WorldWideScience

Sample records for stable visible plumes

  1. Evaluation of Visible Plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Thomas

    Developed for presentation at the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971, this outline discusses plumes with contaminants that are visible to the naked eye. Information covers: (1) history of air pollution control regulations, (2) need for methods of evaluating…

  2. EVALUATION AND MITIGATION OF VISIBLE ACIDIC AEROSOL PLUMES FROM COAL FIRED POWER BOILERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The formation of sulfur trioxide during the combustion of coal can increase significantly following the installation and operation of selective catalytic reduction systems for reduction of nitrogen oxides. This can in turn lead to adverse environmental impacts, including visible...

  3. Pressure-standardised mammography does not affect visibility, contrast and sharpness of stable lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groot, J.E. de, E-mail: jerry.degroot@sigmascreening.com [Sigmascreening, Meibergdreef 45, 1105 BA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hopman, I.G.M., E-mail: ingrid-hopman@hetnet.nl [University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lier, M.G.J.T.B. van, E-mail: monique.vanlier@sigmascreening.com [Sigmascreening, Meibergdreef 45, 1105 BA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Branderhorst, W., E-mail: w.branderhorst@amc.uva.nl [Sigmascreening, Meibergdreef 45, 1105 BA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Grimbergen, C.A., E-mail: c.a.grimbergen@amc.nl [Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heeten, G.J. den, E-mail: denheeten@gmail.com [Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-01-15

    Introduction: A recent technological development allows pressure-standardised mammography by personalizing the compression force to the breast size and firmness. The technique has been shown to reduce pain and compression variability between consecutive exams, but also results in a slightly thicker compressed breast during exposure. This raises the question whether visibility, contrast and sharpness of lesions are affected? Methods: Four experienced radiologists compared 188 stable lesions and structures including (clusters of) calcifications, (oil) cysts and lymph nodes that were visible in mammograms obtained in 2009 with a pain-tolerance limited 18 daN target force compression protocol, and in 2014/2015 obtained with a 10 kPa (75 mmHg) pressure-standardised compression protocol. Observers were blinded for all DICOM metadata and rated which of the randomly ordered, side by side presented images had better lesion visibility, contrast and sharpness, or whether they saw no difference. They also indicated which overall image they preferred, if any, and whether the non-preferred image was still adequate. Statistical non-inferiority is concluded when the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval of the 4-rater averaged ‘new protocol better’ proportions exceed the non-inferiority limit of 0.463. Results: In 2014/2015, the compressions were significantly milder, with on average 17% (mediolateral oblique) to 29% (craniocaudal) lower forces. Breasts remained on average 2.4% (1.4 mm) thicker. Dose was significantly lower (6.5%), which is explained by glandular atrophy. The 95% confidence interval lower limits are 0.479 for visibility, 0.473 for contrast, 0.488 for sharpness and 0.486 for preference, all exceeding the non-inferiority limit. Of the 60 non-preferred mammograms, multiple observers found only five to be inadequate: 4 obtained with the force protocol and 1 with the pressure protocol. Conclusion: Pain-reduced mammography with 10 kPa pressure

  4. Pressure-standardised mammography does not affect visibility, contrast and sharpness of stable lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, J.E. de; Hopman, I.G.M.; Lier, M.G.J.T.B. van; Branderhorst, W.; Grimbergen, C.A.; Heeten, G.J. den

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: A recent technological development allows pressure-standardised mammography by personalizing the compression force to the breast size and firmness. The technique has been shown to reduce pain and compression variability between consecutive exams, but also results in a slightly thicker compressed breast during exposure. This raises the question whether visibility, contrast and sharpness of lesions are affected? Methods: Four experienced radiologists compared 188 stable lesions and structures including (clusters of) calcifications, (oil) cysts and lymph nodes that were visible in mammograms obtained in 2009 with a pain-tolerance limited 18 daN target force compression protocol, and in 2014/2015 obtained with a 10 kPa (75 mmHg) pressure-standardised compression protocol. Observers were blinded for all DICOM metadata and rated which of the randomly ordered, side by side presented images had better lesion visibility, contrast and sharpness, or whether they saw no difference. They also indicated which overall image they preferred, if any, and whether the non-preferred image was still adequate. Statistical non-inferiority is concluded when the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval of the 4-rater averaged ‘new protocol better’ proportions exceed the non-inferiority limit of 0.463. Results: In 2014/2015, the compressions were significantly milder, with on average 17% (mediolateral oblique) to 29% (craniocaudal) lower forces. Breasts remained on average 2.4% (1.4 mm) thicker. Dose was significantly lower (6.5%), which is explained by glandular atrophy. The 95% confidence interval lower limits are 0.479 for visibility, 0.473 for contrast, 0.488 for sharpness and 0.486 for preference, all exceeding the non-inferiority limit. Of the 60 non-preferred mammograms, multiple observers found only five to be inadequate: 4 obtained with the force protocol and 1 with the pressure protocol. Conclusion: Pain-reduced mammography with 10 kPa pressure

  5. Simulating Regolith Excavation, Entrainment, Dispersal and Visibility Impairment due to Rocket Plume-Surface Interaction via a Hybrid Continuum-Rarefied Flow Solver

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — With NASA planning to redirect an asteroid and possible future missions to the Moon or Martian satellites, the effects of thruster plume impingement on the surfaces...

  6. Bathymetric influence on dissolved methane in hydrothermal plumes revealed by concentration and stable carbon isotope measurements at newly discovered venting sites on the Central Indian Ridge (11-13°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Ok-Rye; Son, Seung Kyu; Baker, Edward T.; Son, Juwon; Kim, Mi Jin; Barcelona, Michael J.; Kim, Moonkoo

    2014-09-01

    Methane is a useful tracer for studying hydrothermal discharge, especially where the source fluids are of low temperature and lack metal precipitates. However, the dual origins of deep-sea methane, both chemical and biological, complicate the interpretation of methane observations. Here, we use both the concentration and stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of dissolved methane to trace hydrothermal plumes and identify the source and behavior of methane at two sites of newly discovered hydrothermal activity on the Central Indian Ridge (11-13°S). At both sites, methane and optical anomalies between 2500 and 3500 m at all stations indicate active hydrothermal discharge. We compared methane concentrations and δ13C at three stations, two (CTIR110136 and CTIR110208) with the most prominent anomalies at each site, and a third (CTIR110140) with near-background methane values. At stations CTIR110136 and CTIR110208, the concentration and δ13C of methane in distinct plumes ranged from 3.3 to 42.3 nmol kg-1 and -30.0 to -15.4‰, respectively, compared to deep-water values of 0.5 to 1.2 nmol kg-1 and -35.1 to -28.9‰ at the station with a near-background distal plume (CTIR110140). δ13C was highest in the center of the plumes at CTIR110136 (-15.4‰) and CTIR110208 (-17.8‰). From the plume values we estimate that the δ13C of methane in the hydrothermal fluids at these stations was approximately -19‰ and thus the methane was most likely derived from magmatic outgassing or the chemical synthesis of inorganic matter. We used the relationship between δ13C and methane concentration to examine the behavior of methane at the plume stations. In the CTIR110208 plume, simple physical mixing was likely the major process controlling the methane profile. In the CTIR110136 plume we interpret a more complicated relationship as resulting from microbial oxidation as well as physical mixing. We argue that this difference in methane behavior between the two areas stems from a

  7. Rhodium-doped barium titanate perovskite as a stable p-type semiconductor photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution under visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-12

    Rhodium-doped barium titanate (BaTiO3:Rh) powder was prepared by the polymerized complex (PC) method, and the photocatalytic activity for H2 evolution from water was examined. BaTiO3 is a wide-gap n-type semiconductor having a band gap of 3.0 eV. Doping Rh species into the lattice of BaTiO3 resulted in the formation of new absorption bands in visible light region. Upon visible light (λ > 420 nm), BaTiO3:Rh modified with nanoparticulate Pt as a water reduction promoter was capable of producing H2 from water containing an electron donor such as methanol and iodide. The best material prepared by the PC method exhibited higher activity than that made by a conventional solid-state reaction method. Visible-light-driven Z-scheme water splitting was also accomplished using Pt/BaTiO3:Rh as a building block for H2 evolution in combination with PtOx-loaded WO3 as an O2 evolution photocatalyst in the presence of an IO3(-)/I(-) shuttle redox mediator. Photoelectrochemical analysis indicated that a porous BaTiO3:Rh electrode exhibited cathodic photoresponse due to water reduction in a neutral aqueous Na2SO4 solution upon visible light.

  8. Nanostructured N-doped orthorhombic Nb2O5as an efficient stable photocatalyst for hydrogen generation under visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Aniruddha K; Praveen, C S; Sethi, Yogesh A; Panmand, Rajendra P; Arbuj, Sudhir S; Naik, Sonali D; Ghule, Anil V; Kale, Bharat B

    2017-11-07

    The synthesis of orthorhombic nitrogen-doped niobium oxide (Nb 2 O 5-x N x ) nanostructures was performed and a photocatalytic study carried out in their use in the conversion of toxic H 2 S and water into hydrogen under UV-Visible light. Nanostructured orthorhombic Nb 2 O 5-x N x was synthesized by a simple solid-state combustion reaction (SSCR). The nanostructural features of Nb 2 O 5-x N x were examined by FESEM and HRTEM, which showed they had a porous chain-like structure, with chains interlocked with each other and with nanoparticles sized less than 10 nm. Diffuse reflectance spectra depicted their extended absorbance in the visible region with a band gap of 2.4 eV. The substitution of nitrogen in place of oxygen atoms as well as Nb-N bond formation were confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. A computational study (DFT) of Nb 2 O 5-x N x was also performed for investigation and conformation of the crystal and electronic structure. N-Substitution clearly showed a narrowing of the band gap due to N 2p bands cascading above the O 2p band. Considering the band gap in the visible region, Nb 2 O 5-x N x exhibited enhanced photocatalytic activity toward hydrogen evolution (3010 μmol h -1 g -1 ) for water splitting and (9358 μmol h -1 g -1 ) for H 2 S splitting under visible light. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of Nb 2 O 5-x N x was attributed to its extended absorbance in the visible region due to its electronic structure being modified upon doping, which in turn generates more electron-hole pairs, which are responsible for higher H 2 generation. More significantly, the mesoporous nanostructure accelerated the supression of electron and hole recombination, which also contributed to the enhancement of its activity.

  9. Hydrothermal growth of two dimensional hierarchical MoS2 nanospheres on one dimensional CdS nanorods for high performance and stable visible photocatalytic H2 evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chava, Rama Krishna; Do, Jeong Yeon; Kang, Misook

    2018-03-01

    The visible photocatalytic H2 production from water splitting considered as a clean and renewable energy source could solve the problem of greenhouse gas emission from fossil fuels. Despite tremendous efforts, the development of cost effective, highly efficient and more stable visible photocatalysts for splitting of water remains a great challenge. Here, we report the heteronanostructures consisting of hierarchical MoS2 nanospheres grown on 1D CdS nanorods referred to as CdS-MoS2 HNSs as a high performance visible photocatalyst for H2 evolution. The as-synthesized CdS-MoS2 HNSs exhibited ∼11 fold increment of H2 evolution rate when compared to pure CdS nanorods. This remarkable enhanced hydrogen evolution performance can be assigned to the positive synergetic effect from heteronanostructures formed between the CdS and MoS2 components which assist as an electron sink and source for abundant active edge sites and in turn increases the charge separation. This study presents a low-cost visible photocatalyst for solar energy conversion to achieve efficient H2.

  10. Formation of Hierarchical In2S3-CdIn2S4Heterostructured Nanotubes for Efficient and Stable Visible Light CO2Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sibo; Guan, Bu Yuan; Lu, Yan; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2017-12-06

    We demonstrate rational design and fabrication of hierarchical In 2 S 3 -CdIn 2 S 4 heterostructured nanotubes as efficient and stable photocatalysts for visible light CO 2 reduction. The novel self-templated strategy, including sequential anion- and cation-exchange reactions, integrates two distinct sulfide semiconductors into hierarchical tubular hybrids with homogeneous interfacial contacts and ultrathin two-dimensional (2D) nanosheet subunits. Accordingly, the hierarchical heterostructured nanotubes facilitate separation and migration of photoinduced charge carriers, enhance the adsorption and concentration of CO 2 molecules, and offer rich active sites for surface redox reactions. Benefiting from these structural and compositional features, the optimized hierarchical In 2 S 3 -CdIn 2 S 4 nanotubes without employing noble metal cocatalysts in the catalytic system manifest remarkable performance for deoxygenative reduction of CO 2 with high CO generation rate (825 μmol h -1 g -1 ) and outstanding stability under visible light irradiation.

  11. In situ photoactivated plasmonic Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}@silver as a stable catalyst with enhanced photocatalytic activity under visible light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dongfang; Wang, Jiaxun, E-mail: zdfbb66@aliyun.com [College of Science, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan (China)

    2017-05-15

    Silver orthophosphate (Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) had been reported as an excellent candidate to split water or decompose pollutants with high efficiency in visible light region, yet is not stable due to the reduction of silver ion. In this work, an easy-fabricated method (in situ photoinduced reduction) was provided to enhance the stability of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} for its possible application as a visible-light sensitive photocatalyst. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra, photoluminescence spectra (PL) and Photoelectrochemical measurements. The Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/Ag photocatalysts showed strong photocatalytic activity for decomposition of RhB dye or phenol-X-3B mixture under visible light irradiation (λ> 420 nm) and can be used repeatedly. The possible mechanism for the enhanced photocatalytic properties of the Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} /Ag hybrid was also discussed. It was found that •OH and holes take priority over •O{sub 2}{sup -} radicals in serving as the main oxidant in the Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/Ag photocatalytic system. Especially, the experimental results indicate that the surface plasmon resonance of Ag nanoparticles and a large negative charge of PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} ions as well as high separation efficiency of {sup e-} --h{sup +} pairs, facilitated the enhancement of the photocatalytic activity of the Ag{sub 3} PO{sub 4} /Ag composite. The results indicated that Ag{sub 3} PO{sub 4} /Ag is an efficient and stable visible-light-driven photocatalyst. (author)

  12. Ag-bridged Ag2O nanowire network/TiO2 nanotube array p-n heterojunction as a highly efficient and stable visible light photocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengbin; Cao, Chenghao; Luo, Xubiao; Luo, Shenglian

    2015-03-21

    A unique Ag-bridged Ag2O nanowire network/TiO2 nanotube array p-n heterojunction (Ag-Ag2O/TiO2 NT) was fabricated by simple electrochemical method. Ag nanoparticles were firstly electrochemically deposited onto the surface of TiO2 NT and then were partly oxidized to Ag2O nanowires while the rest of Ag mother nanoparticles were located at the junctions of Ag2O nanowire network. The Ag-Ag2O/TiO2 NT heterostructure exhibited strong visible-light response, effective separation of photogenerated carriers, and high adsorption capacity. The integration of Ag-Ag2O self-stability structure and p-n heterojunction permitted high and stable photocatalytic activity of Ag-Ag2O/TiO2 NT heterostructure photocatalyst. Under 140-min visible light irradiation, the photocatalytic removal efficiency of both dye acid orange 7 (AO7) and industrial chemical p-nitrophenol (PNP) over Ag-Ag2O/TiO2 NT reached nearly 100% much higher than 17% for AO7 or 13% for PNP over bare TiO2 NT. After 5 successive cycles under 600-min simulated solar light irradiation, Ag-Ag2O/TiO2 NT remained highly stable photocatalytic activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hierarchical 3C-SiC nanowires as stable photocatalyst for organic dye degradation under visible light irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Judong; Chen, Jianjun; Xin, Lipeng; Wang, Mingming

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The photocatalytic performance was enhanced by hierarchical nanostructural SiC nanowires due to the increased specific surface areas and efficient incident light scattering. The positive effect of SiO 2 layer growth on the surface of nanowires during the catalytic process on the high decolorization efficiency of SiC nanowires was attributed to SiO 2 surface oxygen vacancies. -- Highlights: • High decolorization rate of methylene blue using hierarchical 3C-SiC nanowires was obtained. • The effect of methylene blue with different concentration to catalytic result was investigated. • The photocatalytic reaction mechanism of degrading methylene blue was explained. • The SiO 2 layer generating on nanowire surface in the catalytic process was analyzed. -- Abstract: 3C-SiC nanowires with hierarchical structure were synthesized by sol–gel carbothermal reduction method. The photocatalytic property of SiC nanowires was investigated. 3C-SiC hierarchical nanowires exhibited an enhanced photocatalytic activity by accelerating the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue solution under visible light irradiation. Methylene blue was degraded efficiently after 5 h irradiation over the photocatalyst. The photocatalytic activity was affected by the initial concentration of the methylene blue solution. Silicon dioxide layer was observed on the surface of nanowires after the catalytic process. The positive effect of SiO 2 surface oxygen vacancies and 3C-SiC hierarchical nanostructures on the high decolorization efficiency of SiC nanowires was discussed. The detailed photocatalytic redox processes were also explained

  14. Au/BiOCl heterojunction within mesoporous silica shell as stable plasmonic photocatalyst for efficient organic pollutants decomposition under visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Xiaohui; Li, Renhong; Chen, Wenxing

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A heterojunction of Au/BiOCl was fabricated within the mesoporous silica shell. • The compact contact between Au and BiOCl enables electrons back flow from Au to BiOCl. • Au/BiOCl@mSiO 2 plasmonic photocatalyst shows efficient visible light photoactivity. • Hydroxyl radicals are the main oxidants in formaldehyde and Rhodamine B decomposition. - Abstract: A new mesoporous silica protected plasmonic photocatalyst, Au/BiOCl@mSiO 2 , was prepared by a modified AcHE method and a subsequent UV light induced photodeposition process. The surfactant-free heterojunction allows the electrons spontaneously flow from Au to nearby BiOCl surface, leading to the accumulation of positive charges on Au surface, and negative charges on Bi species under visible light. Au/BiOCl@mSiO 2 exhibits high visible light photocatalytic efficiency in complete oxidation of aqueous formaldehyde and Rhodamin B. We showed that a positive relationship exists between the LSPR effect and rate enhancements, and leads to a hypothesis that the metallic Au LSPR enhances the photocatalytic rates on nearby semiconductors by transferring energetic electrons to BiOCl and increasing the steady-state concentration of active ·OH species by a multi-electron reduction of molecular oxygen. The ·OH species is the main oxidant in photocatalytic transformations, whose intensity is greatly enhanced in the dye-involving systems due to the synergetic effect between LSPR and dye sensitization processes. In addition, the mesoporous SiO 2 shell not only inhibits the over growth of BiOCl nanocrystals within the silica frameworks, but also protects the dissolution of chloride or Au species into aqueous solution, which ultimately makes the Au/BiOCl@mSiO 2 catalysts rather stable during photocatalysis.

  15. Spectroscopic diagnostics of plume rebound and shockwave dynamics of confined aluminum laser plasma plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeates, P.; Kennedy, E. T.

    2011-01-01

    Generation and expansion dynamics of aluminum laser plasma plumes generated between parallel plates of varying separation (ΔZ = 2.0, 3.2, 4.0, and 5.6 mm), which confined plume expansion normal to the ablation surface, were diagnosed. Space and time resolved visible emission spectroscopy in the spectral range λ = 355-470 nm and time gated visible imaging were employed to record emission spectra and plume dynamics. Space and time resolved profiles of N e (the electron density), T e (the electron temperature), and T ionz (the ionization temperature) were compared for different positions in the plasma plume. Significant modifications of the profiles of the above parameters were observed for plasma-surface collisions at the inner surface of the front plate, which formed a barrier to the free expansion of the plasma plume generated by the laser light on the surface of the back plate. Shockwave generation at the collision interface resulted in delayed compression of the low-density plasma plume near the inner ablation surface, at late stages in the plasma history. Upon exiting the cavity formed by the two plates, through an aperture in the front plate, the plasma plume underwent a second phase of free expansion.

  16. Measurements at cooling tower plumes. Part 3. Three-dimensional measurements at cooling tower plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortak, H.

    An extended field experiment is described in which cooling tower plumes were studied by means of three-dimensional in situ measurements. The goal was to obtain input data for numerical models of cooling tower plumes. Of special interest were data for testing or developing assumptions for sub-grid parametrizations. Utilizing modern systems for high-resolution aerology and small aircraft, four measuring campaigns were conducted: two campaigns (1974) at the cooling towers of the RWE power station Neurath and also two (1975) at the single cooling tower of the RWE power station Meppen. Because of the broad spectrum of weather situations it can be assumed that the results are representative with regard to the interrelationship between structure of cooling tower plume and large-scale meteorological situation. A large number of flights with a powered glider crossing the plumes on orthogonal tracks was performed. All flights showed that the plume could be identified up to large downwind distances by discontinuous jumps of temperature and vapor pressure. Therefore, a definite geometry of the plume could always be defined. In all cross sections a vertical circulation could be observed. At the boundary, which could be defined by the mentioned jumps of temperature and vapor pressure, a maximum of downward vertical motion could be observed in most cases. Entrainment along the boundary of a cross section seems to be very small, except at the lower part of the plume. There, the mass entrainment is maximum and is responsible for plume rise as well as for enlargement of the cross section. The visible part of the plume (cloud) was only a small fraction of the whole plume. High-resolution aerology is necessary in order to explain the structure and behavior of such plumes. This is especially the case in investigations regarding the dynamic break-through of temperature inversions. Such cases were observed frequently under various meteorological conditions and are described

  17. Syntheses, structures and photoelectrochemical properties of three water-stable, visible light absorbing mental-organic frameworks based on tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)silane and 1,4-bis(pyridyl)benzene mixed ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tiantian; Yang, Xiaowei; Li, Ruyan; Liu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Yanling; Dai, Zhihui; Fang, Min; Liu, Hong-Ke; Wu, Yong

    2017-09-01

    Photovoltaics (PV), which directly convert solar energy into electricity generally using semiconductors, offer a practical and sustainable solution to the current energy shortage and environmental pollution crisis. Photovoltaic applications of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) belong to a relatively new area of research. Given that UV light accounts for only 4% while visible light contributes 43% of solar energy, it is rather imperative to develop semiconductors with narrow band gaps so that they could absorb visible light. In this work, three water-stable, narrow band semiconducting MOFs of [Cu(H2TCS)(H2O)] (1), [Co(H2TCS)(BPB)] (2) and [Ni(H2TCS)(BPB)] (3) were synthesized using tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)silane (H4TCS) and 1,4-bis (pyridyl)benzene (BPB) in water, and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffractions. MOF 1 has a 2D structure. MOF 2 and 3 are isostructrual and have 3D frameworks formed by interwoven 2D layers. All three MOFs are stable in acidic water solutions and can be stable in water for 7 days. MOFs 1-3 absorb UV and visible light and have band gaps of 0.50, 1.77 and 1.49 eV, respectively. Rapid and stable photocurrent responses of MOFs 1-3 under UV and visible light illuminations are observed. This work demonstrates that using electron rich Cu2+, Co2+, or Ni2+ as metal nodes can effectively decrease the band gaps of MOFs to make them absorbing visible light. To increase the conjugation in the linker is generally considered to be the method to decrease the band gap of MOFs. The conjugation in H4TCS is not significant and this ligand basically only absorbs UV light. However, by using electron rich Cu2+ ions as metal nodes, the prepared [Cu(H2TCS)(H2O)]·H2O (1) absorbs broadly in the visible light region. Thus, this work suggests that by using electron rich Cu2+, many narrow-band semiconductor MOFs can be prepared even by using ligands which only absorbs UV light.

  18. Determining resolvability of mantle plumes with synthetic seismic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, R.; Van Keken, P. E.; Ritsema, J.; Fichtner, A.; Goes, S. D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Hotspot volcanism in locations such as Hawaii and Iceland is commonly thought to be associated with plumes rising from the deep mantle. In theory these dynamic upwellings should be visible in seismic data due to their reduced seismic velocity and their effect on mantle transition zone thickness. Numerous studies have attempted to image plumes [1,2,3], but their deep mantle origin remains unclear. In addition, a debate continues as to whether lower mantle plumes are visible in the form of body wave travel time delays, or whether such delays will be erased due to wavefront healing. Here we combine geodynamic modeling of mantle plumes with synthetic seismic waveform modeling in order to quantitatively determine under what conditions mantle plumes should be seismically visible. We model compressible plumes with phase changes at 410 km and 670 km, and a viscosity reduction in the upper mantle. These plumes thin from greater than 600 km in diameter in the lower mantle, to 200 - 400 km in the upper mantle. Plume excess potential temperature is 375 K, which maps to seismic velocity reductions of 4 - 12 % in the upper mantle, and 2 - 4 % in the lower mantle. Previous work that was limited to an axisymmetric spherical geometry suggested that these plumes would not be visible in the lower mantle [4]. Here we extend this approach to full 3D spherical wave propagation modeling. Initial results using a simplified cylindrical plume conduit suggest that mantle plumes with a diameter of 1000 km or greater will retain a deep mantle seismic signature. References[1] Wolfe, Cecily J., et al. "Seismic structure of the Iceland mantle plume." Nature 385.6613 (1997): 245-247. [2] Montelli, Raffaella, et al. "Finite-frequency tomography reveals a variety of plumes in the mantle." Science 303.5656 (2004): 338-343. [3] Schmandt, Brandon, et al. "Hot mantle upwelling across the 660 beneath Yellowstone." Earth and Planetary Science Letters 331 (2012): 224-236. [4] Hwang, Yong Keun, et al

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of High Efficiency and Stable Spherical Ag3PO4 Visible Light Photocatalyst for the Degradation of Methylene Blue Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqin Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A facile method for the synthesis of Ag3PO4 visible light photocatalyst has been developed to improve the photocatalytic activity and stability. The as-prepared samples are investigated by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL spectroscopy, and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy techniques. The results reveal that the prepared Ag3PO4 has cube structure with a band gap of 2.26 eV. The as-prepared samples show higher photocatalytic activity for methylene blue (MB degradation than that of N-TiO2 under visible light irradiation.

  20. Entrainment by turbulent plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David; Burridge, Henry; Partridge, Jamie; Linden, Paul

    2017-11-01

    Plumes are of relevance to nature and real consequence to industry. While the Morton, Taylor & Turner (1956) plume model is able to estimate the mean physical flux parameters, the process of entrainment is only parametrised in a time-averaged sense and a deeper understanding is key to understanding how they evolve. Various flow configurations, resulting in different entrainment values, are considered; we perform simultaneous PIV and plume-edge detection on saline plumes in water resulting from a point source, a line source and a line source where a vertical wall is placed immediately adjacent. Of particular interest is the effect the large scale eddies, forming at the edge of the plume and engulfing ambient fluid, have on the entrainment process. By using velocity statistics in a coordinate system based on the instantaneous scalar edge of the plume the significance of this large scale engulfment is quantified. It is found that significant mass is transported outside the plumes, in particular in regions where large scale structures are absent creating regions of relatively high-momentum ambient fluid. This suggests that the large scale processes, whereby ambient fluid is engulfed into the plume, contribute significantly to the entrainment.

  1. Ag-bridged Ag{sub 2}O nanowire network/TiO{sub 2} nanotube array p–n heterojunction as a highly efficient and stable visible light photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chengbin, E-mail: chem_cbliu@hnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Jiangxi Province for Persistent Pollutants Control and Resources Recycle, Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Cao, Chenghao [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Luo, Xubiao [Key Laboratory of Jiangxi Province for Persistent Pollutants Control and Resources Recycle, Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063 (China); Luo, Shenglian [Key Laboratory of Jiangxi Province for Persistent Pollutants Control and Resources Recycle, Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2015-03-21

    Graphical abstract: A unique Ag-bridged Ag{sub 2}O nanowire network/TiO{sub 2} nanotube array p–n heterojunction was fabricated by simple electrochemical method. The heterostructures exhibit high photocatalytic activity and excellent recycling performance. - Highlights: • Ag-bridged Ag{sub 2}O nanowire network self-stability structure. • Ag{sub 2}O nanowire network/TiO{sub 2} nanotube p–n heterojunction. • High visible light photocatalytic activity. • Highly stable recycling performance. - Abstract: A unique Ag-bridged Ag{sub 2}O nanowire network/TiO{sub 2} nanotube array p–n heterojunction (Ag–Ag{sub 2}O/TiO{sub 2} NT) was fabricated by simple electrochemical method. Ag nanoparticles were firstly electrochemically deposited onto the surface of TiO{sub 2} NT and then were partly oxidized to Ag{sub 2}O nanowires while the rest of Ag mother nanoparticles were located at the junctions of Ag{sub 2}O nanowire network. The Ag–Ag{sub 2}O/TiO{sub 2} NT heterostructure exhibited strong visible-light response, effective separation of photogenerated carriers, and high adsorption capacity. The integration of Ag–Ag{sub 2}O self-stability structure and p–n heterojunction permitted high and stable photocatalytic activity of Ag–Ag{sub 2}O/TiO{sub 2} NT heterostructure photocatalyst. Under 140-min visible light irradiation, the photocatalytic removal efficiency of both dye acid orange 7 (AO7) and industrial chemical p-nitrophenol (PNP) over Ag–Ag{sub 2}O/TiO{sub 2} NT reached nearly 100% much higher than 17% for AO7 or 13% for PNP over bare TiO{sub 2} NT. After 5 successive cycles under 600-min simulated solar light irradiation, Ag–Ag{sub 2}O/TiO{sub 2} NT remained highly stable photocatalytic activity.

  2. Hybrid cooling tower Neckarwestheim 2 cooling function, emission, plume dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braeuning, G.; Ernst, G.; Maeule, R.; Necker, P.

    1990-01-01

    The fan-assisted hybrid cooling tower of the 1300 MW power plant Gemeinschafts-Kernkraftwerk Neckarwestheim 2 was designed and constructed based on results from theoretical and experimental studies and experiences from a smaller prototype. The wet part acts in counterflow. The dry part is arranged above the wet part. Each part contains 44 fans. Special attention was payed to the ducts which mix the dry into the wet plume. The cooling function and state, mass flow and contents of the emission were measured. The dispersion of the plume in the atmosphere was observed. The central results are presented in this paper. The cooling function corresponds to the predictions. The content of drifted cooling water in the plume is extremely low. The high velocity of the plume in the exit causes an undisturbed flow into the atmosphere. The hybrid operation reduces visible plumes strongly, especially in warmer and drier ambient air

  3. Electrical charging of ash in Icelandic volcanic plumes

    OpenAIRE

    Aplin, Karen L; Houghton, Isobel M P; Nicoll, Keri A

    2014-01-01

    The existence of volcanic lightning and alteration of the atmospheric potential gradient in the vicinity of near-vent volcanic plumes provides strong evidence for the charging of volcanic ash. More subtle electrical effects are also visible in balloon soundings of distal volcanic plumes. Near the vent, some proposed charging mechanisms are fractoemission, triboelectrification, and the so-called "dirty thunderstorm" mechanism, which is where ash and convective clouds interact electrically to e...

  4. Solar Coronal Plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannina Poletto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar plumes are thin long ray-like structures that project beyond the limb of the Sun polar regions, maintaining their identity over distances of several solar radii. Plumes have been first observed in white-light (WL images of the Sun, but, with the advent of the space era, they have been identified also in X-ray and UV wavelengths (XUV and, possibly, even in in situ data. This review traces the history of plumes, from the time they have been first imaged, to the complex means by which nowadays we attempt to reconstruct their 3-D structure. Spectroscopic techniques allowed us also to infer the physical parameters of plumes and estimate their electron and kinetic temperatures and their densities. However, perhaps the most interesting problem we need to solve is the role they cover in the solar wind origin and acceleration: Does the solar wind emanate from plumes or from the ambient coronal hole wherein they are embedded? Do plumes have a role in solar wind acceleration and mass loading? Answers to these questions are still somewhat ambiguous and theoretical modeling does not provide definite answers either. Recent data, with an unprecedented high spatial and temporal resolution, provide new information on the fine structure of plumes, their temporal evolution and relationship with other transient phenomena that may shed further light on these elusive features.

  5. The benefits of visibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupnick, A.; DeWitt, D.

    1994-01-01

    The benefits of visibility improvement (or the damages with additional degradation) refer to increases (or decreases) in utility obtained in three different dimensions. The first of these is associated with the nature of the visibility change. Visual range may be improved so that features of an area become more distinct or the sky becomes clearer. Alternatively, normal features of an area may be marred, say by the site of a power plant or its plume (called plume blight). The second dimension is the location of the change: in an urban area, in a rural setting, or in a recreational area or area of particular beauty, such as the Grand Canyon. The third dimension is the type of value: use or non-use. Thus, a person who visits the Grand Canyon (or may visit it in the future) may hold use values for improving his view of the Canyon or its surroundings and may also old non-use values for improved visibility (whether for altruistic or other reasons) irrespective of present or planned visits. In all, therefore, there are 12 possible combinations of the elements in these three dimension, each of which is logically distinct from the others and which demands attention in the literature to derive willingness to pay (WTP)

  6. Chemistry in aircraft plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraabol, A.G.; Stordal, F.; Knudsen, S. [Norwegian Inst. for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Konopka, P. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    An expanding plume model with chemistry has been used to study the chemical conversion of NO{sub x} to reservoir species in aircraft plumes. The heterogeneous conversion of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} to HNO{sub 3}(s) has been investigated when the emissions take place during night-time. The plume from an B747 has been simulated. During a ten-hour calculation the most important reservoir species was HNO{sub 3} for emissions at noon. The heterogeneous reactions had little impact on the chemical loss of NO{sub x} to reservoir species for emissions at night. (author) 4 refs.

  7. Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapelushnik, I.; Sheinfeld, M.; Avida, R.; Kadmon, Y.; Ellenbogen, M.; Tirosh, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Airborne Radiation Monitoring System (ARMS) monitors air or ground radioactive contamination. The contamination source can be a radioactive plume or an area contaminated with radionuclides. The system is based on two major parts, an airborne unit carried by a helicopter and a ground station carried by a truck. The system enables real time measurement and analysis of radioactive plumes as well as post flight processing. The Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator purpose is to create a virtual space where the trained operators experience full radiation field conditions, without real radiation hazard. The ARMS is based on a flying platform and hence the simulator allows a significant reduction of flight time costs

  8. Three-dimensional temporal reconstruction and analysis of plume images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Atam P.; Disimile, Peter J.; Peck, Charles, III

    1992-01-01

    An experiment with two subsonic jets generating a cross-flow was conducted as part of a study of the structural features of temporal reconstruction of plume images. The flow field structure was made visible using a direct injection flow visualization technique. It is shown that image analysis and temporal three-dimensional visualization can provide new information on the vortical structural dynamics of multiple jets in a cross-flow. It is expected that future developments in image analysis, quantification and interpretation, and flow visualization of rocket engine plume images may provide a tool for correlating the engine diagnostic features by interpreting the evolution of the structures in the plume.

  9. Construction of stable Ta3N5/g-C3N4 metal/non-metal nitride hybrids with enhanced visible-light photocatalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yinhua; Liu, Peipei; Chen, YeCheng; Zhou, Zhengzhong; Yang, Haijian; Hong, Yuanzhi; Li, Fan; Ni, Liang; Yan, Yongsheng; Gregory, Duncan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel Ta3N5/g-C3N4 metal/non-metal nitride hybrid was successfully synthesized by a facile impregnation method. The photocatalytic activity of Ta3N5/g-C3N4 hybrid nitrides was evaluated by the degradation of organic dye rhodamine B (RhB) under visible light irradiation, and the result indicated that all Ta3N5/g-C3N4 samples exhibited distinctly enhanced photocatalytic activities for the degradation of RhB than pure g-C3N4. The optimal Ta3N5/g-C3N4 composite sample, with Ta3N5...

  10. Plume rise from stacks with scrubbers: a state-of-the-art review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatzmann, M.; Policastro, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of predicting plume rise from stacks with scrubbers is evaluated critically. The significant moisture content of the scrubbed plume upon exit leads to important thermodynamic effects during plume rise that are unaccounted for in the usual dry plume rise theories. For example, under conditionally unstable atmospheres, a wet scrubbed plume treated as completely dry acts as if the atmosphere were stable, whereas in reality the scrubbed plume behaves instead as if the atmosphere were unstable. Even the use of moist plume models developed for application to cooling tower plume rise is not valid since these models 1) employ the Boussinesq approximation, 2) use a number of additional simplifying approximations that require small exit temperature differences between tower exit and ambient temperatures, and 3) are not calibrated to stack data

  11. Numerical model simulation of atmospheric coolant plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, P.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of humid atmospheric coolants on the atmosphere is simulated by means of a three-dimensional numerical model. The atmosphere is defined by its natural vertical profiles of horizontal velocity, temperature, pressure and relative humidity. Effluent discharge is characterised by its vertical velocity and the temperature of air satured with water vapour. The subject of investigation is the area in the vicinity of the point of discharge, with due allowance for the wake effect of the tower and buildings and, where application, wind veer with altitude. The model equations express the conservation relationships for mometum, energy, total mass and water mass, for an incompressible fluid behaving in accordance with the Boussinesq assumptions. Condensation is represented by a simple thermodynamic model, and turbulent fluxes are simulated by introduction of turbulent viscosity and diffusivity data based on in-situ and experimental water model measurements. The three-dimensional problem expressed in terms of the primitive variables (u, v, w, p) is governed by an elliptic equation system which is solved numerically by application of an explicit time-marching algorithm in order to predict the steady-flow velocity distribution, temperature, water vapour concentration and the liquid-water concentration defining the visible plume. Windstill conditions are simulated by a program processing the elliptic equations in an axisymmetrical revolution coordinate system. The calculated visible plumes are compared with plumes observed on site with a view to validate the models [fr

  12. Investigation of Jupiter's Equatorial Hotspots and Plumes Using Cassini ISS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, David S.; Showman, A. P.; Vasavada, A. R.; Simon-Miller, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present updated analysis of Jupiter's equatorial meteorology from Cassini observations. For two months preceding the spacecraft's closest approach, the ISS onboard regularly imaged the atmosphere. We created time-lapse movies from this period in order to analyze the dynamics of equatorial 5-micron hot spots and their interactions with adjacent latitudes. Hot spots are quasi-stable, rectangular dark areas on visible-wavelength images, with defined eastern edges that sharply contrast with surrounding clouds, but a diffuse western edge serving as a nebulous boundary with adjacent equatorial plumes. Hot spots exhibit significant variations in size and shape over timescales of days and weeks. Some of these changes correspond with passing vortex systems from adjacent latitudes interacting with hot spots. Strong anticyclonic gyres present to the south and southeast of the dark areas appear to circulate into hot spots. Impressive, bright white plumes occupy spaces in between hot spots. Compact cirrus-iike 'scooter' clouds flow rapidly through the plumes before disappearing within the dark areas. This raises the possibility that the plumes and fast-moving clouds are at higher altitudes, because their speed does not match previously published zonal wind profiles. Most profiles represent the drift speed of the hot spots at their latitude from pattern matching of the entire longitudinal image strip. If a downward branch of an equatorially-trapped Rossby waves controls the overall appearance of hot spots, however, the westward phase velocity of the wave leads to underestimates of the true jet stream speed. Instead, our expanded data set demonstrating the rapid flow of these scooter clouds may be more illustrative of the actual jet stream speed at these latitudes. This research was supported by a NASA JDAP grant and the NASA Postdoctoral Program.

  13. Self-powered sensitive and stable UV-visible photodetector based on GdNiO3/Nb-doped SrTiO3 heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Chang, Lei; Yin, Xinmao; You, Lu; Zhao, Jia-Li; Guo, Haizhong; Jin, Kuijuan; Ibrahim, Kurash; Wang, Jiaou; Rusydi, Andrivo; Wang, Junling

    2017-01-01

    The properties of perovskite nickelates are very sensitive to their oxygen content, which allows us to tune their electronic structures by varying the oxygen partial pressure during film deposition. Under the optimized condition, we have obtained GdNiO3 films that are sensitive to a wide spectrum of light. By combining the GdNiO3 film with Nb-doped SrTiO3 to form a heterojunction, we design a self-powered photodetector with high sensitivity toward light with a wavelength between 650 nm and 365 nm. Under 365 nm illumination (50 μW/cm2), the device shows a responsivity of 0.23 A/W at 0 V bias, comparable to or even better than the ultraviolet photodetectors made of semiconductor materials such as GaN or ZnO. The photo-dark ratio can be close to 103 when the power light density reaches 0.6 mW/cm2. Moreover, the device performance is very stable without any decay after 6 months.

  14. Plumes, Superplumes, and Dupal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps Morgan, J.; Morgan, W. J.

    2007-12-01

    The Dupal anomaly is a prominent low-order spatial pattern in the geochemistry of oceanic basalts. In 1988 Castillo noted an apparent correlation between the Dupal spatial pattern and the large-scale structure of seismic velocity anomalies in the deep lower mantle. Here we explore a simple physical mechanism that can explain this correlation. First, long-time subduction around the rim of the Pacific would drive flow in D" toward the center of the 'rim of fire' and the center of the African superplume. This continuous supply of D" would promote the concentration of plumes into the superplume regions. This is relatively independent of migration of the subduction zones as the Pacific closes in pace with the opening of the Atlantic and Indian oceans. Second, longterm outward conduction of heat from the plume pipes would heat the mantle between the pipes (it would heat outward ~100 km in 100 m.y.; ~200 km in 400 m.y.). This heating of the 'background' mantle to plume-rim temperatures would change the geotherm of the superswell region compared to the mantle beneath 'normal' suboceanic asthenosphere. The result would be that a larger fraction of ambient mantle would be heated enough for its lowest-solidus plums to begin to partially melt, and to become buoyant enough for this non-plume mantle to rise into and become part of the overlying layer of hot plume-fed asthenosphere - i.e. only in superplume regions is non-plume material hot and buoyant enough to upwell in significant amounts into the asthenosphere. We predict that Dupal material differs in its mean age from the age of the D'' source of other plume-fed asthenosphere, and also differs in that it has been (on-average) cooler and less-melted than 'average' plume-fed asthenosphere. This leads to its distinctive isotopic differences. Global asthenosphere flow then preferentially transports Dupal material towards the southern ocean spreading centers (Yamamoto et al., 2007). The patchiness of superswell volcanism

  15. Dilution in Transition Zone between Rising Plumes and Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    2004-01-01

    The papers presents some physical experiments with the dilution of sea outfall plumes with emphasize on the transition zone where the relative fast flowing vertical plume turns to a horizontal surface plume following the slow sea surface currents. The experiments show that a considerable dilution...

  16. On predicting mantle mushroom plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka-Kheng Tan

    2011-04-01

    Top cooling may produce plunging plumes of diameter of 585 km and at least 195 Myr old. The number of cold plumes is estimated to be 569, which has not been observed by seismic tomography or as cold spots. The cold plunging plumes may overwhelm and entrap some of the hot rising plumes from CMB, so that together they may settle in the transition zone.

  17. Buoyant plume calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penner, J.E.; Haselman, L.C.; Edwards, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Smoke from raging fires produced in the aftermath of a major nuclear exchange has been predicted to cause large decreases in surface temperatures. However, the extent of the decrease and even the sign of the temperature change, depend on how the smoke is distributed with altitude. We present a model capable of evaluating the initial distribution of lofted smoke above a massive fire. Calculations are shown for a two-dimensional slab version of the model and a full three-dimensional version. The model has been evaluated by simulating smoke heights for the Hamburg firestorm of 1943 and a smaller scale oil fire which occurred in Long Beach in 1958. Our plume heights for these fires are compared to those predicted by the classical Morton-Taylor-Turner theory for weakly buoyant plumes. We consider the effect of the added buoyancy caused by condensation of water-laden ground level air being carried to high altitude with the convection column as well as the effects of background wind on the calculated smoke plume heights for several fire intensities. We find that the rise height of the plume depends on the assumed background atmospheric conditions as well as the fire intensity. Little smoke is injected into the stratosphere unless the fire is unusually intense, or atmospheric conditions are more unstable than we have assumed. For intense fires significant amounts of water vapor are condensed raising the possibility of early scavenging of smoke particles by precipitation. 26 references, 11 figures

  18. Buoyant plume calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, J.E.; Haselman, L.C.; Edwards, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Smoke from raging fires produced in the aftermath of a major nuclear exchange has been predicted to cause large decreases in surface temperatures. However, the extent of the decrease and even the sign of the temperature change, depend on how the smoke is distributed with altitude. We present a model capable of evaluating the initial distribution of lofted smoke above a massive fire. Calculations are shown for a two-dimensional slab version of the model and a full three-dimensional version. The model has been evaluated by simulating smoke heights for the Hamburg firestorm of 1943 and a smaller scale oil fire which occurred in Long Beach in 1958. Our plume heights for these fires are compared to those predicted by the classical Morton-Taylor-Turner theory for weakly buoyant plumes. We consider the effect of the added buoyancy caused by condensation of water-laden ground level air being carried to high altitude with the convection column as well as the effects of background wind on the calculated smoke plume heights for several fire intensities. We find that the rise height of the plume depends on the assumed background atmospheric conditions as well as the fire intensity. Little smoke is injected into the stratosphere unless the fire is unusually intense, or atmospheric conditions are more unstable than we have assumed. For intense fires significant amounts of water vapor are condensed raising the possibility of early scavenging of smoke particles by precipitation. 26 references, 11 figures.

  19. Thermal plumes in ventilated rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Peter; Nielsen, Peter V.

    1990-01-01

    The design of a displacement ventilation system involves determination of the flow rate in the thermal plumes. The flow rate in the plumes and the vertical temperature gradient influence each other, and they are influenced by many factors. This paper shows some descriptions of these effects. Free...... to be the only possible approach to obtain the volume flow in: thermal plumes in ventilated rooms....

  20. Monitoring and forecasting Etna volcanic plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Scollo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the results of a project ongoing at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV. The objective is to develop and implement a system for monitoring and forecasting volcanic plumes of Etna. Monitoring is based at present by multispectral infrared measurements from the Spin Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager on board the Meteosat Second Generation geosynchronous satellite, visual and thermal cameras, and three radar disdrometers able to detect ash dispersal and fallout. Forecasting is performed by using automatic procedures for: i downloading weather forecast data from meteorological mesoscale models; ii running models of tephra dispersal, iii plotting hazard maps of volcanic ash dispersal and deposition for certain scenarios and, iv publishing the results on a web-site dedicated to the Italian Civil Protection. Simulations are based on eruptive scenarios obtained by analysing field data collected after the end of recent Etna eruptions. Forecasting is, hence, supported by plume observations carried out by the monitoring system. The system was tested on some explosive events occurred during 2006 and 2007 successfully. The potentiality use of monitoring and forecasting Etna volcanic plumes, in a way to prevent threats to aviation from volcanic ash, is finally discussed.

  1. Four dimensional reconstruction and analysis of plume images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Atam P.; Peck, Charles, III; Disimile, Peter

    1991-01-01

    A number of methods have been investigated and are under current investigation for monitoring the health of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Plume emission analysis has recently emerged as a potential technique for correlating the emission characteristics with the health of an engine. In order to correlate the visual and spectral signatures of the plume emission with the characteristic health monitoring features of the engine, the plume emission data must be acquired, stored, and analyzed in a manner similar to flame emission spectroscopy. The characteristic visual and spectral signatures of the elements vaporized in exhaust plume along with the features related to their temperature, pressure, and velocity can be analyzed once the images of plume emission are effectively acquired, digitized, and stored on a computer. Since the emission image varies with respect to time at a specified planar location, four dimensional visual and spectral analysis need to be performed on the plume emission data. In order to achieve this objective, feasibility research was conducted to digitize, store, analyze, and visualize the images of a subsonic jet in a cross flow. The jet structure was made visible using a direct injection flow visualization technique. The results of time-history based three dimensional reconstruction of the cross sectional images corresponding to a specific planar location of the jet structure are presented. The experimental set-up to acquire such data is described and three dimensional displays of time-history based reconstructions of the jet structure are discussed.

  2. Quantitative Chemical Analysis of Enceladus' Plume Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, J.; Nordheim, T.; Hofmann, A.; Hand, K. P.

    2017-12-01

    Analyses of data from Cassini's Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) taken during several close flybys of Enceladus suggest the presence of a potentially habitable ocean underneath the ice shell [1,2]. Proper identification of the molecular species sampled from Enceladus' plumes by INMS is of utmost importance for characterizing the ocean's chemical composition. Data from Cassini's Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) and Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) have provided clues for possible plume chemistry, but further analysis of the INMS data is necessary [3,4]. Here we present a novel automated algorithm for comparing INMS spectra and analogue laboratory spectra to a vast library of sample spectra provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The algorithm implements a Monte Carlo simulation that computes the angular similarity between the spectrum of interest and a random sample of synthetic spectra generated at arbitrary mixing ratios of molecular species. The synthetic spectra with the highest similarity scores are then averaged to produce a convergent estimate of the mixing ratio of the spectrum of interest. Here we will discuss the application of this technique to INMS and laboratory data and the implication of our preliminary results for the ocean chemistry and habitability of Enceladus. 1. Waite, J., et al., 2009. Liquid Water on Enceladus From Observations of Ammonia and 40Ar in the Plume. Nature 460, 487-498. 2. Waite, J., et al. 2017. Cassini Finds Molecular Hydrogen in the Enceladus Plume: Evidence for Hydrothermal Processes. Science 356, 155-159. 3. Postberg, F., et al., 2008. The E Ring in the Vicinity of Enceladus II: Signatures of Enceladus in the Elemental Composition of E-Ring Particles. Icarus 193(2), 438-454. 4. Brown, R., et al., 2006. Composition and Physical Properties of Enceladus' Surface. Science 311, 1425-1428.

  3. Ozone production efficiency of a ship-plume: ITCT 2K2 case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun S; Kim, Yong H; Han, Kyung M; Kim, Jhoon; Song, Chul H

    2016-01-01

    Ozone production efficiency (OPE) of ship plume was first evaluated in this study, based on ship-plume photochemical/dynamic model simulations and the ship-plume composition data measured during the ITCT 2K2 (Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation 2002) aircraft campaign. The averaged instantaneous OPEs (OPE(i)‾) estimated via the ship-plume photochemical/dynamic modeling for the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume ranged between 4.61 and 18.92, showing that the values vary with the extent of chemical evolution (or chemical stage) of the ship plume and the stability classes of the marine boundary layer (MBL). Together with OPE(i)‾, the equivalent OPEs (OPE(e)‾) for the entire ITCT 2K2 ship-plume were also estimated. The OPE(e)‾ values varied between 9.73 (for the stable MBL) and 12.73 (for the moderately stable MBL), which agreed well with the OPE(e)‾ of 12.85 estimated based on the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume observations. It was also found that both the model-simulated and observation-based OPE(e)‾ inside the ship-plume were 0.29-0.38 times smaller than the OPE(e)‾ calculated/measured outside the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume. Such low OPEs insides the ship plume were due to the high levels of NO and non-liner ship-plume photochemistry. Possible implications of this ship-plume OPE study in the global chemistry-transport modeling are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Investigation of Balcony Plume Entrainment

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, F.; Nielsen, Peter V.; Heiselberg, Per; Brohus, Henrik; Li, B. Z.

    2009-01-01

    An investigation on the scenarios of the spill plume and its equation was presented in this paper. The study includes two aspects, i.e., the small-scale experiment and the numerical simulation. Two balcony spill plume models are assessed by comparing with the FDS (Fire Dynamic Simulation) and small scale model experiment results. Besides validating the spill model by experiments, the effect of different fire location on balcony plume is also discussed.The results show that the balcony equatio...

  5. Seismic Imaging of Mantle Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataf, Henri-Claude

    The mantle plume hypothesis was proposed thirty years ago by Jason Morgan to explain hotspot volcanoes such as Hawaii. A thermal diapir (or plume) rises from the thermal boundary layer at the base of the mantle and produces a chain of volcanoes as a plate moves on top of it. The idea is very attractive, but direct evidence for actual plumes is weak, and many questions remain unanswered. With the great improvement of seismic imagery in the past ten years, new prospects have arisen. Mantle plumes are expected to be rather narrow, and their detection by seismic techniques requires specific developments as well as dedicated field experiments. Regional travel-time tomography has provided good evidence for plumes in the upper mantle beneath a few hotspots (Yellowstone, Massif Central, Iceland). Beneath Hawaii and Iceland, the plume can be detected in the transition zone because it deflects the seismic discontinuities at 410 and 660 km depths. In the lower mantle, plumes are very difficult to detect, so specific methods have been worked out for this purpose. There are hints of a plume beneath the weak Bowie hotspot, as well as intriguing observations for Hawaii. Beneath Iceland, high-resolution tomography has just revealed a wide and meandering plume-like structure extending from the core-mantle boundary up to the surface. Among the many phenomena that seem to take place in the lowermost mantle (or D''), there are also signs there of the presence of plumes. In this article I review the main results obtained so far from these studies and discuss their implications for plume dynamics. Seismic imaging of mantle plumes is still in its infancy but should soon become a turbulent teenager.

  6. Comparison of the observed and predicted visual effects caused by power plant plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Seigneur, Christian; Babson, Betsy L.; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Wojcik, Michael A.

    One of the objectives of the June-July and December 1979 E.P.A.-VISTTA field programs was to obtain the data necessary to evaluate the components of the EPA/SAI plume visibility model. The data were obtained through a coordinated set of measurements of specific power plant emissions, meteorological conditions, plume concentrations measured by an aircraft and through telephotometer measurements of the visual effects of the plume. This paper presents a comparison of measurements obtained between 4 and 32 km downwind from the plant with model predictions. The various components of the plume visibility model were evaluated independently and it was found that the greatest uncertainties in the model predictions are in the diffusion module, which has the limitations associated with all Gaussian diffusion models. The chemistry module describes plume chemistry well in a clean background atmosphere; however, the rate of NO-to-NO 2 conversion is slightly overpredicted in the model. Predicted secondary aerosol formation is negligible. The optics module of the visibility model was evaluated by predicting the optical effects of the plume on the basis of the airplane-measured plume concentrations. These calculations were compared with the ground-based telephotometer measurements. The optics module tends to slightly overestimate the plume visual effect; the average absolute relative errors in measurements of the plume/sky intensity ratio are 6.0, 6.4, 3.0 and 4.8% at 405, 450, 550 and 630 nm, respectively. For contrast values below - 0.06, the contrast predicted by the optics module is within a factor of 2 of the measured values. A major uncertainty in the data is found in the degree of alignment between the airplane and telephotometer measurements. The overall evaluation of the plume visibility model was carried out with 20 sets of measurements. It was found that the model tends to overestimate the visual effect of the plume. The average absolute relative errors in the plume

  7. Terrestrial Plume Impingement Testbed Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Masten Space Systems proposes to create a terrestrial plume impingement testbed for generating novel datasets for extraterrestrial robotic missions. This testbed...

  8. Dilution of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Petersen, Ole

    The purpose of present work is to establish a quantitative description of a surface plume which is valid for the range of density differences occurring in relation to sewage outfalls.......The purpose of present work is to establish a quantitative description of a surface plume which is valid for the range of density differences occurring in relation to sewage outfalls....

  9. Thermal Plumes in Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Peter; Nielsen, Peter V.

    The design of a displacement ventilation system involves determination of the flow rate in the thermal plumes. The flow rate in the plumes and the vertical temperature gradient influence each other, and they are influenced by many factors. This paper shows some descriptions of these effects....

  10. Mercury and selenium biomagnification in a Brazilian coastal food web using nitrogen stable isotope analysis: A case study in an area under the influence of the Paraiba do Sul River plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehrig, Helena A.; Seixas, Tercia G.; Malm, Olaf; Di Beneditto, Ana Paula M.; Rezende, Carlos E.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Cetacean and voracious fish displayed similar δ 15 N values. • Cetacean displayed higher Hg and lower Se than voracious fish. • Hg showed an elevated biomagnification power over the entire tropical food web. • Se biomagnified in lower and intermediate trophic positions. • Five trophic positions were found in relation to primary consumer as baseline. -- Abstract: Mercury (Hg), selenium (Se) and nitrogen (δ 15 N) stable isotope were assessed in a tropical food web of Rio de Janeiro’s north coast. Isotopic data on muscle suggest a difference related to this parameter along the food web; where top-predators (cetacean and voracious fish) displayed heavier δ 15 N over the entire food web. Both top-predators presented similar δ 15 N values. Cetacean displayed higher Hg and lower Se than voracious fish. Five trophic positions (TP) were found in relation to primary consumer as baseline, ranging from 2.0 to 4.0. Positive relationships were found between trace-element and δ 15 N. The slope of regression equations (0.11 for Se and 0.21 for Hg) and food web magnification factors (2.4 for Se and 5.4 for Hg) showed that Hg presented higher rate of increase over the food web. Simultaneous measurements of trace-elements and ecological tracers emphasize the importance of TP into the trophic structure and distribution of Hg and Se throughout the food web

  11. Plume rise from multiple sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    A simple enhancement factor for plume rise from multiple sources is proposed and tested against plume-rise observations. For bent-over buoyant plumes, this results in the recommendation that multiple-source rise be calculated as [(N + S)/(1 + S)]/sup 1/3/ times the single-source rise, Δh 1 , where N is the number of sources and S = 6 (total width of source configuration/N/sup 1/3/ Δh 1 )/sup 3/2/. For calm conditions a crude but simple method is suggested for predicting the height of plume merger and subsequent behavior which is based on the geometry and velocity variations of a single buoyant plume. Finally, it is suggested that large clusters of buoyant sources might occasionally give rise to concentrated vortices either within the source configuration or just downwind of it

  12. The importance of plume rise on the concentrations and atmospheric impacts of biomass burning aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Carolin; Freitas, Saulo R.; Kottmeier, Christoph; Kraut, Isabel; Rieger, Daniel; Vogel, Heike; Vogel, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    We quantified the effects of the plume rise of biomass burning aerosol and gases for the forest fires that occurred in Saskatchewan, Canada, in July 2010. For this purpose, simulations with different assumptions regarding the plume rise and the vertical distribution of the emissions were conducted. Based on comparisons with observations, applying a one-dimensional plume rise model to predict the injection layer in combination with a parametrization of the vertical distribution of the emissions outperforms approaches in which the plume heights are initially predefined. Approximately 30 % of the fires exceed the height of 2 km with a maximum height of 8.6 km. Using this plume rise model, comparisons with satellite images in the visible spectral range show a very good agreement between the simulated and observed spatial distributions of the biomass burning plume. The simulated aerosol optical depth (AOD) with data of an AERONET station is in good agreement with respect to the absolute values and the timing of the maximum. Comparison of the vertical distribution of the biomass burning aerosol with CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) retrievals also showed the best agreement when the plume rise model was applied. We found that downwelling surface short-wave radiation below the forest fire plume is reduced by up to 50 % and that the 2 m temperature is decreased by up to 6 K. In addition, we simulated a strong change in atmospheric stability within the biomass burning plume.

  13. Plume rise predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    Anyone involved with diffusion calculations becomes well aware of the strong dependence of maximum ground concentrations on the effective stack height, h/sub e/. For most conditions chi/sub max/ is approximately proportional to h/sub e/ -2 , as has been recognized at least since 1936 (Bosanquet and Pearson). Making allowance for the gradual decrease in the ratio of vertical to lateral diffusion at increasing heights, the exponent is slightly larger, say chi/sub max/ approximately h/sub e/ - 2 . 3 . In inversion breakup fumigation, the exponent is somewhat smaller; very crudely, chi/sub max/ approximately h/sub e/ -1 . 5 . In any case, for an elevated emission the dependence of chi/sub max/ on h/sub e/ is substantial. It is postulated that a really clever ignorant theoretician can disguise his ignorance with dimensionless constants. For most sources the effective stack height is considerably larger than the actual source height, h/sub s/. For instance, for power plants with no downwash problems, h/sub e/ is more than twice h/sub s/ whenever the wind is less than 10 m/sec, which is most of the time. This is unfortunate for anyone who has to predict ground concentrations, for he is likely to have to calculate the plume rise, Δh. Especially when using h/sub e/ = h/sub s/ + Δh instead of h/sub s/ may reduce chi/sub max/ by a factor of anywhere from 4 to infinity. Factors to be considered in making plume rise predictions are discussed

  14. Visibility Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildgaard, Lorna Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Research production, which earns universities money, is accredited publications in peer-reviewed journals and books. Increasing research productivity is one policy amongst many used by management to boost growth and income. It is time for a pat on the back, the growth of knowledge and visibility...... at RSLIS ranks us among the top 10 contributors to core LIS journals in a new international ranking. The management should be pleased....

  15. Reactor accident plume rise calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, A.J.

    1976-07-01

    The equations governing the rise of steam and radioactive contaminant laden plumes which might result from a nuclear reactor accident have been numerically solved. The equations are based on a simple ''top hat'' model of the plume. A parameter sensitivity study was performed in which the plume and atmospheric moisture content, the radioactive heating level, and the initial jet emission angle with respect to the wind were varied. The results are related to formula currently being used in consequence modeling and some changes are recommended

  16. Small rocket exhaust plume data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirivella, J. E.; Moynihan, P. I.; Simon, W.

    1972-01-01

    During recent cryodeposit tests with an 0.18-N thruster, the mass flux in the plume back field was measured for the first time for nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and a mixture of nitrogen, hydrogen, and ammonia at various inlet pressures. This mixture simulated gases that would be generated by a hydrazine plenum attitude propulsion system. The measurements furnish a base upon which to build a mathematical model of plume back flow that will be used in predicting the mass distribution in the boundary region of other plumes. The results are analyzed and compared with existing analytical predictions.

  17. SRS reactor stack plume marking tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petry, S.F.

    1992-03-01

    Tests performed in 105-K in 1987 and 1988 demonstrated that the stack plume can successfully be made visible (i.e., marked) by introducing smoke into the stack breech. The ultimate objective of these tests is to provide a means during an emergency evacuation so that an evacuee can readily identify the stack plume and evacuate in the opposite direction, thus minimizing the potential of severe radiation exposure. The EPA has also requested DOE to arrange for more tests to settle a technical question involving the correct calculation of stack downwash. New test canisters were received in 1988 designed to produce more smoke per unit time; however, these canisters have not been evaluated, because normal ventilation conditions have not been reestablished in K Area. Meanwhile, both the authorization and procedure to conduct the tests have expired. The tests can be performed during normal reactor operation. It is recommended that appropriate authorization and procedure approval be obtained to resume testing after K Area restart

  18. Thermal Plumes in Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Peter

    Axisymmeric circular buoyant jets are treated both theoretically and experimentally. From a literature study the author concludes that the state of experimental knowledge is less satisfactory. Further three different measuring methods have been established to investigate the thermal plumes from...

  19. Thermal plumes in ventilated rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Peter; Nielsen, Peter V.

    1990-01-01

    The design of a displacement ventilation system involves determination of the flow rate in the thermal plumes. The flow rate in the plumes and the vertical temperature gradient influence each other, and they are influenced by many factors. This paper shows some descriptions of these effects. Free...... into account and the temperature excess and the velocity distribution are calculated by use of an extrapolation method. In the case with a concentrated heat source (dia 50mm, 343W) and nearly uniform surroundings the model of a plume above a point heat source is verified. It represents a borderline case...... with the smallest entrainment factor and the smallest angle of spread. Due to the measuring method and data processing the velocity and temperature excess profiles are observed more narrowly than those reported by previous authors. In the case with an extensive heat source (dia 400mm, lOOW) the model of a plume...

  20. Biogeochemistry of landfill leachate plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Kjeldsen, Peter; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    2001-01-01

    is on dissolved organic matter, xenobiotic organic compounds, inorganic macrocomponents as anions and cations, and heavy metals. Laboratory as well as field investigations are included. This review is an up-date of an earlier comprehensive review. The review shows that most leachate contamination plumes...... are relatively narrow and do not in terms of width exceed the width of the landfill. The concept of redox zones being present in the plume has been confirmed by the reported composition of the leachate contaminated groundwater at several landfills and constitutes an important framework for understanding...... in a few cases. Apparently, observations in actual plumes indicate more extensive degradation than has been documented in the laboratory. The behavior of cations in leachate plumes is strongly influenced by exchange with the sediment, although the sediment often is very coarse and sandy. Ammonium seems...

  1. Novel plume deflection concept testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort will explore the feasibility and effectiveness of utilizing an electrically driven thermal shield for use as part of rocket plume deflectors. To...

  2. Estimation and Modeling of Enceladus Plume Jet Density Using Reaction Wheel Control Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Allan Y.; Wang, Eric K.; Pilinski, Emily B.; Macala, Glenn A.; Feldman, Antonette

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft was launched on October 15, 1997 by a Titan 4B launch vehicle. After an interplanetary cruise of almost seven years, it arrived at Saturn on June 30, 2004. In 2005, Cassini completed three flybys of Enceladus, a small, icy satellite of Saturn. Observations made during these flybys confirmed the existence of a water vapor plume in the south polar region of Enceladus. Five additional low-altitude flybys of Enceladus were successfully executed in 2008-9 to better characterize these watery plumes. The first of these flybys was the 50-km Enceladus-3 (E3) flyby executed on March 12, 2008. During the E3 flyby, the spacecraft attitude was controlled by a set of three reaction wheels. During the flyby, multiple plume jets imparted disturbance torque on the spacecraft resulting in small but visible attitude control errors. Using the known and unique transfer function between the disturbance torque and the attitude control error, the collected attitude control error telemetry could be used to estimate the disturbance torque. The effectiveness of this methodology is confirmed using the E3 telemetry data. Given good estimates of spacecraft's projected area, center of pressure location, and spacecraft velocity, the time history of the Enceladus plume density is reconstructed accordingly. The 1-sigma uncertainty of the estimated density is 7.7%. Next, we modeled the density due to each plume jet as a function of both the radial and angular distances of the spacecraft from the plume source. We also conjecture that the total plume density experienced by the spacecraft is the sum of the component plume densities. By comparing the time history of the reconstructed E3 plume density with that predicted by the plume model, values of the plume model parameters are determined. Results obtained are compared with those determined by other Cassini science instruments.

  3. Visibility graphs and landscape visibility analysis

    OpenAIRE

    O Sullivan, D.; Turner, A.

    2001-01-01

    Visibility analysis based on viewsheds is one of the most frequently used GIS analysis tools. In this paper we present an approach to visibility analysis based on the visibility graph. A visibility graph records the pattern of mutual visibility relations in a landscape, and provides a convenient way of storing and further analysing the results of multiple viewshed analyses for a particular landscape region. We describe how a visibility graph may be calculated for a landscape. We then give exa...

  4. Active Volcanic Plumes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This color image, acquired during Galileo's ninth orbit around Jupiter, shows two volcanic plumes on Io. One plume was captured on the bright limb or edge of the moon (see inset at upper right), erupting over a caldera (volcanic depression) named Pillan Patera after a South American god of thunder, fire and volcanoes. The plume seen by Galileo is 140 kilometers (86 miles) high and was also detected by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Galileo spacecraft will pass almost directly over Pillan Patera in 1999 at a range of only 600 kilometers (373 miles).The second plume, seen near the terminator (boundary between day and night), is called Prometheus after the Greek fire god (see inset at lower right). The shadow of the 75-kilometer (45- mile) high airborne plume can be seen extending to the right of the eruption vent. The vent is near the center of the bright and dark rings. Plumes on Io have a blue color, so the plume shadow is reddish. The Prometheus plume can be seen in every Galileo image with the appropriate geometry, as well as every such Voyager image acquired in 1979. It is possible that this plume has been continuously active for more than 18 years. In contrast, a plume has never been seen at Pillan Patera prior to the recent Galileo and Hubble Space Telescope images.North is toward the top of the picture. The resolution is about 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) per picture element. This composite uses images taken with the green, violet and near infrared filters of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The images were obtained on June 28, 1997, at a range of more than 600,000 kilometers (372,000 miles).The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http

  5. Channelization of plumes beneath ice shelves

    KAUST Repository

    Dallaston, M. C.

    2015-11-11

    © 2015 Cambridge University Press. We study a simplified model of ice-ocean interaction beneath a floating ice shelf, and investigate the possibility for channels to form in the ice shelf base due to spatial variations in conditions at the grounding line. The model combines an extensional thin-film description of viscous ice flow in the shelf, with melting at its base driven by a turbulent ocean plume. Small transverse perturbations to the one-dimensional steady state are considered, driven either by ice thickness or subglacial discharge variations across the grounding line. Either forcing leads to the growth of channels downstream, with melting driven by locally enhanced ocean velocities, and thus heat transfer. Narrow channels are smoothed out due to turbulent mixing in the ocean plume, leading to a preferred wavelength for channel growth. In the absence of perturbations at the grounding line, linear stability analysis suggests that the one-dimensional state is stable to initial perturbations, chiefly due to the background ice advection.

  6. Coastal river plumes: Collisions and coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, Jonathan; Farnsworth, Katherine L

    2017-01-01

    Plumes of buoyant river water spread in the ocean from river mouths, and these plumes influence water quality, sediment dispersal, primary productivity, and circulation along the world’s coasts. Most investigations of river plumes have focused on large rivers in a coastal region, for which the physical spreading of the plume is assumed to be independent from the influence of other buoyant plumes. Here we provide new understanding of the spreading patterns of multiple plumes interacting along simplified coastal settings by investigating: (i) the relative likelihood of plume-to-plume interactions at different settings using geophysical scaling, (ii) the diversity of plume frontal collision types and the effects of these collisions on spreading patterns of plume waters using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model, and (iii) the fundamental differences in plume spreading patterns between coasts with single and multiple rivers using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. Geophysical scaling suggests that coastal margins with numerous small rivers (watershed areas  100,000 km2). When two plume fronts meet, several types of collision attributes were found, including refection, subduction and occlusion. We found that the relative differences in pre-collision plume densities and thicknesses strongly influenced the resulting collision types. The three-dimensional spreading of buoyant plumes was found to be influenced by the presence of additional rivers for all modeled scenarios, including those with and without Coriolis and wind. Combined, these results suggest that plume-to-plume interactions are common phenomena for coastal regions offshore of the world’s smaller rivers and for coastal settings with multiple river mouths in close proximity, and that the spreading and fate of river waters in these settings will be strongly influenced by these interactions. We conclude that new investigations are needed to characterize how plumes interact offshore of river mouths to

  7. A sub-basin scale dust plume source frequency inventory for southern Africa, 2005-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, Kathryn J.; Eckardt, Frank D.; Bryant, Robert G.

    2013-10-01

    present a dust plume source inventory for southern Africa. In order to locate and track the local, short-lived plume events, source and frequency data have been derived from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) thermal infrared composite data (4 km data using 8.7, 10.8, and 12.0 µm) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) visible composite data (0.25 km data utilizing 0.620 - 0.670 µm, 0.545 - 0.565 µm, and 0.459 - 0.479 µm). Between January 2005 and December 2008, a total of 328 distinct daytime dust plumes more than 10 km in length were detected. These plumes were attributed to 101 distinct point sources, consisting largely of ephemeral inland lakes, coastal pans as well as dry river valleys in Namibia, Botswana, and South Africa. These data also provided sub-basin scale source observations for large basins such as Etosha and Makgadikgadi Pans.

  8. Lithosphere erosion atop mantle plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrusta, R.; Arcay, D.; Tommasi, A.

    2012-12-01

    Mantle plumes are traditionally proposed to play an important role in lithosphere erosion. Seismic images beneath Hawaii and Cape Verde show a lithosphere-asthenosphere-boundary (LAB) up to 50 km shallower than the surroundings. However, numerical models show that unless the plate is stationary the thermo-mechanical erosion of the lithosphere does not exceed 30 km. We use 2D petrological-thermo-mechanical numerical models based on a finite-difference method on a staggered grid and marker in cell method to study the role of partial melting on the plume-lithosphere interaction. A homogeneous peridotite composition with a Newtonian temperature- and pressure-dependent viscosity is used to simulate both the plate and the convective mantle. A constant velocity, ranging from 5 to 12.5 cm/yr, is imposed at the top of the plate. Plumes are created by imposing a thermal anomaly of 150 to 350 K on a 50 km wide domain at the base of the model (700 km depth); the plate right above the thermal anomaly is 40 Myr old. Partial melting is modeled using batch-melting solidus and liquidus in anhydrous conditions. We model the progressive depletion of peridotite and its effect on partial melting by assuming that the melting degree only strictly increases through time. Melt is accumulated until a porosity threshold is reached and the melt in excess is then extracted. The rheology of the partially molten peridotite is determined using viscous constitutive relationship based on a contiguity model, which enables to take into account the effects of grain-scale melt distribution. Above a threshold of 1%, melt is instantaneously extracted. The density varies as a function of partial melting degree and extraction. Besides, we analyze the kinematics of the plume as it impacts a moving plate, the dynamics of time-dependent small-scale convection (SSC) instabilities developing in the low-viscosity layer formed by spreading of hot plume material at the lithosphere base, and the resulting thermal

  9. Satellite and Ground Based Monitoring of Aerosol Plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, Martin; Dorling, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Plumes of atmospheric aerosol have been studied using a range of satellite and ground-based techniques. The Sea-viewing WideField-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) has been used to observe plumes of sulphate aerosol and Saharan dust around the coast of the United Kingdom. Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) was retrieved from SeaWiFS for two events; a plume of Saharan dust transported over the United Kingdom from Western Africa and a period of elevated sulphate experienced over the Easternregion of the UK. Patterns of AOT are discussed and related to the synoptic and mesoscale weather conditions. Further observation of the sulphate aerosol event was undertaken using the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer instrument(AVHRR). Atmospheric back trajectories and weather conditions were studied in order to identify the meteorological conditions which led to this event. Co-located ground-based measurements of PM 10 and PM 2.5 were obtained for 4sites within the UK and PM 2.5/10 ratios were calculated in order to identify any unusually high or low ratios(indicating the dominant size fraction within the plume)during either of these events. Calculated percentiles ofPM 2.5/10 ratios during the 2 events examined show that these events were notable within the record, but were in noway unique or unusual in the context of a 3 yr monitoring record. Visibility measurements for both episodes have been examined and show that visibility degradation occurred during both the sulphate aerosol and Saharan dust episodes

  10. Ship exhaust gas plume cooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleijpen, H.M.A.; Neele, P.P.

    2004-01-01

    The exhaust gas plume is an important and sometimes dominating contributor to the infrared signature of ships. Suppression of the infrared ship signatures has been studied by TNO for the Royal Netherlands Navy over considerable time. This study deals with the suppression effects, which can be

  11. Thermal Plumes in Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, P.; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The main objective of ventilation is to provide good air quality for the occupants. For this purpose the necessary ventilating air change rate must be determined. Within displacement ventilation the estimation is closely related to the air flow rate in the thermal plumes when an air quality based...

  12. Characterization of redox conditions in pollution plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwart, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Evalution of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...

  13. The importance of plume rise on the concentrations and atmospheric impacts of biomass burning aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Walter

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We quantified the effects of the plume rise of biomass burning aerosol and gases for the forest fires that occurred in Saskatchewan, Canada, in July 2010. For this purpose, simulations with different assumptions regarding the plume rise and the vertical distribution of the emissions were conducted. Based on comparisons with observations, applying a one-dimensional plume rise model to predict the injection layer in combination with a parametrization of the vertical distribution of the emissions outperforms approaches in which the plume heights are initially predefined. Approximately 30 % of the fires exceed the height of 2 km with a maximum height of 8.6 km. Using this plume rise model, comparisons with satellite images in the visible spectral range show a very good agreement between the simulated and observed spatial distributions of the biomass burning plume. The simulated aerosol optical depth (AOD with data of an AERONET station is in good agreement with respect to the absolute values and the timing of the maximum. Comparison of the vertical distribution of the biomass burning aerosol with CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation retrievals also showed the best agreement when the plume rise model was applied. We found that downwelling surface short-wave radiation below the forest fire plume is reduced by up to 50 % and that the 2 m temperature is decreased by up to 6 K. In addition, we simulated a strong change in atmospheric stability within the biomass burning plume.

  14. Mantle plumes and hotspot geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M. G.; Becker, T. W.; Konter, J.

    2017-12-01

    Ever improving global seismic models, together with expanding databases of mantle derived hotspot lavas, herald advances that relate the geochemistry of hotspots with low seismic shear-wave velocity conduits (plumes) in the mantle. Early efforts linked hotspot geochemistry with deep mantle large low velocity provinces (LLVPs) [1]. More recently, Konter and Becker (2012) [2] observed that the proportion of the C mantle component (inferred from Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes) in hotspot lavas shows an inverse relationship with seismic S-wave velocity anomalies in the shallow mantle (200 km) beneath each hotspot. They proposed that these correlations should also be made based on 3He/4He. Thus, we compare 3He/4He versus seismic S-wave velocity anomalies at 200 km depth. We find that plume-fed hotspots with the highest maximum 3He/4He (i.e., which host more of the C component) have higher hotspot buoyancy fluxes and overlie regions of lower seismic S-wave velocity (interpreted to relate to hotter mantle temperatures) at 200 km depth than hotspots that have only low 3He/4He [3]. This result complements recent work that shows an inverse relationship between maximum 3He/4He and seismic S-wave velocity anomalies in the mantle beneath the western USA [4]. The relationship between 3He/4He, shallow mantle seismic S-wave velocity anomalies, and buoyancy flux is most easily explained by a model where hotter plumes are more buoyant and entrain more of a deep, dense high 3He/4He reservoir than cooler plumes that underlie low 3He/4He hotspots. If the high 3He/4He domain is denser than other mantle components, it will be entrained only by the hottest, most buoyant plumes [3]. Such a deep, dense reservoir is ideally suited to preserving early-formed Hadean domains sampled in modern plume-fed hotspots. An important question is whether, like 3He/4He, seismic S-wave velocity anomalies in the mantle are associated with distinct heavy radiogenic isotopic compositions. C signatures are related to hot

  15. Teaching the Mantle Plumes Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulger, G. R.

    2010-12-01

    There is an ongoing debate regarding whether or not mantle plumes exist. This debate has highlighted a number of issues regarding how Earth science is currently practised, and how this feeds into approaches toward teaching students. The plume model is an hypothesis, not a proven fact. And yet many researchers assume a priori that plumes exist. This assumption feeds into teaching. That the plume model is unproven, and that many practising researchers are skeptical, may be at best only mentioned in passing to students, with most teachers assuming that plumes are proven to exist. There is typically little emphasis, in particular in undergraduate teaching, that the origin of melting anomalies is currently uncertain and that scientists do not know all the answers. Little encouragement is given to students to become involved in the debate and to consider the pros and cons for themselves. Typically teachers take the approach that “an answer” (or even “the answer”) must be taught to students. Such a pedagogic approach misses an excellent opportunity to allow students to participate in an important ongoing debate in Earth sciences. It also misses the opportunity to illustrate to students several critical aspects regarding correct application of the scientific method. The scientific method involves attempting to disprove hypotheses, not to prove them. A priori assumptions should be kept uppermost in mind and reconsidered at all stages. Multiple working hypotheses should be entertained. The predictions of a hypothesis should be tested, and unpredicted observations taken as weakening the original hypothesis. Hypotheses should not be endlessly adapted to fit unexpected observations. The difficulty with pedagogic treatment of the mantle plumes debate highlights a general uncertainty about how to teach issues in Earth science that are not yet resolved with certainty. It also represents a missed opportunity to let students experience how scientific theories evolve, warts

  16. Novel Precursor-Derived Meso-/Macroporous TiO2/SiOC Nanocomposites with Highly Stable Anatase Nanophase Providing Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity and Superior Adsorption of Organic Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eranezhuth Wasan Awin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Titania (TiO2 is considered to have immense potential as a photocatalyst, the anatase phase in particular. There have been numerous attempts to push the limits of its catalytic activity to higher wavelengths to harness the visible electromagnetic radiation. Most of the investigations till date have been restricted to fine-tuning the bandgap by doping, control of defect chemistry at the surface and several to first principle simulations either with limited success or success at the cost of complexities in processing. Here, we report a simple and elegant way of preparing ceramics through precursor chemistry which involves synthesis of macroporous and mesoporous nanocomposites with in situ formation of TiO2 nanocrystals into a robust and protecting SiOC matrix. The in situ nanoscaled TiO2 is anatase of size 9–10 nm, which is uniformly distributed in an amorphous SiOC matrix forming a new generation of nanocomposites that combine the robustness, structural stability and durability of the SiOC matrix while achieving nanoscaled TiO2 functionalities. The stabilization of the anatase phase even at temperature as high as 1200 °C was evident. With an average pore size of 6.8 nm, surface area of 129 m2/g (BET and pore volume of 0.22 cm3/g (BET, mesoporosity was achieved in the nanocomposites. The composites exhibited visible light photocatalytic activity, which is attributed to the Ti–O–C/TiC bonds resulting in the reduction of band gap by 0.2 to 0.9 eV. Furthermore, the heterojunction formed between the amorphous SiOC and crystalline TiO2 is also expected to minimize the recombination rate of electron-hole pair, making these novel nanocomposites based on TiO2 extremely active in visible wavelength regime.

  17. Schlieren image velocimetry measurements in a rocket engine exhaust plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Rudy; Peguero, Julio; Hargather, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Schlieren image velocimetry (SIV) measures velocity fields by tracking the motion of naturally-occurring turbulent flow features in a compressible flow. Here the technique is applied to measuring the exhaust velocity profile of a liquid rocket engine. The SIV measurements presented include discussion of visibility of structures, image pre-processing for structure visibility, and ability to process resulting images using commercial particle image velocimetry (PIV) codes. The small-scale liquid bipropellant rocket engine operates on nitrous oxide and ethanol as propellants. Predictions of the exhaust velocity are obtained through NASA CEA calculations and simple compressible flow relationships, which are compared against the measured SIV profiles. Analysis of shear layer turbulence along the exhaust plume edge is also presented.

  18. The Initial Development of Transient Volcanic Plumes as a Function of Source Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournigand, Pierre-Yves; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Gaudin, Damien; Peña Fernández, Juan José; Del Bello, Elisabetta; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Kueppers, Ulrich; Sesterhenn, Jörn; Yokoo, Akihiko

    2017-12-01

    Transient volcanic plumes, having similar eruption duration and rise timescales, characterize many unsteady Strombolian to Vulcanian eruptions. Despite being more common, such plumes are less studied than their steady state counterpart from stronger eruptions. Here we investigate the initial dynamics of transient volcanic plumes using high-speed (visible light and thermal) and high-resolution (visible light) videos from Strombolian to Vulcanian eruptions of Stromboli (Italy), Fuego (Guatemala), and Sakurajima (Japan) volcanoes. Physical parameterization of the plumes has been performed by defining their front velocity, velocity field, volume, and apparent surface temperature. We also characterized the ejection of the gas-pyroclast mixture at the vent, in terms of number, location, duration, and frequency of individual ejection pulses and of time-resolved mass eruption rate of the ejecta's ash fraction. Front velocity evolves along two distinct trends related to the initial gas-thrust phase and later buoyant phase. Plumes' velocity field, obtained via optical flow analysis, highlights different features, including initial jets and the formation and/or merging of ring vortexes at different scales. Plume volume increases over time following a power law trend common to all volcanoes and affected by discharge history at the vent. Time-resolved ash eruption rates range between 102 and 107 kg/s and may vary up to 2 orders of magnitude within the first seconds of eruption. Our results help detailing how the number, location, angle, duration, velocity, and time interval between ejection pulses at the vents crucially control the initial (first tens of second), and possibly later, evolution of transient volcanic plumes.

  19. Seismically imaging the Afar plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, J. O.; Kendall, J. M.; Bastow, I. D.; Stuart, G. W.; Keir, D.; Ayele, A.; Ogubazghi, G.; Ebinger, C. J.; Belachew, M.

    2011-12-01

    Plume related flood basalt volcanism in Ethiopia has long been cited to have instigated continental breakup in northeast Africa. However, to date seismic images of the mantle beneath the region have not produced conclusive evidence of a plume-like structure. As a result the nature and even existence of a plume in the region and its role in rift initiation and continental rupture are debated. Previous seismic studies using regional deployments of sensors in East-Africa show that low seismic velocities underlie northeast Africa, but their resolution is limited to the top 200-300km of the Earth. Thus, the connection between the low velocities in the uppermost mantle and those imaged in global studies in the lower mantle is unclear. We have combined new data from Afar, Ethiopia with 6 other regional experiments and global network stations across Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti and Yemen, to produce high-resolution models of upper mantle P- and S- wave velocities to the base of the transition zone. Relative travel time tomographic inversions show that the top 100km is dominated by focussed low velocity zones, likely associated with melt in the lithosphere/uppermost asthenosphere. Below these depths a broad SW-NE oriented sheet like upwelling extends down to the top of the transition zone. Within the transition zone two focussed sharp-sided low velocity regions exist: one beneath the Western Ethiopian plateau outside the rift valley, and the other beneath the Afar depression. The nature of the transition zone anomalies suggests that small upwellings may rise from a broader low velocity plume-like feature in the lower mantle. This interpretation is supported by numerical and analogue experiments that suggest the 660km phase change and viscosity jump may impede flow from the lower to upper mantle creating a thermal boundary layer at the base of the transition zone. This allows smaller, secondary upwellings to initiate and rise to the surface. Our images of secondary upwellings

  20. Mantle plumes on Venus revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.

    1992-01-01

    The Equatorial Highlands of Venus consist of a series of quasicircular regions of high topography, rising up to about 5 km above the mean planetary radius. These highlands are strongly correlated with positive geoid anomalies, with a peak amplitude of 120 m at Atla Regio. Shield volcanism is observed at Beta, Eistla, Bell, and Atla Regiones and in the Hathor Mons-Innini Mons-Ushas Mons region of the southern hemisphere. Volcanos have also been mapped in Phoebe Regio and flood volcanism is observed in Ovda and Thetis Regiones. Extensional tectonism is also observed in Ovda and Thetis Regiones. Extensional tectonism is also observed in many of these regions. It is now widely accepted that at least Beta, Atla, Eistla, and Bell Regiones are the surface expressions of hot, rising mantel plumes. Upwelling plumes are consistent with both the volcanism and the extensional tectonism observed in these regions. The geoid anomalies and topography of these four regions show considerable variation. Peak geoid anomalies exceed 90 m at Beta and Atla, but are only 40 m at Eistla and 24 m at Bell. Similarly, the peak topography is greater at Beta and Atla than at Eistla and Bell. Such a range of values is not surprising because terrestrial hotspot swells also have a side range of geoid anomalies and topographic uplifts. Kiefer and Hager used cylindrical axisymmetric, steady-state convection calculations to show that mantle plumes can quantitatively account for both the amplitude and the shape of the long-wavelength geoid and topography at Beta and Atla. In these models, most of the topography of these highlands is due to uplift by the vertical normal stress associated with the rising plume. Additional topography may also be present due to crustal thickening by volcanism and crustal thinning by rifting. Smrekar and Phillips have also considered the geoid and topography of plumes on Venus, but they restricted themselves to considering only the geoid-topography ratio and did not

  1. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  2. Bifurcation of volcanic plumes in a crosswind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Gerald G. J.; Davis, John P.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.

    1994-08-01

    Bent-over buoyant jets distorted by a crosscurrent develop a vortex pair structure and can bifurcate to produce two distinct lobes which diverge from one another downwind. The region downwind of the source between the lobes has relatively low proportions of discharged fluid. Factors invoked by previous workers to cause or enhance bifurcation include buoyancy, release of latent heat at the plume edge by evaporating water droplets, geometry and orientation of the source, and the encounter with a density interface on the rising path of the plume. We suggest that the pressure distribution around the vortex pair of a rising plume may initially trigger bifurcation. We also report new experimental observations confirming that bifurcation becomes stronger for stronger bent-over plumes, identifying that bifurcation can also occur for straight-edged plumes but gradually disappears for stronger plumes which form a gravity current at their final level and spread for a significant distance against the current. Observations from satellites and the ground are reviewed and confirm that volcanic plumes can show bifurcation and a large range of bifurcation angles. Many of the bifurcating plumes spread out at the tropopause level and suggest the tropopause may act on the plumes as a density interface enhancing bifurcation. Even for quite moderate bifurcation angles, the two plume lobes become rapidly separated downwind by distances of tens of kilometers. Such bifurcating plumes drifting apart can only result in bilobate tephra fall deposits. The tephra fall deposit from the 16 km elevation, SE spreading, bifurcating volcanic plume erupted on 15 May 1981 from Mt Pagan was sampled by previous workers and clearly displayed bilobate characteristics. Examples of bilobate tephra fall deposits are reviewed and their origin briefly discussed. Bilobate deposits are common and may result from many causes. Plume bifurcation should be considered one of the possible mechanisms which can account

  3. Analysis of surgical smoke produced by various energy-based instruments and effect on laparoscopic visibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weld, Kyle J; Dryer, Stephen; Ames, Caroline D; Cho, Kuk; Hogan, Chris; Lee, Myonghwa; Biswas, Pratim; Landman, Jaime

    2007-03-01

    We analyzed the smoke plume produced by various energy-based laparoscopic instruments and determined its effect on laparoscopic visibility. The Bipolar Macroforceps, Harmonic Scalpel, Floating Ball, and Monopolar Shears were applied in vitro to porcine psoas muscle. An Aerodynamic Particle Sizer and Electrostatic Classifier provided a size distribution of the plume for particles >500 nm and Visibility was calculated using the measured-size distribution data and the Rayleigh and Mie light-scattering theories. The real-time instruments were successful in measuring aerosolized particle size distributions in two size ranges. Electron microscopy revealed smaller, homogeneous, spherical particles and larger, irregular particles consistent with cellular components. The aerosol produced by the Bipolar Macroforceps obscured visibility the least (relative visibility 0.887) among the instruments tested. Particles from the Harmonic Scalpel resulted in a relative visibility of 0.801. Monopolar-based instruments produced plumes responsible for the poorest relative visibility (Floating Ball 0.252; Monopolar Shears 0.026). Surgical smoke is composed of two distinct particle populations caused by the nucleation of vapors as they cool (the small particles) and the entrainment of tissue secondary to mechanical aspects (the large particles). High concentrations of small particles are most responsible for the deterioration in laparoscopic vision. Bipolar and ultrasonic instruments generate a surgical plume that causes the least deterioration of visibility among the instruments tested.

  4. Meteorology of Jupiter's Equatorial Hot Spots and Plumes from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, David Sanghun; Showman, Adam P.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.

    2013-01-01

    We present an updated analysis of Jupiter's equatorial meteorology from Cassini observations. For two months preceding the spacecraft's closest approach, the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) onboard regularly imaged the atmosphere. We created time-lapse movies from this period in order to analyze the dynamics of equatorial hot spots and their interactions with adjacent latitudes. Hot spots are relatively cloud-free regions that emit strongly at 5 lm; improved knowledge of these features is crucial for fully understanding Galileo probe measurements taken during its descent through one. Hot spots are quasistable, rectangular dark areas on visible-wavelength images, with defined eastern edges that sharply contrast with surrounding clouds, but diffuse western edges serving as nebulous boundaries with adjacent equatorial plumes. Hot spots exhibit significant variations in size and shape over timescales of days and weeks. Some of these changes correspond with passing vortex systems from adjacent latitudes interacting with hot spots. Strong anticyclonic gyres present to the south and southeast of the dark areas appear to circulate into hot spots. Impressive, bright white plumes occupy spaces in between hot spots. Compact cirrus-like 'scooter' clouds flow rapidly through the plumes before disappearing within the dark areas. These clouds travel at 150-200 m/s, much faster than the 100 m/s hot spot and plume drift speed. This raises the possibility that the scooter clouds may be more illustrative of the actual jet stream speed at these latitudes. Most previously published zonal wind profiles represent the drift speed of the hot spots at their latitude from pattern matching of the entire longitudinal image strip. If a downward branch of an equatorially-trapped Rossby wave controls the overall appearance of hot spots, however, the westward phase velocity of the wave leads to underestimates of the true jet stream speed.

  5. Particle Simulation of Pulsed Plasma Thruster Plumes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boyd, Ian

    2002-01-01

    .... Our modeling had made progress in al aspects of simulating these complex devices including Teflon ablation, plasma formation, electro-magnetic acceleration, plume expansion, and particulate transport...

  6. Propagation of light through ship exhaust plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Iersel, M.; Mack, A.; van Eijk, A. M. J.; Schleijpen, H. M. A.

    2014-10-01

    Looking through the atmosphere, it is sometimes difficult to see the details of an object. Effects like scintillation and blur are the cause of these difficulties. Exhaust plumes of e.g. a ship can cause extreme scintillation and blur, making it even harder to see the details of what lies behind the plume. Exhaust plumes come in different shapes, sizes, and opaqueness and depending on atmospheric parameters like wind speed and direction, as well as engine settings (power, gas or diesel, etc.). A CFD model is used to determine the plume's flow field outside the stack on the basis of exhaust flow properties, the interaction with the superstructure of the ship, the meteorological conditions and the interaction of ship's motion and atmospheric wind fields. A modified version of the NIRATAM code performs the gas radiation calculations and provides the radiant intensity of the (hot) exhaust gases and the transmission of the atmosphere around the plume is modeled with MODTRAN. This allows assessing the irradiance of a sensor positioned at some distance from the ship and its plume, as function of the conditions that influence the spatial distribution and thermal properties of the plume. Furthermore, an assessment can be made of the probability of detecting objects behind the plume. This plume module will be incorporated in the TNO EOSTAR-model, which provides estimates of detection range and image quality of EO-sensors under varying meteorological conditions.

  7. Lidar measurements of plume statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Mikkelsen, T.

    1993-01-01

    of measured crosswind concentration profiles, the following statistics were obtained: 1) Mean profile, 2) Root mean square profile, 3) Fluctuation intensities,and 4)Intermittency factors. Furthermore, some experimentally determined probability density functions (pdf's) of the fluctuations are presented. All...... the measured statistics are referred to a fixed and a 'moving' frame of reference, the latter being defined as a frame of reference from which the (low frequency) plume meander is removed. Finally, the measured statistics are compared with statistics on concentration fluctuations obtained with a simple puff...

  8. Plume spread and atmospheric stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, R.O. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The horizontal spread of a plume in atmospheric dispersion can be described by the standard deviation of horizontal direction. The widely used Pasquill-Gifford classes of atmospheric stability have assigned typical values of the standard deviation of horizontal wind direction and of the lapse rate. A measured lapse rate can thus be used to estimate the standard deviation of wind direction. It is examined by means of a large dataset of fast wind measurements how good these estimates are. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  9. Simulation of plume rise: Study the effect of stably stratified turbulence layer on the rise of a buoyant plume from a continuous source by observing the plume centroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhimireddy, Sudheer Reddy; Bhaganagar, Kiran

    2016-11-01

    Buoyant plumes are common in atmosphere when there exists a difference in temperature or density between the source and its ambience. In a stratified environment, plume rise happens until the buoyancy variation exists between the plume and ambience. In a calm no wind ambience, this plume rise is purely vertical and the entrainment happens because of the relative motion of the plume with ambience and also ambient turbulence. In this study, a plume centroid is defined as the plume mass center and is calculated from the kinematic equation which relates the rate of change of centroids position to the plume rise velocity. Parameters needed to describe the plume are considered as the plume radius, plumes vertical velocity and local buoyancy of the plume. The plume rise velocity is calculated by the mass, momentum and heat conservation equations in their differential form. Our study focuses on the entrainment velocity, as it depicts the extent of plume growth. This entrainment velocity is made up as sum of fractions of plume's relative velocity and ambient turbulence. From the results, we studied the effect of turbulence on the plume growth by observing the variation in the plume radius at different heights and the centroid height reached before loosing its buoyancy.

  10. Hierarchical Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@MoS{sub 2}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} magnetic nanocomposites: Enhanced and stable photocatalytic performance for water purification under visible light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Na [Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Environment, Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130102 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Li, Haiyan; Xu, Xingjian [Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Environment, Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130102 (China); Yu, Hongwen, E-mail: yuhw@neigae.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Environment, Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130102 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • The FM/A-6% possesses a large specific surface area: 76.56 m{sup 2}/g. • The FM/A-6% displays high photocatalytic stability. • The FM/A-6% can be collected easily from the water by magnetic field. - Abstract: Novel hierarchical Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@MoS{sub 2}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} magnetic nanophotocatalyst with remarkable photocatalytic capability were prepared by simply depositing the Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} onto the surface of crumpled Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@MoS{sub 2} nanosphere. The nanocomposites were characterized by XRD, TEM, HRTEM, XPS, BET, and UV–vis DRS. The outcome of the photocatalytic experiments demonstrated that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@MoS{sub 2}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with 6 wt% content of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} (FM/A-6%) showed the highest photocatalytic activity upon the degradation Congo red (CR) and Rhodamine B (RhB) under both visible light and simulated sunlight irradiation. In addition, FM/A-6% possessed larger specific surface area (76.56 m{sup 2}/g) and excellent optical property. The possible Z-scheme charge carriers transfer mechanism for the enhanced photocatalytic properties of the FM/A-6% was also discussed. The Z-scheme charge carriers transfer mechanism established between MoS{sub 2} and Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} facilitate the charge separation efficiency. Moreover, FM/A-6% can be separated and collected easily by external magnetic field and maintain high activity after five times photoreaction cycles. Given the remarkable photocatalytic performance and high stability of FM/A-6% nanocomposite, it is looking forward to exhibit great potential for applications in water purification.

  11. Skylon Aerodynamics and SABRE Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Unmeel; Afosmis, Michael; Bowles, Jeffrey; Pandya, Shishir

    2015-01-01

    An independent partial assessment is provided of the technical viability of the Skylon aerospace plane concept, developed by Reaction Engines Limited (REL). The objectives are to verify REL's engineering estimates of airframe aerodynamics during powered flight and to assess the impact of Synergetic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) plumes on the aft fuselage. Pressure lift and drag coefficients derived from simulations conducted with Euler equations for unpowered flight compare very well with those REL computed with engineering methods. The REL coefficients for powered flight are increasingly less acceptable as the freestream Mach number is increased beyond 8.5, because the engineering estimates did not account for the increasing favorable (in terms of drag and lift coefficients) effect of underexpanded rocket engine plumes on the aft fuselage. At Mach numbers greater than 8.5, the thermal environment around the aft fuselage is a known unknown-a potential design and/or performance risk issue. The adverse effects of shock waves on the aft fuselage and plumeinduced flow separation are other potential risks. The development of an operational reusable launcher from the Skylon concept necessitates the judicious use of a combination of engineering methods, advanced methods based on required physics or analytical fidelity, test data, and independent assessments.

  12. Visibly Pushdown Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srba, Jiri

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of (bi)simulation-like preorder/equivalence checking on the class of visibly pushdown automata and its natural subclasses visibly BPA (Basic Process Algebra) and visibly one-counter automata. We describe generic methods for proving complexity upper and lower bounds...... for a number of studied preorders and equivalences like simulation, completed simulation, ready simulation, 2-nested simulation preorders/equivalences and bisimulation equivalence. Our main results are that all the mentioned equivalences and preorders are EXPTIME-complete on visibly pushdown automata, PSPACE......-complete on visibly one-counter automata and P-complete on visibly BPA. Our PSPACE lower bound for visibly one-counter automata improves also the previously known DP-hardness results for ordinary one-counter automata and one-counter nets. Finally, we study regularity checking problems for visibly pushdown automata...

  13. In situ controllable synthesis of novel surface plasmon resonance-enhanced Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Ag/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} composite for enhanced and stable visible light photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Jiali [College of Physics and Electronic Information, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000 (China); Dai, Kai, E-mail: daikai940@chnu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronic Information, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000 (China); Zhang, Jinfeng [College of Physics and Electronic Information, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000 (China); Lu, Luhua, E-mail: lhlu@cug.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center of Nano-Geomaterials of Ministry of Education, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Liang, Changhao, E-mail: chliang@issp.ac.cn [College of Physics and Electronic Information, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Physics and Anhui Key Laboratory of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 23003 (China); Geng, Lei; Wang, Zhongliao; Yuan, Guangyu; Zhu, Guangping [College of Physics and Electronic Information, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000 (China)

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Ag/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} ternary photocatalyst was prepared. • Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Ag/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} showed enhanced catalytic activity. • Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Ag/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} showed long reusable life. - Abstract: A novel hierarchical Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Ag/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} ternary visible-light-driven photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by in situ doping Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4} with Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} nanosheets through a facile hydrothermal and photochemical process. The morphology, structure, optical performance and crystallinity of the products were measured by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Ag was uniformly dispersed on the surface of Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} nanosheets. The photocatalytic performance of Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Ag/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} heterostructures was evaluated by the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under 410 nm LED arrays. The ternary Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Ag/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} nanocomposite exhibits higher photocatalytic activity than Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} and Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}. The synergistic effect of Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4} and Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} could generated more heterojunctions which promoted photoelectrons transfer from Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4} to Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}, leading to the improvement of photocatalytic performance by photoelectrons-holes recombination suppression. At the same time, the surface plasmon resonance of Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Ag/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} is another crucial reason for the high photocatalytic performance of organic pollutants degradation. And the 20 wt% Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}-loaded Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} shows the optimal photocatalytic performance in the degradation of MB. In addition, the ternary composites can be easily reclaimed by precipitation and exhibits high stability of photocatalytic

  14. The Alberta smoke plume observation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kerry; Pankratz, Al; Mooney, Curtis; Fleetham, Kelly

    2018-02-01

    A field project was conducted to observe and measure smoke plumes from wildland fires in Alberta. This study used handheld inclinometer measurements and photos taken at lookout towers in the province. Observations of 222 plumes were collected from 21 lookout towers over a 6-year period from 2010 to 2015. Observers reported the equilibrium and maximum plume heights based on the plumes' final levelling heights and the maximum lofting heights, respectively. Observations were tabulated at the end of each year and matched to reported fires. Fire sizes at assessment times and forest fuel types were reported by the province. Fire weather conditions were obtained from the Canadian Wildland Fire Information System (CWFIS). Assessed fire sizes were adjusted to the appropriate size at plume observation time using elliptical fire-growth projections. Though a logical method to collect plume observations in principle, many unanticipated issues were uncovered as the project developed. Instrument limitations and environmental conditions presented challenges to the investigators, whereas human error and the subjectivity of observations affected data quality. Despite these problems, the data set showed that responses to fire behaviour conditions were consistent with the physical processes leading to plume rise. The Alberta smoke plume observation study data can be found on the Canadian Wildland Fire Information System datamart (Natural Resources Canada, 2018) at datamart" target="_blank">http://cwfis.cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/datamart.

  15. The Alberta smoke plume observation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Anderson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A field project was conducted to observe and measure smoke plumes from wildland fires in Alberta. This study used handheld inclinometer measurements and photos taken at lookout towers in the province. Observations of 222 plumes were collected from 21 lookout towers over a 6-year period from 2010 to 2015. Observers reported the equilibrium and maximum plume heights based on the plumes' final levelling heights and the maximum lofting heights, respectively. Observations were tabulated at the end of each year and matched to reported fires. Fire sizes at assessment times and forest fuel types were reported by the province. Fire weather conditions were obtained from the Canadian Wildland Fire Information System (CWFIS. Assessed fire sizes were adjusted to the appropriate size at plume observation time using elliptical fire-growth projections. Though a logical method to collect plume observations in principle, many unanticipated issues were uncovered as the project developed. Instrument limitations and environmental conditions presented challenges to the investigators, whereas human error and the subjectivity of observations affected data quality. Despite these problems, the data set showed that responses to fire behaviour conditions were consistent with the physical processes leading to plume rise. The Alberta smoke plume observation study data can be found on the Canadian Wildland Fire Information System datamart (Natural Resources Canada, 2018 at http://cwfis.cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/datamart.

  16. Ablation plume dynamics in a background gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, Salvatore; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, James G.

    2010-01-01

    the expansion. The model also leads to an insightful treatment of the stopping behavior in dimensionless units for plumes and background gases of different atomic/molecular masses. The energetics of the plume dynamics can also be treated with this model. Experimental time-of-flight data of silver ions in a neon...

  17. Infrared Sensing of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole; Larsen, Torben

    1988-01-01

    This paper is concerned with laboratory experiments on buoyant surface plumes where heat is the source of buoyancy. Temperature distributions were measured at the water surface using infra-red sensing, and inside the waterbody a computer based measurement system was applied. The plume is described...

  18. The Visibility Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pocchiola, Michel; Vegter, Gert

    1993-01-01

    We introduce the visibility complex of a collection O of n pairwise disjoint convex objects in the plane. This 2–dimensional cell complex may be considered as a generalization of the tangent visibility graph of O. Its space complexity k is proportional to the size of the tangent visibility graph. We

  19. Mount Everest snow plume: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, G. W. K.

    2004-11-01

    A plume of snow blowing from the summit of Mount Everest is one of the most iconic images of the world's highest mountain. Its presence provides evidence of the strong jet stream winds that can buffet the mountain. In January 2004, astronauts onboard the International Space Station (ISS) observed a 15 to 20 km long snow plume emanating from the summit of Mount Everest. Remarkably little is known about these plumes and the role that they play in the redistribution of snow in the high Himalaya. In this paper we use a variety of meteorological datasets to show that the observed plume was the combination of high winds associated with the East Asian Jet Stream (EAJS) and a heavy snowfall that had occurred over the Himalaya during the preceding week. A simple model of a blown snow plume is shown to be consistent with the observations made from the ISS.

  20. Spectroscopic, imaging, and probe diagnostics of laser plasma plumes expanding between confining surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeates, P.; Kennedy, E. T.

    2010-01-01

    Laser plasma plumes were generated in aluminum rectangular cavities of fixed depth (6 mm) and varying height (2.0, 1.5, and 1.0 mm). Space and time resolved visible emission spectroscopy, gated intensified visible imaging, and Langmuir probe diagnostics were utilized to diagnose the evolution of the confined plasma plumes in comparison to freely expanding plasma plume generated from ablation of a planar target. The constrained plasma behavior displayed a multiphase history. Early stage interactions (t 160 ns) resulted in sustained 'decay', i.e., a rapid termination of continuum emission, in concert with decreases in peak electron density (N e ) and plasma temperature (T). This later phase originates from loss mechanisms which bleed the plasma plume of thermal energy and charged particles. These loss mechanisms increase in magnitude as the duration of the plasma-surface interaction increases. The transition from enhancement phase, originating from hydrodynamic containment, and plasma-surface collisions, to decay phase is described and occurs for each cavity at a different point in the space time history.

  1. Galileo observations of volcanic plumes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, P.E.; McMillan, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Io's volcanic plumes erupt in a dazzling variety of sizes, shapes, colors and opacities. In general, the plumes fall into two classes, representing distinct source gas temperatures. Most of the Galileo imaging observations were of the smaller, more numerous Prometheus-type plumes that are produced when hot flows of silicate lava impinge on volatile surface ices of SO2. Few detections were made of the giant, Pele-type plumes that vent high temperature, sulfur-rich gases from the interior of Io; this was partly because of the insensitivity of Galileo's camera to ultraviolet wavelengths. Both gas and dust spout from plumes of each class. Favorably located gas plumes were detected during eclipse, when Io was in Jupiter's shadow. Dense dust columns were imaged in daylight above several Prometheus-type eruptions, reaching heights typically less than 100 km. Comparisons between eclipse observations, sunlit images, and the record of surface changes show that these optically thick dust columns are much smaller in stature than the corresponding gas plumes but are adequate to produce the observed surface deposits. Mie scattering calculations suggest that these conspicuous dust plumes are made up of coarse grained “ash” particles with radii on the order of 100 nm, and total masses on the order of 106 kg per plume. Long exposure images of Thor in sunlight show a faint outer envelope apparently populated by particles small enough to be carried along with the gas flow, perhaps formed by condensation of sulfurous “snowflakes” as suggested by the plasma instrumentation aboard Galileo as it flew through Thor's plume [Frank, L.A., Paterson, W.R., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. (Space Phys.) 107, doi:10.1029/2002JA009240. 31-1]. If so, the total mass of these fine, nearly invisible particles may be comparable to the mass of the gas, and could account for much of Io's rapid resurfacing.

  2. Atmospheric dispersion of argon-41 from anuclear research reactor: measurement and modeling of plume geometry and gamma radiation field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Bent; Astrup, Poul; Drews, Martin

    2003-01-01

    An atmospheric dispersion experiment was conducted using a visible tracer along with the routine release of argon-41 from the BR1 research reactor in Mol, Belgium. Simultaneous measurements of plume geometry and radiation fields for argon-41 decay were performed as well as measurements of the argon...

  3. Ablation plume dynamics in a background gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, Salvatore; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, James G.

    2010-01-01

    the expansion. The model also leads to an insightful treatment of the stopping behavior in dimensionless units for plumes and background gases of different atomic/molecular masses. The energetics of the plume dynamics can also be treated with this model. Experimental time-of-flight data of silver ions in a neon......The expansion of a plume in a background gas of pressure comparable to that used in pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been analyzed in terms of the model of Predtechensky and Mayorov (PM). This approach gives a relatively clear and simple description of the essential hydrodynamics during...

  4. Mapping Pollution Plumes in Areas Impacted by Hurricane Katrina With Imaging Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swayze, G. A.; Furlong, E. T.; Livo, K. E.

    2007-12-01

    New Orleans endured flooding on a massive scale subsequent to Hurricane Katrina in August of 2005. Contaminant plumes were noticeable in satellite images of the city in the days following flooding. Many of these plumes were caused by oil, gasoline, and diesel that leaked from inundated vehicles, gas stations, and refineries. News reports also suggested that the flood waters were contaminated with sewage from breached pipes. Effluent plumes such as these pose a potential health hazard to humans and wildlife in the aftermath of hurricanes and potentially from other catastrophic events (e.g., earthquakes, shipping accidents, chemical spills, and terrorist attacks). While the extent of effluent plumes can be gauged with synthetic aperture radar and broad- band visible-infrared images (Rykhus, 2005) (e.g., Radarsat and Landsat ETM+) the composition of the plumes could not be determined. These instruments lack the spectral resolution necessary to do chemical identification. Imaging spectroscopy may help solve this problem. Over 60 flight lines of NASA Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data were collected over New Orleans, the Mississippi Delta, and the Gulf Coast from one to two weeks after Katrina while the contaminated water was being pumped out of flooded areas. These data provide a unique opportunity to test if imaging spectrometer data can be used to identify the chemistry of these flood-related plumes. Many chemicals have unique spectral signatures in the ultraviolet to near-infrared range (0.2 - 2.5 microns) that can be used as fingerprints for their identification. We are particularly interested in detecting thin films of oil, gasoline, diesel, and raw sewage suspended on or in water. If these materials can be successfully differentiated in the lab then we will use spectral-shape matching algorithms to look for their spectral signatures in the AVIRIS data collected over New Orleans and other areas impacted by Katrina. If imaging spectroscopy

  5. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets, with a few more additions - with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers - exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the foree of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc. (orig.)

  6. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc

  7. Sensitivity of air quality simulation to smoke plume rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongqiang Liu; Gary Achtemeier; Scott Goodrick

    2008-01-01

    Plume rise is the height smoke plumes can reach. This information is needed by air quality models such as the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to simulate physical and chemical processes of point-source fire emissions. This study seeks to understand the importance of plume rise to CMAQ air quality simulation of prescribed burning to plume rise. CMAQ...

  8. Plume Diagnostics for Combustion Stability Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sierra Engineering Inc. and Purdue University propose to develop a non-intrusive plume instrument capable of detecting and diagnosing combustion instability. This...

  9. Near-glacier surveying of a subglacial discharge plume: Implications for plume parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R. H.; Shroyer, E. L.; Nash, J. D.; Sutherland, D. A.; Carroll, D.; Fried, M. J.; Catania, G. A.; Bartholomaus, T. C.; Stearns, L. A.

    2017-07-01

    At tidewater glaciers, plume dynamics affect submarine melting, fjord circulation, and the mixing of meltwater. Models often rely on buoyant plume theory to parameterize plumes and submarine melting; however, these parameterizations are largely untested due to a dearth of near-glacier measurements. Here we present a high-resolution ocean survey by ship and remotely operated boat near the terminus of Kangerlussuup Sermia in west Greenland. These novel observations reveal the 3-D structure and transport of a near-surface plume, originating at a large undercut conduit in the glacier terminus, that is inconsistent with axisymmetric plume theory, the most common representation of plumes in ocean-glacier models. Instead, the observations suggest a wider upwelling plume—a "truncated" line plume of ˜200 m width—with higher entrainment and plume-driven melt compared to the typical axisymmetric representation. Our results highlight the importance of a subglacial outlet's geometry in controlling plume dynamics, with implications for parameterizing the exchange flow and submarine melt in glacial fjord models.

  10. Fire analog: a comparison between fire plumes and energy center cooling tower plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orgill, M.M.

    1977-10-01

    Thermal plumes or convection columns associated with large fires are compared to thermal plumes from cooling towers and proposed energy centers to evaluate the fire analog concept. Energy release rates of mass fires are generally larger than for single or small groups of cooling towers but are comparable to proposed large energy centers. However, significant physical differences exist between cooling tower plumes and fire plumes. Cooling tower plumes are generally dominated by ambient wind, stability and turbulence conditions. Fire plumes, depending on burning rates and other factors, can transform into convective columns which may cause the fire behavior to become more violent. This transformation can cause strong inflow winds and updrafts, turbulence and concentrated vortices. Intense convective columns may interact with ambient winds to create significant downwind effects such as wakes and Karman vortex streets. These characteristics have not been observed with cooling tower plumes to date. The differences in physical characteristics between cooling tower and fire plumes makes the fire analog concept very questionable even though the approximate energy requirements appear to be satisfied in case of large energy centers. Additional research is suggested in studying the upper-level plume characteristics of small experimental fires so this information can be correlated with similar data from cooling towers. Numerical simulation of fires and proposed multiple cooling tower systems could also provide comparative data.

  11. Cretaceous Arctic magmatism: Slab vs. plume? Or slab and plume?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, E. S.; Miller, E. L.; Andronikov, A. V.; Brumley, K.; Mayer, L. A.; Mukasa, S. B.

    2010-12-01

    Tectonic models for the Cretaceous paleogeographic evolution of the Arctic Ocean and its adjacent landmasses propose that rifting in the Amerasia Basin (AB) began in Jura-Cretaceous time, accompanied by the development of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP). During the same timespan, deformation and slab-related magmatism, followed by intra-arc rifting, took place along the Pacific side of what was to become the Arctic Ocean. A compilation and comparison of the ages, characteristics and space-time variation of circum-Arctic magmatism allows for a better understanding of the role of Pacific margin versus Arctic-Atlantic plate tectonics and the role of plume-related magmatism in the origin of the Arctic Ocean. In Jura-Cretaceous time, an arc built upon older terranes overthrust the Arctic continental margins of North America and Eurasia, shedding debris into foreland basins in the Brooks Range, Alaska, across Chukotka, Russia, to the Lena Delta and New Siberian Islands region of the Russian Arctic. These syn-tectonic sediments have some common sources (e.g., ~250-300 Ma magmatic rocks) as determined by U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology. They are as young as Valanginian-Berriasian (~136 Ma, Gradstein et al., 2004) and place a lower limit on the age of formation of the AB. Subsequent intrusions of granitoid plutons, inferred to be ultimately slab-retreat related, form a belt along the far eastern Russian Arctic continental margin onto Seward Peninsula and have yielded a continuous succession of zircon U-Pb ages from ~137-95 Ma (n=28) and a younger suite ~91-82 Ma (n=16). All plutons dated were intruded in an extensional tectonic setting based on their relations to wall-rock deformation. Regional distribution of ages shows a southward migration of the locus of magmatism during Cretaceous time. Basaltic lavas as old as 130 Ma and as young as 80 Ma (40Ar/39Ar)) erupted across the Canadian Arctic Islands, Svalbard and Franz Josef Land and are associated with

  12. Hyperspectral chemical plume quantification via background radiance estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Sidi; Golowich, Steven E.; Ingle, Vinay K.; Manolakis, Dimitris G.

    2013-05-01

    Existing chemical plume quantification algorithms assume that the off-plume radiance of a pixel containing the plume signal is unobservable. When the problem is limited to a single gas, the off-plume radiance may be estimated from the bands in which the gas absorption is nearly zero. It is then possible to compute the difference between the on- and off-plume radiances and solve for the plume strength from Beer's Law. The major advantage of this proposed method is that the gas strength can be resolved from the radiance difference so that the estimation error remains small for thick plumes.

  13. A modeling of buoyant gas plume migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, D.; Patzek, T.; Benson, S.M.

    2008-12-01

    This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. Ideally, the injected greenhouse gas stays in the injection zone for a geologic time, eventually dissolves in the formation brine and remains trapped by mineralization. However, one of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is that naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leakage from primary storage. Even in a supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the formation brine. Buoyancy tends to drive the leaked CO{sub 2} plume upward. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution and migration, are critical for developing technology, monitoring policy, and regulations for safe carbon dioxide geologic sequestration. In this study, we obtain simple estimates of vertical plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. We describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases by a Buckley-Leverett type model. The model predicts that a plume of supercritical carbon dioxide in a homogeneous water-saturated porous medium does not migrate upward like a bubble in bulk water. Rather, it spreads upward until it reaches a seal or until it becomes immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration (Silin et al., 2007). In a layered reservoir, the simplified solution predicts a slower plume front propagation relative to a homogeneous formation with the same harmonic mean permeability. In contrast, the model yields much higher

  14. Effects of plume afterburning on infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xijuan; Xu, Ying; Ma, Jing; Duan, Ran; Wu, Jie

    2017-10-01

    Contains H2, CO and unburned components of high-temperature plume of rocket engine, then injected into the atmosphere, continue to carry out the oxidation reaction in the plume near field region with the volume in the plume of oxygen in the air, two times burning. The afterburning is an important cause of infrared radiation intensification of propellant plume, which increases the temperature of the flame and changes the components of the gas, thus enhancing the infrared radiation intensity of the flame. [1]. Two the combustion numerical using chemical reaction mechanism involving HO2 intermediate reaction, the study confirmed that HO2 is a key intermediate, plays a decisive role to trigger early response, on afterburning temperature and flow concentration distribution effect. A finite rate chemical reaction model is used to describe the two burning phenomenon in high temperature plume[2]. In this paper, a numerical simulation of the flame flow field and radiative transfer is carried out for the afterburning phenomenon. The effects of afterburning on the composition, temperature and infrared radiation of the plume are obtained by comparison.

  15. RELATIVE ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENTS IN PLUMES AND INTERPLUMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guennou, C.; Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) <10 eV are enhanced relative to their photospheric abundances. This coronal-to-photospheric abundance ratio, commonly called the FIP bias, is typically 1 for elements with a high-FIP (>10 eV). We have used Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over a ≈24 hr period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we used a differential emission measure analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These results may help to identify whether plumes or interplumes contribute to the fast solar wind observed in situ and may also provide constraints on the formation and heating mechanisms of plumes

  16. Experimental investigation of bubble plume structure instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marco Simiano; Robert Zboray; Francois de Cachard [Thermal-Hydraulics Laboratory, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Djamel Lakehal; George Yadigaroglu [Institute of Energy Technology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH-Zentrum/CLT, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The hydrodynamic properties of a 3D bubble plume in a large water pool are investigated experimentally. Bubble plumes are present in various industrial processes, including chemical plants, stirred reactors, and nuclear power plants, e.g. in BWR suppression pools. In these applications, the main issue is to predict the currents induced by the bubbles in the liquid phase, and to determine the consequent mixing. Bubble plumes, especially large and unconfined ones, present strong 3D effects and a superposition of different characteristic length scales. Thus, they represent relevant test cases for assessment and verification of 3D models in thermal-hydraulic codes. Bubble plumes are often unsteady, with fluctuations in size and shape of the bubble swarm, and global movements of the plume. In this case, local time-averaged data are not sufficient to characterize the flow. Additional information regarding changes in plume shape and position is required. The effect of scale on the 3D flow structure and stability being complex, there was a need to conduct studies in a fairly large facility, closer to industrial applications. Air bubble plumes, up to 30 cm in base diameter and 2 m in height were extensively studied in a 2 m diameter water pool. Homogeneously sized bubbles were obtained using a particular injector. The main hydrodynamic parameters. i.e., gas and liquid velocities, void fraction, bubble shape and size, plume shape and position, were determined experimentally. Photographic and image processing techniques were used to characterize the bubble shape, and double-tip optical probes to measure bubble size and void fraction. Electromagnetic probes measured the recirculation velocity in the pool. Simultaneous two-phase flow particle image velocimetry (STPFPIV) in a vertical plane containing the vessel axis provided instantaneous velocity fields for both phases and therefore the relative velocity field. Video recording using two CCD

  17. Visibility and Citation Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale; Salehi, Hadi; Embi, Mohamed Amin; Tanha, Farid Habibi; Gholizadeh, Hossein; Motahar, Seyed Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The number of publications is the first criteria for assessing a researcher output. However, the main measurement for author productivity is the number of citations, and citations are typically related to the paper's visibility. In this paper, the relationship between article visibility and the number of citations is investigated. A case study of…

  18. Viewer Makes Radioactivity "Visible"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L. I.

    1983-01-01

    Battery operated viewer demonstrates feasibility of generating threedimensional visible light simulations of objects that emit X-ray or gamma rays. Ray paths are traced for two pinhold positions to show location of reconstructed image. Images formed by pinholes are converted to intensified visible-light images. Applications range from radioactivity contamination surveys to monitoring radioisotope absorption in tumors.

  19. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  20. Hubble Captures Volcanic Eruption Plume From Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has snapped a picture of a 400-km-high (250-mile-high) plume of gas and dust from a volcanic eruption on Io, Jupiter's large innermost moon.Io was passing in front of Jupiter when this image was taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in July 1996. The plume appears as an orange patch just off the edge of Io in the eight o'clock position, against the blue background of Jupiter's clouds. Io's volcanic eruptions blasts material hundreds of kilometers into space in giant plumes of gas and dust. In this image, material must have been blown out of the volcano at more than 2,000 mph to form a plume of this size, which is the largest yet seen on Io.Until now, these plumes have only been seen by spacecraft near Jupiter, and their detection from the Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope opens up new opportunities for long-term studies of these remarkable phenomena.The plume seen here is from Pele, one of Io's most powerful volcanos. Pele's eruptions have been seen before. In March 1979, the Voyager 1 spacecraft recorded a 300-km-high eruption cloud from Pele. But the volcano was inactive when the Voyager 2 spacecraft flew by Jupiter in July 1979. This Hubble observation is the first glimpse of a Pele eruption plume since the Voyager expeditions.Io's volcanic plumes are much taller than those produced by terrestrial volcanos because of a combination of factors. The moon's thin atmosphere offers no resistance to the expanding volcanic gases; its weak gravity (one-sixth that of Earth) allows material to climb higher before falling; and its biggest volcanos are more powerful than most of Earth's volcanos.This image is a contrast-enhanced composite of an ultraviolet image (2600 Angstrom wavelength), shown in blue, and a violet image (4100 Angstrom wavelength), shown in orange. The orange color probably occurs because of the absorption and/or scattering of ultraviolet light in the plume. This light from Jupiter passes through the plume and is

  1. Sinking, merging and stationary plumes in a coupled chemotaxis-fluid model: a high-resolution numerical approach

    KAUST Repository

    Chertock, A.

    2012-02-02

    Aquatic bacteria like Bacillus subtilis are heavier than water yet they are able to swim up an oxygen gradient and concentrate in a layer below the water surface, which will undergo Rayleigh-Taylor-type instabilities for sufficiently high concentrations. In the literature, a simplified chemotaxis-fluid system has been proposed as a model for bio-convection in modestly diluted cell suspensions. It couples a convective chemotaxis system for the oxygen-consuming and oxytactic bacteria with the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations subject to a gravitational force proportional to the relative surplus of the cell density compared to the water density. In this paper, we derive a high-resolution vorticity-based hybrid finite-volume finite-difference scheme, which allows us to investigate the nonlinear dynamics of a two-dimensional chemotaxis-fluid system with boundary conditions matching an experiment of Hillesdon et al. (Bull. Math. Biol., vol. 57, 1995, pp. 299-344). We present selected numerical examples, which illustrate (i) the formation of sinking plumes, (ii) the possible merging of neighbouring plumes and (iii) the convergence towards numerically stable stationary plumes. The examples with stable stationary plumes show how the surface-directed oxytaxis continuously feeds cells into a high-concentration layer near the surface, from where the fluid flow (recurring upwards in the space between the plumes) transports the cells into the plumes, where then gravity makes the cells sink and constitutes the driving force in maintaining the fluid convection and, thus, in shaping the plumes into (numerically) stable stationary states. Our numerical method is fully capable of solving the coupled chemotaxis-fluid system and enabling a full exploration of its dynamics, which cannot be done in a linearised framework. © 2012 Cambridge University Press.

  2. Pele Plume Deposit on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The varied effects of Ionian volcanism can be seen in this false color infrared composite image of Io's trailing hemisphere. Low resolution color data from Galileo's first orbit (June, 1996) have been combined with a higher resolution clear filter picture taken on the third orbit (November, 1996) of the spacecraft around Jupiter.A diffuse ring of bright red material encircles Pele, the site of an ongoing, high velocity volcanic eruption. Pele's plume is nearly invisible, except in back-lit photographs, but its deposits indicate energetic ejection of sulfurous materials out to distances more than 600 kilometers from the central vent. Another bright red deposit lies adjacent to Marduk, also a currently active ediface. High temperature hot spots have been detected at both these locations, due to the eruption of molten material in lava flows or lava lakes. Bright red deposits on Io darken and disappear within years or decades of deposition, so the presence of bright red materials marks the sites of recent volcanism.This composite was created from data obtained by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The region imaged is centered on 15 degrees South, 224 degrees West, and is almost 2400 kilometers across. The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 3 kilometers across. North is towards the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the west.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  3. Microbial populations in contaminant plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Sheridan K.; Bekins, Barbara A.

    Efficient biodegradation of subsurface contaminants requires two elements: (1) microbial populations with the necessary degradative capabilities, and (2) favorable subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions. Practical constraints on experimental design and interpretation in both the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences have resulted in limited knowledge of the interaction between hydrogeological and microbiological features of subsurface environments. These practical constraints include: (1) inconsistencies between the scales of investigation in the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences, and (2) practical limitations on the ability to accurately define microbial populations in environmental samples. However, advances in application of small-scale sampling methods and interdisciplinary approaches to site investigations are beginning to significantly improve understanding of hydrogeological and microbiological interactions. Likewise, culture-based and molecular analyses of microbial populations in subsurface contaminant plumes have revealed significant adaptation of microbial populations to plume environmental conditions. Results of recent studies suggest that variability in subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions significantly influences subsurface microbial-community structure. Combined investigations of site conditions and microbial-community structure provide the knowledge needed to understand interactions between subsurface microbial populations, plume geochemistry, and contaminant biodegradation. La biodégradation efficace des polluants souterrains requiert deux éléments: des populations microbiennes possédant les aptitudes nécessaires à la dégradation, et des conditions géochimiques et hydrologiques souterraines favorables. Des contraintes pratiques sur la conception et l'interprétation des expériences à la fois en microbiologie et en hydrogéologie ont conduit à une connaissance limitée des interactions entre les

  4. CALIOP-derived Smoke Plume Injection Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soja, A. J.; Winker, D. M.; Choi, H. D.; Fairlie, T. D.; Westberg, D. J.; Roller, C. M.; Pouliot, G.; Vaughan, M.; Pierce, T. E.; Trepte, C. R.; Rao, V.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning is a dominant natural and anthropogenic disturbance that feeds back to the climate system. Fire regimes, ecosystem fuels, fire severity and intensity vary widely, even within the same system, largely under the control of weather and climate. These strongly influence fire plume injection height and thus the transport of related biomass burning emissions, affecting air quality, human health and the climate system. If our knowledge of plume injection height is incorrect, transport models of those emissions will likewise be incorrect, adversely affecting our ability to analyze and predict climate feedbacks (i.e. black carbon to the Arctic, precipitation, cloud-radiation relationships) and public health (air quality forecast). Historically, plume height was based on the pioneering work of G.A. Briggs [1969; 1971] and verified with limited field campaigns. However, we currently have two satellite instruments, Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) onboard CALIPSO (afternoon overpass) and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) onboard TERRA (morning overpass), that can provide the statistics necessary to verify our assumptions and improve fire plume injection height estimates for use in both small- and large-scale models. We have developed a methodology to assess fire plume injection height using the Langley Trajectory Model (LaTM), CALIOP, Hazard Mapping System (HMS) smoke plume, and MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) thermal anomaly data that is capable of generating two distinct types of verification data. A single CALIOP smoke-filled aerosol envelop can be traced back to numerous fire events, and using multiple CALIOP transects from numerous days, a daily smoke plume injection height evolution from a single fire can be defined. Additionally, we have linked the smoke plumes to ecosystems and the meteorological variables that define fire weather. In concert, CALIOP and MISR data can produce the statistical knowledge

  5. Opposing authigenic controls on the isotopic signature of dissolved iron in hydrothermal plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, A. J. M.; Klar, J. K.; Homoky, W. B.; Comer-Warner, S. A.; Milton, J. A.; Connelly, D. P.; James, R. H.; Mills, R. A.

    2017-04-01

    Iron is a scarce but essential micronutrient in the oceans that limits primary productivity in many regions of the surface ocean. The mechanisms and rates of Fe supply to the ocean interior are still poorly understood and quantified. Iron isotope ratios of different Fe pools can potentially be used to trace sources and sinks of the global Fe biogeochemical cycle if these boundary fluxes have distinct signatures. Seafloor hydrothermal vents emit metal rich fluids from mid-ocean ridges into the deep ocean. Iron isotope ratios have the potential to be used to trace the input of hydrothermal dissolved iron to the oceans if the local controls on the fractionation of Fe isotopes during plume dispersal in the deep ocean are understood. In this study we assess the behaviour of Fe isotopes in a Southern Ocean hydrothermal plume using a sampling program of Total Dissolvable Fe (TDFe), and dissolved Fe (dFe). We demonstrate that δ56Fe values of dFe (δ56dFe) within the hydrothermal plume change dramatically during early plume dispersal, ranging from -2.39 ± 0.05‰ to -0.13 ± 0.06‰ (2 SD). The isotopic composition of TDFe (δ56TDFe) was consistently heavier than dFe values, ranging from -0.31 ± 0.03‰ to 0.78 ± 0.05‰, consistent with Fe oxyhydroxide precipitation as the plume samples age. The dFe present in the hydrothermal plume includes stabilised dFe species with potential to be transported to the deep ocean. We estimate that stable dFe exported from the plume will have a δ56Fe of -0.28 ± 0.17‰. Further, we show that the proportion of authigenic iron-sulfide and iron-oxyhydroxide minerals precipitating in the buoyant plume exert opposing controls on the resultant isotope composition of dissolved Fe passed into the neutrally buoyant plume. We show that such controls yield variable dissolved Fe isotope signatures under the authigenic conditions reported from modern vent sites elsewhere, and so ought to be considered during iron isotope reconstructions of past

  6. The 2016 Case for Mantle Plumes and a Plume-Fed Asthenosphere (Augustus Love Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jason P.

    2016-04-01

    The process of science always returns to weighing evidence and arguments for and against a given hypothesis. As hypotheses can only be falsified, never universally proved, doubt and skepticism remain essential elements of the scientific method. In the past decade, even the hypothesis that mantle plumes exist as upwelling currents in the convecting mantle has been subject to intense scrutiny; from geochemists and geochronologists concerned that idealized plume models could not fit many details of their observations, and from seismologists concerned that mantle plumes can sometimes not be 'seen' in their increasingly high-resolution tomographic images of the mantle. In the place of mantle plumes, various locally specific and largely non-predictive hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origins of non-plate boundary volcanism at Hawaii, Samoa, etc. In my opinion, this debate has now passed from what was initially an extremely useful restorative from simply 'believing' in the idealized conventional mantle plume/hotspot scenario to becoming an active impediment to our community's ability to better understand the dynamics of the solid Earth. Having no working hypothesis at all is usually worse for making progress than having an imperfect and incomplete but partially correct one. There continues to be strong arguments and strong emerging evidence for deep mantle plumes. Furthermore, deep thermal plumes should exist in a mantle that is heated at its base, and the existence of Earth's (convective) geodynamo clearly indicates that heat flows from the core to heat the mantle's base. Here I review recent seismic evidence by French, Romanowicz, and coworkers that I feel lends strong new observational support for the existence of deep mantle plumes. I also review recent evidence consistent with the idea that secular core cooling replenishes half the mantle's heat loss through its top surface, e.g. that the present-day mantle is strongly bottom heated. Causes for

  7. East Asian SO2 pollution plume over Europe – Part 2: Evolution and potential impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stohl

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on the first observation-based case study of an aged East Asian anthropogenic SO2 pollution plume over Europe. Our airborne measurements in that plume detected highly elevated SO2 mole fractions (up to 900 pmol/mol between about 5000 and 7000 m altitude. Here, we focus on investigations of the origin, dispersion, evolution, conversion, and potential impact of the observed excess SO2. In particular, we investigate SO2 conversion to gas-phase sulfuric acid and sulfuric acid aerosols. Our FLEXPART and LAGRANTO model simulations, along with additional trace gas measurements, suggest that the plume originated from East Asian fossil fuel combustion sources and, 8–7 days prior to its arrival over Europe, ascended over the coast region of central East Asia to 9000 m altitude, probably in a cyclonic system with an associated warm conveyor belt. During this initial plume ascent a substantial fraction of the initially available SO2 must have escaped from removal by cloud processes. Hereafter, while mostly descending slowly, the plume experienced advection across the North Pacific, North America and the North Atlantic. During its upper troposphere travel, clouds were absent in and above the plume and OH-induced gas-phase conversion of SO2 to gas-phase sulfuric acid (GSA was operative, followed by GSA nucleation and condensation leading to sulfuric acid aerosol formation and growth. Our AEROFOR model simulations indicate that numerous large sulfuric acid aerosol particles were formed, which at least tempora-rily, caused substantial horizontal visibility degradation, and which have the potential to act as water vapor condensation nuclei in liquid water cloud formation, already at water vapor supersaturations as low as about 0.1%. Our AEROFOR model simulations also indicate that those fossil fuel combustion generated soot particles, which have survived cloud induced removal during the initial plume ascent, have experienced extensive H2SO4/H2O

  8. Visible spectroscopy on ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, J.V.

    1991-12-01

    In this report visible spectroscopy and impurity investigations on ASDEX are reviewed and several sets of visible spectra are presented. As a basis for identification of metallic impurity lines during plasma discharges spectra from a stainless steel - Cu arc have been recorded. In a next step a spectrum overview of ASDEX discharges is shown which reveals the dominating role of lines from light impurities like carbon and oxygen throughout the UV and visible range (2000 A ≤ λ ≤ 8000 A). Metallic impurity lines of neutrals or single ionized atoms are observed near localized surfaces. The dramatic effect of impurity reduction by boronization of the vessel walls is demonstrated in a few examples. In extension to some ivesti-gations already published, further diagnostic applications of visible spectroscopy are presented. Finally, the hardware and software system used on ASDEX are described in detail. (orig.)

  9. Predicting catastrophes of non-autonomous networks with visibility graphs and horizontal visibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haicheng; Xu, Daolin; Wu, Yousheng

    2018-05-01

    Prediction of potential catastrophes in engineering systems is a challenging problem. We first attempt to construct a complex network to predict catastrophes of a multi-modular floating system in advance of their occurrences. Response time series of the system can be mapped into an virtual network by using visibility graph or horizontal visibility algorithm. The topology characteristics of the networks can be used to forecast catastrophes of the system. Numerical results show that there is an obvious corresponding relationship between the variation of topology characteristics and the onset of catastrophes. A Catastrophe Index (CI) is proposed as a numerical indicator to measure a qualitative change from a stable state to a catastrophic state. The two approaches, the visibility graph and horizontal visibility algorithms, are compared by using the index in the reliability analysis with different data lengths and sampling frequencies. The technique of virtual network method is potentially extendable to catastrophe predictions of other engineering systems.

  10. Infrared measurements of launch vehicle exhaust plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Caroline; Ohmer, Phillip; Wendelstein, Norbert; Stein, Karin

    2017-10-01

    In the fields of early warning, one is depending on reliable analytical models for the prediction of the infrared threat signature: By having this as a basis, the warning sensors can be specified as suitable as possible to give timely threat approach alerts. In this paper, we will present preliminary results of measurement trials that have been carried out in 2015, where the exhaust plume of launch vehicles has been measured under various atmospheric conditions. The gathered data will be used to validate analytical models for the prediction of the plume signature.

  11. Inferences of Particle Size and Composition From Video-like Images Based on Acoustic Data: Grotto Plume, Main Endeavor Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.; Santilli, K.; Dastur, J.; Silver, D.

    2004-12-01

    Optical and acoustic scattering from particles in a seafloor hydrothermal plume can be related if the particle properties and scattering mechanisms are known. We assume Rayleigh backscattering of sound and Mie forward scattering of light. We then use the particle concentrations implicit in the observed acoustic backscatter intensity to recreate the optical image a camera would see given a particular lighting level. The motivation for this study is to discover what information on particle size and composition in the buoyant plume can be inferred from a comparison of the calculated optical images (based on acoustic data) with actual video images from the acoustic acquisition cruise and the IMAX film "Volcanoes of the Deep Sea" (Stephen Low Productions, Inc.). Because the geologists, biologists and oceanographers involved in the study of seafloor hydrothermal plumes all "see" plumes in different ways, an additional motivation is to create more realistic plume images from the acoustic data. By using visualization techniques, with realistic lighting models, we can convert the plume image from mechanical waves (sound) to electromagnetic waves (light). The resulting image depends on assumptions about the particle size distribution and composition. Conversion of the volume scattering coefficients from Rayleigh to Mie scattering is accomplished by an extinction scale factor that depends on the wavelengths of light and sound and on the average particle size. We also make an adjustment to the scattered light based on the particles reflectivity (albedo) and color. We present a series of images of acoustic data for Grotto Plume, Main Endeavour Field (within the Endeavour ISS Site) using both realistic lighting models and traditional visualization techniques to investigate the dependence of the images on assumptions about particle composition and size. Sensitivity analysis suggests that the visibility of the buoyant plume increases as the intensity of supplied light increases

  12. Predicting visibility of aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew; Ramirez, Cesar V; Salud, Ellen

    2009-05-20

    Visual detection of aircraft by human observers is an important element of aviation safety. To assess and ensure safety, it would be useful to be able to be able to predict the visibility, to a human observer, of an aircraft of specified size, shape, distance, and coloration. Examples include assuring safe separation among aircraft and between aircraft and unmanned vehicles, design of airport control towers, and efforts to enhance or suppress the visibility of military and rescue vehicles. We have recently developed a simple metric of pattern visibility, the Spatial Standard Observer (SSO). In this report we examine whether the SSO can predict visibility of simulated aircraft images. We constructed a set of aircraft images from three-dimensional computer graphic models, and measured the luminance contrast threshold for each image from three human observers. The data were well predicted by the SSO. Finally, we show how to use the SSO to predict visibility range for aircraft of arbitrary size, shape, distance, and coloration.

  13. Measuring visibility using smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Jan; Bialon, Raphael; Claßen, Christoph; Graffi, Kalman

    2017-04-01

    Spatial information on fog density is an important parameter for ecohydrological studies in cloud forests. The Dhofar cloud forest in Southern Oman exhibits a close interaction between the fog, trees, and rainfall. During the three month monsoon season the trees capture substantial amounts of horizontal precipitation from fog which increases net precipitation below the tree canopy. As fog density measurements are scarce, a smartphone app was designed to measure visibility. Different smartphone units use a variety of different parts. It is therefore important to assess the developed visibility measurement across a suite of different smartphones. In this study we tested five smartphones/ tablets (Google/ LG Nexus 5X, Huawei P8 lite, Huawei Y3, HTC Nexus 9, and Samsung Galaxy S4 mini) against digital camera (Sony DLSR-A900) and visual visibility observations. Visibility was assessed from photos using image entropy, from the number of visible targets, and from WiFi signal strength using RSSI. Results show clear relationships between object distance and fog density, yet a considerable spread across the different smartphone/ tablet units is evident.

  14. Seismic structure of the lithosphere beneath NW Namibia: Impact of the Tristan da Cunha mantle plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaohui; Heit, Benjamin; Brune, Sascha; Steinberger, Bernhard; Geissler, Wolfram H.; Jokat, Wilfried; Weber, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Northwestern Namibia, at the landfall of the Walvis Ridge, was affected by the Tristan da Cunha mantle plume during continental rupture between Africa and South America, as evidenced by the presence of the Etendeka continental flood basalts. Here we use data from a passive-source seismological network to investigate the upper mantle structure and to elucidate the Cretaceous mantle plume-lithosphere interaction. Receiver functions reveal an interface associated with a negative velocity contrast within the lithosphere at an average depth of 80 km. We interpret this interface as the relic of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) formed during the Mesozoic by interaction of the Tristan da Cunha plume head with the pre-existing lithosphere. The velocity contrast might be explained by stagnated and "frozen" melts beneath an intensively depleted and dehydrated peridotitic mantle. The present-day LAB is poorly visible with converted waves, indicating a gradual impedance contrast. Beneath much of the study area, converted phases of the 410 and 660 km mantle transition zone discontinuities arrive 1.5 s earlier than in the landward plume-unaffected continental interior, suggesting high velocities in the upper mantle caused by a thick lithosphere. This indicates that after lithospheric thinning during continental breakup, the lithosphere has increased in thickness during the last 132 Myr. Thermal cooling of the continental lithosphere alone cannot produce the lithospheric thickness required here. We propose that the remnant plume material, which has a higher seismic velocity than the ambient mantle due to melt depletion and dehydration, significantly contributed to the thickening of the mantle lithosphere.

  15. Tracking Iceland Plume Motion Using Trace Element Geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitton, J. G.; Walters, R. L.; Jones, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Greenland-Scotland Ridge (GSR) is a hotspot track built by interaction between the Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and the Iceland mantle plume. Unlike most other hotspot tracks built by ridge-plume interaction, the GSR is 2 to 3 times wider than the plume conduit in the upper mantle. (This unusual wide morphology arises because Icelandic crust changes significantly in thickness within a few million years of accretion, probably mainly by viscous flow in the hot lower crust). The upshot is that the GSR cannot be compared directly with theoretical plume tracks from hotspot reference frame models. However, it is possible to track the position of the Iceland plume conduit using the trace element geochemistry of basaltic lavas. Away from the plume conduit, plate spreading drives upwelling of mantle through the melting region. Above the plume conduit, plume-driven flow forces mantle through the lower part of the melting region faster than the plate-driven upwelling rate. The average depth of melting is therefore greater directly above the plume conduit than away from the plume conduit, and this difference in average melting depth means that melts generated directly above the plume conduit are relatively enriched in incompatible trace elements. Joint modelling of trace element compositions and crustal thickness can also be used to establish location of melting relative to the plume conduit. To date, these concepts have been used only to explain compositional variations in modern (post-glacial) Icelandic lavas; in this study we show that the same concepts can be applied to map the location of the plume conduit throughout the onshore Icelandic geological record (since the middle Miocene, c. 16 Ma). The plume track thus determined is in reasonable agreement with theoretical tracks calculated under the assumption that the Iceland Plume has remained fixed relative to other Indo-Atlantic hotspots. This result also supports the idea that episodic relocations of the onshore part of

  16. Hydrothermal plumes over the Carlsberg Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, D.; KameshRaju, K.A.; Baker, E.T.; Rao, A.S.; Mudholkar, A.V.; Lupton, J.E.; SuryaPrakash, L.; Gawas, R.B.; VijayaKumar, T.

    year later [Ray et al., 2008] found evidence of a chronic hydrothermal plume. Neither study was able to provide any information about the location of seafloor vent sources. Other than these slim results, no other hydrothermal evidence has been.... The newly discovered submarine plumes have a maximum thickness of ~200 m and maximum rise height of about 400 m from seafloor, resembling a typical chronic hydrothermal plume rather than the apparent event plume discovered on the Carlsberg Ridge by Murton...

  17. The evolution of photochemical smog in a power plant plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Menachem; Valente, Ralph J.; Tanner, Roger L.; Gillani, Noor V.; Imhoff, Robert E.; Mueller, Stephen F.; Olszyna, Kenneth J.; Meagher, James F. Present address: Aeronomy Laboratory, NOAA, 325 Broadway, Boulder CO 80303, USA.)

    The evolution of photochemical smog in a plant plume was investigated with the aid of an instrumented helicopter. Air samples were taken in the plume of the Cumberland Power Plant, located in central Tennessee, during the afternoon of 16 July 1995 as part of the Southern Oxidants Study - Nashville Middle Tennessee Ozone Study. Twelve cross-wind air sampling traverses were made at six distance groups from 35 to 116 km from the source. During the sampling period the winds were from the west-northwest and the plume drifted towards the city of Nashville TN. Ten of the traverses were made upwind of the city, where the power plant plume was isolated, and two traverses downwind of the city when the plumes were possibly mixed. The results revealed that even six hours after the release, excess ozone production was limited to the edges of the plume. Only when the plume was sufficiently dispersed, but still upwind of Nashville, was excess ozone (up to 109 ppbv, 50-60 ppbv above background levels) produced in the center of the plume. The concentrations image of the plume and a Lagrangian particle model suggests that portions of the power plant plume mixed with the urban plume. The mixed urban power plant plume began to regenerate O 3 that peaked at 120 ppbv at a short distance (15-25 km) downwind of Nashville. Ozone productivity (the ratio of excess O 3 to NO y and NO z) in the isolated plume was significantly lower compared with that found in the city plume. The production of nitrate, a chain termination product, was significantly higher in the power plant plume compared to the mixed plume, indicating shorter chain length of the photochemical smog chain reaction mechanism.

  18. The evolution of photochemical smog in a power plant plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luria, M.; The Hebrew University, Jerusalem; Valente, R.J.; Tanner, R.L.; Imhoff, R.E.; Mueller, S.F.; Olszyna, K.J.; Meagher, J.F.; Gillani, N.V.; University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of photochemical smog in a plant plume was investigated with the aid of an instrumented helicopter. Air samples were taken in the plume of the Cumberland Power Plant, located in central Tennessee, during the afternoon of 16 July 1995 as part of the Southern Oxidants Study - Nashville Middle Tennessee Ozone Study. Twelve cross-wind air sampling traverses were made at six distance groups from 35 to 116 km from the source. During the sampling period the winds were from the west-northwest and the plume drifted towards the city of Nashville TN. Ten of the traverses were made upwind of the city, where the power plant plume was isolated, and two traverses downwind of the city when the plumes were possibly mixed. The results revealed that even six hours after the release, excess ozone production was limited to the edges of the plume. Only when the plume was sufficiently dispersed, but still upwind of Nashville, was excess ozone (up to 109 ppbv, 50-60 ppbv above background levels) produced in the center of the plume. The concentrations image of the plume and a Lagrangian particle model suggests that portions of the power plant plume mixed with the urban plume. The mixed urban power plant plume began to regenerate O 3 that peaked at 120 ppbv at a short distance (15-25 km) downwind of Nashville. Ozone productivity (the ratio of excess O 3 to NO y and NO z ) in the isolated plume was significantly lower compared with that found in the city plume. The production of nitrate, a chain termination product, was significantly higher in the power plant plume compared to the mixed plume, indicating shorter chain length of the photochemical smog chain reaction mechanism. (author)

  19. Near field characteristics of buoyant helium plumes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Reactor Safety Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085, India e-mail: das@iitk.ac.in ... Velocity and density fields are measured across a diametric plane using Particle. Image Velocimetry .... and density measurements in a diametric plane of the plume are carried out using PIV and PLIF and puffing ...

  20. Confirming the ice plumes of Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, William

    2016-10-01

    The presence of plumes of water ice venting from the icy surface of Europa is of tremendous interest to the scientific community, NASA and the general public, as it offers the prospect of access to material that was once in Europa's ocean without the need to drill through many miles of ice. We secured three observations, from a sample of ten, showing plume candidates, using FUV HST imaging of Europa as it transits the smooth face of Jupiter (Sparks et al., 2016). Crucially, the most accurately localized candidate, which is also the candidate of highest statistical significance, appears to repeat in recent unpublished 2016 data. We propose to acquire additional transit images in order to assess the repeatability of this event, determine a timescale for activity, and to aid in quantifying the column density and mass required. The data will provide additional opportunities to isolate new plume candidates and further characterize the persistent absorption around the southern limb of Europa. We propose a campaign to image Europa in transit against Jupiter close to the April 2017 opposition, in order to maximize spatial resolution, sensitivity, and time sampling. These measurements have the potential to profoundly influence a topic of fundamental scientific importance and of great strategic interest to NASA. If the ice plumes of Europa arise from the deep ocean, we have gained access to probably the most astrobiologically interesting location in the Solar System.

  1. Dispersion of Chernobyl radioactive plume over Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albergel, A.

    1988-01-01

    A long-range pollutant transport and removal model, is used to analyse the Chernobyl radioactive plume dispersion over the Europe Continent. Model predictions are compared to field measurements of Cs-137 activity in the air from April 26th, to May 5th 1986 [fr

  2. Diagnostics of laser ablated plasma plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, S.; Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    emission spectroscopy. Second, deposition rate and fast ion probe measurements have been used to study the plume propagation dynamics during laser ablation of a silver target, over a large range of Ar background gas pressures (from high vacuum to approximate to 100 Pa). A comparative analysis...

  3. Propagation of light through ship exhaust plumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iersel, M. van; Mack, A.; Eijk, A.M.J. van; Schleijpen, H.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Looking through the atmosphere, it is sometimes difficult to see the details of an object. Effects like scintillation and blur are the cause of these difficulties. Exhaust plumes of e.g. a ship can cause extreme scintillation and blur, making it even harder to see the details of what lies behind the

  4. Analytical modeling of nonradial expansion plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Iain D.

    1990-01-01

    The 'Modified Simons' model presented allows the nonradial nature of axisymmetric rocket and thruster plume flowfields having a large exit Mach number and/or a large nozzle exit half-angle to be successfully predicted. The model is applied to monatomic and polyatomic gas (N, Ar, tetrafluoromethane) expansions; the nonradial density decay observed experimentally is successfully predicted.

  5. Plume dynamics in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Jerome A.; Huppert, Herbert E.

    2008-11-01

    Buoyancy driven flows in layered porous media are present in many geological settings and play an important role in the mixing of fluids, from the dispersal of pollutants in underground aquifers to enhanced oil recovery techniques and, of more recent importance, the sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Seismic images of the rise of a buoyant CO2 plume at Sleipner in the North Sea indicate that these plumes are greatly influenced by a vertical array of thin lenses of relatively low permeability material. We model propagation of CO2 at each layer as a gravity current in a porous medium which propagates along, and drains through, a thin, low permeability seal. Drainage, driven both by hydrostatic pressure and the body force on the draining fluid, leads to an initial rapid advance followed by a gradual retreat of the current to a steady-state. By incorporating a vertical array of these single layer models we are able to capture the rise of the buoyant plume in layered reservoirs. We find that the plume is characterized by a broad head with a tail given by the steady state extent.

  6. Merging Thermal Plumes in the Indoor Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Erik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    This experimental work deals with the basic problem of merging thermal plumes from heat sources situated in the vicinity of each other. No studies have been made yet of how close two heat sources must be to each other, before they can be considered as a single source with a cumulative heat effect...

  7. Between visibility and surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldam, Julie

    As activists move from alternative media platforms to commercial social media platforms they face increasing challenges in protecting their online security and privacy. While government surveillance of activists is well-documented in both scholarly research and the media, corporate surveillance...... of activists remains under-researched. This presentation explores visibility as a prerequisite and an obstacle to political participation. The dual capacity of visibility in social media enables both surveillance and counter-surveillance by making not only the surveilled actor, but also the surveilling actor...... visible. It thus enables activists to monitor and expose corporate misconduct, but simultaneously renders them vulnerable to surveillance from corporations. In this presentation, I examine these practices and discuss their implications for political participation by drawing on examples of companies...

  8. UVISS preliminary visibility analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this work is to obtain a preliminary assessment of the sky visibility for anastronomical telescope located on the express pallet of the International SpaceStation (ISS)} taking into account the major constraints imposed on the instrument by the ISSattitude and structure. Part of the w......The goal of this work is to obtain a preliminary assessment of the sky visibility for anastronomical telescope located on the express pallet of the International SpaceStation (ISS)} taking into account the major constraints imposed on the instrument by the ISSattitude and structure. Part...... of the work is also to setup the kernel of a software tool for the visibility analysis thatshould be easily expandable to consider more complex strucures for future activities.This analysis is part of the UVISS assessment study and it is meant to provide elementsfor the definition and the selection...

  9. In-Situ Observations of a Subglacial Outflow Plume in a Greenland Fjord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankoff, K. D.; Straneo, F.; Singh, H.; Das, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    We present oceanographic observations collected in and immediately outside of a buoyant, fresh, sediment-laden subglacial outflow plume rising up the marine-terminating front of Sarqardleq Glacier, Greenland (68.9 N, 50.4 W). Subglacial outflow plumes, associated with the discharge at depth of upstream glacial surface melt, entrain the relatively warm fjord waters and are correlated with enhanced submarine melt and increased calving. Few in-situ observations exist due to the challenges of making measurements at the calving front of glaciers. Our data were collected using a small boat, a helicopter, and a JetYak (a remote-controlled jet-ski-powered kayak). Temperature and salinity profiles in, around, and far from the plume are used to described its oceanographic properties, spatial extent, and temporal variability. This plume rises vertically up the ice front expanding laterally and away from the ice, over-shoots its stable isopycnal and reaches the surface. Its surface expression is identified by colder, saltier, sediment-laden water flowing at ~5 m/s away from the ice face. Within ~300 m from the ice it submerges as it seeks buoyant stability.

  10. Plume dispersion and deposition processes of tracer gas and aerosols in short-distance experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taeschner, M.; Bunnenberg, C.

    1988-01-01

    Data used in this paper were extracted from field experiments carried out in France and Canada to study the pathway of elementary tritium after possible emissions from future fusion reactors and from short-range experiments with nutrient aerosols performed in a German forest in view of a therapy of damaged coniferous trees by foliar nutrition. Comparisons of dispersion parameters evaluated from the tritium field experiments show that in the case of the 30-min release the variations of the wind directions represent the dominant mechanism of lateral plume dispersion under unstable weather conditions. This corresponds with the observation that for the short 2-min emission the plume remains more concentrated during propagation, and the small lateral dispersion parameters typical for stable conditions have to be applied. The investigations on the dispersion of aerosol plumes into a forest boundary layer show that the Gaussian plume model can be modified by a windspeed factor to be valid for predictions on aerosol concentrations and depositions even in a structured topography like a forest

  11. Morphology of the Zambezi River Plume on the Sofala Bank ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    driven current. Abstract — Hydrographic data collected in the vicinity of the Zambezi River plume between 2004 and 2007 is discussed alongside historical data to infer the ... plume in a short list of plumes across the globe that propagate in a direction opposite to Kelvin or shelf ... a surface layer of less saline water flowing.

  12. The visibility complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pocchiola, M; Vegter, G

    We introduce the visibility complex (rr 2-dimensional regular cell complex) of a collection of n pairwise disjoint convex obstacles in the plane. It can be considered as a subdivision of the set of free rays (i.e., rays whose origins lie in free space, the complement of the obstacles). Its cells

  13. Making Invisible Forces Visible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratner, Helene Gad

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates managerial tactics of visualisation when a need to know and manage employees' values and attitudes is expressed. Using the Danish public school as a case study, we explore how school managers use teachers' emotions to render visible presumably invisible information about t...

  14. Visible Solid State Lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikmet, R.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Diode lasers can be found in various applications most notably in optical communication and optical storage. Visible lasers were until recently were all based on IR diode lasers. Using GaN, directly blue and violet emitting lasers have also been introduced to the market mainly in the area of optical

  15. Two classes of volcanic plumes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, A.S.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    Comparison of Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 images of the south polar region of Io has revealed that a major volcanic eruption occured there during the period between the two spacecraft encounters. An annular deposit ???1400 km in diameter formed around the Aten Patera caldera (311??W, 48??S), the floor of which changed from orange to red-black. The characteristics of this eruption are remarkably similar to those described earlier for an eruption centered on Surt caldera (338??W, 45??N) that occured during the same period, also at high latitude, but in the north. Both volcanic centers were evidently inactive during the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters but were active sometime between the two. The geometric and colorimetric characteristics, as well as scale of the two annular deposits, are virtually identical; both resemble the surface features formed by the eruption of Pele (255??W, 18??S). These three very large plume eruptions suggest a class of eruption distinct from that of six smaller plumes observed to be continously active by both Voyagers 1 and 2. The smaller plumes, of which Prometheus is the type example, are longer-lived, deposit bright, whitish material, erupt at velocities of ???0.5 km sec-1, and are concentrated at low latitudes in an equatorial belt around the satellite. The very large Pele-type plumes, on the other hand, are relatively short-lived, deposit darker red materials, erupt at ???1.0 km sec-1, and (rather than restricted to a latitudinal band) are restricted in longitude from 240?? to 360??W. Both direct thermal infrared temperature measurements and the implied color temperatures for quenched liquid sulfur suggest that hot spot temperatures of ???650??K are associated with the large plumes and temperatures 650??K), sulfur is a low-viscosity fluid (orange and black, respectively); at other temperatures it is either solid or has a high viscosity. As a result, there will be two zones in Io's crust in which liquid sulfur will flow freely: a shallow zone

  16. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  17. Are splash plumes the origin of minor hotspots?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J. H.; Bunge, H.-P.

    2006-05-01

    It has been claimed that focused hot cylindrical upwelling plumes cause many of the surface volcanic hotspots on Earth. It has also been argued that they must originate from thermal boundary layers. In this paper, we present spherical simulations of mantle circulation at close to Earth-like vigor with significant internal heating. These show, in addition to thermal boundary layer plumes, a new class of plumes that are not rooted in thermal boundary layers. These plumes develop as instabilities from the edge of bowls of hot mantle, which are produced by cold downwelling material deforming hot sheets of mantle. The resulting bowl and plume structure can look a bit like the “splash” of a water droplet. These splash plumes might provide an explanation for some hotspots that are not underlain by thermal boundary layer sourced plumes and not initiated by large igneous provinces. We suggest that in Earth's mantle, lithospheric instabilities or small pieces of subducting slab could play the role of the model downwelling material in initiating splash plumes. Splash plumes would have implications for interpreting ocean-island basalt geochemistry, plume fixity, excess plume temperature, and estimating core heat flux. Improved seismic imaging will ultimately test this hypothesis.

  18. Optimal swarm formation for odor plume finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjovi, Ali; Marques, Lino

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an analytical approach to the problem of odor plume finding by a network of swarm robotic gas sensors, and finds an optimal configuration for them, given a set of assumptions. Considering cross-wind movement for the swarm, we found that the best spatial formation of robots in finding odor plumes is diagonal line configuration with equal distance between each pair of neighboring robots. We show that the distance between neighboring pairs in the line topology depends mainly on the wind speed and the environmental conditions, whereas, the number of robots and the swarm's crosswind movement distance do not show significant impact on optimal configurations. These solutions were analyzed and verified by simulations and experimentally validated in a reduced scale realistic environment using a set of mobile robots.

  19. Airborne aerosol measurements in the quiescent plume of Mount Saint Helens September, 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, J. M.; Finnegan, D. L.; Ballantine, D. S.; Zoller, W. H.; Hart, M. A.; Moyers, J. L.

    1982-09-01

    A study of the emissions from the Mt. St. Helens volcano was conducted to obtain data for an assessment of the importance of volcanoes as a global source of volatile trace elements to the atmosphere and to the global biochemical cycles of these elements. Sampling was done on board an Orion P-3 turboprop aircraft modified for tropospheric aerosol and gas sampling. Two filter collection systems were used. Samples were collected on a single flight on September 22, 1980, at which time the volcano was emitting a stable plume to an altitude of between 2 and 3 km. The results regarding the concentrations of aerosols obtained for this mission are presented in a table. Attention is also given to data concerning particulate vs. gas phase sulfur in the Mt. Saint Helens plume, and the estimated volcanic particle flux of selected volatile elements.

  20. Stationary plume induced by carbon dioxide dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadal, F.; Meunier, P.; Pouligny, B.; Laurichesse, E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, laminar convection flows induced by carbon dioxide absorption are addressed from experimental, numerical and theoretical points of view. A vertical glass tube (of centimetre scale) filled with distilled water is subjected to a sudden increase in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide. As a result of the diffusion of the gas into the unsaturated solution, a thin layer of fluid located underneath the surface becomes heavier. This initial density gradient first destabilizes to form a plume, which goes downwards through the entire cell. After a first transient pulsating regime (periodic succession of such Rayleigh-Benard plumes), a stationary flow settles in the tube, which is maintained by the constant supply of gas at the surface. At late stages, this stationary regime is followed by an aperiodic regime, which lasts until the complete saturation of the solution (thermodynamic equilibrium). The present study only focuses on the stationary regime, whose characteristics appear to be almost independent of the Bond number and the aspect ratio but strongly dependent on the chemical Rayleigh number. Three decades of Rayleigh numbers are explored using particle image velocimetry measurements, which allows for a precise determination of the scaling exponents for the vertical velocity amplitude and the plume width. The assumption that gravity and a constant pressure gradient balance the viscous effects enables us to derive an analytic expression for the stationary vertical velocity on the axis, which scales as Ra 2/3 (ln Ra) 1/3 . As a consequence, the width of the plume scales as Ra -1/6 (ln Ra) -1/3 and the mass Nusselt number as (Ra= ln Ra) 1/3 . These scalings are in excellent agreement with the experimental and numerical results. The multiplicative constants of these scalings can also be calculated and show a fairly good agreement if a rigid boundary condition (no-slip) is assumed at the free surface. (authors)

  1. Social media visibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldam, Julie

    2018-01-01

    As activists move from alternative media platforms to commercial social media platforms, they face increasing challenges in protecting their online security and privacy. While government surveillance of activists is well-documented in scholarly research and the media, corporate surveillance...... for responding to the activities of individual activists in social media. It shows that while social media afford an unprecedented level of visibility for activists, it comes with the risk of being monitored by corporations. Theoretically, it draws on conceptions of visibility in social sciences and media...... of activists remains under-researched. This article examines BP’s surveillance of activists who criticise the company’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) programme as ‘greenwashing’. In this way, it goes beyond corporations’ uses of big data and instead explores how they monitor and discuss strategies...

  2. Plumes from one and two cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannberg, L.D.; Onishi, Y.

    1978-01-01

    Use of mechanical- and natural-draft cooling towers is expanding in the United States in response to pressures for better resource allocation and preservation. Specifically, increasing public and regulatory concern over the effects of the intake and discharge of large volumes of cooling water has encouraged electric utilities to accept cooling towers as the primary method of removing condenser waste heat even though once-through cooling is considerably less expensive. Other factors encouraging the use of cooling towers include small water supply and consumption rates, reduction in land requirements (compared to cooling ponds or lakes), and operational flexibility. The growing demand for electric energy should also add to the increase of cooling tower use. The experimental program and its comparison to model prediction suggest that optimal siting of cooling towers, particularly multiple towers, is a task requiring knowledge of ambient wind history, plume dynamics, and tower operating conditions. Based on the tower wake effects and on the results for interaction of plumes from two cooling towers, site terrain may be a very significant factor in plume dynamics and interaction

  3. Thermal turbulent convection: thermal plumes and fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibert, M.

    2007-10-01

    In this study we investigate the phenomenon of thermal turbulent convection in new and unprecedented ways. The first system we studied experimentally is an infinite vertical channel, where a constant vertical mean gradient of temperature exists. Inside this channel the average mass flux is null. The results obtained from our measurements reveal that the flow is mainly inertial; indeed the dissipative coefficients (here the viscosity) play a role only to define a coherence length L. This length is the distance over which the thermal plumes can be considered as 'free falling' objects. The horizontal transport, of heat and momentum, is entirely due to fluctuations. The associated 'mixing length' is small compared to the channel width. In the other hand, the vertical heat transport is due to coherent structures: the heat plumes. Those objects were also investigated in a Lagrangian study of the flow in the bulk of a Rayleigh-Benard cell. The probe, which has the same density as the fluid used in this experiment, is a sphere of 2 cm in diameter with embarked thermometers and radio-emitter. The heat plumes transport it, which allows a statistical study of such objects. (author)

  4. Stable Isotope Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tissue samples (skin, bone, blood, muscle) are analyzed for stable carbon, stable nitrogen, and stable sulfur analysis. Many samples are used in their entirety for...

  5. Quantification of Plume-Soil Interaction and Excavation Due to the Sky Crane Descent Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizcaino, Jeffrey; Mehta, Manish

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of the particulate erosion that occurs as a result of a rocket exhaust plume impinging on soil during extraterrestrial landings is critical for future robotic and human lander mission design. The aerodynamic environment that results from the reflected plumes results in dust lifting, site alteration and saltation, all of which create a potentially erosive and contaminant heavy environment for the lander vehicle and any surrounding structures. The Mars Science Lab (MSL), weighing nearly one metric ton, required higher levels of thrust from its retro propulsive systems and an entirely new descent system to minimize these effects. In this work we seek to quantify plume soil interaction and its resultant soil erosion caused by the MSL's Sky Crane descent stage engines by performing three dimensional digital terrain and elevation mapping of the Curiosity rover's landing site. Analysis of plume soil interaction altitude and time was performed by detailed examination of the Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) still frames and reconstructed inertial measurement unit (IMU) sensor data. Results show initial plume soil interaction from the Sky Crane's eight engines began at ground elevations greater than 60 meters and more than 25 seconds before the rovers' touchdown event. During this time, viscous shear erosion (VSE) was dominant typically resulting in dusting of the surface with flow propagating nearly parallel to the surface. As the vehicle descended and decreased to four powered engines plume-plume and plume soil interaction increased the overall erosion rate at the surface. Visibility was greatly reduced at a height of roughly 20 meters above the surface and fell to zero ground visibility shortly after. The deployment phase of the Sky Crane descent stage hovering at nearly six meters above the surface showed the greatest amount of erosion with several large particles of soil being kicked up, recirculated, and impacting the bottom of the rover chassis. Image

  6. Socially visible midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Teresa; Clarke, Jenny

    2016-02-01

    Social media are playing a bigger and bigger part in our personal lives and what's more they are now infiltrating our professional lives, too. Moving from just 'being on' social media to using social media effectively as a midwife, is a huge challenge that many midwives are facing. To be effective and to really utilise social media to their full potential, midwives need to consider role-modelling, leading, social capital, digital footprint, visibility and continuing professional development. If all of these aspects are considered and midwives take a more considered approach to social media, they can really start to benefit from engaging in these online spaces.

  7. Making Invisible Forces Visible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratner, Helene; Pors, Justine Grønbæk

    2013-01-01

    their 'true' attitudes and values. The paper draws on theories of affect as well as actor-network theory to analyse three incidents where managers turn their interpretations of teachers' emotions into such information. These incidents suggest that the efforts to render employees' attitudes and values visible...... install a normative emotional scale where an ideal employee displays emotional investment and self-control. This has implications, not only for employees who are expected to exhibit the 'right' emotions, but also for management, which comes to depend on transient emotions and co-presence in situations...

  8. Chemical Plume Detection with an Iterative Background Estimation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-17

    schemes because of contamination of background statistics by the plume. To mitigate the effects of plume contamination , a first pass of the detector...can be used to create a background mask. However, large diffuse plumes are typically not removed by a single pass. Instead, contamination can be...sensors are the detection of surface materials over a wide area, and the detection of chemical vapors in the atmosphere . Hyperspectral imagers have

  9. Linear global stability of a confined plume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Lesshafft

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A linear stability analysis is performed for a plume flow inside a cylinder of aspect ratio 1. The configuration is identical to that used by Lopez and Marques (2013 for their direct numerical simulation study. It is found that the first bifurcation, which leads to a periodic axisymmetric flow state, is accurately predicted by linear analysis: both the critical Rayleigh number and the global frequency are consistent with the reported DNS results. It is further shown that pressure feedback drives the global mode, rather than absolute instability.

  10. Stable convergence and stable limit theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Häusler, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a concise but complete exposition of the mathematical theory of stable convergence and give various applications in different areas of probability theory and mathematical statistics to illustrate the usefulness of this concept. Stable convergence holds in many limit theorems of probability theory and statistics – such as the classical central limit theorem – which are usually formulated in terms of convergence in distribution. Originated by Alfred Rényi, the notion of stable convergence is stronger than the classical weak convergence of probability measures. A variety of methods is described which can be used to establish this stronger stable convergence in many limit theorems which were originally formulated only in terms of weak convergence. Naturally, these stronger limit theorems have new and stronger consequences which should not be missed by neglecting the notion of stable convergence. The presentation will be accessible to researchers and advanced students at the master's level...

  11. Innovative Strategy For Long Term Monitoring Of Metal And Radionuclide Plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Millings, Margaret R.; Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.

    2014-01-01

    Many government and private industry sites that were once contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. The sites will require long term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality at these 'legacy' sites. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site, the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. There is a need to optimize the performance and manage the cost of long term surveillance and monitoring at their sites. Currently, SRNL is initiating a pilot field test using alternative protocols for long term monitoring of metals and radionuclides. A key component of the approach is that monitoring efforts are focused on measurement of low cost metrics related to hydrologic and chemical conditions that control contaminant migration. The strategy combines careful monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions with measurement of master variables such as chemical surrogates along with a smaller number of standard well analyses. In plumes contaminated with metals, master variables control the chemistry of the groundwater system, and include redox variables (ORP, DO, chemicals), pH, specific conductivity, biological community (breakdown/decay products), and temperature. Significant changes in these variables will result in conditions whereby the plume may not be stable and therefore can be used to predict possible plume migration. Conversely, concentration measurements for all types of contaminants in groundwater are a lagging indicator plume movement - major changes contaminant concentrations indicate that contamination has migrated. An approach based on measurement of master variables and explicit monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions combined with traditional metrics should lead

  12. Innovative Strategy For Long Term Monitoring Of Metal And Radionuclide Plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Millings, Margaret R.; Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.

    2014-01-08

    Many government and private industry sites that were once contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. The sites will require long term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality at these "legacy" sites. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site, the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. There is a need to optimize the performance and manage the cost of long term surveillance and monitoring at their sites. Currently, SRNL is initiating a pilot field test using alternative protocols for long term monitoring of metals and radionuclides. A key component of the approach is that monitoring efforts are focused on measurement of low cost metrics related to hydrologic and chemical conditions that control contaminant migration. The strategy combines careful monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions with measurement of master variables such as chemical surrogates along with a smaller number of standard well analyses. In plumes contaminated with metals, master variables control the chemistry of the groundwater system, and include redox variables (ORP, DO, chemicals), pH, specific conductivity, biological community (breakdown/decay products), and temperature. Significant changes in these variables will result in conditions whereby the plume may not be stable and therefore can be used to predict possible plume migration. Conversely, concentration measurements for all types of contaminants in groundwater are a lagging indicator plume movement - major changes contaminant concentrations indicate that contamination has migrated. An approach based on measurement of master variables and explicit monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions combined with traditional metrics should lead

  13. Women visible enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, P

    1996-06-07

    The head of the UN Development Fund for Women's delegation at Habitat II, Achola Pala Okeyo, held a press conference to voice her concern that the women's nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) attending the conference were not receiving enough visibility. Issues raised at the press conference included the important role played by the NGOs in taking the Habitat agenda to the grassroots level, the promotion of cooperative ownership of houses and equal inheritance rights, and the lack of input sought from "everyday" women in planning and development efforts in their communities. Okeyo noted that the Habitat conference was the first organized attempt to bring women's NGOs together since the women's conference in Beijing and that women were disappointed at their lack of progress in attaining equal rights.

  14. Visible but Unseen?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torkilsheyggi, Arnvør Martinsdóttir á; Hertzum, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that whiteboards support much cooper-ative work by for example strengthening awareness, im-proving communication, and reducing mental workload. In line with these predominantly positive findings, an emer-gency department (ED) turned to its whiteboard to improve the coordination...... of its work with blood tests. We investi-gate this use of the whiteboard through observations and informal interviews in the ED and analyze the ability of the whiteboard to support coordination and awareness in the work with blood tests. Our findings show limitations in the ability of the whiteboard...... to support awareness in a setting where the users are (locally) mobile, specifically in regard to information that requires continuous monitoring. We do however also find that the whiteboard safeguarded the work with blood tests against some risks by making blood-test information socially visible....

  15. Intercontinental transport of nitrogen oxide pollution plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wenig

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the first satellite observation of intercontinental transport of nitrogen oxides emitted by power plants, verified by simulations with a particle tracer model. The analysis of such episodes shows that anthropogenic NOx plumes may influence the atmospheric chemistry thousands of kilometers away from its origin, as well as the ocean they traverse due to nitrogen fertilization. This kind of monitoring became possible by applying an improved algorithm to extract the tropospheric fraction of NO2 from the spectral data coming from the GOME instrument. As an example we show the observation of NO2 in the time period 4--14 May, 1998, from the South African Plateau to Australia which was possible due to favourable weather conditions during that time period which availed the satellite measurement. This episode was also simulated with the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART which uses NOx emissions taken from an inventory for industrial emissions in South Africa and is driven with analyses from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Additionally lightning emissions were taken into account by utilizing Lightning Imaging Sensor data. Lightning was found to contribute probably not more than 25% of the resulting concentrations. Both, the measured and simulated emission plume show matching patterns while traversing the Indian Ocean to Australia and show great resemblance to the aerosol and CO2 transport observed by Piketh et al. (2000.

  16. Modeling contaminant plumes in fractured limestone aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosthaf, Klaus; Brauns, Bentje; Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann

    Determining the fate and transport of contaminant plumes from contaminated sites in limestone aquifers is important because they are a major drinking water resource. This is challenging because they are often heavily fractured and contain chert layers and nodules, resulting in a complex transport...... model. The paper concludes with recommendations on how to identify and employ suitable models to advance the conceptual understanding and as decision support tools for risk assessment and the planning of remedial actions....... behavior. Improved conceptual models are needed for this type of site. Here conceptual models are developed by combining numerical models with field data. Several types of fracture flow and transport models are available for the modeling of contaminant transport in fractured media. These include...... the established approaches of the equivalent porous medium, discrete fracture and dual continuum models. However, these modeling concepts are not well tested for contaminant plume migration in limestone geologies. Our goal was to develop and evaluate approaches for modeling the transport of dissolved contaminant...

  17. Performance of monitoring networks estimated from a Gaussian plume model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seebregts, A.J.; Hienen, J.F.A.

    1990-10-01

    In support of the ECN study on monitoring strategies after nuclear accidents, the present report describes the analysis of the performance of a monitoring network in a square grid. This network is used to estimate the distribution of the deposition pattern after a release of radioactivity into the atmosphere. The analysis is based upon a single release, a constant wind direction and an atmospheric dispersion according to a simplified Gaussian plume model. A technique is introduced to estimate the parameters in this Gaussian model based upon measurements at specific monitoring locations and linear regression, although this model is intrinsically non-linear. With these estimated parameters and the Gaussian model the distribution of the contamination due to deposition can be estimated. To investigate the relation between the network and the accuracy of the estimates for the deposition, deposition data have been generated by the Gaussian model, including a measurement error by a Monte Carlo simulation and this procedure has been repeated for several grid sizes, dispersion conditions, number of measurements per location, and errors per single measurement. The present technique has also been applied for the mesh sizes of two networks in the Netherlands, viz. the Landelijk Meetnet Radioaciviteit (National Measurement Network on Radioactivity, mesh size approx. 35 km) and the proposed Landelijk Meetnet Nucleaire Incidenten (National Measurement Network on Nuclear Incidents, mesh size approx. 15 km). The results show accuracies of 11 and 7 percent, respectively, if monitoring locations are used more than 10 km away from the postulated accident site. These figures are based upon 3 measurements per location and a dispersion during neutral weather with a wind velocity of 4 m/s. For stable weather conditions and low wind velocities, i.e. a small plume, the calculated accuracies are at least a factor 1.5 worse.The present type of analysis makes a cost-benefit approach to the

  18. Redox zones of a landfill leachate pollution plume (Vejen, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngkilde, John; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1992-01-01

    , ferrogenic, nitrate-reducing and aerobic environments overa distance of 370 m. This redox zone sequence is consistent with thermodynamical principles and is closely matched by the leachate plume determined by the chloride plume distribution. The redox zone sequence is believed to be key in controlling...

  19. Airborne Gamma-ray Measurements in the Chernobyl Plume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grasty, R. L.; Hovgaard, Jens; Multala, J.

    1997-01-01

    On 29 April 1986, the Geological Survey of Finland (GSF) survey aircraft with a gamma ray spectrometer flew through a radioactive plume from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. The aircraft became contaminated and the gamma spectrometer measured radioactivity in the plume as well as radioactivity...

  20. Plume Splitting in a Two-layer Stratified Ambient Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yongxing; Flynn, Morris; Sutherland, Bruce

    2017-11-01

    A line-source plume descending into a two-layer stratified ambient fluid in a finite sized tank is studied experimentally. Although the total volume of ambient fluid is fixed, lower- and upper-layer fluids are respectively removed and added at a constant rate mimicking marine outfall through diffusers and natural and hybrid ventilated buildings. The influence of the plume on the ambient depends on the value of λ, defined as the ratio of the plume buoyancy to the buoyancy loss of the plume as it crosses the ambient interface. Similar to classical filling-box experiments, the plume can always reach the bottom of the tank if λ > 1 . By contrast, if λ < 1 , an intermediate layer eventually forms as a result of plume splitting. Eventually all of the plume fluid spreads within the intermediate layer. The starting time, tv, and the ending time, tt, of the transition process measured from experiments correlate with the value of λ. A three-layer ambient fluid is observed after transition, and the mean value of the measured densities of the intermediate layer fluid is well predicted using plume theory. Acknowledgments: Funding for this study was provided by NSERC.

  1. Conjecture of plume components in hydrothermal sea area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, K., IV; Aoyama, C.

    2017-12-01

    Investigation at Southern Okinawa Trough, western Kume Island, and Tokara Islands was performed from June 26 to July 12, 2016, as a part of Japan's cross ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program (SIP) for a complete understanding of active hydrothermal vents. In this investigation, water column sonar data was obtained using multi-beam sonar (EM122) onboard YOKOSUKA (Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology) and methane plumes were alsp monitored (YK16-07). Multi-beam sonar is an acoustic instrument used to measure submarine topography, and in this investigation, plumes were observed to successfully regenerate the data. It also became clear that volume backscattering strength (SV) of plumes varies, depending on the area where they are settled. On the other hand, components of plumes are still unknown. In this study, acoustic data obtained from YK16-07 will be reviewed using analytical software (echo view 7) to calculate volume backscattering strength (SV) of plumes. Likewise, multi-beam sonar (EM122) onboard DAIICHI KAIYOMARU (KAIYO ENGINEERING CO., LTD) was used to collect acoustic data. This already known data of methane plume from Sea of Japan will be analyzed using echo view 7. By comparing these data, plume components will be examined from plume size.

  2. Laboratory Study of Dispersion of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole; Larsen, Torben

    1990-01-01

    A laboratory a study on surface dispersion of buoyant plumes in open channel turbulence in made, where the buoyancy is due to both salinity and heat. The measured parameters are the downstream derivative of a plume width and height, which are integral-characteristics of the distributions of density...

  3. Ocean outfall plume characterization using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, Peter; Terrill, Eric; Otero, Mark; Hazard, Lisa; Middleton, William

    2013-01-01

    A monitoring mission to map and characterize the Point Loma Ocean Outfall (PLOO) wastewater plume using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) was performed on 3 March 2011. The mobility of an AUV provides a significant advantage in surveying discharge plumes over traditional cast-based methods, and when combined with optical and oceanographic sensors, provides a capability for both detecting plumes and assessing their mixing in the near and far-fields. Unique to this study is the measurement of Colored Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) in the discharge plume and its application for quantitative estimates of the plume's dilution. AUV mission planning methodologies for discharge plume sampling, plume characterization using onboard optical sensors, and comparison of observational data to model results are presented. The results suggest that even under variable oceanic conditions, properly planned missions for AUVs equipped with an optical CDOM sensor in addition to traditional oceanographic sensors, can accurately characterize and track ocean outfall plumes at higher resolutions than cast-based techniques.

  4. Morphology of the Zambezi River plume in the Sofala Bank ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, hydrographic data collected in the vicinity of the Zambezi River plume between 2004-2007 is discussed alongside historical data to infer the plume morphology. The sampling plan called for 73 CTD stations that were interspersed with sampling of shrimp recruitment. Satellite-derived wind speed and river ...

  5. The mantle-plume model, its feasibility and consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calsteren, van P.W.C.

    1981-01-01

    High beat-flow foci on the Earth have been named ‘hot-spots’ and are commonly correlated with ‘mantle-plumes’ in the deep. A mantle plume may be described as a portion of mantle material with a higher heat content than its surroundings. The intrusion of a mantle-plume is inferred to be similar to

  6. Volcanic origin of the eruptive plumes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, A.F.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Smith, B.A.; Danielson, G.E.; Johnson, T.V.; Synnott, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    A quadruple long exposure of Io in eclipse exhibits faint auroral emission from the eruptive plumes. No luminous spots in the vents, predicted by Gold, were observed. Heat from the interior of Io appears to be the predominant source of energy in the plumes. Copyright ?? 1981 AAAS.

  7. Porphyry-copper ore shells form at stable pressure-temperature fronts within dynamic fluid plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, P; Driesner, T; Heinrich, C A

    2012-12-21

    Porphyry-type ore deposits are major resources of copper and gold, precipitated from fluids expelled by crustal magma chambers. The metals are typically concentrated in confined ore shells within vertically extensive vein networks, formed through hydraulic fracturing of rock by ascending fluids. Numerical modeling shows that dynamic permeability responses to magmatic fluid expulsion can stabilize a front of metal precipitation at the boundary between lithostatically pressured up-flow of hot magmatic fluids and hydrostatically pressured convection of cooler meteoric fluids. The balance between focused heat advection and lateral cooling controls the most important economic characteristics, including size, shape, and ore grade. This self-sustaining process may extend to epithermal gold deposits, venting at active volcanoes, and regions with the potential for geothermal energy production.

  8. stableGP

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The code in the stableGP package implements Gaussian process calculations using efficient and numerically stable algorithms. Description of the algorithms is in the...

  9. Multi-temporal dynamics of suspended particulate matter in a macro-tidal river Plume (the Gironde) as observed by satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Sorin; Doxaran, David; Derkacheva, Anna; Novoa, Stéfani; Lavigne, Héloïse

    2018-03-01

    The Gironde River plume area is unique in terms of Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) dynamics. Multiple factors contribute to the variations of SPM at multiple time scales, from river outputs to wind stress, currents and tidal cycles. The formation and evolution of the Maximum Turbidity Zone (MTZ) inside the estuary also plays a significant role. Thus, detailed analyses and monitoring of the region is important for better understanding the mechanisms governing the turbid plume dynamics, for proper future management and monitoring of SPM export from the estuary to the coastal ocean. In this study we use an unprecedented volume of satellite data to capture and better understand the dynamics of the river plume. We combine two types of satellite information in order to achieve these goals: data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) sensors. The integrated information allows accounting for multiple time scales, i.e. from seasonal to diurnal cycles. We show and parameterize the overall effects of river discharge rates over the plume extension. Seasonal variations are also analyzed and an overall relationship between river discharge rates and plume magnitude is computed. For the first time, we clearly observe and explain the diurnal cycle of SPM dynamics in the river plume. Despite the limited capabilities of the SEVIRI sensor, geostationary data was successfully used to derive such information and results similar to in-situ datasets were obtained. The same patterns are observed, with significant increase in SPM plume during spring/ebb tide periods. Results from our study can be further used to refine sediment transport models and to gain a better perspective on the ecological implications of the sediment output in the continental shelf area.

  10. Modelling thermal plume impacts - Kalpakkam approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, T.S.; Anup Kumar, B.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    2002-01-01

    A good understanding of temperature patterns in the receiving waters is essential to know the heat dissipation from thermal plumes originating from coastal power plants. The seasonal temperature profiles of the Kalpakkam coast near Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS) thermal out fall site are determined and analysed. It is observed that the seasonal current reversal in the near shore zone is one of the major mechanisms for the transport of effluents away from the point of mixing. To further refine our understanding of the mixing and dilution processes, it is necessary to numerically simulate the coastal ocean processes by parameterising the key factors concerned. In this paper, we outline the experimental approach to achieve this objective. (author)

  11. Is the 'Fast Halo' around Hawaii as imaged in the PLUME experiment direct evidence for buoyant plume-fed asthenosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J. P.; Shi, C.; Hasenclever, J.

    2010-12-01

    An intriguing spatial pattern of variations in shear-wave arrival times has been mapped in the PLUME ocean bottom experiment (Wolfe et al., 2009) around Hawaii. The pattern consists of a halo of fast travel times surrounding a disk of slow arrivals from waves traveling up though the plume. We think it is directly sensing the pattern of dynamic uplift of the base of a buoyant asthenosphere - the buoyancy of the plume conduit lifting a 'rim' of the cooler, denser mantle that the plume rises through. The PLUME analysis inverted for lateral shear velocity variations beneath the lithosphere, after removing the assumed 1-D model velocity structure IASP91. They found that a slow plume-conduit extends to at least 1200 km below the Hawaiian hotspot. In this inversion the slow plume conduit is — quite surprisingly - surrounded by a fast wavespeed halo. A fast halo is impossible to explain as a thermal halo around the plume; this should lead to a slow wavespeed halo, not a fast one. Plume-related shearwave anisotropy also cannot simply explain this pattern — simple vertical strain around the plume conduit would result in an anisotropic slow shear-wavespeed halo, not a fast one. (Note the PLUME experiment’s uniform ‘fast-halo’ structure from 50-400km is likely to have strong vertical streaking in the seismic image; Pacific Plate-driven shear across a low-viscosity asthenosphere would be expected to disrupt and distort any cold sheet of vertical downwelling structure between 50-400km depths so that it would no longer be vertical as it is in the 2009 PLUME image with its extremely poor vertical depth control.) If the asthenosphere is plume-fed, hence more buoyant than underlying mantle, then there can be a simple explanation for this pattern. The anomaly would be due to faster traveltimes resulting from dynamic relief at the asthenosphere-mesosphere interface; uplift of the denser mesosphere by the buoyancy of the rising plume increases the distance a wave travels

  12. Learning to rapidly re-contact the lost plume in chemical plume tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Meng-Li; Meng, Qing-Hao; Wang, Jia-Ying; Luo, Bing; Jing, Ya-Qi; Ma, Shu-Gen

    2015-03-27

    Maintaining contact between the robot and plume is significant in chemical plume tracing (CPT). In the time immediately following the loss of chemical detection during the process of CPT, Track-Out activities bias the robot heading relative to the upwind direction, expecting to rapidly re-contact the plume. To determine the bias angle used in the Track-Out activity, we propose an online instance-based reinforcement learning method, namely virtual trail following (VTF). In VTF, action-value is generalized from recently stored instances of successful Track-Out activities. We also propose a collaborative VTF (cVTF) method, in which multiple robots store their own instances, and learn from the stored instances, in the same database. The proposed VTF and cVTF methods are compared with biased upwind surge (BUS) method, in which all Track-Out activities utilize an offline optimized universal bias angle, in an indoor environment with three different airflow fields. With respect to our experimental conditions, VTF and cVTF show stronger adaptability to different airflow environments than BUS, and furthermore, cVTF yields higher success rates and time-efficiencies than VTF.

  13. Learning to Rapidly Re-Contact the Lost Plume in Chemical Plume Tracing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Li Cao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining contact between the robot and plume is significant in chemical plume tracing (CPT. In the time immediately following the loss of chemical detection during the process of CPT, Track-Out activities bias the robot heading relative to the upwind direction, expecting to rapidly re-contact the plume. To determine the bias angle used in the Track-Out activity, we propose an online instance-based reinforcement learning method, namely virtual trail following (VTF. In VTF, action-value is generalized from recently stored instances of successful Track-Out activities. We also propose a collaborative VTF (cVTF method, in which multiple robots store their own instances, and learn from the stored instances, in the same database. The proposed VTF and cVTF methods are compared with biased upwind surge (BUS method, in which all Track-Out activities utilize an offline optimized universal bias angle, in an indoor environment with three different airflow fields. With respect to our experimental conditions, VTF and cVTF show stronger adaptability to different airflow environments than BUS, and furthermore, cVTF yields higher success rates and time-efficiencies than VTF.

  14. Probing Below the Visible Cloud Layers in Jupiter's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pater, Imke; Sault, Robert J.; Butler, Bryan J.; DeBoer, David R.; Wong, Michael H.

    2016-10-01

    Visible and near-infrared images of the giant planets reveal a multitude of clouds, ranging in size from tiny, hardly visible, features to giant storm systems, such as Jupiter's Great Red Spot and Oval BA. At radio wavelengths we can probe altitudes in Jupiter's atmosphere below these visible cloud layers. We used the upgraded Very Large Array to map this unexplored region down to ~10 bar. We will present full radio maps at frequencies between 4 and ~35 GHz, with typical spatial resolutions of order 1000-2000 km. We will also show spectra and radiative transfer calculations of individual features, such as the Great Red Spot, Oval BA, hot spots and ammonia-rich "plumes". Our maps are complementary to observations planned for Juno's microwave radiometer (MWR). MWR's field-of-view is tiny, ~1000 km at the highest frequencies at perijove, and is limited to extremely narrow swaths of longitude; as such, our VLA maps will provide regional and global context at wavelengths overlapping with Juno MWR. Several maps at 8-12 GHz, at a spatial resolution of ~1000 km, will be taken during Juno perijove passes.Our analysis to date, based on 4-18 GHz maps, reveal a dynamically active planet at pressures responsible for the spectroscopically identified fresh ammonia ice clouds detected by the Galileo spacecraft at these latitudes.

  15. DYNAMICALLY MAINTAINING THE VISIBILITY GRAPH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VEGTER, G

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm is presented to maintain the visibility graph of a set of N line segments in the plane in O(log2 N + K log N) time, where K is the total number of arcs of the visibility graph that are destroyed or created upon insertion or deletion of a line segment. The line segments should be

  16. Non-Euclidean visibility problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We prove a visibility criterion and study orchard problem and the cardinality of visible points in large circles. Author Affiliations. Fernando Chamizo1. Departamento de Matemáticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain. Dates. Manuscript received: 14 November 2005. Proceedings ...

  17. Thermal to visible face recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jonghyun; Hu, Shuowen; Young, S. Susan; Davis, Larry S.

    2012-06-01

    In low light conditions, visible light face identification is infeasible due to the lack of illumination. For nighttime surveillance, thermal imaging is commonly used because of the intrinsic emissivity of thermal radiation from the human body. However, matching thermal images of faces acquired at nighttime to the predominantly visible light face imagery in existing government databases and watch lists is a challenging task. The difficulty arises from the significant difference between the face's thermal signature and its visible signature (i.e. the modality gap). To match the thermal face to the visible face acquired by the two different modalities, we applied face recognition algorithms that reduce the modality gap in each step of face identification, from low-level analysis to machine learning techniques. Specifically, partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) based approaches were used to correlate the thermal face signatures to the visible face signatures, yielding a thermal-to-visible face identification rate of 49.9%. While this work makes progress for thermal-to-visible face recognition, more efforts need to be devoted to solving this difficult task. Successful development of a thermal-to-visible face recognition system would significantly enhance the Nation's nighttime surveillance capabilities.

  18. Revisiting visibility in the plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkinson, Bryan Thomas

    Abstract We consider two closely related problems: computing the region visible from a point amid simple polygonal obstacles and computing the lower envelope of a set of disjoint segments. Visibility problems such as these were proposed and promptly solved in the late'80s and early'90s before...

  19. NW Iberia Shelf Dynamics. Study of the Douro River Plume.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Iglesias

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available River plumes are one of the most important mechanisms that transport the terrestrial materials to the coast and the ocean. Some examples of those materials are pollutants, essential nutrients, which enhance the phytoplankton productivity or sediments, which settle on the seabed producing modifications on the bathymetry affecting the navigation channels. The mixing between the riverine and the oceanic waters can induce instabilities, which might generate bulges, filaments, and buoyant currents over the continental shelf. Offshore, the buoyant riverine water could form a front with the oceanic waters often related with the occurrence of current-jets, eddies and strong mixing. The study and modelling of the river plumes is a key factor for the complete understanding of sediment transport mechanisms and patterns, and of coastal physics and dynamic processes. On this study the Douro River plume will be simulated. The Douro River is located on the north-west Iberian coast and its daily averaged freshwater discharge can range values from 0 to 13000 m3/s. This variability impacts the formation of the river plumes and its dispersion along the continental shelf. This study builds on the long-term objective of generate a Douro River plume forecasting system as part of the RAIA and RAIA.co projects. Satellite imagery was analyzed showing that the river Douro is one of the main sources of suspended particles, dissolved material and chlorophyll in the NW Iberian Shelf. The Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS model was selected to reproduce scenarios of plume generation, retention and dispersion. Whit this model, three types of simulations were performed: (i schematic winds simulations with prescribed river flow, wind speed and direction; (ii multi-year climatological simulation, with river flow and temperature change for each month; (iii extreme case simulation, based on the Entre-os-Rios accident situation. The schematic wind case-studies suggest that the

  20. Argonne National Laboratory's thermal plume measurements: instruments and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Loon, L.S.; Frigo, A.A.; Paddock, R.A.

    1977-12-01

    Instrumentation and techniques were developed at Argonne National Laboratory for measuring the three-dimensional temperature structure of thermal plumes from power plants, along with the limnological, meteorological, and plant operating conditions affecting their behavior. The equipment and procedures were designed to provide field data for use in evaluating predictive models that describe thermal plume behavior, and over 100 sets of these data have been collected. The instrument systems and techniques employed in a typical thermal discharge survey are highly integrated. Continuous monitoring of ambient and plant conditions is coupled with plume mapping from a moving survey boat. The instantaneous location of the boat together with subsurface temperature measurements from a towed thermistor chain provide a quasisynoptic view of the plume structure. Real-time, onboard display of the boat path and vertical temperatures supply feedback to investigators for determining the extent and spatial resolution of measurements required. The unique design, reliability, accuracy, calibration, and historical development of the components of these integrated systems are described. Survey system interfaces with data handling and processing techniques are also explained. Special supportive studies to investigate plume dynamics, values of eddy diffusivities, time-temperature histories of water parcels in thermal plumes, and rapid changes in plume shape are also described along with instrumentation used

  1. Cooling tower and plume modeling for satellite remote sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, B.J.

    1995-05-01

    It is often useful in nonproliferation studies to be able to remotely estimate the power generated by a power plant. Such information is indirectly available through an examination of the power dissipated by the plant. Power dissipation is generally accomplished either by transferring the excess heat generated into the atmosphere or into bodies of water. It is the former method with which we are exclusively concerned in this report. We discuss in this report the difficulties associated with such a task. In particular, we primarily address the remote detection of the temperature associated with the condensed water plume emitted from the cooling tower. We find that the effective emissivity of the plume is of fundamental importance for this task. Having examined the dependence of the plume emissivity in several IR bands and with varying liquid water content and droplet size distributions, we conclude that the plume emissivity, and consequently the plume brightness temperature, is dependent upon not only the liquid water content and band, but also upon the droplet size distribution. Finally, we discuss models dependent upon a detailed point-by-point description of the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of the plume dynamics and those based upon spatially integrated models. We describe in detail a new integral model, the LANL Plume Model, which accounts for the evolution of the droplet size distribution. Some typical results obtained from this model are discussed.

  2. Biodegradation at Dynamic Plume Fringes: Mixing Versus Reaction Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirpka, O. A.; Eckert, D.; Griebler, C.; Haberer, C.; Kürzinger, P.; Bauer, R.; Mellage, A.

    2014-12-01

    Biodegradation of continuously emitted plumes is known to be most pronounced at the plume fringe, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. Under steady-state conditions, physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion was shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation, with plume lengths scaling inversely with the bulk transverse dispersivity in quasi two-dimensional settings. Under these conditions, the presence of suitable microbes is essential but the biokinetic parameters do not play an important role. When the location of the plume shifts (caused, e.g., by a fluctuating groundwater table), however, the bacteria are no more situated at the plume fringe and biomass growth, decay, activation and deactivation determine the time lag until the fringe-controlled steady state is approached again. During this time lag, degradation is incomplete. The objective of the presented study was to analyze to which extent flow and transport dynamics diminish effectiveness of fringe-controlled biodegradation and which microbial processes and related biokinetic parameters determine the system response in overall degradation to hydraulic fluctuations. We performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth and maintenance (often subsumed as "biomass decay") microbial dormancy (that is, change into a metabolically inactive state) and

  3. Airborne Gamma-ray Measurements in the Chernobyl Plume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grasty, R. L.; Hovgaard, Jens; Multala, J.

    1997-01-01

    On 29 April 1986, the Geological Survey of Finland (GSF) survey aircraft with a gamma ray spectrometer flew through a radioactive plume from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. The aircraft became contaminated and the gamma spectrometer measured radioactivity in the plume as well as radioactivity...... on the aircraft. By using simple assumptions on the build-up of contamination it has been possible to separate the signals from contamination and from plume. The analysis further showed that even a detector/spectrometer with low energy resolution is able to identify a contamination with iodine....

  4. Observations of Eyjafjallajökull eruption's plume at Potenza EARLINET station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Amodeo, Aldo; Boselli, Antonella; Cornacchia, Carmela; D'Amico, Guiseppe; Giunta, Aldo; Madonna, Fabio; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2010-05-01

    Eyjafjallajökull is one of the smallest glacier in Iceland. After seismic activity recorded during December 2009, a first eruption started on 20 March, between 22:30 and 23:30 UT. After a brief stop, a new phase of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption started around midnight on April 14, where melt penetrated its way to the central crater beneath the glacier. An eruption plume was observed in the early morning on 14 April. Ash loaded eruption plume rose to more than 8 km height, deflected to the East by westerly winds. Eruptive activity continued in the following days until 23 April with variable maximum height (between 8 and 2 km a.s.l.). Until 27 April, a plume is always visible in proximity of the volcano. On 15 April, the eruption plume reaches continental Europe with closure of airspace over large part of Northern Europe. In the following days, airspace was closed also in some regions of Southern Europe. On 15 April, 10:00 UT CNR-IMAA, Potenza distributed an alert to EARLINET stations informing about a large amount of ash is directing towards North-West of Europe. Even if EARLINET is not an operational, but research oriented, network, almost all the EARLINET stations followed the event performing measurements whenever weather conditions allow it. Because of their proximity to the source, England and Scandinavian countries are of course the most involved in the transported ash arrival. Accordingly to the MetOffice forecasts, the ash plume would have to reach Central Europe on 16 April. The transport toward South was almost blocked by the Alps. A different scenario is forecasted by MetOffice for 20-21 April when the arrival of the volcanic plume is forecasted down to the Southern Italy. At CNR-IMAA, the atmospheric observatory (CIAO) followed the event by means of all available instruments, including EARLINET multi-wavelength lidars, cloud-radar, microwave profiler and AERONET sun-photometer. Low clouds and rain did not permit measurements over Potenza for the period

  5. Patterns of Transcript Abundance of Eukaryotic Biogeochemically-Relevant Genes in the Amazon River Plume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Brian L; Allen, Andrew E; Carpenter, Edward J; Coles, Victoria J; Crump, Byron C; Doherty, Mary; Foster, Rachel A; Goes, Joaquim I; Gomes, Helga R; Hood, Raleigh R; McCrow, John P; Montoya, Joseph P; Moustafa, Ahmed; Satinsky, Brandon M; Sharma, Shalabh; Smith, Christa B; Yager, Patricia L; Paul, John H

    2016-01-01

    silicon became limiting. Expression of these genes, including carbonic anhydrase and transporters for nitrate and phosphate, were found to reflect the physiological status and biogeochemistry of river plume environments. These relatively stable patterns of eukaryotic transcript abundance occurred over modest spatiotemporal scales, with similarity observed in sample duplicates collected up to 2.45 km in space and 120 minutes in time. These results confirm the use of metatranscriptomics as a valuable tool to understand and predict microbial community function.

  6. Patterns of Transcript Abundance of Eukaryotic Biogeochemically-Relevant Genes in the Amazon River Plume.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian L Zielinski

    transporters as silicon became limiting. Expression of these genes, including carbonic anhydrase and transporters for nitrate and phosphate, were found to reflect the physiological status and biogeochemistry of river plume environments. These relatively stable patterns of eukaryotic transcript abundance occurred over modest spatiotemporal scales, with similarity observed in sample duplicates collected up to 2.45 km in space and 120 minutes in time. These results confirm the use of metatranscriptomics as a valuable tool to understand and predict microbial community function.

  7. Patterns of Transcript Abundance of Eukaryotic Biogeochemically-Relevant Genes in the Amazon River Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Andrew E.; Carpenter, Edward J.; Coles, Victoria J.; Crump, Byron C.; Doherty, Mary; Foster, Rachel A.; Goes, Joaquim I.; Gomes, Helga R.; Hood, Raleigh R.; McCrow, John P.; Montoya, Joseph P.; Moustafa, Ahmed; Satinsky, Brandon M.; Sharma, Shalabh; Smith, Christa B.; Yager, Patricia L.; Paul, John H.

    2016-01-01

    silicon became limiting. Expression of these genes, including carbonic anhydrase and transporters for nitrate and phosphate, were found to reflect the physiological status and biogeochemistry of river plume environments. These relatively stable patterns of eukaryotic transcript abundance occurred over modest spatiotemporal scales, with similarity observed in sample duplicates collected up to 2.45 km in space and 120 minutes in time. These results confirm the use of metatranscriptomics as a valuable tool to understand and predict microbial community function. PMID:27598790

  8. Modelling Europa's interaction with Jupiter's magnetosphere: Influence of plumes in Europa's atmosphere on the plasma environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloecker, A.; Saur, J.; Roth, L.

    2015-12-01

    We study the influence of plumes in Europa's atmosphere on the interaction with Jupiter's magnetosphere and the plasma environment. We apply a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, which includes plasma production and loss due to electron impact ionization and dissociative recombination, and electromagnetic induction in a subsurface water ocean.The model considers the magnetospheric and ionospheric electrons separately. We show that an atmospherical inhomogeneity, such as a plume, affects the plasma interaction in the way that a pronounced north-south asymmetry in the near and the Alfvénic far field develops. Furthermore, a "small Alfvén winglet" within Europa's Alfvén wing forms. We also investigate if such signatures of atmospherical inhomogeneities are visible in magnetic field measurements of the Galileo magnetometer. In addition to our MHD model we apply an analytical approach based on the model by Saur et al. (2007) for our studies. We compare the model results with the observed magnetic field data from three flybys of Europa that occurred during the Alfvén wing crossing.

  9. PLUME-FEATHER, referencing and finding software for research and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bénassy, O; Caron, C; Ferret-Canape, C; Cheylus, A; Courcelle, E; Dantec, C; Dayre, P; Dostes, T; Durand, A; Facq, A; Gambini, G; Morris, F; Geahchan, E; Helft, C; Hoffmann, D; Ingarao, M; Joly, P; Kieffer, J; Larré, J-M; Libes, M

    2014-01-01

    PLUME-FEATHER is a non-profit project created to Promote economicaL, Useful and Maintained softwarEFor theHigher Education And THE Research communities. The site references software, mainly Free/Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) from French universities and national research organisations, (CNRS, INRA...), laboratories or departments as well as other FLOSS software used and evaluated by users within these institutions. Each software is represented by a reference card, which describes origin, aim, installation, cost (if applicable) and user experience from the point of view of an academic user for academic users. Presently over 1000 programs are referenced on PLUME by more than 900 contributors. Although the server is maintained by a French institution, it is open to international contributions in the academic domain. All contained and validated contents are visible to anonymous public, whereas (presently more than 2000) registered users can contribute, starting with comments on single software reference cards up to help with the organisation and presentation of the referenced software products. The project has been presented to the HEP community in 2012 for the first time [1]. This is an update of the status and a call for (further) contributions.

  10. On characterizing terrain visibility graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Evans

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A terrain is an $x$-monotone polygonal line in the $xy$-plane. Two vertices of a terrain are mutually visible if and only if there is no terrain vertex on or above the open line segment connecting them. A graph whose vertices represent terrain vertices and whose edges represent mutually visible pairs of terrain vertices is called a terrain visibility graph. We would like to find properties that are both necessary and sufficient for a graph to be a terrain visibility graph; that is, we would like to characterize terrain visibility graphs.Abello et al. [Discrete and Computational Geometry, 14(3:331--358, 1995] showed that all terrain visibility graphs are “persistent”. They showed that the visibility information of a terrain point set implies some ordering requirements on the slopes of the lines connecting pairs of points in any realization, and as a step towards showing sufficiency, they proved that for any persistent graph $M$ there is a total order on the slopes of the (pseudo lines in a generalized configuration of points whose visibility graph is $M$.We give a much simpler proof of this result by establishing an orientation to every triple of vertices, reflecting some slope ordering requirements that are consistent with $M$ being the visibility graph, and prove that these requirements form a partial order. We give a faster algorithm to construct a total order on the slopes. Our approach attempts to clarify the implications of the graph theoretic properties on the ordering of the slopes, and may be interpreted as defining properties on an underlying oriented matroid that we show is a restricted type of $3$-signotope.

  11. The 1991 version of the plume impingement computer program. Volume 1: Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Robert L.; Somers, Richard E.; Prendergast, Maurice J.; Clayton, Joseph P.; Smith, Sheldon D.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this contract was to continue development of a vacuum plume impingement evaluator to provide an analyst with a capability for rapid assessment of thruster plume impingement scenarios. The research was divided into three areas: Plume Impingement Computer Program (PLIMP) modification/validation; graphics development; and documentation in the form of a Plume Handbook and PLIMP Input Guide.

  12. Turbulent Boyant Jets and Plumes in Flowing Ambient Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hai-Bo

    Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes in flowing ambient environments have been studied theoretically and experimentally. The mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes in flowing ambients have been discussed. Dimensional analysis was employed to investigate the mean behaviour of the turbulent....... Comprehensive laboratory experiments were conducted to study the mean behaviour of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes in a flowing ambient by using both fresh and salt receiving waters. The experimental data on the jet trajectories and dilutions, for a horizontal jet in a coflowing ambient and for a vertical jet......, the available field observated data on the initial dilutions for a horizontal jet issuing into a perpendicular crossflowing ambient have been presented and discussed. Mathematical modelling of the turbulent buoyant jets and plumes has been carried out by using both an integral model and a turbulence model...

  13. An Approach to In-Situ Observations of Volcanic Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, W. D.; Lopes, M. C.; Pieri, D. C.; Hall, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    Volcanoes have long been recognized as playing a dominant role in the birth, and possibly the death, of biological populations. They are possible sources of primordial gases, provide conditions sufficient for creating amino acids, strongly affect the heat balance in the atmosphere, and have been shown to sustain life (in oceanic vents.) Eruptions can have profound effects on local flora and fauna, and for very large eruptions, may alter global weather patterns and cause entire species to fail. Measurements of particulates, gases, and dynamics within a volcanic plume are critical to understanding both how volcanoes work and how plumes affect populations, environment, and aviation. Volcanic plumes and associated eruption columns are a miasma of toxic gases, corrosive condensates, and abrasive particulates that makes them hazardous to nearby populations and poses a significant risk to all forms of aviation. Plumes also provide a mechanism for sampling the volcanic interior, which, for hydrothermal environments, may host unique biological populations.

  14. Hydrocarbon Rocket Engine Plume Imaging with Laser Induced Incandescence Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA/ Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) needs sensors that can be operated on rocket engine plume environments to improve NASA/SSC rocket engine performance. In...

  15. Numerical Speadsheet Modeling of Natural Attenuation for Groundwater Contaminant Plumes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Twesme, Troy

    1999-01-01

    .... The model was used to evaluate natural attenuation for removal of a trichloroethylene (TCE) plume from a surficial aquifer containing three regions with distinctly different processes for degradation of TCE...

  16. Airborne Remote Sensing of the Plata Plume Using STARRS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Perez, Tabare; Wesson, Joel C; Burrage, Derek

    2006-01-01

    ...s. An international project, La Plata, was undertaken within the South American Climate Change Consortium framework to assess the behavior of the La Plata and Patos Lagoon plumes and their effects...

  17. Saturated Zone Plumes in Volcanic Rock: Implications for Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Kelkar; R. Roback; B. Robinson; G. Srinivasan; C. Jones; P. Reimus

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a literature survey of the occurrences of radionuclide plumes in saturated, fractured rocks. Three sites, Idaho National laboratory, Hanford, and Oak Ridge are discussed in detail. Results of a modeling study are also presented showing that the length to width ratio of a plume starting within the repository footprint at the Yucca Mountain Project site, decreases from about 20:1 for the base case to about 4:1 for a higher value of transverse dispersivity, indicating enhanced lateral spreading of the plume. Due to the definition of regulatory requirements, this lateral spreading does not directly impact breakthrough curves at the 18 km compliance boundary, however it increases the potential that a plume will encounter reducing conditions, thus significantly retarding the transport of sorbing radionuclides

  18. False alarm recognition in hyperspectral gas plume identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, James L [San Ramon, CA; Lawson, Janice K [Tracy, CA; Aimonetti, William D [Livermore, CA

    2011-03-29

    According to one embodiment, a method for analyzing hyperspectral data includes collecting first hyperspectral data of a scene using a hyperspectral imager during a no-gas period and analyzing the first hyperspectral data using one or more gas plume detection logics. The gas plume detection logic is executed using a low detection threshold, and detects each occurrence of an observed hyperspectral signature. The method also includes generating a histogram for all occurrences of each observed hyperspectral signature which is detected using the gas plume detection logic, and determining a probability of false alarm (PFA) for all occurrences of each observed hyperspectral signature based on the histogram. Possibly at some other time, the method includes collecting second hyperspectral data, and analyzing the second hyperspectral data using the one or more gas plume detection logics and the PFA to determine if any gas is present. Other systems and methods are also included.

  19. Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry for Rocket Plumes, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the need for non-intrusive sensors for rocket plume properties, we propose a laser-based velocity diagnostic that does not require seeding, works in high...

  20. Near-Shore Hydrodynamic Conditions and Chemical Plume Tracking

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fong, Derek

    2004-01-01

    .... Analyzing a dye concentration data set collected by a state of the art autonomous underwater vehicle and fixed hydrodynamic measurements, we quantify the meandering and lateral dispersion of a plume...

  1. Ash plume top height estimation using AATSR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Virtanen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm is presented for the estimation of volcanic ash plume top height using the stereo view of the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR aboard Envisat. The algorithm is based on matching top of the atmosphere (TOA reflectances and brightness temperatures of the nadir and 55° forward views, and using the resulting parallax to obtain the height estimate. Various retrieval parameters are discussed in detail, several quality parameters are introduced, and post-processing methods for screening out unreliable data have been developed. The method is compared to other satellite observations and in situ data. The proposed algorithm is designed to be fully automatic and can be implemented in operational retrieval algorithms. Combined with automated ash detection using the brightness temperature difference between the 11 and 12 μm channels, the algorithm allows efficient simultaneous retrieval of the horizontal and vertical dispersion of volcanic ash. A case study on the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 is presented.

  2. Plume conversion rates in the SURE Region. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easter, R.C.; Busness, K.M.; Hales, J.M.; Lee, R.N.; Arbuthnot, D.A.; Miller, D.F.; Sverdrup, G.M.; Spicer, C.W.; Howes, J.E. JR.

    1980-08-01

    Results of a study of transformation and transport processes in plumes emitted from fossil-fueled power plants are described. Primary research emphasis was placed upon transformations of sulfur and nitrogen oxides, with the principal objective of generating parameterized transformation relationships suitable for input to models currently being developed. Extensive field measurements were performed in late spring and late fall of 1977 at two coal-fired and one oil-fired power plants; the Breed plant in Indiana, the Cobb plant in Michigan, and the Andrus plant in Mississippi. Plume measurements were obtained using an instrumented DC-3 aircraft and included gas concentrations (SO/sub 2/, NO/sub x/, O/sub 3/, HNO/sub 3/, hydrocarbons), aerosol composition (SO/sub 4//sup =/, NO/sub 3//sup -/, NH/sub 4//sup +/), and physical aerosol parameters. Source emission measurements were also performed and SF/sub 6/ tracer released into the plumes. The resulting data, which include 140 hours of aircraft measurements, have been organized into a data base. Conversion and loss rates of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ were estimated using a variety of ratio techniques, and the results were analyzed using reactive plume models of varying complexity. A parameter-search technique was developed to utilize a reactive plume model to establish candidate conversion expressions for SO/sub 2/ transformations. SO/sub 2/ was generally found to oxidize in power plant plumes at rates ranging from 0 to 3%/h, depending upon insolation, plume dispersion, and ambient hydrocarbon concentration, as well as a variety of possible additional factors. Nitrogen oxides data suffer from lower measurement sensitivity, but preliminary indications are that nitrate and nitric acid production proceeds quite slowly in plumes, although substantial total NO/sub x/ losses were sometimes observed.

  3. Plume conversion rates in the SURE region. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easter, R.C.; Busness, K.M.; Hales, J.M.; Lee, R.N.; Arbuthnot, D.A.; Miller, D.F.; Sverdrup, G.M.; Spicer, C.W.; Howes, J.E. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    Results of a study of transformation and transport processes in plumes emitted from fossil-fueled power plants are described. Primary research emphasis was placed upon transformations of sulfur and nitrogen oxides, with the principal objective of generating parameterized transformation relationships suitable for input to models currently being developed for the EPRI Sulfate Regional Experiment Program. Extensive field measurements were performed in late spring and late fall of 1977 at two coal-fired and one oil-fired power plants; the Breed plant in Indiana, the Cobb plant in Michigan, and the Andrus plant in Mississippi. Plume measurements were obtained using an instrumented DC-3 aircraft and included gas concentrations (SO/sub 2/, NO/sub x/, O/sub 3/, NH/sub 3/, HNO/sub 3/, hydrocarbons), aerosol composition (SO/sub 4//sup =/, NO/sub 3//sup -/, NH/sub 4//sup +/), and physical aerosol parameters. Source emission measurements were also performed and SF/sub 6/ tracer released into the plumes. The resulting data, which include 140 hours of aircraft measurements, have been organized into a data base. Conversion and loss rates of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ were estimated using a varity of ratio techniques, and the results were analyzed using reactive plume models of varying complexity. A parameter-search technique was developed to utilize a reactive plume model to establish candidate conversion expressions for SO/sub 2/ transformations. SO/sub 2/ was generally found to oxidize in power plant plumes at rates ranging from 0 to 3% hr, depending upon insolation, plume dispersion, and ambient hydrocarbon concentration, as well as possible additional factors. Homogeneous oxidation paths appeared more significant than heterogeneous paths under the conditions observed. Nitrogen oxides data suffer from lower measurement sensitivity, but preliminary indications are that nitrate and nitric acid production proceeds quite slowly in plumes, although substantial total NO/sub x/ losses

  4. Arcjet Plume Ionization Effects on Exposed Solar Array Conducting Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    work with the focus now being on low power arcjets since they are near deployment. The main concerns at this point are issues involving the...11]. 1. Arcjet Plume Ionization Investigations by Langmuir Probe The plume characteristics of a low power (1.1 kW) dc arcjet have been investigated... power range will be ubeful for orbit transfer. Investigation of the effects arcjet thrusters have on other spacecraft systems has been ongoing and

  5. Plume Impingement Analysis for the European Service Module Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, John; Sibe, Fabien; Lerardo, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Plume impingement analyses were performed for the European Service Module (ESM) propulsion system Orbital Maneuvering System engine (OMS-E), auxiliary engines, and reaction control system (RCS) engines. The heat flux from plume impingement on the solar arrays and other surfaces are evaluated. This information is used to provide inputs for the ESM thermal analyses and help determine the optimal configuration for the RCS engines.

  6. Microspatial gene expression patterns in the Amazon River Plume

    OpenAIRE

    Satinsky, Brandon M.; Crump, Byron C.; Smith, Christa B.; Sharma, Shalabh; Zielinski, Brian L.; Doherty, Mary; Meng, Jun; Sun, Shulei; Medeiros, Patricia M.; Paul, John H.; Coles, Victoria J.; Yager, Patricia L.; Moran, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    The microbial community of the Amazon River Plume determines the fate of the world’s largest input of terrestrial carbon and nutrients to the ocean. By benchmarking with internal standards during sample collection, we determined that each liter of plume seawater contains 1 trillion genes and 50 billion transcripts from thousands of bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic taxa. Gene regulation by taxa inhabiting distinct microenvironments provides insights into micron-scale patterns of transformat...

  7. Optical characterization of water masses within the Columbia River plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Sherry L.; Peterson, Tawnya D.; Kudela, Raphael M.

    2012-11-01

    The Columbia River plume (CRP) is a buoyant plume that influences the Oregon and Washington shelf with the delivery of freshwater, silicic acid, trace metals, and particulate and dissolved organic matter. The highly dynamic plume contains submesoscale features that have an impact on the chemistry, biology, and transport of water and material offshore. Bio-optical classification of the larger plume water mass has confirmed seasonal and annual flow patterns but has not described the internal structure of the plume in a biogeochemically relevant way, as there were no in situ data to validate classification. The objectives of this study were to define water types statistically within the CRP using in situ measurements of biogeochemically and bio-optically relevant variables, to build a training data set from these water types, and to apply this training data set to 250 m resolution Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Aqua imagery from an oceanographically downwelling and upwelling period to predictively discriminate water masses within the plume. This study's classification technique was effective at predicting water types in the CRP. The three-variable input matrix (temperature, salinity, and chlorophyllafluorescence) performed better than the two-variable input matrix (temperature and salinity) at distinguishing fine-scale structure within the plume at the river mouth. Retentive features such as the plume bulge and eddies were observed at the river mouth and on the Washington shelf. This classification approach was limited to the available continuous variables measured by shipboard, mooring, and satellite sensors. Two new classification methods are proposed that build on the framework of the classifier described here.

  8. Iodine Plasma Species Measurements in a Hall Effect Thruster Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    from a 200 W Hall Effect Thruster fueled by iodine vapor was analyzed. The plasma source included a laboratory propellant feed system and a laboratory...distribution is unlimited Abstract • The plasma plume from a 200 W Hall Effect Thruster fueled by iodine vapor was analyzed. • The plasma source... pressure with I2 – Plume divergence lower with I2 – Dimers (I2+) measured at beam centroid (a few %) Iodine Xenon 7 Distribution A: Approved for public

  9. Simultaneous retrieval of CO2 and aerosols in a plume from hyper spectral imagery: application to the characterization of forest fire smoke using AVIRIS data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschamps, Adrien; Marion, Rodolphe; Briottet, Xavier; Foucher, Pierre-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Hyper spectral imagery is a widely used technique to study atmospheric composition. For several years, many methods have been developed to estimate the abundance of gases. However, existing methods do not simultaneously retrieve the properties of aerosols and often use standard aerosol models to describe the radiative impact of particles. This approach is not suited to the characterization of plumes, because plume particles may have a very different composition and size distribution from aerosols described by the standard models given by radiative transfer codes. This article presents a new method to simultaneously retrieve carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and aerosols inside a plume, combining an aerosol retrieval algorithm using visible and near-infrared (VNIR) wavelengths and a CO 2 estimation algorithm using shortwave infrared (SWIR) wavelengths. The micro-physical properties of the plume particles, obtained after aerosol retrieval, are used to calculate their optical properties in the SWIR. Then, a database of atmospheric terms is generated with the radiative transfer code, Moderate Resolution Atmospheric Transmission (MODTRAN). Finally, pixel radiances around the 2.0 μm absorption feature are used to retrieve the CO 2 abundances. After conducting a signal sensitivity analysis, the method was applied to two airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) images acquired over areas of biomass burning. For the first image, in situ measurements were available. The results show that including the aerosol retrieval step before the CO 2 estimation: (1) induces a better agreement between in situ measurements and retrieved CO 2 abundances (the CO 2 overestimation of about 15%, induced by neglecting aerosols has been corrected, especially for pixels where the plume is not very thick); (2) reduces the standard deviation of estimated CO 2 abundance by a factor of four; and (3) causes the spatial distribution of retrieved concentrations to be coherent. (authors)

  10. Visible neutrino decay at DUNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coloma, Pilar [Fermilab; Peres, Orlando G. [ICTP, Trieste

    2017-05-09

    If the heaviest neutrino mass eigenstate is unstable, its decay modes could include lighter neutrino eigenstates. In this case part of the decay products could be visible, as they would interact at neutrino detectors via mixing. At neutrino oscillation experiments, a characteristic signature of such \\emph{visible neutrino decay} would be an apparent excess of events at low energies. We focus on a simple phenomenological model in which the heaviest neutrino decays as $\

  11. Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2012-11-01

    The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

  12. Implementation of microwave transmissions for rocket exhaust plume diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutu, Nicholas George

    Rocket-launched vehicles produce a trail of exhaust that contains ions, free electrons, and soot. The exhaust plume increases the effective conductor length of the rocket. A conductor in the presence of an electric field (e.g. near the electric charge stored within a cloud) can channel an electric discharge. The electrical conductivity of the exhaust plume is related to its concentration of free electrons. The risk of a lightning strike in-flight is a function of both the conductivity of the body and its effective length. This paper presents an approach that relates the electron number density of the exhaust plume to its propagation constant. Estimated values of the collision frequency and electron number density generated from a numerical simulation of a rocket plume are used to guide the design of the experimental apparatus. Test par meters are identified for the apparatus designed to transmit a signal sweep form 4 GHz to 7 GHz through the exhaust plume of a J-class solid rocket motor. Measurements of the scattering parameters imply that the transmission does not penetrate the plume, but instead diffracts around it. The electron density 20 cm downstream from the nozzle exit is estimated to be between 2.7x1014 m--3 and 5.6x10 15 m--3.

  13. Improvement of ash plume monitoring, modeling and hazard assessment in the MED-SUV project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coltelli, Mauro; Andronico, Daniele; Boselli, Antonella; Corradini, Stefano; Costa, Antonio; Donnadieu, Franck; Leto, Giuseppe; Macedonio, Giovanni; Merucci, Luca; Neri, Augusto; Pecora, Emilio; Prestifilippo, Michele; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Scollo, Simona; Spinelli, Nicola; Spata, Gaetano; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Wang, Xuan; Zanmar Sanchez, Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    Volcanic ash clouds produced by explosive eruptions represent a strong problem for civil aviation, road transportation and other human activities. Since Etna volcano produced in the last 35 years more the 200 explosive eruptions of small and medium size. The INGV, liable for its volcano monitoring, developed since 2006 a specific system for forecasting and monitoring Etna's volcanic ash plumes in collaboration with several national and international institutions. Between 12 January 2011 and 31 December 2013 Etna produced forty-six basaltic lava fountains. Every paroxysm produced an eruption column ranging from a few up to eleven kilometers of height above sea level. The ash cloud contaminated the controlled airspace (CTR) of Catania and Reggio Calabria airports and caused tephra fallout on eastern Sicily sometime disrupting the operations of these airports. In order to give prompt and detailed warnings to the Aviation and Civil Protection authorities, ash plumes monitoring at Osservatorio Etneo, the INGV department in Catania, is carried out using multispectral (from visible to infrared) satellite and ground-based video-surveillance images; seismic and infrasound signals processed in real-time, a Doppler RADAR (Voldorad IIB) able to detect the eruption column in all weather conditions and a LIDAR (AMPLE) for retrieving backscattering and depolarization values of the ash clouds. Forecasting is performed running tephra dispersal models using weather forecast data, and then plotting results on maps published on a dedicated website. 24/7 Control Room operators were able to timely inform Aviation and Civil Protection operators for an effective aviation safety management. A variety of multidisciplinary activities are planned in the MED-SUV project with reference to volcanic ash observations and studies. These include: 1) physical and analogue laboratory experiments on ash dispersal and aggregation; 2) integration of satellite data (e.g. METEOSAT, MODIS) and ground

  14. Dispersion of radionuclides released into a stable planetary boundary layer using a Monte Carlo model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basit, Abdul; Raza, S Shoaib; Irfan, Naseem

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a Monte Carlo model for describing the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides (represented by Lagrangian particles/neutral tracers) continuously released into a stable planetary boundary layer is presented. The effect of variation in release height and wind directional shear on plume dispersion is studied. The resultant plume concentration and dose rate at the ground is also calculated. The turbulent atmospheric parameters, like vertical profiles of fluctuating wind velocity components and eddy lifetime, were calculated using empirical relations for a stable atmosphere. The horizontal and vertical dispersion coefficients calculated by a numerical Lagrangian model are compared with the original and modified Pasquill-Gifford and Briggs empirical σs. The comparison shows that the Monte Carlo model can successfully predict dispersion in a stable atmosphere using the empirical turbulent parameters. The predicted ground concentration and dose rate contours indicate a significant increase in the affected area when wind shear is accounted for in the calculations

  15. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  16. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  17. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    After Maynard-Smith and Price [1] mathematically derived why a given behaviour or strategy was adopted by a certain proportion of the population at a given time, it was shown that a strategy which is currently stable in a population need not be stable in evolutionary time (across generations). Additionally it was sug-.

  18. Near-realtime monitoring of the 2014 Holuhraun volcanic plume, its composition and dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk Jónasdóttir, Elín; Barsotti, Sara; Bergsson, Baldur; Pfeffer, Melissa Anne; Arason, Þórður; Björnsson, Halldór; Nína Petersen, Guðrún; Þorsteinsson, Hróbjartur; Yeo, Richard; Arngrímsson, Hermann; Jóhannsson, Þorsteinn

    2015-04-01

    The ongoing effusive eruption in the Holuhraun, Iceland emits a very high concentration of volcanic gases and along with a release of metals this constitues the main threat from the eruption to the health and safety in Iceland. The atmospheric monitoring of the volcanic plume utilizes many different instruments and systems including both in-situ measurements and remote sensing. Cameras, satellites and radars have been the most useful real-time monitoring tools. Two visible light cameras with different perspectives were deployed soon after increased unrest started in Bárðarbunga on 16 August 2014. Infrared cameras were installed, first during a field campaign and later as longer term monitoring devices. The sulfur-rich plume is qualitatively monitored using BTD technique on two wavelength filters on the infrared camera. The eruption plume is, in certain atmospheric conditions, visible on a C-band operational radar in east Iceland. An X-band mobile radar was moved within about 25 km of the eruption site, providing higher resolution radar imagery, but due to the remote location was removed before the onset of harsh winter contitions. Several polar-orbiting satellites pass Iceland daily. High-resolution imagery is available from the MODIS instruments on NASA Aqua and Terra satellites as well as from the AVHRR instruments on NOAA's and EUMETSAT's satellites. Other satellites with specific instruments useful for tracking gases also provide valuable information, although not all in near-real time. Eumetsat SEVIRI instruments on geostationary satellites provide the highest temporal resolution - but low spatial resolution. Gas emissions from the fissure, the plume dispersion and down-wind ground-level SO2 concentrations have been monitored throughout the eruption. The network of ground-based air-quality monitors was enhanced after the onset of the eruption and as of writing, consists of 21 online monitors as well as 27 handheld monitors positioned with key personel from

  19. El Nino, from 1870 to 2014, and other Atmospheric Circulation Forcing by Extreme Apparitions of the Eight Annual, Continental Scale, Aerosol Plumes in the Satellite Era which Point to a Possible Cause for the Current Californian Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Eight continental scale aerosol plumes exist each year as the enclosed image shows. Apparitions of seven plumes only exist for a few months in the same season each year whilst the East Asian Plume is visible all year. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) of all the plumes varies enormously interannually with two studies showing the surface radiative forcing of the South East Asian Plume (SEAP) as -150W/m2 and -286W/m2/AOD. I show that the SEAP, created by volcanic aerosols (natural) and biomass burning and gas flares in the oil industry (anthropogenic), is the sole cause of all El Nino events, the greatest interannual perturbation of the atmospheric circulation system. The SEAP creates an El Nino by absorbing solar radiation at the top of the plume which heats the upper atmosphere and cools the surface. This creates a temperature inversion compared to periods without the plume and reduces convection. With reduced convection in SE Asia, the Maritime Continent, the Trade Winds blowing across the Pacific are forced to relax as their exit into the Hadley and Walker Cells is constrained and the reduced Trade Wind speed causes the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) to rise in the central tropical Pacific Ocean as there is a strong negative correlation between wind speed and SST. The warmer SST in the central Pacific creates convection in the region which further reduces the Trade Wind speed and causes the Walker Cell to reverse - a classic El Nino. Having established the ability of such extreme aerosol plumes to create El Nino events I will then show how the South American, West African, Middle East and SEAP plumes create drought in the Amazon, Spain, Darfur and Australia as well as causing the extremely warm autumn and winter in Europe in 2006-07. All these effects are created by the plumes reducing convection in the region of the plume which forces the regional Hadley Cells into anomalous positions thereby creating persistent high pressure cells in the mid latitudes. This

  20. Hydrologic Process Parameterization of Electrical Resistivity Imaging of Solute Plumes Using POD McMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awatey, M. T.; Irving, J.; Oware, E. K.

    2016-12-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (McMC) inversion frameworks are becoming increasingly popular in geophysics due to their ability to recover multiple equally plausible geologic features that honor the limited noisy measurements. Standard McMC methods, however, become computationally intractable with increasing dimensionality of the problem, for example, when working with spatially distributed geophysical parameter fields. We present a McMC approach based on a sparse proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) model parameterization that implicitly incorporates the physics of the underlying process. First, we generate training images (TIs) via Monte Carlo simulations of the target process constrained to a conceptual model. We then apply POD to construct basis vectors from the TIs. A small number of basis vectors can represent most of the variability in the TIs, leading to dimensionality reduction. A projection of the starting model into the reduced basis space generates the starting POD coefficients. At each iteration, only coefficients within a specified sampling window are resimulated assuming a Gaussian prior. The sampling window grows at a specified rate as the number of iteration progresses starting from the coefficients corresponding to the highest ranked basis to those of the least informative basis. We found this gradual increment in the sampling window to be more stable compared to resampling all the coefficients right from the first iteration. We demonstrate the performance of the algorithm with both synthetic and lab-scale electrical resistivity imaging of saline tracer experiments, employing the same set of basis vectors for all inversions. We consider two scenarios of unimodal and bimodal plumes. The unimodal plume is consistent with the hypothesis underlying the generation of the TIs whereas bimodality in plume morphology was not theorized. We show that uncertainty quantification using McMC can proceed in the reduced dimensionality space while accounting for the

  1. Amazon Plume Salinity Response to Ocean Teleconnections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Tyaquiçã

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST variability strongly influences rainfall changes in the Amazon River basin, which impacts on the river discharge and consequently the sea surface salinity (SSS in the Amazon plume. An Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF analysis was performed using 46 years of SST, rainfall, and SSS datasets, in order to establish the relationship between these variables. The first three modes of SST/rainfall explained 87.83% of the total covariance. Pacific and Atlantic SSTs led Amazon basin rainfall events by 4 months. The resultant SSS in the western tropical North Atlantic (WTNA lagged behind basin rainfall by 3 months, with 75.04% of the total covariance corresponding to the first four EOF modes. The first EOF mode indicated a strong SSS pattern along the coast that was connected to negative rainfall anomalies covering the Amazon basin, linked to El Niño events. A second pattern also presented positive SSS anomalies, when the rainfall was predominantly over the northwestern part of the Amazon basin, with low rainfall around the Amazon River mouth. The pattern with negative SSS anomalies in the WTNA was associated with the fourth mode, when positive rainfall anomalies were concentrated in the northwest part of South America. The spatial rainfall structure of this fourth mode was associated with the spatial rainfall distribution found in the third EOF mode of SST vs. rainfall, which was a response to La Niña Modoki events. A statistical analysis for the 46 year period and monthly anomaly composites for 2008 and 2009 indicated that La Niña Modoki events can be used for the prediction of low SSS patterns in the WNTA.

  2. Plume Aerosol Size Distribution Modeling and Comparisons to PrAIRie2005 Field Study Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S.; Liggio, J.; Makar, P.; Li, S.; Racinthe, J.

    2006-12-01

    As part of the analysis phase of the PrAIRie2005 field study, the effects of different Edmonton-area emission sources on local air-quality are being examined. Four large coal-fired power-plants are located to the West of the city. Here, the effects of these power-plants on urban and regional air-quality will be examined, using both plume and regional air-quality models. During the last few decades, coal-fired power plants have been found to be as a major source of pollution, affecting public-health. According to NACEC (North American Commission for Environmental Corporation, 2001)'s report, 46 of the top 50 air polluters in North America were power plants. The importance of such sources has resulted in several attempts to improve understanding of the basic formation mechanisms of plume particulate matter. Sulphur dioxide contributes to acidifying emissions and to the production of secondary acidic aerosols that have been linked to a number of serious human health problems, acid rain and visibility (Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998; Hidy, 1984; Wilson and McMurray, 1981). Primary particulate matter originating directly from coal-fired power plants may also increase secondary particulate mass by providing a surface for sulphuric acid absorption . Environment Canada's PrAIRie2005 field study between August 12th and September 7th, 2005 included overflights and downwind measurements near the Edmonton powerplants (Wabamun, Sundance, Keephills and Genesee). The data collected consisted of particle size distributions, ozone, NOX, total mass and the chemical composition of fine particles. In order to investigate and improve our understanding of the formation mechanisms and physical properties of power-plant-generated aerosols in the Edmonton area, the Plume Aerosol Microphysical (PAM) model has been employed. This model accounts for gas-phase chemistry, aerosol microphysical processes (i.e. homogeneous/heterogeneous nucleation, condensation/evaporation and coagulation) and

  3. Ash Deposition Mechanisms and Plume Scrubbing in the 2008 Okmok Eruption, Umnak Island, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unema, J. A.; Ort, M. H.; Larsen, J. F.; Neal, C. A.; Schaefer, J. R.; Webley, P.

    2010-12-01

    Okmok volcano, Aleutian Arc, Alaska, produced five weeks of explosive eruption in July and August 2008 from vents in a 10-km-wide caldera. Water was available in the caldera in lakes and aquifers, and its interaction with erupting magma (~56% SiO2) is evidenced by observations of white steam clouds throughout the eruption, fine grain size of deposits, and consumption of caldera lakes during eruption. The opening sequence on July 12 produced the eruption’s highest column, 16 km above sea level. Basal deposits from this opening sequence, divided into 3 units, are present in the caldera and on the north-east (NE), east (E), and south-east (SE) flanks and are clast-supported coarse ash to medium lapilli at proximal and medial sites. Unit 1 is made up of vitric coarse ash and lapilli. Fine and medium ash form a matrix in the upper half. Unit 2 is open-framework coarse ash and lapilli, similar in componentry but finer than Unit 1. The uppermost unit of the opening sequence, Unit 3, is poorly sorted ash with scattered lapilli, ash pellets, and cored lapilli. The axes of Units 1 and 2 are oriented NE, while that of Unit 3 has two lobes, one NE and the other east-south-east (ESE), recording a wind shift during Unit 3 deposition. Infrared satellite imagery show a NE-directed plume at 21:45 UTC July 12 and an ESE plume 14:00 UTC July 13, the first visible wind shift during the eruption. A column sufficient to carry the large clasts in Unit 3 was present during July 12-13, not later in the eruption, so this wind shift places the timing of Unit 3 deposition between 21:45 UTC July 12 and 14:00 UTC July 13. Wind direction during the rest of the eruption, as seen in infrared satellite images, varied, sending most plumes NE, E, and SE, with southwest-directed plumes on July 30-August 4. Deposits above Units 1-3 within 7 km of vents are dominated by fine and medium ash with several distinct structures. Facies include layers (cm-dm thick) of 2-6-mm pellets of fine ash, medium ash

  4. Nighttime NOx Chemistry in Coal-Fired Power Plant Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibiger, D. L.; McDuffie, E. E.; Dube, W. P.; Veres, P. R.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Lee, B. H.; Green, J. R.; Fiddler, M. N.; Ebben, C. J.; Sparks, T.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Montzka, D.; Campos, T. L.; Cohen, R. C.; Bililign, S.; Holloway, J. S.; Thornton, J. A.; Brown, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) play a key role in atmospheric chemistry. During the day, they catalyze ozone (O3) production, while at night they can react to form nitric acid (HNO3) and nitryl chloride (ClNO2) and remove O3 from the atmosphere. These processes are well studied in the summer, but winter measurements are more limited. Coal-fired power plants are a major source of NOx to the atmosphere, making up approximately 30% of emissions in the US (epa.gov). NOx emissions can vary seasonally, as well as plant-to-plant, with important impacts on the details of the plume chemistry. In particular, due to inefficient plume dispersion, nighttime NOx emissions from power plants are held in concentrated plumes, where rates of mixing with ambient O3 have a strong influence on plume evolution. We will show results from the aircraft-based WINTER campaign over the northeastern United States, where several nighttime intercepts of power plant plumes were made. Several of these intercepts show complete O3 titration, which can have a large influence on NOx lifetime, and thus O3 production, in the plume. When power plant NO emissions exceed background O3 levels, O3 is completely consumed converting NO to NO2. In the presence of O3, NO2 will be oxidized to NO3, which will then react with NO2 to form N2O5, which can then form HNO3 and/or ClNO2 and, ultimately, remove NOx from the atmosphere or provide next-day oxidant sources. If there is no O3 present, however, no further chemistry can occur and NO and NO2 will be transported until mixing with sufficient O3 for higher oxidation products. Modeling results of plume development and mixing, which can tell us more about this transport, will also be presented.

  5. Biogeochemical evolution of a landfill leachate plume, Norman, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Böhlke, John Karl; Masoner, Jason R.; Breit, George N.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Jaeschke, Jeanne B.

    2011-01-01

    Leachate from municipal landfills can create groundwater contaminant plumes that may last for decades to centuries. The fate of reactive contaminants in leachate-affected aquifers depends on the sustainability of biogeochemical processes affecting contaminant transport. Temporal variations in the configuration of redox zones downgradient from the Norman Landfill were studied for more than a decade. The leachate plume contained elevated concentrations of nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC) (up to 300 mg/L), methane (16 mg/L), ammonium (650 mg/L as N), iron (23 mg/L), chloride (1030 mg/L), and bicarbonate (4270 mg/L). Chemical and isotopic investigations along a 2D plume transect revealed consumption of solid and aqueous electron acceptors in the aquifer, depleting the natural attenuation capacity. Despite the relative recalcitrance of NVDOC to biodegradation, the center of the plume was depleted in sulfate, which reduces the long-term oxidation capacity of the leachate-affected aquifer. Ammonium and methane were attenuated in the aquifer relative to chloride by different processes: ammonium transport was retarded mainly by physical interaction with aquifer solids, whereas the methane plume was truncated largely by oxidation. Studies near plume boundaries revealed temporal variability in constituent concentrations related in part to hydrologic changes at various time scales. The upper boundary of the plume was a particularly active location where redox reactions responded to recharge events and seasonal water-table fluctuations. Accurately describing the biogeochemical processes that affect the transport of contaminants in this landfill-leachate-affected aquifer required understanding the aquifer's geologic and hydrodynamic framework.

  6. Policy on stable iodine prophylaxis following nuclear reactor accidents (1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    This policy considers the alleviation of possible hazards that may arise from any radioiodines inhaled from a plume of fission products emanating from a nuclear reactor accident. Such a nuclear reactor may be land or ship-based. In any accident that releases radioiodines to the environment, one countermeasure that may need to be considered to reduce the effect of inhalation of radioiodines by persons downwind of the point of release is to provide those persons with tablets containing stable iodine. Both potassium iodide (KI) and potassium iodate (KIO 3 ) are recommended as effective prophylactics tablets for this purpose in Australia. Action levels, doses and contraindicatories are briefly outlined

  7. Normal modified stable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses two classes of distributions, and stochastic processes derived from them: modified stable (MS) laws and normal modified stable (NMS) laws. This extends corresponding results for the generalised inverse Gaussian (GIG) and generalised hyperbolic (GH) or normal generalised inverse...... Gaussian (NGIG) laws. The wider framework thus established provides, in particular, for added flexibility in the modelling of the dynamics of financial time series, of importance especially as regards OU based stochastic volatility models for equities. In the special case of the tempered stable OU process...

  8. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letolle, R.; Mariotti, A.; Bariac, T.

    1991-06-01

    This report reviews the historical background and the properties of stable isotopes, the methods used for their measurement (mass spectrometry and others), the present technics for isotope enrichment and separation, and at last the various present and foreseeable application (in nuclear energy, physical and chemical research, materials industry and research; tracing in industrial, medical and agronomical tests; the use of natural isotope variations for environmental studies, agronomy, natural resources appraising: water, minerals, energy). Some new possibilities in the use of stable isotope are offered. A last chapter gives the present state and forecast development of stable isotope uses in France and Europe

  9. Analysing Stable Time Series

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adler, Robert

    1997-01-01

    We describe how to take a stable, ARMA, time series through the various stages of model identification, parameter estimation, and diagnostic checking, and accompany the discussion with a goodly number...

  10. Plume capture by a migrating ridge: Analog geodynamic experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, J. S.; Hall, P.

    2010-12-01

    Paleomagnetic data from the Hawaii-Emperor Seamount Chain (HESC) suggests that the Hawaiian hotspot moved rapidly (~40 mm/yr) between 81 - 47 Ma but has remained relatively stationary since that time. This implies that the iconic bend in the HESC may in fact reflect the transition from a period of rapid hotspot motion to a stationary state, rather than a change in motion of the Pacific plate. Tarduno et al. (2009) have suggested that this period of rapid hotspot motion might be the surface expression of a plume conduit returning to a largely vertical orientation after having been “captured” and tilted by a migrating mid-ocean ridge. We report on a series of analog fluid dynamic experiments designed to characterize the interaction between a migrating spreading center and a thermally buoyant mantle plume. Experiments were conducted in a clear acrylic tank (100 cm x 70 cm x 50 cm) filled with commercial grade high-fructose corn syrup. Plate-driven flow is modeled by dragging two sheets of Mylar film (driven by independent DC motors) in opposite directions over the surface of the fluid. Ridge migration is achieved by moving the point at which the mylar sheets diverge using a separate motor drive. Buoyant plume flow is modeled using corn syrup introduced into the bottom of the tank from an external, heated, pressurized reservoir. Small (~2 mm diameter), neutrally buoyant Delrin spheres are mixed into reservoir of plume material to aid in visualization. Plate velocities and ridge migration rate are controlled and plume temperature monitored using LabView software. Experiments are recorded using digital video which is then analyzed using digital image analysis software to track the position and shape of the plume conduit throughout the course of the experiment. The intersection of the plume conduit with the surface of the fluid is taken as an analog for the locus of hotspot volcanism and tracked as a function of time to obtain a hotspot migration rate. Experiments are

  11. Integrating wildfire plume rises within atmospheric transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallia, D. V.; Kochanski, A.; Wu, D.; Urbanski, S. P.; Krueger, S. K.; Lin, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Wildfires can generate significant pyro-convection that is responsible for releasing pollutants, greenhouse gases, and trace species into the free troposphere, which are then transported a significant distance downwind from the fire. Oftentimes, atmospheric transport and chemistry models have a difficult time resolving the transport of smoke from these wildfires, primarily due to deficiencies in estimating the plume injection height, which has been highlighted in previous work as the most important aspect of simulating wildfire plume transport. As a result of the uncertainties associated with modeled wildfire plume rise, researchers face difficulties modeling the impacts of wildfire smoke on air quality and constraining fire emissions using inverse modeling techniques. Currently, several plume rise parameterizations exist that are able to determine the injection height of fire emissions; however, the success of these parameterizations has been mixed. With the advent of WRF-SFIRE, the wildfire plume rise and injection height can now be explicitly calculated using a fire spread model (SFIRE) that is dynamically linked with the atmosphere simulated by WRF. However, this model has only been tested on a limited basis due to computational costs. Here, we will test the performance of WRF-SFIRE in addition to several commonly adopted plume parameterizations (Freitas, Sofiev, and Briggs) for the 2013 Patch Springs (Utah) and 2012 Baker Canyon (Washington) fires, for both of which observations of plume rise heights are available. These plume rise techniques will then be incorporated within a Lagrangian atmospheric transport model (STILT) in order to simulate CO and CO2 concentrations during NASA's CARVE Earth Science Airborne Program over Alaska during the summer of 2012. Initial model results showed that STILT model simulations were unable to reproduce enhanced CO concentrations produced by Alaskan fires observed during 2012. Near-surface concentrations were drastically

  12. CALIOP-based Biomass Burning Smoke Plume Injection Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soja, A. J.; Choi, H. D.; Fairlie, T. D.; Pouliot, G.; Baker, K. R.; Winker, D. M.; Trepte, C. R.; Szykman, J.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon and aerosols are cycled between terrestrial and atmosphere environments during fire events, and these emissions have strong feedbacks to near-field weather, air quality, and longer-term climate systems. Fire severity and burned area are under the control of weather and climate, and fire emissions have the potential to alter numerous land and atmospheric processes that, in turn, feedback to and interact with climate systems (e.g., changes in patterns of precipitation, black/brown carbon deposition on ice/snow, alteration in landscape and atmospheric/cloud albedo). If plume injection height is incorrectly estimated, then the transport and deposition of those emissions will also be incorrect. The heights to which smoke is injected governs short- or long-range transport, which influences surface pollution, cloud interaction (altered albedo), and modifies patterns of precipitation (cloud condensation nuclei). We are working with the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) science team and other stakeholder agencies, primarily the Environmental Protection Agency and regional partners, to generate a biomass burning (BB) plume injection height database using multiple platforms, sensors and models (CALIOP, MODIS, NOAA HMS, Langley Trajectory Model). These data have the capacity to provide enhanced smoke plume injection height parameterization in regional, national and international scientific and air quality models. Statistics that link fire behavior and weather to plume rise are crucial for verifying and enhancing plume rise parameterization in local-, regional- and global-scale models used for air quality, chemical transport and climate. Specifically, we will present: (1) a methodology that links BB injection height and CALIOP air parcels to specific fires; (2) the daily evolution of smoke plumes for specific fires; (3) plumes transport and deposited on the Greenland Ice Sheet; and (4) compare CALIOP-derived smoke plume injection

  13. Plant odour plumes as mediators of plant-insect interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyaert, Ivo; Hilker, Monika

    2014-02-01

    Insect olfactory orientation along odour plumes has been studied intensively with respect to pheromonal communication, whereas little knowledge is available on how plant odour plumes (POPs) affect olfactory searching by an insect for its host plants. The primary objective of this review is to examine the role of POPs in the attraction of insects. First, we consider parameters of an odour source and the environment which determine the size, shape and structure of an odour plume, and we apply that knowledge to POPs. Second, we compare characteristics of insect pheromonal plumes and POPs. We propose a 'POP concept' for the olfactory orientation of insects to plants. We suggest that: (i) an insect recognises a POP by means of plant volatile components that are encountered in concentrations higher than a threshold detection limit and that occur in a qualitative and quantitative blend indicating a resource; (ii) perception of the fine structure of a POP enables an insect to distinguish a POP from an unspecific odorous background and other interfering plumes; and (iii) an insect can follow several POPs to their sources, and may leave the track of one POP and switch to another one if this conveys a signal with higher reliability or indicates a more suitable resource. The POP concept proposed here may be a useful tool for research in olfactory-mediated plant-insect interactions. © 2013 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2013 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  14. Sewage outfall plume dispersion observations with an autonomous underwater vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, P; Cunha, S R; Neves, M V; Pereira, F L; Quintaneiro, I

    2005-01-01

    This work represents one of the first successful applications of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) for interdisciplinary coastal research. A monitoring mission to study the shape and estimate the initial dilution of the S. Jacinto sewage outfall plume using an AUV was performed on July 2002. An efficient sampling strategy enabling greater improvements in spatial and temporal range of detection demonstrated that the sewage effluent plume can be clearly traced using naturally occurring tracers in the wastewater. The outfall plume was found at the surface highly influenced by the weak stratification and low currents. Dilution varying with distance downstream was estimated from the plume rise over the outfall diffuser until a nearly constant value of 130:1, 60 m from the diffuser, indicating the near field end. Our results demonstrate that AUVs can provide high-quality measurements of physical properties of effluent plumes in a very effective manner and valuable considerations about the initial mixing processes under real oceanic conditions can be further investigated.

  15. A cold plasma plume with a highly conductive liquid electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guangliang; Chen Wenxing; Chen Shihua; Yang Size

    2008-01-01

    A cold dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma plume with one highly conductive liquid electrode has been developed to treat thermally sensitive materials, and its preliminary discharging characteristics have been studied. The averaged electron temperature and density is estimated to be 0.6eV and 10 11 /cm 3 , respectively. The length of plasma plume can reach 5 cm with helium gas (He), and the conductivity of the outer electrode affects the plume length obviously. This plasma plume could be touched by bare hand without causing any burning or painful sensation, which may provide potential application for safe aseptic skin care. Moreover, the oxidative particles (e.g., OH, O * , O 3 ) in the downstream oxygen (O2) gas of the plume have been applied to treat the landfill leachate. The results show that the activated O 2 gas can degrade the landfill leachate effectively, and the chemical oxygen demand (COD), conductivity, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and suspended solid (SS) can be decreased by 52%, 57%, 76% and 92%, respectively. (fluids, plasmas and electric discharges)

  16. Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, Antoni K.; Maxson, James A.; Hensinger, David M.

    1993-01-01

    An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure.

  17. Laser beam-plasma plume interaction during laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jacek; Moscicki, Tomasz; Szymanski, Zygmunt

    2003-10-01

    Laser welding process is unstable because the keyhole wall performs oscillations which results in the oscillations of plasma plume over the keyhole mouth. The characteristic frequencies are equal to 0.5-4 kHz. Since plasma plume absorbs and refracts laser radiation, plasma oscillations modulate the laser beam before it reaches the workpiece. In this work temporary electron densities and temperatures are determined in the peaks of plasma bursts during welding with a continuous wave CO2 laser. It has been found that during strong bursts the plasma plume over the keyhole consists of metal vapour only, being not diluted by the shielding gas. As expected the values of electron density are about two times higher in peaks than their time-averaged values. Since the plasma absorption coefficient scales as ~N2e/T3/2 (for CO2 laser radiation) the results show that the power of the laser beam reaching the metal surface is modulated by the plasma plume oscillations. The attenuation factor equals 4-6% of the laser power but it is expected that it is doubled by the refraction effect. The results, together with the analysis of the colour pictures from streak camera, allow also interpretation of the dynamics of the plasma plume.

  18. Early Learning Theories Made Visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloglovsky, Miriam; Daly, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Go beyond reading about early learning theories and see what they look like in action in modern programs and teacher practices. With classroom vignettes and colorful photographs, this book makes the works of Jean Piaget, Erik Erikson, Lev Vygotsky, Abraham Maslow, John Dewey, Howard Gardner, and Louise Derman-Sparks visible, accessible, and easier…

  19. Magnetic Fields: Visible and Permanent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkeljohn, Dorothy R.; Earl, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Children will be able to see the concept of a magnetic field translated into a visible reality using the simple method outlined. Standard shelf paper, magnets, iron filings, and paint in a spray can are used to prepare a permanent and well-detailed picture of the magnetic field. (Author/JN)

  20. Non-Euclidean visibility problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FERNANDO CHAMIZO. Departamento de Matemáticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain. MS received 14 November 2005. Abstract. We consider the analog of visibility problems in hyperbolic plane (repre- sented by Poincaré half-plane model H), replacing the standard lattice Z ...

  1. Incremental Visualizer for Visible Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukauskas, Linas; Bøhlen, Michael Hanspeter

    This paper discusses the integration of database back-end and visualizer front-end into a one tightly coupled system. The main aim which we achieve is to reduce the data pipeline from database to visualization by using incremental data extraction of visible objects in a fly-through scenarios. We...

  2. Using satellite imagery for qualitative evaluation of plume transport in modeling the effects of the Kuwait oil fire smoke plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, A.; Janota, P.

    1992-01-01

    To forecast the behavior of the Kuwait oil fire smoke plumes and their possible acute or chronic health effects over the Arabian Gulf region, TASC created a comprehensive health and environmental impacts modeling system. A specially-adapted Lagrangian puff transport model was used to create (a) short-term (multiday) forecasts of plume transport and ground-level concentrations of soot and SO 2 ; and (b) long-term (seasonal and longer) estimates of average surface concentrations and depositions. EPA-approved algorithms were used to transform exposures to SO 2 and soot (as PAH/BaP) into morbidity, mortality and crop damage risks. Absent any ground truth, satellite imagery from the NOAA Polar Orbiter and the ESA Geostationary Meteosat offered the only opportunity for timely qualitative evaluation of the long-range plume transport and diffusion predictions. This paper shows the use of actual satellite images (including animated loops of hourly Meteosat images) to evaluate plume forecasts in near-real-time, and to sanity-check the meso- and long-range plume transport projections for the long-term estimates. Example modeled concentrations, depositions and health effects are shown

  3. IASI measurements of reactive trace species in biomass burning plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.-F. Coheur

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This work presents observations of a series of short-lived species in biomass burning plumes from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI, launched onboard the MetOp-A platform in October 2006. The strong fires that have occurred in the Mediterranean Basin – and particularly Greece – in August 2007, and those in Southern Siberia and Eastern Mongolia in the early spring of 2008 are selected to support the analyses. We show that the IASI infrared spectra in these fire plumes contain distinctive signatures of ammonia (NH3, ethene (C2H4, methanol (CH3OH and formic acid (HCOOH in the atmospheric window between 800 and 1200 cm−1, with some noticeable differences between the plumes. Peroxyacetyl nitrate (CH3COOONO2, abbreviated as PAN was also observed with good confidence in some plumes and a tentative assignment of a broadband absorption spectral feature to acetic acid (CH3COOH is made. For several of these species these are the first reported measurements made from space in nadir geometry. The IASI measurements are analyzed for plume height and concentration distributions of NH3, C2H4 and CH3OH. The Greek fires are studied in greater detail for the days associated with the largest emissions. In addition to providing information on the spatial extent of the plume, the IASI retrievals allow an estimate of the total mass emissions for NH3, C2H4 and CH3OH. Enhancement ratios are calculated for the latter relative to carbon monoxide (CO, giving insight in the chemical processes occurring during the transport, the first day after the emission.

  4. Interaction between Edge-Driven Convection and Mantle Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjón-Cabeza Córdoba, A.; Ballmer, M.

    2017-12-01

    Intraplate volcanism can occur in a variety of geodynamic settings. Its characteristics can inform about the underlying mantle dynamics. A non-negligible number of intraplate oceanic volcanoes are located close to continental shelves (e.g. Bermuda, Canary Islands, Cape Verde…). In these regions, any putative plumes would interact with Edge-Driven Convection (EDC), a mode of Small-Scale Convection that is triggered along steps of lithospheric thickness. We have systematically explored 2-D geodynamic models of EDC, varying e.g. the viscosity of the mantle, geometry of the edge, potential temperature, etc. In addition, we study the influence of a mantle plume with variable excess temperature and buoyancy flux at a given distance to the edge. The mantle-convection code is coupled with a new melting parameterization that considers the depletion effect on productivity. We apply this parameterization not only to predict the extent of melting for a given lithology, but also the major-element composition of extracted melts for comparison with geochemical data. Results show that the first EDC upwellings are always localized in the oceanic domain at a distance from the continental margin that depends on mantle viscosity. The initial geometry of the edge does not have a significant influence on the "steady-state" shape of EDC. Depending on the distance of the plume from the edge and plume vigor, the plume is either deflected or enhanced by EDC. The mix of materials that melts in the mantle, as well as the amount of melting, is controlled by the interaction of the plume with EDC (e.g., with melting restricted to fertile heterogeneities in the end-member EDC case). Because several model parameters affect this interaction and related melting, a joint analysis of major-element and trace-element composition of hotspot lavas is required to constrain mantle processes.

  5. Tidally induced lateral dispersion of the Storfjorden overflow plume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Wobus

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the flow of brine-enriched shelf water from Storfjorden (Svalbard into Fram Strait and onto the western Svalbard Shelf using a regional set-up of NEMO-SHELF, a 3-D numerical ocean circulation model. The model is set up with realistic bathymetry, atmospheric forcing, open boundary conditions and tides. The model has 3 km horizontal resolution and 50 vertical levels in the sh-coordinate system which is specially designed to resolve bottom boundary layer processes. In a series of modelling experiments we focus on the influence of tides on the propagation of the dense water plume by comparing results from tidal and non-tidal model runs. Comparisons of non-tidal to tidal simulations reveal a hotspot of tidally induced horizontal diffusion leading to the lateral dispersion of the plume at the southernmost headland of Spitsbergen which is in close proximity to the plume path. As a result the lighter fractions in the diluted upper layer of the plume are drawn into the shallow coastal current that carries Storfjorden water onto the western Svalbard Shelf, while the dense bottom layer continues to sink down the slope. This bifurcation of the plume into a diluted shelf branch and a dense downslope branch is enhanced by tidally induced shear dispersion at the headland. Tidal effects at the headland are shown to cause a net reduction in the downslope flux of Storfjorden water into the deep Fram Strait. This finding contrasts previous results from observations of a dense plume on a different shelf without abrupt topography.

  6. Plume Mitigation for Mars Terminal Landing: Soil Stabilization Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has led the efforts for lunar and Martian landing site preparation, including excavation, soil stabilization, and plume damage prediction. There has been much discussion of sintering but until our team recently demonstrated it for the lunar case there was little understanding of the serious challenges. Simplistic sintering creates a crumbly, brittle, weak surface unsuitable for a rocket exhaust plume. The goal of this project is to solve those problems and make it possible to land a human class lander on Mars, making terminal landing of humans on Mars possible for the first time.

  7. Magnetic Detachment and Plume Control in Escaping Magnetized Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmit, P.F.; Fisch, N.J.

    2008-01-01

    The model of two-fluid, axisymmetric, ambipolar magnetized plasma detachment from thruster guide fields is extended to include plasmas with non-zero injection angular velocity profiles. Certain plasma injection angular velocity profiles are shown to narrow the plasma plume, thereby increasing exhaust efficiency. As an example, we consider a magnetic guide field arising from a simple current ring and demonstrate plasma injection schemes that more than double the fraction of useful exhaust aperture area, more than halve the exhaust plume angle, and enhance magnetized plasma detachment

  8. Studies of the Kuwait oil fire plume during midsummer 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daum, P.H.; Al-Sunaid, A.; Busness, K.M.; Hales, J.M.; Mazurek, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-09-20

    This paper reports aircraft observations of the Kuwait oil fire plume conducted during the period July 31-August 17, 1991. During this study the plume was transported almost exclusively to the south of Kuwait over the Persian Gulf and the Arabian Peninsula. The plume base was generally found to be well above the surface, in some cases as high as 1-2 km; plume tops did not exceed 5 km. Aerosol mass (based on measured aerosol constituents) in the central section of the plume, ca. 150-200 km downwind of the source region, was found to be >500 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, with number densities in the size range (approximate) 0.2 < d < 3 {mu}m (where d is diameter) as high as 30,000/cm{sup 3}. The aerosol was composed of (in order of approximate contribution to mass) inorganic salts, elemental carbon, and organic carbon. Sodium chloride constituted a surprisingly large component of the soluble inorganic mass. The aerosol particles appeared to function as good cloud condensation nuclei, with a large fraction of accumulation mode particles (by number) activated at a supersaturation of 0.6%. Under conditions in which the plume was relatively compact, transmittance of solar radiation to the surface was only 10-20%. Plume albedo was observed to be as low as 2-3% close to the source region, consistent with the high elemental-carbon concentrations present in the plume. Trace gas concentrations were consistent with fuel composition and with current knowledge of atmospheric chemical processes. Sulfur dioxide concentrations close to the source region were found to be as high as 300-400 ppb. The emissions factor for S (expressed as a percentage) was estimated to be 1.8%, which is consistent with estimates of a fuel sulfur content of 2-2.5%. SO{sub 2} was found to be only slowly oxidized (<1%/h). Nitrogen oxide concentrations were found to be quite low (<50 ppb near the source, decreasing to 1-2 ppb well downwind), which is consistent with a crude oil nitrogen source. 32 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Odor identity influences tracking of temporally patterned plumes in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frye Mark A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Turbulent fluid landscapes impose temporal patterning upon chemical signals, and the dynamical neuronal responses to patterned input vary across the olfactory receptor repertoire in flies, moths, and locusts. Sensory transformations exhibit low pass filtering that ultimately results in perceptual fusion of temporally transient sensory signals. For example, humans perceive a sufficiently fast flickering light as continuous, but the frequency threshold at which this fusion occurs varies with wavelength. Although the summed frequency sensitivity of the fly antenna has been examined to a considerable extent, it is unknown how intermittent odor signals are integrated to influence plume tracking behavior independent of wind cues, and whether temporal fusion for behavioral tracking might vary according to the odor encountered. Results Here we have adopted a virtual reality flight simulator to study the dynamics of plume tracking under different experimental conditions. Flies tethered in a magnetic field actively track continuous (non-intermittent plumes of vinegar, banana, or ethyl butyrate with equal precision. However, pulsing these plumes at varying frequency reveals that the threshold rate, above which flies track the plume as if it were continuous, is unique for each odorant tested. Thus, the capability of a fly to navigate an intermittent plume depends on the particular odorant being tracked during flight. Finally, we measured antennal field potential responses to an intermittent plume, found that receptor dynamics track the temporal pattern of the odor stimulus and therefore do not limit the observed behavioral temporal fusion limits. Conclusions This study explores the flies' ability to track odor plumes that are temporally intermittent. We were surprised to find that the perceptual critical fusion limit, determined behaviorally, is strongly dependent on odor identity. Antennal field potential recordings indicate that

  10. Calculation of cooling tower plumes for high pressure wintry situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gassmann, F.; Tinguely, M.; Haschke, D.

    1982-12-01

    The diffusion of the plumes of the projected nuclear power plants at Kaiseraugst and Schwoerstadt, during high pressure wintry conditions, has been examined using a mathematical model to simulate the plumes. For these calculations, microaerological measurements were made in the proximity of Kaiseraugst and Schwoerstadt. These give a typical image of the weather during high pressure wintry conditions, which is normally associated with an inversion, sometimes strong, at a low height. Dry cooling towers with natural draught, which offer an alternative solution to the wet cooling towers proposed for Kasieraugst, are examined equally. (Auth./G.T.H.)

  11. Plume Mitigation: Soil Erosion and Lunar Prospecting Sensor Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Philip T.

    2014-01-01

    Demonstrate feasibility of the simplest, lowest-mass method of measuring density of a cloud of lunar soil ejected by rocket exhaust, using new math techniques with a small baseline laser/camera system. Focus is on exploring the erosion process that occurs when the exhaust plume of a lunar rocket impacts the regolith. Also, predicting the behavior of the lunar soil that would be blasted from a lunar landing/launch site shall assist in better design and protection of any future lunar settlement from scouring of structures and equipment. NASA is gathering experimental data to improve soil erosion models and understand how lunar particles enter the plume flow.

  12. Monitoring Groundwater Contaminant Plumes Using Airborne Geophysical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Martin; Oftendinger, Ulrich; Ruffell, Alastair; Cowan, Marie; Cassidy, Rachel; Comte, Jean-Christophe; Wilson, Christopher; Desissa, Mohammednur

    2013-04-01

    Under the European Union Water Framework Directive, Member States are required to assess water quality across both surface water and groundwater bodies. Subsurface pollution plumes, originating from a variety of sources, pose a significant direct risk to water quality. The monitoring and characterisation of groundwater contaminant plumes is generally invasive, time consuming and expensive. In particular, adequately capturing the contaminant plume with monitoring installations, when the extent of the feature is unknown and the presence of contamination is only evident from indirect observations, can be prohibitively expensive. This research aims to identify the extent and nature of subsurface contaminant plumes using airborne geophysical survey data. This data was collected across parts of the island of Ireland within the scope of the original Tellus and subsequent Tellus Border projects. The rapid assessment of the airborne electro-magnetic (AEM) data allowed the identification of several sites containing possible contaminant plumes. These AEM anomalies were assessed through the analysis of existing site data and field site inspections, with areas of interest being examined for metallic structures that could affect the AEM data. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), ground penetrating radar (GPR) and ground-based electro-magnetic (EM) surveys were performed to ground-truth existing airborne data and to confirm the extent and nature of the affected area identified using the airborne data. Groundwater and surface water quality were assessed using existing field site information. Initial results collected from a landfill site underlain by basalt have indicated that the AEM data, coupled with ERT and GPR, can successfully be used to locate possible plumes and help delineate their extent. The analysis of a range of case study sites exhibiting different geological and environmental settings will allow for the development of a consistent methodology for examining the

  13. Airborne I-DOAS measurements at Mt. Etna: BrO and OClO evolution in the plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    S., General; Bobrowski, N.; Pöhler, D.; Weber, K.; Fischer, C.; Platt, U.

    2015-07-01

    Spatial distributions of bromine monoxide (BrO), chlorine dioxide (OClO) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) were determined in the volcanic emissions of Mt. Etna on 8th and 9th of July 2011 by Airborne Imaging Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (AI-DOAS). Slant column densities (SCDs in units of molec/cm2) of up to 4.2 × 1014 for BrO, 1.5 × 1014 for OClO and 4.6 × 1018 for SO2 were detected. Assuming SO2 to be a stable tracer to overcome dilution effects, measurements of BrO/SO2 and OClO/SO2 ratios from distances of 1-19 km to the summit crater region were used to investigate the evolution of BrO and OClO within corresponding plume ages of 2-34 min. Along the centerline of the plume relatively constant BrO/SO2 ratios of 1.4 × 10- 4 and 2.0 × 10- 4 were detected on 8th and 9th of July 2011, respectively. Furthermore the BrO/SO2 ratio was investigated along several cross-sections of the volcanic plume. On both days significant increases by a factor of 2-3 in the BrO/SO2 ratio from the center to the edge of the plume were seen. From simultaneous measurements of BrO and OClO the mixing ratios of ClO could be inferred to range from about 80 to 300 ppt. In addition, decreases in the BrO/SO2 ratio with time could be observed by measurements three to four hours before the culmination of a paroxysm at Mt. Etna on 9th July 2011.

  14. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  15. The impact of glacier geometry on meltwater plume structure and submarine melt in Greenland fjords

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carroll, D.; Sutherland, D. A.; Hudson, B.; Moon, T.; Catania, G. A.; Shroyer, E. L.; Nash, J. D.; Bartholomaus, T. C.; Felikson, D.; Stearns, L. A.; Noël, B. P Y; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Meltwater from the Greenland Ice Sheet often drains subglacially into fjords, driving upwelling plumes at glacier termini. Ocean models and observations of submarine termini suggest that plumes enhance melt and undercutting, leading to calving and potential glacier destabilization. Here we

  16. Follow the Plume: Organic Molecules and Habitable Conditions in the Subsurface Ocean of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Alfonso; McKay, Christopher P.; Willson, David; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Hurford, Terry

    2018-01-01

    This white paper describes the astrobiological significance of the Enceladus plume, and makes a series of scientific and technological recommendations that would lead to a future mission that samples and analyzes plume materials, and searches for evidence of life.

  17. Sediment plume response to surface melting and supraglacial lake drainages on the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, Vena W.; Smith, Laurence C; Rennermalm, Asa K.

    2009-01-01

    of a downstream sediment plume in Kangerlussuaq Fjord by comparing: (1) plume area and suspended sediment concentration from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery and field data; (2) ice-sheet melt extent from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) passive microwave data; and (3......) supraglacial lake drainage events from MODIS. Results confirm that the origin of the sediment plume is meltwater release from the ice sheet. Interannual variations in plume area reflect interannual variations in surface melting. Plumes appear almost immediately with seasonal surface-melt onset, provided...... the estuary is free of landfast sea ice. A seasonal hysteresis between melt extent and plume area suggests late-season exhaustion in sediment supply. Analysis of plume sensitivity to supraglacial events is less conclusive, with 69% of melt pulses and 38% of lake drainage events triggering an increase in plume...

  18. Towards visible soliton microcomb generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Oh, Dong Yoon; Yang, Qi-Fan; Shen, Boqiang; Wang, Heming; Yang, Ki Youl; Lai, Yu-Hung; Yi, Xu; Li, Xinbai; Vahala, Kerry

    2017-11-03

    Frequency combs have applications that extend from the ultra-violet into the mid-infrared bands. Microcombs, a miniature and often semiconductor-chip-based device, can potentially access most of these applications, but are currently more limited in spectral reach. Here, we demonstrate mode-locked silica microcombs with emission near the edge of the visible spectrum. By using both geometrical and mode-hybridization dispersion control, devices are engineered for soliton generation while also maintaining optical Q factors as high as 80 million. Electronics-bandwidth-compatible (20 GHz) soliton mode locking is achieved with low pumping powers (parametric oscillation threshold powers as low as 5.4 mW). These are the shortest wavelength soliton microcombs demonstrated to date and could be used in miniature optical clocks. The results should also extend to visible and potentially ultra-violet bands.

  19. Ultraviolet, Visible, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Michael H.

    Spectroscopy in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) range is one of the most commonly encountered laboratory techniques in food analysis. Diverse examples, such as the quantification of macrocomponents (total carbohydrate by the phenol-sulfuric acid method), quantification of microcomponents, (thiamin by the thiochrome fluorometric procedure), estimates of rancidity (lipid oxidation status by the thiobarbituric acid test), and surveillance testing (enzyme-linked immunoassays), are presented in this text. In each of these cases, the analytical signal for which the assay is based is either the emission or absorption of radiation in the UV-Vis range. This signal may be inherent in the analyte, such as the absorbance of radiation in the visible range by pigments, or a result of a chemical reaction involving the analyte, such as the colorimetric copper-based Lowry method for the analysis of soluble protein.

  20. Physiochemical characterisation of biomass burning plumes in Brazil during SAMBBA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William; Allan, James; Flynn, Michael; Darbyshire, Eoghan; Hodgson, Amy; Johnson, Ben; Haywood, Jim; Longo, Karla; Artaxo, Paulo; Coe, Hugh

    2013-04-01

    Biomass burning represents one of the largest sources of particulate matter to the atmosphere, which results in a significant perturbation to the Earth's radiative balance coupled with serious negative impacts on public health. Globally, biomass burning aerosols are thought to exert a small warming effect of 0.03 Wm-2, however the uncertainty is 4 times greater than the central estimate. On regional scales, the impact is substantially greater, particularly in areas such as the Amazon Basin where large, intense and frequent burning occurs on an annual basis for several months (usually from August-October). Furthermore, a growing number of people live within the Amazon region, which means that they are subject to the deleterious effects on their health from exposure to substantial volumes of polluted air. Results are presented here from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA), which took place during September and October 2012 over Brazil. A suite of instrumentation was flown on-board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft. Measurements from the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) form the major part of the analysis presented here. The aircraft sampled several fires in close proximity (approximately 150m above the most intense fires) in different areas of Brazil. This included two extensive areas of burning, which occurred in the states of Rondonia and Tocantins. The Rondonia fire was largely dominated by smouldering combustion of a huge single area of rainforest with a visible plume of smoke extending approximately 80km downwind. The Tocantins example contrasted with this as it was a collection of a large number of smaller fires, with flaming combustion being more prevalent. Furthermore, the burned area was largely made up of agricultural land in a cerrado (savannah-like) region of Brazil. Initial results suggest that the chemical nature of these fires differed

  1. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 9. Evolutionary Stable Strategy: Application of Nash Equilibrium in Biology. General ... Using some examples of classical games, we show how evolutionary game theory can help understand behavioural decisions of animals.

  2. The Stable Concordance Genus

    OpenAIRE

    Kearney, M. Kate

    2013-01-01

    The concordance genus of a knot is the least genus of any knot in its concordance class. Although difficult to compute, it is a useful invariant that highlights the distinction between the three-genus and four-genus. In this paper we define and discuss the stable concordance genus of a knot, which describes the behavior of the concordance genus under connected sum.

  3. Manifolds admitting stable forms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Le, Hong-Van; Panák, Martin; Vanžura, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 1 (2008), s. 101-11 ISSN 0010-2628 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP201/05/P088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : stable forms * automorphism groups Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  4. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  5. Interactive Stable Ray Tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal Corso, Alessandro; Salvi, Marco; Kolb, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Interactive ray tracing applications running on commodity hardware can suffer from objectionable temporal artifacts due to a low sample count. We introduce stable ray tracing, a technique that improves temporal stability without the over-blurring and ghosting artifacts typical of temporal post-pr...

  6. The stable subgroup graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Tolue

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce stable subgroup graph associated to the group $G$. It is a graph with vertex set all subgroups of $G$ and two distinct subgroups $H_1$ and $H_2$ are adjacent if $St_{G}(H_1\\cap H_2\

  7. Chemical lasers in the visible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.R.; Broida, H.P.

    1974-01-01

    Since the beginning of the laser era in 1960, a continuing search for chemical lasers has been carried out. This quest has been influenced by the knowledge that many chemical reactions produce visible chemiluminescence and, therefore, partition some of the reaction products into emitting, electronically excited states. Such luminescence has been observed not only from low-pressure, gas-phase reactions, notably those of alkali metals and halogens, but also from a limited number of liquid-phase reactions. (U.S.)

  8. Computing Visible-Surface Representations,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    Terzopoulos N00014-75-C-0643 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AMC ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK Artificial Inteligence Laboratory AREA A...Massachusetts Institute of lechnolog,. Support lbr the laboratory’s Artificial Intelligence research is provided in part by the Advanced Rtccarcl Proj...dynamically maintaining visible surface representations. Whether the intention is to model human vision or to design competent artificial vision systems

  9. Atmospheric ventilation corridors and coefficients for pollution plume ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    Information Science and Technology, Nanjing, China. Received 21 April, 2016; Accepted 11 August, 2016. This study presents a comparative investigation of atmospheric ventilation corridors and coefficients for gaseous pollution plume released from an isolated industrial facility into the ambient air of the host community in ...

  10. Solar Coronal Plumes and the Fast Solar Wind

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Before the spectroscopic peculiarities in IPRs and plumes in Polar Coronal Holes (PCHs) can be further investigated with the instrument Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), it is mandatory to summarize the results of the ...

  11. Proceedings of plumes, plates and mineralisation symposium: an introduction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hatton, CJ

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The papers in this special issue consider possible South African plume-related deposits, such as the Ventersdorp and Karoo volcanic rocks, and the Bushveld and Uitkomst Complexes. These magnetic provinces are described and interpreted in the context...

  12. Characterization of ablated species in laser-induced plasma plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusawa, Hideki; Sakka, Tetsuo; Ogata, Yukio H.

    2004-01-01

    Plasma electron density and atomic population densities in the plasma plume produced by a laser ablation of aluminum metal were determined in various ambient gases at relatively high pressures. The method is based on the fit of a spectral line profile of Al(I) 2 P (convolutionsign) - 2 S emission to the theoretical spectrum obtained by one-dimensional radiative transfer calculation. The electron density was higher for a higher ambient gas pressure, suggesting the confinement of the plume by an ambient gas. The electron density also depends on the type of ambient gases, i.e., it increased in the order He 4 2 4 , while the atomic population density is almost independent of the type of ambient species and pressure. The population densities of the upper and lower levels of the transition were compared, and the ratio between their spatial distribution widths was calculated. These results provide valuable information regarding the confinement of the plume by the ambient gas and give insight into the time evolution of the plume

  13. Global volcanic emissions: budgets, plume chemistry and impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past few decades our understanding of global volcanic degassing budgets, plume chemistry and the impacts of volcanic emissions on our atmosphere and environment has been revolutionized. Global volcanic emissions budgets are needed if we are to make effective use of regional and global atmospheric models in order to understand the consequences of volcanic degassing on global environmental evolution. Traditionally volcanic SO2 budgets have been the best constrained but recent efforts have seen improvements in the quantification of the budgets of other environmentally important chemical species such as CO2, the halogens (including Br and I) and trace metals (including measurements relevant to trace metal atmospheric lifetimes and bioavailability). Recent measurements of reactive trace gas species in volcanic plumes have offered intriguing hints at the chemistry occurring in the hot environment at volcanic vents and during electrical discharges in ash-rich volcanic plumes. These reactive trace species have important consequences for gas plume chemistry and impacts, for example, in terms of the global fixed nitrogen budget, volcanically induced ozone destruction and particle fluxes to the atmosphere. Volcanically initiated atmospheric chemistry was likely to have been particularly important before biological (and latterly anthropogenic) processes started to dominate many geochemical cycles, with important consequences in terms of the evolution of the nitrogen cycle and the role of particles in modulating the Earth's climate. There are still many challenges and open questions to be addressed in this fascinating area of science.

  14. Ion Engine Plume Interaction Calculations for Prototypical Prometheus 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Myron J.; Kuharski, Robert A.; Gardner, Barbara M.; Katz, Ira; Randolph, Tom; Dougherty, Ryan; Ferguson, Dale C.

    2005-01-01

    Prometheus 1 is a conceptual mission to demonstrate the use of atomic energy for distant space missions. The hypothetical spacecraft design considered in this paper calls for multiple ion thrusters, each with considerably higher beam energy and beam current than have previously flown in space. The engineering challenges posed by such powerful thrusters relate not only to the thrusters themselves, but also to designing the spacecraft to avoid potentially deleterious effects of the thruster plumes. Accommodation of these thrusters requires good prediction of the highest angle portions of the main beam, as well as knowledge of clastically scattered and charge exchange ions, predictions for grid erosion and contamination of surfaces by eroded grid material, and effects of the plasma plume on radio transmissions. Nonlinear interactions of multiple thrusters are also of concern. In this paper we describe two- and three-dimensional calculations for plume structure and effects of conceptual Prometheus 1 ion engines. Many of the techniques used have been validated by application to ground test data for the NSTAR and NEXT ion engines. Predictions for plume structure and possible sputtering and contamination effects will be presented.

  15. Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs

  16. Observations of brine plumes below melting Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Algot K.

    2018-02-01

    In sea ice, interconnected pockets and channels of brine are surrounded by fresh ice. Over time, brine is lost by gravity drainage and flushing. The timing of salt release and its interaction with the underlying water can impact subsequent sea ice melt. Turbulence measurements 1 m below melting sea ice north of Svalbard reveal anticorrelated heat and salt fluxes. From the observations, 131 salty plumes descending from the warm sea ice are identified, confirming previous observations from a Svalbard fjord. The plumes are likely triggered by oceanic heat through bottom melt. Calculated over a composite plume, oceanic heat and salt fluxes during the plumes account for 6 and 9 % of the total fluxes, respectively, while only lasting in total 0.5 % of the time. The observed salt flux accumulates to 7.6 kg m-2, indicating nearly full desalination of the ice. Bulk salinity reduction between two nearby ice cores agrees with accumulated salt fluxes to within a factor of 2. The increasing fraction of younger, more saline ice in the Arctic suggests an increase in desalination processes with the transition to the new Arctic.

  17. Sulfate Reduction Remediation of a Metals Plume Through Organic Injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phifer, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory testing and a field-scale demonstration for the sulfate reduction remediation of an acidic/metals/sulfate groundwater plume at the Savannah River Site has been conducted. The laboratory testing consisted of the use of anaerobic microcosms to test the viability of three organic substrates to promote microbially mediated sulfate reduction. Based upon the laboratory testing, soybean oil and sodium lactate were selected for injection during the subsequent field-scale demonstration. The field-scale demonstration is currently ongoing. Approximately 825 gallons (3,123 L) of soybean oil and 225 gallons (852 L) of 60 percent sodium lactate have been injected into an existing well system within the plume. Since the injections, sulfate concentrations in the injection zone have significantly decreased, sulfate-reducing bacteria concentrations have significantly increased, the pH has increased, the Eh has decreased, and the concentrations of many metals have decreased. Microbially mediated sulfate reduction has been successfully promoted for the remediation of the acidic/metals/sulfate plume by the injection of soybean oil and sodium lactate within the plume

  18. Modelling the Zambezi River plume | Nehama | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    typical of observed discharge amounts in summer), the Kelvin and Froude numbers for the resulting plume imply a 'large-scale' buoyant discharge with a coastal current that is close to being in geostrophic balance with the across-shore pressure ...

  19. Reducing the effect on the environment by collecting methane plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, R.; Aoyama, C.

    2017-12-01

    Often times, seeping methane plumes can be observed in the vicinity of surface layer methane hydrate. Greenhouse effect of methane gas is approximately 25 times that of carbon dioxide. This is a big influence on the environment. From the investigation performed in 2006 at Umitaka Kaikyaku of the Sea of Japan, the annual amount of methane gas seeping naturally from seafloor was 7.7×105m3/per m2. Methane plume is one of the important factors in considering carbon cycle. In order to collect seeping methane plumes naturally, a method using dome-shaped film was examined. In March, 2016, experiment was performed in the northeast coast of Sado Island in the Sea of Japan using ROV to collect bubbles with a film, using ROV at methane plume gushing point of 150m depth. Bubbles rising into the tubes from dome-shaped film were observed. In June, 2017, another investigation was performed in Umitaka Kaikyaku in offshore Joetsu at Sea of Japan. ROV was used at 890m depth and the experiment was performed with domes made of various materials and shapes. In this study, the author will describe the investigation result.

  20. Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs.

  1. Atmospheric Halogen Chemistry of Volcanic Plumes in WRF-Chem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surl, Luke; Donohoue, Deanna; von Glasow, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions are known to be a strong and concentrated source of reactive halogen species. The chemistry that these species are known to take part in include ozone-destruction cycles. Despite the potentially large perturbation to the chemistry of the troposphere that eruptions may cause, the magnitude of such impacts on global and regional scales is largely unknown. We used WRF-Chem to investigate the influence of Mount Etna on the tropospheric chemistry of the Mediterranean region. The chemistry of bromine, chlorine and mercury has been added to the chemical mechanism CBMZ and we have coupled WRF-Chem with the emissions program PrepChem. We developed a simple parameterisation of the key multiphase reaction cycles involving halogens. Comparison with published field data shows that the model is able to reproduce the bromine explosion phenomenon seen in spectroscopic investigations of volcanic plumes. From the model results we are able to determine a detailed picture of the chemistry of a volcanic plume; results are presented which show in detail how the character of the volcanic plume evolves as it is advected downwind and we identify which parts of the chemical cycle are most likely to be the limiting factors for the speed of the processing. Additionally, these modelled results are supplemented with, and compared against, measurements of ozone depletion that we made within the plume at the summit of Mount Etna.

  2. The EUV Spectrum of Sunspot Plumes Observed by SUMER on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Abstract. We present results from sunspot observations obtained by. SUMER on SOHO. In sunspot plumes the EUV spectrum differs from the quiet Sun; continua are observed with different slopes and intensities; emission lines from molecular hydrogen and many unidentified species indicate unique plasma conditions ...

  3. New method for calculation of integral characteristics of thermal plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukowska, Daria; Popiolek, Zbigniew; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2008-01-01

    of the directional velocity (upward component of the mean velocity). The method is applied for determination of the characteristics of an asymmetric thermal plume generated by a sitting person. The method was validated in full-scale experiments in a climatic chamber with a thermal manikin as a simulator of a sitting...

  4. Atmospheric ventilation corridors and coefficients for pollution plume ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study presents a comparative investigation of atmospheric ventilation corridors and coefficients for gaseous pollution plume released from an isolated industrial facility into the ambient air of the host community in Ile-Ife suburb, southwest Nigeria. For the months of September to December in the year 2012 and 2013, ...

  5. Visual plumes coastal dispersion modeling in south- west Sabah

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2011-12-16

    Dec 16, 2011 ... The travel distance (lt) is a main function of ambient current velocity (m/s) and direction. Prior to the modeling exercise, field data pertaining ... The plume travel distance would also not entrain into foreign waters as long .... U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Pacific. Ecosystems Branch, Newport, Oregon.

  6. Multiphase CFD modeling of nearfield fate of sediment plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saremi, Sina; Hjelmager Jensen, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    . The two-phase mixture solution based on the drift-flux method is evaluated for 3D simulation of material disposal and overflow discharge from the hoppers. The model takes into account the hindrance and resistance mechanisms in the mixture and is capable of describing the flow details within the plumes...

  7. Observations of brine plumes below melting Arctic sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Peterson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In sea ice, interconnected pockets and channels of brine are surrounded by fresh ice. Over time, brine is lost by gravity drainage and flushing. The timing of salt release and its interaction with the underlying water can impact subsequent sea ice melt. Turbulence measurements 1 m below melting sea ice north of Svalbard reveal anticorrelated heat and salt fluxes. From the observations, 131 salty plumes descending from the warm sea ice are identified, confirming previous observations from a Svalbard fjord. The plumes are likely triggered by oceanic heat through bottom melt. Calculated over a composite plume, oceanic heat and salt fluxes during the plumes account for 6 and 9 % of the total fluxes, respectively, while only lasting in total 0.5 % of the time. The observed salt flux accumulates to 7.6 kg m−2, indicating nearly full desalination of the ice. Bulk salinity reduction between two nearby ice cores agrees with accumulated salt fluxes to within a factor of 2. The increasing fraction of younger, more saline ice in the Arctic suggests an increase in desalination processes with the transition to the new Arctic.

  8. THE QUANTIFYING OF FLUE QUALITY IN OSTRICH PLUMES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    portant economic traits in the fashion plume industry to the general belief among ostrich farm€rs and featier. (Swa , 1979). The quality ofthe flue is determined main- dealers, that the fatty appearance ofthe flue is one ofthe ly by subjective traits such as handling, fatty appeannce, most important single components of flue ...

  9. The EUV Spectrum of Sunspot Plumes Observed by SUMER on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    J. Astrophys. Astr. (2000) 21, .397-401. The EUV Spectrum of Sunspot Plumes Observed by SUMER on. SOHO. W. Curdt,. 1. B. N. Dwivedi. 2. & U. Feldman. 3. 1. Max-Planck-Institut für Aeronomie, D-37191, Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany. 2. Department of Applied Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005, India.

  10. Impacts of wildfire smoke plumes on regional air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Recent trends in increased frequency and severity of large fires necessitate an improved understanding of smoke plume impacts on regional-scale air quality and public health. Objective: We examine the impact of fire smoke on regional air quality between 2006 and 2013 ...

  11. Deciphering the Origin of Plume-Textured Geodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlick, George Donald; Jones, Francis Tucker

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an interpretation of the inward and outward growth and formation of plume textured geodes available from southern Brazil. Field occurrence, morphology of vesicles, growth history, closure of the agate shell, microscopic features, coherent reflection of light from convoluted surfaces, and accessory minerals of the inner cavity are…

  12. Plume Generation Zones On The Core Mantle Boundary: their origin and what they tell about how the Earth works - and how it has worked (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    It is more than 50 years since Wilson (1963) suggested that a fixed plume of deep origin from the convecting mantle is generating the Hotspots of the Hawaiian chain on the overlying moving rigid lithosphere and nearly 45 years since Morgan (1972) followed by suggesting that the plumes which generate Hotspots rise only from the Core/Mantle Boundary (CMB). During the past ~ 15 years testing has begun of a refinement of Morgan's idea based on the observation that Plumes responsible for Hotspots, Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) and a significant fraction of other igneous rocks (including kimberlites) originate only in Plume Generation Zones (PGZs) at the edges on the CMB of one or other of TUZO and JASON the 2 antipodal, equatorial, Large Low Shear Wave Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) of the deep mantle (Garnero et al. 2007) or from similar PGZs at the edges on the CMB of ~8 smaller Low Shear Wave Velocity Provinces. Today I will: (i) demonstrate using dated Hotspot, Large Igneous Province and Kimberlite occurrence history and paleomagnetic rotations (e.g. Torsvik et al. 2010, Burke et al.2008) the stability throughout the past 0.55 Ga of the LLSVPs and LSVPs (ii) show from the history of the Earth and Mars how the LLSVPs and LSVPs are likely to have formed early in Earth history and to have been stable since ~ 4.4 Ga (Burke et al. 2012) (iii) show, following an analogy suggested by Jack Whitehead of similarity to atmospheric fronts, why plumes are generated only from PGZs on the CMB at the margins of LLSVPs and LSVPs. (iv) show from results of recent seismological studies of Iceland, Jan Mayen, Hawaii, Yellowstone, the Afar and Ontong Java, that although plumes rise vertically in the deep mantle from the CMB their fate in the top ~ 1, 000 km of the mantle is proving to be varied and to depend largely, as Wilson suggested, on how they interact with the plates above them. Properties of the Plume Generation Zones (PGZs) on the CMB and of the plumes that rise from them are

  13. CFD investigation of balcony spill plumes in atria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCartney, C.J.; Lougheed, G.D.; Weckman, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Smoke management in buildings during fire events often uses mechanical ventilation systems to maintain smoke layer elevation above a safe evacuation path. Design of these systems requires accurate correlations for the smoke production rate of the buoyant fire plume. One design issue is the smoke production rate of fire plumes which spill out from a fire compartment, under a balcony and up through an atrium or other large volume. Current engineering correlations for these balcony spill plumes are based on a combination of one-tenth scale test data and theoretical analysis. Questions have arisen over the suitability of these correlations for real-scale designs. A combined program of full-scale experimentation and CFD modeling is being conducted to analyze the accuracy of these correlations. A full-scale experimental facility was constructed with a 5 m by 5 m by 15 m fire compartment connected to a four-story atrium. Propane fires in the compartment produce balcony spill plumes which form steady-state smoke layers in the atrium. Experimental variables include fire size, compartment opening width, balcony depth and compartment fascia depth. A variable exhaust system was used to achieve various smoke layer heights for each of 100 compartment configurations. Temperature, smoke obscuration and gas concentrations were measured in the compartment, atrium and exhaust system. The experimental data was used to determine the atrium smoke layer elevation and balcony spill plume smoke production rate for each configuration and fire size. Comparison of this data with zone model results and design correlations for atrium smoke management systems will be performed to evaluate their accuracy. A CFD model of the experimental facility was implemented using the Fire Dynamics Simulator software (Version 3). Large-eddy simulations of the flow were performed with a constant radiative fraction and an infinitely fast mixture fraction combustion model. A grid sensitivity analysis was

  14. Ion energy distributions and densities in the plume of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Shotaro; Cravens, Thomas E.; Omidi, Nojan; Perry, Mark E.; Waite, J. Hunter

    2016-10-01

    Enceladus has a dynamic plume that is emitting gas, including water vapor, and dust. The gas is ionized by solar EUV radiation, charge exchange, and electron impact and extends throughout the inner magnetosphere of Saturn. The charge exchange collisions alter the plasma composition. Ice grains (dust) escape from the vicinity of Enceladus and form the E ring, including a portion that is negatively charged by the local plasma. The inner magnetosphere within 10 RS (Saturn radii) contains a complex mixture of plasma, neutral gas, and dust that links back to Enceladus. In this paper we investigate the energy distributions, ion species and densities of water group ions in the plume of Enceladus using test particle and Monte Carlo methods that include collisional processes such as charge exchange and ion-neutral chemical reactions. Ion observations from the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) for E07 are presented for the first time. We use the modeling results to interpret observations made by the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) and the INMS. The low energy ions, as observed by CAPS, appear to be affected by a vertical electric field (EZ=-10 μV/m) in the plume. The EZ field may be associated with the charged dust and/or the pressure gradient of plasma. The model results, along with the results of earlier models, show that H3O+ ions created by chemistry are predominant in the plume, which agrees with INMS and CAPS data, but the INMS count rate in the plume for the model is several times greater than the data, which we do not fully understand. This composition and the total ion count found in the plume agree with INMS and CAPS data. On the other hand, the Cassini Langmuir Probe measured a maximum plume ion density more than 30,000 cm-3, which is far larger than the maximum ion density from our model, 900 cm-3. The model results also demonstrate that most of the ions in the plume are from the external magnetospheric flow and are not generated by local

  15. Heat and mass transfer in the mushroom-shaped head of mantle plume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirdyashkin Anatoly

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of experimental and theoretical modeling of free-convection flows in the melt of the plume conduit and in the mushroom-shaped head are presented. It was shown that the plumes with the mushroom-shaped heads can be responsible for the batholith formation. The main parameters of such plumes are estimated.

  16. Seismic Evidence for Lower Mantle Plume Under the Yellowstone Hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, P.; Grand, S.

    2017-12-01

    The mantle plume hypothesis for the origin of intraplate volcanism has been controversial since its inception in the 1970s. The hypothesis proposes hot narrow upwelling of rock rooted at the core mantle boundary (CMB) rise through the mantle and interact with the base of the lithosphere forming linear volcanic systems such as Hawaii and Yellowstone. Recently, broad lower mantle (>500 km in diameter) slow velocity conduits, most likely thermochemical in origin, have been associated with some intraplate volcanic provinces (French and Romanowicz, 2015). However, the direct detection of a classical thin thermal plume in the lower mantle using travel time tomography has remained elusive (Anderson and Natland, 2014). Here we present a new shear wave tomography model for the mantle beneath the western United States that is optimized to find short wavelength, sub-vertical structures in the lower mantle. Our approach uses carefully measured SKS and SKKS travel times recorded by dense North American seismic networks in conjunction with finite frequency kernels to build on existing tomography models. We find the presence of a narrow ( 300 km diameter) well isolated cylindrically shaped slow anomaly in the lower most mantle which we associate with the Yellowstone Hotspot. The conduit has a 2% reduction in shear velocity and is rooted at the CMB near the California/Arizona/Nevada border. A cross sectional view through the anomaly shows that it is slightly tilted toward the north until about 1300 km depth where it appears to weaken and deflect toward the surficial positon of the hotspot. Given the anomaly's strength, proximity to the Yellowstone Hotspot, and morphology we argue that a thermal plume interpretation is the most reasonable. Our results provide strong support for a lower mantle plume origin of the Yellowstone hotspot and more importantly the existence of deep thermal plumes.

  17. Arsenic cycling in hydrocarbon plumes: secondary effects of natural attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Schreiber, Madeline E.; Erickson, Melinda L.; Ziegler, Brady A.

    2016-01-01

    Monitored natural attenuation is widely applied as a remediation strategy at hydrocarbon spill sites. Natural attenuation relies on biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled with reduction of electron acceptors, including solid phase ferric iron (Fe(III)). Because arsenic (As) adsorbs to Fe-hydroxides, a potential secondary effect of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons coupled with Fe(III) reduction is a release of naturally occurring As to groundwater. At a crude-oil-contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota, anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled to Fe(III) reduction has been well documented. We collected groundwater samples at the site annually from 2009 to 2013 to examine if As is released to groundwater and, if so, to document relationships between As and Fe inside and outside of the dissolved hydrocarbon plume. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater in the plume reached 230 µg/L, whereas groundwater outside the plume contained less than 5 µg/L As. Combined with previous data from the Bemidji site, our results suggest that (1) naturally occurring As is associated with Fe-hydroxides present in the glacially derived aquifer sediments; (2) introduction of hydrocarbons results in reduction of Fe-hydroxides, releasing As and Fe to groundwater; (3) at the leading edge of the plume, As and Fe are removed from groundwater and retained on sediments; and (4) downgradient from the plume, patterns of As and Fe in groundwater are similar to background. We develop a conceptual model of secondary As release due to natural attenuation of hydrocarbons that can be applied to other sites where an influx of biodegradable organic carbon promotes Fe(III) reduction.

  18. Different modes of continental break-up triggered by a sole mantle plume: a 2D and 3D numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniest, Anouk; Koptev, Alexander; Leroy, Sylvie; Burov, Evgueni

    2017-04-01

    We used 2D and 3D numerical models to investigate the impact of a single mantle plume on continental rifting and breakup processes. We varied the thermo-rheological structure of the continental lithosphere, its geometry and the initial plume position. Based on the results of our 2D experiments, three continental break-up modes can be distinguished: A) 'central' continental break-up, the break-up center is located directly above the original mantle anomaly position, B) 'shifted' break-up, the break-up center is 50 to 200 km displaced from the initial plume location and C) 'distant' break-up, due to convection and/or slab-subduction/delamination, the break-up center is considerably shifted (300 to 800 km) from the primary plume position. Our 3D model, with a laterally homogeneous initial setup also results in continental break-up with the axis of continental break-up hundreds of kilometers shifted from the original plume location. The model results show that the classical, 'central' view of mantle plume induced continental break-up is not the only mode of break-up. When considering a diversity of break-up styles, it is possible to explain a variety of observed geophysical and geological features. For example, the mantle material glued to the base of the lithosphere at shallower depths corresponds geometrically and location-wise to high-velocity/high-density bodies observed on seismic data below the thinned continental lithosphere and the transition zone of the South Atlantic domain. During migration, products of partial melting of the mantle material can move vertically to (shallow) lower crustal levels. They might resemble high density bodies observed at lower crustal levels inside continental crust with similar geometries observed with gravity modelling. Also, topographic variation form in the very early stages of rifting on the first impingement of upwelled plume material. These variations remain visible, as the final position of the spreading center is shifted

  19. Image-based meteorologic visibility estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Graves, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    Awareness and understanding of atmospheric visibility has strong implications for our daily lives. In addition to being critical for navigation, it acts as an indicator for air quality and pollution. The devices traditionally used to measure visibility, transmissometers and nephelometers, are expensive and often require field maintenance and calibration. Visibility camera systems are increasingly being deployed to measure atmospheric visibility; however, their use has so far be...

  20. Stable isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibari, Elghali; Taous, Fouad; Marah, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    This report presents results related to stable isotopes analysis carried out at the CNESTEN DASTE in Rabat (Morocco), on behalf of Senegal. These analyzes cover 127 samples. These results demonstrate that Oxygen-18 and Deuterium in water analysis were performed by infrared Laser spectroscopy using a LGR / DLT-100 with Autosampler. Also, the results are expressed in δ values (‰) relative to V-SMOW to ± 0.3 ‰ for oxygen-18 and ± 1 ‰ for deuterium.

  1. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  2. Beyond Language Equivalence on Visibly Pushdown Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srba, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    We study (bi)simulation-like preorder/equivalence checking on the class of visibly pushdown automata and its natural subclasses visibly BPA (Basic Process Algebra) and visibly one-counter automata. We describe generic methods for proving complexity upper and lower bounds for a number of studied p...

  3. Visibility and invisibility in chronic illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoppe, S.

    2010-01-01

    Does the visibility of a condition necessarily lead to stigmatization? Is it easier to suffer from an invisible than a visible condition? And what are the consequences of living with an invisible or visible illness? In this article the author draws on the concepts of stigma and concealability to

  4. Performance evaluation of dispersion parameterization schemes in the plume simulation of FFT-07 diffusion experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Gavendra; Sharan, Maithili

    2018-01-01

    Application of atmospheric dispersion models in air quality analysis requires a proper representation of the vertical and horizontal growth of the plume. For this purpose, various schemes for the parameterization of dispersion parameters σ‧s are described in both stable and unstable conditions. These schemes differ on the use of (i) extent of availability of on-site measurements (ii) formulations developed for other sites and (iii) empirical relations. The performance of these schemes is evaluated in an earlier developed IIT (Indian Institute of Technology) dispersion model with the data set in single and multiple releases conducted at Fusion Field Trials, Dugway Proving Ground, Utah 2007. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the relative performance of all the schemes is carried out in both stable and unstable conditions in the light of (i) peak/maximum concentrations, and (ii) overall concentration distribution. The blocked bootstrap resampling technique is adopted to investigate the statistical significance of the differences in performances of each of the schemes by computing 95% confidence limits on the parameters FB and NMSE. The various analysis based on some selected statistical measures indicated consistency in the qualitative and quantitative performances of σ schemes. The scheme which is based on standard deviation of wind velocity fluctuations and Lagrangian time scales exhibits a relatively better performance in predicting the peak as well as the lateral spread.

  5. Mantle thermochemical plumes and their influence on the formation of highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirdyashkin, A. G.; Kirdyashkin, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    The structure of a thermochemical plume conduit rising from the core-mantle boundary and reaching the maximal height when its rising (melting of a plume conduit) terminates is considered in this paper. The relative thermal power of plumes not reaching the surface is Ka ball-like roof of the plume and the rate of rising of day surface above the plume on time are presented. Due to the influence of superlithostatic pressure on the plume roof, the day surface rises above the plume. The elevation of the day surface formed above the plume was calculated for various times in dependence on the horizontal coordinate. With decreasing viscosity of the lithosphere above the plume roof and depth of the plume roof, the rate of rising of the day surface increases, and the time necessary for reaching of the maximal surface elevation decreases. The maximal elevation of the highland above the plume was estimated. The surface elevations formed under the influence of two or three plumes that did not reach the surface were estimated for various times. Based on the suggested model of the formation of elevations above the plume, it is concluded that large highlands (mountain ridges and plateaus) can be formed under the influence of plume clusters that do not reach the day surface. The estimates of the rate of rising of the day surface above the plume obtained in this study are in a good agreement with the geological data on the rates of rising of Tibet and the Caucasus. The rising of a temperature front above the plume roof reaching the maximal rising height is considered. The dependences of the height and rate of rising of a temperature front above the plume roof on time were obtained. The local increase of a specific heat flux in the highland formed above the plume may show that the maximal height of rising of a surface above the plume was gained. Based on the analysis of the heat transfer, the association between the activity of plume clusters that do not reach the surface and the

  6. Lateral Dispersion of Pollutants in a Very Stable Atmosphere - The Effect of Meandering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Leif; Jensen, Niels Otto; Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1981-01-01

    A model based on single particle diffusion is introduced to account for the effect of “meandering” on lateral plume dispersion in a very stable atmosphere. It is assumed that small scale atmospheric turbulence is absent, so that only large horizontal eddies are effective. A formula for the lateral....... Meteorological data from Risø and the small island Sprogø have been analysed in order to identify all situations in which the atmosphere is so stable that small scale turbulence cannot exist. The purpose is to see in how many of these situations meandering is also absent. The results show that, as a rule...

  7. Unified origin for baryonic visible matter and antibaryonic dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Morrissey, David E; Sigurdson, Kris; Tulin, Sean

    2010-11-19

    We present a novel mechanism for generating both the baryon and dark matter densities of the Universe. A new Dirac fermion X carrying a conserved baryon number charge couples to the standard model quarks as well as a GeV-scale hidden sector. CP-violating decays of X, produced nonthermally in low-temperature reheating, sequester antibaryon number in the hidden sector, thereby leaving a baryon excess in the visible sector. The antibaryonic hidden states are stable dark matter. A spectacular signature of this mechanism is the baryon-destroying inelastic scattering of dark matter that can annihilate baryons at appreciable rates relevant for nucleon decay searches.

  8. Estimation of Eruption Source Parameters from Plume Growth Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouget, Solene; Bursik, Marcus; Webley, Peter; Dehn, Jon; Pavalonis, Michael; Singh, Tarunraj; Singla, Puneet; Patra, Abani; Pitman, Bruce; Stefanescu, Ramona; Madankan, Reza; Morton, Donald; Jones, Matthew

    2013-04-01

    The eruption of Eyjafjallajokull, Iceland in April and May, 2010, brought to light the hazards of airborne volcanic ash and the importance of Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersion models (VATD) to estimate the concentration of ash with time. These models require Eruption Source Parameters (ESP) as input, which typically include information about the plume height, the mass eruption rate, the duration of the eruption and the particle size distribution. However much of the time these ESP are unknown or poorly known a priori. We show that the mass eruption rate can be estimated from the downwind plume or umbrella cloud growth rate. A simple version of the continuity equation can be applied to the growth of either an umbrella cloud or the downwind plume. The continuity equation coupled with the momentum equation using only inertial and gravitational terms provides another model. Numerical modeling or scaling relationships can be used, as necessary, to provide values for unknown or unavailable parameters. Use of these models applied to data on plume geometry provided by satellite imagery allows for direct estimation of plume volumetric and mass growth with time. To test our methodology, we compared our results with five well-studied and well-characterized historical eruptions: Mount St. Helens, 1980; Pinatubo, 1991, Redoubt, 1990; Hekla, 2000 and Eyjafjallajokull, 2010. These tests show that the methodologies yield results comparable to or better than currently accepted methodologies of ESP estimation. We then applied the methodology to umbrella clouds produced by the eruptions of Okmok, 12 July 2008, and Sarychev Peak, 12 June 2009, and to the downwind plume produced by the eruptions of Hekla, 2000; Kliuchevsko'i, 1 October 1994; Kasatochi 7-8 August 2008 and Bezymianny, 1 September 2012. The new methods allow a fast, remote assessment of the mass eruption rate, even for remote volcanoes. They thus provide an additional path to estimation of the ESP and the forecasting

  9. The timescales of plume generation caused by continental aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Satoru; Yoshida, Masaki; Ootorii, Sakie; Iwase, Yasuyuki

    2000-02-01

    To understand the thermal evolution of the mantle following the aggregation of non-subductable thick continental lithosphere, we study a numerical model in which a supercontinent, simulated by high viscosity raft, HVR, covers a part of the top surface of a convection layer. We model infinite Prandtl number convection either in a three-dimensional (3D) spherical shell, 3D rectangular box (aspect ratios: 8 and 4) or two-dimensional (2D) rectangular box (aspect ratio: 8) and except for the HVR, we specify a constant viscosity. The HVR, which has a viscosity higher than that of its surrounding, is instantaneously placed on the top surface of a well-developed convection layer and its position is fixed. Our results from 3D spherical shell cases with and without phase transitions show the emergence of a large plume characterized by a long wavelength thermal anomaly (a degree one pattern) for a Pangea-like geometry. We analyze the volume averaged temperature under the HVR (=) the remaining (oceanic) area (=) and total area (=) to determine the timescale of plume generation. The difference between and (=Δ TCO) and show the existence of two characteristic timescales.Δ TCO exhibits an initial rapid increase and may become constant or continue to gradually increase. Meanwhile, shows a similar behavior but with a longer timescale. We find that these timescales associated with the increase of Δ TCO and can be attributed to the formation of large scale flow (i.e. plume) and response of the whole system to the emplacement of the HVR, respectively. For 3D spherical cases, we find that the timescale of plume generation is 1-2 Gyr, if the Rayleigh number is 10 6. To determine the effects of the viscosity of the HVR, 2D versus 3D modeling and the effects of the internal heating, we have also studied 2D and 3D rectangular box cases. A factor of about two variation exists in the timescale of plume generation. It appears that the timescale becomes greater for a smaller amount of

  10. TAG Plume: Revisiting the Hydrothermal Neodymium Contribution to Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torben Stichel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We present results on the distribution of εNd and [Nd] from the TAG hydrothermal vent field and adjacent locations collected during the GEOTRACES GA03 cruise in October 2011. Our results show that Nd isotopes directly below and above the plume do not significantly deviate from average NADW (εNd = −12.3 ± 0.2. Within the plume, however, isotope values are shifted slightly toward more radiogenic values up to εNd = −11.4. Interestingly at the same time a significant decrease in [Nd] along with rare earth element (REE fractionation is observed, indicating enhanced scavenging within the plume despite the change in Nd isotopes. Elemental concentrations of Nd are reduced by 19.6–18.5 pmol/kg, coinciding with the maximum increase of mantle derived helium (xs3He from 0.203 to 0.675 fmol/kg, resulting in an average 1.8 pmol/kg decrease in [Nd] relative to an expected linear increase with depth. The inventory loss of Nd within the plume sums up to 614 nmoles/m2, or 6%, if a continuous increase of [Nd] with depth is assumed. Compared to BATS and the western adjacent station USGT11-14, the local inventory loss is even higher at 10%. The tight relationship of xs3He increase and [Nd] decrease allows us to estimate scavenging rates at TAG suggesting 40 mol/year are removed within the TAG plume. A global estimate using power output along ocean ridges yields an annual Nd removal of 3.44 × 106 mol/year, which is about 71% of riverine and dust flux combined or 6–8% of the estimated global flux of Nd into the ocean. The change in Nd isotopic composition of up to 0.7 more radiogenic εNd values suggests an exchange process between hydrothermally derived particles and seawater in which during the removal process an estimated 1.1 mol/year of hydrothermal Nd is contributed to the seawater at the TAG site. This estimate is only 0.1% of the global Nd signal added to the ocean by boundary exchange processes at ocean margins, limiting the ability of changing

  11. Plume trajectory formation under stack tip self-enveloping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribkov, A. M.; Zroichikov, N. A.; Prokhorov, V. B.

    2017-10-01

    The phenomenon of stack tip self-enveloping and its influence upon the conditions of plume formation and on the trajectory of its motion are considered. Processes are described occurring in the initial part of the plume while the interaction between vertically directed flue gases outflowing from the stack and a horizontally directed moving air flow at high wind velocities that lead to the formation of a flag-like plume. Conditions responsible for the origin and evolution of interaction between these flows are demonstrated. For the first time, a plume formed under these conditions without bifurcation is registered. A photo image thereof is presented. A scheme for the calculation of the motion of a plume trajectory is proposed, the quantitative characteristics of which are obtained based on field observations. The wind velocity and direction, air temperature, and atmospheric turbulence at the level of the initial part of the trajectory have been obtained based on data obtained from an automatic meteorological system (mounted on the outer parts of a 250 m high stack no. 1 at the Naberezhnye Chelny TEPP plant) as well as based on the results of photographing and theodolite sighting of smoke puffs' trajectory taking into account their velocity within its initial part. The calculation scheme is supplemented with a new acting force—the force of self-enveloping. Based on the comparison of the new calculation scheme with the previous one, a significant contribution of this force to the development of the trajectory is revealed. A comparison of the natural full-scale data with the results of the calculation according to the proposed new scheme is made. The proposed calculation scheme has allowed us to extend the application of the existing technique to the range of high wind velocities. This approach would make it possible to simulate and investigate the trajectory and full rising height of the calculated the length above the mouth of flue-pipes, depending on various modal

  12. Observed and predicted cooling tower plume rise at the John E. Amos Power Plant, West Virginia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, S.R.

    1977-01-01

    There is much current interest in cooling tower plume rise because of its importance in determining the environmental impact of cooling towers at planned power plants and industrial facilities. Some of the possible environmental problems related to heat and water emissions from cooling towers are drift deposition, ground level fog, cloud formation, and precipitation enhancement. An important factor in all of these problems is the calculation of the plume trajectory, which is often complicated by the presence of multiple sources and water phase changes in the plume. The latent heat does not strongly influence plume rise if there is no cloud present at the top of the plume. A one dimensional plume and cloud growth model was developed to study these effects. In this paper, the predictions of the model are compared with observations of cooling tower plume rise at the John E. Amos, W. Va. fossil-fuel power plant

  13. Wedge Shock and Nozzle Exhaust Plume Interaction in a Supersonic Jet Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Raymond; Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Heath, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the nozzle exhaust plume. Aft body shock waves that interact with the exhaust plume contribute to the near-field pressure signature of a vehicle. The plume and shock interaction was studied using computational fluid dynamics and compared with experimental data from a coaxial convergent-divergent nozzle flow in an open jet facility. A simple diamond-shaped wedge was used to generate the shock in the outer flow to study its impact on the inner jet flow. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the opposite plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the nozzle exhaust plume was modified by the presence of the wedge. Both the experimental results and computational predictions show changes in plume deflection.

  14. Air motion measurements in and around thermal plumes using radar and chaff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauvageot, H.; Lafon, G.; Oruba, M.

    1982-01-01

    A thermal plume initiated by a ground-based artificial heat source was observed by radar, and some other remote and in-situ measurement techniques (lidar, photogrammetry, instrumented aircraft). In dry air, plume tracers for radar consisted of reflecting chaff released discontinuously in the plume from the bottom of the updraft and also in the nearby atmoshpere by aircraft. Comparative evaluation of the remote sensing techniques for geometrical plume paramteer measurements are presented. It is shown that radar and chaff techniques permit, in almost all atmospheric conditions, an accurate determination of lateral limits and maximum height of the plume. Air velocity and some other parameters concerning airflow conditions in the plume can be measured as well. Some aspects of the environmental plume circulation are also tentatively investigated

  15. Similarity scaling of surface-released smoke plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, T.; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Nielsen, M.

    2002-01-01

    Concentration fluctuation data from surface-layer released smoke plumes have been investigated with the purpose of finding suitable scaling parameters for the corresponding two-particle, relative diffusion process. Dispersion properties have been measured at downwind ranges between 0.1 and 1 km...... from a continuous, neutrally buoyant ground level source. A combination of SF6 and chemical smoke (aerosols) was used as tracer. Instantaneous crosswind concentration profiles of high temporal (up to 55 Hz) and spatial resolution (down to 0.375 m) were obtained from aerosol-backscatter Lidar detection...... and duration statistics. The diffusion experiments were accompanied by detailed in-situ micrometeorological mean and turbulence measurements. In this paper, a new distance-neighbour function for surface-released smoke plumes is proposed, accompanied by experimental evidence in its support. The new distance...

  16. Growth of aerosol in an urban plume. [METROMEX program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkezweeny, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    Time changes of aerosol particle size distribution in the range of 0.01 ..mu..m diameter, concentration of O/sub 3/, NO, NO/sub 2/, SO/sub 2/, several hydrocarbons, and sulfate were measured in an urban plume. The investigation was conducted in a Lagrangian frame of reference using instrumented aircraft. The air parcel trajectory was identified by the movement of a tetroon launched from the ground to an altitude within the plume. This study was carried out in metropolitan St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A., during the METROMEX program. A pronounced change in the aerosol particle size distribution and an increase in the total volume of the aerosol were observed. Gas to particle transformation involving existing nuclei is responsible for the aerosol growth. The results of the measurement of trace gases and the aerosol particles and their chemical analyses are presented and discussed. (auth)

  17. Volcanic tremor and plume height hysteresis from Pavlof Volcano, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fee, David; Haney, Matthew M; Matoza, Robin S; Van Eaton, Alexa R; Cervelli, Peter; Schneider, David J; Iezzi, Alexandra M

    2017-01-06

    The March 2016 eruption of Pavlof Volcano, Alaska, produced an ash plume that caused the cancellation of more than 100 flights in North America. The eruption generated strong tremor that was recorded by seismic and remote low-frequency acoustic (infrasound) stations, including the EarthScope Transportable Array. The relationship between the tremor amplitudes and plume height changes considerably between the waxing and waning portions of the eruption. Similar hysteresis has been observed between seismic river noise and discharge during storms, suggesting that flow and erosional processes in both rivers and volcanoes can produce irreversible structural changes that are detectable in geophysical data. We propose that the time-varying relationship at Pavlof arose from changes in the tremor source related to volcanic vent erosion. This relationship may improve estimates of volcanic emissions and characterization of eruption size and intensity. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Southeastern Virginia Urban Plume Study design considerations and measurement results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdougal, D. S.; Gregory, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    The Southeastern Virginia Urban Plume Study is intended to provide a testing ground for NASA remote sensors designed for urban and regional scale monitoring of air quality phenomena. The air quality experiments it has conducted have incorporated surface, airborne, sonde and balloon platforms which measured air quality and meteorology parameters, with emphasis on photochemically produced O3 and its primary precursors upwind, above, and downwind of the Hampton Roads area urban complex. The results from three years of experiments have shown that such different meteorological conditions as blue/broken skies, high/moderate temperatures and low/high winds have a direct impact on the degree of downwind aging of the summer urban O3 airmass. In 1979, the urban plume was traced at aging times of 0.5, 1.5, and 5 hr.

  19. The use of sparge curtains for contaminant plume control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnaa, B.; Dablow, J.

    1994-01-01

    Contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons and organic solvents represents a major impact to soil and groundwater. Following recent research and development, several technologies have evolved to treat saturated zone adsorbed- and dissolved-phase contaminants in situ. These technologies include bioremediation and air sparging. Funnel and gate approaches have been developed at the Waterloo Center for Groundwater Research to control contaminant plume migration and treat dissolved-phase contaminants before allowing migration downgradient and off site. The process consists of using low hydraulic conductivity cutoff walls to funnel groundwater flow through gates that contain in situ bioreactors. These systems can maintain hydraulic control and treat dissolved-phase contaminants at the downgradient margins of plumes, while minimizing, or in some cases eliminating, the need for groundwater pumping. Sparge curtains can be applied to treat dissolved-phase contaminants and prevent downgradient, off-site migration of contaminated groundwater

  20. Experimental Investigation of Large-Scale Bubbly Plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zboray, R.; Simiano, M.; De Cachard, F

    2004-03-01

    Carefully planned and instrumented experiments under well-defined boundary conditions have been carried out on large-scale, isothermal, bubbly plumes. The data obtained is meant to validate newly developed, high-resolution numerical tools for 3D transient, two-phase flow modelling. Several measurement techniques have been utilised to collect data from the experiments: particle image velocimetry, optical probes, electromagnetic probes, and visualisation. Bubble and liquid velocity fields, void-fraction distributions, bubble size and interfacial-area-concentration distributions have all been measured in the plume region, as well as recirculation velocities in the surrounding pool. The results obtained from the different measurement techniques have been compared. In general, the two-phase flow data obtained from the different techniques are found to be consistent, and of high enough quality for validating numerical simulation tools for 3D bubbly flows. (author)

  1. Spectroscopic studies of laser ablation plumes of artwork materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oujja, M.; Rebollar, E.; Castillejo, M.

    2003-04-01

    Studies on the plasma plume created during KrF laser (248 nm) ablation of dosimeter tempera samples in vacuum have been carried out to investigate the basic interactions of the laser with paint materials. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to measure the translational velocity of electronically excited transients in the plasma plume. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) studies using a probe dye laser, allowed to determine the velocities of non-emitting species. The propagation velocities of C 2 in the a 3π u and d 3π g electronic states and of excited atomic species are indicative of a high translational temperature. Differences between the velocities of organic and inorganic species and between emissions from the tempera systems and from the pigments as pellets allow to discuss the participation of photochemical mechanisms in the laser irradiation of the paint systems.

  2. Preliminary disposal limits, plume interaction factors, and final disposal limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2018-01-11

    In the 2008 E-Area Performance Assessment (PA), each final disposal limit was constructed as the product of a preliminary disposal limit and a plume interaction factor. The following mathematical development demonstrates that performance objectives are generally expected to be satisfied with high confidence under practical PA scenarios using this method. However, radionuclides that experience significant decay between a disposal unit and the 100-meter boundary, such as H-3 and Sr-90, can challenge performance objectives, depending on the disposed-of waste composition, facility geometry, and the significance of the plume interaction factor. Pros and cons of analyzing single disposal units or multiple disposal units as a group in the preliminary disposal limits analysis are also identified.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Large-Scale Bubbly Plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zboray, R.; Simiano, M.; De Cachard, F.

    2004-01-01

    Carefully planned and instrumented experiments under well-defined boundary conditions have been carried out on large-scale, isothermal, bubbly plumes. The data obtained is meant to validate newly developed, high-resolution numerical tools for 3D transient, two-phase flow modelling. Several measurement techniques have been utilised to collect data from the experiments: particle image velocimetry, optical probes, electromagnetic probes, and visualisation. Bubble and liquid velocity fields, void-fraction distributions, bubble size and interfacial-area-concentration distributions have all been measured in the plume region, as well as recirculation velocities in the surrounding pool. The results obtained from the different measurement techniques have been compared. In general, the two-phase flow data obtained from the different techniques are found to be consistent, and of high enough quality for validating numerical simulation tools for 3D bubbly flows. (author)

  4. Thermal plume residence and temperature exposure of salmonid fishes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spigarelli, S.A.; Romberg, G.P.; Thommes, M.M.; Prepejchal, W.

    1976-01-01

    A nondestructive echo-location technique was used to estimate the density-distribution patterns of fish and to determine the influence of discharge design and location on fish attraction. Studies were conducted between 1972 and 1975 at the Point Beach and Zion nulcear power plants and Waukegan fossil-fuel power plant on Lake Michigan. Preliminary inspection of results indicates seasonal attraction of abundant species, such as alewife, trout, and salmon. In general, fish densities in the plume area tend to be elevated relative to unheated areas during spring and early summer. Power plant location and discharge type apparently affect the magnitude and timing of attraction to discharges. Fish in plume areas generally are observed at elevated temperatures or near temperature interfaces. Data analyses include conventional approaches to detect differences in mean densities over time and space and recent developments in time-series analysis. Predictability of fish responses will depend on the identification of temporal and spatial distribution patterns

  5. Visible light induced photobleaching of methylene blue over melamine-doped TiO2 nanocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    TiO2 doping with N-rich melamine produced a stable, active and visible light sentisized nanocatalyst that showed a remarkable efficiency towards the photobleaching of a model compound – methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution. The photobleaching followed a mixed reaction order ki...

  6. Observations of brine plumes below melting Arctic sea ice

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Algot K.

    2018-01-01

    In sea ice, interconnected pockets and channels of brine are surrounded by fresh ice. Over time, brine is lost by gravity drainage and flushing. The timing of salt release and its interaction with the underlying water can impact subsequent sea ice melt. Turbulence measurements 1 m below melting sea ice north of Svalbard reveal anticorrelated heat and salt fluxes. From the observations, 131 salty plumes descending from the warm sea ice are identified, confirming previous obse...

  7. Observations of brine plumes below Arctic sea ice

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Algot Kristoffer

    2017-01-01

    In sea ice, interconnected pockets and channels of brine are surrounded by fresh ice. Over time, brine is lost by gravity drainage and flushing. The timing of salt release and its interaction with the underlying water can impact subsequent sea ice melt. Turbulence measurements 1 m below melting sea ice north of Svalbard reveal anti-correlated heat and salt fluxes. From the observations, 131 salty plumes descending from the warm sea ice are identified, confirming previous observations...

  8. Plume Characterization of Busek 600W Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    45 Figure 19: Inverted pendulum set up. Taken from Temkin [46]. .................................... 46 Figure...top of a steel plate for various tests. Figure 19: Inverted pendulum set up. Taken from Temkin [46]. The thrust stand system uses water along with...Thruster Plumes,” AIAA 2006-4818, 42 nd Joint Propulsion Conference & Exhibit, Sacramento, CA, 9-12 July 2006. [46] Temkin , S., “Performance

  9. Exploration Method Development for hydrothermal plume hunting by XCTD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Y.; Ikeda, M.; Kadoshima, K.; Koizumi, Y.; Nakano, J.; Asakawa, E.; Sumi, T.

    2017-12-01

    J-MARES (Research and Development Partnership for Next Generation Technology of Marine Resources Survey, JAPAN) has been designing a low-cost and high-efficiency exploration system for seafloor hydrothermal massive sulfide deposits in "Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program (SIP)" granted by the Cabinet Office, Government of Japan since 2014. We proposed hydrothermal plume hunting by XCTD (eXpendables Conductivity, Temperature and Depth). We applied this method to an area of interest more than 100km x 100km over Okinawa Trough, including some known seafloor massive sulfide deposits. Generally, hydrothermal plume exploration has been by ship mounted with MBES (Multi Beam Echo Sounder) or AUV with sound anomaly observation. However, these methods have to charter the sophisticated ship costly. On the other hand, throw-in type water quality meters (eg. XCTD and XBT) can be low-cost and easily operable. Moreover, that can make a quick look at seawater temperature and conductivity even in rough waters.Firstly, we confirmed XCTD probes position on the seafloor by ROV mounted deep-sea high vision camera. As a result of the test, probes swept downstream about 40 m in horizontal distance from throwing positions with about 1,600m in water depth. Following the previous test results, we had performed to the next test that confirmed detection range of hydrothermal plume at the chimney of North Mound in Izena Cauldron, so we had caught anomaly of seawater temperature and conductivity successfully which could be possibly derived from hydrothermal activities. Although averaged seawater temperature at a depth of 1500 m or more was about 3.95 degrees C, near the chimney was about 4.93 degrees C. The temperature anomalies originated from the hydrothermal plumes could be distributed at most 30m in horizontal distance and became smaller away from the chimney. Moreover, temperature anomaly mass of sea water tended to move upward in depth with distance away from the

  10. Aquatic dispersion modelling of a tritium plume in Lake Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klukas, M.H.; Moltyaner, G.L.

    1996-05-01

    Approximately 2900 kg of tritiated water, containing 2.3E+15 Bq of tritium, were released to Lake Ontario via the cooling water discharge when a leak developed in a moderator heat exchanger in Unit 1 at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) on 1992 August 2. The release provided the opportunity to study the dispersion of a tritium plume in the coastal zone of Lake Ontario. Current direction over the two-week period following the release was predominantly parallel to the shore, and elevated tritium concentrations were observed up to 20 km east and 85 km west of the PNGS. Predictions of the tritium plume movement were made using current velocity measurements taken at 8-m depth, 2.5 km offshore from Darlington and using a empirical relationship where alongshore current speed is assumed to be proportional to the alongshore component of the wind speed. The tritium migration was best described using current velocity measurements. The tritium plume dispersion is modelled using the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation. Transport parameters are the alongshore current speed and longitudinal dispersion coefficient. Longitudinal dispersion coefficients, estimated by fitting the solution of the advection-dispersion equation to measured concentration distance profiles ranged from 3.75 to 10.57 m 2 s -1 . Simulations using the fitted values of the dispersion coefficient were able to describe maximum tritium concentrations measured at water supply plants located within 25 km of Pickering to within a factor of 3. The dispersion coefficient is a function of spatial and temporal variability in current velocity and the fitted dispersion coefficients estimated here may not be suitable for predicting tritium plume dispersion under different current conditions. The sensitivity of the dispersion coefficient to variability in current conditions should be evaluated in further field experiments. (author). 13 refs., 7 tabs., 12 figs

  11. Automatic recognition of smoke-plume signatures in lidar signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkin, Andrei B.; Lavrov, Alexander; Vilar, Rui

    2008-10-01

    A simple and robust algorithm for lidar-signal classification based on the fast extraction of sufficiently pronounced peaks and their recognition with a perceptron, whose efficiency is enhanced by a fast nonlinear preprocessing that increases the signal dimension, is reported. The method allows smoke-plume recognition with an error rate as small as 0.31% (19 misdetections and 4 false alarms in analyzing a test set of 7409 peaks).

  12. Modeling Plume-Triggered, Melt-Enabled Lithospheric Delamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry-Houts, J.; Humphreys, G.

    2015-12-01

    It has been suggested that arrival of the Yellowstone plume below North America triggered a lithospheric foundering event which aided the eruption of the Columbia River flood basalts. This hypothesis potentially accounts for some of the biggest mysteries related to the CRB's including their location as "off-track" plume volcanism; and the anomalous chemical signatures of the most voluminous units. The foundered lithosphere appears to be a remnant chunk of Farallon slab, which had been stranded beneath the Blue Mountains terrain since the accretion of Siletzia. If this is the case then the mechanisms by which this slab stayed metastable between Siletzia accretion and CRB time, and then so suddenly broke loose, is unclear. The addition of heat and mantle buoyancy supplied by the Yellowstone plume provides a clue, but the geodynamic process by which the slab was able to detach remains unclear.Efforts to model numerically the underlying processes behind delamination events have been gaining popularity. Typically, such models have relied on drastically weakened regions within the crust, or highly non-linear rheologies to enable initiation and propagation of lithosphere removal. Rather than impose such a weak region a priori, we investigated the role of mantle and crustal melt, generated by the addition of plume heat, as the source of such a rheologic boundary.We track melt generation and migration though geodynamic models using the Eulerian finite element code, ASPECT. Melt moves relative to the permeable, compacting, and viscously-deforming mantle using the approach of (Keller, et al. 2013) with the notable exception that ASPECT currently cannot model elasticity. Dike and sill emplacement is therefore still a work in progress. This work is still in the preliminary stages and results are yet inconclusive.

  13. Statistical analyses of plume composition and deposited radionuclide mixture ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Terrence D.; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Eckert-Gallup, Aubrey Celia; Brito, Roxanne; Hunt, Brian D.; Osborn, Douglas.

    2014-01-01

    A proposed method is considered to classify the regions in the close neighborhood of selected measurements according to the ratio of two radionuclides measured from either a radioactive plume or a deposited radionuclide mixture. The subsequent associated locations are then considered in the area of interest with a representative ratio class. This method allows for a more comprehensive and meaningful understanding of the data sampled following a radiological incident.

  14. Frontal dynamics at the edge of the Columbia River plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akan, Çiğdem; McWilliams, James C.; Moghimi, Saeed; Özkan-Haller, H. Tuba

    2018-02-01

    In the tidal ebb-cycle at the Mouth of the Columbia River, strong density and velocity fronts sometimes form perpendicular to the coast at the edges of the freshwater plume. They are distinct from previously analyzed fronts at the offshore western edge of the plume that evolve as a gravity-wave bore. We present simulation results to demonstrate their occurrence and investigate the mechanisms behind their frontogenesis and evolution. Tidal velocities on average ranged between 1.5 m s-1 in flood and 2.5 m s-1 in ebb during the brief hindcast period. The tidal fronts exhibit strong horizontal velocity and buoyancy gradients on a scale ∼ 100 m in width with normalized relative vorticity (ζz/f) values reaching up to 50. We specifically focus on the front on the northern edge of the plume and examine the evolution in plume characteristics such as its water mass gradients, horizontal and vertical velocity structure, vertical velocity, turbulent vertical mixing, horizontal propagation, cross-front momentum balance, and Lagrangian frontogenetic tendencies in both buoyancy and velocity gradients. Advective frontogenesis leads to a very sharp front where lateral mixing near the grid-resolution limit arrests its further contraction. The negative vorticity within the front is initiated by the positive bottom drag curl on the north side of the Columbia estuary and against the north jetty. Because of the large negative vorticity and horizontal vorticity gradient, centrifugal and lateral shear instability begins to develop along the front, but frontal fragmentation and decay set in only after the turn of the tide because of the briefness of the ebb interval.

  15. Sediment plume monitoring in the Clarion-Clipperton Zone

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Eynde, D.; Baeye, M.; Fettweis, M.; Francken, F.; Naudts, L.; Van Lancker, V.

    2014-01-01

    OD Nature has a vast experience in monitoring and modelling Suspended Particulate Matter concentration in shelf areas. In the framework of the JPI-Oceans cruise with the RV Sonne in the Belgian, French and German concession zones for deep-sea mining in the Clarion-Clipperton Zone, this experience will be used to monitor sediments plumes, caused by deep-sea mning exploration activities.

  16. IR sensor design insight from missile-plume prediction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapanotti, John L.; Gilbert, Bruno; Richer, Guy; Stowe, Robert

    2002-08-01

    Modern anti-tank missiles and the requirement of rapid deployment have significantly reduced the use of passive armour in protecting land vehicles. Vehicle survivability is becoming more dependent on sensors, computers and countermeasures to detect and avoid threats. An analysis of missile propellants suggests that missile detection based on plume characteristics alone may be more difficult than anticipated. Currently, the passive detection of missiles depends on signatures with a significant ultraviolet component. This approach is effective in detecting anti-aircraft missiles that rely on powerful motors to pursue high-speed aircraft. The high temperature exhaust from these missiles contains significant levels of carbon dioxide, water and, often, metal oxides such as alumina. The plumes emits strongest in the infrared, 1 to 5micrometers , regions with a significant component of the signature extending into the ultraviolet domain. Many anti-tank missiles do not need the same level of propulsion and radiate significantly less. These low velocity missiles, relying on the destructive force of shaped-charge warhead, are more difficult to detect. There is virtually no ultraviolet component and detection based on UV sensors is impractical. The transition in missile detection from UV to IR is reasonable, based on trends in imaging technology, but from the analysis presented in this paper even IR imagers may have difficulty in detecting missile plumes. This suggests that the emphasis should be placed in the detection of the missile hard body in the longer wavelengths of 8 to 12micrometers . The analysis described in this paper is based on solution of the governing equations of plume physics and chemistry. These models will be used to develop better sensors and threat detection algorithms.

  17. Salem 98: A post-plume phase, federal participation exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    Salem 98 was the largest nuclear power plant post-plume phase exercise since the 1993 FRMAC-93 exercise at the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Power Plant in Nebraska. Salem 98 was a 3 Day exercise, held on May 5--7, 1998, involving participation by the States of New Jersey and Delaware and associated State and county agencies. Public Service Electric and Gas was the host utility and Salem County the host county. Federal participation included the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency, US department of Agriculture and Department of Health and Human Services. In addition, the American Nuclear Insurers participated, adding a dimension to the exercise not experienced often enough. This was a stand-alone post-plume phase exercise, which took place 2 months after the evaluated plume phase exercise held on March 3, 1998, also including participation by various Federal agencies. This exercise demonstrated the positive working relationship among utility, State, county, and Federal responders in response to a postulated major nuclear power plant emergency with significant offsite consequences.

  18. Microphysical, chemical, and dynamical processes in aircraft plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere]|[Muenchen Univ., Freising (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bioklimatologie und Immissionsforschung; Hirschberg, M.; Fabian, P. [Muenchen Univ., Freising (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bioklimatologie und Immissionsforschung

    1997-12-01

    This project investigated theoretically microphysical and chemical processes in aircraft exhaust plumes during the first stages of wake dispersion. A suitable computational model has been developed, describing the two-dimensional (2D) turbulent mixing of a single jet of exhaust gas from aircraft engines with the atmosphere. The model has been used to work out general features of transport and conversion of exhaust effluents. It has also been employed to study the conditions in the jet that lead to the formation of ice contrails. The model has then been extended to include a set of all relevant chemical reactions in the gas phase and to study the chemical conversion of exhaust species with regard to the specific fluid dynamical conditions of the jet regime. A trajectory box model has been developed that is driven by turbulent mixing rates from the 2D jet model, and by parameterized mixing rates at later stages of wake dispersion. Further, a microphysical module has been designed and coupled to the box model, with which detailed investigations of adsorption, binary homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, heteromolecular condensation and evaporation, scavenging and coagulation, and homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing in diluting aircraft exhaust plumes and contrails have been performed. The potential for heterogeneous chemical processing on/in plume and contrail aerosols has been investigated. The results have supported the analyses of in situ observations. Vice versa, model development took great advantages form the close collaborations with several experimental groups. (orig.) 144 figs., 42 tabs., 497 refs.

  19. Detecting Traces of Life in the Plume of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krolikowski, Daniel M.; Lunine, Jonathan I.

    2015-01-01

    Saturn's moon Enceladus presents one of the most promising bodies in the solar system on which to detect (at least traces of) extraterrestrial life. We present a study of biomarkers in the plume. A variety of potential biomarkers were considered and their applicability to the plume was assessed. Our study focused primarily on the relative abundances of hydrocarbons to methane, and amino acids. Concentrations of these biomarkers were estimated by combining data from studies of methanogenic and hydrothermal communities with a plume density model. We studied mass spectrometry as a possible means to detect these indicators of life. We performed a parameterized study by considering mass spectrometers with a sensitivity of 10, 100, and 1000 times that of Cassini's mass spectrometer. Promisingly, the concentration of biogenic hydrocarbons is around an order of magnitude higher than the detection threshold of the most sensitive mass spectrometer we considered. Therefore, analysis of such hydrocarbons on a future mission is a promising approach to detecting biochemical processes within Enceladus.

  20. Microspatial gene expression patterns in the Amazon River Plume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satinsky, Brandon M; Crump, Byron C; Smith, Christa B; Sharma, Shalabh; Zielinski, Brian L; Doherty, Mary; Meng, Jun; Sun, Shulei; Medeiros, Patricia M; Paul, John H; Coles, Victoria J; Yager, Patricia L; Moran, Mary Ann

    2014-07-29

    We investigated expression of genes mediating elemental cycling at the microspatial scale in the ocean's largest river plume using, to our knowledge, the first fully quantitative inventory of genes and transcripts. The bacterial and archaeal communities associated with a phytoplankton bloom in Amazon River Plume waters at the outer continental shelf in June 2010 harbored ∼ 1.0 × 10(13) genes and 4.7 × 10(11) transcripts per liter that mapped to several thousand microbial genomes. Genomes from free-living cells were more abundant than those from particle-associated cells, and they generated more transcripts per liter for carbon fixation, heterotrophy, nitrogen and phosphorus uptake, and iron acquisition, although they had lower expression ratios (transcripts ⋅ gene(-1)) overall. Genomes from particle-associated cells contributed more transcripts for sulfur cycling, aromatic compound degradation, and the synthesis of biologically essential vitamins, with an overall twofold up-regulation of expression compared with free-living cells. Quantitatively, gene regulation differences were more important than genome abundance differences in explaining why microenvironment transcriptomes differed. Taxa contributing genomes to both free-living and particle-associated communities had up to 65% of their expressed genes regulated differently between the two, quantifying the extent of transcriptional plasticity in marine microbes in situ. In response to patchiness in carbon, nutrients, and light at the micrometer scale, Amazon Plume microbes regulated the expression of genes relevant to biogeochemical processes at the ecosystem scale.

  1. Martian Atmospheric Methane Plumes from Meteor Shower Infall: A Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M.; Christou, A.; Archer, D.; Conrad, P.; Cooke, W.; Eigenbrode, J.; ten Kate, I. L.; Matney, M.; Niles, P.; Sykes, M.

    2016-01-01

    Methane plumes in the martian atmosphere have been detected using Earth-based spectroscopy, the Planetary Fourier Spectrometer on the ESA Mars Express mission, and the NASA Mars Science Laboratory. The methane's origin remains a mystery, with proposed sources including volcanism, exogenous sources like impacts and interplanetary dust, aqueous alteration of olivine in the presence of carbonaceous material, release from ancient deposits of methane clathrates, and/or biological activity. To date, none of these phenomena have been found to reliably correlate with the detection of methane plumes. An additional source exists, however: meteor showers could generate martian methane via UV pyrolysis of carbon-rich infall material. We find a correlation between the dates of Mars/cometary orbit encounters and detections of methane on Mars. We hypothesize that cometary debris falls onto Mars during these interactions, depositing freshly disaggregated meteor shower material in a regional concentration. The material generates methane via UV photolysis, resulting in a localized "plume" of short-lived methane.

  2. Salem 98: A post-plume phase, federal participation exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Salem 98 was the largest nuclear power plant post-plume phase exercise since the 1993 FRMAC-93 exercise at the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Power Plant in Nebraska. Salem 98 was a 3 Day exercise, held on May 5--7, 1998, involving participation by the States of New Jersey and Delaware and associated State and county agencies. Public Service Electric and Gas was the host utility and Salem County the host county. Federal participation included the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency, US department of Agriculture and Department of Health and Human Services. In addition, the American Nuclear Insurers participated, adding a dimension to the exercise not experienced often enough. This was a stand-alone post-plume phase exercise, which took place 2 months after the evaluated plume phase exercise held on March 3, 1998, also including participation by various Federal agencies. This exercise demonstrated the positive working relationship among utility, State, county, and Federal responders in response to a postulated major nuclear power plant emergency with significant offsite consequences

  3. Thermography of the New River Inlet plume and nearshore currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chickadel, C.; Jessup, A.

    2012-12-01

    As part of the DARLA and RIVET experiments, thermal imaging systems mounted on a tower and in an airplane captured water flow in the New River Inlet, NC, USA. Kilometer-scale, airborne thermal imagery of the inlet details the ebb flow of the estuarine plume water mixing with ocean water. Multiple fronts, corresponding to the preferred channels through the ebb tidal delta, are imaged in the aerial data. A series of internal fronts suggest discreet sources of the tidal plume that vary with time. Focused thermal measurements made from a tower on the south side of the inlet viewed an area within a radius of a few hundred meters. Sub-meter resolution video from the tower revealed fine-scale flow features and the interaction of tidal exchange and wave-forced surfzone currents. Using the tower and airborne thermal image data we plan to provide geophysical information to compare with numerical models and in situ measurements made by other investigators. From the overflights, we will map the spatial and temporal extent of the estuarine plume to correlate with tidal phase and local wind conditions. From the tower data, we will investigate the structure of the nearshore flow using a thermal particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique, which is based on tracking motion of the surface temperature patterns. Long term variability of the mean and turbulent two-dimensional PIV currents will be correlated to local wave, tidal, and wind forcing parameters.

  4. Groundwater-quality data for a treated-wastewater plume near the Massachusetts Military Reservation, Ashumet Valley, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2006-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoie, Jennifer G.; LeBlanc, Denis R.; Fairchild, Gillian M.; Smith, Richard L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Barber, Larry B.; Repert, Deborah A.; Hart, Charles P.; Keefe, Steffanie H.; Parsons, Luke A.

    2012-01-01

    A plume of contaminated groundwater extends from former disposal beds at the Massachusetts Military Reservation's wastewater-treatment plant toward Ashumet Pond, coastal ponds, and Vineyard Sound, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Treated sewage-derived wastewater was discharged to the rapid-infiltration beds for nearly 60 years before the disposal site was moved to a different location in December 1995. Water-quality samples were collected from monitoring wells, multilevel samplers, and profile borings to characterize the nature and extent of the contaminated groundwater and to observe the water-quality changes after the wastewater disposal ceased. Data are presented here for water samples collected in 2007 from 394 wells (at 121 well-cluster locations) and 780 multilevel-sampler ports (at 42 locations) and in 2006-08 at 306 depth intervals in profile borings (at 20 locations) in and near the treated-wastewater plume. Analyses of these water samples for field parameters (specific conductance, pH, dissolved oxygen and phosphate concentrations, and alkalinity); absorbance of ultraviolet/visible light; and concentrations of nitrous oxide, dissolved organic carbon, methylene blue active substances, selected anions and nutrients, including nitrate and ammonium, and selected inorganic solutes, including cations, anions, and minor elements, are presented in tabular format. The natural restoration of the sand and gravel aquifer after removal of the treated-wastewater source, along with interpretations of the water quality in the treated-wastewater plume, have been documented in several published reports that are listed in the references.

  5. Visible and UV emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monier-Garbet, P.

    1991-01-01

    Visible and ultra-violet emission spectroscopy is a well established plasma diagnostic technique extensively used in contemporary fusion experiments. Theoretical plasma models are required to derive the relevant physical parameters. These models are reviewed in the first part of this paper. They allow spectral line intensities and radiative power losses to be calculated from the knowledge of the detailed atomic physics processes occurring in the plasma. In tokamak plasma experiments, impurity contamination and transport are important concerns. Basic spectroscopic methods used in their understanding are described. They include the determination of impurity concentrations either by line emission modelling (through the use of an impurity transport code), or by direct charge-exchange recombination measurement. They also include the evaluation of neutral particle fluxes at the plasma periphery. Finally, the experimental techniques used in the derivation of impurity transport coefficients are reported

  6. Visible light broadband perfect absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, X. L.; Meng, Q. X.; Yuan, C. X.; Zhou, Z. X.; Wang, X. O., E-mail: wxo@hit.edu.cn [School of Science, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2016-03-15

    The visible light broadband perfect absorbers based on the silver (Ag) nano elliptical disks and holes array are studied using finite difference time domain simulations. The semiconducting indium silicon dioxide thin film is introduced as the space layer in this sandwiched structure. Utilizing the asymmetrical geometry of the structures, polarization sensitivity for transverse electric wave (TE)/transverse magnetic wave (TM) and left circular polarization wave (LCP)/right circular polarization wave (RCP) of the broadband absorption are gained. The absorbers with Ag nano disks and holes array show several peaks absorbance of 100% by numerical simulation. These simple and flexible perfect absorbers are particularly desirable for various potential applications including the solar energy absorber.

  7. Stable orbits for lunar landing assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condoleo, Ennio; Cinelli, Marco; Ortore, Emiliano; Circi, Christian

    2017-10-01

    To improve lunar landing performances in terms of mission costs, trajectory determination and visibility the use of a single probe located over an assistance orbit around the Moon has been taken into consideration. To this end, the properties of two quasi-circular orbits characterised by a stable behaviour of semi-major axis, eccentricity and inclination have been investigated. The analysis has demonstrated the possibility of using an assistance probe, located over one of these orbits, as a relay satellite between lander and Earth, even in the case of landings on the far side of the Moon. A comparison about the accuracy in retrieving the lander's state with respect to the use of a probe located in the Lagrangian point L2 of the Earth-Moon system has also been carried out.

  8. INVESTIGATION OF THE FATE OF MERCURY IN A COAL COMBUSTION PLUME USING A STATIC PLUME DILUTION CHAMBER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis L. Laudal

    2001-11-01

    The overall goal of the project was to further develop and then verify SPDC's ability to determine the physical and chemical transformations of mercury in combustion stack plumes. Specific objectives of the project were to perform controlled tests at the pilot scale using dynamic spiking of known mercury compounds (i.e., Hg{sup 0} and HgCl{sub 2}) to prove the ability of the SPDC to determine the following: whether mercury condenses onto particulate matter in a cooling plume; whether there is reduction of Hg{sup 2+} to Hg{sup 0} occurring in hygroscopic aerosols; whether condensed Hg{sup 2+} on particles is photochemically reduced to Hg{sup 0}; and whether or not the Solid Ontario Hydro mercury speciation method (SOH) provides the same results as the Ontario Hydro (OH) mercury speciation method.

  9. Marginally Stable Nuclear Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Altamirano, D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts result from unstable nuclear burning of the material accreted on neutron stars in some low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Theory predicts that close to the boundary of stability oscillatory burning can occur. This marginally stable regime has so far been identified in only a small number of sources. We present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bursting, high- inclination LMXB 4U 1323-619 that reveal for the first time in this source the signature of marginally stable burning. The source was observed during two successive RXTE orbits for approximately 5 ksec beginning at 10:14:01 UTC on March 28, 2011. Significant mHz quasi- periodic oscillations (QPO) at a frequency of 8.1 mHz are detected for approximately 1600 s from the beginning of the observation until the occurrence of a thermonuclear X-ray burst at 10:42:22 UTC. The mHz oscillations are not detected following the X-ray burst. The average fractional rms amplitude of the mHz QPOs is 6.4% (3 - 20 keV), and the amplitude increases to about 8% below 10 keV.This phenomenology is strikingly similar to that seen in the LMXB 4U 1636-53. Indeed, the frequency of the mHz QPOs in 4U 1323-619 prior to the X-ray burst is very similar to the transition frequency between mHz QPO and bursts found in 4U 1636-53 by Altamirano et al. (2008). These results strongly suggest that the observed QPOs in 4U 1323-619 are, like those in 4U 1636-53, due to marginally stable nuclear burning. We also explore the dependence of the energy spectrum on the oscillation phase, and we place the present observations within the context of the spectral evolution of the accretion-powered flux from the source.

  10. Enceladus Plume Morphology and Variability from UVIS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Candice; Esposito, Larry; Colwell, Josh; Hendrix, Amanda; Portyankina, Ganna

    2017-10-01

    The Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) on the Cassini spacecraft has been observing Enceladus’ plume and its effect on the Saturnian environment since 2004. One solar and 7 stellar occultations have been observed between 2005 and 2017. On 27 March 2017 epsilon Canis Majoris (CMa) passed behind the plume of water vapor spewing from Enceladus’ tiger stripe fissures. With this occultation we have 6 cuts through the plume at a variety of orientations over 12 years. Following our standard procedure the column density along the line of sight from Enceladus to the star was determined and the water flux calculated [1]. The mean anomaly was 131, well away from the dust flux peak associated with Enceladus at an orbital longitude near apoapsis [2]. We find that the water vapor flux was ~160 kg/sec (this number will be refined when the final reconstructed trajectory is available). That puts it “in family” with the other occultations, with values that cluster around 200 kg/sec. It is at the low end, which may be consistent with the drop in particle output observed over the last decade [3]. UVIS results show that the supersonic collimated gas jets imbedded in the plume are the likely source of the variability in dust output [4], rather than overall flux from the tiger stripes. An occultation of epsilon Orionis was observed on 11 March 2016 when Enceladus was at a mean anomaly of 208. Although the bulk flux changed little the amount of water vapor coming from the Baghdad I supersonic jet increased by 25% relative to 2011. The Baghdad I jet was observed again in the 2017 epsilon CMa occultation, and the column density is half that of 2016, further bolstering the conclusion that the gas jets change output as a function of orbital longitude. UVIS results describing gas flux, jets, and general structure of the plume, the observables above the surface, are key to testing hypotheses for what is driving Enceladus’ eruptive activity below the surface. [1] Hansen, C. J. et

  11. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE BUILDING 100 PLUME, FORMER DOE PINELLAS SITE (YOUNG - RAINEY STAR CENTER), LARGO, FLORIDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Rossabi, J.; Amidon, M.; Riha, B.; Kaback, D.

    2010-07-30

    and/or bioaugmentation to provide a sustainable remediation system within the flow path of the plume. Additional data will be required to implement this approach and will include: (1) Better delineation of the nature and extent of contamination; (2) Demonstration the plume is currently stable or shrinking; and (3) Demonstration the full reductive dechlorination is occurring. The technical team recommends that DOE use a phased approach to identify residual contamination and to provide rapid installation of remedies. Matrices of characterization and remediation sensors, technologies, and tools were developed by the team in order to match the specific conditions and requirements of the site. The team provides a specific example of remedy that includes the incorporation of a dynamic characterization strategy moving from minimally invasive to more aggressive field techniques, the consideration of multiple complementary remediation approaches based on a spatiotemporally phased approach keyed to the different demands of different parts of the plume, and the integration and sequencing of the characterization and remediation activities.

  12. The Green Propellant Infusion Mission Thruster Performance Testing for Plume Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Matthew C.; Reed, Brian D.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Williams, George J.; Kojima, Jun J.; Kinzbach, McKenzie I.; McLean, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) is sponsored by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) office. The goal of GPIM is to advance the technology readiness level of a green propulsion system, specifically, one using the monopropellant, AF-M315E, by demonstrating ground handling, spacecraft processing, and on-orbit operations. One of the risks identified for GPIM is potential contamination of sensitive spacecraft surfaces from the effluents in the plumes of AF-M315E thrusters. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is conducting activities to characterize the effects of AF-M315E plume impingement and deposition. GRC has established individual plume models of the 22-N and 1-N thrusters that will be used on the GPIM spacecraft. The model simulations will be correlated with plume measurement data from Laboratory and Engineering Model 22-N, AF-M315E thrusters. The thrusters are currently being tested in a small rocket, altitude facility at NASA GRC. A suite of diagnostics, including Raman spectroscopy, Rayleigh spectroscopy, and Schlieren imaging are being used to acquire plume measurements of AF-M315E thrusters. Plume data will include temperature, velocity, relative density, and species concentration. The plume measurement data will be compared to the corresponding simulations of the plume model. The GRC effort will establish a data set of AF-M315E plume measurements and a plume model that can be used for future AF-M315E applications.

  13. The time varying structure of a river plume: Observations with an autonomous glider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, R. J.; Glenn, S. M.; Gong, D.

    2004-12-01

    During the 2004 LaTTE (Lagrangian Transport and Transformation Experiment) pilot study we deployed a Slocum Autonomous glider on a 10-day mission to run repeated transects across the Hudson River Plume in the vicinity of Sandy Hook. The glider completed 13 cross-plume surveys during the mission with horizontal resolution of approximately 100 meters. Wind forcing was highly variable and fluctuated between upwelling and downwelling conditions at 1-2 day intervals. Tidal forcing decreased markedly from spring to neap tide conditions and river discharge averaged approximately 500 m3/s during the survey. The plume responded rapidly to the variable wind forcing. During upwelling conditions the plume thinned and extended over 30 km from shore, while during downwelling winds the plume thickened and was compressed at the shore. However, during both upwellling and downwelling conditions the plume remained detached from the bottom. The cross-sectional area of the plume also tended to vary with the wind forcing. However, a significant increase in the plume's area during the last half of the mission does not appear to be related to either wind forcing or river discharge. Instead, we suggest that the plumes structure could be impacted by spring neap variability which is known to control stratification and freshwater fluxes out of the Hudson River Estuary. This presentation will relate the structure of the plume to wind forcing, river flow and the spring/neap cycle.

  14. Plume Characterization of a Laboratory Model 22 N GPIM Thruster via High-Frequency Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, George J.; Kojima, Jun J.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Deans, Matthew C.; Reed, Brian D.; Kinzbach, McKenzie I.; McLean, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the capability of a green propulsion system, specifically, one using the monopropellant, AF-M315E. One of the risks identified for GPIM is potential contamination of sensitive areas of the spacecraft from the effluents in the plumes of AF-M315E thrusters. Plume characterization of a laboratory-model 22 N thruster via optical diagnostics was conducted at NASA GRC in a space-simulated environment. A high-frequency pulsed laser was coupled with an electron-multiplied ICCD camera to perform Raman spectroscopy in the near-field, low-pressure plume. The Raman data yielded plume constituents and temperatures over a range of thruster chamber pressures and as a function of thruster (catalyst) operating time. Schlieren images of the near-field plume enabled calculation of plume velocities and revealed general plume structure of the otherwise invisible plume. The measured velocities are compared to those predicted by a two-dimensional, kinetic model. Trends in data and numerical results are presented from catalyst mid-life to end-of-life. The results of this investigation were coupled with the Raman and Schlieren data to provide an anchor for plume impingement analysis presented in a companion paper. The results of both analyses will be used to improve understanding of the nature of AF-M315E plumes and their impacts to GPIM and other future missions.

  15. Vapor plume oscillation mechanisms in transient keyhole during tandem dual beam fiber laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Zhang, Xiaosi; Pang, Shengyong; Hu, Renzhi; Xiao, Jianzhong

    2018-01-01

    Vapor plume oscillations are common physical phenomena that have an important influence on the welding process in dual beam laser welding. However, until now, the oscillation mechanisms of vapor plumes remain unclear. This is primarily because mesoscale vapor plume dynamics inside a millimeter-scale, invisible, and time-dependent keyhole are difficult to quantitatively observe. In this paper, based on a developed three-dimensional (3D) comprehensive model, the vapor plume evolutions in a dynamical keyhole are directly simulated in tandem dual beam, short-wavelength laser welding. Combined with the vapor plume behaviors outside the keyhole observed by high-speed imaging, the vapor plume oscillations in dynamical keyholes at different inter-beam distances are the first, to our knowledge, to be quantitatively analyzed. It is found that vapor plume oscillations outside the keyhole mainly result from vapor plume instabilities inside the keyhole. The ejection velocity at the keyhole opening and dynamical behaviors outside the keyhole of a vapor plume both violently oscillate with the same order of magnitude of high frequency (several kHz). Furthermore, the ejection speed at the keyhole opening and ejection area outside the keyhole both decrease as the beam distance increases, while the degree of vapor plume instability first decreases and then increases with increasing beam distance from 0.6 to 1.0 mm. Moreover, the oscillation mechanisms of a vapor plume inside the dynamical keyhole irradiated by dual laser beams are investigated by thoroughly analyzing the vapor plume occurrence and flow process. The vapor plume oscillations in the dynamical keyhole are found to mainly result from violent local evaporations and severe keyhole geometry variations. In short, the quantitative method and these findings can serve as a reference for further understanding of the physical mechanisms in dual beam laser welding and of processing optimizations in industrial applications.

  16. Charge structure in volcanic plumes: a comparison of plume properties predicted by an integral plume model to observations of volcanic lightning during the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Mark J; Behnke, Sonja A

    Observations of volcanic lightning made using a lightning mapping array during the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull allow the trajectory and growth of the volcanic plume to be determined. The lightning observations are compared with predictions of an integral model of volcanic plumes that includes descriptions of the interaction with wind and the effects of moisture. We show that the trajectory predicted by the integral model closely matches the observational data and the model well describes the growth of the plume downwind of the vent. Analysis of the lightning signals reveals information on the dominant charge structure within the volcanic plume. During the Eyjafjallajökull eruption both monopole and dipole charge structures were observed in the plume. By using the integral plume model, we propose the varying charge structure is connected to the availability of condensed water and low temperatures at high altitudes in the plume, suggesting ice formation may have contributed to the generation of a dipole charge structure via thunderstorm-style ice-based charging mechanisms, though overall this charging mechanism is believed to have had only a weak influence on the production of lightning.

  17. Analysis of dissolved benzene plumes and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) plumes in ground water at leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Happel, A.M.; Rice, D.; Beckenbach, E.; Savalin, L.; Temko, H.; Rempel, R.; Dooher, B.

    1996-11-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments mandate the addition of oxygenates to gasoline products to abate air pollution. Currently, many areas of the country utilize oxygenated or reformulated fuel containing 15- percent and I I-percent MTBE by volume, respectively. This increased use of MTBE in gasoline products has resulted in accidental point source releases of MTBE containing gasoline products to ground water. Recent studies have shown MTBE to be frequently detected in samples of shallow ground water from urban areas throughout the United States (Squillace et al., 1995). Knowledge of the subsurface fate and transport of MTBE in ground water at leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) sites and the spatial extent of MTBE plumes is needed to address these releases. The goal of this research is to utilize data from a large number of LUFT sites to gain insights into the fate, transport, and spatial extent of MTBE plumes. Specific goals include defining the spatial configuration of dissolved MTBE plumes, evaluating plume stability or degradation over time, evaluating the impact of point source releases of MTBE to ground water, and attempting to identify the controlling factors influencing the magnitude and extent of the MTBE plumes. We are examining the relationships between dissolved TPH, BTEX, and MTBE plumes at LUFT sites using parallel approaches of best professional judgment and a computer-aided plume model fitting procedure to determine plume parameters. Here we present our initial results comparing dissolved benzene and MTBE plumes lengths, the statistical significance of these results, and configuration of benzene and MTBE plumes at individual LUFT sites

  18. Long-term atmospheric visibility trends in megacities of China, India and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue; Yao, Ling; Cheng, Zhen; Wang, Yungang

    2017-11-01

    Millions of premature deaths worldwide every year mostly in China and India are contributed by the poor air quality. The atmospheric visibility is a proven indicator of the ambient air quality. In this study, nine megacities were selected, including Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou from China, Chicago, Los Angeles (LA) and New York City (NYC) from the United States, and Mumbai, Chennai and Jaipur from India. The data of visibility, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and meteorological factors from 1973 to 2015 were collected. The temporal variations of annual and monthly percentages of bad days (visibility 15km) were evaluated. Visibility of Chicago, LA and NYC gradually improved during the past 43 years and has reached a very good level (good day percentages: 75-88%; bad day percentages: 0 - 4%). Conversely, visibility in Mumbai, Chennai and Jaipur continued deteriorating and suffered an extremely poor visibility situation in recent years (good day percentages: 0; bad day percentages: 6-100%). Likewise, visibility in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou has experienced the worsening period during the industrial development from 1970s and turned better after the 1990s. A strong seasonal pattern of bad day percentages of each year were observed in most cities, especially in the winter, which is caused by the fossil fuel combustion for heating, relatively high relative humidity, and other unfavorable meteorological conditions. The low visibility events occurred more frequently in days with low wind speeds and specific wind directions, further explaining the seasonal patterns of visibility. With population growth from the period of 2000-2010 to the period of 2011-2015, AOD and bad day percentages both increased in Mumbai, Chennai, Jaipur and Beijing while others were relatively stable. This study demonstrated that the macro-control of pollution emissions could effectively reduce air deterioration. The relationships among visibility variation, meteorological, pollutant and

  19. Visibility of sparkle in metallic paints

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchner, Eric; Van der Lans, Ivo; Perales Romero, Esther; Martínez Verdú, Francisco Miguel; Campos Acosta, Joaquín; Ferrero Turrión, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    For suitable illumination and observation conditions, sparkles may be observed in metallic coatings. The visibility of these sparkles depends critically on their intensity, and on the paint medium surrounding the metallic flakes. Based on previous perception studies from other disciplines, we derive equations for the threshold for sparkles to be visible. The resulting equations show how the visibility of sparkles varies with the luminosity and distance of the light source, the diameter of the...

  20. How visible light curing came into dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, N H F

    2016-01-01

    The present paper details the history of the introduction of visible light curing into dentistry. This history provides an excellent example of 'out of the box', lateral thinking translation of innovative scientific technology into dentistry. Visible light curing is an important UK contribution to the recent history and current practice of dentistry, with several million visible light curing procedures being carried out globally on a daily basis.

  1. The role of a mantle plume in the formation of Yellowstone volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Tiffany; Liu, Lijun

    2016-02-01

    The origin of the Yellowstone volcanic province remains debated. Proposed hypotheses involve either a mantle plume or not. Recent tomographic images allow a quantitative evaluation of the plume hypothesis and its interaction with the Farallon slabs. Using 4-D geodynamic models with data assimilation, we find that the slab is always in the way of the initially rising plume and that the plume could reach the surface only through the broken slab hinge at ~15 Ma. For most of the time, the sinking slabs dominate the mantle flow and prohibit upwelling. We find that a plume that satisfies the present mantle image beneath Yellowstone fails to predict both voluminous hot materials at shallow depths beneath the western U.S. and the age migration of the hot spot tracks. We suggest that a plume is likely to have much less influence on the Yellowstone volcanism than previously thought.

  2. Field studies of submerged-diffuser thermal plumes with comparisons to predictive model results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigo, A.A.; Paddock, R.A.; Ditmars, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal plumes from submerged discharges of cooling water from two power plants on Lake Michigan were studied. The system for the acquisition of water temperatures and ambient conditions permitted the three-dimensional structure of the plumes to be determined. The Zion Nuclear Power Station has two submerged discharge structures separated by only 94 m. Under conditions of flow from both structures, interaction between the two plumes resulted in larger thermal fields than would be predicted by the superposition of single non-interacting plumes. Maximum temperatures in the near-field region of the plume compared favorably with mathematical model predictions. A comparison of physical-model predictions for the plume at the D. C. Cook Nuclear Plant with prototype measurements indicated good agreement in the near-field region, but differences in the far-field occurred as similitude was not preserved there

  3. Plasma Plume Characterization of the HERMeS During a 1722-hr Wear Test Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wensheng; Williams, George J.; Peterson, Peter Y.; Kamhawi, Hani; Gilland, James H.; Herman, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    A 1722-hr wear test campaign of NASA's 12.5-kW Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding was completed. This wear test campaign, completed in 2016, was divided into four segments including an electrical configuration characterization test, two short duration tests, and one long wear test. During the electrical configuration characterization test, the plasma plume was examined to provide data to support the down select of the electrical configuration for further testing. During the long wear tests, the plasma plume was periodically examined for indications of changes in thruster behavior. Examination of the plasma plume data from the electrical configuration characterization test revealed a correlation between the plume properties and the presence of a conduction path through the front poles. Examination of the long wear test plasma plume data revealed that the plume characteristics remained unchanged during testing to within the measurement uncertainty.

  4. Visible-frequency hyperbolic metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    High, Alexander A.; Devlin, Robert C.; Dibos, Alan; Polking, Mark; Wild, Dominik S.; Perczel, Janos; de Leon, Nathalie P.; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Park, Hongkun

    2015-06-01

    Metamaterials are artificial optical media composed of sub-wavelength metallic and dielectric building blocks that feature optical phenomena not present in naturally occurring materials. Although they can serve as the basis for unique optical devices that mould the flow of light in unconventional ways, three-dimensional metamaterials suffer from extreme propagation losses. Two-dimensional metamaterials (metasurfaces) such as hyperbolic metasurfaces for propagating surface plasmon polaritons have the potential to alleviate this problem. Because the surface plasmon polaritons are guided at a metal-dielectric interface (rather than passing through metallic components), these hyperbolic metasurfaces have been predicted to suffer much lower propagation loss while still exhibiting optical phenomena akin to those in three-dimensional metamaterials. Moreover, because of their planar nature, these devices enable the construction of integrated metamaterial circuits as well as easy coupling with other optoelectronic elements. Here we report the experimental realization of a visible-frequency hyperbolic metasurface using single-crystal silver nanostructures defined by lithographic and etching techniques. The resulting devices display the characteristic properties of metamaterials, such as negative refraction and diffraction-free propagation, with device performance greatly exceeding those of previous demonstrations. Moreover, hyperbolic metasurfaces exhibit strong, dispersion-dependent spin-orbit coupling, enabling polarization- and wavelength-dependent routeing of surface plasmon polaritons and two-dimensional chiral optical components. These results open the door to realizing integrated optical meta-circuits, with wide-ranging applications in areas from imaging and sensing to quantum optics and quantum information science.

  5. STG-CT: High-vacuum plume test facility for chemical thrusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Grabe

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The STG-CT, operated by the DLR Institute for Aerodynamics and Flow Technology in Göttingen, is a vacuum facility specically designed to provide and maintain a space-like vacuum environment for researching plume flow and plume impingement from satellite reaction control thrusters. Its unique liquid-helium driven cryopump of 30m2 allows maintaining a background pressure <10^-5 mbar even when molecular hydrogen is a plume constituent.

  6. Dynamics of Mantle Plume Controlled by both Post-spinel and Post-garnet Phase Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Leng, W.

    2017-12-01

    Mineralogical studies indicate that two major phase transitions occur near 660 km depth in the Earth's pyrolitic mantle: the ringwoodite (Rw) to perovskite (Pv) + magnesiowüstite (Mw) and majorite (Mj) to perovskite (Pv) phase transitions. Seismological results also show a complicated phase boundary structure for plume regions at this depth, including broad pulse, double reflections and depressed 660 km discontinuity beneath hot regions etc… These observations have been attributed to the co-existence of these two phase transformations. However, previous geodynamical modeling mainly focused on the effects of Rw-Pv+Mw phase transition on the plume dynamics and largely neglected the effects of Mj-Pv phase transition. Here we develop a 3-D regional spherical geodynamic model to study the influence of the combination of Rw - Pv+Mw and Mj - Pv phase transitions on plume dynamics, including the topography fluctuation of 660 km discontinuity, plume shape and penetration capability of plume. Our results show that (1) a double phase boundary occurs at the hot center area of plume while for other regions with relatively lower temperature the phase boundary is single and flat, which respectively corresponds to the double reflections in the seismic observations and a high velocity prism-like structure at the top of 660 km discontinuity; (2) a large amount of low temperature plume materials could be trapped to form a complex trapezoid overlying the 660 km depth; (3) Mj - Pv phase change strongly enhances the plume penetration capability at 660 km depth, which significantly increases the plume mass flux due to the increased plume radius, but significantly reduces plume heat flux due to the decreased plume temperature in the upper mantle. Our model results provide new enlightenments for better constraining seismic structure and mineral reactions at 660 km phase boundaries.

  7. Inferring Properties of the Hawaiian Plume from the Hawaiian Swell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribe, N. M.

    2012-04-01

    The most prominent geophysical signature associated with the Hawaiian island chain is a broad topographic anomaly ('swell') some 1000 km wide and 2500 km long. Isostasy requires the swell to be compensated by a layer of low-density material at depth whose shape in mapview is similar to that of the swell itself. That shape can be predicted using a simple 2-D thin-layer flow model in which buoyant fluid with constant viscosity is supplied at a volumetric rate Q by a fixed mantle plume and spreads laterally over the base of a plate moving at speed U. A more realistic 3-D version of the model involves a hot thermal plume in a fluid with temperature- and pressure-dependent viscosity that interacts with the shear flow generated by the plate motion. Comparison of the predictions of these models with observations of the Hawaiian swell yields several important inferences about the Hawaiian plume: (1) Plume buoyancy flux B. The observed height and width of the swell imply B ≈ 3000 kg s-1, much less than earlier estimates B = 6300-8700 kg s-1 based solely on the horizontal flux of (negative) swell buoyancy carried by the moving plate. The reason for the discrepancy is that the horizontal flux calculation neglects (a) the contribution of the buoyant residue of partial melting to the swell topography, and (b) the fact that the mean speed of downstream transport of the buoyant material by the shear flow is less than the plate speed. (2) Depth of compensation. The 3-D model predicts a geoid/topography ratio (GTR) ≈ 7-8 m/km for the Hawaiian swell, in apparent contradiction with earlier estimates ≈ 4-5 m/km based on the observed geoid and bathymetry alone. However, an extended version of the 3-D model including volcanic loading and lithospheric flexure reveals that the low values GTR≈ 4-5 m/km are artifacts of incomplete removal of the shallowly compensated volcanic islands and the surrounding flexural moat. The GTR of the swell itself is therefore ≈ 7-8 m/km, implying a

  8. CO2 plume management in saline reservoir sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frailey, S.M.; Finley, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    A significant difference between injecting CO2 into saline aquifers for sequestration and injecting fluids into oil reservoirs or natural gas into aquifer storage reservoirs is the availability and use of other production and injection wells surrounding the primary injection well(s). Of major concern for CO2 sequestration using a single well is the distribution of pressure and CO2 saturation within the injection zone. Pressure is of concern with regards to caprock integrity and potential migration of brine or CO2 outside of the injection zone, while CO2 saturation is of interest for storage rights and displacement efficiency. For oil reservoirs, the presence of additional wells is intended to maximize oil recovery by injecting CO2 into the same hydraulic flow units from which the producing wells are withdrawing fluids. Completing injectors and producers in the same flow unit increases CO2 throughput, maximizes oil displacement efficiency, and controls pressure buildup. Additional injectors may surround the CO2 injection well and oil production wells in order to provide external pressure to these wells to prevent the injected CO2 from migrating from the pattern between two of the producing wells. Natural gas storage practices are similar in that to reduce the amount of "cushion" gas and increase the amount of cycled or working gas, edge wells may be used for withdrawal of gas and center wells used for gas injection. This reduces loss of gas to the formation via residual trapping far from the injection well. Moreover, this maximizes the natural gas storage efficiency between the injection and production wells and reduces the areal extent of the natural gas plume. Proposed U.S. EPA regulations include monitoring pressure and suggest the "plume" may be defined by pressure in addition to the CO2 saturated area. For pressure monitoring, it seems that this can only be accomplished by injection zone monitoring wells. For pressure, these wells would not need to be very

  9. Phosphorus-bearing Aerosol Particles From Volcanic Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenholzner, J. H.; Schroettner, H.; Poelt, P.; Delgado, H.; Caltabiano, T.

    2003-12-01

    Particles rich in P or bulk geochemical data of volcanic aerosol particles showing high P contents are known from many volcanic plumes (Stanton, 1994; Obenholzner et al., 2003). FESEM/EDS analysis of individual particles obtained from the passively degassing plume of Popocatepetl volcano, Mx. (1997) and from the plume of Stromboli (May 2003) show P frequently. Even at the high resolution of the FESEM, euhedral apatite crystals could not be observed. At Popocatepetl (1997) spherical Ca-P-O particles are common. Fluffy, fractal or botryoidal particles also can contain EDS-detectable amounts of P. The EDS spectrum of such particles can comprise various elements. However most particles show P, S and Cl. P-S and P-S-metal species are known in chemistry but do they occur in volcanic plumes? Stoichiometric considerations had been made in the past suggesting the existence of P-S species in plumes (Stanton 1994), gas sampling and remote gas monitoring systems have not detected yet such molecules in plumes. The particle spectrum of the reawakened Popocateptel volcano might be related to accumulation of volatiles at the top of a magma chamber during the phase of dormancy. P-Fe rich, Ca-free aggregates are also known from the eruption of El Chichon 1982 (SEM/EDS by M. Sheridan, per. comm. 08-24-2003). Persistently active volcanoes (i.e. Stromboli) represent a different category according to continuous degassing and aerosol particle formation. A particle collector ( ca. 90 ml/min) accompanied a COSPEC helicopter flight at Stromboli (May 15, 2003) after one of the rare types of sub-plinian events on April 5 2003. P-bearing particles are very common. For instance, an Fe oxide grain (diam. = 2 æm) is partially covered by fluffy and euhedral P-bearing matter. The elements detected are P, Cl, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti and (Fe). The fluffy and the euhedral (rhombohedral?) matter show in SE-BSE-mix image almost identical grey colors. At Stromboli and Popocatepetl particles on which

  10. Asymmetric three-dimensional topography over mantle plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, Evgueni; Gerya, Taras

    2014-09-04

    The role of mantle-lithosphere interactions in shaping surface topography has long been debated. In general, it is supposed that mantle plumes and vertical mantle flows result in axisymmetric, long-wavelength topography, which strongly differs from the generally asymmetric short-wavelength topography created by intraplate tectonic forces. However, identification of mantle-induced topography is difficult, especially in the continents. It can be argued therefore that complex brittle-ductile rheology and stratification of the continental lithosphere result in short-wavelength modulation and localization of deformation induced by mantle flow. This deformation should also be affected by far-field stresses and, hence, interplay with the 'tectonic' topography (for example, in the 'active/passive' rifting scenario). Testing these ideas requires fully coupled three-dimensional numerical modelling of mantle-lithosphere interactions, which so far has not been possible owing to the conceptual and technical limitations of earlier approaches. Here we present new, ultra-high-resolution, three-dimensional numerical experiments on topography over mantle plumes, incorporating a weakly pre-stressed (ultra-slow spreading), rheologically realistic lithosphere. The results show complex surface evolution, which is very different from the smooth, radially symmetric patterns usually assumed as the canonical surface signature of mantle upwellings. In particular, the topography exhibits strongly asymmetric, small-scale, three-dimensional features, which include narrow and wide rifts, flexural flank uplifts and fault structures. This suggests a dominant role for continental rheological structure and intra-plate stresses in controlling dynamic topography, mantle-lithosphere interactions, and continental break-up processes above mantle plumes.

  11. Meteorological Situations Favouring the Development of Dust Plumes over Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepanski, K.; Szodry, K.

    2017-12-01

    The knowledge on mineral dust emitted at high latitudes is limited, but its impact on the polar environments is divers. Within a warming climate, dust emitted from regions in cold climates is expected to increase due to the retreat of the ice sheet and increasing melting rates. Therefore, and for its extensive impacts on different aspects of the climate system, a better understanding of the atmospheric dust life-cycle at high latitudes/cold climates in general, and the spatio-temporal distribution of dust sources in particular, are essential. At high-latitudes, glacio-fluvial sediments as found on river flood plains e.g. supplied by glaciers are prone to wind erosion when dry and bare. In case of the occurrence of strong winds, sediments are blown out and dust plumes develop. As dust uplift is controlled by soil surface characteristics, the availability of suitable sediments, and atmospheric conditions, an interannual variability in dust source activity is expected. We investigated atmospheric circulation patterns that favour the development of dust plumes over Iceland, which presents a well-known dust source at high latitudes. Using the atmosphere model COSMO (COnsortium for Small-scale MOdeling), we analysed the wind speed distribution over the Iceland region for identified and documented dust cases. As one outcome of the study, the position of the Icelandic low, the anticyclones located over Northern Europe, and the resulting pressure gradients are of particular relevance. The interaction of the synoptic-scale winds with the Icelandic orography may locally enhance the wind speeds and thus foster local dust emission. Results from this study suggest that the atmospheric circulation determined by the pressure pattern is of particular relevance for the formation of dust plumes entering the North Atlantic.

  12. Lidar detection of carbon dioxide in volcanic plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorani, Luca; Santoro, Simone; Parracino, Stefano; Maio, Giovanni; Del Franco, Mario; Aiuppa, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Volcanic gases give information on magmatic processes. In particular, anomalous releases of carbon dioxide precede volcanic eruptions. Up to now, this gas has been measured in volcanic plumes with conventional measurements that imply the severe risks of local sampling and can last many hours. For these reasons and for the great advantages of laser sensing, the thorough development of volcanic lidar has been undertaken at the Diagnostics and Metrology Laboratory (UTAPRAD-DIM) of the Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA). In fact, lidar profiling allows one to scan remotely volcanic plumes in a fast and continuous way, and with high spatial and temporal resolution. Two differential absorption lidar instruments will be presented in this paper: BILLI (BrIdge voLcanic LIdar), based on injection seeded Nd:YAG laser, double grating dye laser, difference frequency mixing (DFM) and optical parametric amplifier (OPA), and VULLI (VULcamed Lidar), based on injection seeded Nd:YAG laser and optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The first one is funded by the ERC (European Research Council) project BRIDGE and the second one by the ERDF (European Regional Development Fund) project VULCAMED. While VULLI has not yet been tested in a volcanic site, BILLI scanned the gas emitted by Pozzuoli Solfatara (Campi Flegrei volcanic area, Naples, Italy) during a field campaign carried out from 13 to 17 October 2014. Carbon dioxide concentration maps were retrieved remotely in few minutes in the crater area. Lidar measurements were in good agreement with well-established techniques, based on different operating principles. To our knowledge, it is the first time that carbon dioxide in a volcanic plume is retrieved by lidar, representing the first direct measurement of this kind ever performed on an active volcano and showing the high potential of laser remote sensing in geophysical research.

  13. The Thermal Evolution of the Galapagos Mantle Plume: Insights from Al-in-Olivine Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trela, J.; Gazel, E.; Sobolev, A. V.; Class, C.; Bizimis, M.; Jicha, B. R.; Batanova, V. G.; Denyer, P.

    2016-12-01

    The mantle plume hypothesis is widely accepted for the formation of large igneous provinces (LIP) and many ocean island basalts (OIB). Petrologic models support a mantle plume origin by indicating high mantle temperatures (>1500 °C) for some plume-melts relative to melts generated at ambient mid ocean ridge conditions (1350 °C). Mantle plumes forming LIPs and OIBs provide our primary source of information on the geochemical and lithological heterogeneity of the lower mantle. The Galapagos hotspot represents one of the most thermally and geochemically heterogeneous plumes on the planet, sustaining long-lived isotopic and lithological heterogeneity over its 90 Ma evolution. Previous petrologic studies showed that the Galapagos plume secularly cooled over time and that the decrease in the plume's temperature correlates with an increase in a recycled (pyroxenite) component. We used Al-in-olivine thermometry to show that maximum olivine crystallization temperatures confirm secular cooling of the Galapagos plume. Olivines from the early melting stages of the plume at 90 Ma (Caribbean LIP) record the highest crystallization temperatures (1600 °C). Olivines from the current archipelago record the lowest temperatures of only 1300 °C. The largest decrease in temperature occurred between 90 and 70 Ma ( 200 °C decrease) and coincides with the plume head-tail transition. Olivines from the 60-90 Ma-old accreted Galapagos-tracks in Costa Rica and Panama record higher Ni, Fe/Mn, and lower Ca contents than those from the present-day archipelago, indicating a higher abundance of pyroxenite (recycled oceanic crust) entrained in parts of the plume head that melted to form the Caribbean LIP. However, the Galapagos plume was pyroxenite-rich for 40 Ma thus pyroxenite-entrainment goes beyond the plume-tail transition. Our results suggest that hotter regions of the Galapagos plume entrained larger amounts of dense, recycled components due to their greater buoyancy; however, this

  14. Loire and Gironde turbid plumes: Characterization and influence on thermohaline properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costoya, X.; Fernández-Nóvoa, D.; deCastro, M.; Gómez-Gesteira, M.

    2017-12-01

    Knowledge and predictability of turbid river plumes is of great importance because they modulate the properties of the seawater adjacent to river mouths. The Loire and Gironde Rivers form the most important plumes in the Bay of Biscay, as they provide > 75% of total runoff. The development of the turbid plume under the influence of its main drivers was analyzed using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite data from the period 2003-2015. River discharge was found to be the main driver, followed by wind, which also had an important effect in modulating the turbid plume during periods of high river discharge. Seaward and upwelling favorable winds enhanced the dispersion of plumes on seawater, whereas landward and downwelling favorable winds limited mixing with the adjacent ocean water. The maximum extension of the turbid plume was reached under landward winds. In addition, the spatio-temporal evolution of the East Atlantic pattern and the North Atlantic Oscillation was observed to affect the dynamics of plumes: positive values of both indices favored a greater extension of the plume. Thermohaline properties differed inside and outside the area affected by both rivers. In particular, these rivers maintain winter stratification inside the turbid plume, which results in a different warming ratio when compared with the adjacent ocean.

  15. High Fidelity Modeling of Plume-Induced Soil Erosion During Lunar and Planetary Landing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During lunar and planetary landings, rocket plumes interact with the surface, ejecting soil and other particles into the surrounding environment. These particles,...

  16. Flowfield and Radiation Analysis of Missile Exhaust Plumes Using a Turbulent-Chemistry Interaction Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calhoon, W. H; Kenzakowski, D. C

    2000-01-01

    ... components and missile defense systems. Current engineering level models neglect turbulent-chemistry interactions and typically underpredict the intensity of plume afterburning and afterburning burnout...

  17. Assessment of Turbulence-Chemistry Interactions in Missile Exhaust Plume Signature Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calhoon, W

    2002-01-01

    ... components and missile defense systems. Current engineering level models neglect turbulence chemistry interactions and typically underpredict the intensity of plume afterburning and afterburning burnout...

  18. A multi-decadal history of biomass burning plume heights identified using aerosol index measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Guan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We have quantified the relationship between Aerosol Index (AI measurements and plume height for young biomass burning plumes using coincident Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO measurements. This linear relationship allows the determination of high-altitude plumes wherever AI data are available, and it provides a data set for validating global fire plume heights in chemistry transport models. We find that all plumes detected from June 2006 to February 2009 with an AI value ≥9 are located at altitudes higher than 5 km. Older high-altitude plumes have lower AI values than young plumes at similar altitudes. We have examined available AI data from the OMI and TOMS instruments (1978–2009 and find that large AI plumes occur more frequently over North America than over Australia or Russia/Northeast Asia. According to the derived relationship, during this time interval, 181 plumes, in various stages of their evolution, reached altitudes above 8 km.

  19. A Monte Carlo simulation method for assessing biotransformation effects on groundwater fuel hydrocarbon plume lengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNab, W.W. Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Biotransformation of dissolved groundwater hydrocarbon plumes emanating from leaking underground fuel tanks should, in principle, result in plume length stabilization over relatively short distances, thus diminishing the environmental risk. However, because the behavior of hydrocarbon plumes is usually poorly constrained at most leaking underground fuel tank sites in terms of release history, groundwater velocity, dispersion, as well as the biotransformation rate, demonstrating such a limitation in plume length is problematic. Biotransformation signatures in the aquifer geochemistry, most notably elevated bicarbonate, may offer a means of constraining the relationship between plume length and the mean biotransformation rate. In this study, modeled plume lengths and spatial bicarbonate differences among a population of synthetic hydrocarbon plumes, generated through Monte Carlo simulation of an analytical solute transport model, are compared to field observations from six underground storage tank (UST) sites at military bases in California. Simulation results indicate that the relationship between plume length and the distribution of bicarbonate is best explained by biotransformation rates that are consistent with ranges commonly reported in the literature. This finding suggests that bicarbonate can indeed provide an independent means for evaluating limitations in hydrocarbon plume length resulting from biotransformation. (Author)

  20. The propagation of GPS signals through electrically charged plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez Harper, J.; Steffes, P. G.; Dufek, J.

    2017-12-01

    Probing the interior dynamics of eruptive columns using electrostatic processes generated within the flows themselves has garnered much interest in the recent years. Indeed, large eruptions are often accompanied by brilliant displays of lightning, testifying to the high potentials that can be accumulated by a diverse set of electrification mechanisms. Unfortunately, lightning on its own cannot be used as a general remote sensing tool because not all volcanic eruptions produce spark discharges. As pointed out by McNutt and Williams, 2010, only 30-35% of volcanoes maintain lightning storms. The absence of lightning in two thirds of all eruptions indicates that most volcanoes produce flows with 1) inefficient or limited granular charging processes or 2) dynamics that do not promote the charge separation that sets up coherent electric fields needed for lightning. Yet, even if the prerequisites for spark discharges are not met, it is difficult to argue for plumes which are completely electrostatically neutral. The problems permeating passive electromagnetic sensing may be overcome through the use of active methods which involve interrogating charged volcanic plumes with electromagnetic radiation. The scattering of electromagnetic waves has been a common method to retrieve the physical properties of collections of particles, specifically those which cannot be accessed directly. By modifying the standard Mie formulation, Klavcka et al., 2007 showed that surface charge may influence the extinction properties of grains if such particles are much smaller than the wavelength of the incident radiation. Based on this model, we posit that the properties of charged clouds of particles can be readily assessed using robust, existing infrastructure-the Global Positioning System. In the present work, we numerically explore the manner in which electrostatic charge on particles affect the propagation of electromagnetic waves through volcanic plumes. We show that, for the range of

  1. Plume-driven plumbing and crustal formation in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, R.M.; Nolet, G.; Morgan, W.J.; Vogfjord, K.; Nettles, M.; Ekstrom, G.; Bergsson, B.H.; Erlendsson, P.; Foulger, G.R.; Jakobsdottir, S.; Julian, B.R.; Pritchard, M.; Ragnarsson, S.; Stefansson, R.

    2002-01-01

    Through combination of surface wave and body wave constraints we derive a three-dimensional (3-D) crustal S velocity model and Moho map for Iceland. It reveals a vast plumbing system feeding mantle plume melt into upper crustal magma chambers where crustal formation takes place. The method is based on the partitioned waveform inversion to which we add additional observations. Love waves from six local events recorded on the HOTSPOT-SIL networks are fitted, Sn travel times from the same events measured, previous observations of crustal thickness are added, and all three sets of constraints simultaneously inverted for our 3-D model. In the upper crust (0-15 km) an elongated low-velocity region extends along the length of the Northern, Eastern and Western Neovolcanic Zones. The lowest velocities (-7%) are found at 5-10 km below the two most active volcanic complexes: Hekla and Bardarbunga-Grimsvotn. In the lower crust (>15 km) the low-velocity region can be represented as a vertical cylinder beneath central Iceland. The low-velocity structure is interpreted as the thermal halo of pipe work which connects the region of melt generation in the uppermost mantle beneath central Iceland to active volcanoes along the neovolcanic zones. Crustal thickness in Iceland varies from 15-20 km beneath the Reykjanes Peninsula, Krafla and the extinct Snfellsnes rift zone, to 46 km beneath central Iceland. The average crustal thickness is 29 km. The variations in thickness can be explained in terms of the temporal variation in plume productivity over the last ~20 Myr, the Snfellsnes rift zone being active during a minimum in plume productivity. Variations in crustal thickness do not depart significantly from an isostatically predicted crustal thickness. The best fit linear isostatic relation implies an average density jump of 4% across the Moho. Rare earth element inversions of basalt compositions on Iceland suggest a melt thickness (i.e., crustal thickness) of 15-20 km, given passive

  2. Aging of plumes from emission sources based on chamber simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Deng, W.; Fang, Z.; Bernard, F.; Zhang, Y.; Yu, J.; Mellouki, A.; George, C.

    2017-12-01

    Study on atmospheric aging of plumes from emission sources is essential to understand their contribution to both secondary and primary pollutants occurring in the ambient air. Here we directly introduced vehicle exhaust, biomass burning plume, industrial solvents and cooking plumes into a smog chamber with 30 m3 fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon film reactor housed in a temperature-controlled enclosure, for characterizing primarily emitted air pollutants and for investigating secondarily formed products during photo-oxidation. Moreover, we also initiated study on the formation of secondary aerosols when gasoline vehicle exhaust is mixed with typical coal combustion pollutant SO2 or typical agricultural-related pollutant NH3. Formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from typical solvent toluene was also investigated in ambient air matrix in comparison with purified air matrix. Main findings include: 1) Except for exhaust from idling gasoline vehicles, traditional precursor volatile organic compounds could only explain a very small fraction of SOA formed from vehicle exhaust, biomass burning or cooking plumes, suggesting knowledge gap in SOA precursors; 2) There is the need to re-think vehicle emission standards with a combined primary and/or secondary contribution of vehicle exhaust to PM2.5 or other secondary pollutants such as ozone; 3) When mixed with SO2, the gasoline vehicle exhaust revealed an increase of SOA production factor by 60-200% and meanwhile SO2 oxidation rates increased about a factor of 2.7; when the aged gasoline vehicle exhaust were mixing with NH3, both particle number and mass concentrations were increasing explosively. These phenomenons implied the complex interaction during aging of co-existing source emissions. 4) For typical combination of "tolune+SO2+NOx", when compared to chamber simulation with purified air as matrix, both SOA formation and SO2 oxidation were greatly enhanced under ambient air matrix, and the enhancement

  3. Optical Thomson scatter from laser-ablated plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delserieys, A.; Khattak, F. Y.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Riley, D.; Pedregosa Gutierrez, J.

    2008-01-01

    We have obtained density and temperature informations on an expanding KrF laser-ablated magnesium plume via optical Thomson scatter with a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. The electron temperature was found to decay with the expected T e ∝t -1 dependence. However, we have found the electron density to have a time dependence n e ∝t -4.95 which can be explained by strong recombination processes. We also observed atomic Raman satellites originating from transitions between the different angular momentum levels of the metastable 3 P 0 term in Mg I

  4. Action Research on "Visible Learning" in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, David

    2014-01-01

    "Visible teaching and learning" is an educational philosophy that makes the processes and endpoints in a classroom highly visible and understandable to all involved. This was translated into a series of lesson "roadmaps" for a group of chemistry students studying rates of reaction and reaction energetics. Their end-of-unit…

  5. Rendering Visible: Painting and Sexuate Subjectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Linda

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I examine Luce Irigaray's aesthetic of sexual difference, which she develops by extrapolating from Paul Klee's idea that the role of painting is to render the non-visible rather than represent the visible. This idea is the premise of her analyses of phenomenology and psychoanalysis and their respective contributions to understanding…

  6. Articulation Visibility at Two-Year Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincher, Mark; Sharp, Lance; Burks, James; Lyon, Kelly; Parker, Mitchell; Ward, Justin; Hall, Ashia; Wilson, Vicki; Washington, Brittany

    2014-01-01

    Articulation between two-year colleges and universities provides a critical opportunity for potential students. Most institutions declare their support of articulation; however, the visibility of this support to potential students is inconsistent at best. Articulation agreements that are visible and easily understood by potential students serve as…

  7. No-visible-scar cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz M. Wróblewski

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS is a laparoscopic method providing a good cosmetic effect,but requiring the application of special ports and instruments enabling the surgeon to perform the procedure.We report three-ports cholecystectomy through umbilical and suprapubic incisions performed with typical laparos -copic instruments which calls no-visible-scar cholecystectomy (NVSC.Material and methods: Twenty patients with symptomatic cholelithiasis were qualified for NVSC. Typical CO2 pneumoperitoneumwas done after umbilical skin incision. Two ports of 5 mm were inserted in the maximum externaledges of this incision. After cystic duct and cystic artery dissection the right one was exchanged for a port of 11 mm.The second incision for the 11-mm trocar for the laparoscope was done in the suprapubic median line within the hairarea.Results: Cholecystectomies were performed without any conversion to classical laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LCHor open surgery. They were not technically identical due to the gradual improvement in the access and manipulationof instruments. The time of the intervention ranged from 2 hours during the introduction of the new method to 50 minfor the last procedures. No postoperative complications were observed and all patients were discharged not later thanafter conventional LCH.Conclusions: NVSC is a three-port laparoscopic intervention performed with typical laparoscopic instruments. It ismore convenient for the surgeon than single incision LCH, because the placement of the optic in the suprapubic regiongives more space for the instruments. It also provides a very good cosmetic effect of the intervention. The describedprocedure is easy to learn and in case of technical problems additional ports can be applied (as in typical LCH.

  8. Satellite remote sensing of a low-salinity water plume in the East China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Ahn

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available With the aim to map and monitor a low-salinity water (LSW plume in the East China Sea (ECS, we developed more robust and proper regional algorithms from large in-situ measurements of apparent and inherent optical properties (i.e. remote sensing reflectance, Rrs, and absorption coefficient of coloured dissolved organic matter, aCDOM determined in ECS and neighboring waters. Using the above data sets, we derived the following relationships between visible Rrs and absorption by CDOM, i.e. Rrs (412/Rrs (555 vs. aCDOM (400 (m−1 and aCDOM (412 (m−1 with a correlation coefficient R2 0.67 greater than those noted for Rrs (443/Rrs (555 and Rrs (490/Rrs (555 vs. aCDOM (400 (m−1 and aCDOM (412 (m−1. Determination of aCDOM (m−1 at 400 nm and 412 nm is particularly necessary to describe its absorption as a function of wavelength λ using a single exponential model in which the spectral slope S as a proxy for CDOM composition is estimated by the ratio of aCDOM at 412 nm and 400 nm and the reference is explained simply by aCDOM at 412 nm. In order to derive salinity from the absorption coefficient of CDOM, in-situ measurements of salinity made in a wide range of water types from dense oceanic to light estuarine/coastal systems were used along with in-situ measurements of aCDOM at 400 nm, 412 nm, 443 nm and 490 nm. The CDOM absorption at 400 nm was better inversely correlated (R2=0.86 with salinity than at 412 nm, 443 nm and 490 nm (R2=0.85–0.66, and this correlation corresponded best with an exponential (R2=0.98 rather than a linear function of salinity measured in a variety of water types from this and other regions. Validation against a discrete in-situ data set showed that empirical algorithms derived from the above relationships could be successfully applied to satellite data over the range of water types for which they have been developed. Thus, we applied these algorithms to a series of SeaWiFS images for the derivation of CDOM and salinity

  9. Dynamical attraction to stable processes

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Albert M.; Talet, Marina

    2012-01-01

    We apply dynamical ideas within probability theory, proving an almost-sure invariance principle in log density for stable processes. The familiar scaling property (self-similarity) of the stable process has a stronger expression, that the scaling flow on Skorokhod path space is a Bernoulli flow. We prove that typical paths of a random walk with i.i.d. increments in the domain of attraction of a stable law can be paired with paths of a stable process so that, after applying a non-random regula...

  10. Sensitivity of the Plume Rise Model in the estimation of biomass burning plume injection heights in South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrada, Gonzalo A.; Freitas, Saulo; Pereira, Gabriel; Paugam, Ronan

    2017-04-01

    This study had the aim to evaluate the new developments on the Plume Rise Model (PRM), embedded into the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (BRAMS). PRM computes the biomass burning plume injection heights and returns that information to the host model. Then, the atmospheric model releases all the fire emissions at this height. New developments are based on the initialization data used by the PRM, using fire size and fire radiative power (FRP) from remote sensing. The main difference between the two new versions is the conversion parameter (β) used to convert from FRP to the plume convective flux. In addition, a new scheme to generate daily fire emission fluxes is offered using the fire radiative energy (computed from remote sensing) in the Brazilian Biomass Burning Emission Model (3BEM-FRE). Model results using the three versions of the PRM are compared with observed airborne CO and O3 data from the SAMBBA campaign, which took place in southern Amazonia and Cerrado (savanna-like) regions in September 2012. Results show that improvements in both 3BEM-FRE and PRM models, had a better performance in the vertical and horizontal reproduction of CO and O3 than the original versions of them, especially in the middle and upper troposphere. Nevertheless, with some difficulty to reproduce the emissions by the end of the campaign, probably due to the cumulus parameterization used, which overestimated the precipitation in the region of study. Also, developments made in the 3BEM model show better agreement with the observed remote sensing data of daily fire emissions than the original version of it in the Amazon region, but with some difficulty in the Cerrado.

  11. ENZYME ACTIVITY PROBE AND GEOCHEMICAL ASSESSMENT FOR POTENTIAL AEROBIC COMETABOLISM OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN GROUNDWATER OF THE NORTHWEST PLUME, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, B; M. Hope Lee, M; S. K. Hampson, S

    2008-06-27

    The overarching objective of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) enzyme activity probe (EAP) effort is to determine if aerobic cometabolism is contributing to the attenuation of trichloroethene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents in the contaminated groundwater beneath PGDP. The site-specific objective for the EAP assessment is to identify if key metabolic pathways are present and expressed in the microbial community--namely the pathways that are responsible for degradation of methane and aromatic (e.g. toluene, benzene, phenol) substrates. The enzymes produced to degrade methane and aromatic compounds also break down TCE through a process known as cometabolism. EAPs directly measure if methane and/or aromatic enzyme production pathways are operating and, for the aromatic pathways, provide an estimate of the number of active organisms in the sampled groundwater. This study in the groundwater plumes at PGDP is a major part of a larger scientific effort being conducted by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and North Wind Inc. in which EAPs are being applied to contaminated groundwater from diverse hydrogeologic and plume settings throughout the U.S. to help standardize their application as well as their interpretation. While EAP data provide key information to support the site specific objective for PGDP, several additional lines of evidence are being evaluated to increase confidence in the determination of the occurrence of biodegradation and the rate and sustainability of aerobic cometabolism. These complementary efforts include: (1) Examination of plume flowpaths and comparison of TCE behavior to 'conservative' tracers in the plume (e.g., {sup 99}Tc); (2) Evaluation of geochemical conditions throughout the plume; and (3) Evaluation of stable isotopes in the contaminants and their daughter products throughout the

  12. A new method for GPS-based wind speed determinations during airborne volcanic plume measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doukas, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    Begun nearly thirty years ago, the measurement of gases in volcanic plumes is today an accepted technique in volcano research. Volcanic plume measurements, whether baseline gas emissions from quiescent volcanoes or more substantial emissions from volcanoes undergoing unrest, provide important information on the amount of gaseous output of a volcano to the atmosphere. Measuring changes in gas emission rates also allows insight into eruptive behavior. Some of the earliest volcanic plume measurements of sulfur dioxide were made using a correlation spectrometer (COSPEC). The COSPEC, developed originally for industrial pollution studies, is an upward-looking optical spectrometer tuned to the ultraviolet absorption wavelength of sulfur dioxide (Millán and Hoff, 1978). In airborne mode, the COSPEC is mounted in a fixed-wing aircraft and flown back and forth just underneath a volcanic plume, perpendicular to the direction of plume travel (Casadevall and others, 1981; Stoiber and others, 1983). Similarly, for plumes close to the ground, the COSPEC can be mounted in an automobile and driven underneath a plume if a suitable road system is available (Elias and others, 1998). The COSPEC can also be mounted on a tripod and used to scan a volcanic plume from a fixed location on the ground, although the effectiveness of this configuration declines with distance from the plume (Kyle and others, 1990). In the 1990’s, newer airborne techniques involving direct sampling of volcanic plumes with infrared spectrometers and electrochemical sensors were developed in order to measure additional gases such as CO2 and H2S (Gerlach and others, 1997; Gerlach and others, 1999; McGee and others, 2001). These methods involve constructing a plume cross-section from several measurement traverses through the plume in a vertical plane. Newer instruments such as open-path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers are now being used to measure the gases in volcanic plumes mostly from fixed

  13. Primary hydrothermal input above nonbuoyant plume level in the water column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K.

    2008-12-01

    Accumulating in-situ Eh measurements of seawater by CTD hydrothermal plume chasing above ridges in various oceans suggest that some ill-diluted reduced water can be eventually observed above nonbuoyant plume level, which indicate locations of buoyant rising plume penetration through spread nonbuoyant plume. Such location can even be intentionally detectable by successive three to four orthogonal CTD tow-yo operations. See an example in the South Atlantic (http://www.divediscover.whoi.edu/expedition12/daily/080109.html). Large/rapid voltage drops recorded by in- situ Eh (ORP) electrodes on moving platform like CTD (non-equilibrated measurement) occur when electrodes pass from oxygen-controlled to sulfide-controlled redox condition. Assuming a common chemical compositions of 350 deg C hydrothermal fluid source, the calculated redox potential of mixture of hydrothermal fluid and ambient seawater shows a sharp discontinuity around the dilution factor of 130 (aquatic chemistry textbooks of Morel(1983) p.345, (1993) p.460). In popular turbulent plume models based on Morton, Taylor and Turner (1956, point source and homogeneous dilution by ambient seawater entrainment along by an amount proportional to the vertical velocity in the plume), the dilution factors at the level of zero rising momentum are calculated as 5500 to 10,000 (ex., McDuff, 1995). Evidence of redox anomalies above nonbuoyant plume level contradicts momentum overshoot by popular turbulent plume models and prefers a plume cap overshoot in starting plume (Turner, 1973) or heterogeneous dilution. Turner's starting plume were thought to be generated by on and off of buoyant fluid input. The plume cap is assumed to have vortex structure like thermal and resistant to dilution. In the ridge environment with ocean tide it is likely generated spatially and temporary by semidiurnal to diurnal bottom current direction change. Some recent AUV profiles cross-cutting rising buoyant plume will be also presented to

  14. Analysis of Wien filter spectra from Hall thruster plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wensheng; Shastry, Rohit

    2015-07-01

    A method for analyzing the Wien filter spectra obtained from the plumes of Hall thrusters is derived and presented. The new method extends upon prior work by deriving the integration equations for the current and species fractions. Wien filter spectra from the plume of the NASA-300M Hall thruster are analyzed with the presented method and the results are used to examine key trends. The new integration method is found to produce results slightly different from the traditional area-under-the-curve method. The use of different velocity distribution forms when performing curve-fits to the peaks in the spectra is compared. Additional comparison is made with the scenario where the current fractions are assumed to be proportional to the heights of peaks. The comparison suggests that the calculated current fractions are not sensitive to the choice of form as long as both the height and width of the peaks are accounted for. Conversely, forms that only account for the height of the peaks produce inaccurate results. Also presented are the equations for estimating the uncertainty associated with applying curve fits and charge-exchange corrections. These uncertainty equations can be used to plan the geometry of the experimental setup.

  15. Thermal radiation from large bolides and impact plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetsov, V.; Shuvalov, V.

    2017-09-01

    Numerical simulations of the impacts of asteroids and comets from 20 m to 3 km in diameter have been carried out and thermal radiation fluxes on the ground and luminous efficiencies of the impacts have been calculated. It was assumed that the cosmic objects have no strength, deform, fragment, and vaporize in the atmosphere. After the impact on the ground, formation of craters and plumes was simulated taking into account internal friction of destroyed rocks and a wake formed in the atmosphere. The equations of radiative transfer, added to the equations of gas dynamics, were used in the approximation of radiative heat diffusion or, if the Rosseland optical depth of a radiating volume of gas and vapor was less than unity, in the approximation of volume emission. Radiation fluxes on the Earth's surface were calculated by integrating the equation of radiative transfer along rays passing through a luminous area. Direct thermal radiation from fireballs and impact plumes produced by asteroids and comets larger than 50 m in diameter is dangerous for people, animals, plants, economic objects. Forest fires can be ignited on the ground within a radius of roughly 1000 times the body's diameter (for diameters of the order or smaller than 1 km), 50-m-diameter bodies can ignite forest fires within a radius of up to 40 km and 3-km asteroids - within 1700 km.

  16. Room-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma plume for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laroussi, M.; Lu, X.

    2005-01-01

    As low-temperature nonequilibrium plasmas come to play an increasing role in biomedical applications, reliable and user-friendly sources need to be developed. These plasma sources have to meet stringent requirements such as low temperature (at or near room temperature), no risk of arcing, operation at atmospheric pressure, preferably hand-held operation, low concentration of ozone generation, etc. In this letter, we present a device that meets exactly such requirements. This device is capable of generating a cold plasma plume several centimeters in length. It exhibits low power requirements as shown by its current-voltage characteristics. Using helium as a carrier gas, very little ozone is generated and the gas temperature, as measured by emission spectroscopy, remains at room temperature even after hours of operations. The plasma plume can be touched by bare hands and can be directed manually by a user to come in contact with delicate objects and materials including skin and dental gum without causing any heating or painful sensation

  17. PLUME DEVELOPMENT OF THE SHOEMAKER-LEVY 9 COMET IMPACT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palotai, Csaba; Harrington, Joseph; Rebeli, Noemi; Gabriel, Travis; Korycansky, Donald G.

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the plume formation after a Jovian comet impact using the ZEUS-MP 2 hydrodynamics code. The three-dimensional models followed objects with 500, 750, and 1000 m diameters. Our simulations show the development of a fast, upward-moving component of the plume in the wake of the impacting comet that 'pinches off' from the bulk of the cometary material ∼50 km below the 1 bar pressure level, ∼100 km above the depth of the greatest mass and energy deposition. The fast-moving component contains about twice the mass of the initial comet, but consists almost entirely (>99.9%) of Jovian atmosphere rather than cometary material. The ejecta rise mainly along the impact trajectory, but an additional vertical velocity component due to buoyancy establishes itself within seconds of impact, leading to an asymmetry in the ejecta with respect to the entry trajectory. The mass of the upward-moving component follows a velocity distribution M(>v) approximately proportional to v -1.4 (v -1.6 for the 750 m and 500 m cases) in the velocity range 0.1 km s -1 -1 .

  18. Thermally-Driven Mantle Plumes Reconcile Hot-spot Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, D.; Davies, J.

    2008-12-01

    Hot-spots are anomalous regions of magmatism that cannot be directly associated with plate tectonic processes (e.g. Morgan, 1972). They are widely regarded as the surface expression of upwelling mantle plumes. Hot-spots exhibit variable life-spans, magmatic productivity and fixity (e.g. Ito and van Keken, 2007). This suggests that a wide-range of upwelling structures coexist within Earth's mantle, a view supported by geochemical and seismic evidence, but, thus far, not reproduced by numerical models. Here, results from a new, global, 3-D spherical, mantle convection model are presented, which better reconcile hot-spot observations, the key modification from previous models being increased convective vigor. Model upwellings show broad-ranging dynamics; some drift slowly, while others are more mobile, displaying variable life-spans, intensities and migration velocities. Such behavior is consistent with hot-spot observations, indicating that the mantle must be simulated at the correct vigor and in the appropriate geometry to reproduce Earth-like dynamics. Thermally-driven mantle plumes can explain the principal features of hot-spot volcanism on Earth.

  19. Measuring reactive nitrogen emissions from point sources using visible spectroscopy from aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, M L; Solomon, S; Daniel, J S; Langford, A O; Portmann, R W; Ryerson, T B; Nicks, D K; McKeen, S A

    2003-02-01

    Accurate measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a key trace gas in the formation and destruction of tropospheric ozone, are important in studies of urban pollution. Nitrogen dioxide column abundances were measured during the Texas Air Quality Study 2000 using visible absorption spectroscopy from an aircraft. The method allows for quantification of the integrated total number of nitrogen dioxide molecules in the polluted atmosphere and is hence a useful tool for measuring plumes of this key trace gas. Further, we show how such remote-sensing observations can be used to obtain information on the fluxes of nitrogen dioxide into the atmosphere with unique flexibility in terms of aircraft altitude, and the height and extent of mixing of the boundary layer. Observations of nitrogen dioxide plumes downwind of power plants were used to estimate the flux of nitrogen oxide emitted from several power plants in the Houston and Dallas metropolitan areas and in North Carolina. Measurements taken over the city of Houston were also employed to infer the total flux from the city as a whole.

  20. Overview of NASA GRCs Green Propellant Infusion Mission Thruster Testing and Plume Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Matthew C.; Reed, Brian D.; Yim, John T.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Williams, George J.; Kojima, Jun J.; McLean, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) is sponsored by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) office. The goal of GPIM is to advance the technology readiness level of a green propulsion system, specifically, one using the monopropellant, AF-M315E, by demonstrating ground handling, spacecraft processing, and on-orbit operations. One of the risks identified for GPIM is potential contamination of sensitive spacecraft surfaces from the effluents in the plumes of AF-M315E thrusters. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is conducting activities to characterize the effects of AF-M315E plume impingement and deposition. GRC has established individual plume models of the 22-N and 1-N thrusters that will be used on the GPIM spacecraft. The models describe the pressure, temperature, density, Mach number, and species concentration of the AF-M315E thruster exhaust plumes. The models are being used to assess the impingement effects of the AF-M315E thrusters on the GPIM spacecraft. The model simulations will be correlated with plume measurement data from Laboratory and Engineering Model 22-N, AF-M315E thrusters. The thrusters will be tested in a small rocket, altitude facility at NASA GRC. The GRC thruster testing will be conducted at duty cycles representatives of the planned GPIM maneuvers. A suite of laser-based diagnostics, including Raman spectroscopy, Rayleigh spectroscopy, Schlieren imaging, and physical probes will be used to acquire plume measurements of AFM315E thrusters. Plume data will include temperature, velocity, relative density, and species concentration. The plume measurement data will be compared to the corresponding simulations of the plume model. The GRC effort will establish a data set of AF-M315E plume measurements and a plume model that can be used for future AF-M315E applications.

  1. Karymsky volcano eruptive plume properties based on MISR multi-angle imagery and the volcanological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. J. B. Flower

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Space-based operational instruments are in unique positions to monitor volcanic activity globally, especially in remote locations or where suborbital observing conditions are hazardous. The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR provides hyper-stereo imagery, from which the altitude and microphysical properties of suspended atmospheric aerosols can be derived. These capabilities are applied to plumes emitted at Karymsky volcano from 2000 to 2017. Observed plumes from Karymsky were emitted predominantly to an altitude of 2–4 km, with occasional events exceeding 6 km. MISR plume observations were most common when volcanic surface manifestations, such as lava flows, were identified by satellite-based thermal anomaly detection. The analyzed plumes predominantly contained large (1.28 µm effective radius, strongly absorbing particles indicative of ash-rich eruptions. Differences between the retrievals for Karymsky volcano's ash-rich plumes and the sulfur-rich plumes emitted during the 2014–2015 eruption of Holuhraun (Iceland highlight the ability of MISR to distinguish particle types from such events. Observed plumes ranged from 30 to 220 km in length and were imaged at a spatial resolution of 1.1 km. Retrieved particle properties display evidence of downwind particle fallout, particle aggregation and chemical evolution. In addition, changes in plume properties retrieved from the remote-sensing observations over time are interpreted in terms of shifts in eruption dynamics within the volcano itself, corroborated to the extent possible with suborbital data. Plumes emitted at Karymsky prior to 2010 display mixed emissions of ash and sulfate particles. After 2010, all plumes contain consistent particle components, indicative of entering an ash-dominated regime. Post-2010 event timing, relative to eruption phase, was found to influence the optical properties of observed plume particles, with light absorption varying in a consistent

  2. The occurrence of ionospheric signatures of plasmaspheric plumes over different longitudinal sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, E.; Dewar, J.; MacNeil, J.; Moldwin, M. B.; Galvan, D.; Sanny, J.; Berube, D.; Sandel, B.

    2008-08-01

    Plasmaspheric plumes have ionospheric signatures and are observed as storm-enhanced density (SED) in global positioning system (GPS) total electron content (TEC). These ionospheric signatures have been primarily observed over the American sector and in a few limited examples over the European sector. This study examines the longitudinal occurrence frequency of plasmaspheric plumes. We analyzed all images from the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUV) databases for the first half of 2001 and identified a total of 31 distinct plume intervals observed during different storm events. Out of the total IMAGE EUV plumes that we identified, 12 were projected over North America, 10 over Asia, and the remaining 9 were over Europe and the Atlantic Ocean. Using ground-based GPS TEC from MIT's Madrigal database, we searched for corresponding SED/TEC plumes at different longitudinal sector and found 12 ionospheric SED plume signatures over North America, 4 over Europe, and 2 over Asia. This indicates that the observation probability of an ionospheric SED plume when a plasmaspheric plume is seen is 100% in the American sector, 50% in the European sector, and 20% in the Asian sector. This could be due to the fact that the plumes may be either positioned beyond the limit of the ground-based GPS field of view, which happens mainly when there is less plasmaspheric erosion, or are too weak to be detected by the sparse number of GPS receivers over Asia. The in situ plasma densities from the available coincident defense metrological satellite program (DMSP) satellites were also used to study the characteristics of SED/TEC plume at DMSP orbiting altitude (i.e., ˜870 km). The TOPographic EXplorer (TOPEX) altimeter TEC also is used to identify the conjugate SED/plume signature over the Southern Hemisphere.

  3. Satellite data driven modeling system for predicting air quality and visibility during wildfire and prescribed burn events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, U. S.; Keiser, K.; Wu, Y.; Maskey, M.; Berendes, D.; Glass, P.; Dhakal, A.; Christopher, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Alabama Forestry Commission (AFC) is responsible for wildfire control and also prescribed burn management in the state of Alabama. Visibility and air quality degradation resulting from smoke are two pieces of information that are crucial for this activity. Currently the tools available to AFC are the dispersion index available from the National Weather Service and also surface smoke concentrations. The former provides broad guidance for prescribed burning activities but does not provide specific information regarding smoke transport, areas affected and quantification of air quality and visibility degradation. While the NOAA operational air quality guidance includes surface smoke concentrations from existing fire events, it does not account for contributions from background aerosols, which are important for the southeastern region including Alabama. Also lacking is the quantification of visibility. The University of Alabama in Huntsville has developed a state-of-the-art integrated modeling system to address these concerns. This system based on the Community Air Quality Modeling System (CMAQ) that ingests satellite derived smoke emissions and also assimilates NASA MODIS derived aerosol optical thickness. In addition, this operational modeling system also simulates the impact of potential prescribed burn events based on location information derived from the AFC prescribed burn permit database. A lagrangian model is used to simulate smoke plumes for the prescribed burns requests. The combined air quality and visibility degradation resulting from these smoke plumes and background aerosols is computed and the information is made available through a web based decision support system utilizing open source GIS components. This system provides information regarding intersections between highways and other critical facilities such as old age homes, hospitals and schools. The system also includes satellite detected fire locations and other satellite derived datasets

  4. Investigation of natural gas plume dispersion using mobile observations and large eddy simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulton, Dana R.; Li, Qi; Golston, Levi; Pan, Da; Bou-Zeid, Elie; Fitts, Jeff; Lane, Haley; Lu, Jessica; Zondlo, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    Recent work suggests the distribution of methane emissions from fracking operations is skewed with a small percentage of emitters contributing a large proportion of the total emissions. These sites are known as 'super-emitters.' The Marcellus shale, the most productive natural gas shale field in the United States, has received less intense focus for well-level emissions and is here used as a test site for targeted analysis between current standard trace-gas advection practices and possible improvements via advanced modeling techniques. The Marcellus shale is topographically complex, making traditional techniques difficult to implement and evaluate. For many ground based mobile studies, the inverse Gaussian plume method (IGM) is used to produce emission rates. This method is best applied to well-mixed plumes from strong point sources and may not currently be well-suited for use with disperse weak sources, short-time frame measurements or data collected in complex terrain. To assess the quality of IGM results and to improve source-strength estimations, a robust study that combines observational data with a hierarchy of models of increasing complexity will be presented. The field test sites were sampled with multiple passes using a mobile lab as well as a stationary tower. This mobile lab includes a Garmin GPS unit, Vaisala weather station (WTX520), LICOR 7700 CH4 open path sensor and LICOR 7500 CO2/H2O open path sensor. The sampling tower was constructed consisting of a Metek uSonic-3 Class A sonic anemometer, and an additional LICOR 7700 and 7500. Data were recorded for at least one hour at these sites. The modeling will focus on large eddy simulations (LES) of the wind and CH4 concentration fields for these test sites. The LES model used 2 m horizontal and 1 m vertical resolution and was integrated in time for 45 min for various test sites under stable, neutral and unstable conditions. It is here considered as the reference to which various IGM approaches can be

  5. Graphene on gallium arsenide: Engineering the visibility

    OpenAIRE

    Friedemann, M.; Pierz, K.; Stosch, R.; Ahlers, F. J.

    2009-01-01

    Graphene consists of single or few layers of crystalline ordered carbon atoms. Its visibility on oxidized silicon (Si/SiO\\_2) enabled its discovery and spawned numerous studies of its unique electronic properties. The combination of graphene with the equally unique electronic material gallium arsenide (GaAs) has up to now lacked such easy visibility. Here we demonstrate that a deliberately tailored GaAs/AlAs (aluminum arsenide) multi-layer structure makes graphene just as visible on GaAs as o...

  6. Query Load Balancing For Visible Object Extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukauskas, Linas; Bøhlen, Michael Hanspeter

    2004-01-01

    Interactive visual data explorations impose rigid real-time requirements on the extraction of visible objects. Often these requirements are met by deploying powerful hardware that maintains the entire data set in huge main memory structures. In this paper we propose an approach that retrieves...... the visible data on demand and is based on a tight integration of the database and visualization systems. We propose to incrementally adjust the observer path by adding and dropping path points. The result is an optimal path that minimizes the interaction with the database system and retrieves all visible...

  7. Surface fire effects on conifer and hardwood crowns--applications of an integral plume model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew Dickinson; Anthony Bova; Kathleen Kavanagh; Antoine Randolph; Lawrence Band

    2009-01-01

    An integral plume model was applied to the problems of tree death from canopy injury in dormant-season hardwoods and branch embolism in Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) crowns. Our purpose was to generate testable hypotheses. We used the integral plume models to relate crown injury to bole injury and to explore the effects of variation in fire...

  8. A CATALOG OF GROUND WATER FLOW SOLUTIONS FOR PLUME DIVING CALCULATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report focuses on the problem of diving plumes, a term which generally refers to plumes that go deeper into aquifers with distances from their sources. This document presents the mathematical basis of software for real-time development and refinement of site conceptual model...

  9. Variation in the Mississippi River Plume from Data Synthesis of Model Outputs and MODIS Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, C.; Kolker, A.; Chu, P. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the Mississippi River (MR) plume's interaction with the open ocean is crucial for understanding many processes in the Gulf of Mexico. Though the Mississippi River and its delta and plume have been studied extensively, recent archives of model products and satellite imagery have allowed us to highlight patterns in plume behavior over the last two decades through large scale data synthesis. Using 8 years of USGS discharge data and Landsat imagery, we identified the spatial extent, geographic patterns, depth, and freshwater concentration of the MR plume across seasons and years. Using 20 years of HYCOM (HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model) analysis and reanalysis model output, and several years of NGOFS FVCOM model outputs, we mapped the minimum and maximum spatial area of the MR plume, and its varied extent east and west. From the synthesis and analysis of these data, the statistical probability of the MR plume's spatial area and geographical extent were computed. Measurements of the MR plume and its response to river discharge may predict future behavior and provide a path forward to understanding MR plume influence on nearby ecosystems.

  10. Cross shore transport by wind-driven turbidity plumes in western Lake Superior*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbidity plumes frequently occur in the western arm of Lake Superior and may represent a significant cross shelf transport mechanism for sediment, nutrient and biota. We characterize a plume that formed in late April 2016 using observations from in situ sensors and remote sensin...

  11. Biological Ocean Margins Program. Active Microbes Responding to Inputs from the Orinoco River Plume. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge E. Corredor

    2013-01-28

    The overall goal of the proposed work is to identify the active members of the heterotrophic community involved in C and N cycling in the perimeter of the Orinoco River Plume (ORP), assess their spatial distribution, quantify their metabolic activity, and correlate these parameters to plume properties such as salinity, organic matter content and phytoplankton biomass.

  12. Eyjafjallajokull Volcano Plume Particle-Type Characterization from Space-Based Multi-angle Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Limbacher, James

    2012-01-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Research Aerosol algorithm makes it possible to study individual aerosol plumes in considerable detail. From the MISR data for two optically thick, near-source plumes from the spring 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallaj kull volcano, we map aerosol optical depth (AOD) gradients and changing aerosol particle types with this algorithm; several days downwind, we identify the occurrence of volcanic ash particles and retrieve AOD, demonstrating the extent and the limits of ash detection and mapping capability with the multi-angle, multi-spectral imaging data. Retrieved volcanic plume AOD and particle microphysical properties are distinct from background values near-source, as well as for overwater cases several days downwind. The results also provide some indication that as they evolve, plume particles brighten, and average particle size decreases. Such detailed mapping offers context for suborbital plume observations having much more limited sampling. The MISR Standard aerosol product identified similar trends in plume properties as the Research algorithm, though with much smaller differences compared to background, and it does not resolve plume structure. Better optical analogs of non-spherical volcanic ash, and coincident suborbital data to validate the satellite retrieval results, are the factors most important for further advancing the remote sensing of volcanic ash plumes from space.

  13. FOOTPRINT: A New Tool to Predict the Potential Impact of Biofuels on BTEX Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsanuzzaman et al. (2008) used the Deeb et al. (2002) conceptual model to construct a simple screening model to estimate the area of a plume of benzene produced from a release of gasoline containing ethanol. The screening model estimates the plume area, or footprint of the plum...

  14. An algorithm for the detection and characterisation of volcanic plumes using thermal camera imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombrun, Maxime; Jessop, David; Harris, Andrew; Barra, Vincent

    2018-02-01

    Volcanic plumes are turbulent mixtures of particles and gas which are injected into the atmosphere during a volcanic eruption. Depending on the intensity of the eruption, plumes can rise from a few tens of metres up to many tens of kilometres above the vent and thus, present a major hazard for the surrounding population. Currently, however, few if any algorithms are available for automated plume tracking and assessment. Here, we present a new image processing algorithm for segmentation, tracking and parameters extraction of convective plume recorded with thermal cameras. We used thermal video of two volcanic eruptions and two plumes simulated in laboratory to develop and test an efficient technique for analysis of volcanic plumes. We validated our method by two different approaches. First, we compare our segmentation method to previously published algorithms. Next, we computed plume parameters, such as height, width and spreading angle at regular intervals of time. These parameters allowed us to calculate an entrainment coefficient and obtain information about the entrainment efficiency in Strombolian eruptions. Our proposed algorithm is rapid, automated while producing better visual outlines compared to the other segmentation algorithms, and provides output that is at least as accurate as manual measurements of plumes.

  15. Modelling of Far-Field Mixing of Industrial Effluent Plume in Ambient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was initiated with a view to understanding the mathematical physics of industrial effluent plume dispersion in Ikpoba River which has resulted in the ... This study sought to describe the dynamics of advective and dispersive transport of the effluent plume in the river and also ascertain the extent of its effect from ...

  16. Impact of personal factors and furniture arrangement on the thermal plume above a sitting occupant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukowska, Daria; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Popiolek, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    be disregarded. The volume flux of the thermal plume 0.7 m above the head of a sedentary occupant can be calculated with 25% uncertainty, using values for the convective heat loss equal to 30% of the sensible heat generated by the body and the distance of the virtual plume origin equal to −1.60 m....

  17. Laser-generated plasma plume expansion: Combined continuous-microscopic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itina, Tatiana E.; Hermann, Jörg; Delaporte, Philippe; Sentis, Marc

    2002-12-01

    The physical phenomena involved in the interaction of a laser-generated plasma plume with a background gas are studied numerically. A three-dimensional combined model is developed to describe the plasma plume formation and its expansion in vacuum or into a background gas. The proposed approach takes advantages of both continuous and microscopic descriptions. The simulation technique is suitable for the simulation of high-rate laser ablation for a wide range of background pressure. The model takes into account the mass diffusion and the energy exchange between the ablated and background species, as well as the collective motion of the ablated species and the background-gas particles. The developed approach is used to investigate the influence of the background gas on the expansion dynamics of the plume obtained during the laser ablation of aluminum. At moderate pressures, both plume and gas compressions are weak and the process is mainly governed by the diffusive mixing. At higher pressures, the interaction is determined by the plume-gas pressure interplay, the plume front is strongly compressed, and its center exhibits oscillations. In this case, the snowplough effect takes place, leading to the formation of a compressed gas layer in front of the plume. The background pressure needed for the beginning of the snowplough effect is determined from the plume and gas density profiles obtained at various pressures. Simulation results are compared with experimentally measured density distributions. It is shown that the calculations suggest localized formation of molecules during reactive laser ablation.

  18. Laser-generated plasma plume expansion: Combined continuous-microscopic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itina, Tatiana E.; Hermann, Joerg; Delaporte, Philippe; Sentis, Marc

    2002-01-01

    The physical phenomena involved in the interaction of a laser-generated plasma plume with a background gas are studied numerically. A three-dimensional combined model is developed to describe the plasma plume formation and its expansion in vacuum or into a background gas. The proposed approach takes advantages of both continuous and microscopic descriptions. The simulation technique is suitable for the simulation of high-rate laser ablation for a wide range of background pressure. The model takes into account the mass diffusion and the energy exchange between the ablated and background species, as well as the collective motion of the ablated species and the background-gas particles. The developed approach is used to investigate the influence of the background gas on the expansion dynamics of the plume obtained during the laser ablation of aluminum. At moderate pressures, both plume and gas compressions are weak and the process is mainly governed by the diffusive mixing. At higher pressures, the interaction is determined by the plume-gas pressure interplay, the plume front is strongly compressed, and its center exhibits oscillations. In this case, the snowplough effect takes place, leading to the formation of a compressed gas layer in front of the plume. The background pressure needed for the beginning of the snowplough effect is determined from the plume and gas density profiles obtained at various pressures. Simulation results are compared with experimentally measured density distributions. It is shown that the calculations suggest localized formation of molecules during reactive laser ablation

  19. Remote Sensing and Underwater Glider Observations of a Springtime Plume in Western Lake Superior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumes are commonly observed in satellite imagery of western Lake Superior following storm events, and represent a significant cross-shelf pathway for sediment and other constituents. However, their subsurface extent is poorly understood. This study reports results from plume ob...

  20. Using SEVIRI fire observations to drive smoke plumes in the CMAQ air quality model: the case of Antalya in 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassarre, G.; Pozzoli, L.; Schmidt, C. C.; Unal, A.; Kindap, T.; Menzel, W. P.; Whitburn, S.; Coheur, P.-F.; Kavgaci, A.; Kaiser, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Among the atmospheric emission sources, wildfires are episodic events characterized by large spatial and temporal variability. Therefore, accurate information on fire gaseous and aerosol emissions for specific regions and seasons is critical for air quality forecasts. The Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) in geostationary orbit provides fire observations over Africa and the Mediterranean with a unique temporal resolution of 15 min. It thus resolves the complete fire life cycle and captures the fires' peak intensities, which is not possible in MODIS-based fire emission inventories like GFAS. We evaluate two different operational Fire Radiative Power (FRP) products derived from SEVIRI, by studying the case of a large forest fire in Antalya, Turkey, in July-August 2008. The EUMETSAT LSA SAF product has higher FRP values during the fire episode than the WF_ABBA product. It is also in better agreement with the co-located, gridded MODIS FRP. Both products miss small fires that frequently occur in the region and are detected by MODIS. Emissions are derived from the FRP products. They are used along-side GFAS emissions in smoke plume simulations with WRF and the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ). Comparisons with MODIS AOT and IASI CO and NH3 observations show that including the diurnal variability of fire emissions improves the spatial distribution and peak concentrations of the simulated smoke plumes associated to the large fire. They also show a large discrepancy between the currently available operational FRP products, with the LSA SAF one being the most appropriate.

  1. Sediment plume model-a comparison between use of measured turbidity data and satellite images for model calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghian, Amir; Hudson, Jeff; Wheater, Howard; Lindenschmidt, Karl-Erich

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we built a two-dimensional sediment transport model of Lake Diefenbaker, Saskatchewan, Canada. It was calibrated by using measured turbidity data from stations along the reservoir and satellite images based on a flood event in 2013. In June 2013, there was heavy rainfall for two consecutive days on the frozen and snow-covered ground in the higher elevations of western Alberta, Canada. The runoff from the rainfall and the melted snow caused one of the largest recorded inflows to the headwaters of the South Saskatchewan River and Lake Diefenbaker downstream. An estimated discharge peak of over 5200 m 3 /s arrived at the reservoir inlet with a thick sediment front within a few days. The sediment plume moved quickly through the entire reservoir and remained visible from satellite images for over 2 weeks along most of the reservoir, leading to concerns regarding water quality. The aims of this study are to compare, quantitatively and qualitatively, the efficacy of using turbidity data and satellite images for sediment transport model calibration and to determine how accurately a sediment transport model can simulate sediment transport based on each of them. Both turbidity data and satellite images were very useful for calibrating the sediment transport model quantitatively and qualitatively. Model predictions and turbidity measurements show that the flood water and suspended sediments entered upstream fairly well mixed and moved downstream as overflow with a sharp gradient at the plume front. The model results suggest that the settling and resuspension rates of sediment are directly proportional to flow characteristics and that the use of constant coefficients leads to model underestimation or overestimation unless more data on sediment formation become available. Hence, this study reiterates the significance of the availability of data on sediment distribution and characteristics for building a robust and reliable sediment transport model.

  2. Model Intercomparison Study to Investigate a Dense Contaminant Plume in a Complex Hydrogeologic System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Mark D.; Cole, Charles R.; Foley, Michael G.; Zinina, Galina A.; Zinin, Alexander I.; Vasil'Kova, Nelly A.; Samsonova, Lilia M.

    2001-01-01

    A joint Russian and U.S. model intercomparison study was undertaken for developing more realistic contaminant transport models of the Mayak Site, Southern Urals. The test problems were developed by the Russian Team based on their experience modeling contaminant migration near Lake Karachai. The intercomparison problems were designed to address lake and contaminant plume interactions, as well as river interactions and plume density effects. Different numerical codes were used. Overall there is good agreement between the results of both models. Features shown by both models include (1) the sinking of the plume below the lake, (2) the raising of the water table in the fresh water adjacent to the lake in response to the increased pressure from the dense plume, and (3) the formation of a second sinking plume in an area where evapotranspiration exceeded infiltration, thus increasing the solute concentrations above the source (i.e., lake) values

  3. Fluid simulation of plume head-on collision dynamics during pulsed laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, R; Doi, K; Yokoyama, Y; Sugimura, A; Tominaga, N; Susa, H; Umezu, I; Fukuoka, H

    2013-01-01

    Expansion dynamics of plume after irradiation of the target material is essential to prepare nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation and it can be modified by collision of two plumes. In the present paper, effect of head-on collision on the expansion dynamics is discussed by numerical simulation based on the fluid dynamics and compared with the experimental results of plume emission. Suppression of plumes by collision with counter plume observed by experiment is reproduced by numerical simulation. Results of the numerical calculation indicate that shockwave induced by the irradiation of the opposite target suppress vapor expansion. The vapors do not mix around the center of the targets when the two targets are irradiated simultaneously and unstable flow is seen when delay between laser pulses was applied for irradiation of two targets. The results of the numerical simulation suggest that formation of combined and alloy nanoparticles are expected for former and latter cases

  4. Utilization of a hydraulic barrier to control migration of a uranium plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brettschneider, D.J.; Simmons, R.A. Jr.; Kappa, J.D.; Stover, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    A uranium plume emanating from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) in Fernald, Ohio had migrated off site and the leading edge of the plume had already mixed with an organic and inorganic plume emanating from two industries south of the FEMP. A method was needed to prevent the further southern migration of the plume, minimize any impacts to the geometry, concentrations, distribution or flow patterns of the organic and inorganic plumes emanating from the off-site industries, while meeting the ultimate cleanup goals for the FEMP. This paper discusses the use of a hydraulic barrier created to meet these goals by pumping a five well recovery system and the problems associated with the disposition of over 2 million gallons per day of water with low concentrations of uranium

  5. Well test flare plume monitoring : results of DIAL measurements in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, A. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Carbon and Energy Management

    2003-07-01

    The DIAL testing system in Alberta is used to track plumes of gaseous waste from sour gas plants and measure emissions of sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, methane, ethylene, volatile organic compounds, ozone, and benzene. The DIAL system can also determine the efficiency of flare combustion. The remote monitoring and plume tracking system can be used on plumes from tail gas incinerator stacks, sour gas well test flares, and fugitive emissions at sour gas plants. Several graphs and figures were presented to illustrate typical plume profiles, outgoing/returning DIAL signals, and an overview of a typical application. Studies have shown that DIAL can accurately track plumes of sulfur dioxide to at least 2 km and can detect levels that are smaller than 450 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. Some of the limitations for DIAL were also presented. DIAL prefers winds above 7 km/h for fugitives and it did not work in fog. 7 tabs., 25 figs.

  6. ALOFT-PC a smoke plume trajectory model for personal computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, W.D.; McGrattan, K.B.; Mullin, J.V.

    1996-01-01

    A computer model, named ALOFT-PC, was developed for use during in-situ burning of oil spills to predict smoke plume trajectory. The downwind distribution of smoke particulate is a complex function of fire parameters, meteorological conditions, and topographic features. Experimental burns have shown that the downwind distribution of smoke is not Gaussian and simple smoke plume models do not capture the observed plume features. ALOFT-PC consists of the Navier-Stokes equations using an eddy viscosity over a uniform grid that spans the smoke plume and its surroundings. The model inputs are wind speed and variability, atmospheric temperature profile, and fire parameters and the output is the average of the plume. 7 refs., 3 tabs

  7. Solar Synthesis: Prospects in Visible Light Photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Danielle M.; Yoon, Tehshik P.

    2015-01-01

    Chemists have long aspired to synthesize molecules the way that plants do — using sunlight to facilitate the construction of complex molecular architectures. Nevertheless, the use of visible light in photochemical synthesis is fundamentally challenging because organic molecules tend not to interact with the wavelengths of visible light that are most strongly emitted in the solar spectrum. Recent research has begun to leverage the ability of visible light absorbing transition metal complexes to catalyze a broad range of synthetically valuable reactions. In this review, we highlight how an understanding of the mechanisms of photocatalytic activation available to these transition metal complexes, and of the general reactivity patterns of the intermediates accessible via visible light photocatalysis, has accelerated the development of this diverse suite of reactions. PMID:24578578

  8. Crisis Management- Operational Logistics & Asset Visibility Technologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Braunbeck, Richard A; Mastria, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    .... Recent crisis response operations that would have benefited from improved asset visibility include the Indian Ocean tsunami, the Pakistani earthquake, Hurricane Katrina and those related to the Global War on Terror...

  9. Visibility of noisy point cloud data

    KAUST Repository

    Mehra, Ravish

    2010-06-01

    We present a robust algorithm for estimating visibility from a given viewpoint for a point set containing concavities, non-uniformly spaced samples, and possibly corrupted with noise. Instead of performing an explicit surface reconstruction for the points set, visibility is computed based on a construction involving convex hull in a dual space, an idea inspired by the work of Katz et al. [26]. We derive theoretical bounds on the behavior of the method in the presence of noise and concavities, and use the derivations to develop a robust visibility estimation algorithm. In addition, computing visibility from a set of adaptively placed viewpoints allows us to generate locally consistent partial reconstructions. Using a graph based approximation algorithm we couple such reconstructions to extract globally consistent reconstructions. We test our method on a variety of 2D and 3D point sets of varying complexity and noise content. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Tracing Mantle Plumes: Quantifying their Morphology and Behavior from Seismic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Farrell, K. A.; Eakin, C. M.; Jones, T. D.; Garcia, E.; Robson, A.; Mittal, T.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Jackson, M. G.; Lekic, V.; Rudolph, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    Hotspot volcanism provides a direct link between the deep mantle and the surface, but the location, depth and source of the mantle plumes that feed hotspots are highly controversial. In order to address this issue it is important to understand the journey along which plumes have travelled through the mantle. The general behavior of plumes in the mantle also has the potential to tell us about the vigor of mantle convection, net rotation of the mantle, the role of thermal versus chemical anomalies, and important bulk physical properties of the mantle such as the viscosity profile. To address these questions we developed an algorithm to trace plume-like features in shear-wave (Vs) seismic tomographic models based on picking local minima in velocity and searching for continuous features with depth. We apply this method to several of the latest tomographic models and can recover 30 or more continuous plume conduits that are >750 km long. Around half of these can be associated with a known hotspot at the surface. We study the morphology of these plume chains and find that the largest lateral deflections occur near the base of the lower mantle and in the upper mantle. We analyze the preferred orientation of the plume deflections and their gradient to infer large scale mantle flow patterns and the depth of viscosity contrasts in the mantle respectively. We also retrieve Vs profiles for our traced plumes and compare with velocity profiles predicted for different mantle adiabat temperatures. We use this to constrain the thermal anomaly associated with these plumes. This thermal anomaly is then converted to a density anomaly and an upwelling velocity is derived. We compare this to buoyancy fluxes calculated at the surface and use this in conjunction with our measured plume tilts/deflections to estimate the strength of the "mantle wind".

  11. Mutual Visibility by Robots with Persistent Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Bhagat, Subhash; Mukhopadhyaya, Krishnendu

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the mutual visibility problem for a set of semi-synchronous, opaque robots occupying distinct positions in the Euclidean plane. Since robots are opaque, if three robots lie on a line, the middle robot obstructs the visions of the two other robots. The mutual visibility problem asks the robots to coordinate their movements to form a configuration, within finite time and without collision, in which no three robots are collinear. Robots are endowed with a constant bits of pe...

  12. Method and means for a spatial and temporal probe for laser-generated plumes based on density gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, E.S.; Chen, G.

    1990-05-01

    A method and means are disclosed for a spatial and temporal probe for laser generated plumes based on density gradients includes generation of a plume of vaporized material from a surface by an energy source. The probe laser beam is positioned so that the plume passes through the probe laser beam. Movement of the probe laser beam caused by refraction from the density gradient of the plume is monitored. Spatial and temporal information, correlated to one another, is then derived. 15 figs.

  13. A climatology of visible surface reflectance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoogman, Peter; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly; Sun, Qingsong; Schaaf, Crystal; Mahr, Tobias; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We present a high spectral resolution climatology of visible surface reflectance as a function of wavelength for use in satellite measurements of ozone and other atmospheric species. The Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) instrument is planned to measure backscattered solar radiation in the 290-740 nm range, including the ultraviolet and visible Chappuis ozone bands. Observation in the weak Chappuis band takes advantage of the relative transparency of the atmosphere in the visible to achieve sensitivity to near-surface ozone. However, due to the weakness of the ozone absorption features this measurement is more sensitive to errors in visible surface reflectance, which is highly variable. We utilize reflectance measurements of individual plant, man-made, and other surface types to calculate the primary modes of variability of visible surface reflectance at a high spectral resolution, comparable to that of TEMPO (0.6 nm). Using the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Bidirection Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF)/albedo product and our derived primary modes we construct a high spatial resolution climatology of wavelength-dependent surface reflectance over all viewing scenes and geometries. The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) Lambertian Equivalent Reflectance (LER) product provides complementary information over water and snow scenes. Preliminary results using this approach in multispectral ultraviolet+visible ozone retrievals from the GOME-2 instrument show significant improvement to the fitting residuals over vegetated scenes.

  14. Hydrothermal Helium Plumes over Submarine Volcanoes of the Marianas Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, J. E.; Baker, E. T.; Embley, R. W.; Resing, J. E.; Massoth, G. J.; Nakamura, K.; Greene, R.; Walker, S.; Lebon, G.

    2003-12-01

    During February-March, 2003, as part of the Submarine Ring of Fire project funded by NOAA's Ocean Exploration Program, the R/V T.G. Thompson conducted a comprehensive survey of hydrothermal activity along 1200 km of the Mariana Arc from 13.5° N to 22.5° N [see Embley et al., EOS Trans. AGU, 2003]. Plume surveys were conducted in the water-column above ~50 submarine volcanoes using a CTD/rosette system. A total of 70 CTD casts were completed, and discrete water samples were collected for analysis of a variety of hydrothermal tracers, including 3He, CH4, CO2, H2S, Fe, Mn, pH, and suspended particles. Although shorebased analysis of the samples is still underway, preliminary results indicate that about 11 of the 50 submarine volcanoes surveyed are hydrothermally active. Because many of the Marianas Arc volcanoes rise to within 500 m of the sea surface, hydrothermal plume signals such as light attenuation (suspended particles) and temperature anomaly have limited utility due to masking by near surface effects. For this reason 3He, an unambiguous hydrothermal tracer, has been particularly useful for identifying which of the shallow arc volcanoes are hydrothermally active. Our expectation was that the water-column helium signal might be reduced at shallow depths due to ventilation into the atmosphere. However, we observed very high 3He enrichments at shallow depths both at Maug Islands and at NW Rota #1 (14° 36'N; 144° 46.5'E). The 3He enrichments were strongly correlated with changes in pH, Mn, and other hydrothermal tracers. The three Maug Islands mark the perimeter of a caldera formed by an explosive eruption, and a single hydrocast in the center of the caldera detected a robust helium plume at 120-200 m depth with δ 3He reaching a maximum of 250% at 150m depth. Analysis of the co-variation of [3He] vs. [4He] at Maug gave R/Ra = 6.6 for an estimate of the end-member helium isotope ratio (R = 3He/4He and Ra = Rair). This value falls well within the range of R

  15. AUV-Based Plume Tracking: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awantha Jayasiri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simulation study of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV navigation system operating in a GPS-denied environment. The AUV navigation method makes use of underwater transponder positioning and requires only one transponder. A multirate unscented Kalman filter is used to determine the AUV orientation and position by fusing high-rate sensor data and low-rate information. The paper also proposes a gradient-based, efficient, and adaptive novel algorithm for plume boundary tracking missions. The algorithm follows a centralized approach and it includes path optimization features based on gradient information. The proposed algorithm is implemented in simulation on the AUV-based navigation system and successful boundary tracking results are obtained.

  16. Next-generation marine instruments to join plume debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, F. J.; Nolet, G.; Babcock, J.

    2003-12-01

    Whether hot spot volcanism is the consequence of plate tectonics or has a deep origin in a mantle plume is debated. G.~Foulger (Geol.~Soc.~London Lett.~Online, accessed 9/3/2003), writes that carefully truncated cross sections, with color scales cranked up, give noisy images the illusion of strong anomalies traversing the mantle. Don Anderson, the big daddy of non-plume hypotheses (R.~Kent, Geol.~Soc.~London Lett.~Online, accessed 9/3/2003) has written that the resolution of regional tomography experiments must be improved in order to successfully determine whether (...) the deep mantle is the controlling factor in the formation of proposed hot spots (Keller et al., GRL 27 (24), 2000). In particular for Iceland, at issue is the inherently limited aperture of any land-based seismometer array on the island: (...) the resolution of such images could be increased (...) by using ocean bottom seismometers (...) (ibidem). These problems are not unique to the plume debate. Coverage, resolution and robustness of models of the wave speed distribution in the interior of the Earth obtained by seismic tomographic inversions are limited by the areal distribution of seismic stations. Two thirds of Earth's surface are virtually inaccessible to passive-source seismometry, save indeed for expensive ocean-bottom seismometers or moored hydrophones. Elsewhere at this meeting, Montelli et al. describe how an improved theoretical treatment of the generation and survival of travel-time anomalies and sophisticated parameterization techniques yield unprecedented resolution of the seismic expression of a variety of ``plumes'' coming from all depths within the mantle. On the other hand, the improved resolution required to settling the debate on the depth to the seismic origin of various hot spots will also result from the collection of previously inaccessable data. Here, we show our progress in the development of an independent hydro-acoustical recording device mounted on SOLO floats. Our

  17. Imaging subsurface geology and volatile organic compound plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qualheim, B.J.; Daley, P.F.; Johnson, V.; McPherrin, R.V.; Laguna, G.

    1992-03-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) (Fig. 1) is in the final stages of the Superfund decisionmaking process for site remediation and restoration. In the process of characterizing the subsurface of the LLNL site, we have developed unique methods of collecting, storing, retrieving, and imaging geologic and chemical data from more than 350 drill holes. The lateral and vertical continuity of subsurface paleostream channels were mapped for the entire LLNL site using geologic descriptions from core samples, cuttings, and interpretations from geophysical logs. A computer-aided design and drafting program, SLICE, written at LLNL, was used to create two-dimensional maps of subsurface sediments, and state-of-the-art software produced three-dimensional images of the volatile organic compound (VOC) plumes using data from water and core fluid analyses

  18. Evolution of a chemically reacting plume in a ventilated room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, D. T.; Smith, Stefan G. Llewellyn; Caulfield, C. P.

    2005-08-01

    The dynamics of a second-order chemical reaction in an enclosed space driven by the mixing produced by a turbulent buoyant plume are studied theoretically, numerically and experimentally. An isolated turbulent buoyant plume source is located in an enclosure with a single external opening. Both the source and the opening are located at the bottom of the enclosure. The enclosure is filled with a fluid of a given density with a fixed initial concentration of a chemical. The source supplies a constant volume flux of fluid of different density containing a different chemical of known and constant concentration. These two chemicals undergo a second-order non-reversible reaction, leading to the creation of a third product chemical. For simplicity, we restrict attention to the situation where the reaction process does not affect the density of the fluids involved. Because of the natural constraint of volume conservation, fluid from the enclosure is continually vented. We study the evolution of the various chemical species as they are advected by the developing ventilated filling box process within the room that is driven by the plume dynamics. In particular, we study both the mean and vertical distributions of the chemical species as a function of time within the room. We compare the results of analogue laboratory experiments with theoretical predictions derived from reduced numerical models, and find excellent agreement. Important parameters for the behaviour of the system are associated with the source volume flux and specific momentum flux relative to the source specific buoyancy flux, the ratio of the initial concentrations of the reacting chemical input in the plume and the reacting chemical in the enclosed space, the reaction rate of the chemicals and the aspect ratio of the room. Although the behaviour of the system depends on all these parameters in a non-trivial way, in general the concentration within the room of the chemical input at the isolated source passes

  19. Ventilation induced by finite mass flux plumes in enclosed spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Colm-Cille; Woods, Andrew

    2000-11-01

    Continuous isolated releases of finite quantities of dense (or buoyant) turbulent fluid within an enclosed ventilated space occur in a range of industrial and geophysical contexts. We analyse theoretically, numerically and experimentally the effect of turbulent plumes with finite source mass fluxes on the transient evolution of the ambient density within a confined ventilated space. We consider in detail flows with both one and two vents. For flows with sufficiently large source mass fluxes, the room becomes completely contaminated with the continuous releases approaching non-buoyant jet-like behaviour. For all the flows we consider, we develop simple reduced models which capture quantitatively the evolution of the bulk characteristics of the flow, and also agree well with data obtained from a sequence of analogue laboratory experiments.

  20. AgBr/diatomite for the efficient visible-light-driven photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing; Zhao, Huamei; Liu, Qinglei; Zhang, Wang; Gu, Jiajun; Su, Yishi; Abbas, Waseem; Su, Huilan; You, Zhengwei; Zhang, Di

    2018-03-01

    The treatment of organic pollution via photocatalysis has been investigated for a few decades. However, earth-abundant, cheap, stable, and efficient substrates are still to be developed. Here, we prepare an efficient visible-light-driven photocatalyst via the deposition of Ag nanoparticles (nanoparticles (nanoparticles ( κ = 0.05 min-1) were measured as well. The experimental results reveal that diatomite acted more than a substrate benefiting the dispersion of AgBr nanoparticles, as well as a cooperator to help harvest visible light and adsorb dye molecules, leading to the efficient visible-light-driven photocatalytic performance of AgBr/diatomite. Considering the low cost (10 per ton) and large-scale availability of diatomite, our study provides the possibility to prepare other types of diatomite-based efficient photocatalytic composites with low-cost but excellent photocatalytic performance.

  1. Guided episodic sampling for capturing and characterizing industrial plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Liao, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Chih-Chung; Hsieh, Hsin-Cheng; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2018-02-01

    An integrated sampling technique, dubbed trigger sampling, was developed to capture characteristic industrial emissions or plumes. In the field experiment, a hydrogen sulfide (H2S) analyzer was used as the triggering instrument at the boundary of a refinery plant due to frequent complaints of foul smell from local residents. Ten episodic samples were captured when the H2S level surpassed the prescribed trigger level of 8.5 ppbv over a three-day period. Three non-episodic (blank) samples and 23 road-side samples were also collected for comparison. All the 36 flask samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection (GC-MS/FID) for 108 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The total VOC abundance of the event samples was exceedingly higher than the non-episodic samples by over 80 times in the extreme case. Alkanes were found to be the dominant constituents in the event samples, amounting to over 90% of the total VOC concentrations vs. only 30-40% for the blank and metropolitan samples. In addition, light alkanes in the event samples were highly correlated with the trigger species H2S (R2 = 0.82), implying their common origin. The matrix of chemical composition vs. sample types permitted easy visualization of the dominance of light alkanes for the event samples compared to other types of samples. Principle component analysis (PCA) identified two major contributors to cover 93% of the total variance arising from the 36 samples, further quantifying the distinction of the triggered episodic samples from the contrast samples. The proposed trigger sampling is a coupling of fast-and-slow measurement techniques. In this example, the fast-response H2S analyzer served to "guide" sampling to capture industrial plumes which were then characterized by a relatively slow method of GC-MS/FID for detailed chemical composition representative of the prominent sources.

  2. A hybrid plume model for local-scale dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikmo, J.; Tuovinen, J.P.; Kukkonen, J.; Valkama, I.

    1997-12-31

    The report describes the contribution of the Finnish Meteorological Institute to the project `Dispersion from Strongly Buoyant Sources`, under the `Environment` programme of the European Union. The project addresses the atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles emitted from typical fires in warehouses and chemical stores. In the study only the `passive plume` regime, in which the influence of plume buoyancy is no longer important, is addressed. The mathematical model developed and its numerical testing is discussed. The model is based on atmospheric boundary-layer scaling theory. In the vicinity of the source, Gaussian equations are used in both the horizontal and vertical directions. After a specified transition distance, gradient transfer theory is applied in the vertical direction, while the horizontal dispersion is still assumed to be Gaussian. The dispersion parameters and eddy diffusivity are modelled in a form which facilitates the use of a meteorological pre-processor. Also a new model for the vertical eddy diffusivity (K{sub z}), which is a continuous function of height in the various atmospheric scaling regions is presented. The model includes a treatment of the dry deposition of gases and particulate matter, but wet deposition has been neglected. A numerical solver for the atmospheric diffusion equation (ADE) has been developed. The accuracy of the numerical model was analysed by comparing the model predictions with two analytical solutions of ADE. The numerical deviations of the model predictions from these analytic solutions were less than two per cent for the computational regime. The report gives numerical results for the vertical profiles of the eddy diffusivity and the dispersion parameters, and shows spatial concentration distributions in various atmospheric conditions 39 refs.

  3. Emissions lifetimes and ozone formation in power plant plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryerson, T.B.; Buhr, M.P.; Frost, G.J.; Goldan, P.D.; Holloway, J.S.; Huebler, G.; Jobson, B.T.; Kuster, W.C.; McKeen, S.A.; Parrish, D.D.; Roberts, J.M.; Sueper, D.T.; Trainer, M.; Williams, J.; Fehsenfeld, F.C. [NOAA Aeronomy Laboratory, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1998-09-20

    The concept of ozone production efficiency (OPE) per unit NO{sub x} is based on photochemical models and provides a tool with which to assess potential regional tropospheric ozone control strategies involving NO{sub x} emissions reductions. An aircraft study provided data from which power plant emissions removal rates and measurement-based estimates of OPE are estimated. This study was performed as part of the Southern Oxidants Study - 1995 Nashville intensive and focuses on the evolution of NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and ozone concentrations in coal-fired power plant plumes during transport. Two approaches are examined. A mass balance approach accounts for mixing effects within the boundary layer and is used to calculate effective boundary layer removal rates for NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} and to estimate net OPE, Net OPE is more directly comparable to photochemical model results than previous measurement-based estimates. Derived net production efficiencies from mass balance range from 1 to 3 molecules of ozone produced per molecule of NO{sub x} emitted. A concentration ratio approach provides an estimate of removal rates of primary emissions relative to a tracer species. This approach can be combined with emissions ratio information to provide upper limit estimates of OPE that range from 2 to 7. Both approaches illustrate the dependence of ozone production on NO{sub x} source strength in these large point source plumes. The dependence of total ozone production, ozone production efficiency, and the rate of ozone production on NO{sub x} source strength is examined. These results are interpreted in light of potential ozone control strategies for the region. 42 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Development and application of procedures to evaluate air quality and visibility impacts of low-altitude flying operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebsch, E.J.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the development and application of procedures to evaluate the effects of low-altitude aircraft flights on air quality and visibility. The work summarized in this report was undertaken as part of the larger task of assessing the various potential environmental impacts associated with low-altitude military airspaces. Accomplishing the air quality/visibility analysis for the GEIS included (1) development and application of an integrated air quality model and aircraft emissions database specifically for Military Training Route (MTR) or similar flight operations, (2) selection and application of an existing air quality model to analyze the more widespread and less concentrated aircraft emissions from military Operations Areas (MOAs) and Restricted Areas (RAs), and (3) development and application of procedures to assess impacts of aircraft emissions on visibility. Existing air quality models were considered to be inadequate for predicting ground-level concentrations of pollutants emitted by aircraft along MTRs; therefore, the Single-Aircraft Instantaneous Line Source (SAILS) and Multiple-Aircraft Instantaneous Line Source (MAILS) models were developed to estimate potential impacts along MTRs. Furthermore, a protocol was developed and then applied in the field to determine the degree of visibility impairment caused by aircraft engine exhaust plumes. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Integrated characterization of natural attenuation of a PCE plume after thermal remediation of the source zone - incl. dual isotope and microbial techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Mette Martina

    redox, chlorinated ethenes, non-chlorinated degradation products, carbon and chlorine stable isotope composition, as well as specific degraders and their activity was conducted in 2014. The source remediation has, in addition to direct reduction of the concentration level in and flux from the source...... have changed, suggesting an evolution in natural attenuation at significant distance (>1 km down-gradient) from the treated source area. Stable carbon isotopic fractionation revealed significant changes (increase) in the degree of degradation of cDCE in particular both near the source area and > 1 km...... down-gradient which co-inside with the reduction in redox conditions. The findings document a significant increase in cDCE degradation without accumulation of VC. This reduces the risk posed by the contaminant plume to the drinking water resource. This project is unique in the integrated...

  6. Detection of SO2, HCl and CO2 in Arenal Volcano Eruptive Plume Using MASTER Multispectral Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonatti, J.; Berrocal, M.; Malavassi, E.

    2004-12-01

    The Costa Rica Airborne Research and Technology Applications (CARTA) Mission developed in March-April, 2003 was a join effort between the National Program for Airtransported Missions of the National Center for High Technology of Costa Rica formed by the four public universities in Costa Rica, and NASA. This mission took aerial infrared photography and multiespectral images using the MASTER sensor of 70% of the national territory of Costa Rica. Multiespectral images were taken from Arenal volcano at high (13780 m) and at low (3450 m) altitude. The MASTER images have an aperture ranging between 0.44 micrometers in the visible and 13 micrometers in the thermic infrared. In addition, the distribution of the 50 channels of the MASTER sensor, have been arranged to avoid the influence of water vapor, always present in large quantities in the atmosphere and also in volcanic gases. We determined that SO2 is clearly visible between 8.5-9.3 micrometers (LWIR), and CO2, H2S and HCl in a smaller bandwidth 3.5-4.4 micrometers (MWIR). Another gas detected at Arenal volcanic plumes is methane, in a bandwidth between 7.7-8.1 micrometers (LWIR). When both multispectral images were taken, Arenal volcano had an active lava flow descending its NE flank and no significative winds were blowing, so the eruptive plume was rising almost vertically from the active vent. Profiles of gas concentration collected from the above mentioned bands were performed on the image using the software ENVI to detect different species present in volcanic gases. The concentration of volcanic gases in the multiespectral image was largest above the active crater (north vent of Crater C), and lower on the short active lava flow whose blocks were cascading down up to 1 km on the NE flank. Significant amounts of SO2 were measured above the lava flow and the fan of cascading blocks suggesting that the cooling lava continues to release magmatic gases as their cascading blocks move down flank of the volcano. The

  7. Visible light catalyzed Mannich reaction between tert-amines and silyl diazoenolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Mukund M D; Nagode, Savita B; Kant, Ruchir; Rastogi, Namrata

    2017-09-13

    The present work documents the α-C-H functionalization of tertiary amines via the visible light catalyzed Mannich reaction with silyl diazoenolates. The reaction takes place at room temperature with an organic dye, Rose Bengal, as a photocatalyst and oxygen as the oxidant. The resulting multifunctional products bearing an α-diazo-β-keto group undergo Rh-carbenoid mediated cyclization, affording stable ammonium ylides in high yields.

  8. Shelf-Stable Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is an MRE? Is an MRE shelf stable? What foods are packaged in retort packages? What is aseptic ... type of package is used for aseptic processing? What foods are packaged in aseptic packages? Can I microwave ...

  9. Pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumbiegel, P.

    1986-11-01

    The relatively new field of pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes is reviewed. Scientific, juridical, and ethical questions are discussed concerning the application of these pharmaceuticals in human medicine. 13 C, 15 N, and 2 H are the stable isotopes mainly utilized in metabolic function tests. Methodical contributions are given to the application of 2 H, 13 C, and 15 N pharmaceuticals showing new aspects and different states of development in the field under discussion. (author)

  10. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for distribution for nondestructive research use on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Research Materials Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or is in reprocessing. For some of the high abundance naturally occurring isotopes, larger amounts can be made available; for example, Ca-40 and Fe-56

  11. A climatology of visible surface reflectance spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoogman, Peter; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly; Sun, Qingsong; Schaaf, Crystal; Mahr, Tobias; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We present a high spectral resolution climatology of visible surface reflectance as a function of wavelength for use in satellite measurements of ozone and other atmospheric species. The Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) instrument is planned to measure backscattered solar radiation in the 290–740 nm range, including the ultraviolet and visible Chappuis ozone bands. Observation in the weak Chappuis band takes advantage of the relative transparency of the atmosphere in the visible to achieve sensitivity to near-surface ozone. However, due to the weakness of the ozone absorption features this measurement is more sensitive to errors in visible surface reflectance, which is highly variable. We utilize reflectance measurements of individual plant, man-made, and other surface types to calculate the primary modes of variability of visible surface reflectance at a high spectral resolution, comparable to that of TEMPO (0.6 nm). Using the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Bidirection Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF)/albedo product and our derived primary modes we construct a high spatial resolution climatology of wavelength-dependent surface reflectance over all viewing scenes and geometries. The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment–2 (GOME-2) Lambertian Equivalent Reflectance (LER) product provides complementary information over water and snow scenes. Preliminary results using this approach in multispectral ultraviolet+visible ozone retrievals from the GOME-2 instrument show significant improvement to the fitting residuals over vegetated scenes. - Highlights: • Our goals was visible surface reflectance for satellite trace gas measurements. • Captured the range of surface reflectance spectra through EOF analysis. • Used satellite surface reflectance products for each given scene to anchor EOFs. • Generated a climatology of time/geometry dependent surface reflectance spectra. • Demonstrated potential to

  12. Assessing anthropogenic pressures on groundwater using stable OH isotopes: perspectives and issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrel, Philippe; Ollivier, Patrick; Flehoc, Christine; Hube, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Large developments of isotope hydrogeology were done and well-established techniques mainly applying stable isotopes of the water molecule (hydrogen and oxygen) are now used largely to trace water provenance but also recharge processes. New methods allow the use of non-traditional isotopes (metals, compound specific stable isotope analysis CSIA...) to trace anthropogenic pressures in surface- and groundwater. Groundwater contamination in large industrial sites may come from several origins such as leakage from tanks during the production process of chemical products, liquid storage tanks, solid end product or past accumulated product in soil which is released over the time. The understanding of the origin and the further evolution of the chemical contamination in groundwater in an industrial site issued from past or current industrial activities is essential for the industrial companies regarding their environmental policies. The objective of this study was to use with an innovative way the stable isotopes of the water molecule as a low cost tool to trace pollutant plumes in groundwater and help to a better management of contaminated industrial sites. We present data on stable isotopes O and H in an European region where electrochemistry plants occur. For confidentiality purposes, the sites remain anonymous. Present day industrial activities have a direct impact on the groundwater over the site and migration of the contaminant(s) plume out of the site is supposed. We first characterize the natural groundwater background through the O-H characterization of surface water, lakes, thermal waters and regional shallow aquifers. High and low altitude recharge can be demonstrated in the area. Secondly, we used the stable isotope of the water molecule to trace over the site the impact of the Cl-rich liquor manufacturing process. Large deuterium enrichment was evidenced in the groundwater and the high values can be related to a direct contamination of the groundwater through

  13. Measurement of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in the plume of Kuwait oil well fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, K.B.; Wright, C.W.; Veverka, C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ball, J.C. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Scientific Research Lab.; Stevens, R. [US Environmental Protection Agency (United States). Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Lab.

    1995-03-01

    Following their retreat from Kuwait during February and March of 1991, the Iraqi Army set fire to over 500 oil wells dispersed throughout the Kuwait oil fields. During the period of sampling from July to August 1991, it was estimated that between 3.29 {times} 10{sup 6} barrels per day of crude oil were combusted. The resulting fires produced several plumes of black and white smoke that coalesced to form a composite ``super`` plume. Because these fires were uncontrolled, significant quantities of organic materials were dispersed into the atmosphere and drifted throughout the Middle East. The organic particulants associated with the plume of the oil well fires had a potential to be rich in polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds. Based on the extreme mutagenic and carcinogenic activities of PAHs found in laboratory testing, a serious health threat to the population of that region potentially existed. Furthermore, the Kuwait oil fire plumes represented a unique opportunity to study the atmospheric chemistry associated with PAHs in the plume. If samples were collected near the plume source and from the plume many kilometers downwind from the source, comparisons could be made to better understand atmospheric reactions associated with particle-bound and gas-phase PAHs. To help answer health-related concerns and to better understand the fate and transport of PAHs in an atmospheric environment, a sampling and analysis program was developed.

  14. Space Shuttle main engine OPAD: The search for a hardware enhanced plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, W. T.; Cooper, A. E.; Wallace, Tim L.; Buntine, W. L.; Whitaker, K. W.

    1993-11-01

    The process of applying spectroscopy to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) for plume diagnostics, as it exists today, originated at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, and its implementation was assured largely through the efforts of Sverdrup AEDC, in Tullahoma, Tennessee. This team continues to lead and guide efforts in the plume diagnostics arena. The process, Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD), formed the basis for various activities in the development of ground-based systems as well as the development of in-flight plume spectroscopy. OPAD currently provides and will continue to provide valuable information relative to future systems definitions, instrumentation development, code validation, and data diagnostic processing. OPAD is based on the detection of anomalous atomic and molecular species in the SSME plume using two complete, stand-alone optical spectrometers. To-date OPAD has acquired data on 44 test firings of the SSME at the Technology Test Bed (TTB) at MSFC. The purpose of this paper will be to provide an introduction to the OPAD system by discussing the process of obtaining data as well as the methods of examining and interpreting the data. It will encompass such issues as selection of instrumentation correlation of data to nominal engine operation, investigation of SSME component erosion via OPAD spectral data, necessity and benefits of plume seeding, application of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to data analysis, and the present status of efforts to quantify specie erosion utilizing standard plume and chemistry codes as well as radiative models currently under development.

  15. Plume tracer experiments at Hinkley Point 'A' [Nuclear Power Station] during 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, P.M.

    1988-11-01

    The results of the first part of a programme of plume dispersion measurements at the Hinkley Point Nuclear Power Station are described. Using SF 6 gas and pyrotechnic smoke tracer techniques developed during an earlier study at Oldbury, measurements of ground level plume behaviour out to about 4 km and elevated plume behaviour out to about 1 km have been made in a series of twelve 1 hour trials and one 15 minute trial. Whereas the Oldbury study considered passive emissions, attention in this study has been focussed on the behaviour of the buoyant shield cooling air emission. Data on plume rise and the degree of plume entrainment by the building wake and on the effects of entrainment and wind meander on plume width and concentration, are presented and discussed in relation to current modelling recommendations. A limited number of 10 minute averaged measurements of plume concentration and 41-Ar decay gamma count were also made at 2 km range and their correlation and variability examined. (author)

  16. Impact of wind on the dynamics of explosive volcanic plumes inferred from analog experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carazzo, G.; Girault, F.; Aubry, T. J.; Bouquerel, H.; Kaminski, E. C.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic plumes produced by explosive eruptions commonly interact with atmospheric wind causing plume bending and a reduction of its maximum height. Strength of the wind field and intensity of the eruption control the behavior of the column in the atmosphere, which may form either a strong plume that is little affected by the presence of wind or a weak plume that is bent-over in the wind field. To better understand the transition between weak and strong plumes, we present a series of new laboratory reproducing a buoyant jet rising in a stratified environment with a uniform cross-flow. The experiments consist in injecting downward fresh water in a tank containing an aqueous NaCl solution with linear density stratification. The jet source is towed at a constant speed through the stationary fluid in order to produce a cross-flow. We show that depending on the environmental and source conditions, the buoyant jet may form either a strong, distorted, or weak plume. The transition from one dynamical regime to another is governed by the strength of the horizontal wind velocity compared to the vertical buoyant rise of the plume. A review of field data on historical eruptions confirms that the experimentally-determined transition curves capture the behavior of volcanic columns. We quantify the impact of wind on the maximum height reached by the column, and we propose a universal scaling relationship to link the mass discharge rate feeding an eruption to its observed maximum height in the presence of wind.

  17. Space Shuttle main engine OPAD: The search for a hardware enhanced plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, W. T.; Cooper, A. E.; Wallace, Tim L.; Buntine, W. L.; Whitaker, K. W.

    1993-01-01

    The process of applying spectroscopy to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) for plume diagnostics, as it exists today, originated at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, and its implementation was assured largely through the efforts of Sverdrup AEDC, in Tullahoma, Tennessee. This team continues to lead and guide efforts in the plume diagnostics arena. The process, Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD), formed the basis for various activities in the development of ground-based systems as well as the development of in-flight plume spectroscopy. OPAD currently provides and will continue to provide valuable information relative to future systems definitions, instrumentation development, code validation, and data diagnostic processing. OPAD is based on the detection of anomalous atomic and molecular species in the SSME plume using two complete, stand-alone optical spectrometers. To-date OPAD has acquired data on 44 test firings of the SSME at the Technology Test Bed (TTB) at MSFC. The purpose of this paper will be to provide an introduction to the OPAD system by discussing the process of obtaining data as well as the methods of examining and interpreting the data. It will encompass such issues as selection of instrumentation correlation of data to nominal engine operation, investigation of SSME component erosion via OPAD spectral data, necessity and benefits of plume seeding, application of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to data analysis, and the present status of efforts to quantify specie erosion utilizing standard plume and chemistry codes as well as radiative models currently under development.

  18. Self-consistent modeling of laminar electrohydrodynamic plumes from ultra-sharp needles in cyclohexane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Marley; Frid, Henrik; Vázquez, Pedro A.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a self-consistent model of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) laminar plumes produced by electron injection from ultra-sharp needle tips in cyclohexane. Since the density of electrons injected into the liquid is well described by the Fowler-Nordheim field emission theory, the injection law is not assumed. Furthermore, the generation of electrons in cyclohexane and their conversion into negative ions is included in the analysis. Detailed steady-state characteristics of EHD plumes under weak injection and space-charge limited injection are studied. It is found that the plume characteristics far from both electrodes and under weak injection can be accurately described with an asymptotic simplified solution proposed by Vazquez et al. ["Dynamics of electrohydrodynamic laminar plumes: Scaling analysis and integral model," Phys. Fluids 12, 2809 (2000)] when the correct longitudinal electric field distribution and liquid velocity radial profile are used as input. However, this asymptotic solution deviates from the self-consistently calculated plume parameters under space-charge limited injection since it neglects the radial variations of the electric field produced by a high-density charged core. In addition, no significant differences in the model estimates of the plume are found when the simulations are obtained either with the finite element method or with a diffusion-free particle method. It is shown that the model also enables the calculation of the current-voltage characteristic of EHD laminar plumes produced by electron field emission, with good agreement with measured values reported in the literature.

  19. Precursor gases of aerosols in the Mount St. Helens eruption plumes at stratospheric altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inn, E. C. Y.; Vedder, J. F.; Condon, E. P.; Ohara, D.

    1982-01-01

    Nineteen stratospheric samples from the eruption plumes of Mount St. Helens were collected in five flight experiments. The plume samples were collected at various altitudes from 13.1 to 20.7 km by using the Ames cryogenic sampling system on board the NASA U-2 aircraft. The enriched, cryogenically collected samples were analyzed by chromatography. The concentrations of aerosols precursor gases (OCS, SO2, and CS2), CH3Cl, N2O, CF2Cl2, and CFCl3 were measured by gas chromatography. Large enhancement of the mixing ratio of SO2 and moderate enhancement of CS2 and OCS were found in the plume samples compared with similar measurement under pre-volcanic conditions. A fast decay rate of the SO2 mixing ratio in the plume was observed. Measurement of Cl(-), SO2(2-), and NO3(-) by ion chromatography was also carried out on water solutions prepared from the plume samples. The results obtained with this technique imply large mixing ratios of HCl, (NO + NO2 + HNO3), and SO2, in which these constituents are the respective sources of the anions. Measurement of the Rn222 concentration in the plume was made. Other stratospheric constituents in the plume samples, such as H2O, CO2, CH4, and CO, were also observed.

  20. The influence of thermochemical convection on the fixity of mantle plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Allen K.; Zhong, Shijie

    2004-05-01

    A general feature of both isochemical and thermochemical studies of mantle convection is that horizontal plume velocities tend to be smaller than typical convective velocities, however, it is not clear which system leads to a greater fixity of mantle plumes. We perform two- and three-dimensional numerical calculations and compare both thermochemical and isochemical cases with similar convective vigor to determine whether presence of a dense component in the mantle can lead to smaller ratios of horizontal plume velocity to surface velocity. We investigate different viscosity and density contrasts between chemical components in the thermochemical calculations, and we perform isochemical calculations with both free-slip and no-slip bottom boundary conditions. We then compare both visually and quantitatively the results of the thermochemical and isochemical calculations to determine which leads to greater plume fixity. We find that horizontal plume velocities for thermochemical calculations are similar to those from isochemical calculations with no-slip bottom boundary conditions. In addition, we find that plumes tend to be more fixed for isochemical cases with free-slip bottom boundary conditions for two-dimensional calculations, however, in three dimensions, we find that plume fixity is similar to that observed in thermochemical calculations.

  1. Satellite infrared imagery for thermal plume contamination monitoring in coastal ecosystem of Cernavoda NPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoran, M. A.; Zoran, Liviu Florin V.; Dida, Adrian I.

    2017-10-01

    Satellite remote sensing is an important tool for spatio-temporal analysis and surveillance of NPP environment, thermal heat waste of waters being a major concern in many coastal ecosystems involving nuclear power plants. As a test case the adopted methodology was applied for 700x2 MW Cernavoda nuclear power plant (NPP) located in the South-Eastern part of Romania, which discharges warm water affecting coastal ecology. The thermal plume signatures in the NPP hydrological system have been investigated based on TIR (Thermal Infrared) spectral bands of NOAA AVHRR, Landsat TM/ETM+/OLI, and MODIS Terra/Aqua time series satellite data during 1990-2016 period. If NOAA AVHRR data proved the general pattern and extension of the thermal plume signature in Danube river and Black Sea coastal areas, Landsat TM/ETM and MODIS data used for WST (Water Surface Temperature) change detection, mapping and monitoring provided enhanced information about the plume shape, dimension and direction of dispersion in these waters. Thermal discharge from two nuclear reactors cooling is dissipated as waste heat in Danube-Black -Sea Channel and Danube River. From time-series analysis of satellite data during period 1990-2016 was found that during the winter season thermal plume was localized to an area of a few km of NPP, and the mean temperature difference between the plume and non-plume areas was about 1.7 oC. During summer and fall, derived mean temperature difference between the plume and non-plume areas was of about 1.3°C and thermal plume area was extended up to 5- 10 km far along Danube Black Sea Channel.

  2. Influence of a West Antarctic mantle plume on ice sheet basal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seroussi, Helene; Ivins, Erik R.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Bondzio, Johannes

    2017-09-01

    The possibility that a deep mantle plume manifests Pliocene and Quaternary volcanism and potential elevated heat flux in West Antarctica has been studied for more than 30 years. Recent seismic images support the plume hypothesis as the cause of Marie Byrd Land (MBL) volcanism and geophysical structure. Mantle plumes may more than double the geothermal heat flux above nominal continental values. A dearth of in situ ice sheet basal data exists that samples the heat flux. Consequently, we examine a realistic distribution of heat flux associated with a possible late Cenozoic mantle plume in West Antarctica and explore its impact on thermal and melt conditions at the ice sheet base. We use a simple analytical mantle plume parameterization to produce geothermal heat flux at the base of the ice sheet. The three-dimensional ice flow model includes an enthalpy framework and full-Stokes stress balance. As both the putative plume location and extent are uncertain, we perform broadly scoped experiments to characterize the impact of the plume on geothermal heat flux and ice sheet basal conditions. The experiments show that mantle plumes have an important local impact on the ice sheet, with basal melting rates reaching several centimeters per year directly above the hotspot. In order to be consistent with observations of basal hydrology in MBL, the upper bound on the plume-derived geothermal heat flux is 150 mW/m2. In contrast, the active lake system of the lower part of Whillans Ice Stream suggests a widespread anomalous mantle heat flux, linked to a rift source.

  3. Rebound of a Coal Tar Creosote Plume Following Partial Source Zone Treatment With Permanganate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, N.; Fraser, M.; Lamarche, C.; Barker, J.; Forsey, S.

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of partial permanganate treatment to reduce the ability of a coal tar creosote source zone to generate a multi-component plume at the pilot-scale over both the short-term (weeks to months) and the long-term (years). A network of ~280 14-point multilevel samplers was used to monitor the dissolved plumes and mass discharge of ten compounds emanating from an emplaced coal tar creosote source for greater than 10 years. Bench scale experiments demonstrated that eight of the ten study compounds were readily oxidized by permanganate. Based on mass balance estimates, the 125 Kg of permanganate delivered to the source zone over 35 days would be capable of transforming at most 10% of the residual NAPL. This was sufficient to produce a short-term (after 150 days) decrease in mass discharge of greater than 35% for all monitored compounds except biphenyl, dibenzofuran, and fluoranthene. Pre- and post-treatment soil core data indicated a highly variable spatial distribution of mass within the source zone and provided no insight into the mass removed. The down-gradient plume was monitored approximately 1, 2 and 4 years following treatment. Once treated, oxidized compounds displayed a reduced plume mass and mass discharge while they migrated through the monitoring network. The data collected at 1 and 2 years post- treatment showed a decrease in mass discharge of 10 to 60% and/or total plume mass of 0 to 55%. Once the treated compounds migrated beyond the monitoring network (4-years post treatment) the mass discharge and plume mass of these compounds returned to pre-treatment values or higher. Non-reactive compounds displayed no significant change in mass discharge or plume mass. In the long term, reduction of mass discharge and total plume mass was within the error associated with mass discharge and total plume mass estimates, even at this highly monitored site.

  4. [VISIBLE LIGHT AND HUMAN SKIN (REVIEW)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsibadze, A; Chikvaidze, E; Katsitadze, A; Kvachadze, I; Tskhvediani, N; Chikviladze, A

    2015-09-01

    Biological effect of a visible light depends on extend of its property to penetrate into the tissues: the greater is a wavelength the more is an effect of a radiation. An impact of a visible light on the skin is evident by wave and quantum effects. Quanta of a visible radiation carry more energy than infrared radiation, although an influence of such radiation on the skin is produced by the light spectrum on the boarder of the ultraviolet and the infrared rays and is manifested by thermal and chemical effects. It is determined that large doses of a visible light (405-436 nm) can cause skin erythema. At this time, the ratio of generation of free radicals in the skin during an exposure to the ultraviolet and the visible light range from 67-33% respectively. Visible rays of 400-500 nm length of wave cause an increase of the concentration of oxygen's active form and mutation of DNA and proteins in the skin. The urticaria in 4-18% of young people induced by photodermatosis is described. As a result of a direct exposure to sunlight photosensitive eczema is more common in elderly. Special place holds a hereditary disease - porphyria, caused by a visible light. In recent years, dermatologists widely use phototherapy. The method uses polychromatic, non-coherent (wavelength of 515-1200 nm) pulsating beam. During phototherapy/light treatment a patient is being exposed to sunlight or bright artificial light. Sources of visible light are lasers, LEDs and fluorescent lamps which have the full range of a visible light. Phototherapy is used in the treatment of acne vulgaris, seasonal affective disorders, depression, psoriasis, eczema and neurodermities. LED of the red and near infrared range also is characterized by the therapeutic effect. They have an ability to influence cromatophores and enhance ATP synthesis in mitochondria. To speed up the healing of wounds and stimulate hair growth light sources of a weak intensity are used. The light of blue-green spectrum is widely used for

  5. Natural attenuation processes in landfill leachate plumes at three Danish sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Tuxen, Nina; Reitzel, Lotte

    2011-01-01

    . The research performed serves as good case studies to conceptualize natural attenuation processes in landfill leachate plumes and also supports the notion that monitored natural attenuation (MNA) may be a possible remediation strategy at landfills. However, landfill leachate plumes challenge traditional......This article provides an overview of comprehensive core and fringe field studies at three Danish landfill sites. The goal of the research activities is to provide a holistic description of core and fringe attenuation processes for xenobiotic organic compounds in landfill leachate plumes...

  6. Hydrogen chloride heterogeneous chemistry on frozen water particles in subsonic aircraft plume. Laboratory studies and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persiantseva, N.V.; Popovitcheva, O.B.; Rakhimova, T.V. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    Heterogeneous chemistry of HCl, as a main reservoir of chlorine content gases, has been considered after plume cooling and ice particle formation. The HCl, HNO{sub 3}, N{sub 2}O{sub 5} uptake efficiencies by frozen water were obtained in a Knudsen-cell flow reactor at the subsonic cruise conditions. The formation of ice particles in the plume of subsonic aircraft is simulated to describe the kinetics of gaseous HCl loss due to heterogeneous processes. It is shown that the HCl uptake by frozen water particles may play an important role in the gaseous HCl depletion in the aircraft plume. (author) 14 refs.

  7. Simple approximation for estimating centerline gamma absorbed dose rates due to a continuous Gaussian plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overcamp, T.J.; Fjeld, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    A simple approximation for estimating the centerline gamma absorbed dose rates due to a continuous Gaussian plume was developed. To simplify the integration of the dose integral, this approach makes use of the Gaussian cloud concentration distribution. The solution is expressed in terms of the I1 and I2 integrals which were developed for estimating long-term dose due to a sector-averaged Gaussian plume. Estimates of tissue absorbed dose rates for the new approach and for the uniform cloud model were compared to numerical integration of the dose integral over a Gaussian plume distribution

  8. Stable Boundary Layer Education (STABLE) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The properties of, and the processes that occur in, the nocturnal stable boundary layer are not well understood, making it difficult to represent adequately in numerical models. The nocturnal boundary layer often is characterized by a temperature inversion and, in the Southern Great Plains region, a low-level jet. To advance our understanding of the nocturnal stable boundary layer, high temporal and vertical resolution data on the temperature and wind properties are needed, along with both large-eddy simulation and cloud-resolving modeling.

  9. Sensitivity analysis of alkaline plume modelling: influence of mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaboreau, S.; Claret, F.; Marty, N.; Burnol, A.; Tournassat, C.; Gaucher, E.C.; Munier, I.; Michau, N.; Cochepin, B.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of a disposal facility for radioactive waste in clayey geological formation, an important modelling effort has been carried out in order to predict the time evolution of interacting cement based (concrete or cement) and clay (argillites and bentonite) materials. The high number of modelling input parameters associated with non negligible uncertainties makes often difficult the interpretation of modelling results. As a consequence, it is necessary to carry out sensitivity analysis on main modelling parameters. In a recent study, Marty et al. (2009) could demonstrate that numerical mesh refinement and consideration of dissolution/precipitation kinetics have a marked effect on (i) the time necessary to numerically clog the initial porosity and (ii) on the final mineral assemblage at the interface. On the contrary, these input parameters have little effect on the extension of the alkaline pH plume. In the present study, we propose to investigate the effects of the considered initial mineralogy on the principal simulation outputs: (1) the extension of the high pH plume, (2) the time to clog the porosity and (3) the alteration front in the clay barrier (extension and nature of mineralogy changes). This was done through sensitivity analysis on both concrete composition and clay mineralogical assemblies since in most published studies, authors considered either only one composition per materials or simplified mineralogy in order to facilitate or to reduce their calculation times. 1D Cartesian reactive transport models were run in order to point out the importance of (1) the crystallinity of concrete phases, (2) the type of clayey materials and (3) the choice of secondary phases that are allowed to precipitate during calculations. Two concrete materials with either nanocrystalline or crystalline phases were simulated in contact with two clayey materials (smectite MX80 or Callovo- Oxfordian argillites). Both

  10. Digital/Commercial (In)visibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leander, Anna

    2017-01-01

    an argument demonstrating specifically how digital and commercial logics characterize the aesthetic, circulatory, and infrastructuring practices re-producing the regime of (in)visibility. It shows that digital/commercial logics are at the heart of the combinatorial marketing of multiple, contradictory images......This article explores one aspect of digital politics, the politics of videos and more spe- cifically of DAESH recruitment videos. It proposes a practice theoretical approach to the politics of DAESH recruitment videos focused on the re-production of regimes of (in)visibility. The article develops...... on the internet. The theoretical and political cost of overlooking these digital and commercial characteristics of DAESH visibility practices are high. It perpetuates misconceptions of how the videos work and what their politics are and it reinforces the digital Orientalism/Occidentalism in which...

  11. Analysis of driver performance under reduced visibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeppler, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    Mathematical models describing vehicle dynamics as well as human behavior may be useful in evaluating driver performance and in establishing design criteria for vehicles more compatible with man. In 1977, a two level model of driver steering behavior was developed, but its parameters were identified for clear visibility conditions only. Since driver performance degrades under conditions of reduced visibility, e.g., fog, the two level model should be investigated to determine its applicability to such conditions. The data analysis of a recently performed driving simulation experiment showed that the model still performed reasonably well under fog conditions, although there was a degradation in its predictive capacity during fog. Some additional parameters affecting anticipation and lag time may improve the model's performance for reduced visibility conditions.

  12. Imaging of the Galapagos Plume Using a Network of Mermaids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolet, G.; Hello, Y.; Chen, J.; Pazmino, A.; Van der Lee, S.; Bonnieux, S.; Deschamps, A.; Regnier, M. M.; Font, Y.; Simons, F.

    2017-12-01

    A network of nine submarine seismographs (Mermaids) has been floating freely from 2014 to 2016 around the Galapagos islands, with the aim to enhance the resolving power of deep tomographic images of the mantle plume in this region (see poster by Hello et al. in session S002 for technical details).Analysing a total of 1329 triggered signals transmitted by satellite, we were able to pick the onset times of 434 P waves, 95 PKP and 26 pP arrivals. For the events recorded by at least one Mermaid, these data were complemented with hand-picked onsets from stations on the islands, or on the continent nearby, for a total of 3892 onset times of rays crossing the mantle beneath the Galapagos, many of them with a small standard error estimated at 0.3s. These data are used in a local inversion using ray theory, as is appropriate for onset times. To compensate for delays acquired in the rest of the Earth, the local model is embedded in a global inversion of P delays from the EHB data set most recently published by the ISC for 2000-2003. By selecting a strongly redundant subset of more than one million EHB P wave arrivals, we determined an objective standard error for these delays of 0.51s using the method of Voronin et al. (GJI, 2014). Using a combination of (strong) smoothing and (weak) damping, we force the tomographic model to fit the data close to the level of the estimated standard errors.Preliminary images obtained at the time of writing of this abstract indicate a deep reaching plume that is stronger in the lower mantle than near the surface.Most importantly, the experiment shows how even a limited number of Mermaids can contribute a significant gain in resolution. This is a direct consequence of the fact that they float with abyssal currents, thus avoiding redundancy in raypaths even for aftershocks.The final tomographic images and an analysis of their significance will be subject of the presentation.

  13. Numerical modeling of continental lithospheric weak zone over plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perepechko, Y. V.; Sorokin, K. E.

    2011-12-01

    The work is devoted to the development of magmatic systems in the continental lithosphere over diffluent mantle plumes. The areas of tension originating over them are accompanied by appearance of fault zones, and the formation of permeable channels, which are distributed magmatic melts. The numerical simulation of the dynamics of deformation fields in the lithosphere due to convection currents in the upper mantle, and the formation of weakened zones that extend up to the upper crust and create the necessary conditions for the formation of intermediate magma chambers has been carried out. Thermodynamically consistent non-isothermal model simulates the processes of heat and mass transfer of a wide class of magmatic systems, as well as the process of strain localization in the lithosphere and their influence on the formation of high permeability zones in the lower crust. The substance of the lithosphere is a rheologic heterophase medium, which is described by a two-velocity hydrodynamics. This makes it possible to take into account the process of penetration of the melt from the asthenosphere into the weakened zone. The energy dissipation occurs mainly due to interfacial friction and inelastic relaxation of shear stresses. The results of calculation reveal a nonlinear process of the formation of porous channels and demonstrate the diversity of emerging dissipative structures which are determined by properties of both heterogeneous lithosphere and overlying crust. Mutual effect of a permeable channel and the corresponding filtration process of the melt on the mantle convection and the dynamics of the asthenosphere have been studied. The formation of dissipative structures in heterogeneous lithosphere above mantle plumes occurs in accordance with the following scenario: initially, the elastic behavior of heterophase lithosphere leads to the formation of the narrow weakened zone, though sufficiently extensive, with higher porosity. Further, the increase in the width of

  14. Visible imaging of edge turbulence in NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Zweben; R. Maqueda; K. Hill; D. Johnson; S. Kaye; H. Kugel; F. Levinton; R. Maingi; L. Roquemore; S. Sabbagh; G. Wurden

    2000-01-01

    Edge plasma turbulence in tokamaks and stellarators is believed to cause the radial heat and particle flux across the separatrix and into the scrape-off-layers of these devices. This paper describes initial measurements of 2-D space-time structure of the edge density turbulence made using a visible imaging diagnostic in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The structure of the edge turbulence is most clearly visible using a method of ''gas puff imaging'' to locally illuminate the edge density turbulence

  15. Visible Counterterrorism Measures in Urban Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard-Nielsen, Anja; Laisen, Jesper; Wandorf, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    factors impacting positively or negatively on the feelings of safety of Danish citizens, when being in a crowded place. Surprisingly, the response to security measures like fences, cameras, and uniformed guards was positive. More visible security apparently reinforced feelings of safety. This article......Many scholars working within the tradition of critical studies are sceptical of the presence of visible security measures in urban spaces, arguing that they cause fear and facilitate the political control of citizens. A study carried out in Denmark in 2011 sought to capture, describe, and rank...

  16. The EtnaPlumeLab (EPL research cluster: advance the understanding of Mt. Etna plume, from source characterisation to downwind impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Sellitto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2013, a multidisciplinary research cluster named EtnaPlumeLab (EPL was established, gathering experts from volcanology and atmospheric science communities. Target of EPL is to advance the understanding of Mt. Etna's gas and aerosol emissions and the related processes, from source to its regional climatic impact in the Mediterranean area. Here, we present the cluster and its three interacting modules: EPL-RADIO (Radioactive Aerosols and other source parameters for better atmospheric Dispersion and Impact estimatiOns, SMED (Sulfur MEditerranean Dispersion and Med-SuV (MEDiterranean SUpersite Volcanoes Work Package 5. Preliminary results have for the first time highlighted the relevance of Mt. Etna's plume impact at the Mediterranean regional scale. These results underline that further efforts need to be made to get insight into a synoptic volcanogenic-atmospheric chemistry/climatic understanding of volcanic plumes impact.

  17. Modeling Multiple-Core Updraft Plume Rise for an Aerial Ignition Prescribed Burn by Coupling Daysmoke with a Cellular Automata Fire Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. L Achtemeier; S. L. Goodrick; Y. Liu

    2012-01-01

    Smoke plume rise is critically dependent on plume updraft structure. Smoke plumes from landscape burns (forest and agricultural burns) are typically structured into “sub-plumes” or multiple-core updrafts with the number of updraft cores depending on characteristics of the landscape, fire, fuels, and weather. The number of updraft cores determines the efficiency of...

  18. Formation of mantle "lone plumes" in the global downwelling zone - A multiscale modelling of subduction-controlled plume generation beneath the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Li, Zheng-Xiang

    2018-01-01

    It has been established that almost all known mantle plumes since the Mesozoic formed above the two lower mantle large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs). The Hainan plume is one of the rare exceptions in that instead of rising above the LLSVPs, it is located within the broad global mantle downwelling zone, therefore classified as a "lone plume". Here, we use the Hainan plume example to investigate the feasibility of such lone plumes being generated by subducting slabs in the mantle downwelling zone using 3D geodynamic modelling. Our geodynamic model has a high-resolution regional domain embedded in a relatively low resolution global domain, which is set up in an adaptive-mesh-refined, 3D mantle convection code ASPECT (Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth's ConvecTion). We use a recently published plate motion model to define the top mechanical boundary condition. Our modelling results suggest that cold slabs under the present-day Eurasia, formed from the Mesozoic subduction and closure of the Tethys oceans, have prevented deep mantle hot materials from moving to the South China Sea from regions north or west of the South China Sea. From the east side, the Western Pacific subduction systems started to promote the formation of a lower-mantle thermal-chemical pile in the vicinity of the future South China Sea region since 70 Ma ago. As the top of this lower-mantle thermal-chemical pile rises, it first moved to the west, and finally rested beneath the South China Sea. The presence of a thermochemical layer (possible the D″ layer) in the model helps stabilizing the plume root. Our modelling is the first implementation of multi-scale mesh in the regional model. It has been proved to be an effective way of modelling regional dynamics within a global plate motion and mantle dynamics background.

  19. Resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion in vacuum and argon gas backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindley, Roger Alan [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This thesis discusses the following on resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion: Introduction to laser ablation; applications of laser ablation; The study of plume expansion; holographic interferometry; resonant holographic interferometry; accounting for finite laser bandwidth; The solution for doppler broadening and finite bandwidth; the main optical table; the lumonics laser spot shape; developing and reconstructing the holograms; plume expansion in RF/Plasma Environments; Determining λ°; resonant refraction effects; fringe shift interpretation; shot-to-shot consistency; laser ablation in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; theoretically modeling plume expansion in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; and laser ablation in higher pressure, inert, background gas.

  20. Multiscale GasKinetics/Particle (MGP) Simulation for Rocket Plume/Lunar Dust Interactions, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Multiscale GasKinetic/Particle (MGP) computational method is proposed to simulate the plume-crater-interaction/dust-impingement(PCIDI) problem. The MGP method...