios are described, along with permissible staff-selection steps: position analysis, recruitment,…

  12. Selecting and Developing an A+ Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Vernon G.

    2008-01-01

    Because the demand for excellence in public education is ever present, this article explores the development of a professional enhancement program designed to select and develop a qualified, competent faculty and staff. The basis for the program is a strong educational philosophy, which leads to a vision of what schools can be. It stresses the…

  13. Staff Development: Creating a Community of Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Norman D.

    2004-01-01

    One of the most crucial roles of the school leader is to develop and maintain the professional level of the staff which he/she supervises. It is generally agreed upon that the desired school culture is one in which the focus is on the development of a community of learners. Consequently, intellectual growth can never happen for children unless it…

  14. Staff Development Resolutions for the Next Millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsh, Stephanie; Sparks, Dennis

    1999-01-01

    Initiating improved models of teacher practice requires a series of resolutions to guide staff-development efforts. The revamped scenario sets priorities among all the teacher's essential roles and responsibilities: learning, instructing, planning, writing, coaching, tutoring, and studying. Teacher competence and quality are also priorities. (MLH)

  15. The impact of staff training on staff outcomes in dementia care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Aimee; Revolta, Catherine; Orrell, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Caring for people with dementia can be emotionally challenging and is often linked to low job satisfaction and burnout in care staff. Staff training within care settings is potentially valuable in improving well-being and quality of care. This review aimed to (i) establish the impact of training on staff outcomes; (ii) compare the impact of different training approaches; (iii) explore the influence of training intensity; and (iv) explore potential barriers to success. A database search of staff training interventions revealed 207 papers, 188 of which were excluded based on prespecified criteria. Nineteen studies were included and appraised using a quality rating tool. Overall, the studies were found to be of variable quality; however, 16 studies found a significant change following training in at least one staff domain, with knowledge improving most frequently. Approaches focusing on managing challenging behaviours appeared to be the most effective. Training staff can be an effective method of improving well-being, and programmes helping staff to manage challenging behaviour appear to be the most beneficial. There is no clear relationship between training intensity and outcome. Most studies point to the importance of addressing organisational factors as a barrier to change. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. The role of the psychiatrist: job satisfaction of medical directors and staff psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranz, J; Stueve, A; McQuistion, H L

    2001-12-01

    In a previous survey of Columbia University Public Psychiatry Fellowship alumni, medical directors reported experiencing higher job satisfaction compared to staff psychiatrists. To further this inquiry, the authors conducted an expanded survey among the membership of the American Association of Community Psychiatrists (AACP). We mailed a questionnaire to all AACP members. Respondents categorized their positions as staff psychiatrist, program medical director or agency medical director, and rated their overall job satisfaction. The form also included a number of demographic and job characteristic items. Of 479 questionnaires mailed, a total of 286 individuals returned questionnaires (61%-12 forms were undeliverable). As in our previous survey, medical directors experience significantly higher job satisfaction compared to staff psychiatrists. Program and agency medical directors do not differ significantly. In addition, job satisfaction is strongly and negatively correlated with age for staff psychiatrists but not for medical directors. This survey strengthens the previously reported advantage medical directors have over staff psychiatrists regarding job satisfaction. The finding that job satisfaction decreases with increasing age of staff psychiatrists but not medical directors is particularly interesting, suggesting that staff psychiatrist positions may come to be regarded as "dead-end" over time. Psychiatrists are advised to seek promotions to program medical director positions early in their careers, since these positions are far more available, and provide equal job satisfaction, compared to agency medical director positions.

  17. The drone as an additional risk factor due to conditions not provided for in radiological safety at major events; O drone como fator adicional de risco decorrente de condicoes nao previstas na seguranca radiologica em grandes eventos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Gilberto de Jesus

    2015-07-01

    Major international events are potential targets of terrorist actions, seeking instant publicity that events of this magnitude provide, with the intention of causing terror and disseminate its power to a large number of people worldwide. In this context, the critical analysis of additional risk factor linked to procedures and protocols adopted on radiation safety is important. The possibility of unforeseen situations of risk, especially those resulting from the current global technological development, is a fact. Radioactive material can be used in this type of terrorism in a wide range of devices and illicit trafficking of this material is a reality that worries the International Atomic Energy Agency. In the current technological development scenario of the world, the potential occurrence of terrorist acts using drones combined with radioactive material dispersal devices, is real. The recent history of drones incidents presents cases where, despite not having been necessarily terrorist motivation, their circumstances and characteristics favor the occurrence of malicious acts. This paper proposes to alert the need of updating the current security protocols, considering the potential association of this technology with radioactive dispersal devices. (author)

  18. Patient Involvement in Patient Safety: A Qualitative Study of Nursing Staff and Patient Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Andrea C; Macdonald, Marilyn

    2017-06-01

    The risk associated with receiving health care has called for an increased focus on the role of patients in helping to improve safety. Recent research has highlighted that patient involvement in patient safety practices may be influenced by patient perceptions of patient safety practices and the perceptions of their health care providers. The objective of this research was to describe patient involvement in patient safety practices by exploring patient and nursing staff perceptions of safety. Qualitative focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of nursing staff and patients who had previously completed a patient safety survey in 2 tertiary hospital sites in Eastern Canada. Six focus groups (June 2011 to January 2012) were conducted and analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Four themes were identified: (1) wanting control, (2) feeling connected, (3) encountering roadblocks, and (4) sharing responsibility for safety. Both patient and nursing staff participants highlighted the importance of building a personal connection as a precursor to ensuring that patients are involved in their care and safety. However, perceptions of provider stress and nursing staff workload often reduced the ability of the nursing staff and patient participants to connect with one another and promote involvement. Current strategies aimed at increasing patient awareness of patient safety may not be enough. The findings suggest that providing the context for interaction to occur between nursing staff and patients as well as targeted interventions aimed at increasing patient control may be needed to ensure patient involvement in patient safety.

  19. "It is a thin line to walk on": challenges of staff working at Swedish immigration detention centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthoopparambil, Soorej J; Ahlberg, Beth M; Bjerneld, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Detention of irregular migrants awaiting deportation is widely practiced in many countries and has been shown to have profound negative impact on health and well-being of detainees. Detention staff, an integral part of the detention environment, affect and are affected by detainees' health and well-being. The objective of the study was to explore experiences of staff working at Swedish immigration detention centres. Fifteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with staff in three Swedish detention centres and were analysed using thematic analysis. The results indicate that the main challenge for the staff was to manage the emotional dilemma entailed in working as migration officers and simultaneously fellow human beings whose task was to implement deportation decisions while being expected to provide humane service to detainees. They tried to manage their dilemma by balancing the two roles, but still found it challenging. Among the staff, there was a high perception of fear of physical threat from detainees that made detention a stressful environment. Limited interaction between the staff and detainees was a reason for this. There is thus a need to support detention staff to improve their interaction with detainees in order to decrease their fear, manage their emotional dilemma, and provide better service to detainees. It is important to address staff challenges in order to ensure better health and well-being for both staff and detainees.

  20. Staff management, training and knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Hitoshi; Umeki, Hiroyuki; Capouet, M.; Depaus, C.; Berckmans, A.

    2014-01-01

    Staff management/training and knowledge management are organisational issues that are particularly sensitive in long-term projects stretching over decades like the development and operation of a geological repository. The IAEA has already issued several publications that deal with this issue (IAEA, 2006, 2008). Organisational aspects were also discussed in the framework of a topical session organised by the Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) at its annual meeting in 2009 and were regarded as a topic deserving future attention (NEA, 2009a). More recently, the Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) identified organisational, mission and behavioural features as attributes of confidence and trust (NEA, 2013). They also identified that aspects such as structural learning capacity, high levels of skill and competence in relevant areas, specific management plan, good operating records, transparency and consistency are associated with confidence building in a safety case. These aspects are considerably related to staff training/management and knowledge management. The IGSC has initiated a proposal of study dedicated to staff training/management and knowledge management with the objective to highlight how these recent concerns and the requirements issued by the IAEA are concretely implemented in the national programmes. The goal of this study is to acknowledge the differences of views and needs for staff management and knowledge management at different stages of individual programmes and between implementer and regulator. As a starting point to this study, the JAEA and ONDRAF/NIRAS prepared a draft questionnaire in order to succinctly capture processes and tools that the national organisations have implemented to meet the requirements and address the issues set out in the field of staff and knowledge management. For the purpose of this study, a questionnaire is now under development, which will be presented on the occasion of this symposium with guidance based on a

  1. Reference Gene Selection in the Desert Plant <em>Eremosparton songoricuem>m>

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dao-Yuan Zhang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available <em>Eremosparton songoricum em>(Litv. Vass. (<em>E. songoricumem> is a rare and extremely drought-tolerant desert plant that holds promise as a model organism for the identification of genes associated with water deficit stress. Here, we cloned and evaluated the expression of eight candidate reference genes using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions. The expression of these candidate reference genes was analyzed in a diverse set of 20 samples including various <em>E. songoricumem> plant tissues exposed to multiple environmental stresses. GeNorm analysis indicated that expression stability varied between the reference genes in the different experimental conditions, but the two most stable reference genes were sufficient for normalization in most conditions.<em> EsEFem> and <em>Esα-TUB> were sufficient for various stress conditions, <em>EsEF> and <em>EsACT> were suitable for samples of differing germination stages, and <em>EsGAPDH>and <em>Es>UBQ em>were most stable across multiple adult tissue samples. The <em>Es18Sem> gene was unsuitable as a reference gene in our analysis. In addition, the expression level of the drought-stress related transcription factor <em>EsDREB2em>> em>verified the utility of<em> E. songoricumem> reference genes and indicated that no single gene was adequate for normalization on its own. This is the first systematic report on the selection of reference genes in <em>E. songoricumem>, and these data will facilitate future work on gene expression in this species.

  2. Delirium superimposed on dementia: A quantitative and qualitative evaluation of informal caregivers and health care staff experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Alessandro; Lucchi, Elena; Turco, Renato; Morghen, Sara; Guerini, Fabio; Santi, Rossana; Gentile, Simona; Meagher, David; Voyer, Philippe; Fick, Donna M; Schmitt, Eva M; Inouye, Sharon K; Trabucchi, Marco; Bellelli, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    Delirium superimposed on dementia is common and potentially distressing for patients, caregivers, and health care staff. We quantitatively and qualitatively assessed the experience of informal caregiver and staff (staff nurses, nurse aides, physical therapists) caring for patients with delirium superimposed on dementia. Caregivers' and staff experience was evaluated three days after delirium superimposed on dementia resolution (T0) with a standardized questionnaire (quantitative interview) and open-ended questions (qualitative interview); caregivers were also evaluated at 1-month follow-up (T1). A total of 74 subjects were included; 33 caregivers and 41 health care staff (8 staff nurses, 20 physical therapists, 13 staff nurse aides/health care assistants). Overall, at both T0 and T1, the distress level was moderate among caregivers and mild among health care staff. Caregivers reported, at both T0 and T1, higher distress related to deficits of sustained attention and orientation, hypokinesia/psychomotor retardation, incoherence and delusions. The distress of health care staff related to each specific item of the Delirium-O-Meter was relatively low except for the physical therapists who reported higher level of distress on deficits of sustained/shifting attention and orientation, apathy, hypokinesia/psychomotor retardation, incoherence, delusion, hallucinations, and anxiety/fear. The qualitative evaluation identified important categories of caregivers' and staff feelings related to the delirium experience. This study provides information on the implication of the experience of delirium on caregivers and staff. The distress related to delirium superimposed on dementia underlines the importance of providing continuous training, support and experience for both the caregivers and health care staff to improve the care of patients with delirium superimposed on dementia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Delirium superimposed on dementia: a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of informal caregivers and health care staff experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Alessandro; Lucchi, Elena; Turco, Renato; Morghen, Sara; Guerini, Fabio; Santi, Rossana; Gentile, Simona; Meagher, David; Voyer, Philippe; Fick, Donna M.; Schmitt, Eva M.; Inouye, Sharon K.; Trabucchi, Marco; Bellelli, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Objective Delirium superimposed on dementia (DSD) is common and potentially distressing for patients, caregivers, and health care staff. We quantitatively and qualitatively assessed the experience of informal caregiver and staff (staff nurses, nurse aides, physical therapists) caring for patients with DSD. Methods Caregivers’ and staff experience was evaluated three days after DSD resolution (T0) with a standardized questionnaire (quantitative interview) and open-ended questions (qualitative interview); caregivers were also evaluated at 1-month follow-up (T1). Results A total of 74 subjects were included; 33 caregivers and 41 health care staff (8 staff nurses, 20 physical therapists, 13 staff nurse aides/health care assistants). Overall, at both T0 and T1, the distress level was moderate among caregivers and mild among health care staff. Caregivers reported, at both T0 and T1, higher distress related to deficits of sustained attention and orientation, hypokinesia/psychomotor retardation, incoherence and delusions. The distress of health care staff related to each specific item of the Delirium-O-Meter was relatively low except for the physical therapists who reported higher level of distress on deficits of sustained/shifting attention and orientation, apathy, hypokinesia/psychomotor retardation, incoherence, delusion, hallucinations, anxiety/fear. The qualitative evaluation identified important categories of caregivers ‘and staff feelings related to the delirium experience. Conclusions This study provides information on the implication of the experience of delirium on caregivers and staff. The distress related to DSD underlines the importance of providing continuous training, support and experience for both the caregivers and health care staff to improve the care of patients with delirium superimposed on dementia. PMID:26286892

  4. Engaging Frontline Leaders and Staff in Real-Time Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennifer; Hebish, Linda J; Mann, Sharon; Ching, Joan M; Blackmore, C Craig

    2016-04-01

    The relationship of staff satisfaction and engagement to organizational success, along with the integral influence of frontline managers on this dimension, is well established in health care and other industries. To specifically address staff engagement, Virginia Mason Medical Center, an integrated, single-hospital health system, developed an approach that involved leaders, through the daily use of standard work for leaders, as well as staff, through a Lean-inspired staff idea system. Kaizen Promotion Office (KPO) staff members established three guiding principles: (1) Staff engagement begins with leader engagement; (2) Integrate daily improve- ment (kaizen) as a habitual way of life not as an add-on; and (3) Create an environment in which staff feel psycho- logically safe and valued. Two design elements--Standard Work for Leaders (SWL) and Everyday Lean Ideas (ELIs) were implemented. For the emergency department (ED), an early adopter of the staff engagement work, the challenge was to apply the guiding principles to improve staff engagement while improving quality and patient and staff satisfaction, even as patient volumes were increasing. Daily huddles for the KPO staff members and weekly leader rounds are used to elicit staff ideas and foster ELIs in real time. Overall progress to date has been tracked in terms of staff satisfaction surveys, voluntary staff turnover, adoption of SWL, and testing and implementation of staff ideas. For example, voluntary turnover of ED staff decreased from 14.6% in 2011 to 7.5% in 2012, and 2.0% in 2013. Organizationwide, at least 800 staff ideas are in motion at any given time, with finished ones posted in an idea supermarket website. A leadership and staff engagement approach that focuses on SWL and on capturing staff ideas for daily problem solving and improvement can contribute to organization success and improve the quality of health care delivery.

  5. Integrating Doulas Into First-Trimester Abortion Care: Physician, Clinic Staff, and Doula Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chor, Julie; Lyman, Phoebe; Ruth, Jean; Patel, Ashlesha; Gilliam, Melissa

    2018-01-01

    Balancing the need to provide individual support for patients and the need for an efficient clinic can be challenging in the abortion setting. This study explores physician, staff, and specially trained abortion doula perspectives on doula support, one approach to patient support. We conducted separate focus groups with physicians, staff members, and doulas from a high-volume, first-trimester aspiration abortion clinic with a newly established volunteer abortion doula program. Focus groups explored 1) abortion doula training, 2) program implementation, 3) program benefits, and 4) opportunities for improvement. Interviews were transcribed and computer-assisted content analysis was performed; salient findings are presented. Five physicians, 5 staff members, and 4 abortion doulas participated in separate focus group discussions. Doulas drew on both their prior personal skills and experiences in addition to their abortion doula training to provide women with support at the time of abortion. Having doulas in the clinic to assist with women's emotional needs allowed physicians and staff to focus on technical aspects of the procedure. In turn, both physicians and staff believed that introducing doulas resulted in more patient-centered care. Although staff did not experience challenges to integrating doulas, physicians and doulas experienced initial challenges in incorporating doula support into the clinical flow. Staff and doulas reported exchanging skills and techniques that they subsequently used in their interactions with patients. Physicians, clinic staff, and doulas perceive abortion doula support as an approach to provide more patient-centered care in a high-volume aspiration abortion clinic. © 2018 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  6. Using Computer-Based Continuing Professional Education of Training Staff to Develop Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sooraksa, Nanta

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a career development program for staff involved in providing training for small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Thailand. Most of these staff were professional vocational teachers in schools. The program uses information communication technology (ICT), and its main objective is to teach Moodle software as a tool for…

  7. 75 FR 32952 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; “‘Harmful and Potentially...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0281] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; ```Harmful and Potentially Harmful... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' This draft guidance provides written guidance to industry and FDA staff...

  8. Development of Brigade Staff Tasks for the COBRAS II Brigade Staff Exercise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deter, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    ... and development of simulation-based training for the conventional mounted brigade staff. The work was performed under a project called Combined Arms Operations at Brigade Level, Realistically Achieved Through Simulation (COBRAS).

  9. Staff perspectives on modified therapeutic community services for homeless dually diagnosed clients: an exploratory pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Nadia; Astone-Twerell, Janetta; Hernitche, Ted

    2009-12-01

    The modified therapeutic community (MTC) is one treatment modality developed to meet the needs of the homeless dually diagnosed population. While studies have shown the effectiveness of the MTC, little is known regarding staff perspectives of this modality. Using data from in-depth qualitative interviews, this study examines key staff perspectives on treatment services offered at an MTC in New York for homeless, mentally ill substance abusers. Many staff members indicated that the services provided are innovative, state of the art, and comprehensive as compared to other programs that specifically treat only one need. The most beneficial aspects of the MTC modality noted were the number of social workers available and the introduction of art therapy groups. The MTC modality also fostered increases in communication and collaboration between staff to introduce more specialized clinical groups not outlined in MTC guidelines to better meet the needs of clients.

  10. Smoking behavior among hospital staff still influences attitudes and counseling on smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willaing, Ingrid; Ladelund, Steen

    2004-01-01

    Smoking among health professionals has been shown to influence smoking-related knowledge and counseling in clinical practice. The evidence regarding smoking as a risk factor has increased in the past decade. The present study was carried out in 2000 and investigated the associations between...... individual smoking behavior among hospital staff and (a). smoking-related knowledge, (b). attitudes toward counseling on smoking, and (c). self-reported smoking-related counseling provided by the staff. The study was based on a survey using self-administered questionnaires given to all hospital staff...... in a large university hospital in Denmark. Altogether, 82% of staff (2561) returned a completed questionnaire. Analyses focused on a subsample consisting of health professionals in the clinical wards (1429). Multivariate analyses were performed in which smoking-related knowledge, attitudes toward smoking...

  11. Staff Technical Position on geological repository operations area underground facility design: Thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nataraja, M.S.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this Staff Technical Position (STP) is to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) with a methodology acceptable to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for demonstrating compliance with 10 CFR 60.133(i). The NRC staff's position is that DOE should develop and use a defensible methodology to demonstrate the acceptability of a geologic repository operations area (GROA) underground facility design. The staff anticipates that this methodology will include evaluation and development of appropriately coupled models, to account for the thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes that are induced by repository-generated thermal loads. With respect to 10 CFR 60.133(i), the GROA underground facility design: (1) should satisfy design goals/criteria initially selected, by considering the performance objectives; and (2) must satisfy the performance objectives 10 CFR 60.111, 60.112, and 60.113. The methodology in this STP suggests an iterative approach suitable for the underground facility design

  12. The Effectiveness of the Additional Vocational Education and Staff Development for Industrial Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. S. Kalabina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the course of the Russian economy modernization, developing the effec- tive system of vocational training and further professional training appears to be the main condition for the dynamic competitive advantage of industrial enterprises. The paper inves- tigates the urgent issue of developing the system of additional vocational training and staff development with the reference to the ever-changing institutional logic controlling the em- ployee – employer relations. The paper presents the review of theoretic approaches to the system of additional vocational training, as well as the economic analysis and estimates of return on investment in different forms of vocational training. The methodological approach to the system efficiency estimation is given along with the factors determining the forma- tion and development of vocational training system. Based on the research findings, the recommendations integrating the staff development policy are given aimed at promoting the effectiveness of the employee – employer relations. 

  13. Organ donation after cardiac death in children: acceptance of a protocol by multidisciplinary staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowl, Allison S; Cummings, Brian M; Yager, Phoebe H; Miller, Brenda; Noviski, Natan

    2012-09-01

    Organ donation after cardiac death is increasingly implemented, with outcomes similar to those of organ donation after brain death. Many hospitals hesitate to implement a protocol for donation after cardiac death because of the potential negative reactions among health care providers. To determine the acceptance of a protocol for donation after cardiac death among multidisciplinary staff in a pediatric intensive care unit. An anonymous, 15-question, Likert-scale questionnaire (scores 1-5) was used to determine the opinions of staff about donation after brain death and after cardiac death in a pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary-care university hospital. Survey response rate was 67% (n = 60). All physicians, 89% of nurses, and 82% of the remaining staff members stated that they understood the difference between donation after brain death and donation after cardiac death; staff supported both types of donation, at rates of 90% and 85%, respectively. Staff perception was the same for each type of donation (ρ = 0.82; r = 0.92; P death considered such donation worthwhile. However, 60% of those providers offered suggestions to improve the established protocol for donation. The multidisciplinary staff has accepted organ donation after cardiac death and has fully integrated this kind of donation without reported differences from their acceptance of donation after brain death.

  14. Implementação de um sistema Collaborative Planning, Forecasting, and Replenishment em uma grande rede de fast food por meio de um prestador de serviços logísticos Implementation of a Collaborative Planning, Forecasting, and Replenishment system in a large fast food company through a logistics provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Vivaldini

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A gestão colaborativa é, atualmente, um elemento-chave no contexto da gestão da cadeia de suprimentos. Neste artigo, o tema é abordado mediante a análise de um caso real, em que uma grande rede mundial de fast-food e seu prestador de serviço logístico (PSL trabalharam conjuntamente no Brasil em um projeto-piloto para a implementação de um collaborative planning, forecasting, and replenishment (CPFR. O trabalho faz uso de uma metodologia de pesquisa-ação e apresenta as principais variáveis que influenciaram o projeto, abordando os processos necessários para a implementação e os pontos que favorecem o CPFR. Com base no caso estudado, o trabalho apresenta um conjunto de propostas sobre o papel dos agentes da cadeia em projetos dessa natureza. A gestão da cadeia de suprimentos por intermédio da coordenação direta de um PSL também permite demonstrar as possibilidades e dificuldades desse sistema, contribuindo com a visão colaborativa na cadeia de suprimentos a partir da relação entre seus agentes.Nowadays, Collaborative Planning has been considered a key element in the Supply Chain Management context. In this article, this topic is addressed by a real case where a large worldwide fast-food network and its logistics provider worked together in Brazil in a pilot project in order to implement a Collaborative Planning, Forecasting, and Replenishment (CPFR system. Based on an action research approach, this paper presents the main variables that influenced the real project embracing the necessary processes, and it points out those that leveraged the CPFR implementation. Based on the case studied, a set of proposals about the role of the supply chain agents in similar projects is presented. Moreover, the case of conducting the supply chain management by a direct coordination of a logistics provider also allows to highlight the possibilities and difficulties of the CPFR system and to contribute towards a supply chain agents

  15. Predictors of staff-supportive organizational culture in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska-Simmons, Elzbieta

    2008-03-01

    This study examined predictors of staff-supportive organizational culture in assisted living settings. The sample included 294 staff members in 52 facilities. Organizational culture was assessed according to staff perceptions of teamwork, morale, information flow, involvement, supervision, and meetings. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to examine the effects of organizational factors (i.e., facility size, chain membership, ownership, level of care, level of residents' disability) on staff-supportive organizational culture. More staff-supportive culture was associated with smaller facility size, chain membership, and a higher level of care. These findings point to the importance of organizational factors in shaping a staff-supportive organizational culture.

  16. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 January 2004: • Preliminary note - Terminology realignment following the restructuring of the Organization (page - i -) • Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73) • Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74) • Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81) • Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2003/2004, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2003 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 3/2004, are available in the departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  17. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows : as from 1 July 2002 Article R IV 1.41 - Method of adjustment of the amount of subsistence indemnity (page 53) as from 1 January 2003 Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73) Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74) Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81) Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2002/2003, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2002 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 4/2003, are available in the divisional secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at : http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  18. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 January 2005 : Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73) Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74) Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81) Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2004/2005, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2004 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 4/2005, are available in the departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  19. AMENDMENTS TO THE STAFF RULES AND REGULATIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 January 2002: Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73). Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74). Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81). Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2001/2002, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2001 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 4/2002, are available in the divisional secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web HERE Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  20. Mobbing behaviors encountered by nurse teaching staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Dilek; Yildirim, Aytolan; Timucin, Arzu

    2007-07-01

    The term 'mobbing' is defined as antagonistic behaviors with unethical communication directed systematically at one individual by one or more individuals in the workplace. This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted for the purpose of determining the mobbing behaviors encountered by nursing school teaching staff in Turkey, its effect on them, and their responses to them. A large percentage (91%) of the nursing school employees who participated in this study reported that they had encountered mobbing behaviors in the institution where they work and 17% that they had been directly exposed to mobbing in the workplace. The academic staff who had been exposed to mobbing behaviors experienced various physiological, emotional and social reactions. They frequently 'worked harder and [were] more organized and worked very carefully to avoid criticism' to escape from mobbing. In addition, 9% of the participants stated that they 'thought about suicide occasionally'.

  1. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 July 2006: The modifications are listed below: Financial and social conditions for Paid Associates, Fellows and Students (introduction of a new payment scheme for the Paid Scientific Associates Programme - reorganization of the Fellowship Programme - modification of the Student subsistence rates) Protection of members of the personnel against the financial consequences of illness, accident and disability (clarification of the scope of the relevant provisions - new definition of disability and associated benefits - revised role of the Joint Advisory Rehabilitation and Disability Board - bringing together the relevant provisions). Copies of this update (modification# 16) are available in departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at the following address: http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Administrative Circular ...

  2. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1st January 1996 are modified as follows as of 1st July 2006: Financial and social conditions for Paid Associates, Fellows and Students (introduction of a new payment scheme for the Paid Scientific Associates Programme-reorganisation of the Fellowship Programme-modification of Student subsistence rates) Protection of members of the personnel against the financial consequences of illness, accident and disability (clarification of the scope of the relevant provisions-new definition of disability and associated benefits-revised role of the Joint Advisory Rehabilitation and Disability Board-bringing together of the relevant provisions). Copies of this update (modification No.16) are available from Departmental secretariats. In addition, the Staff Rules and Regulations can be consulted on the Web at the following address: http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Administrative Circular No. 14 (Rev. 2)-July 2006 Protection of members o...

  3. Contract policy for CERN staff members

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Public information meeting on Monday 28 September 2009 at 10.00 a.m. With effect from 1 August 2009, new provisions regarding staff employment contract policy have entered into force. These provisions are set out in: The Staff Rules and Regulations and Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 4). Further details are available in: Frequently Asked Questions. The new provisions are outlined below: Limited-duration contracts From 1 August 2009, limited-duration contracts will be awarded for a maximum period of five years (instead of four years previously) and no extensions beyond five years will be granted. Contracts for periods shorter than five years can be exceptionally awarded, e.g. for a project whose mission or financial resources are time-limited. Indefinite contracts : award procedure A number of changes have been introduced regarding the procedure for the award of indefinite contracts. From now on, posts leading to the award of an indefinite contract will be opened at le...

  4. Results of the staff survey: your priorities

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    This is the first in a series of articles which will give some details about the results of the Staff Association staff survey To know your priorities and the evolution of your concerns over the last decade we study how, in each of our latest three surveys, you chose from a list of 15 items the five most important and classified them by assigning them a priority, from the most important to the fifth most important. The list of fifteen items, and a short description, follows. Career evolution (classification, level of recruitment, advancement, promotion) Salary level Family policy (recognition of partners, allowances, school fees, kindergarten, nursery, crèche, parental leave) Health insurance Non-residence and international indemnity Annual salary adjustment (cost variation index) Contract policy (duration, recruitment, award of IC, conditions of the beginning and ending of the contract) Motivation at work (interest, team, supervision, mobility, reward scheme) Pensions (retirement, disability, o...

  5. Emergency Medical Services Provider Experiences of Hospice Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnette Donnelly, Cassandra; Armstrong, Karen Andrea; Perkins, Molly M; Moulia, Danielle; Quest, Tammie E; Yancey, Arthur H

    2018-01-01

    Growing numbers of emergency medical services (EMS) providers respond to patients who receive hospice care. The objective of this investigation was to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and experiences of EMS providers in the care of patients enrolled in hospice care. We conducted a survey study of EMS providers regarding hospice care. We collected quantitative and qualitative data on EMS provider's knowledge, attitudes, and experiences in responding to the care needs of patients in hospice care. We used Chi-squared tests to compare EMS provider's responses by credential (Emergency Medical Technician [EMT] vs. Paramedic) and years of experience (0-5 vs. 5+). We conducted a thematic analysis to examine open-ended responses to qualitative questions. Of the 182 EMS providers who completed the survey (100% response rate), 84.1% had cared for a hospice patient one or more times. Respondents included 86 (47.3%) EMTs with Intermediate and Advanced training and 96 (52.7%) Paramedics. Respondent's years of experience ranged from 0-10+ years, with 99 (54.3%) providers having 0-5 years of experience and 83 (45.7%) providers having 5+ years of experience. There were no significant differences between EMTs and Paramedics in their knowledge of the care of these patients, nor were there significant differences (p care of hospice patients. A total of 36% respondents felt that patients in hospice care required a DNR order. In EMS providers' open-ended responses on challenges in responding to the care needs of hospice patients, common themes were family-related challenges, and the need for more education. While the majority of EMS providers have responded to patients enrolled in hospice care, few providers received formal training on how to care for this population. EMS providers have expressed a need for a formal curriculum on the care of the patient receiving hospice.

  6. The Provisional Staff Regulations of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The Provisional Staff Regulations of the Agency, as amended up to 19 September 1975 by the Board of Governors, are set forth in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. When an individual provision of the Regulations and the Annexes thereto has been amended since their approval by the Board in 1957, this is indicated by a footnote giving the date on which the current text became effective. There is a subject index at the end of the document

  7. Cutting hospital costs without cutting staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, John P

    2011-10-01

    A hospital that is seeking ways to cut costs without compromising care should resist the temptation to lay off staff and instead make it a priority to improve efficiencies. This approach requires a formal program to identify and analyze all of the hospital's processes. The focus of the analysis should be to determine which activities are being performed efficiently, which are being performed inefficiently, and which are unnecessary. This effort will achieve the greatest success if it is customer-centric.

  8. Staff attitudes towards patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendsborg, Per; Bratbo, Johanne; Dannevang, Anders; Hagedorn-Møller, Julie; Kistrup, Kristen; Lindhardt, Anne; Nordentoft, Merete

    2013-10-01

    Stigmatizing attitudes have been reported in international studies among staff in psychiatry. The authors wanted to investigate if this was the case in Denmark. A survey of attitudes among staff at two psychiatric units in Copenhagen was performed using the Mental Illness: Clinicians' Attitudes scales. The scales have 16 questions to which another four questions were added by the authors. A total of 548 staff members answered the questions (61 doctors and 487 other professionals). The majority of the respondents believed in the possibility of recovery for patients and only a minority associated a high degree of dangerousness with schizophrenia. The cause of the illness was mainly regarded as being biological, but all agreed to a bio-psycho-social aetiological approach. The majority of the respondents believed that the illness was chronic and agreed on the need for staff to also be aware of patients' somatic illness. The doctors did not question their role as "real doctors" or the scientific basis for psychiatry. The majority would not mind working with a colleague with schizophrenia, but about half would hesitate to disclose if they themselves were diagnosed with the illness. Being a woman working in community psychiatry with long experience and participation in a recovery educational programme was associated with less stigmatizing attitudes. The survey showed a relatively low level of stigmatizing attitudes. This runs counter to the results from international investigation. This trend could be interpreted both as a result of a shift towards a more recovery-oriented approach to treatment as well as a reflection of political correctness.

  9. Production, staff, working time and financial planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Boiteux

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate planning can be a tool for coordinating the tactical decisions belonging to some functional areas of a company. This potential has been limited due to methodological and technical reasons, but nowadays it is possible to solve very sophisticated models integrating, with a high level of detail, a great number of decisions of several functional areas and that permit to include new management schemes. In this paper, a production, staff, working time and cash management model is introduced.

  10. Prison staff and the health promoting prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixey, Rachael; Woodall, James

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss some of the obstacles to implementing policy and strategy related to health promoting prisons. It focuses on the role of prison officers and raises issues concerning their conditions of service, training and organisational culture in a situation where the prison system faces security issues, overcrowding and high levels of ill health among prisoners. This paper emerged as a result of significant overlapping themes between two separate studies conducted by the authors. The paper draws on the authors' qualitative data from these studies. The findings demonstrate the ambiguities and tensions in changing organisational cultures and among prison staff. Alongside the qualitative data, the paper draws on theory regarding policy implementation at the micro-level to show how staff can block or speed up that implementation. Prison officers are an essential part of health promoting prisons, but have been relatively ignored in the discussion of how to create healthier prisons. The contribution that prison staff make to creating health promoting prisons has been under-explored, yet pertinent theory can show how they can be more effectively involved in making changes in organisational culture.

  11. A new logo for the Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    On 3rd December 2012 the Staff Association launched a competition open to all to design a new logo, which should not contain the official CERN logo, reserved by CERN’s new graphic charter to the official use by the Organization. We are pleased that this competition sparked a strong interest. A total of 57 proposals were received within the time limits, some submitted from far away: Poland, Czech Republic, Turkey and even Cameroon! The selection of the winning logo was made in two steps: first the pre-selection of six finalists, followed by the final choice of the winning logo by members of the Staff Association.  Winning logo The pre-selection was made in two stages. Three of the six finalists were nominated by a jury consisting of seven members of the Staff Association, including communication professionals. In parallel, from 4 to 15 February CERN employed members of the personnel were able to visit the exhibition of all the logo proposals on the 1st floor of the Main Building and ...

  12. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from : 1 January 2005 Internal taxation of remuneration, payments and other financial benefits (New articles IV 2.01, R IV 2.01 to 2.04 pages 56 bis & 56 ter; Annex R A 1 bis page 73 bis) 1 September 2005 Reimbursement of education fees (Article R A 8.01 page 81) for the academic year 2005/2006 1 November 2005 Age limit (Article R II 6.04 page 37) 1 January 2006 Scale of basic salaries and scale of basic stipends (Annex R A 1 page 73 & Annex R A 2 page 74 respectively). Family Allowance and Child Allowance (Annex R A 4 page 76) New contract policy for staff members (Articles R II 1.19 & 1.20 page 15, R II 1.23 page 16, II 6.01 page 36, R II 6.02 & R II 6.06 page 37, VIII 1.03 page 68, R A 9.01 page 83). Copies of this update (modification # 15) are available in departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at the following addr...

  13. Synthesis, Crystal Structure and Luminescent Property of Cd (II Complex with <em>N-Benzenesulphonyl-L>-leucine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xishi Tai

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A new trinuclear Cd (II complex [Cd3(L6(2,2-bipyridine3] [L =<em> Nem>-phenylsulfonyl-L>-leucinato] has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR and X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis. The results show that the complex belongs to the orthorhombic, space group<em> Pem>212121 with<em> aem> = 16.877(3 Å, <em>b> em>= 22.875(5 Å, <em>c em>= 29.495(6 Å, <em>α> em>= <emem>= <emem>= 90°, <em>V> em>= 11387(4 Å3, <em>Z> em>= 4, <em>Dc>= 1.416 μg·m−3, <emem>= 0.737 mm−1, <em>F> em>(000 = 4992, and final <em>R>1 = 0.0390, <em>ωR>2 = 0.0989. The complex comprises two seven-coordinated Cd (II atoms, with a N2O5 distorted pengonal bipyramidal coordination environment and a six-coordinated Cd (II atom, with a N2O4 distorted octahedral coordination environment. The molecules form one dimensional chain structure by the interaction of bridged carboxylato groups, hydrogen bonds and p-p interaction of 2,2-bipyridine. The luminescent properties of the Cd (II complex and <em>N-Benzenesulphonyl-L>-leucine in solid and in CH3OH solution also have been investigated.

  14. Mental health inpatients' and staff members' suggestions for reducing physical restraint: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C; Rouse, L; Rae, S; Kar Ray, M

    2018-04-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Restraint has negative psychological, physical and relational consequences for mental health patients and staff. Restraint reduction interventions have been developed (e.g., "Safewards"). Limited qualitative research has explored suggestions on how to reduce physical restraint (and feasibility issues with implementing interventions) from those directly involved. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This paper explores mental health patients' and staff members' suggestions for reducing physical restraint, whilst addressing barriers to implementing these. Findings centred on four themes: improving communication and relationships; staffing factors; environment and space; and activities and distraction. Not all suggestions are addressed by currently available interventions. Barriers to implementation were identified, centring on a lack of time and/or resources; with the provision of more time for staff to spend with patients and implement interventions seen as essential to reducing physical restraint. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Improving communication and relationships between staff/patients, making staffing-related changes, improving ward environments and providing patient activities are central to restraint reduction in mental healthcare. Fundamental issues related to understaffing, high staff turnover, and lack of time and resources need addressing in order for suggestions to be successfully implemented. Introduction Physical restraint has negative consequences for all involved, and international calls for its reduction have emerged. Some restraint reduction interventions have been developed, but limited qualitative research explores suggestions on how to reduce physical restraint (and feasibility issues with implementation) from those directly involved. Aims To explore mental health patients' and staff members' suggestions for reducing physical restraint. Methods Interviews were conducted with 13 inpatients

  15. Assisted living facility administrator and direct care staff views of resident mental health concerns and staff training needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, Emily; Quijano, Louise M; McAlister, Courtney

    2011-01-01

    This community needs assessment surveyed 21 administrators and 75 direct care staff at 9 larger and 12 smaller assisted living facilities (ALFs) regarding perceptions of resident mental health concerns, direct care staff capacity to work with residents with mental illness, and direct care staff training needs. Group differences in these perceptions were also examined. Both administrators and directcare staff indicated that direct care staff would benefit from mental health-related training, and direct care staff perceived themselves as being more comfortable working with residents with mental illness than administrators perceived them to be. Implications for gerontological social work are discussed.

  16. WIC providers' perspectives on offering smoking cessation interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilino, Mary Lober; Goody, Cynthia M; Lowe, John B

    2003-01-01

    To examine the perspectives of WIC clinic providers on offering smoking cessation interventions for pregnant women. Four focus groups consisting of WIC nurses, dietitians, and social workers (N = 25) were conducted at WIC clinics in eastern Iowa. Researchers developed discussion guidelines to determine how WIC providers currently approached pregnant women who smoke cigarettes and what they considered barriers to providing effective smoking cessation interventions. Code mapping was used to analyze focus group discussions. Factors influencing the ability of WIC staff to provide a smoking cessation intervention for pregnant women included available time, clinic priorities, staff approaches to clients, and staff training. In addition, providers expressed concerns about educational materials for clients as well as additional client issues that prevented smoking cessation. The absence of mechanisms to track clinic outcomes related to smoking cessation was also noted. WIC providers have time limitations that may necessitate minimal or low-intensity interventions for smoking cessation, but did not know that such approaches are actually effective. WIC providers require more education about the entire issue of smoking cessation in order to become more proactive in their attempts to help pregnant women quit. Training that enhances self-efficacy and understanding of the impact of smoking on mothers, infants, and children should be initiated to motivate staff to intervene. Another strategy to motivate WIC staff in this regard could be tracking clinic outcomes in helping women to quit smoking or prevent relapse.

  17. Motivating Staff--A Problem for the School Administrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchler, Merv

    1981-01-01

    Examines the implications for educators of the "Motivation-Hygiene Theory" proposed by Frederick Herzberg. Suggests increasing staff opportunities for goal setting, decision making, and expanded professional competence as strategies for developing staff motivation. (Author/MLF)

  18. Use Of Computer Among Library Staff In Four Universities Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4) selected Universities of Technology Libraries in Northern Nigeria. Survey research was adopted with population of 151 Library staff and a random sample size of 120 staff in four (4) selected Universities of Technology Libraries in Northern ...

  19. A path analysis study of factors influencing hospital staff perceptions of quality of care factors associated with patient satisfaction and patient experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Sandra G; Karimi, Leila; Bartram, Timothy

    2017-11-16

    Hospital staff are interested in information on patient satisfaction and patient experience that can help them improve quality of care. Staff perceptions of quality of care have been identified as useful proxies when patient data are not available. This study explores the organizational factors and staff attitudes that influence staff perceptions of the quality of the care they provide in relation to patient satisfaction and patient experience. Cross sectional survey completed by 258 staff of a large multi-campus, integrated metropolitan hospital in Australia. Structured equation modelling was used to analyse the data. Our data suggest that different perceived organizational factors and staff attitudes contribute to different pathways for patient satisfaction and patient experience indicators. Hospital staff in our sample were more likely to indicate they provided the care that would result in higher patient satisfaction if they felt empowered within a psychologically safe environment. Conversely their views on patient experience were related to their commitment towards their hospital. There was no relationship between the staff perceptions of patient satisfaction and the staff response to the friends and family test. This study provides empirical evidence that staff perceptions of the quality of care they provide that is seen to be related to patient satisfaction and patient experience are enacted through different pathways that reflect differing perceptions of organizational factors and workplace psychological attitudes.

  20. 32 CFR 700.710 - Organization of a staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organization of a staff. 700.710 Section 700.710... Commanders Staffs of Commanders § 700.710 Organization of a staff. (a) The term “staff” means those officers... operation of his or her command. (b) The officer detailed as chief of staff and aide to a fleet admiral or...

  1. Molecular Cloning and Functional Analysis of Three <em>FLOWERING LOCUS T (FTem> Homologous Genes from Chinese <em>Cymbidium>

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime A. Teixeira da Silva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The <em>FLOWERING LOCUS Tem> (<em>FT> gene plays crucial roles in regulating the transition from the vegetative to reproductive phase. To understand the molecular mechanism of reproduction, three homologous <em>FT> genes were isolated and characterized from <em>Cymbidium sinenseem> “Qi Jian Bai Mo”, <em>Cymbidium goeringiiem> and <em>Cymbidium ensifoliumem> “Jin Si Ma Wei”. The three genes<em> em>contained 618-bp nucleotides with a 531-bp open reading frame (ORF of encoding 176 amino acids (AAs. Alignment of the AA sequences revealed that CsFT, CgFT and CeFT contain a conserved domain, which is characteristic of the<em> em>PEBP-RKIP superfamily, and which share high identity with FT of other plants in GenBank: 94% with OnFT<em> em>from <em>Oncidium em>Gower Ramsey, 79% with Hd3a from <em>Oryza sativaem>, and 74% with FT from <em>Arabidopsis thalianaem>. qRT-PCR analysis showed a diurnal expression pattern of <em>CsFT>, <em>CgFT> and <em>CeFT> following both long day (LD, 16-h light/8-h dark and short day (SD, 8-h light/16-h dark treatment. While the transcripts of both <em>CsFT em>and <em>CeFT em>under LD were significantly higher than under SD, those of <em>CgFT em>were> em>higher under SD. Ectopic expression of <em>CgFT> in transgenic <em>Arabidopsis> plants resulted in early flowering compared to wild-type plants and significant up-regulation of <em>APETALA1em> (<em>AP1em> expression. Our data indicates that CgFT is a putative phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein gene in <em>Cymbidium> that may regulate the vegetative to reproductive transition in flowers, similar to its <em>Arabidopsis> ortholog.

  2. A Preliminary Study of Staff Meetings as Viewed by Dental Hygienists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Anderson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Staff meetings in general dental practices represent what is be-lieved to be a key management strategy to build teams and to enhance efficiency and effec-tiveness. However, very little research has been done regarding staff meetings in dental offices. This study examined staff meetings from the viewpoint of dental hygienists who grow in unique careers in that they work largely independently of the dentist and yet typically within a dental practice while providing patient care and education. One-hundred-six dental hygienists completed a survey about staff meetings in dental offices. Key findings include: only approximately 43% of dental offices conduct morning huddles to get the day off to a smooth and organized start, 72% of dental practices conduct longer staff meetings with largely positive outcomes, including increasing practice efficiency and productivity, few practices (12% hold specific meetings only for the hygiene-department (and probably thereby miss some opportunities for practice im-provement, the most important variable by far to hygienists' job satisfaction is respect from the owner-dentist, and there exists an important and synergistic relationship among job sa-tisfaction, relationships with other staff and relationship with the owner-dentist.

  3. Operational Work System Design and Staff Performance in the Nigerian Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Ejikeme Isichei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study investigated the impact of operational work system design on staff performance in selected construction firms in Nigeria. Research Design & Methods: The study used primary data gathered with the use of a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire format administered to 138 respondents. A hypothesis was postulated to test the significance of the research problem. Data analysis was carried out using correlation and multiple regression analysis which proved the significance of the alternative hypothesis as a result of testing the hypothesis. Findings: The findings show that there is a significant relationship between operational work system design and staff performance. The study concludes that operational job design can be advanced as a motivation tool, which is non-monetary in nature, to improve staff performance. Implications & Recommendations: A key drive to improve performance is the satisfaction of staff coupled with an outstanding operational job design which takes into consideration the total physical and mental well-being of staff and its interaction with other organisational factors. The study recommends, among others, that there should be active participation of staff in the design of work in the organisation. Contribution & Value Added: The study provides an empirical approach to enhancing performance in the construction industry and thereby developing an indigenous firm to compete favourably on a growing market.

  4. Difficulties of nursing staff involved in phase 1 oncology trials in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kazufumi; Nagamura, Fumitaka; Ogami, Yuko; Yamashita, Naohide; Kamibeppu, Kiyoko

    2011-01-01

    Nurses, such as clinical research coordinators (CRCs) and nursing staff, are playing a greater role in clinical trials. Prior studies show that CRCs face various challenges, yet information on the problems nursing staff encounter in phase 1 oncology trials is limited. The purpose of the present study was to explore using a qualitative and descriptive approach the difficulties that nursing staff experience in their work with phase 1 oncology trials. Twenty-one nurses from 2 hospital wards in Japan with phase 1 oncology trials completed semistructured interviews. The data were analyzed qualitatively and descriptively. The results show that nursing staff were expected to take on broader roles as specialists in clinical trial nursing. These expectations led to 3 categories of difficulties: caring for patients, conducting accurate and reliable clinical trials, and collaborating with the clinical trial team. In some cases, these had a negative effect on nurses' attitudes toward clinical trials. Nursing staff face unique difficulties, including a lack of clearly defined responsibilities and recognition from the clinical trial team. These differ from difficulties in ordinary oncology nursing and are similar to those encountered by CRCs. The clinical trial team should reinforce the need for a collaborative approach, provide education and support for nursing staff, and recognize the critical role nurses play as specialists. These steps are important for the well-being of patients and the conduct of high-quality clinical trials.

  5. Leadership styles of nursing home administrators and their association with staff turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, Christopher; Castle, Nicholas G

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between nursing home administrator (NHA) leadership style and staff turnover. We analyzed primary data from a survey of 2,900 NHAs conducted in 2005. The Online Survey Certification and Reporting database and the Area Resource File were utilized to extract organizational and local economic characteristics of the facilities. A general linear model (GLM) was used to estimate the effects of NHA leadership style, organizational characteristics, and local economic characteristics on nursing home staff turnover for registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), and nurse's aides (NAs). The complete model estimates indicate that NHAs who are consensus managers (leaders who solicit, and act upon, the most input from their staff) are associated with the lowest turnover levels, 7% for RNs, 3% for LPNs, and 44% for NAs. Shareholder managers (leaders who neither solicit input when making a decision nor provide their staffs with relevant information for making decisions on their own) are associated with the highest turnover levels, 32% for RNs, 56% for LPNs, and 168% for NAs. The findings indicate that NHA leadership style is associated with staff turnover, even when the effects of organizational and local economic conditions are held constant. Because leadership strategies are amenable to change, the findings of this study may be used to develop policies for lowering staff turnover.

  6. Training for Defense? From Stochastic Traits to Synchrony in Giant Honey Bees (<em>Apis dorsataem>

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Kastberger

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In Giant Honey Bees, abdomen flipping happens in a variety of contexts. It can be either synchronous or cascaded, such as in the collective defense traits of shimmering and rearing-up, or it can happen as single-agent behavior. Abdomen flipping is also involved in flickering behavior, which occurs regularly under quiescent colony state displaying singular or collective traits, with stochastic, and (semi- synchronized properties. It presumably acts via visual, mechanoceptive, and pheromonal pathways and its goals are still unknown. This study questions whether flickering is preliminary to shimmering which is subject of the <em>fs em>(flickering-shimmering-transition> hypothesis? We tested the respective prediction that trigger sites (<em>ts> at the nest surface (where shimmering waves had been generated show higher flickering activity than the alternative non-trigger sites (<em>nts>. We measured the flickering activity of <em>ts>- and <em>nts>-surface bees from two experimental nests, before and after the colony had been aroused by a dummy wasp. Arousal increased rate and intensity of the flickering activity of both <em>ts>- and <em>nts> cohorts (P < 0.05, whereby the flickering intensity of <em>ts>-bees were higher than that of <em>nts>-bees (P < 0.05. Under arousal, the colonies also increased the number of flickering-active <em>ts>- and <em>nts>-cohorts (P < 0.05. This provides evidence that cohorts which are specialist at launching shimmering waves are found across the quiescent nest zone. It also proves that arousal may reinforce the responsiveness of quiescent curtain bees for participating in shimmering, practically by recruiting additional trigger site bees for expanding repetition of rate and intensity of shimmering waves. This finding confirms the <em>fs-transition> hypothesis and constitutes evidence that flickering is part of a basal colony-intrinsic information system

  7. Internal marketing strategy: Focusing on staff orientation in health care in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. De Jager

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to determine the levels of satisfaction in respect of pre identified internal marketing-related variables in a large provincial hospital in South Africa. Problem investigated: Low job satisfaction is often cited as a major cause of high turnover among health care providers worldwide. Likewise the Public Health Care Industry in South Africa is facing complex employee retention issues. In determining the reasons for high turnover an interest in evaluating employee satisfaction among health care providers has increased. Measuring components of job satisfaction will assist not only the health care organisations' management to understand hospital culture, but also to compile an effective internal marketing plan and strategy. Design/Methodology/Approach: A staff satisfaction survey was conducted amongst staff members at a provincial hospital in the Tshwane region, South Africa. Attitudes of staff on pre-identified staff satisfaction variables were assessed. These variables were employed to implement an internal marketing strategy. A list of variables was formulated after an extensive literature study had been conducted. A total of 416 staff members voluntarily completed a self-administered questionnaire. A five-point Likert type scale was used to measure the levels of satisfaction on staff-related issues, with a view to addressing issues in the internal marketing strategy. Findings : It was evident that the management principles currently employed by the management team were a cause for concern among staff members. Based on the analysis that identified the satisfaction variables best it was clear that management should take immediate steps to address the following issues : • Clarification of hospital goals \\ objectives; • Understanding the goals of the respective departments; • The functioning of the Human resource department; • Functioning of the overall hospital management; and Implications: This paper

  8. Smoking and its treatment in addiction services: clients' and staff behaviour and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, Camilla; Strang, John; Ratschen, Elena; Sutherland, Gay; Finch, Emily; McNeill, Ann

    2014-07-14

    High smoking prevalence has been observed among those misusing other substances. This study aimed to establish smoking behaviours and attitudes towards nicotine dependence treatment among clients and staff in substance abuse treatment settings. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey of staff and clients in a convenience sample of seven community and residential addiction services in, or with links to, Europe's largest provider of mental health care, the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. Survey items assessed smoking behaviour, motivation to quit, receipt of and attitudes towards nicotine dependence treatment. Eighty five percent (n = 163) and 97% (n = 145) response rates of clients and staff were achieved. A high smoking prevalence was observed in clients (88%) and staff (45%); of current smokers, nearly all clients were daily smokers, while 42% of staff were occasional smokers. Despite 79% of clients who smoked expressing a desire to quit and 46% interested in receiving advice, only 15% had been offered support to stop smoking during their current treatment episode with 56% reported never having been offered support. Staff rated smoking treatment significantly less important than treatment of other substances (p < 0.001), and only 29% of staff thought it should be addressed early in a client's primary addiction treatment, compared with 48% of clients. A large unmet clinical need is evident with a widespread failure to deliver smoking cessation interventions to an extraordinarily high prevalence population of smokers in addiction services. This is despite the majority of smokers reporting motivation to quit. Staff smoking and attitudes may be a contributory factor in these findings.

  9. How nursing home residents develop relationships with peers and staff: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Tonya; Bowers, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Social support and social relationships have been repeatedly identified as essential to nursing home resident quality of life. However, little is known about ways residents develop relationships with peers or staff. This study was conducted to explore the ways resident develop relationships with peers and staff in nursing homes. Fifteen cognitively intact nursing home residents from two facilities were interviewed for this grounded theory study. Sampling, interviewing, and analysis occurred in a cyclical process with results at each stage of the study informing decisions about data collection and analysis in the next. Unstructured interviews and field observations were conducted. Data were analyzed with open, axial, and selective coding. Residents developed relationships with peers and staff largely as an unintended consequence of trying to have a life in the nursing home. Having a life was a two-step process. First, life motivations (Being Self and Creating a Positive Atmosphere) influenced resident preferences for daily activities and interaction goals and subsequently their strategies for achieving and establishing both. Second, the strategies residents used for achieving their required daily activities (Passing Time and Getting Needs Met) and interaction goals then influenced the nature of interaction and the subsequent peer or staff response to these interactions. Residents defined relationships as friendly or unfriendly depending on whether peers or staff responded positively or negatively. There was considerable overlap in the ways peer and staff relationships developed and the results highlight the role of peer and staff responsiveness in relationship development. The results provide possible explanations for the success of interventions in the literature designed to improve staff responsiveness to residents. The results suggest that adapting these kinds of interventions for use with peers may also be successful. The conceptual model also presents a number

  10. Policy implications of staff turnover at the Kwame Nkrumah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the Library administration examines its employee performance trends to know which category of staff seem at risk of leaving and to institute human resource interventions such as training programmes, job enrichment and reward schemes to improve staff retention. Keywords: Employee turnover, staff retention, motivation, ...

  11. Organizational Climate as a Tool for Child Care Staff Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkner, Joan M.; Riley, Dave; Roach, Mary A.

    2005-01-01

    A successful early childhood program that is a nurturing place for children must also be a good place for staff to work. Too often it is not, and employees leave. Coping with staff turnover in early childhood programs is a constant struggle, not only for administrators but also for children and their families and the staff who remain behind. Both…

  12. Classification of Staff Development Programmes and Effects Perceived by Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rijdt, Catherine; Dochy, Filip; Bamelis, Sofie; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2016-01-01

    Educational institutions offer diverse staff development programmes to allow staff members to keep up with educational innovations and to guarantee educational quality. The current study investigates by means of a survey and semi-structured interviews whether the teacher perceives staff development as a management model, a shop-floor model or a…

  13. 25 CFR 36.86 - Are there staff training requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... section before the first day of student occupancy for the year. (1) First Aid/Safety/Emergency & Crisis... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are there staff training requirements? 36.86 Section 36... Programs Staffing § 36.86 Are there staff training requirements? (a) All homeliving program staff as well...

  14. The Relationship of Staff Development to Personnel Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C. A.

    Staff development, one of the nine main functions in personnel management, is not an isolated function. Administrators with whom the ultimate responsibility for personnel management rests, determine the extent to which the personnel and staff development specialists can be utilized. The staff development specialist has three major roles, as…

  15. Academic Staff Development and Output in State Universities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings were that significant relationship exists between staff development and the productivity of academic staff in terms of research, teaching and community service. Therefore, the study concluded that in-service training and attendance of conferences and workshops influence the output of academic staff.

  16. Staff development and employee welfare practices and their effect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Every organization primarily needs committed and dedicated staff that will help the organization to meet its tactical and strategic objectives. The study examines whether staff development policies exist in three special libraries in Ghana, and whether training programmes are being offered to increase staff competence, ...

  17. Identifying Needs to Develop a PBL Staff Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffin, Prarthana

    2013-01-01

    Staff development is a crucial element for educational intervention. Recognizing the importance of staff development, this study aims to pin-point suitable methodologies in developing a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) academic staff development program for a higher education institute where PBL has become an intervention alternative. The study aims…

  18. 7 CFR 1700.33 - Financial Services Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial Services Staff. 1700.33 Section 1700.33... AGRICULTURE GENERAL INFORMATION Agency Organization and Functions § 1700.33 Financial Services Staff. The Financial Services Staff evaluates the financial condition of financially troubled borrowers in order to...

  19. 32 CFR 191.7 - Civilian EEO program staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civilian EEO program staff. 191.7 Section 191.7...) MISCELLANEOUS THE DOD CIVILIAN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY (EEO) PROGRAM § 191.7 Civilian EEO program staff. (a) EEO Managers, including SEP Managers and other staff who are responsible for EEO and affirmative...

  20. 32 CFR 1602.5 - Area office staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Area office staff. 1602.5 Section 1602.5....5 Area office staff. The compensated employees, civilian and military, of the Selective Service System employed in an area office will be referred to as the area office staff. ...

  1. 13 CFR 120.824 - Professional management and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Professional management and staff... management and staff. A CDC must have full-time professional management, including an Executive Director (or the equivalent) managing daily operations. It must also have a full-time professional staff qualified...

  2. 17 CFR 171.28 - Participation by Commission staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... staff. 171.28 Section 171.28 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION..., Membership Denial and Registration Actions § 171.28 Participation by Commission staff. The Division of.... The Commission shall by order establish a supplementary briefing schedule for the Commission staff and...

  3. 10 CFR 51.40 - Consultation with NRC staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consultation with NRC staff. 51.40 Section 51.40 Energy....40 Consultation with NRC staff. (a) A prospective applicant or petitioner for rulemaking is encouraged to confer with NRC staff as early as possible in its planning process before submitting...

  4. 32 CFR 700.720 - Administration and discipline: Staff embarked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff embarked... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.720 Administration and discipline: Staff embarked. In matters of general discipline, the staff of a commander embarked and all...

  5. THE RESULTS OF INDIVIDUAL DOSE CONTROL OF HEALTH INSTITUTIONS STAFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Shleenkova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The  work  provides  comparative  assessment  of  the  levels  of  occupational  exposure  of  Saint-Petersburg health institutions staff. The analysis was carried out of the 891 individual doses measurement results which have  being  obtained  during  5  years  investigations  (2009-2013.  The  comparing  of  the  average  annual effective doses was carried out for 4 groups of medical specialists: x-ray laboratory assistant, radiotherapist, radiographer of dental clinics and X-ray surgery staff (surgeons, anesthesiologists and surgical nurses who are working close to irradiation source. It is shown that the annual effective dose average value is about 0.5 mSv for the first three groups of medical specialists. The same value for X-ray surgery staff is 1.6 mSv. Individual  annual  exposure  doses  have  not  exceeded  the  main  dose  limits  required  by  Radiation  Safety Standard 99/2009. The issues are considered of the estimation exactness of the effective dose basing on the results of individual dose equivalent measurement. 

  6. <em>α>-Glucosidase Inhibitory Constituents from <em>Acanthopanax senticosusem> Harm Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Xue Kuang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A new triterpene glycoside, 3-<em>O-[(α>-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1→2]-[<em>β>-D-glucuronopyranosyl-6-<em>O>-methyl ester]-olean-12-ene-28-olic acid (1 and a new indole alkaloid, 5-methoxy-2-oxoindolin-3-acetic acid methyl ester (5 were isolated from the leaves of <em>Acanthopanax senticosusem> Harms along with six known compounds. The structures of the new compounds were determined by means of 2D-NMR experiments and chemical methods. All the isolated compounds were evaluated for their glycosidase inhibition activities and compound 6 showed significant <em>α>-glucosidase inhibition activity.

  7. History of the Joint Chiefs of Staff: The Joint Chiefs of Staff and the War in Vietnam, 1971-1973

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Webb, Willard J; Poole, Walter S

    2007-01-01

    The series of five volumes titled "The Joint Chiefs of Staff and the War in Vietnam" covers the activities of the Joint Chiefs of Staff with regard to Vietnam from 1945 to the final withdrawal of U.S...

  8. Caring for Dying Patients in the Nursing Home: Voices From Frontline Nursing Home Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagle, John G.; Unroe, Kathleen T.; Bunting, Morgan; Bernard, Brittany L.; Miller, Susan C.

    2017-01-01

    Context Nursing homes are an important site for end-of-life care, yet little is known about the perspectives of the frontline staff who provide a majority of this care. Objective To describe, from the staff perspective, positive/negative experiences related to caring for dying residents. Methods Qualitative analysis using survey data from staff working in 52 Indiana nursing homes. Results A total of 707 frontline staff who provide nursing, nurse aide, and social work services responded to open-ended prompts. Study data included responses to open-ended prompts asking participants to describe one positive experience and one negative experience caring for a dying patient. A thematic content analysis was conducted using the constant-comparative method. Respondents were largely female (93%), white (78%), 31–50 years (42%), and 53% had >5 years of nursing home work experience. Experiences were described from three perspectives: 1) first-hand experiences, 2) observed experiences of dying patients, and 3) observed experiences of family members. Selected themes for positive experiences include the following: creating close bonds; good patient care; involvement of hospice; being prepared; and good communication. Selected themes for negative experiences consisted of the following: challenging aspects of care; unacknowledged death; feeling helpless; uncertainty; absent family; painful emotions; and family discord. Conclusion Findings reveal the richness and many complexities of providing end-of-life care in nursing homes and have implications for improving staff knowledge, coordination of care with hospice, and social support for patients. PMID:27815169

  9. EM-21 Retrieval Knowledge Center: Waste Retrieval Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellinger, Andrew P.; Rinker, Michael W.; Berglin, Eric J.; Minichan, Richard L.; Poirier, Micheal R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Martin, Bruce A.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Saldivar, Eloy; Mullen, O Dennis; Chapman, Noel F.; Wells, Beric E.; Gibbons, Peter W.

    2009-04-10

    EM-21 is the Waste Processing Division of the Office of Engineering and Technology, within the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). In August of 2008, EM-21 began an initiative to develop a Retrieval Knowledge Center (RKC) to provide the DOE, high level waste retrieval operators, and technology developers with centralized and focused location to share knowledge and expertise that will be used to address retrieval challenges across the DOE complex. The RKC is also designed to facilitate information sharing across the DOE Waste Site Complex through workshops, and a searchable database of waste retrieval technology information. The database may be used to research effective technology approaches for specific retrieval tasks and to take advantage of the lessons learned from previous operations. It is also expected to be effective for remaining current with state-of-the-art of retrieval technologies and ongoing development within the DOE Complex. To encourage collaboration of DOE sites with waste retrieval issues, the RKC team is co-led by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Two RKC workshops were held in the Fall of 2008. The purpose of these workshops was to define top level waste retrieval functional areas, exchange lessons learned, and develop a path forward to support a strategic business plan focused on technology needs for retrieval. The primary participants involved in these workshops included retrieval personnel and laboratory staff that are associated with Hanford and Savannah River Sites since the majority of remaining DOE waste tanks are located at these sites. This report summarizes and documents the results of the initial RKC workshops. Technology challenges identified from these workshops and presented here are expected to be a key component to defining future RKC-directed tasks designed to facilitate tank waste retrieval solutions.

  10. Geneva University honours two CERN staff members

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Albert Hofmann Steve Myers On 8 June, two CERN staff members will receive Geneva University's highest distinction. On the proposal of the University's particle physicists, Steve Myers and Albert Hoffmann, who orchestrated LEP commissioning and operation and were instrumental in its success, will awarded the distinction of doctor honoris causa. The ceremony, interspersed with musical interludes, will be followed by a formal reception and is open to all. The Uni Dufour car park will be free to members of the public attending the ceremony. 8 June 2001 at 10.00 a.m. Uni Dufour, Auditoire Piaget 24, rue Général Dufour, Geneva.

  11. Staff numbers: from words to action!

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2006-01-01

    2006 is a decisive year for the definition of needs for human resources and long-term budget for the Organization. The LHC is officially programmed for 31 August 2007; the Director-General has to draw up a â€ワLong-term Plan” (LTP) by the end of the year. This projected programme will specify the needs for staff fron now until 2010 and beyond, in particular in the framework of the completion and running of this unique machine.

  12. Nursing staff requirements for neonatal intensive care.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, S; Whelan, A; Weindling, A M; Cooke, R W

    1993-01-01

    A study to estimate the number of nursing staff required for neonatal nursing was undertaken. Certain nursing tasks, such as transporting any infant, caring for the dying infant, and looking after the very unstable infant required continuous attention by one nurse (5.5 whole time equivalent (wte) nurses for each cot). The stable ventilated infant required 10.5 nursing hours each day-that is, 2.4 wte/cot. Infants with intravenous infusions, but not ventilated, required only slightly less nursi...

  13. Staff awareness of food and fluid care needs for older people with dementia in residential care: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Emma J; Goldberg, Lynette R; Price, Andrea D; Tierney, Laura T; McInerney, Fran

    2017-12-01

    To examine awareness of aged care home staff regarding daily food and fluid care needs of older people with dementia. Older people in residential care frequently are malnourished, and many have dementia. Staff knowledge of the food and fluid needs of people with dementia is limited. Qualitative research on this topic is scarce but can provide insight into how nutrition and hydration care may be improved. Qualitative, interview-based study. Eleven staff in a range of positions at one care home were interviewed regarding their perceptions of current and potential food/fluid care practices. Transcripts were coded and analysed thematically. Key food and fluid issues reported by these staff members were weight loss and malnutrition, chewing and swallowing difficulties (dysphagia), and inadequate hydration. Staff identified a number of current care practices that they felt to be effective in facilitating older people's food and fluid intake, including responsiveness to their needs. Staff suggestions to facilitate food and fluid intake centred on improved composition and timing of meals, enhanced physical and social eating environment, and increased hydration opportunities. Staff commented on factors that may prevent changes to care practices, particularly the part-time workforce, and proposed changes to overcome such barriers. Staff were aware of key food and fluid issues experienced by the older people in their care and of a range of beneficial care practices, but lacked knowledge of many promising care practices and/or how to implement such practices. Staff need to be supported to build on their existing knowledge around effective food and fluid care practices. The numerous ideas staff expressed for changing care practices can be leveraged by facilitating staff networking to work and learn together to implement evidence-based change. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Chairmen Joint Chiefs of Staff's Leadership Using the Joint Strategic Planning System in the 1990s: Recommendations for Strategic Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meinhart, Richard

    2003-01-01

    This monograph examines how the three Chairmen of the Joint Chiefs of Staff adapted and used the Joint Strategic Planning System from 1990 to 2000 to provide advice to the Secretary of Defense and to the...

  15. Focus on Dementia Care: Continuing Education Preferences, Challenges, and Catalysts among Rural Home Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosteniuk, Julie G.; Morgan, Debra G.; O'Connell, Megan E.; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Stewart, Norma J.

    2016-01-01

    Home care staff who provide housekeeping and personal care to individuals with dementia generally have lower levels of dementia care training compared with other health care providers. The study's purposes were to determine whether the professional role of home care staff in a predominantly rural region was associated with preferences for delivery…

  16. Self-management-support in dementia care: A mixed methods study among nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkaik, Renate; van Antwerpen-Hoogenraad, Paulien; de Veer, Anke; Francke, Anneke; Huis In Het Veld, Judith

    2017-11-01

    Background Self-management in patients and family caregivers confronted with dementia is not self-evident. Self-management skills may be limited because of the progressive cognitive decline of the patient and because family caregivers are often also very aged. Self-management support by nursing staff is therefore of paramount importance. Objectives To gain insight into how nursing staff perceive their self-management support tasks, and how they put them into practice. Research questions are: 'What are the opinions and experiences of Dutch nursing staff working in home care or residential elderly care regarding self-management support for people with dementia and their family caregivers?' and 'Do nursing staff feel sufficiently trained and skilled for self-management support?'. Methods A mixed methods approach was used, combining cross-sectional quantitative survey data from 206 Dutch nursing professionals with qualitative interviews among 12 nursing staff working in home care or residential elderly care in The Netherlands. Results Nursing staff working in home care experienced self-management support of people with dementia as a part of their job and as an attractive task. They consider 'helping people with dementia to maintain control over their lives by involving them in decisions in daily care' the essence of self-management support. Nursing staff saw family caregivers as their main partners in providing self-management support to the patient. They were less aware that family caregivers themselves might also need self-management support. Nursing staff often felt insufficiently trained to give adequate self-management support. RN's and CNA's did not differ in their opinions, experiences and training needs. Conclusions Nursing staff in home care do consider self-management support an important and attractive task in dementia care. Their skills for providing self-management support to patients with dementia and family caregivers need improvement. Recommendations

  17. The Effectiveness of Staff Training Focused on Increasing Emotional Intelligence and Improving Interaction between Support Staff and Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, L. J. M.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A. M. T.; Derksen, J. J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed at emotional intelligence and interactions…

  18. A crèche for CERN staff The Staff Association project

    CERN Document Server

    Association du personnel

    2006-01-01

    For many years, the Staff Association has supported the demand for the creation of a crèche for the children of CERN staff. Several studies have been carried out without leading to a concrete plan. The fact that the CERN population is getting younger and the shortage of local facilities have led to a more urgent demand for this type of social service over the past few years. Furthermore, the Equal Opportunities Panel had already recommended that crèche places be made available.

  19. Leadership: a key strategy in staff nurse retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Carol S

    2004-01-01

    Nursing administrators are challenged to recruit and retain staff nurses in the midst of increasing job vacancies and staff nurse turnover rates averaging 21%. The prevailing issues related to staff nurse recruitment and retention in the current healthcare environment are briefly reviewed as introductory content. The article outlines the case from nursing administration literature that effective leadership styles of nurse managers and nurse administrators enhance staff nurse retention. As nurse administrators continue to struggle with staff nurse recruitment and retention, evidenced-based strategies are discussed that address leader preparation and organizational leadership structure including advanced education, leadership training, and shared leadership models.

  20. 'I have the world's best job' - staff experience of the advantages of caring for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldh, Ann Catrine; van der Zijpp, Teatske; McMullan, Christel; McCormack, Brendan; Seers, Kate; Rycroft-Malone, Jo

    2016-06-01

    Besides a growing demand for safe high-quality care for older people, long-term care (LTC) often struggles to recruit appropriately qualified nursing staff. Understanding what LTC staff value in their work may contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of what can attract staff and support person-centred care. To explore staff experience of the advantages of working in LTC settings for older people. Narrative descriptions of 85 LTC staff in Ireland, the Netherlands and Sweden on what they value in their work were analysed with qualitative content analysis. Ethical approval was obtained according to the requirements of each country, and participants provided informed consent prior to the individual interviews. Working in LTC signifies bonding with the older people residing there, their next of kin and the team members. It means autonomy in one's daily tasks amalgamated with being a part of an affirmative team. Participants reported a sense of accomplishment and fulfilment; caring meant consideration and recognition of the older people and the relationships formed, which provided for professional and personal growth. The sharing of compassion between staff and residents indicated reciprocity of the relationship with residents. The findings may be transferable to LTC in general although they address only the positive aspects of caring for older people and only the experiences of those staff who had consented to take part in the study. The findings add to what underpins the quality of care in nursing homes: compassion in the nurse-resident relationship and person-centred care in LTC. They indicate reciprocity in the relations formed that may contribute to the empowerment of older people, but further studies are needed to explore this in more detail. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  1. Extraction of Dihydroquercetin<em> em>from <em>Larix gmeliniem>i> em>with Ultrasound-Assisted and Microwave-Assisted Alternant Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuangang Zu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available An ultrasound and microwave assisted alternant extraction method (UMAE was applied for extracting dihydroquercetin (DHQ from <em>Larix gmeliniem>i> wood. This investigation was conducted using 60% ethanol as solvent, 1:12 solid to liquid ratio, and 3 h soaking time. The optimum treatment time was ultrasound 40 min, microwave 20 min, respectively, and the extraction was performed once. Under the optimized conditions, satisfactory extraction yield of the target analyte was obtained. Relative to ultrasound-assisted or microwave-assisted method, the proposed approach provides higher extraction yield. The effect of DHQ of different concentrations and synthetic antioxidants on oxidative stability in soy bean oil stored for 20 days at different temperatures (25 °C and 60 °C was compared. DHQ was more effective in restraining soy bean oil oxidation, and a dose-response relationship was observed. The antioxidant activity of DHQ was a little stronger than that of BHA and BHT. Soy bean oil supplemented with 0.08 mg/g DHQ exhibited favorable antioxidant effects and is preferable for effectively avoiding oxidation. The <em>L. gmeliniiem> wood samples before and after extraction were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the UMAE method is a simple and efficient technique for sample preparation.

  2. Evaluating and Calculating the Costs for Staff Recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samchuk Kateryna I.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the components of the accounting method such as evaluation and calculation. It has been found that these constituents occupy an important place both in the overall staff costs and the costs for recruitment in particular, because in the future information about such costs may impact managerial decisions. Despite the fact that the costs for staff recruiting are the pure administrative costs of enterprise, there is a need to identify them with the separate workspaces for management purposes. For the apportionment of the costs for recruitment, it has been suggested to determine the distribution base depending on the category of coworkers. The author investigated the normative-legal acts of Ukraine concerning the calculation of the self-cost of production (works, services, which provide the following methods of calculation: job-order, simple, normative, process, standard-cost, direct cost. Proceeding from the analysis of the normative-legal acts, it can be seen the the most of the above mentioned methods of calculation are used to determine the self-cost of production, i.e. in the sphere of production. Given the specifity of the recruiting services, the author has suggested to use the integrated job-order and process method.

  3. [Impact of a disaster preparedness training program on health staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Cotanda, Cristina; Rebordosa Martínez, Mónica; Trenchs Sainz de la Maza, Victoria; Luaces Cubells, Carles

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a disaster preparedness training program in a Paediatric Emergency Department (PED). A quasi-experimental study was conducted using an anonymous questionnaire that was distributed to health care providers of a PED in a tertiary paediatric hospital. The questions concerned the disaster plan (DP), including theoretical and practical aspects. Questionnaires were distributed and completed in January 2014 (period 1) and November 2014 (period 2). The disaster training program includes theoretical and practical sessions. A total of 110 questionnaires were collected in period 1, and 80 in period 2. Almost three-quarters (71.3%) of PED staff attended the theoretical sessions, and 43.8% attended the practical sessions. The application of this training program significantly improved knowledge about the DP, but no improvement was observed in the practical questions. PED staff felt more prepared to face a disaster after the training program (15.5% vs. 41.8%, Ptraining program improved some knowledge about the disaster plan, but it has not improved responses in practical situations, which may be due to the low attendance at practical sessions and the time between the training program and the questionnaires. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Five-Yearly Review: the Staff Association keeps you informed!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    The Staff Association (SA) has already published several articles on this topic, especially at the beginning of the year and at the end of June (Echo No. 248). In these articles, we discussed the implementation of the decisions taken by the CERN Council in December 2015, covering the deadlines and progress, but also the SA’s concerns. First milestone reached On 18 August, all staff members received an individual notification letter indicating: their placement within the new salary scale, i.e. their grade and salary position expressed as a percentage of the midpoint of the grade; the provisional benchmark job they are assigned to. An information sheet was also enclosed in the email from HR Office. Soon after, the SA was contacted by a significant number of colleagues seeking further information on the content of the documents or wishing to share their disappointment and fears regarding the impact that these changes will have on their career. It seems therefore that the information provide...

  5. COMPOSITION OF STAFF REVIEW ADVISORY BODIES - 2001

    CERN Multimedia

    Seamus Hegarty / HR; Tel. 74128

    2001-01-01

    For the present staff review, the advisory bodies set up to prepare recommendations are composed as follows : Senior Staff Advancement Committee (SSAC) David O. Williams/it (Convener) Cristoforo Benvenuti/est David Plane/ep Technical Engineers & Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) Sverre Jarp/it (Chairman) Flemming Pedersen/ps Robin Lauckner/sl Christian Roche/ett Lars Leistam/est Dietrich Schinzel/ep Long-term contract Boards (LTCBs) LTCB 1 (Categories 2 & 5a) Tiziano Camporesi/ep [Convener] - Florence Ranjard/ep [Alternate] Jacques Gruber/ps - Peter Sievers/lhc [Alternate] Thomas Pettersson/est - Michel Mayoud/est [Alternate] Sue Foffano/as - Thierry Lagrange/spl [Alternate] Werner Zapf/hr (Secretary) LTCB 2 (Categories 3, 4, 5b & 5c) Véronique Paris/sl [Convener] - Fabien Perriollat/ps [Alternate] Mats Wilhelmsson/st - Véronique Fassnacht/tis [Alternate] Lucie Linssen/ep - Alfredo Placci/ep [Alternate] Patrick Geeraert/fi - John Cuthb...

  6. Factors Effecting Job Satisfaction Among Academic Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezih Dağdeviren

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this paper, we aimed to investigate the job satisfaction levels of all the academic staff in Trakya University, along with their socioeconomic features.Material and Methods: We used a questionnaire including the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire Short Form. Frequency tables, cross tabulations, Pearson Chi-square, Exact Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn’s Multiple Comparison and Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector (CHAID tests were used for statistical analysis.Results: The mean age of 560 participants was 33.86±7.33 years, of whom 47% (n=263 were female and 53% (n=297 male. Of the participants, the mean levels were 63.06±10.96 for general, 44.79±7.49 for intrinsic, and 18.27±4.64 for extrinsic job satisfaction. 85.4% of the academic staff (n=478 had a moderate level of satisfaction, whereas 14.6% (n=82 had a higher level. There was a significant relationship between income and job satisfaction levels. With the CHAID analysis, it was determined that job satisfaction had a relationship with age, educational status, total years of service and years of service in the current department. Conclusion: Job satisfaction can reflect the general emotional status of employees. It has a greater importance for the jobs that can affect the extraoccupational lives directly and require constant devotion. Employers should take some measures to increase job satisfaction in order to improve efficiency.

  7. Composition of Staff Review Advisory Bodies - 2003

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    For the present staff review, the advisory bodies set up to prepare recommendations are composed as follows : Senior Staff Advancement Committee (SSAC) David Plane/EP [Convener] Enrico Chiaveri/AB Peter Schmid/EP Technical Engineers & Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) Robin Lauckner/AB [Chairman]Marcel Mottier/EST Michael Letheren/EP Louis Walckiers/AT Lucie Linssen/EP Mats Wilhelmsson/ST Long-term contract Boards (LTCBs) LTCB 1 (Categories 2 & 5a) Tiziano Camporesi/EP [Convener]Florence Ranjard/EP [Alternate] Roger Bailey/ABPeter Sievers/AT " " Doris Forkel-Wirth/TISPierre Ninin/ST " " Rob Rayson/HRMaarten Wilbers/DSU " " Seamus Hegarty/HR [Secretary] LTCB 2 (Categories 3, 4, 5b & 5c) Véronique Paris/AB [Convener]Fabien Perriollat/AB [Alternate] Christian Lasseur/ESTRamon Folch/EST " " Lucie Linssen/EP Alfredo Placci/EP " " Mats Møller/ASLaszlo Abel/SPL " " Seamus Hegarty/HR [Secretary] Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  8. COMPOSITION OF STAFF REVIEW ADVISORY BODIES - 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    For the present staff review, the advisory bodies set up to prepare recommendations are composed as follows: Senior Staff Advancement Committee (SSAC) Cristoforo BENVENUTI/EST [Convener] David PLANE/EP Peter SCHMID/EP Technical Engineers & Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) Robin LAUCKNER/SL [Chairman] Flemming PEDERSEN/PS Lucie LINSSEN/EP Dietrich SCHINZEL/EP Marcel MOTTIER/EST Louis WALCKIERS/LHC Long-term contract Boards (LTCBs) (Categories 2 & 5a) Tiziano CAMPORESI/EP [Convener] Florence RANJARD/EP [Alternate] Jacques GRUBER/PS [until 30.6.2002] Roger BAILEY/SL [from 1.7. 2002] Peter SIEVERS/LHC [Alternate] Doris FORKEL-WIRTH/TIS Pierre NININ/ST [Alternate] Sue FOFFANO/AS Maarten WILBERS/DSU [Alternate] Werner ZAPF/HR[Secretary] LTCB 2 Categories 3, 4, 5b & 5c) Véronique PARIS/SL [Convener] Fabien PERRIOLLAT/PS [Alternate] Mats WILHELMSSON/ST Charles NUTTALL/TIS [Alternate] Lucie LINSSEN/EP Alfredo PLACCI/EP [Alternate] Patrick GEERAER...

  9. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 July 2005 : Article R II 4.07 of the Staff Regulations - Leave year (pages 25 & 26) The purpose of the amendment is to allow certain members of the personnel, on an exceptional basis in the context of LHC construction, to carry forward more than 30 days of annual leave into the following year. This possibility of additional carry-forward, which will be used sparingly, is governed by strict conditions : i.e. it must be with the consent of the member of the personnel concerned and subject to a specific, documented request by the hierarchy and a favourable medical opinion. In addition, the number of additional days of leave that can be carried forward must not exceed 10 per leave year, and all days of leave accumulated in this way must be used before 30 September 2009. Finally, this possibility will not be available to members of the personnel taking part in the Saved Leave Scheme (SLS) as at 3...

  10. Transmission of Pneumocystis carinii from patients to hospital staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Bettina; Elvin, K; Rothman, L P

    1997-01-01

    rooms in departments of infectious diseases managing patients with P carinii pneumonia (PCP), suggesting the airborne route of transmission. Exposure of staff to P carinii may occur in hospital departments treating patients with PCP. METHODS: Exposure to P carinii was detected by serological responses...... to human P carinii by ELISA, Western blotting, and indirect immunofluorescence in 64 hospital staff with and 79 staff without exposure to patients with PCP from Denmark and Sweden. DNA amplification of oropharyngeal washings was performed on 20 Danish staff with and 20 staff without exposure to patients...... with PCP. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the frequency or level of antibodies to P carinii between staff exposed and those unexposed to patients with PCP. None of the hospital staff had detectable P carinii DNA in oropharyngeal washings. CONCLUSIONS: There is no difference in antibodies...

  11. Trends in nursing staff allocation: the nurse-to-patient ratio and skill mix issues in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, M; Silner, D

    2007-03-01

    This article describes a case study relating to trends in nurse-to-patient ratios and nursing staff mix in Israel. In recent years, there has been a worldwide trend towards changing nurse-to-patient ratios and nursing staff mixes. On the one hand, the patient's status has become more complex and requires a more professional nursing staff to maintain treatment, safety and quality, on the other hospitals have become more economically focused. In light of this, the need to re-examine the issues of nurse-to-patient ratio and nursing staff mix are of primary importance to the health system. Legislation of nurse-to-patient ratios is being widely discussed in nursing circles, and nurse-to-patient ratios are now mandatory in the State of California, USA, and the State of Victoria, Australia. The trend in nursing staff mix in Israel has been towards increased hiring of academic registered nurses, leading to the clinical development of quality treatment programmes and decreased mortality rates. Subsequently, license practical nurses are phased out, and where necessary auxiliary staff, which represents a cheaper work force, provides unskilled care. Today, the staff mix distribution in Israeli general governmental hospitals consists of 73% registered nurses, 11% licensed vocational nurses, and 16% auxiliary staff. In addition, there is a special collective agreement related to the allocation of nursing positions, including a classification method involving 10 categories of inpatient wards.

  12. Midwifery scope of practice among staff nurses: a grounded theory study in Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bharati; Johansson, Eva; Prakasamma, M; Mavalankar, Dileep; Christensson, Kyllike

    2013-06-01

    midwifery is a part of the nursing profession in India. This current study explores and describes the midwifery scope of practice among staff nurses. a grounded theory approach was used to develop a model. Twenty-eight service providers from the maternity sections of public health facilities, selected through purposive and theoretical sampling were interviewed in-depth. Unstructured observations in the labour wards were also used for developing the model. the midwifery practice of staff nurses was limited in scope compared to international standards of midwifery. Their practice was circumstance driven, ranging from extended to marginal depending on the context. Their right to practice was not legally defined, but they were not specifically prohibited from practice. As a consequence, the staff nurses faced loss of skills, and deskilling when their practice was restricted. Their practice was perceived as risky, when the scope of practice was extended because it was not rightfully endorsed, the nurses having no officially recognized right to practice midwifery at that level. The clinical midwifery education of nursing and midwifery students was marginalized because the education of medical students was given priority, and the students only got exposed to the restricted practice of staff nurses. unclear definitions of the right to practice and the scope of practice have led to the un-utilized potential of staff nurses practising midwifery. This is detrimental because India faces an acute shortage of qualified personnel to meet the need in providing human resources for maternal health. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Staff supplement to the draft report on human engineering guide to control room evaluation: response to comments, sample checklist, draft systems review guidelines, and evaluation procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    This staff supplement to Draft Report NUREG/CR-1580, Human Engineering Guide to Control Room Evaluation, provides staff responses to comments on the draft report and supplemental material not provided in the draft report. The supplemental material includes new draft guidelines for the systems review of nuclear power plant control rooms and sample checklists and corresponding human engineering guidelines

  14. Promoting oral health care among people living in residential aged care facilities: Perceptions of care staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarosa, Amy R; Clark, Sally; Villarosa, Ariana C; Patterson Norrie, Tiffany; Macdonald, Susan; Anlezark, Jennifer; Srinivas, Ravi; George, Ajesh

    2018-04-23

    This study aimed to look at the practices and perspectives of residential aged care facility (RACF) care staff regarding the provision of oral health care in RACFs. Emphasis has been placed on the provision of adequate oral health care in RACFs through the Better Oral Health in Residential Aged Care programme. Endorsed by the Australian government, this programme provided oral health education and training for aged care staff. However, recent evidence suggests that nearly five years after the implementation of this programme, the provision of oral care in RACFs in NSW remains inadequate. This project utilised an exploratory qualitative design which involved a focus group with 12 RACF care staff. Participants were asked to discuss the current oral health practices in their facility, and their perceived barriers to providing oral health care. The key findings demonstrated current oral health practices and challenges among care staff. Most care staff had received oral health training and demonstrated positive attitudes towards providing dental care. However, some participants identified that ongoing and regular training was necessary to inform practice and raise awareness among residents. Organisational constraints and access to dental services also limited provision of dental care while a lack of standardised guidelines created confusion in defining their role as oral healthcare providers in the RACF. This study highlighted the need for research and strategies that focus on capacity building care staff in oral health care and improving access of aged care residents to dental services. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A Comparison of Pyramidal Staff Training and Direct Staff Training in Community-Based Day Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberlin, Alayna T.; Beauchamp, Ken; Agnew, Judy; O'Brien, Floyd

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated two methods of training staff who were working with individuals with developmental disabilities: pyramidal training and consultant-led training. In the pyramidal training, supervisors were trained in the principles of applied behavior analysis (ABA) and in delivering feedback. The supervisors then trained their direct-care…

  16. Predictors of Cyberbullying Intervention among Elementary School Staff: The Moderating Effect of Staff Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williford, Anne; Depaolis, Kathryn J.

    2016-01-01

    Cyberbullying behavior among youth has become a growing concern among parents, educators, and policymakers due to emerging evidence documenting its harmful consequences on youths' development. As such, schools are increasingly required to address to this form of bullying. Thus, effective responses by school staff are needed. However, no study to…

  17. staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in south african public sector mental

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    occupational therapists 0.01, occupational therapy assistants. 0.01, social workers 0.01, community health workers 0.00, psychologists 0.00, intern psychologists 0.00, psychiatrists. 0.00, psychiatric registrars O.Dl, and medical officers 0.00. The ratio of ambulatory psychiatric service staff to daily patient visits (DPV) for the ...

  18. <em>Helicobacter pyloriem> Disrupts Host Cell Membranes, Initiating a Repair Response and Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Fen Juan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available <em>Helicobacter pyloriem> (<em>H. pyloriem>, the human stomach pathogen, lives on the inner surface of the stomach and causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Plasma membrane repair response is a matter of life and death for human cells against physical and biological damage. We here test the hypothesis that <em>H. pyloriem> also causes plasma membrane disruption injury, and that not only a membrane repair response but also a cell proliferation response are thereby activated. Vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA have been considered to be major <em>H. pyloriem> virulence factors. Gastric cancer cells were infected with <em>H. pyloriem> wild type (vacA+/cagA+, single mutant (ΔvacA or ΔcagA or double mutant (ΔvacA/ΔcagA strains and plasma membrane disruption events and consequent activation of membrane repair components monitored. <em>H. pyloriem> disrupts the host cell plasma membrane, allowing localized dye and extracellular Ca2+ influx. Ca2+-triggered members of the annexin family, A1 and A4, translocate, in response to injury, to the plasma membrane, and cell surface expression of an exocytotic maker of repair, LAMP-2, increases. Additional forms of plasma membrane disruption, unrelated to <em>H.> pylori em>exposure, also promote host cell proliferation. We propose that <em>H. pyloriem> activation of a plasma membrane repair is pro-proliferative. This study might therefore provide new insight into potential mechanisms of <em>H. pyloriem>-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

  19. Impact of hospital mergers on staff job satisfaction: a quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ka Keat

    2014-12-12

    Hospital mergers began in the UK in the late 1990s to deal with underperformance. Despite their prevalence, there is a lack of research on how such organizational changes affect the staff morale. This study aims to assess the impact of NHS hospital mergers between financial years 2009/10 and 2011/12 on staff job satisfaction and to identify factors contributing to satisfaction. Data on staff job satisfaction were obtained from the annual NHS Staff Survey. A list of mergers was compiled using data provided by the Cooperation and Competition Panel and the Department of Health. Other sources of data included the NHS Hospital Estates and Facilities Statistics, the NHS 'Quarter' publication, official reports from health service regulators, individual hospitals' annual accounts, data from the NHS Information Centre and the NHS Recurrent Revenue Allocations Exposition Book. Only full mergers of acute and mental health hospitals were analyzed. Propensity scores were generated using observable factors likely to affect merger decision to select three comparable hospitals for every constituent hospital in a merger to act as a control group. A difference-in-difference was estimated between baseline (3 years before merger approval) and each subsequent year up to 4 years post-merger, controlling for work environment, drivers of job satisfaction, data year, type of hospital and occupation group. There were nine mergers during the study period. Only job satisfaction scores 1 to 2 years before (0.03 to 0.04 point) and 1 year after merger approval (0.06 point) were higher (P increase in autonomy, staff support, perceived quality and job clarity ratings would increase job satisfaction scores. Higher job satisfaction scores were also associated with being classified as medical, dental, management or administrative staff and working in a mental health trust. Hospital mergers have a small, transient positive impact on staff job satisfaction in the year immediately before and after

  20. Therapy Provider Phase Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Therapy Provider Phase Information dataset is a tool for providers to search by their National Provider Identifier (NPI) number to determine their phase for...

  1. Staff Training for Nanoindustry in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorov Sergey Grigoryevich

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The nanotechnology industry represents such a direction of the development of science, technologies and industries by means of which Russia will be able to achieve advanced positions in the world. For the last decade the necessary regulatory base for nanotech industry development was created in the country, beginning with the concept of nanotechnological works, and the strategy of nanotech industry development, and finishing by the program of nanotech industry development in Russia till 2015. The special place is allocated for education in the field of nanotechnologies and nanomaterials. The system of staff training for nanotech industry is developing very quickly. The departments of nanotechnologies are established almost in all leading higher education institutions of Russia, the institutes of scientific and educational centers as well as the centers of collective use are introduced in the country, the national nanotechnological network is functioning. RUSNANO State Corporation of Nanotechnologies makes significant contribution to the training of innovation staff. The corporation is planning to create at least 100 educational programs of staff training and retraining for the needs of nanotech industry. The fund of infrastructure and educational programs was established in RUSNANO which in 2012 launched the project on creation of training system in the field of nanotechnology in the e-Learning mode. In 2013 the fund created the autonomous non-profit organization “Electronic Education for Nanotech Industry” (“eNano” which became the leading developer of innovative branch educational resources and the operator on rendering educational services for nanotech industry. Since 2011 in RUSNANO there is a School League which set for itself the task to make the contribution to improvement of the situation in teaching naturalscience disciplines at schools. At the same time, according to the results of students enrolment in Russia in 2011-2014, the

  2. The closure of a major psychiatric hospital. Reactions of the psychogeriatric nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dencker, K

    1989-05-01

    A political decision to decentralize psychiatric care in a province in Sweden was arrived at in October 1984, leading to the closing down of the only psychiatric hospital in the area (290,000 inh.). The hospital is of the traditional type with 490 beds and 1,294 staff. It has units for long-term care, short-term care and rehabilitation, as well as a unit for research and education. The psychogeriatric patients are to be transferred to their home districts. All of the psychogeriatric staff have been guaranteed new jobs under the auspices of the County Council's medical services. This study is concerned with the nursing staff's reactions to the decentralization and the kind of problems they were faced with. A questionnaire was sent to all nursing staff, and for the psychogeriatric unit (199 patients) the personnel turnover was also registered. The results show that the greatest problems for the nursing staff were the splitting up of their working teams and having to establish relations with new colleagues. They were also worried about longer and more expensive journeys to new places of work. Most of the nursing staff considered the information given about the consequences of the political decision very poor. More than half of the nursing staff (54%) thought the patients would be provided with better care by decentralized psychiatric health services. Many stated that the decision had affected them so that their interest in further education (37%) and in working in a new type of psychiatric care (43%) had increased.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Elections for staff representatives – Join, commit and vote!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    The Staff Council is a statutory body representing collectively in the area of employment conditions all CERN staff members (MPE and MPA), as well as the pensioners, former Cernois. The Staff Council is the supreme representative body of the CERN staff and pensioners, which defines the main lines of the policy of the Staff Association. The Staff Council is composed of staff representatives (45 seats to represent staff members, and 5 for representing fellows and associate members), as well as delegates for pensioners (seven positions), designated by GAC-EPA. Every two years, the Council is renewed through elections. Concerning the 45 delegates representing staff members, all departments have a least two seats allocated, one in career paths AA to D and one in career paths E to H. This guarantees a fair distribution of seats among the various organizational units and career paths. The table below, shows the exact number of delegates per department and career paths. Staff members or fellows who want to participa...

  4. AMENDMENTS TO THE STAFF RULES AND REGULATIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from : 1 January 2001 Scale of basic salaries and scale of basic stipends (Annex R A 1 and Annex R A 2 respectively). These scales include the correction approved in June 2001 of the discrepancy of 0.3% in the net salary adjustment on 1 January 2001. Family Allowance and Child Allowance (Annex R A 4). Reimbursement of education fees (Article R A 8.01) for the academic year 2000/2001, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2000. Periodic reviews of the financial conditions of members of the personel (Annex A1). 1 July 2001 Various drafting amendments adopted in order to ensure greater coherence between the texts, the procedures and actual practice. 1 September 2001 Implementation of the new career structure. Copies of these updates are available in the divisional secretariats.

  5. G. N. Rassam Joins AGU Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassan N. Rassam joined the AGU staff today, assuming the dual roles of Division Director for Public Information and Marketing and of Special Assistant for Nonprint Publications. He comes to AGU from the American Geological Institute, where he has been chief editor and assistant director of the GeoRef Information System.As Director of Public Information and Marketing, Rassam will head one of AGU's five divisions. He will have under his purview the Public Information Department and the Promotion and Sales Department. The Public Information Department produces Eos and also has the responsibility for press relations, including the preparation of news releases and the operation of press rooms at meetings. These activities are critical to the implementation of AGU's public education and public affairs initiatives, as well as to the central role of AGU in promoting the unity of geophysics.

  6. An analysis of obituaries in staff magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heynderickx, Priscilla C; Dieltjens, Sylvain M

    2016-01-01

    In the literature, extensive attention is given to the content, structure, and style of obituaries in newspapers. Analyses of the demise of colleagues in internal business communications are however nonexistent. This article discusses a bottom-up analysis of 150 obituaries published in Flemish staff magazines--obituaries that mostly focus on the deceased's career and professional qualities. Following analysis, the data were divided in obituaries that are continuous texts and obituaries with a letter format. The differences between the two types lie at different levels: format, content, structure, and language use. Obituaries with a letter format are characterized and determined by three paradoxes: the sender-receiver paradox, life-death paradox, and happiness-sadness paradox.

  7. Patient and staff dose during hysterosalpinography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buls, N.; Osteaux, M.

    2001-01-01

    Hysterosalpingography (HSG) is a useful and widely employed technique which uses X-ray fluoroscopy to investigate the female genital tract. Fluoroscopy is assessed by a gynaecologist, a physician who is not always trained to work with ionising radiation. Dose-area product measurements in a group of 34 patients allowed an estimation of the median effective dose (0,83 mSv) and the median dose to the ovaries (1,63 mGy) of the patient per procedure. The dose to the staff was estimated using thermoluminescent dosimetry. The following median entrance surface doses were estimated per procedure: 0,22 mGy to the lens of the eye, 0,15 mGy to the neck at thyroid level and 0,19 mGy to the back of the hand. The annual eye dose limit could be exceeded if the gynaecologist is a member of the public. (author)

  8. Neonatal Phosphate Nutrition Alters <em>in em>Vivo> and <em>in em>Vitro> Satellite Cell Activity in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad H. Stahl

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Satellite cell activity is necessary for postnatal skeletal muscle growth. Severe phosphate (PO4 deficiency can alter satellite cell activity, however the role of neonatal PO4 nutrition on satellite cell biology remains obscure. Twenty-one piglets (1 day of age, 1.8 ± 0.2 kg BW were pair-fed liquid diets that were either PO4 adequate (0.9% total P, supra-adequate (1.2% total P in PO4 requirement or deficient (0.7% total P in PO4 content for 12 days. Body weight was recorded daily and blood samples collected every 6 days. At day 12, pigs were orally dosed with BrdU and 12 h later, satellite cells were isolated. Satellite cells were also cultured <em>in vitroem> for 7 days to determine if PO4 nutrition alters their ability to proceed through their myogenic lineage. Dietary PO4 deficiency resulted in reduced (<em>P> < 0.05 sera PO4 and parathyroid hormone (PTH concentrations, while supra-adequate dietary PO4 improved (<em>P> < 0.05 feed conversion efficiency as compared to the PO4 adequate group. <em>In vivoem> satellite cell proliferation was reduced (<em>P> < 0.05 among the PO4 deficient pigs, and these cells had altered <em>in vitroem> expression of markers of myogenic progression. Further work to better understand early nutritional programming of satellite cells and the potential benefits of emphasizing early PO4 nutrition for future lean growth potential is warranted.

  9. Uncovering the emotional aspects of working on a clinical trial: a qualitative study of the experiences and views of staff involved in a type 1 diabetes trial

    OpenAIRE

    Lawton, Julia; Kirkham, Jackie; White, David; Rankin, David; Cooper, Cindy; Heller, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Background: The perspectives and experiences of trial staff are increasingly being investigated as these can be used to improve recruitment, adherence to trial protocols and support given to future staff. We interviewed staff working on a type 1 diabetes trial in order to aid interpretation of trial findings, inform recommendations for the rollout of the treatments investigated and provide recommendations for the conduct of future trials. However, our interviews uncovered aspects of trial wor...

  10. Review of utility staff training and certification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    The Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety (ACNS) has reviewed the nuclear utility training programs in Canada and the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) certification program, to determine their effectiveness in meeting current and future needs. It has also looked briefly at the practices in other countries and in the aviation industry in Canada, by way of comparison. While a quantitative measure of effectiveness was beyond the scope of this review, on a purely qualitative basis the ACNS concludes that the current training and certification regime produces qualified operators, but not necessarily in the most effective way. The report makes five recommendations. The thrust of these recommendations is towards a more effective and streamlined training and certification regime based on strict adherence to the Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) methodology combined with independent verification through a peer review and accreditation process. The Committee believes that training and qualification of nuclear power plant operating staff is the complete responsibility of the utilities and that the role of the AECB is to audit the process to ensure that the utilities discharge their responsibility appropriately. In other words, the AECB should deal with operator training and certification in the same way that it deals with other aspects of nuclear power plant operation that are important to health, safety, security and the environment - by inspections and audits. The Committee believes that the proposed regulatory requirement for recertification of certain nuclear power plant operating staff, which would come into effect when the new Regulations are promulgated, is not consistent with the government's thrust and with how the AECB regulates other aspects of nuclear power plant operations. (author)

  11. Attitudes of healthcare staff and patients' family members towards family presence during resuscitation in adult critical care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Nga Yee; Chow, Susan K Y

    2012-07-01

    This study examines the attitudes of healthcare staff and patients' family members towards family presence during resuscitation (FPDR) in critical care units in Hong Kong. A wealth of literature is available on FPDR in various hospital and healthcare settings. The findings include many anecdotal accounts of both the positive and the negative effects of family presence. There is little documentation on the comparisons of staff and family members' perceptions and the predictors of staff attitudes towards FPDR practice. Cross-sectional survey design. A convenience sample of 163 healthcare staff and 69 family members was recruited from the intensive care units. There was significant difference in the attitudes of healthcare staff and patients' families towards FPDR. The regression analysis showed that the healthcare staff would be more supportive to FPDR if family members could share the dying moments with patients, family members were accompanied by a bereavement team member, there was adequate staff to support the family and staff members were adequately trained. If healthcare staff feel that family members may have the impression that the resuscitation is chaotic, witness resuscitation is traumatic experience for the family, family presence will increase risk of litigation and colleagues will not allow family members to stay during resuscitation making them less supportive of FPDR. Nurses were more supportive to FPDR than doctors. The results provide information for healthcare professionals on the development of FPDR programmes for patients and their family members. Through multi-disciplinary collaborations, the effective and safe implementation of FPDR practice can be enhanced. The results could help the clinical staff to develop written guidelines to produce an integrated and consistent approach to this sensitive issue in clinical practice. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Development of an Inventory for Health-Care Office Staff to Self-Assess Their Patient-Centered Cultural Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn M. Tucker

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patient-centered culturally sensitive health care (PC-CSHC is a best practice approach for improving health-care delivery to culturally diverse populations and reducing health disparities. Despite patients’ report that cultural sensitivity by health-care office staff is an important aspect of PC-CSHC, the majority of available research on PC-CSHC focuses exclusively on health-care providers. This may be due in part to the paucity of instruments available to assess the cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff. The objective of the present study is to determine the psychometric properties of the Tucker-Culturally Sensitive Health Care Office Staff Inventory-Self-Assessment Form (T-CSHCOSI-SAF. This instrument is designed to enable health-care office staff to self-assess their level of agreement that they display behaviors and attitudes that culturally diverse patients have identified as office staff cultural sensitivity indicators. Methods: A sample of 510 health-care office staff were recruited at 67 health-care sites across the United States. These health-care office staff anonymously completed the T-CSHCOSI-SAF and a demographic data questionnaire. Results and Level of Evidence: Confirmatory factor analyses of the T-CSHCOSI-SAF revealed that this inventory has 2 factors with high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s αs= .916 and .912. Conclusion and Implications: The T-CSHCOSI-SAF is a useful inventory for health-care office staff to assess their own level of patient-centered cultural sensitivity. Such self-assessment data can be used in the development and implementation of trainings to promote patient-centered cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff and to help draw the attention of these staff to displaying patient-centered cultural sensitivity.

  13. Staff resistance to restraint reduction: identifying & overcoming barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Staci Silver

    2007-05-01

    Professional organizations, regulating agencies, and hospital administrators have taken a strong stance on restraint reduction policies. When implementing a restraint reduction initiative, it is important to identify the barriers to restraint reduction, such as concern for personal safety, lack of knowledge about and practice using alternate de-escalation skills, and fear of disrupting the therapeutic milieu by using a variety of de-escalation methods. Education aimed to reduce the use of restraints needs to do more than simply provide information. It is important to acknowledge the emotional response of the nursing staff and the culture of the current practice. A variety of educational strategies, including role-playing, and case studies will help identify attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors that are congruent with reducing the use of restraints. If the ultimate goal of restraint reduction is philosophical change, it will eventually lead to a new culture of practice.

  14. "Hi Mommy": Parental Preferences of Greetings by Medical Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks-Gallo, Lisa; Aron, Chaim Zev; Messina, Catherine R

    2018-04-01

    The therapeutic alliance between pediatricians and parents begins at the initial encounter. The manner in which pediatricians greet family members influences this relationship. This study evaluated whether parents are addressed using generic titles and investigated perceptions of parents regarding how they are addressed by medical staff. Written surveys of 137 parents of pediatric inpatients collected opinions about greetings during medical encounters. Parents were asked if they have been addressed as Mom/Dad/Mommy/Daddy during past medical encounters and which generic titles they would prefer. Using a Likert-type scale, the parents' perceptions of various salutations were assessed and compared. In this sample, 86% of parents were previously called Mom/Dad/Mommy/Daddy. Parents preferred to be addressed as Mom or Dad over other generic titles. Many disliked being addressed as Mommy/Daddy, Ma'am/Sir, or without a name, suggesting that providers should avoid the use of these salutations.

  15. Consumers as staff in assertive community treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, L; Hackman, A; Lehman, A

    1997-11-01

    The last decade has witnessed the increasing importance of consumers as providers of mental health services. Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) teams and ACT variants, with their emphasis on rehabilitation and support in the client's natural environment, have hosted consumer-professional collaborations. The authors discuss one such program in which an ACT program for homeless mentally ill adults employed consumer advocates (CAs). Consumer advocates were found to have a service profile similar to other staff. Further, there is suggestive evidence that the employment of CAs created a more positive attitude toward persons with mental illness. Issues of role definition, boundaries, support with supervision and the importance of CAs' experiences with mental illness are discussed.

  16. Caracterização diagnóstica dos serviços que atendem vítimas de acidentes e violências em cinco capitais brasileiras Diagnostic characterization of services providing care to victims of accidents and violence in five Brazilian state capitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suely Ferreira Deslandes

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo caracteriza serviços que atendem as vítimas em capitais das cinco regiões brasileiras com altos índices de violências e acidentes.Analisam-se atividades e estratégias de atendimento, perfil das equipes, condições das instalações, equipamentos e insumos, serviços integrados de atenção e de registro de agravos e a ótica de gestores de saúde sobre demandas e necessidades para uma atenção de qualidade às vítimas. O acervo se constitui de 103 serviços: 34 de Recife, 25 do Rio de Janeiro, 18 de Manaus, 18 de Curitiba e 8 de Brasília. Os resultados ainda preliminares indicam: menor número de serviços com atendimentos voltados a idosos; pouco investimento em ações de prevenção; suporte social, atendimento ambulatorial, hospitalar e psicológico são as principais ações empreendidas; encaminhamentos das unidades básicas de saúde requerem atenção nas comunidades e famílias; necessidade de investimentos na capacitação dos profissionais para atendimento; registros precários e feitos manualmente. O texto da Política Nacional de Redução de Morbimortalidade por Acidentes e Violências é pouco conhecido e há desarticulação inter e intra-institucional e entre atendimento pré-hospitalar e de emergência. Em todas as cidades há insuficiência de serviços de reabilitação.This article characterizes the services providing care to victims in five Brazilian regions with high violence and accident rates. It analyzes care activities and strategies, the profile of the teams, the conditions of installations, equipment and supplies, integrated care and registration services and the opinion of health managers with respect to the needs and requirements for a better care to the victims. The sample is composed by 103 services: 34 from Recife, 25 from Rio de Janeiro, 18 from Manaus, 18 from Curitiba and 8 from Brasília. The still preliminary results indicate: lower number of services focusing on the elderly; scarce

  17. Diagnostic characterization of services providing care to victims of accidents and violence in five Brazilian state capitals Caracterização diagnóstica dos serviços que atendem a vítimas de acidentes e violências em cinco capitais brasileiras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suely Ferreira Deslandes

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This article characterizes the services providing care to victims in five Brazilian regions with high violence and accident rates. It analyzes care activities and strategies, the profile of the teams, the conditions of installations, equipment and supplies, integrated care and registration services and the opinion of health managers with respect to the needs and requirements for a better care to the victims. The sample is composed by 103 services: 34 from Recife, 25 from Rio de Janeiro, 18 from Manaus, 18 from Curitiba and 8 from Brasília. The still preliminary results indicate: lower number of services focusing on the elderly; scarce investment in preventive actions; the principal actions carried out are social assistance, ambulatory and hospital care and psychological assistance; patients received from Basic Health Units require attention of the communities and families; need for investment in capacity building programs for professionals; precarious registries, data handled manually. The wording of the National Policy for Reduction of Morbidity and Mortality from Accidents and Violence is not well-known and there is a lack of articulation among and inside sectors and between prehospital and emergency care services. Rehabilitation services are insufficient in all cities.Este artigo caracteriza serviços que atendem as vítimas em capitais das cinco regiões brasileiras com altos índices de violências e acidentes. Analisam-se atividades e estratégias de atendimento, perfil das equipes, condições das instalações, equipamentos e insumos, serviços integrados de atenção e de registro de agravos e a ótica de gestores de saúde sobre demandas e necessidades para uma atenção de qualidade às vítimas. O acervo se constitui de 103 serviços: 34 de Recife, 25 de Rio de Janeiro, 18 de Manaus, 18 de Curitiba e 8 de Brasília. Os resultados ainda preliminares indicam: menor número de serviços com atendimentos voltados a idosos; pouco

  18. School Climate Improvement Action Guide for Instructional Staff. School Climate Improvement Resource Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center on Safe Supportive Learning Environments, 2017

    2017-01-01

    Improving school climate takes time and commitment from a variety of people in a variety of roles. This document outlines key action steps that instructional staff--including teachers, paraprofessionals, and others in the classroom who provide instruction or assistance--can take to support school climate improvements. Key action steps are provided…

  19. Pulled in Many Directions: Tensions and Complexity for Academic Staff Responding to International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyrme, Gillian; McGee, Alyson

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an interview-based study of the academic practices of staff members in a New Zealand university in response to international students in their classes and under their supervision. International students enter academic cultures which are inevitably different from those which have provided their academic preparation.…

  20. Involving Tutors and Support Staff in the Adult and Community Learning Quality Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenhall, Mark; Ogilvie, Margaret; Ewens, David

    This booklet outlines the new policy context facing adult and community learning (ACL) providers in Great Britain in their pursuit of high-quality learning experiences for their customers. It shows how a Total Quality Management (TQM) approach to supporting staff development can be effective in securing quality. TQM components are values,…

  1. Trainees versus Staff: Exploring Counseling Outcomes in a College Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilagan, Guy; Vinson, Mike; Sharp, Julia L.; Havice, Pamela; Ilagan, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Investigators compared counseling outcomes among nonpaid graduate-level trainees and professional staff at a college counseling center. Counseling outcomes for 331 college student participants were measured using the Outcome Questionnaire 45.2 (OQ45.2), employing a pretest--posttest design. The two groups of service providers did not differ…

  2. Suicide Intervention Training for College Staff: Program Evaluation and Intervention Skill Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannonhouse, Laura; Lin, Yung-Wei Dennis; Shaw, Kelly; Wanna, Reema; Porter, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Suicide remains a pressing issue for college communities. Consequently, gatekeeper trainings are often provided for staff. This study examines the effect of one such program, Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST). Participants: 51 college employees received ASIST in August of 2014 and were compared to 30 wait-list control…

  3. Overview of Teenage Pregnancy and Pregnancy Prevention. Staff Brief 90-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Richard; And Others

    This staff brief was prepared for the Wisconsin Legislative Council's Special Committee on Teenage Pregnancy Prevention and Related Issues. It presents information on teenage pregnancy, programs to deal with teenage pregnancy, and proposed legislation from the 1989-1990 Wisconsin Legislative Session. Part I of the brief provides pregnancy data for…

  4. Nursing staff stress from challenging behaviour of residents with dementia: a concept analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazelhof, T.J.G.M.; Schoonhoven, L.; Gaal, B.G. van; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Gerritsen, D.L.

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Provide insight into the concept of stress in the context of challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia and its causes and consequences. BACKGROUND: Challenging behaviour is frequent in residents with dementia, but consequences for nursing staff are unclear. INTRODUCTION:

  5. Student and Staff Perceptions of Key Aspects of Computer Science Engineering Capstone Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olarte, Juan José; Dominguez, César; Jaime, Arturo; Garcia-Izquierdo, Francisco José

    2016-01-01

    In carrying out their capstone projects, students use knowledge and skills acquired throughout their degree program to create a product or provide a technical service. An assigned advisor guides the students and supervises the work, and a committee assesses the projects. This study compares student and staff perceptions of key aspects of…

  6. An Innovative Approach to Pulic School Staff Development. A Collaborative Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Richard J.; Schuttenberg, Ernest M.

    This paper describes the planning and implementation of a Staff Development Program for teachers and administrators in the 22 school systems served by MEC (Merrimack Education Center). This program, which provided in-service learning experiences for educational practitioners, is discussed following an introductory statement. Information concerning…

  7. 78 FR 4417 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Submissions for Postapproval...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... intends to provide the underlying principles to determine the type of marketing submission that may be... industry and FDA staff on the underlying principles to determine the type of marketing submission that may... Modifications to a Combination Product Approved Under Certain Marketing Applications; Availability AGENCY: Food...

  8. Military, University, and Police Agency Command and Staff Colleges in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Richard H.

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses three models of command and staff colleges (CSC). Five university models, five United States Military models, and one police agency model are discussed. The 11 CSCs provide leadership development in various training and education programs all leading to the increased capabilities of leaders and potential leaders for public…

  9. Analysis of journal usage by Wageningen UR staff members via article references

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veller, van M.G.P.

    2013-01-01

    The research activities of Wageningen University and Research (or Wageningen UR) are concentrated around food and food production, living environment and health, lifestyle and livelihood. To facilitate the scientific information access of Wageningen UR staff members, the library strives to provide a

  10. DOE Handbook: Guide to good practices for training of technical staff and managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Training programs at DOE facilities should prepare personnel to safely and efficiently operate the facilities in accordance with DOE requirements. This guide contains information that can be used to develop or validate training programs for technical staff and managers at DOE nuclear facilities. Training programs based on the content of this guide should provide assurance that these personnel perform their jobs safely and competently

  11. Can primary health care staff be trained in basic life-saving surgery?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-08-03

    Aug 3, 2012 ... If so, what type of training is best? Should there be a recognized curriculum and accreditation? What further information would you like the authors to provide? Is your organisation training non-medical health staff in surgery (or other medical procedures)? If so, what are the results? Write to the editor at: ...

  12. 76 FR 9381 - Notice of Availability of Interim Staff Guidance Documents for Spent Fuel Storage Casks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Matthew Gordon, Structural Mechanics and Materials Branch, Division... transportation packaging licensing actions.'' This ISG document would provide guidance to the NRC staff when... a fee. Comments and questions on ISG-23 should be directed to Matthew Gordon, Structural Mechanics...

  13. A Survey on Dementia Training Needs among Staff at Community-Based Outpatient Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Geri; Lawrence, Briana M.; Ounpraseuth, Songthip T.; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a major public health concern. Educating health-care providers about dementia warning signs, diagnosis, and management is paramount to fostering clinical competence and improving patient outcomes. The objective of this project was to describe and identify educational and training needs of staff at community-based outpatient clinics…

  14. Code of Nursing Practice for Staff Exposed to Ionizing Radiation (1984)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This Code, published by the National Health and Medical Research Council and intended for nurses and auxiliary staff provides general guidance on radiation protection. The Code is supplementary to radiation control legislation relating to the use of ionizing radiation in medical practice. The principles established by the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) have been taken into account. (NEA) [fr

  15. The meaning of physical environmental factors on patient, family, carers and staff outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joost van Hoof; E. Morales; H.S.M. Kort; E.R.C.M. Huisman

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In recent years, the effects of the physical environment on the healing process and well-being has proved to be increasingly relevant for the patient, family, carers (PFC), and staff. Moreover, it is a growing concern among health care providers, environmental psychologist, consultants,

  16. Redesigning Schools to Reach Every Student with Excellent Teachers: Teacher & Staff Selection, Development, & Evaluation Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Impact, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This toolkit is a companion to the school models provided on OpportunityCulture.org. The school models use job redesign and technology to extend the reach of excellent teachers to more students, for more pay, within budget. Most of these school models create new roles and collaborative teams, enabling all teachers and staff to develop and…

  17. Evaluating the opinions of staff and health care service provision of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Zimbabwe has an incidence of STD/HIV infection and measures are needed to explore the efficiency of clinics in providing adequate patient care. To explore the views or opinions of the currently employed staff of an STD/HIV clinic, and suggest a means for improvement thereof. Methods: A current position ...

  18. Professional Development for Sessional Staff in Higher Education: A Review of Current Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitch, Danielle; Mahoney, Paige; Macfarlane, Susie

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an integrated review of evidence published in the past decade around professional development for sessional staff in higher education. Using the Integrating Theory, Evidence and Action method, the review analysed recent evidence using the three principles of the Benchmarking Leadership and Advancement of…

  19. Love and Hate in University Technology Transfer: Examining Faculty and Staff Conflicts and Ethical Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Clovia; Schumann, David

    2016-01-01

    With respect to university technology transfer, the purpose of this paper is to examine the literature focused on the relationship between university research faculty and technology transfer office staff. We attempt to provide greater understanding of how research faculty's personal values and research universities' organization values may differ…

  20. Howard Community College 1986 Staff Services Evaluation: Internal Marketing Survey, Spring 1986. Research Report Number 45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, Susan; Novak, Virginia E.

    As part of an internal marketing effort, a study was conducted at Howard Community College (HCC) to determine employees' evaluation of key educational services provided by the college. All full-time faculty, administrators, and support staff were asked to evaluate 13 areas of service on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent) and to identify HCC's…