WorldWideScience

Sample records for staff educational programmes

  1. Classification of Staff Development Programmes and Effects Perceived by Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rijdt, Catherine; Dochy, Filip; Bamelis, Sofie; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2016-01-01

    Educational institutions offer diverse staff development programmes to allow staff members to keep up with educational innovations and to guarantee educational quality. The current study investigates by means of a survey and semi-structured interviews whether the teacher perceives staff development as a management model, a shop-floor model or a…

  2. Paediatric burns in LMICs: An evaluation of the barriers and facilitators faced by staff involved in burns education training programmes in Blantyre, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lyndsey; Fioratou, Evridiki; Broadis, Emily

    2016-08-01

    A burn prevention and education programme - the Reduction of Burn and Scald Mortality and Morbidity in Children in Malawi project - was implemented from January 2010-2013 in Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Malawi. This study aimed to investigate the barriers and facilitators of implementing education-training programmes. Semi-structured interviews with 14 Scottish and Malawian staff delivering and receiving teaching at training education programmes were conducted. All interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. Overarching barriers and facilitators were similar for both sets of staff. Scottish participants recognised that limited experience working in LMICs narrowed the challenges they anticipated. Time was a significant barrier to implementation of training courses for both sets of participants. Lack of hands on practical experience was the greatest barrier to implementing the skills learnt for Malawian staff. Sustainability was a significant facilitator to successful implementation of training programmes. Encouraging involvement of Malawian staff in the co-ordination and delivery of teaching enabled those who attend courses to teach others. A recognition of and response to the barriers and facilitators associated with introducing paediatric burn education training programmes can contribute to the development of sustainable programme implementation in Malawi and other LMICs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  3. The impact of the Dementia ABC educational programme on competence in person-centred dementia care and job satisfaction of care staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokstad, Anne Marie Mork; Døble, Betty Sandvik; Engedal, Knut; Kirkevold, Øyvind; Benth, Jūratė Šaltytė; Selbaek, Geir

    2017-06-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of the Dementia ABC educational programme on the participants' competence in person-centred care and on their level of job satisfaction. The development of person-centred care for people with dementia is highly recommended, and staff training that enhances such an approach may positively influence job satisfaction and the possibility of recruiting and retaining competent care staff. The study is a longitudinal survey, following participants over a period of 24 months with a 6-month follow-up after completion of the programme. A total of 1,795 participants from 90 municipalities in Norway are included, and 580 from 52 municipalities completed all measurements. The person-centred care assessment tool (P-CAT) is used to evaluate person-centredness. The psychosocial workplace environment and job satisfaction questionnaire is used to investigate job satisfaction. Measurements are made at baseline, and after 12, 24 and 30 months. A statistically significant increase in the mean P-CAT subscore of person-centred practice and the P-CAT total score is found at 12, 24 and 30 months compared to baseline. A statistically significant decrease in scores in the P-CAT subscore for organisational support is found at all points of measurement compared to baseline. Statistically significant increases in satisfaction with workload, personal and professional development, demands balanced with qualifications and variation in job tasks as elements of job satisfaction are reported. The evaluation of the Dementia ABC educational programme identifies statistically significant increases in scores of person-centredness and job satisfaction, indicating that the training has a positive impact. The results indicate that a multicomponent training programme including written material, multidisciplinary reflection groups and workshops has a positive impact on the development of person-centred care practice and the job satisfaction of care

  4. Assessment of Non-Professional Staff Training programme In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study identified training and development for non-professional staff in Nigerian University Libraries, the categories of staff that are enjoying the training programme, the relevance of the course contents, and the effect of the training programme for non-professional and job performance. The method adopted for the study ...

  5. A formative evaluation of a staff reward and recognition programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleemah Salie

    2012-07-01

    Research purpose: The main aim of this evaluation was to test the plausibility of the programme theory underlying a staff reward and recognition programme within a retail setting. Secondary aims were to assess whether or not the programme was implemented as intended and whether or not its outcomes were well defined. Motivation for the study: Different groups of people may have different assumptions about whether a reward and recognition programme works or not. This evaluation was motivated by the different assumptions held by programme stakeholders, programme recipients and social science researchers regarding the programme. Research design, approach and method: This formative evaluation used a descriptive design. Primary qualitative data were collected by means of structured interviews with the Human Resource Development (HRD Facilitator and ten programme participants. Main findings: The results showed that the programme theory was not plausible and that the programme was not implemented as intended. Although the HRD Facilitator and the participants agreed that the programme led to improved customer service, they disagreed about the other programme outcomes. Practical/managerial implications: This evaluation contains practical suggestions for improving the programme theory, the programme implementation process and the redefinition of the outcomes of the programme as standard performance indicators. Contribution/value-add: This evaluation contributed to the limited literature on the effect of reward and recognition programmes. Whilst there is a vast amount of literature pertaining to such programmes, very few formal evaluations exist about them.

  6. Effectiveness of a structured education reminiscence-based programme for staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units: a study protocol for a cluster randomised trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Shea, Eamon

    2011-02-01

    Current projections indicate that there will be a significant increase in the number of people with dementia in Ireland, from approximately 40,000 at present to 100,000 by 2036. Psychosocial interventions, such as reminiscence, have the potential to improve the quality of life of people with dementia. However, while reminiscence is used widely in dementia care, its impact on the quality of life of people with dementia remains largely undocumented and there is a need for a robust and fair assessment of its overall effectiveness. The DementiA education programme incorporating REminiscence for Staff study will evaluate the effectiveness of a structured reminiscence-based education programme for care staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units.

  7. Staff and Educational Development Case Studies, Experiences & Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K PULIST

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Staff and educational development is relatively a new field in higher education. It has recently been emerging as a systematic activity in higher education. The staff and educational development as a professional function includes teaching and training, human resource development and management, organizational development, management and implementation of policy and strategy on teachingand learning. Though earlier, it had been limited to a few common activities like workshop, training programme for new teaching staff and the provision of written and multimedia material. Different authors have tried to provide a direction to the activity of staff and educational development.

  8. Equity development programmes for academic staff at South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current academic staff profile in South African Higher Education reflects much of the skewdness of the past. The central dilemma faced by these institutions is how to achieve an equitable ratio in the short and medium terms. In response to government concerns expressed through the National Plan on Higher Education, ...

  9. Effectiveness of a structured education reminiscence-based programme for staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units: A study protocol for a cluster randomised trial

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Shea, Eamon

    2011-02-14

    Abstract Background Current projections indicate that there will be a significant increase in the number of people with dementia in Ireland, from approximately 40,000 at present to 100,000 by 2036. Psychosocial interventions, such as reminiscence, have the potential to improve the quality of life of people with dementia. However, while reminiscence is used widely in dementia care, its impact on the quality of life of people with dementia remains largely undocumented and there is a need for a robust and fair assessment of its overall effectiveness. The DementiA education programme incorporating REminiscence for Staff study will evaluate the effectiveness of a structured reminiscence-based education programme for care staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units. Methods\\/Design The study is a two-group, single-blind cluster randomised trial conducted in public and private long-stay residential settings in Ireland. Randomisation to control and intervention is at the level of the long-stay residential unit. Sample size calculations suggest that 18 residential units each containing 17 people with dementia are required for randomisation to control and intervention groups to achieve power of at least 80% with alpha levels of 0.05. Each resident in the intervention group is linked with a nurse and care assistant who have taken the structured reminiscence-based education programme. Participants in the control group will receive usual care. The primary outcome is quality of life of residents as measured by the Quality of Life-AD instrument. Secondary outcomes include agitation, depression and carer burden. Blinded outcome assessment is undertaken at baseline and at 18-22 weeks post-randomisation. Discussion Trials on reminiscence-based interventions for people with dementia have been scarce and the quality of the information arising from those that have been done has been undermined by methodological problems, particularly in relation to scale

  10. Effectiveness of a structured education reminiscence-based programme for staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units: A study protocol for a cluster randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Fionnuala

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current projections indicate that there will be a significant increase in the number of people with dementia in Ireland, from approximately 40,000 at present to 100,000 by 2036. Psychosocial interventions, such as reminiscence, have the potential to improve the quality of life of people with dementia. However, while reminiscence is used widely in dementia care, its impact on the quality of life of people with dementia remains largely undocumented and there is a need for a robust and fair assessment of its overall effectiveness. The DementiA education programme incorporating REminiscence for Staff study will evaluate the effectiveness of a structured reminiscence-based education programme for care staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units. Methods/Design The study is a two-group, single-blind cluster randomised trial conducted in public and private long-stay residential settings in Ireland. Randomisation to control and intervention is at the level of the long-stay residential unit. Sample size calculations suggest that 18 residential units each containing 17 people with dementia are required for randomisation to control and intervention groups to achieve power of at least 80% with alpha levels of 0.05. Each resident in the intervention group is linked with a nurse and care assistant who have taken the structured reminiscence-based education programme. Participants in the control group will receive usual care. The primary outcome is quality of life of residents as measured by the Quality of Life-AD instrument. Secondary outcomes include agitation, depression and carer burden. Blinded outcome assessment is undertaken at baseline and at 18-22 weeks post-randomisation. Discussion Trials on reminiscence-based interventions for people with dementia have been scarce and the quality of the information arising from those that have been done has been undermined by methodological problems, particularly in

  11. Gaming: a creative strategy for staff education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartzendruber, D

    1994-02-01

    Providing staff development in a stimulating, innovative manner is the challenge of all nurse educators. This article discusses gaming, a creative teaching strategy that can help meet these needs. Games designed specifically for the education of dialysis staff will be reviewed. Advantages of the various games will also be examined.

  12. Hand in Hand - SEI Programmes for School Staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Réol, Lise Andersen; Laursen, Hilmar Dyrborg

    2017-01-01

    This catalogue of research in the field of SEI programmes for the school staff’s and teachers’ SEI competencies is based on a review performed by the main researchers Birgitte Lund Nielsen, Lise Andersen Réol and Hilmar Dyrborg Laursen, VIA University College, Denmark, but discussed by the entire...... team of Hand in Hand partner countries and researchers. The aim was to identify the central aspects and elements concerning successful implementation, and school staff’s development of professional competencies in the specific field of supporting students’ social, emotional and intercultural (SEI......) competencies. Abstract: Framed by the EU-project Hand in Hand focusing on Social, Emotional and Intercultural (SEI) competencies among students and school staff, the paper discusses implementation and professional competencies based on a research review. The following five topics were identified: 1...

  13. JS3P: junior staff programme pilot project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretrel, H.; Tregoures, N.; Bessiron, V.; Dehoyos, A.; Delvallee, I.; Brisson, N.; Debayle, C.; Dubreuil, M.; Nicaise, G.; Perignon, J.P.; Richard, J.; Reinke, N.; Kaulard, J.; Burgener, M.; Keesmann, S.; Schramm, B.; Seubert, A.; Sternkopf, J.; Thuma, G.; Weber, S.; Smidts, O.; Maillet, E.; Bucalossi, A.; Van haesendonck, M.; Uyttenhove, W.; Mertens, J.

    2006-01-01

    Concept: The objective of the project is to allow junior staff members from the European Technical Safety Organisations (TSOs), IRSN, GRS and AVN, to work together with the final goal of creating a junior staff network, based on technical, cultural and personal interests. These projects are to show junior staff members at a very early stage during their career the need for European collaborations. They are also a tool to explore new subjects of co-operation. It is an initiative that should strengthen the links between the organisations and contribute to establishing the future of nuclear safety in Europe. A JS3P (Junior Staff Programme Pilot Project) is a project done jointly by 'junior' staff members from the three TSOs, where experience of 'seniors' is also integrated when needed. Compared to other collaborative activities, it has certain specific features. The JS3P favours staff exchanges, and technical meetings of several days should be planned during a project in order to encourage people to work together. Technical objectives are shared and the work is done jointly (reports, articles). The team involved in the JS3P should be as small as possible to favour its efficiency. The JS3P is short and easy to realize. Its duration is fixed to a maximum of about 12 months with the option to be prolonged. Typical topics are bibliographic work, comparison issues, scientific surveys, benchmark exercises and prospective investigations on innovative ideas. They can be linked to existing joint projects and then form a smaller module integrated into the large project. Topics may concern prospective issues, tentatively investigating new topics that can be seen as exploratory co-operation projects. Subjects may also concern research issues that are not a priority but that deserve to be investigated as new attractive topics. The JS3P is defined and managed by junior staff members. It is approved by a management board committee and supervised by a technical steering committee

  14. Population Education Country Programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Population Education in Asia and the Pacific Newsletter, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Describes population programs in Afghanistan (nonformal, population education literacy program), India (problems in planning/managing population education in higher education), Indonesia (training for secondary/out-of-school inspectors), and Pakistan (integration of population education into school curricula). Programs in China, Korea, Vietnam,…

  15. Utilization of Peace Education in Adult Literacy Programmes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mrs Afam

    2016-12-15

    Dec 15, 2016 ... and continuous staff training and retraining; peace education should effectively be integrated and embedded into all adult literacy programmes; government ..... integration of peace and conflict resolution education into the adult and non- formal literacy school curriculum for peace, progress and national ...

  16. Between Education and Psychology: School Staff Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Tim; Finney, Dave

    2015-01-01

    When discussing contributions from psychology in/to educational practices like school-based mental health promotion, it is peculiar that psychologists (of an educational or clinical kind) or education-oriented sociologists, both not often based in schools or classrooms, dominate the topic. It has been acknowledged that school staff have been over…

  17. German General Staff Officer Education and Current Challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Groeters, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    "German General Staff Officer Education and Current Challenges" examines the institutional education of German General Staff Officers, as experienced by the author, and offers a "Conceptual Competency...

  18. Open educational resources: staff attitudes and awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Rolfe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Attitudes are changing in education globally to promote the open sharing of educational courses and resources. The aim of this study was to explore staff awareness and attitudes toward ‘open educational resources’ (OER as a benchmark for monitoring future progress. Faculty staff (n=6 were invited to participate in semi-structured interviews which facilitated the development of a questionnaire. Staff respondents (n=50 were not familiar with the term OER but had a clear notion of what it meant. They were familiar with open content repositories within the university but not externally. A culture of borrowing and sharing of resources exists between close colleagues, but not further a field, and whilst staff would obtain resources from the Internet they were reticent to place materials there. Drivers for mobilising resources included a strong belief in open education, the ability of OER to enhance individual and institutional reputations, and economic factors. Barriers to OER included confusion over copyright and lack of IT support. To conclude, there is a positive collegiate culture within the faculty, and overcoming the lack of awareness and dismantling the barriers to sharing will help advance the open educational practices, benefiting both faculty staff and the global community.

  19. Faculty staff and rural placement supervisors' pre- and post-placement perceptions of a clinical rural placement programme in NSW Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G; Blinkhorn, A

    2013-02-01

    Staff views on a rural clinical placement involving 4th year dental undergraduates from the University of Sydney (Australia) were collected in order to monitor whether the programme was feasible and acceptable to the academic Faculty Staff and the rural clinical supervisors. An evaluation of the rural placement programme was undertaken in 2009 at three rural sites in New South Wales (Australia). Semi-structured pre- and post-placement in person interviews recorded the views of three University Faculty Staff whilst similar data were collected by telephone interviews for three supervising clinicians at the rural clinical sites. Interviews gathered opinions on the organisation, implementation and outcomes of the rural placement programme. Eight qualitative analysis identified themes were specified and included communication, programme duration, effect on students and staff, benefits of the programme, rural intentions, programme sustainability and the success of the programme. Positive pre-placement aspects were potentially good clinical experience, new environment, sharing of knowledge and interaction with a rural community. Negative issues were anxieties about students' clinical ability to offer a service, missing lectures and maintaining clinical training quotas. The post-placement themes were generally positive; staff reported that the students enjoyed the rural community experience, their communication and clinical skills improved. According to the staff, the placement programme was feasible and provided acceptable positive clinical and personal development for the students. This research will help educators planning to incorporate a rural clinical programme into a University curriculum. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Bangladesh. Population education programme reviewed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The UNFPA (UN Population Fund)-funded population education program was reviewed last November 1994 in order to identify the emerging needs and requirements as well as chart the future directions of the program. The review was undertaken with the assistance of the CST SAWA Adviser on Population Education, Dr. D.M. de Rebello. Comprehensive literature review, and intensive discussions with government functionaries, educationists, teachers, students, UNFPA country director and staff and concerned officials of the World Bank and other UN agencies involved in the program served as the modalities for the review. The review looked into the current status of the school education sector and assessed the present progress of the population education program vis-a-vis its objectives and achievements. It also analyzed the issues and constraints in relation to institutionalization of the program, capacity building and integration of population education in curriculum and textbooks. Among the many recommendations, the review proposed further building up of national capacities at various levels; development of teaching/learning materials and textbooks for the new sectors; and intensification of good quality teacher education. Institutionalization of population education in the formal school system up to grade 12 and in technical and vocational education as well as the madrasah system and the introduction of population education in the Mass Non-formal Education Program were also proposed. full text

  1. Programme evaluation: Maintaining quality in higher education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The evaluation of educational or social programmes is paramount for establishing success or impact in higher education. Evaluation questions about programme goals (e.g. better performance of first-year students) or about the quality of programme strategies (design and implementation) and effectiveness of delivery ...

  2. Some innovative programmes in Astronomy education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, G. S. D.; Sujatha, S.

    In order to inculcate a systematic scientific awareness of the subject of Astronomy among the students and to motivate them to pursue careers in Astronomy and Astrophysics, various innovative educational programmes have been designed at MPBIFR. Among them, the main programme is termed as the ``100-hour Certificate Course in Astronomy and Astrophysics'' which has been designed basically for the students of the undergraduate level of B.Sc. and B.E. streams. The time duration of the 100 hours in this course is partitioned as 36 hours of classroom lectures, 34 hours of practicals and field trips and the remaining 30 hours being dedicated to dissertation writing and seminar presentations by the students. In addition, after the 100-hour course, the students have the option to take up specialized advance courses in the topics of Astrobiology, Astrochemistry, Radio Astronomy, Solar Astronomy and Cosmology as week-end classes. These courses are at the post graduate level and are covered in a span of 18 to 20 hours spread over a period of 9 to 10 weeks. As a preparatory programme, short-term introductory courses in the same subject are conducted for the high school students during the summer vacation period. Along with this, a three-week programme in basic Astronomy is also designed as an educational package for the general public. The students of these courses have the opportunity of being taken on field trips to various astronomical centers as well as the Radio, Solar and the Optical Observatories as part of their curriculum. The guided trips to the ISRO’s Satellite Centre at Bangalore and the Satellite Launching Station at SHAR provide high degree of motivation apart from giving thrilling experiences to the students. Further, the motivated students are encouraged to involve themselves in regular research programmes in Astronomy at MPBIFR for publishing research papers in national and international journals. The teaching and mentoring faculty for all these programmes

  3. [Multiprofessional family-system training programme in psychiatry--effects on team cooperation and staff strain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwack, Julika; Schweitzer, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    How does the interdisciplinary cooperation of psychiatric staff members change after a multiprofessional family systems training programme? Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 49 staff members. Quantitative questionnaires were used to assess burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory, MBI) and team climate (Team-Klima-Inventar, TKI). The multiprofessional training intensifies interdisciplinary cooperation. It results in an increased appreciation of the nurses involved and in a redistribution of therapeutic tasks between nurses, psychologists and physicians. Staff burnout decreased during the research period, while task orientation and participative security within teams increased. The multiprofessional family systems training appears suitable to improve quality of patient care and interdisciplinary cooperation and to reduce staff burnout.

  4. Educational Programme in Nuclear Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The potential of a malicious act involving nuclear or other radioactive material is a continuing worldwide threat. Available data indicate circumstances in which nuclear and other radioactive material are vulnerable to theft, are uncontrolled, or are in unauthorized circulation. States must establish sustainable security measures to prevent such acts and to protect society from nuclear terrorism. Appropriate training and education at all levels and in all relevant organizations and facilities can play a major role in this process. There is increased interest in nuclear applications. Many States have expressed interest in expanding or introducing nuclear power in their country as a result of their own assessment of their energy supply needs, because of climate change, and development requirements. The projected increase in the demand for nuclear energy will increase the number of nuclear reactors worldwide and, consequently, the amount of nuclear material in use. Possible malicious acts involving nuclear or other radioactive material are a real threat. These developments are mirrored by an increase in the use of nuclear techniques in non-power applications. As a result, the need for experts in the area of nuclear security has become of great importance, and both universities and students have shown an increasing interest in nuclear security specialities. In September 2005, the Board of Governors approved a Nuclear Security Plan covering the period 2006-2009. This emphasized, inter alia, the importance of human resource development to assist States in building capacity to establish and maintain appropriate nuclear security to prevent, detect and respond to malicious acts involving nuclear and other radioactive material. The Nuclear Security Plan envisages the development of guidance for an educational programme in nuclear security that could be used by all States. In pursuit of this goal, this publication has been developed to provide advice and assistance to

  5. A 'Communication and Patient Safety' training programme for all healthcare staff: can it make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peter; Allen, Kellie; Daly, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Communication breakdown is a factor contributing to most cases of patient harm, and this harm continues to occur at unacceptable levels. Responding to this evidence, the Metro South District of Queensland Health (Australia) has developed a communication skills training programme titled 'Communication and Patient Safety'. The three modules, each lasting 3½ h, cover both staff-to-patient and staff-to-staff communication issues, and an unusual feature is that clinical and non-clinical staff attend together. Following positive evaluation data from our initial pilot programme (involving 350 staff in a single hospital), the programme was expanded to all five hospitals in the district, and has now been completed by over 3000 staff. The results show that despite the significant time commitment, participants find the courses useful and relevant (Kirkpatrick level 1), they learn and retain new material (level 2), and they report changes in behaviour at individual, team and facility levels (level 3). Although it remains a challenge to obtain quantitative data showing that training such as this directly improves patient safety (level 4), our qualitative and informal feedback indicates that participants and their managers perceive clear improvements in the 'communication culture' after a workplace team has attended the courses. Improving 'communication for safety' in healthcare is a worldwide imperative, and other healthcare jurisdictions should be able to obtain similar results to ours if they develop and support interactive, non-didactic training in communication skills.

  6. An Impact Evaluation of the "FoodMate" Programme: Perspectives of Homeless Young People and Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiklejohn, Sarah J.; Barbour, Liza; Palermo, Claire E.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Food insecurity remains an issue for vulnerable populations in developed countries. The potential dietary and food security impacts of nutrition education programmes in Australia remain largely undocumented. This study investigated the impacts of an eight-session nutrition education programme delivered within community case management…

  7. Staff perceptions of change resulting from participation in a European cancer accreditation programme: a snapshot from eight cancer centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Abinaya; Wind, Anke; Saghatchian, Mahasti; Thonon, Frederique; Boomsma, Femke; van Harten, Wim H

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare accreditation is considered to be an essential quality improvement tool. However, its effectiveness has been critiqued. Twenty-four interviews were conducted with clinicians (five), nurses (six), managers (eight), and basic/translational researchers (five) from eight European cancer centres on changes observed from participating in a European cancer accreditation programme. Data were thematically analysed and verified with participants and checked against auditor's feedback. Four change categories emerged: (i) the growing importance of the nursing and supportive care field (role change). Nurses gained more autonomy/clarity on their daily duties. Importance was given to the hiring and training of supportive care personnel (ii) critical thinking on data integration (strategic change). Managers gained insight on how to integrate institutional level data (iii) improved processes within multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings (procedural change). Clinical staff experienced improved communication between MDTs (iv) building trust (organisational change). Accreditation improved the centre's credibility with its own staff and externally with funders and patients. No motivational changes were perceived. Researchers perceived no changes. The auditor's feedback included changes in 13 areas: translational research, biobanks, clinical trials, patient privacy and satisfaction, cancer registries, clinical practice guidelines, patient education, screening, primary prevention, role of nurses, MDT, supportive care, and data integration. However, our study revealed that staff perceived changes only in the last four areas. Staff perceived changes in data integration, nursing and supportive care, and in certain clinical aspects. Accreditation programmes must pay attention to the needs of different stakeholder groups, track changes, and observe how/why change happens.

  8. Educational Quality at Universities for inclusive international Programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.; Cozart, Stacey Marie

    The aim of the EQUiiP project (Educational Quality at Universities for inclusive international Programmes) is to establish an electronic resource for Educational Developers (EDs) responsible for the Continuous Professional Development (CPD) of university teaching staff, in particular staff teaching...... supports the capability within higher education institutions for developing and implementing an internationalized curriculum and teaching in the international classroom. The five modules cover the following topics: (i) Teaching and Learning in the International Classroom, (ii) Intended International....... The project is financially supported by Erasmus+. The poster will present an overview of the project with particular focus on the outcomes of the first year: A (draft) profile of the Educational Developer with expertise in this field and the first module on Teaching and Learning in the International Classroom...

  9. Screening for depression: integrating training into the professional development programme for low vision rehabilitation staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Gwyneth; Holloway, Edith E; Craig, Graeme; Hepi, Niky; Coad, Samantha; Keeffe, Jill E; Lamoureux, Ecosse L

    2012-12-01

    To describe the integration of depression screening training into the professional development programme for low vision rehabilitation staff and report on staff evaluation of this training. Pre-post intervention study, in a single population of low vision rehabilitation staff. Three hundred and thirty-six staff from Australia's largest low vision rehabilitation organization, Vision Australia. Staff completed the depression screening and referral training as part of a wider professional development programme. A pre-post-training questionnaire was administered to all staff. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were used to determine differences in self-reported knowledge, confidence, barriers to recognition and management of depression between baseline and post training. One hundred and seventy-two participants completed both questionnaires. Following training, participants reported an increased knowledge of depression, were more likely to respond to depression in their clients and reported to be more confident in managing depression (P training incorporating more active and 'hands-on' sessions are likely to be required. This training is a promising first step in integrating a depression screening tool into low vision rehabilitation practice. Further work is needed to determine the barriers and facilitators to implementation in practice and to assess clients' acceptability and outcomes. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2012 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  10. Evaluation of a Staff Training Programme using Positive Psychology coaching with film and theatre elements in care homes: views and attitudes of residents, staff and relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Azucena; Wenborn, Jennifer; Ledgerd, Ritchard; Orrell, Martin

    2017-03-01

    There is a recognised need to improve staff training in care homes. The aim of this study was to conduct a qualitative evaluation of the Ladder to the Moon Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme (CCSEP), a staff training programme aimed at enhancing staff-resident communication. Focus groups were conducted with residents able to provide consent; staff and relatives and managers were interviewed in two care homes. A theoretical framework was developed to interpret the impact of CCSEP using Framework Analysis. Residents noted that the programme appeared to result in staff interacting more with them, as well as enjoying working together as a team. Staff reported an improved sense of teamwork, developing more positive attitudes towards residents, as well as their concerns about using theatrical techniques in the care setting. Relatives identified care home organisational aspects as being barriers to implementation, and some regarded CCSEP simply as 'entertainment' rather than 'creative care'. This study provides an insight into the potential of this staff training programme to improve staff-resident interactions. However, participants' varying views of CCSEP highlight the need to brief staff, residents and relatives before implementation so as to enable full understanding of the aim. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. International recognition of basic medical education programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karle, Hans

    2008-01-01

    This document aims to formulate a World Federation for Medical Education (WFME) policy and to open debate on the subject on international recognition of basic medical education institutions and programmes. We carried out a systematic review of international quality assurance of medical education and recognition methodology, including accreditation procedures and alternative quality assurance methods, with a focus on the role of the WFME in international recognition of basic medical education programmes. In order to further the intentions of the WFME, the Federation will: continue its activity to establish new Global Directories of Health Professions Education Institutions (GDHPEI); set up a planning working group to prepare the work of the international advisory committee for GDHPEI; develop a database of relevant accrediting and recognising agencies; continue its project on the promotion of proper national accreditation; establish a working group to develop principles to be used in the evaluation of medical schools and other health professions education institutions and their programmes for the purpose of international recognition, especially when proper accreditation is not feasible, and work with partners on training programmes for advisors and assessors. The new directory for medical schools, which will include qualitative information about basic medical education programmes, will provide a basis for the meta-recognition of medical schools' programmes by stimulating the establishment of national accreditation systems and other quality assurance instruments.

  12. Dementia training programmes for staff working in general hospital settings - a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Anthony; Innes, Anthea; Scerri, Charles

    2017-08-01

    Although literature describing and evaluating training programmes in hospital settings increased in recent years, there are no reviews that summarise these programmes. This review sought to address this, by collecting the current evidence on dementia training programmes directed to staff working in general hospitals. Literature from five databases were searched, based on a number of inclusion criteria. The selected studies were summarised and data was extracted and compared using narrative synthesis based on a set of pre-defined categories. Methodological quality was assessed. Fourteen peer-reviewed studies were identified with the majority being pre-test post-test investigations. No randomised controlled trials were found. Methodological quality was variable with selection bias being the major limitation. There was a great variability in the development and mode of delivery although, interdisciplinary ward based, tailor-made, short sessions using experiential and active learning were the most utilised. The majority of the studies mainly evaluated learning, with few studies evaluating changes in staff behaviour/practices and patients' outcomes. This review indicates that high quality studies are needed that especially evaluate staff behaviours and patient outcomes and their sustainability over time. It also highlights measures that could be used to develop and deliver training programmes in hospital settings.

  13. Debriefing Note Secondary Education Support Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webster, Neil; Vagnby, Bo Hellisen; Thomsen, Thomas J.

    Debriefing note regarding joint programming for the Secondary Education Support Programme (2003- 2007). The note specifies preparation of SIP Physical Guidelines; Training needs assessment for Physical School Status and Rapid Technical Assessments; SIP/DEP preparation; Selection criteria...

  14. Education in geriatric medicine for community hospital staff.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hanlon, Shane

    2010-12-01

    Community hospitals provide many services for older people. They are mainly managed by nursing staff, with some specialist input. Little is known about education provided in these facilities. Most education in geriatric medicine is provided in hospitals, despite most elderly care being provided in the community. The authors surveyed senior nursing staff in Irish community hospitals to examine this area in more detail. Staff in all 18hospitals in the Health Service Executive (South) area were invited to participate. The response rate was 100%. Sixteen of the 18 respondents (89%) felt staff did not have enough education in geriatric medicine. Just over half of hospitals had regular staff education sessions in the area, with a minority of sessions led by a geriatrician, and none by GPs. Geriatrician visits were valued, but were requested only every 1-3 months. Staff identified challenging behaviour and dementia care as the areas that posed most difficulty.

  15. Oral health educational interventions for nursing home staff and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Martina; Kupfer, Ramona; Reissmann, Daniel R; Mühlhauser, Ingrid; Köpke, Sascha

    2016-09-30

    Associations between nursing home residents' oral health status and quality of life, respiratory tract infections, and nutritional status have been reported. Educational interventions for nurses or residents, or both, focusing on knowledge and skills related to oral health management may have the potential to improve residents' oral health. To assess the effects of oral health educational interventions for nursing home staff or residents, or both, to maintain or improve the oral health of nursing home residents. We searched the Cochrane Oral Health Trials Register (to 18 January 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2015, Issue 12), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 18 January 2016), Embase Ovid (1980 to 18 January 2016), CINAHL EBSCO (1937 to 18 January 2016), and Web of Science Conference Proceedings (1990 to 18 January 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials to 18 January 2016. In addition, we searched reference lists of identified articles and contacted experts in the field. We placed no restrictions on language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-RCTs comparing oral health educational programmes for nursing staff or residents, or both with usual care or any other oral healthcare intervention. Two review authors independently screened articles retrieved from the searches for relevance, extracted data from included studies, assessed risk of bias for each included study, and evaluated the overall quality of the evidence. We retrieved data about the development and evaluation processes of complex interventions on the basis of the Criteria for Reporting the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions in healthcare: revised guideline (CReDECI 2). We contacted authors of relevant studies for additional information. We included nine RCTs involving

  16. IMPLEMENTATION OF ESG FOR INTERNATIONAL JOINT EDUCATION PROGRAMMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera I. Zabotkina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: joint international programmes stimulate staff and student mobility, provide joint studies, provide development of joint study programmes of excellence, and open up new possibilities for cooperation between countries. Promotion and development of joint international programmes depend on effective quality assurance system which is high on the universities` priority list. ESG provide solid basis for the quality assurance system development at both institutional and programme levels. The problems of ESG interpretation in compliance with national legislative systems and education traditions in the countries participating in Bologna process are paid much attention to. Our emphases are on the practical aspects of ESG (2015 version implementation. The article concentrates on one of the most acute problems facing Russian Higher Education Institutions in the field of development and promotion of joint international programs: the problem of setting up modern quality assurance systems compatible with those in European HEIs is closely correlating with the profile of the journal “Integration of Education”. The journal centers around the publications on the enhancement and dissemination of the best practices on integration of regional education in Russia and abroad. Materials and Methods: methodical and practical aspects of the implementation of the ESG provisions for international joint educational programs on the basis of the European approach to education quality are the materials of study. The descriptive method, analysis of documents about education quality, and synthesis were used as research methods. Results: the authors come up with concrete recommendations for the implementation of the ESG renewed version (2015 in Quality Assurance systems of joint international programmes. This approach enhances the practical value of ESG. Modern Quality Assurance system is one of the main prerequisites for the successful collaboration among higher

  17. Implementing biosecurity education: approaches, resources and programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minehata, Masamichi; Sture, Judi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Whitby, Simon

    2013-12-01

    This paper aims to present possible approaches, resources and programmes to introduce the topic of biosecurity to life scientists and engineers at the higher education level. Firstly, we summarise key findings from a number of international surveys on biosecurity education that have been carried out in the United States, Europe, Israel and the Asia-Pacific region. Secondly, we describe the development of our openly-accessible education resource, illustrating the scope and content of these materials. Thirdly, we report on actual cases of biosecurity education that have been implemented. These include achievements in and lessons derived from the implementation of biosecurity education at the National Defense Medical College in Japan. These experiences are followed by presentation of the expert-level "Train-the-Trainer" programmes subsequently launched by the University of Bradford in the United Kingdom. These examples will help readers to understand how educators can enhance their own understanding about biosecurity issues and how they can then disseminate their knowledge through development of their own customised, relevantly-targeted and stage-tailored education programmes within their own life science communities. By providing these examples, we argue that education for life scientists, policy-makers and other stakeholders about social responsibility on dual-use issues is easily achievable and need not be expensive, time-consuming or over-burdening. We suggest that recurring classes or courses be held at appropriate times during educational programmes to accommodate the developing expertise and advancing learning stages of students.

  18. Retention of Staff in the Early Childhood Education Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holochwost, Steven J.; DeMott, Kerri; Buell, Martha; Yannetta, Kelly; Amsden, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    What incentives can the administrators of early childhood education facilities offer their staff in order to retain them? In light of research identifying low staff turnover as a key component of high quality early childhood education, the answer to this question has ramifications beyond human-resources management. This paper presents the results…

  19. Attitudes of Spanish University Teaching Staff to Quality in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barandiaran-Galdos, Marta; Barrenetxea-Ayesta, Miren; Cardona-Rodriguez, Antonio; Mijangos-Del-Campo, Juan Jose; Olaskoaga-Larrauri, Jon

    2012-01-01

    This article sets out to investigate the notions Spanish university teaching staff have of quality in education, on the assumption that those notions give a reliable picture of the attitudes of teaching staff towards education policy design and university management. The paper takes an empirical approach, collecting opinions telematically via a…

  20. [Medical rehabilitation group-programmes concerning health promotion, patient education and psychoeducation - a 2010 national survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, A; Schug, M; Küffner, R; Vogel, H; Faller, H

    2013-08-01

    High quality demands are being placed on concepts of educational group programmes in medical rehabilitation as well as the related trainer qualifications. A nationwide survey of German medical rehabilitation clinics in 2005 had revealed a need for improving educational practice according to these quality criteria. An updated investigation was performed in 2010 aiming at describing group programmes used in medical rehabilitation. 1 473 inpatient and outpatient medical rehabilitation clinics were invited to participate. 908 clinics reported on their training programmes. Data from clinics caring for patients with somatic disorders could be compared to the 2005 survey. Data from clinics for both psychosomatic and substance abuse disorders was collected for the first time in 2010. Overall, psychologists and physicians were reported to be the most frequent conductors of educative programmes. In somatic clinics, psychologists, dieticians and occupational therapists or physiotherapists were the most common conductors. Two-thirds of the institutions reported no training prerequisites for staff members to perform patient education. 80% of the education programmes were categorized post hoc into 3 classes: "generic health education", "disorder-specific patient education", and "psychoeducational group programmes". Almost two-thirds of all programmes were carried out with 8-15 participants, and many used several interactive didactic methods. Programmes conducted in small groups (15 participants). Only half of the programmes were manualized. Significantly more interactive methods were used in completely manualized programmes. Only about half of the programmes were evaluated, and only very few evaluation studies were published. The institutions wished additional support by workshops especially concerning qualification of their staff and concerning educational concepts. A need for further improvement and support exists relative to the training of educators and the development of

  1. A Staff Education Consortium: One Model for Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetler, Cheryl Beth; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the development, organization, activities, problems, and future of a staff education consortium of five medical center hospitals in Boston. The purposes of the consortium are mutual sharing, reduction in duplication, and cost containment of educational programing. (JOW)

  2. Embracing the complexity of educational programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elly Govers

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Systems of monitoring and control have left many educators and organisations in the field of post-compulsory education struggling to find ways to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse society. Education is complex. Many educators would agree that it is influenced by many, often contradictory, voices and power structures. Based on the findings of a case study involving multiple programmes in a post-compulsory education institution in Aotearoa/New Zealand, this paper aims to unravel this complexity for the case of educational programmes. It describes how programmes can be seen as complex systems, created by people and directed by discourses in society, some of which are more influential than others. If programmes are seen as complex systems, the experience of struggle as referred to above can be understood as a consequence of the attempt to control the complexity rather than work with it. This control limits the possibilities for development and innovation. Alternatively, as this paper will explain, acknowledging and embracing the complexity of programmes helps open up spaces for innovation that would otherwise remain hidden. It is argued that the ultimate space for change is educators’ personal and collective responsibility for the discourses in society they choose to follow.

  3. Environmental education programmes offered by delta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Environmental education has developed over time in South Africa with environmental education centres playing a significant role. However not enough is known about how such centres operate. This article presents some of the findings of a research project that documented and evaluated the programmes presented by ...

  4. Benchmarking Danish Vocational Education and Training Programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogetoft, Peter; Wittrup, Jesper

    This study paper discusses methods whereby Danish vocational education and training colleges can be benchmarked, and presents results from a number of models. It is conceptually complicated to benchmark vocational colleges, as the various colleges in Denmark offer a wide range of course programmes...... attempt to summarise the various effects that the colleges have in two relevant figures, namely retention rates of students and employment rates among students who have completed training programmes....

  5. Nutrition education for care staff and possible effects on nutritional status in residents of sheltered accommodation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faxén-Irving, G; Andrén-Olsson, B; Geijerstam, A; Basun, H; Cederholm, T

    2005-08-01

    We investigated the nutritional, cognitive and functional status in residents of two service-flat (SF) complexes and the effects of a nutrition education programme for care staff. Controlled nonrandomised study. Two SF complexes, that is community-assisted accommodation. Of 115 eligible SF residents, 80 subjects participated (age 83+/-7 y, 70% women). The nutritional status was assessed using body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)), subjective global assessment (SGA), serum concentrations of albumin, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and vitamin B(12). Cognitive and functional status were evaluated using the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, 0-30 points, education programme was given to the staff at one of the SF complexes. At baseline, the means of BMI and the biochemical nutritional indices were normal, whereas one-third had BMI or =10% of previous weight. According to SGA, 30% demonstrated possible or serious malnutrition. The median MMSE was 23 points (19.5-26.5, 25-75th percentile). Nearly 70% were ADL-independent. At the 5-month follow-up there were no differences in the nutritional and cognitive status of the residents. The nutritional knowledge of the staff improved slightly (Pnutritional risk. Five months after a 12-h staff nutrition education programme, no objective changes were seen in the nutritional status of the SF residents.

  6. Staff perceptions of change resulting from participation in a European cancer accreditation programme: a snapshot from eight cancer centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Abinaya; Wind, Anke; Saghatchian, Mahasti; Thonon, Frederique; Boomsma, Femke; van Harten, Wim H

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare accreditation is considered to be an essential quality improvement tool. However, its effectiveness has been critiqued. Methods Twenty-four interviews were conducted with clinicians (five), nurses (six), managers (eight), and basic/translational researchers (five) from eight European cancer centres on changes observed from participating in a European cancer accreditation programme. Data were thematically analysed and verified with participants and checked against auditor’s feedback. Results Four change categories emerged: (i) the growing importance of the nursing and supportive care field (role change). Nurses gained more autonomy/clarity on their daily duties. Importance was given to the hiring and training of supportive care personnel (ii) critical thinking on data integration (strategic change). Managers gained insight on how to integrate institutional level data (iii) improved processes within multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings (procedural change). Clinical staff experienced improved communication between MDTs (iv) building trust (organisational change). Accreditation improved the centre’s credibility with its own staff and externally with funders and patients. No motivational changes were perceived. Researchers perceived no changes. The auditor’s feedback included changes in 13 areas: translational research, biobanks, clinical trials, patient privacy and satisfaction, cancer registries, clinical practice guidelines, patient education, screening, primary prevention, role of nurses, MDT, supportive care, and data integration. However, our study revealed that staff perceived changes only in the last four areas. Conclusion Staff perceived changes in data integration, nursing and supportive care, and in certain clinical aspects. Accreditation programmes must pay attention to the needs of different stakeholder groups, track changes, and observe how/why change happens. PMID:26180546

  7. QUILT: a case study in the impact of a staff development programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Donovan

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The QUILT programme was designed and delivered on the basis of a major FE sector survey of 15,000 college staff and a series of consultation events during 1996. The survey results were included in FEDA's submission for funding for the QUILT programme to the FEFC. The events, to which a senior manager and the member of staff responsible for IT in every sector college were invited, took place in every English region and in Wales. Theseestablished training and other needs, the extent of technological readiness in colleges, and preferred training methods. QUILT was launched in Wales in 1996 and in England during the following year. Its design has been adjusted to account for a follow-up survey in 1998 and an impact study in 1999. Both of these (like the original survey report were unpublished FEDA documents; data from them was used in internal reports to the FEFC and its Information and Learning Technology Committee (FEILTC. Other evidence for change was provided by (for example comments from delegates at events and from members of the FEILTC. Subsequent initiatives also accounted for adjustments to the programme to avoid duplication and to maximize synergy.

  8. Practical Staff Management Techniques for Distance Education Coordinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Toccara D.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the author's enrollment in the SuccessfUL Supervisor Series course. As a new distance education library coordinator the author sought out formal supervisor training to address staff misconduct and establish staff training initiatives for distance library service needs. Structured as a case study, the author discusses how…

  9. Developments in the educational effectiveness research programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creemers, Bert P.M.; Scheerens, Jaap

    1994-01-01

    Educational effectiveness as a research programme moved from an input-output paradigm to an input-process-output paradigm and, in view of the fact that so-called contextual school effectiveness is gaining in importance, this might be more properly termed a context-input-process-output-based

  10. Racism, Staff Development and Adult Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galliers, David

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses the use of racial awareness training in staff development programs. He describes the four types of racism: (1) overt institutional, (2) overt personal, (3) covert institutional, and (4) covert personal. He calls for better trainers and training programs. (CH)

  11. Creating a Learning Environment to Promote Food Sustainability Issues in Primary Schools? Staff Perceptions of Implementing the Food for Life Partnership Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Orme

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the role that schools can play in promoting education for sustainable development (ESD, and evidence is emerging that schools can be influential in the emerging agenda around the ecological, ethical and social aspects of food, diet and nutrition. With regard to such food sustainability issues, this paper analyses the role of the Food for Life Partnership national programme in supporting garden and farm-based learning activities in 55 primary schools in England, UK. Using a mixed methods approach, the study examined the programme’s implementation through staff perceptions and a range of school change indicators. The study found that the programme delivery was associated with widespread institutional reforms. According to staff, implementation of the programme provided a range of opportunities for pupils to learn about food production and sustainability, but addressing these issues was challenging for teachers and raised a number of questions concerned with effective, equitable and on-going implementation. At a pedagogical level, teachers also reflected on conceptually challenging aspects of food sustainability as a topic for primary school education. The study identified ways that ESD programmes could support schools to think about and implement learning opportunities as well as identifying significant barriers related to resourcing such programmes.

  12. From Passive to Active Learners: The "Lived Experience" of Nurses in a Specialist Nephrology Nursing Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridger, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore the lived experience of learning for a group of staff nurses in the Middle East, who undertook a post-registration nursing education programme in the speciality of nephrology nursing (the NNP) between 2001 and 2002. The broad-based curriculum seeks to develop the staff nurses into active learners, able to…

  13. Radiation education required for medical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunugida, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the present state and problems of radiation education in the training course for health professionals. Firstly, the following are introduced: Revised version of 'Medical education model and core curriculum ? Guidelines for educational contents (FY2010),' and the contents of pre-graduation education of education curriculum at the Department of Radiation Biology and Health, University of Occupational and Environmental Health (UOEH). Next, the author describes his educational experience at the Institute of Industrial Ecological Sciences (Nursing) of UOEH, and stresses the need for radiation education in order to eliminate the anxiety of nurses against radiation. In addition, he also describes the present state and problems with respect to exposure and radiation risk due to the Fukushima nuclear accident. (A.O.)

  14. Assessment of library user education programmes in universities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is on the assessment of library user education programmes i n Universities in Benue State. The study was set to identify content of library user education programmes and determine the importance of library user education programmes to students of insti tutions under study as well as effectiveness of library user ...

  15. Programmes of Educational Technology in China: Looking Backward, Thinking Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuyin, Xu; Jianli, Jiao

    2010-01-01

    There is a history of programmes in educational technology in colleges and universities in China going back about 70 years. This paper briefly reviews the developmental history of the educational technology programme in China, elaborates the status-quo of the programme and looks ahead into the future trends of educational technology development in…

  16. User Education Programme in the John Rylands University Library of Manchester: A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatti, Rubina

    2007-01-01

    The paper reports a case study which was conducted during the doctoral research by the author. It aimed to find out the relevance of user education programme in academic libraries to the teaching and learning process. Data for the study was collected through the questionnaires, interviews with the library user-education specialists, other library staff, students and faculty. The multidisciplinary approach was applied to investigate the library’s activities in providing user education to new s...

  17. Outcomes in knowledge, attitudes and confidence of nursing staff working in nursing and residential care homes following a dementia training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Anthony; Scerri, Charles

    2017-11-08

    Dementia training programmes for staff working in long-term care settings have been found to be effective in improving staff outcomes. This study investigated the impact of a dementia training programme for all Maltese nursing staff working in public nursing/residential homes on their knowledge, attitudes and confidence. Additionally, we identified the predictors of these domains before and after the programme. A 14-hour training programme focusing on dementia management, care and policy was developed for all nursing staff working in public nursing and residential homes in Malta. A pretest-posttest design was used to evaluate the participants' knowledge of dementia, attitudes and confidence in working with residents with dementia using validated tools. Demographic variables were measured and compared with each staff domain. The majority of nursing staff attended the training programme with 261 fully completed questionnaires being collected pre-training and 214 post-training. The programme significantly improved nursing staff knowledge, attitudes and confidence. Stepwise regression analysis of each staff domain showed that the strongest predictor in all models at pre-training was the intensity of previous training programmes. Furthermore, staff who attended previous training continued to improve in their attitudes and confidence following programme completion. The study continues to shed further evidence on the impact of dementia training programs on staff outcomes. It also indicated that the intensity of previous participation in dementia training programmes was related to the participants' knowledge, attitudes and confidence and that continual exposure to training had a cumulative effect.

  18. Improving residents' oral health through staff education in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Phu; Dempster, Laura; Limeback, Hardy; Locker, David

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of oral care education among nursing home staff members to improve the oral health of residents. Nursing home support staff members (NHSSMs) in the study group received oral care education at baseline between a pretest and posttest. NHSSMs' oral care knowledge was measured using a 20-item knowledge test at baseline, posteducation, and at a 6-month follow-up. Residents' oral health was assessed at baseline and again at a 6-month follow-up using the Modified Plaque Index (PI) and Modified Gingival Index (GI). Among staff members who received the oral care education (n = 32), posttest knowledge statistically significantly increased from the pretest level (p Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Staff Development in an Interdisciplinary Education: Medialogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Rolf; Kofoed, Lise B.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we describe how interdisciplinarity and transdisciplinarity have been approached in the Medialogy education at Aalborg University in Copenhagen. We discuss the role of the faculty members, and what are the criteria to establish that they achieve transdisciplinarity and what enables ...

  20. Factors to consider in the introduction of huddles on clinical wards: perceptions of staff on the SAFE programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapley, Emily; Sharples, Evelyn; Lachman, Peter; Lakhanpaul, Monica; Wolpert, Miranda; Deighton, Jessica

    2018-02-01

    To explore paediatric hospital staff members' perceptions of the emerging benefits and challenges of the huddle, a new safety improvement initiative, as well as the barriers and facilitators to its implementation. A qualitative study was conducted using semi-structured interviews to explore staff perspectives and experiences. Situation Awareness For Everyone (SAFE), a safety improvement programme, was implemented on a sample of National Health Service (NHS) paediatric wards from September 2014 to June 2016. Previously untested in England, the huddle was a central component of the programme. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 76 staff members on four wards ~4 months after the start of the programme. A thematic analysis showed that staff perceived the huddle as helping to increase their awareness of important issues, improve communication, facilitate teamwork, and encourage a culture of increased efficiency, anticipation and planning on the ward. Challenges of the huddle included added pressure on staff time and workload, and the potential for junior nurses to be excluded from involvement, thus perhaps inadvertently reinforcing medical hierarchies. Staff also identified several barriers and facilitators to the huddle process, including the importance of senior nursing and medical staff leadership and managing staff time and capacity issues. The findings point towards the potential efficacy of the huddle as a way of improving hospital staff members' working environments and clinical practice, with important implications for other sites seeking to implement such safety improvement initiatives. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Self-management education programmes for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Féline P B; van der Burg, Lennart R A; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Osborne, Richard H; Johnston, Renea V; Pitt, Veronica

    2014-01-15

    Self-management education programmes are complex interventions specifically targeted at patient education and behaviour modification. They are designed to encourage people with chronic disease to take an active self-management role to supplement medical care and improve outcomes. To assess the effectiveness of self-management education programmes for people with osteoarthritis. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PyscINFO, SCOPUS and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trial Registry Platform were searched, without language restriction, on 17 January 2013. We checked references of reviews and included trials to identify additional studies. Randomised controlled trials of self-management education programmes in people with osteoarthritis were included. Studies with participants receiving passive recipients of care and studies comparing one type of programme versus another were excluded. In addition to standard methods we extracted components of the self-management interventions using the eight domains of the Health Education Impact Questionnaire (heiQ), and contextual and participant characteristics using PROGRESS-Plus and the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ). Outcomes included self-management of osteoarthritis, participant's positive and active engagement in life, pain, global symptom score, self-reported function, quality of life and withdrawals (including dropouts and those lost to follow-up). We assessed the quality of the body of evidence for these outcomes using the GRADE approach. We included twenty-nine studies (6,753 participants) that compared self-management education programmes to attention control (five studies), usual care (17 studies), information alone (four studies) or another intervention (seven studies). Although heterogeneous, most interventions included elements of skill and technique acquisition (94%), health-directed activity (85%) and self-monitoring and insight (79

  2. Academic Staff Quality in Higher Education: An Empirical Analysis of Portuguese Public Administration Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrico, Cláudia S.; Alves, André A.

    2016-01-01

    Higher education accreditation frameworks typically consider academic staff quality a key element. This article embarks on an empirical study of what academic staff quality means, how it is measured, and how different aspects of staff quality relate to each other. It draws on the relatively nascent Portuguese experience with study programme…

  3. Uptake of Space Technologies - An Educational Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacai, Hina; Zolotikova, Svetlana; Young, Mandy; Cowsill, Rhys; Wells, Alan; Monks, Paul; Archibald, Alexandra; Smith, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Earth Observation data and remote sensing technologies have been maturing into useful tools that can be utilised by local authorities and businesses to aid in activates such as monitoring climate change trends and managing agricultural land and water uses. The European Earth observation programme Copernicus, previously known as GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security), provides the means to collect and process multi-source EO and environmental data that supports policy developments at the European level. At the regional and local level, the Copernicus programme has been initiated through Regional Contact Office (RCO), which provide knowledge, training, and access to expertise both locally and at a European level through the network of RCOs established across Europe in the DORIS_Net (Downstream Observatory organised by Regions active In Space - Network) project (Grant Agreement No. 262789 Coordination and support action (Coordinating) FP7 SPA.2010.1.1-07 "Fostering downstream activities and links with regions"). In the East Midlands UK RCO, educational and training workshops and modules have been organised to highlight the wider range of tools and application available to businesses and local authorities in the region. Engagement with businesses and LRA highlighted the need to have a tiered system of training to build awareness prior to investigating innovative solutions and space technology uses for societal benefits. In this paper we outline education and training programmes which have been developed at G-STEP (GMES - Science and Technology Education Partnership), University of Leicester, UK to open up the Copernicus programme through the Regional Contact Office to downstream users such as local businesses and LRAs. Innovative methods to introduce the operational uses of Space technologies in real cases through e-learning modules and web-based tools will be described and examples of good practice for educational training in these sectors will be

  4. Staff Utilization and Commitment in Borno State Colleges of Education, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fika, Ibrahim Baba; Ibi, Mustapha Baba; Abdulrahman, Aishatu

    2016-01-01

    The study determines the relationship between staff utilization and staff commitment in Borno State Colleges of Education, Nigeria. The objectives of the study were to determine: the level of staff utilization in Borno State Colleges of Education, the level of staff commitment in Borno State Colleges of Education and the relationship between staff…

  5. Building Staff Capacity to Evaluate in Museum Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubarek, Joy

    2015-01-01

    For years, museums of all varieties, including art museums, science centers, history museums, zoos, and aquariums, have conducted education evaluation. However, museums are all too often faced with the challenge of allocating staff time, expertise, and other resources toward conducting evaluation, particularly evaluation that moves beyond program…

  6. Educating Academic Staff to Reorient Curricula in ESD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasutti, Michele; Makrakis, Vassilios; Concina, Eleonora; Frate, Sara

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a professional development experience for higher education academic staff within the framework of an international Tempus project focused on reorienting university curricula to address sustainability. The project included revising curricula to phase sustainable development principles into university…

  7. Quality Management in Slovenian Education Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Alič

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Product and service quality, effective process management, continuous improvement and innovation are some essential conditions for making a successful business. They are often emphasised by managers of successful organizations, by authors of professional and scientific papers and even by politicians and journalists. Quality management standards and models, such as ISO 9001 and EFQM model appeared in assistance to the needs of organisations to assure stable product and service quality, to improve it and to make the production process and its supporting processes effective. It has been 28 years since the standard ISO 9001 appeared. Now it is the most widely spread global standard implemented in more than 1.100.000 organizations worldwide. If quality management was proved to be an important approach to make organizations operate better and thus to contribute to well-being of the society, it would be expected that it is somehow included in our regular school programmes on all the levels. We expect that learning and living quality approaches in childhood and youth would be the least costly way to improve the culture of quality in the society and to implement it in our organizations as well. The paper gives some insight in the situation by searching for quality management related programmes and approaches in our primary, secondary and tertiary school programmes. The purpose of this paper is only to highlight the issue of teaching for quality in our regular education programmes – just to become aware of it and to find some improvement opportunities. There should be still some more detailed research on this topic to give strong suggestions.

  8. Educational Programme in Nuclear Security (Chinese Version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Higher education plays an essential role in nuclear security capacity building. It ensures the availability of experts able to provide the necessary competencies for the effective national nuclear security oversight of nuclear and other radioactive material and to establish and maintain an appropriate nuclear regime in a State. This guide provides both the theoretical knowledge and the practical skills necessary to meet the requirements described in the international framework for nuclear security. Emphasis is placed on the implementation of these requirements and recommendations in States. On the basis of this guide, each university should be able to develop its own academic programme tailored to suit the State's educational needs in the area of nuclear security and to meet national requirements.

  9. Feasibility of a peer-led, school-based asthma education programme for adolescents in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sheyab, N A; Gallagher, R; Roydhouse, J K; Crisp, J; Shah, S

    2012-05-01

    The Adolescent Asthma Action programme (Triple A) has been used successfully to promote asthma knowledge, awareness and quality of life in adolescents with asthma in Australia. We describe the feasibility and acceptability of an adaptation of this English-language, peer-led, asthma education programme in a girls' high school in Northern Jordan. The pilot was conducted by bilingual health workers. Feasibility, acceptability and adaptability were measured through participation rates, open-ended questionnaires completed by peer leaders, a focus group for junior students and reflective journal notes. The programme was well-received by staff and students, with high levels of participation. The peer-led approach was viewed positively. Students reported that they enjoyed the interactive learning activities and the opportunity to practise English. The students reported increased asthma knowledge and awareness, with students with asthma reporting receiving more support from peers. A peer-led asthma education programme is feasible and acceptable in the Jordanian school context.

  10. Peer Sexual Health Education: Interventions for Effective Programme Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriranganathan, Gobika; Jaworsky, Denise; Larkin, June; Flicker, Sarah; Campbell, Lisa; Flynn, Susan; Janssen, Jesse; Erlich, Leah

    2012-01-01

    Peer education is used as a health promotion strategy in a number of areas, including sexual health. Although peer education programmes have been around for some time, published systematic evaluations of youth sexual health peer education programmes are rare. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of youth sexual health peer…

  11. Information literacy programmes and early childhood education as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information literacy programmes and early childhood education as a means to achieving sustainable development goal 4: Any nexus for librarianship? Magnus Osahon Igbinovia, Christiana Omolola Akinbade ...

  12. Evaluation of the 'Ladder to the Moon, Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme' staff training: Two quasi-experimental case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Azucena; Wenborn, Jennifer; Swinson, Tom; Orrell, Martin

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of the CCSEP on care home staff in two care settings for older people in one nursing home and one residential home. Care homes provide personal care and accommodation for older people. The English Dementia Strategy aims to improve the quality of service provision for people with dementia. This includes specific mention of improving the quality of life in care homes and as such includes objectives related to developing the workforce knowledge and skills. The Ladder to the Moon Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme (CCSEP) is a staff training approach based on the Positive Psychology framework that uses theatre- and film-based activities. This study used a wait-list controlled design. However, the data analysis plan was amended to reflect difficulties in data collection, and a quasi-experimental case study approach was consequently utilised. Outcome measures for staff attitudes and beliefs were as follows: Sense of Competence in Dementia Care Staff; Approaches to Dementia Questionnaire; Job Satisfaction Index; Brief Learning Transfer System Inventory; and Scale of Positive and Negative Experience. The Quality of Interaction Schedule (QUIS) was used to observe changes in staff-resident interaction. Fifty staff in two care homes completed the questionnaires and forty-one undertook formal CCSEP training. In Home A (nursing home), there was no significant change in any of the measures. In Home B (residential home), the QUIS showed an increase in positive interactions post intervention; a significant increase in the Building Relationship subscale of Sense of Competence; and a significant increase in staff sense of hopefulness towards people with dementia. The Brief Learning Transfer System Inventory showed a significant decrease post-intervention. The intervention did not significantly affect the happiness or job satisfaction of care home staff. The results of this study provide tentative evidence about the efficacy of this staff training

  13. The Impact of Programme Accreditation on Portuguese Higher Education Provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Cristina; Tavares, Orlanda; Amaral, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    The paper analyses the impact of programme accreditation in Portugal further to the operations of the Agency for Assessment and Accreditation of Higher Education, which were initiated in 2009. Tracking the evolution of study programmes, the paper found that, out of the initial 5262 programmes on offer in 2009/2010, 40% have been either…

  14. Diploma Disease in Ghanaian Distance Education Upgrading Programmes for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereku, Damian Kofi

    2014-01-01

    This research explores manifestations of "diploma disease" in distance education (DE) upgrading programmes for basic school teachers in Ghana. A survey design which included document analysis was used to explore the emphasis in the contents of the DE programme and the experiences of teachers who took the programmes. The study involved a…

  15. Social welfare effects of educational labour market programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Martin

    for subsidizing ALMP-programmes relative to passive support, or whether individuals’ self-interest reduces the need to support such programmes. Hence we discuss the relative benefit rates in optimal of social policy. The optimal benefit rate in education programmes turns out to be higher or lower than the passive......A number of papers (e.g. Besley and Coate (1992, 1995)) have considered the optimality of ALMP-programmes and especially the deterrence effect, i.e. the feature that participation in ALMP-programmes implies a disutility comparable to disutility for ordinary work. The papers consider the relative...... levels of benefit rates in ALMP-programmes and in ‘passive’ public income support. In this paper, we focus on ALMP-programmes with a positive outcome, namely education programmes that raise participants’ level of productivity. A’ priori it appears difficult to say whether a positive outcome is a motive...

  16. Active over 45: a step-up jogging programme for inactive female hospital staff members aged 45+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baschung Pfister, Pierrette; Niedermann, Karin; Sidelnikov, Eduard; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike A

    2013-10-01

    Inactive individuals face motivational obstacles for becoming and remaining physically active. Therefore, sustainable physical activity promotion programmes tailored to reach inactive individuals are needed. The aim of this study was to test the role of motivation and the effect and feasibility of a training programme. We enrolled physically inactive female hospital staff members aged 45 and older in an uncontrolled exercise trial. Follow-up assessments were at 3 and 12 months. The primary outcome was running distance (Cooper test). Secondary outcomes were level of physical activity (Freiburger Physical Activity Questionnaire) and body mass index. Out of 1249 female hospital staff, 275 classified themselves as inactive and 250 (91%) of them were interested in the exercise programme. Of these, 68 (27%; mean age 53.2 years) agreed to participate in our study and 47 (69%) completed the programme. Average running distance increased by 255.70 m [95% confidence interval (CI) 208.09-303.31] at 3-month follow-up with a sustained benefit at 12-month follow-up (194.02; 95% CI 143.75-244.47). Physical activity level increased by 1152.52 kcal week(-1) (95% CI 703.73-1601.32) at 3 months with a sustained benefit (1279.10 kcal week(-1), 95% CI 826.80-1731.40) after 12 months. Notably, baseline motivation to become physically active was not associated with change in physical performance or physical activity level during the programme. The 3-month step-up jogging programme is a feasible and effective exercise intervention for physically inactive, middle-aged female hospital staff members. The intervention leads to sustained benefits independently of motivation to become more physically active.

  17. UNESCO's global renewable energy education and training programme (GREET Programme)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benchikh, O. [UNESCO, Paris (France). Div. of Basic and Engineering Sciences

    2004-09-01

    In every development process, there is a pressing need to increase the availability of qualified human resources. Developing countries tend to experience a crucial lack in precisely this area. They are confronted with many difficulties in developing scientific education. It is costly to teach in these countries and there is a lack of equipment and laboratory materials. Moreover, they often lack capacity for local production. Science and technology help forming a world view, including values, which stimulates creative capabilities, open mindedness, and a perception of nature and the environment that provide people with indispensable tools to cope with a globalizing world. The rational use of scientific and technological progress can contribute powerfully to solving development problems, particularly those of hunger and disease. Increasingly, science is becoming a direct productive force that underpins economic growth and social progress. The role of training in the scientific field is apparent at three levels: for upper echelon staff and researchers, for mid-level technicians and for qualified workers. In recent years, important achievements have been accomplished in this regard, particularly in developing countries. Much work has been done in order to ensure a higher priority for the scientific teaching process, both to improve its quality and to direct it more towards solving problems related to everyday life. A diversified training programme is needed to meet increasing demands for qualified personnel in the developing countries. This training should consider the latest developments in science and technology. It must strengthen competence and technical polyvalence, in such a way as to produce a technical staff of high quality in judgement and decision making. Both of these qualities are necessary for project planning and management, and for being able to identify the most appropriate application and utilisation for local conditions. (orig.)

  18. Health-related doctoral distance education programmes: A review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Doctoral distance education programmes enable students to obtain their qualifications without leaving their homes, jobs or countries. There is an increasing demand for health-related distance education doctoral programmes. The objective of this paper is to consider ethical scholarship issues that might impact on the quality ...

  19. Cost and benefits of a multidisciplinary intensive diabetes education programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keers, J.C.; Groen, H.; Sluiter, W.J.; Bouma, J.; Links, T.P.

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the cost and benefits of an intensive diabetes education programme for patients with prolonged self-management problems and to determine the inclusion criteria for optimal outcomes. METHODS: Sixty-one participants of a multidisciplinary intensive diabetes education programme

  20. Challenges of Administering Teacher Education Programme in Kenyan Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genvieve, Nasimiyu

    2017-01-01

    Proper management of logistical issues in Teacher education programme tends to promote the quality of preparation of school teachers. The main objective of the study was to investigate challenges of administering teacher education programmes in Kenyan universities. The theoretical framework of the study was adopted as used by Koehler and Mishra's…

  1. Evaluating a Special Education Training Programme in Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delkamiller, Julie; Swain, Kristine D.; Ritzman, Mitzi J.; Leader-Janssen, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined a two-year special education and inclusive practices in-service training programme with a university in Nicaragua. Participants included 14 teachers from nine schools in Nicaragua. Participants' knowledge of special education concepts were evaluated as part of assessing the training modules. In addition, programme evaluation…

  2. Students' attitudes towards library user education programme in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was set to ascertain the methods of packaging library user education programme in university libraries in Benue State and determine the attitude of students towards presentation of library user education programmes. The study adopted a descriptive survey research design. The population of study was 6253 and ...

  3. Open Primary Education School Students' Opinions about Mathematics Television Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenilmez, Kursat

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine open primary education school students' opinions about mathematics television programmes. This study indicated that to determine differences among open primary education school students' opinions about mathematics television programmes point of view students' characteristics like gender, age, grade,…

  4. Learning Together: An International Master Programme in Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Swet, Jacqueline; Brown, Kathleen L.; Tedla, Paulos Kebreab

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the Erasmus Mundus Special Educational Needs (EM SEN) programme experience and the ways in which it influenced the authors' perception of reflection and research involving inclusive education. The authors argue that incorporating reflective practice and research into an international Master's programme holds promise for…

  5. Nurse educators' experiences of case-based education in a South African nursing programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Felicity M; Fakude, Lorraine P; Linda, Ntombizodwa S; Marie Modeste, Rugira R

    2015-12-09

    A school of nursing at a university in the Western Cape experienced an increase in student enrolments from an intake of 150 students to 300 students in the space of one year. This required a review of the teaching and learning approach to ensure that it was appropriate for effective facilitation of large classes. The case-based education (CBE) approach was adopted for the delivery of the Bachelor of Nursing programme in 2005. The aim of the study was to explore nurse educators' experiences, current practices and possible improvements to inform best practice of CBE at the nursing school in the Western Cape. A participatory action research method was applied in a two day workshop conducted with nurse educators in the undergraduate nursing programme. The nominal group technique was used to collect the data. Three themes emerged from the final synthesis of the findings, namely: teaching and learning related issues, student issues and teacher issues. Amongst other aspects, theory and practice integration, as well as the need for peer support in facilitation of CBE, were identified as requiring strengthening. It was concluded that case-based education should continue to be used in the school, however, more workshops should be arranged to keep educators updated and new staff orientated in respect of this teaching and learning approach.

  6. Implementing peer tutoring in a graduate medical education programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno-Kennedy, Rossana; Henn, Pat; O'Flynn, Siun

    2010-06-01

    In modern times, peer tutoring methods have been explored in health care education for over 30 years. In this paper, we report our experience of implementing a peer-tutoring approach to Clinical Skills Laboratory (CSL) training in the Graduate Entry in Medicine Programme (GEM) at University College Cork. Eighteen fourth-year medical students were recruited as peer tutors for CSL sessions on physical examination. In order to standardise the process, we developed a training course for peer tutors that comprised two stages. They then ran the practical sessions with junior students, under the watchful eye of medical educators. At the end of the last CSL session, the students were given 10 minutes to reflect individually on the experience, and were asked to complete a feedback form. Twenty-four of the 42 GEM students and six of the seven Senior Tutors (STs) completed and returned their feedback forms. With the caveats of small sample sizes and low response rates, both groups reported that they had both positive and negative experiences of peer tutoring, but that the positive experiences predominated. The overall experience was positive. In terms of the primary thesis of this study, the STs thought that they were well prepared by the teaching staff to take part in these teaching sessions. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2010.

  7. Earthkeepers in the Czech Republic: Experience from the implementation process of an earth education programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Činčera

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents experience with implementation of the international Earthkeepers earth education programme in the Czech Republic. The paper begins with an evaluation of the implementation process from the point of view of the staff of the Bohemian Paradise Ecological Education Centre (Středisko ekologické výchovy Český ráj that prepared and conducted the Czech version of the programme. According to their assessment, the process was challenging, demanding, and rewarding. In the second part, the article analyzes pupils’ (age 10-12 and teachers’ satisfaction with the programme. The respondents expressed a high level of satisfaction, with the programme having a lingering effect on following school lessons. The last part presents the effects of the piloted programme on pupils’ ecological knowledge and attitudes. The results proved to have a positive impact of the programme on both variables. Implications for further dissemination of the programme in the Czech Republic are discussed.

  8. The merits of a staff ombudsman in higher education : a plea for the widespread introduction of a Staff Ombudsman in the Higher Education system in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herfs, Paul; Teppema, Sytske

    2014-01-01

    The position of Staff Ombudsman remains virtually unknown within higher education. This article examines the duties, powers and impact that a Staff Ombudsman can have. Should the position of Staff Ombudsman become a more widespread phenomenon? In other words, what benefits does the appointment of a

  9. Coming to grips with challenging behaviour: a cluster randomised controlled trial on the effects of a new care programme for challenging behaviour on burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff on dementia special care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwijsen, S A; Gerritsen, D L; Eefsting, J A; Smalbrugge, M; Hertogh, C M P M; Pot, A M

    2015-01-01

    Caring for people with dementia in dementia special care units is a demanding job. Challenging behaviour is one of the factors influencing the job satisfaction and burnout of care staff. A care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia might, next to diminishing the challenging behaviour of residents, improve job satisfaction and reduce the care staff's feelings of burnout. To determine the effects of a care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia on the burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff. The care programme was implemented according to a stepped wedge design in which care units were randomly divided over five groups with different time points of starting with implementation. 17 Dutch dementia special care units. Care staff members of the 17 units. The care programme consists of an education package and of various structured assessment tools that guide professionals through the multidisciplinary detection, analysis, treatment and evaluation of treatment of challenging behaviour. Burnout, job satisfaction and job demands were measured before implementation, halfway through the implementation process and after all the care units had implemented the care programme. Burnout was measured with the Dutch version of the Maslach burnout inventory (UBOS-C, three subscales); job satisfaction and job demands were measured with subscales of the Leiden Quality of Work Questionnaire. Mixed model analyses were used to determine effects. Care staff could not be blinded for the intervention. Of the 1441 questionnaires, 645 were returned (response 45%, 318 control measurements, 327 intervention measurements) by 380 unique care staff members. Significant effects were found on job satisfaction (0.93, 95% CI 0.48-1.38). On the other outcomes, no significant changes in the scores were found. Positive effects of using the Grip on Challenging behaviour care programme were found on job

  10. IDES-EDU: Comprehensive multidisciplinary education programme to accelerate the implementation of EPBD in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyckmans, Annemie; Almeida, Manuela; Brunsgaard, Camilla

    education according to local capacity and legislation. This paper summarises the evaluation process of the first implementation of the educational material in the 15 universities, by academic staff, national industry and professional organisations, and reference students from each university. Included......This paper presents a new education and training programme on integrated energy design developed by fifteen European universities collaborating within the IDES-EDU project (2010-2013), funded by Intelligent Energy Europe. IDES-EDU aims to accelerate the implementation of the Energy Performance...

  11. An interdisciplinary approach to palliative care - context and challenges in basic education programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangild Stølen, Karen Marie; Breum, Wanda Elisabeth; Andersen, Tanja Thinggaard

    , psychological, social and existential perspectives is necessary in order to be able to meet the needs of these people. The health education programmes should therefore offer instruction in palliative care. On this background, University College Capital has developed an interdisciplinary elective course...... in the palliative area, the physiotherapy and psychomotor education programmes have made valuable contributions to developing the understanding of palliative care to the benefit of patients with life-threatening illnesses and their families........ Results: The three courses that have been carried out with the participation of 60 nursing students, 12 physiotherapy students and two psychomotor- therapist students two students have shown that the students and staff from the three programmes have benefitted greatly from the different professional...

  12. Preparing Dedicated Education Unit Staff Nurses for the Role of Clinical Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Susan A; Bonham, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Dedicated Education Units optimize the expertise of staff nurses to provide clinical instruction to nursing students, thereby creating a need to prepare staff nurses for the teaching role and educate them about clinical teaching strategies. A curriculum to educate Dedicated Education Unit staff nurses in the art of clinical instruction was created to fill this gap in staff development. This article describes the development of an innovative, interactive, evidence-based curriculum to prepare Dedication Education Unit staff nurses and strengthen an academic-practice partnership.

  13. Educational technologies in the system of managerial staff mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Gancharik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations related to educational technologies, ensuring the Investigations are related to the educational technologies, ensuring the formation and support of a system of mentoring of managerial staff on the basis of the «cascade» technology training. A new form of cascade training – academic cascade training when the educational institutions create a large-scale information and educational environment on the basis of telecommunication technologies to provide the institute mentoring support in the state bodies and organizations.In comparison with the traditional mentoring (personal experience, students and graduates of the retraining system of educational institutions can transmit the knowledge and skills, acquired by them in the course of training, to the young managers and specialists of their organizations, thereby promoting further innovative educational potential of educational institutions through a system of cascading mentoring. For this purpose, in educational institutions an interactive educational environment is created based on telecommunication technologies, which allows you to create and develop a common information space, to simplify the procedure for communicating the mentors and trainees, to provide a wide access to the content. Telecommunication information technologies are not only a powerful tool, intelligent instrument and means of creating a cascade learning environment, but also an important factor in improving the entire methodical system of mentoring.It is proposed the creation of a large-scale information and educational environment on the basis of telecommunication technologies for cascade training when the educational institutions may become a part of the mentoring institution. On the one hand, they prepare students, including both potential mentors, and on the other hand, using modern telecommunication educational technologies, they participate together with the students-mentors in mentoring activity in

  14. [IJHS] Perceptions of special education academic staff: Who should be employed as special education teachers?

    OpenAIRE

    Şenay Sezgin Nartgün

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the perceptions of special education department staff about people employed as special education teachers. In this study, the effects of employment policies upon quality of special education and special education are discussed. In this regard, during the present study, the qualitative data were collected through semi -structured interviews held with academicians (n=24) of special education department in the spring of 2007-2008 academic year on the basis of...

  15. An Impact Evaluation of Nomadic Education Programme in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper assessed the extent of the realization of the objectives of nomadic education programme in the northeast sub-region of Nigeria. The study showed that the programme performed satisfactorily and the impact on the nomads is significant. There are however some major problems militating against effective ...

  16. Universal Basic Education Programme in Nigeria: Implication for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The focus of this paper is on the role the school library could play in making the Universal Basic Education (UBE) programme successful in Nigeria. It discusses' the skills of teaching library usl and study skills to students and teachersfor effective implementation of the UEE programme. Although the development ofschool ...

  17. Pre-retirement education programme for Nigerian army personnel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines and describes the need for pre-retirement education programme for Nigerian Army personnel in 1 Mechanised Division, Kaduna. An investigation was carried out into the contents of such pre-retirement programme. A sample of 78 male and female army personnel was purposively selected from the ...

  18. Sexual Orientation Topics in Educational Leadership Programmes across the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Todd

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examines the inclusion of sexual orientation topics within the formal curriculum of 55 public college and university educational administration/leadership programmes across the USA. The findings indicate that programmes place a low priority upon sexual orientation compared to other diversity topics and that 59.5% of programmes…

  19. The Simalelo Peer Education Programme for HIV prevention: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the project was to evaluate a peer education programme in Zambia run by local people in relation to changes in behaviours, the effects of the programme on the community and the dynamics of peer health promotion. A qualitative process evaluation using focus groups consisting of both participants in the peer ...

  20. IAEA education and training programme in nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, J.L.F.; Lederman, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the IAEA education and training (E and T) programme in nuclear safety. A strategic planning for the programme implementation is described in terms of objectives, outputs and activities. A framework based on areas of competency and the level of depth of the training is presented as well as the main achievements to date. (author)

  1. Assessing the Impact of Entrepreneurship Education Programmes: A New Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayolle, Alain; Gailly, Benoit; Lassas-Clerc, Narjisse

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Facing the multiplication of entrepreneurship education programmes (EEP) and the increasing resources allocated, there is a need to develop a common framework to evaluate the design of those programmes. The purpose of this article is to propose such a framework, based on the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). Design/methodology/approach:…

  2. Education and innovativeness of the slovene hotel organisations staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metod Šuligoj

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The author’s purpose in this article is to ascertain the differences in the attitude to innovativeness between bureaucratic and non-bureaucratic hotel organisations. He defines as bureaucratic the organisations establishing standards. As a separate issue he wishes to find out whether bureaucratic organisations employ properly educated staff or not. For this purpose he defines basic terminology: hotel industry, innovativeness, bureaucracy and knowledge, general and knowledge of tourism and hotel trade. He points out that the government is aware of the importance of innovativeness in hotel industry and tourism, whence a number of measures. In the empirical part, using statistical methods, such as the descriptive analysis and the Bonferroni test, the author establishes that there are no statistically significant differences between bureaucratic and non-bureaucratic organisations either with regard to innovativeness or the level of staff education. In this way, by using scientific method, the author rejects the often misinterpreted opinion on the influence of bureaucracy on innovativeness.

  3. The administrative staff recruitment and selection in Romanian public higher education institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Luminita Mihaela Strajeri

    2009-01-01

    Administrative staff, it will be argued, is essential to the activity of higher education. Adminis-trative staff make up about 44% of the Romanian public higher education workforce, working directly with students and providing services that allow schools to function. There is a major shortfall in the effort and attention now being devoted to the administrative staff of all kinds, despite the workload and importance of this staff. The paper looks at some of the challenges facing higher educati...

  4. The influence of staff training and education on prosthetic and orthotic service quality: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghany, Saeed; Sadeghi-Demneh, Ebrahim; Trinler, Ursula; Onmanee, Pornsuree; Dillon, Michael P; Baker, Richard

    2017-07-01

    Education and training in prosthetics and orthotics typically comply with International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics standards based on three categories of prosthetic and orthotic professionals. This scoping study sought to describe the evidence base available to answer the question, How are prosthetic and orthotic services influenced by the training of staff providing them? Scoping review. A structured search of the peer-reviewed literature catalogued in major electronic databases yielded 3039 papers. Following review of title and abstract, 93 articles were considered relevant. Full-text review reduced this number to 25. Only two articles were identified as providing direct evidence of the effects of training and education on service provision. While both suggested that there was an impact, it is difficult to see how the more specific conclusions of either could be generalised. The other 23 articles provide a useful background to a range of issues including the specification of competencies that training programmes should deliver (3 articles), descriptions of a range of training programmes and the effects of training and education on student knowledge and skills. Although it is considered axiomatic, the service quality is dependent on practitioner education and training. There is insufficient evidence to establish whether levels of training and education in prosthetics and orthotics have an effect on the quality of prosthetic and orthotic services. Clinical relevance There is very little evidence about the effects of training and education of prosthetists and orthotists on service quality. While this is a somewhat negative finding, we feel that it is important to bring this to the attention of the prosthetics and orthotics community.

  5. Practice education: A snapshot from Australian university programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Louise; Brown, Ted; McKinstry, Carol; Caine, Anne-Maree

    2017-04-01

    Practice education is an integral component of the learning process for occupational therapy students. The dramatic increase in Australian occupational therapy programmes and students enrolled over the last decade is placing exponential demands on universities and practice education providers to meet accreditation and registration requirements. This study aimed to explore practice education from the perspectives of Australian occupational therapy university programmes. A purpose-designed survey was emailed to the heads of all Australian occupational therapy programmes. The survey gathered qualitative and quantitative data on courses offered, number of students, practice education hours and models, practice education administration and funding, and challenges for stakeholders. All data were summarised and are presented descriptively. Responses were received from 21 (95.5%) Australian university occupational therapy programmes, with a total enrolment of 5569 undergraduate and 659 graduate-entry masters students. Practice education hours were predominantly in the later years of study and used an apprenticeship model for supervision. There was a trend for observation, simulation and service-learning experiences to be placed in the early years of programmes. Participants reported that the increasing student numbers presented difficulties within the changing clinical contexts. There was a call to re-examine the 1000-hour requirement for practice education. Practice education is a critical issue for Australian occupational therapy. Increasing student numbers place mounting financial and resource demands on education programmes and practice education providers. There is a need for a national, collaborative approach to develop guidelines and processes to ensure sustainability relating to practice education. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  6. Culture in medical education: comparing a Thai and a Canadian residency programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Anne K

    2011-12-01

    Globalisation initiatives in medical education are premised on a universal model of medical education. This study was conducted to challenge this premise by empirically examining the impact of culture on the practice of medical education in anaesthesia residency training programmes in Thailand and Canada. Using a mixed-methods comparative case study research approach, one Thai and one Canadian anaesthesia residency training programme were examined with respect to curriculum, educational practices and teacher beliefs. Data sources included observations of academic and clinical teaching, programme document analysis, surveys and faculty interviews. Recruitment resulted in a 76% survey response rate and 13 interview participants at the Thai site and a 61% survey response rate and 16 interview participants at the Canadian site. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to compare survey responses between the two programmes. The qualitative analysis consisted of primary coding, clustering into pattern codes, and identifying themes and sub-themes. The integration of quantitative and qualitative data for each case was followed by a cross-case analysis. The two programmes were similarly organised and had similar curricular content. However, important differences emerged in curricular emphasis, educational practices, and teacher beliefs and values. Thai faculty staff emphasised knowledge and scholarship, described the faculty-resident relationship as 'familial' and focused on 'teaching methods'. Canadian faculty members emphasised clinical abilities, described the faculty-resident relationship as 'collegial' and focused on 'learning environments'. These findings were related to broader cultural differences that influenced how the curriculum was interpreted and enacted at each site. This study shows that although the scientific and knowledge base of medical education is universal, its enactment may be influenced by culture and context. Globalisation initiatives in medical

  7. Patient and Staff (doctors and nurses) Experiences of Abdominal Hysterectomy in Accelerated Recovery Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Lis; Carlslund, Anne Mette; Møller, Charlotte

    2004-01-01

    the experiences of the women operated and the staff involved. Material and methods: The study is exploratory and descriptive, using qualitative methods. Seventeen women, with good health status, were consecutively selected from August to September 2001. The women were observed and ten were interviewed twice...... they had expected. Conclusion: The ARP did not appear to be a burden for the women involved in the study; however, it did not consider individual needs for psychological care. Future efforts should ensure a thorough introduction of the ARP to new staff as well as illustrative material for purposes......, at discharge and one month following their return home. The staff (n=15) were interviewed individually and/or participated in focus group interviews before (February 2001) and following (November 2001) the introduction of the ARP. Results: The women experienced little difficulty with the ARP. They defined...

  8. A learning design methodology for developing short learning programmes in further and continuing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Lillian; Georgsen, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, teaching staff at the School of Continuing Education, VIA University College, Denmark, has been designing digitally supported teaching within diploma programmes and tailor-made courses in the fields of health, education, social sciences and management. More and more...... throughout the course or program; a higher degree of exposure as the teacher often becomes the sole point of contact in online environments; communication skills needed to facilitate dialogue and collaboration in an online environment; etc. Furthermore, involvement of teaching staff in co-creation of new...... learning designs require skills which many lecturers do not have when they enter the design team for the first time, among others skills to articulate their pedagogical principles and technological imagination....

  9. Strengthening medical education in haematology and blood transfusion: postgraduate programmes in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makani, Julie; Lyimo, Magdalena; Magesa, Pius; Roberts, David J

    2017-06-01

    Haematology and blood transfusion, as a clinical and laboratory discipline, has a far-reaching impact on healthcare both through direct patient care as well as provision of laboratory and transfusion services. Improvement of haematology and blood transfusion may therefore be significant in achieving advances in health in Africa. In 2005, Tanzania had one of the lowest distributions of doctors in the world, estimated at 2·3 doctors per 100 000 of population, with only one haematologist, a medical doctor with postgraduate medical education in haematology and blood transfusion. Here, we describe the establishment and impact of a postgraduate programme centred on Master of Medicine and Master of Science programmes to build the capacity of postgraduate training in haematology and blood transfusion. The programme was delivered through Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) with partnership from visiting medical and laboratory staff from the UK and complemented by short-term visits of trainees from Tanzania to Haematology Departments in the UK. The programme had a significant impact on the development of human resources in haematology and blood transfusion, successfully training 17 specialists with a significant influence on delivery of health services and research. This experience shows how a self-sustaining, specialist medical education programme can be developed at low cost within Lower and Middle Income Countries (LMICs) to rapidly enhance delivery of capacity to provide specialist services. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Youth, Terrorism and Education: Britain's Prevent Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Since the 7/7 bombings of July 2005, Britain has experienced a domestic terror threat posed by a small minority of young Muslims. In response, Britain has initiated "Prevent," a preventative counter-terrorism programme. Building on previous, general critiques of Prevent, this article outlines and critically discusses the ways in which…

  11. Towards Improving Nursery Education Programme In Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper therefore determines the areas of emphasis in nursery education, benefits from effective nursery education and the need to co-ordinate nursery education in Nigeria. Suggestions were made based on the conclusion. Keywords: Nursery Education, ogramme In Urban / Rural Areas. Journal of Technology and ...

  12. Construction of elderly identity within an education programme for care workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Winther

    courses and on-the-job training in a nursing home or in the private homes of the elderly. The paper suggests that throughout the theoretical courses a specific elderly identity is constructed alongside the future care helper identity: E.g. while the care helpers are construed as activating and motivating...... helpers, the elderly are construed and looked upon as a homogeneous group that must be activated. Likewise in the traineeships: The care worker staff and their practices influence the students´ view upon the elderly. The elderly as well as the students are positioned by the dominant discourses within...... an educational research project; however as the programme being studied is withinThe Basic Social and Health Education Programmes in Denmark, Elderly Identity is an important subtheme....

  13. Staff Retention. Personnel Management Module. Operational Management Programme. Increasing Opportunities for Supervisors and Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jennifer

    This self-instructional unit for supervisors and managers in the British hotel and catering industry is based on the view that problems in staff recruitment and retention are directly linked to the level of job satisfaction. The document begins with an introduction and advice on how to use the unit. Five sections cover the following topics: (1)…

  14. Factors Influencing the Contribution of Staff to Health Education in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Didier; McNamara, Patricia Mannix; Simar, Carine; Geary, Tom; Pommier, Jeanine

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the contribution of the whole-school staff to health education (HE) is an important goal in HE research. This study aimed to identify the views of staff (principals; teachers; school nurses and doctors; counsellors and administrative, maintenance, canteen and cleaning staff) regarding the nature of their contribution to HE. The…

  15. Opportunities and Challenges of Academic Staff in Higher Education in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushemeza, Elijah Dickens

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses the opportunities and challenges of academic staff in higher education in Africa. The paper argues that recruitment, appointment and promotion of academic staff should depend highly on their productivity (positive production per individual human resource). The staff profile and qualifications should be posted on the University…

  16. Audit of the Bloodhound Education Programme, 2012-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straw, Suzanne; Jeffes, Jennifer; Dawson, Anneka; Lord, Pippa

    2015-01-01

    The National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) was commissioned by the "Bloodhound Education Programme" (BEP) to conduct an audit of its activities throughout 2012 and early 2013. The audit included: telephone consultations with a range of stakeholders; analysis of monitoring and internal evaluation data; and attendance at two…

  17. Human Rights Education and the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froman, Nica

    2015-01-01

    In 2003, the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP)--a program implemented in thousands of schools globally--introduced a human rights course (Makivirta, 2003). This curriculum is the first of its kind to hold potential widespread influence on human rights education in the formal education sector. In this study, I analyze the…

  18. Management of Adult Education Programme in Abia State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adult Education is the instruction or controlled experiences for the mature person so that he/she may attain social, economic, cultural, political or technical competence or individual development. The importance of management in adult education programme cannot be over emphasized because of the vital role it plays in ...

  19. Subjects' experiences of a nutrition education programme: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects' experiences of a nutrition education programme: a qualitative study of adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus living in a rural resource-limited setting in South Africa. ... Positive educator characteristics, such as competence, patience, being respectful and approachable, were cited as desirable. Conclusion: ...

  20. Providing An Appropriate Education Programme For Children With ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... special school, integrated school, special unit in regular schools and the new emphasis on inclusive education. The paper then emphasized the danger inherent in wrong education programme for the children with mental retardation. International Journal of Emotional psychology and sport ethics (IJEPSE) Vol. 7 2005: pp.

  1. Undergraduate students' choice of special education programme as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the undergraduate students' choice of special education programme as a career. A descriptive survey research method was adopted for the study. A total number of 100 undergraduate students from the special education department were randomly selected across the levels (100 to 400 levels).

  2. The evaluation of a nutrition education programme on the nutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this project was to test if learning took place through the implementation of a nutrition education programme, using specific developed nutrition education tools in pre-primary school children, aged six and seven years old, in the Vaal region. A validated nutrition knowledge questionnaire was completed with ...

  3. Relating secondary school to higher education honours programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Valk, A.E.; Kleijer, C.C.; Michels, B.I.

    2017-01-01

    U-Talent Academy is part of the U-Talent programme, a collaboration between two universities and 40 schools. The aim of U-Talent is to strengthen science and mathematics (STEM) education in secondary school and in the bachelor phase of higher education by the valorization of scientific research and

  4. A Mechanism for Programme Evaluation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, P. A.; Bezuidenhout, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    Quality assurance in higher education has a bearing on the policies, systems and processes directed at ensuring the quality of education provision in an institution (HEQC 1996, 14). To ensure a striving for excellence in academic programmes in a Faculty, to determine the extent to which this striving is achieved and to promote development and…

  5. The Winds of Change: Higher Education Management Programmes in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausits, Attila; Pellert, Ada

    2009-01-01

    Amid the Bologna Process and as a direct effect of it, European higher education institutions have to rethink their core institutional policies in order to effectively deal with the increasing demands and needs of their "customers" and society at large. The higher education management programmes across Europe, with some specific needs…

  6. Illuminating the Black Box of Entrepreneurship Education Programmes: Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritz, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a justified, legitimate and validated model on entrepreneurship education programmes (EEPs), by combining recent research and scholarship in leading edge entrepreneurship education (EE). Design/methodology/approach: A systematic literature review of recent EE research and scholarship is followed by…

  7. Examining Some Aspects of Alternative Basic Education Programmes in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwu, Gilbert O. M.; Agu, Augustine

    2010-01-01

    This study examines some aspects of the quality of Alternative Basic Education (ABE) provision in Ethiopia. Educational indicators of quality were formulated under two general topic areas of ABE programme process and content, and pupil learning outcomes. A qualitative-interpretative research approach and survey design was used to collect data from…

  8. Academic Staff's Apathy towards Formal Professional Development Programmes at North West University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makunye, M. M.; Pelser, T. G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore reasons for academics' apathy towards formal professional development programmes at North-West University. The research design was essentially descriptive, employing both qualitative and quantitative research techniques to gather and analyse data. Three techniques, namely, questionnaire surveys, analysis of…

  9. An examination of concussion education programmes: a scoping review methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Jeffrey G; Bloom, Gordon A; Falcão, William R; Sweet, Shane N

    2015-10-01

    The primary purpose was to review the literature on concussion education programmes. The secondary purpose was to inform knowledge translation strategies for concussion researchers and practitioners. Research on concussion education programmes is relatively new. As a result, the current study implemented a scoping review methodology, which is a type of literary search used to provide a preliminary assessment of the size and scope of a body of literature, as well as identify strengths, weaknesses and gaps in the research. A five-stage process for conducting a scoping review was followed for this study: (a) identifying the research questions, (b) identifying relevant studies, (c) identifying the study selection criteria, (d) charting the data and (e) reporting the results. Concussion education programmes have been developed and implemented with populations ranging in age from 9 to 49 years and have used interactive oral presentations, educational videos and computer-based learning programmes. Although the content of these programmes varied, the topics generally addressed salient aspects of concussion injury and recovery. Quantitative instruments have been the preferred methods for assessment. Education programmes aimed at improving participants' long-term concussion knowledge, behaviours and attitudes of concussions are needed. Researchers must consider using a knowledge translation framework to enhance concussion education programmes. The application of such a framework can lead to novel and interesting ways of disseminating information about concussive injury and recovery. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Promoting Interdisciplinary Education: The Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöschl, Günter; Bucher, Christian; Carr, Gemma; Farnleitner, Andreas; Rechberger, Helmut; Wagner, Wolfgang; Zessner, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    . Through a structured one-on-one mentoring programme close interaction is ensured between the students and the internationally reputed staff of the programme. This gives the opportunity for the encouragement of interdisciplinary thinking at the individual level. Interdisciplinarity also evolves passively through interactions between the doctoral students in their daily research work, during journal clubs, meetings, workshops and courses. A total of 22 doctoral students are enrolled in the programme at any time which allows for cross-fertilisation across the wide range of research projects. Finally, the programme is holistic, incorporating all aspects of the hydrological system at the catchment and multi-catchment scale. The ultimate aim is to provide an education programme which not only equips the students with an understanding of the need for interdisciplinarity, but also with the skills required to deliver interdisciplinary work in keeping with the holistic catchment management paradigm adopted by the hydrological science community.

  11. Crèche and School of the Staff Association: a programme for children from 2 to 4 year old

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    Find out how children between the ages of two to four and their families can benefit from the Staff Association Crèche and School programme. Classes for children aged between two and four years have been set-up to ensure the initial transition from home to school is as smooth as possible. Children attend mornings only and are welcomed by the same group of teaching staff throughout the week, allowing the children to establish a link between their home life and the crèche/school. The challenge of these classes is to offer the children a happy environment where they can feel emotionally secure, and the teaching staff can create a harmonious atmosphere allowing them to learn by moving, manipulating, exchanging, making mistakes… playing. Creativity takes a central role as it enables the child to express him or herself and increase their ability to handle their emotions constructively. According to Albert Einstein ‘Play is the highest form of research’. &nbs...

  12. Increasing Access to Science Oriented Education Programmes in Tertiary Institutions in Ghana through Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei, C. K.; Mensah, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    There is emphasis in the educational policy of Ghana for the promotion of Distance Education programmes to widen access to education at all levels and facilitate human resource development. This study examined the level of access and challenges faced by learners in science oriented programmes offered by distance in the Kwame Nkrumah University of…

  13. Theory and practice: Essential balance in the education of staff in the hotel industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurašević Silvana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of tourism as the most promising sector in Montenegro requires a higher proportion of high-quality, highly educated staff this is particularly true if we bear in mind that tourism, and predominantly the hos­pitality industry, is a generator of new jobs. For the sustainable development of human resources in the hotel industry, it is necessary to harmonize the higher education system with the needs of the hotel sector. For the purpose of this paper, interviews were conducted and the obtained results analyzed using statistical and descriptive methods. We analyzed the attitudes of two key groups: managers in the hotel industry, as those considered responsible for the implementation of the services and students as future employees. The objective was to examine whether the provision of quality service in hospitality requires the introduction of practical knowledge and skills as a compulsory part of education in tourism and hotel industry studies. The results obtained may serve as a basis for the establishment of modern study programmes in higher education in the field of tourism and hospitality.

  14. Quality of doctoral nursing education in the United Kingdom: exploring the views of doctoral students and staff based on a cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Hugh; Keeney, Sinead; Kim, Mi Ja; Park, Chang Gi

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the quality of doctoral education in nursing in the United Kingdom. In recent decades, doctoral education programmes in nursing are increasing worldwide. There are many reasons for this and concerns have been raised regarding the quality of provision in and across countries. To date, the quality of doctoral education on a global level has not been reported in the literature. This United Kingdom study is part of a seven country investigation into the quality of doctoral education in nursing (Australia, Japan, Korea, South Africa, Thailand, United Kingdom and United States of America). A quantitative study using a cross-sectional comparative survey design. An online survey was administered to collect the views of doctoral students and staff members on four domains: programme, faculty/staff, resource and evaluation. The study was carried out between 2010-2012. In most cases, staff perceived these more positively than students and the differences in perception were often statistically significant. Interestingly, many students rated the quality of supervision as excellent, whereas no staff member rated supervision this highly. The crucial importance of resources was confirmed in the path analysis of the four Quality of Doctoral Nursing Education domains. This demonstrates that investment in resources is much more cost-effective than investment in the other domains in relation to improving the overall quality of doctoral education in nursing. This study has wide-ranging implications for how the quality of doctoral education is monitored and enhanced. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. environmental education programmes offered by delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the early days of environmental education in this country, emphasis was on conservation education. (lrwin,l990:4). The main emphasis was on ecologi- cal instruction and simplistic notions of attitude change through awareness creation so as to change behaviour. Such views were strongly influenced by the notion that the ...

  16. The Relationship between Organizational Climate and the Organizational Silence of Administrative Staff in Education Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozveh, Asghar Zamani; Karimi, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between organizational climate and the organizational silence of administrative staff in Education Department in Isfahan. The research method was descriptive and correlational-type method. The study population was administrative staff of Education Department in Isfahan during the…

  17. Association between addiction treatment staff professional and educational levels and perceptions of organizational climate and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Ivy; Lundgren, Lena; Beltrame, Clelia

    2014-01-01

    Research studies have identified addiction treatment staff who have higher levels of education as having more positive attitudes about evidence-based treatment practices, science-based training, and the usefulness of evidence-based practices. This study examined associations between addiction treatment staff level of education and their perceptions of 3 measures of organizational change: organizational stress, training resources and staffing resources in their treatment unit. The sample included 588 clinical staff from community-based substance abuse treatment organizations who received Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) funding (2003-2008) to implement evidence-based practices (EBPs). Bivariate analysis and regression modeling methods examined the relationship between staff education level (no high school education, high school education, some college, associate's degree, bachelor's degree, master's degree, doctoral degree, and other type of degree such as medical assistant, registered nurse [RN], or postdoctoral) and attitudes about organizational climate (stress), training resources, and staffing resources while controlling for staff and treatment unit characteristics. Multivariable models identified staff with lower levels of education as having significantly more positive attitudes about their unit's organizational capacity. These results contradict findings that addiction treatment staff with higher levels of education work in units with greater levels of organizational readiness for change. It cannot be inferred that higher levels of education among treatment staff is necessarily associated with high levels of organizational readiness for change.

  18. Translating the family medicine vision into educational programmes in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Teck Yee; Cheong, Seng Kwing; Koh, Gerald Ch; Goh, Lee Gan

    2008-05-01

    The core of the Family Medicine (FM) vision is patient-centred care, requiring specific education and vocational training. We traced how FM education started and what have been achieved. FM training began in 1971 with the formation of the College of General Practitioners Singapore. Previously, training consisted of self-directed learning, lunchtime talks and examination preparation courses run by hospital specialists. Formal FM vocational training programmes in the United Kingdom and Australia provided the model for a 3-year programme in 1988. The tripartite relationship between the local university, College of Family Physicians and Ministry of Health, together with a structured training programme, contributed to its success. To date, more than 240 Family Physicians in Singapore have been awarded the Masters in Medicine (FM) degree. The Graduate Diploma in Family Medicine programme (GDFM) was introduced in 2000 for Family Physicians who wished to practice at an enhanced level. This programme has trained 194 doctors since then. Behind the scenes, the following were important developments: counterculture with a difference, tripartite stake-holding, training the trainers and learning from others. For the FM undergraduate programme, our aim is to develop the knowledge base, core values and roles of the Family Physician. Sustaining the value of Family Medicine as a career choice is the enduring vision.

  19. An outcome evaluation of a perinatal education programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfeous Rundare

    2012-07-01

    Research purpose: The Perinatal Education Programme (PEP has been introduced in the Western Cape in South Africa, and the main aim of this evaluation was to provide information regarding the effectiveness of perinatal training in a single maternity hospital in this province. Motivation for the study: There are a few evaluation studies of the PEP in different South African contexts. These evaluations have shown that the programme was effective in improving the knowledge of midwives. The current evaluation was motivated by the need for more research on the programme’s effectiveness. Research design, approach and method: A quasi-experimental design was used to determine knowledge and skills acquisition of midwives. The sample consisted of 42 midwives. Programme records and questionnaire results were used as data. Main findings: This evaluation showed that the PEP is an effective programme endorsed by participants and supervisors alike. Practical/managerial implications: This specific hospital added group facilitation to the self-study mode of the programme. This mode of study produced additional increases in knowledge, skills and group work. Contributions/value-add: The evaluation has provided sound evidence for programme managers to increase programme coverage and continue the good work already evident from the results.

  20. Arts-based palliative care training, education and staff development: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, Benjamin Mark; Williams, Sion; Burton, Christopher R; Williams, Lynne

    2018-02-01

    The experience of art offers an emerging field in healthcare staff development, much of which is appropriate to the practice of palliative care. The workings of aesthetic learning interventions such as interactive theatre in relation to palliative and end-of-life care staff development programmes are widely uncharted. To investigate the use of aesthetic learning interventions used in palliative and end-of-life care staff development programmes. Scoping review. Published literature from 1997 to 2015, MEDLINE, CINAHL and Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, key journals and citation tracking. The review included 138 studies containing 60 types of art. Studies explored palliative care scenarios from a safe distance. Learning from art as experience involved the amalgamation of action, emotion and meaning. Art forms were used to transport healthcare professionals into an aesthetic learning experience that could be reflected in the lived experience of healthcare practice. The proposed learning included the development of practical and technical skills; empathy and compassion; awareness of self; awareness of others and the wider narrative of illness; and personal development. Aesthetic learning interventions might be helpful in the delivery of palliative care staff development programmes by offering another dimension to the learning experience. As researchers continue to find solutions to understanding the efficacy of such interventions, we argue that evaluating the contextual factors, including the interplay between the experience of the programme and its impact on the healthcare professional, will help identify how the programmes work and thus how they can contribute to improvements in palliative care.

  1. Challenges to nordic teacher education programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens; Dorf, Hans

    2010-01-01

    and subjects in the Finnish teacher education program (pedagogical studies, quality of practice teaching, research base) and its strong focus on training future teachers for the teacher profession and a professional community play an important role in respect to recruitment and low drop-out rates....... teacher education programs it tries to find explanations for the fact that only the Finnish teacher education does not suffer from a decreasing number of applicants, from high drop-out rates, and from low retention rates. It is claimed that the strong emphasis on specific professional elements...

  2. Organization of Specialist Adjustment Training Based on Existing Educational Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E V. Zelentsova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with matters related to the adjustment training of the specialist who has specified competences in order to solve the specific staffing problems of enterprises, provide scheduled staff re-training, suggest additional specializations to graduates of educational institutions, etc. Defines a structure and content of the management system elements for training and adjustment training of specialists, including a shift from activity-related competence to desirable areas of knowledge, and therefrom to the curricula and programmes.A concept of the knowledge subject is defined. It allows perceiving a specific subject area. A concept of the aspects of the certain knowledge subject is proposed, and in this case it is assumed that the knowledge subject can be represented as a finite set of aspects of the given subject of knowledge. A concept of the knowledge section is defined as a body of knowledge, reflecting some aspect of the particular subject of knowledge. Thus, the entire body of knowledge to be offered by the particular Department may be represented by a variety of specific sections of knowledge. For each section of knowledge is introduced a concept of the training level, which corresponds to the level of detail and quality of the educational material delivered. To assess the level of training it is possible to use the method of expert’s estimates.The paper suggests a scheme that allows realization of the relevant order for target training of specialists. Requirements for training specialists are represented as a competency model of the specialist; an implemented study programme is characterized by the competences, obtained as the learning outcomes.The content of knowledge, corresponding to some competence, is represented as a total of all the sections of knowledge related to the aspects generated by the competence. Then the competence can be revealed through the body of knowledge. As a result, both an order for adjustment training

  3. Individualized education programme in special programme of education – an effective work plan or merely a legal requirement

    OpenAIRE

    Stergar, David

    2016-01-01

    The undergraduate thesis presents the development of Individualized Education Programmes (hereinafter IEP) at the Education, Work and Care Centre Dobrna. The theoretical part deals with the legislation in the field of IEP development and placement of children with special needs, the guidelines for IEP development, and the characteristics of people with mental health disorders and autism spectrum disorders at the Education, Work and Care Centre Dobrna. The empirical part of the thesis p...

  4. What works in delivering dementia education or training to hospital staff? A critical synthesis of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surr, Claire A; Gates, Cara

    2017-10-01

    The quality of care delivered to people with dementia in hospital settings is of international concern. People with dementia occupy up to one quarter of acute hospital beds, however, staff working in hospitals report lack of knowledge and skills in caring for this group. There is limited evidence about the most effective approaches to training hospital staff on dementia. The purpose of this literature review was to examine published evidence on the most effective approaches to dementia training and education for hospital staff. The review was conducted using critical synthesis and included qualitative, quantitative and mixed/multi- methods studies. Kirkpatrick's four level model for the evaluation of training interventions was adopted to structure the review. The following databases were searched: MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, AMED, British Education Index, Education Abstracts, ERIC (EbscoHost), The Cochrane Library-Cochrane reviews, Economic evaluations, CENTRAL (Wiley), HMIC (Ovid), ASSIA, IBSS (Proquest), Conference Proceedings Citation Indexes (Web of Science), using a combination of keyword for the following themes: Dementia/Alzheimer's, training/education, staff knowledge and patient outcomes. A total of 20 papers were included in the review, the majority of which were low or medium quality, impacting on generalisability. The 16 different training programmes evaluated in the studies varied in terms of duration and mode of delivery, although most employed face-to-face didactic techniques. Studies predominantly reported on reactions to training and knowledge, only one study evaluated outcomes across all of the levels of the Kirkpatrick model. Key features of training that appeared to be more acceptable and effective were identified related to training content, delivery methods, practicalities, duration and support for implementation. The review methodology enabled inclusion of a broad range of studies and permitted common features of successful programmes to be

  5. Educating sexologists in a Danish university hospital in accordance with a Nordic educational programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rischel, Karen; Kristensen, Ellids

    2005-01-01

    The establishment of an educational programme in sexology in a Danish university hospital is described and an overview of the historical background of the Nordic Association for Clinical Sexology (NACS) and the Nordic educational programme is presented. The Nordic Association for Clinical Sexolog...

  6. Educational Change Following Conflict: Challenges Related to the Implementation of a Peace Education Programme in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Solvor Mjøberg

    2016-01-01

    Following the post-election violence in Kenya an attempt to bring about educational change through a peace education programme was launched by the MoE, UNICEF and UNHCR. The programme, which was aimed at building peace at the grassroots level, targeted the areas most affected by the post-election violence. Teaching plans were designed for all…

  7. The American nuclear Society's educational outreach programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacha, N.J.

    1994-01-01

    The American Nuclear Society has an extensive program of public educational outreach in the area of nuclear science and technology. A teacher workshop program provides up to five days of hands-on experiments, lectures, field trips, and lesson plan development for grades 6-12 educators. Curriculum materials have been developed for students in grades kindergarten through grade 12. A textbook review effort provides reviews of existing textbooks as well as draft manuscripts and textbook proposals, to ensure that the information covered on nuclear science and technology is accurate and scientifically sound

  8. Educating sexologists in a Danish university hospital in accordance with a Nordic educational programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rischel, Karen; Kristensen, Ellids

    2005-01-01

    The establishment of an educational programme in sexology in a Danish university hospital is described and an overview of the historical background of the Nordic Association for Clinical Sexology (NACS) and the Nordic educational programme is presented. The Nordic Association for Clinical Sexology...... was founded in 1978. In 2000, agreement was reached on a three-level educational programme for sexologists and identical rules for authorization in the Nordic countries. After analysis of the Nordic educational programme, curricula on levels 1 and 2 as well as logbooks were designed. Employees of the clinic...... traditions to orientations encountered in other parts of the world. In continuation of the NACS curricula, we have established an educational programme for sexologists. We suggest that this can be carried out at any major sexological unit....

  9. Competence Based Educational Metadata for Supporting Lifelong Competence Development Programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampson, Demetrios; Fytros, Demetrios

    2008-01-01

    Sampson, D., & Fytros, D. (2008). Competence Based Educational Metadata for Supporting Lifelong Competence Development Programmes. In P. Diaz, Kinshuk, I. Aedo & E. Mora (Eds.), Proceedings of the 8th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT 2008), pp. 288-292. July,

  10. Living Smart Homes: A Pilot Australian Sustainability Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Evonne; Buys, Laurie; Bell, Lorraine

    2009-01-01

    This article documents the rationale and experience of a pilot Australian sustainability education programme, "Living Smart Homes" (LSH) based on a community-based social marketing model. Inspired by the Australian "Land for Wildlife" scheme, LSH is designed to engage homeowners with sustainable practices through face-to-face…

  11. Physician education programme improves quality of diabetes care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physician education programme improves quality of diabetes care. D G van Zyl, P Rheeder. Background. Diabetes mellitus is a common chronic disease needing long-term glycaemic control to prevent complications. Guidelines are available for achievement of optimal glycaemic control, but these are seldom properly.

  12. Physician education programme improves quality of diabetes care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To determine if a physician education programme and a structured consultation schedule would improve the quality of diabetes patient care in a diabetes clinic. Setting. Two tertiary care diabetes clinics at Kalafong Hospital, Pretoria. Study design. Quasi-experimental controlled before-and-after study. Methods.

  13. The impact of the Perinatal Education Programme on cognitive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine whether the Maternal Care and Newborn Care manuals from the Perinatal Education Programme significantly improves the cognitive knowledge of midwives. Design. Assessment of cognitive knowledge by means of multiple-choice testing. These tests were conducted before and after each of the 30 ...

  14. Impact Assessment of Nomadic Education Extension Programme on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impact Assessment of Nomadic Education Extension Programme on Nomadic Pastoralists and Traditional Livestock Production in Kaduna State. ... All the Pastoralists (100%) vaccinated their animals annually, 88% practiced feed supplementation and 100% of the Pastoralist communities formed cooperative societies out of ...

  15. Years Universal Basic Education Programme in Public Primary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    Disciplinary Journal, ... 3-4 programme while the scope covers the public primary and junior secondary schools in Imo State. It adopted .... impact of 9-3-4 system on education as it relates to administration of the schools and duties of the teachers in the 9 ...

  16. Utilization of Peace Education in Adult Literacy Programmes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study focused on utilization of peace education in adult literacy programmes in Anambra State for promoting peace, conflict resolution and national security. The study employed the descriptive survey research design. Three research questions were formulated to guide the study. The proportionate random sampling ...

  17. Reflections on Mainstreaming Gender Equality in Adult Basic Education Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Agneta

    2006-01-01

    This article is about mainstreaming gender equality in adult basic learning and education (ABLE). Gender equality is defined as equal rights of both women and men to influence, participate in and benefit from a programme. It is argued that specific gender analyses of emerging patterns of gender relations is helpful in formulating gender equality…

  18. perceptions of the environmental education programme at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Std. 3 and 4 pupils were chosen because they are of particular importance to the environmental education ..... role and importance the pupils' Pilanesberg experience might have played in either re-inforcing or internali- ... 'energy from sun - plant grows - giraffe eats plant -. 1 ion eats giraffe'. No pupil was able to express the.

  19. Evaluating the implementation of a multicomponent asthma education program for Head Start staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruvalcaba, Elizabeth; Chung, Shang-En; Rand, Cynthia; Riekert, Kristin A; Eakin, Michelle

    2018-03-15

    Asthma disproportionately affects minority groups, low income populations, and young children under 5. Head Start (HS) programs predominantly serve this high-risk population, yet staff are not trained on asthma management. The objective of this study was to assess a 5-year, multicomponent HS staff asthma education program in Baltimore City HS programs. All HS programs were offered annual staff asthma education by a medical research team that included didactic lectures and hands-on training. Attendees received continuing education credits. HS staff were anonymously surveyed on asthma knowledge and skills and asthma medication management practices in Year 1 (preimplementation) and Year 5. There was an estimated response rate of 94% for Year 1 and 82% for Year 5. Compared to staff in Year 1, Year 5 staff were significantly more likely to report they had very good knowledge and skills related to asthma [odds ratio (OR) 1.63; p staff reported higher self-assessed knowledge and skills, self-reports of asthma medication management practices, and self-reports of asthma activities compared to Year 1 staff. HS serves high-risk children with asthma, and a multicomponent program can adequately prepare staff to manage asthma in the child care setting. Our results indicate the feasibility of providing efficacious health skill education into child care provider training to reduce asthma knowledge gaps.

  20. Educational status: improvement and problems. Population programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T

    1997-08-01

    This report describes the levels of literacy and educational status in Tibet Autonomous Region. Data were obtained from the 1990 and earlier China Censuses. Traditional education among Tibetans was accessible only to lamas and a privileged few. The reasons were religious influence and an underdeveloped socioeconomic status. In 1990, illiteracy was 90.6% for the urban population (80.0% for males and 81.6% for females). Illiteracy was 91.4% in rural areas (81.6% for males and 98.1% for females). There were 2556 modern schools in 1990, with a total enrollment of 175,600 students. The percentage of well-educated Tibetan population was lower than that for any other ethnic groups living in Tibet. Illiteracy among persons aged 15 years and older declined from 74% in 1982, to 69% in 1990. Tibet Autonomous Region has the highest illiteracy rate in China. The absolute number of illiterates increased by 12.4% during 1982-90. Urban illiteracy also rose by 12%. In rural areas, the absolute number of illiterates increased by only 1.3%. Illiteracy in rural areas declined by 0.52%, to 88%, during 1982-90. In 1990, illiteracy among adolescents aged 10-14 years was 74.25% in rural areas, 36.26% in towns, and 28.60% in Lhasa city. More women are illiterate than men. Enrollment of school age children is low due to religious reasons and a need among herdsmen for help tending livestock.

  1. The forgotten workforce: clerical and administrative staff within British Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Kay

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines the employment conditions for clerical and administrative staff within the British Higher Education Sector. For this analysis a national questionnaire was distributed and 747 responses were returned and analysed. In order to further enrich the qualitative research data, 30 interviews were also conducted, mainly with clerical and secretarial staff but also with management staff who had progressed from clerical grades.\\ud \\ud The main focus of the research was to examine in...

  2. Five years of an educational programme - Results and experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufkova, Marie

    1998-01-01

    Full text: School teachers and pupils constitute an important group having the ability to listen, Understand and help to create positive ties between the public and a utility. Therefore, CEZ spends a part of its revenue arising from the sales of electricity on education. CEZ's information and education programme named 'Energy for everybody' has been used by Czech schools for five years now. The main part of this educational programme is devoted to nuclear energy. CEZ materials for schools include: printed information, supplements to textbooks, videotapes, computer programmes, CD ROMs, an educational set for experiments with ionizing radiation, posters and other assorted materials. Schools are invited to visit Czech power plants and other facilities of the power sector (for example the experimental reactor at the Prague Technical University). Seminars and workshops are organised for teachers. CEZ offers objective information on all activities associated with energy generation and uses and the relationships between man and nature. The prices of our informational materials are rather symbolic, they come to one-tenth to one-third of the actual cost. CEZ is the only industrial company offering such a large-scale educational programme for schools in the Czech Republic. Materials are distributed to nearly 7 000 primary and secondary schools and 30 university departments. We have agreements with several schools which have committed themselves to testing our materials. Several dissertations and studies have demonstrated the usefulness of our materials for education and the contribution this information has made to the better understanding of nuclear energy. We have organised polls in order to ascertain how the schools liked the materials, what additional things they wished and what their view of nuclear power plants and CEZ was. The outcome has been unexpectedly favourable. In my contribution I will present the results of these polls and examples of successful activities

  3. Pedagogical Approaches to Exploring Theory-Practice Relationships in an Outdoor Education Teacher Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Kathleen; Smith, Heidi; Dyment, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Understanding theory-practice relationships in pre-service teacher education is an enduring concern for many teacher educators. Drawing on data from an investigation into the theory-practice nexus in an outdoor education teacher education programme, this article examines pedagogical approaches to exploring theory and practice with pre-service…

  4. Flexible Programmes in Higher Professional Education: Expert Validation of a Flexible Educational Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, Ad; Paas, Fred; Verbraeck, Alexander; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2010-01-01

    In a preceding case study, a process-focused demand-driven approach for organising flexible educational programmes in higher professional education (HPE) was developed. Operations management and instructional design contributed to designing a flexible educational model by means of discrete-event simulation. Educational experts validated the model…

  5. Changes and Challenges in Music Education: Reflections on a Norwegian Arts-in-Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophersen, Catharina

    2015-01-01

    With a recent research study on a Norwegian arts-in-education programme "The Cultural Rucksack" as its starting point, this article addresses policy changes in the fields of culture and education and possible implications these could have on music education in schools. Familiar debates on the quality of education and the political…

  6. Modernising educational programmes in ICT based on the Tuning methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Bedny

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An analysis is presented of the experience of modernising undergraduate educational programs using the TUNING methodology, based on the example of the area of studies “Fundamental computer science and information technology” (FCSIT implemented at Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod (Russia. The algorithm for reforming curricula for the subject area of information technology in accordance with the TUNING methodology is explained. A comparison is drawn between the existing Russian and European standards in the area of ICT education, including the European e-Competence Framework, with the focus on relevant competences. Some guidelines for the preparation of educational programmes are also provided.

  7. Administrative, Faculty, and Staff Perceptions of Organizational Climate and Commitment in Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John Charles

    2008-01-01

    Findings of 957 surveyed employees from four evangelical higher education institutions found a negative correlation for climate and commitment and staff members. Administrators were found to have a more favorable view of their institutional climate than staff. Employee age, tenure, and classification had predictive value for organizational…

  8. Developing an Education Intervention for Staff Supporting Persons with an Intellectual Disability and Advanced Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey-McCarthy, Elizabeth; McCarron, Mary; Connaire, Kevin; McCallion, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Generally, staff working in settings that provide care for adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) have not received specific education with respect to extended care for terminal illnesses or late-stage dementia. Equally, staff working in specialist palliative care often are not familiar with the unique issues of supporting persons with…

  9. Student and Staff Perceptions of a Learning Management System for Blended Learning in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Kathryn A.; Prieto-Rodriguez, Elena

    2018-01-01

    Higher education institutions routinely use Learning Management Systems (LMS) for multiple purposes; to organise coursework and assessment, to facilitate staff and student interactions, and to act as repositories of learning objects. The analysis reported here involves staff (n = 46) and student (n = 470) responses to surveys as well as data…

  10. Reflection in Teacher Education Programmes for Novice EFL Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiota G. Karkaletsi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The present paper focuses on the concept of reflection as an integral component of professional English Foreign Language teacher education. Many scholars have acknowledged its paramount importance in teachers’ training and development and the relevant literature reveals that reflection may herald the beginning of a true learning process towards professional growth, productive change and professional autonomy. Thus, it appears as an imperative need to evaluate whether teacher preparation programmes develop reflective abilities in their trainees. It is primarily for this reason that the study seeks to investigate whether the compulsory, induction training programme offered by the Greek State for the newly appointed English Foreign Language teachers (P.E.K. induction training programme grants them sufficient space, time and support to engage in reflective thought and action consciously and creatively. The research that is conducted employs the questionnaire as its methodological tool with a view to collecting sufficient data, whose analysis will lead to valuable conclusions. The results show that the training programme under investigation bears a great weakness since it marginalises the role of reflection leaving its rich potential unexploited. The findings provide a strong case for assigning greater value to reflective practices and for enhancing the quality of reflection in the specific induction training programme through the adoption of various promising techniques.

  11. Assessment of nutrition and physical activity education programmes in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, V; Beilin, L J; Milligan, R; Thompson, C

    1995-03-01

    1. Studies in children relating blood lipids to the extent of atherosclerosis at post-mortem suggest a link between risk factors for cardiovascular disease in childhood and adult life. Tracking of blood pressure (BP) and cholesterol from childhood also supports this association. However, prospective studies have not yet established the outcome in children with increased levels of risk factors. 2. In a controlled trial in Perth, Western Australia, involving over 1000 10-12 year old children, fitness was improved by physical activity programmes which were associated with a greater fall in diastolic BP and triceps skinfolds in girls compared with controls. Sugar intake decreased in boys and fat intake fell in girls, mainly affecting participants in home nutrition programmes. 3. In higher risk children, identified by cluster analysis, major benefits were associated with the fitness and home nutrition programmes. Physical activity combined with involvement of the family in nutrition education is likely to be the most successful approach to modifying lifestyle in children, including those with higher levels of risk. 4. Undernutrition by too rigid restriction of fat intake must be avoided in young children who need calorie-dense foods. Undernutrition, in itself, may predispose to cardiovascular disease in later life. Programmes should aim to establish a prudent diet appropriate to the age of the child combined with physical activity. As regular activity and a healthy diet in adult life will reduce risks of cardiovascular disease it is likely that childhood education will establish lifestyle habits of potential long-term benefit.

  12. Nurse educators’ experiences of case-based education in a South African nursing programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity M. Daniels

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: A school of nursing at a university in the Western Cape experienced an increase in student enrolments from an intake of 150 students to 300 students in the space of one year. This required a review of the teaching and learning approach to ensure that it was appropriate for effective facilitation of large classes. The case-based education (CBE approach was adopted for the delivery of the Bachelor of Nursing programme in 2005. Aim: The aim of the study was to explore nurse educators’ experiences, current practices and possible improvements to inform best practice of CBE at the nursing school in the Western Cape. Methods: A participatory action research method was applied in a two day workshop conducted with nurse educators in the undergraduate nursing programme. The nominal group technique was used to collect the data. Results: Three themes emerged from the final synthesis of the findings, namely: teaching and learning related issues, student issues and teacher issues. Amongst other aspects, theory and practice integration, as well as the need for peer support in facilitation of CBE, were identified as requiring strengthening. Conclusion: It was concluded that case-based education should continue to be used in the school, however, more workshops should be arranged to keep educators updated and new staff orientated in respect of this teaching and learning approach.

  13. Therapeutic patient education in heart failure: do studies provide sufficient information about the educational programme?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Maria Grazia; Jourdain, Patrick; De Andrade, Vincent; Domenke, Aukse; Desnos, Michel; d'Ivernois, Jean-François

    2014-05-01

    Therapeutic patient education programmes on heart failure have been widely proposed for many years for heart failure patients, but their efficiency remains questionable, partly because most articles lack a precise programme description, which makes comparative analysis of the studies difficult. To analyse the degree of precision in describing therapeutic patient education programmes in recent randomized controlled trials. Three major recent recommendations on therapeutic patient education in heart failure inspired us to compile a list of 23 relevant items that an 'ideal' description of a therapeutic patient education programme should contain. To discover the extent to which recent studies into therapeutic patient education in heart failure included these items, we analysed 19 randomized controlled trials among 448 articles published in this field from 2005 to 2012. The major elements required to describe a therapeutic patient education programme were present, but some other very important pieces of information were missing in most of the studies we analysed: the patient's educational needs, health literacy, projects, expectations regarding therapeutic patient education and psychosocial status; the educational methodology used; outcomes evaluation; and follow-up strategies. Research into how therapeutic patient education can help heart failure patients will be improved if more precise descriptions of patients, educational methodology and evaluation protocols are given by authors, ideally in a standardized format. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of honours programme participation in higher education: A propensity score matching approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kool, Ada; Mainhard, Tim; Jaarsma, Debbie; van Beukelen, Peter; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2017-01-01

    Honours programmes have become part of higher education systems around the globe, and an increasing number of students are enrolled in such programmes. So far, effects of these programmes are largely under-researched. Two gaps in previous research on the effects of such programmes were addressed: (1) most studies lack a comparable control group of students not enrolled in honours programmes and (2) few studies have longitudinally investigated effects of honours programmes on student character...

  15. A career exploration programme for learners with special educational needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Niekerk, Matty

    2007-01-01

    Learners with disabilities lag far behind their peers without disabilities in achievement, graduation rates, post-school education and employment outcomes [4]. Against the current state of education affairs in South Africa, where curriculum models for learners with special educational needs (LSEN) are still under revision, therapists and teachers are finding it difficult to prepare these learners for appropriate employment after school. Even where systems in education are established, persons with learning disabilities face more challenges to enter employment [5]. This article reports on a unique career exploration programme for grade 11 learners at a school for learners with special educational needs in Gauteng, South Africa. It is a collaborative strategy between the learners, their parents, a teacher and the occupational therapists at the school. Two case studies are described to indicate the success of the program.

  16. Foreign language education to seniors through intergenerational programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Határ Ctibor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The intergenerational learning within various types of social environment and in relation to different target groups has long covered a wide range of uses. The professional literature mostly describes its benefits for children and young people, however, the intergenerational education also contributes to the development of personality and the saturation of the educational and psycho-social needs of both adults and seniors. The paper represents the authors’ output of the VEGA research project No. 1/0176/15 and it is structured into three chapters. In the first chapter, the author deals with the opportunities of the foreign language education for (not only disabled seniors. The second chapter focuses on the intergenerational programmes that can be used in the language education of (not only disabled seniors who are clients of social residential facilities. In the third chapter, the author elaborates the psychological aspects of the foreign language education of seniors.

  17. Safety and health practice among laboratory staff in Malaysian education sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husna Che Hassan, Nurul; Rasdan Ismail, Ahmad; Kamilah Makhtar, Nor; Azwadi Sulaiman, Muhammad; Syuhadah Subki, Noor; Adilah Hamzah, Noor

    2017-10-01

    Safety is the most important issue in industrial sector such as construction and manufacturing. Recently, the increasing number of accident cases reported involving school environment shows the important of safety issues in education sector. Safety awareness among staff in this sector is crucial in order to find out the method to prevent the accident occurred in future. This study was conducted to analyze the knowledge of laboratory staff in term of safety and health practice in laboratory. Survey questionnaires were distributing among 255 of staff laboratory from ten District Education Offices in Kelantan. Descriptive analysis shows that the understanding of safety and health practice are low while doing some job activities in laboratory. Furthermore, some of the staff also did not implemented safety practice that may contribute to unplanned event occur in laboratory. Suggestion that the staff at laboratory need to undergo on Occupational Safety and Health training to maintain and create safe environment in workplaces.

  18. PBL as a Tool for Staff Development in the Educational Transformation towards PBL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Xiangyun; Kolmos, Anette; Qvist, Palle

    2007-01-01

    and practices in the process of organizational transformation, staff development remains one of key elements in the transformation process in order to teach staff new PBL practice.. A growing body of literature discussing the role of facilitation in PBL, implementation of PBL at different levels in educational...... practice, PBL online; however, little has been documented on the practice of staff development in PBL, especially through online education in the form of PBL. This paper presents the experiences and reflections of using PBL online as a strategy for staff development based on the practice...... of an international e-learning program for staff development on PBL, the Master program in Problem Based Learning in Engineering and Science (MPBL) at Aalborg University, Denmark....

  19. The pursuit of excellence and innovation in service user involvement in nurse education programmes: report from a travel scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Julia M

    2013-05-01

    The involvement of service users and carers in nurse education is increasing, with the new standards for pre-registration nurse education in the UK, which require nurse education providers to demonstrate how they are involving users and carers in the planning, delivery, teaching and evaluation of nursing curricula (Nursing and Midwifery Council, 2010). A travel scholarship provided the opportunity to explore best practice in this area, focussing on identifying support systems and processes that enable user involvement. The scholarship was undertaken in the UK and Ireland during a 4 week study tour between June and July 2011, during which I visited 15 universities, and met with nurse education staff, users and carers involved in nurse education programmes. Prerequisite processes, the spectrum and variety of involvement activities, quality assurance and evaluation; and sustainability of user involvement in nurse education are reported in this paper. Service users and carers are an under-utilised resource, and as experts by experience have much to offer students and staff by increased involvement in nurse education programmes. The importance of values, enthusiasm and relationships, the cornerstones that strengthen user involvement; often sustain such partnerships. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Teacher Education Programmes at Alexandria University with reference to Tuning Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsaeed Alshamy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The study aims at using the outcomes of Tuning Africa Project — I to propose implications for policy and practice for enhancing the quality of Teacher Education Programmes in Egyptian higher education. It investigates the views of different stakeholders — academics, students, graduates and employers — who relate to three faculties in charge of Teacher Education at Alexandria University. The study focuses on the generic competences and the key subject-specific competences which future teachers should be acquainted with. The data have been collected through questionnaires administered to 384 participants and through semi-structured interviews with 10 academics. The main findings show that, across all different stakeholders, there are significant gaps for both generic and subject-specific competences between what is deemed important and what is deemed as the level of achievement at Alexandria University. The average ranking for both generic and subject-specific competences was 3.75 in terms of importance but only 2.54 in terms of achievement. This is an indication that effort and intentional strategies needed to be put in place to minimize the gaps of the relevant Teacher Education Programmes. This calls for a paradigm shift from input and staff-centered programmes to output and student oriented ones. In order to achieve such a paradigm shift, several actions concerning policy and practice should be promoted. Among them, the study proposes changing the regulations of existing programmes; revising programmes in order to allow inclusion of the Tuning determined generic and subject-specific competences. The study further proposes raising awareness about the importance of competence-based learning among academics, students, graduates, employers and the society at large as well as involving all stakeholders in the process of curriculum design and quality enhancement. All these are potential in promoting capacity building and training for academics

  1. Educational and psychosocial programmes for adolescents with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gage, Heather; Hampson, Sarah; Skinner, T. Chas

    2004-01-01

    Diabetes incurs heavy personal and health system costs. Self-management is required if complications are to be avoided. Adolescents face particular challenges as they learn to take responsibility for their diabetes. A systematic review of educational and psychosocial programmes for adolescents...... on knowledge/skills, psychosocial issues, and behaviour/self-management. They result in modest improvements across a range of outcomes but improvements are often not sustained, suggesting a need for continuous support, possibly integrated into normal care. In-hospital education at diagnosis confers few...

  2. A Bilingual Education Programme in California. The Education of Migrant Workers -- Where Do We Stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan-Cabrera, Patricia

    1974-01-01

    The University of Southern California Teacher Corps Rural-Migrant Project in Bilingual-Bicultural Education is a joint teacher training effort between university and local education agencies and a two-year graduate studies programme that recruits and trains bilingual interns with commitment to careers in the education of the disadvantaged. (JH)

  3. Innovation in learning and development in multilingual and multicultural contexts: Principles learned from a higher educational study programme in Luxembourg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Gudrun

    2011-12-01

    Multilingualism in education is a conceptual as well as a pedagogical challenge of the 21st century. Luxembourg, with its three statutory official languages (Luxembourgish, French and German), is an especially complex setting. The gap between traditional principles of language education on the one hand and the challenging impacts of today's multilingualisms on the other led the University of Luxembourg (founded in 2003) to set up a developmentally-driven Master's programme in 2007, entitled "Learning and Development in Multilingual and Multicultural Contexts". After a presentation of the general multilingual settings in Luxembourg, this paper discusses the constellation of the multilingual University's staff and students and provides an analysis of the concept of the course by outlining its innovative approach, its principles and lessons learned with regard to running a trilingual higher education programme.

  4. Effects of Honours Programme Participation in Higher Education: A Propensity Score Matching Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kool, Ada; Mainhard, Tim; Jaarsma, Debbie; van Beukelen, Peter; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2017-01-01

    Honours programmes have become part of higher education systems around the globe, and an increasing number of students are enrolled in such programmes. So far, effects of these programmes are largely under-researched. Two gaps in previous research on the effects of such programmes were addressed: (1) most studies lack a comparable control group of…

  5. Effects of honours programme participation in higher education : a propensity score matching approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, Ada; Mainhard, Tim; Jaarsma, Debbie; van Beukelen, Peter; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2017-01-01

    Honours programmes have become part of higher education systems around the globe, and an increasing number of students are enrolled in such programmes. So far, effects of these programmes are largely under-researched. Two gaps in previous research on the effects of such programmes were addressed:

  6. Effects of honours programme participation in higher education : A propensity score matching approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, Ada; Mainhard, Tim; Jaarsma, Debbie; van Beukelen, Peter; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2017-01-01

    Honours programmes have become part of higher education systems around the globe, and an increasing number of students are enrolled in such programmes. So far, effects of these programmes are largely under-researched. Two gaps in previous research on the effects of such programmes were addressed:

  7. A study into the effectiveness of a postural care training programme aimed at improving knowledge, understanding and confidence in parents and school staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotham, S; Hamilton-West, K E; Hutton, E; King, A; Abbott, N

    2017-09-01

    Parents and school staff lack knowledge and confidence when providing postural care to physically disabled children. This can act as a barrier to the successful implementation of therapy. To address this problem, we developed a novel training programme to improve knowledge and confidence in providing postural care and evaluate the impact of the training programme in parents and school staff. The postural care training programme included three elements: a 2-h interactive workshop facilitated by physiotherapists and occupational therapists, a follow-up home/school visit and a follow-up telephone call. The Understanding, Knowledge and Confidence in Providing Postural Care for Children with Disabilities questionnaire was utilized to evaluate the impact and includes subscales assessing knowledge and understanding, concerns and confidence in providing postural care. The Understanding, Knowledge and Confidence in Providing Postural Care for Children with Disabilities questionnaire was completed at baseline and 6 weeks later. The training programme was delivered to N = 75 parents and school staff. Of these, N = 65 completed both baseline and follow-up measures and were used in the data analysis. Participants and therapists were also invited to provide further feedback on the overall training programme via interviews and focus groups. Paired samples t-tests were used to determine statistically significant differences between baseline and follow-up scores for each of the three subscales. Mean levels of understanding and knowledge and confidence improved (P confidence in parents and school staff that care for children with significant physical postural care impairments. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Staff-reported antecedents to aggression in a post-acute brain injury treatment programme: what are they and what implications do they have for treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Gordon Muir; Scott, Karen; Manchester, David

    2013-01-01

    Research in psychiatric settings has found that staff attribute the majority of in-patient aggression to immediate environmental stressors. We sought to determine if staff working with persons with brain injury-related severe and chronic impairment make similar causal attributions. If immediate environmental stressors precipitate the majority of aggressive incidents in this client group, it is possible an increased focus on the management of factors that initiate client aggression may be helpful. The research was conducted in a low-demand treatment programme for individuals with chronic cognitive impairment due to acquired brain injury. Over a six-week period, 63 staff and a research assistant reported on 508 aggressive incidents. Staff views as to the causes of client aggression were elicited within 72 hours of observing an aggressive incident. Staff descriptions of causes were categorised using qualitative methods and analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Aggression towards staff was predominantly preceded by (a) actions that interrupted or redirected a client behaviour, (b) an activity demand, or (c) a physical intrusion. The majority of aggressive incidents appeared hostile/angry in nature and were not considered by staff to be pre-meditated. Common treatment approaches can be usefully augmented by a renewed focus on interventions aimed at reducing antecedents that provoke aggression. Possible approaches for achieving this are considered.

  9. Effectiveness of a Psycho-Educational Staff Training Program on Attitudes of Staff in a Long-Term Care Facility: A Pilot Study and Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elpers, Kathy; Amano, Takashi; DeCoster, Vaughn; Johnson, Missy

    2017-01-01

    Managing Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) is a significant challenge for staff working in long-term care facilities. This study examines the effectiveness of a psycho-educational training aimed at changing staff's attitudes. The results indicated that participants' attitudes toward dementia were more positive,…

  10. Regulatory history of educational requirements for nuclear power plant staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persensky, J.J.; Goodman, C.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to describe the history of educational qualifications requirements considered by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) since 1980 and to discuss the current NRC position on educational qualifications

  11. Clinical staff perceptions of palliative care-related quality of care, service access, education and training needs and delivery confidence in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Rosemary; Gott, Merryn; Raphael, Deborah; O'Callaghan, Anne; Robinson, Jackie; Boyd, Michal; Laking, George; Manson, Leigh; Snow, Barry

    2014-12-01

    Central to appropriate palliative care management in hospital settings is ensuring an adequately trained workforce. In order to achieve optimum palliative care delivery, it is first necessary to create a baseline understanding of the level of palliative care education and support needs among all clinical staff (not just palliative care specialists) within the acute hospital setting. The objectives of the study were to explore clinical staff: perceptions concerning the quality of palliative care delivery and support service accessibility, previous experience and education in palliative care delivery, perceptions of their own need for formal palliative care education, confidence in palliative care delivery and the impact of formal palliative care training on perceived confidence. A purposive sample of clinical staff members (598) in a 710-bed hospital were surveyed regarding their experiences of palliative care delivery and their education needs. On average, the clinical staff rated the quality of care provided to people who die in the hospital as 'good' (x̄=4.17, SD=0.91). Respondents also reported that 19.3% of their time was spent caring for end-of-life patients. However, only 19% of the 598 respondents reported having received formal palliative care training. In contrast, 73.7% answered that they would like formal training. Perceived confidence in palliative care delivery was significantly greater for those clinical staff with formal palliative care training. Formal training in palliative care increases clinical staff perceptions of confidence, which evidence suggests impacts on the quality of palliative care provided to patients. The results of the study should be used to shape the design and delivery of palliative care education programmes within the acute hospital setting to successfully meet the needs of all clinical staff. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. A cluster-randomised trial of staff education to improve the quality of life of people with dementia living in residential care: the DIRECT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Christopher; Horner, Barbara; Flicker, Leon; Scherer, Samuel; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; Bretland, Nick; Flett, Penelope; Schaper, Frank; Almeida, Osvaldo P

    2011-01-01

    The Dementia In Residential care: EduCation intervention Trial (DIRECT) was conducted to determine if delivery of education designed to meet the perceived need of GPs and care staff improves the quality of life of participants with dementia living in residential care. This cluster-randomised controlled trial was conducted in 39 residential aged care facilities in the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia. 351 care facility residents aged 65 years and older with Mini-Mental State Examination ≤ 24, their GPs and facility staff participated. Flexible education designed to meet the perceived needs of learners was delivered to GPs and care facility staff in intervention groups. The primary outcome of the study was self-rated quality of life of participants with dementia, measured using the QOL-Alzheimer's Disease Scale (QOL-AD) at 4 weeks and 6 months after the conclusion of the intervention. Analysis accounted for the effect of clustering by using multi-level regression analysis. Education of GPs or care facility staff did not affect the primary outcome at either 4 weeks or 6 months. In a post hoc analysis excluding facilities in which fewer than 50% of staff attended an education session, self-rated QOL-AD scores were 6.14 points (adjusted 95%CI 1.14, 11.15) higher at four-week follow-up among residents in facilities randomly assigned to the education intervention. The education intervention directed at care facilities or GPs did not improve the quality of life ratings of participants with dementia as a group. This may be explained by the poor adherence to the intervention programme, as participants with dementia living in facilities where staff participated at least minimally seemed to benefit. ANZCTR.org.au ACTRN12607000417482.

  13. A cluster-randomised trial of staff education to improve the quality of life of people with dementia living in residential care: the DIRECT study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Beer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Dementia In Residential care: EduCation intervention Trial (DIRECT was conducted to determine if delivery of education designed to meet the perceived need of GPs and care staff improves the quality of life of participants with dementia living in residential care. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This cluster-randomised controlled trial was conducted in 39 residential aged care facilities in the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia. 351 care facility residents aged 65 years and older with Mini-Mental State Examination ≤ 24, their GPs and facility staff participated. Flexible education designed to meet the perceived needs of learners was delivered to GPs and care facility staff in intervention groups. The primary outcome of the study was self-rated quality of life of participants with dementia, measured using the QOL-Alzheimer's Disease Scale (QOL-AD at 4 weeks and 6 months after the conclusion of the intervention. Analysis accounted for the effect of clustering by using multi-level regression analysis. Education of GPs or care facility staff did not affect the primary outcome at either 4 weeks or 6 months. In a post hoc analysis excluding facilities in which fewer than 50% of staff attended an education session, self-rated QOL-AD scores were 6.14 points (adjusted 95%CI 1.14, 11.15 higher at four-week follow-up among residents in facilities randomly assigned to the education intervention. CONCLUSION: The education intervention directed at care facilities or GPs did not improve the quality of life ratings of participants with dementia as a group. This may be explained by the poor adherence to the intervention programme, as participants with dementia living in facilities where staff participated at least minimally seemed to benefit. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ANZCTR.org.au ACTRN12607000417482.

  14. Ten-year population education programme reaps good results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    A study, which was undertaken by the National Education Committee to determine differences in knowledge and behavior regarding population issues between those who had taken population education courses from 1981-1986 at Tai An No. 1 Middle School and those who had graduated in 1983 and 1984 without the benefit of population education from Tai An No. 4 Middle School, demonstrated that those students exposed to population education in 1983 and 1984 had better knowledge on population issues, and married and began producing children later than the others. 26.1% of those who attended population courses in 1983, and 13.3% of those who attended in 1984, married. In comparison, 66.7% of those who did not attend population courses in 1983, and 53.3% of those who did not attend in 1984, married. Population education was introduced at Tai An No. 1 Middle School in 1981; the forms it has taken include curriculum development, teaching programmes, examinations, social investigations, knowledge competitions, research and thesis writing, and after-class activities. Teaching methodologies have included lecture and practicum, audio-visual aids, discussion, self-learning methods, and social investigations. Since 1980, 5391 students from 94 classes in the first term of grade 2 in senior level have received population education. Results of examinations indicate that a large majority of these students perform well in terms of knowledge and attitude and have a better understanding of the interrelationships among population problems, environmental and ecological balance, and economic and social development. Social investigations and community visits have strengthened the commitment and social responsibility of the students, who form a voluntary propaganda team for the government's population programme. The Tai An No. 1 Middle School has also used an exhibit hall for population education of the public.

  15. A Report on Education and Training in the International Council on Archives' Africa Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, James

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, the International Council on Archives launched its Africa Programme (2015-2020) in order to coordinate its support for African archives and archivists. The Programme is focused on two strategic priorities: advocacy and education and training. This article examines the education and training component of the Programme. It begins by…

  16. Using life history narratives to educate staff members about personhood in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammonley, Denise; Lester, Connie L; Fleishman, Daniel; Duran, Lloyd; Cravero, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Oral life history narratives are a promising method to promote person-centered values of personhood and belonging. This project used resident oral history interviews to educate staff members in an assisted-living setting about personhood. A single group pre-post test design evaluated impacts on 37 staff members to assess their use of resident videotaped oral history interviews and impacts on their perceived knowledge of residents. Perceived knowledge of residents declined (p = .003) between pretest and posttest. Older staff members were less likely to view a video. Staff members are interested in resident oral history biographies and identify them as helpful for delivering care. Oral history methods might provide an opportunity for staff members to promote personhood by allowing them to expand their understanding of resident preferences, values, and experiences.

  17. Academic staff involvement and openness to diversity in international educational organisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob; Jonasson, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Joint work among academic staff is important for solving the ever-increasing number of complex tasks that are becoming part of everyday activities in higher education. At the same time, diversification and internationalisation may challenge collaboration processes and communication demands....... Speaking a shared language consistently could be a way of overcoming problems. Hence, this study focuses on the effect of shared language among academic staff on the relation between academic staff involvement in work processes and openness to diversity. This study draws on data from 489 Danish academic...... staff members in science departments of three universities. Results show positive associations between academic staff involvement and all openness-to-diversity variables (openness to informational, linguistic, value and visible diversity). Shared language had a positive effect on openness to surface...

  18. Education Inside. Motives for Participation in Prison Education Programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshier, Roger

    A study analyzed the motives of inmates participating in prison educational programs in Canada. During the study, a prison education participation scale was developed to measure the interrelationship among motivational orientations and the following factors: inmates' personal characteristics, criminal background, present offence and sentence,…

  19. Manual on Cost-Effectiveness of Training Modalities in Population Education. Population Education Programme Service Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    This manual is the result of a regional training workshop on the cost-effectiveness of different training strategies in population education by Unesco in Kathmandu, Nepal, June 1-8, 1987. The purpose of the manual is to enable project staff to initiate studies to determine cost-effective training strategies in population growth control education.…

  20. Enhancing the well-being of support services staff in higher education: The power of appreciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurika van Straaten

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: A literature search for studies on the well-being of support staff of higher education institutions (HEIs produced very little results. Appreciation was then used to identify elements that might enhance the well-being of a selected HEI’s support staff. Research purpose: The aim was to explore the strengths of a selected HEI that might serve as driving forces for enhancing its support staff’s well-being. Motivation for the study: The lack of research on the well-being of support staff motivated the study. A need was identified to explore driving forces that might enhance their well-being. Research design, approach and method: A literature review guided by theoretical perspectives and theories on staff well-being was conducted. Subsequently, a qualitative action research design involving an Appreciative Inquiry (AI workshop with support staff of an institution was followed. Main findings: The following strengths that might serve as driving forces for enhancing the well-being of the institution’s support services staff were identified: hard-working and dedicated support staff, positive relations among colleagues, a willingness to adapt to change,good remuneration and benefits, job security and a supportive work environment. Appreciative Inquiry was found to be well suited for identifying such strengths, as opposed to methods that focus on identifying problems or weaknesses of an organisation. As a result of this study, the relevant institution might react and build on these identified strengths towards promoting the well-being of its support staff. Practical/managerial implications: Institutions should make an effort to enhance staff well being. The results of the study could also be used to encourage HEIs to use AI to establish optimal staff well-being. Contribution/value add: The study confirmed the power of appreciation to identify the strengths that might serve as driving forces for enhancing the well-being of support staff

  1. Job Motivation and Job Satisfaction among Academic Staff in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovska, Gordana; Angelkoska, Slagana; Osmani, Fadbi; Grncarovska, Svetlana Pandiloska

    2017-01-01

    Education is the most important organization of a nation; it plays a significant role in the development of any country. Universities create and cultivate knowledge for the sake of building a modern world. The academic staff is the key resource within higher education institutions. A positive and healthy university structure results in increased…

  2. Understanding the Use of Educational Technology among Faculty, Staff, and Students at a Medical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazley, Abby Swanson; Annan, Dustin L.; Carson, Nancy E.; Freeland, Melissa; Hodge, Ashley B.; Seif, Gretchen A.; Zoller, James S.

    2013-01-01

    A college of health professions at a medical university located in the southeastern United States is striving to increase the use of educational technology among faculty, staff, and students. A strategic planning group was formed and charged with enhancing the use of educational technology within the college. In order to understand the current…

  3. Reproducing Monocultural Education: Ethnic Majority Staff's Discursive Constructions of Monocultural School Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mampaey, Jelle; Zanoni, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of ethnic majority staff in the perpetuation of monocultural education that excludes non-western, ethnic minority cultures and reproduces institutional racism in schools. Based on qualitative data collected through semi-structured interviews in four ethnically diverse schools in the Flemish educational system, we…

  4. Staff Helping Attain Relevant Education (Project SHARE): Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OREA Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranadive, Jyoti

    Project SHARE (Staff Helping Attain Relevant Education), a project funded by Title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, was in its third and final year of operation in 1992-93, in eight primary schools in the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Manhattan (New York). The project served 141 limited English proficient students from low-income families…

  5. An Investigation into Staff:Student Ratios in Nursing and Midwifery Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter, Susan; And Others

    A study examined the calculation of staff:student ratios (SSRs) in nursing and midwifery education in courses validated by the English National Board for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting (ENB). Data were collected from questionnaires mailed to all 108 colleges of nursing and midwifery and higher education institutions offering ENB-validated…

  6. Implementation of a teacher-delivered sex education programme: obstacles and facilitating factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buston, Katie; Wight, Daniel; Hart, Graham; Scott, Sue

    2002-02-01

    Interventions are unlikely to achieve their desired aims unless they are implemented as intended. This paper focuses on factors that impeded or facilitated the implementation of a specially designed sex education programme, SHARE, which 13 Scottish schools were allocated to deliver in a randomized trial. Drawing on qualitative and quantitative data provided by teachers, we describe how this intervention was not fully implemented by all teachers or in all schools. Fidelity to the programme was aided by intensive teacher training, compatibility with existing Personal and Social Education (PSE) provision, and senior management support. It was hindered by competition for curriculum time, brevity of lessons, low priority accorded to PSE by senior management, particularly in relation to timetabling, and teachers' limited experience and ability in use of role-play. The nature of the adoption process, staff absence and turnover, theoretical understanding of the package, and commitment to the research were also factors influencing the extent of implementation across and within schools. The lessons learned may be useful for those involved in designing and/or implementing other teacher-delivered school-based health promotion initiatives.

  7. 'Getting to Know Me': The second phase roll-out of a staff training programme for supporting people with dementia in general hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvish, Ruth; Burrow, Simon; Cawley, Rosanne; Harney, Kathryn; Pilling, Mark; Gregory, Julie; Keady, John

    2018-01-01

    Objectives The aims were to evaluate a second phase roll-out of a dementia care training programme for general hospital staff and to further develop two outcome scales: the Confidence in Dementia scale for measuring confidence in working with people with dementia and the Knowledge in Dementia scale for measuring knowledge in dementia. Method Following a 'training the trainers' phase, the study involved the delivery of the 'Getting to Know Me' training programme to a large number of staff (n = 517) across three National Health Service (NHS) Trusts situated in North-West England. The impact of the programme was evaluated using a pre-post design which explored: (i) changes in confidence in dementia, (ii) changes in knowledge in dementia, and (iii) changes in beliefs about behaviours that challenge. Results Statistically significant change was identified between pre-post training on all outcome measures (Confidence in Dementia: eight point increase, p Staff knowledge in dementia and confidence in working with people with dementia significantly increased following attendance at the training sessions. The findings are consistent with preliminary findings and strengthen current knowledge about the impact of dementia care training in general hospitals. The Confidence in Dementia and Knowledge in Dementia scales continue to demonstrate psychometrically sound properties and demonstrate utility in the field of dementia research.

  8. Impact of a person-centred dementia care training programme on hospital staff attitudes, role efficacy and perceptions of caring for people with dementia: A repeated measures study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surr, C A; Smith, S J; Crossland, J; Robins, J

    2016-01-01

    People with dementia occupy up to one quarter of acute hospital beds. However, the quality of care delivered to this patient group is of national concern. Staff working in acute hospitals report lack of knowledge, skills and confidence in caring for people with dementia. There is limited evidence about the most effective approaches to supporting acute hospital staff to deliver more person-centred care. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a specialist training programme for acute hospital staff regarding improving attitudes, satisfaction and feelings of caring efficacy, in provision of care to people with dementia. A repeated measures design, with measures completed immediately prior to commencing training (T1), after completion of Foundation level training (T2: 4-6 weeks post-baseline), and following Intermediate level training (T3: 3-4 months post-baseline). One NHS Trust in the North of England, UK. 40 acute hospital staff working in clinical roles, the majority of whom (90%) were nurses. All participants received the 3.5 day Person-centred Care Training for Acute Hospitals (PCTAH) programme, comprised of two levels, Foundation (0.5 day) and Intermediate (3 days), delivered over a 3-4 months period. Staff demographics and previous exposure to dementia training were collected via a questionnaire. Staff attitudes were measured using the Approaches to Dementia Questionnaire (ADQ), satisfaction in caring for people with dementia was captured using the Staff Experiences of Working with Demented Residents questionnaire (SEWDR) and perceived caring efficacy was measured using the Caring Efficacy Scale (CES). The training programme was effective in producing a significant positive change on all three outcome measures following intermediate training compared to baseline. A significant positive effect was found on the ADQ between baseline and after completion of Foundation level training, but not for either of the other measures. Training acute hospital staff in

  9. Determining Teachers' Educational Needs Regarding School Education Projects within the Scope of Erasmus+ Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Fatma; Uyar, Melis Yesilpinar; Balbag, Nur Leman

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine teachers' educational needs regarding school education projects within the scope of Erasmus+ programme. In the study, the case study method, one of qualitative research designs, was used. The participants were determined using the snowball sampling method, and eight secondary school teachers took part in…

  10. A STUDY OF THE IMPACT OF THREE DAY TRAINING PROGRAMME ON KNOWLEDGE REGARDING BIOMEDICAL WASTE AMONG PARAMEDICAL STAFF OF DISTRICT HOSPITAL ETAWAH (UP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Kumar Srivastava

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biomedical waste by definition means “Any waste which is generated during the process of diagnosis, treatment or immunization of human or animal or in research activities pertaining there to in the production or testing of biological”Objectives:•    The level of awareness about various aspect of Bio Medical Waste management among the paramedical staff.•    To study the impact of three day training programme on knowledge of Bio Medical Waste management. Material & Methods: The present study  is a Cross sectional Study carried out to assess the impact of three day training programme on knowledge of Paramedical staff posted at District Hospital, Etawah. The change in knowledge was assessed using pre- test and post- test questionnaire.Result: A total of 72 paramedical staff participated in the study. Majority of the participants were unaware about the hazards associated with the improper handing f Biomedical wastes. The knowledge about the different color codes used for the segregation of biomedical waste was also very low. Similarly, the awareness about the vehicle used for the transportation of biomedical waste was also poor.Conclusion: The present study concludes that there is an urgent need for regular training for paramedical staff posted at District Hospital and other government hospital located in small District & town as awareness about the Biomedical waste among them is very low.

  11. Equivalency Programmes (EPs) for Promoting Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Caroline, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Equivalency programmes (EPs) refers to alternative education programmes that are equivalent to the formal education system in terms of curriculum and certification, policy support mechanisms, mode of delivery, staff training, and other support activities such as monitoring, evaluation and assessment. The development of EPs is potentially an…

  12. Anaphylaxis Preparedness among Preschool Staff before and after an Educational Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley A. Foster

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Children with severe food allergies may spend many hours in the preschool setting. Little is known about anaphylaxis recognition and management preparedness among preschool staff. The objective of this study was to assess anaphylaxis preparedness among preschool staff. Methods. Anonymous questionnaires were administered before and after a 40-minute educational seminar on anaphylaxis recognition and management. Results. In total, 181 individuals participated in the preintervention survey and 171 participated in the postintervention survey. The comfort level with recognizing anaphylaxis and administering an epinephrine autoinjector significantly increased after the intervention (P<.001 for both. Of the 5 steps needed to administer an epinephrine autoinjector, staff named a mean (SD of 3 (1.3 steps in the correct order compared with 4.2 (1.1 steps after the educational intervention (P<.001. Conclusion. This study shows that a brief education intervention can significantly increase caregiver comfort regarding identifying anaphylaxis and administering an epinephrine autoinjector.

  13. programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aid for AIDS (AfA) is a disease management programme (DIVIPI available to beneficiaries and employees of contracted medical funds and ... the challenges alluded to in the first article, including late enrolment and the measurement of survival, especially in patients with ... I the HIV prevalence and incidence (new infections].

  14. Education Programme About Radiation at School in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, M.

    2015-01-01

    After Fukushima–Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident Japanese have thought “Basic radiation knowledge for school education” is very important. Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan published supplemental learning textbooks on radiation for school students and teachers written in Japanese in October 2011 just after the accident. These textbooks show the clear explanation of radiation and cover the various topics especially on the accident. Japan Atomic Energy Agency has also published new textbook for secondary school students and teachers written in English in January 2015. English version textbooks are very useful for Japanese students who want be a teacher and also for students from foreign countries in our University. Using these textbooks new class have stated at our University. In this presentation the education programmes at school in Japan and the effects of these textbooks as a practical tool will be discussed. (author)

  15. Integration of Higher Education and Endogenous Development in Staff, Students and Curricula Development Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mwadiwa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher education in most developing countries, particularly on the African continent, suffers a major contradiction, where even though the populations in nearly all African countries are of mixed cultural backgrounds, the university curriculum content encompasses, predominantly, the modern western view. Accordingly efforts and experiences for staff, student and curriculum development incorporating research, teaching and learning capacities focus, primarily, on modern concepts, approaches and methodologies. Thus most development initiatives are consequently looking to modern western view to motivate individuals who have come to associate modern western schooling and school-type programmes with success and the non-modern western world views with failure (Rustemeyer 2011:15. Arguably, modern western view pervades nearly every aspect of daily lives of traditional societies dwelling in rural communities whilst being increasingly influenced by inevitable factors of universal marketplace economically. This article challenges the University of Technology to become more passionately initiative in supporting the essence of ‘endogenous development (ED meaning development originating from within through encouraging and promoting networking with rural Community-based Traditional Institutions. The international Comparing and Supporting Endogenous Development (COMPAS Network describes endogenous development as an empowering process of the community, in which cultural awakening, creation of unity and participatory action are essential elements (COMPAS 2006:9. The significant aspect of the endogenous development approach is the willingness of development experts to implant their work and effort in the worldviews of the Traditional Institutions even though the professionals may not fully understand or agree with the worldviews of the respective Traditional Institutions.

  16. Management perceptions of a higher educational brand for the attraction of talented academic staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Saurombe

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Academic staff members have a crucial role in the success of higher education institutions (HEIs. Therefore, it is imperative to cultivate an appealing organisational brand that will attract them to HEIs as an employer of choice. Research purpose: The main objective of this study was to explore management perceptions on a higher educational institution as a brand for the attraction of talented academic staff. Motivation for the study: Although a substantial amount of research has been conducted on organisational branding, not much has emphasised the higher educational sector. Research approach, design and method: A qualitative research approach was adopted, using semi-structured interviews to collect data from management (N = 12 of a merged South African HEI. Main findings: The findings revealed six themes that should form the core of a higher educational brand for academic staff: reputation and image, organisational culture and identity, strategic vision, corporate social responsibility and work and surrounding environment. Practical/managerial implications: The findings of the study will assist higher education management to create a compelling organisational brand and work environment to attract and retain talented academic staff members. Contribution/value-add: This research makes a valuable contribution towards creating new knowledge in the key that should form part of an appealing higher education brand that will attract and retain current and future talent.

  17. Staff education aimed at reducing ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Gurdal; Aydin, Hava; Aydin, Mustafa; Saylan, Sedat; Ulusoy, Hulya; Koksal, Iftihar

    2016-12-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a life-saving invasive procedure performed in intensive care units (ICUs) where critical patients are given advanced support. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of personnel training on the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The study, performed prospectively in the ICU, was planned in two periods. In both periods, patient characteristics were recorded on patient data forms. In the second period, ICU physicians and assistant health personnel were given regular theoretical and practical training. Twenty-two cases of VAP developed in the pre-training period, an incidence of 31.2. Nineteen cases of VAP developed in the post-training period, an incidence of 21.0 (PVAP by 31.7 %. Crude VAP mortality was 69 % in the first period and 26 % in the second (PVAP in both periods were prolonged hospitalization, increased number of days on mechanical ventilation, and enteral nutrition; risk factors determined in the first period were re-intubation, central venous catheter use and heart failure and, in the second period, erythrocyte transfusion >5 units (Paspiration and adequate oral hygiene in particular were very low. An improvement was observed after training (P<0.001). The training of personnel who will apply infection control procedures for the prevention of healthcare-associated infections is highly important. Hand hygiene and other infection control measures must be emphasized in training programmes, and standard procedures in patient interventions must be revised.

  18. EDUCATION QUALITY AND ISSUES OF PEDAGOGICAL STAFF TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir P. Borisenkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to reveal the reasons of deterioration of education quality at the Soviet and Post-Soviet school and, adopting the best experience of the countries that are recognised as world leaders in education; to plan the solution ways to current problems and situation at the Russian school. Methods. The principle of a historicism that expresses the necessity of concrete historical studying of the public phenomena is put in a basis of methodology of the research conducted by the author; it includes pedagogical phenomena (in the course of its origin, its development and transformation, taking into account variety of its communications, dependences and mediations. The concrete methods used in work, are typical for theoretical research: the analysis, an estimation and reduction in system of the empirical and generalised material on the selected theme. Large corpus of the scientific literature is studied. The data of the published international researches on education in which our country is widely involved (PISA, TIMSS, and also the national researches undertaken in the USA, Great Britain and other countries are considered. Methods of expert estimations, and direct supervision of educational process in secondary and higher educational institutions are applied. Results. The general characteristic of evolution of quality of the Russian education is presented during the Soviet and Post-Soviet periods. The factors which have had negative influence on quality of school training during the various periods are revealed. The estimation of the reasons which have caused failures of school reforms, carried out in the USSR in the 60–80s and within two last decades in modern Russia is given. The concurrent important positive shifts in this sphere, taking place in the same years are noted. Results of the international researches on education (PISA and TIMSS are presented; the scoring of Russia among other states is defined, following

  19. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  20. Writing About Stress: The Impact of a Stress-Management Programme on Staff Accounts of Dealing with Stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Helping staff serving clients with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour to cope with stress has implications for their own well-being and for the lives of those they support. Method This study examined staff members' views of stress and the effectiveness of a

  1. THE INNOVATIVE METHODS OF FUTURE PROFESSIONAL STAFF EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Iwona Grabara

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the results of the carried out analysis concerning the level determination of the use of innovative methods of teaching specialized subjects in preparation for the profession of logistics, and to identify and determine possible changes in the types of teaching methods, used in relation to carried out in this area of research by specialists and experts in the past 15 years. The purpose of this article is to realize that the education system in all schools modes in Poland d...

  2. Implementation of a nurse education programme in paediatric oncology using appreciative inquiry: a single center experience in Belgrade, Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, Jelena; Radenovic, Magdalena; Arnfield, Alison; Janic, Dragana

    2011-12-01

    The nursing staff in our center are very committed to the patients but have not had the opportunity for systematic clinical education, since there is no formal education for paediatric hematology and oncology nursing in our country. We joint a project, developed to explore and develop collaborative working between nurses and doctors in paediatric oncology under the auspices of The European Cancer Organization (ECCO), The International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) and The European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS). The Appreciative Inquiry (AI) approach to change management was chosen as it looks at what works in an organization and builds on that to make improvements. Using AI we chose to develop a programme of education for nursing staff, as a project of local interest, to enhance their skills and knowledge of the specialty with the main aim of providing high quality care and ensuring best practice. We found that collaboration profoundly influenced the working environment and resulted in staff being receptive to new challenges. With improved knowledge, nurses are actually more involved in best practice which, in turn, motivates the doctors and improves professional relationships and the patient's treatment and care. We have stressed the importance of collaborative working throughout and used this model of nurse/doctor collaboration to improve the quality of care in our center. We are very hopeful that this model of collaboration and education will last longer than the project itself and be followed by future generations of doctors and nurses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Towards flexible programmes in higher professional education: An operations-management approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Ad

    2007-01-01

    Schellekens, A. (2004). Towards flexible programmes in higher professional education: An operations-management approach. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Open University of the Netherlands, The Netherlands.

  4. Spreading of Excellence in SARNET Network on Severe Accidents: The Education and Training Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Paci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The SARNET2 (severe accidents Research NETwork of Excellence project started in April 2009 for 4 years in the 7th Framework Programme (FP7 of the European Commission (EC, following a similar first project in FP6. Forty-seven organisations from 24 countries network their capacities of research in the severe accident (SA field inside SARNET to resolve the most important remaining uncertainties and safety issues on SA in water-cooled nuclear power plants (NPPs. The network includes a large majority of the European actors involved in SA research plus a few non-European relevant ones. The “Education and Training” programme in SARNET is a series of actions foreseen in this network for the “spreading of excellence.” It is focused on raising the competence level of Master and Ph.D. students and young researchers engaged in SA research and on organizing information/training courses for NPP staff or regulatory authorities (but also for researchers interested in SA management procedures.

  5. Re-Engineering the Business Education Programme in Universities for Enhanced Human Resources Development in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoli, B. E.; Azih, N.

    2015-01-01

    The paper reviewed a business education programme in Nigeria vis-a-vis its role in human resource development and highlighted deficiencies in programme curricular and delivery changes needed in remodeling of the programme to enhance learning outcomes, increase skill acquisition, meet world's standards and current labour demands in business…

  6. Outcomes for Engineering Students Delivering a STEM Education and Outreach Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzallen, Noleine; Brown, Natalie Ruth

    2017-01-01

    University science outreach programmes are used to encourage more school students to select science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) subjects in further education and pursue science-related careers. The benefits of science outreach programmes are often espoused from the perspective of programme participants. Little attention,…

  7. REBOUND: A Media-Based Life Skills and Risk Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröninger-Jungaberle, Henrik; Nagy, Ede; von Heyden, Maximilian; DuBois, Fletcher

    2015-01-01

    Background: REBOUND is a novel media-based life skills and risk education programme developed for 14- to 25-year olds in school, university or youth group settings. This paper outlines the programme's rationale, curriculum and implementation. It provides information of relevance to researchers, programme developers and policymakers. Methods/design…

  8. Postgraduate Work-Based Learning Programmes in English Higher Education: Exploring Case Studies of Organizational Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul; Preece, David

    2009-01-01

    The first part of the paper outlines and discusses the nature of work-based learning (WBL) and WBL programmes, and the overall direction of government strategy towards WBL programmes in Higher Education (HE) in England, with particular reference to postgraduate programmes, policy documents, and the WBL literature. Drawing upon case study research,…

  9. A Balancing Act: Facilitating a University Education Induction Programme for (Early Career) Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sarasvathie; Searle, Ruth L.; Shawa, Lester B.; Teferra, Damtew

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the University Education Induction Programme (UEIP), an academic development programme, delivered at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The authors, who developed and now facilitate the UEIP, deliver the programme to early career academics and senior academics as per a senate-mandated requirement. Drawing on…

  10. Improving Educational Objectives of the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Programme at Kuwait University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldowaisan, Tariq; Allahverdi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process of developing programme educational objectives (PEOs) for the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering programme at Kuwait University, and the process of deployment of these PEOs. Input of the four constituents of the programme, faculty, students, alumni, and employers, is incorporated in the development and…

  11. Criteria that ensure the quality of higher education in tourism and sport management study programme

    OpenAIRE

    Mikalauskas, Rimantas; Jasinskas, Edmundas; Švagždienė, Biruta

    2012-01-01

    The quality of higher education is predominantly determined by the work of academic staff and organization of instructional process; the criteria of higher education institution’s infrastructure are of moderate importance. Professional qualities of teaching staff that are related to communication with students during lectures are important for quality assurance; effective communication with others was found to be the most important personal quality of teaching staff. Professional qualities we...

  12. The Multimedia Educational Programme for teaching regional geography of Australia and New Zealand for 2nd stage of PS

    OpenAIRE

    BROŽOVÁ, Kristýna

    2013-01-01

    The diploma thesis deals with teaching regional geography of Australia and New Zealand on the second stage of Primary school. The main aim is to create the multimedia educational programme in the SMART notebook 11, the special programme for interactive board. The thesis also contains a methodological guide for teachers which was created with educational programme. This programme corresponds to the principles of the current educational documents (Framework Educational Programme for Elementary ...

  13. Occupational stress and strain of support staff at a higher education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the occupational stressors and strains for support staff at a higher education institution in the North West Province, and to assess the differences between the stressors and strains of different biographical groups. A cross-sectional survey design (N = 315) was used. The ASSET and a ...

  14. Sexuality and Relationship Education for Young People with Autistic Spectrum Disorder: Curriculum Change and Staff Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Sue; Tector, Angie

    2010-01-01

    Finding suitable curriculum materials for Sexuality and Relationship Education for young people with autistic spectrum disorder can be a challenge for teaching staff. In this article, Sue Hatton and Angie Tector who both formerly worked at Coddington Court School discuss findings from their research project asking pupils with autistic spectrum…

  15. The new system of education and training of medical staff in radiation protection in Albania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grillo, B.; Preza, K.; Titka, V.; Shehi, G.

    2001-01-01

    The present situation as regarding the education and training of medical staff in radiological protection is discussed. In particular the protection of patients, children and pregnant women were the most sensible topics in some courses held in recent years. Emphasis is given on a number of courses and course units dealing with radiation safety problems in the medical field and their content. (author)

  16. Personal Understanding of Assessment and the Link to Assessment Practice: The Perspectives of Higher Education Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Nicola; Sadler, Ian

    2017-01-01

    The study investigates how higher education staff understand assessment, and the relationship between these understandings and their assessment practices. Nine individuals attended a workshop that guided them through the creation of a concept map about assessment, which was subsequently discussed in one-to-one semi-structured interviews. We found…

  17. Outsourcing Academic Development in Higher Education: Staff Perceptions of an International Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Kerry; Hughes, Kate; Stephens, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, higher education support services are being outsourced. Our case study was of a program from a global, USA-based, non-profit organisation. From in-depth interviews, we investigated staff perceptions of academic development workshops and the efficacy of outsourcing to a transnational tertiary-support program. We found that…

  18. Demography and higher education: the impact on the age structure of staff and human capital formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willekens, F.J.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter first highlights major demographic trends in the OECD area and compares them to trends in other major areas of the world. It then presents a simulation to show how the ageing of staff in higher education is an outcome of two processes – ageing in place and evolution of the student

  19. Professional Development for Sessional Staff in Higher Education: A Review of Current Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitch, Danielle; Mahoney, Paige; Macfarlane, Susie

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an integrated review of evidence published in the past decade around professional development for sessional staff in higher education. Using the Integrating Theory, Evidence and Action method, the review analysed recent evidence using the three principles of the Benchmarking Leadership and Advancement of…

  20. Beyond Administration and Management: Reconstructing the Identities of Professional Staff in UK Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitchurch, Celia

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an empirical study associated with earlier reviews of the changing roles and identities of contemporary professional staff in UK higher education (Whitchurch, 2004; 2006a; 2006b). The study draws on the narratives of 24 individuals to illustrate that identity movements cannot be captured solely in terms of a shift from…

  1. Barriers to Providing Health Education During Primary Care Visits at Community Health Centers: Clinical Staff Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea-Planas, Jessica; Pose, Alix; Smith, Linda

    2016-04-01

    The rapid increase of diverse patients living in the US has created a different set of needs in healthcare, with the persistence of health disparities continuing to challenge the current system. Chronic disease management has been discussed as a way to improve health outcomes, with quality patient education being a key component. Using a community based participatory research framework, this study utilized a web-based survey and explored clinical staff perceptions of barriers to providing patient education during primary care visits. With a response rate of nearly 42 %, appointment time allotment seemed to be one of the most critical factors related to the delivery of health education and should be considered key. The importance of team-based care and staff training were also significant. Various suggestions were made in order to improve the delivery of quality patient education at community health centers located in underserved areas.

  2. Permanent education of administrative staff and develop their capacity - a worthwhile investment in the functioning of higher education institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSc. Aleksandar Todorovski

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Each institution of higher education in order to achieve their goals and to address problems that arise as obstacles to its development has a regular need for trained, an accurate and educated administrative staff. On the other hand, an individual through their knowledge, skills and experience running a particular job, faced with new requirements and new things felt need for new expertise and new knowledge and skills. Rational behavior of a particular higher education institution means the alignment of these two types of needs, mutual benefit. Systematically develop staff in the institution is essentially a long-term strategy that maximizes the institution's human capital through investment of time, money and ideas to enrich the knowledge and skills of the employees. When the very institutions of higher education (University units will create conditions for all or at least most of the administrative staff to be involved in all administrative and technical processes, when you enable permanent education administrative staff, then they feel that that work is part of them, then creates a sense of commitment to the work and responsibility of the same sense of pride and only then success will be guaranteed. Permanent education and lifelong learning in the area of capacity development (personal skills and professional competencies is a key factor for increasing level knowledge and skills, but also to improve the quality of life of the individual.

  3. Motivational orientations of urban- and rural-based RNs: implications for staff development educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, M L; Clark, D W; Stuppy, D J

    1995-01-01

    Part of professional development is influencing RNs to return for an undergraduate degree, a challenge for the staff development educator. Expanding on earlier research using Boshier's Educational Participation Scale to reveal motivational orientations, the authors queried 5 groups of RNs who were enrolled in BSN education between 1990 and 1992 (N = 235) and living in rural and urban areas of Texas. There were no significant differences of overall motivational orientations, yet RN students living in rural areas scored higher in professional knowledge (P = 0.03) whereas urban-based RN students scored higher in compliance with authority (P = 0.02). Specific marketing and educational strategies are discussed.

  4. Education and training of operators and maintenance staff at commercial nuclear power stations in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Kataoka, H.

    1998-01-01

    Safe and stable operation of a nuclear power station requires personnel fostering. In Japan, with the objectives of systematically securing qualified people for a long period of time, and maintaining and improving their skills and knowledge, the utilities have created strict personnel training plans, for continuous education and training. Concrete examples of education and training for operators and maintenance personnel at commercial nuclear power stations in Japan, such as education systems training, facility and contents of curriculum, are detailed including some related matters. Recent activities to catch up with environment changes surrounding education and training of operators and maintenance staff are also mentioned. (author)

  5. Internationally educated nurses in Canada: perceived benefits of bridging programme participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covell, C L; Primeau, M D; St-Pierre, I

    2018-02-12

    To examine internationally educated nurses' perceptions of the extent to which participating in bridging programmes is beneficial for preparing to practise nursing in Canada. Internationally educated nurses continue to migrate from low-income to high-income countries. Many experience challenges when attempting to practise their profession in the destination country. Canada and other top destination countries offer educational support, such as bridging programmes, to assist internationally educated nurses' with preparing to practise nursing in the destination country. The research evidence falls short in demonstrating the usefulness of bridging programmes. A subsample of 360 internationally educated nurse participants from a Canadian cross-sectional survey conducted in 2014. All were permanent residents, employed as regulated nurses and participants of bridging programmes. Multiple linear regression was employed to examine the influence of internationally educated nurses' human capital (academic preparation, language proficiency, professional experience) and the economic status of their source country on perceived benefits of bridging programme participation. Regression model explained 11.5% of variance in perceived benefits of bridging programme participation. Two predictors were statistically significant: source country and professional experience. Bridging programmes help internationally educated nurses address gaps in their cultural, practical and theoretical knowledge. Source country and amount of professionally experience influences the extent to which internationally educated nurses benefit from participating in bridging programmes in Canada. Provides emerging evidence for decision-makers globally when developing policies and supports to help internationally educated nurses integrate into the destination country's nursing workforce. © 2018 International Council of Nurses.

  6. High-Performance Cricket Coaches' Perceptions of an Educationally Informed Coach Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Hugh; Fyall, Glenn; Culpan, Ian

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports and discusses the findings of a research project that investigated the recently conceptualized and implemented New Zealand Cricket, Level 3, high-performance coach education programme (CEP). A qualitative methodology was employed to gather data from six coaches involved in the CEP. In particular the researchers sought the…

  7. Good Intentions: Teaching and Specialist Support Staff Perspectives of Student Disclosure of Mental Health Issues in Post-Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venville, Annie; Street, Annette F.; Fossey, Ellie

    2014-01-01

    This article reports findings from a qualitative case study, as part of which staff perspectives of student disclosure of mental health issues in an Australian post-secondary vocational education setting were explored. Twenty teaching and specialist support staff from four vocational education and training institutions participated in individual…

  8. Future and Changing Roles of Staff in Distance Education: A Study to Identify Training and Professional Development Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    The roles of distance education teaching staff are changing, necessitating role clarity and the development of appropriate competency frameworks. This article investigates the perceptions of the teaching and research staff at the University of South Africa, regarding the current and future roles of distance educators, their own competencies in…

  9. The Safety Assessment Education and Training Programme (SAET). Education and Training in the Area of Safety Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellinger-Deroy, M.

    2014-01-01

    • The SAET Programme provides a systematic approach for training regulatory, operational and technical support staff in the skills needed for informed decision-making and technical review of NPP safety case documentation. • The objective of the Programme is to support the IAEA Member States in developing the knowledge and skills necessary for making the right decisions in NPP design, licensing and operation. (author)

  10. Providing a Flexible, Learner-Centred Programme: Challenges for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Sarah; Gordon, Carole

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of the implementation of a flexible learner-centred programme of study which blends face-to-face and online learning. The programme was developed to be flexible in terms of content and study strategies, whilst remaining within more rigid organisational structures and processes. This paper outlines the programme and…

  11. Happiness, work engagement and organisational commitment of support staff at a tertiary education institution in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyndsay K. Field

    2011-09-01

    Research purpose: The purpose of the research was to determine the relationship between happiness, work engagement and organisational commitment and to determine whether happiness and work engagement hold predictive value for the organisational commitment of support staff. Motivation for the study: This study aims to enable the identification of a link between happiness, work engagement and organisational commitment and to identify a predictive value of the model. Research design, approach and method: The researchers used a cross-sectional survey design. They used a sample of 123 (N = 123 support staff members from a tertiary education institution in South Africa. The researchers used four demographic questionnaires for the research. These were the ‘Satisfaction with Life Scale’ (SWLS, the ‘Well-Being Questionnaire’ (WBQ, the ‘Utrecht Work Engagement Scale’ (UWES and the ‘Organisational Commitment Questionnaire’ (OCQ. Main findings: The researchers found a significant positive relationship between affective organisational commitment and work engagement, as well as between affective organisational commitment and happiness (as the SWLS and WBQ measure. They found a significant positive relationship between work engagement and happiness. Finally, the results showed that happiness and work engagement have predictive value for affective organisational commitment. Practical/managerial implications: Happiness and work engagement have predictive value for affective organisational commitment. Therefore, institutions should carefully tailor any implementation programme or initiative to address this relationship. Contribution/value-add: The findings will benefit both managers and workers. Institutions should consider evaluating the levels of happiness and work engagement of their support staff to address the issue of the organisational commitment of their employees.

  12. Plants Have a Chance: Outdoor Educational Programmes Alter Students' Knowledge and Attitudes towards Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancovicova, Jana; Prokop, Pavol

    2011-01-01

    Outdoor educational programmes are generally believed to be a suitable alternative to conventional biology settings that improve participants' environmental attitudes and knowledge. Here we examine whether outdoor educational programmes focused solely on practical work with plants influence participants' knowledge of and attitudes towards plants.…

  13. Hospital staff education on severe sepsis/septic shock and hospital mortality: an original hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capuzzo Maurizia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signs of serious clinical events overlap with those of sepsis. We hypothesised that any education on severe sepsis/septic shock may affect the outcome of all hospital patients. We designed this study to assess the trend of the mortality rate of adults admitted to hospital for at least one night in relationship with a hospital staff educational program dedicated to severe sepsis/septic shock. Methods This study was performed in six Italian hospitals in the same region. Multidisciplinary Sepsis Teams members were selected by each hospital management among senior staff. The education included the following steps: i the Teams were taught about adult learning, problem based learning, and Surviving Sepsis guidelines, and provided with educational material (literature, electronic presentations, scenarios of clinical cases for training and booklets; ii they started delivering courses and seminars each to their own hospital staff in the last quarter of 2007. To analyse mortality, we selected adult patients, admitted for at least one night to the wards or units present in all the study hospitals and responsible for 80% of hospital deaths. We fitted a Poisson model with monthly hospital mortality rates from December 2003 to August 2009 as dependent variable. The effect of the educational program on hospital mortality was measured as two dummy variables identifying a first (November 2007 to December 2008 and a second (January to August 2009 education period. The analysis was adjusted for a linear time trend, seasonality and monthly average values of age, Charlson score, length of stay in hospital and urgent/non-urgent admission. Results The hospital staff educated reached 30.6% at the end of June 2009. In comparison with the pre-education period, the Relative Risk of death of the patient population considered was 0.93 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87-0.99; p 0.025 for in-patients in the first, and 0.89 (95% CI 0.81-0.98; p 0.012 for

  14. Using Computerized Mental Health Programs in Alternative Education: Understanding the Requirements of Students and Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuosmanen, Tuuli; Fleming, Theresa M; Barry, Margaret M

    2018-06-01

    Computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (cCBT) programs have been shown to be both acceptable and effective with youth. However, their use with more vulnerable youth, such as early school leavers, remains relatively unstudied. This study explored student and staff attitudes toward the use of cCBT in an alternative education setting. Student and staff needs were assessed using the Requirements development approach (Van Velsen, Wentzel, & Van Gemert-Pijnen, 2013). An online staff survey (n = 16) was conducted to provide information on the context of delivery, and stakeholder requirements were further explored in four student workshops (n = 32) and staff group discussions (n = 12). Students' requirements in relation to program look and feel were reflective of issues with literacy and concentration. Activity- rather than text-based programs were considered easier to learn from, whereas attractive design with features such as connecting with others were thought necessary to keep young people engaged. Students wanted to learn practical skills on improving their mental health and well-being, using content that is positive, encouraging, and credible and that can be tailored to individual needs. Anonymity and voluntary participation were considered essential when delivering cCBT in the context of alternative education, as well as additional access from home to ensure timeliness of support. Staff required both flexibility and careful planning and timetabling in order to deliver cCBT in the alternative education setting and to support student engagement. The findings provide novel insight into the needs and preferences of vulnerable youth, with important implications for the implementation of computerized mental health programs in alternative education settings. A better understanding of user needs and preferences is critical for improving the uptake and impact of e-mental health resources.

  15. INVESTIGATING THE OPINIONS OF MoNE STAFF ABOUT INSET PROGRAMS VIA DISTANCE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasit OZEN

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the opinions of the Ministry of National Education (MoNE staff about in-service training (INSET programs via distance education. The subjects of this study were the staff (n=15 of the Inservice Training Department of MoNE in 2008. During the study, the qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews held with the (MoNE staff by the researcher. The results of the interviews revealed the importance of needs assessment, the relationship between INSET program course content and participants’ school curriculum, support mechanism in INSET programs via distance education, the application of what is learned and providing various opportunities to them that lead to their active involvement to the application of these programs, the characteristics of learning environments for these programs, INSET instructors’ teaching competencies and skills to fulfill various roles in online learning environments, of measuring and evaluating the performance of teachers during INSET programs via distance education and of the effectiveness of INSET programs via distance education.

  16. MODEL OF COOPERATION OF THE SYSTEM OF STAFF EDUCATION FOR INDUSTRY – CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK OF EDUCATIONAL CLUSTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata PRADELA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Education of staff for industry in Poland is carried out in vocational education system in schools, responsible for education of qualified workers and in system of technical universities, responsible for engineering education. This article concentrates on aspects of education of qualified workers. There is presented model of cooperation insitution responsible for vocational education for industry on the basis of concept of educational cluster. The first part of the article describes aims and determinants of cluster formulation. The second – model of structure of educational cluster, particularly: stakeholders of cluster (potential participants of cluster, scope of cooperation, information flows and stakeholders’ activities. The last part of article discusses possibilities of implementati on the model: (a by creation educational strategies and (b by caring out projects concentrated on particular problem.

  17. Language barriers in medical education and attitudes towards Arabization of medicine: student and staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbour, S M; Dewedar, S A; Kandil, S K

    2012-12-04

    Students and staff perspectives on language barriers in medical education in Egypt and their attitude towards Arabization of the medical curriculum were explored in a questionnaire survey of 400 medical students and 150 staff members. Many students (56.3%) did not consider learning medicine in English an obstacle, and 44.5% of staff considered it an obstacle only in the 1st year of medical school. Many other barriers to learning other than language were mentioned. However, 44.8% of students translated English terms to Arabic to facilitate studying and 70.6% of students in their clinical study years would prefer to learn patient history-taking in Arabic. While Arabization in general was strongly declined, teaching in Arabic language was suggested as appropriate in some specialties.

  18. Tracing It Back: Identifying the Impact of a Trans-National Language Teacher Education Programme on Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macalister, John

    2016-01-01

    Language teacher education programmes can be viewed as "change" programmes, particularly in their endeavours to re-shape cognition. However, often such programmes are found to be relatively ineffective in this regard. As a means of facilitating the desired change, trans-national language teacher education programmes, in which students…

  19. Implementation of The World Starts With Me, a comprehensive rights-based sex education programme in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijsdijk, Liesbeth E; Bos, Arjan E R; Lie, Rico; Leerlooijer, Joanne N; Eiling, Ellen; Atema, Vera; Gebhardt, Winifred A; Ruiter, Robert A C

    2014-04-01

    This article presents a process evaluation of the implementation of the sex education programme the World Starts With Me (WSWM) for secondary school students in Uganda. The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to examine factors associated with dose delivered (number of lessons implemented) and fidelity of implementation (implementation according to the manual), as well as to identify the main barriers and facilitators of implementation. Teachers' confidence in teaching WSWM was negatively associated with dose delivered. Confidence in educating and discussing sexuality issues in class was positively associated with fidelity of implementation, whereas the importance teachers attached to open sex education showed a negative association with fidelity. Main barriers for implementing WSWM were lack of time, unavailability of computers, lack of student manuals and lack of financial support and rewards. Other barriers for successful implementation were related to high turnover of staff and insufficient training and guidance of teachers. Teachers' beliefs/attitudes towards sexuality of adolescents, condom use and sex education were found to be important socio-cognitive factors intervening with full fidelity of implementation. These findings can be used to improve the intervention implementation and to better plan for large-scale dissemination of school-based sex education programmes in sub-Saharan Africa.

  20. [General conditions concerning the implementation of an outpatient education programme--characteristics and distinctions from an inpatient training programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, I; Wunderlich, B; Niehues, C

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the EVA study was to develop an outpatient education programme for women with endometriosis with a view to permanent transfer into routine care. Implementation of the programme generated several problems and obstacles that are not, or not to this extent, present in the inpatient setting of a rehabilitation clinic. The patient education programme was developed in line with an existing inpatient programme, taking into account the criteria for evaluating such training programmes. Several adjustments to process, structure and content level had to be made to achieve the conditions of the outpatient setting. Since May 2008, 17 training courses took place in various outpatient and acute inpatient settings, and a total of 156 women with diagnosed endometriosis participated. The problems and obstacles that emerged affected similarly the process, structure and content of the training programme. On the structural level, especially problems with availability of rooms, technical equipment and trainers occurred, leading to significant time pressures. The main problem on the procedural level was the recruitment of participants, since--in contrast to the inpatient setting and to disease management programmes--no assignment by physicians or insurers takes place. Furthermore, gainful activity of the participants and the resulting shift of the training beyond the usual working and opening hours are important barriers for implementation. The unavailability of trainers in these settings requires creative solutions. Regarding the contents of the training it has to be taken into consideration that--unlike the inpatient setting--no aftercare intervention and no individual psychological consultation are possible. The training programme has to be designed in such a way that all problems that have occurred could be dealt with appropriately. In summary, the permanent implementation of an outpatient training programme is possible but is more time-consuming than inpatient trainings

  1. Connecting the learners: improving uptake of a nursing home educational program by focusing on staff interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S; Pinheiro, Sandro O; Anderson, Ruth A; Porter, Kristie; McConnell, Eleanor; Corazzini, Kirsten; Hancock, Kathryn; Lipscomb, Jeffery; Beales, Julie; Simpson, Kelly M

    2014-06-01

    The CONNECT intervention is designed to improve staff connections, communication, and use of multiple perspectives for problem solving. This analysis compared staff descriptions of the learning climate, use of social constructivist learning processes, and outcomes in nursing facilities receiving CONNECT with facilities receiving a falls education program alone. Qualitative evaluation of a randomized controlled trial was done using a focus group design. Facilities (n = 8) were randomized to a falls education program alone (control) or CONNECT followed by FALLS (intervention). A total of 77 staff participated in 16 focus groups using a structured interview protocol. Transcripts were analyzed using framework analysis, and summaries for each domain were compared between intervention and control facilities. Notable differences in descriptions of the learning climate included greater learner empowerment, appreciation of the role of all disciplines, and seeking diverse viewpoints in the intervention group. Greater use of social constructivist learning processes was evidenced by the intervention group as they described greater identification of communication weaknesses, improvement in communication frequency and quality, and use of sense-making by seeking out multiple perspectives to better understand and act on information. Intervention group participants reported outcomes including more creative fall prevention plans, a more respectful work environment, and improved relationships with coworkers. No substantial difference between groups was identified in safety culture, shared responsibility, and self-reported knowledge about falls. CONNECT appears to enhance the use of social constructivist learning processes among nursing home staff. The impact of CONNECT on clinical outcomes requires further study.

  2. Practical Work in Earth Sciences Education: an experience with students in the context of a National Science Programme in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Luis; Praja, Joäo; Thompson, David

    2002-02-01

    The programme Ciencia Viva of the Portuguese Ministry of Science and Technology aims to create a greater understanding of science and science education amongst scientists, teachers, school children and the general public, each of whom is encouraged to cooperate and interact through regular contacts. The purpose is to improve practical, experimental and other forms of investigative work. To accomplish such work in schools, an overview of the state of science education worldwide is presented in terms of old and new traditions of the teaching of the physical and historical sciences the latter including the teaching of fieldwork. Traditional practices are compared with those established recently in various parts of the world in which more carefully considered understanding of the nature of science and science education has been established. In illustration of good practice, an outline is offered of the nature and rationale of two sets of curricular materials. These were designed by a team comprising staff members of the University of Aveiro and secondary school teachers and were trialled in schools. These activities are concerned with the internal rock cycle and the internal energy of the Earth in relation to plate tectonic theory. They are also related to the processes of weathering, erosion, transportation and deposition of sedimentary rocks and structures (like wave and current ripple marks) which were formed as part of the external rock cycle driven by the Sun's energy. The account concludes with an outline of the sub programme 'Geology in Summer', a fieldwork programme which introduces a holistic understanding of the workings of the outer part of the Earth to the general public. Students' perspectives and teachers' views about these experiences are generally very positive and are presented at the end. The whole programme was evaluated by an international team of scientists and science educators.

  3. The effects of a three-year integrated Olympic education programme on adolescents' prosocial behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukys, Saulius; Majauskiene, Daiva; Dumciene, Audrone

    2017-04-01

    The concept of Olympic education and its use of moral education to shape the development of personality have received insufficient empirical support. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of an integrated Olympic education programme on the development of prosocial behaviour in adolescents. A natural experimental research design was applied in this study. The pre-test sample included 411 adolescents (aged 13-14) who were randomly selected from schools that had begun to apply an integrated Olympic education programme, along with 430 adolescents from schools without an Olympic education programme. The post-test sample included 381 students from schools implementing the Olympic education programme and 402 students from schools without an Olympic education programme. The revised prosocial tendencies measure was administered to the participants at pre- and post-test time points to assess changes in prosocial behaviour and specifically on six types of prosocial behaviour: public, anonymous, dire, emotional, compliant, and altruistic. The analyses showed significant improvements in prosocial behaviour in adolescents from schools that had implemented an integrated Olympic education programme. Changes in prosocial behaviour following the implementation of an integrated Olympic education programme were observed for the compliant, altruistic, and dire types of prosocial behaviour. In conclusion, these findings suggest that an integrated Olympic education programme effectively encourages prosocial behaviour in adolescents. This study expands our understanding of the efficiency of implementing an Olympic education programme in schools. We suggest that future research should investigate the behavioural changes in students of different ages from perspective of both teachers and students.

  4. Comparative study of teaching content in teacher education programmes in Canada, Denmark, Finland and Singapore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens; Bayer, Martin

    2012-01-01

    , mathematics, and science. The study does not offer proof of any clear difference between the Danish teacher education programmes and those found in the topperforming countries; differences can be found in certain areas, in other areas there are greater differences between the four individual countries. Three...... in Canada and Singapore more frequently employ literature combining research-based knowledge with practical guidance and experiences, while the programmes in Denmark and Finland keep these knowledge forms separate. 3) The main distinguishing feature of the teacher education programme at the University......This article presents the results of a comparative study of the content in teacher education programmes for primary and lower secondary teachers (years 1-9(10)) in Canada, Denmark, Finland and Singapore. First and foremost, the study is a comparison between teacher education programmes in...

  5. Paid staff or volunteers - does it make a difference? The impact of staffing on child outcomes for children attending community-based programmes in South Africa and Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Mark; Sherr, Lorraine; Macedo, Ana; Hunt, Xanthe; Skeen, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Globally, and in low and middle income countries (LMIC) specifically, there is a critical shortage of workers. The use of volunteers to support such care delivery systems has been examined, there is scant literature on the impact of volunteers on child outcome in high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-affected communities. To examine the differential impact of paid versus volunteer workforce in Community Based Organisations (CBOs) providing care to children and families affected by the HIV epidemic in South Africa and Malawi on child outcomes over time. This study compared child outcomes for 989 consecutive children attending CBOs (0.7% refusal) at baseline and 854 at follow-up (86.3% response rate). Children attending CBOs with paid staff had higher self-esteem, fewer emotional/behavioural problems and less perceived stigma. Likewise, children attending CBOs with paid staff had fewer educational risks, and 20 heightened cognitive performance, and the digit-span memory test. After controlling for outcome at baseline, gender, age, HIV status, and disability, attending a CBO with paid staff remained a significant independent predictor of higher self-esteem scores, less perceived stigma, as well as fewer educational risks and better performance on the drawing test. We found no associations between CBO attendance - paid or volunteer - and children's depressive and trauma symptoms. Our findings show that in order to most optimally impact on child outcome 30 community-based workers (CBWs) should ideally be paid with trained staff. Specialised input for more severe child difficulties is needed.

  6. Efficacy of educational programm for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E V Bolshakova

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To estimate influence of educational programm on the level of knowledge of patients with RA about the disease, readiness for compliance, quality of life, efficiency of therapy and attitude to the disease. Methods. 103 women with RA were included in the study. They were divided into four groups: a control group, "passive" school and "active" school groups and a group with individual training (33, 21, 29 and 20 pts respectively. At the discharge from hospital and 12 months later medical estimation of patient knowledge and 10 test tasks were performed including "Index of biotic satisfaction" (N.Panin, quality of life estimation on visual analogous scale, a self-rating "of health and happiness" (Dembo- Rubinstein, "Level of social frustration" and "type of attitude to illness" (SPb Bechterev’s institute, readiness for complianse (original questionnaire. Results. At the time of discharge and in after 12 months test tasks and medical estimation of pts knowledge indices in "active" school and individual training groups were significantly higher, than in of control group and group of "passive" school (p < 0,001. The collective medical assessment demonstrated a correlation between treatment efficacy and the method of information transfer (p=0.29: p < 0,05. The quality of life correlates with the method of training according to all assessment techniques. Estimation of training method influencing on compliance provided similar results (p: = 0.45; p < 0,05. In groups of "active" school and individual training the number of pts who strictly followed the regimens of physical rehabilitation increased. Conclusion. Our data confirm the necessity of purposeful and systematic educational training in RA. The active methods and individual training promote the achievement of best results

  7. The incidence of secual harassment at higher education institutions in South Africa: perceptions of academic staff

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre Joubert; Christo van Wyk; Sebastiaan Rothmann

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to investigate the perceptions of academic staff relating to the incidence of sexual harassment at higher education institutions in South Africa. The results show a relatively low incidence level of sexual harassment, with gender harassment being more prevalent than unwanted sexual attention and quid pro quo harassment. No statistically significant effect of gender, age, population group or years of service was found on the perceptions of the incidence of sexual harassment. ...

  8. Impact of Curricular Reforms on Educational Philosophy Courses in M.Ed Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafoor, K. Abdul; Remia, K. R.

    2014-01-01

    In the context of Vision of Teacher Education envisaged in National Curriculum Framework for Teacher Education, this study probes "Do M.Ed programmes provide for the prerequisites of educational philosophy for teacher educators?" and "whether the syllabi following credit and non credit pattern vary in their coverage of content of…

  9. Factors associated with staff development processes and the creation of innovative science courses in higher education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Jeanelle Bland

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine factors associated with staff development processes and the creation of innovative science courses by higher education faculty who have participated in a model staff development project. The staff development program was designed for college faculty interested in creating interdisciplinary, constructivist-based science, mathematics, or engineering courses designed for non-majors. The program includes workshops on incorporating constructivist pedagogy, alternative assessment, and technology into interdisciplinary courses. Staff development interventions used in the program include grant opportunities, distribution of resource materials, and peer mentoring. University teams attending the workshops are comprised of faculty from the sciences, mathematics, or engineering, as well as education, and administration. A purposeful and convenient sample of three university teams were subjects for this qualitative study. Each team had attended a NASA Opportunities for Visionary Academics (NOVA) workshop, received funding for course development, and offered innovative courses. Five questions were addressed in this study: (a) What methods were used by faculty teams in planning the courses? (b) What changes occurred in existing science courses? (c) What factors affected the team collaboration process? (d) What personal characteristics of faculty members were important in successful course development? and (e) What barriers existed for faculty in the course development process? Data was collected at each site through individual faculty interviews (N = 11), student focus group interviews (N = 15), and classroom observations. Secondary data included original funding proposals. The NOVA staff development model incorporated effective K--12 interventions with higher education interventions. Analysis of data revealed that there were four factors of staff development processes that were most beneficial. First, the team collaborative processes

  10. Writing about stress: the impact of a stress-management programme on staff accounts of dealing with stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M W J; Embregts, Petri J C M; Bosman, Anna M T; Jahoda, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Helping staff serving clients with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour to cope with stress has implications for their own well-being and for the lives of those they support. This study examined staff members' views of stress and the effectiveness of a stress-management intervention. Effectiveness was assessed using written assignments regarding stress management, and changes in views presented were tested in a pre- and post-test control group design. In the first phase, a content analysis was conducted across groups, which revealed that participants expressed a broad variety of views about stress and coping mechanisms, with considerable individual differences. In the second phase, a more fine-grained quantitative analysis was conducted to assess training effectiveness. Results showed an increase in the proportion of coping strategies referred to by the experimental group post-training. This positive change remained at follow-up. The results of the content analysis and the outcome data have implications for staff training. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Empowering Education: A New Model for In-service Training of Nursing Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaghari, Mahmud; Saffari, Mohsen; Ebadi, Abbas; Ameryoun, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    In-service training of nurses plays an indispensable role in improving the quality of inpatient care. Need to enhance the effectiveness of in-service training of nurses is an inevitable requirement. This study attempted to design a new optimal model for in-service training of nurses. This qualitative study was conducted in two stages during 2015-2016. In the first stage, the Grounded Theory was adopted to explore the process of training 35 participating nurses. The sampling was initially purposeful and then theoretically based on emerging concept. Data were collected through interview, observation and field notes. Moreover, the data were analyzed through Corbin-Strauss method and the data were coded through MAXQDA-10. In the second stage, the findings were employed through 'Walker and Avants strategy for theory construction so as to design an optimal model for in-service training of nursing staff. In the first stage, there were five major themes including unsuccessful mandatory education, empowering education, organizational challenges of education, poor educational management, and educational-occupational resiliency. Empowering education was the core variable derived from the research, based on which a grounded theory was proposed. The new empowering education model was composed of self-directed learning and practical learning. There are several strategies to achieve empowering education, including the fostering of searching skills, clinical performance monitoring, motivational factors, participation in the design and implementation, and problem-solving approach. Empowering education is a new model for in-service training of nurses, which matches the training programs with andragogical needs and desirability of learning among the staff. Owing to its practical nature, the empowering education can facilitate occupational tasks and achieving greater mastery of professional skills among the nurses.

  12. Empowering education: A new model for in-service training of nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHMUD CHAGHARI

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In-service training of nurses plays an indispensable role in improving the quality of inpatient care. Need to enhance the effectiveness of in-service training of nurses is an inevitable requirement. This study attempted to design a new optimal model for in-service training of nurses. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted in two stages during 2015-2016. In the first stage, the Grounded Theory was adopted to explore the process of training 35 participating nurses. The sampling was initially purposeful and then theoretically based on emerging concept. Data were collected through interview, observation and field notes. Moreover, the data were analyzed through Corbin-Strauss method and the data were coded through MAXQDA-10. In the second stage, the findings were employed through Walker and Avant’s strategy for theory construction so as to design an optimal model for in-service training of nursing staff. Results: In the first stage, there were five major themes including unsuccessful mandatory education, empowering education, organizational challenges of education, poor educational management, and educational-occupational resiliency. Empowering education was the core variable derived from the research, based on which a grounded theory was proposed. The new empowering education model was composed of self-directed learning and practical learning. There are several strategies to achieve empowering education, including the fostering of searching skills, clinical performance monitoring, motivational factors, participation in the design and implementation, and problem-solving approach. Conclusion: Empowering education is a new model for in-service training of nurses, which matches the training programs with andragogical needs and desirability of learning among the staff. Owing to its practical nature, the empowering education can facilitate occupational tasks and achieving greater mastery of professional skills among the nurses.

  13. A targeted rural postgraduate education programme - linking rural doctors across New Zealand and into the Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blattner, Katharina; Nixon, Garry; Gutenstein, Marc; Davey, Emma

    2017-11-01

    This article describes the University of Otago Rural Postgraduate medical programme, established in 2002 to provide a targeted rural education option for medical practitioners working in rural and remote areas of New Zealand. With both faculty and participants dispersed throughout New Zealand and the Cook Islands embedded in day to day rural clinical practice, this programme uniquely reflects the national and international clinical networks it has been developed to support. It now provides the academic component of two vocational training programmes: the New Zealand Rural Hospital Medicine Training Programme and The Cook Islands General Practice Training Programme. We describe the journey the Rural Postgraduate programme has taken over the last decade: the opportunities, learnings and challenges. The programme is continuing to expand and is creating a growing community of rural and remote practitioners throughout New Zealand and the Pacific.

  14. Development and validation of an eye care educational programme for intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ok-Hee; Yoo, Yang-Sook; Yun, Sun-Hee; Hwang, Kyung-Hye

    2017-07-01

    To develop and validate an eye care educational programme for intensive care unit nurses. Eye care guidelines and protocols have been developed for increasing eye care implementation in intensive care units. However, the guidelines lack consistency in assessment or intervention methodology. This was a one-sample pre/postprogramme evaluation study design for testing the effects of the eye care educational programme, developed for and applied to intensive care unit nurses, on their levels of knowledge and awareness. The eye care educational programme was developed based on literature review and survey of educational needs. Thirty intensive care unit nurses served as subjects for the study. The levels of eye care-related knowledge, awareness and practice were enhanced following the implementation of the educational programme. Moreover, satisfaction with the educational programme was high. It is necessary to intensify eye care education aimed at new nurses who are inexperienced in intensive care unit nursing and provide continuing education on the latest eye care methods and information to experienced nurses. The eye care educational programme developed in this study can be used as a strategy to periodically assess the eye status of patients and facilitate the appropriate eye care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Evaluation of Kilifi epilepsy education programme: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibinda, Fredrick; Mbuba, Caroline K; Kariuki, Symon M; Chengo, Eddie; Ngugi, Anthony K; Odhiambo, Rachael; Lowe, Brett; Fegan, Greg; Carter, Julie A; Newton, Charles R

    2014-02-01

    The epilepsy treatment gap is largest in resource-poor countries. We evaluated the efficacy of a 1-day health education program in a rural area of Kenya. The primary outcome was adherence to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as measured by drug levels in the blood, and the secondary outcomes were seizure frequency and Kilifi Epilepsy Beliefs and Attitudes Scores (KEBAS). Seven hundred thirty-eight people with epilepsy (PWE) and their designated supporter were randomized to either the intervention (education) or nonintervention group. Data were collected at baseline and 1 year after the education intervention was administered to the intervention group. There were 581 PWE assessed at both time points. At the end of the study, 105 PWE from the intervention group and 86 from the nonintervention group gave blood samples, which were assayed for the most commonly used AEDs (phenobarbital, phenytoin, and carbamazepine). The proportions of PWE with detectable AED levels were determined using a standard blood assay method. The laboratory technicians conducting the assays were blinded to the randomization. Secondary outcomes were evaluated using questionnaires administered by trained field staff. Modified Poisson regression was used to investigate the factors associated with improved adherence (transition from nonoptimal AED level in blood at baseline to optimal levels at follow-up), reduced seizures, and improved KEBAS, which was done as a post hoc analysis. This trial is registered in ISRCTN register under ISRCTN35680481. There was no significant difference in adherence to AEDs based on detectable drug levels (odds ratio [OR] 1.46, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.74-2.90, p = 0.28) or by self-reports (OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.71-1.40, p = 1.00) between the intervention and nonintervention group. The intervention group had significantly fewer beliefs about traditional causes of epilepsy, cultural treatment, and negative stereotypes than the nonintervention group. There was no

  16. How can systems engineering inform the methods of programme evaluation in health professions education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, David; Grierson, Lawrence; Mylopoulos, Maria; Trbovich, Patricia; Bagli, Darius; Brydges, Ryan

    2018-04-01

    We evaluate programmes in health professions education (HPE) to determine their effectiveness and value. Programme evaluation has evolved from use of reductionist frameworks to those addressing the complex interactions between programme factors. Researchers in HPE have recently suggested a 'holistic programme evaluation' aiming to better describe and understand the implications of 'emergent processes and outcomes'. We propose a programme evaluation framework informed by principles and tools from systems engineering. Systems engineers conceptualise complexity and emergent elements in unique ways that may complement and extend contemporary programme evaluations in HPE. We demonstrate how the abstract decomposition space (ADS), an engineering knowledge elicitation tool, provides the foundation for a systems engineering informed programme evaluation designed to capture both planned and emergent programme elements. We translate the ADS tool to use education-oriented language, and describe how evaluators can use it to create a programme-specific ADS through iterative refinement. We provide a conceptualisation of emergent elements and an equation that evaluators can use to identify the emergent elements in their programme. Using our framework, evaluators can analyse programmes not as isolated units with planned processes and planned outcomes, but as unfolding, complex interactive systems that will exhibit emergent processes and emergent outcomes. Subsequent analysis of these emergent elements will inform the evaluator as they seek to optimise and improve the programme. Our proposed systems engineering informed programme evaluation framework provides principles and tools for analysing the implications of planned and emergent elements, as well as their potential interactions. We acknowledge that our framework is preliminary and will require application and constant refinement. We suggest that our framework will also advance our understanding of the construct of 'emergence

  17. Staff perceptions of change resulting from participation in a European cancer accreditation programme: a snapshot from eight cancer centres

    OpenAIRE

    Rajan, A.; Wind, Anke; Saghatchian, Mahasti; Thonon, Frederique; Boomsma, Femke; van Harten, Willem H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Healthcare accreditation is considered to be an essential quality improvement tool. However, its effectiveness has been critiqued. Methods: Twenty-four interviews were conducted with clinicians (five), nurses (six), managers (eight), and basic/translational researchers (five) from eight European cancer centres on changes observed from participating in a European cancer accreditation programme. Data were thematically analysed and verified with participants and checked against audit...

  18. A Critique of Singaporean Internal Tertiary Education Programmes offered by Private Colleges: A Brief Comparison with Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherin Batcha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Singapore has a similar population to Ireland and gross domestic products (GDPs for both countries are comparable. However, culturally and in other respects, the two republics are very different. Unemployment in Ireland is six times higher than in Singapore where GDP has almost doubled since 2007 but has fallen by nearly 11% in Ireland in the same time-span. One aspect of life in both countries transcending cultural differences is the importance placed on tertiary education. The Irish and Singaporean people share a deep commitment to education and the imperative of building and maintaining a knowledge economy is central to both societies. Employment in higher education in Singapore is more tenuous than in Ireland and it is common for a lecturer who is considered to have underperformed to not have a contract renewed. Irish higher education adheres closely to European policies and practices, particularly in adoption of quality assurance procedures. Consequently, it is expected that similar bachelor degree programmes in Ireland, for example in Mechanical Engineering or Physics, will be quality assured to a consistent standard across the higher education system. Quality assurance (QA differs markedly in both states. For instance, QA in the National University of Singapore (NUS is typically managed by internal committees, augmented by ‘Visiting Committees’. The multitude of courses offered by private colleges in partnership with UK universities are subject to the QA procedures of the respective universities and hence are regulated by the UK Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA. However, an internal tertiary programme may or may not follow a strict QA procedure. If it does, the QA policies are drafted by the institution’s staff and are based on the requirements of Singapore’s Council of Private Education (CPE. Hence it is possible that the standard set may be inconsistent with the standard demanded by overseas QA regulations. In

  19. Quality assurance of medical education in the Netherlands: programme or systems accreditation? [

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hillen, Harry F. P.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] Accreditation is an instrument that is used worldwide to monitor, maintain and improve the quality of medical education. International standards have been defined to be used in reviewing and evaluating the quality of education. The organization and the process of accreditation of medical education programmes in the Netherlands and in Flanders are described in some detail. Accreditation can be based on the results of a detailed assessment of an educational programme or on an evaluation of the educational system and the organization of the institution in question. The Flemish-Dutch accreditation organization (NAO is moving from programme accreditation towards a combination of programme and systems accreditation. The pros and cons of these two approaches are discussed.

  20. Quality assurance of medical education in the Netherlands: programme or systems accreditation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillen, Harry F P

    2010-01-01

    Accreditation is an instrument that is used worldwide to monitor, maintain and improve the quality of medical education. International standards have been defined to be used in reviewing and evaluating the quality of education. The organization and the process of accreditation of medical education programmes in the Netherlands and in Flanders are described in some detail. Accreditation can be based on the results of a detailed assessment of an educational programme or on an evaluation of the educational system and the organization of the institution in question. The Flemish-Dutch accreditation organization (NAO) is moving from programme accreditation towards a combination of programme and systems accreditation. The pros and cons of these two approaches are discussed.

  1. Coping with Challenging Behaviours of Children with Autism: Effectiveness of Brief Training Workshop for Frontline Staff in Special Education Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, C. Y. M.; Mak, W. W. S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The present study examined the effectiveness of three staff training elements: psychoeducation (PE) on autism, introduction of functional behavioural analysis (FBA) and emotional management (EM), on the reaction of challenging behaviours for frontline staff towards children with autism in Hong Kong special education settings. Methods:…

  2. Innovative Access Programme for Young Mothers Wishing to Train in Childbirth Education: From Concept to Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Mary L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the conception, planning, implementation and evaluation of an access programme arising out of an innovative collaboration between two charities, Straight Talking and the National Childbirth Trust. The access programme was designed at the request of a group of young mothers who had finished compulsory education and subsequently…

  3. Implementation and Evaluation of a Formal Academic-Peer-Mentoring Programme in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Vanessa; Wood, Leigh; Lai, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Formal mentoring programmes continue to gain popularity in higher education, mirroring trends in industry. The study described in this article examines the design features of a formal mentoring programme for first year undergraduates and focused on three key aspects--the matching process, training and orientation, and interaction frequency. The…

  4. Transnational higher education for capacity development? An analysis of British degree programmes in Hong Kong

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leung, W.H.M.; Waters, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing upon a project on British transnational education (TNE) programmes offered in Hong Kong, this paper interrogates the capacity development impact of TNE on the students, the Hong Kong Government and the programme providers. It addresses the questions: ‘What capacity is being developed in

  5. Transnational Higher Education for Capacity Development? An Analysis of British Degree Programmes in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Maggi W. H.; Waters, Johanna L.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing upon a project on British transnational education (TNE) programmes offered in Hong Kong, this paper interrogates the capacity development impact of TNE on the students, the Hong Kong Government and the programme providers. It addresses the questions: "What capacity is being developed in TNE operations?" and "For whom?"…

  6. Evaluation of an HIV/AIDS peer education programme South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To evaluate a South African workplace HIV I AIDS peer-education programme running since 1997. Methods ... and was modelled on a similar workplace-based programme run by the Zimbabwe AIDS Prevention Project (ZAPP) in ..... HIV I AIDS prevention program at the workplace. Journal of Health Communication 2003; 8:.

  7. "We Don't Recruit, We Educate": High School Program Marketing and International Baccalaureate Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Martha K.; Lakes, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    Public education reformers have created a widespread expectation of school choice among school consumers. School leaders adopt rigorous academic programs, like the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme (DP) and Career Programme (CP), to improve their market position in the competitive landscape. While ample research has investigated…

  8. Educational benefits of Internet and computer-based programmes for prostate cancer patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonen, Anne; Ryhänen, Anne M; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to review systematically the available literature on Internet and computer-based patient education programmes, assess the quality of these studies and analyze the benefit of these programmes for prostate cancer patients. Complete databases were searched. Studies were included if they concerned patient education of prostate cancer patients, were qualitative or quantitative and examined Internet or interactive CD-ROM use. Eighteen studies met the inclusion criteria. The majority of the studies reported a significant increase in the knowledge of the disease, satisfaction with treatment options and support for men. The benefit of the programmes was that the patients felt more empowered and obtained a heightened sense of control over their disease. The Internet or computer-based programmes had a positive impact on prostate cancer patient education. Most papers reported that the programmes were beneficial, but few presented data from studies with rigorous research methodologies to support these claims. Internet and computer-based programmes can be useful tools in prostate cancer patient education. In order to improve the benefits of the programmes, more Internet and computer-based programmes need to be developed and studied. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Expanding Global Language Education in Public Primary Schools: The National English Programme in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The paper examines the recent national programme of English language instruction in the Mexican public primary schools, called the "Programa Nacional de Inglés en Educación Básica" (PNIEB). The programme, initiated in 2009 by the Ministry of Education as part of the national curriculum, represents the largest expansion of English…

  10. Spring Fever: Process Evaluation of a Sex and Relationships Education Programme for Primary School Pupils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Katie V.; Mathieu-Chartier, Sara

    2018-01-01

    In primary schools in England, programmes of Sex and Relationships Education (SRE) are rare. Provision has been judged as requiring improvement in over one-third of these schools at a time when statutory provision has been mandated by the government. The aim of this study was to examine the early implementation of Spring Fever, a programme of…

  11. The Return Home: Transitioning from a 28-Day Remote Outdoor Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNatty, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the challenges for students transitioning from the remote Te Kahu (pseudonym) outdoor education programme back into their home and school city environments. Students must develop methods of coping and readjust to society to continue the personal growth and process the learning affected through the 28-day programme. The…

  12. A peer evaluation of the community-based education programme for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences (UZCHS), Harare, which has a long tradition of community-based education (CBE), has not been evaluated since 1991. An innovative approach was used to evaluate the programme during 2015. Objectives. To evaluate the CBE programme, using a ...

  13. Education and training of operators and maintenance staff at Hamaoka Nuclear Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makido, Hideki; Hayashi, Haruhisa

    1999-01-01

    At Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, in order to ensure higher safety and reliability of plant operation, education and training is provided consistently, on a comprehensive basis, for all operating, maintenance and other technical staff, aimed at developing more capable human resources in the nuclear power division. To this end, Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station has the 'Nuclear Training Center' on its site. The training center provides the technical personnel including operators and maintenance personnel with practical training, utilizing simulators for operation training and the identical facilities with those at the real plant. Thus, it plays a central role in promoting comprehensive education and training concerning nuclear power generation. Our education system covers knowledge and skills necessary for the safe and stable operation of nuclear power plant, targeting new employees to managerial personnel. It is also organized systematically in accordance with experience and job level. We will report the present education and training of operators and maintenance personnel at Hamaoka Nuclear Training Center. (author)

  14. A systematic review of education programmes to prevent concussion in rugby union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraas, Michael R; Burchiel, Jessica

    2016-11-01

    There is a high incidence of concussion sustained by athletes participating in rugby union, many of which go unreported. A lack of sufficient knowledge about concussion injuries may explain athletes' failure to report. Several rugby union-playing countries have developed injury education and prevention programmes to address this issue. The aim of the current review was to systematically assess the content and level of evidence on concussion education/prevention programmes in rugby union and to make recommendations for the quality, strength, and consistency of this evidence. We searched PubMed, PsycInfo, MEDLINE, SPORTDiscuss, Webofscience, and conducted a manual search for articles. Ten articles were included for review. Of these, six focused on the BokSmart injury prevention programme in South Africa, two focused on the RugbySmart injury prevention programme in New Zealand, one was an analysis of prevention programmes, and one was a systematic review of rugby injury prevention strategies. Despite the initiative to develop concussion education and prevention programmes, there is little evidence to support the effectiveness of such programmes. There is evidence to support education of coaches and referees. In addition, there is scant evidence to suggest that education and rule changes may have the benefit of changing athlete behaviours resulting in a reduction in catastrophic injury.

  15. A mechanism for programme evaluation in higher education | Venter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    evaluations, but which will also be suitable for preparations for external evaluations and can serve as a premise for planning and development actions to improve programme quality. For the purpose of this project, quality assurance is labelled by ...

  16. Call for papers: SAJHE special issue 'Re-imagining writing retreats for academic staff in higher education'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guest Editors

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Call for papers for an upcoming special issue of the South African Journal of Higher Education (SAJHE in 2016: ‘Re-imagining writing retreats for academic staff in higher education’.

  17. An ICF-based education programme in amputation rehabilitation for medical residents in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Rommers, G. M.; Dekker, Rienk

    Background and Aim: Education programmes of the International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics (ISPO) are directed primarily at prosthetists and orthotists. In a multidisciplinary setting, greater attention should be given to other professionals working in the field of amputation, prosthetics

  18. Comparative Education on the Map of Teacher Preparation Programme in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Al Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Comparative education represents one of the main topics included in teacher preparation programmes in most countries. This subject is critical for future teachers because it represents a window through which learners can look at other educational systems and see how they are managed and what sort of policies and educational philosophies are used.…

  19. Nutrition Education in Australian Midwifery Programmes: A Mixed-Methods Study

    OpenAIRE

    Arrish, Jamila; Yeatman, Heather; Williamson, Moira

    2016-01-01

    Little research has explored how nutrition content in midwifery education prepares midwives to provide prenatal nutrition advice. This study examined the nature and extent of nutrition education provided in Australian midwifery programmes. A mixed-methods approach was used, incorporating an online survey and telephone interviews. The survey analysis included 23 course coordinators representing 24 of 50 accredited midwifery programmes in 2012. Overall, the coordinators considered nutrition in ...

  20. Structured Doctoral Education in Hannover - Joint Programme IMPRS-GW and geo-Q RTG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawazoe, Fumiko; Bruns, Sandra

    2018-02-01

    Two structured doctoral programmes that we have in Hannover, the IMPRS on Gravitational Wave Astronomy and SFB on relativistic geodesy and gravimetry with quantum sensors geo-Q, have not only become major resources for education in each field but have also started to provide substantial synergy to members of both programmes. Our strong crossdisciplinary approach to create a joint programme has received excellent feedback not only from researchers inside the programme but also from various external committee. Building on experience that we have acquired over the last decade, we propose to set up a common doctoral programme within the international gravitational wave astronomy and physics. We envisage that with a common doctoral programme we will create a strong team of young researchers who will carry on building a strong network of third generation gravitational wave detectors and observatories.

  1. Arkitekturskolans självvärderingsrapport till Universitetskanslerämbetet : Self evaluation report of the Architecture Programme at KTH, for the Swedish Agency for Higher Education Services

    OpenAIRE

    Gullström, Charlie

    2013-01-01

    The current report was commissioned by the Swedish Higher Education Authority in 2012 and delivered in 2013. It is a Self-Evaluation Report that results from a thorough process 2011-2013 to develop the Degree Programme in Architecture and Master of Science in Architecture at KTH School of Architecture. Its editor is Charlie Gullström, Head of Programme 2012-2013 and appointed process leader for the assessment of the Architecture Degree Programme. The process involved all pedagogic staff at KT...

  2. Job embeddedness, work engagement and turnover intention of staff in a higher education institution: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndayiziveyi Takawira

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The world economy is becoming increasingly knowledge driven, and intellectual capital is now considered as a human resource that affords organisations a competitive advantage. A high turnover rate in higher education and the importance of retaining staff are concerns that have resulted in increased interest in psychological variables, such as job embeddedness and work engagement that may influence employee retention.Research purpose: The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between job embeddedness, work engagement and turnover intention of staff in a higher education institution.Motivation for the study: Research on how employees’ job embeddedness and work engagement influence their turnover intention is important in the light of organisational concerns about retaining knowledgeable staff in the current higher education environment.Research design, approach and method: A cross-sectional quantitative survey was conducted on a non-probability purposive sample (N = 153 of academic and non-academic staff in a South African higher education institution.Main findings: Correlational analyses revealed significant relationships between job embeddedness, work engagement and turnover intention. Multiple regression analyses showed that organisational links and dedication significantly and negatively predict turnover intention.Practical/managerial implications: When designing retention strategies, management and human resource practitioners need to recognise how job embeddedness and work engagement influence the turnover intention of higher education staff.Contribution: These findings contribute valuable new knowledge that can be applied in the retention of staff in the higher education environment.

  3. The role of Middle Managers in the enhancement of staff professionalism for the Further Education system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey, Jayne

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The Statutory Instrument of September 2007 approved as part of the regulatory powers of the Education Act (DfES, 2002 established regulations for a minimum undertaking of 30 hours’ Continuing Professional Development (CPD for all teaching staff on a year-on-year basis. Seen as part of the professionalisation agenda for the Further Education (FE sector, this regulation has placed additional responsibilities on the role of Middle Managers. Here we report on a small-scale research project based in one College of Further Education which set out to explore and better understand the role of Middle Managers in supporting the professionalisation agenda. The study determined to explore how Middle Managers, defined as those with operational rather than strategic roles, were supporting their colleagues whilst also trying to secure time for their own Continuing Professional Development (CPD. The impact of the IfL’s approach to dual professionalism is also explored.

  4. Going global in physical therapist education: International Service-Learning in US-based programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechak, Celia; Thompson, Mary

    2011-12-01

     Internationalization is expanding its presence in higher education in the United States. Reflecting this trend that includes incorporating global perspectives in the curricula, physical therapist education programmes increasingly offer international opportunities such as International Service-Learning (ISL) to their students. Service-learning, a teaching strategy that integrates community service with structured learning activities, has gained broad acceptance in health professions education including physical therapy, and is therefore the focus of this paper. The specific purposes of this paper were to identify and analyse the commonalities that existed among established ISL programmes within physical therapist education programmes in terms of structures and processes, and to consider its broader implications for physical therapist education.   A descriptive, exploratory study was performed using grounded theory. Snowball and purposive, theoretical sampling yielded 14 faculty members with experience in international service, international learning or ISL in physical therapist education programmes. Faculty were interviewed by phone. Interview transcriptions and course documents were analysed applying grounded theory methodology. Data from eight programmes which met the operational definition of established ISL were used to address the purposes of this paper.   Five phases of establishing an ISL programme were identified: development, design, implementation, evaluation, and enhancement. Although no single model exists for ISL in physical therapist education; commonalities in structures and processes were identified in each phase. However, attention to service objectives and outcomes is lacking.   While analysis revealed that each programme shared commonalities and demonstrated differences in structures and processes compared with the other programmes, the study demonstrated a general lack of focus on formal community outcomes which raises ethical

  5. Using an intervention mapping framework to develop an online mental health continuing education program for pharmacy staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Amanda; Fowler, Jane; Hattingh, Laetitia

    2013-01-01

    Current mental health policy in Australia recognizes that ongoing mental health workforce development is crucial to mental health care reform. Community pharmacy staff are well placed to assist people with mental illness living in the community; however, staff require the knowledge and skills to do this competently and effectively. This article presents the systematic planning and development process and content of an education and training program for community pharmacy staff, using a program planning approach called intervention mapping. The intervention mapping framework was used to guide development of an online continuing education program. Interviews with mental health consumers and carers (n = 285) and key stakeholders (n = 15), and a survey of pharmacy staff (n = 504) informed the needs assessment. Program objectives were identified specifying required attitudes, knowledge, skills, and confidence. These objectives were aligned with an education technique and delivery strategy. This was followed by development of an education program and comprehensive evaluation plan. The program was piloted face to face with 24 participants and then translated into an online program comprising eight 30-minute modules for pharmacists, 4 of which were also used for support staff. The evaluation plan provided for online participants (n ≅ 500) to be randomized into intervention (immediate access) or control groups (delayed training access). It included pre- and posttraining questionnaires and a reflective learning questionnaire for pharmacy staff and telephone interviews post pharmacy visit for consumers and carers. An online education program was developed to address mental health knowledge, attitudes, confidence, and skills required by pharmacy staff to work effectively with mental health consumers and carers. Intervention mapping provides a systematic and rigorous approach that can be used to develop a quality continuing education program for the health workforce

  6. The Focus on Youth Prevention and Education Research Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynette Deveaux

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Like many developing or transitional countries affected by the HIV epidemic, The Bahamas has been deeply committed to HIV and sexually transmitted infection reduction and continues to make great strides in controlling the epidemic within its boundaries. Encouraged by the impact of the Focus on Youth Caribbean (FOYC, a school-based HIV/AIDS prevention programme and its parenting component on Grade 6 and Grade 10 students and their parents, a team of researchers from The Bahamas and the United States sought to implement a similar programme at a national level, while simultaneously evaluating factors that impact the sustainability of sexual risk-reduction programmes like FOYC. This paper describes five research projects conducted in The Bahamas between 1998 and 2016 and includes a list of over 40 published research articles

  7. SOCIO-PEDAGOGICAL EVALUATION OF TEACHING STAFF ACTIVITIES IN COMPREHENSIVE SCHOOLS AS AN INDEPENDENT MECHANISM OF EDUCATION QUALITY ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina О. Antipina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to reveal various ways for developing the independent mechanisms of education quality assessment.Methods involve the analysis of the existing views concerning the quality assessment of teaching staff activities.Results: The research findings demonstrate functional specificity of comprehensive schools, the main phases of socio-pedagogic assessment of teaching staff activities, and the main criteria and indices of their monitoring. The author considers professional educational activity as a general assessment criterion. The main feature of socio-pedagogic assessment procedures involves participation of different categories of teaching and research staff, along with students’ parents and the neighboring society members.Scientific novelty: The author specifies the concept of socio-pedagogic assessment of teaching staff activities.Practical significance: Implementation of the research outcomes can stimulate professional activity of pedagogical society in developing the independent system of education quality assessment.

  8. Feasibility and Educational Value of a Student-Run Pharmacovigilance Programme: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Tim; Tichelaar, Jelle; Reumerman, Michael O; van Eekeren, Rike; Rolfes, Leàn; van Puijenbroek, Eugène P; Richir, Milan C; van Agtmael, Michiel A

    2017-05-01

    Pharmacovigilance, the monitoring of drug safety after marketing approval, highly depends on the adequate reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). To improve pharmacovigilance awareness and future ADR reporting among medical students, we developed and evaluated a student-run pharmacovigilance programme. In this project, teams of medical students (first- to fifth-year) assessed real ADR reports, as submitted to the national pharmacovigilance centre. After assessment of causality, including identification of a potential pharmacological explanation for the ADR, the students wrote a personalized feedback letter to the reporter, as well as a summary for the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and World Health Organization (WHO) pharmacovigilance databases. This student assessment was then verified and evaluated by staff from The Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre Lareb (Lareb), using an e-questionnaire. Student attitudes, intentions, skills, and knowledge of ADR reporting were evaluated using the e-questionnaire, before and after participation in the programme. From May 2014 to January 2015, a total of 43 students assessed 100 different ADR reports selected by Lareb staff (n = 3). Student assessments were rated as useful (93%), scientifically substantiated (90%), accurate (92%), and complete (92%), and, on average, did not cost Lareb staff extra time. Medical students were positive about ADR reporting, and their awareness of ADR reporting increased significantly following participation in the programme (p < 0.05). After participation in the programme, the students intended to report serious ADRs in their future practice, and their knowledge of pharmacovigilance and ADR reporting showed they had a high overall level of pharmacological understanding. The student-run pharmacovigilance programme is a win-win venture. It offers students a valuable 'pharmacovigilance experience', creates awareness in future doctors, and has the potential to increase pharmacovigilance

  9. Medical student delivery of alcohol education to high school pupils: the MEDALC programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcolado, R; Alcolado, J C

    2011-10-01

    There is increasing concern about the inappropriate use of alcohol by teenagers and young adults. The objective of this study was to assess the practicality of developing an alcohol education programme for school pupils delivered by medical students. The study design was of a prospective, observational, interventional cohort study. The primary outcomes were the number of schools, school pupils and medical students participating in the programme. Secondary outcomes were quantitative and qualitative measures derived from the feedback received from the participants. Over a three-year period, 60 medical students provided alcohol education sessions to 1,780 high school pupils (aged 13-15 years) within seven schools in Wales. Strongly positive feedback was obtained from all stakeholders and all schools asked to be included in future programmes. In conclusion, medical student-delivered teaching of alcohol education programmes to school pupils appears to be feasible and welcome by schools, teachers, pupils and medical students.

  10. Task-based learning programme for clinical years of medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Hasan; Degirmenci, Berna; Musal, Berna; Itil, Oya; Akalin, Elif; Kilinc, Oguz; Ozkan, Sebnem; Alici, Emin

    2006-03-01

    Task-based learning (TBL) is an educational strategy recommended for the later years of the medical education programme. The TBL programme was adopted for clinical years in the 2000-2001 academic year in Dokuz Eylul University School of Medicine (DEUSM). The aim of this paper is to describe the TBL programme of DEUSM. DEUSM outlined 50 clinical tasks for fourth-year students and 37 for fifth-year students. The tasks were grouped into four and five blocks. Interdisciplinary practicals, lectures and patient visits were organised in each task's schedule. The tasks were the focus of learning and each discipline contributed its own learning opportunities to the attached tasks. Formative and summative methods were used to evaluate the programme. Based on the experience and feedback provided by the students and trainers, the authors considered TBL an applicable and advisable approach for the clinical years of medical education.

  11. Development of an education and training programme for radiation protection officers in facilities and activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutwamezi, Tekla

    2015-02-01

    Education and training is a crucial matter in radiation protection and it is considered a regulatory requirement. For this reason, this project work focused on developing an education and training programme for Radiation Protection Officers whose overall function is to oversee radiation protection and safety at the work place. The developed education and training programme has adopted both the class room based and on the job training methods. Additionally, the programme is organized into 6 modules and focuses on fundamentals of radioactivity; biological effects; legislation; principles of radiation protection; assessment and protection against occupational exposure; medical exposure (only applicable to Radiation Protection Officers in the medical sector) and emergency preparedness and response. The purpose of the programme is to provide Radiation Protection Officers with the basic knowledge and skills to function effectively to meet radiation safety and regulatory requirements. (au)

  12. Population Education Programme in the 90s in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muley, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a projection of the plans and requirements for modification of the national population education program in India. Outlines various strategies for attainment of the main objective to institutionalize population education in all national educational processes. (MCO)

  13. Internationalisation and Multiculturalism in CELA-Particpating Landscape Architecture International Education Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hewitt

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the need for research in landscape architecture international education by offering a selective analysis of three surveys of department heads in CELA-participating landscape architecture programmes. The primary data addressed in the paper is a set of follow-up focused interviews conducted in 2004. These interviews expand on the authors' previous surveys concerning international education activities in CELA-participating schools, which were conducted in 2002 and 2003, and a similar survey by Malcomb Cairns and Ann Hoover, conducted in 2003. The selected data from the surveys and interviews provide information from the reporting landscape architecture programmes on their history, and approaches to internationalisation and multiculturalism. Analysis of the data indicates that: (1 Most landscape architecture international education programmes began during the 1980s and 1990s, and the majority of programmes reported significant change in their activities within the last decade. (2 A significant number of programmes described their approach to international education in terms of the relationship between the region and the global or international. (3 A significant number of programmes described their international education activities in terms of opportunities for, and benefits of, exposure to cultures other than their own, and in terms of relationships between multiculturalism and internationalisation.

  14. Professional Ethics and Organizational Commitment Among the Education Department Staff of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Imani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Concepts such as organizational commitment and employees’ and managers’ ethics provide decision-makers and policy makers with potentially useful information which can result in increasing organizational efficiency and effectiveness. This study aimed to explore the relationship between professional ethics and organizational commitment among the staff working in the education departments of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. The study population consisted of all staff working as educational experts in the education departments of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (N = 65. Data collection instruments used in this study were two standard questionnaires on professional ethics and organizational commitment. SPSS software version 21 was used to analyze the data. Results: According to the results, mean scores obtained for professional ethics and organizational commitment were (91.57± 9.13 (95% CI, 89.23-93.91 and (64.89 ± 10.37 (95% CI, 62.2367.54, respectively. A significant relationship was observed between professional ethics and organizational commitment among the educational experts working in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (correlation coefficient = 0.405 (P = 0.001 (at 95% confidence level. Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between professional ethics and work experience (P = 0.043. The highest level of professional ethics observed was associated with those participants having a work experience of ranging from 6 to 10 years. Individuals with fulltime employment scored the highest in organizational commitment. Conclusion: Educational experts possessed a high level of professional ethics. The finding provides the grounds for promoting organizational commitment, which will lead to higher levels of organizational effectiveness.

  15. The opinions and attitudes of dental school academic staff towards oral healthcare education for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haresaku, S; Mariño, R; Naito, T; Morgan, M V

    2016-08-01

    The term 'oral health care for older adults' has various interpretations, and its meaning is not clear among dental school academic staff. Additionally, there are no theoretical or practical stand-alone courses on oral health care for older adults in Japanese dental schools. To improve oral health care education, we investigated the opinions and attitudes toward oral health care education for older adults among academic staff in dental schools. Data were collected in seven dental schools from May to September 2013 via an online questionnaire survey. Five-hundred-fifty-eight academics (428 male, 130 female) participated (response rate 57%). The average number of years since they had completed a university degree was 20.2 (SD 10.2) years. The majority (Over 90%) of participants perceived that oral health care should be provided in nursing facilities, hospitals, and at home. Its treatments and instructions should include, not only methods of keeping good oral hygiene, but also improvement of oral function such as swallowing training and salivary glands massage. The majority (84.2%) suggested oral health care education should be combined as a one-credit, stand-alone course. Findings indicate that dental academics have an understanding the need for a course in oral health care for older adults. Participants supported the need for further development of education in oral health care for older adults' in Japan, as a separate course on its own right. However there were some different views about content by teaching field. The need for a national core program for teaching oral health care education was suggested. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The personal value of being part of a Tropical Health Education Trust (THET) links programme to develop a palliative care degree programme in Sub Saharan Africa: a descriptive study of the views of volunteer UK health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, B A; Kirton, J A; Downing, J; Frame, K

    2015-12-14

    There is a global need to expand palliative care services to reach the increasing number requiring end of life care. In developing countries where the incidences of cancer are rising there is an urgent need to develop the palliative care workforce. This paper reports on a UK Department for international development (DFID) initiative funded through the Tropical Health Education Trust (THET) where palliative care staff, both clinical and academic, volunteered to help to develop, support and deliver a degree in palliative care in sub-Saharan Africa. The objective of the study was to explore the personal impact on the health care professionals of being part of this initiative. An evaluation approach using a confidential electronic survey containing quantitative and qualitative questions was distributed to all 17 volunteers on the programme, three months after completion of the first cohort. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and content thematic analysis. Ethical review deemed the study to be service evaluation. 82 % (14) responded and several themes emerged from the data including the positive impact on teaching and educational skills; clinical practice and finally personal development. Using a score of 1-10 (1-no impact, 10 maximum impact) 'Lifestyle choices - life work balance' (rating 7.83) had the most impact. This approach to supporting the development of palliative care in Sub-Saharan Africa through skill sharing in supporting the delivery of a degree programme in palliative care was successful in terms of delivery of the degree programme, material development and mentorship of local staff. Additionally, this study shows it provided a range of positive impacts on the volunteer health care professionals from the UK. Professional impacts including increased management skills, and being better prepared to undertake a senior role. However it is the personal impact including lifestyle choices which the volunteers reported as the highest impact

  17. Psychological effects of a cosmetic education programme in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H Y; Kim, J H; Choi, S; Kang, E; Oh, S; Kim, J Y; Kim, S W

    2015-07-01

    Treatments for breast cancer often include interventions related to psychosocial issues such as negative body image, loss of femininity, and low self-esteem. We identified the psychological effects of a cosmetics education programme in patients with breast cancer. Cosmetic programme is a specific care designed to help patients handle appearance-related side effects. Thirty-one women with breast cancer at a university hospital in South Korea who received a cosmetics education programme were compared with 29 subjects in a control group who received the treatment as usual. Psychological factors including distress, self-esteem, and sexual functioning were assessed three times (before and after the programme, and at the 1-month follow-up). After the programme, patients in the treatment group were significantly less likely than those in the control group to rely on distress (P = 0.038) and avoidance coping (P cosmetics education programme for reducing distress and reliance on negative coping strategies. Implementing a cosmetics programme for patients with breast cancer may encourage patients to control negative psychological factors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. OUTREACH PROGRAMMES FOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING: CONTRIBUTIONS FROM THE INTERNATIONAL CARTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. E. Cartwright

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Organisations like the International Cartographic Association champion programmes that develop and deliver education and training to cartographers and geospatial scientists, globally. This can be in the form of traditional university and training college programmes, short courses for professional and technical members of mapping agencies and as outreach initiatives to transfer knowledge about the discipline and its contemporary practices. Through its international community, the ICA undertakes the transfer of knowledge about cartography and GI Science by publishing books and special editions of journals and running workshops. Colleagues from the ICA community conduct these workshops on a volunteer basis, generally with the support of the national member organisation of ICA or the national mapping body. For example, the ICA promotes the generation of extensive publications, generally through its Commissions and Working Groups. The publications include books, journals and the ICA Newsletter. Outreach activities are especially pertinent to up skill colleagues from developing countries. Specialist programmes can be offered for professional and 'everyday' map users (from adults to children. The ICA can assist with its current programmes, designed to embrace professional and non-professional cartographers alike. This paper will address how education and outreach programmes can be supported by international associations, by offering programmes independently, or in partnership with sister associations and national and regional organisations and societies. As well, the paper will address the need to deliver education and outreach programmes not to just the professional international community, but also to map users and citizen map publishers.

  19. Outreach Programmes for Education and Training: Contributions from the International Cartographic Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, W. E.; Fairbairn, D.

    2012-07-01

    Organisations like the International Cartographic Association champion programmes that develop and deliver education and training to cartographers and geospatial scientists, globally. This can be in the form of traditional university and training college programmes, short courses for professional and technical members of mapping agencies and as outreach initiatives to transfer knowledge about the discipline and its contemporary practices. Through its international community, the ICA undertakes the transfer of knowledge about cartography and GI Science by publishing books and special editions of journals and running workshops. Colleagues from the ICA community conduct these workshops on a volunteer basis, generally with the support of the national member organisation of ICA or the national mapping body. For example, the ICA promotes the generation of extensive publications, generally through its Commissions and Working Groups. The publications include books, journals and the ICA Newsletter. Outreach activities are especially pertinent to up skill colleagues from developing countries. Specialist programmes can be offered for professional and 'everyday' map users (from adults to children). The ICA can assist with its current programmes, designed to embrace professional and non-professional cartographers alike. This paper will address how education and outreach programmes can be supported by international associations, by offering programmes independently, or in partnership with sister associations and national and regional organisations and societies. As well, the paper will address the need to deliver education and outreach programmes not to just the professional international community, but also to map users and citizen map publishers.

  20. The Erasmus programme for postgraduate education in orthodontics in Europe: an update of the guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggare, J; Derringer, K A; Eliades, T; Filleul, M P; Kiliaridis, S; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A; Martina, R; Pirttiniemi, P; Ruf, S; Schwestka-Polly, R

    2014-06-01

    In 1989, the ERASMUS Bureau of the European Cultural Foundation of the Commission of the European Communities funded the development of a new 3-year curriculum for postgraduate education in orthodontics. The new curriculum was created by directors for orthodontic education representing 15 European countries. The curriculum entitled 'Three years Postgraduate Programme in Orthodontics: the Final Report of the Erasmus Project' was published 1992. In 2012, the 'Network of Erasmus Based European Orthodontic Programmes' developed and approved an updated version of the guidelines. The core programme consists of eight sections: general biological and medical subjects; basic orthodontic subjects; general orthodontic subjects; orthodontic techniques; interdisciplinary subjects; management of health and safety; practice management, administration, and ethics; extramural educational activities. The programme goals and objectives are described and the competencies to be reached are outlined. These guidelines may serve as a baseline for programme development and quality assessment for postgraduate programme directors, national associations, and governmental bodies and could assist future residents when selecting a postgraduate programme.

  1. The impact of the Perinatal Education Programme on cognitive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Programme significantly improves the cognitive knowledge of midwives. Design. Assessment of cognitive ... The cognitive knowledge of both maternal and newborn care can be significantly improved when ..... certificates to successful candidates generated personal pride and resulted in the reward of peer recognitiOn. In.

  2. Alternative Education Programmes and Middle School Dropout in Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jeffery H.; Aguilar, Claudia R.; Alas, Mario; Castellanos, Renán Rápalo; Castro, Levi; Enamorado, Ramón; Fonseca, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Honduras has made steady progress in expanding post-primary school coverage in recent years, but many rural communities still do not provide a middle (lower secondary) school. As a result, Honduras has implemented a number of middle school alternative programmes designed to meet the needs of at-risk populations throughout the country. This article…

  3. Natural hazards education in global environment leaders education programme for designing a low-carbon society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Soo; Yamashita, Takao; Fujiwara, Akimasa

    2010-05-01

    Global environmental leader (GEL) education programme at graduate school for international development and cooperation (IDEC) in Hiroshima University is an education and training programme for graduate students especially from developing countries in Asian region to build and enhance their ability to become international environmental leaders. Through this programme, they will participate in regular course works and other activities to learn how to cope with the various environment and resource management issues from global to regional scales toward a low-carbon society via multi-disciplinary approaches considering sustainable development and climate change. Under this GEL programme, there are five different research sub-groups as follows assuming a cause-effect relationship among interacting components of social, economic, and environmental systems; 1) urban system design to prevent global warming, 2) wise use of biomass resources, 3) environmental impact assessment, 4) policy and institutional design, and 5) development of environmental education programs. Candidate students of GEL programme belong to one of the five research sub-groups, perform their researches and participate in many activities under the cross-supervisions from faculty members of different sub-groups. Under the third research group for environmental impact assessment, we use numerical models named as regional environment simulator (RES) as a tool for research and education for assessing the environmental impacts due to natural hazards. Developed at IDEC, Hiroshima University, RES is a meso-scale numerical model system that can be used for regional simulation of natural disasters and environmental problems caused by water and heat circulation in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. RES has three components: i) atmosphere-surface waves-ocean part, ii) atmosphere-land surface process-hydrologic part, and iii) coastal and estuarine part. Each part is constructed with state-of-the-art public

  4. The relationship between perfectionism of managers and Empowerment staff of physical education offices in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram G H A D I R I

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is relationship between perfectionism of managers and empowerment staff of physical education offices in Tehran. This research is a descriptive – correlation, from Perspective of Nature, Applicable. The po pulation of this research consisted of managers and administrative staff in physical education offices of Tehran are the number of 351 persons. The sample estimate of the population and with using Morgan’s table And Karjsi and 185 patients were selected us ing stratified random number, of which 50 were managers and 135 employees. Independent variables were instrumented perfectionism of managers, 59 item questionnaires of Hill and Associates (2004 and tools to measure the dependent variable of empowerment pe rsonnel was 16 - item questionnaire Aspretizr (2002 . Statistical methods was included descriptive statistics and inferential statistics (Pearson and Friedman and the results in general showed a there is significant relationship between perfectionism of man agers and capabilities of personnel. And so dimensions of perfectionism of Managers had a meaningful significant negative relationship with empowerment personnel. However, discipline and stress had the strongest associations with empowerment personnel.

  5. Job demands, job resources and work engagement of academic staff in South African higher education institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rothmann

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the work engagement of academics in selected South African higher education institutions as well as the impact of job demands and job resources on their work engagement. Stratified random samples (N = 471 were drawn from academic staff in three higher education institutions in South Africa. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES and the Job Demands-Resources Scale (JDRS were administered. The results confirmed a two-factor structure of work engagement, consisting of vigour and dedication. Six reliable factors were extracted on the JDRS, namely organisational support, growth opportunities, social support, overload, advancement and job insecurity. Job resources (including organisational support and growth opportunities predicted 26% of the variance in vigour and 38% of the variance in dedication. Job demands (overload impacted on dedication of academics at low and moderate levels of organisational support.

  6. Coming to grips with challenging behaviour: a cluster randomised controlled trial on the effects of a new care programme for challenging behaviour on burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff on dementia special care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, S.A.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Eefsting, J.A.; Smalbrugge, M.; Hertogh, C.M.; Pot, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Caring for people with dementia in dementia special care units is a demanding job. Challenging behaviour is one of the factors influencing the job satisfaction and burnout of care staff. A care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia might, next to

  7. Coming to grips with challenging behaviour: a cluster randomised controlled trial on the effects of a new care programme for challenging behaviour on burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff on dementia special care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, S.A.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Eefsting, J.A.; Smalbrugge, M.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.; Pot, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Caring for people with dementia in dementia special care units is a demanding job. Challenging behaviour is one of the factors influencing the job satisfaction and burnout of care staff. A care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia might, next to

  8. The evidence-based practice profiles of academic and clinical staff involved in pre-registration nursing students' education: a cross sectional survey of US and UK staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Penney; Scurlock-Evans, Laura; Williamson, Kathleen; Rouse, Joanne; Upton, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Competency in evidence-based practice (EBP) is a requirement for graduate nurses. Despite a growing body of research exploring the EBP profiles of students, little research has explored the EBP profiles of nurse educators. To explore: the differences/similarities in the EBP profiles of US and UK clinical and academic faculty; the barriers nurse educators experience when teaching EBP; the impact of postgraduate education on EBP profile and; what nurse educators perceive "success" in implementing and teaching EBP to be. A cross-sectional online survey design was employed. Two Universities delivering undergraduate nursing education in the US and UK, in partnership with large hospital systems, small community hospitals, community settings, and independent sector health organisations. Eighty-one nurse educators working in academic and clinical contexts in the US and UK (US academic=12, US clinical=17, UK academic=9, UK clinical=43) were recruited opportunistically. Participants were emailed a weblink to an online survey, comprising demographic questions, the Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire and open-ended questions about EBP barriers, facilitators and successes. Quantitative results indicated that academic faculty scored significantly higher on knowledge and skills of EBP, than clinical faculty, but revealed no other significant differences on EBP use or attitudes, or between US and UK professionals. Participants with postgraduate training scored significantly higher on EBP knowledge/skills, but not EBP attitudes or use. Qualitative findings identified key themes relating to EBP barriers and facilitators, including: Evidence-, organisational-, and teaching-related issues. Perceptions of successes in EBP were also described. Nurse educators working in the UK and US face similar EBP barriers to teaching and implementation, but view it positively and use it frequently. Clinical staff may require extra support to maintain their EBP knowledge and skills in

  9. Pre-Requisites of Pre-Service Secondary Teacher Education Programme in Jharkhand: An Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpi Kumari

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental basis of the curriculum, critical andragogical input, availability of time period, modern and innovative transactional approaches and qualitative evaluation process in the prescribed curriculum, infrastructural facilities as well as the teacher composition are considered to be the quality indicators of teacher education programme. The study was delimited to colleges (both private and government having attached B.Ed. wing under Kolhan University. By utilizing both qualitative and quantitative techniques the relevant data were collected in terms of intended curriculum, infrastructural facilities and teacher composition. Subsequently it was revealed that the secondary teacher education programme of Kolhan University was more or less a knowledge transmission model inefficient to foster prospective teachers as a facilitator of pupil’s learning in varied socio-cultural contexts. The present research contrives necessary measures to evolve a quality teacher education programme which may be capable of meeting the emerging challenges of secondary education in Jharkhand.

  10. Implicit, Stand-Alone or Integrated Skills Education for Undergraduates: A Longitudinal Analysis of Programme Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacVaugh, Jason; Jones, Anna; Auty, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a longitudinal investigation into the effectiveness of skills education programmes within business and management undergraduate degree courses. During the period between 2005 and 2011, a large business school in the south-west of England was developed and implemented two distinct approaches to skills education.…

  11. Advancing Pain Education in Canadian Physiotherapy Programmes: Results of a Consensus-Generating Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wideman, Timothy H; Miller, Jordan; Bostick, Geoff; Thomas, Aliki; Bussières, André

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This article reports on a national stakeholder workshop that focused on advancing pain education in physiotherapy programmes across Canada. Methods: Workshop participants included national leaders from the following stakeholder groups: people living with pain; physiotherapy students and recent graduates; pain educators; physiotherapy programme administrators; and representatives from the Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators, Physiotherapy Education Accreditation Canada, Canadian Physiotherapy Association, and Physiotherapy Practice Profile project. During the workshop, barriers to, facilitators of, and strategies for advancing pain education were discussed, and a stakeholder-endorsed consensus statement was generated. The workshop was recorded, and data were thematically analyzed. Results: Participants identified important barriers and facilitators associated with the field of pain, standards and regulatory processes, physiotherapy programmes, and physiotherapy students and people living with pain. Strategies for advancing pain education included integrating pain competencies into standards and regulatory policy, encouraging the development of best teaching practices, partnering with people living with pain, building awareness, and setting goals and assessing clear outcomes. The consensus statement highlighted the central importance of pain education for physiotherapists and the need for a reference standard to guide its implementation in the Canadian context. Conclusion: This was the first initiative to specifically explore national stakeholders' perceptions of pain education. The workshop outcomes provide a strong mandate and direction for advancing pain education across Canadian physiotherapy programmes.

  12. An Evaluation of Participation in a Schools-Based Youth Mental Health Peer Education Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Aileen; Barry, James; Neary, Marie-Louise; Lane, Sabrina; O'Keeffe, Lynsey

    2016-01-01

    The use of peer education has been well documented within the discipline of health promotion, but not within the youth mental health domain. This paper describes an evaluation of an innovative schools-based peer education training programme that involved preparing young people to deliver a mental health workshop to their peers. Participants…

  13. Political Empowerment of Women through Literacy Education Programmes in EDO and Delta States, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olomukoro, Caroline O.; Adelore, Omobola O.

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the political empowerment of women through literacy education programmes in Edo and Delta States in the South-South Geopolitical zone of Nigeria. A sample of 1022 women was randomly drawn from the different levels of literacy classes organised by the Agency of Adult and Nonformal Education and non-governmental and private…

  14. Marketing University Programmes in China: Innovative Experience in Executive and Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning Rong; Crossley, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the limited amount of research in the realm of programme marketing in the Chinese higher education sector. Original field research examines the emergence of marketing principles and strategies with specific reference to the experience of three higher education institutions in China. The development and promotion of executive…

  15. Influence of adult and non-formal education programmes on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the extent to which adult and non-formal education programmes could facilitate the attainment of the sustainable development goal four (Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote life-long learning opportunities for all) in Bayelsa State. The descriptive survey research design was ...

  16. Therapeutic Responses to "At Risk" Disengaged Early School Leavers in a Rural Alternative Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Tim

    2017-01-01

    The identification of disengaged early school leavers as young people "at risk" can lead to a deficit-based framing of how educational institutions respond to them. A rural secondary school in Victoria, Australia established an alternative education programme to cater for local disengaged young people. A critical ethnographic study was…

  17. Examining Teachers' Beliefs about ICT in Education: Implications of a Teacher Preparation Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimoyiannis, Athanassios; Komis, Vassilis

    2007-01-01

    The survey presented in this article examines current teachers' beliefs and attitudes towards information and communication technologies (ICT) in education. A total of 1165 primary and secondary education teachers participated in the study, immediately after following a training programme on basic ICT skills. The authors' results showed that the…

  18. Through the Lens of Teachers in Two Bilingual Programmes: A Look at Early Bilingual Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Mila; Wee Koh, Poh; Xi Chen, Becky; Sinke, Mark; Geva, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Educators and researchers increasingly recognise the impact of language policies on bilingual education. The present study examined the similarities and differences in how the teachers and principals in two different contexts, a Mandarin-English bilingual programme in a Canadian kindergarten and elementary school and a Russian-Hebrew bilingual…

  19. Evaluation of the In-Service Education and Training Programme for Kuwait Army Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mutawa, Najat; Al-Furaih, Suad

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluates the In-Service Education and Training (INSET) programme organised for Kuwait Army instructors. The focus is on their perceptual gain in related topics and skills, as they attended 10 courses at the College of Education--Kuwait University. Pre- and post-assessments involved 20 trainees. The analysis indicates significant…

  20. Art and Science Education Collaboration in a Secondary Teacher Preparation Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Jerez, William; Dambekalns, Lydia; Middleton, Kyndra V.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this study was to record and measure the level of involvement and appreciation that prospective teachers in art and science education programmes demonstrated during a four-session integrated activity. Art and science education prospective teachers from a Rocky Mountain region university in the US worked in…

  1. Demographic Differences in Learner Response to Entrepreneurial Education Programmes in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Tariq; Chandran, V. G. R.; Klobas, Jane E.

    2017-01-01

    Recent research on the benefits of entrepreneurship education has tended to ignore or "control out" possible demographic differences in outcomes for entrepreneurship graduates. This paper examines demographic differences in the perceived benefits of different components of entrepreneurship education programmes (EEPs), entrepreneurial…

  2. Adapting the Tuning Programme Profiles to the Needs of Russian Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgeniya V. Karavayeva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article considers how TUNING-compatible programme profiles could be developed in the Russian Federation in the context of: on-going reform of the higher education; introduction of the new generation of Federal State Educational Standards (FSES; development of the new professional standards; implementation of a system of public accreditation of educational programmes; and a complex system of educational quality assessment. It also analyses the results of monitoring of the effectiveness of FSES implementation in the system of Russian higher education by the Association of the Classical Universities of Russia (ACUR that identified a number of problems in the area of programme design and implementation related to drawbacks within the current FSES. Based on the experience gained during the implementation of the TUNING RUSSIA Project (2010-2013, this article demonstrates the usefulness of the TUNING basic principles and approaches and suggests the ways TUNING profile development methodology might be successfully adapted and applied for designing educational programmes in the course of the Russian higher education reform. Creating TUNING-model degree profiles may be crucial to aid the Russian higher education institutions in the development of the new educational programs. Brief but all-encompassing formulation of the aims and outcomes and specific characteristics of an educational programme, listing competences and learning outcomes could permit higher education institutions to move from trying to comply with standards and requirements, which are sent from above but are foreign to the institutions themselves, to adopting the principle of transparency and designing better and more competitive degrees.

  3. Exploring the Heterogeneity of Class in Higher Education: Social and Cultural Differentiation in Danish University Programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jens Peter

    2012-01-01

    education demands a closer examination of the hidden heterogeneity in the students’ social origin and educational strategies. Using a mixed-method approach (register data and ethnographic observations and interviews) the paper focuses on the students’ class origins and on different cultural practices......This paper examines the relationship between social background, choice of university programme and academic culture among Danish university students. Statistically and sociologically, university students are often treated as a homogeneous group, but the ever-increasing number of students in higher...... in three Danish university programmes. It is shown that the Danish university field is characterized by a significant variation in social selectivity from programme to programme, and it is argued that these different social profiles correspond with distinctively different cultural practices...

  4. Validating a Steiner-Waldorf Teacher Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberski, Iddo; Pugh, Alistair; MacLean, Astrid; Cope, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Steiner-Waldorf (SW) education, based on the work of Rudolf Steiner (1861-1925), provides a distinctive form of education. There are approximately 900 SW schools worldwide. The only teacher training course for SW education in Scotland is currently offered at the Edinburgh Rudolf Steiner School (ERSS). Although students are continuously assessed on…

  5. Effect of Inclusive Education Awareness Programme on Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingle, Sudha; Garg, Indu

    2015-01-01

    In India, the concept of inclusive education schools is gaining importance to provide equal opportunities for education for all. Aims of schools in India has is to include students with special needs in the regular classrooms. However, biggest challenge they face is lack of awareness among teachers about inclusive education. Educationists across…

  6. Promoting widening participation and higher education: Lessons from a four year intervention programme

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro-Torres, C; Portman-Smith, C

    2008-01-01

    Since the labour government came to power in 1997, a major policy has been to increase the participation rates of those entering higher education, particularly those from lower-socio economic backgrounds. Just over 10 years later, little has changed. The Brunel Urban Scholars programme is a 4 year long intervention programme for students from lower socio-economic backgrounds aged 12-16. It aims, through university style teaching, emersion in a university environment, and regular interaction w...

  7. Developing a work/study programme for midwifery education in East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Grace; Hellen, Kyakuwaire; Brownie, Sharon

    2018-04-01

    there is extensive evidence to show that skilled midwifery care is crucial in reducing maternal deaths; however, in East Africa, the midwifery profession has been subsumed within the nursing role. This paper highlights issues in the preparation of skilled midwives in three East African countries, specifically, Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania and provides a case study description of a flexible work/study programme designed to develop skilled midwives to meet internationally regarded ICM competency standards in midwifery education and practice. THE MODEL: a flexible, competency-based Bachelor's of Science in Midwifery programme (BScM) has been developed based on fifteen years' experience of running a Bachelor of Science in nursing programme. The new BSCM programme allows licensed diploma midwives the opportunity to study for two days a week towards a bachelor's degree in midwifery, whilst continuing to work and support their families. The model also provides education at degree level thus providing a sound platform for ongoing development of a cadre of midwifery leaders. the BScM education model for working midwives builds on the success of the BScN work/study model in developing strong leadership, clinical and critical thinking competencies. The newly developed midwifery programme provides a pathway by which to increase the availability of skilled East African midwives educated to the Global Standards for Midwifery Education. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biodiversity and Education for Sustainable Development in Teacher Education Programmes of Four Jamaican Educational Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins-Figueroa, Marceline

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an account of biodiversity education in a national teacher education project in Jamaica. Four case studies are examined here. Document analyses and interviews of educators and student teachers are used to explore how biodiversity was addressed in teacher education curricula, the processes and outcomes of learning in education…

  9. Learning in a clinical education programme in primary care : the Maastricht Adoption Programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mainhard, M.T.; Hurk, M.M. van den; Wiel, M.W.J. van de; Crebolder, H.F.J.M.; Scherpbier, A.J.J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction At Maastricht University, the integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes in preclinical medical education is promoted by an ‘Adoption Programme’, where students carry out assignments in a general practice setting. The assignments are explained and discussed in practical medical

  10. The effect of advanced practice nurse-modulated education on rehabilitation nursing staff knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, Kristen L

    2013-01-01

    Rehabilitation is a specialty area with defined competencies and discrete nursing knowledge. Nurses need to be educated in the basic competencies of rehabilitation to provide safe, quality care to patients with chronic illnesses and disabilities. A critical appraisal of the literature showed that education increased knowledge in a specialty area and had positive benefits for nurses, organizations, and patients. The purpose of this paper is to describe an evidence-based educational intervention. Self-study modules on 15 rehabilitation competencies were developed for 16 nurses working on a new inpatient unit. Outcomes were evaluated using pre and post tests via the online Association of Rehabilitation Nurses (ARN) Competency Assessment Tool (CAT). Data were analyzed using the SPSS14.0 statistical package. Paired t-tests demonstrated a significant difference between pre and post test scores on 14 of the 15 competencies measured. Findings suggested that education of nursing staff resulted in increased knowledge about rehabilitation nursing competencies. © 2013 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  11. An exploration of stereotype perceptions amongst support staff within a South African higher education institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Given R.B. Moloto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: After the 1994 democratic elections, South African organisations had to replace discriminatory policies with new policies to integrate all people and to embrace diversity. As a consequence stereotypes may be more prevalent in diverse working environments. Research purpose: The objective of this study was to explore the experience of stereotypes amongst the support staff within a higher education institution. Motivation for this study: Changes within South African working environments, and specifically higher education institutions, resulted in more diverse management teams and a more culturally diverse workforce. With this in mind, the experience of stereotypes may become more prevalent within South African working environments. Many researchers have focused on stereotypes; however, studies on stereotypes within South Africa are limited, especially within higher education institutions. Research approach, design and method: The research approach was qualitative and a case study design was employed. A combination of both quota and convenience sampling was used. The sample consisted of (N = 30 support staff within a higher education institution in South Africa. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data. Main findings: The results indicated that the participants do experience stereotypes within their workplace and also hold stereotypes of other people within their workplace. The most prevalent stereotypes mentioned by participants were age, gender, racial and occupational stereotypes. There is also an indication that stereotypes have cognitive, emotional and behavioural effects on the stereotyped. Practical/managerial implications: Organisations should do away with stereotyping by embracing and managing diversity and dealing with stereotypes, specifically within higher education institutions. When managers are aware of stereotypes and the effects thereof in the organisation, they can make every effort to eradicate the

  12. An exploration of stereotype perceptions amongst support staff within a South African higher education institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Given R.B. Moloto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: After the 1994 democratic elections, South African organisations had to replace discriminatory policies with new policies to integrate all people and to embrace diversity. As a consequence stereotypes may be more prevalent in diverse working environments.Research purpose: The objective of this study was to explore the experience of stereotypes amongst the support staff within a higher education institution.Motivation for this study: Changes within South African working environments, and specifically higher education institutions, resulted in more diverse management teams and a more culturally diverse workforce. With this in mind, the experience of stereotypes may become more prevalent within South African working environments. Many researchers have focused on stereotypes; however, studies on stereotypes within South Africa are limited, especially within higher education institutions. Research approach, design and method: The research approach was qualitative and a case study design was employed. A combination of both quota and convenience sampling was used. The sample consisted of (N = 30 support staff within a higher education institution in South Africa. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data.Main findings: The results indicated that the participants do experience stereotypes within their workplace and also hold stereotypes of other people within their workplace. The most prevalent stereotypes mentioned by participants were age, gender, racial and occupational stereotypes. There is also an indication that stereotypes have cognitive, emotional and behavioural effects on the stereotyped.Practical/managerial implications: Organisations should do away with stereotyping by embracing and managing diversity and dealing with stereotypes, specifically within higher education institutions. When managers are aware of stereotypes and the effects thereof in the organisation, they can make every effort to eradicate the stereotypes

  13. An investigation of perceptions of programme quality support of adult basic education programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udouj, Gary; Grover, Kenda; Belcher, Greg; Kacirek, Kit

    2017-04-01

    This study was designed to identify the degree to which the directors of adult basic education programs perceive they have program quality support, as evidenced by a well-defined mission and role in the community, a management system, human resources management, and a suitable learning environment. NSCALL's Evidence-based program self-assessment (2006) was modified and administered electronically to administrators of adult education programs in a mid-southern state. Findings indicated that most directors perceive they are implementing the indicators of program quality support in all of the areas surveyed. A research-based annual self-study that considers the quality indicators is recommended, leaving a need for an update to the NCSALL assessment for use as a program assessment instrument. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Patient level cost of diabetes self-management education programmes: an international evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Gerardine; O'Donnell, Shane; Quigley, Etáin; Cullen, Kate; Gibney, Sarah; Levin-Zamir, Diane; Ganahl, Kristin; Müller, Gabriele; Muller, Ingrid; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Chang, Wushou Peter; Van Den Broucke, Stephan

    2017-06-04

    The objective of this study was to examine the value of time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) in understanding the process and costs of delivering diabetes self-management education (DSME) programmes in a multicountry comparative study. Outpatient settings in five European countries (Austria, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, UK) and two countries outside Europe, Taiwan and Israel. Providers of DSME programmes across participating countries (N=16) including healthcare professionals, administrators and patients taking part in DSME programmes. Primary measure: time spent by providers in the delivery of DSME and resources consumed in order to compute programme costs. Secondary measures: self-report measures of behavioural self-management and diabetes disease/health-related outcomes. We found significant variation in costs and the processes of how DSME programmes are provided across and within countries. Variations in costs were driven by a combination of price variances, mix of personnel skill and efficiency variances. Higher cost programmes were not found to have achieved better relative outcomes. The findings highlight the value of TDABC in calculating a patient level cost and potential of the methodology to identify process improvements in guiding the optimal allocation of scarce resources in diabetes care, in particular for DSME that is often underfunded. This study is the first to measure programme costs using estimates of the actual resources used to educate patients about managing their medical condition and is the first study to map such costs to self-reported behavioural and disease outcomes. The results of this study will inform clinicians, managers and policy makers seeking to enhance the delivery of DSME programmes. The findings highlight the benefits of adopting a TDABC approach to understanding the drivers of the cost of DSME programmes in a multicountry study to reveal opportunities to bend the cost curve for DSME. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  15. Development of a tool to evaluate health science students' experiences of an interprofessional education (IPE) programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lê, Quynh; Spencer, Judy; Whelan, Jessica

    2008-12-01

    The Rural Interprofessional Programme Emergency Retreat (RIPPER) is an educational programme collaboratively developed and evaluated by an interprofessional team from Schools within Faculty of Health Science (FHS), University of Tasmania (UTAS), Australia. The aims of RIPPER are to foster and facilitate positive and productive interprofessional learning experiences for undergraduate students in a rural setting; and to develop a firmly embedded and sustainable interprofessional healthcare module within the health science curriculum. This paper reports on the development of a reliable and valid survey tool to evaluate students' understandings and experiences of this interprofessional learning programme. Twenty-nine students from the Schools of Nursing, Medicine and Pharmacy of the FHS, UTAS participated in the RIPPER programme which offers a number of interactive rural emergency healthcare scenarios using high- and low-fidelity simulation. To evaluate the programme a survey which consisted of 2 main components was developed and implemented before and after the programme. The first component was designed to gather students' demographic information, their understanding of the interprofessional practice concepts, and their expectations of the RIPPER programme using open-ended questions. The second component consisted of a 5-point Likert scale for students to rank their level of agreement pre- and post- intervention with 12 statements about team working, programme evaluation and collaborative learning. Three processes were used to establish the validity and reliability of the survey. Content validity was assessed by academics and experts in health science education. Construct validity was assessed using exploratory factor analysis. The internal consistency and reliability of the survey was checked using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Factor analysis of the 12 statements identified 3 main factors including appreciation of professional roles and responsibilities, improved

  16. Demedicalisation of “Medical prescription of sport”: The Strasbourg programme as Viewed by Sports Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsault, Christelle

    2016-06-08

    Promoting health by sport has now gone one step further. Integrated into the 2015 Health Act, medical prescription of sport activities is organized locally, as illustrated by the Strasbourg “sport-health prescription” programme, which promotes physical activity for patients with stable chronic diseases within local sports structures. Observation of the real functioning of this programme, based on the practices and descriptions of six sports educators in various structures, reveals demedicalisation in favour of sportification, as sports educators translate the prescription according to their specific institution and policies. Although there is a general consensus about the need for physical education to fight against inactivity and isolation of patients, the expected effects of physical activity are redefined according to a political economy of local structures. Implementation of the sport-health programme is subject to the social and political conditions of the local sports movement.

  17. The Effect of a Multidisciplinary Regional Educational Programme on the Quality of Colon Cancer Resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheehan-Dare, Gemma E; Marks, Kate M; Tinkler-Hundal, Emma

    2018-01-01

    Mesocolic plane surgery with central vascular ligation produces an oncologically superior specimen following colon cancer resection and appears to be related to optimal outcomes. Aim We aimed to assess whether a regional educational programme in optimal mesocolic surgery led to an improvement...... in the quality of specimens. METHOD: Following an educational programme in the Capital and Zealand areas of Denmark, 686 cases of primary colon cancer resected across six hospitals were assessed by grading the plane of surgery and undertaking tissue morphometry. These were compared to 263 specimens resected...... educational programme in optimal mesocolic surgery improved the oncological quality of colon cancer specimens as assessed by mesocolic planes, however, there was no significant effect on the amount of tissue resected centrally. Surgeons who attempt central vascular ligation continue to produce more radical...

  18. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy: elaboration of a therapeutic patient education programme, "EdAmyl".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Théaudin, Marie; Cauquil, Cécile; Antonini, Teresa; Algalarrondo, Vincent; Labeyrie, Céline; Aycaguer, Sophie; Clément, Mireille; Kubezyk, Marie; Nonnez, Géraldine; Morier, Agnès; Bourges, Catherine; Darras, Amandine; Mouzat, Laurence; Adams, David

    2014-12-01

    Transthyretin-related amyloidosis (ATTR) is an autosomal dominant disease affecting the peripheral and autonomic nervous system, heart, eyes and kidneys. It is the most disabling hereditary polyneuropathy in adults. The French National Reference centre for this disease was accredited in 2005 with 10 lines of action. One of them is to inform and educate patients about their disease to improve their care and reduce morbidities. We thus decided to elaborate a therapeutic patient education (TPE) programme, starting with patients' needs assessment. A qualitative research study was conducted with one-to-one semi-structured interviews of selected individuals. Recorded interviews were analysed to identify the skills that patients need to acquire. A TPE programme was elaborated on the basis of these findings. Seven patients, one asymptomatic carrier and two healthy spouses were interviewed. Analysis of the interviews showed that interviewees had a good knowledge of the disease and its symptoms but they had difficulties explaining the disease mechanism and did not have an adequate knowledge of the available treatment options, although they knew that liver transplant might halt progression of the disease. ATTR amyloidosis appeared to have a major negative impact on the patient's physical and mental well-being. Patients feared loss of autonomy and having to require assistance from their relatives and spouses. All interviewees were keen to participate in a TPE programme. Based on this needs assessment, we identified seven skills that patients need to acquire and several pedagogical goals to be achieved during the education programme. An interdisciplinary team then elaborated a complete TPE programme. Elaboration of a TPE programme for ATTR amyloidosis required to obtain useful information from the patients themselves, and their relatives, concerning their perception of their disease. This needs' assessment constituted the basis for designing the first TPE programme, to our

  19. Roles, tasks and educational functions of postgraduate programme directors: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydén, Hanna; Ponzer, Sari; Heikkilä, Kristiina; Kihlström, Lars; Nordquist, Jonas

    2015-10-01

    A programme director is often required to organise postgraduate medical education. This leadership role can include educational as well as managerial duties. Only a few published studies have explored programme directors' own perceptions of their role. There is a need to explore the use of theoretical frameworks to improve the understanding of educational roles. To explore programme directors' own perceptions of their role in terms of tasks and functions, and to relate these roles to the theoretical framework developed by Bolman and Deal. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 programme directors between February and August 2013. The data were subjected to content analysis using a deductive approach. The various roles and tasks included by participants in their perceptions of their work could be categorised within the framework of functions described by Bolman and Deal. These included: structuring the education (structural function); supporting individuals and handling relations (human resource function); negotiating between different interests (political function); and influencing the culture at the departmental level (symbolic function). The functions most often emphasised by participants were the structural and human resource functions. Some tasks involved several functions which varied over time. Programme directors' own perceptions of their roles, tasks and functions varied widely. The theoretical framework of Bolman and Deal might be helpful when explaining and developing these roles. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. How does pre-dialysis education need to change? Findings from a qualitative study with staff and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Gill; Sein, Kim; Allen, Kerry

    2017-11-23

    Pre-dialysis education (PDE) is provided to thousands of patients every year, helping them decide which renal replacement therapy (RRT) to choose. However, its effectiveness is largely unknown, with relatively little previous research into patients' views about PDE, and no research into staff views. This study reports findings relevant to PDE from a larger mixed methods study, providing insights into what staff and patients think needs to improve. Semi-structured interviews in four hospitals with 96 clinical and managerial staff and 93 dialysis patients, exploring experiences of and views about PDE, and analysed using thematic framework analysis. Most patients found PDE helpful and staff valued its role in supporting patient decision-making. However, patients wanted to see teaching methods and materials improve and biases eliminated. Staff were less aware than patients of how informal staff-patient conversations can influence patients' treatment decision-making. Many staff felt ill equipped to talk about all treatment options in a balanced and unbiased way. Patient decision-making was found to be complex and patients' abilities to make treatment decisions were adversely affected in the pre-dialysis period by emotional distress. Suggested improvements to teaching methods and educational materials are in line with previous studies and current clinical guidelines. All staff, irrespective of their role, need to be trained about all treatment options so that informal conversations with patients are not biased. The study argues for a more individualised approach to PDE which is more like counselling than education and would demand a higher level of skill and training for specialist PDE staff. The study concludes that even if these improvements are made to PDE, not all patients will benefit, because some find decision-making in the pre-dialysis period too complex or are unable to engage with education due to illness or emotional distress. It is therefore recommended that

  1. Different Moves, Similar Outcomes: A Comparison of Chinese and Swedish Preschool Teacher Education Programmes and the Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vong, Keang-ieng Peggy; Hu, Bi Ying; Xia, Yan-ping

    2015-01-01

    A Chinese and a Swedish preschool teacher education programme were examined in search for commonalities and differences of the curriculum decision-making considerations involved in the respective programme revision process. Findings include: (1) the two programmes have shifted orientations and become similar, yet there was no fundamental…

  2. Improving Latino Children's Early Language and Literacy Development: Key Features of Early Childhood Education within Family Literacy Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Youngok; Zuniga, Stephen; Howes, Carollee; Jeon, Hyun-Joo; Parrish, Deborah; Quick, Heather; Manship, Karen; Hauser, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Noting the lack of research on how early childhood education (ECE) programmes within family literacy programmes influence Latino children's early language and literacy development, this study examined key features of ECE programmes, specifically teacher-child interactions and child engagement in language and literacy activities and how these…

  3. Population Education Programme in the 90s in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muley, D S

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of India's Population Education Project, launched in 1980 with financial and technical support from United Nations' agencies, is to institutionalize such education in all the country's educational processes. As the Project begins its third phase (1991-95), an emphasis is being placed on reaching the 60% of children (most of them girls) who drop out of school between classes I-V through a variety of interventions in the nonformal education sector. Within the formal sector, integration of population education into school sylabi and textbooks at the secondary and plus-two levels will be pursued; such integration is now largely complete at the primary and upper primary levels. Another focus will be to reach the estimated 60-70% of teachers who have not yet received the in-service training in population education and to integrate this subject into some courses taught at the pre-service teacher training level. To strengthen the attitude formation and value orientation aspects of population education, a greater emphasis will be placed on linking co-curricular activities in the community with the school curriculum. Given the finding that students exposed to print, audio, and audiovisual media show higher levels of awareness of population themes, the use of the mass media in population education will be promoted. A weakness of the project to be addressed in the 1990s is inadequate coordination between the school and other sectors, especially at the grassroots level and in terms of development activities. Another goal is to emphasize the links between family planning and population education. In the past, the population education project tended to differentiate itself from family planning to increase program acceptability. At present, however, there is awareness that a major purpose of population education is to create demands for family planning services.

  4. Psycho-education programme for temporomandibular disorders: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Maaytah Mohammed

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs are by far the most predominant condition affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ, however many patients have mild self-limiting symptoms and should not be referred for specialist care. The aim of this pilot study was to develop a simple, cost-effective management programme for TMDs using CD-ROM. 41 patients (age 18–70 participated in this study, patients were divided into three groups: the 1st group were involved in an attention placebo CD-ROM (contain anatomical information about the temporomandibular system, the 2nd group received information on CD-ROM designed to increase their control and self efficacy, while the 3rd group received the same programme of the 2nd group added to it an introduction to self-relaxing techniques followed by audio tape of progressive muscle relaxation exercises. Each of the groups was asked to complete a number of questionnaires on the day of initial consultation and six weeks afterwards. Results The two experimental groups (2nd & 3rd were equally effective in reducing pain, disability and distress, and both were more effective than the attention placebo group (1st, however the experimental groups appeared to have improved at follow-up relative to the placebo-group in terms of disability, pain and depressed mood. Conclusion This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility and acceptability of the design. A full, randomized, controlled trial is required to confirm the efficacy of the interventions developed here.

  5. Students’ Perceptions about Role of Faculty and Administrative Staff in Business Education Service Quality Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Arslanagić-Kalajdžić

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on dimensions of the perceived service quality measurement for business schools. We propose an adapted SERVQUAL measure of expected and perceived quality, where employees at business schools are split into two groups: faculty and administrative staff, and assessed separately. This measure represents a tool for comparable service quality assessment at business schools. Empirical data were collected among undergraduate students in a developing economy. A total of 282 respondents were used to assess the overall fit of the proposed model and to test the differences between the expectations and the perceptions of service quality in a business school. The results support usability of the proposed adapted SERVQUAL measure. Therefore, the study contributes to the existing literature reporting the findings on service quality in an educational context.

  6. Challenges of Universal Basic Education Programme: The Role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    The main tenet of Universal Basic Education is to make sure that the many school age children in the country today who are involved in hawking and other vices go to school. It is expected to be mandatory for all pupils within the target group in the 21st century. The desire for. Basic Education in Nigeria stressed Universality.

  7. The review of teacher education programmes and transformational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Higher Education Quality Committee's definition of quality (HEQC 2001) includes standard elements familiar to other higher education systems as well as elements specific to South Africa's own contextual priorities and purposes. These elements are fitness for and of purpose, value for money, and individual and social ...

  8. Library User Education Programme for Covenant University Freshmen

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study looked into the various types of user- education offered in Covenant University. These include library orientation, teaching of use of library and study skills, basic bibliographic instructions etc. The research revealed that the highest impact of user education on students is equipping them with good search skills as ...

  9. Strategies for improving library user education programme in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determines strategies for improving library user education in universities in Benue State. The main purpose of this study is to determine the strategies for students' positive attitudes towards library user education. The study adopted a descriptive survey research design. Population of the study was 6,253 and ...

  10. Mathematics Education and the Objectivist Programme in HPS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glas, E.

    2012-01-01

    Using history of mathematics for studying concepts, methods, problems and other internal features of the discipline may give rise to a certain tension between descriptive adequacy and educational demands. Other than historians, educators are concerned with mathematics as a normatively defined

  11. improving education programme at pmtct sites in liberia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    among the HIV positive mother under 6 months, in order to improve nutritional education program at PMTCT ... civil war which is exacerbated by poverty, food ... very little data exist concerning these aspects of nutrition and infant feeding practices among women living with HIV in Liberia. Education programs are more likely ...

  12. Impact of the 'Providing Access to Continued Education' Programme on Repeat Teenage Pregnancy in the Bahamas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharkar, V P; Frankson, M A; Sakharkar, P R

    2015-05-15

    To determine the relationship of determinants such as age, ethnicity, education and sexual behaviour with repeat teenage pregnancy and to determine the impact of 'Providing Access to Continued Education' (PACE) programme in reducing repeat teenage pregnancy amongst its participants in The Bahamas. This retrospective cohort study included 397 attendees of the Adolescent Health Centre (AHC). Eighty-eight out of 139 registered participants completed the PACE programme. Data on age, ethnicity, education, sexual behaviour and repeat pregnancy in two years were analysed for descriptive statistics, and association of demographic characteristics and participation in the PACE programme with repeat pregnancy using the Chi-squared test. Mean age of participants was 16.4 ± 1.1 years; median school grade and mean grade point average (GPA) was 11 and 1.97 ± 0.7, respectively. The mean age at the first sexual activity was 14.9 ± 1.2 years. The mean age and number of sexual partners were 21 ± 4.3 years and 2 ± 1, respectively. Overall, repeat pregnancy rate was 39%: 37.4% amongst PACE registered and 31.8% amongst PACE completed mothers. No significant difference was observed in repeat pregnancy between registered and non-registered as well as those who completed the programme and those who did not. The odds ratio of 0.525 suggested that completion of the PACE programme had a moderate protective effect on reducing repeat pregnancy. Age, ethnicity, education and sexual behaviour showed no association with repeat pregnancy. The PACE programme did not reduce repeat pregnancy rate significantly. However, completion of the programme offered a moderate protection.

  13. Using smartphones and tablets in higher education contexts: an exploratory study within a teacher education programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmigiani Davide

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyse and explore the potential opportunities offered by mobile devices to improve the higher education scenario. In particular, the study was conducted within a teacher education programme. The students attended a course called Educational Technology, which focussed on the use of mobile devices (smartphones and tablets inside and outside the classroom. We examined the impact of mobile learning on students’ university activities and the changes in the organisation of their studying activity, their learning strategies and their interaction/cooperation levels. After the course, we administered a questionnaire that highlighted some findings concerning the differences between smartphones and tablets in supporting these aspects. We found that both types of devices improved the interaction/collaboration among students and the search for information, which was useful for studying. However, the organisation of studying and the learning strategies were supported only by tablets and for specific aspects of learning. This exploratory research suggests, on the one hand, some possible solutions to improve the quality of university activities, and on the other, it underlines some difficulties that will be analysed more thoroughly in further studies.

  14. Is the delivery of a quality improvement education programme in obstetrics and gynaecology for final year medical students feasible and still effective in a shortened time frame?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kool, Bridget; Wise, Michelle R; Peiris-John, Roshini; Sadler, Lynn; Mahony, Faith; Wells, Susan

    2017-05-26

    Teaching clinical audit skills to nascent health professionals is one strategy to improve frontline care. The undergraduate medical curriculum at the University of Auckland provides improvement science theory and skills in Year 5 teaching, and the opportunity to put this into practice during an Obstetrics and Gynaecology (O&G) clinical attachment in Year 6. In 2015, a revised medical school curriculum at the university resulted in a planned reduction of the O&G attachment from five weeks to four, necessitating revision of the Year 6 Quality Improvement (QI) project. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the revised programme provided an important experiential learning opportunity for medical students without imposing an unsustainable burden on clinical services. Based on a CIPP (Context/Input/Process/Product) evaluation model, the study was conducted in several stages to get a sense of the context as the new programme was being planned (Context evaluation), the feasibility of an alternative approach to meet the educational need (Input evaluation), the implementation of the revised programme (Process evaluation) and finally, the programme outcomes (Product evaluation). We used multiple data sources (supervisors, students, academic administrators, and hospital staff) and data collection methods (questionnaires, focus groups, individual interviews, consultative workshops, student reports and oral presentations). The context evaluation revealed the Year 6 QI programme to be valuable and contributed to O&G service improvements, however, the following concerns were identified: time to complete the project, timely topic selection and access to data, recognition of student achievement, and staff workload. The evaluation of the revised QI project indicated improvement in student perceptions of their QI knowledge and skills, and most areas previously identified as challenging, despite the concurrent reduction in the duration of the O&G attachment. Applying the CIPP model

  15. Evaluation of an educational programme with workshops for families of children with food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Porta, J; Ruiz-Baqués, A; Gabarron Hortal, E; Capel Torres, F; Ariño Pla, M N; Zorrozua Santisteban, A; Sáinz de la Maza, E

    2016-01-01

    When a child is diagnosed with a food allergy, prevention and patient education are the key interventions for maintaining the child's health and quality of life and that of his or her whole family. However, health education activities for the families of children with food allergies are very limited, and most of these activities have not been evaluated. Therefore, the objectives of the present study were to develop an educational programme, to empower its participants through workshops, and to evaluate its results. Several types of educational materials were created specifically for the programme, called "Proyecto CESA" ("STOP-FAR Project: Stop Food-Induced Allergic Reactions"). The programme was carried out in seven Spanish cities and was attended by parents and caregivers. The workshops were led by physicians specialising in allergies and by expert patients. Afterwards, participant learning and satisfaction were evaluated based on questionnaires that were completed both before and after the workshops. A significant improvement was observed in 29 items out of 40 (McNemar's test). Participant satisfaction with the programme was also very high: 90% rated the course between 8 and 10 points out of a possible 10 (41% rated it as a 10). The face-to-face workshops, which included utilisation of educational materials, had positive results in terms of learning as well as in levels of satisfaction in participating families. Copyright © 2015 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Building nurse education capacity in India: insights from a faculty development programme in Andhra Pradesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Catrin; Razia, Rafath; Cook, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    India faces an acute shortage of nurses. Strategies to tackle the human resource crisis depend upon scaling up nursing education provision in a context where the social status and working conditions of nurses are highly variable. Several national and regional situation assessments have revealed significant concerns about educational governance, institutional and educator capacity, quality and standards. Improving educational capacity through nursing faculty development has been proposed as one of several strategies to address a complex health human resource situation. This paper describes and critically reflects upon the experience of one such faculty development programme in the state of Andhra Pradesh. The faculty development programme involved a 2 year partnership between a UK university and 7 universities in Andhra Pradesh. It adopted a participatory approach and covered training and support in 4 areas: teaching, research/scholarship, leadership/management and clinical education. Senior hospital nurses were also invited to participate. The programme was evaluated positively and some changes to educational practice were reported. However, several obstacles to wider change were identified. At the programme level, there was a need for more intensive individual and institutional mentorship as well as involvement of Indian Centres of Excellence in Nursing to provide local (as well as international) expertise. At the organisational level, the participating Colleges reported heavy workloads, lack of control over working conditions, lack of control over the curriculum and poor infra-structure/resources as ongoing challenges. In the absence of wider educational reform in nursing and government commitment to the profession, faculty development programmes alone will have limited impact.

  17. Oral hygiene caregivers' educational programme improves oral health conditions in institutionalised independent and functional elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portella, Fernando F; Rocha, Aline W; Haddad, Daniel C; Fortes, Carmem B B; Hugo, Fernando N; Padilha, Dalva M P; Samuel, Susana M W

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the impact of an oral hygiene education programme for caregivers on the oral health of institutionalised elderly and to examine the effect of disability and low muscle strength on programme outcomes. The subjects of this study were geriatric patients (n = 80) from a nursing home. Katz Index for activities of daily living, handgrip strength and mucosal-plaque score (MPS) was evaluated at baseline and 1 year after intervention. The intervention consisted of an educational programme and specific guidelines for caregivers (to perform oral hygiene for dependent elderly and to supervise the independent elderly during oral hygiene practices). Differences on MPS were evaluated using a paired-sample t-test. A stratified analysis was carried out to identify differences in response to the programme according to the Katz Index and handgrip strength of elderly. The MPS was significantly reduced (p = 0.001) at follow-up; however, a separate analysis showed that only the independent elderly (p = 0.002) and those with normal muscle strength (p = 0.006) showed a reduction in MPS during the follow-up examination. The oral hygiene education programme for caregivers resulted in a positive impact on oral hygiene of the independent and functional elderly. © 2013 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Facilitating positive attitudes towards an innovative programme for baccalaureate nursing education:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Adejumo

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available A survey of nurse ward leaders understanding of, and their attitude to, community/ problem based learning (CPBL approach adopted for the education of nursing students in the degree programme of the University of Natal in Durban (UND was conducted. This was with a view to intervening, if necessary, to ensure positive understanding and attitude among the nurse leaders towards the non-traditional CPBL of UND nursing students. It was hypothesised that focused discussions, between facilitators and nurse ward leaders, aimed at providing information and explanation about the advantages of changing from traditional to non-traditional educational programmes in nursing would enhance positive attitude towards the students and their education programme. Using a questionnaire developed for this study, quantitative and qualitative data were twice collected at intervals of 5-6 months from 54 nurse ward leaders who interacted with the CPBL students in 27 wards of 2 provincial hospitals. The data, collected in the early part of the students’ deployment and at 5-6 months after included information about the participants understanding of CPBL; their rating of CPBL students in terms of expected knowledge and practice; and their attitude towards CPBL nursing students in clinical settings. Contact sessions were held with the participants in between the measures for a discussion about the CPBL programme and the expectations of the learners. Analysis of the pre and post measures showed more favourable attitude, improved understanding, and tolerance towards the students by the nurse ward leaders in the post-measures than in the pre-measures. The writers concluded that if students in this type of programme must experience satisfaction with less intimidation, implementers of CPBL programmes in nursing should relentlessly involve the qualified nurses and other professionals working with the students in informative discussions about the purpose and the process of learning

  19. The Belgian nuclear higher education network: the evolution of an academic programme in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkvens, T.; Coeck, M.

    2014-01-01

    The master-after-master in nuclear engineering provided by the Belgian Nuclear higher Education Network (BNEN) is a one-year, 60 ECTS programme which combines the expertise of six Belgian universities and SCK.CEN, the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, which participates through its Academy for Nuclear Science and Technology. It was created in close collaboration with representatives of academia, research centres, industry and other nuclear stakeholders. The BNEN consortium Due to its modular programme, BNEN is accessible for both full-time students (mainly young engineering graduates) as well as young professionals already employed in the nuclear industry. The programme is offered in English to facilitate the participation of international students. One of the important aspects of the BNEN programme is the fact that exercises and hands-on sessions in the specialised laboratories of SCK.CEN complement the theoretical classes to bring the students into contact with all facets of nuclear energy. Several of SCK.CEN's researchers provide valuable contributions to the programme through seminars and practical exercises. From their daily practices and responsibilities they give an expert view on the subjects that are being taught. In 2012, in the framework of an official accreditation process all aspects of the BNEN programme were audited by an international visitation panel. The most important outcome of this process is the current reform of the academic programme, which will be implemented in the academic year 2014-2015, taking into account the recommendations by the visitation panel. In this paper, the history of the BNEN programme will be discussed, the new BNEN programme will be presented as well as the process that has led to its implementation. (authors)

  20. Assessment of learning needs and the development of an educational programme for registered nurses in advanced midwifery and neonatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AE Fichardt

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available A key step in the development of any educational programme is learning needs assessment. This is however often neglected. The purpose of this research was to identify learning needs of potential students in order to develop a relevant educational programme for registered nurses in advanced midwifery and neonatology. A survey design was used, and the population of the study was the registered nurses in the Free State. Two thousand questionnaires were mailed to respondents, selected by means of simple random sampling. Advanced educational programmes emphasize the teaching of advanced knowledge and skills and accept that the students entering these programmes already have specific knowledge and skills included in the curricula for basic programmes. This is contrary to the findings of this study. The results underline the importance of learning needs assessment in the development of relevant educational programmes.

  1. Guest speakers and internationalization in higher education: A critical reflection of guest speakers in tourism programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At its general term, this paper discusses the role of guest lecturers in higher education. More precisely, the paper considers the role of guest lecturers in tourism Management programmes taught to student in Universities. The paper examines theory and literature relating to tourism studies and higher education in general. It discusses the relevance of guest speakers in universities and examines their contributions towards tourism programmes. The paper discusses lecturers in tourism degrees suggesting that they might lack industry experiences but are still required to deliver theories to students and are seen as classroom managers and student mentors. The paper further investigates how lecturers and guest speakers are perceived as two different entities by students where lecturers are seen as classroom managers and guest speakers are seen as the industry knowledge providers. As internationalization of education becomes the focus of higher education institutions that aim to deliver education in a more international context, guest speakers that address local practical occurrences become less appealing. With the rapid spread of distant learning and online education, the paper concludes that guest lecturers are not the solution for perfect academic experiences in higher education in general and specifically in tourism programmes.

  2. Questioning the Role of Internationalization in the Nationalization of Higher Education: The Impact of the EU TEMPUS Programme on Higher Education in Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoubi, Rami M.; Massoud, Hiba K.

    2011-01-01

    Given the need for major reform of the higher education programmes in Syria, and answering the voices that question the role of European Union (EU) in assisting the development of the higher education sector, this study presents an analysis of the contribution of (TEMPUS) Programme in modernising higher education in Syria. The study compares the…

  3. Oral health in pregnancy: educational needs of dental professionals and office staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloetzel, Megan K; Huebner, Colleen E; Milgrom, Peter; Littell, Christopher T; Eggertsson, Hafsteinn

    2012-01-01

    Dental care during pregnancy is important for pregnant women and their children. Comprehensive guidelines for the provision of dental services for pregnant patients were published in 2006, but there is relatively little information about their use in actual practice. The aim of this study was to examine differences in knowledge and attitudes regarding dental care in pregnancy among dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, and nonclinical office staff. A secondary aim was to identify sources of influence on attitudes and knowledge regarding the guidelines. A survey was used to collect information from 766 employees of a Dental Care Organization based in Oregon; responses from 546 were included in the analyses reported here. Statistically significant differences in knowledge were found among the professional-role groups. Dentists and hygienists consistently answered more items correctly than did other respondents. Within all professional-role groups, knowledge gaps existed and were most pronounced regarding provision of routine and emergency services. Positive perceptions of providing dental care during pregnancy were associated with higher knowledge scores (z = 4.16, P education and continuing education for all dental office personnel are needed to promote the diffusion of current evidence-based guidelines for dental care during pregnancy. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  4. Food provision in early childhood education and care services: Exploring how staff determine nutritional adequacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Amanda; Vidgen, Helen; Cleland, Phoebe

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the methods, processes and strategies used by early childhood education and care (ECEC) services when determining the nutritional adequacy of food provided to children in their care. Semi-structured interviews (n = 22) were conducted with directors, educators and cooks at long day care services (LDCS) (n = 12) regarding nutritional adequacy, the use of tools, guidelines and checklists, menu planning and identification and management of unhealthy foods. A qualitative thematic approach was used to identify anticipated and emergent themes. Case-by-case comparisons were then made, and tables and models were created to allow for comparative analysis. LDCS relied on personal knowledge, experience and 'common sense' when determining the nutritional adequacy of the food provided to children. LDCS demonstrated a lack of awareness and use of current regulatory requirements, nutrition guidelines and recommendations, although the services were confident in providing nutrition advice to parents/carers. LDCS staff use personal knowledge and experience over evidence-based nutrition guidelines and recommendations when determining if the food provided to children is nutritionally adequate. ECEC services are recognised as important settings for obesity prevention and the development of lifetime healthy eating habits. This study highlights the complexities and inconsistencies in providing food that is nutritious and appropriate to children in care while highlighting the need to improve the use and accessibility of nutrition guidelines. © 2016 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  5. Creative writing workshops for medical education: learning from a pilot study with hospital staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gull, S E; O'Flynn, R; Hunter, J Y L

    2002-12-01

    A course in creative writing was designed as a possible tool in medical education. Twelve volunteers (six doctors and six non-medical staff) participated in seven workshops held weekly. Four aims were identified: to help put thoughts onto paper; to facilitate interpretation of narrative; to encourage expression of emotions related to illness and death, and to encourage creativity. The course was evaluated using participant observational analysis and two questionnaires. This paper discusses the outcomes in relation to these aims, but identifies additional issues raised by the development.Only six of the 12 participants produced a final piece of written work, with lack of self discipline being cited as the chief reason. There was a strong tendency for self reflection in the group, which needed appropriate support. How creativity can be encouraged remains unclear. The value of multidisciplinary learning in this context was identified.The value of creative writing for medical education remains difficult to measure, but the participants agreed unanimously that the course would be an enjoyable way of encouraging medical students in its stated aims.

  6. Satellite communication programmes for rural education and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnik, Kiran

    In the space of three decades, the technology of satellite communication has notched up remarkable advances. Even more dramatic have been the range of its applications, and their impact. The reach of satellite communication, its ability to instantaneously link remote, far-flung and inaccessible areas, has been one of its major characteristics. Therefore, the contribution of this technology towards fostering development and education in rural areas is of special interest. Some uses of satellite communication for rural education and development in India are described. On the basis of an analysis of the Indian experience, some general lessons are discussed, many of which may be of relevance to other countries also.

  7. Financial and Mathematical Model of Payroll for Labour Remuneration of Teaching Staff in the Sphere of Secondary Professional Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Vladimirovich Dorzhdeev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to building up a financial and mathematical model and designing the appropriate procedure of forming the quota, directed to the payroll of the vocational education teaching staff under the circumstances of normative-per capita financing. Nowadays the given problem occurred after the implementation of normative-per capita financing system is one of the most urgent and complicated problems. The procedures used in many educational institutions are outdated, based on a totally hourly basis and don’t meet the modern requirements of the educational economics and financial management. The approach, suggested in the article, not only solves many financial problems of educational institutions but also reveals problem areas, unprofitable educational programs, resolves optimization tasks, and proposes the algorithm of making the appropriate managerial decisions. Besides, the article describes the distribution procedure of the teaching staff payroll among structural subdivisions of the vocational educational institutions. In the context of the given model, financing should be implemented in proportion to the part of the structural subdivision in the educational process. This part is determined on the basis of the education financial plan of the current academic year of each educational program in this educational institution. In addition, the part of each structural subdivision is determined as the sum of parts of the respective subjects of the educational plan. The suggested procedure promotes the optimization of managing financial performance of vocational educational institutions, provides the opportunity of implementing individual contracts with the teaching staff, and using a number of other modern approaches to financial management of educational institutions.

  8. Structured education programme for women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Mani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a structured education programmes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. Methods: Single-centre, randomised controlled trial, testing a single exposure to a group-based, face-to-face, structured education programme. Inclusion criteria were women with PCOS, aged 18–49 years inclusive and body mass index ≥23 kg/m2 for black and minority ethnicities or ≥25 kg/m2 for white Europeans. Primary outcome was step-count/day at 12 months. Secondary outcomes included indices of physical activity, cardiovascular risk factors, quality of life (QoL and illness perception (IP. Results: 161 women were included (78 control, 83 intervention; 69% white; mean age 33.4 (s.d. 7.6 years, of whom 100 (48 intervention; 52 control attended their 12-month visit (38% attrition. 77% of the intervention arm attended the education programme. No significant change in step-count was observed at 12 months (mean difference: +351 steps/day (95% confidence interval −481, +1183; P = 0.40. No differences were found in biochemical or anthropometric outcomes. The education programme improved participants’ IP in 2 dimensions: understanding their PCOS (P < 0.001 and sense of control (P < 0.01 and improved QoL in 3 dimensions: emotions (P < 0.05, fertility (P < 0.05, weight (P < 0.01 and general mental well-being (P < 0.01. Discussion: A single exposure to structured education programme did not increase physical activity or improve biochemical markers in overweight and obese women with PCOS. However, providing a structured education in parallel to routine medical treatment can be beneficial for participants’ understanding of their condition, reducing their anxiety and improving their QoL.

  9. Structured education programme for women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Hamidreza; Chudasama, Yogini; Hadjiconstantinou, Michelle; Bodicoat, Danielle H; Edwardson, Charlotte; Levy, Miles J; Gray, Laura J; Barnett, Janette; Daly, Heather; Howlett, Trevor A; Khunti, Kamlesh; Davies, Melanie J

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a structured education programmes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Single-centre, randomised controlled trial, testing a single exposure to a group-based, face-to-face, structured education programme. Inclusion criteria were women with PCOS, aged 18-49 years inclusive and body mass index ≥23 kg/m 2 for black and minority ethnicities or ≥25 kg/m 2 for white Europeans. Primary outcome was step-count/day at 12 months. Secondary outcomes included indices of physical activity, cardiovascular risk factors, quality of life (QoL) and illness perception (IP). 161 women were included (78 control, 83 intervention); 69% white; mean age 33.4 (s.d. 7.6) years, of whom 100 (48 intervention; 52 control) attended their 12-month visit (38% attrition). 77% of the intervention arm attended the education programme. No significant change in step-count was observed at 12 months (mean difference: +351 steps/day (95% confidence interval -481, +1183); P  = 0.40). No differences were found in biochemical or anthropometric outcomes. The education programme improved participants' IP in 2 dimensions: understanding their PCOS ( P  < 0.001) and sense of control ( P  < 0.01) and improved QoL in 3 dimensions: emotions ( P  < 0.05), fertility ( P  < 0.05), weight ( P  < 0.01) and general mental well-being ( P  < 0.01). A single exposure to structured education programme did not increase physical activity or improve biochemical markers in overweight and obese women with PCOS. However, providing a structured education in parallel to routine medical treatment can be beneficial for participants' understanding of their condition, reducing their anxiety and improving their QoL. © 2018 The authors.

  10. Nuclear Engineering Education in Support of Thailand’s Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanyotha, S.; Pengvanich, P.; Nilsuwankosit, S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to introduce the nuclear engineering education at the Department of Nuclear Engineering, Chulalongkon University, Bangkok Thailand. The department has been offering curriculum in nuclear engineering to support the national nuclear power programme since 1970s. It is the oldest established nuclear engineering educational programme in the South East Asia region. Nevertheless, since the nuclear power programme has been postponed several times due to various reasons, the educational programme at the department has been continuously adapted to meet the nation’s needs. Several areas of study have been introduced, including nuclear power engineering, industrial applications of radioisotope, nuclear instrumentation, radioisotope production, radiation processing, environment and safety, nuclear materials, as well as the newly created nuclear security and non-proliferation. With the renewed interest in using nuclear power in Thailand in 2007, the department has been actively assisting both the government and the electric utility in preparing human resources to support the nuclear power programme through various educational and training modules. Realizing the importance of establishing and balancing all 3 aspects of the nuclear 3S (safety, security and safeguard) in Thailand and in the Southeast Asian region. The new curriculum of nuclear security and safeguard programme has been offered since 2013. Since the establishment, the department has produced hundreds of graduates (Diploma, Master’s, and Ph.D. levels) to feed the continuously expanding Thai nuclear industry. The full paper will provide detailed information of the curriculum, the challenges and obstacles that the department has encountered, as well as the national and international linkages which have been established over the years. (author)

  11. Minimising visitor impacts to protected areas: The efficacy of low impact education programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, J.L.; Reid, S.E.

    2007-01-01

    Protected area managers, tourism providers, and other organisations commonly employ education programmes to address visitation-related impairment of natural and cultural resources, social conditions, and neighbouring communities. These programmes have different names (Leave No Trace, Codes of Conduct, Environmental Guidelines for Tourists) but share common objectives: to sustain opportunities for high quality visitor experiences while avoiding or minimising associated negative impacts to protected area resources, visitor experiences, and park neighbours. Theoretical and empirical research studies in the United States are reviewed to evaluate the efficacy of educational efforts that seek to encourage adoption of low impact behaviours. Findings reveal that most of the visitor education efforts evaluated did effectively alter visitor knowledge, behaviour and/or resource and social conditions in the intended direction. These findings, including discussions of message content, delivery, audience characteristics and theoretical grounding, provide insights for improving the efficacy of future educational efforts.

  12. A Survey of Students Participating in a Computer-Assisted Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yel, Elif Binboga; Korhan, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    This paper mainly examines anthropometric data, data regarding the habits, experiences, and attitudes of the students about their tablet/laptop/desktop computer use, in addition to self-reported musculoskeletal discomfort levels and frequencies of students participating in a tablet-assisted interactive education programme. A two-part questionnaire…

  13. School Heads and Mentors in Cahoots? Challenges to Teaching Practice in Zimbabwean Teacher Education Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makura, Alfred Henry; Zireva, Davison

    2013-01-01

    Mentors and school heads play cardinal roles in teacher education programmes in most countries, including Zimbabwe. The side-effects of such symbiosis have not yet been investigated fully. This article used a qualitative methodological approach to investigate the perceptions of some Zimbabwean student teachers regarding their teaching practice…

  14. Sweden's International Training Programme in Education for Sustainable Development Enables Students to Change Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jim; Neeser, Marie

    2012-01-01

    The Swedish International Training Programme in Education for Sustainable Development, which has been run annually for the past 10 years, is a five-phase program that supports participants to develop and implement a change project in their work places. It requires a team of students from an institution and provides extensive follow up. The course…

  15. The effect of a water-hygiene educational programme on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated whether a water-handling hygiene education programme could improve the health-related microbiological quality of container water stored and used in households in a dense urban settlement in the Free State Province. Previous studies in the area indicated that stored container water became ...

  16. What Can the Work of Habermas Offer Educational Researcher Development Programmes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Although certain aspects of the work of Habermas have had much influence on emancipatory and action research, this article draws on a wider range of his thinking in order to explore how his ideas can inform the content and process of educational researcher development programmes. Habermas's theory of communicative action, his discourse ethics…

  17. The Creation of Multimedia Resources to Support the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) Coach Education Programme (CEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotty, Yvonne; D'Arcy, Jimmy; Sweeney, David

    2016-01-01

    The Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) is an Irish amateur sporting and cultural organisation. It represents in excess of 20,000 teams nationwide and is committed to supporting the development of players and coaches through its Coach Education Programme (CEP). A strategic goal of the CEP is to supplement the traditional field based coach education…

  18. Implementation of PBL Curriculum Involving Multiple Disciplines in Undergraduate Medical Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, Srikumar; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how a multidisciplinary problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum was established at the International Medical University in Malaysia for preclinical education in a 5-semester phase 1 programme. Based on positive feedback from a modified PBL program implemented in one discipline, a multidisciplinary PBL curriculum was…

  19. Implications of Incessant Strike Actions on the Implementation of Technical Education Programme in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adavbiele, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper was designed to x-ray the implications of incessant strike actions on the implementation of Technical education programme in Nigeria. The paper took an exploratory view on the concept of strike actions in Nigeria with particular references on notable strike actions that have occurred in Nigeria. The types of strike were explained and…

  20. Practical Skills in Laptop Computer Repairs for Curriculum Innovation in Technical Education Programmes in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwuedo, Samson O.; Omofonmwan, Godwin O.

    2015-01-01

    The increase in the use of laptop computer in Nigeria with their corresponding incessant breakdown calls for the preparation of competent technicians/technologists to carry out such repairs at the downtime of the appliance. This is one of the responsibilities of technology education programmes. This study therefore determined the practical skills…

  1. The Effectiveness of Farm Programmes on Bangladesh Betar in Educating Farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md. Mahedi; Mondal, Md. Nazrul Islam; Islam, Md. Nurul; Hoque, Md. Aminul

    2017-01-01

    Farm programmes (FPs) of varied categories have been developed and aired over several decades by Bangladesh Betar, the national radio of Bangladesh for the diffusion of farm technologies. The study aimed to produce an in-depth academic evaluation of their effectiveness in educating farmers in Bangladesh. A sample of 465 respondents from the Khulna…

  2. Design and Effects of an Academic Development Programme on Leadership for Educational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunefeld, Hetty; van Tartwijk, Jan; Jongen, Havva; Wubbels, Theo

    2015-01-01

    This article describes and assesses the design and effects of one of the first academic development programmes on Leadership for Educational Change. The participants are senior academics, involved in leadership of teaching and learning. We report on an evaluation using a mixed-method approach employing a self-report questionnaire administered to…

  3. Design and effects of an academic development programme on leadership for educational change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunefeld, Hetty; van Tartwijk, Jan; Jongen, Havva; Wubbels, Theo

    2015-01-01

    This article describes and assesses the design and effects of one of the first academic development programmes on Leadership for Educational Change. The participants are senior academics, involved in leadership of teaching and learning. We report on an evaluation using a mixed-method approach

  4. EPIC Trial: education programme impact on serum phosphorous control in CKD 5D patients on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Tzanno Branco Martins

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: In stage 5D chronic kidney disease (CKD 5D patients, the encouragement of treatment adherence by health professionals is a significant clinical challenge. Objectives: This study evaluates the impact of a nutritional education programme on hyperphosphatemia, utilizing the transtheoretical model of behavior change (TMBC. Subjects and Methods: A prospective interventional study comprising 179 CKD 5D patients with hypophosphatemia. The 4-month educational programme took place during dialysis sessions. Demographic and laboratory data were evaluated, whilst the TMBC was utilized both pre- and post-intervention. Results: 132 patients showed a positive change and significant reduction in phosphate levels, whilst 47 patients showed a negative change and little reduction in phosphate levels. Positive changes were identified at different levels of literacy. 117/179 participants had ongoing treatment with sevelamer throughout the trial period. 61 patients with intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH 300 pg/ml also showed a decrease in phosphate levels. Conclusions: Nutritional education programmes can achieve excellent results when appropriately applied. An education programme may be effective across different literacy levels.

  5. Contextualising Learning through the Participatory Construction of an Environmental Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Mallen, Isabel; Barraza, Laura; Bodenhorn, Barbara; Ceja-Adame, Maria de la Paz; Reyes-Garcia, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    Strengthening links between school and community is critical for improving people's participation in environmental issues. However, Mexican education programmes are generally unrelated to rural students' life experience and are planned without considering either teachers' or students' opinions. This article describes the participatory construction…

  6. Impact of in-service education and training programmes on teachers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Up to 80% of the teachers have participated in three or less INSET activities but only 10% of them said they engaged in activities that involved teaching reading methods in Social Studies. The paper therefore argues that in-service education and training programmes organized did little in exposing teachers to skills required ...

  7. Evaluation of an HIV/AIDS peer education programme in a South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To evaluate a South African workplace HIV I AIDS peer-education programme running since 1997. Methods. In 2001 a cross-sectional study was done of 900 retail-section employees in three geographical areas. The study measured HIV I AIDS knowledge, attitudes towards people living with HIV I AIDS, belief ...

  8. Competing discourses and the positioning of students in an adult basic education programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Winther

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a case study of the learning processes of students enrolled in an adult basic education programme in the social and health care sector in Denmark. Theoretically the project draws on ‘positioning theory’, i.e. a poststructuralist approach. The issues being researched are how...

  9. Improving Vision Awareness in Autism Services: Evaluation of a Dedicated Education Programme for Support Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Joseph J.; Butchart, Maggie; Brown, Michael; Bain, Janice; McMillan, Anne; Karatzias, Thanos

    2018-01-01

    Background: The research reported here sought to evaluate whether a dedicated education programme in vision awareness improved the knowledge and skills of autism support practitioners in identifying visual impairment in autistic people with intellectual disabilities and providing better support to those individuals identified as visually impaired.…

  10. Deconstructing Engineering Education Programmes: The DEEP Project to Reform the Mechanical Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch-Vishniac, Ilene; Kibler, Tom; Campbell, Patricia B.; Patterson, Eann; Guillaume, Darrell; Jarosz, Jeffrey; Chassapis, Constantin; Emery, Ashley; Ellis, Glenn; Whitworth, Horace; Metz, Susan; Brainard, Suzanne; Ray, Pradosh

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the Deconstructing Engineering Education Programmes project is to revise the mechanical engineering undergraduate curriculum to make the discipline more able to attract and retain a diverse community of students. The project seeks to reduce and reorder the prerequisite structure linking courses to offer greater flexibility for…

  11. The impact of a school-based health education programme on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a health education programme on the risk factors of chronic diseases of lifestyle. This study adopted a one-group pretest posttest non-experimental design. The study sample consisted of 93 grade 8 and 9 learners at a high school in the Western Cape, South Africa.

  12. Integrating Assessment for Learning in the Teacher Education Programme at the University of Oslo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Lisbeth M.; Blikstad-Balas, Marte; Engelien, Kirsti Lyngvaer

    2017-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of the integration of assessment for learning principles in the newly revised five-year Master of Education programme at the University of Oslo, Norway, across didactic subjects, pedagogy and school practice. The analysis draws on lecture notes, student videos and student exam papers among 143 student teachers,…

  13. Evaluating the level of degree programmes in higher education: The case of nursing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rexwinkel, G.B.; Haenen, J.P.P.; Pilot, A.

    2013-01-01

    The European Quality Assurance system demands that the degree programme level is represented in terms of quantitative outcomes to be valid and reliable. To meet this need the Educational Level Evaluator (ELE) was devised. This conceptually designed procedure with instrumentation aiming to evaluate

  14. Recognition Organisations That Evaluate Agencies Accrediting Medical Education Programmes: "Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zanten, Marta

    2017-01-01

    The goals of agencies that accredit medical education programmes or institutions are to ensure high quality student experiences and to certify the readiness of graduates to further their training or begin practice as physicians. While accreditation provides a level of legitimacy, the agencies conducting the reviews vary in their organisation,…

  15. The Effect of Entrepreneurship Education Programmes on Satisfaction with Innovation Behaviour and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Natalia Martin; Escudero, Ana Isabel Rodriguez; Barahona, Juan Hernangomez; Leitao, Fernando Saboia

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper attempts to shed light on the effect of educational programmes aimed at entrepreneurs on innovation and business success. Design/methodology/approach: We use as theoretical framework the theory of planned behaviour. We use a sample of 354 entrepreneurs from Castile and Leon, Spain. To estimate the model we use a path analysis…

  16. European online postgraduate educational programme in neonatology-the way forward?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michael A; Cuttini, Marina; Flemmer, Andreas W

    2008-01-01

    participation followed a similar pattern. Eighty-six trainees were contactable at the end of the programme, and 67 (78%) completed an evaluation questionnaire. Of these, 92% reported that participation had "added value" to their training, attributable to the high-quality curriculum, the educational resources...

  17. Nutrition Education in Australian Midwifery Programmes: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Arrish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Little research has explored how nutrition content in midwifery education prepares midwives to provide prenatal nutrition advice. This study examined the nature and extent of nutrition education provided in Australian midwifery programmes. A mixed-methods approach was used, incorporating an online survey and telephone interviews. The survey analysis included 23 course coordinators representing 24 of 50 accredited midwifery programmes in 2012. Overall, the coordinators considered nutrition in midwifery curricula and the midwife’s role as important. All programmes included nutrition content; however, eleven had only 5 to <10 hours allocated to nutrition, while two had a designated unit. Various topics were covered. Dietitians/other nutrition experts were rarely involved in teaching or reviewing the nutrition content. Interviews with seven coordinators revealed that nutrition education tended to be problem-oriented and at times based on various assumptions. Nutrition content was not informed by professional or theoretical models. The development of nutrition assessment skills or practical training for midwifery students in providing nutrition advice was lacking. As nutrition is essential for maternal and foetal health, nutrition education in midwifery programmes needs to be reviewed and minimum requirements should be included to improve midwives’ effectiveness in this area. This may require collaboration between nutrition experts and midwifery bodies.

  18. Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility Model-Based Programmes in Physical Education: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo, Pablo; Grao-Cruces, Alberto; Pérez-Ordás, Raquel

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a review of research on the Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility model-based programme within physical education. Papers selected for analysis were found through searches of Web of Science, SportDiscus (EBSCO), SCOPUS, and ERIC (ProQuest) databases. The keywords "responsibility model" and…

  19. Views of patients on a group diabetes education programme using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Patients gained useful new knowledge about diabetes and reported a change in their behaviour, especially with regard to diet, physical activity, medication and foot care. The educational material was experienced positively and enhanced recall and understanding. Health promoters were competent, utilised useful ...

  20. Effect of a nutrition education programme on nutritional status of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Globally, the prevalence of chronic and acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiency is high in young children, especially in developing countries. Nutrition education is an important intervention to address these challenges. Objective. To determine the nutritional (anthropometric and micronutrient) status of ...

  1. Educational Impact of a School Breakfast Programme in Rural Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueto, Santiago; Chinen, Marjorie

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present data from an evaluation of the educational impact of a school breakfast program implemented in rural schools in Peru. The results showed positive effects on school attendance and dropout rates, and a differential effect of the breakfast program on multiple-grade and full-grade schools. Particularly in multiple-grade…

  2. The impact of a nutrition education programme on feeding practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the impact of nutrition education on feeding practices of caregivers with children aged 3 to 5 years at baseline and post intervention. Methodology: A pre-test–post-test control group design was chosen using eight villages (four villages in the experimental group (E) and four villages in the control ...

  3. The effect of an educational intervention programme on reproductive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Decision making process in reproductive health in Sub-Saharan Africa is a complex activity dictated by the customs, religious beliefs, socio-economic factors, and cultural innovations. The central role played by men in this process gives a strong justification for health education intervention with a primary focus on ...

  4. Integrating Key Competences in School Physical Education Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lleixà, Teresa; González-Arévalo, Carles; Braz-Vieira, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    In 2006, the European Union published its recommendations on competences for lifelong learning. Since then, key competences have been integrated into the official curriculum in Spain. The objectives of the present study are: a) to describe the strategies used most frequently by physical education teachers to incorporate key competences in their…

  5. improving education programme at pmtct sites in liberia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    among the HIV positive mother under 6 months, in order to improve nutritional education program at PMTCT sites level. A total of 90 ... practice among the HIV positive mothers of child under 6 months in terms of nutrition and infant feeding. Keywords: .... the replacement feeding is the sustainability of this. Even though they ...

  6. Regional Experts Meeting on the Asian Programme of Educational Innovation for Development (Bangkok, 25 February - 4 March 1974). Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    This publication reports on the Regional Experts Meeting on the Asian Programme of Educational Innovation for Development, which was held by UNESCO in Bangkok from February 25-March 4, 1974. Purpose of the meeting was 1) to examine and review the Asian Programme of Educational Innovation for Development (APEID) and the projects proposed for it,…

  7. Ideal Pictures and Actual Perspectives of Junior Secondary School Science: Comparisons Drawn from Australian Students in an Astronomy Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaia, L.; McKinnon, D. H.; Fitzgerald, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: This research investigates the impact of a junior secondary astronomy education programme undertaken in four Australian educational jurisdictions. Purpose: Junior secondary students' perceptions of the science they experience at School are examined both before, during and after their engagement with a science programme targeting…

  8. The Impact of a Values Education Programme for Adolescent Romanies in Spain on Their Feelings of Self-Realisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Encarnacion; Franco, Clemente; Sleeter, Christine

    2011-01-01

    This study analysed the effects a values education programme can have on the feelings of self-realisation, self-concept and self-esteem of Romany adolescents in southern Spain. To do this, an experimental group received a values education intervention but a control group did not. The intervention programme was adapted to the Romany culture. The…

  9. What EFL Student Teachers Think about Their Professional Preparation: Evaluation of an English Language Teacher Education Programme in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Agudo, Juan de Dios

    2017-01-01

    Given the importance of programme evaluation in the EFL teacher education, this research paper of exploratory-interpretive nature mainly focuses on both strengths and weaknesses identified through the analysis and/or critical evaluation of an EFL teacher education programme carried out in Spain. Both quantitative and qualitative research…

  10. [Caries free smile: a dental health educational programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimoud, A M; Verchère, A C; Lodter, J P; Sudre, M C; Rémésy, M C; Charras, P

    2005-01-01

    A multidisciplinary team associating members from the hospital, national education and local council sectors prepared, and led, a carie-free smile educational campaign in Toulouse. The aim was two-fold: to teach children how to manage their routine oral hygiene while giving a positive image to health care-hence the carie-free smile theme chosen by the team; secondly, to promote an awareness campaign targeting professionals in the education sector (public health sector, independent paediatricians and odontologists) who together constitute the transmitters of our initiative. The action involved 12,000 children in the 5-8-year age group from 76 public and private schools, 36 kindergarten and primary school leisure centres, six holiday centres together with infant patients from the children's hospital, all of whom were volunteers in the scheme. The team produced back-up material in the form of posters, booklets and stickers; there was also a website dealing with oral hygiene themes, caries and their treatment. Those taking part included practising dentists and students of dentistry. Before the presentation, posters were sent to teachers and other educational partners so as to prepare the children; this included an interactive phase in the presence of the teacher, and a brushing session. Each child was given a booklet, a sticker and a toothbrush. By means of a poll organised among the partners the impact of the campaign could be assessed: firstly, on teachers and children by evaluating their motivation in the setting up of the toothbrushing session in 17 classes following the midday meal, thus appraising their appreciation of the visual material, and secondly, to the dentistry students: the future dentists had noted disparities in oral hygiene practices according to residential area, and thus could appreciate the importance of early provision in the school curriculum, as well as the value of accomplishing this health education task in the daily exercise of their

  11. Development and evaluation of a newborn care education programme in primiparous mothers in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sharmila; Adachi, Kumiko; Petrini, Marcia A; Shrestha, Sarita; Rana Khagi, Bina

    2016-11-01

    the health and survival of newborns depend on high levels of attention and care from caregivers. The growth and development of some infants are unhealthy because of their mother's or caregiver's lack of knowledge or the use of inappropriate or traditional child-rearing practices that may be harmful. to develop a newborn care educational programme and evaluate its impact on infant and maternal health in Nepal. a randomised controlled trial. one hundred and forty-three mothers were randomly assigned to the intervention (n=69) and control (n=74) groups. Eligible participants were primiparous mothers who had given birth to a single, full-term, healthy infant, and were without a history of obstetric, medical, or psychological problems. prior to being discharged from the postnatal unit, the intervention group received our structured newborn care education programme, which consisted of one-on-one educational sessions lasting 10-15minutes each and one postpartum follow-up telephone support within two weeks after discharge, in addition to the hospital's routine general newborn care education. The control group received only the regular general newborn care education. Outcomes were measured by using Newborn care Knowledge Questionnaires, Karitane Parenting Confidence Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Adults and infant health and care status. the number of mothers attending the health centre due to the sickness of their babies was significantly decreased in the intervention group compared to the control group. Moreover, the intervention group had significant increases in newborn care knowledge and confidence, and decreases in anxiety, compared with the control group. the structured newborn care education programme enhanced the infant and mother health. Moreover, it increased maternal knowledge of newborn care and maternal confidence; and reduced anxiety in primiparous mothers. Thus, this educational programme could be integrated into routine educational programs to

  12. "Empty Signifiers" and "Dreamy Ideals": Perceptions of the "International University" among Higher Education Students and Staff at a British University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartner, Alina; Cho, Yoonjoo

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on a mixed-methods case study investigating how higher education staff and students understand, experience and envision the "international university." As it is becoming clear that international student mobility is not in itself a panacea for universities seeking to internationalise, "internationalisation at…

  13. A pathway to empowerment: evaluating a cancer education and support programme in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, P; Jasperse, M; Boland, P; Herst, P

    2014-09-01

    Support programmes often benefit cancer patients and their families. This study evaluates how the Living Well Cancer Education Programme (LWCEP), from the Cancer Society of New Zealand, meets the needs of its clients. A purposeful sample of 21 participants representing the normal range of demographic characteristics (age, gender, diagnosis and geographical location) for the programme, participated in semi-structured interviews. Demographic data were subjected to a frequency analysis. Main data were collected and analysed using a constructivist grounded theory approach regarding the experiences of the participants with being on the programme and recommendations for future development. Of the 21 participants, 14 were cancer patients (eight women and six men) and seven were support people (five women and two men). The LWCEP was described as a safe, supportive and stimulating environment, provided a powerful sense of belonging, empowered participants to gain perspective, enhance their confidence and communication skills and make increasingly informed choices. Consistent with a previous evaluation focussing on the facilitators of the LWCEP, there was a strong desire for better promotion of the programme to the wider community, establishment of a better referral pathway and the potential to offer two separate programmes depending on the stage of a patient's journey. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The effect of a sexuality education programme among out- of- school adolescents in Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeyemi, K A; Onajole, A T; Ogunowo, B E; Olufunlayo, T; Segun, B

    2014-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess the effect of a community based sexuality education programme on the sexual health knowledge and practices of out of school female adolescents. This Intervention study was conducted in two markets within Lagos, Nigeria. Representative samples of adolescents were interviewed on their sexual health knowledge and practices. An Education- entertainment programme provided sexuality education to adolescents in Mushin market only (intervention group) followed by post intervention surveys in Mushin market and Sangrouse market (control group). The pre and post intervention surveys were compared 6 months post intervention to detect any changes. Sexual health knowledge and behaviour was similar among respondents in both markets pre intervention. Post intervention, the sexual health knowledge of the respondents in the intervention site improved significantly. (psex in the intervention site than in the control site and contraceptive use increased. However among the sexually active, there was no significant change in their condom use and number of sexual partners. Community based health education programmes can be used to provide effective sexuality education for out of school adolescents. Provision should be made by government and non-governmental organisations during adolescent reproductive health programming for sexuality education targeted at out of school adolescents.

  15. [Quality of vocational education in speech therapy - development and implementation of a quality assurance programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, A; Kawski, S; Koch, U; Härter, M

    2014-12-01

    The provision of high-quality health-services is only possible if it is based on vocational education of corresponding quality. To promote the quality of vocational education in speech therapy, a quality assurance programme was developed in a scientifically supervised multi-step process. The main goals of the quality assurance programme include: (i) external review of the quality of education by means of well-defined criteria, (ii) certification of schools that meet the requirements, and (iii) provision of feedback to schools about their results. A total of 208 quality indicators cover the essential aspects of vocational education in speech therapy, and apply to the structural, process and outcome quality. These indicators are based on a literature survey as well as on expert opinion, and are calibrated by data. The data are collected by using questionnaires (school management, teachers in speech therapy, students, consecutive patient sample) and are validated by specific document analyses and telephone audits. Each school receives an individual quality report of its achieved results benchmarked to other schools. Since the initial implementation in 2008, a total of 50 schools participated in the quality assurance programme and 41 achieved certification. Therefore, the defined set of quality criteria has been disseminated and utilized by about half of all German schools for vocational education in speech therapy. The evaluation of the data on quality collected across all schools highlights the strengths and weaknesses of vocational education as well as the demands for quality improvement. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Application of a child abuse prevention programme in an educational context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Moreno-Manso

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses the effectiveness of a child abuse prevention programme in an educational context. The proposal for action is based on the use of stories as an instrument of primary prevention. The programme aims to improve a child's capacity to face potentially threatening situations and was applied in 10 primary schools of Extremadura (Spain to 317 pupils aged 9 and 10 years old. There were 12 sessions whose aim was for the children to gain an awareness of abuse, identify situations of abuse and learn strategies to face them. This was done through the use of tutorials and by linking the programme to the aims of the pupils' educational stage. The evaluation of the programme shows that the pupils in the experimental group resolved the situations with increasing skill, confidence and determination; and that they could see more clearly where to look for help in terms of protection measures. The tutors evaluated the programme positively, considering the contents useful for prevention.

  17. Education and training of nuclear power plant staff in the GDR - state of the art and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, R.; Schulz, K.D.; Mertins, M.; Rabold, H.

    1989-01-01

    Starting from the regulations applicable in the GDR as to the requirements on both qualification and education and training of NPP staff to ensure nuclear safety and radiation protection, the practice observed in the GDR is described and elucidated. On the example of the reactor operator whose education is considered the basic education for many other activities related to nuclear power plant operation the individual stages of education and training are presented and evaluated from the points of view of time, contents, and method. Central importance in this respect has an NPP simulator developed in the GDR for reactors of the WWER-440/W-213 type. (author)

  18. Current experiences and educational preferences of general practitioners and staff caring for people with dementia living in residential facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherer Samuel

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Residential care is important for older adults, particularly for those with advanced dementia and their families. Education interventions that achieve sustainable improvement in the care of older adults are critical to quality care. There are few systematic data available regarding the educational needs of Residential Care Facility (RCF staff and General Practitioners (GPs relating to dementia, or the sustainability of educational interventions. We sought to determine participation in dementia education, perceived levels of current knowledge regarding dementia, perceived unmet educational needs, current barriers, facilitators and preferences for dementia education. Methods A mixed methods study design was utilised. A survey was distributed to a convenience sample of general practitioners, and staff in 223 consecutive residential care facilities in Perth, Western Australia. Responses were received from 102 RCF staff working in 10 facilities (out of 33 facilities who agreed to distribute the survey and 202 GPs (19% of metropolitan GPs. Quantitative survey data were summarised descriptively and chi squared statistics were used to analyse the distribution of categorical variables. Qualitative data were collected from general practitioners, staff in residential care facilities and family carers of people with dementia utilizing individual interviews, surveys and focus groups. Qualitative data were analysed thematically. Results Among RCF staff and GPs attending RCF, participation in dementia education was high, and knowledge levels generally perceived as good. The individual experiences and needs of people with dementia and their families were emphasised. Participants identified the need for a person centred philosophy to underpin educational interventions. Limited time was a frequently mentioned barrier, especially in relation to attending dementia care education. Perceived educational needs relating to behaviours of concern

  19. Education and training to enhance end-of-life care for nursing home staff: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstey, Sally; Powell, Tom; Coles, Bernadette; Hale, Rachel; Gould, Dinah

    2016-09-01

    The delivery of end-of-life care in nursing homes is challenging. This situation is of concern as 20% of the population die in this setting. Commonly reported reasons include limited access to medical care, inadequate clinical leadership and poor communication between nursing home and medical staff. Education for nursing home staff is suggested as the most important way of overcoming these obstacles. To identify educational interventions to enhance end-of-life care for nursing home staff and to identify types of study designs and outcomes to indicate success and benchmark interventions against recent international guidelines for education for palliative and end-of-life care. Thirteen databases and reference lists of key journals were searched from the inception of each up to September 2014. Included studies were appraised for quality and data were synthesised thematically. Twenty-one studies were reviewed. Methodological quality was poor. Education was not of a standard that could be expected to alter clinical behaviour and was evaluated mainly from the perspectives of staff: self-reported increase in knowledge, skills and confidence delivering care rather than direct evidence of impact on clinical practice and patient outcomes. Follow-up was often short term, and despite sound economic arguments for delivering effective end-of-life care to reduce burden on the health service, no economic analyses were reported. There is a clear and urgent need to design educational interventions that have the potential to improve end-of-life care in nursing homes. Robust evaluation of these interventions should include impact on residents, families and staff and include economic analysis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Examination of the Career and Work Adaptability Levels of Education Faculty Students and Pedagogical Formation Education Certificate Programme Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat POLAT

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to examine the career and work adaptability levels of education faculty and pedagogical formation programme prospective teachers. General survey method design has been used in this study. The participants of research are 531 (291 female and 240 male students studying in education faculty and pedagogical formation programme. The students from education faculty and pedagogical formation programme consist of n=219 (%41.2 and n=312 (%58.8 respectively. In this study, ‘the career and work adaptability questionnaire’ has been used as data collecting tool. Levene’s test, t-Test, ANOVA, eta square (η2, Cohen’s d and Post-Hoc (Tukey ve Dunnett C analysis techniques have been applied in this study. Results have shown that career and work adaptability levels are higher for pedagogical formation programme prospective teachers than education faculty students and higher for male students than female students. Also, it is found that gender, program, and age differences have significant effects on prospective teachers’ career and work adaptability levels.

  1. Interest in international programmes - a survey of Japanese dental hygiene students and educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenouchi, A; Sakurai/Matsukubo, M; Matsukubo, T

    2017-11-01

    Globalization of Japanese dental hygienists is important to match the demands in the present society. The purpose of this study was to gauge opinions on international programmes of Japanese dental hygiene students and educators. Data were collected using a survey that was sent to all eight Japanese universities of oral hygiene in December 2014. Participants were composed of 466 university students majoring in oral hygiene (463 women; three men; mean age: 21 years) and 45 educators teaching dental hygiene education (mean age: 50 years). The response rates were 83.81% and 46.88%, respectively. 48.06% of 464 students would like to study abroad, and 76.04% of 330 students would like to interact with foreign students frequently. 97.54% of 455 students answered that learning English is important for dental hygienists, but 72.39% of 460 students are not comfortable interacting with foreigners in English. Those who knew more dental English terms had higher interest in studying abroad (odds ratio: 1.136). 75% of 44 educators think that dental hygiene students need to or sometimes need to study abroad. 68.89% of 45 educators think that teaching international programmes is costly. We found that Japanese dental hygiene students and educators have positive interest in international programmes. However, they have concerns about their English skills and about the cost of studying it. Therefore, English classes need to be improved, and new approaches are required for lowering the cost of teaching international programmes, while stimulating foreign students' and educators' interest in studying abroad in Japan. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Fostering Critical Thinking about Citizenship Education in Particular Contexts: Notes from an Anglo-Turkish Student Teachers' Exchange Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busher, Hugh; Wilkins, Chris; Lawson, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Student teachers and staff from three universities in Turkey and from Leicester University, England took part in an exchange programme in Turkey and Britain in 2008-2009. Funding for this from the European Union (EU) and Turkey was in part related to Turkey's application for EU membership and currently contested discourses about the nature of…

  3. Effect of a multi-dimensional intervention programme on the motivation of physical education students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, Diana; Del Villar, Fernando; Leo, Francisco Miguel; Sánchez-Oliva, David; Sánchez-Miguel, Pedro Antonio; García-Calvo, Tomás

    2014-01-01

    This research study purports to verify the effect produced on the motivation of physical education students of a multi-dimensional programme in dance teaching sessions. This programme incorporates the application of teaching skills directed towards supporting the needs of autonomy, competence and relatedness. A quasi-experimental design was carried out with two natural groups of 4(th) year Secondary Education students--control and experimental -, delivering 12 dance teaching sessions. A prior training programme was carried out with the teacher in the experimental group to support these needs. An initial and final measurement was taken in both groups and the results revealed that the students from the experimental group showed an increase of the perception of autonomy and, in general, of the level of self-determination towards the curricular content of corporal expression focused on dance in physical education. To this end, we highlight the programme's usefulness in increasing the students' motivation towards this content, which is so complicated for teachers of this area to develop.

  4. Contribution of the Slovak University of Technology Bratislava to the Education of NPP Operation Staff in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hascik, J.; Slugen, V.; Hinca, R.; Miglierini, M.

    2006-01-01

    Paper is focused on the preparation of NPP VVER -440 staff in Slovak conditions. The realisation is managed via special technical courses, seminars, workshops, and trainings on selected experimental facilities at domestic as well as international level. Post-gradual re-qualification study: Safety aspects of NPP operation is discussed in detail. Six-year experience with NPP operating staff education can be shared and recommended also at international level. Based on these courses, special training for optimal preparation of NPP supervising physicists was started in 2002. In addition to all our activities, the international course: Safety aspects of NPP operation for subcontractors was prepared and realised in 2005.(author)

  5. What is the value of Values Based Recruitment for nurse education programmes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groothuizen, Johanna E; Callwood, Alison; Gallagher, Ann

    2017-11-29

    A discussion of issues associated with Values Based Recruitment (VBR) for nurse education programmes. Values Based Recruitment is a mandatory element in selection processes of students for Higher Education healthcare courses in England, including all programmes across nursing. Students are selected on the basis that their individual values align with those presented in the Constitution of the National Health Service. However, there are issues associated with the use of values as selection criteria that have been insufficiently addressed. These are discussed. Discussion paper. This article is based on documents published on the website of the executive body responsible for the implementation of a policy regarding VBR in Higher Education Institutions up until June 2017 and our evaluation of the conceptualisation of VBR, underpinned by contemporary theory and literature. Values Based Recruitment influences who is accepted onto a nurse education programme, but there has been limited critical evaluation regarding the effectiveness of employing values as selection criteria. Values are subject to interpretation and evidence regarding whether or how VBR will improve practice and care is lacking. The issues discussed in this article show that Higher Education Institutions offering nursing courses, whether in England or in other countries, should be critical and reflective regarding the implementation of VBR methods. We call for a debate regarding the meaning and implications of VBR and further research regarding its validity and effectiveness. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Creating an Excellent Patient Experience Through Service Education: Content and Methods for Engaging and Motivating Front-Line Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Denise M

    2017-12-01

    Service quality and patient satisfaction affect an organization's value-based payments. This new value paradigm calls for a new approach to service education and training for front-line staff. Thoughtfully conceived, department-specific content, infused with patient feedback, value creation, and science of service quality principles, was developed to give front-line staff a deeper understanding of the impact of their performance on patient experience, value creation, and value-based revenue. Feedback from nearly 1500 trainees in 60 educational sessions delivered over 7 years indicates good understanding of the content and appreciation of the targeted approach. On a 5-point scale ranging from 1 (least effective) to 5 (most effective), trainees' ratings of their understanding of service quality concepts and impact on value ranged from 4.7 to 4.9. Verbatim comments showed a positive impact on staff. Employee feedback suggests that value-based service education may be useful in motivating front-line staff, improving service quality, and creating value.

  7. Students’ perceptions of Black English teaching staff at education institutions in Johannesburg, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chacha-Mhlahlo, Memory T.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the official end of apartheid in South Africa, the English departments of some former whites-only secondary schools and universities have made attempts at transformation by employing both local and foreign black teaching staff. This paper qualitatively explores both secondary and tertiary students’ perceptions of black teachers/lecturers of English at two secondary schools, an FET college and a university located in Johannesburg. It does so against the backdrop of South Africa’s racial history, the high status the colonial language of English continues to have in the postcolonial country and now, its instruction by second-language speakers of English to multi-racial students. It is in this context that the paper investigates and comes to grips with how postcolonial identity constructs of the last century are today impacting the teaching-learning of English; how identity is being perceived, constructed and performed in some South African schools and higher education institutions. It concludes by recommending context-sensitive approaches that exploit the opportunities bi/multilingual identities offer, specifically to the teaching-learning of English and other languages generally.

  8. Occupational Hazards Education for Nursing Staff through Web-Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yin Tung

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to explore the efficiency of using online education as an intervention measure to prevent occupational hazards in a clinical nursing setting. The subjects were 320 female nursing staff from two hospitals in Taiwan. The questionnaire results indicated that the subjects primarily experienced human factor occupational hazards, as well as psychological and social hazards. Specifically, 73.1% and 69.8% of the subjects suffered from poor sleep quality and low back pain, respectively. After web-based learning, the experimental group had higher post-test scores than the control group in terms of knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP. However, there was only a significant difference (p < 0.05 in their knowledge about the prevention of occupational hazards. It is suggested that an online discussion may enhance nursing staff’s participation in web-based learning, and further facilitate their comments on negative factors. The findings can highly promote nursing staff’s attitudes and practices toward preventing occupational hazards through web-based learning.

  9. Effect of interprofessional clinical education programme length on students' attitudes towards teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renschler, Lauren; Rhodes, Darson; Cox, Carol

    2016-05-01

    This article reports on a study involving a range of health professions students who participated in similar one-semester (short) or two-semester (long) interprofessional clinical education programmes that focused on clinical assessment of senior citizens living independently in the community. Students' attitudes towards teamwork skills and perceptions of their own teamwork skills both before and after the programmes were assessed using two validated scales. Osteopathic medical student participants reported no significant changes in attitudes towards interprofessional healthcare teamwork skills or their perceptions of their own interprofessional teamwork skills after either the one- or two-semester programmes. For athletic training, speech-language pathology, exercise sciences, public health, and nursing students, though, attitudes towards teamwork skills significantly improved (p teamwork attitude change, but with a significant difference between medical as compared to nursing, allied health, and public health students.

  10. Developing a diabetes prevention education programme for community health-care workers in Thailand: formative findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sranacharoenpong, Kitti; Hanning, Rhona M

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate barriers to and supports for implementing a diabetes prevention education programme for community health-care workers (CHCWs) in Chiang Mai province, Thailand. The study also aimed to get preliminary input into the design of a tailored diabetes prevention education programme for CHCWs. Thailand has faced under-nutrition and yet, paradoxically, the prevalence of diseases of over-nutrition, such as obesity and diabetes, has escalated. As access to diabetes prevention programme is limited in Thailand, especially in rural and semi-urban areas, it becomes critical to develop a health information delivery system that is relevant, cost-effective, and sustainable. Health-care professionals (n = 12) selected from health centres within one district participated in in-depth interviews. In addition, screened people at risk for diabetes participated in interviews (n = 8) and focus groups (n = 4 groups, 23 participants). Coded transcripts from audio-taped interviews or focus groups were analysed by hand and using NVivo software. Concept mapping illustrated the findings. Health-care professionals identified potential barriers to programme success as a motivation for regular participation, and lack of health policy support for programme sustainability. Health-care professionals identified opportunities to integrate health promotion and disease prevention into CHCWs' duties. Health-care professionals recommended small-group workshops, hands-on learning activities, case studies, and video presentations that bring knowledge to practice within their cultural context. CHCWs should receive a credit for continuing study. People at risk for diabetes lacked knowledge of nutrition, diabetes risk factors, and resources to access health information. They desired two-way communication with CHCWs. Formative research supports the need for an effective, sustainable programme to support knowledge translation to CHCWs and at-risk populations in the

  11. Promoting interdisciplinary education - the Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöschl, G.; Carr, G.; Bucher, C.; Farnleitner, A. H.; Rechberger, H.; Wagner, W.; Zessner, M.

    2012-02-01

    The Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems (DK-WRS) is a programme that aims to educate students in interdisciplinary water science through cutting edge research at an international level. It is funded by the Austrian Science Fund and designed to run over a period of 12 yr during which 80 doctoral students are anticipated to graduate. This paper reports on our experiences of setting up and implementing the Programme. We identify three challenges: integrating the disciplines, maintaining depth in an interdisciplinary programme, and teaching subjects remote to each student's core expertise. To address these challenges we adopt a number of approaches. We use three levels of instruments to foster integration across the disciplines: joint groups (e.g. a joint study programme), joint science questions (e.g. developed in annual symposia), and joint study sites. To maintain depth we apply a system of quality control including regular feedback sessions, theses by journal publications and international study exchange. For simultaneously teaching students from civil and environmental engineering, biology, geology, chemistry, mathematics we use visually explicit teaching, learning by doing, extra mentoring and by cross relating associated subjects. Our initial assessment of the Programme shows some very positive outcomes. Joint science questions formed between students from various disciplines indicate integration is being achieved. The number of successful publications in top journals suggests that depth is maintained. Positive feedback from the students on the variety and clarity of the courses indicates the teaching strategy is working well. Our experiences have shown that implementing and running an interdisciplinary doctoral programme has its challenges and is demanding in terms of time and human resources but seeing interactions progress and watching people grow and develop their way of thinking in an interdisciplinary environment is a valuable reward.

  12. Promoting interdisciplinary education − the Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Wagner

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems (DK-WRS is a programme that aims to educate students in interdisciplinary water science through cutting edge research at an international level. It is funded by the Austrian Science Fund and designed to run over a period of 12 yr during which 80 doctoral students are anticipated to graduate. This paper reports on our experiences of setting up and implementing the Programme. We identify three challenges: integrating the disciplines, maintaining depth in an interdisciplinary programme, and teaching subjects remote to each student's core expertise. To address these challenges we adopt a number of approaches. We use three levels of instruments to foster integration across the disciplines: joint groups (e.g. a joint study programme, joint science questions (e.g. developed in annual symposia, and joint study sites. To maintain depth we apply a system of quality control including regular feedback sessions, theses by journal publications and international study exchange. For simultaneously teaching students from civil and environmental engineering, biology, geology, chemistry, mathematics we use visually explicit teaching, learning by doing, extra mentoring and by cross relating associated subjects. Our initial assessment of the Programme shows some very positive outcomes. Joint science questions formed between students from various disciplines indicate integration is being achieved. The number of successful publications in top journals suggests that depth is maintained. Positive feedback from the students on the variety and clarity of the courses indicates the teaching strategy is working well. Our experiences have shown that implementing and running an interdisciplinary doctoral programme has its challenges and is demanding in terms of time and human resources but seeing interactions progress and watching people grow and develop their way of thinking in an interdisciplinary environment is a

  13. Impact of Group Clinical Supervision on Patient Education Process: A Comprehensive Assessment of Patients, Staff, and Organization Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Jafari Moghadam

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most important barriers to patient education are nurses’ poor motivation and training, and poor quality of managerial supervision. Clinical supervision could be a powerful tool for overcoming these barriers. However, the associated patient, staff, and organization-related outcomes still require further research. Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the patient-, staff-, and organization-related outcomes of group clinical supervision with the goal of improving patient education. Method: This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 35 nurses and mothers of 94 children admitted to the surgery and nephrology wards of Dr. Sheikh Hospital, Mashhad, Iran, in 2016. A 3-month clinical supervision program consisting of support, education, feedback, and facilitation stages was implemented with the assistance of education facilitators. The data were collected using the questionnaire of patient’s satisfaction with nurses’ education, Herzberg’s job motivation questionnaire, and the checklists of nurses’ education performance and quality of education documentation. Data analysis was performed by Mann-Whitney U test, Fisher’s exact test, and independent-t test in SPSS, version 14. Results: The mean ages of the nurses, patients, and mothers were 30.3±6.7, 5.2±3.8, and 32.2±6.2, respectively. Mann-Whitney U test showed a significant improvement in patients’ satisfaction with nurses’ education performance (P

  14. Shaping space programme as a tool for educating youth about architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczak, Piotr

    2017-10-01

    The Polish Architectural Policy’s vision of a systematic promotion of spatial culture has made its way into the national curriculum for 2009 - 2016 designed for various stages of child and teenager education. The objective of this effort was to furnish a basis for a system of architectural education which allows teaching society to be more conscious in their decisions as to spatial order with the effect of improving the quality of our living space. Educating individuals to engage consciously in activities related to the protection of space and transformations taking place within that space requires an understanding of basic issues connected with space, the nature of space and the interrelations of various elements which form it. The “Shaping space” programme under the patronage of the Chamber of Polish Architects is one of the tools dedicated to students of lower and higher secondary schools, designed to assist teachers as architectural educators. The aim of this paper is to present the results of a survey related to the implementation of the programme in Lower Secondary School 3 in Malbork in the years 2013-2016. The programme involved observation of students (of grades 1 to 3) in architecture-oriented classes, assistance for the teacher in the class rooms well as an evaluation of the usefulness of educational materials. A number of problems became evident during the implementation of the “Shaping space” programme which is now available in book form. The size of the book is large enough to discourage any potential readers. The subject matter of the book is not suitable for the intended age group (age: 13-16). Another issue was the teacher’s suitability to conduct this type of class. Class observation in grades 1-3 of the lower secondary school and discussions with teachers in charge of that programme served as a basis for developing our own tools and materials in the form of multimedia presentations, templates and lesson scenarios designed to convey

  15. Development of a brief multidisciplinary education programme for patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moe Rikke H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is a prevalent progressive musculoskeletal disorder, leading to pain and disability. Patient information and education are considered core elements in treatment guidelines for OA; however, there is to our knowledge no evidence-based recommendation on the best approach, content or length on educational programmes in OA. Objective: to develop a brief, patient oriented disease specific multidisciplinary education programme (MEP to enhance self-management in patients with OA. Method Twelve persons (80% female mean age 59 years diagnosed with hand, hip or knee OA participated in focus group interviews. In the first focus group, six participants were interviewed about their educational needs, attitudes and expectations for the MEP. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and thereafter condensed. Based on results from focus group interviews, current research evidence, clinical knowledge and patients' experience, a multidisciplinary OA team (dietist, nurse, occupational therapist, pharmacist, physical therapist and rheumatologist and a patient representative developed a pilot-MEP after having attended a work-shop in health pedagogics. Finally, the pilot-MEP was evaluated by a second focus group consisting of four members from the first focus group and six other experienced patients, before final adjustments were made. Results The focus group interviews revealed four important themes: what is OA, treatment options, barriers and coping strategies in performing daily activities, and how to live with osteoarthritis. Identified gaps between patient expectations and experience with the pilot-programme were discussed and adapted into a final MEP. The final MEP was developed as a 3.5 hour educational programme provided in groups of 6-9 patients. All members from the multidisciplinary team are involved in the education programme, including a facilitator who during the provision of the programme ensures that the individual

  16. World Federation for Medical Education Policy on international recognition of medical schools' programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karle, Hans

    2008-12-01

    The increasing globalisation of medicine, as manifested in the migration rate of medical doctors and in the growth of cross-border education providers, has inflicted a wave of quality assurance efforts in medical education, and underlined the need for definition of standards and for introduction of effective and transparent accreditation systems. In 2004, reflecting the importance of the interface between medical education and the healthcare delivery sector, a World Health Organization (WHO)/World Federation for Medical Education (WFME) Strategic Partnership to improve medical education was formed. In 2005, the partnership published Guidelines for Accreditation of Basic Medical Education. The WHO/WFME Guidelines recommend the establishment of proper accreditation systems that are effective, independent, transparent and based on medical education-specific criteria. An important prerequisite for this development was the WFME Global Standards programme, initiated in 1997 and widely endorsed. The standards are now being used in all 6 WHO/WFME regions as a basis for quality improvement of medical education throughout its continuum and as a template for national and regional accreditation standards. Promotion of national accreditation systems will have a pivotal influence on future international appraisal of medical education. Information about accreditation status - the agencies involved and the criteria and procedure used - will be an essential component of new Global Directories of Health Professions Educational Institutions. According to an agreement between the WHO and the University of Copenhagen (UC), these Directories (the Avicenna Directories) will be developed and published by the UC with the assistance of the WFME, starting with renewal of the WHO World Directory of Medical Schools, and sequentially expanding to cover educational institutions for other health professions. The Directories will be a foundation for international meta-recognition ("accrediting the

  17. The perceptions of teaching staff from Nigerian independent schools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of a training programme conducted by academic staff at the University of South. Africa (Unisa). .... New developments and effective change take time to be explored and to occur. Unfortunately short courses, while being worthwhile in other ways, do not allow time for the four elements .... Education Department workshops = 3 ...

  18. Knowing versus doing: education and training needs of staff in a chronic care hospital unit for individuals with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Katherine A; Stanley, Ian H; Van Haitsma, Kimberly; Moody, Jennifer; Alonzi, Dana; Hansen, Bryan R; Gitlin, Laura N

    2014-12-01

    Hospital clinical staff routinely confront challenging behaviors in patients with dementia with limited training in prevention and management. The authors of the current article conducted a survey of staff on a chronic care hospital unit concerning knowledge about dementia, perceived educational needs, and the care environment. The overall mean score for a 27-item knowledge scale was 24.08 (SD = 2.61), reflecting high level of disease knowledge. However, staff indicated a need for more information and skills, specifically for managing behaviors nonpharmacologically (92.3%), enhancing patient safety (89.7%), coping with care challenges (84.2%), and involving patients in activities (81.6%). Although most staff (i.e., nurses [80%] and therapists [86.4%]) believed their care contributed a great deal to patient well-being, approximately 75% reported frustration and being overwhelmed by dementia care. Most reported being hit, bitten, or physically hurt by patients (66.7%), as well as disrespected by families (53.8%). Findings suggest that staff have foundational knowledge but lack the "how-to" or hands-on skills necessary to implement nonpharmacological behavioral management approaches and communicate with families. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Empowerment of Bilingual Education Professionals: The Training of Trainers Programme for Educators in Multilingual Settings in Southern Africa (ToTSA) 2002-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Carol; Pluddemann, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a South Africa-based training programme in multilingual education for African educators and assesses its potentially transformative effects on participants. Based on a range of data collected during four course runs, as well as an e-mail survey of past participants, the authors explore how the programme has supported…

  20. The effect of the emotional intelligence education programme on quality of life in haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnavazi, Masoome; Parsa-Yekta, Zohreh; Yekaninejad, Mir-Saeed; Amaniyan, Sara; Griffiths, Pauline; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba

    2018-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of the emotional intelligence education programme on quality of life of haemodialysis patients. Nurses need knowledge development regarding the impact of educational strategies on patients' quality of life suffering from chronic diseases. A pragmatic quasi-randomized controlled trial was conducted with 47 haemodialysis patients attending a university hospital in an urban area of Iran. The patients were randomly assigned to intervention (n=23) and control (n=24) groups. A socio-demographic questionnaire, the Cyberia-Shrink Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire, and the Kidney Disease Quality of Life-Short Form were used to gather data. The intervention group attended an educational programme on emotional intelligence that consisted of six-group discussion sessions. To ensure the continuity of learning and to measure the subsequent expected behavioural changes, the patients filled out the data collection tools six and 12weeks after the completion of the education programme. The mean score of quality of life in the intervention group was 39.94±15.88 in pre-test, 44.87±16.04 six weeks and 52.47±16.07 at the 12weeks after the intervention (p=0.032). The consideration of emotional intelligence educational strategies by nurses requires its incorporation into pre-qualifying nursing degrees and professional development programmes. Nurse managers need to lead nurses for applying emotional intelligence in daily practice with the aim of providing an holistic patient care. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Literature research of the Nutrition Improvement Programme for Rural Compulsory Education Students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Hu, Xiaoqi; Tian, Zuyin; Zhang, Qian; Ma, Guansheng

    2015-04-01

    To describe the Nutrition Improvement Programme for Rural Compulsory Education Students (NIPRCES) in China and to share the experiences of developing and implementing nationwide school meal programmes with other countries. The article is based on a literature review of technical documents and reports of NIPRCES and relevant national legislation, technical reports and studies on school nutrition, minutes of meetings and national conferences, and official documents of the National Office of Student Nutrition and the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. People's Republic of China. Published papers, national policies, legislation and unpublished official documents. A total of 23 million rural compulsory education students were covered by NIPRCES. In the development and implementation process of NIPRCES, fifteen ministries and national committees were involved and an efficient collaborative mechanism was established. All NIPRCES-covered schools were required to serve meals on a daily basis. By the end of June 2012, the proportions of students choosing 'school feeding', 'food package' and 'family feeding' modes were respectively 64.0 %, 32.0 % and 4.0 %. The central government subsidized school meals annually by more than $US 2.5 billion and invested $US 4.8 billion on school kitchens to support this programme. The NIPRCES is a significant movement of governmental nutritional intervention in China. Food safety, financial security, decentralization and other potential concerns should be considered and lessons can be learned from other countries. Further relevant research and a nationwide monitoring and evaluation programme are needed.

  2. Artistic and Intellectual Development Of Children in Different Basic School Education Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Duh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a study that investigated the level of artistic and intellectual development of students in different primary school education programmes. The differences were monitored in the groups of sixth-grade students of regular basic schools and of students of basic schools with an adapted programme and a lower educational standard in the regions of Štajerska and Prekmurje. The study also examined any gender-related differences. The study results indicate that there are differences in the artistic and intellectual development of children between the group of children with normal development and the group of children with special needs in favour of the group of children with normal development. No statistically significant gender-related differences were established in the level of artistic and intellectual development.

  3. Perceptions of an educational programme for registered nurses who work at non-major trauma services in Victoria, Australia: The Nursing Emergency eXternal Trauma Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Sharyn; Cross, Rachel; Decker, Kelly; Mitra, Biswadev

    2017-08-01

    Emergency nurses working in non-Major Trauma Service (non-MTS) facilities face the challenge of providing immediate care to seriously injured patients, despite infrequent presentations at their workplace. A one-day education programme endorsed by the Australian College of Nursing was developed to provide contemporary trauma education for nurses. The aim of this study was to report participants' perceptions of their experience of this programme. Peer reviewed lesson plans were developed to guide educational activities. Of 32 participants, 24 consented to and completed pre and post-programme surveys. Thematic analysis and descriptive statistics were used to report study findings. Most participants were nurses with greater than two years' experience in Emergency Nursing (92%). Trauma patient transfers each year from a non-MTS to a Major Trauma Service occurred infrequently; eight nurses (33.3%) reported greater than10 trauma transfers per year. Participant expectations of the programme included personal growth, knowledge acquisition, increased confidence and a focus on technical skills. Participants reported the day to be worthwhile and valuable; improved confidence, increased knowledge, and the opportunity to discuss current evidence based practice were highly regarded. Recommendations for future programmes included extending to two days and include burns and more complex pathophysiology. With centralisation of trauma care to major trauma services, frequent and continuing education of nurses is essential. Nurses from non-Major Trauma Service facilities in Victoria found this programme worthwhile as they gained knowledge and skills and increased confidence to care for trauma patients. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. An evaluation of the impact of the Social Mobility Foundation Programmes on Education Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, Claire; Greaves, Ellen; Jin, Wenchao

    2015-01-01

    The Social Mobility Foundation (SMF) is a charity that aims to make apractical improvement to social mobility in the UK by encouraging and supporting access to "high-status" universities and professional occupations for high attaining pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds. The SMF's programmes are targeted to those who are eligible for free school meals (or, in earlier cohorts, the educational maintenance allowance) and, amongst the latest cohorts, to those who are in the first generation of ...

  5. Preferred 'Learning Styles' in Students Studying Sports Related Programmes in Higher Education in the United Kingdom.

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, D.M.; Jones, Gareth; Peters, John

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the 'preferred learning styles' and their relationship with grades for students undertaking sports-related undergraduate programmes at a higher education institution in the UK. Preferred 'learning styles' in students in this discipline have been identified as auditory, kinaesthetic and group, although the vast majority of students are multimodal in their learning preferences. Only individual learning style preference was found to be positively related to higher grade...

  6. Methodology and results of a space station education pilot programme in the primary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirra, G.; Mirra, C.

    Potential users of the Space Station Freedom are now still in the Primary School. Subject studies 1 have shown that a robust familiarization programme has to be developed in order to increase public awareness on the microgravity environment and its capabilities to perform unique science. At the same time, several surveys 2 have demonstrated that elementary school students are showing the greatest interest and enthusiasm in space related activities among all school students. With these boundary conditions, a pilot programme, aimed at verifying the capabilities of young primary school pupils (aged between 10 and 12) in understanding why one performs research in space, has been conceived. In order to overcome the lack of space training of school teachers, an expert in space operations joined a group of elementary teachers to activate this program: merging the necessary didactic and technical capabilities. Consequently, the aim of the program becomes two folded: •generate critical thinking and problem solving capacities as well as inventiveness in children making them aware on the use of space to improve life on Earth. •identify the key issues for the definition of a robust space utilization educational programme. The programme has been managed by MARS Center. the Italian User Support Center for the Space Station utilization, and the institute "Speranzas" in the nearby of Naples, Italy. MARS Center, in particular, is responsible towards the national agency ASI, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, of the execution of the promotional activity towards all the possible target groups: young students are among these groups. This programme started in late 1992 and is currently ongoing. The objective of this paper is to provide a description of the methodology and the reasons of such a programme with a snapshot on the preliminary results and future trends. Means used as supporting tools, such as films, posters and role plays are herein depicted as well as statistics on the pupils

  7. Opening-up education : promoting active learning with students and staff

    OpenAIRE

    Denholm-Price, James; Orwell, Suzan; Soan, Peter

    2015-01-01

    It is well-established that active learning benefits students’ learning (Freeman et al, 2014), however changing pedagogy can be challenging for academic staff. The “Clickers Project” described here, although originally envisaged primarily as an automated mechanism for monitoring student attendance and engagement, additionally made it easy for academic staff to increase in-class interactivity, giving students opportunities for self-assessment and feedback. Over 500 first year students were pro...

  8. Integrating Mobile Learning into Nomadic Education Programme in Nigeria: Issues and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid A. Aderinoye

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of the Nigerian National Commission for Nomadic Education in 1989 created wider opportunities for an estimated 9.3 million nomads living in Nigeria to acquire literacy skills. This commission was struck to address low literacy rates among pastoral nomads and migrant fishermen, which put literacy rates at 0.28 percent and 20 percent respectively (FME, 2005. To improve the literacy rate among Nigeria’s nomadic populations, the National Commission for Nomadic Education employed various approaches such as onsite schools, ‘shift system’ schools with alternative intake, and Islamiyya (Islamic schools, to provide literacy education to its nomads. A critical appraisal of these approaches by the commission, however, shows that very few of the schools were actually viable. This paper explores why these approaches have not notably helped to improve the literacy rate among Nigeria’s nomadic people. Thus, there remains a need for alternative approaches to educational delivery. In face of the revolutionary trends taking place in information and communication technologies (ICTs in Nigeria, there is now opportunity to embrace mobile learning using low cost mobile technologies (i.e., mobile phones to enhance the literacy rates among Nigeria’s nomadic people, some of whom are enrolled in Nigeria’s current Nomadic Education Programme. Indeed, mobile telephones with simple text messaging features, for example, are prevalent in many parts of Nigeria. This paper explores the needs and advantages of integrating mobile learning into Nomadic Education programmes in Nigeria to ensure a successful implementation and achievement of the goals of the programme.

  9. Can Teachers in Primary Education Implement a Metacognitive Computer Programme for Word Problem Solving in Their Mathematics Classes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kock, Willem D.; Harskamp, Egbert G.

    2014-01-01

    Teachers in primary education experience difficulties in teaching word problem solving in their mathematics classes. However, during controlled experiments with a metacognitive computer programme, students' problem-solving skills improved. Also without the supervision of researchers, metacognitive computer programmes can be beneficial in a natural…

  10. Re-Imagining School Health in Education and Health Programmes: A Study across Selected Municipal Schools in Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Mita; Baru, Rama V.; Nundy, Madhurima

    2014-01-01

    The idea of school health is re-imagined with an emphasis on the need for children's health programmes to be rooted in an understanding of the social context. Such programmes must address health, nutrition and education in a comprehensive manner. The article details findings and insights emerging from a qualitative study conducted in municipal…

  11. Impact and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the National School-Based Sexuality Education Programme in Estonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivela, Jari; Haldre, Kai; Part, Kai; Ketting, Evert; Baltussen, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Policy-makers making decisions on the implementation of school-based sexuality education (SE) programmes face two important questions: (1) what are the costs of implementing and scaling up SE programmes, and (2) what are the impacts? This paper responds to these questions by retrospectively assessing costs, impact and cost-effectiveness of the…

  12. Rate Your Course! Student Teachers' Perceptions of a Primary Pre-Service Mathematics Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourigan, Mairead; Leavy, Aisling M.

    2017-01-01

    Although research suggests that many pre-service mathematics education programmes are weak interventions having a negligible effect on student teachers' knowledge, beliefs and attitudes, there is consensus that programmes that model and engage student teachers in reform teaching and learning approaches have the potential to effect positive change…

  13. Learning technology in Scottish higher education - a survey of the views of senior managers, academic staff and 'experts'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Haywood

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Central concerns within the field of learning technology in higher education have been the promotion of institutional change and staff awareness and development. This focus on the need to bring about a 'culture shift' and the importance of 'change agents' is reflected in the Dearing Report (DfEE, 1997 and in Funding Council initiatives such as TLTP and TLTSN (Davies, 1995. It is common for many of us who work in this area to feel that although we see clearly the task ahead, we have little at our disposal by way of evidence about how far we have come. Much of the evidence which does exist, and which has been incorporated into lectures and reports, is anecdotal, local and small scale, although there have been some larger studies, notably the Information Technology Assisted Teaching and Learning project (ITATL, 1997, and a 1999 study of C&IT materials funded by the Funding Councils (HEFCE, 1999a, and in the United States the national survey of desktop computing and IT in higher education (Green, 1989-99. These showed a rapidly increasing use of learning technology in higher education, and some of the limitations and restrictions which staff feel, such as technical support. However, there had been no indepth study of the subject and institution-specific influences on academic staff use of, and attitudes to, learning technology.

  14. Educational needs of adolescents with congenital heart disease: Impact of a transition intervention programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladouceur, Magalie; Calderon, Johanna; Traore, Maladon; Cheurfi, Radhia; Pagnon, Christine; Khraiche, Diala; Bajolle, Fanny; Bonnet, Damien

    2017-05-01

    Adolescents and young adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) have complex health needs and require lifelong follow-up. Interventions to facilitate the paediatric-to-adult healthcare transition are recommended, but outcomes remain largely under-investigated. To identify the educational needs and the impact of a transition intervention on knowledge and self-management skills in adolescents and young adults with CHD. From September 2014 to May 2015, 115 adolescents and young adults with CHD (mean age 17±2 years; 47 girls) were consecutively enrolled. Among these, 22 had participated in a structured educational programme in the previous 11±4 months (education group) and 93 had not (comparison group). Knowledge about their health status was assessed using a targeted CHD questionnaire. The mean overall health knowledge score (maximum of 20) in the education group was significantly higher than in the comparison group (11.7±3.5 vs. 8.6±3.2; Peducation and higher academic attainment were significant determinants of health-related knowledge (PEducation during adolescent-to-adult transition has a significant impact on health knowledge. Structured CHD educational programmes could improve understanding and prevent potential future complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. The Impact of a Computer Training Program on the Ministry of Education and Higher Education Staff to Improve Computer Skills and Productive Performances

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed S. AbuShugair; Magdy Aqel; Ali. H. Abuseada

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims at identifying the impact of the training program (International Computer Driving Licence, CDL), which is used to improve skills and productivity performances, on the of Education and Higher Education Ministry staff, the sample consisted of 216 school head teachers and head teachers assistant in east and west directorates in Gaza city. The researchers applied the two study tools, which were the computer skills questionnaire, and training impact measuring questionnaire, ...

  16. [First favourable results of the group education programme Go4it for overweight and obese adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofsteenge, G H; Weijs, P J M; Chin A Paw, M J M; Delemarre-van de Waal, H A

    2008-07-19

    To evaluate the effect of Go4it, a multidisciplinary group education programme for adolescents with overweight or obesity. Uncontrolled intervention study. At the obesity outpatient clinic of the Transmural Research and Treatment Centre for Overweight and Obese Children of the VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, a group education programme was developed for adolescents (age 12-18 year) who are overweight or obese. Obese adolescents who were referred to the obesity outpatient clinic were asked to participate. During 7 sessions (one session every two weeks) the adolescents were educated on the health consequences of obesity, diet, physical activity, energy balance, improving self-esteem and how to handle bullying and other difficult situations. All sessions were held in groups of 8-10 adolescents. In addition, two sessions were organised for the parents concerning the health consequences of obesity, diet, and physical activity. Body weight and height, glucose tolerance (by an oral glucose tolerance test; OGTT), and insulin resistance were measured at enrolment into the Go4it programme and 6 months later. In total, 93 adolescents (39 boys, 54 girls) were included with a mean age of 3.9 (SD: 1.7) years. Of those, 69 adolescents (74%) attended at least 6 out of 7 sessions of the education programme. Stabilisation or reduction in obesity levels following completion of Go4it was achieved in 51 (74%) of these participants. 50 adolescents had a second OGTT. The BMI standard deviation score (BMI-sds) decreased by 4.3% for boys (p = 0.020) and 3.3% for girls (p = 0.017). Among girls, fasting blood glucose levels decreased by an average of 0.37 mmol/l (95% CI: 0.14-0.60) and insulin concentrations decreased by an average of 299 pmol/l (95% CI: 71-528). Participation in the Go4it education programme is accompanied by a stabilisation or reduction in the level of obesity and has favourable effects on glucose and insulin metabolism.

  17. Parent education programmes for special health care needs children: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Alun C; Liang, Rachel P-T; Frydenberg, Erica; Higgins, Rosemary O; Murphy, Barbara M

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this review was to examine parent education programmes for families with children with special health care needs, to better design interventions focusing on the psychosocial aspects of living with a child's chronic condition. Studies of familial coping with children with special health care needs indicate high levels of parenting stress, with families with children with special health care needs at risk of major psychological and social disturbances and financial strain. Despite increased knowledge of the factors affecting children with special health care needs themselves, evidence for the effectiveness of preventative and treatment interventions in the form of parent education programmes remains limited. Systematic review using PRISMA guidelines. Multi database Boolean searches in EBSCO Discovery Services using the search terms 'complex/special health care needs children', 'child/pediatric/congenital heart disease', 'chronic illness (including diabetes, cancer and cystic fibrosis)', 'family coping', 'siblings' AND 'parenting/family support programs' were conducted. Analysis of 13 included studies showed evidence for the effectiveness of both mixed-health condition and condition-specific parenting programmes delivered in a variety of modes. Three common core intervention approaches were: use of narrative therapy enabling families to tell their own stories, thus facilitating emotional processing and (co-) construction of meaning; a focus on strengthening protective factors such as enhancing parents' skills in communication, and behavioural management and provision of psycho-education to deepen parents' understanding of their child's condition and associated developmental challenges. Irrespective of the type of outcome measures used in the studies, the review showed that there were positive gains and improvements across a range of areas of family functioning such as mental health, parenting, communication and problem-solving skills postprogramme

  18. An important ethical and medicolegal issue; projecting the need for medical education about patient rights among the hospital staff

    OpenAIRE

    SELÇUK, Mustafa Yasin; ÜNAL, Mustafa; TONTUŞ, Hacı Ömer; ALTINTOP, Levent; KARAKUŞ, Akan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the need for medical education about patient rights among hospital staff and in the light of the study findings a curriculum map were designed on this issue. A self-administered questionnaire about patient’s rights was hand-delivered to 124 university hospital personnel who accepted to fill a questionnaire before education program settled in 29 March 2012. Ninety-two (74.2%) respondents were female and thirty-two (25.8%) were male. The mean age was 34.71±...

  19. Public nursing home staff's experience of participating in an intervention aimed at enhancing their self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadensten, Barbro; Engström, Maria; Häggström, Elisabeth

    2009-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to gain an understanding of how nursing staff experienced participating in a training programme aimed at strengthening their self-esteem and empowering them, to determine whether participation benefited them in any way, and to describe their opinions about possible benefits or disadvantages. Staff working in institutions such as nursing homes have a low status in society. A training programme was introduced to staff in a public nursing home. It focused on helping them understand factors in the work situation that influence them and on empowering them. The study was explorative and qualitative in design. The participants in the programme were generally satisfied with it. Their opinions about the benefits they received from the programme can be described using three themes: 'improved communication skills', 'enhanced self-esteem' and 'sees work in a different light'. The most important finding of the present study is that it was possible to strengthen and empower staff. Staff members were generally pleased and satisfied with the content/organization of the training programme. They felt the programme had been of value to them by improving their communication skills and increasing their self-esteem. The present result could be of value to managers and educators working in the area of nursing home care when planning education and development activities for staff. Learning to communicate better and understand the social structure at the workplace could improve staff members' self-esteem, thereby enhancing the work situation and atmosphere as well as empowering the individuals.

  20. Staff-reported antecedents to aggression in a post-acute brain injury treatment programme: What are they and what implications do they have for treatment?

    OpenAIRE

    Giles, Gordon Muir; Scott, Karen; Manchester, David

    2013-01-01

    Research in psychiatric settings has found that staff attribute the majority of inpatient aggression to immediate environmental stressors. We sought to determine if staff working with persons with brain injury-related severe and chronic impairment make similar causal attributions. If immediate environmental stressors precipitate the majority of aggressive incidents in this client group, it is possible an increased focus on the management of factors that initiate client aggression may be helpf...

  1. Socio-ethical education in nanotechnology engineering programmes: a case study in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Balamuralithara; Er, Pek Hoon; Visvanathan, Punita

    2013-09-01

    The unique properties of nanotechnology have made nanotechnology education and its related subjects increasingly important not only for students but for mankind at large. This particular technology brings educators to work together to prepare and produce competent engineers and scientists for this field. One of the key challenges in nanotechnology engineering is to produce graduate students who are not only competent in technical knowledge but possess the necessary attitude and awareness toward the social and ethical issues related to nanotechnology. In this paper, a research model has been developed to assess Malaysian nanotechnology engineering students' attitudes and whether their perspectives have attained the necessary objectives of ethical education throughout their programme of study. The findings from this investigation show that socio ethical education has a strong influence on the students' knowledge, skills and attitudes pertaining to socio ethical issues related to nanotechnology.

  2. Need for a Comprehensive Sex and Relationship Education Programme for Adults with Learning Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enow, Humphrey; Nagalingam, Priya; Singh, Ranbir; Thalitaya, Madhusudan Deepak

    2015-09-01

    Most people with learning disabilities (PWLD) have little understanding of the concept of sex and relationship. PWLD are vulnerable and more likely to be victims of sexual offending. Currently, the only formal access to sex and relationship education that PWLD have is in special need schools. The right to express their sexuality is frequently restricted or denied by restricted policies, negative attitudes and lack of awareness of their needs. To provide a Comprehensive Sex and Relationship Education programme for PWLD. These group/individual sessions will led by a sexuality support worker with experience in working with PWLD. They will be supported by members of the multidisciplinary team including, psychiatrist, psychologist, occupational therapists etc. Providing sex and relationship education PWLD would help them achieve a fulfilling and rewarding sexual experience and make them less vulnerable to sexual abuse. There should be greater emphasis to be placed on sex and relationship education in PWLD; preferably by qualified professionals.

  3. Evaluating the systematic implementation of the 'Let Me Decide' advance care planning programme in long term care through focus groups: staff perspectives.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cornally, Nicola

    2015-11-01

    The \\'Let Me Decide\\' Advance Care Planning (LMD-ACP) programme offers a structured approach to End-of-Life (EoL) care planning in long-term care for residents with and without capacity to complete an advance care directive\\/plan. The programme was implemented in three homes in the South of Ireland, with a view to improving quality of care at end of life. This paper will present an evaluation of the systematic implementation of the LMD-ACP programme in the homes.

  4. Education of staff in preschool aged classrooms in child care centers and child outcomes: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falenchuk, Olesya; Perlman, Michal; McMullen, Evelyn; Fletcher, Brooke; Shah, Prakesh S

    2017-01-01

    Staff education is considered key to quality of early childhood education and care (ECEC) programs. However, findings about associations between staff education and children's outcomes have been inconsistent. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of associations between ECEC staff education and child outcomes. Searches of Medline, PsycINFO, and ERIC, websites of large datasets and reference sections of all retrieved articles were conducted. Eligible studies provided a statistical link between staff education and child outcomes for preschool-aged children in ECEC programs. Titles, abstracts and paper reviews as well as all data extraction were conducted by two independent raters. Of the 823 studies reviewed for eligibility, 39 met our inclusion criteria. Research in this area is observational in nature and subject to the inherent biases of that research design. Results from our systematic review were hampered by heterogeneity in how staff education was defined, variability in whose education was measured and the child outcomes that were assessed. However, overall the qualitative summary indicates that associations between staff education and childhood outcomes are non-existent to very borderline positive. In our meta-analysis of more homogeneous studies we identified certain positive, albeit very weak, associations between staff education and children's language outcomes (specifically, vocabulary and letter word identification) and no significant association with a mathematics outcome (WJ Applied Problems). Thus, our findings suggest that within the range of education levels found in the existing literature, education is not a key driver of child outcomes. However, since we only explored levels of education that were reported in the literature, our findings cannot be used to argue for lowering education standards in ECEC settings.

  5. Comparative Study of Pre-Service Teacher Education Programme at Secondary Stage in Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    The present research work has studied and compared the different issues of pre-service teacher education programme in India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Pakistan. The data were collected from 24 principals, 88 teacher educators and 157 student teachers from institutions and universities where Bachelor of Education (B.Ed.) course were. The data were…

  6. Assessing Readiness for Integration of Electronic Learning into Business Education Programmes in Tertiary Institutions in Ebonyi State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwagwu, Lazarus; Azih, Nonye

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to assess readiness for integration of electronic learning into business education programmes in tertiary institutions in Ebonyi State. Two research questions and two hypotheses guided the study. The population was 37 business education lecturers and 748 Business Education Students in tertiary institutions that offer…

  7. A Train-the-Trainer Design for Green Ambassadors in an Environmental Education Programme on Plastic Waste Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Yannes Tsz-Yan; Chow, Cheuk-Fai; So, Winnie Wing-Mui

    2018-01-01

    To educate a sustainable future, a train-the-trainer (TTT) approach was adopted to train student teachers (STs) from a teacher education institute to be green ambassadors (GAs) in an environmental education (EE) programme with the aim of promoting plastic waste recycling among primary school pupils. The design of the TTT course for the GAs not…

  8. Effects of streching exercises education programme on pain and cervical spine movement function in patients with cervical radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Janulevičiūtė, Augė

    2016-01-01

    Effects of Streching Exercises Education Programme on Pain and Cervical Spine Movement Function in Patients with Cervical Radiculopathy The Author: Vilnius University Bachelor of the Physiotherapy Program fourth-year student Augė Janulevičiūtė. Academic advisor: doctor Ieva Eglė Jamontaitė, Vilnius University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Physical and Sports medicine. Key words: cervical radiculopathy, neck pain, physical therapy, streching exercises, education programme. The aim of rese...

  9. Assessing the Impact of a Program Designed to Develop Sustainability Leadership amongst Staff Members in Higher Education Institutes: A Case Study from a Community of Practice Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaher, Iris; Avissar, Ilana

    2018-01-01

    This study focuses on the impact of a sustainability leadership development program (SLDP) designed to develop staff members as leaders who encourage sustainability practices within institutions of higher education (IHE). Using the framework of community of practice (CoP), we explored the program's contribution by interviewing 16 staff members who…

  10. Attitude of Academic Staff in Nigerian Tertiary Educational Institutions to Student Evaluation of Instruction (SEI): A Case Study of Cross River State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaka, Idaka I.; Joshua, Monday T.

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the attitude of academic staff in Nigerian tertiary educational institutions to student evaluation of instruction (SEI) and to find out the variable factors that influenced the expressed attitude of members of the academic staff, using Cross River State University as a case study. The study was a survey and so a…

  11. Influencing Variables and Moderators of Transfer of Learning to the Workplace within the Area of Staff Development in Higher Education: Research Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rijdt, Catherine; Stes, Ann; van der Vleuten, Cees; Dochy, Filip

    2013-01-01

    The goal of staff development in higher education is a change in teacher practices to positively influence student learning. In other words, the goal of staff development is the transfer of learning to the workplace. Research illuminates that this transfer of learning to the workplace is a complex issue. To make an accurate assessment of staff…

  12. New Work Demands in Higher Education. A Study of the Relationship between Excessive Workload, Coping Strategies and Subsequent Health among Academic Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Marika; Astvik, Wanja; Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the work conditions in higher education work settings, the academic staff's strategies for handling excessive workload and impact on well-being and work-life balance. The results show that there is a risk that staff in academic work places will start using compensatory coping strategies to deal with…

  13. The International Baccalaureate (IB programme: An international gateway to higher education and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E. Saxton

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present the International Baccalaureate (IB Programme and briefly outline its core components, followed by a review of what authoritative reports identify as skills for the future, esteemed by universities and the job market. There is a striking match between these skills and IB outcomes; thus, DP graduates perform well in higher education and add to the reputation of those institutions. After a review of the literature, the authors found the IB Diploma Programme has been studied in many countries by both consultants and educational agencies, and also by a wide array of universities themselves; however, there are fewer qualitative studies concerning the degree to which IB graduates display attitudes, values, and behaviours in line with the IB Learner Profile. This is why the authors stress the claims made are supported by examples of significant research, noting that there is a dearth of qualitative longitudinal studies to sufficiently substantiate the affective domain claims that currently rely more on anecdotal evidence. The authors conclude by pointing out more research is needed in order to substantiate anecdotal evidence regarding future employment success for IB Diploma Programme graduates.  DOI: 10.18870/hlrc.v4i3.123

  14. Online supplementary mathematics tuition in a first-year childhood teacher education programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Fonseca

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on an intervention that was aimed at improving the content knowledge of first-year intermediate-phase education students at a South African university. The study gives some insight into preservice teachers’ perceptions of an online programme for the development of mathematics common content knowledge for teachers of mathematics in the intermediate grades. The effectiveness of the intervention programme was analysed according to Shapiro’s evaluation criteria for intervention research. The findings show that there has been a positive shift in preservice teachers’ common content knowledge but that there is much room for further development. The student teachers found the programme to be of great benefit with regard to the development of their mathematics knowledge as well as their confidence as future teachers of mathematics. The findings highlighted their disturbingly limited knowledge of mathematics content knowledge and pointed to the responsibility of teacher education departments at universities to implement sufficient maths content courses that will address the status quo of poor mathematics teaching in South African primary schools. The authors conclude that the students need to spend much more time on ‘catching up’ before they become teachers.

  15. An education and training programme for radiological institutes: impact on the reduction of the CT radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindera, Sebastian T; Treier, Reto; von Allmen, Gabriel; Nauer, Claude; Trueb, Philipp R; Vock, Peter; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt

    2011-10-01

    To establish an education and training programme for the reduction of CT radiation doses and to assess this programme's efficacy. Ten radiological institutes were counselled. The optimisation programme included a small group workshop and a lecture on radiation dose reduction strategies. The radiation dose used for five CT protocols (paranasal sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary angiography and abdomen) was assessed using the dose-length product (DLP) before and after the optimisation programme. The mean DLP values were compared with national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). The average reduction of the DLP after optimisation was 37% for the sinuses (180 vs. 113 mGycm, P CT. The post-optimisation DLP values of the sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary arteries and abdomen were 68%, 10%, 20%, 55% and 15% below the DRL, respectively. The education and training programme for radiological institutes is effective in achieving a substantial reduction in CT radiation dose.

  16. Conceptualisation of knowledge construction in community service-learning programmes in nursing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindi Z. Mthembu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Practices in higher education have been criticised for not developing and preparing students for the expertise required in real environments. Literature reports that educational programmes tend to favour knowledge conformation rather than knowledge construction; however, community service learning (CSL is a powerful pedagogical strategy that encourages students to make meaningful connections between the content in the classroom and real-life experiences as manifested by the communities. Through CSL, learning is achieved by the active construction of knowledge supported by multiple perspectives within meaningful real contexts, and the social interactions amongst students are seen to play a critical role in the processes of learning and cognition. This article reflects facilitators’ perspective of the knowledge construction process as used with students doing community service learning in basic nursing programmes. Objectives: The aim of this article was to conceptualise the phenomenon of knowledge construction and thereby provide educators with a shared meaning and common understanding, and to analyse the interaction strategies utilised by nurse educators in the process of knowledge construction in community service-learning programmes in basic nursing education. Method: A qualitative research approach based on a grounded theory research design was used in this article. Two nursing education institutions were purposively selected. Structured interviews were conducted with 16 participants. Results: The results revealed that the knowledge construction in community service-learning programmes is conceptualised as having specific determinants, including the use of authentic health-related problems, academic coaching through scaffolding, academic discourse-dialogue, interactive learning in communities of learners, active learning, continuous reflection as well as collaborative and inquiry-based learning. Upon completion of an experience

  17. A bibliometric study of food and nutrition education programmes and interventions in schools in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Trescastro-López

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: 13.9% of children and young people in Spain today are obese, and 26.3% are overweight. It is therefore essential that healthy eating habits be developed early in life. Food and nutrition education, taught as part of health education programmes in schools, plays a fundamental role in instilling this behaviour. Te main goal of this publication was to conduct a bibliometric review in order to analyse the literature on food and nutrition education programmes and interventions in schools in Spain which have been shown to influence health and/or school children’s eating habits.Material and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study of the results obtained from a literature search of the databases Medline, Cochrane Library Plus en Español, Cuiden, Excelencia clínica, IBECS, Scielo, CSIC (ICYT, ISOC e IME, Lilacs, Cuidatge y Teseo. A study of bibliometric indicators: databases, journals, documents published, languages, authorship, index of collaboration, and degree of obsolescence (Burton and Kebler half-life, and Price index.Results: The search provided a total of 148 citations. The final percentage of relevant articles was 49 (33.11%. The database that provided the highest number of pertinent citations was Medline, accounting 24 (48.98%. 42 of the selected citations (85.71% corresponded to original articles. The journal with the largest number of papers was Nutrición Hospitalaria (Hospital Nutrition, accounting 11 (22.45%. The Burton and Kebler half-life was 6 years and the Price index was 42.86%.Conclusions: Many academic articles have been published concerning food and nutrition education programmes in schools in Spain, indicating the importance of acquiring healthy eating habits and behaviours in childhood and the interest this subject arouses.

  18. An educational programme for patients with psoriasis and atopic dermatitis: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostoen, J; Bracke, S; De Keyser, S; Lambert, J

    2012-11-01

    Patient education in addition to standard treatment, with the aim of affecting care through courses, is a relatively new concept in dermatology. Here we introduce a randomized controlled trial (RCT) regarding a previously described 12-week educational programme for chronic skin diseases. The primary objective of the RCT was to measure the effect of an educational programme on disease severity and quality of life in patients with psoriasis or atopic dermatitis. We recruited 50 patients from Ghent University Hospital. Patients with diagnosed psoriasis or atopic dermatitis were randomized (1 : 1) to the intervention or control group. The clinical outcome was measured by two blinded observers using the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI), Scoring Atopic Dermatitis or the Eczema Area and Severity Index. Quality of life was measured by dermatology-specific quality-of-life questionnaires. There was a follow-up period of 9 months. We found that disease severity and quality of life improved significantly for patients with psoriasis (n = 29) but not for patients with atopic dermatitis (n = 21) at 3 months. Patients in the intervention group showed a significant reduction in mean PASI (P = 0·036), mean Dermatology Life Quality Index (P = 0·019) and mean Psoriasis Disability Index (P = 0·015), compared with the control group at 3 months. This improvement continued for at least 6 months, i.e. 3 months after the intervention, but was lost at follow-up after 9 months. Evaluating this form of educational programme, by means of a single-centre RCT, indicates its added value in the longer term management of psoriasis. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  19. Children's environmental knowing: A case study of children's experiences during an environmental education programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Sandra Anne

    This study explores children's experiences during WaterWorlds (pseudonym) a field-based environmental education programme at a marine science centre. The study objectives were to investigate how children understand and interpret their experiences, and how these experiences foster their environmental knowing. To address these objectives, I carried out a case study at a marine science centre in British Columbia. I examined children's WaterWorlds experiences and explored their environmental understandings and commitment to environmental action. I analysed the experiences of children in four separate classes and carried out an in-depth examination of four individual children. Data were collected using informal semi-structured interviews, observations, conversations, researcher journal logs, and student documents including their writing and illustrations. My findings indicate that the WaterWorlds programme experience fosters children's environmental knowing. Participation in WaterWorlds activities led to connection, caring, and concern for other species and in some cases, for the marine environment as a whole. During the programme, children chose the ways they interpreted and expressed their environmental knowledge, ethic of care, advocacy, and commitment to action. This development of each child's self-expression resulted in motivational and powerful learning experiences that inspired and nurtured their connections to the earth. This research provides evidence and examples of how educators can foster children's environmental knowing through multi-disciplinary environmental education experiences. It illustrates that activities such as observing and documenting the lives of other animal species, collecting data and conducting research on those species, and working and learning alongside experts in the field of environmental education are powerful experiences that motivate concern and care for the earth among children.

  20. Reasons why patients referred to diabetes education programmes choose not to attend: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horigan, G; Davies, M; Findlay-White, F; Chaney, D; Coates, V

    2017-01-01

    To identify the reasons why those offered a place on diabetes education programmes declined the opportunity. It is well established that diabetes education is critical to optimum diabetes care; it improves metabolic control, prevents complications, improves quality of life and empowers people to make informed choices to manage their condition. Despite the significant clinical and personal rewards offered by diabetes education, programmes are underused, with a significant proportion of patients choosing not to attend. A systematic search of the following databases was conducted for the period from 2005-2015: Medline; EMBASE; Scopus; CINAHL; and PsycINFO. Studies that met the inclusion criteria focusing on patient-reported reasons for non-attendance at structured diabetes education were selected. A total of 12 studies spanning quantitative and qualitative methodologies were included. The selected studies were published in Europe, USA, Pakistan, Canada and India, with a total sample size of 2260 people. Two broad categories of non-attender were identified: 1) those who could not attend for logistical, medical or financial reasons (e.g. timing, costs or existing comorbidities) and 2) those who would not attend because they perceived no benefit from doing so, felt they had sufficient knowledge already or had emotional and cultural reasons (e.g. no perceived problem, denial or negative feelings towards education). Diabetes education was declined for many reasons, and the range of expressed reasons was more diverse and complex than anticipated. New and innovative methods of delivering diabetes education are required which address the needs of people with diabetes whilst maintaining quality and efficiency. © 2016 Diabetes UK.