WorldWideScience

Sample records for stable thermal stratification

  1. Thermal Stratification in Vertical Mantle Tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Søren; Furbo, Simon

    2001-01-01

    are carried out to investigate how the thermal stratification is affected by different placements of the mantle inlet. The heat transfer between the solar collector fluid in the mantle and the domestic water in the inner tank is analysed by CFD-simulations. Furthermore, the flow pattern in the vertical mantle......It is well known that it is important to have a high degree of thermal stratification in the hot water storage tank to achieve a high thermal performance of SDHW systems. This study is concentrated on thermal stratification in vertical mantle tanks. Experiments based on typical operation conditions...

  2. Evaluation and verification of thermal stratification models for was

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    form bacteria and verification. INTRODUCTION ... bottom. The thermal stratification can be stable-persisting for months or intermittent, appearing for a few hours in the day (Dor et al. 1993; Pedahzur et al., 1993; Torres et al.,. 1997). In waste stabilization ponds the .... water depth of 0.2 and a thick sludge deposits. The WSP ...

  3. PPOOLEX experiments on thermal stratification and mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puustinen, M.; Laine, J.; Raesaenen, A. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Safety Research Unit (Finland))

    2009-08-15

    The results of the thermal stratification experiments in 2008 with the PPOOLEX test facility are presented. PPOOLEX is a closed vessel divided into two compartments, dry well and wet well. Extra temperature measurements for capturing different aspects of the investigated phenomena were added before the experiments. The main purpose of the experiment series was to generate verification data for evaluating the capability of GOTHIC code to predict stratification and mixing phenomena. Altogether six experiments were carried out. Heat-up periods of several thousand seconds by steam injection into the dry well compartment and from there into the wet well water pool were recorded. The initial water bulk temperature was 20 deg. C. Cooling periods of several days were included in three experiments. A large difference between the pool bottom and top layer temperature was measured when small steam flow rates were used. With higher flow rates the mixing effect of steam discharge delayed the start of stratification until the pool bulk temperature exceeded 50 deg. C. The stratification process was also different in these two cases. With a small flow rate stratification was observed only above and just below the blowdown pipe outlet elevation. With a higher flow rate over a 30 deg. C temperature difference between the pool bottom and pipe outlet elevation was measured. Elevations above the pipe outlet indicated almost linear rise until the end of steam discharge. During the cooling periods the measurements of the bottom third of the pool first had an increasing trend although there was no heat input from outside. This was due to thermal diffusion downwards from the higher elevations. Heat-up in the gas space of the wet well was quite strong, first due to compression by pressure build-up and then by heat conduction from the hot dry well compartment via the intermediate floor and test vessel walls and by convection from the upper layers of the hot pool water. The gas space

  4. PPOOLEX experiments on thermal stratification and mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puustinen, M.; Laine, J.; Raesaenen, A.

    2009-08-01

    The results of the thermal stratification experiments in 2008 with the PPOOLEX test facility are presented. PPOOLEX is a closed vessel divided into two compartments, dry well and wet well. Extra temperature measurements for capturing different aspects of the investigated phenomena were added before the experiments. The main purpose of the experiment series was to generate verification data for evaluating the capability of GOTHIC code to predict stratification and mixing phenomena. Altogether six experiments were carried out. Heat-up periods of several thousand seconds by steam injection into the dry well compartment and from there into the wet well water pool were recorded. The initial water bulk temperature was 20 deg. C. Cooling periods of several days were included in three experiments. A large difference between the pool bottom and top layer temperature was measured when small steam flow rates were used. With higher flow rates the mixing effect of steam discharge delayed the start of stratification until the pool bulk temperature exceeded 50 deg. C. The stratification process was also different in these two cases. With a small flow rate stratification was observed only above and just below the blowdown pipe outlet elevation. With a higher flow rate over a 30 deg. C temperature difference between the pool bottom and pipe outlet elevation was measured. Elevations above the pipe outlet indicated almost linear rise until the end of steam discharge. During the cooling periods the measurements of the bottom third of the pool first had an increasing trend although there was no heat input from outside. This was due to thermal diffusion downwards from the higher elevations. Heat-up in the gas space of the wet well was quite strong, first due to compression by pressure build-up and then by heat conduction from the hot dry well compartment via the intermediate floor and test vessel walls and by convection from the upper layers of the hot pool water. The gas space

  5. Fatigue design of nuclear class 1 piping considering thermal stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kweon, Hyeong Do; Kim, Jong Sung; Lee, Kang Yong

    2008-01-01

    In ASME B and PV Code, Section III, Subsection NB-3600, thermal stratification is not taken into account to determine the peak stress intensity range for fatigue design of nuclear class 1 piping. Therefore, the effects of several parameters such as boundary layer thickness, temperature difference, stratification length, wall thickness, inner diameter and material properties on peak temperature and peak stress intensity due to non-linear temperature distribution of thermal stratification in a pipe cross-section are studied through the numerical parametric study. The results of the parametric study are closely examined and consolidated to introduce an additional term into the equation of ASME so that the modified equation can be used to determine the peak stress intensity range due to all loads including thermal stratification

  6. Effect of layout on surge line thermal stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Jianyong; Huang Wei

    2011-01-01

    In order to analyze and evaluate the effect of layout on the thermal stratification for PWR Pressurizer surge line, numerical simulation by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method is taken on 6 kinds of layout improvement with 2 improvement schemes, i.e., increasing the obliquity of quasi horizontal section and adding a vertical pipe between the quasi horizontal section and next elbow, and the maximum temperature differences of quasi horizontal section of surge line of various layouts under different flowrate are obtained. The comparison shows that, the increasing of the obliquity of quasi horizontal section can mitigate the thermal stratification phenomena but can not eliminate this phenomena, while the adding of a vertical pipe between the quasi horizontal section and next elbow can effectively mitigate and eliminate the thermal stratification phenomena. (authors)

  7. GOTHIC code simulation of thermal stratification in POOLEX facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Kudinov, P. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) (Sweden))

    2009-07-15

    Pressure suppression pool is an important element of BWR containment. It serves as a heat sink and steam condenser to prevent containment pressure buildup during loss of coolant accident or safety relief valve opening during normal operations of a BWR. Insufficient mixing in the pool, in case of low mass flow rate of steam, can cause development of thermal stratification and reduction of pressure suppression pool capacity. For reliable prediction of mixing and stratification phenomena validation of simulation tools has to be performed. Data produced in POOLEX/PPOOLEX facility at Lappeenranta University of Technology about development of thermal stratification in a large scale model of a pressure suppression pool is used for GOTHIC lumped and distributed parameter validation. Sensitivity of GOTHIC solution to different boundary conditions and grid convergence study for 2D simulations of POOLEX STB-20 experiment are performed in the present study. CFD simulation was carried out with FLUENT code in order to get additional insights into physics of stratification phenomena. In order to support development of experimental procedures for new tests in the PPOOLEX facility lumped parameter pre-test GOTHIC simulations were performed. Simulations show that drywell and wetwell pressures can be kept within safety margins during a long transient necessary for development of thermal stratification. (au)

  8. GOTHIC code simulation of thermal stratification in POOLEX facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Kudinov, P.

    2009-07-01

    Pressure suppression pool is an important element of BWR containment. It serves as a heat sink and steam condenser to prevent containment pressure buildup during loss of coolant accident or safety relief valve opening during normal operations of a BWR. Insufficient mixing in the pool, in case of low mass flow rate of steam, can cause development of thermal stratification and reduction of pressure suppression pool capacity. For reliable prediction of mixing and stratification phenomena validation of simulation tools has to be performed. Data produced in POOLEX/PPOOLEX facility at Lappeenranta University of Technology about development of thermal stratification in a large scale model of a pressure suppression pool is used for GOTHIC lumped and distributed parameter validation. Sensitivity of GOTHIC solution to different boundary conditions and grid convergence study for 2D simulations of POOLEX STB-20 experiment are performed in the present study. CFD simulation was carried out with FLUENT code in order to get additional insights into physics of stratification phenomena. In order to support development of experimental procedures for new tests in the PPOOLEX facility lumped parameter pre-test GOTHIC simulations were performed. Simulations show that drywell and wetwell pressures can be kept within safety margins during a long transient necessary for development of thermal stratification. (au)

  9. Influence of precipitating light elements on stable stratification below the core/mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, J. G.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Stable stratification below the core/mantle boundary is often invoked to explain anomalously low seismic velocities in this region. Diffusion of light elements like oxygen or, more slowly, silicon could create a stabilizing chemical gradient in the outermost core. Heat flow less than that conducted along the adiabatic gradient may also produce thermal stratification. However, reconciling either origin with the apparent longevity (>3.45 billion years) of Earth's magnetic field remains difficult. Sub-isentropic heat flow would not drive a dynamo by thermal convection before the nucleation of the inner core, which likely occurred less than one billion years ago and did not instantly change the heat flow. Moreover, an oxygen-enriched layer below the core/mantle boundary—the source of thermal buoyancy—could establish double-diffusive convection where motion in the bulk fluid is suppressed below a slowly advancing interface. Here we present new models that explain both stable stratification and a long-lived dynamo by considering ongoing precipitation of magnesium oxide and/or silicon dioxide from the core. Lithophile elements may partition into iron alloys under extreme pressure and temperature during Earth's formation, especially after giant impacts. Modest core/mantle heat flow then drives compositional convection—regardless of thermal conductivity—since their solubility is strongly temperature-dependent. Our models begin with bulk abundances for the mantle and core determined by the redox conditions during accretion. We then track equilibration between the core and a primordial basal magma ocean followed by downward diffusion of light elements. Precipitation begins at a depth that is most sensitive to temperature and oxygen abundance and then creates feedbacks with the radial thermal and chemical profiles. Successful models feature a stable layer with low seismic velocity (which mandates multi-component evolution since a single light element typically

  10. Thermal stratification of sodium in the BN 600 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obmelukhin, J.A.; Obukhov, P.I.; Rinejskij, A.A.; Sobolev, V.A.; Sherbakov, S.I.

    1983-01-01

    The signs of thermal stratification of sodium in the BN 600 reactor upper plenum revealed by the analysis of standard temperature sensors' readings are defined. The initial conditions for existence of different temperature sodium layers are given. Two approaches for realizing on a computer of equations describing sodium motion in the upper plenum of the reactor are presented. (author)

  11. Large-eddy simulation of flows over idealized urban areas in thermal stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mr.; Liu, Dr.

    2012-04-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) equipped with the one-equation subgrid-scale model was employed to investigate the mean wind and turbulence over idealized two-dimensional (2D) street canyons in various thermal stratifications. The prevailing wind is driven by a background pressure gradient above the roof level that is perpendicular to the axis of street canyons. The building-height-to-street-width (aspect) ratio is kept unity so the flows fall into the skimming flow regime. Cyclic boundary conditions are assigned to the domain inlet and outlet, simulating the infinite horizontally homogenous building structures. The buoyancy force is modeled by Boussinesq approximation. Building geometry is the key factor governing the wind flow behaviors aloft. Its effects on the flow structures in isothermal conditions are widely studied. Whereas, thermal stratification, which is caused by the temperature difference between the urban fabrics and the prevailing wind, plays another important role in the wind flow behaviors. The presence of buoyancy force drives/suppresses convective flows that substantially modify the vertical transport processes. In stable stratification, e.g. nighttime, a cooler urban surface favors subsidence that reduces turbulence intensities subsequently. While in unstable stratification, e.g. daytime, a hotter urban surface induces buoyancy and convective current that in turn promotes turbulence. In isothermal conditions, it is well known that the mean flows exhibit a log-law region over an aerodynamically smooth surface where the mean wind profile is in a logarithmic form (law of the wall). The logarithmic wind profile is also observed over homogenously rough surfaces, such as the idealized two-dimensional street canyons used in this study. However, in thermal stratification (both stable and unstable), the mean wind profile deviates from the isothermal one whose extent depends on the intensity of thermal stratification compared with the mean wind (measured by

  12. Shear mixing in stellar radiative zones. I. Effect of thermal diffusion and chemical stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, V.; Lignières, F.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Turbulent transport of chemical elements in radiative zones of stars is considered in current stellar evolution codes thanks to phenomenologically derived diffusion coefficients. Recent local numerical simulations suggest that the coefficient for radial turbulent diffusion due to radial differential rotation satisfies Dt ≃ 0.058κ/Ri, in qualitative agreement with the model of Zahn (1992, A&A, 265, 115). However, this model does not apply (i) when differential rotation is strong with respect to stable thermal stratification or (ii) when chemical stratification has a significant dynamical effect, a situation encountered at the outer boundary of nuclear-burning convective cores. Aims: We extend our numerical study to consider the effects of chemical stratification and of strong shear, and compare the results with prescriptions used in stellar evolution codes. Methods: We performed local, direct numerical simulations of stably stratified, homogeneous, sheared turbulence in the Boussinesq approximation. The regime of high thermal diffusivities, typical of stellar radiative zones, is reached thanks to the so-called small-Péclet-number approximation, which is an asymptotic development of the Boussinesq equations in this regime. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on chemical stratification was explored in this approximation. Results: Maeder's extension of Zahn's model in the strong-shear regime (Maeder 1995, A&A, 299, 84) is not supported by our results, which are better described by a model found in the geophysical literature. As regards the effect of chemical stratification, our quantitative estimate of the diffusion coefficient as a function of the mean gradient of mean molecular weight leads to the formula Dt ≃ 0.45κ(0.12-Riμ) /Ri, which is compatible in the weak-shear regime with the model of Maeder & Meynet (1996, A&A, 313, 140) but not with Maeder's (1997, A&A, 321, 134).

  13. Study of thermal stratification and mixing using PIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaji, B.; Szijarto, R.; Aszodi, A.

    2010-01-01

    Paks Nuclear Power Plant uses the REMIX code for the calculation of the coolant mixing in case of the use of high pressure injection system while stagnating flow is present. The use of the code for Russian type WWER-440 reactors needs strict conservative approach, and in several cases the accuracy and the reserves to safety margins cannot be determined now. In order to quantify and improve these characteristics experimental validation of the code is needed. An experimental program has been launched at Institute of Nuclear Techniques with the aim of investigating thermal stratification processes and the mixing of plumes in simple geometries. With the comparison and evaluation of measurement and computational fluid dynamics result computational models can be validated. For the experiments a simple hexahedral plexiglas tank (250 x 500 x 100 mm - H x L x D) was fabricated with five nozzles attached, which can be set up as inlets or outlets. With different inlet and outlet setups and temperature differences thermal stratification, plume mixing may be investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry. In the paper comparison of Particle Image Velocimetry measurements carried out on the plexiglas tank and the results of simulations will be presented. For the calculations the ANSYS CFX three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code was used. (Authors)

  14. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.

    1999-01-31

    The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume

  15. A comparison of experimental thermal stratification parameters for an oil/pebble-bed thermal energy storage (TES) system during charging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mawire, Ashmore; Taole, Simeon H.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Six experimental thermal stratification parameters are evaluated in a TES system. → Stratification number and temperature difference evaluate stratification adequately. → Exergy efficiency and Reynolds number evaluate stratification qualitatively. → Richardson number and energy efficiency not clearly related with stratification. -- Abstract: Six different experimental thermal stratification evaluation parameters during charging for an oil/pebble-bed TES system are presented. The six parameters are the temperature distribution along the height of the storage tank at different time intervals, the charging energy efficiency, the charging exergy efficiency, the stratification number, the Reynolds number and the Richardson number. These parameters are evaluated under six different experimental charging conditions. Temperature distribution along the height of the storage tank at different time intervals and the stratification number are parameters found to describe thermal stratification quantitatively adequately. On the other-hand, the charging exergy efficiency and the Reynolds number give important information about describing thermal stratification qualitatively and should be used with care. The charging energy efficiency and the Richardson number have no clear relationship with thermal stratification.

  16. Investigation of thermal stratification in cisterns using analytical and Artificial Neural Networks methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ameri Siahoui, H.R.; Dehghani, A.R.; Razavi, M.; Khani, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal characteristics of an underground cold-water reservoir are investigated analytically and using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). An analytical solution is developed for the temperature distribution in the reservoir by assuming a linearized boundary condition at the water surface. For the general non-linear boundary condition, the temperature distribution is modeled using ANN. Very good agreements between the analytical and ANN results at various times during the withdrawal cycle are observed, ensuring the accuracy of the analytical and ANN procedures. The results show that a stable thermal stratification is preserved in the reservoir throughout the entire course of withdrawal cycle. As one important outcome of this research, two different regions are observed inside the thermally stratified tank during discharge cycle. The bottom region with a linear temperature distribution and the upper one in which a nearly exponential thermal stratification are developed. During withdrawal cycle, the outside temperature reaches as high as 42 o C, while cool water with the temperature varying from 12 to 13 o C is easily available from the underground water reservoir under investigation.

  17. T-junction cross-flow mixing with thermally driven density stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kickhofel, John, E-mail: jkickhofel@gmail.com [Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Systems, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Prasser, Horst-Michael, E-mail: prasser@lke.mavt.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Systems, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Selvam, P. Karthick, E-mail: karthick.selvam@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Laurien, Eckart, E-mail: eckart.laurien@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Kulenovic, Rudi, E-mail: rudi.kulenovic@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Mesh sensor for realistic nuclear thermal hydraulic scenarios is demonstrated. • Flow temperature behavior across a wide range of Richardson numbers measured. • Upstream stratified flow in the T-junction results in a thermal shock scenario. • Large, stable near-wall thermal gradients exist in spite of turbulent flows. - Abstract: As a means of further elucidating turbulence- and stratification-driven thermal fatigue in the vicinity of T-junctions in nuclear power plants, a series of experiments have been conducted at the high temperature high pressure fluid–structure interaction T-junction facility of the University of Stuttgart with novel fluid measurement instrumentation. T-junction mixing with large fluid temperature gradients results in complex flow behavior, the result of density driven effects. Deionized water mixing at temperature differences of up to 232 K at 7 MPa pressure have been investigated in a T-junction with main pipe diameter 71.8 mm and branch line diameter 38.9 mm. The experiments have been performed with fixed flow rates of 0.4 kg/s in the main pipe and 0.1 kg/s in the branch line. A novel electrode-mesh sensor compatible with the DN80 PN100 pipeline upstream and downstream of the T-junction has been utilized as a temperature sensor providing a high density information in the pipe cross-section in both space and time. Additionally, in-flow and in-wall thermocouples quantify the damping of thermal fluctuations by the wall material. The results indicate that large inflow temperature differences lead to strong turbulence damping, and ultimately stable stratification extending both downstream and upstream of the T-junction resulting in large local thermal gradients.

  18. State of the Art: Blood Biomarkers for Risk Stratification in Patients with Stable Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omland, Torbjørn; White, Harvey D

    2017-01-01

    Multiple circulating biomarkers have been associated with the incidence of cardiovascular events and proposed as potential tools for risk stratification in stable ischemic heart disease (IHD), yet current guidelines do not make any firm recommendations concerning the use of biomarkers for risk stratification in this setting. This state-of-the-art review provides an overview of biomarkers for risk stratification in stable IHD. Circulating biomarkers associated with the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with stable IHD reflect different pathophysiological processes, including myocardial injury, myocardial stress and remodeling, metabolic status, vascular inflammation, and oxidative stress. Compared to the primary prevention setting, biomarkers reflecting end-organ damage and future risk of heart failure development and cardiovascular death may play more important roles in the stable IHD setting. Accordingly, biomarkers that reflect chronic, low-grade myocardial injury, and stress, i.e., high-sensitivity cardiac troponins and natriuretic peptides, provide graded and incremental prognostic information to conventional risk markers. In contrast, in stable IHD patients the prognostic value of traditional metabolic biomarkers, including serum lipids, is limited. Among several novel biomarkers, growth-differentiation factor-15 may provide the most robust prognostic information, whereas most inflammatory markers provide limited incremental prognostic information to risk factor models that include conventional risk factors, natriuretic peptides, and high-sensitivity troponins. Circulating biomarkers hold promise as useful tools for risk stratification in stable IHD, but their future incorporation into clinically useful risk scores will depend on prospective, rigorously performed clinical trials that document enhanced risk prediction. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  19. Atmospheric thermal tides and planetary spin. I. The complex interplay between stratification and rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auclair-Desrotour, P.; Mathis, S.; Laskar, J.

    2018-02-01

    Context. Thermal atmospheric tides can torque telluric planets away from spin-orbit synchronous rotation, as observed in the case of Venus. They thus participate in determining the possible climates and general circulations of the atmospheres of these planets. Aims: The thermal tidal torque exerted on an atmosphere depends on its internal structure and rotation and on the tidal frequency. Particularly, it strongly varies with the convective stability of the entropy stratification. This dependence has to be characterized to constrain and predict the rotational properties of observed telluric exoplanets. Moreover, it is necessary to validate the approximations used in global modelings such as the traditional approximation, which is used to obtain separable solutions for tidal waves. Methods: We wrote the equations governing the dynamics of thermal tides in a local vertically stratified section of a rotating planetary atmosphere by taking into account the effects of the complete Coriolis acceleration on tidal waves. This allowed us to analytically derive the tidal torque and the tidally dissipated energy, which we used to discuss the possible regimes of tidal dissipation and to examine the key role played by stratification. Results: In agreement with early studies, we find that the frequency dependence of the thermal atmospheric tidal torque in the vicinity of synchronization can be approximated by a Maxwell model. This behavior corresponds to weakly stably stratified or convective fluid layers, as observed previously. A strong stable stratification allows gravity waves to propagate, and makes the tidal torque negligible. The transition is continuous between these two regimes. The traditional approximation appears to be valid in thin atmospheres and in regimes where the rotation frequency is dominated by the forcing or the buoyancy frequencies. Conclusions: Depending on the stability of their atmospheres with respect to convection, observed exoplanets can be tidally

  20. Gas phase thermal diffusion of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eck, C.F.

    1979-01-01

    The separation of stable isotopes at Mound Facility is reviewed from a historical perspective. The historical development of thermal diffusion from a laboratory process to a separation facility that handles all the noble gases is described. In addition, elementary thermal diffusion theory and elementary cascade theory are presented along with a brief review of the uses of stable isotopes

  1. Thermal stratification in a scaled-down suppression pool of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Byeongnam, E-mail: jo@vis.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Erkan, Nejdet [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Takahashi, Shinji [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Song, Daehun [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Hyundai and Kia Corporate R& D Division, Hyundai Motors, 772-1, Jangduk-dong, Hwaseong-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 445-706 (Korea, Republic of); Sagawa, Wataru; Okamoto, Koji [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Thermal stratification was reproduced in a scaled-down suppression pool of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants. • Horizontal temperature profiles were uniform in the toroidal suppression pool. • Subcooling-steam flow rate map of thermal stratification was obtained. • Steam bubble-induced flow model in suppression pool was suggested. • Bubble frequency strongly depends on the steam flow rate. - Abstract: Thermal stratification in the suppression pool of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants was experimentally investigated in sub-atmospheric pressure conditions using a 1/20 scale torus shaped setup. The thermal stratification was reproduced in the scaled-down suppression pool and the effect of the steam flow rate on different thermal stratification behaviors was examined for a wide range of steam flow rates. A sparger-type steam injection pipe that emulated Fukushima Daiichi Unit 3 (F1U3) was used. The steam was injected horizontally through 132 holes. The development (formation and disappearance) of thermal stratification was significantly affected by the steam flow rate. Interestingly, the thermal stratification in the suppression pool vanished when subcooling became lower than approximately 5 °C. This occurred because steam bubbles are not well condensed at low subcooling temperatures; therefore, those bubbles generate significant upward momentum, leading to mixing of the water in the suppression pool.

  2. Evaluation and Verification of Thermal Stratification Models for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stratification is a usual phenomenon occurring in waste stabilization ponds which needs to be incorporated in prediction models. The occurrence of stratification in waste stabilization pond (WSP) alters the flow pattern of the pond. Hence, its study is important for complete and accurate modeling of the WSP. In this study, two ...

  3. Methods to determine stratification efficiency of thermal energy storage processes–Review and theoretical comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haller, Michel; Cruickshank, Chynthia; Streicher, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews different methods that have been proposed to characterize thermal stratification in energy storages from a theoretical point of view. Specifically, this paper focuses on the methods that can be used to determine the ability of a storage to promote and maintain stratification...

  4. Advection of pollutants by internal solitary waves in oceanic and atmospheric stable stratifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Haarlemmer

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available When a pollutant is released into the ocean or atmosphere under turbulent conditions, even a steady release is captured by large eddies resulting in localized patches of high concentration of the pollutant. If such a cloud of pollutant subsequently enters a stable stratification-either a pycnocline or thermocline-then internal waves are excited. Since large solitary internal waves have a recirculating core, pollutants may be trapped in the sclitary wave, and advected large distances through the waveguide provided by the stratification. This paper addresses the mechanisms, through computer and physical simulation, by which a localized release of a dense pollutant results in solitary waves that trap the pollutant or disperse the pollutant faster than in the absence of the waves.

  5. Numerical investigation on thermal stratification and striping phenomena in various coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumao Yang; Muramatsu, Toshiharu

    2000-02-01

    It is important to study thermal stratification and striping phenomena for they can induce thermal fatigue failure of structures. This presentation uses the AQUA code, which has been developed in Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), to investigate the characteristics of these thermal phenomena in water, liquid sodium, liquid lead and carbon dioxide gas. There are altogether eight calculated cases with same Richardson number and initial inlet hot velocity in thermal stratification calculations, in which four cases have same velocity difference between inlet hot and cold fluid, the other four cases with same temperature difference. The calculated results show: (1) The fluid's properties and initial conditions have considerable effects on thermal stratification, which is decided by the combination of such as thermal conduction, viscous dissipation and buoyant force, etc., and (2) The gas has distinctive thermal stratification characteristics from those of liquid because for horizontal flow in the transportation of momentum and energy, the drastic exchange usually happens at the hot-cold interface for liquid, however, the buoyancy and natural convection make the quick exchange position depart from the hot-cold interface for gas. In thermal striping analysis, only the first step work has been finished. The calculated results show: (1) the vertical flow has some difference in thermal stratification characteristics from those of horizontal flow, and (2) For deep thermal striping analysis in the calculated area, more attention should be paid to the center area along Z-direction for liquid and small velocity area for gas. (author)

  6. Thermal and solutal stratification on MHD nanofluid flow over a porous vertical plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kandasamy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have the highest credibility to develop the thermal properties compared to conventional particle fluid suspension. Thermal and solutal stratification on heat and mass transfer induced due to a nanofluid over a porous vertical plate is analyzed. The transport equations engaged in the study include the effect of Brownian motion and thermophoresis particle deposition. The nonlinear governing equations and their related boundary conditions are initially looked into dimensionless forms by similarity variables. The resulting equations are solved numerically utilizing the fourth-fifth order Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg method with shooting technique (MAPLE 18. It is investigated that the temperature of the nanofluid and the concentration fraction decelerate with increase in thermal and solutal stratification. Keywords: Thermal and solutal stratification, Nanofluid, Magnetic field, Nanoparticle volume fraction, Porous vertical plate

  7. Thermal stratification built up in hot water tank with different inlet stratifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Janne; Furbo, Simon; Dannemand, Mark

    2017-01-01

    in order to elucidate how well thermal stratification is established in the tank with differently designed inlet stratifiers under different controlled laboratory conditions. The investigated inlet stratifiers are from Solvis GmbH & Co KG and EyeCular Technologies ApS. The inlet stratifier from Solvis Gmb......Thermal stratification in a water storage tank can strongly increase the thermal performance of solar heating systems. Thermal stratification can be built up in a storage tank during charge, if the heated water enters through an inlet stratifier. Experiments with a test tank have been carried out......H is a rigid plastic pipe with holes for each 30 cm. The holes are designed with flaps preventing counter flow into the pipe. The inlet stratifier from EyeCular Technologies ApS is made of a flexible polymer with openings all along the side and in the full length of the stratifier. The flexibility...

  8. Characterization of pool thermal stratification in the San Joaquin River system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, N. L.; Hunt, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Temperature is a critical water quality parameter for Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawystcha) and is a potentially limiting factor for the successful reintroduction of Chinook into the San Joaquin River system. When ambient stream water temperatures exceed salmon thermal tolerances, salmon seek out cooler water in pools as thermal refuge. While current models of the San Joaquin River can estimate ambient surface water temperature, vertical variations in pool temperature are unknown and not modeled. This study measured river pool thermal stratification in the San Joaquin River system to assess available thermal refuge and identify the key drivers of thermal stratification in this system. During July 2012, daytime vertical water temperature profiles were measured in 53 river pools to survey the prevalence of thermal stratification in the San Joaquin River system from the Mariposa Bypass to the its confluence with the Merced River. Between September and November 2012 six of the pools that exhibited thermal stratification during July were instrumented with water temperature sensor arrays and piezometers. The water temperature sensor arrays were constructed by attaching sensors at regular intervals to the exterior of a PVC pipe to measure the vertical water temperature in the pool and into the sediment. Additionally, piezometers determined pool water head along with pressure head at two different depths into the sediment. Sensor arrays were setup for a minimum of two weeks at each site with sensors recording data every 15 minutes. Thermal stratification occurred in 82% of the 53 pools surveyed in the San Joaquin River during July. Pool depths ranged from 0.64 m to 6.37 m with an average depth of 2.09 m. Differences in vertical water temperature ranged from less than 3 °C to 11.4 °C with an average water temperature difference of 4.2 °C. Vertical water temperature differences did not correlate with pool depth. In the six pools instrumented for two weeks, thermal

  9. Thermal Stratification in Small Solar Domestic Storage Tanks caused by Draw-offs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Ulrike; Furbo, Simon

    2005-01-01

    As shown in many research studies in the past, the thermal stratification of the tank caused by draw-offs has a high impact on the performance of a Solar Domestic Hot Water (SDHW) system. Nevertheless, in most tank models for system simulations the influence of the draw-off pattern on the mixing...... with a component oriented simulation tool for solar thermal systems....... are placed in order to reduce the mixing of the incoming cold water with the warmer storage water. To measure the thermal stratification thermocouples were placed in a vertical glass tube inside the tank. Measurements were carried out with different draw-off volumes, flow rates, and initial temperatures...

  10. Thermal Stratification in Small Solar Domestic Storage Tanks caused by Draw-offs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Ulrike; Furbo, Simon

    2005-01-01

    As shown in many research studies in the past, the thermal stratification of the tank caused by draw-offs has a high impact on the performance of a Solar Domestic Hot Water (SDHW) system. Nevertheless, in most tank models for system simulations the influence of the draw-off pattern on the mixing...... with a component oriented simulation tool for solar thermal systems....

  11. THERMAL STRATIFICATION IN SOLAR DOMESTIC STORAGE TANKS CAUSED BY DRAW-OFFS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Ulrike; Furbo, Simon

    2003-01-01

    As shown in many research studies in the past, the thermal stratification of the tank caused by draw-offs has a high impact on the performance of a Solar Domestic Hot Water (SDHW) system. Nevertheless, in most tank models for system simulations the influence of the draw-off pattern on the mixing...... with a component oriented simulation tool for solar thermal systems....

  12. Fluid-structure interaction analysis for pressurizer surge line subjected to thermal stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Dong Gu; Jhung, Myung Jo; Chang, Soon Heung

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Temperature of surge line due to stratified flow is defined using CFD analysis. → Fluid-structure interaction analysis is performed to investigate the response characteristics due to thermal stress. → Fatigue usage factors due to thermal stratification are relatively low. → Simplifying temperature distribution in surge line is not always conservative. - Abstract: Serious mechanical damages such as cracks and plastic deformations due to excessive thermal stress caused by thermal stratification have been experienced in several nuclear power plants. In particular, the thermal stratification in the pressurizer surge line has been addressed as one of the significant safety and technical issues. In this study, a detailed unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis involving conjugate heat transfer analysis is performed to obtain the transient temperature distributions in the wall of the pressurizer surge line subjected to stratified internal flows either during out-surge or in-surge operation. The thermal loads from CFD calculations are transferred to the structural analysis code which is employed for the thermal stress analysis to investigate the response characteristics, and the fatigue analysis is ultimately performed. In addition, the thermal stress and fatigue analysis results obtained by applying the realistic temperature distributions from CFD calculations are compared with those by assuming the simplified temperature distributions to identify some requirements for a realistic and conservative thermal stress analysis from a safety point of view.

  13. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF THERMAL STRATIFICATION IN THE UPPER PLENUM OF THE MONJU FAST REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEOK-KI CHOI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A numerical analysis of thermal stratification in the upper plenum of the MONJU fast breeder reactor was performed. Calculations were performed for a 1/6 simplified model of the MONJU reactor using the commercial code, CFX-13. To better resolve the geometrically complex upper core structure of the MONJU reactor, the porous media approach was adopted for the simulation. First, a steady state solution was obtained and the transient solutions were then obtained for the turbine trip test conducted in December 1995. The time dependent inlet conditions for the mass flow rate and temperature were provided by JAEA. Good agreement with the experimental data was observed for steady state solution. The numerical solution of the transient analysis shows the formation of thermal stratification within the upper plenum of the reactor vessel during the turbine trip test. The temporal variations of temperature were predicted accurately by the present method in the initial rapid coastdown period (∼300 seconds. However, transient numerical solutions show a faster thermal mixing than that observed in the experiment after the initial coastdown period. A nearly homogenization of the temperature field in the upper plenum is predicted after about 900 seconds, which is a much shorter-term thermal stratification than the experimental data indicates. This discrepancy may be due to the shortcoming of the turbulence models available in the CFX-13 code for a natural convection flow with thermal stratification.

  14. A method to determine stratification efficiency of thermal energy storage processes independently from storage heat losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haller, M.Y.; Yazdanshenas, Eshagh; Andersen, Elsa

    2010-01-01

    A new method for the calculation of a stratification efficiency of thermal energy storages based on the second law of thermodynamics is presented. The biasing influence of heat losses is studied theoretically and experimentally. Theoretically, it does not make a difference if the stratification...... directly, and a tank-in-tank system whose outer tank is charged and the inner tank is discharged thereafter. The new method has a great potential for the comparison of the stratification efficiencies of thermal energy storages and storage components such as stratifying devices....... efficiency is calculated based on entropy balances or based on exergy balances. In practice, however, exergy balances are less affected by measurement uncertainties, whereas entropy balances can not be recommended if measurement uncertainties are not corrected in a way that the energy balance of the storage...

  15. Thermally Stable, Latent Olefin Metathesis Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Renee M.; Fedorov, Alexey; Keitz, Benjamin K.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Highly thermally stable N-aryl,N-alkyl N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ruthenium catalysts were designed and synthesized for latent olefin metathesis. These catalysts showed excellent latent behavior toward metathesis reactions, whereby the complexes were inactive at ambient temperature and initiated at elevated temperatures, a challenging property to achieve with second generation catalysts. A sterically hindered N-tert-butyl substituent on the NHC ligand of the ruthenium complex was found to i...

  16. Effects of thermal stratification on transient free convective flow of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-09-22

    Sep 22, 2016 ... as well as average skin friction and the rate of heat transfer of nanofluids are discussed and represented graphically. The results are found to be in good agreement with the existing results in literature. Keywords. Nanofluid; thermal stratification; transient; isothermal vertical plate. PACS Nos 44.20.+b; 47; 44.

  17. Effects of thermal stratification on transient free convective flow of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-09-22

    Sep 22, 2016 ... silver having volume fraction of the nanoparticles less than or equal to 0.04 with water as the base fluid are consid- ered. The governing boundary layer equations are solved numerically. ... Thermal stratification within very large batteries could produce internal leakage or self-discharge. Design of nuclear.

  18. Effects of thermal stratification on transient free convective flow of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An analysis of thermal stratification in a transient free convection of nanofluids past an isothermal vertical plate is performed. Nanofluids containing nanoparticles of aluminium oxide, copper, titanium oxide and silver having volume fraction of the nanoparticles less than or equal to 0.04 with water as the base fluid are ...

  19. Thermal stratification effects on MHD radiative flow of nanofluid over nonlinear stretching sheet with variable thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahaya Shagaiya Daniel

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of thermal stratification, applied electric and magnetic fields, thermal radiation, viscous dissipation and Joules heating are numerically studied on a boundary layer flow of electrical conducting nanofluid over a nonlinearly stretching sheet with variable thickness. The governing equations which are partial differential equations are converted to a couple of ordinary differential equations with suitable similarity transformation techniques and are solved using implicit finite difference scheme. The electrical conducting nanofluid particle fraction on the boundary is passively rather than actively controlled. The effects of the emerging parameters on the electrical conducting nanofluid velocity, temperature, and nanoparticles concentration volume fraction with skin friction, heat transfer characteristics are examined with the aids of graphs and tabular form. It is observed that the variable thickness enhances the fluid velocity, temperature, and nanoparticle concentration volume fraction. The heat and mass transfer rate at the surface increases with thermal stratification resulting to a reduction in the fluid temperature. Electric field enhances the nanofluid velocity which resolved the sticking effects caused by a magnetic field which suppressed the profiles. Radiative heat transfer and viscous dissipation are sensitive to an increase in the fluid temperature and thicker thermal boundary layer thickness. Comparison with published results is examined and presented. Keywords: MHD nanofluid, Variable thickness, Thermal radiation, Similarity solution, Thermal stratification

  20. Thermal stratification in a hot water tank established by heat loss from the tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2012-01-01

    computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. The measured heat loss coefficient for the different parts of the tank is used as input to the CFD model. Parametric studies are carried out using the validated models to investigate the influence on thermal stratification of the tank by the downward flow...... to characterize the effect of the buoyancy driven flow on exchange of heat loss between tank layers by natural convection. Based on results of the parametric studies, a generalized equation for the heat loss removal factor is obtained by regression which takes into account the influences of tank volume, height......This paper presents numerical investigations of thermal stratification in a vertical cylindrical hot water tank established by standby heat loss from the tank. The transient fluid flow and heat transfer in the tank during cooling caused by standby heat loss are calculated by means of validated...

  1. Simulation of Thermal Stratification in BWR Suppression Pools with One Dimensional Modeling Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The suppression pool in a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides the major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as a loss-of-coolant accident and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (available net positive suction head) and therefore the performance of the Emergency Core Cooling System and Reactor Core Isolation Cooling System pumps that draw cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use zero dimensional (0-D) lumped parameter models to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool; therefore, they have large uncertainties in the prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods can be used to analyze realistic 3-D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, resulting in a long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code (Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by one-dimensional (1-D) transient partial differential equations and substructures (such as free or wall jets) are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to multi-dimensional CFD modeling. One heat-up experiment performed at the Finland POOLEX facility, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, is used for

  2. An efficient modeling method for thermal stratification simulation in a BWR suppression pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; Hua Li; Walter Villanueva; Pavel Kudinov

    2012-09-01

    The suppression pool in a BWR plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as LOCA and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; and the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (Available Net Positive Suction Head) and therefore the performance of the pump which draws cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use 0-D lumped parameter methods to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool and therefore have large uncertainty in prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze realistic 3D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, therefore long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by 1-D transient partial differential equations and substructures such as free or wall jets are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to 3-D CFD modeling. The POOLEX experiments at Finland, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, are used for validation. GOTHIC lumped parameter models are used to obtain boundary conditions for BMIX++ code and CFD simulations. Comparison between the BMIX++, GOTHIC, and CFD calculations against the POOLEX experimental data is discussed in detail.

  3. Assessment of the mechanical consequences of thermal stratifications in elbow geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau, T.H.

    1993-09-01

    Analysis of incidents due to thermal stratification phenomena in the fluid circulating in certain PWR primary and secondary piping has evidenced the necessity for an overall methodology to determine the origin and assess the mechanical consequences. Since 1990, R and D have assembled a team comprising specialists in thermal hydraulics, mechanics and materials in the framework of a Multiannual R and D Project on the subject. This report presents the main developments and results obtained. It stresses the advantages of an approach associating experimental (site and mockup tests) and numeric methods (ESTET and ASTER codes) and describes the general tools developed in this context. (authors). 8 figs., 8 refs

  4. Experimental investigation of thermal de-stratification in rock bed TES systems for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okello, Denis; Nydal, Ole J.; Banda, Eldad J.K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • High thermal stratifications exists rock bed TES when charge with high temperature heat. • Faster thermal degradation occurs in highly stratified bed irrespective of the bed length. • Average rate of heat loss as a function of storage time increases with increasing average bed temperature. - Abstract: Solar energy fluctuates so much that it cannot promote continuous use. Integration of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) with solar energy collection devices has the potential of making solar energy available on demand. Thermal energy can be stored in a bed of rocks at temperatures suitable for applications like cooking, boiling space heating, etc. During charging, temperature stratification is observed in the bed. In a stratified system, if the heat is used immediately, then it is possible to extract heat at reasonably high temperature from the top. For cases where the system is to be used after sometime (later at night or the following morning), the high temperature heat at the top is observed to degrade as the system tries to establish thermal equilibrium irrespective of the bed height. The average rate of heat loss from the TES unit to the ambient is found to increase with increasing average bed temperatures

  5. Dissolved oxygen stratification and response to thermal structure and long-term climate change in a large and deep subtropical reservoir (Lake Qiandaohu, China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunlin; Wu, Zhixu; Liu, Mingliang; He, Jianbo; Shi, Kun; Zhou, Yongqiang; Wang, Mingzhu; Liu, Xiaohan

    2015-05-15

    From January 2010 to March 2014, detailed depth profiles of water temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were collected at three sites in Lake Qiandaohu, a large, deep subtropical reservoir in China. Additionally, we assessed the changes in DO stratification over the past 61 years (1953-2013) based on our empirical models and long-term air temperature and transparency data. The DO concentration never fell below 2 mg/L, the critical value for anoxia, and the DO depth profiles were closely linked to the water temperature depth profiles. In the stable stratification period in summer and autumn, the significant increase in CDOM in the metalimnion explained the decrease in DO due to the oxygen consumed by CDOM. Well-developed oxygen stratification was detected at the three sites in spring, summer and autumn and was associated with thermal stratification. Oxycline depth was significantly negatively correlated with daily air temperature and thermocline thickness but significantly positively correlated with thermocline depth during the stratification weakness period (July-February). However, there were no significant correlations among these parameters during the stratification formation period (March-June). The increase of 1.67 °C in yearly average daily air temperature between 1980 and 2013 and the decrease of 0.78 m in Secchi disk depth caused a decrease of 1.65 m and 2.78 m in oxycline depth, respectively, facilitating oxygen stratification and decreasing water quality. Therefore, climate warming has had a substantial effect on water quality through changing the DO regime in Lake Qiandaohu. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Modelling thermal stratification in the North Sea: Application of a 2-D potential energy model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Holtegaard; St. John, Michael

    2001-01-01

    dynamics we have developed and tested a potential energy model of thermal stratification based on the energy equation (for turbulence). The energy equation relates the temporal and spatial changes of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), the production of TKE and the dissipation of TKE to the change of potential...... energy as water masses of different densities are mixed in the field of gravity. A constant ratio between the gain in potential energy and the production of TKE is assumed, known as the flux Richardson number. The model is comprised of 0·5m vertical layers with a temporal time step of 1 day. The model...... is forced with wind, dew point temperature from Ekofisk oilfield in the central North Sea, and tidal current and atmospheric radiation. The model is used to simulate the seasonal cycle of stratification in the central North Sea in the years 1988, 1989 and 1990 and is compared to density profiles...

  7. Characterization of down-valley winds in stable stratification from the KASCADE field campaign and WRF mesoscale simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duine, Gert-Jan

    2015-01-01

    and Durance down-valley (CDV and DDV, respectively) winds are both dominating flows during the period of investigation. Once stable stratification has set around sunset, CDV wind continuously grows and thickens. The profile forms in a jet which is mostly observed at around 30 m agl with 2 - 3 m s -1 . CDV wind is a thermally driven flow, which persists regularly throughout the night and disappears in the early morning alongside stable stratification. Though the Cadarache current observational network lacks means of measurement for inside CDV wind, this work shows that it can be now forecasted from available meteorological tower observations. Although the forecast of CDV wind is out of reach of mesoscale modeling on a kilometer-scale resolution, the now casting methodology developed here could be used to forecast it by means of a combination of dynamical and statistical down-scaling. The DDV wind has been investigated by means of observations and modeling - all IOPs were simulated with an optimized WRF configuration at a 1-km horizontal grid spacing. The DDV wind has been recognized as down-valley oriented, and strongly related to stability at a regional scale, as it exists only after sunset when synoptic forcing is very weak. On the one hand, though highly variable, the DDV wind arrival at Cadarache is mostly observed 6 to 9 hours after sunset. On the other hand, it is dominantly present around sunrise, when convectively driven processes are not yet established. Jets are observed mostly at around 175 - 225 m agl with wind speeds between 4 and 8 m s -1 . DDV wind depth appears to be closely related to valley depth, which varies throughout the DV. Some deficiencies of the simulations are found, including underestimations of diurnal temperature ranges, overestimations of atmospheric turbulent fluxes, too early timing for onset and cessation of DDV wind. Despite these, the DDV wind is simulated close to reality thanks to the 1-km resolution allowing a correct

  8. Thermal fatigue damage evaluation of a PWR NPP steam generator injection nozzle model subjected to thermal stratification phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite da Silva, Luiz; Rodrigues Mansur, Tanius; Cimini Junior, Carlos Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Thermal stratification phenomenon with the same thermodynamic steam generator (SG) injection nozzle parameters was simulated. After 41 experiments, the experimental section was dismantled; cut and specimens were made of its material. Other specimens were made of the preserved pipe material. By comparing their fatigue tests results, the pipe material damage was evaluated. The water temperature layers and also the outside pipe wall temperatures were measured at the same level. Strains outside the pipe in 7 positions were measured. The experimental section develops thermal stratified flows, stresses and strains caused enlargement of material grain size and reduction in fatigue life.

  9. The development of monitoring techniques for thermal stratification in nuclear plant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Cheul Muu; Joo, Young Sang; Yoon, Kwang Sik; Park, Chi Seung; Choi, Ha Lim; Moon, Jae Wha; Bae, Sang Ho.

    1996-12-01

    The conventional nondestructive testing has been performed in those area which are susceptible to thermal stress in according to NRC 88-08,11. In addition to that, it is necessary to set up a monitoring system to prevent severe thermal stress to pipes in early stages and to develop the non-intrusive techniques to diagnose the check valve because the thermal stratification has been caused by the malfunction of the check valve in ECCS pipe. Thermal stratification monitoring system has been designed and installed at ECCS line permanently and surge line temporally in YG nuclear power plant. The data is acceptable in according to TASCS guide line. Also, the data originated from ISMS is useful for the arrangement of a special UT program and stress analysis. Applying a togetherness of acoustics and magnetics signal, it is possible to determine the parameters of the function of the check valve internals without disassembling it. This series of tests show that the accelerometers can be use d to measure and to differentiate the three types of impacts; metal to metal impacts mechanical rubs, and worn internal parts. The magnet sensors can be used to detect the opening/closing of stainless check and fluttering of disk. (author). 50 refs., 5 tabs., 28 figs

  10. On the investigation of cracking in safety injection PWR lines due to thermal stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simos, N.; Reich, M.; Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Hartzmann, M.

    1990-01-01

    Circumferential cracking in injection lines as well as feedwater lines has been observed in a number of PWRs around the world while its exact cause has been continuously sought through a number of independent investigations. The comprehensive conclusion of all studies is that the primary but not the only, cause of pipe failure is the thermal stratification phenomenon that occurs in pipes experiencing temperature differentials across their cross section. This phenomenon becomes more critical when it occurs in a cyclic manner and is associated with a number of transients as well as thermal shocks during each cycle. The resulting fatigue loading mechanism and its impact on the integrity of an auxiliary injection line is the focus of the present analysis. Thermal loadings which can simulate real temperature conditions are imposed on a 3-D finite element model of a portion of an injection line that has already experienced cracking. The induced thermal stress field is utilized to obtain excessive fatigue damage in the vicinity of the observed cracks. Finally, the impact of different levels and types of stratification as well as the geometric configuration of such lines on the pipe integrity is addressed. 12 refs., 12 figs

  11. Surface Stress with Non-stationary Weak Winds and Stable Stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrt, L.; Thomas, Christoph K.

    2016-04-01

    The behaviour of turbulent transport in the weak-wind, stably-stratified, boundary layer over land is examined in terms of the non-stationarity of the wind field using measurements from three field programs. These field programs include towers ranging from 12 to 20 m in height and an extensive horizontal network of sonic anemometers. The relationship of the friction velocity to the stratification and non-stationary submeso motions is investigated from several points of view and nominally quantified. The relationship of the turbulence to the stratification is less systematic than expected partly due to enhancement of the turbulence by submeso motions. Cause and effect relationships are difficult to isolate because the non-stationary momentum flux significantly modifies the profile of the non-stationary mean flow. The link between the turbulence and accelerations at the surface is examined in terms of the changing vertical structure of the wind profile and sudden increases in the downward transport of momentum.

  12. A numerical analysis on thermal stratification phenomenon in the SCS piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwang Chu; Park, Man Heung; Youm, Hag Ki; Lee, Sun Ki; Kim, Tae Ryong

    2003-01-01

    A numerical study is performed to estimate on an unsteady thermal stratification phenomenon in the Shutdown Cooling System(SCS) piping branched off the Reactor Coolant System(RCS) piping of Nuclear Power Plant. In the results, turbulent penetration reaches to the 1 st isolation valve. At 500sec, the maximum temperature difference between top and bottom inner wall in piping is observed at the starting point of horizontal piping passing elbow. The temperature of coolant in the rear side of the 1 st isolation valve disk is very slowly increased and the inflection point in temperature difference curve for time is observed at 2700sec. At the beginning of turbulent penetration from RCS piping, the fast inflow generates the higher temperature for the inner wall than the outer wall in the SCS piping. In the case the hot-leg injection piping and the drain piping are connected to the SCS piping, the effect of thermal stratification in the SCS piping is decreased due to an increase of heat loss compared with no connection case. The hot-leg injection piping affected by turbulent penetration from the SCS piping has a severe temperature difference that exceeds criterion temperature stated in reference. But the drain piping located in the rear compared with the hot-leg injection piping shows a tiny temperature difference. In a viewpoint of designer, for the purpose of decreasing the thermal stratification effect, it is necessary to increase the length of vertical piping in the SCS piping, and to move the position of the hot-leg injection piping backward

  13. Effect of Insulation Thickness on Thermal Stratification in Hot Water Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak KURŞUN

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the important factors to be considered in increasing the efficiency of hot water storage tanks used for thermal energy storage is thermal stratification. Reducing the temperature of the water at the base of the tank provides more utilization of the energy of the heat source during the heating of the water and improves the efficiency of the system. In this study, the effect of the insulation thickness on the outer surface of the tank and the ratio of the tank diameter to the height (D/H on the thermal stratification was investigated numerically. Numerical analyzes were carried out for the condition that the insulation thickness was constant and variable in the range of D/H=0,3-1. Water was used as the heat storage fluid and the analysis results were obtained for eight hours cooling period. Numerical results showed that the temperature difference between the bottom and top surfaces of the tank increased between 7-9 ° C for the range of D / H = 0,3-1 with changing the insulation thickness.

  14. Self sloshing of thermal-stratification interface in LMFBR hot plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobukazu

    2010-01-01

    One of the important problems in thermal hydraulic designs for pool-type LMFBR is to properly estimate thermal conditions of the coolant that is liquid sodium affecting thermal stresses on the vessel or internal structures during both steady and transient operations. The severity of these conditions of pool-type reactor in Japan which will be reinforced and equipped with special devices for anti-seismic demands is apt to be much greater than loop-type due to large volume of coolant. Water tests and thermal hydraulic analyses were performed to investigate such conditions in our institute. Purpose of this report is to overview such investigations which were conducted yet. That is to estimate the effects of the elevations of UIS (Upper Internal Structure) discharge and IHX (Intermediate Heat Exchanger) intakes on flow patterns, free surface disturbance and thermal stratification in hot plenum. From the results of the experiments, suitable elevations could be recommended by comparing some thermal hydraulic characteristics and self sloshing of thermal interface called as internal standing wave was observed in certain limited ranges of Richardson number. (author)

  15. Vertical Distribution of Bacterial Community Diversity and Water Quality during the Reservoir Thermal Stratification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Han Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Reservoir thermal stratification drives the water temperature and dissolved oxygen gradient, however, the characteristic of vertical water microbial community during thermal stratification is so far poorly understood. In this work, water bacterial community diversity was determined using the Illumina Miseq sequencing technique. The results showed that epilimnion, metalimnion and hypolimnion were formed steadily in the JINPEN drinking water reservoir. Water temperature decreased steadily from the surface (23.11 °C to the bottom (9.17 °C. Total nitrogen ranged from 1.07 to 2.06 mg/L and nitrate nitrogen ranged from 0.8 to 1.84 mg/L. The dissolved oxygen concentration decreased sharply below 50 m, and reached zero at 65 m. The Miseq sequencing revealed a total of 4127 operational taxonomic units (OTUs with 97% similarity, which were affiliated with 15 phyla including Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Armatimonadetes, Bacteroidetes, Caldiserica, Chlamydiae, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia. The highest Shannon diversity was 4.41 in 45 m, and the highest Chao 1 diversity was 506 in 5 m. Rhodobacter dominated in 55 m (23.24% and 65 m (12.58%. Prosthecobacter dominated from 0.5 to 50 m. The heat map profile and redundancy analysis (RDA indicated significant difference in vertical water bacterial community composition in the reservoir. Meanwhile, water quality properties including dissolved oxygen, conductivity, nitrate nitrogen and total nitrogen have a dramatic influence on vertical distribution of bacterial communities.

  16. Vertical Distribution of Bacterial Community Diversity and Water Quality during the Reservoir Thermal Stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Han; Chen, Sheng-Nan; Huang, Ting-Lin; Ma, Wei-Xing; Xu, Jin-Lan; Sun, Xin

    2015-06-17

    Reservoir thermal stratification drives the water temperature and dissolved oxygen gradient, however, the characteristic of vertical water microbial community during thermal stratification is so far poorly understood. In this work, water bacterial community diversity was determined using the Illumina Miseq sequencing technique. The results showed that epilimnion, metalimnion and hypolimnion were formed steadily in the JINPEN drinking water reservoir. Water temperature decreased steadily from the surface (23.11 °C) to the bottom (9.17 °C). Total nitrogen ranged from 1.07 to 2.06 mg/L and nitrate nitrogen ranged from 0.8 to 1.84 mg/L. The dissolved oxygen concentration decreased sharply below 50 m, and reached zero at 65 m. The Miseq sequencing revealed a total of 4127 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with 97% similarity, which were affiliated with 15 phyla including Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Armatimonadetes, Bacteroidetes, Caldiserica, Chlamydiae, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia. The highest Shannon diversity was 4.41 in 45 m, and the highest Chao 1 diversity was 506 in 5 m. Rhodobacter dominated in 55 m (23.24%) and 65 m (12.58%). Prosthecobacter dominated from 0.5 to 50 m. The heat map profile and redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated significant difference in vertical water bacterial community composition in the reservoir. Meanwhile, water quality properties including dissolved oxygen, conductivity, nitrate nitrogen and total nitrogen have a dramatic influence on vertical distribution of bacterial communities.

  17. Mathematical and physical modeling of thermal stratification phenomena in steel ladles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putan, V.; Vilceanu, L.; Socalici, A.; Putan, A.

    2018-01-01

    By means of CFD numerical modeling, a systematic analysis of the similarity between steel ladles and hot-water model regarding natural convection phenomena was studied. The key similarity criteria we found to be dependent on the dimensionless numbers Fr and βΔT. These similarity criteria suggested that hot-water models with scale in the range between 1/5 and 1/3 and using hot water with temperature of 45 °C or higher are appropriate for simulating natural convection in steel ladles. With this physical model, thermal stratification phenomena due to natural convection in steel ladles were investigated. By controlling the cooling intensity of water model to correspond to the heat loss rate of steel ladles, which is governed by Fr and βΔT, the temperature profiles measured in the water bath of the model were to deduce the extent of thermal stratification in liquid steel bath in the ladles. Comparisons between mathematically simulated temperature profiles in the prototype steel ladles and those physically simulated by scaling-up the measured temperatures profiles in the water model showed good agreement. This proved that it is feasible to use a 1/5 scale water model with 45 °C hot water to simulate natural convection in steel ladles. Therefore, besides mathematical CFD models, the physical hot-water model provided an additional means of studying fluid flow and heat transfer in steel ladles.

  18. Numerical analysis of unsteady conjugate heat transfer for initial evolution of thermal stratification in a curved pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Kim, Wee Kyung; Kim, Yun Il; Cho, Sang Jin; Choi, Seok Ki

    2000-01-01

    A detailed numerical analysis of initial evolution of thermal stratification in a curved pipe with a finite wall thickness is performed. A primary emphasis of the present study is placed on the investigation of the effect of existence of pipe wall thickness on the evolution of thermal stratification. A simple and convenient numerical method of treating the unsteady conjugate heat transfer in Cartesian as well as non-orthogonal coordinate systems is presented. The proposed unsteady conjugate heat transfer analysis method is implemented in a finite volume thermal-hydraulic computer code based on a cell-centered, non-staggered grid arrangement, the SIMPLEC algorithm and a higher-order bounded convection scheme. Calculations are performed for initial evolution of thermal stratification with high Richardson number in a curved pipe. The predicted results show that the thermally stratified flow and transient conjugate heat transfer in a curved pipe with a specified wall thickness can be satisfactorily analyzed by using the numerical method presented in this paper. As the result, the present analysis method is considered to be effective for the determination of transient temperature distributions in the wall of curved piping system subjected to internally thermal stratification. In addition, the method can be extended to be applicable for the simulation of turbulent flow of thermally stratified fluid

  19. Development of a Performance Calculation Program for Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems with Improved Prediction of Thermal Stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon; Li, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    The transient fluid flow and heat transfer in a hot water tank during cooling caused by standby heat loss were investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations and by thermal measurements in previous investigation. It is elucidated how thermal stratification in the tank is influenced...... by the natural convection and how the heat loss from the tank sides will be distributed at different levels of the tank at different thermal conditions....

  20. An analysis of system pressure and temperature distribution in self-pressurizer of SMART considering thermal stratification at intermediate cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yeon Moon; Lee, Doo Jeong; Yoon, Ju Hyun; Kim, Hwan Yeol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    Because the pressurizer is in reactor vessel, the heat transfer from primary water would increase the temperatures of fluids in pressurizer to same temperature of hotleg, if no cooling equipment were supplied. Thus, heat exchanger and thermal insulator are needed to minimize heat transferred from primary water and to remove heat in pressurizer. The temperatures in cavities of pressurizer for normal operation are 70 deg C and 74 deg C for intermediate and end cavity, respectively, which considers the solubility of nitrogen gas in water. Natural convection is the mechanism of heat balance in pressurizer of SMART. In SMART, the heat exchanger in pressurizer is placed in lower part of intermediate cavity, so the heat in upper part of intermediate cavity can't be removed adequately and it can cause thermal stratification. If thermal stratification occurred, it increases heat transfers to nitrogen gas and system pressure increases as the result. Thus, proper evaluation of those effects on system pressure and ways to mitigate thermal stratification should be established. This report estimates the system pressure and temperatures in cavities of pressurizer with considering thermal stratification in intermediate cavity. The system pressure and temperatures for each cavities considered size of wet thermal insulator, temperature of upper plate of reactor vessel, parameters of heat exchanger in intermediate cavity such as flow rate and temperature of cooling water, heat transfer area, effective tube height, and location of cooling tube. In addition to the consideration of thermal stratification thermal mixing of all water in intermediate cavity also considered and compared in this report. (author). 6 refs., 60 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Study of thermal and hydraulic efficiency of supersonic tube of temperature stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsynaeva, Anna A.; Nikitin, Maxim N.; Tsynaeva, Ekaterina A.

    2017-10-01

    Efficiency of supersonic pipe for temperature stratification with finned subsonic surface of heat transfer is the major of this paper. Thermal and hydraulic analyses of this pipe were conducted to asses effects from installation of longitudinal rectangular and parabolic fins as well as studs of cylindrical, rectangular and parabolic profiles. The analysis was performed based on refined empirical equations of similarity, dedicated to heat transfer of high-speed gas flow with plain wall, and Kármán equation with Nikuradze constants. Results revealed cylindrical studs (with height-to-diameter ratio of 5:1) to be 1.5 times more efficient than rectangular fins of the same height. At the same time rectangular fins (with height-to-thickness ratio of 5:1) were tend to enhance heat transfer rate up to 2.67 times compared to bare walls from subsonic side of the pipe. Longitudinal parabolic fins have minuscule effect on combined efficiency of considered pipe since extra head losses void any gain of heat transfer. Obtained results provide perspective of increasing efficiency of supersonic tube for temperature stratification. This significantly broadens device applicability in thermostatting systems for equipment, cooling systems for energy converting machinery, turbine blades and aerotechnics.

  2. Double stratification effects in chemically reactive squeezed Sutterby fluid flow with thermal radiation and mixed convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ahmad

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A current analysis is carried out to study theoretically the mixed convection characteristics in squeezing flow of Sutterby fluid in squeezed channel. The constitutive equation of Sutterby model is utilized to characterize the rheology of squeezing phenomenon. Flow characteristics are explored with dual stratification. In flowing fluid which contains heat and mass transport, the first order chemical reaction and radiative heat flux affect the transport phenomenon. The systems of non-linear governing equations have been modulating which then solved by mean of convergent approach (Homotopy Analysis Method. The graphs are reported and illustrated for emerging parameters. Through graphical explanations, drag force, rate of heat and mass transport are conversed for different pertinent parameters. It is found that heat and mass transport rate decays with dominant double stratified parameters and chemical reaction parameter. The present two-dimensional examination is applicable in some of the engineering processes and industrial fluid mechanics. Keywords: Squeezing flow, Sutterby fluid model, Mixed convection, Double stratification, Thermal radiation, Chemical reaction

  3. Lidar Observation of Aerosol and Temperature Stratification over Urban Area During the Formation of a Stable Atmospheric PBL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolev, I.; Parvanov, O.; Kaprielov, B.; Mitev, V.; Simeonov, V.; Grigorov, I.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, the processes in the atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL) over urban areas were intensely investigated, due to ecological problems related to the air, soil, and water pollution. New pollution sources in new residential districts, when in contradiction to the microclimate and topography requirements of that region, create a number of considerable hazards and problems. The present study is a continuation of our preceding investigations and aims at revealing the aerosol structure and stratification during the transition after sunset as measured by two lidars. Such observation of the nocturnal, stable PBL formation over an urban area in Bulgaria has not been reported before. The lidars' high time and spatial resolutions allow the changes of the internal structure of the PBL's part located above the surface layer to be observed.

  4. Thermally-Stable High Strain Deployable Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is for the development of a thermally-stable composite made of carbon fibers and elastomeric resin. This combination of materials will allow...

  5. Thermal stratification in steam generator feedwater line. Life assessment from real transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morilhat, P.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal stratification in the vicinity of steam generator feedwater nozzle at low flow rates has led to the surveillance of two specially instrumented PWR units during a complete fuel cycle. This paper is an overview of the tests performed. The analysis of the operating conditions of these units shows their representativness with the characteristics of the other plants and identifies the main phases responsible for stratified states. A simplified model for computing axial stresses is carried out. Computed stresses are compared with the values given by extensometric gauges. The fatigue usage factor is calculated from transients actually occurred on these units and the share of damage due to each type of event is assessed

  6. Effects of Seasonal Thermal Stratification on the Functional Diversity and Composition of the Microbial Community in a Drinking Water Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Yang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The microbial communities within reservoir ecosystems are shaped by water quality and hydrological characteristics. However, there are few studies focused on the effects of thermal stratification on the bacterial community diversity in drinking water reservoirs. In this study, we collected water samples from the Jinpen Reservoir around the re-stratification period. To explore the functional diversity and bacterial community composition, we used the Biolog method and 16S rRNA-based 454 pyrosequencing combined with flow cytometry. The results indicated that stratification of the reservoir had great effects on temperature and oxygen profiles, and both the functional diversity and the composition of the bacterial community strongly reflected the significant vertical stratification in the reservoir. The results of the Biolog method showed a significantly higher utilization of carbon sources in the hypolimnion than in the epilimnion. The result of pyrosequencing also showed a significantly higher species diversity and richness in the hypolimnion than in the epilimnion with different dominant phylum. Redundancy analysis also indicated that the majority of environmental variables, especially pH and dissolved oxygen, played key roles in shaping bacterial community composition. Our study provides a better understanding of the functional diversity of bacterial communities, and the response of microorganisms to seasonal thermal stratification.

  7. Thermally stable dexsil-400 glass capillary columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maskarinec, M.P.; Olerich, G.

    1980-01-01

    The factors affecting efficiency, thermal stability, and reproducibility of Dexsil-400 glass capillary columns for gas chromatography in general, and for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in particular were investigated. Columns were drawn from Kimble KG-6 (soda-lime) glass or Kimox (borosilicate) glass. All silylation was carried out at 200 0 C. Columns were coated according to the static method. Freshly prepared, degassed solutions of Dexsil-400 in pentane or methylene chloride were used. Thermal stability of the Dexsil 400 columns with respect to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) were tested. Column-to-column variability is a function of each step in the fabrication of the columns. The degree of etching, extent of silylation, and stationary phase film thickness must be carefully controlled. The variability in two Dexsil-400 capillary column prepared by etching, silylation with solution of hexa methyl disilazone (HMDS), and static coating is shown and also indicates the excellent selectivity of Dexsil-400 for the separation of alkylated aromatic compounds. The wide temperature range of Dexsil-400 and the high efficiency of the capillary columns also allow the analysis of complex mixtures with minimal prefractionation. Direct injection of a coal liquefaction product is given. Analysis by GC/MS indicated the presence of parent PAHs, alkylated PAHs, nitrogen and sulfur heterocycles, and their alkylated derivatives. 4 figures

  8. Comparison of weak-wind characteristics across different Surface Types in stable stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundorfer, Anita; Rehberg, Ingo; Thomas, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric transport in weak winds and very stable conditions is often characterized by phenomena collectively referred to as submeso motions since their time and spatial scales exceed those of turbulence, but are smaller than synoptic motions. Evidence is mounting that submeso motions invalidate models for turbulent dispersion and diffusion since their physics are not captured by current similarity theories. Typical phenomena in the weak-wind stable boundary layer include meandering motions, quasi two-dimensional pancake-vortices or wavelike motions. These motions may be subject to non-local forcing and sensitive to small topographic undulations. The invalidity of Taylor's hypothesis of frozen turbulence for submeso motions requires the use of sensor networks to provide observations in both time and space domains simultaneously. We present the results from the series of Advanced Resolution Canopy Flow Observations (ARCFLO) experiments using a sensor network consisting of 12 sonic anemometers and 12 thermohygrometers. The objective of ARCFLO was to observe the flow and the turbulent and submeso transport at a high spatial and temporal resolution at 4 different sites in the Pacific Northwest, USA. These sites represented a variable degree of terrain complexity (flat to mountainous) and vegetation architecture (grass to forest, open to dense). In our study, a distinct weak-wind regime was identified for each site using the threshold velocity at which the friction velocity becomes dependent upon the mean horizontal wind speed. Here we used the scalar mean of the wind speed because the friction velocity showed a clearer dependence on the scalar mean compared to the vector mean of the wind velocity. It was found that the critical speed for the weak wind regime is higher in denser vegetation. For an open agricultural area (Botany and Plant Pathology Farm) we found a critical wind speed of v_crit= (0.24±0.05) ms-1 while for a very dense forest (Mary's River Douglas Fir

  9. A study of thermal stratification in the cold legs during the subcooled blowdown phase of a loss of coolant accident in the OSU APEX thermal hydraulic testing facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachs, D. M.

    1998-11-04

    Thermal stratification, which has been linked to the occurrence of pressurized thermal shock (PTS), is observed to occur during the early stages of simulated loss of coolant accidents (LOCAS) in the Oregon State University Advanced Plant Experiment (OSU APEX) Thermal Hydraulic Test Facility. The OSU APEX Test Facility is a scaled model of the Westinghouse AP600 nuclear power plant. Analysis of the OSU APEX facility data has allowed the determination of an onset criteria for thermal stratification and has provided support for the postulated mechanisms leading to thermal stratification. CFX 4.1, a computational fluid dynamics code, was used to generate a model of the cold legs and the downcomer that described the phenomena occurring within them. Some mixing phenomena were predicted that lead to non-uniformity between the two cold legs attached to the steam generator on the side of the facility containing the Passive Residual Heat Removal (PRHR) injection system. The stratification was found to be two phase and unlikely to be a factor in PTS.

  10. A study of thermal stratification in the cold legs during the subcooled blowdown phase of a loss of coolant accident in the OSU APEX thermal hydraulic testing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachs, D. M.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal stratification, which has been linked to the occurrence of pressurized thermal shock (PTS), is observed to occur during the early stages of simulated loss of coolant accidents (LOCAS) in the Oregon State University Advanced Plant Experiment (OSU APEX) Thermal Hydraulic Test Facility. The OSU APEX Test Facility is a scaled model of the Westinghouse AP600 nuclear power plant. Analysis of the OSU APEX facility data has allowed the determination of an onset criteria for thermal stratification and has provided support for the postulated mechanisms leading to thermal stratification. CFX 4.1, a computational fluid dynamics code, was used to generate a model of the cold legs and the downcomer that described the phenomena occurring within them. Some mixing phenomena were predicted that lead to non-uniformity between the two cold legs attached to the steam generator on the side of the facility containing the Passive Residual Heat Removal (PRHR) injection system. The stratification was found to be two phase and unlikely to be a factor in PTS

  11. Thermally stable surfactants and compositions and methods of use thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiko, David J [Woodridge, IL

    2008-09-02

    There are provided novel thermally stable surfactants for use with fillers in the preparation of polymer composites and nanocomposites. Typically, surfactants of the invention are urethanes, ureas or esters of thiocarbamic acid having a hydrocarbyl group of from 10 to 50 carbons and optionally including an ionizable or charged group (e.g., carboxyl group or quaternary amine). Thus, there are provided surfactants having Formula I: ##STR00001## wherein the variables are as defined herein. Further provided are methods of making thermally stable surfactants and compositions, including composites and nanocomposites, using fillers coated with the surfactants.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of thermally stable oligomer-metal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synthesis and characterization of thermally stable oligomer-metal complexes of copper(II), nickel(II), zinc(II) and cobalt(II) derived from oligo- p - nitrophenylazomethinephenol. ... Based on half degradation temperature parameters Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes were more resistant than the others. KEY WORDS: Oligomer metal ...

  13. Development of a Reduced-Order Three-Dimensional Flow Model for Thermal Mixing and Stratification Simulation during Reactor Transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Rui

    2017-09-03

    Mixing, thermal-stratification, and mass transport phenomena in large pools or enclosures play major roles for the safety of reactor systems. Depending on the fidelity requirement and computational resources, various modeling methods, from the 0-D perfect mixing model to 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models, are available. Each is associated with its own advantages and shortcomings. It is very desirable to develop an advanced and efficient thermal mixing and stratification modeling capability embedded in a modern system analysis code to improve the accuracy of reactor safety analyses and to reduce modeling uncertainties. An advanced system analysis tool, SAM, is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory for advanced non-LWR reactor safety analysis. While SAM is being developed as a system-level modeling and simulation tool, a reduced-order three-dimensional module is under development to model the multi-dimensional flow and thermal mixing and stratification in large enclosures of reactor systems. This paper provides an overview of the three-dimensional finite element flow model in SAM, including the governing equations, stabilization scheme, and solution methods. Additionally, several verification and validation tests are presented, including lid-driven cavity flow, natural convection inside a cavity, laminar flow in a channel of parallel plates. Based on the comparisons with the analytical solutions and experimental results, it is demonstrated that the developed 3-D fluid model can perform very well for a wide range of flow problems.

  14. Progress Report on SAM Reduced-Order Model Development for Thermal Stratification and Mixing during Reactor Transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report documents the initial progress on the reduced-order flow model developments in SAM for thermal stratification and mixing modeling. Two different modeling approaches are pursued. The first one is based on one-dimensional fluid equations with additional terms accounting for the thermal mixing from both flow circulations and turbulent mixing. The second approach is based on three-dimensional coarse-grid CFD approach, in which the full three-dimensional fluid conservation equations are modeled with closure models to account for the effects of turbulence.

  15. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C. [and others

    1996-04-01

    The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable jet fuels has five components:(1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub- micrometer and micrometer sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and (5) assessment of the potential of producing high yields of cycloalkanes and hydroaromatics by direct liquefaction of coal. Progress reports for these tasks are presented.

  16. Short-term thermal stratification and partial overturning events in a warm polymictic reservoir: effects on distribution of phytoplankton community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RM. Santos

    Full Text Available In lentic freshwater ecosystems, patterns of thermal stratification play a considerable part in determining the population dynamics of phytoplankton. In this study we investigated how these thermal patterns and the associated hydrodynamic processes affect the vertical distribution of phytoplankton during two consecutive diel cycles in a warm polymictic urban reservoir in the metropolitan region of São Paulo, Brazil. Water samples were taken and physical, chemical and biological data collected at half-meter intervals of depth along a water column at a fixed site, every 3 hours throughout the 48-hour period. Two events of stratification, followed by deepening of the thermocline occurred during the study period and led to changes in the vertical distribution of phytoplankton populations. Aphanocapsa delicatissima Nägeli was the single dominant species throughout the 48-hour period. In the second diel cycle, the density gradient induced by temperature differences avoided the sedimentation of Mougeotia sp. C. Agardh to the deepest layers. On the other hand, Pseudanabaena galeata Böcher remained in the 4.0-5.5 m deep layer. The thermal structure of the water was directly affected by two meteorological factors: air temperature and wind speed. Changes in the cell density and vertical distribution of the phytoplankton were controlled by the thermal and hydrodynamic events.

  17. An overview of modeling methods for thermal mixing and stratification in large enclosures for reactor safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Per F. Peterson

    2010-10-01

    Thermal mixing and stratification phenomena play major roles in the safety of reactor systems with large enclosures, such as containment safety in current fleet of LWRs, long-term passive containment cooling in Gen III+ plants including AP-1000 and ESBWR, the cold and hot pool mixing in pool type sodium cooled fast reactor systems (SFR), and reactor cavity cooling system behavior in high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR), etc. Depending on the fidelity requirement and computational resources, 0-D steady state models (heat transfer correlations), 0-D lumped parameter based transient models, 1-D physical-based coarse grain models, and 3-D CFD models are available. Current major system analysis codes either have no models or only 0-D models for thermal stratification and mixing, which can only give highly approximate results for simple cases. While 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze simple configurations, these methods require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries. Due to prohibitive computational expenses for long transients in very large volumes, 3-D CFD simulations remain impractical for system analyses. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, UC Berkeley developed 1-D models basing on Zuber’s hierarchical two-tiered scaling analysis (HTTSA) method where the ambient fluid volume is represented by 1-D transient partial differential equations and substructures such as free or wall jets are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to 3-D CFD modeling. This paper will present an overview on important thermal mixing and stratification phenomena in large enclosures for different reactors, major modeling methods and their advantages and limits, potential paths to improve simulation capability and reduce analysis uncertainty in this area for advanced reactor system analysis tools.

  18. Thermal stratification in vertical mantle heat-exchangers with application to solar domestic hot-water systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Søren; Furbo, Simon

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and numerical investigations of vertical mantle heat exchangers for solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems have been carried out. Two different inlet positions are investigated. Experiments based on typical operation conditions are carried out to investigate how the thermal...... stratification is affected by different positions of the mantle inlet. The heat transfer between the solar collector fluid in the mantle and the domestic water in the tank is analysed by CFD-simulations. Furthermore, side-by-side laboratory tests have been carried out with SDHW systems with different mantle...

  19. Properties of stable nonstoichiometric nanoceria produced by thermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yuan-Pei; Sohn, Hong Yong; Mohassab, Yousef; Liu, Qingcai; Xu, Baoqiang

    2017-08-01

    Thermally stable blue nonstoichiometric nanoceria was produced by feeding nanoceria with an average size of 50 nm into a DC thermal plasma reactor. The effects of different plasma power levels and atmospheres were investigated. XRD results showed the ceria lattice parameter increased with plasma power. SEM and TEM results showed that the shape of nanoparticles changed after plasma treatment; the blue nonstoichiometric nanoceria had highly regular shapes such as triangular pyramids and polyhedral in contrast to the irregular shape of the raw nanoceria. Significant downshift was found in the Raman spectra of the plasma products, with a 7.9-cm-1 shift compared with raw nanoceria, which was explained by the reduction of Ce4+. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results showed that the Ce3+ fraction increased from 14% in the raw nanoceria to 38-39% for the product CeO2- x , indicating the high reduction state on the ceria surface. It was determined that this blue nonstoichiometric nanoceria was stable up to 400 °C in air, but the color changed to pale yellow after 4 h at 500 °C in air indicating oxidation to CeO2. Additionally, this novel stable nano-CeO2- x caused a red shift in the UV-visible absorption results; a 48-nm red shift occurred for the nonstoichiometric nanoceria produced at 15 kW compared with the raw nanoceria. The band gap was calculated to be 2.5 eV while it was 3.2 eV for the raw nanoceria, indicating that this novel stable blue nonstoichiometric nanoceria should be a promising material for optical application.

  20. Dopant designing for thermally stable graded index plastic optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaki, Y.; Kondo, A.; Koike, Y.

    2009-02-01

    The graded index polymer optical fiber (GI POF) has been proposed as a media for very short reach network because of its high flexibility, low laying cost and excellent transmission characteristics. However, the plasticization efficiency which causes by the high refractive dopant decreases the glass transition temperature (Tg) in the center of the core and deteriorates thermal stability of fibers. In this paper, thermally stable PMMA based GI POF was successfully fabricated for the first time by designing dopant molecule which has little plasticizer effect. Tg at the core region was improved to 104 °C while that of conventional GI POF is 86 °C. Stability of attenuation at 85 °C/dry and 75 °C/85 %RH were clarified to be as high as that of non-doped step index POF.

  1. Fluid mechanical dispersion of airborne pollutants inside urban street canyons subjecting to multi-component ventilation and unstable thermal stratifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Shuo-Jun; Liu, Cheng-Wei; Liu, Di; Zhao, Fu-Yun; Wang, Han-Qing; Li, Xiao-Hong

    2016-09-15

    The pedestrian level pollutant transport in street canyons with multiple aspect ratios (H/W) is numerically investigated in the present work, regarding of various unstable thermal stratification scenarios and plain surrounding. Non-isothermal turbulent wind flow, temperature field and pollutant spread within and above the street canyons are solved by the realizable k-ε turbulence model along with the enhanced wall treatment. One-vortex flow regime is observed for shallow canyons with H/W=0.5, whereas multi-vortex flow regime is observed for deep canyons with H/W=2.0. Both one-vortex and multi-vortex regimes could be observed for the street canyons with H/W=1.0, where the secondary vortex could be initiated by the flow separation and intensified by unstable thermal stratification. Air exchange rate (AER) and pollutant retention time are adopted to respectively evaluate the street canyon ventilation and pollutant removal performance. A second-order polynomial functional relationship is established between AER and Richardson number (Ri). Similar functional relationship could be established between retention time and Ri, and it is only valid for canyons with one-vortex flow regime. In addition, retention time could be prolonged abruptly for canyons with multi-vortex flow regime. Very weak secondary vortex is presented at the ground level of deep canyons with mild stratification, where pollutants are highly accumulated. However, with the decrease of Ri, pollutant concentration adjacent to the ground reduces accordingly. Present research could be applied to guide the urban design and city planning for enhancing pedestrian environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Potential instability of thermal stratification in the territory of the CR

    OpenAIRE

    Turková, Edita

    2012-01-01

    This work deals with the conditions of creating and releasing potential instability of temperature stratification, its occurrence in the CR and its influence on the weather. The first part of the work contains a theoretical basis necessary for the understanding of potential instability. Firstly, we describe the adiabatic processes which lead to the genesis of static instability and stability. Then we formulate a criterion of the occurrence and strength of potential instability given by the ne...

  3. Thermal Neutron Capture onto the Stable Tungsten Isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichols A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermal neutron-capture measurements of the stable tungsten isotopes have been carried out using the guided thermal-neutron beam at the Budapest Reactor. Prompt singles spectra were collected and analyzed using the HYPERMET γ-ray analysis software package for the compound tungsten systems 183W, 184W, and 187W, prepared from isotopically-enriched samples of 182W, 183W, and 186W, respectively. These new data provide both confirmation and new insights into the decay schemes and structure of the tungsten isotopes reported in the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File based upon previous elemental analysis. The experimental data have also been compared to Monte Carlo simulations of γ-ray emission following the thermal neutron-capture process using the statistical-decay code DICEBOX. Together, the experimental cross sections and modeledfeeding contribution from the quasi continuum, have been used to determine the total radiative thermal neutron-capture cross sections for the tungsten isotopes and provide improved decay-scheme information for the structural- and neutron-data libraries.

  4. Limnological Comparisons of Threats to Aquatic Life Owing to Thermal Stratification in two Morphometrically Different Urban Shallow Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Roy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A minimum value in the Dissolved Oxygen distribution of two shallow lakes namely, Rabindra Sarobar in south Kolkata and Subhas Sarobar in East Kolkata in the Gangetic Delta plain, has been observed to develop in the Hypolimnion during the stratified period. This minimum is usually explained by the accumulation of organic matter from the overlying layer of water. The introduction of organic matter from allochthonous and autochthonous sources is also a likely contributor to the accelerated oxygen depletion within Hypolimnion. The thermal stratification, in general, which occurs in these tropical lakes, is of direct relevance in maintaining the water quality standards, particularly for higher aquatic life. The present article attempts to investigate the possible depletion of hypolimnetic oxygen depletion as a result of the impact of thermal stratification. These investigations will be the basic guidelines for the fishermen and their livelihoods potentially depend upon the different varieties of fishing on daily basis. The massive summer fish kills in these lakes is a major devastating happenings that is reported by the fishermen and also it is well evident from our experimental observations. The comparison of the biodiversity of these two lakes is attempted in the present investigation.

  5. Turbulent heat flux measurements in thermally stable boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Owen J.; van Buren, Tyler; Smits, Alexander J.

    2014-11-01

    Thermally stable turbulent boundary layers are prevalent in the polar regions and nocturnal atmospheric surface layer but heat and momentum flux measurements in such flow are often difficult. Here, a new method is employed using a nanoscale cold-wire (T-NSTAP) adjacent to a 2D PIV light sheet to measure these fluxes within rough-wall turbulent boundary layer. This method combines the advantages of fast thermal frequency response with measurement of the spatial variation of the velocity field. Resolution is limited solely by the separation of the probe and the light sheet. The new technique is used to examine the applicability of Monin-Obukhov similarity over a range of Richardson numbers from weak to strongly stable. In addition, the velocity fields are conditionally averaged subject to strong deviations of temperature above and below the local average in an effort to determine the relationship between the coherent turbulent motions and the fluctuating temperature field. This work was supported by the Princeton University Cooperative Institute for Climate Science.

  6. Assessment of thermal fatigue damage caused by local fluid temperature fluctuation (part I: characteristics of constraint and stress caused by thermal striation and stratification)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The source of the membrane constraint due to local temperature fluctuation was shown. • Thermal fatigue that occurred at a mixing tee and branched elbow was analyzed. • Cracking occurrence was reasonably explained by the constraint and stress conditions. - Abstract: This study was aimed at identifying the constraint conditions under local temperature fluctuation by thermal striping at a mixing tee and by thermal stratification at an elbow pipe branched from the main pipe. Numerical and analytical approaches were made to derive the thermal stress and its fluctuation. It was shown that an inhomogeneous temperature distribution in a straight pipe caused thermal stress due to a membrane constraint even if an external membrane constraint did not act on the pipe. Although the membrane constraint increased the mean stress at the mixing tee, it did not contribute to fluctuation of the thermal stress. On the other hand, the membrane constraint played an important role in the fatigue damage accumulation near the stratification layer of the branched elbow. Based on the constraint and stress conditions analyzed, the characteristics of the cracking observed in actual nuclear power plants were reasonably explained. Namely, at the mixing tee, where thermal crazing has been found, the lack of contribution of the membrane constraint to stress fluctuation caused a stress gradient in the thickness direction and arrested crack growth. On the other hand, at the branched elbow, where axial through-wall cracks have been found, the relatively large hoop stress fluctuation was brought about by movement of the stratified layer together with the membrane constraint even under a relatively low frequency of stress fluctuation

  7. Effect of thermal stratification on free convection in a square porous cavity filled with a nanofluid using Tiwari and Das' nanofluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheremet, M. A.; Dinarvand, S.; Pop, I.

    2015-05-01

    Natural convection in a square porous cavity filled with a nanofluid in conditions of thermal stratification has been numerically studied. The mathematical model has been formulated in terms of the dimensionless stream function and temperature using the Darcy-Boussinesq approximation and Tiwari and Das' nanofluid model with new more realistic empirical correlations for the physical properties of the nanofluids. Formulated partial differential equations along with the corresponding boundary conditions have been solved by the finite difference method. Particular efforts have been focused on the effects of the Rayleigh number, thermal stratification parameter, porosity of the porous medium, solid volume fraction parameter of nanoparticles, and the solid matrix of the porous medium (glass balls and aluminum foam) on the local and average Nusselt numbers, streamlines and isotherms. It has been observed an essential effect of thermal stratification parameter on heat and fluid flow fields.

  8. Salinity-induced stratification and the onset of hypoxia during the Holocene Thermal Maximum and the Medieval Climate Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadomanolaki, Nina; Dijkstra, Nikki; van Helmond, Niels; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Hagens, Mathilde; Kotthoff, Ulrich; Slomp, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    During the past ~8000 years the Baltic Sea has experienced three distinct intervals of hypoxia, of which the last one is still ongoing. These intervals are characterized by enhanced sedimentary organic matter burial and enrichment of redox-sensitive metals, such as molybdenum and iron. The first two of these intervals occurred during the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM) and the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA), two phases with high temperatures and changed precipitation patterns. Studies focussing on the Holocene sedimentary record of the Baltic Sea aim at clarifying the causes of the initiation, evolution and termination of these hypoxic intervals, as well as their consequences. This information could help to potentially aid in finding solutions for the mitigation of present-day hypoxia in the Baltic Sea. The factors contributing to hypoxia development during the HTM and MCA are still debated. Here we present data from a core retrieved during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 347 in the Landsort Deep basin, the deepest basin of the Baltic Sea at 463m water depth. Sediments were analysed at a high resolution using inorganic geochemical and (mainly marine) palynological proxies. Dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) assemblages and total elemental compositions provide clues on the role of salinity in enhancing stratification, ultimately causing hypoxia. During the onset of the HTM changes in salinity, as indicated by the palynology, closely follow changes in sedimentary organic carbon burial and trace metal concentrations. This suggests that stratification was an important cause of hypoxia during the HTM. In contrast, the palynology suggests that reduced stratification did not contribute to re-oxygenation during the termination of the HTM. We did not observe major changes in the palynology throughout the hypoxic interval of the MCA. Our results thus suggest that changes in salinity did not cause the onset and termination of hypoxia during the MCA.

  9. Minimized thermal conductivity in highly stable thermal barrier W/ZrO{sub 2} multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doering, Florian; Major, Anna; Eberl, Christian; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich [University of Goettingen, Institut fuer Materialphysik, Goettingen (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Nanoscale thin-film multilayer materials are of great research interest since their large number of interfaces can strongly hinder phonon propagation and lead to a minimized thermal conductivity. When such materials provide a sufficiently small thermal conductivity and feature in addition also a high thermal stability, they would be possible candidates for high-temperature applications such as thermal barrier coatings. For this article, we have used pulsed laser deposition in order to fabricate thin multilayers out of the thermal barrier material ZrO{sub 2} in combination with W, which has both a high melting point and high density. Layer thicknesses were designed such that bulk thermal conductivity is governed by the low value of ZrO{sub 2}, while ultrathin W blocking layers provide a high number of interfaces. By this phonon scattering, reflection and shortening of mean free path lead to a significant reduction in overall thermal conductivity even below the already low value of ZrO{sub 2}. In addition to this, X-ray reflectivity measurements were taken showing strong Bragg peaks even after annealing such multilayers at 1300 K. Those results identify W/ZrO{sub 2} multilayers as desired thermally stable, low-conductivity materials. (orig.)

  10. Palmitic acid/polypyrrole composites as form-stable phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silakhori, Mahyar; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis; Mahlia, Teuku Meurah Indra; Fauzi, Hadi; Baradaran, Saeid; Naghavi, Mohammad Sajad

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel phase change composite of palmitic acid–polypyrrole(PA–PPy) was fabricated. • Thermal properties of PA–PPy are characterized in different mass ratios of PA–PPy. • Thermal cycling test showed that form stable PCM had a favorable thermal reliability. - Abstract: In this study a novel palmitic acid (PA)/polypyrrole (PPy) form-stable PCMs were readily prepared by in situ polymerization method. PA was used as thermal energy storage material and PPy was operated as supporting material. Form-stable PCMs were investigated by SEM (scanning electron microscopy) and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectrometer) analysis that illustrated PA Particles were wrapped by PPy particles. XRD (X-ray diffractometer) was used for crystalline phase of PA/PPy composites. Thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used for investigating Thermal stability and thermal energy storage properties of prepared form-stable PCMs. According to the obtained results the form stable PCMs exhibited favorable thermal stability in terms of their phase change temperature. The form-stable PCMs (79.9 wt% loading of PA) were considered as the highest loading PCM with desirable latent heat storage of 166.3 J/g and good thermal stability. Accelerated thermal cycling tests also showed that form stable PCM had an acceptable thermal reliability. As a consequence of acceptable thermal properties, thermal stability and chemical stability, we can consider the new kind of form stable PCMs for low temperature solar thermal energy storage applications

  11. Double stratification effects in chemically reactive squeezed Sutterby fluid flow with thermal radiation and mixed convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Farooq, M.; Javed, M.; Anjum, Aisha

    2018-03-01

    A current analysis is carried out to study theoretically the mixed convection characteristics in squeezing flow of Sutterby fluid in squeezed channel. The constitutive equation of Sutterby model is utilized to characterize the rheology of squeezing phenomenon. Flow characteristics are explored with dual stratification. In flowing fluid which contains heat and mass transport, the first order chemical reaction and radiative heat flux affect the transport phenomenon. The systems of non-linear governing equations have been modulating which then solved by mean of convergent approach (Homotopy Analysis Method). The graphs are reported and illustrated for emerging parameters. Through graphical explanations, drag force, rate of heat and mass transport are conversed for different pertinent parameters. It is found that heat and mass transport rate decays with dominant double stratified parameters and chemical reaction parameter. The present two-dimensional examination is applicable in some of the engineering processes and industrial fluid mechanics.

  12. Lightweight Thermally Stable Multi-Meter Aperture Submillimeter Reflectors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future astrophysics missions will require lightweight, thermally stable, submillimeter reflectors in sizes of 4m and greater. To date, graphite fiber reinforced...

  13. Thermally stable antireflective coatings based on nanoporous organosilicate thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhan; Cho, Jinhan; Char, Kookheon

    2007-06-05

    Thermally stable nanoporous organosilicate thin films were realized by the microphase separation of pore-generating polymers mixed with an organosilicate matrix to be antireflective coatings (ARCs), for which a thin film with a refractive index (n) of 1.23 for zero reflection is required. The refractive index of such nanoporous organosilicate films can be tuned from 1.39 down to 1.23 by incorporating nanopores within the films. With a nanoporous single layer with n approximately 1.23, the light transmittance of the glass above 99.8% was achieved in the visible range (lambda approximately 550 nm). To overcome the limitation on the narrow wavelength for high transmittance imposed by a single antireflective nanoporous thin film, bilayer thin films with different refractive indices were prepared by placing a high refractive index layer with a refractive index of 1.45 below the nanoporous thin film. UV-vis transmittance of a glass coated with the bilayer films was compared with nanoporous single-layer films and it is demonstrated that the novel broadband antireflection coatings in a wide range of visible wavelength can be easily obtained by the organosilicate bilayer thin films described in this study. Also, ARCs developed in this study demonstrate excellent AR durability owing to the hydrophobic nature of the organosilicate matrix.

  14. LINCOM wind flow model: Application to complex terrain with thermal stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunkerley, F.; Moreno, J.; Mikkelsen, T.

    2001-01-01

    LINCOM is a fast linearised and spectral wind flow model for use over hilly terrain. It is designed to rapidly generate mean wind field predictions which provide input to atmospheric dispersion models and wind engineering applications. The thermal module, LINCOM-T, has recently been improved to p...

  15. synthesis and characterization of thermally stable poly(amide-imide)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    -imide)- montmorillonite nanocomposite, Thermal properties. INTRODUCTION. Polymer-clay nanocomposites typically exhibited mechanical, thermal and gas barrier properties, which are superior to those of the corresponding pure polymers ...

  16. Validation of Effective Models for Simulation of Thermal Stratification and Mixing Induced by Steam Injection into a Large Pool of Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Effective Heat Source (EHS and Effective Momentum Source (EMS models have been proposed to predict the development of thermal stratification and mixing during a steam injection into a large pool of water. These effective models are implemented in GOTHIC software and validated against the POOLEX STB-20 and STB-21 tests and the PPOOLEX MIX-01 test. First, the EHS model is validated against STB-20 test which shows the development of thermal stratification. Different numerical schemes and grid resolutions have been tested. A 48×114 grid with second order scheme is sufficient to capture the vertical temperature distribution in the pool. Next, the EHS and EMS models are validated against STB-21 test. Effective momentum is estimated based on the water level oscillations in the blowdown pipe. An effective momentum selected within the experimental measurement uncertainty can reproduce the mixing details. Finally, the EHS-EMS models are validated against MIX-01 test which has improved space and time resolution of temperature measurements inside the blowdown pipe. Excellent agreement in averaged pool temperature and water level in the pool between the experiment and simulation has been achieved. The development of thermal stratification in the pool is also well captured in the simulation as well as the thermal behavior of the pool during the mixing phase.

  17. Effect of variable viscosity on free flow of non-Newtonian power-law fluids along a vertical surface with thermal stratification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moorthy M.B.K.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of thermal stratification together with variable viscosity on free convection flow of non- Newtonian fluids along a nonisothermal semi infinite vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium. The governing equations of continuity, momentum and energy are transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations and then solved by using the Runge-Kutta-Gill method along with shooting technique. Governing parameters for the problem under study are the variable viscosity, thermal stratification parameter, non-Newtonian parameter and the power-law index parameter.The velocity and temperature distributions are presented and discussed. The Nusselt number is also derived and discussed numerically.

  18. Mechanisms of double stratification and magnetic field in flow of third grade fluid over a slendering stretching surface with variable thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Qayyum, Sajid; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Ahmad, Bashir

    2018-03-01

    This article addresses the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stagnation point flow of third grade fluid towards a nonlinear stretching sheet. Energy expression is based through involvement of variable thermal conductivity. Heat and mass transfer aspects are described within the frame of double stratification effects. Boundary layer partial differential systems are deduced. Governing systems are then converted into ordinary differential systems by invoking appropriate variables. The transformed expressions are solved through homotopic technique. Impact of embedded variables on velocity, thermal and concentration fields are displayed and argued. Numerical computations are presented to obtain the results of skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. It is revealed that larger values of magnetic parameter reduces the velocity field while reverse situation is noticed due to wall thickness variable. Temperature field and local Nusselt number are quite reverse for heat generation/absorption parameter. Moreover qualitative behaviors of concentration field and local Sherwood number are similar for solutal stratification parameter.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of thermally stable poly(amide-imide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... polymeric chains on the properties of nanocomposites films were investigated by using UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermal gravimetry analysis (TGA) and water uptake measurements. KEYWORDS: Bis(4-carboxyphenyl)-N,N'-pyromellitimide acid moiety, Poly(amide-imide)-montmorillonite nanocomposite, Thermal properties.

  20. Lightweight Thermally Stable Multi-Meter Aperture Submillimeter Reflectors, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase II effort will be an affordable demonstrated full-scale design for a thermally stable multi-meter submillimeter reflector. The Phase I...

  1. Numerical modeling of flows and pollutant dispersion within and above urban street canyons under unstable thermal stratification by large-eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ming-Chung; Liu, Chun-Ho

    2013-04-01

    Recently, with the ever increasing urban areas in developing countries, the problem of air pollution due to vehicular exhaust arouses the concern of different groups of people. Understanding how different factors, such as urban morphology, meteorological conditions and human activities, affect the characteristics of street canyon ventilation, pollutant dispersion above urban areas and pollutant re-entrainment from the shear layer can help us improve air pollution control strategies. Among the factors mentioned above, thermal stratification is a significant one determining the pollutant transport behaviors in certain situation, e.g. when the urban surface is heated by strong solar radiation, which, however, is still not widely explored. The objective of this study is to gain an in-depth understanding of the effects of unstable thermal stratification on the flows and pollutant dispersion within and above urban street canyons through numerical modeling using large-eddy simulation (LES). In this study, LES equipped with one-equation subgrid-scale (SGS) model is employed to model the flows and pollutant dispersion within and above two-dimensional (2D) urban street canyons (flanked by idealized buildings, which are square solid bars in these models) under different intensities of unstable thermal stratifications. Three building-height-to-street-width (aspect) ratios, 0.5, 1 and 2, are included in this study as a representation of different building densities. The prevailing wind flow above the urban canopy is driven by background pressure gradient, which is perpendicular to the street axis, while the condition of unstable thermal stratification is induced by applying a higher uniform temperature on the no-slip urban surface. The relative importance between stratification and background wind is characterized by the Richardson number, with zero value as a neutral case and negative value as an unstable case. The buoyancy force is modeled by Boussinesq approximation and the

  2. Facile synthesis of new thermally stable and organosoluble ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mise between solubility, high thermal properties and processability.23–25. According to the phosphorylation technique first described by Yamazaki et al., a series of high- molecular-weight PAIs are synthesized from the imide ring bearing dicarboxylic acids with phosphorus and silicon containing new aromatic diamines.26 ...

  3. Multilayer fabric stratification pipes for solar tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon; Fan, Jianhua

    2007-01-01

    The thermal performance of solar heating systems is strongly influenced by the thermal stratification in the heat storage. The higher the degree of thermal stratification is, the higher the thermal performance of the solar heating systems. Thermal stratification in water storages can for instance...... be achieved by use of inlet stratifiers combined with low flow operation in the solar collector loop. In this paper, investigations of a number of different fabric stratification pipes are presented and compared to a non flexible inlet stratifier. Additional, detailed investigations of the flow structure...

  4. Recent advances in the management of chronic stable angina I: approach to the patient, diagnosis, pathophysiology, risk stratification, and gender disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kones, Richard

    2010-08-09

    The potential importance of both prevention and personal responsibility in controlling heart disease, the leading cause of death in the USA and elsewhere, has attracted renewed attention. Coronary artery disease is preventable, using relatively simple and inexpensive lifestyle changes. The inexorable rise in the prevalence of obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, often in the risk cluster known as the metabolic syndrome, drives the ever-increasing incidence of heart disease. Population-wide improvements in personal health habits appear to be a fundamental, evidence based public health measure, yet numerous barriers prevent implementation. A common symptom in patients with coronary artery disease, classical angina refers to the typical chest pressure or discomfort that results when myocardial oxygen demand rises and coronary blood flow is reduced by fixed, atherosclerotic, obstructive lesions. Different forms of angina and diagnosis, with a short description of the significance of pain and silent ischemia, are discussed in this review. The well accepted concept of myocardial oxygen imbalance in the genesis of angina is presented with new data about clinical pathology of stable angina and acute coronary syndromes. The roles of stress electrocardiography and stress myocardial perfusion scintigraphic imaging are reviewed, along with the information these tests provide about risk and prognosis. Finally, the current status of gender disparities in heart disease is summarized. Enhanced risk stratification and identification of patients in whom procedures will meaningfully change management is an ongoing quest. Current guidelines emphasize efficient triage of patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Many experts believe the predictive value of current decision protocols for coronary artery disease still needs improvement in order to optimize outcomes, yet avoid unnecessary coronary angiograms and radiation exposure. Coronary angiography remains the

  5. Recent advances in the management of chronic stable angina I: Approach to the patient, diagnosis, pathophysiology, risk stratification, and gender disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kones, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The potential importance of both prevention and personal responsibility in controlling heart disease, the leading cause of death in the USA and elsewhere, has attracted renewed attention. Coronary artery disease is preventable, using relatively simple and inexpensive lifestyle changes. The inexorable rise in the prevalence of obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, often in the risk cluster known as the metabolic syndrome, drives the ever-increasing incidence of heart disease. Population-wide improvements in personal health habits appear to be a fundamental, evidence based public health measure, yet numerous barriers prevent implementation. A common symptom in patients with coronary artery disease, classical angina refers to the typical chest pressure or discomfort that results when myocardial oxygen demand rises and coronary blood flow is reduced by fixed, atherosclerotic, obstructive lesions. Different forms of angina and diagnosis, with a short description of the significance of pain and silent ischemia, are discussed in this review. The well accepted concept of myocardial oxygen imbalance in the genesis of angina is presented with new data about clinical pathology of stable angina and acute coronary syndromes. The roles of stress electrocardiography and stress myocardial perfusion scintigraphic imaging are reviewed, along with the information these tests provide about risk and prognosis. Finally, the current status of gender disparities in heart disease is summarized. Enhanced risk stratification and identification of patients in whom procedures will meaningfully change management is an ongoing quest. Current guidelines emphasize efficient triage of patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Many experts believe the predictive value of current decision protocols for coronary artery disease still needs improvement in order to optimize outcomes, yet avoid unnecessary coronary angiograms and radiation exposure. Coronary angiography remains the

  6. Shelf-stable egg-based products processed by high pressure thermal sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Producing a thermally sterilized egg-based product with increased shelf life without losing the sensory and nutritional properties of the freshly prepared product is challenging. Until recently, all commercial shelf-stable egg-based products were sterilized using conventional thermal processing; how...

  7. Structural studies of thermally stable, combustion-resistant polymer composites

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, G.N.; Hallett, J.E.; Joseph, P.; Tretsiakova-McNally, S.; Zhang, T.; Blum, F.D.; Eastoe, J.

    2017-01-01

    Composites of the industrially important polymer, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), were prepared by free-radical polymerization of MMA with varying amounts (1–30 wt. %) of sodium dioctylsulfosuccinate (Aerosol OT or AOT) surfactant added to the reaction mixture. The composites with AOT incorporated show enhanced resistance to thermal degradation compared to pure PMMA homopolymer, and micro-cone combustion calorimetry measurements also show that the composites are combustion-resistant. The ph...

  8. Highly thermal-stable, plasma-polymerized BCB polymer film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, J; Nakano, A; Kinoshita, K; Harada, Y; Tagami, M; Tada, M; Hayashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    A new plasma-enhanced organic monomer-vapour polymerization (plasma polymerization) method has been developed. It was used to make a divinyl siloxane bis-benzocyclobutene (DVS-BCB) polymer film for Cu dual-damascene interconnects that had high thermal stability and a low dielectric constant, k = 2.6. The method consists of the vaporization of organic monomers, transportation of monomers in the gas phase, and polymerization by plasma to make the polymer film. The method eliminates polymer oxidation of DVS-BCB during the polymerization in high vacuum, which improves the film's thermal stability. The thermal stability of plasma-polymerized BCB (p-BCB) exceeded 400 deg. C because of the higher deposition temperature, and the film had a high resistance to Cu diffusion at 400 deg. C annealing. The narrow-pitched Cu/BCB damascene lines showed a 35% reduction in line capacitance compared with Cu/SiO 2 ones. The p-BCB is shown to be a strong candidate for Cu/low-k interconnects

  9. On the performance of heat absorption/generation and thermal stratification in mixed convective flow of an Oldroyd-B fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasawar Hayat

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This investigation explores the thermally stratified stretchable flow of an Oldroyd-B material bounded by a linear stretched surface. Heat transfer characteristics are addressed through thermal stratification and heat generation/absorption. Formulation is arranged for mixed convection. Application of suitable transformations provides ordinary differential systems through partial differential systems. The homotopy concept is adopted for the solution of nonlinear differential systems. The influence of several arising variables on velocity and temperature is addressed. Besides this, the rate of heat transfer is calculated and presented in tabular form. It is noticed that velocity and Nusselt number increase when the thermal buoyancy parameter is enhanced. Moreover, temperature is found to decrease for larger values of Prandtl number and heat absorption parameter. Comparative analysis for limiting study is performed and excellent agreement is found.

  10. Thermally Stable Dialkylzirconocenes with β-Hydrogens. Synthesis and Diastereoselectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Wendt, Ola F.; Bercaw, John E.

    2001-01-01

    Alkylation of Cp^r_2ZrCl_2 (Cpr = Cp (η^5-C_5H_5), Cp‘ (η^5-C_5H_4Me), Cp^* (η^5-C_5Me_5)) and CpCp^*Zr(CH_3)Cl with 1-lithio-2-methylpentane (R^1Li) gives the corresponding dialkylzirconocenes Cp^r_2ZrR^1_2 and CpCp^*Zr(CH_3)R^1, in high yields. Such alkyls have unprecedented thermal stabilities, especially for the CpCp^* ligand framework. The diastereomers of the Cp^r_2ZrR^1_2 complexes are formed in a statistical distribution, whereas the diastereomers of CpCp^*Zr(CH_3)R^1 form in a 2:3 ra...

  11. Recent advances in the management of chronic stable angina I: Approach to the patient, diagnosis, pathophysiology, risk stratification, and gender disparities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Kones

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Richard KonesThe Cardiometabolic Research Institute, Houston, Texas 77054 USAAbstract: The potential importance of both prevention and personal responsibility in ­controlling heart disease, the leading cause of death in the USA and elsewhere, has attracted renewed ­attention. Coronary artery disease is preventable, using relatively simple and inexpensive lifestyle changes. The inexorable rise in the prevalence of obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and ­hypertension, often in the risk cluster known as the metabolic syndrome, drives the ­ever-increasing incidence of heart disease. Population-wide improvements in personal health habits appear to be a fundamental, evidence based public health measure, yet numerous barriers prevent implementation. A common symptom in patients with coronary artery disease, classical angina refers to the typical chest pressure or discomfort that results when myocardial oxygen demand rises and coronary blood flow is reduced by fixed, atherosclerotic, obstructive lesions. Different forms of angina and diagnosis, with a short description of the significance of pain and silent ischemia, are discussed in this review. The well accepted concept of myocardial oxygen imbalance in the genesis of angina is presented with new data about clinical pathology of stable angina and acute coronary syndromes. The roles of stress electrocardiography and stress myocardial perfusion scintigraphic imaging are reviewed, along with the information these tests provide about risk and prognosis. Finally, the current status of gender disparities in heart disease is summarized. Enhanced risk stratification and identification of patients in whom procedures will meaningfully change management is an ongoing quest. Current guidelines emphasize efficient triage of patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Many experts believe the predictive value of current decision protocols for coronary artery disease still needs improvement in order to

  12. Long term thermal energy storage with stable supercooled sodium acetate trihydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Schultz, Jørgen M.; Johansen, Jakob Berg

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing stable supercooling of sodium acetate trihydrate makes it possible to store thermal energy partly loss free. This principle makes seasonal heat storage in compact systems possible. To keep high and stable energy content and cycling stability phase separation of the storage material must...... to 230 kJ/kg. TRNSYS simulations of a solar combi system including a storage with four heat storage modules of each 200 kg of sodium acetate trihydrate utilizing stable supercooling achieved a solar fraction of 80% for a low energy house in Danish climatic conditions....

  13. Highly thermal-stable and functional cellulose nanocrystals and nanofibrils produced using fully recyclable organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liheng Chen; Junyong Zhu; Carlos Baez; Peter Kitin; Thomas Elder

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the production of highly thermal stable and functional cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) and nanofibrils (CNF) by hydrolysis using concentrated organic acids. Due to their low water solubility, these solid organic acids can be easily recovered after hydrolysis reactions through crystallization at a lower or ambient temperature. When dicarboxylic acids were...

  14. Organic light emitting diodes with environmentally and thermally stable doped graphene electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuruvila, Arun; Kidambi, Piran R.; Kling, Jens

    2014-01-01

    We present a comparative study of the environmental and thermal stability of graphene charge transfer doping using molybdenum– trioxide (MoO3), vanadium–pentoxide (V2O5) and tungsten–trioxide (WO3). Our results show that all these metal oxides allow a strong and stable p-type doping of graphene, ...

  15. High-Temperature Adhesives for Thermally Stable Aero-Assist Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberts, Kenneth; Ou, Runqing

    2013-01-01

    Aero-assist technologies are used to control the velocity of exploration vehicles (EVs) when entering Earth or other planetary atmospheres. Since entry of EVs in planetary atmospheres results in significant heating, thermally stable aero-assist technologies are required to avoid the high heating rates while maintaining low mass. Polymer adhesives are used in aero-assist structures because of the need for high flexibility and good bonding between layers of polymer films or fabrics. However, current polymer adhesives cannot withstand temperatures above 400 C. This innovation utilizes nanotechnology capabilities to address this need, leading to the development of high-temperature adhesives that exhibit high thermal conductivity in addition to increased thermal decomposition temperature. Enhanced thermal conductivity will help to dissipate heat quickly and effectively to avoid temperature rising to harmful levels. This, together with increased thermal decomposition temperature, will enable the adhesives to sustain transient high-temperature conditions.

  16. Preparation and thermal properties of form stable paraffin phase change material encapsulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xing; Liu Hongyan; Wang Shujun; Zhang Lu; Cheng Hua

    2006-01-01

    Paraffin waxes are cheap and have moderate thermal energy storage density but low thermal conductivity and, hence, require large surface area to be used in energy storage. Form stable paraffin phase change materials (PCM) in which paraffin serves as a latent heat storage material and polyolefins act as a supporting material, because of paraffin leakage, are required to be improved. The form stable paraffin PCM in the present paper was encapsulated in an inorganic silica gel polymer successfully by in situ polymerization. The differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was used to measure its thermal properties. At the same time, the Washburn equation, which measures the wetting properties of powder materials, was used to test the hydrophilic-lipophilic properties of the PCMs. The result indicated that the enthalpy of the microencapsulated PCMs was reduced little, while their hydrophilic properties were enhanced largely

  17. Enhanced thermal conductivity of form-stable phase change composite with single-walled carbon nanotubes for thermal energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Tingting; Li, Jinhong; Feng, Wuwei; Nian, Hong'en

    2017-03-16

    A striking contrast in the thermal conductivities of polyethylene glycol (PEG)/diatomite form-stable phase change composite (fs-PCC) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) as nano-additive has been reported in our present study. Compared to the pure PEG, the thermal conductivity of the prepared fs-PCC has increased from 0.24 W/mK to 0.87 W/Mk with a small SWCNs loading of 2 wt%. SWCNs are decorated on the inner surface of diatomite pores whilst retaining its porous structure. Compared to PEG/diatomite fs-PCC, the melting and solidification time of the PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC are respectively decreased by 54.7% and 51.1%, and its thermal conductivity is 2.8 times higher. The composite can contain PEG as high as 60 wt% and maintain its original shape perfectly without any PEG leakage after subjected to 200 melt-freeze cycles. DSC results indicates that the melting point of the PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC shifts to a lower temperature while the solidification point shifts to a higher temperature due to the presence of SWCNs. Importantly, the use of SWCNs is found to have clear beneficial effects for enhancing the thermal conductivity and thermal storage/release rates, without affecting thermal properties, chemical compatibility and thermal stability. The prepared PEG/diatomite/SWCNs fs-PCC exhibits excellent chemical and thermal durability and has potential application in solar thermal energy storage and solar heating.

  18. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, October 1993--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Walsh, P.M.; Coleman, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Penn State program in advancd thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding them formation of vcarbonaceous solids; and, (5) assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal.

  19. Advanced Thermally Stable Coal-Derived Jet Fuels Compositional Factors Affecting Thermal Degradation of Jet Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    115 3.3 FTIR spectra of dodecane stressed under 100 psi air at 425C ..................... 118 3.4 Deoxygenated fuel at 100 psi (0.1 ppm of 02...formation of higher molecular weight compounds, such as alkanes larger than the starting compound; other cyclic compounds, such as indenes and naphthalenes...Studies Thermal stress studies were performed on additive free Jet A-I fuel at 425TC under 100 psi nitrogen or air. Fourier transform infrared ( FTIR

  20. Development of a hot water tank simulation program with improved prediction of thermal stratification in the tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon; Yue, Hongqiang

    2015-01-01

    A simulation program SpiralSol was developed in previous investigations to calculate thermal performance of a solar domestic hot water (SDHW) system with a hot water tank with a built-in heat exchanger spiral [1]. The simulation program is improved in the paper in term of prediction of thermal......, taking into account the influences of tank volume, height to diameter ratio, tank insulation, thickness and material property of the tank and initial thermal conditions of the tank. The equation is validated for a tank volume between 150 l and 500 l, a tank height to tank diameter ratio of 1-5, a tank...... wall thickness of 1.5 mm to 3 mm for a stainless steel tank and a tank wall thickness of between 3 mm to 5 mm for a normal steel tank. Accuracy and reliability of the SpiralSol program with the improved prediction of heat loss removal factor will be examined in future investigations....

  1. Preparation of organo clays thermally stable to be employed as filler in PET nano composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, I.F.; Soares, A.P.S.; Silva, S.M.L.; Malta, O.M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal stability of organically modified clays is fundamental to melt processing polymer nanocomposites, especially, poly(terephthalate ethylene) (PET). However, the use of organic salts with high thermal stability is factor essential to obtaining of organoclays with great thermal properties. This work has as purpose to evaluate the influence of organic modifier based on alkyl ammonium, alkyl phosphonium and aryl phosphonium, in the clay organic modification visa to improve thermal properties to use as filler in nanocomposites preparation, where temperatures at about 260 deg C will be employed. The most common, and commercially available, surfactants used for cation exchange reactions with montmorillonites, rendering them organophilic, are quaternary ammonium salts, that when present as cations in montmorillonite, typically begin degradation at above 200 deg C. However, organoclays prepared with quaternary alkyl phosphonium salts may be potentially useful for the organoclays preparation stable thermally. In this study bentonite clay from Bentonit Uniao Nordeste/PB was purified and organically modified with the organic salts reported above. Organoclays were characterized by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and analysis thermogravimetry. The results shown that the samples modified with the salts based on phosphonium presented higher thermal stability that the alkyl ammonium salt. (author)

  2. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels: Technical progress report, October 1994--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Boehman, A.; Coleman, M.M.

    1995-02-01

    There are five tasks within this project on thermally stable coal-based jet fuels. Progress on each of the tasks is described. Task 1, Investigation of the quantitative degradation chemistry of fuels, has 5 subtasks which are described: Literature review on thermal stability of jet fuels; Pyrolytic and catalytic reactions of potential endothermic fuels: cis- and trans-decalin; Use of site specific {sup 13}C-labeling to examine the thermal stressing of 1-phenylhexane: A case study for the determination of reaction kinetics in complex fuel mixtures versus model compound studies; Estimation of critical temperatures of jet fuels; and Surface effects on deposit formation in a flow reactor system. Under Task 2, Investigation of incipient deposition, the subtask reported is Uncertainty analysis on growth and deposition of particles during heating of coal-derived aviation gas turbine fuels; under Task 3, Characterization of solid gums, sediments, and carbonaceous deposits, is subtask, Studies of surface chemistry of PX-21 activated carbon during thermal degradation of jet A-1 fuel and n-dodecane; under Task 4, Coal-based fuel stabilization studies, is subtask, Exploratory screening and development potential of jet fuel thermal stabilizers over 400 C; and under Task 5, Exploratory studies on the direct conversion of coal to high quality jet fuels, are 4 subtasks: Novel approaches to low-severity coal liquefaction and coal/resid co-processing using water and dispersed catalysts; Shape-selective naphthalene hydrogenation for production of thermally stable jet fuels; Design of a batch mode and a continuous mode three-phase reactor system for the liquefaction of coal and upgrading of coal liquids; and Exploratory studies on coal liquids upgrading using mesopores molecular sieve catalysts. 136 refs., 69 figs., 24 tabs.

  3. Thermal performance study of form-stable composite phase change material with polyacrylic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Shin Yiing; Munusamy, Yamuna; Ong, Kok Seng; Chee, Swee Yong; Sanmuggam, Shimalaa

    2017-04-01

    Phase change material (PCM) is one of the most popular and widely used as thermal energy storage material because it is able to absorb and release a large amount of latent heat during a phase change process over a narrow temperature range. In this work, the form-stable composite PCM was prepared by blending of PMMA and myristic acid in different weight percentage. PMMA was used as a supporting material while myristic acid was used as PCM. Theoretically, PCM can be encapsulated in the support material after blending. However, a small amount of liquid PCMs can leak out from supporting material due to the volume change in phase change process. Therefore, a form-stable composite PCM with polyacrylic coating was studied. Leakage test was carried out to determine the leakage percentage of the form-stable composite PCM. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to characterize the chemical compatibility of the form-stable PCM composite while differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the melting, freezing point and the latent heat of melting and freezing for the form-stable composite PCM.

  4. Meteorological conditions, physiochemical properties, thermal-oxygen stratification, water overturn and water balance of Lake Gardno on Wolin Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tylkowski Jacek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main research problem of the paper is aimed at determining the proper functioning of Lake Gardno within the period 2012-2014 considered as hydrological years in reference to the physiochemical properties of its waters, water balance, thermal regime and water overturn. Lake Gardno is a representative of non-run-off lake geo-eco-systems; it is situated within the Southern Baltic Sea Coastland at the cliff shore of Wolin Island. The paper analyses how weather conditions affect the specifics of water supplies provided to the lake and seasonal dynamics of its waters, their chemical, thermal and aerobic properties. It also specifies their overturn and balance with a particular emphasis on their supplies together with fog deposits.

  5. A Truly Second-Order and Unconditionally Stable Thermal Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Chen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available An unconditionally stable thermal lattice Boltzmann method (USTLBM is proposed in this paper for simulating incompressible thermal flows. In USTLBM, solutions to the macroscopic governing equations that are recovered from lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE through Chapman–Enskog (C-E expansion analysis are resolved in a predictor–corrector scheme and reconstructed within lattice Boltzmann framework. The development of USTLBM is inspired by the recently proposed simplified thermal lattice Boltzmann method (STLBM. Comparing with STLBM which can only achieve the first-order of accuracy in time, the present USTLBM ensures the second-order of accuracy both in space and in time. Meanwhile, all merits of STLBM are maintained by USTLBM. Specifically, USTLBM directly updates macroscopic variables rather than distribution functions, which greatly saves virtual memories and facilitates implementation of physical boundary conditions. Through von Neumann stability analysis, it can be theoretically proven that USTLBM is unconditionally stable. It is also shown in numerical tests that, comparing to STLBM, lower numerical error can be expected in USTLBM at the same mesh resolution. Four typical numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the robustness of USTLBM and its flexibility on non-uniform and body-fitted meshes.

  6. Options of microclimate optimization in stable objects with respect to thermal comfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Šimková

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out at the farm in Petrovice. Dairy cows and heifers were included in the experiment. The relative humidity, temperature, cooling value environment and flow rate in stables were measured. The flow rate was measured by the handheld anemometer. The relative humidity and the temperature were obtained by the data logger with sensors. The cooling value environment was obtained by the psychrometer. The rectal temperature was measured simultaneously as further value. It was rated 3 different groups of dairy cows and heifers in 2 stables. The aim of this work was finding how this values impact thermal comfort of the animals. The temperature is the most significant factor because it is very variable value. The animals immediately react for change of this. All these measured values are important for optimal welfare of animals. They influence the productivity of dairy cows and heifers, milk quality, reproduction and health of animals.

  7. Photoluminescence properties of thermally stable highly crystalline CdS nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay R. Dhage

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermally stable and highly crystalline CdS nanoparticles were obtained via chemical bath method. The optical properties of CdS nanocrystals were characterized by ultraviolet-vis and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Improvement in the photoluminescence properties of the synthesized CdS nanocrystals was observed. This improvement is believed to be due to highly crystalline CdS nanoparticles which may reduce the local surface-trap states. The CdS nanoparticles were characterized by x-ray powder diffraction (XRD, thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA/DTA and transmission electron microscopy (TEM.

  8. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, April 1993--June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C. [and others

    1993-10-01

    The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and (5) assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Some of our accomplishments and findings are: The product distribution and reaction mechanisms for pyrolysis of alkylcyclohexanes at 450{degree}C have been investigated in detail. In this report we present results of pyrolysis of cyclohexane and a variety of alkylcyclohexanes in nitrogen atmospheres, along with pseudo-first order rate constants, and possible reaction mechanisms for the origin of major pyrolysis products are presented. Addition of PX-21 activated carbon effectively stops the formation of carbonaceous solids on reactor walls during thermal stressing of JPTS. A review of physical and chemical interactions in supercritical fluids has been completed. Work has begun on thermal stability studies of a second generation of fuel additives, 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-l-naphthol, 9,10-phenanthrenediol, phthalan, and 1,2-benzenedimethanol, and with careful selection of the feedstock, it is possible to achieve 85--95% conversion of coal to liquids, with 40--50% of the dichloromethane-soluble products being naphthalenes. (Further hydrogenation of the naphthalenes should produce the desired highly stable decalins.)

  9. Donor-Acceptor Interface Stabilizer Based on Fullerene Derivatives toward Efficient and Thermal Stable Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junli; Zhu, Xiaoguang; Yuan, Tao; Shen, Jiulin; Liu, Jikang; Zhang, Jian; Tu, Guoli

    2017-02-22

    An interface stabilizer based on alkylation-functionalized fullerene derivatives, [6, 6]-Phenyl-C61-butyric acid (3,5-bis(octyloxy)phenyl)methyl ester (PCB-C8oc), was successfully synthesized and applied for the active layer of Organic Photovoltaics (OPVs). The PCB-C8oc can replace part of the phenyl-C61-buty-ric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and be distributed on the interface of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and PCBM to form P3HT/PCBM/PCB-C8oc ternary blends, leading to thermally stable and efficient organic photovoltaics. The octyl groups of PCB-C8oc exhibit intermolecular interaction with the hexyl groups of P3HT, and the fullerene unit of PCB-C8oc are in tight contact with PCBM. The dual functions of PCB-C8oc will inhibit the phase separation between electron donor and acceptor, thereby improving the stability of devices under long-time thermal annealing at high temperature. When doped with 10 wt % PCB-C8oc, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the P3HT system decreased from 3.54% to 2.88% after 48 h of thermal treatment at 150 °C, whereas the PCE of the reference device without PCB-C8oc dramatically dropped from 3.53% to 0.73%. When doping 10 or 20 wt % PCB-C8oc, the unannealed P3HT/PCBM/PCB-C8oc device achieved a higher PCE than the P3HT/PCBM device without any annealing following the same fabricating condition. For the PTB7/PCBM-based devices, after adding only 5 wt % PCB-C8oc, the OPVs also exhibited thermally stable morphology and better device performances. All these results demonstrate that the utilization of alkyl interchain interactions is an effective and practical strategy to control morphological evolution.

  10. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, August 1992--October 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Walsh, P.M.; Coleman, M.M.; Bortiatynski, J.; Burgess, C.; Dutta, R.; Gergova, K.; Lai, W.C.; Li, J.; McKinney, D.; Parfitt, D.; Peng, Y.; Sanghani, P.; Yoon, E.

    1993-02-01

    The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five borad objectives: (1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and miocrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and (5) assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Pyrolysis of four isomers of butylbenzene was investigated in static microautoclave reactors at 450{degrees}C under 0.69 MPa of UHP N{sub 2}. Thee rates of disappearance of substrates were found to depend upon the bonding energy of C{alpha}-C{beta} bond in the side chain in the initial period of pyrolysis reactions. Possible catalytic effects of metal surfaces on thermal degradation and deposit formation at temperatures >400{degrees}C have been studied. Carbon deposition depends on the composition of the metal surfaces, and also depends on the chemical compositions of the reactants. Thermal stressing of JP-8 was conducted in the presence of alumina, carbonaceous deposits recovered from earlier stressing experiments, activated carbon, carbon black, and graphite. The addition of different solid carbons during thermal stressing leads to different reaction mechanisms. {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, along with {sup 13}C-labeling techniques, have been used to examine the thermal stability of a jet fuel sample mixed with 5% benzyl alcohol. Several heterometallic complexes consisting of two transition metals and sulfur in a single molecule were synthesized and tested as precursors of bimetallic dispersed catalysts for liquefaction of a Montana subbituminous and Pittsburgh No. 8 bituminous coals.

  11. Capric-myristic acid/vermiculite composite as form-stable phase change material for thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaipekli, Ali; Sari, Ahmet [Department of Chemistry, Gaziosmanpasa University, 60240 Tokat (Turkey)

    2009-03-15

    Phase change materials (PCMs) can be incorporated with building materials to obtain novel form-stable composite PCM which has effective energy storage performance in latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems. In this study, capric acid (CA)-myristic acid (MA) eutectic mixture/vermiculite (VMT) composite was prepared as a novel form-stable PCM using vacuum impregnation method. The composite PCM was characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) analysis technique. Thermal properties and thermal reliability of the composite PCM were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. The CA-MA eutectic mixture could be retained by 20 wt% into pores of the VMT without melted PCM seepage from the composite and therefore, this mixture was described as form-stable composite PCM. Thermal cycling test showed that the form-stable composite PCM has good thermal reliability and chemical stability although it was subjected to 3000 melting/freezing cycling. Thermal conductivity of the form-stable CA-MA/VMT composite PCM was increased by about 85% by introducing 2 wt% expanded graphite (EG) into the composite. The increase in thermal conductivity was confirmed by comparison of the melting and freezing times of the CA-MA/VMT composite with that of CA-MA/VMT/EG composite. The form-stable PCM including EG can be used as energy absorbing building material such as lightweight aggregate for plaster, concrete compounds, fire stop mortar, and component of interior fill for wallboards or hollow bricks because of its good thermal properties, thermal and chemical reliability and thermal conductivity. (author)

  12. Till death do us part: stable sponge-bacteria associations under thermal and food shortage stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Pita

    Full Text Available Sporadic mass mortality events of Mediterranean sponges following periods of anomalously high temperatures or longer than usual stratification of the seawater column (i.e. low food availability suggest that these animals are sensitive to environmental stresses. The Mediterranean sponges Ircinia fasciculata and I. oros harbor distinct, species-specific bacterial communities that are highly stable over time and space but little is known about how anomalous environmental conditions affect the structure of the resident bacterial communities. Here, we monitored the bacterial communities in I. fasciculata (largely affected by mass mortalities and I. oros (overall unaffected maintained in aquaria during 3 weeks under 4 treatments that mimicked realistic stress pressures: control conditions (13°C, unfiltered seawater, low food availability (13°C, 0.1 µm-filtered seawater, elevated temperatures (25°C, unfiltered seawater, and a combination of the 2 stressors (25°C, 0.1 µm-filtered seawater. Bacterial community structure was assessed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. As I. fasciculata harbors cyanobacteria, we also measured chlorophyll a (chl a levels in this species. Multivariate analysis revealed no significant differences in bacterial T-RFLP profiles among treatments for either host sponge species, indicating no effect of high temperatures and food shortage on symbiont community structure. In I. fasciculata, chl a content did not significantly differ among treatments although TEM micrographs revealed some cyanobacteria cells undergoing degradation when exposed to both elevated temperature and food shortage conditions. Arguably, longer-term treatments (months could have eventually affected bacterial community structure. However, we evidenced no appreciable decay of the symbiotic community in response to medium-term (3 weeks environmental

  13. Investigations on stratification devices for hot water stores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon; Hampel, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    The significance of the thermal stratification for the energy efficiency of small solar-thermal hot water heat stores is pointed out. Exemplary the thermal stratification build-up with devices already marketed as well as with devices still in development has been investigated experimentally...

  14. Characterization and dispersibility of improved thermally stable amide functionalized graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rani, Sumita [Electronic Science Department, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra, Haryana 136119 (India); Kumar, Mukesh, E-mail: kumarmukesh@gmail.com [Electronic Science Department, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra, Haryana 136119 (India); Kumar, Rajiv [Department of Chemistry, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra, Haryana 136119 (India); Kumar, Dinesh; Sharma, Sumit [Electronic Science Department, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra, Haryana 136119 (India); Singh, Gulshan [Department of Chemistry, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra, Haryana 136119 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Improved thermal stability and surface study of amide functionalized graphene oxide. - Highlights: • Amide functionalized graphene oxides (AGOs) were synthesized from aniline, 2-aminothiazole and 2-aminopyrimidine. • Achieved enhancement in thermal stability of AGOs as compare to GO. • AGOs are found to be highly dispersible in water, DMSO and DMF. • Dispersibility is stable for more than two and half months. - Abstract: Amidation of graphene oxide (GO) with aniline, 2-aminothiazole and 2-aminopyrimidine results in the synthesis of amide functionalized graphene oxides (AGOs). Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), UV–vis and Raman spectroscopy were used to investigate the properties of AGOs. It was found that, contrary to GO, AGOs are soluble in water, dimethyl sulfoxide, dimethylformamide and can be stabilized for months. TGA of AGOs shows the major weight loss above 670 °C as compared to GO in which significant weight loss occurs near 200 °C. Thus AGOs show strong improvement in thermal properties.

  15. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, July 1993--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Walsh, P.M.; Coleman, M.M.

    1993-12-01

    The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. An exploratory study was conducted to investigate the pyrolysis of n-butylbenzene in a flow reactor at atmospheric pressure. A number of similarities to trends previously observed in high-pressure static reactions were identified. The product distribution from pyrolysis of n-tetradecane at 400{degrees}C and 425{degrees}C was investigated. The critical temperatures of a suite of petroleum- and coal-derived jet fuels were measured by a rapidly heating sealed tube method. Work has continued on refining the measurements of deposit growth for stressing mixtures of coal-derived JP-8C with tetradecane. Current work has given emphasis to the initial stages of fuel decomposition and the onset of deposition. Pretreatment of JPTS fuel with PX-21 activated carbon (50 mg of PX-21 in 15 mL JPTS) delayed degradation and prevented carbon deposition during thermal stressing at 425{degrees}C for 5 h in nitrogen and air atmospheres. Clear indications of initial and subsequent deposit formation on different metal surfaces have been identified for thermal stressing of dodecane. Seven additives were tested for their ability to retard decomposition of dodecane at 450{degrees}C under nitrogen. Nuclear magnetic resonance data for Dammar resin indicates that structures proposed in the literature are not entirely correct.

  16. Small scale thermal-hydraulic experiment for stable operation of a pius-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, K.; Tamaki, M.; Imai, S.; Irianto, I.D.; Tsuji, Y.; Kukita, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic experiments using a small-scale atmospheric pressure test loop have been performed for the Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS)-type reactor to develop the new pump speed feedback control system. Three feedback control systems based on the measurement of flow rate, differential pressure, and fluid temperature distribution in the lower density lock have been proposed and confirmed by a series of experiments. Each of the feedback control systems had been verified in the simulation experiment such as a start-up simulation test. The automatic pump speed control based on the fluid temperature at the lower density lock was quite effective to maintain the stratified interface between primary water and borated pool water for stable operation of the reactor. (author)

  17. Using Stable Isotopes to Infer the Impacts of Habitat Change on the Diets and Vertical Stratification of Frugivorous Bats in Madagascar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim E Reuter

    Full Text Available Human-modified habitats are expanding rapidly; many tropical countries have highly fragmented and degraded forests. Preserving biodiversity in these areas involves protecting species-like frugivorous bats-that are important to forest regeneration. Fruit bats provide critical ecosystem services including seed dispersal, but studies of how their diets are affected by habitat change have often been rather localized. This study used stable isotope analyses (δ15N and δ13C measurement to examine how two fruit bat species in Madagascar, Pteropus rufus (n = 138 and Eidolon dupreanum (n = 52 are impacted by habitat change across a large spatial scale. Limited data for Rousettus madagascariensis are also presented. Our results indicated that the three species had broadly overlapping diets. Differences in diet were nonetheless detectable between P. rufus and E. dupreanum, and these diets shifted when they co-occurred, suggesting resource partitioning across habitats and vertical strata within the canopy to avoid competition. Changes in diet were correlated with a decrease in forest cover, though at a larger spatial scale in P. rufus than in E. dupreanum. These results suggest fruit bat species exhibit differing responses to habitat change, highlight the threats fruit bats face from habitat change, and clarify the spatial scales at which conservation efforts could be implemented.

  18. Using Stable Isotopes to Infer the Impacts of Habitat Change on the Diets and Vertical Stratification of Frugivorous Bats in Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Kim E.; Wills, Abigail R.; Lee, Raymond W.; Cordes, Erik E.; Sewall, Brent J.

    2016-01-01

    Human-modified habitats are expanding rapidly; many tropical countries have highly fragmented and degraded forests. Preserving biodiversity in these areas involves protecting species–like frugivorous bats–that are important to forest regeneration. Fruit bats provide critical ecosystem services including seed dispersal, but studies of how their diets are affected by habitat change have often been rather localized. This study used stable isotope analyses (δ15N and δ13C measurement) to examine how two fruit bat species in Madagascar, Pteropus rufus (n = 138) and Eidolon dupreanum (n = 52) are impacted by habitat change across a large spatial scale. Limited data for Rousettus madagascariensis are also presented. Our results indicated that the three species had broadly overlapping diets. Differences in diet were nonetheless detectable between P. rufus and E. dupreanum, and these diets shifted when they co-occurred, suggesting resource partitioning across habitats and vertical strata within the canopy to avoid competition. Changes in diet were correlated with a decrease in forest cover, though at a larger spatial scale in P. rufus than in E. dupreanum. These results suggest fruit bat species exhibit differing responses to habitat change, highlight the threats fruit bats face from habitat change, and clarify the spatial scales at which conservation efforts could be implemented. PMID:27097316

  19. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Devin W; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Traore, Daouda A K; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C; Waldo, Geoffery S; Payne, Riley J; Rucker, Joseph B; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Recoil Induced Room Temperature Stable Frenkel Pairs in a-Hafnium Upon Thermal Neutron Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, Tilman; Das, Satyendra K.; Dey, Chandi C.; Ghoshal, Shamik

    2013-11-01

    Ultrapure hafnium metal (110 ppm zirconium) was neutron activated with a thermal neutron flux of 6:6 · 1012 cm-2s-1 in order to obtain 181Hf for subsequent time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) experiments using the nuclear probe 181Hf(β-) 181Ta. Apart from the expected nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) signal for a hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metal, three further discrete NQIs were observed with a few percent fraction each. The TDPAC spectra were recorded for up to 11 half lives with extreme statistical accuracy. The fitted parameters vary slightly within the temperature range between 248 K and 373 K. The signals corresponding to the three additional sites completely disappear after `annealing' at 453 K for one minute. Based on the symmetry of the additional NQIs and their temperature dependencies, they are tentatively attributed to Frenkel pairs produced by recoil due to the emission of a prompt 5:694 MeV -ray following thermal neutron capture and reported by the nuclear probe in three different positions. These Frenkel pairs are stable up to at least 373 K.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, conductivity and antimicrobial study of a novel thermally stable polyphenol containing azomethine group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz Baran, Nuray; Karakışla, Meral; Demir, Hacı Ökkeş; Saçak, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    Poly(4-[[(4-methylphenyl)methylene]amino]phenol) (P(4-MMAP)), which is a Schiff base polymer, was synthesized by an oxidative polycondensation reaction of 4-[[(4-methylphenyl)methylene]amino]phenol (4-MMAP) with the oxidants NaOCl, H2O2 and O2 in an aqueous alkaline medium. The polymerizations were carried out at various temperatures and times, and the highest polymer yield could be obtained when using 37% with NaOCl oxidant. The structures of the monomer and polymer were characterized by UV-Vis, FTIR 1H NMR and X-ray diffraction techniques. The thermal behaviors of the monomer and polymer were identified by the TG and DTG techniques. The thermal degradation of the polymer which was observed thermally stable up to 1000 °C, was also supported by the Thermo-IR spectra recorded in the temperature range of 25-800 °C. The number average molecular weight (Mn), weight average molecular weight (Mw) and polydispersity index (PDI) of the polymer were found to be 16682, 57796 g/mol and 3.4, respectively. The highest electrical conductivity value of P(4-MMAP) doped with iodine vapor at different temperatures and times was measured to be 7.8 × 10-5 Scm-1 after doping for 48 h at 60 °C. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of 4-MMAP and P(4-MMAP) were also assayed against the bacteria Sarcina lutea, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Bacillus subtilis and the fungi Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively.

  2. Thermally Stable Mesoporous Perovskite Solar Cells Incorporating Low-Temperature Processed Graphene/Polymer Electron Transporting Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Shi Wun; Balapanuru, Janardhan; Fu, Deyi; Loh, Kian Ping

    2016-11-02

    In the short time since its discovery, perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have attained high power conversion efficiency but their lack of thermal stability remains a barrier to commercialization. Among the experimentally accessible parameter spaces for optimizing performance, identifying an electron transport layer (ETL) that forms a thermally stable interface with perovskite and which is solution-processable at low-temperature will certainly be advantageous. Herein, we developed a mesoporous graphene/polymer composite with these advantages when used as ETL in CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 PSCs, and a high efficiency of 13.8% under AM 1.5G solar illumination could be obtained. Due to the high heat transmission coefficient and low isoelectric point of mesoporous graphene-based ETL, the PSC device enjoys good chemical and thermal stability. Our work demonstrates that the mesoporous graphene-based scaffold is a promising ETL candidate for high performance and thermally stable PSCs.

  3. Capric-myristic acid/expanded perlite composite as form-stable phase change material for latent heat thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaipekli, Ali; Sari, Ahmet [Department of Chemistry, Gaziosmanpasa University, 60240 Tokat (Turkey)

    2008-12-15

    The aim of this study is to prepare a novel form-stable phase change material (PCM) for latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) in buildings. A eutectic mixture of capric acid (CA) and myristic acid (MA) is incorporated with expanded perlite (EP). Thermal properties, thermal reliability, and thermal conductivity of the form-stable composite PCM are determined. The maximum CA-MA absorption of EP was found to be 55 wt% without melted PCM seepage from the composite, and therefore this mixture was described as a form-stable composite. The form-stable composite PCM was characterized using the FT-IR spectroscopy method. The melting and freezing temperatures and latent heats of form-stable composite PCM were measured using DSC analysis. Thermal cycling test of the form-stable composite PCM indicated good thermal reliability in terms of changes in thermal properties after 5000 thermal cycling. The thermal conductivity of the form-stable CA-MA/EP composite PCM was increased about 58% by adding 10 wt% expanded graphite (EG). The form-stable CA-MA/EP/EG composite PCM was considered as an effective LHTES material in the building energy conservation due to suitable phase change temperatures, high latent capacities, good thermal reliability, and good thermal conductivity. (author)

  4. Thermally Stable Bulk Heterojunction Prepared by Sequential Deposition of Nanostructured Polymer and Fullerene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heewon Hwang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A morphologically-stable polymer/fullerene heterojunction has been prepared by minimizing the intermixing between polymer and fullerene via sequential deposition (SqD of a polymer and a fullerene solution. A low crystalline conjugated polymer of PCPDTBT (poly[2,6-(4,4-bis-(2-ethylhexyl-4H-cyclopenta [2,1-b;3,4-b′]dithiophene-alt-4,7(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole] has been utilized for the polymer layer and PC71BM (phenyl-C71-butyric-acid-methyl ester for the fullerene layer, respectively. Firstly, a nanostructured PCPDTBT bottom layer was developed by utilizing various additives to increase the surface area of the polymer film. The PC71BM solution was prepared by dissolving it in the 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE, exhibiting a lower vapor pressure and slower diffusion into the polymer layer. The deposition of the PC71BM solution on the nanostructured PCPDTBT layer forms an inter-digitated bulk heterojunction (ID-BHJ with minimized intermixing. The organic photovoltaic (OPV device utilizing the ID-BHJ photoactive layer exhibits a highly reproducible solar cell performance. In spite of restricted intermixing between the PC71BM and the PCPDTBT, the efficiency of ID-BHJ OPVs (3.36% is comparable to that of OPVs (3.87% prepared by the conventional method (deposition of a blended solution of polymer:fullerene. The thermal stability of the ID-BHJ is superior to the bulk heterojunction (BHJ prepared by the conventional method. The ID-BHJ OPV maintains 70% of its initial efficiency after thermal stress application for twelve days at 80 °C, whereas the conventional BHJ OPV maintains only 40% of its initial efficiency.

  5. Synthesis of thermally stable extra-large pore crystalline materials: a uranyl germanate with 12-ring channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Chiang, Ray-Kuang; Lii, Kwang-Hwa

    2009-02-18

    A thermally stable extra-large pore uranyl germanate is synthesized under high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal conditions at 585 degrees C and 150 MPa. The structure contains U(6+)O(6) tetragonal bipyramids which are interconnected by digermanate groups to form a 3D framework with 12-ring pore openings.

  6. Thermal-Hydraulic Experiment To Test The Stable Operation Of A PIUS Type Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irianto, Djoko; Kanji, T.; Kukita, Y.

    1996-01-01

    An advanced type of reaktor concept as the Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor was based on intrinsically passive safety considerations. The stable operation of a PIUS type reactor is based on the automation of circulation pump speed. An automatic circulation pump speed control system by using a measurement of the temperature distribution in the lower density lock is proposed the PIUS-type reactor. In principle this control system maintains the fluid temperature at the axial center of the lower density lock at average of the fluid temperatures below and above the lower density lock. This control system will prevent the poison water from penetrating into the core during normal operation. The effectiveness of this control system was successfully confirmed by a series of experiments using atmospheric pressure thermal-hydraulic test loop which simulated the PIUS principle. The experiments such as: start-up and power ramping tests for normal operation simulation and loss of feedwater test for an accident condition simulation, carried out in JAERI

  7. Synthesis and thermal properties of the MA/HDPE composites with nano-additives as form-stable PCM with improved thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yaojie; Su, Di; Huang, Xiang; Alva, Guruprasad; Liu, Lingkun; Fang, Guiyin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • MA/HDPE composites with nano-additives were prepared for thermal conductivity enhancement. • Microstructure and chemical structure of the FSPCM were analyzed. • Thermal properties and thermal reliability of the FSPCM were investigated. • Thermal conductivity of the FSPCM can be enhanced by adding NAO and NG. - Abstract: For the purpose of improving the thermal conductivity of the form–stable phase change materials (FSPCM), two types of nano–powders with high thermal conductivity were added into the samples. In the modified FSPCM, myristic acid (MA) was used as a solid–liquid phase change material (PCM), high density polyethylene (HDPE) acted as supporting material to prevent the leakage of the melted MA. Nano–Al 2 O 3 (NAO) and nano–graphite (NG) were the additives for thermal conductivity enhancement. Scanning electronic microscope (SEM), Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope (FT–IR) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) were used to analyze the microstructure, chemical structure and crystalline phase of the samples, respectively. Furthermore, the specific latent heat and phase transition temperature, thermal conductivity and thermal reliability were investigated using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), thermal conductivity meter and thermo–gravimetric analyzer (TGA). The results showed that the MA was uniformly absorbed in the HDPE matrices and there was no leakage during the melting process when the mass fraction of the MA in the MA/HDPE composite was less than 70%. The DSC results revealed that the modified FSPCM have a constant phase change temperature and high specific latent heat. The thermal conductivity of the FSPCM was measured in the solid (30 °C) and liquid (60 °C) states of the MA. When the mass fraction of nano–powder additives is 12%, the thermal conductivities of the FSPCM increase by 95% (NAO) and 121% (NG) at 30 °C. It is anticipated that the FSPCM possess a potential application for thermal energy

  8. Form-stable paraffin/high density polyethylene composites as solid-liquid phase change material for thermal energy storage: preparation and thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari, Ahmet

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the preparation of paraffin/high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites as form-stable, solid-liquid phase change material (PCM) for thermal energy storage and with determination of their thermal properties. In such a composite, the paraffin (P) serves as a latent heat storage material and the HDPE acts as a supporting material, which prevents leakage of the melted paraffin because of providing structural strength. Therefore, it is named form-stable composite PCM. In this study, two kinds of paraffins with melting temperatures of 42-44 deg. C (type P1) and 56-58 deg. C (type P2) and latent heats of 192.8 and 212.4 J g -1 were used. The maximum weight percentage for both paraffin types in the PCM composites without any seepage of the paraffin in the melted state were found as high as 77%. It is observed that the paraffin is dispersed into the network of the solid HDPE by investigation of the structure of the composite PCMs using a scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The melting temperatures and latent heats of the form-stable P1/HDPE and P2/HDPE composite PCMs were determined as 37.8 and 55.7 deg. C, and 147.6 and 162.2 J g -1 , respectively, by the technique of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Furthermore, to improve the thermal conductivity of the form-stable P/HDPE composite PCMs, expanded and exfoliated graphite (EG) by heat treatment was added to the samples in the ratio of 3 wt.%. Thereby, the thermal conductivity was increased about 14% for the form-stable P1/HDPE and about 24% for the P2/HDPE composite PCMs. Based on the results, it is concluded that the prepared form-stable P/HDPE blends as composite type PCM have great potential for thermal energy storage applications in terms of their satisfactory thermal properties and improved thermal conductivity. Furthermore, these composite PCMs added with EG can be considered cost effective latent heat storage materials since they do not require encapsulation and extra cost to enhance

  9. INLET STRATIFICATION DEVICE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    formed of a flexible porous material and having an inlet (19) and outlets formed of the pores of the porous material. The stratification device (5) further comprises at least one outer pipe (7) surrounding the inlet pipe (6) in spaced relationship thereto and being at least partially formed of a porous......An inlet stratification device (5) for a circuit circulating a fluid through a tank (1 ) and for providing and maintaining stratification of the fluid in the tank (1 ). The stratification de- vice (5) is arranged vertically in the tank (1) and comprises an inlet pipe (6) being at least partially...

  10. New glyme-cyclic imide lithium salt complexes as thermally stable electrolytes for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Takashi; Hachida, Takeshi; Yoshida, Kazuki; Tachikawa, Naoki; Dokko, Kaoru; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    New glyme-Li salt complexes were prepared by mixing equimolar amounts of a novel cyclic imide lithium salt LiN(C 2F 4S 2O 4) (LiCTFSI) and a glyme (triglyme (G3) or tetraglyme (G4)). The glyme-Li salt complexes, [Li(G3)][CTFSI] and [Li(G4)][CTFSI], are solid and liquid, respectively, at room temperature. The thermal stability of [Li(G4)][CTFSI] is much higher than that of pure G4, and the vapor pressure of [Li(G4)][CTFSI] is negligible at temperatures lower than 100 °C. Although the viscosity of [Li(G4)][CTFSI] is high (132.0 mPa s at 30 °C), because of its high molar concentration (ca. 3 mol dm -3), its ionic conductivity at 30 °C is relatively high, i.e., 0.8 mS cm -1, which is slightly lower than that of a conventional organic electrolyte solution (1 mol dm -3 LiTFSI dissolved in propylene carbonate). The self-diffusion coefficients of a Li + cation, a CTFSI - anion, and a glyme molecule were measured by the pulsed gradient spin-echo NMR method (PGSE-NMR). The ionicity (dissociativity) of [Li(G4)][CTFSI] at 30 °C is ca. 0.5, as estimated from the PGSE-NMR diffusivity measurements and the ionic conductivity measurements. Results of linear sweep voltammetry revealed that [Li(G4)][CTFSI] is electrochemically stable in an electrode potential range of 0-4.5 V vs. Li/Li +. The reversible deposition-stripping behavior of lithium was observed by cyclic voltammetry. The [LiCoO 2|[Li(G4)][CTFSI]|Li metal] cell showed a stable charge-discharge cycling behavior during 50 cycles, indicating that the [Li(G4)][CTFSI] complex is applicable to a 4 V class lithium secondary battery.

  11. Experiment study on the thermal properties of paraffin/kaolin thermal energy storage form-stable phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv, Peizhao; Liu, Chenzhen; Rao, Zhonghao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Different particle sizes of kaolin were employed to load paraffin. • The effects and reasons of particle size on thermal conductivity were studied. • Thermal property and thermal stability of the composites were investigated. • The leakage and thermal storage and release rate of the composites were studied. • The effect of vacuum impregnation method on thermal conductivity was investigated. - Abstract: In this paper, different particle sizes of kaolin were employed to incorporate paraffin via vacuum impregnation method. The paraffin/kaolin composites were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) and Thermogravimetry (TG). The results showed that the paraffin/kaolin composite with the largest particle size of kaolin (K4) has the highest thermal conductivity (0.413 W/(m K) at 20 °C) among the diverse composites. The latent heat capacity of paraffin/K4 is 119.49 J/g and the phase change temperature is 62.4 °C. In addition, the thermal properties and thermal conductivities of paraffin/K4 with different mass fraction of K4 (0–60%) were investigated. The thermal conductivities of the composites were explained in microcosmic field. The phonon mean free path determines the thermal conductivity, and it can be significantly affected by temperature and the contact surface area. The leaks, thermal storage and release properties of pure paraffin and paraffin/kaolin composites were investigated and the composites presented good thermal stabilities.

  12. Solvent-resistant organic transistors and thermally stable organic photovoltaics based on cross-linkable conjugated polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Hyeongjun

    2012-01-10

    Conjugated polymers, in general, are unstable when exposed to air, solvent, or thermal treatment, and these challenges limit their practical applications. Therefore, it is of great importance to develop new materials or methodologies that can enable organic electronics with air stability, solvent resistance, and thermal stability. Herein, we have developed a simple but powerful approach to achieve solvent-resistant and thermally stable organic electronic devices with a remarkably improved air stability, by introducing an azide cross-linkable group into a conjugated polymer. To demonstrate this concept, we have synthesized polythiophene with azide groups attached to end of the alkyl chain (P3HT-azide). Photo-cross-linking of P3HT-azide copolymers dramatically improves the solvent resistance of the active layer without disrupting the molecular ordering and charge transport. This is the first demonstration of solvent-resistant organic transistors. Furthermore, the bulk-heterojunction organic photovoltaics (BHJ OPVs) containing P3HT-azide copolymers show an average efficiency higher than 3.3% after 40 h annealing at an elevated temperature of 150 °C, which represents one of the most thermally stable OPV devices reported to date. This enhanced stability is due to an in situ compatibilizer that forms at the P3HT/PCBM interface and suppresses macrophase separation. Our approach paves a way toward organic electronics with robust and stable operations. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  13. General and simple approach for control cage and cylindrical mesopores, and thermal/hydrothermal stable frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, Sherif A; Mizukami, Fujio; Hanaoka, Takaaki

    2005-05-19

    Highly ordered cage and cylindrical mesoporeous silica monoliths (HOM) with 2- and 3-dimensional (2D and 3D, respectively) structures, mesopore/micropore volumes, and thick-walled frameworks were successfully fabricated by instant direct templating of lyotropic phases of copolymer (EO(m)-PO(n)-EO(m)) surfactants. Large cage-like pores with uniform constriction sizes up to 10 nm and open cylindrical channel-like mesopores can be easily achieved by this simple and efficient synthesis design. Our results show that the cage-like pores could be fabricated at relatively lower copolymer concentrations used in the lyotropic phase domains at copolymer/TMOS ratios of 35 wt %. These ordered cage pore architectures underwent transition to open-cylindrical pores by increasing the copolymer concentration. High EO/PO block copolymers, in general, were crucially affected on the increase of the interior cavity sizes and on the stability of the cage mesopore characters. However, for F108 (EO(141)PO(44)EO(141)) systems, the fabrication of ordered and stable cage pore monoliths was achieved with significantly higher copolymer concentrations up to 90 wt %. Interestingly, the effective copolymer molecular nature was also observed in the ability to design various ordered mesophase geometries in large domain sizes. Our findings here show evidence that the synthetic strategy provides realistic control over a wide range of mesostructured phase geometries and their extended long-range ordering in the final replicas of the silica monolith frameworks. In addition, the HOM silica monoliths exhibited considerable structural stability against higher thermal temperature (up to 1000 degrees C) and longer hydrothermal treatment times under boiling water and steam. The remarkable structural findings of 3D frameworks, transparent monoliths, and micropores combined with large cage- and cylindrical-like mesopores are expected to find promising uses in materials chemistry.

  14. Preparation and thermal energy storage properties of paraffin/calcined diatomite composites as form-stable phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Zhiming [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Chemistry Discipline, Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia); Zhang, Yuzhong [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Zheng, Shuilin, E-mail: shuilinzh@yahoo.com.cn [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Park, Yuri [Chemistry Discipline, Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia); Frost, Ray L., E-mail: r.frost@qut.edu.au [Chemistry Discipline, Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia)

    2013-04-20

    Highlights: ► Composite phase change material (PCM) was prepared by blending composite paraffin and calcined diatomite. ► The optimum mixed proportion was obtained through differential scanning calorimetry. ► Thermal energy storage properties of the composite PCMs were determined by DSC. ► Thermal cycling test showed that the prepared PCMs are thermally reliable and chemically stable. - Abstract: A composite paraffin-based phase change material (PCM) was prepared by blending composite paraffin and calcined diatomite through the fusion adsorption method. In this study, raw diatomite was purified by thermal treatment in order to improve the adsorption capacity of diatomite, which acted as a carrier material to prepare shape-stabilized PCMs. Two forms of paraffin (paraffin waxes and liquid paraffin) with different melting points were blended together by the fusion method, and the optimum mixed proportion with a suitable phase-transition temperature was obtained through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. Then the prepared composite paraffin was adsorbed in calcined diatomite. The prepared paraffin/calcined diatomite composites were characterized by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) analysis techniques. Thermal energy storage properties of the composite PCMs were determined by DSC method. DSC results showed that there was an optimum adsorption ratio between composite paraffin and calcined diatomite and the phase-transition temperature and the latent heat of the composite PCMs were 33.04 °C and 89.54 J/g, respectively. Thermal cycling test of composite PCMs showed that the prepared material is thermally reliable and chemically stable. The obtained paraffin/calcined diatomite composites have proper latent heat and melting temperatures, and show practical significance and good potential application value.

  15. Preparation and thermal energy storage properties of paraffin/calcined diatomite composites as form-stable phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zhiming; Zhang, Yuzhong; Zheng, Shuilin; Park, Yuri; Frost, Ray L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Composite phase change material (PCM) was prepared by blending composite paraffin and calcined diatomite. ► The optimum mixed proportion was obtained through differential scanning calorimetry. ► Thermal energy storage properties of the composite PCMs were determined by DSC. ► Thermal cycling test showed that the prepared PCMs are thermally reliable and chemically stable. - Abstract: A composite paraffin-based phase change material (PCM) was prepared by blending composite paraffin and calcined diatomite through the fusion adsorption method. In this study, raw diatomite was purified by thermal treatment in order to improve the adsorption capacity of diatomite, which acted as a carrier material to prepare shape-stabilized PCMs. Two forms of paraffin (paraffin waxes and liquid paraffin) with different melting points were blended together by the fusion method, and the optimum mixed proportion with a suitable phase-transition temperature was obtained through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. Then the prepared composite paraffin was adsorbed in calcined diatomite. The prepared paraffin/calcined diatomite composites were characterized by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) analysis techniques. Thermal energy storage properties of the composite PCMs were determined by DSC method. DSC results showed that there was an optimum adsorption ratio between composite paraffin and calcined diatomite and the phase-transition temperature and the latent heat of the composite PCMs were 33.04 °C and 89.54 J/g, respectively. Thermal cycling test of composite PCMs showed that the prepared material is thermally reliable and chemically stable. The obtained paraffin/calcined diatomite composites have proper latent heat and melting temperatures, and show practical significance and good potential application value

  16. Investigation of the Solvis stratification inlet pipe for solar tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Jordan, Ulrike; Shah, Louise Jivan

    2004-01-01

    Since the 1960’ties the influence of the thermal stratification in hot water tanks on the thermal performance of solar heating systems has been studied intensively. It was found, that the thermal performance of a solar heating system is increasing for increasing thermal stratification in the hot...... water tank. The temperature of the storage water heated by the solar collector loop usually varies strongly during the day. In order to reach a good thermal stratification in the tank, different types of pipes, plates, diffusers and other devices have been investigated in the past (e.g. Loehrke, 1979...... plates inside the pipes (Davidson, 1992) or openings in form of balls (e.g. Leibfried, 2000) or flaps (e.g. described in Krause, 2001) have entered the market during the recent years. In this paper an investigation of a stratification pipe with openings covered with flaps according to (Krause, 2001...

  17. STRATIFICATION IN WASTE STABILIZATION PONDS II: MODELLING

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NIJOTECH

    The occurrence of thermal stratification in waste stabilization ponds (WSPs) alters the flow pattern of the pond. ... compared favourably with the experimental observation with coefficients of correlation ranging from .... is determined experimentally by sampling in the region of the pond inlet at various depths. Four models exist ...

  18. Modeling Multimodal Stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeriis, Morten

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses one of the core axioms of social semiotic theory, namely stratification, in the light of developments in multimodality in recent years. The discussion takes a point of departure in the approaches to stratification taken by Hjelmslev, Halliday, and Kress and van Leeuwen....... The article outlines a theoretical experiment exploring how an alternative way of modeling stratification and instantiation may raise some interesting ideas on the concepts of realization dynamics, system-instance, and the different contexts of the semiotic text. This is elaborated in a discussion of how...... the relationship between stratification and instantiation in the multimodal instantiation of resources at different strata may provide a new approach to mapping out the dynamics of multimodal meaning making....

  19. Stearic–capric acid eutectic/activated-attapulgiate composite as form-stable phase change material for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Shaokun; Dong, Lijie; Chen, Shun; Xie, Haian; Xiong, Chuanxi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • S–C/a-ATP form-stable PCM was prepared by vacuum fusion method. • Maximum mass fraction of S–C in composite without leakage is as high as 50 wt%. • The phase change temperature and latent heat is measured to be 21.8 °C and 72.6 J/g. • Thermal and chemical reliable with respect to a large number of thermal cycling. • The S–C/a-ATP has great potential in building energy conservation. - Abstract: The aim of this research was to prepare a novel form-stable PCMs (FSPCM) for latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) in low temperature, by incorporating eutectic mixture of stearic-capric acid (S–C) into activated-attapulgite (a-ATP) which acted as supporting material in the composite. The a-ATP is open-ended tubular capillary with large specific surface area, which is beneficial for the adsorption of PCMs. The maximum mass fraction of stearic-capric binary fatty acid loaded in a-ATP is determined as high as 50 wt% without melted S–C seepage from the composite. The phase change temperatures and latent heats of FSPCM are measured to be 21.8 °C and 72.6 J/g for melting process, and 20.3 °C and 71.9 J/g for freezing process, respectively, indicating it has suitable phase change temperature and high latent heat storage capacity. Moreover, the S–C/a-ATP FSPCM shows good thermal and chemical reliability after 1000 times thermal cycling test, which is identified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR). Therefore, the S–C/a-ATP FSPCM is an effective LHTES building material to reduce energy consumption

  20. Stable isotopes use in hydrogeology studies of mineral and thermal waters (Lindoia region, Sao Paulo, Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinaga, S.; Silva, A.A.K. de; Matsui, E.

    1991-01-01

    Deuterium and oxygen-18 studies were used to investigate the origin and the mineralizing processes of the mineral water and thermal water in Aguas de Lindoia and Lindoia, Brazilian municipal districts. (M.V.M.)

  1. Thermally stable, transparent, pressure-sensitive adhesives from epoxidized and dihydroxyl soybean oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, B Kollbe; Kraft, Stefan; Wang, D; Sun, X Susan

    2011-05-09

    Thermal stability and optical transparency are important factors for flexible electronics and heat-related applications of pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs). However, current acryl- and rubber-based PSAs cannot attain the required thermal stability, and silicon-based PSAs are much more expensive than the alternatives. Oleo-chemicals including functionalized plant oils have great potential to replace petrochemicals. In this study, novel biobased PSAs from soybean oils were developed with excellent thermal stability and transparency as well as peel strength comparable to current PSAs. In addition, the fast curing (drying) property of newly developed biobased PSAs is essential for industrial applications. The results show that soybean oil-based PSA films and tapes have great potential to replace petro-based PSAs for a broad range of applications including flexible electronics and medical devices because of their thermal stability, transparency, chemical resistance, and potential biodegradability from triglycerides.

  2. Chemically and Thermally Stable High Energy Density Silicone Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal energy storage systems with 300 -- 1000 kJ/kg energy density through either phase changes or chemical heat absorption are sought by NASA. This proposed...

  3. Fabrication of extremely thermal-stable GaN template on Mo substrate using double bonding and step annealing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Wang; Yang, Liu; Yongjian, Sun; Yuzhen, Tong; Guoyi, Zhang

    2016-08-01

    A new layer transfer technique which comprised double bonding and a step annealing process was utilized to transfer the GaN epilayer from a sapphire substrate to a Mo substrate. Combined with the application of the thermal-stable bonding medium, the resulting two-inch-diameter GaN template showed extremely good stability under high temperature and low stress state. Moreover, no cracks and winkles were observed. The transferred GaN template was suitable for homogeneous epitaxial, thus could be used for the direct fabrication of vertical LED chips as well as power electron devices. It has been confirmed that the double bonding and step annealing technique together with the thermal-stable bonding layer could significantly improve the bonding strength and stress relief, finally enhancing the thermal stability of the transferred GaN template. Project supported by the Guangdong Innovative Research Team Program (No. 2009010044), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No. 2014M562233), the National Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong, China (No. 2015A030312011), and the Opened Fund of the State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics (No. IOSKL2014KF17).

  4. Preparation, Characterization and Thermal Properties of Paraffin Wax – Expanded Perlite Form-Stable Composites for Latent Heat Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugba GURMEN OZCELIK

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, form-stable composite phase change materials (PCM for latent heat storage were prepared by impregnating paraffin wax into the pores of the expanded perlite (EP. The characterization of the composite PCMs was performed by FTIR, TGA, SEM and DSC analysis. The melting point and heat of fusion were determined for 25 % paraffin included composite, as 54.3 °C and 94.71 J/g and for 45 % paraffin included composite as 53.6 °C and 106.69 J/g, respectively. The FTIR results showed that there were no chemical reaction between the perlite and paraffin. TGA analysis indicated that both composite PCMs had good thermal stability. SEM images showed that the paraffin was dispersed uniformly into the pores and on the EP surface. There was no leakage and degradation at the composite PCMs after heating and cooling cycles. According to the results, both prepared composites showed good thermal energy storage properties, reliability and stability. All results suggested that the presented form- stable composite PCMs has great potential for thermal energy storage applications.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.13661

  5. Light stable isotope study of the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Southwestern Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrs D.T.; Bowman, J.R.

    1980-05-01

    The isotopic composition of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon has been determined for regional cold springs, thermal fluids, and rocks and minerals from the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area. The geothermal system has developed within plutonic granitic rocks and amphibolite facies gneiss, relying upon fracture-controlled permeability for the migration of the thermal fluids. Probably originating as meteoric waters in the upper elevations of the Mineral Mountains, the thermal waters sampled in the production wells display an oxygen isotopic shift of at least +1.2. Depletions of delta /sup 18/O in wole rock, K-feldspar, and biotite have a positive correlation with alteration intensity. W/R mass ratios, calculated from the isotopic shifts of rock and water, range up to 3.0 in a producing horizon of one well, although the K-feldspar has experienced only 30% exchange with the thermal waters. While veinlet quartz has equilibrated with the thermal waters, the /sup 18/O values of K-mica clay, an alteration product of plagioclase, mimic the isotopic composition of K-feldspar and whole rock. This suggests that locally small W/R ratios enable plagioclase to influence its alteration products by isotopic exchange.

  6. Cluster-assembled cubic zirconia films with tunable and stable nanoscale morphology against thermal annealing

    KAUST Repository

    Borghi, F.

    2016-08-05

    Nanostructured zirconium dioxide (zirconia) films are very promising for catalysis and biotechnological applications: a precise control of the interfacial properties of the material at different length scales and, in particular, at the nanoscale, is therefore necessary. Here, we present the characterization of cluster-assembled zirconia films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition possessing cubic structure at room temperature and controlled nanoscale morphology. We characterized the effect of thermal annealing in reducing and oxidizing conditions on the crystalline structure, grain dimensions, and topography. We highlight the mechanisms of film growth and phase transitions, which determine the observed interfacial morphological properties and their resilience against thermal treatments. Published by AIP Publishing.

  7. Cluster-assembled cubic zirconia films with tunable and stable nanoscale morphology against thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghi, F.; Lenardi, C.; Podestà, A.; Milani, P., E-mail: pmilani@mi.infn.it [CIMAINA and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Sogne, E. [CIMAINA and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); European School of Molecular Medicine (SEMM), IFOM-IEO, Milano (Italy); Merlini, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra “Ardito Desio”, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Mangiagalli 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ducati, C. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-07

    Nanostructured zirconium dioxide (zirconia) films are very promising for catalysis and biotechnological applications: a precise control of the interfacial properties of the material at different length scales and, in particular, at the nanoscale, is therefore necessary. Here, we present the characterization of cluster-assembled zirconia films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition possessing cubic structure at room temperature and controlled nanoscale morphology. We characterized the effect of thermal annealing in reducing and oxidizing conditions on the crystalline structure, grain dimensions, and topography. We highlight the mechanisms of film growth and phase transitions, which determine the observed interfacial morphological properties and their resilience against thermal treatments.

  8. Thermal-stable proteins of fruit of long-living Sacred Lotus Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn var. China Antique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen-Miller, J; Lindner, Petra; Xie, Yongming; Villa, Sarah; Wooding, Kerry; Clarke, Steven G; Loo, Rachel R O; Loo, Joseph A

    2013-09-01

    Single-seeded fruit of the sacred lotus Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn var. China Antique from NE China have viability as long as ~1300 years determined by direct radiocarbon-dating, having a germination rate of 84%. The pericarp, a fruit tissue that encloses the single seeds of Nelumbo , is considered one of the major factors that contribute to fruit longevity. Proteins that are heat stable and have protective function may be equally important to seed viability. We show proteins of Nelumbo fruit that are able to withstand heating, 31% of which remained soluble in the 110°C-treated embryo-axis of a 549-yr-old fruit and 76% retained fluidity in its cotyledons. Genome of Nelumbo is published. The amino-acid sequences of 11 "thermal proteins" (soluble at 100°C) of modern Nelumbo embryo-axes and cotyledons, identified by mass spectrometry, Western blot and bioassay, are assembled and aligned with those of an archaeal-hyperthermophile Methancaldococcus jannaschii (Mj; an anaerobic methanogen having a growth optimum of 85°C) and with five mesophile angiosperms. These thermal proteins have roles in protection and repair under stress. More than half of the Nelumbo thermal proteins (55%) are present in the archaean Mj, indicating their long-term durability and history. One Nelumbo protein-repair enzyme exhibits activity at 100°C, having a higher heat-tolerance than that of Arabidopsis. A list of 30 sequenced but unassembled thermal proteins of Nelumbo is supplemented.

  9. High-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar thermal storage materials using AZO/graphene hybrids by optimizing hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wen; Feng, Yiyu; Qin, Chengqun; Li, Man; Li, Shipei; Cao, Chen; Long, Peng; Liu, Enzuo; Hu, Wenping; Yoshino, Katsumi; Feng, Wei

    2015-10-21

    An important method for establishing a high-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar heat system is by designing and preparing novel photo-isomerizable molecules with a high enthalpy and a long thermal life by controlling molecular interactions. A meta- and ortho-bis-substituted azobenzene chromophore (AZO) is covalently grafted onto reduced graphene oxide (RGO) for solar thermal storage materials. High grafting degree and close-packed molecules enable intermolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) for both trans-(E) and cis-(Z) isomers of AZO on the surface of nanosheets, resulting in a dramatic increase in enthalpy and lifetime. The metastable Z-form of AZO on RGO is thermally stabilized with a half-life of 52 days by steric hindrance and intermolecular H-bonds calculated using density functional theory (DFT). The AZO-RGO fuel shows a high storage capacity of 138 Wh kg(-1) by optimizing intermolecular H-bonds with a good cycling stability for 50 cycles induced by visible light at 520 nm. Our work opens up a new method for making advanced molecular solar thermal storage materials by tuning molecular interactions on a nano-template.

  10. Thermally stable cellulose nanocrystals toward high-performance 2D and 3D nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao Jia; Huiyang Bian; Tingting Gao; Feng Jiang; Iain Michael Kierzewski; Yilin Wang; Yonggang Yao; Liheng Chen; Ziqiang Shao; J. Y. Zhu; Liangbing Hu

    2017-01-01

    Cellulose nanomaterials have attracted much attention in a broad range of fields such as flexible electronics, tissue engineering, and 3D printing for their excellent mechanical strength and intriguing optical properties. Economic, sustainable, and eco-friendly production of cellulose nanomaterials with high thermal stability, however, remains a tremendous challenge....

  11. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, January 1995--March 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C. [and others

    1995-06-01

    Quantitative structure-property relationships have been applied to study the thermal stability of pure hydrocarbons typical of jet fuel components. A simple method of chemical structure description in terms of Benson groups was tested in searching for structure-property relationships for the hydrocarbons tested experimentally in this program. Molecular connectivity as a structure-based approach to chemical structure-property relationship analysis was also tested. Further development of both the experimental data base and computational methods will be necessary. Thermal decomposition studies, using glass tube reactors, were extended to two additional model compounds: n-decane and n-dodecane. Efforts on refining the deposit growth measurement and characterization of suspended matter in stressed fuels have lead to improvements in the analysis of stressed fuels. Catalytic hydrogenation and dehydrogenation studies utilizing a molybdenum sulfide catalyst are also described.

  12. Thermally Stable Cellulose Nanocrystals toward High-Performance 2D and 3D Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chao; Bian, Huiyang; Gao, Tingting; Jiang, Feng; Kierzewski, Iain Michael; Wang, Yilin; Yao, Yonggang; Chen, Liheng; Shao, Ziqiang; Zhu, J Y; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-08-30

    Cellulose nanomaterials have attracted much attention in a broad range of fields such as flexible electronics, tissue engineering, and 3D printing for their excellent mechanical strength and intriguing optical properties. Economic, sustainable, and eco-friendly production of cellulose nanomaterials with high thermal stability, however, remains a tremendous challenge. Here versatile cellulose nanocrystals (DM-OA-CNCs) are prepared through fully recyclable oxalic acid (OA) hydrolysis along with disk-milling (DM) pretreatment of bleached kraft eucalyptus pulp. Compared with the commonly used cellulose nanocrystals from sulfuric acid hydrolysis, DM-OA-CNCs show several advantages including large aspect ratio, carboxylated surface, and excellent thermal stability along with high yield. We also successfully demonstrate the fabrication of high-performance films and 3D-printed patterns using DM-OA-CNCs. The high-performance films with high transparency, ultralow haze, and excellent thermal stability have the great potential for applications in flexible electronic devices. The 3D-printed patterns with porous structures can be potentially applied in the field of tissue engineering as scaffolds.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Thermally Stable Photocurable Polymer with Cyclohexane Moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Mm; Yu, Seong Hun; Lee, Jun Young

    2016-03-01

    Photocurable polymers with high transparency and thermal stability were synthesized by reaction between a commercial epoxy resin (NC9110) containing cyclohexane moiety and various kinds of cinnamic acids such as trans-cinnamic acid (CA), 3-hydroxy-trans-cinnamic acid (HCA) and 4-methoxy-trans-cinnamic acid (MCA). The photocurable polymers were synthesized with equal equivalent weight ratio of epoxy and cinnamate group. The chemical structures of the synthesized polymers were confirmed by 1H-NMR and FT-IR spectroscopies. Optical transmittance and thermal stability of the photocured polymers were investigated using UV-Visible spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. It was confirmed that the polymers could form thin films with very smooth surface and could be efficiently cured by UV irradiation. It was also found that the polymer after curing showed a good thermal stability and optical transmittance. There was no significant transmittance change after heat treatment at 250 degrees C for 1 h and showed no noticeable weight loss up to 360 degrees C.

  14. Penetration of steady fluid motions into an outer stable layer excited by MHD thermal convection in rotating spherical shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehiro, Shin-ichi; Sasaki, Youhei

    2018-03-01

    Penetration of steady magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) disturbances into an upper strongly stratified stable layer excited by MHD thermal convection in rotating spherical shells is investigated. The theoretical model proposed by Takehiro (2015) is reexamined in the case of steady fluid motion below the bottom boundary. Steady disturbances penetrate into a density stratified MHD fluid existing in the semi-infinite region in the vertical direction. The axis of rotation of the system is tilted with respect to the vertical. The basic magnetic field is uniform and may be tilted with respect to the vertical and the rotation axis. Linear dispersion relation shows that the penetration distance with zero frequency depends on the amplitude of Alfvén wave speed. When Alfvén wave speed is small, viscous diffusion becomes dominant and penetration distance is similar to the horizontal scale of the disturbance at the lower boundary. In contrast, when Alfvén wave speed becomes larger, disturbance can penetrate deeper, and penetration distance becomes proportional to the Alfvén wave speed and inversely proportional to the geometric average of viscous and magnetic diffusion coefficients and to the total horizontal wavenumber. The analytic expression of penetration distance is in good agreement with the extent of penetration of mean zonal flow induced by finite amplitude convection in a rotating spherical shell with an upper stably stratified layer embedded in an axially uniform basic magnetic field. The theory expects that the stable layer suggested in the upper part of the outer core of the earth could be penetrated completely by mean zonal flows excited by thermal/compositional convection developing below the stable layer.

  15. Preparation and characterization of form-stable paraffin/polyurethane composites as phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Keping; Yu, Xuejiang; Tian, Chunrong; Wang, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Paraffin/polyurethane composite as form-stable phase change material was prepared by bulk polymerization. • Paraffin/polyurethane composite possesses typical character of dual phase transition. • Total latent heat of n-eicosane/PUPCM is as high as 141.2 J/g. • Maximum encapsulation ratio for n-octadecane/PUPCM composites is 25% w/w. - Abstract: Polyurethane phase change material (PUPCM) has been demonstrated to be effective solid–solid phase change material for thermal energy storage. However, the high cost and complex process on preparation of PUPCMs with high enthalpy and broad phase transition temperature range can prohibit industrial-scale applications. In this work, a series of novel form-stable paraffin/PUPCMs composites (n-octadecane/PUPCM, n-eicosane/PUPCM and paraffin wax/PUPCM) with high enthalpy and broad phase transition temperature range (20–65 °C) were directly synthesized via bulk polymerization. The composites were prepared at different mass fractions of n-octadecane (10, 20, 25, 30% w/w). The results indicated that the maximum encapsulation ratio for n-octadecane/PUPCM10000 composites was around 25% w/w. The chemical structure and crystalline properties of these composites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), polarizing optical microscopy (POM), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). Thermal properties and thermal reliability of the composites were determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). From DSC analysis, the composites showed a typical dual phase change temperature. The enthalpy for the composite with 25% w/w n-eicosane was as high as 141.2 J/g. TGA analysis indicated that the composites degraded at considerably high temperatures. The process of preparation of PUPCMs and their composites was very simple, inexpensive, environmental friendly and easy to process into desired shapes, which could find the promising applications in solar

  16. Cold stratification, but not stratification in salinity, enhances seedling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cold stratification, but not stratification in salinity, enhances seedling growth of wheat under salt treatment. L Wang, HL Wang, CH Yin, CY Tian. Abstract. Cold stratification was reported to release seed dormancy and enhance plant tolerance to salt stress. Experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that cold ...

  17. Cold stratification, but not stratification in salinity, enhances seedling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-10-26

    Oct 26, 2011 ... Cold stratification was reported to release seed dormancy and enhance plant tolerance to salt stress. Experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that cold stratification and cold stratification in salinity could enhance seedling growth of wheat under salt treatment. The results clearly demonstrated.

  18. Migration and stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasso, Guillermina

    2011-09-01

    Migration and stratification are increasingly intertwined. One day soon it will be impossible to understand one without the other. Both focus on life chances. Stratification is about differential life chances - who gets what and why - and migration is about improving life chances - getting more of the good things of life. To examine the interconnections of migration and stratification, we address a mix of old and new questions, carrying out analyses newly enabled by a unique new data set on recent legal immigrants to the United States (the New Immigrant Survey). We look at immigrant processing and lost documents, depression due to the visa process, presentation of self, the race-ethnic composition of an immigrant cohort (made possible by the data for the first time since 1961), black immigration from Africa and the Americas, skin-color diversity among couples formed by U.S. citizen sponsors and immigrant spouses, and English fluency among children age 8-12 and their immigrant parents. We find, inter alia, that children of previously illegal parents are especially more likely to be fluent in English, that native-born U.S. citizen women tend to marry darker, that immigrant applicants who go through the visa process while already in the United States are more likely to have their documents lost and to suffer visa depression, and that immigration, by introducing accomplished black immigrants from Africa (notably via the visa lottery), threatens to overturn racial and skin color associations with skill. Our analyses show the mutual embeddedness of migration and stratification in the unfolding of the immigrants' and their children's life chances and the impacts on the stratification structure of the United States.

  19. Diketopyrrolopyrrole-based polymer:fullerene nanoparticle films with thermally stable morphology for organic photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Natalie P. [Univ. of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW (Australia). Centre for Organic Electronics; Vaughan, Ben [Univ. of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW (Australia). Centre for Organic Electronics; CSIRO Energy Technology, Newcastle (Australia); Williams, Evan L. [Inst. of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), Agency for Science, Technology, and Research (A*STAR), Singapore (Singapore); Kroon, Renee [Univ. of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, SA (Australia). Ian Wark Research Inst.; Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering/Polymer Technology; Anderrson, Mats R. [Univ. of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, SA (Australia). Ian Wark Research Inst.; Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering/Polymer Technology; Kilcoyne, A. L. David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source (ALS); Sonar, Prashant [Inst. of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), Agency for Science, Technology, and Research (A*STAR), Singapore (Singapore); Queensland Univ. of Technology (QUT), Brisbane (Australia). School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering; Zhou, Xiaojing [Univ. of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW (Australia). Centre for Organic Electronics; Dastoor, Paul C. [Univ. of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW (Australia). Centre for Organic Electronics; Belcher, Warwick J. [Univ. of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW (Australia). Centre for Organic Electronics

    2017-02-02

    Polymer:fullerene nanoparticles (NPs) offer two key advantages over bulk heterojunction (BHJ) films for organic photovoltaics (OPVs), water-processability and potentially superior morphological control. Once an optimal active layer morphology is reached, maintaining this morphology at OPV operating temperatures is key to the lifetime of a device. Here in this paper we study the morphology of the PDPP-TNT (poly{3,6-dithiophene-2-yl-2,5-di(2-octyldodecyl)-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4-dione-alt-naphthalene}):PC71BM ([6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester) NP system and then compare the thermal stability of NP and BHJ films to the common poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT): phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) system. We find that material Tg plays a key role in the superior thermal stability of the PDPP-TNT:PC71BM system; whereas for the P3HT:PC61BM system, domain structure is critical.

  20. Fabrication of robust and thermally stable superhydrophobic nanocomposite coatings based on thermoplastic polyurethane and silica nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyfi, Javad [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafari, Seyed Hassan, E-mail: shjafari@ut.ac.ir [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khonakdar, Hossein Ali [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Strasse 6, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Sadeghi, Gity Mir Mohamad [Department of Polymer Engineering & Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zohuri, Gholamhossein [Polymer Group, Faculty of Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hejazi, Iman [Department of Polymer Engineering & Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Simon, Frank [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Strasse 6, D-01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Superhydrophobic coatings were prepared from an intrinsically hydrophilic polymer. • The superhydrophobicity remained intact at elevated temperatures. • Polyurethane plays a key role in improving the mechanical robustness of the coatings. • A complete surface coverage of nanosilica is necessary for superhydrophobicity. - Abstract: In this paper, superhydrophobic nanocomposite coatings based on thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and modified nanosilica were fabricated using a simple solution-based method. The main challenge was to impart superhydrophobicity to an intrinsically hydrophilic polymer substrate. The prepared nanocomposite coatings were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Based on the obtained results, it was proved that in order to achieve superhydrophobicity, no TPU macromolecule should be present on the coating's top layer, thus a complete coverage of coating's top layer by nanosilica particles was necessary for achieving ultra water repellent coatings. Mechanical and thermal resistance of the coatings, which are the main challenges in commercializing superhydrophobic surfaces, were also studied by drop impact and thermal annealing tests, respectively. It was proved that using TPU as a sublayer results in improving mechanical resistance of the coatings as compared with the pure silica nanocoating. Moreover, the samples showed an excellent resistance against elevated temperatures (150 °C) and remained superhydrophobic; however, further increment of the annealing temperatures to 200 °C caused the TPU macromolecules to migrate onto the top layer of the coatings significantly reducing the water repellency, which was visually proved by SEM.

  1. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, November 1992--January 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Walsh, P.M.; Coleman, M.M.; Arumugam, R.; Bortiatynski, J.; Dutta, R.; Gergova, K.; Hou, L.; Lai, W-C.; Li, J.; McKinney, D.; Peng, Y.; Sanghani, P.; Selvaraj, L.; Sobkowiak, M.

    1993-03-01

    The pyrolysis of octylbenzene (OB) at various temperatures, 400{degrees}C, 425{degrees}C and 450{degrees}C, has been studied. This work represents a continuous effort in the study of the effects of alkylbenzenes in the high temperature thermal degradation of jet fuels, following up the detailed study of the behavior of four isomers of butylbenzenes (1). There are some general similarities in the reactions of OB and butylbenzenes. For example, both produce a large amount of smaller alkylbenzenes during pyrolysis. Reaction kinetics of OB have been calculated based on the temperature range mentioned above, and the major chemical process in its thermal reactions have been analyzed. As expected, temperature plays the most significant role in the degradation process, as shown in Figure 1. The reaction shows only a moderate rate at 400{degrees}C, 8.18 mol% of OB remaining after 16 hours of stressing. At 450{degrees}C, however, there is virtually no OB left after 8 hours of stressing. Rough comparison of the yields (wt%) of gaseous, liquid and solid products formed (Figures 2, 3 and 4) shows a uniform change in this temperature range. For example, a steady increase of the yields (wt%) of gas and solid formation can be observed in Figures 2 and 3. Global kinetics of the reaction of octylbenzene have been calculated.

  2. Intrinsic Flame-Retardant and Thermally Stable Epoxy Endowed by a Highly Efficient, Multifunctional Curing Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlei Dong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to realize flame retardancy of epoxy without suffering much detriment in thermal stability. To solve the problem, a super-efficient phosphorus-nitrogen-containing reactive-type flame retardant, 10-(hydroxy(4-hydroxyphenylmethyl-5,10-dihydrophenophosphazinine-10-oxide (HB-DPPA is synthesized and characterized. When it is used as a co-curing agent of 4,4′-methylenedianiline (DDM for curing diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA, the cured epoxy achieves UL-94 V-0 rating with the limiting oxygen index of 29.3%. In this case, the phosphorus content in the system is exceptionally low (0.18 wt %. To the best of our knowledge, it currently has the highest efficiency among similar epoxy systems. Such excellent flame retardancy originates from the exclusive chemical structure of the phenophosphazine moiety, in which the phosphorus element is stabilized by the two adjacent aromatic rings. The action in the condensed phase is enhanced and followed by pressurization of the pyrolytic gases that induces the blowing-out effect during combustion. The cone calorimeter result reveals the formation of a unique intumescent char structure with five discernible layers. Owing to the super-efficient flame retardancy and the rigid molecular structure of HB-DPPA, the flame-retardant epoxy acquires high thermal stability and its initial decomposition temperature only decreases by 4.6 °C as compared with the unmodified one.

  3. Thermally Stable Solution Processed Vanadium Oxide as a Hole Extraction Layer in Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsulami, Abdullah; Griffin, Jonathan; Alqurashi, Rania; Yi, Hunan; Iraqi, Ahmed; Lidzey, David; Buckley, Alastair

    2016-03-25

    Low-temperature solution-processable vanadium oxide (V₂O x ) thin films have been employed as hole extraction layers (HELs) in polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells. V₂O x films were fabricated in air by spin-coating vanadium(V) oxytriisopropoxide (s-V₂O x ) at room temperature without the need for further thermal annealing. The deposited vanadium(V) oxytriisopropoxide film undergoes hydrolysis in air, converting to V₂O x with optical and electronic properties comparable to vacuum-deposited V₂O₅. When s-V₂O x thin films were annealed in air at temperatures of 100 °C and 200 °C, OPV devices showed similar results with good thermal stability and better light transparency. Annealing at 300 °C and 400 °C resulted in a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 5% with a decrement approximately 15% lower than that of unannealed films; this is due to the relative decrease in the shunt resistance (R sh ) and an increase in the series resistance (R s ) related to changes in the oxidation state of vanadium.

  4. Fabrication of robust and thermally stable superhydrophobic nanocomposite coatings based on thermoplastic polyurethane and silica nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfi, Javad; Jafari, Seyed Hassan; Khonakdar, Hossein Ali; Sadeghi, Gity Mir Mohamad; Zohuri, Gholamhossein; Hejazi, Iman; Simon, Frank

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, superhydrophobic nanocomposite coatings based on thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and modified nanosilica were fabricated using a simple solution-based method. The main challenge was to impart superhydrophobicity to an intrinsically hydrophilic polymer substrate. The prepared nanocomposite coatings were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Based on the obtained results, it was proved that in order to achieve superhydrophobicity, no TPU macromolecule should be present on the coating's top layer, thus a complete coverage of coating's top layer by nanosilica particles was necessary for achieving ultra water repellent coatings. Mechanical and thermal resistance of the coatings, which are the main challenges in commercializing superhydrophobic surfaces, were also studied by drop impact and thermal annealing tests, respectively. It was proved that using TPU as a sublayer results in improving mechanical resistance of the coatings as compared with the pure silica nanocoating. Moreover, the samples showed an excellent resistance against elevated temperatures (150 °C) and remained superhydrophobic; however, further increment of the annealing temperatures to 200 °C caused the TPU macromolecules to migrate onto the top layer of the coatings significantly reducing the water repellency, which was visually proved by SEM.

  5. Thermally stable single-atom platinum-on-ceria catalysts via atom trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, John; Xiong, Haifeng; DelaRiva, Andrew; Peterson, Eric J.; Pham, Hien; Challa, Sivakumar R.; Qi, Gongshin; Oh, Se H.; Wiebenga, Michelle H.; Pereira Hernandez, Xavier I.; Wang, Yong; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2016-07-08

    Catalysts based on single atoms of scarce precious metals can lead to more efficient use through enhanced reactivity and selectivity. However, single atoms on catalyst supports can be mobile and aggregate into nanoparticles when heated at elevated temperatures. High temperatures are detrimental to catalyst performance unless these mobile atoms can be trapped. We used ceria powders having similar surface areas but different exposed surface facets. When mixed with a platinum/ aluminum oxide catalyst and aged in air at 800°C, the platinum transferred to the ceria and was trapped. Polyhedral ceria and nanorods were more effective than ceria cubes at anchoring the platinum. Performing synthesis at high temperatures ensures that only the most stable binding sites are occupied, yielding a sinter-resistant, atomically dispersed catalyst.

  6. A functional form-stable phase change composite with high efficiency electro-to-thermal energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Wenhao; Huang, Xinyu; Li, Kai; Yao, Ruimin; Chen, Renjie; Zou, Ruqiang

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The thermal conductivity of PU was enhanced to 43 times of the pristine value by encapsulation in a PGF, PU@PGF can be used for highly efficient electro-to-heat energy conversion and storage with the highest energy storage efficiency up to 85%. - Highlights: • The composite exhibits an in-situ solid-solid phase change behavior. • The enthalpy of polyurethane is enhanced within the matrix. • The thermal conductivity of the composite is 43 times as much as that of the polyurethane. • Supercooling of polyurethane is greatly reduced. • The composite is applied to cold protection as a wear layer. - Abstract: A novel solid-to-solid phase change composite brick was prepared by combination of polyurethane (PU) and pitch-based graphite foam (PGF). The carbonaceous support, which can be used for mass production, not only greatly improves the thermal conductivity but promote electro-to-heat conversion efficiency of organic phase change materials (PCMs). Our composite retained the enthalpy of PCM and exhibited a greatly reduced supercooling temperature. The novel composite was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The enthalpy of polyurethane has increased about 8.6% after infiltrating into graphite foam. The composite was very stable during thermal cycle test, and the electro-to-heat conversion efficiency achieves to 85% at lower voltages (1.5–1.8 V), which can vastly reduce energy consumption. The as-prepared composite was used in a wear layer to test its performance comparing with normal fabric.

  7. Synthesis, Characterization and Biological Studies of New Linear Thermally Stable Schiff Base Polymers with Flexible Spacers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Farah; Khuhawar, Muhammad Yar; Jahangir, Taj Muhammad; Channar, Abdul Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Five new linear Schiff base polymers having azomethine structures, ether linkages and extended aliphatic chain lengths with flexible spacers were synthesized by polycondensation of dialdehyde (monomer) with aliphatic and aromatic diamines. The formation yields of monomer and polymers were obtained within 75-92%. The polymers with flexible spacers of n-hexane were somewhat soluble in acetone, chloroform, THF, DMF and DMSO on heating. The monomer and polymers were characterized by melting point, elemental microanalysis, FT-IR, (1)HNMR, UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA), fluorescence emission, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and viscosities and thermodynamic parameters measurements of their dilute solutions. The studies supported formation of the monomer and polymers and on the basis of these studies their structures have been assigned. The synthesized polymers were tested for their antibacterial and antifungal activities.

  8. Note: A thermally stable tension meter for atmospheric soundings using kites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walesby, K T; Harrison, R G

    2010-07-01

    Kites offer considerable potential as wind speed sensors--a role distinct from their traditional use as instrument-carrying platforms. In the sensor role, wind speed is measured by kite-line tension. A kite tether line tension meter is described here, using strain gauges mounted on an aluminum ring in a Wheatstone bridge electronic circuit. It exhibits a linear response to tension (19.5 mV N(-1)) with good thermal stability (mean drift of -0.18 N degrees C(-1) over 5-45 degrees C temperature range) and a rapid time response (0.2 s or better). Field comparisons of tether line tension for a Rokkaku kite with a fixed tower sonic anemometer show an approximately linear tension-wind speed relationship over the range 1-6 ms(-1).

  9. Cost-effective fabrication of thermal- and chemical-stable ZIF-9 nanocrystals at ammonia atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Arash; Mansournia, Mohammadreza

    2017-12-01

    In this study, room temperature synthesis of zeolitic imidazolate framework-9 (ZIF-9) nanocrystals is reported for the first time at ammonia atmosphere in the absence of any organic additive. High thermal stability of the as-fabricated ZIF-9 up to 300 °C is illustrated by TG and XRD data. Also, the chemical resistance of product to harsh and severe solvothermal conditions introduces it to be an objective as potential material in many applications. Besides, the modest microporosity of the as-obtained ZIF-9 materials attracts more attentions for further investigation compared to those fabricated in organic solvents. By and large, the represented low-cost and room temperature synthetic method can be applicable in the large scale preparation of ZIF-9 for potentially practical utilization.

  10. Preparation and properties of lauric acid/silicon dioxide composites as form-stable phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Guiyin, E-mail: gyfang@nju.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Hankou Road 22, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093 (China); Li Hui [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu Xu [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Hankou Road 22, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093 (China)

    2010-08-01

    Form-stable lauric acid (LA)/silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) composite phase change materials were prepared using sol-gel methods. The LA was used as the phase change material for thermal energy storage, with the SiO{sub 2} acting as the supporting material. The structural analysis of these form-stable LA/SiO{sub 2} composite phase change materials was carried out using Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope (FT-IR). The microstructure of the form-stable composite phase change materials was observed by a scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The thermal properties and thermal stability were investigated by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and a thermogravimetric analysis apparatus (TGA), respectively. The SEM results showed that the LA was well dispersed in the porous network of SiO{sub 2}. The DSC results indicated that the melting latent heat of the form-stable composite phase change material is 117.21 kJ kg{sup -1} when the mass percentage of the LA in the SiO{sub 2} is 64.8%. The results of the TGA showed that these materials have good thermal stability. The form-stable composite phase change materials can be used for thermal energy storage in waste heat recovery and solar heating systems.

  11. Preparation and properties of lauric acid/silicon dioxide composites as form-stable phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Guiyin; Li Hui; Liu Xu

    2010-01-01

    Form-stable lauric acid (LA)/silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ) composite phase change materials were prepared using sol-gel methods. The LA was used as the phase change material for thermal energy storage, with the SiO 2 acting as the supporting material. The structural analysis of these form-stable LA/SiO 2 composite phase change materials was carried out using Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope (FT-IR). The microstructure of the form-stable composite phase change materials was observed by a scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The thermal properties and thermal stability were investigated by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and a thermogravimetric analysis apparatus (TGA), respectively. The SEM results showed that the LA was well dispersed in the porous network of SiO 2 . The DSC results indicated that the melting latent heat of the form-stable composite phase change material is 117.21 kJ kg -1 when the mass percentage of the LA in the SiO 2 is 64.8%. The results of the TGA showed that these materials have good thermal stability. The form-stable composite phase change materials can be used for thermal energy storage in waste heat recovery and solar heating systems.

  12. Preparation, characterization and thermal properties of styrene maleic anhydride copolymer (SMA)/fatty acid composites as form stable phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari, Ahmet; Alkan, Cemil; Karaipekli, Ali; Onal, Adem

    2008-01-01

    Fatty acids such as stearic acid (SA), palmitic acid (PA), myristic acid (MA) and lauric acid (LA) are promising phase change materials (PCMs) for latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) applications, but high cost is the major drawback of them, limiting their utility area in thermal energy storage. The use of fatty acids as form stable PCMs will increase their feasibilities in practical applications due to the reduced cost of the LHTES system. In this regard, a series of styrene maleic anhydride copolymer (SMA)/fatty acid composites, SMA/SA, SMA/PA, SMA/MA, and SMA/LA, were prepared as form stable PCMs by encapsulation of fatty acids into the SMA, which acts as a supporting material. The encapsulation ratio of fatty acids was as much as 85 wt.% and no leakage of fatty acid was observed even when the temperature of the form stable PCM was over the melting point of the fatty acid in the composite. The prepared form stable composite PCMs were characterized using optic microscopy (OM), viscosimetry and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy methods, and the results showed that the SMA was physically and chemically compatible with the fatty acids. In addition, the thermal characteristics such as melting and freezing temperatures and latent heats of the form stable composite PCMs were measured by using the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique, which indicated they had good thermal properties. On the basis of all the results, it was concluded that form stable SMA/fatty acid composite PCMs had important potential for practical LHTES applications such as under floor space heating of buildings and passive solar space heating of buildings by using wallboard, plasterboard or floors impregnated with a form stable PCM due to their satisfying thermal properties, easy preparation in desired dimensions, direct usability without needing additional encapsulation thereby eliminating the thermal resistance caused by the shell and, thus, reducing the cost of

  13. Preparation, characterization and thermal properties of styrene maleic anhydride copolymer (SMA)/fatty acid composites as form stable phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sari, Ahmet; Alkan, Cemil; Karaipekli, Ali; Oenal, Adem [Department of Chemistry, Gaziosmanpasa University, 60240, Tokat (Turkey)

    2008-02-15

    Fatty acids such as stearic acid (SA), palmitic acid (PA), myristic acid (MA) and lauric acid (LA) are promising phase change materials (PCMs) for latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) applications, but high cost is the major drawback of them, limiting their utility area in thermal energy storage. The use of fatty acids as form stable PCMs will increase their feasibilities in practical applications due to the reduced cost of the LHTES system. In this regard, a series of styrene maleic anhydride copolymer (SMA)/fatty acid composites, SMA/SA, SMA/PA, SMA/MA, and SMA/LA, were prepared as form stable PCMs by encapsulation of fatty acids into the SMA, which acts as a supporting material. The encapsulation ratio of fatty acids was as much as 85 wt.% and no leakage of fatty acid was observed even when the temperature of the form stable PCM was over the melting point of the fatty acid in the composite. The prepared form stable composite PCMs were characterized using optic microscopy (OM), viscosimetry and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy methods, and the results showed that the SMA was physically and chemically compatible with the fatty acids. In addition, the thermal characteristics such as melting and freezing temperatures and latent heats of the form stable composite PCMs were measured by using the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique, which indicated they had good thermal properties. On the basis of all the results, it was concluded that form stable SMA/fatty acid composite PCMs had important potential for practical LHTES applications such as under floor space heating of buildings and passive solar space heating of buildings by using wallboard, plasterboard or floors impregnated with a form stable PCM due to their satisfying thermal properties, easy preparation in desired dimensions, direct usability without needing additional encapsulation thereby eliminating the thermal resistance caused by the shell and, thus, reducing the cost of

  14. Thermally stable pn-junctions based on a single transparent perovskite semiconductor BaSnO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoon Min; Kim, Useong; Park, Chulkwon; Kwon, Hyukwoo; Char, Kookrin

    2016-05-01

    We report p-doping of the BaSnO3 (BSO) by replacing Ba with K. The activation energy of K-dopants is estimated to be about 0.5 eV. We have fabricated pn junctions by using K-doped BSO as a p-type and La-doped BSO as an n-type semiconductor. I-V characteristics of these devices exhibit an ideal rectifying behavior of pn junctions with the ideality factor between 1 and 2, implying high integrity of the BSO materials. Moreover, the junction properties are found to be very stable after repeated high-bias and high-temperature thermal cycling, demonstrating a large potential for optoelectronic functions.

  15. Thermally stable pn-junctions based on a single transparent perovskite semiconductor BaSnO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoon Min Kim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report p-doping of the BaSnO3 (BSO by replacing Ba with K. The activation energy of K-dopants is estimated to be about 0.5 eV. We have fabricated pn junctions by using K-doped BSO as a p-type and La-doped BSO as an n-type semiconductor. I-V characteristics of these devices exhibit an ideal rectifying behavior of pn junctions with the ideality factor between 1 and 2, implying high integrity of the BSO materials. Moreover, the junction properties are found to be very stable after repeated high-bias and high-temperature thermal cycling, demonstrating a large potential for optoelectronic functions.

  16. Thermally stable coexistence of liquid and solid phases in gallium nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losurdo, Maria; Suvorova, Alexandra; Rubanov, Sergey; Hingerl, Kurt; Brown, April S.

    2016-09-01

    Gallium (Ga), a group III metal, is of fundamental interest due to its polymorphism and unusual phase transition behaviours. New solid phases have been observed when Ga is confined at the nanoscale. Herein, we demonstrate the stable coexistence, from 180 K to 800 K, of the unexpected solid γ-phase core and a liquid shell in substrate-supported Ga nanoparticles. We show that the support plays a fundamental role in determining Ga nanoparticle phases, with the driving forces for the nucleation of the γ-phase being the Laplace pressure in the nanoparticles and the epitaxial relationship of this phase to the substrate. We exploit the change in the amplitude of the evolving surface plasmon resonance of Ga nanoparticle ensembles during synthesis to reveal in real time the solid core formation in the liquid Ga nanoparticle. Finally, we provide a general framework for understanding how nanoscale confinement, interfacial and surface energies, and crystalline relationships to the substrate enable and stabilize the coexistence of unexpected phases.

  17. STRATIFICATION IN WASTE STABILIZATION PONDS I: EFFECTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NIJOTECH

    within the pond. Hence thermal stratification resulted in the variation of BOD values within the vertical water column with the maximum value of 1149.5mg/l at the bottom and a mini mum value of 450mg/l at the surface layers as shown in Figures 3c, 3d and 5 to 10. Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD). The vertical distribution of ...

  18. PEG/SiO2–Al2O3 hybrid form-stable phase change materials with enhanced thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Bingtao; Wu, Cheng; Qiu, Meige; Zhang, Xiwen; Zhang, Shufen

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of form-stable PEG/SiO 2 phase change material (PCM) was enhanced by in situ doping of Al 2 O 3 using an ultrasound-assisted sol–gel method. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was used to characterize the structure, and the crystal performance was characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) were used to determine the thermal properties. The phase change enthalpy of PEG/SiO 2 –Al 2 O 3 reached 124 J g −1 , and thermal conductivity improved by 12.8% for 3.3 wt% Al 2 O 3 in the PCM compared with PEG/SiO 2 . The hybrid PCM has excellent thermal stability and form-stable effects. - Highlights: • The PEG/SiO 2 –Al 2 O 3 hybrid form-stable phase change material (PCM) was obtained through the sol–gel method. • The inexpensive aluminum nitrate and tetraethyl orthosilicate were used as sol precursors. • This organic–inorganic hybrid process can effectively enhance the thermal conductivity of PCMs. • The PCM exhibited high thermal stability and excellent form-stable effects

  19. PEG/SiO{sub 2}–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} hybrid form-stable phase change materials with enhanced thermal conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Bingtao, E-mail: tangbt@dlut.edu.cn; Wu, Cheng; Qiu, Meige; Zhang, Xiwen; Zhang, Shufen

    2014-03-01

    The thermal conductivity of form-stable PEG/SiO{sub 2} phase change material (PCM) was enhanced by in situ doping of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using an ultrasound-assisted sol–gel method. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was used to characterize the structure, and the crystal performance was characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) were used to determine the thermal properties. The phase change enthalpy of PEG/SiO{sub 2}–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reached 124 J g{sup −1}, and thermal conductivity improved by 12.8% for 3.3 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the PCM compared with PEG/SiO{sub 2}. The hybrid PCM has excellent thermal stability and form-stable effects. - Highlights: • The PEG/SiO{sub 2}–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} hybrid form-stable phase change material (PCM) was obtained through the sol–gel method. • The inexpensive aluminum nitrate and tetraethyl orthosilicate were used as sol precursors. • This organic–inorganic hybrid process can effectively enhance the thermal conductivity of PCMs. • The PCM exhibited high thermal stability and excellent form-stable effects.

  20. Inlet stratification device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    An inlet stratification (5) is adapted to be arranged vertically in a tank (1) during operation. The stratification device (5) comprises an inlet pipe (6) formed of a flexible porous material and having a lower and upper end. The lower end of the inlet pipe (6) is connected to a bottom cap (10......) with an inlet passage way (16). The upper end of the inlet pipe (6) is connected with a top cap (9). The top cap (9) and the bottom cap (10) are mutually connected by means of a wire (8) and the top cap (9) is configured as a floating device providing a buoyancy force larger than the downwardly directed force...... due to the wire (8), the inlet pipe (6) and any deposited on the above pass during operation....

  1. Study on thermal property of lauric–palmitic–stearic acid/vermiculite composite as form-stable phase change material for energy storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The form-stable composite phase change material of lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture/vermiculite was prepared by vacuum impregnation method for thermal energy storage. The maximum mass fraction of lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture retained in vermiculite was determined as 50 wt% without melted phase change material seepage from the composite phase change material. Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope and scanning electron microscope were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the prepared lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture/vermiculite form-stable composite phase change material, and the results indicate that lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture was well confined into the layer porous structure of vermiculite by physical reaction. The melting and freezing temperatures and latent heats were measured by differential scanning calorimeter as 31.4°C and 30.3°C, and 75.8 and 73.2 J/g, respectively. Thermal cycling test showed that there was no significant change in the thermal properties of lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture/vermiculite form-stable composite phase change material after 1000 thermal cycles. Moreover, 2 wt% expanded graphite was added to improve the thermal conductivity of lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture/vermiculite form-stable composite phase change material. All results indicated that the prepared lauric–palmitic–stearic acid ternary eutectic mixture/vermiculite form-stable composite phase change material had suitable thermal properties and good thermal reliability for the application of thermal energy storage in building energy efficiency.

  2. Novel highly dispersible, thermally stable core/shell proppants for geothermal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childers, Ian M.; Endres, Mackenzie; Burns, Carolyne; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Liu, Jian; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Bonneville, Alain; Moore, Joseph; Leavy, Ian I.; Zhong, Lirong; Schaef, Herbert T.; Fu, Li; Wang, Hong-Fei; Fernandez, Carlos A.

    2017-11-01

    The use of proppants during reservoir stimulation in tight oil and gas plays requires the introduction of highly viscous fluids to transport the proppants (µm–mm) with the fracturing fluid. The highly viscous fluids required result in increased pump loads and energy costs. Furthermore, although proppant deployment with fracturing fluids is a standard practice for unconventional oil and gas stimulation operations, there are only a few examples in the US of the applying proppant technology to geothermal energy production. This is due to proppant dissolution, proppant flowback and loss of permeability associated with the extreme temperatures found in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). This work demonstrates proof-of-concept of a novel, CO2-responsive, lightweight sintered-bauxite/polymer core/shell proppant. The polymer shell has two main roles; 1) increase the stability of the proppant dispersion in water without the addition of rheology modifiers, and 2) once at the fracture network react with CO2 to promote particle aggregation and prop fractures open. In this work, both of these roles are demonstrated together with the thermal and chemical stability of the materials showing the potential of these CO2-responsive proppants as an alternative proppant technology for geothermal and unconventional oil/gas applications.

  3. Anti-adhesive layers on stainless steel using thermally stable dipodal perfluoroalkyl silanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaynak, Baris; Alpan, Cüneyt; Kratzer, Markus; Ganser, Christian; Teichert, Christian; Kern, Wolfgang

    2017-09-01

    In this study steel surfaces are modified with dipodal perfluoroalkyl organosilanes and the resulting wetting properties and surface morphologies are analyzed. Dipodal silane monomers with different fluoroalkyl spacer lengths are synthesized via hydrosilylation reaction. The modification of stainless steel surfaces is performed in a two-step procedure comprising a corona activation of the steel surface and the subsequent reaction of surface hydroxyl groups with the dipodal silanes from the liquid phase. Anti-adhesive behavior on the surface is achieved through the modification. The attachment of the dipodal silanes on the stainless steel surface is validated with infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The wetting properties of the dipodal silane layers are investigated by contact angle measurements and adhesive force measurements. Atomic force microscopy is used to characterize the surface roughness and morphologies. Stainless steel modified with the dipodal perfluoroalkyl silanes exhibits low surface energy and low adhesive force compared to the unmodified steel surface. The thermal stability of coatings based on dipodal silanes is higher when compared to layers based on conventional monopodal organosilanes.

  4. Characterisation and Modification of Thermally Stable High Explosives for Laser Flyer Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, A.; Claridge, R. P.; Proud, W. G.; Johnson, N. A.

    2007-12-01

    Laser initiation offers improved weapon survivability, versatility and greater Insensitive Munitions (IM) compliance. Detonators based on laser-driven flyers are less vulnerable to electrical initiation and can be based on insensitive secondary explosives. Additionally, this technology will offer advantages in terms of improved flexibility and reliability. Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) and nonanitro-m-terphenyl (NONA) were selected for investigation at QinetiQ as their increased thermal stability over conventional explosives makes them ideal candidates for use in insensitive munition compliant applications. The response of these materials to short duration high-amplitude shock impulses provided by exploding foil initiators (EFI), the electrical equivalent of a laser-driven flyer system, was investigated. Preparation techniques including sonication and the incorporation of additives were used to sensitize the materials to flyer impact, yet maintain their insensitivity to external hazards. Sonication significantly reduced the particle size of both HNS and NONA. The reduced-size explosives exhibited increased sensitivity to EFI impact than the starting materials.

  5. Fabrication of Water Jet Resistant and Thermally Stable Superhydrophobic Surfaces by Spray Coating of Candle Soot Dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qahtan, Talal F; Gondal, Mohammed A; Alade, Ibrahim O; Dastageer, Mohammed A

    2017-08-08

    A facile synthesis method for highly stable carbon nanoparticle (CNP) dispersion in acetone by incomplete combustion of paraffin candle flame is presented. The synthesized CNP dispersion is the mixture of graphitic and amorphous carbon nanoparticles of the size range of 20-50 nm and manifested the mesoporosity with an average pore size of 7 nm and a BET surface area of 366 m 2 g -1 . As an application of this material, the carbon nanoparticle dispersion was spray coated (spray-based coating) on a glass surface to fabricate superhydrophobic (water contact angle > 150° and sliding angle fabricated from direct candle flame soot deposition (candle-based coating). This study proved that water jet resistant and thermally stable superhydrophobic surfaces can be easily fabricated by simple spray coating of CNP dispersion gathered from incomplete combustion of paraffin candle flame and this technique can be used for different applications with the potential for the large scale fabrication.

  6. Structurally Deformed MoS2 for Electrochemically Stable, Thermally Resistant, and Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Chang; Lu, Ang-Yu; Lu, Ping; Yang, Xiulin; Jiang, Chang-Ming; Mariano, Marina; Kaehr, Bryan; Lin, Oliver; Taylor, André; Sharp, Ian D; Li, Lain-Jong; Chou, Stanley S; Tung, Vincent

    2017-11-01

    The emerging molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) offers intriguing possibilities for realizing a transformative new catalyst for driving the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). However, the trade-off between catalytic activity and long-term stability represents a formidable challenge and has not been extensively addressed. This study reports that metastable and temperature-sensitive chemically exfoliated MoS 2 (ce-MoS 2 ) can be made into electrochemically stable (5000 cycles), and thermally robust (300 °C) while maintaining synthetic scalability and excellent catalytic activity through physical-transformation into 3D structurally deformed nanostructures. The dimensional transition enabled by a high throughput electrohydrodynamic process provides highly accessible, and electrochemically active surface area and facilitates efficient transport across various interfaces. Meanwhile, the hierarchically strained morphology is found to improve electronic coupling between active sites and current collecting substrates without the need for selective engineering the electronically heterogeneous interfaces. Specifically, the synergistic combination of high strain load stemmed from capillarity-induced-self-crumpling and sulfur (S) vacancies intrinsic to chemical exfoliation enables simultaneous modulation of active site density and intrinsic HER activity regardless of continuous operation or elevated temperature. These results provide new insights into how catalytic activity, electrochemical-, and thermal stability can be concurrently enhanced through the physical transformation that is reminiscent of nature, in which properties of biological materials emerge from evolved dimensional transitions. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Structurally Deformed MoS2 for Electrochemically Stable, Thermally Resistant, and Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yen-Chang

    2017-10-12

    The emerging molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) offers intriguing possibilities for realizing a transformative new catalyst for driving the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). However, the trade-off between catalytic activity and long-term stability represents a formidable challenge and has not been extensively addressed. This study reports that metastable and temperature-sensitive chemically exfoliated MoS2 (ce-MoS2) can be made into electrochemically stable (5000 cycles), and thermally robust (300 °C) while maintaining synthetic scalability and excellent catalytic activity through physical-transformation into 3D structurally deformed nanostructures. The dimensional transition enabled by a high throughput electrohydrodynamic process provides highly accessible, and electrochemically active surface area and facilitates efficient transport across various interfaces. Meanwhile, the hierarchically strained morphology is found to improve electronic coupling between active sites and current collecting substrates without the need for selective engineering the electronically heterogeneous interfaces. Specifically, the synergistic combination of high strain load stemmed from capillarity-induced-self-crumpling and sulfur (S) vacancies intrinsic to chemical exfoliation enables simultaneous modulation of active site density and intrinsic HER activity regardless of continuous operation or elevated temperature. These results provide new insights into how catalytic activity, electrochemical-, and thermal stability can be concurrently enhanced through the physical transformation that is reminiscent of nature, in which properties of biological materials emerge from evolved dimensional transitions.

  8. Influence of vertical stratification on motion in a differentially heated rotating annulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubnov, B. M.; Golitsyn, G. S.

    Understanding the influence of vertical stratification on large scale motions is of prime geophysical interest for both the stable and unstable cases. Here we present a generalization of the Lorenz (1962) model which includes externally imposed stratifications of either sign. Various flow regimes are determined, according to the values of the thermal Rossby number RoT the nondimensional rotation rate and the ratio of temperature differences in the vertical, , and horizontal directions, T. It is found that the stability curve in the RoT,R plane, while preserving its general shape which was found by Hide (1953,1969) for T=0, moves towards the lower right with increasing T>0, other conditions being equal, and to the upper left for the slightly unstable case. The curve separates the Hadley axisymmetrical regimes from the Rossby wave regimes. Introduction of a bulk Richardson number helps to separate regular and irregular wave regimes for the case of unstable stratification. Laboratory experiments with a differentially heated (both horizontally and vertically) rotating annulus confirm qualitatively all the main conclusions of the theoretical analysis for a broad range of the parameter space in which the experiments were performed. The results obtained here may also explain the damping of cyclones in the Martian atmosphere after the onset of global dust storms (Ryan and Henry, 1979) and the attenuation of synoptic activity in numerical experiments modelling the atmospheric consequences of nuclear war (Schneider, 1985). The results are also related to the nature of the stable stratification of the majority of planetary atmospheres even for conditions when the prime radiative equilibrium temperature gradient is unstable.

  9. Controllable and repeatable synthesis of thermally stable anatase nanocrystal-silica composites with highly ordered hexagonal mesostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Weiyang; Sun, Yaojun; Lee, Chul Wee; Hua, Weiming; Lu, Xinchun; Shi, Yifeng; Zhang, Shicheng; Chen, Jianmin; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2007-11-14

    In this article, we report a controllable and reproducible approach to prepare highly ordered 2-D hexagonal mesoporous crystalline TiO2-SiO2 nanocomposites with variable Ti/Si ratios (0 to infinity). XRD, TEM, and N2 sorption techniques have been used to systematically investigate the pore wall structure, and thermal stability functioned with the synthetic conditions. The resultant materials are ultra highly stable (over 900 degrees C), have large uniform pore diameters (approximately 6.8 nm), and have high Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface areas (approximately 290 m2/g). These mesostructured TiO2-SiO2 composites were obtained using titanium isopropoxide (TIPO) and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as precursors and triblock copolymer P123 as a template based on the solvent evaporation-induced co-self-assembly process under a large amount of HCl. Our strategy was the synchronous assembly of titanate and silicate oligomers with triblock copolymer P123 by finely tuning the relative humidity of the surrounding atmosphere and evaporation temperature according to the Ti/Si ratio. We added a large amount of acidity to lower condensation and polymerization rates of TIPO and accelerate the rates for TEOS molecules. TEM and XRD measurements clearly show that the titania is made of highly crystalline anatase nanoparticles, which are uniformly embedded in the pore walls to form the "bricked-mortar" frameworks. The amorphous silica acts as a glue linking the TiO2 nanocrystals and improves the thermal stability. As the silica contents increase, the thermal stability of the resulting mesoporous TiO2-SiO2 nanocomposites increases and the size of anatase nanocrystals decreases. Our results show that the unique composite frameworks make the mesostructures overwhelmingly stable; even with high Ti/Si ratios (> or =80/20) the stability of the composites is higher than 900 degrees C. The mesoporous TiO2-SiO2 nanocomposites exhibit excellent photocatalytic activities (which are

  10. High-temperature stable absorber coatings for linear concentrating solar thermal power plants; Hochtemperaturstabile Absorberschichten fuer linear konzentrierende solarthermische Kraftwerke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrandt, Christina

    2009-03-23

    This work describes the development of new absorber coatings for different applications - para-bolic trough and linear Fresnel collectors - and operating conditions - absorber in vacuum or in air. The demand for higher efficiencies of solar thermal power plants using parabolic trough technology results in higher temperatures in the collectors and on the absorber tubes. As heat losses increase strongly with increasing temperatures, the need for a lower emissivity of the absorber coating at constant absorptivity arises. The linear Fresnel application envisions ab-sorber tubes stable in air at high temperatures of about 450 C, which are to date commercially not available. This work comprises the theoretical background, the modeling and the fabrication of absorber tubes including the technology transfer to a production-size inline sputter coater. In annealing tests and accompanying optical measurements, degradation processes have been observed and specified more precisely by material characterization techniques. The simulations provided the capability of different materials used as potential IR-reflector. The highest selectivity can be achieved by applying silver which consequently has been chosen for the application in absorber coatings of the parabolic trough technology. Thin silver films how-ever need to be stabilized when used at high temperatures. Appropriate barrier layers as well as process and layer parameters were identified. A high selectivity was achieved and stability of the absorber coating for 1200 h at 500 C in vacuum has been demonstrated. For the application in air, silver was also analyzed as a potential IR-reflector. Even though the stability could be increased considerably, it nevertheless proved to be insufficient. The main factors influencing stability in a positive way are the use of higher quality polishing, additional barrier layers and adequate process parameters. This knowledge was applied for developing coatings which are stable in air at

  11. Examining possible effects of seawater pH decline on foraminiferal stable isotopes during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, Joji; Zeebe, Richard E.

    2010-06-01

    A large body of paleoceanographic data for the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is based on foraminiferal stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition (δ13C and δ18O). However, the proxy records could be biased due to a “pH effect” on stable isotopes during times when the ocean became more acidic, as has been demonstrated for modern planktonic foraminifera. In this paper, we calculate the possible ranges of the pH effect on δ13C and δ18O during the PETM based on the relative pH decline (ΔpH) from the preperturbation steady state simulated by a carbon cycle model and the empirical relationships obtained from culture experiments with planktonic foraminifera. The model is configured with Eocene paleogeography and simulates ΔpH for surface, intermediate, and deep water in the major ocean basins in response to various carbon input scenarios (2000 to 5000 Pg C). For an array of scenarios, the modeled ΔpH of the surface ocean ranges from 0.1 to 0.28 units. This suggests that δ13C of planktonic foraminifera may be increased by up to 2.1‰ and δ18O may be increased by up to 0.7‰ (corresponding to over 3°C error in paleotemperature estimate). Under conditions in which the model best simulates the global CaCO3 dissolution pattern, we find marked differences in the deep-sea ΔpH between the Atlantic (-0.4) and Pacific oceans (-0.1). This would imply that the magnitude of the negative δ13C and δ18O excursions of benthic foraminifera in the Atlantic Ocean was dampened by up to 2.8‰ and 0.9‰ at maximum, respectively, relative to a constant pH scenario.

  12. Development of form stable Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) coated thermal phase change material for solar water heater applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munusamy, Y.; Shanmugam, S.; Shi-Ying, Kee

    2018-04-01

    Phase change material (PCM) is one of the most popular and widely used thermal energy storage material in solar water heater because it able to absorb and release a large amount of latent heat during a phase change process over a narrow temperature range. However the practical application of PCM is limited by two major issues; 1) leakage which leads to material loss and corrosion of tank and 2) large volume change during phase change process which cause pressure build up in the tank. In this work, form-stable PCM was prepared by coating myristic acid with Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to prevent leakage of PCM. PMMA was mixed with different weight percentage (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 wt%) of dicumyl peroxide (DCP). The purpose of adding DCP to PMMA is to crosslink the polymer and to increase the mechanical strength of PMMA to hold the myristic acid content inside the coating during the phase change process. Leakage test results showed that PMMA mixed with 0.1% DCP exhibit 0% leakage. This result is further supported by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) images and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis results, where a compact and uniform coating without cracks were formed for PCM coated with PMMA with 0.1% DCP. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results shows that the melting point of form-stable PCM is 55°C, freezing point is 50°C, the latent heat of melting and freezing is 67.59 J/g.

  13. Epoxy-Based Organogels for Thermally Reversible Light Scattering Films and Form-Stable Phase Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Julieta; Dell' Erba, Ignacio E; Schroeder, Walter F; Hoppe, Cristina E; Williams, Roberto J J

    2017-03-29

    Alkyl chains of β-hydroxyesters synthesized by the capping of terminal epoxy groups of diglycidylether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) with palmitic (C16), stearic (C18), or behenic (C22) fatty acids self-assemble forming a crystalline phase. Above a particular concentration solutions of these esters in a variety of solvents led to supramolecular (physical) gels below the crystallization temperature of alkyl chains. A form-stable phase change material (FS-PCM) was obtained by blending the ester derived from behenic acid with eicosane. A blend containing 20 wt % ester was stable as a gel up to 53 °C and exhibited a heat storage capacity of 161 J/g, absorbed during the melting of eicosane at 37 °C. Thermally reversible light scattering (TRLS) films were obtained by visible-light photopolymerization of poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate-ester blends (50 wt %) in the gel state at room temperature. The reaction was very fast and not inhibited by oxygen. TRLS films consisted of a cross-linked methacrylic network interpenetrated by the supramolecular network formed by the esters. Above the melting temperature of crystallites formed by alkyl chains, the film was transparent due to the matching between refractive indices of the methacrylic network and the amorphous ester. Below the crystallization temperature, the film was opaque because of light dispersion produced by the organic crystallites uniformly dispersed in the material. Of high significance for application was the fact that the contrast ratio did not depend on heating and cooling rates.

  14. Positron annihilation lifetime in float-zone n-type silicon irradiated by fast electrons: a thermally stable vacancy defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arutyunov, Nikolay [Martin Luther University Halle, Department of Physics, von-Danckelmann-Platz 3, 06120 Halle (Germany); Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Ion-Plasma and Laser Technologies (Institute of Electronics), 700170 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Emtsev, Vadim; Oganesyan, Gagik [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard [Martin Luther University Halle, Department of Physics, von-Danckelmann-Platz 3, 06120 Halle (Germany); Elsayed, Mohamed [Martin Luther University Halle, Department of Physics, von-Danckelmann-Platz 3, 06120 Halle (Germany); Minia University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, 61519 Minia (Egypt); Kozlovskii, Vitalii [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    Temperature dependency of the average positron lifetime has been investigated for n-type float-zone silicon, n-FZ-Si(P), subjected to irradiation with 0.9 MeV electrons at RT. In the course of the isochronal annealing a new defect-related temperature-dependent pattern of the positron lifetime spectra has been revealed. Beyond the well known intervals of isochronal annealing of acceptor-like defects such as E-centers, divacancies and A-centers, the positron annihilation at the vacancy defects has been observed in the course of the isochronal annealing from ∝ 320 C up to the limit of reliable detecting of the defect-related positron annihilation lifetime at ≥ 500 C. These data correlate with the ones of recovery of the concentration of the charge carriers and their mobility which is found to continue in the course of annealing to ∝ 570 C; the annealing is accomplished at ∝650 C. A thermally stable complex consisting of the open vacancy volume and the phosphorus impurity atom, V{sub op}-P, is suggested as a possible candidate for interpreting the data obtained by the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. An extended couple of semi-vacancies, 2V{sub s-ext}, as well as a relaxed inwards a couple of vacancies, 2V{sub inw}, are suggested as the open vacancy volume V{sub op} to be probed with the positron. It is argued that a high thermal stability of the V{sub s-ext} PV{sub s-ext} (or V{sub inw}PV{sub inw.}) configuration is contributed by the efficiency of PSi{sub 5} bonding. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. The Social Stratification of particular Collectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Štádlerová, Jana

    2011-01-01

    This bachelor's thesis is concerned with the social structure of population in Chodová Planá. The goal of this thesis is the analysis of social stratification in the village using application of stratification criteria of Warner's stratification model. The bachelor's thesis is divided into two main sections. Basic terms of the stratification theory, pre-stratification-theory, current stratification models and the criteria for their building, measuring and criticism of stratification are expla...

  16. Stratification in Natural Water Bodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jacob Steen

    2004-01-01

    Density stratification of natural water bodies plays an important role for a number of civil engineering problems. The origin of stratification in natural water is discussed and the Black Sea, the Gulf of Katchch, and Maarmorilik Fiord in Greenland are described and used as examples. Stratification...... of negative estuaries, immersing of tunnel elements, and others. The paper describes the methods available when the civil engineer encounters a stratification related problem: Field experimentation and monitoring, analytical methods, physical and numerical modelling. Finally the paper advocates...

  17. Intracellular surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) with thermally stable gold nanoflowers grown from Pt and Pd seeds

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hyon Min

    2013-01-01

    SERS provides great sensitivity at low concentrations of analytes. SERS combined with near infrared (NIR)-resonant gold nanomaterials are important candidates for theranostic agents due to their combined extinction properties and sensing abilities stemming from the deep penetration of laser light in the NIR region. Here, highly branched gold nanoflowers (GNFs) grown from Pd and Pt seeds are prepared and their SERS properties are studied. The growth was performed at 80°C without stirring, and this high temperature growth method is assumed to provide great shape stability of sharp tips in GNFs. We found that seed size must be large enough (>30 nm in diameter) to induce the growth of those SERS-active and thermally stable GNFs. We also found that the addition of silver nitrate (AgNO3) is important to induce sharp tip growth and shape stability. Incubation with Hela cells indicates that GNFs are taken up and reside in the cytoplasm. SERS was observed in those cells incubated with 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen)-loaded GNFs. This journal is © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  18. A novel strategy for the synthesis of thermally stable and apoptosis-inducing 2,3-dihydroazetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetanin, Ilia A; Novikov, Mikhail S; Agafonova, Anastasiya V; Rostovskii, Nikolai V; Khlebnikov, Alexander F; Kudryavtsev, Igor V; Terpilowski, Maxim A; Serebriakova, Maria K; Trulioff, Andrey S; Goncharov, Nikolay V

    2016-05-11

    A general and concise approach to thermally and hydrolytically stable alkyl 2,3-dihydroazete-2,3-di-/2,2,3-tricarboxylates from alkyl 2-bromoazirine-2-carboxylates or 4-bromo-5-alkoxyisoxazoles is reported. The synthesis involves the formation of 2-azabuta-1,3-diene by the reaction of rhodium carbenoid with isoxazole or azirine followed by cyclization/hydrodebromination cascade. The latter reaction is the first example of the selective hydrodehalogenation of a valence isomer under equilibrium conditions. In vitro cytotoxicity tests on THP-1 cell line revealed that the 2,3-dihydroazetes greatly differ in their ability to induce apoptosis and/or necrosis. To adequately describe and quantitatively assess these properties, the difference between the two areas under the curves of concentration dependency of apoptosis/necrosis induction within the concentration range was used. Trimethyl 4-phenyl-2,3-dihydroazete-2,2,3-tricarboxylate was found to display the maximal apoptotic potential coupled with high cytotoxic and minimal necrotic potential.

  19. Origin of thermally stable ferroelectricity in a porous barium titanate thin film synthesized through block copolymer templating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiro Suzuki

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A porous barium titanate (BaTiO3 thin film was chemically synthesized using a surfactant-assisted sol-gel method in which micelles of amphipathic diblock copolymers served as structure-directing agents. In the Raman spectrum of the porous BaTiO3 thin film, a peak corresponding to the ferroelectric tetragonal phase was observed at around 710 cm−1, and it remained stable at much higher temperature than the Curie temperature of bulk single-crystal BaTiO3 (∼130 °C. Measurements revealed that the ferroelectricity of the BaTiO3 thin film has high thermal stability. By analyzing high-resolution transmission electron microscope images of the BaTiO3 thin film by the fast Fourier transform mapping method, the spatial distribution of stress in the BaTiO3 framework was clearly visualized. Careful analysis also indicated that the porosity in the BaTiO3 thin film introduced anisotropic compressive stress, which deformed the crystals. The resulting elongated unit cell caused further displacement of the Ti4+ cation from the center of the lattice. This displacement increased the electric dipole moment of the BaTiO3 thin film, effectively enhancing its ferro(piezoelectricity.

  20. Fatty acid/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) blends as form-stable phase change materials for latent heat thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkan, Cemil; Sari, Ahmet [Gaziosmanpasa University, Department of Chemistry, Tasliciftlik, 60240 Tokat (Turkey)

    2008-02-15

    Fatty acids such as stearic acid (SA), palmitic acid (PA), myristic acid (MA), and lauric acid (LA) are promising phase change materials (PCMs) for latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) applications, but high cost is the most drawback which limits the utility area of them in thermal energy storage. The use of fatty acids as form-stable PCM will increase their feasibilities in practical LHTES applications due to reduced cost of the energy storage system. In this regard, a series of fatty acid/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) blends, SA/PMMA, PA/PMMA, MA/PMMA, and LA/PMMA were prepared as new kinds of form-stable PCMs by encapsulation of fatty acids into PMMA which acts as supporting material. The blends were prepared at different mass fractions of fatty acids (50, 60, 70, 80, and 90% w/w) to reach maximum encapsulation ratio. All blends were subjected to leakage test by heating the blends over the melting temperature of the PCM. The blends that do not allow leakage of melted PCM were identified as form-stable PCMs. The form-stable fatty acid/PMMA (80/20 wt.%) blends were characterized using optic microscopy (OM), viscosimetry, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy methods, and the results showed that the PMMA was compatible with the fatty acids. In addition, thermal characteristics such as melting and freezing temperatures and latent heats of the form-stable PCMs were measured by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique and indicated that they had good thermal properties. On the basis of all results, it was concluded that form-stable fatty acid/PMMA blends had important potential for some practical LHTES applications such as under floor space heating of buildings and passive solar space heating of buildings by using wallboard, plasterboard or floor impregnated with a form-stable PCM due to their satisfying thermal properties, easily preparing in desired dimensions, direct usability without needing an add encapsulation and

  1. Fatty acid eutectic/polymethyl methacrylate composite as form-stable phase change material for thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lijiu; Meng, Duo [School of Civil Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2010-08-15

    This work is focused on the preparation and characterization of fatty acid eutectic/polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) form-stable phase change material (PCM). Capric acid (CA), lauric acid (LA), myristic acid (MA) and stearic acid (SA) were selected to prepare binary fatty acid eutectic for the sake of decreasing the phase change temperature. Using the method of self-polymerization, CA-LA, CA-MA, CA-SA and LA-MA eutectics acting as the heat-absorbing materials and PMMA serving as the supporting material were compounded in the ratio of 50/50 wt.%. The relations between mass fraction of LA-MA eutectic and latent heat and compressive strength of LA-MA/PMMA composite were discussed, and the feasible maximum mass fraction of LA-MA eutectic was determined to be 70%. CA-LA/PMMA, CA-MA/PMMA, CA-SA/PMMA and LA-MA/PMMA composites were examined to investigate their potential application in building energy conservation. Scanning electron microscope and polarizing optical microscope observations showed that fatty acid eutectic was coated by PMMA thus the composite remained solid when the sample was heated above the melted point of the fatty acid. Fourier-transform infrared results indicated that fatty acid and PMMA had no chemical reaction and exhibited good compatibility with each other. According to the differential scanning calorimetry results, phase change temperatures of CA-LA/PMMA, CA-MA/PMMA, CA-SA/PMMA and LA-MA/PMMA composites were 21.11 C, 25.16 C, 26.38 C and 34.81 C and their latent heat values were determined to be 76.3 kJ/kg, 69.32 kJ/kg, 59.29 kJ/kg and 80.75 kJ/kg, respectively. Moreover, thermal stability and expansibility of the form-stable PCMs were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis and volume expansion coefficient respectively, and the results indicated that the composites were available for building energy conservation. (author)

  2. Limited range of interspecific vital effects in coccolith stable isotopic records during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Heather M.

    2005-03-01

    Small but significant differences exist among stable carbon and oxygen isotopic excursions measured in coccolith-dominated bulk carbonate and planktic foraminifera during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). One hypothesis suggests that the bulk carbonate isotopic record is compromised by changing nannofossil assemblages, since modern nannofossils show a large (5 permil) range of interspecific vital effects. New techniques are employed here to separate different size fractions of coccoliths from PETM sediments at ODP Site 690 for isotopic analysis, removing a major portion of the variation in nannofossil assemblages. Isotopic compositions of coarse and fine coccolith fractions dominated by coccoliths of genus Chiasmolithus and Toweius, respectively, differ by less than 0.5 permil for both oxygen and carbon. The near-monogeneric Toweius record closely parallels the main trends in the bulk carbonate isotope records, including multiple steps in the negative carbon isotopic excursion, suggesting that the trends in the bulk carbonate record are not artifacts of changing species assemblages. Because both coccolithophorids and symbiont-bearing foraminifera like Acarinina must inhabit the photic zone, it is unlikely that the 103 year lags in isotope event onset between coccoliths and Acarinina reflect true time-transgressive invasion of isotopically depleted CO2 into the water column. The small range of vital effects among Paleocene coccoliths is unlikely to result from diagenetic homogenization, and instead may reflect more similar carbon acquisition strategies of Paleocene coccolithophorid algae due to larger and/or more similar cell sizes and higher atmospheric carbon dioxide. The small range of vital effects suggests that bulk carbonate records are likely reliable for other early and pre-Cenozoic sediments where foraminifera are often scarce.

  3. Effect of pH decline on foraminiferal stable isotopes during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, J.; Zeebe, R. E.

    2009-12-01

    Pioneering culture experiments by Spero et al. (1997) demonstrated that seawater pH (or carbonate chemistry) has a marked effect on planktonic foraminiferal stable oxygen and carbon isotopes (δ18O and δ13C). Both δ18O and δ13C become isotopically heavier as seawater pH decreases (the “pH effect”). Several studies now argue that δ18O and δ13C of benthic foraminifera are similarly influenced by the pH effect. As a result, paleooceanographic information based on foraminiferal δ18O and δ13C can be significantly biased for the time-window during which seawater pH was notably different from the modern condition or varied rapidly. A prime example of such is the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). Widespread dissolution of sedimentary CaCO3 in the PETM strata (e.g., Zachos et al., 2005) suggests significant ocean acidification during this time interval. In this study, we examine the magnitude of the pH effect on foraminiferal δ18O and δ13C during the PETM. First we will estimate the relative pH decline from the pre-PETM steady state in the surface and deep ocean reservoirs in response to 2,000 ~ 5,000 Pg of carbon input using a carbon cycle model (Zeebe et al., 2009). We will then apply the empirical relationships obtained from the culture experiments by Spero et al. (1997) to calculate the ranges of errors in the foraminiferal δ18O and δ13C that could arise due to the pH effect during the PETM. {REFERENCES} Spero et al. (1997) Nature, v390, p497-500: Zachos et al. (2005) Science, v308, p1611-1615: Zeebe et al. (2009) Nature Geoscience, v2, p576-580.

  4. Risk stratification in stable coronary artery disease is possible at cardiac troponin levels below conventional detection and is improved by use of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbæk, Stig; Winkel, Per; Gøtze, Jens P

    2014-01-01

    /l. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with stable CAD, any detectable hs-cTnT level is significantly associated with all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, and myocardial infarction after adjustment for traditional risk factors and NT-pro-BNP. Excess mortality is particularly pronounced in patients with NT...... the conventional 99th percentile (13.5 ng/l) in 23%. Across all levels of hs-cTnT there was a graded increase in the risk of cardiovascular death after adjustment for known prognostic indicators: hazard ratio (HR) per unit increase in the natural logarithm of the hs-cTnT level, 1.49; 95% confidence interval (CI...

  5. Linear and nonlinear stability of a thermally stratified magnetically driven rotating flow in a cylinder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grants, Ilmars; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2010-07-01

    The stability of a thermally stratified liquid metal flow is considered numerically. The flow is driven by a rotating magnetic field in a cylinder heated from above and cooled from below. The stable thermal stratification turns out to destabilize the flow. This is explained by the fact that a stable stratification suppresses the secondary meridional flow, thus indirectly enhancing the primary rotation. The instability in the form of Taylor-Görtler rolls is consequently promoted. These rolls can only be excited by finite disturbances in the isothermal flow. A sufficiently strong thermal stratification transforms this nonlinear bypass instability into a linear one reducing, thus, the critical value of the magnetic driving force. A weaker temperature gradient delays the linear instability but makes the bypass transition more likely. We quantify the non-normal and nonlinear components of this transition by direct numerical simulation of the flow response to noise. It is observed that the flow sensitivity to finite disturbances increases considerably under the action of a stable thermal stratification. The capabilities of the random forcing approach to identify disconnected coherent states in a general case are discussed.

  6. Enhanced linear and nonlinear optical properties of thermally stable ZnO/poly(styrene)–poly(methyl methacrylate) nanocomposite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeeju, P.P.; Jayalekshmi, S.; Chandrasekharan, K.; Sudheesh, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highly transparent and thermally stable zinc oxide (ZnO)/poly(styrene)–poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS–PMMA) nanocomposite films have been deposited on glass substrates, from the ZnO incorporated (PS–PMMA) solutions in toluene, using spin coating technique. A chemical route at room temperature is used to synthesize the ZnO nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscope and high-resolution transmission electron microscope images show that the ZnO nanoparticles are of size around 10 nm. The composite films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, Ultraviolet–visible–Near Infrared (UV–vis–NIR) spectroscopy, Thermo-gravimetric analysis, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and Z-scan technique. From the UV–vis–NIR spectra it is observed that the ZnO/PS–PMMA nanocomposite films with 10 wt.% ZnO content exhibit excellent shielding property in the UV region and, high transparency in the visible region. The PL spectrum of the composite films is different from that of ZnO and PS–PMMA blend and exhibits an excitonic emission peak at ∼ 375 nm. The optical absorptive nonlinearity in the nanocomposite films is investigated using open aperture Z-scan technique. The results indicate optical limiting type nonlinearity in the films due to two photon absorption. A transmittance minimum of around 0.25 has been observed in the ZnO/PS–PMMA nanocomposite films which is much lower compared to that in ZnO/PMMA and ZnO/PS nanocomposite films. The ZnO/PS–PMMA nanocomposite films also show a self-defocusing type negative nonlinear refraction in closed aperture Z-scan experiment. These nanocomposite films extend ample scope of applications as excellent optical limiters and efficient UV protectors. - Highlights: ► Transparent, ZnO/poly(styrene)–poly(methyl methacrylate) composite films are prepared. ► The nanocomposite films with 10 wt.% ZnO content exhibit good UV-shielding property.

  7. Enhanced linear and nonlinear optical properties of thermally stable ZnO/poly(styrene)–poly(methyl methacrylate) nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeeju, P.P., E-mail: jeejupp@gmail.com [Division for Research in Advanced Materials, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi 682 022, Kerala (India); Jayalekshmi, S., E-mail: jayalekshmi@cusat.ac.in [Division for Research in Advanced Materials, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi 682 022, Kerala (India); Chandrasekharan, K.; Sudheesh, P. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Calicut, Kerala (India)

    2013-03-01

    Highly transparent and thermally stable zinc oxide (ZnO)/poly(styrene)–poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS–PMMA) nanocomposite films have been deposited on glass substrates, from the ZnO incorporated (PS–PMMA) solutions in toluene, using spin coating technique. A chemical route at room temperature is used to synthesize the ZnO nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscope and high-resolution transmission electron microscope images show that the ZnO nanoparticles are of size around 10 nm. The composite films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, Ultraviolet–visible–Near Infrared (UV–vis–NIR) spectroscopy, Thermo-gravimetric analysis, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and Z-scan technique. From the UV–vis–NIR spectra it is observed that the ZnO/PS–PMMA nanocomposite films with 10 wt.% ZnO content exhibit excellent shielding property in the UV region and, high transparency in the visible region. The PL spectrum of the composite films is different from that of ZnO and PS–PMMA blend and exhibits an excitonic emission peak at ∼ 375 nm. The optical absorptive nonlinearity in the nanocomposite films is investigated using open aperture Z-scan technique. The results indicate optical limiting type nonlinearity in the films due to two photon absorption. A transmittance minimum of around 0.25 has been observed in the ZnO/PS–PMMA nanocomposite films which is much lower compared to that in ZnO/PMMA and ZnO/PS nanocomposite films. The ZnO/PS–PMMA nanocomposite films also show a self-defocusing type negative nonlinear refraction in closed aperture Z-scan experiment. These nanocomposite films extend ample scope of applications as excellent optical limiters and efficient UV protectors. - Highlights: ► Transparent, ZnO/poly(styrene)–poly(methyl methacrylate) composite films are prepared. ► The nanocomposite films with 10 wt.% ZnO content exhibit good UV-shielding property.

  8. Thermally stable aromatic amine derivative with symmetrically substituted double spirobifluorene core as a hole transport material for green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yong Joo; Lee, Jun Yeob, E-mail: leej17@dankook.ac.kr

    2012-11-01

    A thermally stable aromatic amine derivative with a symmetrically substituted double spirobifluorene core was synthesized as a hole transport material for green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes. A high glass transition temperature of 142 Degree-Sign C was obtained and a film morphology of the hole transport material was kept stable up to 120 Degree-Sign C. The hole transport material showed a high triplet energy of 2.53 eV and a quantum efficiency of 17.4% in green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of symmetrically substituted double spirobifluorene core Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable film morphology up to 120 Degree-Sign C Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High quantum efficiency in green phosphorescent organic light emitting diode.

  9. Numerical Study of Wake Vortex Behavior in Turbulent Domains with Ambient Stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, George F.; Proctor, Fred H.

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional large eddy simulation model is used to investigate the sensitivity of ambient stratification with turbulence on the behavior of aircraft wake vortices. Modeled ambient turbulence levels range from very weak to moderate, and stratification levels range from strongly stable to unstable. The results of profound significance from this study are: 1) very little sensitivity between vortex linking time and the level of stratification, 2) the mean vortex separation remained nearly constant regardless of stratification and turbulence (at least prior to linking), 3) the wake vortices did not rise regardless of the level of stratification, and 4) for very strong stratification, the vortex stopped descending and quickly dissipated even before vortex linking could occur. These results are supported by experimental data and are contrary to conclusions from other numerical studies that assume laminar flow and/or relatively-low Reynolds numbers.

  10. Preparation and thermal properties of form-stable palmitic acid/active aluminum oxide composites as phase change materials for latent heat storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Guiyin; Li, Hui; Cao, Lei; Shan, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Form-stable palmitic acid (PA)/active aluminum oxide composites as phase change materials were prepared by adsorbing liquid palmitic acid into active aluminum oxide. In the composites, the palmitic acid was used as latent heat storage materials, and the active aluminum oxide was used as supporting material. Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope (FT-IR), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM) were used to determine the chemical structure, crystalloid phase and microstructure of the composites, respectively. The thermal properties and thermal stability were investigated by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and a thermogravimetry analyzer (TGA). The FT-IR analyses results indicated that there is no chemical interaction between the palmitic acid and active aluminum oxide. The SEM results showed that the palmitic acid was well adsorbed into porous network of the active aluminum oxide. The DSC results indicated that the composites melt at 60.25 °C with a latent heat of 84.48 kJ kg −1 and solidify at 56.86 °C with a latent heat of 78.79 kJ kg −1 when the mass ratio of the PA to active aluminum oxide is 0.9:1. Compared with that of the PA, the melting and solidifying time of the composites CPCM5 was reduced by 20.6% and 21.4% because of the increased heat transfer rate through EG addition. The TGA results showed that the active aluminum oxide can improve the thermal stability of the composites. -- Highlights: ► Form-stable PA/active aluminum oxide composites as PCMs were prepared. ► Chemical structure, crystalloid phase and microstructure of composites were determined. ► Thermal properties and thermal stability of the composites were investigated. ► Expanded graphite can improve thermal conductivity of the composites.

  11. Thermal Preference Ranges Correlate with Stable Signals of Universal Stress Markers in Lake Baikal Endemic and Holarctic Amphipods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Axenov-Gribanov

    Full Text Available Temperature is the most pervasive abiotic environmental factor for aquatic organisms. Fluctuations in temperature range lead to changes in metabolic performance. Here, we aimed to identify whether surpassing the thermal preference zones is correlated with shifts in universal cellular stress markers of protein integrity, responses to oxidative stress and lactate content, as indicators of anaerobic metabolism. Exposure of the Lake Baikal endemic amphipod species Eulimnogammarus verrucosus (Gerstfeldt, 1858, Ommatogammarus flavus (Dybowski, 1874 and of the Holarctic amphipod Gammarus lacustris Sars 1863 (Amphipoda, Crustacea to increasing temperatures resulted in elevated heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 and lactate content, elevated antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e., catalase and peroxidase, and reduced lactate dehydrogenase and glutathione S-transferase activities. Thus, the zone of stability (absence of any significant changes of the studied molecular and biochemical markers correlated with the behaviorally preferred temperatures. We conclude that the thermal behavioral responses of the studied amphipods are directly related to metabolic processes at the cellular level. Thus, the determined thermal ranges may possibly correspond to the thermal optima. This relationship between species-specific behavioral reactions and stress response metabolism may have significant ecological consequences that result in a thermal zone-specific distribution (i.e., depths, feed spectrum, etc. of species. As a consequence, by separating species with different temperature preferences, interspecific competition is reduced, which, in turn, increases a species' Darwinian fitness in its environment.

  12. Water absorption and viscosity behaviour of thermally stable novel graft copolymer of carboxymethyl cellulose and poly(sodium 1-hydroxy acrylate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Bijender; Negi, Yuvraj Singh

    2018-02-01

    A novel thermally stable hydrolysed carboxymethyl cellulose-g-poly(sodium 1-hydroxy acrylate) i.e. CMC-g-PNaHA graft copolymer was synthesized from the CMC and vinyl monomer 5-methylene-2-isopropyl-1,3-dioxolan-4-one (MD) in an aqueous medium using an initiator followed by transformation of resulting CMC-g-PMD via alkaline hydrolysis. The graft copolymerization is confirmed by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The influence of the CMC and PNaHA content on the properties of the resulting hydrolysed CMC-g-PNaHA graft copolymer was investigated. In comparison with the PNaHA polymer, the resulted hydrolysed CMC-g-PNaHA grafted copolymer has improved thermal stability, water absorption properties, viscosity and weight-average molecular weight. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Fast Method for Synthesis Magnesium Hydroxide Nanoparticles, Thermal Stable and Flame Retardant Poly vinyl alcohol Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yousefi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium hydroxide nanostructures as an effective flame retardant were synthesized by a facile and rapid microwave reaction. The effect of different surfactants such as cationic, anionic and polymeric on the morphology of magnesium hydroxide nanostructures was investigated. Nanostructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy. The influence of Mg(OH2 nanostructures on the thermal stability and flame retardancy of the poly vinyl alcohol (PVA matrix was studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and UL-94 respectively. Thermal decomposition of the nanocomposites shift towards higher temperature in the presence of Mg(OH2 nanostructures. The enhancement of thermal stability and flame retardancy of nanocomposites is due to the endothermic decomposition of Mg(OH2 and release of water which dilutes combustible gases.

  14. Preparation and characterization of form-stable paraffin/polycaprolactone composites as phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aludin M.S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraffin is Phase Change Materials (PCM that possesses desirable properties such as high thermal energy storage and thermal stability to make it suitable for thermal energy storage applications. However, paraffin has been reported to leak out during the melting process. In this study, composites were prepared by dissolving paraffin and polycaprolactone (PCL at varied mass percent compositions in chloroform and then purified through precipitation techniques. The leakage test was conducted by placing the composite samples on a set of four-layer filter papers and left in a furnace at 90°C for 1 hour. By incorporating PCL into paraffin phase, the leakage mass percentage was drastically reduced. The PCL polymer matrix in the composites may have trapped the paraffin molecules during melting process thus prevent it from leaking.

  15. Social Stratification in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodsky, Eric; Jackson, Erika

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: Over the past half century, scholars in a variety of fields have contributed to our understanding of the relationship between higher education and social stratification. We review this literature, highlighting complementarities and inconsistencies. Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of Study: We situate our review of the…

  16. Stratification in SNR-300 outlet plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinders, R.

    1983-01-01

    of the SNR-300 give a very similar behavior. After 50 sec stratification has already occurred. The temperature distribution looks a little bit more complicated as in the case of water models. This is caused by a non-uniform temperature profile at core outlet, but the global temperature pattern in the inner outlet plenum is not very much influenced by this more complicated boundary condition. The results show that in the case of the SNR-300 and its scram concept it is admissible to simplify the equations of thermal hydraulics for long term calculations of scrams. So very specific codes can be developed, which allow a high speed computing of transients. With such a tool it is easy to carry out parametric studies of the transient behavior of the reactor, to give a better understanding of dynamical behavior

  17. Thermal stress for all-ceramics rolls used in molten metal to produce stable high quality galvanized steel sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Noda, Nao-Aki; Yamada, Masahiro; Sano, Yoshikazu; Sugiyama, Shigetada; Kobayashi, Shoichi

    2008-01-01

    The zinc coated steel sheet has been mostly used for automobile and other industries because of its high corrosion resistance. This paper deals with the development of new ceramics support roll used for a continuous galvanizing pot to manufacture stable galvanizing steel sheet. Usually stainless steel rolls coated by tungsten carbide are used to support and stabilize the strip in a continuous galvanizing pot, which is filled with molten zinc. However, corrosion and abrasion arise on the roll ...

  18. Form-stable crystalline polymer pellets for thermal energy storage: high density polyethylene intermediate products. Final report, October 1, 1977--January 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botham, R.A.; Ball, G.L. III; Jenkins, G.H.; Salyer, I.O.

    1978-01-01

    The primary objectives of this program were to demonstrate: (1) that form-stable high density polyethylene (HDPE), which has been shown to have desirable properties as a phase-change type of thermal energy storage material, could be produced by processing in a polyethylene plant for a projected price near 26 cents/lb; and (2) that the raw material, ethylene, will be available in the very long-term from alternate sources (other than petroleum and natural gas). These objectives were accomplished. Production of useful, form-stable HDPE pellets by radiation cross-linking was demonstrated. Such pellets are estimated to be obtainable at 26 cents/lb, using large-volume (> or equal to 10,000,000 lb/yr) in-plant processing. Well-developed technologies exist for obtaining ethylene from coal and plant (or biomass) sources, thus assuring its long-term availability and therefore that of polyethylene. A cost-benefit analysis of the HDPE thermal energy storage system was conducted over its 120 to 140/sup 0/C optimum operating range which is most suited for absorption air conditioning. The HDPE is more cost effective than either rocks, ethylene glycol, or pressurized water and is even competitive with a hypothetical 5 cents/lb salt-hydrate melting in this temperature range. These results applied, as appropriate, to both air and liquid transfer systems.

  19. Carbohydrates and thermal properties indicate a decrease in stable aggregate carbon following forest colonization of mountain grassland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guidi, Claudia; Cannella, David; Leifeld, Jens

    2015-01-01

    In mountainous areas of Europe, the abandonment of grasslands followed by forest expansion is the dominant land-use change. Labile (i.e. easily decomposable) litter represents the major source for soil microbial products, which promote soil aggregation and long-term C stabilization. Our objective......-use gradient in the Southern Alps (Italy) following analysis of carbohydrate monomers and thermal analysis of mineral soil and physical soil fractions. The land-use gradient comprised managed grassland, two transitional phases in which grassland abandonment led to colonization by Picea abies (L.) Karst......., and an old forest dominated by Fagus sylvatica L. and P. abies.Grassland abandoned for 10years tended to have higher levels of carbohydrate and thermally labile soil C than managed grassland and old forest, presumably caused by differences in the quality and amount of litter input. Carbohydrates...

  20. Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes: A better field emitter and stable nanofluid with better thermal conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, S.K.; Jha, A. [School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Chattopadhyay, K.K., E-mail: kalyan_chattopadhyay@yahoo.com [Thin Film & Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs). • Improved dispersion enhanced thermal conductivity of engine oil. • Again f-a-CNTs showed enhanced field emission property compared to pure a-CNTs. - Abstract: Amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) were synthesized at low temperature in open atmosphere and further functionalized by treating them in thionyl chloride added stearic acid-dichloro methane solution. The as prepared functionalized a-CNTs (f-a-CNTs) were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The nanofluid was prepared by dispersing f-a-CNTs in engine oil using ultrasonic treatment. The effective thermal conductivity of as prepared nanofluid was investigated at different loading (volume fraction of f-a-CNTs). Obtained experimental data of thermal conductivity were compared with the predicted values, calculated using existing theoretical models. Stability of the nanofluid was tested by means of zeta potential measurement to optimize the loading. The as prepared f-a-CNTs sample also showed improved field emission result as compared to pristine a-CNTs. Dependence of field emission behavior on inter electrode distance was investigated too.

  1. Thermal and electrical conductivity enhancement of graphite nanoplatelets on form-stable polyethylene glycol/polymethyl methacrylate composite phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Jiaoqun; Zhou, Weibing; Wang, Jun; Wang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Graphite nanoplatelets (GnPs), obtained by sonicating the expanded graphite, were employed to simultaneously enhance the thermal (k) and electrical (σ) conductivity of organic form-stable phase change materials (FSPCMs). Using the method of in situ polymerization upon ultrasonic irradiation, GnPs serving as the conductive fillers and polyethylene glycol (PEG) acting as the phase change material (PCM) were uniformly dispersed and embedded inside the network structure of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), which contributed to the well package and self-supporting properties of composite FSPCMs. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results indicated that the GnPs were physically combined with PEG/PMMA matrix and did not participate in the polymerization. The GnPs additives were able to effectively enhance the k and σ of organic FSPCM. When the mass ratio of GnP was 8%, the k and σ of FSPCM changed up to 9 times and 8 orders of magnitude over that of PEG/PMMA matrix, respectively. The improvements in both k and σ were mainly attributed to the well dispersion and large aspect ratio of GnPs, which were endowed with benefit of forming conducting network in polymer matrix. It was also confirmed that all the prepared specimens possessed available thermal storage density and thermal stability. -- Highlights: ► GnPs were employed to simultaneously enhance the k and σ of organic FSPCMs. ► PEG/PMMA/GnPs composite FSPCMs were prepared by in situ polymerization method. ► The composite FSPCMs exhibited well package and self-supporting properties. ► GnPs additives effectively enhanced the k and σ of composite FSPCMs. ► All the composites possessed available thermal storage density and thermal stability.

  2. Thermally Stable and Regenerable Platinum-Tin Clusters for Propane Dehydrogenation Prepared by Atom Trapping on Ceria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Haifeng; Lin, Sen; Goetze, Joris G.; Pletcher, Paul; Guo, Hua; Kovarik, Libor; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Weckhuysen, Bert M.; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2017-06-28

    CeO2 supports are unique in their ability to trap ionic Pt, providing exceptional stability for isolated single atoms of Pt. Here, we explore the reactivity and stability of single atom Pt species for the industrially important reaction of light alkane dehydrogenation. The single atom Pt/CeO2 catalysts are stable during propane dehydrogenation, but we observe no selectivity towards propene. DFT calculations show strong adsorption of the olefin produced, leading to further unwanted reactions. In contrast, when Sn is added to ceria, the single atom Pt catalyst undergoes an activation phase where it transforms into Pt-Sn clusters under reaction conditions. Formation of small Pt-Sn clusters allows the catalyst to achieve high selectivity towards propene, due to facile desorption of the product. The CeO2-supported Pt-Sn clusters are very stable, even during extended reaction at 680 °C. By adding water vapor to the feed, coke formation can almost completely be suppressed. Furthermore, the Pt-Sn clusters can be readily transformed back to the atomically dispersed species on ceria via oxidation, making Pt-Sn/CeO2 a fully regenerable catalyst.

  3. Morphology and thermal properties of electrospun fatty acids/polyethylene terephthalate composite fibers as novel form-stable phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Changzhong [Key Laboratory of Cellulose and Lignocellulosics Chemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Linge [Key Laboratory of Cellulose and Lignocellulosics Chemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7HF (United Kingdom); Huang, Yong [Key Laboratory of Cellulose and Lignocellulosics Chemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2008-11-15

    The ultrafine fibers based on the composites of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and a series of fatty acids, lauric acid (LA), myristic acid (MA), palmitic acid (PA), and stearic acid (SA), were prepared successfully via electrospinning as form-stable phase change materials (PCMs). The morphology and thermal properties of the composite fibers were studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), respectively. It was found that the average fiber diameter increased generally with the content of fatty acid (LA) in the LA/PET composite fibers. The fibers with the low mass ratio maintained cylindrical shape with smooth surface while the quality became worse when the mass ratio is too high (more than 100/100). Moreover, the latent heat of the composite fibers increased with the increase of LA content and the phase transition temperature of the fibers have no obvious variations compared with LA. In contrast, both the latent heat and phase transition temperature of the fatty acid/PET composite fibers varied with the type of the fatty acids, and could be well maintained after 100 heating-cooling thermal cycles, which demonstrated that the composite fibers had good thermal stability and reliability. (author)

  4. Thermally Stable and Electrically Conductive, Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube/Silicon Infiltrated Composite Structures for High-Temperature Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Qi Ming; Deng, Lei Min; Li, Da Wei; Zhou, Yun Shen; Golgir, Hossein Rabiee; Keramatnejad, Kamran; Fan, Li Sha; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean-Francois; Lu, Yong Feng

    2017-10-25

    Traditional ceramic-based, high-temperature electrode materials (e.g., lanthanum chromate) are severely limited due to their conditional electrical conductivity and poor stability under harsh circumstances. Advanced composite structures based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) and high-temperature ceramics are expected to address this grand challenge, in which ceramic serves as a shielding layer protecting the VACNTs from the oxidation and erosive environment, while the VACNTs work as a conductor. However, it is still a great challenge to fabricate VACNT/ceramic composite structures due to the limited diffusion of ceramics inside the VACNT arrays. In this work, we report on the controllable fabrication of infiltrated (and noninfiltrated) VACNT/silicon composite structures via thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) [and laser-assisted CVD]. In laser-assisted CVD, low-crystalline silicon (Si) was quickly deposited at the VACNT subsurfaces/surfaces followed by the formation of high-crystalline Si layers, thus resulting in noninfiltrated composite structures. Unlike laser-assisted CVD, thermal CVD activated the precursors inside and outside the VACNTs simultaneously, which realized uniform infiltrated VACNT/Si composite structures. The growth mechanisms for infiltrated and noninfiltrated VACNT/ceramic composites, which we attributed to the different temperature distributions and gas diffusion mechanism in VACNTs, were investigated. More importantly, the as-farbicated composite structures exhibited excellent multifunctional properties, such as excellent antioxidative ability (up to 1100 °C), high thermal stability (up to 1400 °C), good high velocity hot gas erosion resistance, and good electrical conductivity (∼8.95 Sm -1 at 823 K). The work presented here brings a simple, new approach to the fabrication of advanced composite structures for hot electrode applications.

  5. European environmental stratifications and typologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazeu, G.W,; Metzger, M.J.; Mücher, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    their limitations and challenges. As such, they provide a sound basis for describing the factors affecting the robustness of such datasets. The latter is especially relevant, since there is likely to be further interest in European environmental assessment. In addition, advances in data availability and analysis......A range of new spatial datasets classifying the European environment has been constructed over the last few years. These datasets share the common objective of dividing European environmental gradients into convenient units, within which objects and variables of interest have relatively homogeneous...... scale. This paper provides an overview of five recent European stratifications and typologies, constructed for contrasting objectives, and differing in spatial and thematic detail. These datasets are: the Environmental Stratification (EnS), the European Landscape Classification (LANMAP), the Spatial...

  6. Syncope: classification and risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puppala, Venkata Krishna; Dickinson, Oana; Benditt, David G

    2014-03-01

    Syncope is one of the most common reasons for emergency department and urgent care clinic visits. The management of syncope continues to be a challenging problem for front-line providers inasmuch as there are a multitude of possible causes for syncope ranging from relatively benign conditions to potentially life-threatening ones. In any event, it is important to identify those syncope patients who are at immediate risk of life-threatening events; these individuals require prompt hospitalization and thorough evaluation. Conversely, it is equally important to avoid unnecessary hospitalization of low-risk patients since unneeded hospital care adds to the healthcare cost burden. Historically, front-line providers have taken a conservative approach with admission rates as high as 30-50% among syncope patients. A number of studies evaluating both the short- and long-term risk of adverse events in patients with syncope have focused on development of risk-stratification guidelines to assist providers in making a confident and well-informed choice between hospitalization and out-patient referral. In this regard, a much needed consensus on optimal decision-making process has not been developed to date. However, knowledge from various available risk-stratification studies can be helpful. This review summarizes the findings of various risk-stratification studies and points out key differences between them. While, the existing risk-stratification methods cannot replace critical assessment by an experienced physician, they do provide valuable guidance. In addition, the various risk-assessment schemes highlight the need for careful initial clinical assessment of syncope patients, selective testing, and being mindful of the short- and long-term risks. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The thermal dependence of carbon stable isotope incorporation and trophic discrimination in the domestic cricket, Acheta domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloyed, Carl S; Eason, Perri K; Dell, Anthony I

    2018-02-09

    Stable isotopes are valuable tools in physiological and ecological research, as they can be used to estimate diet, habitat use, and resource allocation. However, in most cases a priori knowledge of two key properties of stable isotopes is required, namely their rate of incorporation into the body (incorporation rate) and the change of isotope values between consumers and resources that arises during incorporation of the isotopes into the consumer's tissues (trophic discrimination). Previous studies have quantified these properties across species and tissue types, but little is known about how they vary with temperature, a key driver of many biological rates and times. Here, we explored for the first time how temperature affects both carbon incorporation rate and trophic discrimination via growth rates, using the domestic cricket, Acheta domesticus. We raised crickets at 16 °C, 21 °C, and 26 °C and showed that temperature increased carbon isotope incorporation rate, which was driven by both an increased growth rate and catabolism at higher temperatures. Trophic discrimination of carbon isotopes decreased at higher temperatures, which we attributed to either lower activation energies needed to synthesize non-essential amino acids at higher temperatures or the increased utilization of available resources of consumers at higher temperatures. Our results demonstrate that temperature is a key driver of both carbon isotope incorporation rate and trophic discrimination, via mechanisms that likely persist across all ectotherms. Experiments to determine incorporation rates and trophic discrimination factors in ectotherms must include temperature as a major factor, and natural variation in temperature might have significant effects on these isotopic properties that then can affect inferences made from isotope values. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Risk Stratification in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: An Ongoing Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omry-Orbach, Gal

    2016-01-28

    Thyroid cancer is an increasingly common malignancy, with a rapidly rising prevalence worldwide. The social and economic ramifications of the increase in thyroid cancer are multiple. Though mortality from thyroid cancer is low, and most patients will do well, the risk of recurrence is not insignificant, up to 30%. Therefore, it is important to accurately identify those patients who are more or less likely to be burdened by their disease over years and tailor their treatment plan accordingly. The goal of risk stratification is to do just that. The risk stratification process generally starts postoperatively with histopathologic staging, based on the AJCC/UICC staging system as well as others designed to predict mortality. These do not, however, accurately assess the risk of recurrence/persistence. Patients initially considered to be at high risk may ultimately do very well yet be burdened by frequent unnecessary monitoring. Conversely, patients initially thought to be low risk, may not respond to their initial treatment as expected and, if left unmonitored, may have higher morbidity. The concept of risk-adaptive management has been adopted, with an understanding that risk stratification for differentiated thyroid cancer is dynamic and ongoing. A multitude of variables not included in AJCC/UICC staging are used initially to classify patients as low, intermediate, or high risk for recurrence. Over the course of time, a response-to-therapy variable is incorporated, and patients essentially undergo continuous risk stratification. Additional tools such as biochemical markers, genetic mutations, and molecular markers have been added to this complex risk stratification process such that this is essentially a continuum of risk. In recent years, additional considerations have been discussed with a suggestion of pre-operative risk stratification based on certain clinical and/or biologic characteristics. With the increasing prevalence of thyroid cancer but stable mortality

  9. Cancer Stratification by Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justus Weber

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of specificity of traditional cytotoxic drugs has triggered the development of anticancer agents that selectively address specific molecular targets. An intrinsic property of these specialized drugs is their limited applicability for specific patient subgroups. Consequently, the generation of information about tumor characteristics is the key to exploit the potential of these drugs. Currently, cancer stratification relies on three approaches: Gene expression analysis and cancer proteomics, immunohistochemistry and molecular imaging. In order to enable the precise localization of functionally expressed targets, molecular imaging combines highly selective biomarkers and intense signal sources. Thus, cancer stratification and localization are performed simultaneously. Many cancer types are characterized by altered receptor expression, such as somatostatin receptors, folate receptors or Her2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Similar correlations are also known for a multitude of transporters, such as glucose transporters, amino acid transporters or hNIS (human sodium iodide symporter, as well as cell specific proteins, such as the prostate specific membrane antigen, integrins, and CD20. This review provides a comprehensive description of the methods, targets and agents used in molecular imaging, to outline their application for cancer stratification. Emphasis is placed on radiotracers which are used to identify altered expression patterns of cancer associated markers.

  10. Social interaction distance and stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottero, Wendy; Prandy, Kenneth

    2003-06-01

    There have been calls from several sources recently for a renewal of class analysis that would encompass social and cultural, as well as economic elements. This paper explores a tradition in stratification that is founded on this idea: relational or social distance approaches to mapping hierarchy and inequality which theorize stratification as a social space. The idea of 'social space' is not treated as a metaphor of hierarchy nor is the nature of the structure determined a priori. Rather, the space is identified by mapping social interactions. Exploring the nature of social space involves mapping the network of social interaction--patterns of friendship, partnership and cultural similarity--which gives rise to relations of social closeness and distance. Differential association has long been seen as the basis of hierarchy, but the usual approach is first to define a structure composed of a set of groups and then to investigate social interaction between them. Social distance approaches reverse this, using patterns of interaction to determine the nature of the structure. Differential association can be seen as a way of defining proximity within a social space, from the distances between social groups, or between social groups and social objects (such as lifestyle items). The paper demonstrates how the very different starting point of social distance approaches also leads to strikingly different theoretical conclusions about the nature of stratification and inequality.

  11. Principal stratification in causal inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangakis, Constantine E; Rubin, Donald B

    2002-03-01

    Many scientific problems require that treatment comparisons be adjusted for posttreatment variables, but the estimands underlying standard methods are not causal effects. To address this deficiency, we propose a general framework for comparing treatments adjusting for posttreatment variables that yields principal effects based on principal stratification. Principal stratification with respect to a posttreatment variable is a cross-classification of subjects defined by the joint potential values of that posttreatment variable tinder each of the treatments being compared. Principal effects are causal effects within a principal stratum. The key property of principal strata is that they are not affected by treatment assignment and therefore can be used just as any pretreatment covariate. such as age category. As a result, the central property of our principal effects is that they are always causal effects and do not suffer from the complications of standard posttreatment-adjusted estimands. We discuss briefly that such principal causal effects are the link between three recent applications with adjustment for posttreatment variables: (i) treatment noncompliance, (ii) missing outcomes (dropout) following treatment noncompliance. and (iii) censoring by death. We then attack the problem of surrogate or biomarker endpoints, where we show, using principal causal effects, that all current definitions of surrogacy, even when perfectly true, do not generally have the desired interpretation as causal effects of treatment on outcome. We go on to forrmulate estimands based on principal stratification and principal causal effects and show their superiority.

  12. Temperature and concentration stratification effects on non-Newtonian fluid flow past a cylindrical surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Khalil Ur; Khan, Abid Ali; Malik, M. Y.; Zehra, Iffat; Ali, Usman

    The theme of present work is to report the numerical solution of mixed convection tangent hyperbolic fluid flow towards stretching cylindrical surface immersed in a double stratified media. The fluid flow is attained through no slip condition. The flow regime characteristics are modelled in terms of partial differential equations. A similarity transformation is used to transform partial differential equations into coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations. A computational algorithm is executed to predict numerical results. The effects of flow controlling parameters namely, mixed convection parameter, thermal stratification and solutal stratification parameters on velocity, temperature and concentration are examined and offered by means of graphical outcomes. It is noticed that in the presence of mixed convection effect both the fluid temperature and concentration are decreasing function of thermal stratification and solutal stratification parameters respectively. The obtained values are certified by developing comparison with existing values and an excellent agreement is observed which confirms the execution of computational algorithm.

  13. Facile Route to Transparent, Strong, and Thermally Stable Nanocellulose/Polymer Nanocomposites from an Aqueous Pickering Emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Shuji; Togawa, Eiji; Kuroda, Katsushi

    2017-01-09

    Cellulose nanofibril (CNF) is a promising nanofiller for polymer nanocomposite materials, and a critical challenge in designing these materials is organization of the nanostructure using a facile process. Here, we report a facile aqueous preparation process for nanostructured polystyrene (PS)/CNF composites via the formation of a CNF-stabilized Pickering emulsion. PS nanoparticles, with a narrow size distribution, were synthesized by free radical polymerization in water using CNF as a stabilizer. The nanoparticles were easily collected by filtration, and the resulting material had a composite structure of PS nanoparticles embedded in a CNF framework. The PS/CNF nanocomposite showed high optical transparency, strength, and thermal dimensional stability. Thus, this technique provides a simple and environmentally friendly method for the preparation of novel CNF/polymer nanocomposite materials.

  14. Highly sensitive and thermal stable CO gas sensor based on SnO2 modified by SiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Zili; Chen, Juling; Guan, Shaokang; Si, Lifen; Zhang, Pengshuai

    2013-02-01

    Effects of surface chemical modification with SiO2 on the thermal stability and CO gas-sensing properties of SnO2 were investigated. The SiO2 on the SnO2 surface effectively inhibits the nanocrystal growth of SnO2. The average size of modified SnO2 sintered at 600 degrees C is 5.8 nm. The gas sensitivity to CO was found to be markedly enhanced by the surface chemical modification. The CO gas as low as 5 ppm can be effectively detected by the modified SnO2-based sensors. At the same time, the modified SnO2-based sensor has excellent selectivity to CO, fast response and recovery properties.

  15. Preparation and characterization of electrospun poly(phthalazinone ether nitrile ketone) membrane with novel thermally stable properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gang; Zhang, Hao; Qian, Bingqing [Carbon Research Laboratory, Liaoning Key Lab for Energy Materials and Chemical Engineering, State Key Lab of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, Jinyan, E-mail: wangjinyan@dlut.edu.cn [Department of Polymer Science and Materials, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Jian, Xigao [Department of Polymer Science and Materials, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Qiu, Jieshan, E-mail: jqiu@dlut.edu.cn [Carbon Research Laboratory, Liaoning Key Lab for Energy Materials and Chemical Engineering, State Key Lab of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Poly (phthalazinone ether nitrile ketone) (PPENK) was used to successfully prepare nanofiber membranes by electrospinning. • Electrospun membrane exhibits a good thermostability. • Electrospun membrane. - Abstract: Electrospun nanofibrous membranes have several applications because of their excellent properties, such as high porosity, small fiber diameter, and large surface area. However, high-temperature resistant electrospun membranes remain a challenge because of the absence of precursors that offer spinnability, scalability, and superior thermal stability. In this study, poly(phthalazinone ether nitrile ketone) (PPENK) was used to successfully prepare nanofiber membranes by electrospinning. Electrospun PPENK membranes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and tensile stress–strain tests. Results indicated that the prepared electrospun membranes had a very high glass transition temperature, superior chemical resistance, and excellent mechanical strength. These desirable properties broaden their potential application in membranes and treatment of various hot fluid streams without strict temperature control.

  16. Boc-protected ω-amino alkanedithiols provide chemically and thermally stable amine-terminated monolayers on gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Ju; Jamison, Andrew C; Lee, T Randall

    2015-02-24

    Four custom-designed bidentate adsorbates having either ammonium or Boc-protected amino termini and either methanethiol or ethanethioate headgroups were prepared for the purpose of generating amine-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on evaporated gold surfaces. These adsorbates utilize a phenyl-based framework to connect the headgroups to a single hexadecyloxy chain, extending the amino functionality away from the surface of gold, providing two regions within the adsorbate structure where intermolecular interactions contribute to the stability of the fully formed thin film. The structural features of the resulting SAMs were characterized by ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy. The collected data were compared to those of eight additional SAMs formed from analogous monodentate alkanethiols and alkanethioacetates having either a similar aromatic framework or a simple alkyl chain connecting the headgroup to the tailgroup. The analysis of the data obtained for the full set of SAMs revealed that both the tailgroup and headgroup influenced the formation of a well-packed monolayer, with the Boc-protected amine-terminated alkanethiols producing films with superior surface bonding and adsorbate packing as compared to those formed with ammonium tailgroups or alkanethioacetate headgroups. A comparison of the structural differences before and after deprotection of the Boc-protected amine-terminated thiolate SAMs revealed that the bidentate adsorbate was the most resistant to desorption during the Boc-deprotection procedure. Furthermore, solution-phase thermal desorption tests performed to evaluate the thermal stability of the Boc-deprotected amine-terminated alkanethiolate films provided further evidence of the enhanced stability associated with SAMs formed from these bidentate adsorbates.

  17. Simulation of atmosphere stratification in the HDR test facility with the CONTAIN code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skerlavaj, A.; Mavko, B.; Kljenak, I.

    2001-01-01

    The test E11.2 'Hydrogen distribution in loop flow geometry', which was performed in the Heissdampf Reaktor containment test facility in Germany, was simulated with the CONTAIN computer code. The predicted pressure history and thermal stratification are in relatively good agreement with the measurements. The compositional stratification within the containment was qualitatively well predicted, although the degree of the stratification in the dome area was slightly underestimated. The analysis of simulation results enabled a better understanding of the physical phenomena during the test.(author)

  18. Thermally stable single atom Pt/m-Al2O3 for selective hydrogenation and CO oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zailei

    2017-07-27

    Single-atom metal catalysts offer a promising way to utilize precious noble metal elements more effectively, provided that they are catalytically active and sufficiently stable. Herein, we report a synthetic strategy for Pt single-atom catalysts with outstanding stability in several reactions under demanding conditions. The Pt atoms are firmly anchored in the internal surface of mesoporous Al2O3, likely stabilized by coordinatively unsaturated pentahedral Al3+ centres. The catalyst keeps its structural integrity and excellent performance for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene after exposure to a reductive atmosphere at 200 °C for 24 h. Compared to commercial Pt nanoparticle catalyst on Al2O3 and control samples, this system exhibits significantly enhanced stability and performance for n-hexane hydro-reforming at 550 °C for 48 h, although agglomeration of Pt single-atoms into clusters is observed after reaction. In CO oxidation, the Pt single-atom identity was fully maintained after 60 cycles between 100 and 400 °C over a one-month period.

  19. Springtime carbon emission episodes at the Gosan background site revealed by total carbon, stable carbon isotopic composition, and thermal characteristics of carbonaceous particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jung

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the emission of carbonaceous aerosols at the Gosan background super-site (33.17° N, 126.10° E in East Asia, total suspended particles (TSP were collected during spring of 2007 and 2008 and analyzed for particulate organic carbon, elemental carbon, total carbon (TC, total nitrogen (TN, and stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C of TC. The stable carbon isotopic composition of TC (δ13CTC was found to be lowest during pollen emission episodes (range: −26.2‰ to −23.5‰, avg. −25.2 ± 0.9‰, approaching those of the airborne pollen (−28.0‰ collected at the Gosan site. Based on a carbon isotope mass balance equation, we found that ~42% of TC in the TSP samples during the pollen episodes was attributed to airborne pollen from Japanese cedar trees planted around tangerine farms in Jeju Island. A negative correlation between the citric acid-carbon/TC ratios and δ13CTC was obtained during the pollen episodes. These results suggest that citric acid emitted from tangerine fruit may be adsorbed on the airborne pollen and then transported to the Gosan site. Thermal evolution patterns of organic carbon during the pollen episodes were characterized by high OC evolution in the OC2 temperature step (450 °C. Since thermal evolution patterns of organic aerosols are highly influenced by their molecular weight, they can be used as additional information on the formation of secondary organic aerosols and the effect of aging of organic aerosols during the long-range atmospheric transport and sources of organic aerosols.

  20. Preparation and thermal properties of mineral-supported polyethylene glycol as form-stable composite phase change materials (CPCMs) used in asphalt pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiao; Lin, Feipeng; Liu, Ruohua; Xiao, Ting; Zheng, Jianlong; Qian, Guoping; Liu, Hongfu; Wen, Pihua

    2017-12-05

    Three kinds of mineral-supported polyethylene glycol (PEG) as form-stable composite phase change materials (CPCMs) were prepared to choose the most suitable CPCMs in asphalt pavements for the problems of asphalt pavements rutting diseases and urban heat islands. The microstructure and chemical structure of CPCMs were characterized by SEM, FT-IR and XRD. Thermal properties of the CPCMs were determined by TG and DSC. The maximum PEG absorption of diatomite (DI), expanded perlite (EP) and expanded vermiculite (EVM) could reach 72%, 67% and 73.6%, respectively. The melting temperatures and latent heat of CPCMs are in the range of 52-55 °C and 100-115 J/g, respectively. The results show that PEG/EP has the best thermal and chemical stability after 100 times of heating-cooling process. Moreover, crystallization fraction results show that PEG/EP has slightly higher latent heats than that of PEG/DI and PEG/EVM. Temperature-adjusting asphalt mixture was prepared by substituting the fine aggregates with PEG/EP CPCMs. The upper surface maximum temperature difference of temperature-adjusting asphalt mixture reaches about 7.0 °C in laboratory, and the surface peak temperature reduces up to 4.3 °C in the field experiment during a typical summer day, indicating a great potential application for regulating pavement temperature field and alleviating the urban heat islands.

  1. One-step fabrication of thermally stable TiO2/SiO2 nanocomposite microspheres by evaporation-induced self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, J; Sen, D; Mazumder, S; Sastry, P U; Paul, B; Bhatt, H; Singh, S G

    2012-08-07

    The evaporation-induced self-assembly of mixed colloids has been employed to synthesize microspheres of TiO(2)/SiO(2) nanocomposites. Small-angle neutron/X-ray scattering and scanning electron microscopy experiments reveal the hierarchical morphology of the microspheres. Although the internal structure of the microspheres, consisting of solely silica nanoparticles, gets significantly modified with time because of the reduction in the high specific surface area by internal coalescence, the same for the composite microspheres remains stable over an aging time of 1 year. Such temporal stability of the composite microspheres is attributed to the inhibition of coalescence of the silica nanoparticles in the presence of titania nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric results show the improved thermal stability of the composite grains against the anatase-to-rutile phase transition. Such thermal stability is attributed to the suppression of the growth of titania nanoparticles in the presence of silica nanoparticles. The UV-vis results indicate the confinement effect of the TiO(2) nanoparticles in the silica matrix. A plausible mechanism has been elucidated for the formation of microspheres with different morphology during self-assembly.

  2. Cu Nanoparticles Improved Thermal Property of Form-Stable Phase Change Materials Made with Carbon Nanofibers and LA-MA-SA Eutectic Mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaofei; Cai, Yibing; Huang, Cong; Gu, Ying; Zhang, Junhao; Qiao, Hui; Wei, Qufu

    2018-04-01

    A novel form-stable phase change materials (FSPCMs) was fabricated by incorporating fatty acid eutectics with electrospun carbon nanofibers (CNFs) surface-attached with copper (Cu) nanoparticles. Three different Cu/CNFs mats were made through combining the technique and principle of electrospinning, pre-oxidation/carbonization and in-situ reduction, while lauric-myristic-stearic acid (LA-MA-SA) ternary eutectic mixture was prepared as the model PCM. The morphology and crystal structure of Cu/CNFs were characterized by Fourier transfer infrared (FT-IR) spectra, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. The results showed that Cu nanoparticles dispersed uniformly on the surface of CNFs mats without agglomeration, and Cu/CNFs mats could provide the mechanical support for FSPCMs and effectively prevent the flow/leakage of molten fatty acid. Morphological structures, as well as the properties of thermal energy storage and thermal energy storage/retrieval rates, of the resulting FSPCMs were investigated by SEM, Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and measurement of melting/freezing times, respectively. The results indicated that the fabricated FSPCMs exhibited desired structural morphology, and LA-MA-SA well dispersed in three-dimensional porous structure of Cu/CNFs mats. The melting and crystallization enthalpies of the fabricated FSPCMs were in the range of 117.1-140.7 kJ/kg and 117.2-142.4 kJ/kg, respectively. In comparison with melting/freezing times of LA-MA-SA ternary eutectic mixture, the melting/freezing times of fabricated FSPCMs were respectively decreased ~27.0-49.2% and ~44.1-63.0%. The fabricated FSPCMs possessed good thermal energy storage/retrieval property, and might have great potential for renewable energy storage applications.

  3. Color-tunable and highly thermal stable Sr{sub 2}MgAl{sub 22}O{sub 36}:Tb{sup 3+} phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haiming; Zhang, Haoran; Liu, Yingliang [Guangdong Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center for Optical Agricultural, College of Materials and Energy, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Lei, Bingfu, E-mail: tleibf@scau.edu.cn [Guangdong Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center for Optical Agricultural, College of Materials and Energy, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Deng, Jiankun [Guangdong Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center for Optical Agricultural, College of Materials and Energy, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Liu, Wei-Ren [Department of Chemical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Taoyuan City, Taiwan (China); Zeng, Yuan; Zheng, Lingling; Zhao, Minyi [Guangdong Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center for Optical Agricultural, College of Materials and Energy, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Tb{sup 3+} activated Sr{sub 2}MgAl{sub 22}O{sub 36} phosphor was prepared by a high-temperature solid-state reaction route. The X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy were used to characterize the as-prepared samples. The Sr{sub 2}MgAl{sub 22}O{sub 36}:Tb{sup 3+} phosphors show intense green light emission under UV excitation. The phosphor exhibit two groups of emission lines from about 370 to 700 nm, which originating from the characteristic {sup 5}D{sub 3}-{sup 7}F{sub J} and {sup 5}D{sub 4}-{sup 7}F{sub J} transitions of the Tb{sup 3+} ion, respectively. The cross-relaxation mechanism between the {sup 5}D{sub 3} and {sup 5}D{sub 4} emission was investigated and discussed. The emission colors of these phosphors can be tuned from bluish-green to green by adjusting the Tb{sup 3+} doping concentration. Furthermore, the thermal quenching temperature (T{sub 1/2}) is higher than 500 K. The excellent thermal stability and color-tunable luminescent properties suggest that the developed material is a promising green-emitting phosphor candidate for optical devices. - Highlights: • A Color-tunable emitting phosphor Sr{sub 2}MgAl{sub 22}O{sub 36}:Tb{sup 3+} was prepared successfully via high-temperature solid-state reaction. • The photoluminescence of Sr{sub 2}MgAl{sub 22}O{sub 36}:Tb{sup 3+} shows highly thermal stable. • The cross-relaxation mechanism between the {sup 5}D{sub 3} and {sup 5}D{sub 4} emission was investigated and discussed.

  4. Fatigue of LMFBR piping due to flow stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, W.S.

    1983-01-01

    Flow stratification due to reverse flow was simulated in a 1/5-scale water model of a LMFBR primary pipe loop. The stratified flow was observed to have a dynamic interface region which oscillated in a wave pattern. The behavior of the interface was characterized in terms of location, local temperature fluctuation and duration for various reverse flow conditions. A structural assessment was performed to determine the effects of stratified flow on the fatigue life of the pipe. Both the static and dynamic aspects of flow stratification were examined. The dynamic interface produces thermal striping on the inside of the pipe wall which is shown to have the most deleterious effect on the pipe wall and produce significant fatigue damage relative to a static interface

  5. PP3 forms stable tetrameric structures through hydrophobic interactions via the C-terminal amphipathic helix and undergoes reversible thermal dissociation and denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Lise R L; Nielsen, Søren B; Hansted, Jon G; Petersen, Torben E; Otzen, Daniel E; Sørensen, Esben S

    2012-01-01

    The milk protein proteose peptone component 3 (PP3), also called lactophorin, is a small phosphoglycoprotein that is expressed exclusively in lactating mammary tissue. The C-terminal part of the protein contains an amphipathic helix, which, upon proteolytic liberation, shows antibacterial activity. Previous studies indicate that PP3 forms multimeric structures and inhibits lipolysis in milk. PP3 is the principal component of the proteose peptone fraction of milk. This fraction is obtained by heating and acidifying skimmed milk, and in the dairy industry milk products are also typically exposed to treatments such as pasteurization, which potentially could result in irreversible denaturation and inactivation of bioactive components. We show here, by the use of CD, that PP3 undergoes reversible thermal denaturation and that the α-helical structure of PP3 remains stable even at gastric pH levels. This suggests that the secondary structure survives treatment during the purification and possibly some of the industrial processing of milk. Finally, asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation and multi-angle light scattering reveal that PP3 forms a rather stable tetrameric complex, which dissociates and unfolds in guanidinium chloride. The cooperative unfolding of PP3 was completely removed by the surfactant n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside and by oleic acid. We interpret this to mean that the PP3 monomers associate through hydrophobic interactions via the hydrophobic surface of the amphipathic helix. These observations suggest that PP3 tetramers act as reservoirs of PP3 molecules, which in the monomeric state may stabilize the milk fat globule. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  6. Immobilization of Ni–Pd/core–shell nanoparticles through thermal polymerization of acrylamide on glassy carbon electrode for highly stable and sensitive glutamate detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Huicheng; Ma, Zhenzhen; Wu, Zhaoyang

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of a persistently stable and sensitive biosensor is highly important for practical applications. To improve the stability and sensitivity of glutamate sensors, an electrode modified with glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH)/Ni–Pd/core–shell nanoparticles was developed using the thermal polymerization of acrylamide (AM) to immobilize the synthesized Ni–Pd/core–shell nanoparticles onto a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The modified electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Electrochemical data showed that the prepared biosensor had remarkably enhanced electrocatalytic activity toward glutamate. Moreover, superior reproducibility and excellent stability were observed (relative average deviation was 2.96% after continuous use of the same sensor for 60 times, and current responses remained at 94.85% of the initial value after 60 d). The sensor also demonstrated highly sensitive amperometric detection of glutamate with a low limit of detection (0.052 μM, S/N = 3), high sensitivity (4.768 μA μM −1  cm −2 ), and a wide, useful linear range (0.1–500 μM). No interference from potential interfering species such as L-cysteine, ascorbic acid, and L-aspartate were noted. The determination of glutamate levels in actual samples achieved good recovery percentages. - Highlights: • Ni–Pd/core–shell nanoparticles were synthesized. • Nanoparticles were immobilized onto electrodes through thermal polymerization. • The modified sensor exhibited excellent stability and sensitivity for glutamate detection. • The biosensor exhibited remarkable electrocatalytic activity toward glutamate. • The sensor successfully detected glutamate in tomato soup samples.

  7. Immobilization of Ni–Pd/core–shell nanoparticles through thermal polymerization of acrylamide on glassy carbon electrode for highly stable and sensitive glutamate detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Huicheng, E-mail: doyhc@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University for Nationalities, Nanning, 530008 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University for Nationalities, Nanning, 530008 (China); Key Laboratory of Chemistry and Engineering of Forest Products, Guangxi University for Nationalities, Nanning, 530008 (China); Key Laboratory of Guangxi Colleges and Universities for Food Safety and Pharmaceutical Analytical Chemistry, Guangxi University for Nationalities, Nanning, 530008 (China); Ma, Zhenzhen [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); Wu, Zhaoyang, E-mail: zywu@hnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China)

    2015-10-08

    The preparation of a persistently stable and sensitive biosensor is highly important for practical applications. To improve the stability and sensitivity of glutamate sensors, an electrode modified with glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH)/Ni–Pd/core–shell nanoparticles was developed using the thermal polymerization of acrylamide (AM) to immobilize the synthesized Ni–Pd/core–shell nanoparticles onto a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The modified electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Electrochemical data showed that the prepared biosensor had remarkably enhanced electrocatalytic activity toward glutamate. Moreover, superior reproducibility and excellent stability were observed (relative average deviation was 2.96% after continuous use of the same sensor for 60 times, and current responses remained at 94.85% of the initial value after 60 d). The sensor also demonstrated highly sensitive amperometric detection of glutamate with a low limit of detection (0.052 μM, S/N = 3), high sensitivity (4.768 μA μM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}), and a wide, useful linear range (0.1–500 μM). No interference from potential interfering species such as L-cysteine, ascorbic acid, and L-aspartate were noted. The determination of glutamate levels in actual samples achieved good recovery percentages. - Highlights: • Ni–Pd/core–shell nanoparticles were synthesized. • Nanoparticles were immobilized onto electrodes through thermal polymerization. • The modified sensor exhibited excellent stability and sensitivity for glutamate detection. • The biosensor exhibited remarkable electrocatalytic activity toward glutamate. • The sensor successfully detected glutamate in tomato soup samples.

  8. A new international measure of social stratification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meraviglia, C.; Ganzeboom, H.B.G.; De Luca, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a new international measure of social stratification, the ICAMS (International Cambridge Scale). Our aim is to bring new evidence to the hypothesis that the construct that underlies measures of social stratification as different as prestige scales, socio-economic indexes,

  9. Historical Studies of Social Mobility and Stratification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, Marco H.D. van; Maas, Ineke

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses historical studies of social mobility and stratification. The focus is on changes in social inequality and mobility in past societies and their determinants. It discusses major historical sources, approaches, and results in the fields of social stratification (ranks and classes

  10. Response of water temperatures and stratification to changing climate in three lakes with different morphometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Madeline R.; Wu, Chin H.

    2017-12-01

    Water temperatures and stratification are important drivers for ecological and water quality processes within lake systems, and changes in these with increases in air temperature and changes to wind speeds may have significant ecological consequences. To properly manage these systems under changing climate, it is important to understand the effects of increasing air temperatures and wind speed changes in lakes of different depths and surface areas. In this study, we simulate three lakes that vary in depth and surface area to elucidate the effects of the observed increasing air temperatures and decreasing wind speeds on lake thermal variables (water temperature, stratification dates, strength of stratification, and surface heat fluxes) over a century (1911-2014). For all three lakes, simulations showed that epilimnetic temperatures increased, hypolimnetic temperatures decreased, the length of the stratified season increased due to earlier stratification onset and later fall overturn, stability increased, and longwave and sensible heat fluxes at the surface increased. Overall, lake depth influences the presence of stratification, Schmidt stability, and differences in surface heat flux, while lake surface area influences differences in hypolimnion temperature, hypolimnetic heating, variability of Schmidt stability, and stratification onset and fall overturn dates. Larger surface area lakes have greater wind mixing due to increased surface momentum. Climate perturbations indicate that our larger study lakes have more variability in temperature and stratification variables than the smaller lakes, and this variability increases with larger wind speeds. For all study lakes, Pearson correlations and climate perturbation scenarios indicate that wind speed has a large effect on temperature and stratification variables, sometimes greater than changes in air temperature, and wind can act to either amplify or mitigate the effect of warmer air temperatures on lake thermal

  11. Production, Characterization, and Flocculation Mechanism of Cation Independent, pH Tolerant, and Thermally Stable Bioflocculant from Enterobacter sp. ETH-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Song, Liyan; Li, Dou; Qiao, Jing; Zhao, Tiantao; Zhao, Heping

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic high polymer flocculants, frequently utilized for flocculating efficiency and low cost, recently have been discovered as producing increased risk to human health and the environment. Development of a more efficient and environmentally sound alternative flocculant agent is investigated in this paper. Bioflocculants are produced by microorganisms and may exhibit a high rate of flocculation activity. The bioflocculant ETH-2, with high flocculating activity (2849 mg Kaolin particle/mg ETH-2), produced by strain Enterobacter sp. isolated from activated sludge, was systematically investigated with regard to its production, characterization, and flocculation mechanism. Analyses of microscopic observation, zeta potential and ETH-2 structure demonstrates the bridging mechanism, as opposed to charge neutralization, was responsible for flocculation of the ETH-2. ETH-2 retains high molecular weight (603 to 1820 kDa) and multi-functional groups (hydroxyl, amide and carboxyl) that contributed to flocculation. Polysaccharides mainly composed of mannose, glucose, and galactose, with a molar ratio of 1∶2.9∶9.8 were identified as the active constituents in bioflocculant. The structure of the long backbone with active sites of polysaccharides was determined as a primary basis for the high flocculation activity. Bioflocculant ETH-2 is cation independent, pH tolerant, and thermally stable, suggesting a potential fit for industrial application. PMID:25485629

  12. Stable Chlorine Isotopes and Elemental Chlorine by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Ion Chromatography; Martian Meteorites, Carbonaceous Chondrites and Standard Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C.-Y.; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2011-01-01

    Recently significantly large mass fractionation of stable chlorine isotopes has been reported for terrestrial and lunar samples [1,2]. In addition, in view of possible early solar system processes [3] and also potential perchlorate-related fluid/microbial activities on the Martian surface [4,5], a large chlorine isotopic fractionation might be expected for some types of planetary materials. Due to analytical difficulties of isotopic and elemental analyses, however, current chlorine analyses for planetary materials are controversial among different laboratories, particularly between IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1,6,7] for isotopic analyses, as well as between those doing pyrohydrolysis and other groups [i.e. 6,8]. Additional careful investigations of Cl isotope and elemental abundances are required to confirm real chlorine isotope and elemental variations for planetary materials. We have developed a TIMS technique combined with HF-leaching/ion chromatography at NASA JSC that is applicable to analysis of small amounts of meteoritic and planetary materials. We present here results for several standard rocks and meteorites, including Martian meteorites.

  13. Production, characterization, and flocculation mechanism of cation independent, pH tolerant, and thermally stable bioflocculant from Enterobacter sp. ETH-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Tang

    Full Text Available Synthetic high polymer flocculants, frequently utilized for flocculating efficiency and low cost, recently have been discovered as producing increased risk to human health and the environment. Development of a more efficient and environmentally sound alternative flocculant agent is investigated in this paper. Bioflocculants are produced by microorganisms and may exhibit a high rate of flocculation activity. The bioflocculant ETH-2, with high flocculating activity (2849 mg Kaolin particle/mg ETH-2, produced by strain Enterobacter sp. isolated from activated sludge, was systematically investigated with regard to its production, characterization, and flocculation mechanism. Analyses of microscopic observation, zeta potential and ETH-2 structure demonstrates the bridging mechanism, as opposed to charge neutralization, was responsible for flocculation of the ETH-2. ETH-2 retains high molecular weight (603 to 1820 kDa and multi-functional groups (hydroxyl, amide and carboxyl that contributed to flocculation. Polysaccharides mainly composed of mannose, glucose, and galactose, with a molar ratio of 1:2.9:9.8 were identified as the active constituents in bioflocculant. The structure of the long backbone with active sites of polysaccharides was determined as a primary basis for the high flocculation activity. Bioflocculant ETH-2 is cation independent, pH tolerant, and thermally stable, suggesting a potential fit for industrial application.

  14. Assessment of groundwater pollution from ash ponds using stable and unstable isotopes around the Koradi and Khaperkheda thermal power plants (Maharashtra, India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltaggio, M; Spadoni, M; Sacchi, E; Sanam, R; Pujari, P R; Labhasetwar, P K

    2015-06-15

    The impact on local water resources due to fly ash produced in the Koradi and Khaperkheda thermal power plants (district of Nagpur, Maharashtra - India) and disposed in large ponds at the surface was assessed through the study of environmental variation of ratios of stable and unstable isotopes. Analyses of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes suggest scarce interaction between the water temporarily stored in the ponds and the groundwater in the study area. Data also highlight that the high salinity of groundwater measured in the polluted wells is not due to evaporation, but to subsequent infiltration of stream waters draining from the ponds to the local aquifer. (87)Sr/(86)Sr values, when associated with Sr/Ca ratios, demonstrate the dominant role of waste waters coming from tens of brick kilns surrounding the pond sulfate pollution. Uranium isotopic analyses clearly show evidence of the interaction between groundwater and aquifer rocks, and confirm again the low influence of ash ponds. A new conceptual model based on the study of the isotopes of radium is also proposed and used to estimate residence times of groundwater in the area. This model highlights that high salinity cannot be in any case attributed to a prolonged water-rock interaction, but is due to the influence of untreated waste water of domestic or brick kiln origin on the shallow and vulnerable aquifers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermally stable nanoparticles on supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed R.; Behafarid, Farzad

    2012-11-13

    An inverse micelle-based method for forming nanoparticles on supports includes dissolving a polymeric material in a solvent to provide a micelle solution. A nanoparticle source is dissolved in the micelle solution. A plurality of micelles having a nanoparticle in their core and an outer polymeric coating layer are formed in the micelle solution. The micelles are applied to a support. The polymeric coating layer is then removed from the micelles to expose the nanoparticles. A supported catalyst includes a nanocrystalline powder, thin film, or single crystal support. Metal nanoparticles having a median size from 0.5 nm to 25 nm, a size distribution having a standard deviation .ltoreq.0.1 of their median size are on or embedded in the support. The plurality of metal nanoparticles are dispersed and in a periodic arrangement. The metal nanoparticles maintain their periodic arrangement and size distribution following heat treatments of at least 1,000.degree. C.

  16. Diaminouronium Nitriminotetrazolates - Thermally Stable Explosives

    OpenAIRE

    Klapoetke, Thomas M.; Stierstorfer, Joerg; Fischer, Niko; Piercey, Davin; Scheutzow, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Diaminouronium 5-nitriminotetrazolate (1) and diaminouronium 1-methyl-5-nitrimino-tetrazolate (2) were synthesized by the reaction of diaminourea with 5-nitriminotetrazole (3) and 1-methyl-5-nitriminotetrazole (4), respectively. The energetic compounds 1 and 2 were fully characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, NMR spectroscopy, IR- and Raman spectroscopy as well as DSC measurements. The sensitivities towards impact, friction and electrical discharge were determi...

  17. Preparation, thermal and flammability properties of a novel form-stable phase change materials based on high density polyethylene/poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate)/organophilic montmorillonite nanocomposites/paraffin compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Yibing; Song Lei; He Qingliang; Yang Dandan; Hu Yuan

    2008-01-01

    The paraffin is one of important thermal energy storage materials with many desirable characteristics (i.e., high heat of fusion, varied phase change temperature, negligible supercooling, self-nucleating, no phase segregation and cheap, etc.), but has low thermal stability and flammable. Hence, a novel form-stable phase change materials (PCM) based on high density polyethylene (HDPE)/poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) (EVA)/organophilic montmorillonite (OMT) nanocomposites and paraffin are prepared by twin-screw extruder technique. The structures of the HDPE-EVA/OMT nanocomposites and the form-stable PCM are evidenced by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The results of XRD and TEM show that the HDPE-EVA/OMT nanocomposites form the ordered intercalated nanomorphology. The form-stable PCM consists of the paraffin, which acts as a dispersed phase change material and the HDPE-EVA/OMT nanocomposites, which acts as the supporting material. The paraffin disperses in the three-dimensional net structure formed by HDPE-EVA/OMT nanocomposites. The thermal stability, latent heat and flammability properties are characterized by thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), dynamic Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and cone calorimeter, respectively. The TGA and dynamic FTIR analyses indicate that the incorporation of suitable amount of OMT into the form-stable PCM increase the thermal stability. The DSC results show that the latent heat of the form-stable PCM has a certain degree decrease. The cone calorimeter shows that the heat release rate (HRR) has remarkably decreases with loading of OMT in the form-stable PCM, contributing to the improved flammability properties

  18. Dynamic modeling of stratification for chilled water storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Kahar; Al Khaireed, Syed Muhammad Nasrul; Ariffin, Mohd Kamal; Senawi, Mohd Yusoff

    2008-01-01

    Air conditioning of buildings can be costly and energy consuming. Application of thermal energy storage (TES) reduces cost and energy consumption. The efficiency of the overall operation is affected by storage tank sizing design, which affects thermal stratification of water during charging and discharging processes in TES system. In this study, numerical simulation is used to determine the relationship between tank size and good thermal stratification. Three dimensional simulations with different tank height-to-diameter ratio (HD) and inlet Reynolds number (Re) are investigated. The effect of the number of diffuser holes is also studied. For shallow tanks (low HD) simulations, no acceptable thermocline thickness can be seen for all Re experimented. Partial mixing is observed throughout the process. Medium HD tanks simulations show good thermocline behavior and clear distinction between warm and cold water can be seen. Finally, deep tanks (high HD) show less acceptable thermocline thickness as compared to that of medium HD tanks. From this study, doubling and halving the number of diffuser holes show no significant effect on the thermocline behavior

  19. Dynamic modeling of stratification for chilled water storage tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, Kahar; Al Khaireed, Syed Muhammad Nasrul; Ariffin, Mohd Kamal; Senawi, Mohd Yusoff [Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2008-11-15

    Air conditioning of buildings can be costly and energy consuming. Application of thermal energy storage (TES) reduces cost and energy consumption. The efficiency of the overall operation is affected by storage tank sizing design, which affects thermal stratification of water during charging and discharging processes in TES system. In this study, numerical simulation is used to determine the relationship between tank size and good thermal stratification. Three dimensional simulations with different tank height-to-diameter ratio (HD) and inlet Reynolds number (Re) are investigated. The effect of the number of diffuser holes is also studied. For shallow tanks (low HD) simulations, no acceptable thermocline thickness can be seen for all Re experimented. Partial mixing is observed throughout the process. Medium HD tanks simulations show good thermocline behavior and clear distinction between warm and cold water can be seen. Finally, deep tanks (high HD) show less acceptable thermocline thickness as compared to that of medium HD tanks. From this study, doubling and halving the number of diffuser holes show no significant effect on the thermocline behavior. (author)

  20. Chemical Stratification in Lake Fryxell, Victoria Land, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angino, E E; Armitage, K B; Tash, J C

    1962-10-05

    A landlocked lake of sodium-mixed-anion type in lower Taylor Valley has a salinity ranging from 1/35 to 1/5 that of sea water. The lake seems to be chemically stratified into three distinct layers. Several possible sources are postulated for the dissolved salts. The chemical zonation may have been initiated by past climatic variation; however, a thermal or magmatic origin for some of the waters is also indicated. No single origin for the lake waters or the stratification seems likely.

  1. Thermal evolution of Site U1414 by stable isotopes δ13C and δ18O, 87Sr/86Sr and fluid inclusion analyses, IODP Expedition 344

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstätter, Jennifer; Kurz, Walter; Krenn, Kurt; Richoz, Sylvain

    2017-04-01

    IODP Expedition 344 is the second expedition in course of the Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project (Program A), that was designed to reveal processes that effect nucleation and seismic rupture of large earthquakes at erosional subduction zones. Site 344-U1414, located 1 km seaward of the deformation front offshore Costa Rica, serves to evaluate fluid-rock interaction and geochemical processes linked with the tectonic evolution of the incoming Cocos Plate from the Early Miocene up to recent times. Combined isotope analyses and microthermometric analyses of fluid inclusions of hydrothermal veins within lithified sediments and the igneous basement (Cocos Ridge basalt), was used to reveal the thermal history of Site 344-U1414. Veins in the sedimentary rocks are mainly filled by coarse-grained calcite and subordinately by quartz. Veins within the basalt show polymineralic filling of clay minerals, calcite, aragonite and quartz. Blocky veins with embedded wall rock fragments, appearing in the sediments and in the basalt, indicate hydraulic fracturing. The carbon isotopic composition of the vein calcite suggest the influence of a CO2 -rich fluid mixed with seawater (-3.0 to -0.4‰ V-PDB) and the δ18O values can be differentiated in two groups, depending on the formation temperature (-13.6 to -9.3‰ and -10.8 to -4.7‰ V-PDB). 87Sr/86Sr ratios from the veins confirm the results of the stable isotope analyses, with a higher 87Sr/86Sr ratio close to seawater composition and lower ratios indicating the influence of basalt alteration. The hydrothermal veins contain different types of fluid inclusions with high and low entrapment temperatures and low saline fluids. The occurrence of decrepitated fluid inclusions, formed by increased internal overpressure, is related to isobaric heating. Elongated fluid inclusion planes, arc-like fluid inclusions and low homogenization temperatures suggest subsequent isobaric cooling. The stable isotopic content, strontium isotopic composition

  2. Multi-Layered Stratification in the Baltic Sea: Insight from a Modeling Study with Reference to Environmental Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Dargahi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrodynamic and transport characteristics of the Baltic Sea in the period 2000–2009 were studied using a fully calibrated and validated 3D hydrodynamic model with a horizontal resolution of 4.8 km. This study provided new insight into the type and dynamics of vertical structure in the Baltic Sea, not considered in previous studies. Thermal and salinity stratification are both addressed, with a focus on the structural properties of the layers. The detection of cooler regions (dicothermal within the layer structure is an important finding. The detailed investigation of thermal stratification for a 10-year period (i.e., 2000–2009 revealed some new features. A multilayered structure that contains several thermocline and dicothermal layers was identified from this study. Statistical analysis of the simulation results made it possible to derive the mean thermal stratification properties, expressed as mean temperatures and the normalized layer thicknesses. The three-layered model proposed by previous investigators appears to be valid only during the winter periods; for other periods, a multi-layered structure with more than five layers has been identified during this investigation. This study provides detailed insight into thermal and salinity stratification in the Baltic Sea during a recent decade that can be used as a basis for diverse environmental assessments. It extends previous studies on stratification in the Baltic Sea regarding both the extent and the nature of stratification.

  3. Assessment of groundwater pollution from ash ponds using stable and unstable isotopes around the Koradi and Khaperkheda thermal power plants (Maharashtra, India)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voltaggio, M.; Spadoni, M. [CNR — Istituto di Geologia Ambientale e Geoingegneria, Via Salaria km. 29.300, 00010 Montelibretti, Roma (Italy); Sacchi, E. [Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Pavia and CNR-IGG, Via Ferrata 1, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Sanam, R.; Pujari, P.R.; Labhasetwar, P.K. [CSIR-National Environmental Engineering Research Institute, Nehru Marg, Nagpur 440020 (India)

    2015-06-15

    The impact on local water resources due to fly ash produced in the Koradi and Khaperkheda thermal power plants (district of Nagpur, Maharashtra — India) and disposed in large ponds at the surface was assessed through the study of environmental variation of ratios of stable and unstable isotopes. Analyses of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes suggest scarce interaction between the water temporarily stored in the ponds and the groundwater in the study area. Data also highlight that the high salinity of groundwater measured in the polluted wells is not due to evaporation, but to subsequent infiltration of stream waters draining from the ponds to the local aquifer. {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr values, when associated with Sr/Ca ratios, demonstrate the dominant role of waste waters coming from tens of brick kilns surrounding the pond sulfate pollution. Uranium isotopic analyses clearly show evidence of the interaction between groundwater and aquifer rocks, and confirm again the low influence of ash ponds. A new conceptual model based on the study of the isotopes of radium is also proposed and used to estimate residence times of groundwater in the area. This model highlights that high salinity cannot be in any case attributed to a prolonged water–rock interaction, but is due to the influence of untreated waste water of domestic or brick kiln origin on the shallow and vulnerable aquifers. - Highlights: • Ash ponds have wide environmental and social impact in India. • Isotope ratios can be used as tracers for possible pollution of groundwater. • Isotopes of O, H, Sr, U and Ra have been used to investigate the area of Koradi. • Salinity of groundwater is not due to fly ash but linked to local brick kilns. • A model for the residence time of water based on Ra isotopes is described.

  4. Assessment of groundwater pollution from ash ponds using stable and unstable isotopes around the Koradi and Khaperkheda thermal power plants (Maharashtra, India)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voltaggio, M.; Spadoni, M.; Sacchi, E.; Sanam, R.; Pujari, P.R.; Labhasetwar, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    The impact on local water resources due to fly ash produced in the Koradi and Khaperkheda thermal power plants (district of Nagpur, Maharashtra — India) and disposed in large ponds at the surface was assessed through the study of environmental variation of ratios of stable and unstable isotopes. Analyses of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes suggest scarce interaction between the water temporarily stored in the ponds and the groundwater in the study area. Data also highlight that the high salinity of groundwater measured in the polluted wells is not due to evaporation, but to subsequent infiltration of stream waters draining from the ponds to the local aquifer. 87 Sr/ 86 Sr values, when associated with Sr/Ca ratios, demonstrate the dominant role of waste waters coming from tens of brick kilns surrounding the pond sulfate pollution. Uranium isotopic analyses clearly show evidence of the interaction between groundwater and aquifer rocks, and confirm again the low influence of ash ponds. A new conceptual model based on the study of the isotopes of radium is also proposed and used to estimate residence times of groundwater in the area. This model highlights that high salinity cannot be in any case attributed to a prolonged water–rock interaction, but is due to the influence of untreated waste water of domestic or brick kiln origin on the shallow and vulnerable aquifers. - Highlights: • Ash ponds have wide environmental and social impact in India. • Isotope ratios can be used as tracers for possible pollution of groundwater. • Isotopes of O, H, Sr, U and Ra have been used to investigate the area of Koradi. • Salinity of groundwater is not due to fly ash but linked to local brick kilns. • A model for the residence time of water based on Ra isotopes is described

  5. Effects of steam-heating processes on a stratified volcanic aquifer: Stable isotopes and dissolved gases in thermal waters of Vulcano Island (Aeolian archipelago)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, C.; Capasso, G.; Paonita, A.; Favara, R.

    2010-05-01

    We report on a comprehensive study of major-ion chemistry, dissolved gases, and stable isotopes measured in water wells at Vulcano Island since 1988. The work focuses on a quantitative model describing steam condensation and boiling phenomena in shallow water bodies. The model is based on the differences in partition coefficients between liquid water and vapor characterizing oxygen and hydrogen isotopes, as well as volcanic gases (CO 2, S species, and HCl). Based on both physical conditions of aquifers identified during drilling campaigns and the composition of the volcanic vapor, mass and enthalpy balances are applied in a multistep process of steam separation and condensation in shallower aquifers. By comparing the model results with measured data, we infer that (i) strong isotope enrichment observed in some shallow thermal waters can result from an increasing mass rate of condensing deep vapor, even in water meteoric in origin; (ii) the high CO 2 content measured in the fumarolic vapor during 1988-1993 affected the δ18O value of the steam-heated water due to CO 2-H 2O isotope exchange; (iii) the high pCO 2 measured in the coldest and peripheral waters are explained by the progressive enrichment of this gas in the vapor phase during multistep boiling; and (iv) the high Cl - and SO 42-contents in the hottest waters can be attributed to the direct condensation (single-step) of volcanic vapor. The model also takes into account both the mass fluxes and the compositions of the involved endmembers (steam and shallow groundwater), which provides important inferences on the modifications observed or expected during periods of increasing mass and heat input from depth.

  6. An Investigation of Pool Stratification Effects on BWR Wetwell External Venting Using GOTHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, T.L.; Harrell, J.R.; Marshall, M.D.; Ozdemir, O.E.; Massin, S.; Rubio, G.

    2017-01-01

    Strategies for coping with severe accidents and long term loss of AC power at BWR nuclear plants may include the use of wetwell and drywell vents to the atmosphere. In some forensic analyses for the Fukushima events, stratification of the wetwell has been postulated as a contributing factor to the higher than expected pressurization rate of the containment. The GOTHICh code has been used to investigate the containment response during the Fukushima events, including the possibility of suppression pool stratification. Thermal stratification, if it develops, would diminish the heat absorbing capacity of the pool, leading to earlier and more frequent vent valve cycling and earlier steam bypass through the saturated pool. This paper describes the use of the GOTHIC computer code to investigate the containment response during a long term loss of AC power with periodic wetwell venting, including the possibility of suppression pool stratification. The applicability of GOTHIC to pool stratification is discussed and modeling strategies are described for dealing with the long transients that must be considered for vent performance. GOTHIC results are presented for one selected loss of AC power scenario with and without stratification effects included. (author)

  7. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It...

  8. Combustion Mode Design with High Efficiency and Low Emissions Controlled by Mixtures Stratification and Fuel Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu eWang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review on the combustion mode design with high efficiency and low emissions controlled by fuel reactivity and mixture stratification that have been conducted in the authors’ group, including the charge reactivity controlled homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI combustion, stratification controlled premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI combustion, and dual-fuel combustion concepts controlled by both fuel reactivity and mixture stratification. The review starts with the charge reactivity controlled HCCI combustion, and the works on HCCI fuelled with both high cetane number fuels, such as DME and n-heptane, and high octane number fuels, such as methanol, natural gas, gasoline and mixtures of gasoline/alcohols, are reviewed and discussed. Since single fuel cannot meet the reactivity requirements under different loads to control the combustion process, the studies related to concentration stratification and dual-fuel charge reactivity controlled HCCI combustion are then presented, which have been shown to have the potential to achieve effective combustion control. The efforts of using both mixture and thermal stratifications to achieve the auto-ignition and combustion control are also discussed. Thereafter, both charge reactivity and mixture stratification are then applied to control the combustion process. The potential and capability of thermal-atmosphere controlled compound combustion mode and dual-fuel reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI/highly premixed charge combustion (HPCC mode to achieve clean and high efficiency combustion are then presented and discussed. Based on these results and discussions, combustion mode design with high efficiency and low emissions controlled by fuel reactivity and mixtures stratification in the whole operating range is proposed.

  9. The Social Stratification of a Municipality

    OpenAIRE

    Vondrušová, Hana-Kristýna

    2017-01-01

    This bachelor thesis analyses the social stratification in the village Příbraz and is divided into the theoretical and the practical section.The theoretical part is dedicated to the social inequality, history of social stratification, stratification theories, social stratification and its associated concepts, measurement of social stratification and the characteristics of the village Příbraz. The practical part of this bachelor thesis deals with methods of sociological research and data colle...

  10. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  11. Preparation of organo clays thermally stable to be employed as filler in PET nano composites; Preparacao de argilas organofilicas estaveis termicamente para serem empregadas como cargas em nanocompositos de PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, I.F. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (PGMTR/CCEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e da Natureza. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia de Materiais; Soares, A.P.S.; Silva, S.M.L. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UAEMa/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais; Malta, O.M.L. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife PE (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e da Natureza. Dept. de Quimica Fundamental

    2009-07-01

    Thermal stability of organically modified clays is fundamental to melt processing polymer nanocomposites, especially, poly(terephthalate ethylene) (PET). However, the use of organic salts with high thermal stability is factor essential to obtaining of organoclays with great thermal properties. This work has as purpose to evaluate the influence of organic modifier based on alkyl ammonium, alkyl phosphonium and aryl phosphonium, in the clay organic modification visa to improve thermal properties to use as filler in nanocomposites preparation, where temperatures at about 260 deg C will be employed. The most common, and commercially available, surfactants used for cation exchange reactions with montmorillonites, rendering them organophilic, are quaternary ammonium salts, that when present as cations in montmorillonite, typically begin degradation at above 200 deg C. However, organoclays prepared with quaternary alkyl phosphonium salts may be potentially useful for the organoclays preparation stable thermally. In this study bentonite clay from Bentonit Uniao Nordeste/PB was purified and organically modified with the organic salts reported above. Organoclays were characterized by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and analysis thermogravimetry. The results shown that the samples modified with the salts based on phosphonium presented higher thermal stability that the alkyl ammonium salt. (author)

  12. Theoretical comparison of solar water/space-heating combi systems and stratification design options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of differently designed solar combi systems is performed with weather data from the Danish Design Reference Year (55ºN). Three solar combi system designs found on the market are investigated. The investigation focuses on the influence of stratification on the thermal...... performance under different operation conditions with different domestic hot water and space heating demands. The solar combi systems are initially equipped with heat exchanger spirals and direct inlets to the tank. A step-by-step investigation is performed demonstrating the influence on the thermal...... performance of using inlet stratification pipes at the different inlets. Also, it is investigated how the design of the space heating system, the control system of the solar collectors, and the system size influence the thermal performance of solar combi systems. The work is carried out within the Solar...

  13. Analysis of stratification effects on mechanical integrity of pressurizer surge line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas-Solgadi, E.; Taupin, P.; Ensel, C.

    1992-01-01

    Unexpected thermal movements in pressurizer surge lines have been reported by several PWR operating utilities. Sometimes gaps between pipe and pipe whip restraints can become closed and plastic deformations could result. Moreover these movements, which have not been considered at conception, can induce additional stresses, and design limits on fatigue and stresses may be exceeded. These piping movements are caused by thermal stratification phenomenon in the horizontal part of the surge line (difference of temperature between hot leg and pressurizer varying from 30 C to above 160 C). To assess the mechanical consequences of this 3-dimensional phenomenon, FRAMATOME has developed a computer program using simplified models (1 and 2-dimensional). This method integrates past investigations on thermal-hydraulic variation of the stratification based on plant monitoring programs carried out by FRAMATOME since 1981, and based also on thermal-hydraulic tests and thermal-hydraulic computer code results. The methodology developed by FRAMATOME permits the following calculations: movements of the line in the elastic and plastic domains; stresses (Mises criterion -- calculations in compliance with ASME or RCC-M codes); usage factors in different components (elbows, welds, ...); crack propagation taking into account stratification and plastic shakedown

  14. 3D Thermal Stratification of Koycegiz Lake, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurcan, Tugba; Kurtulus, Bedri; Avsar, Ozgur; Avsar, Ulas

    2017-04-01

    Water temperature in lakes, streams and coastal areas is an important indicator for several purposes (water quality, aquatic organism, land use, etc..). There are over a hundred lakes in Turkey. Most of them locates in the area known as the Lake District in southwestern Turkey. The Study area is located at the south and southwest part of Turkey in Muǧla region. The present study focuses on determining possible thermocline changes in Lake Koyceǧiz by in-situ measurements. The measurement were done by two snapshot campaign at July and August 2013. Using Mugla Sıtkı Kocman University geological engineering floating platform, temperature, specific conductance, salinity and depth values were measured with the YSI 6600 and Horiba U2 devices in surface and depth of Lake Köyceǧiz at specific grid. When the depth of the water and the coordinates were measured by GPS. Scattered data interpolation is used to perform interpolation on a scattered dataset that resides in 3D space. The 3D temperature color mesh grid were generated by using Delaunay triangulation and Natural neighbor interpolation methodology. At the end of the study a 3D conceptual lake temperature dynamics model was reconstructed using MATLAB functions. The results show that Koycegiz Lake is a meromictic lake and has a significance decrease of Temperature at 7m of depth.In this regard, we would like also to thank TUBITAK project (112Y137), French Embassy in Turkey and Sıtkı Kocman Foundation for their financial support.

  15. Nutrient status and thermal stratification in Lake Victoria

    OpenAIRE

    Mugidde, R.; Hecky, R.E.

    2004-01-01

    Worldwide, human activity in the watershed has been found to induce lake responses at various levels, including at population and ecosystem scale. Recently, Carignan and Steedman (2000) reported on disruptions of biogeochemical cycles in temperate lakes following watershed deforestation and lor wildfire and Carignan et al., (2000 a, b) concluded that water quality and aquatic biota are strongly influenced by disturbances in the watershed. Similarly, Lake Victoria is no...

  16. Extraordinarily stable mini-hairpins: electrophoretical and thermal properties of the various sequence variants of d(GCGAAAGC) and their effect on DNA sequencing.

    OpenAIRE

    Hirao, I; Nishimura, Y; Tagawa, Y; Watanabe, K; Miura, K

    1992-01-01

    A small DNA fragment having a characteristic sequence d(GCGAAAGC) has been shown to form an extraordinarily stable mini-hairpin structure and to have an unusually rapid mobility in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, even when containing 7M urea. Here, we have studied the stability of the various sequence variants of d(GCGAAAGC) and the corresponding RNA fragments. Many such sequence variants form stable mini-hairpins in a similar manner to the d(GCGAAAGC) sequence. The RNA fragment, r(GCGAAA...

  17. Polar ocean stratification in a cold climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, Daniel M; Jaccard, Samuel L; Haug, Gerald H

    2004-03-04

    The low-latitude ocean is strongly stratified by the warmth of its surface water. As a result, the great volume of the deep ocean has easiest access to the atmosphere through the polar surface ocean. In the modern polar ocean during the winter, the vertical distribution of temperature promotes overturning, with colder water over warmer, while the salinity distribution typically promotes stratification, with fresher water over saltier. However, the sensitivity of seawater density to temperature is reduced as temperature approaches the freezing point, with potential consequences for global ocean circulation under cold climates. Here we present deep-sea records of biogenic opal accumulation and sedimentary nitrogen isotopic composition from the Subarctic North Pacific Ocean and the Southern Ocean. These records indicate that vertical stratification increased in both northern and southern high latitudes 2.7 million years ago, when Northern Hemisphere glaciation intensified in association with global cooling during the late Pliocene epoch. We propose that the cooling caused this increased stratification by weakening the role of temperature in polar ocean density structure so as to reduce its opposition to the stratifying effect of the vertical salinity distribution. The shift towards stratification in the polar ocean 2.7 million years ago may have increased the quantity of carbon dioxide trapped in the abyss, amplifying the global cooling.

  18. Rotating compressible fluids under strong stratification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard; Lu, Y.; Novotný, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, October (2014), s. 11-18 ISSN 1468-1218 Keywords : rotating fluid * compressible Navier-Stokes * strong stratification Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.519, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1468121814000212#

  19. Stable and self-adaptive performance of mechanically pumped CO2 two-phase loops for AMS-02 tracker thermal control in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Sun, X.-H.; Tong, G.-N.; Huang, Z.-C.; He, Z.-H.; Pauw, A.; Es, J. van; Battiston, R.; Borsini, S.; Laudi, E.; Verlaat, B.; Gargiulo, C.

    2011-01-01

    A mechanically pumped CO 2 two-phase loop cooling system was developed for the temperature control of the silicon tracker of AMS-02, a cosmic particle detector to work in the International Space Station. The cooling system (called TTCS, or Tracker Thermal Control System), consists of two evaporators in parallel to collect heat from the tracker's front-end electronics, two radiators in parallel to emit the heat into space, and a centrifugal pump that circulates the CO 2 fluid that carries the heat to the radiators, and an accumulator that controls the pressure, and thus the temperature of the evaporators. Thermal vacuum tests were performed to check and qualify the system operation in simulated space thermal environment. In this paper, we reported the test results which show that the TTCS exhibited excellent temperature control ability, including temperature homogeneity and stability, and self-adaptive ability to the various external heat flux to the radiators. Highlights: → The active-pumped CO 2 two-phase cooling loop passed the thermal vacuum test. → It provides high temperature homogeneity and stability thermal boundaries. → Its working temperature is controllable in vacuum environment. → It possesses self-adaptive ability to imbalanced external heat fluxes.

  20. Air fountains in the erosion of gaseous stratifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deri, E.; Cariteau, B.; Abdo, D.

    2010-01-01

    In 1979, the Three Mile Island accident demonstrated that, in a nuclear reactor undergoing to a severe accident, a loss of core cooling may enhance the oxidation of the clads, and this may turn in the production of a safety-relevant hydrogen amount. Since then, major efforts have been devoting to hydrogen safety R and D in the nuclear field. Owing to buoyancy forces, hydrogen may accumulate in the higher regions of the containment. Therefore, we are now experiencing a renewed interest on stratified enclosures. In this frame, relevant experimental data are required to validate and improve the computer codes that are aimed to predict the post-accident thermal-hydraulic conditions of the containment. The goal of this work is to investigate, on a small scale, the break-up of a gaseous stratification by the injection of vertical fountains. A helium layer is created on the top of an air-filled containment of a total volume of 1 m 3 . A vertical round air fountain is then injected upward from the containment bottom plate. The Particle Image Velocimetry technique and a series of thermal conductivity gauges are used to measure the flow velocity and the species evolution. To describe the stratification break-up phenomenon, a review of a nondimensional approach is presented and applied successfully to the test cases. In order to point out some leading features in the mixing, the influence of molecular diffusion is also taken into account. Finally, during the experimental campaign, a diffusion-, a gravity-, and an inertia-dominated regime are observed.

  1. Stratification studies in components of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randorf, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The applicability of two stratification criteria during loss-of-coolant (LOCA) conditions was studied. The first criteria was developed for addressing cold water injection-induced stratification. The second criteria applied to downcomer/cold leg junction stratification. Both criteria provided predictions consistent with measured conditions during small break loss-of-coolant tests

  2. A Comparative Review of Stratification Texts and Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, Clayton D.

    2012-01-01

    Social stratification is a core substantive area within sociology. There are a number of textbooks and readers available on the market that deal with this central topic. In this article, I conduct a comparative review of (a) four stratification textbooks and (b) four stratification readers. (Contains 2 tables.)

  3. Preparation of some thermal stable polymers based on diesters of polyethylene and polypropylene oxides macro monomers to use as surfactants at high temperature and pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Alsabagh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on polyethylene (PE and polypropylene (PP oxides, six macromonomers were prepared through two steps. The first step was esterification of the PE and PP oxides, with oleic acid to give the corresponding monoesters. The second was the diesterfication of the prepared monoesters with methacrylic acid to give the corresponding diesters. The prepared macromonomers (diesters were polymerized to obtain six polymers. The chemical structure of the prepared mono- and diesters and polymers was justified by IR, NMR, GPC and TGA. The obtained results confirmed that the prepared polymers have a high thermal stability and can be used in high pressure and temperature during the drainage of the water from water-in-oil emulsions. The surface active and thermodynamics parameters of these polymers in non-aqueous solution were also investigated and it was found that, these materials have high thermal stability which leads to the possibility to be used under severe reservoir conditions as surfactants.

  4. Drainage and Stratification Kinetics of Foam Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiran; Sharma, Vivek

    2014-03-01

    Baking bread, brewing cappuccino, pouring beer, washing dishes, shaving, shampooing, whipping eggs and blowing bubbles all involve creation of aqueous foam films. Foam lifetime, drainage kinetics and stability are strongly influenced by surfactant type (ionic vs non-ionic), and added proteins, particles or polymers modify typical responses. The rate at which fluid drains out from a foam film, i.e. drainage kinetics, is determined in the last stages primarily by molecular interactions and capillarity. Interestingly, for certain low molecular weight surfactants, colloids and polyelectrolyte-surfactant mixtures, a layered ordering of molecules, micelles or particles inside the foam films leads to a stepwise thinning phenomena called stratification. Though stratification is observed in many confined systems including foam films containing particles or polyelectrolytes, films containing globular proteins seem not to show this behavior. Using a Scheludko-type cell, we experimentally study the drainage and stratification kinetics of horizontal foam films formed by protein-surfactant mixtures, and carefully determine how the presence of proteins influences the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of foam films.

  5. Thermally induced solid-state transformation of cimetidine. A multi-spectroscopic/chemometrics determination of the kinetics of the process and structural elucidation of one of the products as a stable N{sub 3}-enamino tautomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, Natalia L.; Simonetti, Sebastian O.; Maggio, Rubén M.; Kaufman, Teodoro S., E-mail: kaufman@iquir-conicet.gov.ar

    2015-05-22

    Highlights: • Thermally stressed cimetidine above its melting point affords a stable N{sub 3} tautomer. • Multi-spectroscopic/chemometric approach developed to monitor tautomerization. • First combined use of NMR, UV and IR spectroscopies with chemometrics. • Solid cimetidine suffers first order degradation upon submission to dry heat. • Theoretical chemistry analysis confirmed the relative stability of cimetidine tautomer. - Abstract: Exposure of cimetidine (CIM) to dry heat (160–180 °C) afforded, upon cooling, a glassy solid containing new and hitherto unknown products. The kinetics of this process was studied by a second order chemometrics-assisted multi-spectroscopic approach. Proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopic data were jointly used, whereas multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) was employed as the chemometrics method to extract process information. It was established that drug degradation follows a first order kinetics. One of the products was structurally characterized by mono- and bi-dimensional NMR experiments. It was found to be the N{sub 3}-enamino tautomer (TAU) of CIM, resulting from the thermal isomerization of the double bond of the cyanoguanidine moiety of the drug, from the imine form to its N{sub 3}-enamine state. The thus generated tautomer demonstrated to be stable for months in the glassy solid and in methanolic solutions. A theoretical study of CIM and TAU revealed that the latter is less stable; however, the energy barrier for tautomer interconversion is high enough, precluding the process to proceed rapidly at room temperature.

  6. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets, with a few more additions - with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers - exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the foree of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc. (orig.)

  7. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc

  8. Hazardous to your health: kinetic foundations of risk stratification and therapeutic triage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, George A; Kaul, Sanjay

    2006-03-01

    Risk stratification is widely used in the prognostic assessment of patients with a variety of clinical disorders on the unquestioned assumption that the intensity of treatment should be proportionate to the threat of an adverse event over some finite period of time (risk). However, just as the physical trajectory of an object depends on its current magnitude of displacement (velocity) and the concurrent rate of change of that displacement (acceleration), the prognostic trajectory of a patient depends on the current magnitude of risk and the concurrent rate of change of that risk (hazard). Clinical risk stratification nevertheless relies only on the former. We therefore integrated the quantitative assessment of risk and hazard by way of a kinetic model that characterizes the development of an adverse event as a series of exponential state-to-state transitions-from stable to unstable to event. This model serves to shift the clinical emphasis from prognosis (the assessment of risk) to treatment (the improvement in outcome). In this context, treatment is well advised (even in low-risk individuals) when the hazard is large (risk is rising), and is less well advised (even in high-risk individuals) when the hazard is small (risk is stable). The kinetic model outlined here thereby promises to supersede the superficial practice of risk stratification with a more sophisticated strategy of therapeutic triage that allows one to predict the incremental clinical benefit of alternative treatment strategies.

  9. Formation, stratification, and mixing of the cores of Earth and Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Rubie, David C.; Hernlund, John; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Nakajima, Miki

    2017-09-01

    Earth possesses a persistent, internally-generated magnetic field, whereas no trace of a dynamo has been detected on Venus, at present or in the past, although a high surface temperature and recent resurfacing events may have removed paleomagnetic evidence. Whether or not a terrestrial body can sustain an internally generated magnetic field by convection inside its metallic fluid core is determined in part by its initial thermodynamic state and its compositional structure, both of which are in turn set by the processes of accretion and differentiation. Here we show that the cores of Earth- and Venus-like planets should grow with stable compositional stratification unless disturbed by late energetic impacts. They do so because higher abundances of light elements are incorporated into the liquid metal that sinks to form the core as the temperatures and pressures of metal-silicate equilibration increase during accretion. We model this process and determine that this establishes a stable stratification that resists convection and inhibits the onset of a geodynamo. However, if a late energetic impact occurs, it could mechanically stir the core creating a single homogenous region within which a long-lasting geodynamo would operate. While Earth's accretion has been punctuated by a late giant impact with likely enough energy to mix the core (e.g. the impact that formed the Moon), we hypothesize that the accretion of Venus is characterized by the absence of such energetic giant impacts and the preservation of its primordial stratifications.

  10. Stable cupola-shaped bilayer lipid membranes with mobile Plateau-Gibbs border: expansion-shrinkage of membrane due to thermal transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, V F; Shevchenko, E V; Smirnova EYu; Yakovenko, E V; Frolov, A V

    1992-05-01

    Stable bilayer lipid membranes (BLM) with mobile Plateau-Gibbs border (PGB) have been formed. The precondition of the formation was the presence of a lipid coverage on the teflon surface near the hole, where the membrane has been formed. This allowed the movement of the PGB along the teflon surface after transformation of the planar bilayer into a cupola-shaped by bowing of the bilayer due to excess hydrostatic pressure. As a result the giant bilayers were obtained with an area up to two orders larger in magnitude compared with the initial area. Changes in lipid bilayer area depend on the temperature at the phase transition of the lipid. Cooling of the expanded bilayer was followed by a significant shrinkage of the bilayer at temperatures below the main phase transition.

  11. Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679 and its uses in the derivation of thermal processing schedules for low-acid shelf-stable foods and as a research model for proteolytic Clostridium botulinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Janelle L; Tran-Dinh, Nai; Chapman, Belinda

    2012-04-01

    The putrefactive anaerobe Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679 has been widely used as a nontoxigenic surrogate for proteolytic Clostridium botulinum in the validation of thermal processes for low-acid shelf-stable foods, as a target organism in the derivation of thermal processes that reduce the risk of spoilage of such foods to an acceptable level, and as a research model for proteolytic strains of C. botulinum. Despite the importance of this organism, our knowledge of it has remained fragmented. In this article we draw together the literature associated with PA 3679 and discuss the identity of this organism, the phylogenetic relationships that exist between PA 3679 and various strains of C. sporogenes and proteolytic C. botulinum, the heat resistance characteristics of PA 3679, the advantages and limitations associated with its use in the derivation of thermal processing schedules, and the knowledge gaps and opportunities that exist with regard to its use as a research model for proteolytic C. botulinum. Phylogenetic analysis reviewed here suggests that PA 3679 is more closely related to various strains of proteolytic C. botulinum than to selected strains, including the type strain, of C. sporogenes. Even though PA 3679 is demonstrably nontoxigenic, the genetic basis of this nontoxigenic status remains to be elucidated, and the genetic sequence of this microorganism appears to be the key knowledge gap remaining to be filled. Our comprehensive review of comparative heat resistance data gathered for PA 3679 and proteolytic strains of C. botulinum over the past 100 years supports the practice of using PA 3679 as a (typically fail-safe) thermal processing surrogate for proteolytic C. botulinum.

  12. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  13. Intergroup biases of the intermediate-status group: the effect of stability and instability of social stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricati, Luca; Monacelli, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    In two studies, the effect of instability of social stratification on intergroup behaviour of the intermediate-status group was investigated. In both studies, participants were categorised in the intermediate-status group. In Study 1, perceived instability was measured. Results show that the more social stratification was perceived as stable, the more intermediate-status group members were biased against the high-status group. Biases against both high- and low-status groups tended to become similar as social stratification was perceived as more unstable. In Study 2, instability was manipulated in upward and downward conditions. Results showed that, in the upwardly unstable condition, intermediate-status group members were more biased against high-status group, while in the downwardly unstable condition they were more biased against the low-status group.

  14. Modeling of condensation, stratification, and mixing phenomena in a pool of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Kudinov, P.; Villanueva, W.

    2010-12-01

    This work pertains to the research program on Containment Thermal-Hydraulics at KTH. The objective is to evaluate and improve performance of methods, which are used to analyze thermal-hydraulics of steam suppression pools in a BWR plant under different abnormal transient and accident conditions. As a passive safety system, the function of steam pressure suppression pools is paramount to the containment performance. In the present work, the focus is on apparently-benign but intricate and potentially risk-significant scenarios in which thermal stratification could significantly impede the pool's pressure suppression capacity. For the case of small flow rates of steam influx, the steam condenses rapidly in the pool and the hot condensate rises in a narrow plume above the steam injection plane and spreads into a thin layer at the pool's free surface. When the steam flow rate increases significantly, momentum introduced by the steam injection and/or periodic expansion and shrink of large steam bubbles due to direct contact condensation can cause breakdown of the stratified layers and lead to mixing of the pool water. Accurate prediction of the pool thermal-hydraulics in such scenarios presents a computational challenge. Lumped-parameter models have no capability to predict temperature distribution of water pool during thermal stratification development. While high-order-accurate CFD (RANS, LES) methods are not practical due to excessive computing power needed to calculate 3D high-Rayleighnumber natural circulation flow in long transients. In the present work, a middleground approach is used, namely CFD-like model of the general purpose thermalhydraulic code GOTHIC. Each cell of 3D GOTHIC grid uses lumped parameter volume type closures for modeling of various heat and mass transfer processes at subgrid scale. We use GOTHIC to simulate POOLEX/PPOOLEX experiment, in order to (a) quantify errors due to GOTHIC's physical models and numerical schemes, and (b) propose

  15. Concentration quenching of Eu2+ in a thermal-stable yellow phosphor Ca2BO3Cl:Eu2+ for LED application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xinguo; Zhang Jilin; Dong Zhiyue; Shi Jianxin; Gong Menglian

    2012-01-01

    A piece-shaped phosphor Ca 2 BO 3 Cl: Eu 2+ was synthesized by solid-state reaction method. This phosphor exhibited wide absorption in ultra-violet and visible range, and bright yellow emission band centering at 570 nm. The concentration quenching mechanism was verified to be a dipole–dipole interaction, and its critical transfer distance was about 17 Å by both calculated crystal structural method and experimental spectral method. This phosphor has a good thermal stability with a quenching temperature (T 1/2 ) of 200 °C. Yellow and white LEDs were fabricated with this phosphor and near UV chips, and the yellow LED has a high color purity of 97.0% and promising current tolerant property, while the white LED shows a luminous efficiency of 11.68 lm/W. - Highlights: ► Broadband excitable and strong yellow-emitting Ca 2 BO 3 Cl: Eu 2+ phosphor is obtained by solid state reaction. ► Concentration quenching mechanism of Ca 2 BO 3 Cl: Eu 2+ is dipole–dipole interaction. ► Quenching temperature (T 1/2 ) of Ca 2 BO 3 Cl: Eu 2+ is at 200 °C. ► As synthesized material can be used for LED phosphor application.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of thermally stable poly(amide-imide-montmorillonite nanocomposites based on bis(4-carboxyphenyl-N,N'-pyromellitimide acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hajibeygi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Two new poly(amide-imide-montmorillonite reinforced nanocomposites containing bis(4-carboxyphenyl-N,N'-pyromellitimide acid moiety in the main chain were synthesized by a convenient solution intercalation technique. Poly(amide-imide (PAI as a source of polymer matrix was synthesized by the direct polycondensation reaction of bis(4-carboxyphenyl-N,N'-pyromellitimide acid with 4,4'-diamino diphenyl sulfone in the presence of triphenyl phosphite (TPP, CaCl2, pyridine and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP. Morphology and structure of the resulting PAI-nanocomposite films with 10 and 20% silicate particles were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The effect of clay dispersion and the interaction between clay and polymeric chains on the properties of nanocomposites films were investigated by using UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermal gravimetry analysis (TGA and water uptake measurements.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v27i1.10

  17. Easy Fabrication of Highly Thermal-Stable Cellulose Nanocrystals Using Cr(NO33 Catalytic Hydrolysis System: A Feasibility Study from Macro- to Nano-Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Wei Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reported on the feasibility and practicability of Cr(NO33 hydrolysis to isolate cellulose nanocrystals (CNCCr(NO33 from native cellulosic feedstock. The physicochemical properties of CNCCr(NO33 were compared with nanocellulose isolated using sulfuric acid hydrolysis (CNCH2SO4. In optimum hydrolysis conditions, 80 °C, 1.5 h, 0.8 M Cr(NO33 metal salt and solid–liquid ratio of 1:30, the CNCCr(NO33 exhibited a network-like long fibrous structure with the aspect ratio of 15.7, while the CNCH2SO4 showed rice-shape structure with an aspect ratio of 3.5. Additionally, Cr(NO33-treated CNC rendered a higher crystallinity (86.5% ± 0.3% with high yield (83.6% ± 0.6% as compared to the H2SO4-treated CNC (81.4% ± 0.1% and 54.7% ± 0.3%, respectively. Furthermore, better thermal stability of CNCCr(NO33 (344 °C compared to CNCH2SO4 (273 °C rendered a high potential for nanocomposite application. This comparable effectiveness of Cr(NO33 metal salt provides milder hydrolysis conditions for highly selective depolymerization of cellulosic fiber into value-added cellulose nanomaterial, or useful chemicals and fuels in the future.

  18. Quantitative stratification of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushravya Raghunath

    Full Text Available Diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs are characterized by widespread pathological changes within the pulmonary tissue that impair the elasticity and gas exchange properties of the lungs. Clinical-radiological diagnosis of these diseases remains challenging and their clinical course is characterized by variable disease progression. These challenges have hindered the introduction of robust objective biomarkers for patient-specific prediction based on specific phenotypes in clinical practice for patients with DPLD. Therefore, strategies facilitating individualized clinical management, staging and identification of specific phenotypes linked to clinical disease outcomes or therapeutic responses are urgently needed. A classification schema consistently reflecting the radiological, clinical (lung function and clinical outcomes and pathological features of a disease represents a critical need in modern pulmonary medicine. Herein, we report a quantitative stratification paradigm to identify subsets of DPLD patients with characteristic radiologic patterns in an unsupervised manner and demonstrate significant correlation of these self-organized disease groups with clinically accepted surrogate endpoints. The proposed consistent and reproducible technique could potentially transform diagnostic staging, clinical management and prognostication of DPLD patients as well as facilitate patient selection for clinical trials beyond the ability of current radiological tools. In addition, the sequential quantitative stratification of the type and extent of parenchymal process may allow standardized and objective monitoring of disease, early assessment of treatment response and mortality prediction for DPLD patients.

  19. Life insurance: genomic stratification and risk classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Yann; Burton, Hilary; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Feze, Ida Ngueng; Dent, Tom; Pashayan, Nora; Chowdhury, Susmita; Foulkes, William; Hall, Alison; Hamet, Pavel; Kirwan, Nick; Macdonald, Angus; Simard, Jacques; Van Hoyweghen, Ine

    2014-05-01

    With the development and increasing accessibility of new genomic tools such as next-generation sequencing, genome-wide association studies, and genomic stratification models, the debate on genetic discrimination in the context of life insurance became even more complex, requiring a review of current practices and the exploration of new scenarios. In this perspective, a multidisciplinary group of international experts representing different interests revisited the genetics and life insurance debate during a 2-day symposium 'Life insurance: breast cancer research and genetic risk prediction seminar' held in Quebec City, Canada on 24 and 25 September 2012. Having reviewed the current legal, social, and ethical issues on the use of genomic information in the context of life insurance, the Expert Group identified four main questions: (1) Have recent developments in genomics and related sciences changed the contours of the genetics and life insurance debate? (2) Are genomic results obtained in a research context relevant for life insurance underwriting? (3) Should predictive risk assessment and risk stratification models based on genomic data also be used for life insurance underwriting? (4) What positive actions could stakeholders in the debate take to alleviate concerns over the use of genomic information by life insurance underwriters? This paper presents a summary of the discussions and the specific action items recommended by the Expert Group.

  20. Life insurance: genomic stratification and risk classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Yann; Burton, Hilary; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Feze, Ida Ngueng; Dent, Tom; Pashayan, Nora; Chowdhury, Susmita; Foulkes, William; Hall, Alison; Hamet, Pavel; Kirwan, Nick; Macdonald, Angus; Simard, Jacques; Van Hoyweghen, Ine

    2014-01-01

    With the development and increasing accessibility of new genomic tools such as next-generation sequencing, genome-wide association studies, and genomic stratification models, the debate on genetic discrimination in the context of life insurance became even more complex, requiring a review of current practices and the exploration of new scenarios. In this perspective, a multidisciplinary group of international experts representing different interests revisited the genetics and life insurance debate during a 2-day symposium ‘Life insurance: breast cancer research and genetic risk prediction seminar' held in Quebec City, Canada on 24 and 25 September 2012. Having reviewed the current legal, social, and ethical issues on the use of genomic information in the context of life insurance, the Expert Group identified four main questions: (1) Have recent developments in genomics and related sciences changed the contours of the genetics and life insurance debate? (2) Are genomic results obtained in a research context relevant for life insurance underwriting? (3) Should predictive risk assessment and risk stratification models based on genomic data also be used for life insurance underwriting? (4) What positive actions could stakeholders in the debate take to alleviate concerns over the use of genomic information by life insurance underwriters? This paper presents a summary of the discussions and the specific action items recommended by the Expert Group. PMID:24129434

  1. Heavy stable charged tracks as signatures of non-thermal dark matter at the LHC: a study in some non-supersymmetric scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Avirup; Mondal, Tanmoy; Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup

    2017-12-01

    We consider two theoretical scenarios, each including a ℤ 2-odd sector and leading to an elementary dark matter candidate. The first one is a variant of the Type-III seesaw model where one lepton triplet is ℤ 2-odd, together with a heavy sterile neutrino. It leads to a fermionic dark matter, together with the charged component of the triplet being a quasi-stable particle which decays only via a higher-dimensional operator suppressed by a high scale. The second model consists of an inert scalar doublet together with a ℤ 2-odd right-handed Majorana neutrino dark matter. A tiny Yukawa coupling delays the decay of the charged component of the inert doublet into the dark matter candidate, making the former long-lived on the scale of collider detectors. The parameter space of each model has been constrained by big-bang nucleosynthesis constraints, and also by estimating the contribution to the relic density through freeze-out of the long-lived charged particle as well the freeze-in production of the dark matter candidate. We consider two kinds of signals at the Large Hadron Collider for each case. For the first kind of models, namely two charged tracks and single track [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] and for the second kind, the characteristic signals are opposite as well as same-sign charged track pairs. We perform a detailed analysis using event selection criteria consistent with the current experimental programmes. It is found that the scenario with a lepton triplet can be probed upto 960 (1190) GeV with an integrated luminosity of 300 (3000) fb-1, while the corresponding numbers for the inert doublet scenario are 630 (800) GeV. Furthermore, the second kind of signal mentioned in each case allows us to differentiate different dark matter scenarios from each other.

  2. Observations of Tidal Straining Within Two Different Ocean Environments in the East China Sea: Stratification and Near-Bottom Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Wei, Hao; Zhao, Liang

    2017-11-01

    Tidal straining describes the straining effect induced by the vertical shear of oscillatory tidal currents that act on horizontal density gradients. It tends to create tidal periodic stratification and modulate the turbulence in the bottom boundary layer (BBL). Here, we present observations of current, hydrology and turbulence obtained at two mooring stations that are characterized by two typical hydrological environments in the East China Sea (ECS). One is located adjacent to the Changjiang River's mouth, and the other is located over a sloping shelf which is far from the freshwater sources. Tidal straining induces a semidiurnal switching between stable and unstable stratification at both stations. Near-bottom high-frequency velocity measurements further reveal that the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) is highly elevated during periods when unstable stratification occurs. A comparison between the TKE dissipation rate (ɛ) and the shear production (P) further reveals that the near-bottom mixing is locally shear-induced most of the time except during the unstable stratification period. Within this period, the magnitude of dissipation exceeds the expected value based on the law of the wall by an order of magnitude. The buoyancy flux that calculated by the balance method is too small to compensate for the existing discrepancy between the dissipation and shear production. Another plausible candidate is the advection of TKE, which may play an important role in the TKE budget during the unstable stratification period.

  3. Fatigue flaw growth assessment and inclusion of stratification to the LBB assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samohyl, P.

    1997-04-01

    The application of the LBB requires also fatigue flaw growth assessment. This analysis was performed for PWR nuclear power plants types VVER 440/230, VVER 440/213c, VVER 1000/320. Respecting that these NPP`s were designed according to Russian codes that differ from US codes it was needed to compare these approaches. Comparison with our experimental data was accomplished, too. Margins of applicability of the US methods and their modifications for the materials used for construction of Czech and Slovak NPP`s are shown. Computer code accomplishing the analysis according to described method is presented. Some measurement and calculations show that thermal stratifications in horizontal pipelines can lead to additive loads that are not negligible and can be dangerous. An attempt to include these loads induced by steady-state stratification was made.

  4. Seasonal variations of the upper ocean salinity stratification in the Tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Christophe; O'Kane, Terence J.

    2014-03-01

    In comparison to the deep ocean, the upper mixed layer is a region typically characterized by substantial vertical gradients in water properties. Within the Tropics, the rich variability in the vertical shapes and forms that these structures can assume through variation in the atmospheric forcing results in a differential effect in terms of the temperature and salinity stratification. Rather than focusing on the strong halocline above the thermocline, commonly referred to as the salinity barrier layer, the present study takes into account the respective thermal and saline dependencies in the Brunt-Väisälä frequency (N2) in order to isolate the specific role of the salinity stratification in the layers above the main pycnocline. We examine daily vertical profiles of temperature and salinity from an ocean reanalysis over the period 2001-2007. We find significant seasonal variations in the Brunt-Väisälä frequency profiles are limited to the upper 300 m depth. Based on this, we determine the ocean salinity stratification (OSS) to be defined as the stabilizing effect (positive values) due to the haline part of N2 averaged over the upper 300 m. In many regions of the tropics, the OSS contributes 40-50% to N2 as compared to the thermal stratification and, in some specific regions, exceeds it for a few months of the seasonal cycle. Away from the tropics, for example, near the centers of action of the subtropical gyres, there are regions characterized by the permanent absence of OSS. In other regions previously characterized with salinity barrier layers, the OSS obviously shares some common variations; however, we show that where temperature and salinity are mixed over the same depth, the salinity stratification can be significant. In addition, relationships between the OSS and the sea surface salinity are shown to be well defined and quasilinear in the tropics, providing some indication that in the future, analyses that consider both satellite surface salinity

  5. Characteristic and Mixing Mechanisms of Thermal Fluid at the Tampomas Volcano, West Java, Using Hydrogeochemistry, Stable Isotope and 222Rn Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwan Iskandar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Tampomas Volcano is a Quaternary volcano located on Java Island and controlled by a west-northwest–east-southeast (WNW-ESE regional fault trend. This regional structure acts as conduits for the hydrothermal fluids to ascend from a deeper system toward the surface and, in the end, mix with groundwater. In this research, water geochemistry, gas chemistry and isotopes 2H, 18O and 13C were used to explore the subsurface fluid characteristics and mixing mechanisms of the hydrothermal fluids with groundwater. In addition to those geochemical methods, soil-gas and dissolved 222Rn observations were performed to understand the geological control of fluid chemistry. Based on the analytical results, the hydrothermal system of Tampomas is only developed at the northeastern flank of the volcano, which is mainly controlled by NE-SW structures as deep fluid conduits, while the Cimalaka Caldera Rim around Sekarwangi act as the boundary flow of the system. This system is also categorized as an “intermediate temperature system” wherein fluid is derived from the interaction between the volcanic host-rock at 170 ± 10 °C mixed with trace organic gas input from sedimentary formation; afterwards, the fluid flows laterally and is diluted with groundwater near the surface. Soil-gas and dissolved 222Rn confirm that these permeable zones are effective conduits for the ascending thermal fluids. It is found that NE faults carry higher trace elements from the deeper system, while the circular feature of the Caldera Rim acts as the boundary of the hydrothermal system.

  6. Stratification issues in the primary system. Review of available validation experiments and State-of-the-Art in modelling capabilities (StratRev)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westin, J.; Henriksson, M. (Vattenfall Research and Development AB (Sweden)); Paettikangas, T. (VTT (Finland)); Toppila, T.; Raemae, T. (Fortum Nuclear Services Ltd (Finland)); Kudinov, P. (KTH Nuclear Power Safety (Sweden)); Anglart, H. (KTH Nuclear Reactor Technology (Sweden))

    2009-08-15

    The objective of the present report is to review available validation experiments and State-of-the-Art in modelling of stratification and mixing in the primary system of Light Water Reactors. A topical workshop was arranged in AElvkarleby in June 2008 within the framework of BWR-OG, and the presentations from various utilities showed that stratification issues are not unusual and can cause costly stops in the production. It is desirable to take actions in order to reduce the probability for stratification to occur, and to develop well-validated and accepted tools and procedures for analyzing upcoming stratification events. A research plan covering the main questions is outlined, and a few suggestions regarding more limited research activities are given. Since many of the stratification events results in thermal loads that are localized in time and space, CFD is a suitable tool. However, the often very large and complex geometry posses a great challenge to CFD, and it is important to perform a step-by-step increase in complexity with intermediate validation versus relevant experimental data. The ultimate goal is to establish Best Practice Guidelines that can be followed both by utilities and authorities in case of an event including stratification and thermal loads. An extension of the existing Best Practice Guidelines for CFD in nuclear safety applications developed by OECD/NEA is thus suggested as a relevant target for a continuation project. (au)

  7. PPOOLEX experiments on stratification and mixing in the wet well pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laine, J.; Puustinen, M.; Raesaenen, A.; Tanskanen, V.

    2011-03-01

    This report summarizes the results of the thermal stratification and mixing experiments carried out in 2010 with the scaled down, two compartment PPOOLEX test facility designed and constructed at LUT. Steam was blown into the thermally insulated dry well compartment and from there through the DN200 vertical blowdown pipe to the condensation pool filled with sub-cooled water. The main purpose of the experiment series was to generate verification data for evaluating the capability of GOTHIC and APROS codes to predict stratification and mixing phenomena. Another objective was to test the sound velocity measurement system. Altogether five experiments were carried out. The experiments consisted of a small steam flow rate stratification period and of a mixing period with continuously or stepwise increasing flow rate. The dry well structures were heated up to the level of approximately 90 deg. C before the actual experiments. The initial water bulk temperature was 20 deg. C. When the steam flow rate was low enough (typically ∼100-150 g/s) temperatures below the blowdown pipe outlet remained constant while increasing heat-up occurred towards the pool surface layers indicating strong thermal stratification of the wet well pool water. During the stratification period the highest measured temperature difference between pool bottom and surface was approximately 40 deg. C. During the mixing period total mixing of the pool volume was not achieved in any of the experiments. The bottom layers heated up significantly but never reached the same temperature as the topmost layers. The lowest measured temperature difference between the pool bottom and surface was 7-8 deg. C. According to the test results, it seems that a small void fraction doesn't have an effect on the speed of sound in water and that the acquired sound velocity measurement system cannot be used for the estimation of void fraction in the wet well water pool. However, more tests on this issue have to be executed

  8. PPOOLEX experiments on stratification and mixing in the wet well pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laine, J.; Puustinen, M.; Raesaenen, A.; Tanskanen, V. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Safety Research Unit (Finland))

    2011-03-15

    This report summarizes the results of the thermal stratification and mixing experiments carried out in 2010 with the scaled down, two compartment PPOOLEX test facility designed and constructed at LUT. Steam was blown into the thermally insulated dry well compartment and from there through the DN200 vertical blowdown pipe to the condensation pool filled with sub-cooled water. The main purpose of the experiment series was to generate verification data for evaluating the capability of GOTHIC and APROS codes to predict stratification and mixing phenomena. Another objective was to test the sound velocity measurement system. Altogether five experiments were carried out. The experiments consisted of a small steam flow rate stratification period and of a mixing period with continuously or stepwise increasing flow rate. The dry well structures were heated up to the level of approximately 90 deg. C before the actual experiments. The initial water bulk temperature was 20 deg. C. When the steam flow rate was low enough (typically approx100-150 g/s) temperatures below the blowdown pipe outlet remained constant while increasing heat-up occurred towards the pool surface layers indicating strong thermal stratification of the wet well pool water. During the stratification period the highest measured temperature difference between pool bottom and surface was approximately 40 deg. C. During the mixing period total mixing of the pool volume was not achieved in any of the experiments. The bottom layers heated up significantly but never reached the same temperature as the topmost layers. The lowest measured temperature difference between the pool bottom and surface was 7-8 deg. C. According to the test results, it seems that a small void fraction doesn't have an effect on the speed of sound in water and that the acquired sound velocity measurement system cannot be used for the estimation of void fraction in the wet well water pool. However, more tests on this issue have to be

  9. Nonlinear waves in waveguides with stratification

    CERN Document Server

    Leble, Sergei B

    1991-01-01

    S.B. Leble's book deals with nonlinear waves and their propagation in metallic and dielectric waveguides and media with stratification. The underlying nonlinear evolution equations (NEEs) are derived giving also their solutions for specific situations. The reader will find new elements to the traditional approach. Various dispersion and relaxation laws for different guides are considered as well as the explicit form of projection operators, NEEs, quasi-solitons and of Darboux transforms. Special points relate to: 1. the development of a universal asymptotic method of deriving NEEs for guide propagation; 2. applications to the cases of stratified liquids, gases, solids and plasmas with various nonlinearities and dispersion laws; 3. connections between the basic problem and soliton- like solutions of the corresponding NEEs; 4. discussion of details of simple solutions in higher- order nonsingular perturbation theory.

  10. Syncope: risk stratification and clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Suzanne Y G; Hoek, Amber E; Mollink, Susan M; Huff, J Stephen

    2014-04-01

    Syncope is a common occurrence in the emergency department, accounting for approximately 1% to 3% of presentations. Syncope is best defined as a brief loss of consciousness and postural tone followed by spontaneous and complete recovery. The spectrum of etiologies ranges from benign to life threatening, and a structured approach to evaluating these patients is key to providing care that is thorough, yet cost-effective. This issue reviews the most relevant evidence for managing and risk stratifying the syncope patient, beginning with a focused history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, and tailored diagnostic testing. Several risk stratification decision rules are compared for performance in various scenarios, including how age and associated comorbidities may predict short-term and long-term adverse events. An algorithm for structured, evidence-based care of the syncope patient is included to ensure that patients requiring hospitalization are managed appropriately and those with benign causes are discharged safely.

  11. Primordial Stratification of the Earth's Core (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernlund, J. W.; Rubie, D. C.; Labrosse, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of diverse approaches have been used to assess the formation of Earth's core by silicate-metal equilibration in magma oceans formed by energetic impacts during accretion, all of which invariably yield increasing temperatures and impurity concentrations in the downgoing metal as planetary growth progresses. If one builds the core incrementally with metal equilibrated in magma oceans from the center-up, this gives rise to a gravitationally stratified core with a cool iron-rich central region surrounded by a hot impurity-enriched veneer. The kinetic energy of infalling metal leads to mixing that could moderate such stratification, however, in detail the energetic barriers are difficult to overcome. Regardless of the mechanism of downward metal transport from a magma ocean, the fastest possible descent rate of metal into the core is limited by hard turbulence, for which scaling arguments show that the kinetic energy is much smaller than the expected stabilizing gravitational potential energy. This presents a paradox because the bulk of Earth's present day outer core exhibits density fluctuations of order ppb, apart from stratified regions in the uppermost and lowermost ~100 km. The required degree of mixing seems likely to have been achieved by additional kinetic energy from the direct merging of the cores of large differentiated planetesimal-sized bodies, thus metal transport and merging was not entirely determined by processes such as gravity-driven descent through the mantle from a magma ocean. It is unknown whether the mixing was complete, or whether stratified regions such as the F-layer represent the residue of early stratification. It is possible that Earth's inner core has been growing inside an impurity depleted region of Earth's central core since its birth, which carries implications for the age of the inner core as well as the mechanism of its growth.

  12. STRATIFICATION TECHNIQUE IN MAXILLARY ANTERIOR INCISORS RESTORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Kirilova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Because of their main characteristics: transparency, opalescence and color density, the tooth structures are extremely difficult to restore by means of completely inconspicuous restorations of the natural tooth tissue characteristics. The aim is to show successful aesthetic restoration of III Class dental lesions in upper incisors by means of high quality composites. Materials and method: A female patient visited the clinic being not satisfied with the esthetics of her front teeth. The intraoral examination showed previous restorations and carious lesions in 12, 11, 21, 22. After defining the tooth color a silicone key was made. The treatment was performed under anesthesia, the existing restorations were removed and the carious lesions in teeth 11, 12, 21, 22 were treated with restorations using Vanini edge preparation. The teeth were restored by means of stratification technique. After etching and rinsing, bonding was applied for 20 sec. and then polymerized. After fixing the silicone key enamel shade was applied and then dentine shades UD2, UD3, UD4 of 0.5mm thickness each. The polymerization was done layer by layer. Applied were 10 to 15 layers in total. The composite material was preheated in oven up to 55. Teeth 21 and 22 are restored with Enamel Plus HRi (Micerium. Results and Discussion: Excellent aesthetics is achieved with composite material. They have enamel and dentine shades and allow high quality aesthetics. The polishing is excellent in Enamel Plus HRi (Micerium which is typical for this type of composite. The result of the carious lesion treatment in this patient is real improvement of the dental appearance of her anterior incisors. Conclusion: Materials show excellent aesthetic results due to their characteristics and the stratification technique used.

  13. Awortwi et al.: Mixing and stratification relationship on phytoplankton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Awortwi et al.: Mixing and stratification relationship on phytoplankton of Lake Bosomtwe (Ghana) 43 West African Journal of Applied Ecology, vol. 23(2), 2015: 43–62. The Relationship Between Mixing and Stratification Regime on the Phytoplankton of Lake Bo.

  14. Comments: Should Principal Stratification Be Used to Study Mediational Processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWeele, Tyler J.

    2012-01-01

    Principal stratification provides an approach to study the effect of an exposure on an outcome within strata defined by the effect of the exposure on some third, posttreatment, variable (Frangakis & Rubin, 2002). There has been more recent interest in using principal stratification to study the extent to which the effect of an exposure on an…

  15. Using a Hypothetical Distribution of Grades to Introduce Social Stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brislen, William; Peoples, Clayton D.

    2005-01-01

    Teaching undergraduates about social stratification can be a difficult endeavor. As a number of authors have noted, undergraduate students are sometimes resistant to learning about social stratification, a phenomenon that may be due, in part, to the fact that many undergraduates are from privileged backgrounds and "find it difficult to go…

  16. Education and Social Stratification Processes in Comparative Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerckhoff, Alan C.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses three characteristics of educational systems that have been used to explain social stratification processes: stratification, standardization, and vocational specificity. Describes how these characteristics affect the movement of students through school and into the labor force in France, Germany, Great Britain, and the United States.…

  17. The Impact of Social Stratification to the Phenomenon of "Terrorism"

    OpenAIRE

    Rustamov Nasim; Roostamov Yunusbek

    2013-01-01

    In this work social stratification is considered as one of significant factor which generate the phenomena “terrorism” and it puts the accent on correlation connection between them, with the object of creation info-logical model generation of phenomena of “terrorism” based on stratification process.

  18. Optimized endogenous post-stratification in forest inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul L. Patterson

    2012-01-01

    An example of endogenous post-stratification is the use of remote sensing data with a sample of ground data to build a logistic regression model to predict the probability that a plot is forested and using the predicted probabilities to form categories for post-stratification. An optimized endogenous post-stratified estimator of the proportion of forest has been...

  19. Temperature stratification in a hot water tank with circulation pipe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the project is to investigate the change in temperature stratification due to the operation of a circulation pipe. Further, putting forward rules for design of pipe inlet in order not to disturb the temperature stratification in the hot water tank. A validated computer model based...

  20. The role stratification on Indian ocean mixing under global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, V.; Valsala, V.; Ravindran, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    The impact of changes in Indian ocean stratification on mixing under global warming is examined. Previous studies on global warming and associated weakening of winds reported to increase the stratification of the world ocean leading to a reduction in mixing, increased acidity, reduced oxygen and there by a reduction in productivity. However this processes is not uniform and are also modulated by changes in wind pattern of the future. Our study evaluate the role of stratification and surface fluxes on mixing focusing northern Indian ocean. A dynamical downscaling study using Regional ocean Modelling system (ROMS) forced with stratification and surface fluxes from selected CMIP5 models are presented. Results from an extensive set of historical and Representative Concentration Pathways 8.5 (rcp8.5) scenario simulations are used to quantify the distinctive role of stratification on mixing.

  1. Lake Malawi sediment and pore water chemistry: Proposition of a conceptual model for stratification intensification since the end of the Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchu, Philippe; Bergonzini, Laurent; Pons-branchu, Edwige; Violier, Eric; Dittrich, Maria; Massault, Marc; Ghaleb, Bassam

    2010-07-01

    Sedimentary records of salinity indicators are largely used to reconstruct past climatic changes in lacustrine systems where chemistry is sensitive to hydroclimatic conditions. In large fresh lakes of the East African Rift such as Lakes Tanganyika and Malawi, salinity is often considered constant and other paleoclimatological proxy data are used. However, a relation between lake surface chloride concentration and hydroclimatic regime was previously demonstrated at the century scale in Lake Tanganyika. This relation is transposed to Lake Malawi on the base of similarity between hydrochemical budgets of both lakes that are computed for the whole lake and epilimnion. Whereas numerous physico-chemical difficulties make generally debatable use of lake pore water chemistry, as illustrated here by diffusion modelling, the dissolved chloride concentration profile from a core sampled in northern Lake Malawi is considered as a potential indicator of limnological-hydroclimatic condition changes for the last 200 years. A decrease in pore water chloride concentration between 1840 AD and present situation is directly associated to a metalimnetic water salinity decrease. The chronology of this event is synchronous with diatom productivity change demonstrated by Johnson et al. (2001) at the end of the Little Ice Age (LIA). A conceptual model of Lake Malawi, based on salinity, organic carbon and its "dead" watershed contribution, lake-level and productivity changes since the mid 19th century is presented. A new scenario is proposed, based on thermal stratification reinforcement at the end of the LIA. Lake productivity and chemistry depend on stratification strength, water column mixing rate and on climatic variability. During the LIA, nutrient distribution profiles were more homogeneous with depth due to the climatically (colder and drier climatic conditions than today) induced destabilisation of the mixing barrier. The productive system is then auto-supplied and does not require

  2. Effective Momentum and heat flux models for simulation of stratification and mixing in a large pool of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Li; Villanueva, W.; Kudinov, P. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-06-15

    Performance of a boiling water reactor (BWR) containment is mostly determined by reliable operation of pressure suppression pool which serves as a heat sink to cool and condense steam released from the core vessel. Thermal stratification in the pool can significantly impede the pool's pressure suppression capacity. A source of momentum is required in order to break stratification and mix the pool. It is important to have reliable prediction of transient development of stratification and mixing in the pool in different regimes of steam injection. Previously, we have proposed to model the effect of steam injection on the mixing and stratification with the Effective Heat Source (EHS) and the Effective Momentum Source (EMS) models. The EHS model is used to provide thermal effect of steam injection on the pool, preserving heat and mass balance. The EMS model is used to simulate momentum induced by steam injection in different flow regimes. The EMS model is based on the combination of (1) synthetic jet theory, which predicts effective momentum if amplitude and frequency of flow oscillations in the pipe are given, and (2) model proposed by Aya and Nariai for prediction of the amplitude and frequency of oscillations at a given pool temperature and steam mass flux. The complete EHS/EMS models only require the steam mass flux, initial pool bulk temperature, and design-specific parameters, to predict thermal stratification and mixing in a pressure suppression pool. In this work we use EHS/EMS models implemented in containment thermal hydraulic code GOTHIC. The POOLEX/PPOOLEX experiments (Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland) are utilized, to (a) quantify errors due to GOTHIC's physical models and numerical schemes, (b) propose necessary improvements in GOTHIC sub-grid scale modeling, and (c) validate our proposed models. Specifically the data from POOLEX STB-21 and PPOOLEX STR-03 and STR-04 tests are used for validation of the EHS and EMS models in this

  3. Effective Momentum and heat flux models for simulation of stratification and mixing in a large pool of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Li; Villanueva, W.; Kudinov, P.

    2012-06-01

    Performance of a boiling water reactor (BWR) containment is mostly determined by reliable operation of pressure suppression pool which serves as a heat sink to cool and condense steam released from the core vessel. Thermal stratification in the pool can significantly impede the pool's pressure suppression capacity. A source of momentum is required in order to break stratification and mix the pool. It is important to have reliable prediction of transient development of stratification and mixing in the pool in different regimes of steam injection. Previously, we have proposed to model the effect of steam injection on the mixing and stratification with the Effective Heat Source (EHS) and the Effective Momentum Source (EMS) models. The EHS model is used to provide thermal effect of steam injection on the pool, preserving heat and mass balance. The EMS model is used to simulate momentum induced by steam injection in different flow regimes. The EMS model is based on the combination of (1) synthetic jet theory, which predicts effective momentum if amplitude and frequency of flow oscillations in the pipe are given, and (2) model proposed by Aya and Nariai for prediction of the amplitude and frequency of oscillations at a given pool temperature and steam mass flux. The complete EHS/EMS models only require the steam mass flux, initial pool bulk temperature, and design-specific parameters, to predict thermal stratification and mixing in a pressure suppression pool. In this work we use EHS/EMS models implemented in containment thermal hydraulic code GOTHIC. The POOLEX/PPOOLEX experiments (Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland) are utilized, to (a) quantify errors due to GOTHIC's physical models and numerical schemes, (b) propose necessary improvements in GOTHIC sub-grid scale modeling, and (c) validate our proposed models. Specifically the data from POOLEX STB-21 and PPOOLEX STR-03 and STR-04 tests are used for validation of the EHS and EMS models in this work. We

  4. Effects of stratification and fluctuations on sound propagation in the deep ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, R.H.

    1979-01-01

    It is noted that even in a homogeneous ocean, the effects of non-thermal noise and sound absorption limit the maximum effective range of detection of acoustic signals from particle cascades to distances of 2 to 10 kilometers, depending on the surface conditions prevailing and the directional characteristics of the detector. In the present paper, the effects of stratification and fluctuations in the sound velocity profile in the deep ocean over distances of this order are examined. Attention is given to two effects of potential significance, refraction and scintillation. It is found that neither effect has any significant consequences at ranges of less than 10 km

  5. Stable emulsions in extraction systems containing zirconium and silicic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinegribova, O.A.; Chizhevskaya, S.V.; Kotenko, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of zirconium nitrate compound nature and silicic acid on the rate of emulsions stratification in extraction systems depending on the components concentration, solution acidity, its past history, is studied. It is stated that stable multinuclear zirconium compounds have an influence on formation of stable emulsions in systems containing silicic acid. On the basis of results of chemical analysis and properties of interphase precipitates, being part of stable emulsion, suppositions on mechanism of interaction of zirconium nitrate compounds with silicic acid β-form are made

  6. On a stratification of the Kontsevich moduli space ¯M0,n(G(2,4),d)  and enumerative geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    ‾We consider a particular stratification of the moduli space of stable maps to G(2,4) . As an application we compute the degree of the variety parametrizing rational ruled surfaces with a minimal directrix of degree by studying divisors in this moduli space of stable maps. For example, there are ...

  7. Powerplant Thermal-Pollution Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. S.; Sengupta, S.

    1982-01-01

    Three models predict nature of thermal plumes from powerplant discharge into water. Free-surface model accomodates major changes in ocean currents. Rigid-model accurately predicts changes in thermal plume caused by other inputs and outputs, such as pumped-water storage and hydroelectric-plant discharges. One-dimensional model predicts approximate stratification in lake with such inputs and outputs over a long period.

  8. Development and validation of effective models for simulation of stratification and mixing phenomena in a pool of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Kudinov, P.; Villanueva, W.

    2011-06-01

    This work pertains to the research program on Containment Thermal-Hydraulics at KTH. The objective is to evaluate and improve performance of methods, which are used to analyze thermal-hydraulics of steam suppression pools in a BWR plant under different abnormal transient and accident conditions. The pressure suppression pool was designed to have the capability as a heat sink to cool and condense steam released from the core vessel and/or main steam line during loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or opening of safety relief valve in normal operation of BWRs. For the case of small flow rates of steam influx, thermal stratification could develop on the part above the blowdown pipe exit and significantly impede the pool's pressure suppression capacity. Once steam flow rate increases significantly, momentum introduced by the steam injection and/or periodic expansion and collapse of large steam bubbles due to direct contact condensation can destroy stratified layers and lead to mixing of the pool water. We use CFD-like model of the general purpose thermal-hydraulic code GOTHIC for addressing the issues of stratification and mixing in the pool. In the previous works we have demonstrated that accurate and computationally efficient prediction of the pool thermal-hydraulics in the scenarios with transition between thermal stratification and mixing, presents a computational challenge. The reason is that direct contact condensation phenomena, which drive oscillatory motion of the water in the blowdown pipes, are difficult to simulate with original GOTHIC models because of appearance of artificial oscillations due to numerical disturbances. To resolve this problem we propose to model the effect of steam injection on the mixing and stratification with the Effective Heat Source (EHS) model and the Effective Momentum Source (EMS) model. We use POOLEX/PPOOLEX experiment (Lappeenranta University of Technology in Finland), in order to (a) quantify errors due to GOTHIC's physical models

  9. Development and validation of effective models for simulation of stratification and mixing phenomena in a pool of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Kudinov, P.; Villanueva, W. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety (Sweden))

    2011-06-15

    This work pertains to the research program on Containment Thermal-Hydraulics at KTH. The objective is to evaluate and improve performance of methods, which are used to analyze thermal-hydraulics of steam suppression pools in a BWR plant under different abnormal transient and accident conditions. The pressure suppression pool was designed to have the capability as a heat sink to cool and condense steam released from the core vessel and/or main steam line during loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or opening of safety relief valve in normal operation of BWRs. For the case of small flow rates of steam influx, thermal stratification could develop on the part above the blowdown pipe exit and significantly impede the pool's pressure suppression capacity. Once steam flow rate increases significantly, momentum introduced by the steam injection and/or periodic expansion and collapse of large steam bubbles due to direct contact condensation can destroy stratified layers and lead to mixing of the pool water. We use CFD-like model of the general purpose thermal-hydraulic code GOTHIC for addressing the issues of stratification and mixing in the pool. In the previous works we have demonstrated that accurate and computationally efficient prediction of the pool thermal-hydraulics in the scenarios with transition between thermal stratification and mixing, presents a computational challenge. The reason is that direct contact condensation phenomena, which drive oscillatory motion of the water in the blowdown pipes, are difficult to simulate with original GOTHIC models because of appearance of artificial oscillations due to numerical disturbances. To resolve this problem we propose to model the effect of steam injection on the mixing and stratification with the Effective Heat Source (EHS) model and the Effective Momentum Source (EMS) model. We use POOLEX/PPOOLEX experiment (Lappeenranta University of Technology in Finland), in order to (a) quantify errors due to GOTHIC

  10. Experimental and numerical study on density stratification erosion phenomena with a vertical buoyant jet in a small vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Satoshi; Ishigaki, Masahiro; Sibamoto, Yasuteru; Yonomoto, Taisuke

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper shows results of a small scale experiment and CFD analyses on a density stratification erosion with a vertical buoyant jet. • The particle image velocimetry (PIV) and quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) with a multiport rotating valve were applied. • Two typical well-used RANS models were applied. • The simulated stratification erosion was in agreement with the experimental result, which suggested that the turbulence mixing occurred only in the jet impinging region. - Abstract: The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the ROSA-SA project to investigate thermal hydraulic phenomena in a reactor containment vessel during a severe accident. The hydrogen distribution in the vessel is one of significant safety issues in discussing a potential of hydrogen combustion in the containment. Density stratification and its break-up are important phenomena affecting the hydrogen distribution. This paper focuses on a density stratification erosion and break-up mechanism with a vertical buoyant jet promoting the turbulent helium transport. Small scale experiment and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses were carried out for investigating this phenomena. In the experiment, a rectangular vessel made with acrylic plates with a width of 1.5 m, a length of 1.5 m and a height of 1.8 m was used for visualizing flow field with particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system with a multiport rotating valve was applied for measuring gaseous concentration at 20 elevation points. In CFD analysis with OpenFOAM, two typical well-used turbulence models were used: low-Reynolds number type k–ε model and SST k–ω model, with a turbulence model modification to consider the buoyant effect in the stratification. As a result, the stratification erosion in the CFD analyses with the modified turbulence model agreed well with the experimental data, indicating importance of the turbulence damping by the buoyant effect.

  11. Numerical experiments on thermal convection of highly compressible fluids with variable viscosity and thermal conductivity: Implications for mantle convection of super-Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Masanori; Yamamoto, Mayumi

    2018-01-01

    We conduct a series of numerical experiments of thermal convection of highly compressible fluids in a two-dimensional rectangular box, in order to study the mantle convection on super-Earths. The thermal conductivity and viscosity are assumed to exponentially depend on depth and temperature, respectively, while the variations in thermodynamic properties (thermal expansivity and reference density) with depth are taken to be relevant for the super-Earths with 10 times the Earth's. From our experiments we identified a distinct regime of convecting flow patterns induced by the interplay between the adiabatic temperature change and the spatial variations in viscosity and thermal conductivity. That is, for the cases with strong temperature-dependent viscosity and depth-dependent thermal conductivity, a "deep stratosphere" of stable thermal stratification is formed at the base of the mantle, in addition to thick stagnant lids at their top surfaces. In the "deep stratosphere", the fluid motion is insignificant particularly in the vertical direction in spite of smallest viscosity owing to its strong dependence on temperature. Our finding may further imply that some of super-Earths which are lacking in mobile tectonic plates on their top surfaces may have "deep stratospheres" at the base of their mantles.

  12. Validation of effective momentum and heat flux models for stratification and mixing in a water pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Li; Villanueva, W.; Kudinov, P. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-06-15

    The pressure suppression pool is the most important feature of the pressure suppression system in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) that acts primarily as a passive heat sink during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or when the reactor is isolated from the main heat sink. The steam injection into the pool through the blowdown pipes can lead to short term dynamic phenomena and long term thermal transient in the pool. The development of thermal stratification or mixing in the pool is a transient phenomenon that can influence the pool's pressure suppression capacity. Different condensation regimes depending on the pool's bulk temperature and steam flow rates determine the onset of thermal stratification or erosion of stratified layers. Previously, we have proposed to model the effect of steam injection on the mixing and stratification with the Effective Heat Source (EHS) and the Effective Momentum Source (EMS) models. The EHS model is used to provide thermal effect of steam injection on the pool, preserving heat and mass balance. The EMS model is used to simulate momentum induced by steam injection in different flow regimes. The EMS model is based on the combination of (i) synthetic jet theory, which predicts effective momentum if amplitude and frequency of flow oscillations in the pipe are given, and (ii) model proposed by Aya and Nariai for prediction of the amplitude and frequency of oscillations at a given pool temperature and steam mass flux. The complete EHS/EMS models only require the steam mass flux, initial pool bulk temperature, and design-specific parameters, to predict thermal stratification and mixing in a pressure suppression pool. In this work we use EHS/EMS models implemented in containment thermal hydraulic code GOTHIC. The PPOOLEX experiments (Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland) are utilized to (a) quantify errors due to GOTHIC's physical models and numerical schemes, (b) propose necessary improvements in GOTHIC sub-grid scale

  13. Stratification of women's sport in contemporary China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Huan

    2011-01-01

    Since economic reform in the 1980s, Chinese sport has undergone an extraordinary transformation. The most distinguishing phenomenon is the rapid growth of mass sport at the grassroots level with increasing demands for physical activities in women's daily lives. The rapid growth of women's sports participation at the grassroots is deeply embedded in the process of social stratification as a result of the urbanisation of Chinese society. The purpose of this paper is to use the socialist, feminist and theoretical framework to explore how Chinese women's different economic, educational, domestic and cultural situations shape their sports values and patterns of participation, marking social boundaries in Chinese urban communities. Semi-structured interviews and observations were conducted with 60 female physical exercisers in sports clubs, parks and neighbourhood playgrounds. Documentary research was also applied as a complement method to the interview. The findings indicate that within different classes (middle class, working class and a group who were unemployed), many different opportunities for and limitations on women to participate in sport are noticed. Chinese women have not fully and equally utilised sports opportunities created by urbanisation. Most Chinese women still live within patriarchal arrangements. Consequently, they do not completely fulfil their ambitions in sport.

  14. New developments in thermally stable polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in high-temperature polymers since 1985 are discussed with the emphasis on the chemistry. High-temperature polymers refer to materials that exhibit glass-transition temperatures greater than 200 C and have the chemical structure expected to provide high thermooxidative stability. Specific polymers or series of polymers were selected to show how the chemical structure influences certain properties. Poly(arylene ethers) and polyimides are the two principal families of polymers discussed. Recent work on poly(arylene ethers) has concentrated on incorporating heterocyclic units within the polymer backbone. Recent polyimide work has centered on the synthesis of new polymers from novel monomers, several containing the trifluoromethyl group strategically located on the molecule. Various members in each of these polymer families display a unique combination of properties, heretofore unattainable. Other families of polymers are also briefly discussed with a polymer from an AB maleimidobenzocyclobutene exhibiting an especially attractive combination of properties.

  15. Highly active thermally stable nanoporous gold catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biener, Juergen; Wittstock, Arne; Biener, Monika M.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Baeumer, Marcus; Wichmann, Andre; Neuman, Bjoern

    2016-12-20

    In one embodiment, a system includes a nanoporous gold structure and a plurality of oxide particles deposited on the nanoporous gold structure; the oxide particles are characterized by a crystalline phase. In another embodiment, a method includes depositing oxide nanoparticles on a nanoporous gold support to form an active structure and functionalizing the deposited oxide nanoparticles.

  16. SYNTHESIS OF THERMALLY STABLE METAL SUBSTITUTED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Opre et al. [22, 23] also studied the selective oxidation of alcohols with oxygen on cobalt promoted ruthenium-hydroxyapatite. Earlier, hydroxyapatites were used as supports in a many studies [24-28]. Recently, our group has also successfully used cobalt, iridium and platinum hydroxyapatites as catalysts for solvent-free.

  17. How Stable Is the Stratification of Higher Education in England and Scotland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffe, David; Croxford, Linda

    2015-01-01

    This paper asks whether the institutional hierarchies defined by "golden triangle", other Russell Group, other pre-1992 and post-1992 universities in England, and by ancient, old and new universities in Scotland, have become weaker since the 1990s. Using indicators constructed from Universities and Colleges Admissions Service data for…

  18. Breakup of last glacial deep stratification in the South Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Chandranath; Fröllje, Henning; Lamy, Frank; Gersonde, Rainer; Benz, Verena; Anderson, Robert F.; Molina-Kescher, Mario; Pahnke, Katharina

    2018-02-01

    Stratification of the deep Southern Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum is thought to have facilitated carbon storage and subsequent release during the deglaciation as stratification broke down, contributing to atmospheric CO2 rise. Here, we present neodymium isotope evidence from deep to abyssal waters in the South Pacific that confirms stratification of the deepwater column during the Last Glacial Maximum. The results indicate a glacial northward expansion of Ross Sea Bottom Water and a Southern Hemisphere climate trigger for the deglacial breakup of deep stratification. It highlights the important role of abyssal waters in sustaining a deep glacial carbon reservoir and Southern Hemisphere climate change as a prerequisite for the destabilization of the water column and hence the deglacial release of sequestered CO2 through upwelling.

  19. Water Stratification Raster Images for the Gulf of Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geodatabase contains seasonal water stratification raster images for the Gulf of Maine. They were created by interpolating water density (sigma t) values at 0...

  20. Effects of cold stratification, sulphuric acid, submersion in hot and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of cold stratification, sulphuric acid, submersion in hot and tap water pretreatments in the greenhouse and open field conditions on germination of bladder-Senna ( Colutea armena Boiss. and Huet.) seeds.

  1. Isotope effects associated with the preparation and methylation of fatty acids by boron trifluoride in methanol for compound-specific stable hydrogen isotope analysis via gas chromatography/thermal conversion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivall, David; Berstan, Robert; Bull, Ian D; Evershed, Richard P

    2012-05-30

    Compound-specific stable hydrogen isotope analysis of fatty acids is being used increasingly as a means of deriving information from a diverse range of materials of archaeological, geological and environmental interest. Preparative steps required prior to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) analysis have the potential to alter determined δD values and hence must be accounted for if accurate δD values for target compounds are to be obtained. Myristic, palmitic, stearic, arachidic and behenic saturated fatty acids were derivatised to their respective fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), using 14% (w/v) boron trifluoride in methanol then analysed by gas chromatography/thermal conversion/IRMS (GC/TC/IRMS). FAMEs generated from fatty acid sodium salts of unknown δD values were then used to test a correction factor determined for this method of derivatisation. Derivatisation was found to alter the hydrogen isotopic composition of FAMEs although this effect was reproducible and can be accounted for. The difference between the mean corrected and mean bulk δD values was always less than 6.7 ‰. Extraction of saturated fatty acids and acyl lipids from samples, subsequent hydrolysis, then separation on a solid-phase extraction cartridge, was found to alter the determined δD values by less than one standard deviation. Overall, it has been shown that for natural abundance hydrogen isotope determinations, the isolation and derivatisation of extracted fatty acids alters the determined δD values only by a numerical increment comparable with the experimental error. This supports the use of the described analytical protocol as an effective means of determining fatty acid δD values by GC/TC/IRMS. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Stable Isotope Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tissue samples (skin, bone, blood, muscle) are analyzed for stable carbon, stable nitrogen, and stable sulfur analysis. Many samples are used in their entirety for...

  3. Understanding the Effect of Stratification on Vertical and Temporal Heterogenieties of Cyanobacteria Blooms in Lakes Using a Long Term in-situ Monitoring Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, A.; Guala, M.; Hondzo, M.

    2017-12-01

    Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB) are made up of potentially toxic freshwater microorganisms called cyanobacteria, because of this they are a ecological and public health hazard. The occurrences of toxic HAB are unpredictable and highly spatially and temporary variable in freshwater ecosystems. To study the abiotic drivers for toxic HAB, a floating research station has been deployed in a hyper-eutrophic lake in Madison Lake, Minnesota, from June-October 2016. This research station provides full depth water quality (hourly) and meteorological monitoring (5 minutes). Water quality monitoring is performed by an autonomously traversed water quality sonde that provides chemical, physical and biological measurements; including phycocyanin, a photosynthetic pigment distinct to cyanobacteria. A bloom of cyanobacteria recorded in the epiliminion in mid-July was driven by prolonged strong thermal stratification in the water column, high surface water temperatures and high phosphate concentrations in the epiliminion. The high biovolume (BV) persisted until late September and was sustained below the surface after stratification weakened, when the thermocline did not confine cyanobacteria-rich layers any more, and cyanobacteria vertical heterogeneities decayed in the water column. High correlations among BV stratification, surface water temperature, and stratification stability informed the development of a quantitative relationship to determine how BV heterogeneities vary with thermal structure in the water column. The BV heterogeneity decreased with thermal stratification stability and surface water temperature, and the dynamic lake stability described by the Lake Number. Finally the location of maximum BV accumulation showed diurnal patterns ie. BV peaks were observed at 1 m depth during the day and deeper layers during the night, which followed patterns in light penetration and thermocline depth. These findings capture cyanobacteria vertical and temporal heterogeneities on a on

  4. Modeling of condensation, stratification, and mixing phenomena in a pool of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Kudinov, P.; Villanueva, W. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    This work pertains to the research program on Containment Thermal-Hydraulics at KTH. The objective is to evaluate and improve performance of methods, which are used to analyze thermal-hydraulics of steam suppression pools in a BWR plant under different abnormal transient and accident conditions. As a passive safety system, the function of steam pressure suppression pools is paramount to the containment performance. In the present work, the focus is on apparently-benign but intricate and potentially risk-significant scenarios in which thermal stratification could significantly impede the pool's pressure suppression capacity. For the case of small flow rates of steam influx, the steam condenses rapidly in the pool and the hot condensate rises in a narrow plume above the steam injection plane and spreads into a thin layer at the pool's free surface. When the steam flow rate increases significantly, momentum introduced by the steam injection and/or periodic expansion and shrink of large steam bubbles due to direct contact condensation can cause breakdown of the stratified layers and lead to mixing of the pool water. Accurate prediction of the pool thermal-hydraulics in such scenarios presents a computational challenge. Lumped-parameter models have no capability to predict temperature distribution of water pool during thermal stratification development. While high-order-accurate CFD (RANS, LES) methods are not practical due to excessive computing power needed to calculate 3D high-Rayleighnumber natural circulation flow in long transients. In the present work, a middleground approach is used, namely CFD-like model of the general purpose thermalhydraulic code GOTHIC. Each cell of 3D GOTHIC grid uses lumped parameter volume type closures for modeling of various heat and mass transfer processes at subgrid scale. We use GOTHIC to simulate POOLEX/PPOOLEX experiment, in order to (a) quantify errors due to GOTHIC's physical models and numerical schemes, and (b

  5. Microsatellite diversity in Andhra Pradesh, India: genetic stratification versus social stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, B Mohan; Naidu, V M; Madhavi, V Komal; Thangaraj, L K; Kumar, Vikrant; Langstieh, B T; Venkatramana, P; Reddy, A G; Singh, Lalji

    2005-12-01

    DNA samples of 948 individuals belonging to 27 populations from southern Andhra Pradesh were analyzed for nine AmpFlSTR Profiler Plus loci. The nature and extent of genomic diversity within and between these populations have been examined with reference to socioeconomic and geographic affiliations. The results suggest that the average heterozygosity is uniformly high in these populations (> 0.80) and that the patterns of allele distributions are similar across the populations. The value of the coefficient of gene differentiation and the AMOVA and structure analysis results suggest that these populations are highly homogeneous. The neighbor-joining tree constructed using either D(A) or F(ST) distances suggests no intelligible pattern of population clusters based on ethnohistoric or geographic affiliations. All these observations suggest either a common recent origin of these populations or extensive gene flow across the populations that erased the original genetic differences. Given strict endogamy, the latter explanation can hold only if there has been unauthorized or unrecognized gene flow transecting the social boundaries. Nevertheless, the regression plot of average heterozygosity versus distance from the centroid (Rii), based on Harpending and Ward's (1982) model, and the genetic distances computed between different hierarchical groups within Andhra Pradesh tend to support this conjecture. Overall, the results suggest lack of a significant degree of genetic stratification that is consistent with social stratification in Andhra Pradesh. Furthermore, the neighbor-joining tree based on comparative data from other Indian and continental populations brings out a single and compact cluster of all the Andhra populations that is clearly separated from the rest.

  6. Analysis of thermal stratified storage tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smusz Robert

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The basic aim of the task is to compile a temperature stratification system in an accumulation tank. The range of the thesis concerns the shape and dimensions of a stratification system for an accumulation tank. Thermal stratification is a process that comprises the maintaining of temperature stratification at different levels of an accumulation tank which reduce to a minimum the process of temperature equalization. It results from the fact that the thermal stratification in a tank significantly increases the installation efficiency and improves the process of energy storing. It is connected with a thermodynamic element quality, that is the higher the temperature, the higher the energy, and, thus, the thermos-dynamic element quality. In this phenomenon, thanks to the same amount of accumulated thermal energy and average temperature, as in a fully mixed tank, the user has a higher temperature in the upper part of the tank at his disposal. It has significant importance in the case when there is a low-temperature heating medium that transfers heat to the accumulation tank. Such a situation occurs when heat is absorbed from synthetic freons used in cooling and air-conditioning systems.

  7. Validation of dynamic risk stratification in pediatric differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Seo Young; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, Hye In; Kim, Tae Hyuk; Kim, Sun Wook; Chung, Jae Hoon

    2017-10-01

    There has been increasing interest in a risk-adopted management strategy known as dynamic risk stratification following the revised American Thyroid Association guidelines for differentiated thyroid cancer. We aimed to evaluate the usefulness of dynamic risk stratification for predicting structural disease in pediatric differentiated thyroid cancer patients. We retrospectively reviewed 130 pediatric differentiated thyroid cancer patients (≤19 years) who were treated between 1996 and 2015 at Samsung Medical Center. Patients were stratified according to three American Thyroid Association initial risk group (low, intermediate, or high risk) and four dynamic risk stratification group (excellent, indeterminate, biochemical incomplete, or structural incomplete). Based on dynamic risk stratification strategy, structural disease was identified 3.9% in the excellent group, 9.7% in the indeterminate group, 76.9% in the biochemical incomplete group, and 100% in the structural incomplete group. The hazard ratios of the structural disease were 18.10 (P Dynamic risk stratification based on patient responses to initial therapy was able to effectively predict the risk of structural disease in a pediatric population, and as a follow-up strategy, may work as well in pediatric differentiated thyroid cancer patients as it does in adult differentiated thyroid cancer patients.

  8. Stable convergence and stable limit theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Häusler, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a concise but complete exposition of the mathematical theory of stable convergence and give various applications in different areas of probability theory and mathematical statistics to illustrate the usefulness of this concept. Stable convergence holds in many limit theorems of probability theory and statistics – such as the classical central limit theorem – which are usually formulated in terms of convergence in distribution. Originated by Alfred Rényi, the notion of stable convergence is stronger than the classical weak convergence of probability measures. A variety of methods is described which can be used to establish this stronger stable convergence in many limit theorems which were originally formulated only in terms of weak convergence. Naturally, these stronger limit theorems have new and stronger consequences which should not be missed by neglecting the notion of stable convergence. The presentation will be accessible to researchers and advanced students at the master's level...

  9. Eddy-driven stratification initiates North Atlantic spring phytoplankton blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Amala; D'Asaro, Eric; Lee, Craig; Perry, Mary Jane

    2012-07-06

    Springtime phytoplankton blooms photosynthetically fix carbon and export it from the surface ocean at globally important rates. These blooms are triggered by increased light exposure of the phytoplankton due to both seasonal light increase and the development of a near-surface vertical density gradient (stratification) that inhibits vertical mixing of the phytoplankton. Classically and in current climate models, that stratification is ascribed to a springtime warming of the sea surface. Here, using observations from the subpolar North Atlantic and a three-dimensional biophysical model, we show that the initial stratification and resulting bloom are instead caused by eddy-driven slumping of the basin-scale north-south density gradient, resulting in a patchy bloom beginning 20 to 30 days earlier than would occur by warming.

  10. Update on the risk stratification of acute symptomatic pulmonary thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre Peiró, A; Gonzálvez Gasch, A; Monreal Bosch, M

    Early mortality in patients with pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) varies from 2% in normotensive patients to 30% in patients with cardiogenic shock. The current risk stratification for symptomatic PTE includes 4 patient groups, and the recommended therapeutic strategies are based on this stratification. Patients who have haemodynamic instability are considered at high risk. Fibrinolytic treatment is recommended for these patients. In normotensive patients, risk stratification helps differentiate between those of low risk, intermediate-low risk and intermediate-high risk. There is currently insufficient evidence on the benefit of intensive monitoring and fibrinolytic treatment in patients with intermediate-high risk. For low-risk patients, standard anticoagulation is indicated. Early discharge with outpatient management may be considered, although its benefit has still not been firmly established. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  11. Social Stratification and Cooperative Behavior in Spatial Prisoners' Dilemma Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peng; Zheng, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    It has been a long-lasting pursuit to promote cooperation, and this study aims to promote cooperation via the combination of social stratification and the spatial prisoners' dilemma game. It is previously assumed that agents share the identical payoff matrix, but the stratification or diversity exists and exerts influences in real societies. Thus, two additional classes, elites and scoundrels, derive from and coexist with the existing class, commons. Three classes have different payoff matrices. We construct a model where agents play the prisoners' dilemma game with neighbors. It indicates that stratification and temptation jointly influence cooperation. Temptation permanently reduces cooperation; elites play a positive role in promoting cooperation while scoundrels undermine it. As the temptation getting larger and larger, elites play a more and more positive and critical role while scoundrels' negative effect becomes weaker and weaker, and it is more obvious when temptation goes beyond its threshold.

  12. Offshore wind farms and their impact on North Sea stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, J. R.; Clark, S.; Merckelbach, L.; Callies, U.; Gaslikova, L.; Baschek, B.

    2016-02-01

    In expanding wind energy generation to offshore regions, wind farms are now being operated and constructed in coastal seas that form a seasonal stratification. This stratification develops as increased solar radiation and heating warm the upper ocean in summer. It has a dominant influence on numerous ocean processes such as the growth and distribution of phytoplankton, as well as on the distribution of suspended sediment concentrations. The formation of stratification is opposed by turbulent mixing processes such as bottom boundary layer friction, and wave breaking in the surface mixed layer. However, as more wind farms are built in coastal areas that exhibit strong tidal currents, the turbulence generated as the currents interact with the wind farm foundation structures is expected to contribute to an enhanced mixing of the water column. This is especially true in the North Sea, where proposed wind farm developments comprise thousands of wind mills occupying a significant fraction of the offshore area. With these proposed developments in mind, we examine whether it is possible for the turbulence and mixing generated by these structures to have an impact on the formation of stratification. This is done by combining a series of idealized mixing models with both in-situ observations and numerical modeling of the North Sea. The results show that it is possible for the wind farms to have an influence on the large-scale stratification of the North Sea, but only when the development is particularly dense and widespread. Most important, we find that the amount of mixing is sensitive to both the type and placement of the wind farm foundation structures, as well as on the evolution of the stratification - both of which are currently not well known.

  13. Carbon Stock Stratification of Peat Soils in South Kalimantan, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Siti Nurzakiah; Muhammad Noor; Dedi Nursyamsi

    2015-01-01

    Carbon stock in peat soils is very high, it is necessary to prudent in its management because peat soils is emitting greenhouse gases such as CO2 during land clearing due to oxidation of peat layer.  This research was conducted to study soil carbon stock stratification in relation to soil physical and chemical properties. The carbon stock stratification was based on maturity degrees of peat.  The study was conducted in Pulau Damar Village, Hulu Sungai Utara District, South Kalimantan Province...

  14. STRATIFICATION TECHNIQUE OF A NANOCOMPOSITE USING THE SILICON GUIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana PĂRĂU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available At present, the stratification technique of composite materials, known as offering most predictable, both functional and aesthetic results, uses a silicone reference quide. This allows the dentist to appreciate the size and thickness of the composite resin layer to be applied, as well as selection of the opacity and translucidity degree according to the reconstructed enamel or dentin structure, thus facilitating the stratification of materials. The minimum adjustment, at the level of the palatal wall, represents another great advantage of the silicone key.

  15. Stratification for smoking in case-cohort studies of genetic polymorphisms and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; López, Ana García; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2009-01-01

    The risk estimates obtained in studies of genetic polymorphisms and lung cancer differ markedly between studies, which might be due to chance or differences in study design, in particular the stratification/match of comparison group. The effect of different strategies for stratification......-cohort studies of genetic polymorphisms and lung cancer....... and adjustment for smoking on the estimated effect of polymorphisms on lung cancer risk was explored in the case-cohort design. We used an empirical and a statistical simulation approach. The stratification strategies were: no smoking stratification, stratification for smoking status and stratification...

  16. stableGP

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The code in the stableGP package implements Gaussian process calculations using efficient and numerically stable algorithms. Description of the algorithms is in the...

  17. Variability in stratification and flushing times of the Gautami ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In order to examine the influence of forcing (river flow and tides) and anthropogenic activities (dredging and dam regulation) on stratification, a study was conducted over a period of 19 months (June 2008–December 2009) in the Gautami–Godavari estuary (G–GE) during spring and neap tide periods covering entire ...

  18. Simulation of containment atmosphere stratification experiment using local instantaneous description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babic, M.; Kljenak, I.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment on mixing and stratification in the atmosphere of a nuclear power plant containment at accident conditions was simulated with the CFD code CFX4.4. The original experiment was performed in the TOSQAN experimental facility. Simulated nonhomogeneous temperature, species concentration and velocity fields are compared to experimental results. (author)

  19. Viral lysis of marine microbes in relation to vertical stratification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mojica, K.D.A.

    2015-01-01

    Marine microorganisms represent the largest reservoir of living organic carbon in the ocean and collectively manage the pools and fluxes of nutrients and energy. Climate-induced increases in sea surface temperature and associated modifications to vertical stratification are affecting the structure

  20. Viral lysis of marine microbes in relation to vertical stratification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mojica, K.D.A.

    2015-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis is to investigate how changes in vertical stratification affect autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial communities along a meridional gradient in the Atlantic Ocean. The Northeast Atlantic Ocean is a key area in global ocean circulation and a important sink for

  1. Glacial ocean circulation and stratification explained by reduced atmospheric temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Malte F

    2017-01-03

    Earth's climate has undergone dramatic shifts between glacial and interglacial time periods, with high-latitude temperature changes on the order of 5-10 °C. These climatic shifts have been associated with major rearrangements in the deep ocean circulation and stratification, which have likely played an important role in the observed atmospheric carbon dioxide swings by affecting the partitioning of carbon between the atmosphere and the ocean. The mechanisms by which the deep ocean circulation changed, however, are still unclear and represent a major challenge to our understanding of glacial climates. This study shows that various inferred changes in the deep ocean circulation and stratification between glacial and interglacial climates can be interpreted as a direct consequence of atmospheric temperature differences. Colder atmospheric temperatures lead to increased sea ice cover and formation rate around Antarctica. The associated enhanced brine rejection leads to a strongly increased deep ocean stratification, consistent with high abyssal salinities inferred for the last glacial maximum. The increased stratification goes together with a weakening and shoaling of the interhemispheric overturning circulation, again consistent with proxy evidence for the last glacial. The shallower interhemispheric overturning circulation makes room for slowly moving water of Antarctic origin, which explains the observed middepth radiocarbon age maximum and may play an important role in ocean carbon storage.

  2. Preoperative B-type natriuretic peptide risk stratification: do ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-11

    Sep 11, 2012 ... the Ethics Committee of the Nelson R Mandela School of. Medicine (ethics number BF068/07), and the study was registered with the South African National Clinical Trials. Register ..... to that used in preoperative risk stratification algorithms,28 these intra- and postoperative independent risk factors may.

  3. Seasonal and diurnal stratification in two small Zimbabwean reservoirs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The shallow nature of small reservoirs and the considerable fluctuations in their water levels makes them more vulnerable to external fluxes such as daily changes in incoming short-wave solar radiation and wind runs, and hence the prevalence of diel stratification regimes. Consequently, small reservoirs are characterised ...

  4. The Social Stratification of the German VET System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protsch, Paula; Solga, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Germany is widely known for its vocational education and training (VET) system and its dual apprenticeship system in particular. What is often overlooked, however, is the vertical stratification within the German VET system. This is the focus of this study. Our analysis shows that the VET system, like the German school system, is highly…

  5. USA Stratified Monopoly: A Simulation Game about Social Class Stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Edith M.

    2008-01-01

    Effectively teaching college students about social class stratification is a difficult challenge. Explanations for this difficulty tend to focus on the students who often react with resistance, paralysis, or rage. Sociologists have been using games and simulations as alternative methods for several decades to teach about these sensitive subjects.…

  6. Variability in stratification and flushing times of the Gautami ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In order to examine the influence of forcing (river flow and tides) and anthropogenic activities (dredging and dam regulation) on stratification, a study was conducted over a period of 19 months (June 2008–. December 2009) in the Gautami–Godavari estuary (G–GE) during spring and neap tide periods covering.

  7. Formulation parameters influencing self-stratification of coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, P.; Bots, T.L.

    1996-01-01

    Research was carried out aimed at the development of self-stratifying paints for steel which after application during film formation spontaneously form two well established layers of primer and top coat. The parameters affecting stratification were investigated for combinations of epoxy resins and

  8. Estimation for small domains in double sampling for stratification ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article, we investigate the effect of randomness of the size of a small domain on the precision of an estimator of mean for the domain under double sampling for stratification. The result shows that for a small domain that cuts across various strata with unknown weights, the sampling variance depends on the within ...

  9. Effect of stratification treatments on germination of Sorbus torminalis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 1000 grains seed weight was 3.07 g. The seeds used in this study were sown in 3 different mediums at the beginning of April. When ratios of seed germination were analyzed, maximum germination occured in the 4 months stratification. Although S. torminalis L. Crantz seeds have germination ratio of 5 – 6%, in this study ...

  10. Modelling the tides and their impacts on the vertical stratification ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Sofala Bank, a wide shelf located along the central coast of Mozambique, hosts tides with high amplitudes. The Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS) was used to analyse the tidal currents on the bank and to investigate their effects on the stratification and generation of tidal fronts. During spring tides, barotropic ...

  11. Schematic Harder–Narasimhan stratification for families of principal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As a consequence, all principal bundles of a fixed Harder–Narasimhan type form an Artin stack. We also show the existence of a schematic Harder–Narasimhan stratification for flat families of pure sheaves of -modules (in the sense of Simpson) in arbitrary dimensions and in mixed characteristic, generalizing the result for ...

  12. Schematic Harder–Narasimhan stratification for families of principal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 124; Issue 3. Schematic Harder–Narasimhan Stratification for Families of Principal Bundles ... Author Affiliations. Sudarshan Gurjar1 Nitin Nitsure1. School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India ...

  13. The effects of different warm stratification periods on the seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the effects of different warm stratification periods on the seed germination of some Rosa species such as Rosa heckellana ssp. vanheurckiana, Rosa canina, Rosa pulverelanta and Rosa dumalis naturally grown in the Van region were investigated. In 2007, seeds of these species were kept at 25°C warm ...

  14. Combustion Stratification for Naphtha from CI Combustion to PPC

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.

    2017-03-28

    This study demonstrates the combustion stratification from conventional compression ignition (CI) combustion to partially premixed combustion (PPC). Experiments are performed in an optical CI engine at a speed of 1200 rpm for diesel and naphtha (RON = 46). The motored pressure at TDC is maintained at 35 bar and fuelMEP is kept constant at 5.1 bar to account for the difference in fuel properties between naphtha and diesel. Single injection strategy is employed and the fuel is injected at a pressure of 800 bar. Photron FASTCAM SA4 that captures in-cylinder combustion at the rate of 10000 frames per second is employed. The captured high speed video is processed to study the combustion homogeneity based on an algorithm reported in previous studies. Starting from late fuel injection timings, combustion stratification is investigated by advancing the fuel injection timings. For late start of injection (SOI), a direct link between SOI and combustion phasing is noticed. At early SOI, combustion phasing depends on both intake air temperature and SOI. In order to match the combustion phasing (CA50) of diesel, the intake air temperature is increased to 90°C for naphtha. The combustion stratification from CI to PPC is also investigated for various level of dilution by displacing oxygen with nitrogen in the intake. The start of combustion (SOC) was delayed with the increase in dilution and to compensate for this, the intake air temperature is increased. The mixture homogeneity is enhanced for higher dilution due to longer ignition delay. The results show that high speed image is initially blue and then turned yellow, indicating soot formation and oxidation. The luminosity of combustion images decreases with early SOI and increased dilution. The images are processed to generate the level of stratification based on the image intensity. The level of stratification is same for diesel and naphtha at various SOI. When O concentration in the intake is decreased to 17.7% and 14

  15. Simulation of the turbulent fluxes evolution by the transition theory for different stratifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqueda, G.; Cuadrado, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper shows an easy techniques in order to describe the temporal evolution of profiles and turbulent fluxes in the lower atmosphere from Transilient Turbulence Theory, as an alternative method to the one-order closure, so as k-theory. A nonlocal closure of the turbulent kinetic energy equation, TKE, to get the mixing coefficients is requested in the Transilient theory. Potential matrix and transient matrix, arising from the proposed model, allow to obtain typical profiles of dynamical and thermal variables of PBL, as well as turbulent fluxes associated to them. In this work both, profiles and fluxes, under some imposed conditions and several kinds of stratifications in the 100 m closer to the ground are simulated. (Author) 22 refs

  16. Stratification of the F2 layer observed in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, K. J. W.; Harris, T. J.; Sjarifudin, M.

    2000-12-01

    This paper describes the latitudinal variation in F2 stratification [Balan and Bailey, 1995] as observed by a number of oblique and vertical ionosondes operating in Southeast Asia during 1997. Stratification of the F2 layer was seen at dip latitudes from 4°S to 18°S on the southern side of the magnetic equator but did not occur at the closest reflection point to the magnetic equator (diplatitude=2.3°N). The observed transient cusp (vertical ionosonde) or additional nose (oblique ionosonde) was defined as an F3 layer or an F1.5 layer depending on whether it occurred above or below the layer which maintained continuity with the normal F2 layer peak. Within the zone of occurrence, the transient layer was commonly seen as an F3 layer at reflection points closest to the magnetic equator but invariably as an F1.5 layer at reflection points farther from the magnetic equator. These observations suggest that the distortion in the equatorial electron density profile associated with the phenomenon moved toward the base of the F2 layer as magnetic field lines descended with increasing latitude. Stratification of the F2 layer commenced at the same local time (e.g., 0845 LT in November 1997) throughout the longitudinal range of coverage and was associated with a rapid rise in F2 layer height following sunrise. The stratification ended at times varying from 1300 LT to sunset and was associated with a fall in the height of F2 peak electron density. The region of maximum F2 layer stratification lay between the magnetic equator and the peak of the southern equatorial anomaly.

  17. Thermal fluid mixing behavior during medium break LOCA in evaluation of pressurized thermal shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jae Won; Bang, Young Seok; Seul, Kwang Won; Kim, Hho Jung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    Thermal fluid mixing behavior during a postulated medium-size hot leg break loss of coolant accident is analyzed for the international comparative assessment study on pressurized thermal shock (PTS-ICAS) proposed by OECD-NEA. The applicability of RELAP5 code to analyze the thermal fluid mixing behavior is evaluated through a simple modeling relevant to the problem constraints. Based on the calculation result, the onset of thermal stratification is investigated using Theofanous`s empirical correlation. Sensitivity calculations using a fine node model and crossflow model are also performed to evaluate the modeling capability on multi-dimensional characteristics related to thermal fluid mixing. 6 refs., 8 figs. (Author)

  18. Stratification in horizontal pipes subjected to fluid temperature transient at inlet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhir, V.K.; Amar, R.C.; Mills, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    A one-dimensional hydrodynamic model to predict stratification in horizontal pipes subjected to a temperature transient at the inlet of a pipe has been developed. The model is based on the relative velocity difference created by the difference in hydrostatic heads of cold and hot fluid. The lighter (hotter) fluid occupies the upper half of the pipe, while the heavier (colder) fluid tends to flow underneath the lighter fluid in the lower half of the pipe. Expressions for the time-dependent density difference causing the velocity difference are obtained for slow and fast transients and for specific durations of interest. The thermal aspect of the problem - namely, the fluid-pipe wall interaction - has also been analyzed. The fluid-wall interaction is handled by the transient lumped capacity (in the radial direction) method, which is one-dimensional in space (i.e., along the pipe length). It is shown that for a thin Pyrex pipe with water as the test fluid, the thermal effects play a minimal role. However, for thick pipes of high thermal conductivity material, this is not true

  19. Radiative Flow of Powell-Eyring Magneto-Nanofluid over a Stretching Cylinder with Chemical Reaction and Double Stratification near a Stagnation Point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzan, Muhammad; Bilal, Muhammad; Chung, Jae Dong

    2017-01-01

    This exploration addresses MHD stagnation point Powell Eyring nanofluid flow with double stratification. The effects of thermal radiation and chemical reaction are added in temperature and nanoparticle concentration fields respectively. Furthermore, appropriate transformations are betrothed to obtain nonlinear differential equations from the system of partial differential equations and an analytical solution of system of coupled differential equations is obtained by means of the renowned Homotopy Analysis method. Through graphical illustrations, momentum, energy and concentration distributions are conversed for different prominent parameters. Comparison in limiting case is also part of present study to validate the obtained results. It is witnessed that nanoparticle concentration is diminishing function of chemical reaction parameter. Moreover, mounting values of thermal and solutal stratification lowers the temperature and concentration fields respectively.

  20. Radiative Flow of Powell-Eyring Magneto-Nanofluid over a Stretching Cylinder with Chemical Reaction and Double Stratification near a Stagnation Point.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ramzan

    Full Text Available This exploration addresses MHD stagnation point Powell Eyring nanofluid flow with double stratification. The effects of thermal radiation and chemical reaction are added in temperature and nanoparticle concentration fields respectively. Furthermore, appropriate transformations are betrothed to obtain nonlinear differential equations from the system of partial differential equations and an analytical solution of system of coupled differential equations is obtained by means of the renowned Homotopy Analysis method. Through graphical illustrations, momentum, energy and concentration distributions are conversed for different prominent parameters. Comparison in limiting case is also part of present study to validate the obtained results. It is witnessed that nanoparticle concentration is diminishing function of chemical reaction parameter. Moreover, mounting values of thermal and solutal stratification lowers the temperature and concentration fields respectively.

  1. Bacteriohopanepolyols record stratification, nitrogen fixation and other biogeochemical perturbations in Holocene sediments of the central Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Blumenberg

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Baltic Sea, one of the world's largest brackish-marine basins, established after deglaciation of Scandinavia about 17 000 to 15 000 yr ago. In the changeable history of the Baltic Sea, the initial freshwater system was connected to the North Sea about 8000 yr ago and the modern brackish-marine setting (Littorina Sea was established. Today, a relatively stable stratification has developed in the water column of the deep basins due to salinity differences. Stratification is only occasionally interrupted by mixing events, and it controls nutrient availability and growth of specifically adapted microorganisms and algae. We studied bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs, lipids of specific bacterial groups, in a sediment core from the central Baltic Sea (Gotland Deep and found considerable differences between the distinct stages of the Baltic Sea's history. Some individual BHP structures indicate contributions from as yet unknown redoxcline-specific bacteria (bacteriohopanetetrol isomer, methanotrophic bacteria (35-aminobacteriohopanetetrol, cyanobacteria (bacteriohopanetetrol cyclitol ether isomer and from soil bacteria (adenosylhopane through allochthonous input after the Littorina transgression, whereas the origin of other BHPs in the core has still to be identified. Notably high BHP abundances were observed in the deposits of the brackish-marine Littorina phase, particularly in laminated sediment layers. Because these sediments record periods of stable water column stratification, bacteria specifically adapted to these conditions may account for the high portions of BHPs. An additional and/or accompanying source may be nitrogen-fixing (cyanobacteria, which is indicated by a positive correlation of BHP abundances with Corg and δ15N.

  2. An inexpensive and simple method for thermally stable immobilization of DNA on an unmodified glass surface: UV linking of poly(T)10-poly(C)10-tagged DNA probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guðnason, Haukur; Dufva, Hans Martin; Bang, Dang Duong

    2008-01-01

    the hybridization performance of the immobilized probes on the amino-silane surface, indicating a general benefit of adding a TC tag to DNA probes. In conclusion, our results show that using TC-tagged DNA probes immobilized on an unmodified glass surface is a robust, heat-stable, very simple, and inexpensive method...

  3. DEM Simulation of Particle Stratification and Segregation in Stockpile Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dizhe; Zhou, Zongyan; Pinson, David

    2017-06-01

    Granular stockpiles are commonly observed in nature and industry, and their formation has been extensively investigated experimentally and mathematically in the literature. One of the striking features affecting properties of stockpiles are the internal patterns formed by the stratification and segregation processes. In this work, we conduct a numerical study based on DEM (discrete element method) model to study the influencing factors and triggering mechanisms of these two phenomena. With the use of a previously developed mixing index, the effects of parameters including size ratio, injection height and mass ratio are investigated. We found that it is a void-filling mechanism that differentiates the motions of particles with different sizes. This mechanism drives the large particles to flow over the pile surface and segregate at the pile bottom, while it also pushes small particles to fill the voids between large particles, giving rise to separate layers. Consequently, this difference in motion will result in the observed stratification and segregation phenomena.

  4. Horizontal Stratification in Access to Danish University Programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Martin D.; Thomsen, Jens Peter

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we use register data to examine horizontal stratification within university institutions and university fields of study in Denmark, a country that has experienced a reduction of the social class gap in access to higher education. First, we argue that it is important to use...... in different fields of study and university institutions. Most importantly, we find distinct patterns of horizontal stratification by field of study and parental occupation that would have remained hidden had we used more aggregated classifications for field of study and social origin....... a relatively detailed classification of parents’ occupations to determine how students are endowed with different forms of capital, even when their parents would typically be characterised as belonging to the same social group. Second, we distinguish among disciplines and among university institutions...

  5. Inertial stratification of a dispersing multicomponent gas cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupitskii, E. L.; Kharkunov, A. N.

    2012-05-01

    The possibility of the spatial stratification of the components of an expanding gas ball at the inertial stage of dispersion is considered. Based on numerical investigations into the dispersion of a gas cloud consisting of hydrogen and aluminum, it is shown that, starting from certain dispersion radii, the force of collisional interaction is incapable of providing identical velocities of the components and their radial stratification occurs. The time behavior of the forces of internal pressure and friction is analyzed, and it is demonstrated that the light-component front is far ahead of the heavy-component front as time elapses. This effect is confirmed by experimental data of explosion experiments carried out in the upper layers of the ionosphere.

  6. AB019. Erectile dysfunction: analysis based on age stratification

    OpenAIRE

    Kai, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To establish the profile of erectile dysfunction in different age groups, and analysis the effect of sildenafil based on age stratification. Subjects and Methods From 2007 to 2008, a total of 4,507 men diagnosed with erectile dysfunction (ED) were enrolled from 46 centers in China; 4,039 of these patients were treated with sildenafil and asked to complete the Erectile Function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function, Erection Hardness Score, and Quality of Erection Qu...

  7. Potential Impacts of Offshore Wind Farms on North Sea Stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Jeffrey R.; Merckelbach, Lucas; Callies, Ulrich; Clark, Suzanna; Gaslikova, Lidia; Baschek, Burkard

    2016-01-01

    Advances in offshore wind farm (OWF) technology have recently led to their construction in coastal waters that are deep enough to be seasonally stratified. As tidal currents move past the OWF foundation structures they generate a turbulent wake that will contribute to a mixing of the stratified water column. In this study we show that the mixing generated in this way may have a significant impact on the large-scale stratification of the German Bight region of the North Sea. This region is chosen as the focus of this study since the planning of OWFs is particularly widespread. Using a combination of idealised modelling and in situ measurements, we provide order-of-magnitude estimates of two important time scales that are key to understanding the impacts of OWFs: (i) a mixing time scale, describing how long a complete mixing of the stratification takes, and (ii) an advective time scale, quantifying for how long a water parcel is expected to undergo enhanced wind farm mixing. The results are especially sensitive to both the drag coefficient and type of foundation structure, as well as the evolution of the pycnocline under enhanced mixing conditions—both of which are not well known. With these limitations in mind, the results show that OWFs could impact the large-scale stratification, but only when they occupy extensive shelf regions. They are expected to have very little impact on large-scale stratification at the current capacity in the North Sea, but the impact could be significant in future large-scale development scenarios. PMID:27513754

  8. Potential Impacts of Offshore Wind Farms on North Sea Stratification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R Carpenter

    Full Text Available Advances in offshore wind farm (OWF technology have recently led to their construction in coastal waters that are deep enough to be seasonally stratified. As tidal currents move past the OWF foundation structures they generate a turbulent wake that will contribute to a mixing of the stratified water column. In this study we show that the mixing generated in this way may have a significant impact on the large-scale stratification of the German Bight region of the North Sea. This region is chosen as the focus of this study since the planning of OWFs is particularly widespread. Using a combination of idealised modelling and in situ measurements, we provide order-of-magnitude estimates of two important time scales that are key to understanding the impacts of OWFs: (i a mixing time scale, describing how long a complete mixing of the stratification takes, and (ii an advective time scale, quantifying for how long a water parcel is expected to undergo enhanced wind farm mixing. The results are especially sensitive to both the drag coefficient and type of foundation structure, as well as the evolution of the pycnocline under enhanced mixing conditions-both of which are not well known. With these limitations in mind, the results show that OWFs could impact the large-scale stratification, but only when they occupy extensive shelf regions. They are expected to have very little impact on large-scale stratification at the current capacity in the North Sea, but the impact could be significant in future large-scale development scenarios.

  9. RANS analyses on erosion behavior of density stratification consisted of helium–air mixture gas by a low momentum vertical buoyant jet in the PANDA test facility, the third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Satoshi; Ishigaki, Masahiro; Sibamoto, Yasuteru; Yonomoto, Taisuke

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: . • The third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in the reactor containment vessel. • Two types turbulence model modification were applied in order to accurately simulate the turbulence helium transportation in the density stratification. • The analysis result in case with turbulence model modification is good agreement with the experimental data. • There is a major difference of turbulence helium–mass transportation between in case with and without the turbulence model modification. - Abstract: Density stratification in the reactor containment vessel is an important phenomenon on an issue of hydrogen safety. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the ROSA-SA project on containment thermal hydraulics. As a part of the activity, we participated in the third international CFD benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in containment vessel. This paper shows our approach for the IBE-3, focusing on the turbulence transport phenomena in eroding the density stratification and introducing modified turbulence models for improvement of the CFD analyses. For this analysis, we modified the CFD code OpenFOAM by using two turbulence models; the Kato and Launder modification to estimate turbulent kinetic energy production around a stagnation point, and the Katsuki model to consider turbulence damping in density stratification. As a result, the modified code predicted well the experimental data. The importance of turbulence transport modeling is also discussed using the calculation results

  10. Using Multiple-hierarchy Stratification and Life Course Approaches to Understand Health Inequalities: The Intersecting Consequences of Race, Gender, SES, and Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tyson H; Richardson, Liana J; Hargrove, Taylor W; Thomas, Courtney S

    2016-06-01

    This study examines how the intersecting consequences of race-ethnicity, gender, socioeconomics status (SES), and age influence health inequality. We draw on multiple-hierarchy stratification and life course perspectives to address two main research questions. First, does racial-ethnic stratification of health vary by gender and/or SES? More specifically, are the joint health consequences of racial-ethnic, gender, and socioeconomic stratification additive or multiplicative? Second, does this combined inequality in health decrease, remain stable, or increase between middle and late life? We use panel data from the Health and Retirement Study (N = 12,976) to investigate between- and within-group differences in in self-rated health among whites, blacks, and Mexican Americans. Findings indicate that the effects of racial-ethnic, gender, and SES stratification are interactive, resulting in the greatest racial-ethnic inequalities in health among women and those with higher levels of SES. Furthermore, racial-ethnic/gender/SES inequalities in health tend to decline with age. These results are broadly consistent with intersectionality and aging-as-leveler hypotheses. © American Sociological Association 2016.

  11. LIVELIHOOD STRATEGIES AND FORMATION OFECONOMIC AND SOCIAL STRATIFICATION: EXPRIENCEFROM MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Suhaidi Salleh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the livelihood subsistence strategies used by group ofResearch object who moved from Brunei to Malaysia in the early 19th century.This study seeks to answertwo key questions. First, what type of livelihoodsubsistence strategies that are used bythis group to survive? Second, how thelivelihood subsistence strategies influenced and form new type of social andeconomic stratifications in the group thatare considered as ‘egalitarians’. Usingethnographic techniques, data in thisstudy were collected from in-depthinterviews and participation observation which took 18 months to complete. Thestudy found that there is a slight change in the aspectof subsistence strategywhich is due to market forces and the virtues of capitalism. This community hasdiversified subsistence to balance the pressure of market forces. The study alsorevealed that factors such as incomeand property ownership have developedsocial and economic stratification into several classes based on source of incomeand ownership of production. Objective criteria such as income, and sources ofprimary production such as land, makeit critical value inthis society.Competition for means of production has created conflict of ownership and thussparks competition in other aspects suchas the position and power. This explainsthat in a small community social andeconomic stratification exists and theircompetition for limited resources make themdiversifies their livelihood systems.

  12. Stratification during evaporative assembly of multicomponent nanoparticle films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Liu, Weiping; Carr, Amanda J; Santiago Vazquez, Dayalis; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Majewski, Pawel W; Routh, Alexander F; Bhatia, Surita R

    2018-04-01

    Multicomponent coatings with layers comprising different functionalities are of interest for a variety of applications, including electronic devices, energy storage, and biomaterials. Rather than creating such a film using multiple deposition steps, we explore a single-step method to create such films by varying the particle Peclet numbers, Pe. Our hypothesis, based on recent theoretical descriptions of the stratification process, is that by varying particle size and evaporation rate such that Pe of large and small particles are above and below unity, we can create stratified films of polymeric and inorganic particles. We present AFM on the surface composition of films comprising poly(styrene) nanoparticles (diameter 25-90 nm) and silica nanoparticles (diameter 8-14 nm). Previous studies on films containing both inorganic and polymeric particles correspond to large Pe values (e.g., 120-460), while we utilize Pe ∼ 0.3-4, enabling us to test theories that have been developed for different regimes of Pe. We demonstrate evidence of stratification and effect of the Pe ratio, although our results agree only qualitatively with theory. Our results also provide validation of recent theoretical descriptions of the film drying process that predict different regimes for large-on-top and small-on-top stratification. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Determining the core stratification in white dwarfs with asteroseismology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charpinet S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the forward modeling approach and a new parameterization for the core chemical stratification in ZZ Ceti stars, we test several situations typical of the usually limited constraints available, such as small numbers of observed independent modes, to carry out asteroseismology of these stars. We find that, even with a limited number of modes, the core chemical stratification (in particular, the location of the steep chemical transitions expected in the oxygen profile can be determined quite precisely due to the significant sensitivity of some confined modes to partial reflexion (trapping effects. These effects are similar to the well known trapping induced by the shallower chemical transitions at the edge of the core and at the bottom of the H-rich envelope. We also find that success to unravel the core structure depends on the information content of the available seismic data. In some cases, it may not be possible to isolate a unique, well-defined seismic solution and the problem remains degenerate. Our results establish that constraining the core chemical stratification in white dwarf stars based solely on asteroseismology is possible, an opportunity that we have started to exploit.

  14. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  15. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  16. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    After Maynard-Smith and Price [1] mathematically derived why a given behaviour or strategy was adopted by a certain proportion of the population at a given time, it was shown that a strategy which is currently stable in a population need not be stable in evolutionary time (across generations). Additionally it was sug-.

  17. Normal modified stable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses two classes of distributions, and stochastic processes derived from them: modified stable (MS) laws and normal modified stable (NMS) laws. This extends corresponding results for the generalised inverse Gaussian (GIG) and generalised hyperbolic (GH) or normal generalised inverse...... Gaussian (NGIG) laws. The wider framework thus established provides, in particular, for added flexibility in the modelling of the dynamics of financial time series, of importance especially as regards OU based stochastic volatility models for equities. In the special case of the tempered stable OU process...

  18. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letolle, R.; Mariotti, A.; Bariac, T.

    1991-06-01

    This report reviews the historical background and the properties of stable isotopes, the methods used for their measurement (mass spectrometry and others), the present technics for isotope enrichment and separation, and at last the various present and foreseeable application (in nuclear energy, physical and chemical research, materials industry and research; tracing in industrial, medical and agronomical tests; the use of natural isotope variations for environmental studies, agronomy, natural resources appraising: water, minerals, energy). Some new possibilities in the use of stable isotope are offered. A last chapter gives the present state and forecast development of stable isotope uses in France and Europe

  19. Combustion stratification study of partially premixed combustion using Fourier transform analysis of OH* chemiluminescence images

    KAUST Repository

    Izadi Najafabadi, Mohammad

    2017-11-06

    A relatively high level of stratification (qualitatively: lack of homogeneity) is one of the main advantages of partially premixed combustion over the homogeneous charge compression ignition concept. Stratification can smooth the heat release rate and improve the controllability of combustion. In order to compare stratification levels of different partially premixed combustion strategies or other combustion concepts, an objective and meaningful definition of “stratification level” is required. Such a definition is currently lacking; qualitative/quantitative definitions in the literature cannot properly distinguish various levels of stratification. The main purpose of this study is to objectively define combustion stratification (not to be confused with fuel stratification) based on high-speed OH* chemiluminescence imaging, which is assumed to provide spatial information regarding heat release. Stratification essentially being equivalent to spatial structure, we base our definition on two-dimensional Fourier transforms of photographs of OH* chemiluminescence. A light-duty optical diesel engine has been used to perform the OH* bandpass imaging on. Four experimental points are evaluated, with injection timings in the homogeneous regime as well as in the stratified partially premixed combustion regime. Two-dimensional Fourier transforms translate these chemiluminescence images into a range of spatial frequencies. The frequency information is used to define combustion stratification, using a novel normalization procedure. The results indicate that this new definition, based on Fourier analysis of OH* bandpass images, overcomes the drawbacks of previous definitions used in the literature and is a promising method to compare the level of combustion stratification between different experiments.

  20. Analysing Stable Time Series

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adler, Robert

    1997-01-01

    We describe how to take a stable, ARMA, time series through the various stages of model identification, parameter estimation, and diagnostic checking, and accompany the discussion with a goodly number...

  1. Stratification and Tdal Mixing in the Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, P. A.; Hill, J.; Jordan, N.; Avdis, A.; Markwick, P. J.; Lunt, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Most of the organic carbon preserved in the marine sedimentary lithosphere was deposited in shallow epicontinental seas. Understanding the processes which affected productivity and preservation of this organic matter impacts upon our understanding of the ancient carbon cycle, paleobiodiversity and hydrocarbon resource formation. The epicontinental seas of the geological past were vast, typically shallow and lack suitably scaled modern analogues. A key question is the extent to which these water-bodies were stratified or mixed and how this has affected productivity and preservation. Modern coastal seas such as the North Sea become seasonally stratified in summer but are mixed at the coasts through the interaction of the tidal wave with the seabed. The stratified deeper water is separated from the mixed coastal shallows by a front. Modern fronts are associated with elevated productivity in the frontal region with potential for preservation in stratified areas. Herein we use a range of modelling tools to evaluate the development of seasonal stratification, tidal mixing and tidal fronts in the Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway (WIS) of North America. The paleogeographies (supplied by Getech) used for this work are underpinned by extensive geological databases and based on an in-house plate model. Paleobathymetric reconstructions utilize geological observations (seismic, lithofacies, fossils) for the shelf and a combination of geological data and age-depth relationships for areas underpinned by oceanic crust. A low resolution coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (HADCM3) was used to evaluate the development of seasonal stratification. Fluidity-ICOM, an unstructured FE model was used to quantify the development of tidal mixing and tidal fronts and GOTM, a 1D vertical ocean model was used to evaluate the impact of a suite of parameters (salinity, temperature, depth and atmospheric forcing) on water-body mixing. HADCM3 results show that the seaway was

  2. Repercussions of thermal atmospheric tides on the rotation of terrestrial planets in the habitable zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auclair-Desrotour, P.; Mathis, S.; Laskar, J.

    2017-12-01

    Semidiurnal atmospheric thermal tides are important for terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zone of their host stars. With solid tides, they torque these planets, thus contributing to determine their rotation states as well as their climate. Given the complex dynamics of thermal tides, analytical models are essential to understand its dependence on the structure and rotation of planetary atmospheres and the tidal frequency. In this context, the state of the art model proposed in the 60’s by Lindzen and Chapman explains well the properties of thermal tides in the asymptotic regime of Earth-like rapid rotators but predicts a non-physical diverging tidal torque in the vicinity of the spin-orbit synchronization. In this work, we present a new model that addresses this issue by taking into account dissipative processes through a Newtonian cooling. First, we recover the tidal torque recently obtained with numerical simulations using General Circulation Models (GCM). Second, we show that the tidal response is very sensitive to the atmospheric structure, particularly to the stability with respect to convection. A strong stable stratification is able to annihilate the atmospheric tidal torque, leading to synchronization, while a convective atmosphere will be submitted to a strong torque, leading to a non-synchronized rotation state.

  3. Risk stratification of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in Chinese adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Li Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to determine the distribution of observed atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD incidence in contemporary cohorts in China, and to identify cut-off points for ASCVD risk classification based on traditional criteria and new equations developed by Prediction for ASCVD Risk in China (China-PAR. Methods: The study populations included cohorts in the China-PAR project, with 34,757 participants eligible for the current analysis. Traditional risk stratification was assessed by using Chinese guidelines on prevention of CVD and hypertension, and 5 risk groups were classified based on these guidelines after slight modification for available risk factors. Kaplan–Meier analysis was conducted to obtain the cumulative incidence of observed ASCVD events for all subjects and sub-groups. The predicted 10-year ASCVD risk was obtained using the China-PAR equations. Results: A total of 1922 ASCVD events were identified during an average follow-up of 14.1 years. According to the group classification based on traditional risk stratification, the observed 10-year risks for ASCVD were 4.61% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.11–5.10% in the moderate-risk group and 8.74% (95% CI: 7.82–9.66% in the high-risk group. Based on the China-PAR equations for risk assessment of ASCVD, those with predicted risks of <5%, 5–10%, and ≥10% could be classified into categories of low-, moderate-, and high-risk for ASCVD, respectively. Conclusion: The findings enable development of a simple method for classification of individuals into low-, moderate-, and high-risk groups, based on the China-PAR equations. The method will be useful for self-management and prevention of ASCVD in Chinese adults. Keywords: Risk stratification, Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, Cohort, China-PAR project

  4. Evidence for Ground-Water Stratification Near Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. Futa; B.D. Marshall; Z.E. Peterman

    2006-01-01

    Major- and trace-element concentrations and strontium isotope ratios (strontium-87/strontium-86) in samples of ground water potentially can be useful in delineating flow paths in the complex ground-water system in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water samples were collected from boreholes to characterize the lateral and vertical variability in the composition of water in the saturated zone. Discrete sampling of water-producing intervals in the saturated zone includes isolating borehole sections with packers and extracting pore water from core obtained by sonic drilling. Chemical and isotopic stratification was identified in the saturated zone beneath southern Fortymile Wash

  5. Diphenyl derivatives of dinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene: organic semiconductors for thermally stable thin-film transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Myeong Jin; Miyazaki, Eigo; Osaka, Itaru; Takimiya, Kazuo; Nakao, Akiko

    2013-04-10

    Two isomeric diphenyl-dinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (DPh-DNTTs), 2,9- and 3,10-DPh-DNTT, were characterized by means of single-crystal X-ray analysis, thin film XRDs, and evaluation of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) using their evaporated thin films. The packing structures both in the single crystal and thin film state were classified into a typical herringbone packing regardless of the substitution positions, similar to the parent DNTT. The OFETs showed typical p-channel transistor characteristics with mobilities of as high as 3.5 cm2 V(-1) s(-1) for both isomers, which is slightly higher than that of the parent DNTT. Compared to related DNTT-based organic semiconductors, a unique point of DPh-DNTTs was found to be superior thermal stability in OFET devices. In particular, the 2,9-DPh-DNTT-based OFETs preserved its superior FET characteristics up to 250 °C. For its excellent thermal stability with good FET characteristics, 2,9-DPh-DNTT can be a useful organic semiconductor in various applications that require processes at high temperatures.

  6. Composition Screening in Blue-Emitting Li4Sr1+xCa0.97-x(SiO4)2:Ce3+ Phosphors for High Quantum Efficiency and Thermally Stable Photoluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingchen; Zhang, Jilin; Zhou, Wenli; Ji, Xiaoyu; Ma, Wentao; Qiu, Zhongxian; Yu, Liping; Li, Chengzhi; Xia, Zhiguo; Wang, Zhengliang; Lian, Shixun

    2017-09-13

    Photoluminescence quantum efficiency (QE) and thermal stability are important for phosphors used in phosphor-converted light-emitting diodes (pc-LEDs). Li 4 Sr 1+x Ca 0.97-x (SiO 4 ) 2 :0.03Ce 3+ (-0.7 ≤ x ≤ 1.0) phosphors were designed from the initial model of Li 4 SrCa(SiO 4 ) 2 :Ce 3+ , and their single-phased crystal structures were found to be located in the composition range of -0.4 ≤ x ≤ 0.7. Depending on the substitution of Sr 2+ for Ca 2+ ions, the absolute QE value of blue-emitting composition-optimized Li 4 Sr 1.4 Ca 0.57 (SiO 4 ) 2 :0.03Ce 3+ reaches ∼94%, and the emission intensity at 200 °C remains 95% of that at room temperature. Rietveld refinements and Raman spectral analyses suggest the increase of crystal rigidity, increase of force constant in CeO 6 , and decrease of vibrational frequency by increasing Sr 2+ content, which are responsible for the enhanced quantum efficiency and thermal stability. The present study points to a new strategy for future development of the pc-LEDs phosphors based on local structures correlation via composition screening.

  7. The Social-Institutional Bases of Gender Stratification: Japan as an Illustrative Case

    OpenAIRE

    Brinton, Mary

    1988-01-01

    Gender stratification theory can be informed by a cross-cultural perspective and greater attention to the embeddedness of stratification processes within the social context. This article focuses on how the development and evaluation of human capital varies across cultural settings and on the implications this has for the degree of gender stratification in the economy. An argument is made for the theoretical utility of the concept of a human capital development system, constituted by the way s...

  8. Coolant stratification and its thermohydrodynamic specificity under natural circulation in horizontal steam generator collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagovechtchenski, A.; Leontieva, V.; Mitriukhin, A. [Saint-Petersburg Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The experiments and the test facilities for the study of the stratification phenomenon in the hot plenum of reactor and the upper parts of the steam generator collectors in a nuclear power plant are described. The aim of the experiments was to define the conditions of the stratification initiation, to study the temperature field in the upper part, the definition of the characteristics in the stratification layer, and also to study the factors which cause the intensity of the stagnant volume cooling.

  9. The Scientific Definition of Social Stratification, as a Historical Process Objective

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe Costandachi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the author defines the nature of social stratification and social classes, and the main concepts associated with this process, as well. The work describes the concept of “social stratification” from the point of view of some classic economists and sociologists. In the work is described a contemporary interpretation of the social stratification. Also is given a qualitative assessment in the Republic of Moldova and the attached well-known classification of social stratification in...

  10. Continental Shelf Embayments of the Eastern Margin of the Philippines; Lamon Bay Stratification & Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    in 2011. Data from R/V Revelle hull mounted ADCP. The hull ADCP and the CTD thermohaline stratification reveal a shift in circulation pattern...Philippines; Lamon Bay Stratification & Circulation Arnold L. Gordon Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory 61 Route 9W Palisades, NY 10964-8000... circulation , stratification and the Shelf-Slope interaction, and the resultant ocean productivity, within a major embayment, Lamon Bay, of the eastern

  11. DEM Simulation of Particle Stratification and Segregation in Stockpile Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Dizhe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular stockpiles are commonly observed in nature and industry, and their formation has been extensively investigated experimentally and mathematically in the literature. One of the striking features affecting properties of stockpiles are the internal patterns formed by the stratification and segregation processes. In this work, we conduct a numerical study based on DEM (discrete element method model to study the influencing factors and triggering mechanisms of these two phenomena. With the use of a previously developed mixing index, the effects of parameters including size ratio, injection height and mass ratio are investigated. We found that it is a void-filling mechanism that differentiates the motions of particles with different sizes. This mechanism drives the large particles to flow over the pile surface and segregate at the pile bottom, while it also pushes small particles to fill the voids between large particles, giving rise to separate layers. Consequently, this difference in motion will result in the observed stratification and segregation phenomena.

  12. Microbial diversity and stratification of South Pacific abyssal marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Alan M; Teske, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    Abyssal marine sediments cover a large proportion of the ocean floor, but linkages between their microbial community structure and redox stratification have remained poorly constrained. This study compares the downcore gradients in microbial community composition to porewater oxygen and nitrate concentration profiles in an abyssal marine sediment column in the South Pacific Ocean. Archaeal 16S rRNA clone libraries showed a stratified archaeal community that changed from Marine Group I Archaea in the aerobic and nitrate-reducing upper sediment column towards deeply branching, uncultured crenarchaeotal and euryarchaeotal lineages in nitrate-depleted, anaerobic sediment horizons. Bacterial 16S rRNA clone libraries revealed a similar shift on the phylum and subphylum level within the bacteria, from a complex community of Alpha-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Gemmatimonadetes in oxic surface sediments towards uncultured Chloroflexi and Planctomycetes in the anaerobic sediment column. The distinct stratification of largely uncultured bacterial and archaeal groups within the oxic and nitrate-reducing marine sediment column provides initial constraints for their microbial habitat preferences. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Stratification of Antigen-presenting Cells within the Normal Cornea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared E. Knickelbein

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The composition and location of professional antigen presenting cells (APC varies in different mucosal surfaces. The cornea, long considered an immune-privileged tissue devoid of APCs, is now known to host a heterogeneous network of bone marrow-derived cells. Here, we utilized transgenic mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP from the CD11c promoter (pCD11c in conjunction with immunohistochemical staining to demonstrate an interesting stratification of APCs within non-inflamed murine corneas. pCD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs reside in the basal epithelium, seemingly embedded in the basement membrane. Most DCs express MHC class II on at least some dendrites, which extend up to 50 µm in length and traverse up 20 µm tangentially towards the apical surface of the epithelium. The DC density diminishes from peripheral to central cornea. Beneath the DCs and adjacent to the stromal side of the basement membrane reside pCD11c-CD11b+ putative macrophages that express low levels of MHC class II. Finally, MHC class IIpCD11c-CD11b+ cells form a network throughout the remainder of the stroma. This highly reproducible stratification of bone marrow-derived cells is suggestive of a progression from an APC function at the exposed corneal surface to an innate immune barrier function deeper in the stroma.

  14. MULTIGENERATIONAL ASPECTS OF SOCIAL STRATIFICATION: ISSUES FOR FURTHER RESEARCH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mare, Robert D

    2014-03-01

    The articles in this special issue show the vitality and progress of research on multigenerational aspects of social mobility, stratification, and inequality. The effects of the characteristics and behavior of grandparents and other kin on the statuses, resources, and positions of their descendants are best viewed in a demographic context. Intergenerational effects work through both the intergenerational associations of socioeconomic characteristics and also differential fertility and mortality. A combined socioeconomic and demographic framework informs a research agenda which addresses the following issues: how generational effects combine with variation in age, period, and cohort within each generation; distinguishing causal relationships across generations from statistical associations; how multigenerational effects vary across socioeconomic hierarchies, including the possibility of stronger effects at the extreme top and bottom; distinguishing between endowments and investments in intergenerational effects; multigenerational effects on associated demographic behaviors and outcomes (especially fertility and mortality); optimal tradeoffs among diverse types of data on multigenerational processes; and the variability across time and place in how kin, education, and other institutions affect stratification.

  15. Carbon Stock Stratification of Peat Soils in South Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Nurzakiah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon stock in peat soils is very high, it is necessary to prudent in its management because peat soils is emitting greenhouse gases such as CO2 during land clearing due to oxidation of peat layer.  This research was conducted to study soil carbon stock stratification in relation to soil physical and chemical properties. The carbon stock stratification was based on maturity degrees of peat.  The study was conducted in Pulau Damar Village, Hulu Sungai Utara District, South Kalimantan Province on land use rubber.  The location of the study area was determined by using the purposive sampling method.  All data obtained were analyzed by Excel spreadsheets and drawn on a CorelDraw 12. The results showed that the amount of carbon stock was influenced by the maturity degrees of peats, peat sapric degres has higher carbon stock than of hemik and fibric with a ratio of  2.0: 1.5: 1.  The relationship between soil carbon stock with soil physic (Bulk Density, BD and chemical properties (pH, Eh, Fe, and total-N were not significantly.

  16. Increasing the Knowledge of Stratification in Shallow Coastal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, T.; Bonner, J.; Hodges, B.; Maidment, D.; Montagna, P.; Minsker, B.

    2006-12-01

    A testbed has been established using Corpus Christi Bay as an environmental field facility to study the phenomenon of hypoxia that has been observed to develop at certain periods during the year. Stratification affects vertical turbulent mixing of heat, momentum and mass (or constituents) within the water column, in turn influencing the transport of material. The mixing threshold is dependent on the value of the Richardson Number, Ri with inhibition due to stratification occurring at low values ( 0.25) of Ri. Corpus Christi Bay with average depth of ~3 m is the largest among a system of five bays has been known to stratify due to inflows of hypersaline water (up to 50 psu) from adjoining bays, the Laguna Madre and Oso Bay. Laguna Madre is separated from the Gulf of Mexico by a barrier island and becomes hypersaline because of the imbalance between inflow of freshwater and bay evaporation. Hypersalinity also occurs in Oso Bay due to anthropogenic forcing from a power plant that draws 400 MGD of cooling water from the upper Laguna Madre, discharging waste water into Oso Bay. Several wastewater treatment plants also discharge directly into Oso Bay or its tributary streams. The objective of this study is to develop a methodology for prescribing a set of parameters required for modeling and characterization of hypoxia in this shallow wind-driven bay. The extent to which Ri is dependent on external forcing at the surface boundary was measured using our fully instrumented sensor platforms. Each sensor platform includes sensors for synchronic near-surface meteorological (wind velocity, barometric pressure, air temperature) and water column oceanographic (current, water temperature, conductivity, particle size distribution, particulate concentration, dissolved oxygen, nutrient) variables. These were measured using fixed and mobile vertical profiling sensor platforms. A 2D hydrodynamic model was initially developed for the bay and results indicate that water mass is

  17. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  18. Increased thermohaline stratification as a possible cause for an ocean anoxic event in the Cretaceous period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbacher, J; Huber, B T; Norris, R D; Markey, M

    2001-01-18

    Ocean anoxic events were periods of high carbon burial that led to drawdown of atmospheric carbon dioxide, lowering of bottom-water oxygen concentrations and, in many cases, significant biological extinction. Most ocean anoxic events are thought to be caused by high productivity and export of carbon from surface waters which is then preserved in organic-rich sediments, known as black shales. But the factors that triggered some of these events remain uncertain. Here we present stable isotope data from a mid-Cretaceous ocean anoxic event that occurred 112 Myr ago, and that point to increased thermohaline stratification as the probable cause. Ocean anoxic event 1b is associated with an increase in surface-water temperatures and runoff that led to decreased bottom-water formation and elevated carbon burial in the restricted basins of the western Tethys and North Atlantic. This event is in many ways similar to that which led to the more recent Plio-Pleistocene Mediterranean sapropels, but the greater geographical extent and longer duration (approximately 46 kyr) of ocean anoxic event 1b suggest that processes leading to such ocean anoxic events in the North Atlantic and western Tethys were able to act over a much larger region, and sequester far more carbon, than any of the Quaternary sapropels.

  19. Social stratification and attitudes: a comparative analysis of the effects of class and education in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmijn, Matthijs; Kraaykamp, Gerbert

    2007-12-01

    A classic topic in the sociology of inequality lies in the subjective consequences of people's stratification position. Many studies have shown that education and occupational class have significant effects on attitudes, but little is known about how the magnitude of these effects depends on the societal context. There has been debate in the scholarly literature, with some authors arguing that effects of class and education are less important when societies are more developed, whereas other authors argue that effects are either stable (for class) or increasing (for education). We use a meta-analytical design to address this debate. More specifically we examine the effects of class and education for a broad range of attitudes (21 scales) in 22 European countries using data from the 1999 wave of the European Values Study. We pool summary-measures of association (Eta-values) into a new dataset and analyse these Eta-values (N = 453) applying multilevel models with characteristics of countries and characteristics of attitudes as the independent variables. Our results show that there is no evidence that the effects of class on attitudes are lower when countries are more modern, but we do find larger effects of education in more modern countries.

  20. Thermally stable dielectric responses in uniaxially (001)-oriented CaBi4Ti4O15 nanofilms grown on a Ca2Nb3O10- nanosheet seed layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Junichi; Takuwa, Itaru; Matsushima, Masaaki; Shimizu, Takao; Uchida, Hiroshi; Kiguchi, Takanori; Shiraishi, Takahisa; Konno, Toyohiko J.; Shibata, Tatsuo; Osada, Minoru; Sasaki, Takayoshi; Funakubo, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    To realize a high-temperature capacitor, uniaxially (001)-oriented CaBi4Ti4O15 films with various film thicknesses were prepared on (100)cSrRuO3/Ca2Nb3O10- nanosheet/glass substrates. As the film thickness decreases to 50 nm, the out-of-plane lattice parameters decrease while the in-plane lattice ones increase due to the in-plane tensile strain. However, the relative dielectric constant (ɛr) at room temperature exhibits a negligible degradation as the film thickness decreases to 50 nm, suggesting that ɛr of (001)-oriented CaBi4Ti4O15 is less sensitive to the residual strain. The capacitance density increases monotonously with decreasing film thickness, reaching a value of 4.5 μF/cm2 for a 50-nm-thick nanofilm, and is stable against temperature changes from room temperature to 400 °C irrespective of film thickness. This behaviour differs from that of the widely investigated perovskite-structured dielectrics. These results show that (001)-oriented CaBi4Ti4O15 films derived using Ca2Nb3O10- nanosheets as seed layers can be made candidates for high-temperature capacitor applications by a small change in the dielectric properties against film thickness and temperature variations.

  1. Feeding height stratification among the herbivorous dinosaurs from the Dinosaur Park Formation (upper Campanian) of Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Jordan C; Evans, David C; Ryan, Michael J; Anderson, Jason S

    2013-04-04

    abundance. Sympatric hadrosaurids may have avoided competing with one another by feeding differentially using bipedal and quadrupedal postures. These ecological relationships evidently proved to be evolutionarily stable because they characterize the herbivore assemblage of the Dinosaur Park Formation through time. If niche partitioning served to facilitate the rich diversity of these animals, it may have been achieved by other means in addition to feeding height stratification. Consideration of other feeding height proxies, including dental microwear and skull morphology, may help to alleviate problems of underdetermination identified here.

  2. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 9. Evolutionary Stable Strategy: Application of Nash Equilibrium in Biology. General ... Using some examples of classical games, we show how evolutionary game theory can help understand behavioural decisions of animals.

  3. The Stable Concordance Genus

    OpenAIRE

    Kearney, M. Kate

    2013-01-01

    The concordance genus of a knot is the least genus of any knot in its concordance class. Although difficult to compute, it is a useful invariant that highlights the distinction between the three-genus and four-genus. In this paper we define and discuss the stable concordance genus of a knot, which describes the behavior of the concordance genus under connected sum.

  4. Manifolds admitting stable forms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Le, Hong-Van; Panák, Martin; Vanžura, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 1 (2008), s. 101-11 ISSN 0010-2628 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP201/05/P088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : stable forms * automorphism groups Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  5. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  6. Interactive Stable Ray Tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal Corso, Alessandro; Salvi, Marco; Kolb, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Interactive ray tracing applications running on commodity hardware can suffer from objectionable temporal artifacts due to a low sample count. We introduce stable ray tracing, a technique that improves temporal stability without the over-blurring and ghosting artifacts typical of temporal post-pr...

  7. The stable subgroup graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Tolue

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce stable subgroup graph associated to the group $G$. It is a graph with vertex set all subgroups of $G$ and two distinct subgroups $H_1$ and $H_2$ are adjacent if $St_{G}(H_1\\cap H_2\

  8. Effects of thermal stratification on transient free convective flow of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pramana – Journal of Physics. Current Issue : Vol. 90, Issue 2 · Current Issue Volume 90 | Issue 2. February 2018. Home · Volumes & Issues · Special Issues · Forthcoming Articles · Search · Editorial Board · Information for Authors · Subscription ...

  9. Buoyancy effects on the radiative magneto Micropolar nanofluid flow with double stratification, activation energy and binary chemical reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzan, M; Ullah, Naeem; Chung, Jae Dong; Lu, Dianchen; Farooq, Umer

    2017-10-10

    A mathematical model has been developed to examine the magneto hydrodynamic micropolar nanofluid flow with buoyancy effects. Flow analysis is carried out in the presence of nonlinear thermal radiation and dual stratification. The impact of binary chemical reaction with Arrhenius activation energy is also considered. Apposite transformations are engaged to transform nonlinear partial differential equations to differential equations with high nonlinearity. Resulting nonlinear system of differential equations is solved by differential solver method in Maple software which uses Runge-Kutta fourth and fifth order technique (RK45). To authenticate the obtained results, a comparison with the preceding article is also made. The evaluations are executed graphically for numerous prominent parameters versus velocity, micro rotation component, temperature, and concentration distributions. Tabulated numerical calculations of Nusselt and Sherwood numbers with respective well-argued discussions are also presented. Our findings illustrate that the angular velocity component declines for opposing buoyancy forces and enhances for aiding buoyancy forces by changing the micropolar parameter. It is also found that concentration profile increases for higher values of chemical reaction parameter, whereas it diminishes for growing values of solutal stratification parameter.

  10. Inverse and direct transfer functions for the fatigue follow-up of piping systems submitted to stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guyette, M.; De Smet, M.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we outline a methodology to assess the fatigue induced in piping systems submitted to thermal stratification. More specifically, the transformation from the measured outer wall temperature time histories to stress time histories in any point of the line is treated.By means of inverse transfer functions, the fluid temperature distribution is calculated from the outside wall temperatures measured in a limited number of temperature sections. Using direct transfer functions, the local stresses due to stratification may be determined as well as the pipe free curvatures and the pipe free axial strains. Using a finite beam element model of the line, the global response of the line (in terms of displacements or stresses) due to the applied curvatures, axial strains, end point displacements, internal pressure and possible contacts with the pipe environment may be determined.The method is illustrated for the surge lines of the Doel 2 and Doel 4 nuclear power plants. An excellent correlation is found between measured and calculated displacements. Typical stress time histories are shown for a plant cool down. ((orig.))

  11. Consensus and stratification in the affective meaning of human sociality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrasat, Jens; von Scheve, Christian; Conrad, Markus; Schauenburg, Gesche; Schröder, Tobias

    2014-06-03

    We investigate intrasocietal consensus and variation in affective meanings of concepts related to authority and community, two elementary forms of human sociality. Survey participants (n = 2,849) from different socioeconomic status (SES) groups in German society provided ratings of 909 social concepts along three basic dimensions of affective meaning. Results show widespread consensus on these meanings within society and demonstrate that a meaningful structure of socially shared knowledge emerges from organizing concepts according to their affective similarity. The consensus finding is further qualified by evidence for subtle systematic variation along SES differences. In relation to affectively neutral words, high-status individuals evaluate intimacy-related and socially desirable concepts as less positive and powerful than middle- or low-status individuals, while perceiving antisocial concepts as relatively more threatening. This systematic variation across SES groups suggests that the affective meaning of sociality is to some degree a function of social stratification.

  12. Stratification in the lunar regolith - a preliminary view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duke, M.B.; Nagle, J.S.

    1975-01-01

    Although the knowledge of lunar regolith stratification is incomplete, several categories of thick and thin strata have been identified. Relatively thick units average 2 to 3 cm in thickness, and appear surficially to be massive. On more detailed examination, these units can be uniformly fine-grained, can show internal trends, or can show internal variations which apparently are random. Other thick units contain soil clasts apparently reworked from underlying units. Thin laminae average approximately 1 mm in thickness; lenticular distribution and composition of some thin laminae indicates they are fillets shed from adjacent rock fragments. Other dark, fine-grained, well-sorted thin laminae appear to be surficial zones, reworked by micrometeorites. Interpretations of stratigraphic succession can be strengthened by the occurrence of characteristic coarse rock fragments and the orientation of large spatter agglutinates, which are commonly found in their original depositional orientation. (Auth.)

  13. Redox stratification of an ancient lake in Gale crater, Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurowitz, J A; Grotzinger, J P; Fischer, W W; McLennan, S M; Milliken, R E; Stein, N; Vasavada, A R; Blake, D F; Dehouck, E; Eigenbrode, J L; Fairén, A G; Frydenvang, J; Gellert, R; Grant, J A; Gupta, S; Herkenhoff, K E; Ming, D W; Rampe, E B; Schmidt, M E; Siebach, K L; Stack-Morgan, K; Sumner, D Y; Wiens, R C

    2017-06-02

    In 2012, NASA's Curiosity rover landed on Mars to assess its potential as a habitat for past life and investigate the paleoclimate record preserved by sedimentary rocks inside the ~150-kilometer-diameter Gale impact crater. Geological reconstructions from Curiosity rover data have revealed an ancient, habitable lake environment fed by rivers draining into the crater. We synthesize geochemical and mineralogical data from lake-bed mudstones collected during the first 1300 martian solar days of rover operations in Gale. We present evidence for lake redox stratification, established by depth-dependent variations in atmospheric oxidant and dissolved-solute concentrations. Paleoclimate proxy data indicate that a transition from colder to warmer climate conditions is preserved in the stratigraphy. Finally, a late phase of geochemical modification by saline fluids is recognized. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Stratification-Based Outlier Detection over the Deep Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Xuefeng; Zhao, Pengpeng; Sheng, Victor S; Fang, Ligang; Gu, Caidong; Yang, Yuanfeng; Cui, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    For many applications, finding rare instances or outliers can be more interesting than finding common patterns. Existing work in outlier detection never considers the context of deep web. In this paper, we argue that, for many scenarios, it is more meaningful to detect outliers over deep web. In the context of deep web, users must submit queries through a query interface to retrieve corresponding data. Therefore, traditional data mining methods cannot be directly applied. The primary contribution of this paper is to develop a new data mining method for outlier detection over deep web. In our approach, the query space of a deep web data source is stratified based on a pilot sample. Neighborhood sampling and uncertainty sampling are developed in this paper with the goal of improving recall and precision based on stratification. Finally, a careful performance evaluation of our algorithm confirms that our approach can effectively detect outliers in deep web.

  15. Redox stratification of an ancient lake in Gale crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurowitz, J. A.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Fischer, W. W.; McLennan, S. M.; Milliken, R. E.; Stein, N.; Vasavada, A. R.; Blake, D. F.; Dehouck, E.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Fairén, A. G.; Frydenvang, J.; Gellert, R.; Grant, J. A.; Gupta, S.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; Schmidt, M. E.; Siebach, K. L.; Stack-Morgan, K.; Sumner, D. Y.; Wiens, R. C.

    2017-06-01

    In 2012, NASA's Curiosity rover landed on Mars to assess its potential as a habitat for past life and investigate the paleoclimate record preserved by sedimentary rocks inside the ~150-kilometer-diameter Gale impact crater. Geological reconstructions from Curiosity rover data have revealed an ancient, habitable lake environment fed by rivers draining into the crater. We synthesize geochemical and mineralogical data from lake-bed mudstones collected during the first 1300 martian solar days of rover operations in Gale. We present evidence for lake redox stratification, established by depth-dependent variations in atmospheric oxidant and dissolved-solute concentrations. Paleoclimate proxy data indicate that a transition from colder to warmer climate conditions is preserved in the stratigraphy. Finally, a late phase of geochemical modification by saline fluids is recognized.

  16. Early risk stratification in pediatric type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    in HbA1c was either too small or happened too late. This study highlights that sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy remain a major concern in type 1 diabetes and the importance of early glycemic control. Identifying high-risk patients at a very early stage is not only desired for prevention...... of diabetic retinopathy - neuropathy and nephropathy similarly remain frequent in type 1 diabetes. Early risk stratification will allow for timely implementation of effective interventions and for individualized screening and diabetes care. The second and third studies of this thesis provide the longest...... prospective studies to date on both retinal vessel calibers and retinal fractal dimensions and their predictive value on diabetic microvascular complications. Semi-automated computer software has been developed to measure smaller changes in the retinal vessels on retinal photographs. Two of the first...

  17. Stratification in Business and Agriculture Surveys with R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ballin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Usually sample surveys on enterprises and farms adopt a one stage stratified sampling design. In practice the sampling frame is divided in non-overlapping strata and simple random sampling is carried out independently in each stratum. Stratification allows for reduction of the sampling error and permits to derive accurate estimates. Stratified sampling requires a number of decisions strictly related: (i how to stratify the population and how many strata to consider; (ii the size of the whole sample and corresponding partitioning among the strata (so called allocation. This paper will deal mainly with the problem (i and will show how to tackle it in the R environment using packages already available on the CRAN.

  18. Thermal-hydraulic characteristics in a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor hot plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, N.; Moriya, S.; Wada, A.

    1984-01-01

    The most important problem in the thermal-hydraulic designs of the pool-type fast breeder reactor is to estimate the thermal conditions affecting the vessel and/or internal structures during both steady and transient operations. The severity of these conditions in the Japanese pool-type reactor, which will be reinforced and equipped with special devices for seismic demands, is apt to be much greater than for other countries. Water tests and thermal-hydraulic analyses have been performed to study such conditions. The effects of the elevations of upper internal structure discharge and intermediate heat exchanger intakes on flow patterns, free surface disturbance, and thermal stratification in the hot plenum have been estimated. From the results of the experiments, suitable elevations could be recommended by comparing some thermal-hydraulic characteristics. The calculations agreed well with the experimental results for the steady-state flow patterns and thermal transients, with the exception of thermal stratification

  19. Thermal hydraulic research on next generation PWRs using ROSA/LSTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonomoto, T.; Anoda, Y.

    2000-01-01

    A thermal-hydraulic research on next generation PWRs has been conducted at JAERI using the ROSA-V/Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF), focusing on phenomena related to passive safety systems. This paper describes two test results conducted for this research: a small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) test and a low pressure steady-state natural circulation (NC) test. The former test investigated a combined use of a SG secondary-side automatic depressurization system (SADS) and a gravity-driven injection system (GDIS) to mitigate a SBLOCA. The results have shown that the primary loop can be depressurized to the GDIS actuation pressure of 0.2 MPa by the SADS alone, and then the stable long-term core cooling can be established by NC. Results of both tests showed a complicated nonuniform flow behavior among SG U-tubes during NC, which was characterized by the coexistence of concurrent condensing two-phase flow in some tubes and stagnant two-phase stratification in the others. The mechanism for the stratification was understood from the measured secondary side temperature distribution showing the lowest temperature at the top and bottom regions and the highest around the midplane. This was caused by the saturation temperature difference corresponding to the static pressure difference, and the recirculation in the secondary. This secondary side temperature distribution enabled the condensation occurring around the tube top to be balanced with evaporation occurring around the midplane in the U-tube with the stratification. Since the heat transfer occurs primarily through tubes with the concurrent flow, the nonuniform behavior directly affects the effective heat transfer area at SG. When the SG primary side was modeled with one lumped flow channel, the RELAP5 significantly over predicted the primary depressurization rate, and could not predict the stable long-term core cooling behavior at low pressure. In order to understand the mechanism of the nonuniform behavior, the

  20. Rumen content stratification in the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Cathrine; Clauss, Marcus; Bertelsen, Mads F; Weisbjerg, Martin R; Lund, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Ruminants differ in the degree of rumen content stratification, with 'cattle-types' (i.e., the grazing and intermediate feeding ruminants) having stratified content, whereas 'moose-types' (i.e., the browsing ruminants) have unstratified content. The feeding ecology, as well as the digestive morphophysiology of the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis), suggest that it is a 'moose-type' ruminant. Correspondingly, the giraffe should have an unstratified rumen content and an even rumen papillation pattern. Digesta samples were collected from along the digestive tract of 27 wild-caught giraffes kept in bomas for up to 2months, and 10 giraffes kept in zoological gardens throughout their lives. Samples were analysed for concentration of dry matter, fibre fractions, volatile fatty acids and NH 3 , as well as mean particle size and pH. There was no difference between the dorsal and ventral rumen region in any of these parameters, indicating homogenous rumen content in the giraffes. In addition to the digesta samples, samples of dorsal rumen, ventral rumen and atrium ruminis mucosa were collected and the papillary surface enlargement factor was determined, as a proxy for content stratification. The even rumen papillation pattern observed also supported the concept of an unstratified rumen content in giraffes. Zoo giraffes had a slightly more uneven papillation pattern than boma giraffes. This finding could not be matched by differences in physical characteristics of the rumen content, probably due to an influence of fasting time ante mortem on these parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Horizontal Stratification in Access to Danish University Programs by Institution and Field of Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Martin D.; Thomsen, Jens Peter

    2012-01-01

    to be important: the degree of social stratification in different fields of study − separating applied from more classical disciplines − and the degree of social stratification prevalent at the university institution − whether it has a liberal arts, classical university profile or one that favors more applied...

  2. Economic Stratification Differentiates Home Gardens in the Maya Village of Pomuch, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poot-Pool, W.S.; Wal, van der J.C.; Flores-Guido, S.; Pat-Fernández, J.M.; Esparza-Olguín, L.

    2012-01-01

    Economic Stratification Differentiates Home Gardens in the Maya Village of Pomuch, Mexico. In this paper, we analyze if economic stratification of peasant families in a Maya village in the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico influences species composition and structure of home gardens. Our general

  3. Monitoring of coolant temperature stratification on piping components in WWER-440 NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudcovsky, S.; Slanina, M.; Badiar, S.

    2001-01-01

    The presentation deals with the aims of non-standard temperature measurements installed on primary and secondary circuit in WWER-440 NPPs, explains reasons of coolant temperature stratification on the piping components. It describes methods of the measurements on pipings, range of installation of the temperature measurements in EBO and EMO units and illustrates results of measurements of coolant temperature stratification. (Authors)

  4. "That's Not Fair!": A Simulation Exercise in Social Stratification and Structural Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghlan, Catherine L.; Huggins, Denise W.

    2004-01-01

    Social stratification may be one of the most difficult topics covered in sociology classes. This article describes an interactive learning exercise, using a modified version of the game Monopoly, intended to stress the structural nature of social inequality and to stimulate student reflection and class discussion on social stratification in the…

  5. Thermal performance of marketed SDHW systems under laboratory conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Andersen, Elsa; Fan, Jianhua

    A test facility for solar domestic hot water systems, SDHW systems was established at the Technical University of Denmark in 1992. During the period 1992-2012 21 marketed SDHW systems, 16 systems from Danish manufacturers and 5 systems from manufacturers from abroad, have been tested in the test...... comfort, avoiding simple errors, using the low flow principle and heat stores with a high degree of thermal stratification and by using components with good thermal characteristics....

  6. Thermal instability in a stratified plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermanns, D.F.M.; Priest, E.R.

    1989-01-01

    The thermal instability mechansism has been studied in connection to observed coronal features, like, e.g. prominences or cool cores in loops. Although these features show a lot of structure, most studies concern the thermal instability in an uniform medium. In this paper, we investigate the thermal instability and the interaction between thermal modes and the slow magneto-acoustic subspectrum for a stratified plasma slab. We fomulate the relevant system of equations and give some straightforward properties of the linear spectrum of a non-uniform plasma slab, i.e. the existence of continuous parts in the spectrum. We present a numerical scheme with which we can investigate the linear spectrum for equilibrium states with stratification. The slow and thermal subspectra of a crude coronal model are given as a preliminary result. (author). 6 refs.; 1 fig

  7. Stable isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibari, Elghali; Taous, Fouad; Marah, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    This report presents results related to stable isotopes analysis carried out at the CNESTEN DASTE in Rabat (Morocco), on behalf of Senegal. These analyzes cover 127 samples. These results demonstrate that Oxygen-18 and Deuterium in water analysis were performed by infrared Laser spectroscopy using a LGR / DLT-100 with Autosampler. Also, the results are expressed in δ values (‰) relative to V-SMOW to ± 0.3 ‰ for oxygen-18 and ± 1 ‰ for deuterium.

  8. A two-compartment thermal-hydraulic experiment (LACE-LA4) analyzed by ESCADRE code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passalacqua, R.

    1994-01-01

    Large scale experiments show that whenever a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) occurs, water pools are generated. Stratifications of steam saturated gas develop above water pools causing a two-compartment thermal-hydraulics. The LACE (LWR Advanced Containment Experiment) LA4 experiment, performed at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL), exhibited a strong stratification, at all times, above a growing water pool. JERICHO and AEROSOLS-B2 are part of the ESCADRE code system (Ensemble de Systemes de Codes d'Analyse d'accident Des Reacteurs A Eau), a tool for evaluating the response of a nuclear plant to severe accidents. These two codes are here used to simulate respectively the thermal-hydraulics and the associated aerosol behavior. Code results have shown that modelling large containment thermal-hydraulics without taking account of the stratification phenomenon leads to large overpredictions of containment pressure and temperature. If the stratification is modelled as a zone with a higher steam condensation rate and a higher thermal resistance, ESCADRE predictions match quite well experimental data. The stratification thermal-hydraulics is controlled by power (heat fluxes) repartition in the lower compartment between the water pool and the nearby walls. Therefore the total, direct heat exchange between the two compartment is reduced. Stratification modelling is believed to be important for its influence on aerosol behavior: aerosol deposition through the inter-face of the two subcompartments is improved by diffusiophoresis and thermophoresis. In addition the aerosol concentration gradient, through the stratification, will cause a driving force for motion of smaller particles towards the pool. (author)

  9. Prognostic Determinants of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: Anatomy, Physiology, or Morphology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Amir; Stone, Gregg W; Leipsic, Jonathon; Shaw, Leslee J; Villines, Todd C; Kern, Morton J; Hecht, Harvey; Erlinge, David; Ben-Yehuda, Ori; Maehara, Akiko; Arbustini, Eloisa; Serruys, Patrick; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Narula, Jagat

    2016-07-08

    Risk stratification in patients with stable ischemic heart disease is essential to guide treatment decisions. In this regard, whether coronary anatomy, physiology, or plaque morphology is the best determinant of prognosis (and driver an effective therapeutic risk reduction) remains one of the greatest ongoing debates in cardiology. In the present report, we review the evidence for each of these characteristics and explore potential algorithms that may enable a practical diagnostic and therapeutic strategy for the management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  11. Risk stratification in hypertension: new insights from the Framingham Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannel, W B

    2000-01-01

    hypertensive men and 5% of those in hypertensive women occurred in the absence of additional risk factors. Other important features of risk stratification of hypertension are the presence of an elevated heart rate and left ventricular hypertrophy, and an elevated fibrinogen that often accompany hypertension. Recent population-based data reported suggest that elevated renin accompanying hypertension may independently enhance the risk of coronary events. Because clustering of other major risk factors with hypertension is the rule, the prudent physician should routinely screen for the presence of these other factors. Multivariate risk assessment profiles are now available for coronary disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease, and heart failure, to enable physicians to pool all the relevant risk factor information so as to arrive at a composite risk estimate. Hypertensive patients are more appropriately targeted for therapy by such risk stratification and the goal of the therapy should be to improve the multivariate risk profile.

  12. Vertical stratification of the termite assemblage in a neotropical rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roisin, Yves; Dejean, Alain; Corbara, Bruno; Orivel, Jerôme; Samaniego, Mirna; Leponce, Maurice

    2006-08-01

    The importance of termites as decomposers in tropical forests has long been recognized. Studies on the richness and diversity of termite species and their ecological function have flourished in more recent times, but these have been mostly conducted in a thin stratum within a standing man's reach. Our aims were to evaluate the specific richness and composition of the termite assemblage in the canopy of a tropical rainforest and to determine its originality with respect to the sympatric ground-level fauna. We conducted systematic searches for canopy termites, together with conventional sampling of the sympatric ground-level fauna, in the San Lorenzo forest, Panama. We hypothesized that (1) the canopy accommodates two categories of wood-feeding termites (long-distance foragers and small-colony "one-piece" species) and possibly soil-feeders in suspended soil-like habitats; (2) due to the abundance of soil-feeders, the overall diversity of the ground fauna is higher than that of the canopy; (3) differences in microclimate and resource accessibility favour vertical stratification among wood-feeders. Sixty-three canopy samples yielded ten species of termites, all wood-feeders. Five of these were not found at ground level, although a total of 243 ground samples were collected, representing 29 species. In addition to long-distance foragers (Microcerotermes and Nasutitermes spp.) and small-colony termites (mostly Kalotermitidae), the canopy fauna included Termes hispaniolae, a wood-feeding Termitidae from an allegedly soil-feeding genus, living in large dead branches. Soil-feeders were absent from the canopy, probably because large epiphytes were scarce. As predicted, the ground fauna was much richer than that of the canopy, but the species richness of both habitats was similar when only wood-feeders were considered. Vertical stratification was strongly marked among wood-feeders, as all common species, apart from the arboreal-nesting Microcerotermes arboreus, could

  13. Revealing the timing of ocean stratification using remotely sensed ocean fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Peter I.; Loveday, Benjamin R.

    2017-10-01

    Stratification is of critical importance to the circulation, mixing and productivity of the ocean, and is expected to be modified by climate change. Stratification is also understood to affect the surface aggregation of pelagic fish and hence the foraging behaviour and distribution of their predators such as seabirds and cetaceans. Hence it would be prudent to monitor the stratification of the global ocean, though this is currently only possible using in situ sampling, profiling buoys or underwater autonomous vehicles. Earth observation (EO) sensors cannot directly detect stratification, but can observe surface features related to the presence of stratification, for example shelf-sea fronts that separate tidally-mixed water from seasonally stratified water. This paper describes a novel algorithm that accumulates evidence for stratification from a sequence of oceanic front maps, and discusses preliminary results in comparison with in situ data and simulations from 3D hydrodynamic models. In certain regions, this method can reveal the timing of the seasonal onset and breakdown of stratification.

  14. Variability of stratification according to operation of the tidal power plant in Lake Sihwa, South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, S. B.; Song, J. I.; Jang, T. H.; Park, C. J.; Kwon, H. K.

    2017-12-01

    Artificial forcing according to operation of the tidal power plant (TPP) affects the physical environmental changes near the power plant. Strong turbulence by generation is expected to change the stratification structure of the Lake Sihwa inside. In order to examine the stratification changes by the power plant operation, ship bottom mounted observation were performed for 13 hours using an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) and Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) in Lake Sihwa at near TPP. The strong stratification in Sihwa Lake is maintained before TPP operation. The absence of external forces and freshwater inflow from the land forms the stratification in the Lake. Strong winds in a stratification statement lead to two-layer circulation. After wind event, multi-layer velocity structure is formed which lasted for approximately 4 h. After TPP operation, the jet flow was observed in entire water column at the beginning of the power generation. Vortex is formed by strong jet flow and maintained throughout during power generation period. Strong turbulence flow is generated by the turbine blades, enhancing vertical mixing. External forces, which dominantly affect Lake Sihwa, have changed from the wind to the turbulent flow. The stratification was extinguished by strong turbulent flow and becomes fully-mixed state. Changes in stratification structure are expected to affect material transport and ecological environment change continuously.

  15. Electrocardiologic and related methods of non-invasive detection and risk stratification in myocardial ischemia: state of the art and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seeck, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electrocardiographic methods still provide the bulk of cardiovascular diagnostics. Cardiac ischemia is associated with typical alterations in cardiac biosignals that have to be measured, analyzed by mathematical algorithms and allegorized for further clinical diagnostics. The fast growing fields of biomedical engineering and applied sciences are intensely focused on generating new approaches to cardiac biosignal analysis for diagnosis and risk stratification in myocardial ischemia. Objectives: To present and review the state of the art in and new approaches to electrocardiologic methods for non-invasive detection and risk stratification in coronary artery disease (CAD and myocardial ischemia; secondarily, to explore the future perspectives of these methods. Methods: In follow-up to the Expert Discussion at the 2008 Workshop on "Biosignal Analysis" of the German Society of Biomedical Engineering in Potsdam, Germany, we comprehensively searched the pertinent literature and databases and compiled the results into this review. Then, we categorized the state-of-the-art methods and selected new approaches based on their applications in detection and risk stratification of myocardial ischemia. Finally, we compared the pros and cons of the methods and explored their future potentials for cardiology. Results: Resting ECG, particularly suited for detecting ST-elevation myocardial infarctions, and exercise ECG, for the diagnosis of stable CAD, are state-of-the-art methods. New exercise-free methods for detecting stable CAD include cardiogoniometry (CGM; methods for detecting acute coronary syndrome without ST elevation are Body Surface Potential Mapping, functional imaging and CGM. Heart rate variability and blood pressure variability analyses, microvolt T-wave alternans and signal-averaged ECG mainly serve in detecting and stratifying the risk for lethal arrythmias in patients with myocardial ischemia or previous myocardial infarctions

  16. Thermal energy storage material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, Leslie

    1976-01-01

    A thermal energy storage material which is stable at atmospheric temperature and pressure and has a melting point higher than 32.degree.F. is prepared by dissolving a specific class of clathrate forming compounds, such as tetra n-propyl or tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride, in water to form a substantially solid clathrate. The resultant thermal energy storage material is capable of absorbing heat from or releasing heat to a given region as it transforms between solid and liquid states in response to temperature changes in the region above and below its melting point.

  17. Internal wave energy flux from density perturbations in nonlinear stratifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Frank M.; Allshouse, Michael R.; Swinney, Harry L.; Morrison, P. J.

    2017-11-01

    Tidal flow over the topography at the bottom of the ocean, whose density varies with depth, generates internal gravity waves that have a significant impact on the energy budget of the ocean. Thus, understanding the energy flux (J = p v) is important, but it is difficult to measure simultaneously the pressure and velocity perturbation fields, p and v . In a previous work, a Green's-function-based method was developed to calculate the instantaneous p, v , and thus J , given a density perturbation field for a constant buoyancy frequency N. Here we extend the previous analytic Green's function work to include nonuniform N profiles, namely the tanh-shaped and linear cases, because background density stratifications that occur in the ocean and some experiments are nonlinear. In addition, we present a finite-difference method for the general case where N has an arbitrary profile. Each method is validated against numerical simulations. The methods we present can be applied to measured density perturbation data by using our MATLAB graphical user interface EnergyFlux. PJM was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-FG05-80ET-53088. HLS and MRA were supported by ONR Grant No. N000141110701.

  18. Clinical outcome and risk stratification in Brugada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Wada, MD

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the first report on Brugada syndrome, various risk markers for the prediction of ventricular fibrillation (VF in patients with Brugada syndrome have been reported. Multicenter trials reported spontaneous type 1 electrocardiogram (ECG and disease symptoms as prognostic predictors. VF induction by programmed electrical stimulation is still controversial, and most of the studies have failed to prove its significance for the prediction of spontaneous VF episodes. In Japan, although most multicenter studies have shown that patients with type 1 ECG were at high risk, it is difficult to determine the indication for implantation of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator only based on the ECG type. Recent studies have added new risk markers, such as inferolateral early repolarization, fragmented QRS, and shorter effective refractory periods of the ventricle, in addition to type 1 ECG and symptoms. Here, we review the clinical outcome and indices reported as reliable prognostic factors of Brugada syndrome with a focus on the clinical and ECG markers for risk stratification.

  19. STELLAR CONTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS IN THE AGE OF CHEMICAL STRATIFICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Charles; Sheminova, Valya; Castelli, Fiorella; Monier, Richard

    2018-01-01

    Contribution functions (CF's) were important tools to probe formation depths of features in the early numerical calculations of analytical stellar spectroscopy. In more recent work, CF's have played a minor role. Gray's (2005) text briefly discusses CF's, but CF's are not in Hubeny and Mihalas (2015). Gurtovenko and Sheminova (2015) give an extensive review of contribution functions in a recent preprint (arXiv:1505.00975). The realization that the atmospheres of certain stars are chemically stratified (Ryabchikova, Wade \\& LeBlanc, 2003, in IAU Symp. 210), and much subsequent work makes CF's of current interest. We employ new as well as older methods to compute CF's to find important layers, either for specific intensity or line depth for various points on the line profile. The most important layer is the one that causes the biggest change in the magnitude of the feature when the line absorption coefficient is set equal to zero for successive layers. This is readily done for a stratified or unstratified model. For an equivalent width, W, we calculate $(W-W_i/W) $, where $W_i$ is the equivalent width without absorption from the $i^th$ layer. We concentrate on cases where stratification is most obvious, for example, the Ca II K-line profile in the roAp stars and HR 6000 (Castelli, et al. 2017, A\\&A, 601, A119).

  20. Hepatitis B virus reactivation during immunosuppressive therapy: Appropriate risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Wai-Kay

    2015-04-28

    Our understanding of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation during immunosuppresive therapy has increased remarkably during recent years. HBV reactivation in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive individuals has been well-described in certain immunosuppressive regimens, including therapies containing corticosteroids, anthracyclines, rituximab, antibody to tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HBV reactivation could also occur in HBsAg-negative, antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) positive individuals during therapies containing rituximab, anti-TNF or HSCT.For HBsAg-positive patients, prophylactic antiviral therapy is proven to the effective in preventing HBV reactivation. Recent evidence also demonstrated entecavir to be more effective than lamivudine in this aspect. For HBsAg-negative, anti-HBc positive individuals, the risk of reactivations differs with the type of immunosuppression. For rituximab, a prospective study demonstrated the 2-year cumulative risk of reactivation to be 41.5%, but prospective data is still lacking for other immunosupressive regimes. The optimal management in preventing HBV reactivation would involve appropriate risk stratification for different immunosuppressive regimes in both HBsAg-positive and HBsAg-negative, anti-HBc positive individuals.

  1. Disadvantaged through discrimination? The role of employers in social stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Michelle

    2009-12-01

    Sociologists have consistently demonstrated that a rather strong association exists between an individual's social class origin and their social class destination, even after controlling for educational attainment. One explanation for this persisting association which is rarely addressed in research in social stratification and mobility is the extent to which class inequalities in access to advantaged class positions are due to discrimination by employers. I set up a field experiment to test whether employers discriminate on the basis of class origin characteristics. I sent letters of job application for professional and managerial occupations to 2560 large UK companies, so as to compare the prospects of equally matched potential employees differing on a range of characteristics, some related to class of origin. The six treatment conditions in the experiment were: the name of the candidate, the type of school attended, the candidate's interests outside work, their sex, the university that they attended and their achieved degree class. Results suggest that employers do pay attention to the class origin characteristics tested here, and that candidates with a name, school type and interests associated with the social elite are more likely to receive a reply to their application than candidates with the equivalent non-elite characteristics. However, the treatment conditions do not, on the whole, have significant effects on the employers' responses in and of themselves. Instead, employers appear to favour particular combinations of characteristics while penalising others.

  2. An Interoperable System toward Cardiac Risk Stratification from ECG Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Ramos-López, Javier; Quintanilla Fernández, Teresa; García-García, Antonio; Díez-Mazuela, Daniel; García-Alberola, Arcadi

    2018-01-01

    Many indices have been proposed for cardiovascular risk stratification from electrocardiogram signal processing, still with limited use in clinical practice. We created a system integrating the clinical definition of cardiac risk subdomains from ECGs and the use of diverse signal processing techniques. Three subdomains were defined from the joint analysis of the technical and clinical viewpoints. One subdomain was devoted to demographic and clinical data. The other two subdomains were intended to obtain widely defined risk indices from ECG monitoring: a simple-domain (heart rate turbulence (HRT)), and a complex-domain (heart rate variability (HRV)). Data provided by the three subdomains allowed for the generation of alerts with different intensity and nature, as well as for the grouping and scrutinization of patients according to the established processing and risk-thresholding criteria. The implemented system was tested by connecting data from real-world in-hospital electronic health records and ECG monitoring by considering standards for syntactic (HL7 messages) and semantic interoperability (archetypes based on CEN/ISO EN13606 and SNOMED-CT). The system was able to provide risk indices and to generate alerts in the health records to support decision-making. Overall, the system allows for the agile interaction of research and clinical practice in the Holter-ECG-based cardiac risk domain. PMID:29494497

  3. An Interoperable System toward Cardiac Risk Stratification from ECG Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Soguero-Ruiz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Many indices have been proposed for cardiovascular risk stratification from electrocardiogram signal processing, still with limited use in clinical practice. We created a system integrating the clinical definition of cardiac risk subdomains from ECGs and the use of diverse signal processing techniques. Three subdomains were defined from the joint analysis of the technical and clinical viewpoints. One subdomain was devoted to demographic and clinical data. The other two subdomains were intended to obtain widely defined risk indices from ECG monitoring: a simple-domain (heart rate turbulence (HRT, and a complex-domain (heart rate variability (HRV. Data provided by the three subdomains allowed for the generation of alerts with different intensity and nature, as well as for the grouping and scrutinization of patients according to the established processing and risk-thresholding criteria. The implemented system was tested by connecting data from real-world in-hospital electronic health records and ECG monitoring by considering standards for syntactic (HL7 messages and semantic interoperability (archetypes based on CEN/ISO EN13606 and SNOMED-CT. The system was able to provide risk indices and to generate alerts in the health records to support decision-making. Overall, the system allows for the agile interaction of research and clinical practice in the Holter-ECG-based cardiac risk domain.

  4. The influence of viscosity stratification on boundary-layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin; Jung, Seo Yoon; Sung, Hyung Jin; Zaki, Tamer A.

    2012-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows over isothermally-heated walls were performed to investigate the influence of viscosity stratification on boundary-layer turbulence and drag. The adopted model for temperature-dependent viscosity was typical of water. The free-stream temperature was set to 30°C, and two wall temperatures, 70°C and 99°C, were simulated. In the heated flows, the mean shear-rate is enhanced near the wall and reduced in the buffer region, which induces a reduction in turbulence production. On the other hand, the turbulence dissipation is enhanced near the wall, despite the the reduction in fluid viscosity. The higher dissipation is attributed to a decrease in the smallest length scales and near-wall fine-scale motions. The combined effect of the reduced production and enhanced dissipation leads to lower Reynolds shear stresses and, as a result, reduction of the skin-friction coefficient. Supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (Grant EP/F034997/1) and partially supported by the Erasmus Mundus Build on Euro-Asian Mobility (EM-BEAM) programme.

  5. Risk stratification for implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy: the role of the wearable cardioverter-defibrillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Helmut U; Goldenberg, Ilan; Moss, Arthur J

    2013-08-01

    The benefit of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy depends upon appropriate evaluation of a persisting risk of sudden death and estimation of the patient's overall survival. Assessment of a stable and unchangeable arrhythmogenic substrate is often difficult. Structural abnormality and ventricular dysfunction, the two major risk parameters, may recover, and heart failure symptoms can improve so that ICD therapy may not be indicated. Risk stratification can take time while the patient continues to be at high risk of arrhythmic death, and patients may need temporary bridging by a defibrillator in cases of interrupted ICD therapy. The wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) combines a long-term electrocardiogram (ECG)-monitoring system with an external automatic defibrillator. The LIfeVest® (ZOLL, Pittsburgh, PA, USA) is composed of a garment, containing two defibrillation patch electrodes on the back, and an elastic belt with a front-defibrillation patch electrode and four non-adhesive ECG electrodes, connected to a monitoring and defibrillation unit. The WCD is a safe and effective tool to terminate ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation events, unless a conscious patient withholds shock delivery. It may be used in patients in the early phase after acute myocardial infarction with poor left ventricular function, after acute coronary revascularization procedures (percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass grafting) and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (≤35%), in patients with acute heart failure in non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy of uncertain aetiology and prognosis. The WCD may be helpful in subjects with syncope of assumed tachyarrhythmia origin or in patients with inherited arrhythmia syndromes. The WCD may replace ICD implantation in patients waiting for heart transplantation or who need a ventricular-assist device. This review describes the technical details and characteristics of the WCD, discusses its

  6. Marginally Stable Nuclear Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Altamirano, D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts result from unstable nuclear burning of the material accreted on neutron stars in some low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Theory predicts that close to the boundary of stability oscillatory burning can occur. This marginally stable regime has so far been identified in only a small number of sources. We present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bursting, high- inclination LMXB 4U 1323-619 that reveal for the first time in this source the signature of marginally stable burning. The source was observed during two successive RXTE orbits for approximately 5 ksec beginning at 10:14:01 UTC on March 28, 2011. Significant mHz quasi- periodic oscillations (QPO) at a frequency of 8.1 mHz are detected for approximately 1600 s from the beginning of the observation until the occurrence of a thermonuclear X-ray burst at 10:42:22 UTC. The mHz oscillations are not detected following the X-ray burst. The average fractional rms amplitude of the mHz QPOs is 6.4% (3 - 20 keV), and the amplitude increases to about 8% below 10 keV.This phenomenology is strikingly similar to that seen in the LMXB 4U 1636-53. Indeed, the frequency of the mHz QPOs in 4U 1323-619 prior to the X-ray burst is very similar to the transition frequency between mHz QPO and bursts found in 4U 1636-53 by Altamirano et al. (2008). These results strongly suggest that the observed QPOs in 4U 1323-619 are, like those in 4U 1636-53, due to marginally stable nuclear burning. We also explore the dependence of the energy spectrum on the oscillation phase, and we place the present observations within the context of the spectral evolution of the accretion-powered flux from the source.

  7. The production of stable isotopes in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urgel, M.; Iglesias, J.; Casas, J.; Saviron, J. M.; Quintanilla, M.

    1965-07-01

    The activities developed in the field of the production of stable isotopes by means of ion-exchange chromatography and thermal diffusion techniques are reported. The first method was used to study the separation of the nitrogen and boron isotopes, whereby the separation factor was determined by the break through method. Values ranging from 1,028 to 1,022 were obtained for the separation factor of nitrogen by using ammonium hydroxide solutions while the corresponding values as obtained for boron amounted to 1,035-1,027 using boric acid solutions. Using ammonium chloride or acetate and sodium borate, respectively, resulted in the obtention of values for the separation factor approaching unity. The isotopic separation has been carried out according to the method of development by displacement. The separation of the isotopes of the noble gases, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon has been accomplished resorting to the method of thermal diffusion. (Author) 16 refs.

  8. The production of stable isotopes in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urgel, M.; Iglesias, J.; Casas, J.; Saviron, J. M.; Quintanilla, M.

    1965-01-01

    The activities developed in the field of the production of stable isotopes by means of ion-exchange chromatography and thermal diffusion techniques are reported. The first method was used to study the separation of the nitrogen and boron isotopes, whereby the separation factor was determined by the break through method. Values ranging from 1,028 to 1,022 were obtained for the separation factor of nitrogen by using ammonium hydroxide solutions while the corresponding values as obtained for boron amounted to 1,035-1,027 using boric acid solutions. Using ammonium chloride or acetate and sodium borate, respectively, resulted in the obtention of values for the separation factor approaching unity. The isotopic separation has been carried out according to the method of development by displacement. The separation of the isotopes of the noble gases, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon has been accomplished resorting to the method of thermal diffusion. (Author) 16 refs

  9. Risk stratification of patients suspected of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper M; Voss, Mette; Hansen, Vibeke Bøgelund

    2012-01-01

    To compare the performance of five risk models (Diamond-Forrester, the updated Diamond-Forrester, Morise, Duke, and a new model designated COronary Risk SCORE (CORSCORE) in predicting significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with chest pain suggestive of stable angina pectoris....

  10. Summer microbial community composition governed by upper-ocean stratification and nutrient availability in northern Marguerite Bay, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozema, Patrick D.; Biggs, Tristan; Sprong, Pim A. A.; Buma, Anita G. J.; Venables, Hugh J.; Evans, Claire; Meredith, Michael P.; Bolhuis, Henk

    2017-05-01

    The Western Antarctic Peninsula warmed significantly during the second half of the twentieth century, with a concurrent retreat of the majority of its glaciers, and marked changes in the sea-ice field. These changes may affect summertime upper-ocean stratification, and thereby the seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton and bacteria. In the present study, we examined coastal Antarctic microbial community dynamics by pigment analysis and applying molecular tools, and analysed various environmental parameters to identify the most important environmental drivers. Sampling focussed on the austral summer of 2009-2010 at the Rothera oceanographic and biological Time Series (RaTS) site in northern Marguerite bay, Antarctica. The Antarctic summer was characterized by a salinity decrease (measured at 15 m depth) coinciding with increased meteoric water fraction. Maximum Chl-a values of 35 μg l-1 were observed during midsummer and mainly comprised of diatoms. Microbial community fingerprinting revealed four distinct periods in phytoplankton succession during the summer while bacteria showed a delayed response to the phytoplankton community. Non-metric multidimensional scaling analyses showed that phytoplankton community dynamics were mainly directed by temperature, mixed layer depth and wind speed. Both high and low N/P ratios might have influenced phytoplankton biomass accumulation. The bacterioplankton community composition was mainly governed by Chl-a, suggesting a link to phytoplankton community changes. High-throughput 16S and 18S rRNA amplicon sequencing revealed stable eukaryotic and bacterial communities with regards to observed species, yet varying temporal relative contributions. Eukaryotic sequences were dominated by pennate diatoms in December followed by polar centric diatoms in January and February. Our results imply that the reduction of mixed layer depth during summer, caused by meltwater-related surface stratification, promotes a succession in diatoms rather

  11. Signature of the Core Stratification in Pulsating White Dwarfs and Tests of Seismic Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpinet, S.; Giammichele, N.; Brassard, P.; Fontaine, G.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss and illustrate how the C/O stratification in the core of white dwarf stars affects their g-mode pulsation spectrum. This effect, mostly occurring through the interplay of partial wave reflection (mode trapping), leaves a subtle but detectable signature, in particular with now available ultra high precision photometry from space, that could be exploited to infer the main structures in this stratification. We provide tests demonstrating that asteroseismology can indeed be used, in some cases, to probe the innermost composition stratification of pulsating white dwarfs. This brings interesting prospects to constrain the core chemical stratification inherited from previous evolutionary phases, which is one of the most uncertain aspect of white dwarf internal structure.

  12. Prediction Model and Risk Stratification Tool for Survival in Patients With CKD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Goldfarb-Rumyantzev

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: The risk stratification tool and prediction model of 2-year mortality demonstrated good performance and may be used in clinical practice to quantify the risk of death for individual patients with CKD.

  13. The material and the symbolic in theorizing social stratification: issues of gender, ethnicity and class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthias, F

    2001-09-01

    Within most approaches to stratification gender and ethnicity are seen to pertain primarily to the symbolic or cultural realms, whilst class is regarded as pertaining to material inequality. This constructs gender and ethnic positioning as entailing honour, deference, worth, value and differential treatment (sometimes expressed through the notion of 'status'), but the social relations around these are themselves not seen as constitutive of social stratification. In this paper I will rethink social stratification away from the polarity between the material and the symbolic, and argue that material inequality, as a set of outcomes relating to life conditions, life chances and solidary processes, is informed by claims and struggles over resources of different types, undertaken in terms of gender, ethnicity/race and class. This formulation allows us to include these categorial formations, alongside class, as important elements of social stratification i.e. as determining the allocation of socially valued resources and social places/locations.

  14. Effects of cold-stratification, gibberellic acid and potassium nitrate on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of cold-stratification, gibberellic acid and potassium nitrate on seed germination of yellow gentian (Gentiana lutea L.) Fadil Millaku, Bekim Gashi, Kasamedin Abdullai, Sali Aliu, Mirsade Osmani, Elez Krasniqi, Valbona Mata, Agim Rysha ...

  15. Seasonal stratification and property distributions in a tropical estuary (Cochin estuary, west coast, India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shivaprasad, A; Vinita, J.; Revichandran, C; Reny, P.D.; Deepak, M.P.; Muraleedharan, K.R; NaveenKumar, K.R

    The intratidal, spring–neap and seasonal variations in stratification were examined in the Cochin estuary. The observations established a strong connection with the distribution of chemical and biological properties. The influence of tides and river...

  16. Stable isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botter, F.; Molinari, Ph.; Dirian, G.

    1964-01-01

    Pure deuterium has been separated from gaseous mixtures of hydrogen and deuterium by band displacement chromatography, using columns of palladium on a support. The best results were obtained with columns of Pd on sintered α alumina. With a column of this type, of total capacity about 2 liters, a preparative apparatus of low dead volume has been built which produces 1 liter of pure D 2 from a 50 p. 100 D 2 , 50 p. 100 100 H 2 mixture in about 12 minutes. As a first approximation chromatography is likened theoretically to counter current fractionation, neglecting superficial resistance to the exchange. and also longitudinal diffusions. The number of theoretical plates required necessary for a certain enrichment of the gas phase is determined graphically or by calculation, enabling comparisons to be made between the efficiencies of columns containing different amounts of palladium. Thermal Diffusion: For the separation of hydrogen isotopes a thermal diffusion installation, made of stainless steel and entirely tele-commanded has been constructed. The separation cascade is made up of two identical pairs of hot wire columns. Each pair can work separately or they may be connected by a thermosyphon. The temperature of the hot wire is kept at around 1000 deg C by direct current. With this installation, hydrogen samples with a deuterium content lower than o,5 ppm were obtained from a gas originally containing 32 ppm. It was thus possible to prepare tritium of 99,3 p. 100 concentration from gas with an initial content of 6 p. 100. For quantitative separation of xenon enriched five time in 124 Xe by thermal diffusion, two identical cascades were constructed, each consisting of 5 columns, working in parallel and the two being connected by thermosyphon or by a capillary tube linked to a thermal gas oscillation. The central tungsten wire is heated to 1200 deg C. The columns are grouped like cluster of a heat exchanger, in shell of 30 cm diameter through which cooling water

  17. Stratification of Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection by Cellular Immune Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Alice; Whitworth, Hilary; Kottoor, Sherine Hermagild; Niazi, Umar; Menzies, Sarah; Kunst, Heinke; Bremang, Samuel; Badhan, Amarjit; Beverley, Peter; Kon, Onn Min

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Recently acquired and remotely acquired latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are clinically indistinguishable, yet recent acquisition of infection is the greatest risk factor for progression to tuberculosis in immunocompetent individuals. We aimed to evaluate the ability of cellular immune signatures that differ between active tuberculosis and LTBI to distinguish recently from remotely acquired LTBI. Methods. Fifty-nine individuals were recruited: 20 had active tuberculosis, 19 had recently acquired LTBI, and 20 had remotely acquired LTBI. The proportion of mycobacteria-specific CD4+ T cells secreting tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) but not interferon γ or interleukin 2 which had a differentiated effector phenotype (TNF-α–only TEFF), and the level of CD27 expression on IFN-γ–producing CD4+ T cells, were detected by flow cytometry. Results. The TNF-α–only TEFF signature was significantly higher in the group with recently acquired LTBI, compared with the group with remotely acquired LTBI (P < .0001), and it discriminated between these groups with high sensitivity and specificity, with an area under the curve of 0.87. Two signatures incorporating CD27 expression did not distinguish between recently and remotely acquired LTBI. Interestingly, the TNF-α–only TEFF signature in participants with recently acquired LTBI was more similar to that in participants with tuberculosis than that in participants with remotely acquired LTBI, suggesting that recently acquired LTBI is immunologically more similar to tuberculosis than remotely acquired LTBI. Conclusions. These findings reveal marked biological heterogeneity underlying the clinically homogeneous phenotype of LTBI, providing a rationale for immunological risk stratification to improve targeting of LTBI treatment. PMID:28329119

  18. Biomarker-based prognostic stratification of young adult glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-Qi; Shi, Zhifeng; Chen, Hong; Chung, Nellie Yuk-Fei; Yin, Zi; Li, Kay Ka-Wai; Chan, Danny Tat-Ming; Poon, Wai Sang; Wu, Jinsong; Zhou, Liangfu; Chan, Aden Ka-Yin; Mao, Ying; Ng, Ho-Keung

    2016-01-26

    While the predominant elderly and the pediatric glioblastomas have been extensively investigated, young adult glioblastomas were understudied. In this study, we sought to stratify young adult glioblastomas by BRAF, H3F3A and IDH1 mutations and examine the clinical relevance of the biomarkers. In 107 glioblastomas aged from 17 to 35 years, mutually exclusive BRAF-V600E (15%), H3F3A-K27M (15.9%), H3F3A-G34R/V (2.8%) and IDH1-R132H (16.8%) mutations were identified in over half of the cases. EGFR amplification and TERTp mutation were only detected in 3.7% and 8.4% in young adult glioblastomas, respectively. BRAF-V600E identified a clinically favorable subset of glioblastomas with younger age, frequent CDKN2A homozygous deletion, and was more amendable to surgical resection. H3F3A-K27M mutated glioblastomas were tightly associated with midline locations and showed dismal prognosis. IDH1-R132H was associated with older age and favorable outcome. Interestingly, tumors with positive PDGFRA immunohistochemical expression exhibited poorer prognosis and identified an aggressive subset of tumors among K27M mutated glioblastomas. Combining BRAF, H3F3A and IDH1 mutations allowed stratification of young adult glioblastomas into four prognostic subgroups. In summary, our study demonstrates the clinical values of stratifying young adult glioblastomas with BRAF, H3F3A and IDH1 mutations, which has important implications in refining prognostic classification of glioblastomas.

  19. Advanced colorectal neoplasia risk stratification by penalized logistic regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yunzhi; Yu, Menggang; Wang, Sijian; Chappell, Richard; Imperiale, Thomas F

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the United States. To facilitate the efficiency of colorectal cancer screening, there is a need to stratify risk for colorectal cancer among the 90% of US residents who are considered "average risk." In this article, we investigate such risk stratification rules for advanced colorectal neoplasia (colorectal cancer and advanced, precancerous polyps). We use a recently completed large cohort study of subjects who underwent a first screening colonoscopy. Logistic regression models have been used in the literature to estimate the risk of advanced colorectal neoplasia based on quantifiable risk factors. However, logistic regression may be prone to overfitting and instability in variable selection. Since most of the risk factors in our study have several categories, it was tempting to collapse these categories into fewer risk groups. We propose a penalized logistic regression method that automatically and simultaneously selects variables, groups categories, and estimates their coefficients by penalizing the [Formula: see text]-norm of both the coefficients and their differences. Hence, it encourages sparsity in the categories, i.e. grouping of the categories, and sparsity in the variables, i.e. variable selection. We apply the penalized logistic regression method to our data. The important variables are selected, with close categories simultaneously grouped, by penalized regression models with and without the interactions terms. The models are validated with 10-fold cross-validation. The receiver operating characteristic curves of the penalized regression models dominate the receiver operating characteristic curve of naive logistic regressions, indicating a superior discriminative performance. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. Ethiopian population dermatoglyphic study reveals linguistic stratification of diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seile Yohannes

    -divided populations and also to reveal the stratification mechanism in play.