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Sample records for stable soil aggregates

  1. Saturate hydraulic conductivity, water stable aggregates and soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saturate hydraulic conductivity, water stable aggregates and soil organic matter in a sandy-loam soil in Ikwuano lga of Abia state. ... carbon content of the soil. . Keywords: Toposequence, Water stable aggregates, Saturated hydraulic conductivity, Organic carbon, Slope position. Agro-Science Vol. 4 (1) 2005: pp. 34-37.

  2. Water-stable aggregates of Niger floodplain soils and their organic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five soil profiles were studied along a soil sequence in the Niger river floodplain to determine their soil properties and water-stable aggregates (WSA) between 4.75-2.00 mm, 2.00-1.00 mm, 1.00-0.50 mm, 0.50-02.5 mm and <0.25 mm. The relative distributions of soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen and available ...

  3. A multivariate analysis of intrinsic soil components influencing the mean-weight diameter of water-stable aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbagwu, J.S.C.; Chukwu, W.I.E.

    1994-06-01

    A knowledge of the soil properties influencing the water-stability of soil aggregates is needed for selecting those more easily-determined properties that would be useful in areas where lack of facilities makes its direct determination impossible. In this laboratory study we evaluated the main soil physical, chemical and mineralogical properties influencing the stability of macro aggregates of some Italian surface soils in water. The objective is to select a subset of soil properties which predict optimally, soil aggregate stability. The index of stability used is the mean weight diameter of water-stable aggregates whereas the method of evaluation is the principal component analysis (PCA). The range in coefficients of variation (CV) among the properties was least in the physical (12.0-61.0%), medium in the mineralogical (28.0-116.2%) and highest in the chemical (8.2-110.8%) properties. The wider the range in CV in each subset of properties, the greater the number of components extracted by the PCA. The component defining variables, i.e. those with the highest loadings on each component and therefore, provide the best relationship between the variables and aggregate stability, revealed the ratio of total sand/clay and plastic limit as the significant physical properties. The significant chemical properties are Al 2 O 3 , FeO, MgO and MnO which contribute positively to aggregate stability. Feldspar, quartz and muscovite are the significant mineralogical properties each of which is negatively related to aggregate stability. These soil components are useful for developing empirical models for estimating the stability of aggregates of these soils in water. (author). 38 refs, 7 tabs

  4. Soil structure stability and distribution of carbon in water-stable aggregates in different tilled and fertilized Haplic Luvisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Šimanský

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of tillage and fertilization on soil structure stability and the distribution of carbon in water-stable aggregates of loamy Haplic Luvisol were studied. Soil samples from the locality of Dolná Malanta (experimental station of SUA Nitra were collected (in 2007–2009 from a depth of 0–0.2 m in two tillage variants: (1. conventional tillage, 2. minimal tillage and three treatments of fertilization: (1. without fertilization, 2. crop residues and NPK fertilizers, 3. NPK fertilizers. The minimal tillage system has a positive effect on both the aggregation processes and sequestration of carbon in size fractions of water-stable aggregates, as well as ploughing of crop residues together with NPK fertilizers. On the other hand, application of only NPK fertilizers had a negative effect on SOM content. Under the minimal tillage system and in treatment with crop residues together with NPK fertilizers, what has been observed is a statistically significant increase in the total organic carbon contents by increasing size fractions of water-stable aggregates. Organic carbon did not influence the aggregation processes with dependence on tillage systems. Under conventional tillage as well as in treatment with ploughing crop residues with NPK fertilizers, a very important effect on aggregation had bivalent cations Ca2+ and Mg2+.

  5. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in wetland soils under different land uses in a coastal estuary: toxic levels, sources and relationships with soil organic matter and water-stable aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rong; Bai, Junhong; Wang, Junjing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Zhao, Qingqing; Cui, Baoshan; Liu, Xinhui

    2014-09-01

    The concentrations of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in the soils from industrial, wharf, cropland, milldam and natural wetland sites to characterize their distributions, toxic levels and possible sources in the Pearl River Estuary and identify their relationships with soil organic matter (SOM) and water-stable aggregates (WSAs). Our results indicate that the average concentration of total PAHs in this region reached a moderate pollution level, which was higher than that in other larger estuaries in Asia. The average level of total PAHs in industrial soils was 1.2, 1.5, 1.6 and 2.3 times higher than those in soils from wharf, cropland, milldam and natural wetland sites, respectively. Greater accumulation of PAHs occurred in the middle and/or bottom soil layers where 3-ring PAHs were dominant. Industrial soils also exhibited the highest toxic levels with the highest toxic equivalent concentrations of PAHs, followed by wharf and milldam soils, and the cropland and wetland soils had the lowest toxicity. The diagnostic ratios suggested that PAHs primarily originated from biomass and coal combustion at industrial and milldam sites, and petroleum combustion was determined to be the primary source of PAHs at the wharf, cropland and wetland sites. Both 3-ring and 4-ring PAHs in the milldam and wharf soils were significantly positively correlated with the SOM, whereas the 4,5,6-ring PAHs and total PAHs in industrial soils and the 2-ring PAHs in cropland soils were significantly negatively correlated with the SOM. In addition, large WSAs also exhibited a significant positive correlation with PAHs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Colloid release from soil aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    The content of water-dispersible colloids (WDC) has a major impact on soil functions and structural stability. In addition, the presence of mobile colloids may increase the risk of colloid-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing environmental contaminants. The WDC content was measured in 39 soils......, using laser diffraction, by agitating the samples using a wet-dispersion unit. This approach eliminated the need for long sedimentation times required by the more classical end-over-end shaking approach and provided information about the time-dependent release of WDC. The total clay content of the soils...... ranged from 0.1 to 0.44 kg kg−1. The WDC content was measured on air-dry and moist 1- to 2-mm aggregates. The WDC content at a reference time was highly correlated to the total clay content (r > 0.91, P soils. Only for two sites was the WDC content correlated to the content of clay...

  7. Microbial Ecology of Soil Aggregation in Agroecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmockel, K. S.; Bell, S.; Tfailly, M.; Thompson, A.; Callister, S.

    2017-12-01

    Crop selection and soil texture influence the physicochemical attributes of the soil, which structures microbial communities and influences soil C cycling storage. At the molecular scale, microbial metabolites and necromass alter the soil environment, which creates feedbacks that influence ecosystem functions, including soil C accumulation. By integrating lab to field studies we aim to identify the molecules, organisms and metabolic pathways that control carbon cycling and stabilization in bioenergy soils. We investigated the relative influence of plants, microbes, and minerals on soil aggregate ecology at the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research experiment. Sites in WI and MI, USA have been in corn and switchgrass cropping systems for a decade. By comparing soil aggregate ecology across sites and cropping systems we are able to test the relative importance of plant, microbe, mineral influences on soil aggregate dynamics. Soil microbial communities (16S) differ in diversity and phylogeny among sites and cropping systems. FT-ICR MS revealed differences in the molecular composition of water-soluble fraction of soil organic matter for cropping systems and soil origin for both relative abundance of assigned formulas and biogeochemical classes of compounds. We found the degree of aggregation, measured by mean weighted diameter of aggregate fractions, is influenced by plant-soil interactions. Similarly, the proportion of soil aggregate fractions varied by both soil and plant factors. Differences in aggregation were reflected in differences in bacterial, but not fungal community composition across aggregate fractions, within each soil. Scanning electron microscopy revealed stark differences in mineral-organic interactions that influence the microbial niche and the accessibility of substrates within the soil. The clay soils show greater surface heterogeneity, enabling interactions with organic fraction of the soil. This is consistent with molecular data that reveal differences

  8. Mechanisms of Soil Aggregation: a biophysical modeling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzehei, T. A.; Or, D.

    2016-12-01

    Soil aggregation is one of the main crosscutting concepts in all sub-disciplines and applications of soil science from agriculture to climate regulation. The concept generally refers to adhesion of primary soil particles into distinct units that remain stable when subjected to disruptive forces. It is one of the most sensitive soil qualities that readily respond to disturbances such as cultivation, fire, drought, flooding, and changes in vegetation. These changes are commonly quantified and incorporated in soil models indirectly as alterations in carbon content and type, bulk density, aeration, permeability, as well as water retention characteristics. Soil aggregation that is primarily controlled by organic matter generally exhibits hierarchical organization of soil constituents into stable units that range in size from a few microns to centimeters. However, this conceptual model of soil aggregation as the key unifying mechanism remains poorly quantified and is rarely included in predictive soil models. Here we provide a biophysical framework for quantitative and predictive modeling of soil aggregation and its attendant soil characteristics. The framework treats aggregates as hotspots of biological, chemical and physical processes centered around roots and root residue. We keep track of the life cycle of an individual aggregate from it genesis in the rhizosphere, fueled by rhizodeposition and mediated by vigorous microbial activity, until its disappearance when the root-derived resources are depleted. The framework synthesizes current understanding of microbial life in porous media; water holding and soil binding capacity of biopolymers; and environmental controls on soil organic matter dynamics. The framework paves a way for integration of processes that are presently modeled as disparate or poorly coupled processes, including storage and protection of carbon, microbial activity, greenhouse gas fluxes, movement and storage of water, resistance of soils against

  9. Aggregate stability in soils cultivated with eucalyptus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junior Cesar Avanzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the aggregate stability of tropical soils under eucalyptus plantation and native vegetation, and assess the relationships between aggregate stability and some soil chemical and physical properties. Argisols, Cambisol, Latosols and Plinthosol within three eucalyptus-cultivated regions, in the states of Espírito Santo, Rio Grande do Sul and Minas Gerais, Brazil, were studied. For each region, soils under native vegetation were compared to those under minimum tillage with eucalyptus cultivation. The aggregate stability was measured using the high-energy moisture characteristic (HEMC technique, i.e., the moisture release curve at very low suctions. This method compares the resistance of aggregates to slaking on a relative scale from zero to one. Thus, the aggregate stability from different soils and management practices can be directly compared. The aggregate stability ratio was greater than 50% for all soils, which shows that the aggregate stability index is high, both in eucalyptus and native vegetation areas. This suggests that soil management adopted for eucalyptus cultivation does not substantially modify this property. In these soils, the aggregate stability ratio does not show a good relationship with clay or soil organic matter contents. However, soil organic matter shows a positive relationship with clay content and cation exchange capacity.

  10. Surfactant effects on soil aggregate tensile strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known regarding a soil aggregate's tensile strength response to surfactants that may be applied to alleviate soil water repellency. Two laboratory investigations were performed to determine surfactant effects on the tensile strength of 1) Ap horizons of nine wettable, agricultural soils co...

  11. Soil aggregation under different management systems

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    Cibele Mascioli Rebello Portella

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Considering that the soil aggregation reflects the interaction of chemical, physical and biological soil factors, the aim of this study was evaluate alterations in aggregation, in an Oxisol under no-tillage (NT and conventional tillage (CT, since over 20 years, using as reference a native forest soil in natural state. After analysis of the soil profile (cultural profile in areas under forest management, samples were collected from the layers 0-5, 5-10, 10-20 and 20-40 cm, with six repetitions. These samples were analyzed for the aggregate stability index (ASI, mean weighted diameter (MWD, mean geometric diameter (MGD in the classes > 8, 8-4, 4-2, 2-1, 1-0.5, 0.5-0.25, and < 0.25 mm, and for physical properties (soil texture, water dispersible clay (WDC, flocculation index (FI and bulk density (Bd and chemical properties (total organic carbon - COT, total nitrogen - N, exchangeable calcium - Ca2+, and pH. The results indicated that more intense soil preparation (M < NT < PC resulted in a decrease in soil stability, confirmed by all stability indicators analyzed: MWD, MGD, ASI, aggregate class distribution, WDC and FI, indicating the validity of these indicators in aggregation analyses of the studied soil.

  12. Xyloglucan is released by plants and promotes soil particle aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Andrew F; Pedersen, Martin J; Merry, Beverley; Marcus, Susan E; Blacker, Joshua; Benning, Liane G; Field, Katie J; Knox, J Paul

    2018-02-01

    Soil is a crucial component of the biosphere and is a major sink for organic carbon. Plant roots are known to release a wide range of carbon-based compounds into soils, including polysaccharides, but the functions of these are not known in detail. Using a monoclonal antibody to plant cell wall xyloglucan, we show that this polysaccharide is secreted by a wide range of angiosperm roots, and relatively abundantly by grasses. It is also released from the rhizoids of liverworts, the earliest diverging lineage of land plants. Using analysis of water-stable aggregate size, dry dispersion particle analysis and scanning electron microscopy, we show that xyloglucan is effective in increasing soil particle aggregation, a key factor in the formation and function of healthy soils. To study the possible roles of xyloglucan in the formation of soils, we analysed the xyloglucan contents of mineral soils of known age exposed upon the retreat of glaciers. These glacial forefield soils had significantly higher xyloglucan contents than detected in a UK grassland soil. We propose that xyloglucan released from plant rhizoids/roots is an effective soil particle aggregator and may, in this role, have been important in the initial colonization of land. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Soil organic carbon response to shrub encroachment regulated by soil aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y.; Li, H.; Shen, H.; Feng, Y.; Fang, J.

    2017-12-01

    Shrub encroachment leads to change in soil organic carbon content, but there still exists a lot of uncertainty in its mechanism as it relates to deep soil research. Soil organic carbon is usually associated with stable aggregate quantity. In this study, we conducted a field investigation for typical steppe and desert steppe in Inner Mongolia with the view to examining the impact of shrub encroachment on soil organic carbon with soil aggregate at a depth of 0-500 cm. The results show that in the desert steppe, the particle size of soil aggregate content level in different depth are presented the trend of shrub patches is lower than the herb matrix, organic carbon content of soil aggregate under 50 cm deeper presents the trend of shrub patches is higher than herb matrix, eventually leading to shrub patches whole soil organic carbon in the 0 to 50 cm depth lower than the herb matrix, and in deeper soil below 50 cm higher than the herb matrix. In the typical steppe, there is no significant difference between soil aggregate structure of shrub patches and herb matrix, but organic carbon content of soil aggregate, especially large aggregate organic carbon content in the shrub patches is significantly higher than the herb matrix, so that the whole soil organic carbon content in the shrub patches is significantly higher than herb matrix. The rate of soil organic carbon content change (0-100 cm) by shrub encroachment showed significant negative correlation with the mean weight diameter of soil aggregate of herb matrix. We also found that the variations of soil organic carbon in desert steppe is not dominant by aggregates of some size, but the change of the typical steppe soil organic carbon mainly contributed by > 0.25 mm and 0.053-0.25 mm aggregates. The results suggested that the effects of shrub encroachment on soil organic carbon is regulated by soil aggregate, but it is varied for different type of grassland, which should provide some insights into our understanding on

  14. [Research methods of carbon sequestration by soil aggregates: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Xia; Liang, Ai-Zhen; Zhang, Xiao-Ping

    2012-07-01

    To increase soil organic carbon content is critical for maintaining soil fertility and agricultural sustainable development and for mitigating increased greenhouse gases and the effects of global climate change. Soil aggregates are the main components of soil, and have significant effects on soil physical and chemical properties. The physical protection of soil organic carbon by soil aggregates is the important mechanism of soil carbon sequestration. This paper reviewed the organic carbon sequestration by soil aggregates, and introduced the classic and current methods in studying the mechanisms of carbon sequestration by soil aggregates. The main problems and further research trends in this study field were also discussed.

  15. Aggregate breakdown mechanisms as affected by soil texture and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil aggregates breakdown mechanisms depend on soil properties such as texture, clay mineralogy and organic matter content. Little is known about the effect of soil properties on aggregate breakdown mechanisms in South African soils. The objective of this study was to establish the relationship between aggregate ...

  16. The Potential Of The Soil For Stabilisation Of Organic Carbon In Soil Aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobiašová Erika

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon stabilisation in soil is the result of interaction between the chemical and physical mechanisms of protection and the dominance of the mechanism depends not only on the long-term constant characteristics of soil but also on the properties, which can be partly influenced by human activities. In this study, the potential of the soil for stabilisation of carbon (Ps in different soil types depending on soil properties was compared. Experiment included six soils (Eutric Fluvisol, Mollic Fluvisol, Haplic Chernozem, Haplic Luvisol, Eutric Cambisol, and Rendzic Leptosol of different land uses (forest, meadow, urban, and agro-ecosystem in Slovakia. Ps was determined with dependence on the ratio of labile and stable fractions of carbon in the soil macro-aggregates. Ps was in an exponential dependence (r = 0.942; P < 0.01 with production potential of the soil, and the fractions of dry-sieved aggregates larger than 3 mm play an important role in the first stages of the carbon stabilisation. The suitable parameter, which reflects the changes in carbon stability in the soil is the ratio of the labile carbon and non-labile carbon in the soil macro-aggregates (L/NL. Lower values of L/NL that indicate a higher stability of carbon were determined at a higher pH, at the higher content of carbonates and exchangeable basic cations, and at a higherportion of humic acids free and bound with mobile sesquioxides R2O3.

  17. Is it real or apparent increased aggregate stability sometimes found in burned soils?

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    V. Arcenegui

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The increase in soil aggregate stability observed in many cases after burning is discussed in this paper. Soil samples under pine forest from two Mediterranean areas were collected for this experiment: acid soils from El Algibe Range (Los Alcornocales Natural Park, Cádiz, Southern Spain and calcareous soils of Sierra de la Grana (Alicante, Eastern Spain. In each case, soil aggregates (2 to 0.25 mm were selected and exposed to temperatures of 200, 250, 300, 500 and 700 oC during a 20-minutes period. In both cases weight loss after volatilization of substances and a significant destruction of aggregates with increasing temperature were observed. For acid soils, where organic matter is the main cementing agent, destruction of aggregates with temperature was more intense. Water repellency induced by combustion increased between 200 and 250 oC, also the remaining aggregates remaining increased within the initial size fraction after heating, increasing its stability. For temperatures above 300 oC, water repellency disappeared, although an increase in aggregate stability was observed, possibly due to changes in the mineral soil fraction. Therefore, it is concluded that burning may destroy part of the aggregates by combustion of organic matter, so selecting stable aggregates. Water repellency and transformations of soil minerals contribute to increased stability in selected aggregates.

  18. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN SOIL MICROBIAL BIOMASS, AGGREGATE STABILITY AND AGGREGATE ASSOCIATED-C: A MECHANISTIC APPROACH

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    Patrizia Guidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For the identification of C pools involved in soil aggregation, a physically-based aggregate fractionation was proposed, and  additional pretreatments were used in the measurement of the 1-2 mm aggregate stability in order to elucidate the relevance of the role of soil microorganisms with respect to the different aggregate breakdown mechanisms. The study was carried out on three clay loam Regosols, developed on calcareous shales, known history of organic cultivation.Our results showed that the soil C pool controlling the process of stabilisation of aggregates was related to the microbial community. We identified the resistance to fast wetting as the major mechanism of aggregate stability driven by microorganims. The plausible hypothesis is that organic farming promotes fungi growth, improving water repellency of soil aggregates by fungal hydrophobic substances. By contrast, we failed in the identification of C pools controlling the formation of aggregates, probably because of the disturbance of mechanical tillage which contributes to the breakdown of soil aggregates.The physically-based aggregate fractionation proposed in this study resulted useful in the  mechanistically understanding of the role of microorganisms in soil aggregation and it might be suggested for studying the impact of management on C pools, aggregates properties and their relationships in agricultural soils.

  19. Role of water repellency in aggregate stability of cultivated soils under simulated raindrop impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kořenková, Lucia; Matúš, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Soil aggregate stability (AS) is an important indicator of soil physical quality. For the purpose of this research it was hypothesized that particular properties such as water repellency (WR) influence soil aggregation and AS. Directly after sampling, WR was detected for three soils, after a week of air-drying two of these soils still showed some resistance to penetration by a water drop placed on the surface (WDPT test). The study examines AS of air-dried texturally different aggregates of size 0.25-0.5 mm taken from surface layers (5-15 cm depth) of six agriculturally used soils. The procedure involves exposure of soil aggregates to direct impact of water drops. Results showed that soil AS increases in order: cutanic Luvisol (siltic) Chernozem < calcic mollic Fluvisol < mollic grumic Vertisol (pellic) < mollic Fluvisol (calcaric) < gleyic Fluvisol (eutric). Gradual increase in AS can be explained by the increase in soil organic matter content and its hydrophobic properties. Although WR has been most commonly observed in soils under forests and grass cover, the results confirmed that cultivated soils may also create water-stable aggregates, especially in the case when their organic matter induces WR under particular moisture conditions.

  20. Litter Inputs and Soil Aggregation in Midwestern Biofuel Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantola, I. B.; Masters, M. D.; Smyth, E. M.; DeLucia, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    Perennial C4 grasses represent alternatives to corn for the production of ethanol because of low management costs and high biomass production. To evaluate the effects of perennial grasses on the agricultural soils of the Midwest, native switchgrass and a sterile hybrid of the Asian grass Miscanthus were planted at the University of Illinois Energy Farm in 2008. Through five years of growth, above and belowground plant biomass, litter, and soil were compared with soils in plots growing a corn-corn-soy rotation typical of the area. Above- and belowground plant biomass in Miscanthus and switchgrass averaged higher than corn/soy following two years of perennial establishment, with belowground biomass exceeding corn/soy by approximately 5-fold in the year after establishment (2010) and 25-fold by 2012. Measurements of root distribution and turnover rates indicate that roots are the primary contribution of new carbon to soils under perennial crops. Physical fractionation of the soils into water stable aggregates showed 4-14% increases in macroaggregate fractions under perennial crops; the large aggregates are adhered together by organic material and indicative of the increased presence of labile carbon forms like plant roots, fungi, and plant and microbial exudates. Carbon and nitrogen analyses of the fractions show that while overall carbon has not increased significantly in whole soil, soils under perennial grasses are concentrating carbon by 5-17% in the macroaggregates after just 5 years. Native switchgrass roots (buried) and litter (surface-applied) decompose faster than Miscanthus roots and litter, but slower than corn roots and litter buried to simulate incorporation by tillage. Switchgrass soil shows the highest degree of macroaggregate formation, pointing to a high rate of litter and root decomposition and incorporation into soil structure. While macroaggregates are relatively labile soil structures compared to microaggregates and free silt and clay, they offer

  1. Pore structure of natural and regenerated soil aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Arthur, Emmanuel; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative characterization of aggregate pore structure can reveal the evolution of aggregates under different land use and management practices and their effects on soil processes and functions. Advances in X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) provide powerful means to conduct such characterization....... This study examined aggregate pore structure of three differently managed same textured Danish soils (mixed forage cropping, MFC; mixed cash cropping, MCC; cereal cash cropping, CCC) for (i) natural aggregates, and (ii) aggregates regenerated after 20 months of incubation. In total, 27 aggregates (8-16 mm......) were sampled from nine different treatments; 3 natural soils and 3 repacked lysimeters without and 3 with organic matter (ground rape) amendment. Three dimensional X-ray CT images, tensile strength, and organic carbon were obtained for each aggregate. Aggregate-associated organic carbon differed...

  2. Microbial properties of soil aggregates created by earthworms and other factors: spherical and prismatic soil aggregates from unreclaimed post-mining sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frouz, J.; Kristufek, V.; Liveckova, M.; van Loo, D.; Jacobs, P.; Van Hoorebeke, L. [Charles University of Prague, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Environmental Studies

    2011-01-15

    Soil aggregates between 2 and 5 mm from 35- and 45-year-old unreclaimed post-mining sites near Sokolov (Czech Republic) were divided into two groups: spherical and prismatic. X-ray tomography indicated that prismatic aggregates consisted of fragments of claystone bonded together by amorphous clay and roots while spherical aggregates consisted of a clay matrix and organic fragments of various sizes. Prismatic aggregates were presumed to be formed by plant roots and physical processes during weathering of Tertiary mudstone, while earthworms were presumed to contribute to the formation of spherical aggregates. The effects of drying and rewetting and glucose addition on microbial respiration, microbial biomass, and counts of bacteria in these aggregates were determined. Spherical aggregates contained a greater percentage of C and N and a higher C-to-N ratio than prismatic ones. The C content of the particulate organic matter was also higher in the spherical than in the prismatic aggregates. Although spherical aggregates had a higher microbial respiration and biomass, the growth of microbial biomass in spherical aggregates was negatively correlated with initial microbial biomass, indicating competition between bacteria. Specific respiration was negatively correlated with microbial biomass. Direct counts of bacteria were higher in spherical than in prismatic aggregates. Bacterial numbers were more stable in the center than in the surface layers of the aggregates. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that bacteria often occurred as individual cells in prismatic aggregates but as small clusters of cells in spherical aggregates. Ratios of colony forming units (cultivatable bacteria) to direct counts were higher in spherical than in prismatic aggregates. Spherical aggregates also contained faster growing bacteria.

  3. Effects of Pig Manure Organic Fertilizer Application on Available Nutrient Content and Soil Aggregate Distribution in Fluvo-aquic Soil

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    SHI Wen-xuan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on environmental risk caused by livestock manure disorderly discharged from integrated livestock and poultry industry. 2-year pot experiment was carried out to study the effects of pig manure organic fertilizer on fluvo-aquic soil organic carbon, available nutrient content and soil aggregate distribution, which designed in 5 levels of organic fertilizer application(0, 6.7, 13.3, 26.7, 40.0 g·kg-1 soil. The results showed that the organic carbon, alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen, available P and available K contents in soil were enhanced with organic fertilizer application increasing, and the indicators of soil were increased significantly in second year, such as organic carbon content was 2.7%~54.0% higher than that of the first year, alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen content was higher 6.7%~34.6%, available P content was higher 36.8%~159.5% and available K content was higher 20.3%~35.7%. There was a significant linear relationship between soil organic carbon content and external organic carbon input. Organic fertilizer application could significantly improve lettuce yield, and it had a significant effect. The soil micro-aggregate contents for 0.053~0.25 mm and 0.5 mm soil macro-aggregates were increased with organic fertilizer application increasing. Organic fertilizer application could promote soil macro-aggregates formation, when the pig manure organic fertilizer applied 40.0 g·kg-1 soil, the contents of >0.25 mm soil aggregates reached maximum, and also the mean weight diameter(MWD and geometric average diameter(GWD of soil aggregates were higher than that of other treatments, the soil agglomeration became more stronger and the soil structure became more stable.

  4. A novel method for soil aggregate stability measurement by laser granulometry with sonication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlins, B. G.; Lark, R. M.; Wragg, J.

    2012-04-01

    Regulatory authorities need to establish rapid, cost-effective methods to measure soil physical indicators - such as aggregate stability - which can be applied to large numbers of soil samples to detect changes of soil quality through monitoring. Limitations of sieve-based methods to measure the stability of soil macro-aggregates include: i) the mass of stable aggregates is measured, only for a few, discrete sieve/size fractions, ii) no account is taken of the fundamental particle size distribution of the sub-sampled material, and iii) they are labour intensive. These limitations could be overcome by measurements with a Laser Granulometer (LG) instrument, but this technology has not been widely applied to the quantification of aggregate stability of soils. We present a novel method to quantify macro-aggregate (1-2 mm) stability. We measure the difference between the mean weight diameter (MWD; μm) of aggregates that are stable in circulating water of low ionic strength, and the MWD of the fundamental particles of the soil to which these aggregates are reduced by sonication. The suspension is circulated rapidly through a LG analytical cell from a connected vessel for ten seconds; during this period hydrodynamic forces associated with the circulating water lead to the destruction of unstable aggregates. The MWD of stable aggregates is then measured by LG. In the next step, the aggregates - which are kept in the vessel at a minimal water circulation speed - are subject to sonication (18W for ten minutes) so the vast majority of the sample is broken down into its fundamental particles. The suspension is then recirculated rapidly through the LG and the MWD measured again. We refer to the difference between these two measurements as disaggregation reduction (DR) - the reduction in MWD on disaggregation by sonication. Soil types with more stable aggregates have larger values of DR. The stable aggregates - which are resistant to both slaking and mechanical breakdown by the

  5. Soil aggregation and aggregating agents as affected by long term contrasting management of an Anthrosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shulan; Wang, Renjie; Yang, Xueyun; Sun, Benhua; Li, Qinghui

    2016-12-01

    Soil aggregation was studied in a 21-year experiment conducted on an Anthrosol. The soil management regimes consisted of cropland abandonment, bare fallow without vegetation and cropping system. The cropping system was combined with the following nutrient management treatments: control (CONTROL, no nutrient input); nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK); straw plus NPK (SNPK); and manure (M) plus NPK (MNPK). Compared with the CONTROL treatment, the abandonment treatment significantly increased the formation of large soil macroaggregates (>2 mm) and consequently improved the stability of aggregates in the surface soil layer due to enhancement of hyphal length and of soil organic matter content. However, in response to long-term bare fallow treatment aggregate stability was low, as were the levels of aggregating agents. Long term fertilization significantly redistributed macroaggregates; this could be mainly ascribed to soil organic matter contributing to the formation of 0.5-2 mm classes of aggregates and a decrease in the formation of the >2 mm class of aggregates, especially in the MNPK treatment. Overall, hyphae represented a major aggregating agent in both of the systems tested, while soil organic compounds played significantly different roles in stabilizing aggregates in Anthrosol when the cropping system and the soil management regimes were compared.

  6. Effects of Different Land-Use Systems on Soil Aggregates: A Case Study of the Loess Plateau (Northern China

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    Shahmir Ali Kalhoro

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil aggregate stability is an important indicator for controlling soil losses and can improve soil quality, particularly in an area such as the Loess Plateau. The objective of this study was to estimate the differences in soil aggregates across six different land-use systems (grassland, apple orchard, abandoned apple orchard, cropland maize, cropland wheat, and shrub-grassland. For this purpose, dry and wet sieving techniques were employed to assess aggregate content and aggregate stability. Higher percentages of water stable aggregates were observed in the abandoned apple orchard and shrub-grassland at 63% and 61%, respectively. The maximum dry aggregate stability (% was recorded at 78% and 77% in both wheat cropland and common apple orchard, and the abandoned apple orchard was only 74%. Both mean weight diameters and geometric mean diameters of aggregate were recorded as higher in grassland, shrub-grassland, and the abandoned apple orchard, than the other land uses. The formation of soil aggregates and their stability were positively correlated with soil organic carbon content and root biomass of different plant communities. Higher amounts of soil organic carbon content were noted in the abandoned apple orchard, common apple orchard, and natural grassland at the 0–20 cm soil layer. The results of the correlation coefficient showed a positive significant correlation between the mean weight diameter, geometric diameter, root biomass, and soil organic carbon content. Conclusively, the type of land use affected the soil aggregation and distribution of size fractions; the small fractions of the aggregates formed large fractions by combining with fresh organic matter, and increased soil organic carbon concentrations were closely linked with the formation of macro-aggregates. Thus, converting slope farmland to forestland and grassland could improve water-stable aggregate and reduce soil disturbances in areas (like the Loess Plateau with the

  7. Relationship between soil aggregate strength, shape and porosity for soils under different long-term management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Heck, Richard J; Deen, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Soil aggregate properties, such as strength, shape and porosity, influence a range of essential soil functions and there is a need for more detailed understanding of the effect of soil management on these aggregate properties. There is also a need for improved knowledge on the link between aggreg...

  8. Water-stability of soil aggregates in relation to selected properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbagwu, J.S.C.; Bazzoffi, P.; Unamba Oparah, I.

    1995-03-01

    The stability of soil aggregates in water is an important soil physical property for evaluating the potential of agricultural soils to erode and elucidating the mechanisms of soil erosion. In this study we used aggregates from 15 surface soil samples in Italy to evaluate the influence of intrinsic soil physical, chemical and mineralogical properties on aggregates stability (AS). The aim was to develop a model for predicting AS from a subset of these soil properties. The index of stability used is the mean-weight diameter of water-stable aggregates (MWD). The model developed with soil physical properties alone explained just 42% of variance in MWD and predicted AS in only 20% of test soils. The model developed with mineralogical properties alone explained 70% of variance in MWD and predicted AS in 60% of the test soils. The chemical properties - based model explained 90% of variance in MWD and predicted AS in 80% of the test soils. The best-fit model was developed with soil properties from the physical, chemical and mineralogical subsets. It explained 98% of variance in MWD and predicted AS in 100% of the test soils. This model shows that the most important soil properties which influence the AS of these soils include ratio of total sand to clay, concentrations of iron oxide, magnesium oxide, organic matter, silica/alumina ratio, chlorite, feldspar and muscovite. This indicates that fairly good estimates of the relative stability of these aggregates in water and hence of their potential to erode, requires a knowledge of the physico-chemical and mineralogical properties. (author). 40 refs, 4 tabs

  9. A Novel Method to Quantify Soil Aggregate Stability by Measuring Aggregate Bond Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efrat, Rachel; Rawlins, Barry G.; Quinton, John N.; Watts, Chris W.; Whitmore, Andy P.

    2016-04-01

    Soil aggregate stability is a key indicator of soil quality because it controls physical, biological and chemical functions important in cultivated soils. Micro-aggregates are responsible for the long term sequestration of carbon in soil, therefore determine soils role in the carbon cycle. It is thus vital that techniques to measure aggregate stability are accurate, consistent and reliable, in order to appropriately manage and monitor soil quality, and to develop our understanding and estimates of soil as a carbon store to appropriately incorporate in carbon cycle models. Practices used to assess the stability of aggregates vary in sample preparation, operational technique and unit of results. They use proxies and lack quantification. Conflicting results are therefore drawn between projects that do not provide methodological or resultant comparability. Typical modern stability tests suspend aggregates in water and monitor fragmentation upon exposure to an un-quantified amount of ultrasonic energy, utilising a laser granulometer to measure the change in mean weight diameter. In this project a novel approach has been developed based on that of Zhu et al., (2009), to accurately quantify the stability of aggregates by specifically measuring their bond energies. The bond energies are measured operating a combination of calorimetry and a high powered ultrasonic probe, with computable output function. Temperature change during sonication is monitored by an array of probes which enables calculation of the energy spent heating the system (Ph). Our novel technique suspends aggregates in heavy liquid lithium heteropolytungstate, as opposed to water, to avoid exposing aggregates to an immeasurable disruptive energy source, due to cavitation, collisions and clay swelling. Mean weight diameter is measured by a laser granulometer to monitor aggregate breakdown after successive periods of calculated ultrasonic energy input (Pi), until complete dispersion is achieved and bond

  10. Predicting the water-drop energy required to breakdown dry soil aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbagwu, J.S.C.; Bazzoffi, P.

    1995-04-01

    The raindrop energy required to breakdown dry soil aggregates is an index of structural stability which has been found very useful in modelling soil erosion process and in evaluating the suitability of tillage implements for different soils. The aim of this research was to develop and validate a model for predicting the specific water-drop energy required to breakdown aggregates (D) as influenced by soil properties. Air-dry aggregates (2-4 mm in diameter), collected from 15 surface (0-20 cm) soils in north central Italy were used for this study. The actual and natural log-transformed D values were regressed on the soil properties. Clay content, wilting point moisture content (WP) and percent water-stable aggregates (WSA) > 2.0 mm were good predictors of D. Empirical models developed from either clay content or WP predicted D in 70% of the test soils whereas the model developed from WSA > 2.0 mm predicted D in 90% of the test soils. The correlation coefficients (r) between measured and predicted D were 0.961, 0.963 and 0.997 respectively, for models developed from clay, WP and WSA > 2.0 mm. The validity of these models need to be tested on other soils with a wider variation in properties than those used to developed the models. (author). 42 refs, 5 tabs

  11. Temporal variations in organic carbon, soil reactivity and aggregate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We studied the effect of incorporating agricultural wastes on soil aggregate stability (AS), organic carbon (OC), and soil reactivity (pH) of similarly textured soils under different managements (vegetable, (VG) and Orchard (OR) farming), in South-eastern Nigeria. The agricultural wastes were cow dung (CD,) cassava peels ...

  12. Total organic carbon in aggregates as a soil recovery indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciene Maltoni, Katia; Rodrigues Cassiolato, Ana Maria; Amorim Faria, Glaucia; Dubbin, William

    2015-04-01

    The soil aggregation promotes physical protection of organic matter, preservation of which is crucial to improve soil structure, fertility and ensure the agro-ecosystems sustainability. The no-tillage cultivation system has been considered as one of the strategies to increase total soil organic carbono (TOC) contents and soil aggregation, both are closely related and influenced by soil management systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of soil aggregates and the total organic carbon inside aggregates, with regard to soil recovery, under 3 different soil management systems, i.e. 10 and 20 years of no-tillage cultivation as compared with soil under natural vegetation (Cerrado). Undisturbed soils (0-5; 5-10; and 10-20 cm depth) were collected from Brazil, Central Region. The soils, Oxisols from Cerrado, were collected from a field under Natural Vegetation-Cerrado (NV), and from fields that were under conventional tillage since 1970s, and 10 and 20 years ago were changed to no-tillage cultivation system (NT-10; NT-20 respectively). The undisturbed samples were sieved (4mm) and the aggregates retained were further fractionated by wet sieving through five sieves (2000, 1000, 500, 250, and 50 μm) with the aggregates distribution expressed as percentage retained by each sieve. The TOC was determined, for each aggregate size, by combustion (Thermo-Finnigan). A predominance of aggregates >2000 μm was observed under NV treatment (92, 91, 82 %), NT-10 (64, 73, 61 %), and NT-20 (71, 79, 63 %) for all three depths (0-5; 5-10; 10-20 cm). In addition greater quantities of aggregates in sizes 1000, 500, 250 and 50 μm under NT-10 and NT-20 treatments, explain the lower aggregate stability under these treatments compared to the soil under NV. The organic C concentration for NV in aggregates >2000 μm was 24,4; 14,2; 8,7 mg/g for each depth (0-5; 5-10; 10-20 cm, respectively), higher than in aggregates sized 250-50 μm (7,2; 5,5; 4,4 mg/g) for all depths

  13. Aggregate stability and soil degradation in the tropics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbagwu, J.S.C.

    2004-01-01

    Aggregate stability is a measure of the structural stability of soils. Factors that influence aggregate stability are important in evaluating the ease with which soils erode by water and/or wind, the potential of soils to crust and/or seal, soil permeability, quasi-steady state infiltration rates and seedling emergence and in predicting the capacity of soils to sustain long-term crop production. Aggregate stability of soils can be measured by the wet-sieving or raindrop techniques. A reduction in soil aggregate stability implies an increase in soil degradation. Hence aggregate stability and soil degradation are interwoven. The measures used can either be preventive or remedial. Preventive practices minimize the chances of soil degradation occurring or the magnitude or severity of the damage when the degradation manifests. These include in Nigeria, (i) manuring and mulching, (ii) planted fallows and cover crops, (iii) sustainable farming systems, (iv) adequate rotations, (v) home gardens or compound farms, (vi) alley cropping and related agro forestry systems, and (vii) chemical fertilizers which are mainly remedial measures. Because of alterations in soil properties that affect particular land uses, soils may degrade for one crop (maize rather sorghum). As long as some land use is possible soil degradation is not always an absolute concept. Decline in agricultural productivity should be evaluated in terms of inputs such as fertilizer use, water management and tillage methods. We can alleviate some types of soil degradation by use of micronutrients, inorganic fertilizers and organic residues. Soil that responds to management practices cannot be said to be degraded. Since crop growth depends on weather, degraded soils may be more sensitive to harsh weather (e.g. drought, temperature) than undegraded soils. A soil is degraded if its productivity falls below the economic threshold even under favourable weather conditions or with judicious inputs. All human

  14. [Effects of straw mulching on the soil aggregates in dryland wheat field under no-tillage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Xia; Sun, Hong-Xia; Han, Qing-Fang; Wang, Min; Zhang, Rui; Jia, Zhi-Kuan; Nie, Jun-Feng; Liu, Ting

    2012-04-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of full period and growth period straw mulching with an amount of 3000, 6000, and 9000 kg x hm(-2) on the soil aggregates in a no-tillage dryland wheat field in Weibei Loess Pleateau of Shaanxi Province, taking no full period straw mulching as the control. In the 0-40 cm soil layer, the content of > 5 mm aggregates increased with depth, while that of mulching, the total contents of > 0.25 mm mechanical stable aggregates (DR0.25) and of > 0.25 mm water stable aggregates (WR0.25) were significantly higher than the control, with an increase of 13.0%-26.4% and 18.6%-45.6%, respectively and the largest increment in the treatment 6000 kg x hm(-2) of straw mulching. Straw mulching increased the soil organic matter content, and the latter had a significant positive correlation with the WR0.25 content. All the straw mulching treatments decreased the soil unstable aggregate index (E(LT)) which was the lowest in treatment 6000 kg x hm(-2) of straw mulching. This study showed that straw mulching could increase the >0.25 mm aggregates and organic matter contents in 0-40 cm soil layer and improve the soil structural stability, and mulching with an amount of 6000 kg x hm(-2) had the best effect, being a reasonable straw mulching mode to be applied in the agricultural production in Weibei Loess Plateau.

  15. Aggregate and soil organic carbon dynamics in South Chilean Andisols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huygens, D.; Boeckx, P.; Van Cleemput, O.; Oyarzún, C.; Godoy, R.

    2005-06-01

    Extreme sensitivity of soil organic carbon (SOC) to climate and land use change warrants further research in different terrestrial ecosystems. The aim of this study was to investigate the link between aggregate and SOC dynamics in a chronosequence of three different land uses of a south Chilean Andisol: a second growth Nothofagus obliqua forest (SGFOR), a grassland (GRASS) and a Pinus radiata plantation (PINUS). Total carbon content of the 0-10cm soil layer was higher for GRASS (6.7 kg C m-2) than for PINUS (4.3 kg C m-2, while TC content of SGFOR (5.8 kg C m-2) was not significantly different from either one. High extractable oxalate and pyrophosphate Al concentrations (varying from 20.3-24.4 g kg-1, and 3.9-11.1 g kg-1, respectively) were found in all sites. In this study, SOC and aggregate dynamics were studied using size and density fractionation experiments of the SOC, δ13C and total carbon analysis of the different SOC fractions, and C mineralization experiments. The results showed that electrostatic sorption between and among amorphous Al components and clay minerals is mainly responsible for the formation of metal-humus-clay complexes and the stabilization of soil aggregates. The process of ligand exchange between SOC and Al would be of minor importance resulting in the absence of aggregate hierarchy in this soil type. Whole soil C mineralization rate constants were highest for SGFOR and PINUS, followed by GRASS (respectively 0.495, 0.266 and 0.196 g CO2-Cm-2d-1 for the top soil layer). In contrast, incubation experiments of isolated macro organic matter fractions gave opposite results, showing that the recalcitrance of the SOC decreased in another order: PINUS>SGFOR>GRASS. We deduced that electrostatic sorption processes and physical protection of SOC in soil aggregates were the main processes determining SOC stabilization. As a result, high aggregate carbon concentrations, varying from 148 till 48 g kg-1, were encountered for all land use sites. Al

  16. Hydration and diffusion processes shape microbial community organization and function in model soil aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2015-12-01

    The constantly changing soil hydration status affects gas and nutrient diffusion through soil pores and thus the functioning of soil microbial communities. The conditions within soil aggregates are of particular interest due to limitations to oxygen diffusion into their core, and the presence of organic carbon often acting as binding agent. We developed a model for microbial life in simulated soil aggregates comprising of 3-D angular pore network model (APNM) that mimics soil hydraulic and transport properties. Within these APNM, we introduced individual motile (flagellated) microbial cells with different physiological traits that grow, disperse, and respond to local nutrients and oxygen concentrations. The model quantifies the dynamics and spatial extent of anoxic regions that vary with hydration conditions, and their role in shaping microbial community size and activity and the spatial (self) segregation of anaerobes and aerobes. Internal carbon source and opposing diffusion directions of oxygen and carbon within an aggregate were essential to emergence of stable coexistence of aerobic and anaerobic communities (anaerobes become extinct when carbon sources are external). The model illustrates a range of hydration conditions that promote or suppress denitrification or decomposition of organic matter and thus affect soil GHG emissions. Model predictions of CO2 and N2O production rates were in good agreement with limited experimental data. These limited tests support the dynamic modeling approach whereby microbial community size, composition, and spatial arrangement emerge from internal interactions within soil aggregates. The upscaling of the results to a population of aggregates of different sizes embedded in a soil profile is underway.

  17. Quantifying the contribution of the root system of alpine vegetation in the soil aggregate stability of moraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csilla Hudek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available One fifth of the world's population is living in mountains or in their surrounding areas. This anthropogenic pressure continues to grow with the increasing number of settlements, especially in areas connected to touristic activities, such as the Italian Alps. The process of soil formation on high mountains is particularly slow and these soils are particularly vulnerable to soil degradation. In alpine regions, extreme meteorological events are increasingly frequent due to climate change, speeding up the process of soil degradation and increasing the number of severe erosion processes, shallow landslides and debris flows. Vegetation cover plays a crucial role in the stabilization of mountain soils thereby reducing the risk of natural hazards effecting downslope areas. Soil aggregate stability is one of the main soil properties that can be linked to soil loss processes. Soils developed on moraines in recently deglaciated areas typically have low levels of soil aggregation, and a limited or discontinuous vegetation cover making them more susceptible to degradation. However, soil structure can be influenced by the root system of the vegetation. Roots are actively involved in the formation of water-stable soil aggregation, increasing the stability of the soil and its nutrient content. In the present study, we aim to quantify the effect of the root system of alpine vegetation on the soil aggregate stability of the forefield of the Lys glacier, in the Aosta Valley (NW-Italy. This proglacial area provides the opportunity to study how the root system of ten pioneer alpine species from different successional stages can contribute to soil development and soil stabilization. To quantify the aggregate stability of root permeated soils, a modified wet sieving method was employed. The root length per soil volume of the different species was also determined and later correlated with the aggregate stability results. The results showed that soil aggregate

  18. Cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) : Stable and recyclable biocatalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheldon, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    The key to obtaining an optimum performance of an enzyme is often a question of devising an effective method for its immobilization. In the present review, we describe a novel, versatile and effective methodology for enzyme immobilization as CLEAs (cross-linked enzyme aggregates). The method is

  19. Soil aggregate stability within morphologically diverse areas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakšík, O.; Kodešová, R.; Kubiš, A.; Stehlíková, I.; Drábek, O.; Kapička, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 127, April (2015), s. 287-299 ISSN 0341-8162 R&D Projects: GA MZe QJ1230319 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : soil degradation due to erosion * WSA index * coefficients of vulnerability * magnetic susceptibility Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science Impact factor: 2.612, year: 2015

  20. A stable lipid-induced aggregate of alpha-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, Malte; van Rooijen, Bart D; Veldhuis, Gertjan; Subramaniam, Vinod; Huber, Martina

    2010-03-31

    The Parkinson's disease-related protein alpha-Synuclein (alphaS) is a 140 residue intrinsically disordered protein. Its membrane-binding properties are thought to be relevant for its physiological or pathologic activity. Here, the interaction of alphaS with POPG [1-Palmitoyl-2-Oleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-(Phosphorac-(1-glycerol))] small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) is investigated by spin-label EPR using double electron-electron resonance (DEER). Intermolecular distances between four single mutants reveal that well-defined aggregates are formed. The data suggest a coexistence of two dimer structures with main interactions in the helix 2, encompassing residues 50-100. Previously, the horseshoe conformation was detected by intramolecular restraints obtained by DEER on alphaS double mutants (Drescher et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 7796). The present study suggests that interdigitation of two monomers in the aggregate fills the void between the two helices of each of the monomers thus providing a rationale for the horseshoe structure. This aggregate is lipid induced and affects the structure of the POPG SUVs, which become leaky and diminish in size upon contact with alphaS suggesting a possible origin of conflicting results in the recent literature (Jao et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2008, 105 (50), 19666; Georgieva et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130 (39), 12856; Bortolus et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 6690).

  1. Carbon and nitrogen pools in soil aggregates separated by dry and wet sieving methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil aggregation influences conservation and mineralization of C and N but aggregate separation method may influence levels of aggregate size distribution and quantification of C and N pools. Aggregate size distribution and soil organic C (SOC), soil total N (STN), particulate organic C and N (POC a...

  2. Association of Soil Aggregation with the Distribution and Quality of Organic Carbon in Soil along an Elevation Gradient on Wuyi Mountain in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liguang Li

    Full Text Available Forest soils play a critical role in the sequestration of atmospheric CO2 and subsequent attenuation of global warming. The nature and properties of organic matter in soils have an influence on the sequestration of carbon. In this study, soils were collected from representative forestlands, including a subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest (EBF, a coniferous forest (CF, a subalpine dwarf forest (DF, and alpine meadow (AM along an elevation gradient on Wuyi Mountain, which is located in a subtropical area of southeastern China. These soil samples were analyzed in the laboratory to examine the distribution and speciation of organic carbon (OC within different size fractions of water-stable soil aggregates, and subsequently to determine effects on carbon sequestration. Soil aggregation rate increased with increasing elevation. Soil aggregation rate, rather than soil temperature, moisture or clay content, showed the strongest correlation with OC in bulk soil, indicating soil structure was the critical factor in carbon sequestration of Wuyi Mountain. The content of coarse particulate organic matter fraction, rather than the silt and clay particles, represented OC stock in bulk soil and different soil aggregate fractions. With increasing soil aggregation rate, more carbon was accumulated within the macroaggregates, particularly within the coarse particulate organic matter fraction (250-2000 μm, rather than within the microaggregates (53-250μm or silt and clay particles (< 53μm. In consideration of the high instability of macroaggregates and the liability of SOC within them, further research is needed to verify whether highly-aggregated soils at higher altitudes are more likely to lose SOC under warmer conditions.

  3. Soil dehydrogenase activity of natural macro aggregates in a toposequence of forest soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Kussainova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to determine changes in soil dehydrogenase activity in natural macro aggregates development along a slope in forest soils. This study was carried out in Kocadag, Samsun, Turkey. Four landscape positions i.e., summit, shoulder backslope and footslope, were selected. For each landseape position, soil macro aggregates were separated into six aggregate size classes using a dry sieving method and then dehydrogenase activity was analyzed. In this research, topography influenced the macroaggregate size and dehydrogenase activity within the aggregates. At all landscape positions, the contents of macro aggregates (especially > 6.3 mm and 2.00–4.75 mm in all soil samples were higher than other macro aggregate contents. In footslope position, the soils had generally the higher dehydrogenase activity than the other positions at all landscape positions. In all positions, except for shoulder, dehydrogenase activity was greater macro aggregates of <1 mm than in the other macro aggregate size.

  4. Response of soil aggregate stability to storage time of soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerzabek, M.H.; Roessner, H.

    1993-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the well known phenomenon of changing aggregate stability values as result of soil sample storage. In order to evaluate the impact of soil microbial activity, the soil sample was split into three subsamples. Two samples were sterilized by means of chloroform fumigation and gamma irradiation, respectively. However, the aggregate stability measurements at three different dates were not correlated with the microbial activity (dehydrogenase activity). The moisture content of the aggregate samples seems to be of higher significance. Samples with lower moisture content (range: 0.4 to 1.9%) exhibited higher aggregate stabilities. Thus, airdried aggregate samples without further treatment don't seem to be suitable for standardized stability measurements. (authors)

  5. Recovery of MSWI and soil washing residues as concrete aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Abbà, Alessandro; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the present work was to study if municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) residues and aggregates derived from contaminated soil washing could be used as alternative aggregates for concrete production. Initially, chemical, physical and geometric characteristics (according to UNI EN 12620) of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ashes and some contaminated soils were evaluated; moreover, the pollutants release was evaluated by means of leaching tests. The results showed that the reuse of pre-treated MSWI bottom ash and washed soil is possible, either from technical or environmental point of view, while it is not possible for the raw wastes. Then, the natural aggregate was partially and totally replaced with these recycled aggregates for the production of concrete mixtures that were characterized by conventional mechanical and leaching tests. Good results were obtained using the same dosage of a high resistance cement (42.5R calcareous Portland cement instead of 32.5R); the concrete mixture containing 400 kg/m(3) of washed bottom ash and high resistance cement was classified as structural concrete (C25/30 class). Regarding the pollutants leaching, all concrete mixtures respected the limit values according to the Italian regulation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Group living in squamate reptiles: a review of evidence for stable aggregations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Michael G; Pearson, Sarah K; Johnston, Gregory R; Schwarz, Michael P

    2016-11-01

    How sociality evolves and is maintained remains a key question in evolutionary biology. Most studies to date have focused on insects, birds, and mammals but data from a wider range of taxonomic groups are essential to identify general patterns and processes. The extent of social behaviour among squamate reptiles is under-appreciated, yet they are a promising group for further studies. Living in aggregations is posited as an important step in the evolution of more complex sociality. We review data on aggregations among squamates and find evidence for some form of aggregations in 94 species across 22 families. Of these, 18 species across 7 families exhibited 'stable' aggregations that entail overlapping home ranges and stable membership in long-term (years) or seasonal aggregations. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that stable aggregations have evolved multiple times in squamates. We: (i) identify significant gaps in our understanding; (ii) outline key traits which should be the focus of future research; and (iii) outline the potential for utilising reproductive skew theory to provide insights into squamate sociality. © 2015 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  7. Effect of Different Cultivation Periods on Soil Stable Organic Carbon Pool in Citrus Orchard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Yi-xiang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Effect of different cultivation periods on soil stable organic carbon pools and fractions in citrus orchard was investigated to provide scientific basis on the study of orchard soil carbon sequestration by the temporal-spatial substitution method and physical and chemical fractionation method. The results showed that the citrus orchard planted in 1954 compared with the citrus orchard planted in 1980, the content of total organic carbon increased by 27.16%, organic carbon content in macro-aggregates increased by 13.59%, organic carbon content in micro-aggregates increased by 80.19%, organic carbon content of heavy fraction increased by 29.25%, resistant organic carbon content increased by 32.00%, black carbon content increased by 4.01%. Organic carbon which combined with micro-aggregates was protected, and resistant organic carbon and black carbon were recalcitrant organic carbon in soil, this indicated that the stable organic carbon fractions gradually enriched in soil with the increase of growing periods, which was conducive to improve carbon sink in citrus orchard soil.

  8. Material dynamics in polluted soils with different structures - comparative investigations of general soil and aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taubner, H.

    1992-01-01

    In structured soils, a small-scale heterogeneity of physical and chemical properties will develop which results in a reduced availability of the reaction sites of the soil matrix. In view of the lack of knowledge on the conditions within the individual aggregates were carried out for characterizing the aggregates and comparing them with the soil in, general soil samples were taken from natural structure of a podzolic soil and a podazolic brown earth from two sites in the Fichtelgebirge mountains as well as a parabraun earth from East Holstein. The horizons differed with regard to their texture and structure; silty material tends to have a subpolyhedral structure and calyey material a polyhedral structure. The general soil samples and aggregate samples from the three B horizons were subjected, with comparable experimental conditions, to percolation experiments inducing a multiple acid load. The soil solution from the secondary pore system and aggregate pore system is more heterogeneus for the higher-structured subpolyhedral texture of the perdzolic soil than for the less strongly aggregated subpolyhedral structured of the podzolic brown earth. (orig.) [de

  9. TGP, an extremely stable, non-aggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Close, Devin W.; Don Paul, Craig; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Traore, Daouda A.K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP....

  10. Soil fertility management: Impacts on soil macrofauna, soil aggregation and soil organic matter allocation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayuke, F.O.; Brussaard, L.; Vanlauwe, B.; Six, J.; Lelei, D.K.; Kibunja, C.N.; Pulleman, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Maintenance of soil organic matter through integrated soil fertility management is important for soil quality and agricultural productivity, and for the persistence of soil faunal diversity and biomass. Little is known about the interactive effects of soil fertility management and soil macrofauna

  11. Symbiosis of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Robinia pseudoacacia L. Improves Root Tensile Strength and Soil Aggregate Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haoqiang; Liu, Zhenkun; Chen, Hui; Tang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Robinia pseudoacacia L. (black locust) is a widely planted tree species on Loess Plateau for revegetation. Due to its symbiosis forming capability with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, we explored the influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant biomass, root morphology, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability in a pot experiment. We inoculated R. pseudoacacia with/without AM fungus (Rhizophagus irregularis or Glomus versiforme), and measured root colonization, plant growth, root morphological characters, root tensile force and tensile strength, and parameters for soil aggregate stability at twelve weeks after inoculation. AM fungi colonized more than 70% plant root, significantly improved plant growth. Meanwhile, AM fungi elevated root morphological parameters, root tensile force, root tensile strength, Glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP) content in soil, and parameters for soil aggregate stability such as water stable aggregate (WSA), mean weight diameter (MWD) and geometric mean diameter (GMD). Root length was highly correlated with WSA, MWD and GMD, while hyphae length was highly correlated with GRSP content. The improved R. pseudoacacia growth, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability indicated that AM fungi could accelerate soil fixation and stabilization with R. pseudoacacia, and its function in revegetation on Loess Plateau deserves more attention.

  12. Fractal dimension of soil aggregates as an index of soil erodibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Abbas; Neyshabouri, Mohammad-Reza; Rouhipour, Hassan; Asadi, Hossein

    2011-04-01

    SummaryAggregate stability is an influential factor governing soil erodibility. The fractal dimension of soil aggregates has been related to their size distributions and stabilities. Several fractal models have been proposed for estimating fractal dimension of soil aggregates. This study was conducted to investigate how closely the soil interrill erodibility factor in WEPP model can be correlated to and predicted from soil aggregate size distribution or from their fractal dimensions. Samples from 36 soil series with contrasting properties were collected from northwest of Iran. The fractal dimensions of soil aggregates were calculated from Rieu and Sposito ( D n), Tyler and Wheatcraft ( D mT), and Young and Crawford ( D mY) models using aggregate size distribution (ASD) data. A rainfall simulator with drainable tilting flume (1 × 0.5 m) at slope of 9% was employed and total interrill erosion ( TIE), total splashed soil ( TS) and interrill erodibility factor ( K i) were calculated for 20, 37, and 47 mm h -1 rainfall intensities. Results showed that both D n and D mT estimated from aggregate wet-sieving data characterized ASD of the examined soils and significantly ( p < 0.01) correlated to TS, TIE and K i. Values of D n and D mT estimated from dry-sieving data only correlated to TS but not to TIE and K i. Using air-dried aggregates of 4.75-8 mm size range, instead of aggregates <4.75 mm, in wet-sieving was better for estimating D n as an index for the predication of TIE, TS and K i. Correction of ASD for the particle fraction greater than lower sieve mesh size in each size class decreased the correlation coefficient between TIE, TS or K i and D n or D mT. The values of D mY were not correlated to TS, TIE and K i. The correlation coefficient TIE and K i with D n and D mT derived from wet-sieving data, were higher than those with wet-aggregate stability (WAS), mean weight diameter (MWD) and geometric mean diameter (GMD), implying that D n and D mT may be better

  13. Assessing the strength of soil aggregates produced by two types of organic matter amendments using the ultrasonic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhaolong; minasny, Budiman; Field, Damien; Angers, Denis

    2017-04-01

    The presence of organic matter (OM) is known to stimulate the formation of soil aggregates, but the aggregation strength may vary with different amount and type/quality of OM. Conventionally wet sieving method was used to assess the aggregates' strength. In this study, we wish to get insight of the effects of different types of C inputs on aggregate dynamics using quantifiable energy via ultrasonic agitation. A clay soil with an inherently low soil organic carbon (SOC) content, was amended with two different sources of organic matter (alfalfa, C:N = 16.7 and barley straw, C:N = 95.6) at different input levels (0, 10, 20, & 30 g C kg-1 soil). The soil's inherent macro aggregates were first destroyed via puddling. The soils were incubated in pots at moisture content 70% of field capacity for a period of 3 months. The pots were housed in a 1.2L sealed opaque plastic container. The CO2 generated during the incubation was captured by a vial of NaOH which was placed in each of the sealed containers and sampled per week. At 14, 28, 56, and 84 days, soil samples were collected and the change in aggregation was assessed using a combination of wet sieving and ultrasonic agitation. The relative strength of aggregates exposed to ultrasonic agitation was modelled using the aggregate disruption characteristic curve (ADCC) and soil dispersion characteristic curve (SDCC). Both residue quality and quantity of organic matter input influenced the amount of aggregates formed and their relative strength. The MWD of soils amended with alfalfa residues was greater than that of barley straw at lower input rates and early in the incubation. In the longer term, the use of ultrasonic energy revealed that barley straw resulted in stronger aggregates, especially at higher input rates despite showing similar MWD as alfalfa. The use of ultrasonic agitation, where we quantify the energy required to liberate and disperse aggregates allowed us to differentiate the effects of C inputs on the size of

  14. Modeling of Soil Aggregate Stability using Support Vector Machines and Multiple Linear Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Besalatpour

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil aggregate stability is a key factor in soil resistivity to mechanical stresses, including the impacts of rainfall and surface runoff, and thus to water erosion (Canasveras et al., 2010. Various indicators have been proposed to characterize and quantify soil aggregate stability, for example percentage of water-stable aggregates (WSA, mean weight diameter (MWD, geometric mean diameter (GMD of aggregates, and water-dispersible clay (WDC content (Calero et al., 2008. Unfortunately, the experimental methods available to determine these indicators are laborious, time-consuming and difficult to standardize (Canasveras et al., 2010. Therefore, it would be advantageous if aggregate stability could be predicted indirectly from more easily available data (Besalatpour et al., 2014. The main objective of this study is to investigate the potential use of support vector machines (SVMs method for estimating soil aggregate stability (as quantified by GMD as compared to multiple linear regression approach. Materials and Methods: The study area was part of the Bazoft watershed (31° 37′ to 32° 39′ N and 49° 34′ to 50° 32′ E, which is located in the Northern part of the Karun river basin in central Iran. A total of 160 soil samples were collected from the top 5 cm of soil surface. Some easily available characteristics including topographic, vegetation, and soil properties were used as inputs. Soil organic matter (SOM content was determined by the Walkley-Black method (Nelson & Sommers, 1986. Particle size distribution in the soil samples (clay, silt, sand, fine sand, and very fine sand were measured using the procedure described by Gee & Bauder (1986 and calcium carbonate equivalent (CCE content was determined by the back-titration method (Nelson, 1982. The modified Kemper & Rosenau (1986 method was used to determine wet-aggregate stability (GMD. The topographic attributes of elevation, slope, and aspect were characterized using a 20-m

  15. Biochar Effects on Soil Aggregate Properties Under No-Till Maize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khademalrasoul, Ataalah; Naveed, Muhammad; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    2014-01-01

    Soil aggregates are useful indicators of soil structure and stability, and the impact on physical and mechanical aggregate properties is critical for the sustainable use of organic amendments in agricultural soil. In this work, we evaluated the short-term soil quality effects of applying biochar (0......-over-end shaking, a Yoder-type wet-sieving method, and an unconfined compression test in soil samples collected 7 and 19 months after final biochar application. The highest rates of biochar and swine manure application resulted in the highest aggregate stability and lowest clay dispersibility. Applying both...... amendments systematically increased TS and SRE for large aggregates (4–8 and 8–16 mm) but not for small aggregates (1–2 and 2–4 mm). Increased biochar application also decreased the friability index of soil aggregates. Based on X-ray visualization, it was found that aggregates containing larger amounts...

  16. Testing the effect of a microbial-based soil amendment on aggregate stability and erodibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malozo, Mponda; Iversen, Bo Vangsø; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    Minimizing soil erosion is essential for maintaining proper soil quality and thus preserving soil productivity. The erodibility of a soil is closely linked to its structural stability as well as its infiltrability. This study focuses on testing the effect of two different soil amendments on soil...... aggregate stability and erodibility. Two commercial products, gypsum and a microbial-based solution were used for the experiment and were tested on two Danish sandy loamy soils as well on a sandy soil from Tanzania. The carrier of the microbial-based product, a glycerol solution, was tested as well....... In the laboratory, soils were treated with the soil amendments in a two-step procedure at controlled water contents following aerobic incubation in closed containers. Water-aggregate stability and clay dispersion were measured on soil aggregates less than 8 mm in diameter. Aggregate stability was measured...

  17. Soil aggregation and associated microbial communities modify the impact of agricultural management on carbon content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Pankaj; Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Jeffries, Thomas C; Trivedi, Chanda; Anderson, Ian C; Lai, Kaitao; McNee, Matthew; Flower, Kenneth; Pal Singh, Bhupinder; Minkey, David; Singh, Brajesh K

    2017-08-01

    Soil carbon (C) stabilisation is known to depend in part on its distribution in structural aggregates, and upon soil microbial activity within the aggregates. However, the mechanisms and relative contributions of different microbial groups to C turnover in different aggregates under various management practices remain unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the role of soil aggregation and their associated microbial communities in driving the responses of soil organic matter (SOM) to multiple management practices. Our results demonstrate that higher amounts of C inputs coupled with greater soil aggregation in residue retention management practices has positive effects on soil C content. Our results provide evidence that different aggregate size classes support distinct microbial habitats which supports the colonisation of different microbial communities. Most importantly our results indicate that the effects of management practices on soil C is modulated by soil aggregate sizes and their associated microbial community and are more pronounced in macro-aggregate compared with micro-aggregate sizes. Based on our findings we recommend that differential response of management practices and microbial control on the C turnover in macro-aggregates and micro-aggregate should be explicitly considered when accounting for management impacts on soil C turnover. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [Stable Isotopes Characters of Soil Water Movement in Shijiazhuang City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tong-tong; Chen, Hui; Han, Lu; Xing, Xing; Fu, Yang-yang

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we analyzed the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope values of precipitation, soil water, irrigation water that collected in Shijiazhuang City from April 2013 to May 2014 to investigate the changing rule of the stable isotopes in different soil profiles and the process of soil water movement according to using the isotope tracer technique. The results showed that the mean excess deuterium of the local precipitation was -6.188 5 per thousand. Those reflected that the precipitation in Shijiazhuang City mainly brought by the monsoon from the ocean surface moisture, and also to some extent by the local evaporation. Precipitation was the main source of the soil water and the irrigation water played the supplementary role. In the rainy season, precipitation was enough to supply the soil water. The stable oxygen isotopes at 10-100 cm depth decreased with the increase of depth, the maximum depth of evaporation in the rainy season reached 40 cm. The peak of stable oxygen isotopes of soil water pushed down along the profile, which was infected by the interaction of the precipitation infiltration, evaporation and the mixing water.

  19. Aggregate breakdown and dispersion of soil samples amended with sugarcane vinasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Teixeira Ribeiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil aggregation is a very complex issue related to important soil attributes and processes. The aggregate breakdown and dispersion of soil samples amended with sugarcane vinasse were evaluated using ultrasonic energy. Vinasse is an important byproduct of sugarcane industries, intensively applied to soils in Brazil as liquid fertilizer. Samples of two Oxisols and one Ultisol were used in this study. The physical and chemical characterization of soils was performed, and the 1 to 2 mm size aggregates (200 g were packed in PVC columns (6.0 cm high and 4.0 cm internal diameter and incubated with sugarcane vinasse under lab conditions for 1, 30 and 60 days. After incubation, aggregates were submitted to levels of ultrasonic energy, and the particle size distribution (53 to 2,000 µm, 2 to 53 µm, and < 2 µm fractions was quantified. Mathematical equations were used to relate the mass of aggregates in each of these fractions to the applied ultrasonic energy, and parameters related to aggregate stability were then obtained. Soils showed an aggregate-hierarchy resulting in a stepwise breakdown under ultrasonic agitation. Considering this soil-aggregation hierarchy, vinasse contributed even in a short time to the bonding between and within 2 to 53 µm aggregates, mainly in the Oxisols. This may be related to organic compounds present in the vinasse, cementing soil particles. Potassium enrichment of soil samples did not contribute to soil dispersion.

  20. Aggregation and C dynamics along an elevation gradient in carbonate-containing grassland soils of the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Franco, Noelia; Wiesmeier, Martin; Kiese, Ralf; Dannenmann, Michael; Wolf, Benjamin; Zistl-Schlingmann, Marcus; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2017-04-01

    C sequestration in mountainous grassland soils is regulated by physical, chemical and biological soil process. An improved knowledge of the relationship between these stabilization mechanisms is decisive to recommend the best management practices for climate change mitigation. In this regard, the identification of a successful indicator of soil structural improvement and C sequestration in mountainous grassland soils is necessary. Alpine and pre-alpine grassland soils in Bavaria represent a good example for mountainous grassland soils faced with climate change. We sampled grassland soils of the northern limestone alps in Bavaria along an elevation gradient from 550 to 1300 m above sea level. We analyzed C dynamics by a comparative analysis of the distribution of C according to aggregate size classes: large-macroaggregates (> 2000 µm), small-macroaggregates (250-2000 µm), microaggregates (63-250 µm), silt plus clay particles (soil. Our preliminary results showed higher C content and changed water-stable aggregate distribution in the high elevation sites compared to lower elevations. Magnesium carbonate seem to play an important role in stabilizing macroaggregates formed from fresh OM. In addition, the isolation of occluded microaggregates within macroaggregates will help us to improve our understanding on the effects of climate change on soil structure and on the sensitivity of different C stabilization mechanisms present in mountainous soils.

  1. Computed Microtomography Quantification of Internal Pore Geometry of Soil Aggregates from Contrasting Land Management Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananyeva, K.; Wang, W.; Smucker, A. J.; Kravchenko, A. N.; Chun, H. C.; Rivers, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    Structure of soil aggregate interiors controls intra-aggregate processes and provides important contributions to the biogeochemical processes of the soil profile. Applications of computed microtomography (CMT) to soil science have enabled the direct and nondestructive analyses of internal aggregate pore structures within soil volumes. The main objective of this study was to employ CMT to examine the internal pore structures of soil aggregates, 4 to 6.3 mm across, sampled at 0-20 cm depths from contrasting long-term land management types. Intra-aggregate pore-size distributions were compared among land management types. Porosity below CMT resolution (tillage, grass vegetation) than that of aggregates managed by conventional tillage (CT) used for agriculture. There was also greater percentage of intra-aggregate pores >400 µm in aggregates from NS than CT or NT management systems. In the range 15-100 µm, however, porosity of CT aggregates exceeded that of NS and NT aggregates. Total intra-aggregate porosities were similar and higher for both CT and NS (34.6 and 34.7%, correspondingly) than the 32.6% for NT aggregates. Although statistically significant, this difference (CT or NS vs. NT) was practically small, requiring at least 48 replications to be detected. These results indicate that long-term differences in management affected intra-aggregate pore size distributions. Increased 15-100 µm porosity in CT aggregates is probably related to their greater fragility. A combination of higher microporosity (400 µm in NS aggregates may generate more favorable conditions for microbial activity through a combination of larger intra-aggregate regions with high water-holding capacities and increased aeration and preferential flow pathways for intra-aggregate solute and gas transport. Our current focus is comparing and relating specifics of internal pore structures in the aggregates from contrasting land management types, to the measurements of solution and microbial flow

  2. Friability and aggregate stability of loamy soil after 5 years of biochar application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utomo, Wani; Ganika, Shaory; Wisnubroto, Erwin; Islami, Titiek

    2016-04-01

    The effect of biochar application on soil friability and aggregate stability of loamy soil was studied at Brawijaya University field experimental station, Jatikerto, Malang, Indonesia. The soil has been planted with cassava for 4 years continuously and 1 year planted with maiz. The biochar applied was made from cassava stem and farm yard manure. It was found that biochar application, either made from cassava stem or farm yard manure improved soil qualities. Soil applied with biochar was more friable compared to that of the no biochar soil, although biochar application did not influence Atterberg limits. It seems that the higher friability of biochar applied soil was associated with the higher soil organic matter. It was found that until 5 years application, the biochar treated soil had a higher soil organic matter content. Soil applied with biochar possessed a better soil aggregate stability, both dry and wet stability. This was shown by the higher aggregate mean weight diameter (MWD) of biochar applied soil. The cassava biochar applied soil had MWD of 2.22 mm (dry stability) and 1.56 mm (wet stability), whereas the control soil had MWD of 1.45 mm (dry stability) and 1.25 (wet stability). There was a significant positive correlation between soil friability and dry aggregate stability. The biochar applied soils also had higher soil permeability. Key words: soil qualities, soil physical properties, Atterberg limits, hydraulic conductivity

  3. Dynamics of soil GHG emissions shaped by hydration state, aggregate size distribution and carbon placement: Column experiments using artificial soil aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2017-04-01

    Dynamics of soil hydration affect microbial community dynamics and various biogeochemical processes (soil respiration, denitrification, methane production). Evidence suggests that anoxic conditions may persist in soil aggregates (long after bulk soil is aerated) thereby providing niches for anaerobic microbial communities (hot spots). Despite their recognized role in mediating soil biogeochemical fluxes, systematic studies of the impact of different environmental conditions on CO2, N2O and CH4 emissions from soil aggregates remain rare. We constructed artificial aggregates using a silt loam soil of different sizes and different carbon configurations (mixed, core, no addition) to study effects of hydration, aggregate size and carbon source configuration on GHG emissions. An assembly of aggregates of three sizes (18, 12, and 6 mm aggregates) was embedded in sand columns at four distinct layers (3 replicates for each aggregate-carbon source, 9 columns) and the water level was varied periodically to quantify effects of wetting/drying and submersion on GHG fluxes. Several gas samples were taken from the headspaces of each column (after closure) and analyzed using GC with the proper detectors to resolve fluxes. Results illustrate the critical role of hydration states on GHG emission, for example, lowering the water table (unsaturated conditions) decreases CH4 emissions while increasing N2O flux. We observe links between aerobic processes (e.g., nitrification) and anaerobic denitrification presumably by promoting alternative pathways (e.g., ammonia and nitrite oxidation). Methane production was activated under highly anoxic conditions (prolonged inundation). N2O production was highest form aggregates with carbon placed in the (anoxic) core whereas CO2 production rates were comparable from mixed and centered carbon sources (at rates that fluctuated with hydration conditions). Experimental results of artificial soil aggregates are of interest for improvement of physically

  4. Equivalent cylinder systems representing the soil matrix in diffusion-reaction models for an aggregated soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rappoldt, C; Verhagen, JHG

    1999-01-01

    The structure of an aggregated soil or a dual-porosity medium is characterized by a function called the generalized surface-area-to-volume ratio, which can be measured as a distance distribution. For an isotropic structure the distance measurements may be done in the digitized image of a

  5. Transformations in soil organic matter and aggregate stability after conversion of Mediterranean forest to agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio Vázquez, Lorena; Almendros, Gonzalo; Carral, Pilar; Knicker, Heike; González Pérez, José Antonio; González Vila, Francisco Javier

    2013-04-01

    Conversion of forest ecosystems into croplands often leads to severe decrease of the soil organic matter (SOM) levels with the concomitant deterioration of soil structure. The present research focuses on the effects of cultivation on the stability of soil macroaggregates, as well as on the total quantity and quality of SOM. Three representative soils from central Spain (i.e., Petric Calcisol, Cutanic Luvisol and Calcic Vertisol) were sampled. Each site had natural vegetation (NV) dominated either by characteristic Mediterranean forest (dehesa) or cereal crops (CC) under conventional tillage. For each site, three spatial replicates of the NV and CC were sampled. Soil aggregate stability was measured by the wet sieving method. The structural stability index was then calculated as the mass of aggregated soil (>250 μm) remaining after wet sieving, as a percent of total aggregate weight. The analytical characterization of the SOM was carried out after chemical fractionation for quantifying the different organic pools: free organic matter (FOM), humic acids (HA), fulvic acids (FA) and humin (H). Furthermore, whole soil samples pretreated with 10 % HF solution were analyzed by CP-MAS 13C NMR and the purified HA fraction was characterized by elementary analysis, visible and infrared spectroscopies and Py-GC/MS. A marked reduction in the proportion of stable aggregates when the natural ecosystem was converted to agriculture was observed. Values of the structural stability index (%) changed over from 96.2 to 38.1, 95.1 to 83.7 and 98.5 to 60.6 for the Calcisol, Luvisol and Vertisol respectively. Comparatively higher contents of SOM were found in the soils under NV (11.69 to 0.93, 3.29 to 2.72 and 9.51 to 0.79 g C100 g-1soil) even though a quantitative rearrangement of the SOM pools was noticed. In all sites, the relative contribution of the labile C (FOM) to the total SOM content decreased when the forest soils were converted into croplands, whereas the proportion of both

  6. Long-term manure amendments reduced soil aggregate stability via redistribution of the glomalin-related soil protein in macroaggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongtu; Li, Jianwei; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Lianfeng; Wang, Jingkuan; He, Hongbo; Zhang, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    Glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP) contributes to the formation and maintenance of soil aggregates, it is however remains unclear whether long-term intensive manure amendments alter soil aggregates stability and whether GRSP regulates these changes. Based on a three-decade long fertilization experiment in northeast China, this study examined the impact of long-term manure input on soil organic carbon (SOC), total and easily extractable GRSP (GRSPt and GRSPe) and their respective allocations in four soil aggregates (>2000 μm; 2000–250 μm; 250–53 μm; and soil and SOC in each aggregate generally increased with increasing manure input, GRSPt and GRSPe in each aggregate showed varying changes with manure input. Both GRSP in macroaggregates (2000–250 μm) were significantly higher under low manure input, a pattern consistent with changes in soil aggregate stability. Constituting 38~49% of soil mass, macroaggregates likely contributed to the nonlinear changes of aggregate stability under manure amendments. The regulatory process of GRSP allocations in soil aggregates has important implications for manure management under intensive agriculture. PMID:26423355

  7. Water-stable 0-20 μm microaggregates of cultivated topsoils as relevant indicators of soil functioning ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watteau, Françoise; Villemin, Geneviève; Blanchart, Eric; Bartoli, François

    2010-05-01

    Growing concern about sustainable soil management in agroecosystems, has given new impetus to research on soil quality indicators used to monitor the ability of ecosystems to either resist or degrade or recover from disturbances, i.e. land use change, climate warning, pollution, tillage... Integrating soil aggregation characteristics, and their dynamics, into agrosystem studies is very useful to understand how cultivated soils function and how their soil organic matter pools could be preserved or improved. The aim of the researches reported here was to test the hypothesis that the characterization of water-stable organo-mineral 2-20μm microaggregates - in terms of size, composition, typology and stability - would be relevant dynamic soil quality indicators of the impact of cropping practices. For this, two agrosystems were studied: (1) a temperate maize-cropped silt loam soil amended with sewage sludge and (2) a vertisol of south-eastern Martinique presenting a high sensitivity for erosion and used for intensive vegetable cropping. A quantitative and qualitative study of organo-mineral associations, combining granulometric soil fractionations and morphological/analytical characterizations at ultrastructural (TEM/EDX) scale was conducted. 0-20μm water-stable organo-mineral aggregates were involved in the structural stability of the maize-cropped soil and their organic matter was still recognizable, mainly of plant origin, but also of bacterial origin. Some impacts of the application of sewage sludge were the emergence of microaggregates containing residues of sludge flocs, which can be considered as specific indicators of sludge, and the transfer of Cu from sludge to endogenous soil organic matter within microaggregates. In the agricultural vertisol different types of water-stable 2-20μm microaggregates, were defined, based on the nature and the biodegradation state of the organic matter included in them. Their relative distributions varied as a function of land

  8. Stable isotopes in plant nutrition, soil fertility and environmental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The individual contributions in these proceedings are indexed separately. Main topics covered include the measurement of biological nitrogen fixation, studies of soil organic matter, investigations of nutrient uptake and use by plants, studies of plant metabolism and new methodologies in the analysis of stable isotopes. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. Effects of tillage on contents of organic carbon, nitrogen, water-stable aggregates and light fraction for four different long-term trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andruschkewitsch, R.; Geisseler, D.; Koch, H.-J.; Ludwig, B.

    2012-04-01

    Despite increasing interest in tillage techniques as a factor affecting organic carbon (Corg) dynamics and stabilization mechanisms little is known about the underlying processes. Our objectives were (i) to quantify the impact of different tillage treatments on the amount and distribution of of labile Corg pools, on the water-stable macro-aggregate (>250 µm) contents and on organic carbon (Corg) storage and (ii) to quantify the ability of soils under different tillage treatments, light fraction (LF) inputs and clay contents in macro-aggregate formation. Therefore four long-term tillage trials on loess soil in Germany with regular conventional tillage (CT, to 30 cm), mulch tillage (MT, to 10 cm), and no-tillage (NT) treatments. Samples were taken in 0-5 cm, 5-25 cm and 25-40 cm depth after 18-25 years of different tillage treatments and investigated on free and occluded LF (fLF and oLF, respectively) and on macro-aggregate contents. Furthermore an incubation experiment for the quantifcation of macro-aggregate formation was conducted. Macro-aggregates in soils from CT and NT treatments (0-5 and 5-25 cm soil depth) were destroyed and different amounts of light fraction (LF) and clay were applied. The four long-term tillage trials, differing in texture and climatic conditions, revealed consistent results in Corg storage among each other. Based on the equivalent soil mass approach (CT: 0-40, MT: 0-38, NT: 0-36 cm) the Corg stocks in the sampled profile were significantly higher for the MT treatment than for the CT and NT treatments. Significantly lower Corg, fLF, oLF, and macro-aggregate contents for the soils under CT treatment in comparison with the soils under NT and MT treatments were restricted on the top 5 cm. The correlation of the macro-aggregate content against the fLF and oLF contents suggested that the macro-aggregate content is influenced to a lesser extent directly by the physical impact of the different tillage treatments but by the contents of available

  10. Field soil aggregate stability kit for soil quality and rangeland health evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, J.E.; Whitford, W.G.; de Soyza, A. G.; Van Zee, J. W.; Havstad, K.M.; Seybold, C.A.; Walton, M.

    2001-01-01

    Soil aggregate stability is widely recognized as a key indicator of soil quality and rangeland health. However, few standard methods exist for quantifying soil stability in the field. A stability kit is described which can be inexpensively and easily assembled with minimal tools. It permits up to 18 samples to be evaluated in less than 10 min and eliminates the need for transportation, minimizing damage to soil structure. The kit consists of two 21??10.5??3.5 cm plastic boxes divided into eighteen 3.5??3.5 cm sections, eighteen 2.5-cm diameter sieves with 1.5-mm distance openings and a small spatula used for soil sampling. Soil samples are rated on a scale from one to six based on a combination of ocular observations of slaking during the first 5 min following immersion in distilled water, and the percent remaining on a 1.5-mm sieve after five dipping cycles at the end of the 5-min period. A laboratory comparison yielded a correlation between the stability class and percent aggregate stability based on oven dry weight remaining after treatment using a mechanical sieve. We have applied the method in a wide variety of agricultural and natural ecosystems throughout western North America, including northern Mexico, and have found that it is highly sensitive to differences in management and plant community composition. Although the field kit cannot replace the careful laboratory-based measurements of soil aggregate stability, it can clearly provide valuable information when these more intensive procedures are not possible.

  11. Soil aggregation and intra-aggregate carbon fractions in relation to vegetation succession on the Loess Plateau, China

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Man; Xiang, Yun; Xue, Zhijing; An, Shaoshan; Darboux, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Revegetation has been reported to be one of the most effective measures for reducing soil erosion on the Loess Plateau in China. The Yunwu observatory, located in the northwestern Loess Plateau of China, was selected to study the effect of vegetation succession on total carbon (C), aggregate C, and intra-aggregate particulate organic matter-carbon (iPOM-C) concentrations. The vegetation types studied, listed from the shortest to the longest enclosure duration order, were abandoned graze...

  12. Soil aggregation and the stabilization of organic carbon as affected by erosion and deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X.; Cammeraat, E.L.H.; Cerli, C.; Kalbitz, K.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of soil aggregation in determining the dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) during erosion, transportation and deposition is poorly understood. Particularly, we do not know how aggregation contributes to the often-observed accumulation of SOC at depositional sites. Our objective was

  13. Aggregate-associated carbon and nitrogen in reclaimed sandy loam soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, A.F.; Stahl, P.D.; Ingram, L.J. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Minimal research has been conducted on aggregate, C, and N in coarse-textured soils used to reclaim surface coal mine lands. Furthermore, little is known about the contribution different plant communities make to the recovery of aggregation in these soils. Two chronosequences of semiarid reclaimed sites with sandy loam soils were sampled under shrub- and grass-dominated communities. Aggregation, aggregate fractions, and associated C and N were measured. No definitive trends of increasing macroaggregates between sites were observed undershrubs; however, macro- and microaggregation was greater in the 16-yr-old (0.20 and 0.23 kg aggregate kg{sup -1} soil, respectively) than in the 5-yr-old soils (0.02 and 0.08 kg aggregate kg{sup -1} soil, respectively) under grasses. Although C and N concentrations were drastically reduced (50-75%) with mining activity between the <1-yr-old and native soils, aggregate C and N concentrations tinder shrubs and grasses were similar to each other and to the native soils in the 5-yr-old site. Sods under grass in the 16-yr-old site had lower available and aggregate-occluded C and N concentrations than the 5-yr-old site, while C and N concentrations did not change between 5- and 16-yr-old soils under shrubs. Conversely, aggregate C and N pool sizes under shrubs and grasses both increased with site age to conditions similar to those observed in the native soil. Reclaimed shrub site soils had consistently higher C concentrations in the older reclaimed sites (10 and 16 yr old) than the soils under grasses, indicating greater accumulation and retention of C and N in organic material under shrub than grass communities in semiarid reclaimed sites.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF BIOGENIC, INTERMEDIATE AND PHYSICOGENIC SOIL AGGREGATES OF AREAS IN THE BRAZILIAN ATLANTIC FOREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JÚLIO CÉSAR FEITOSA FERNANDES

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate formation and stability are related to soil quality, contributing significantly to the carbon storage and nutrient maintenance capacities of the soil. Soil aggregates are formed by two different process: physicogenic, related to moistening and drying cycles and input of organic matter; and biogenic, related to the action of macrofauna organisms and roots. The objective this work was to classify aggregates according to their formation process, quantify and compare organic carbon contents in humic substances and assess the stability of aggregates formed by different processes, in areas with different coverage in the Mid Paraiba Valley, Pinheiral, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Aggregated soil samples were collected at a depth of 0-10 cm, in a Cambisol (Cambissolo Háplico Tb Distrófico under four plant covers: secondary forest in advanced (SFAS, medium (SFMS and initial (SFIS successional stages and managed mixed pasture (MMP. Aggregates were classified and identified into three morphological classes (physicogenic, biogenic and intermediate. The variables evaluated were mean weight diameter (MWD and geometric mean diameter (GMD of aggregates, chemical fractions of organic matter, total organic carbon (TOC and humic substances: humin (C-HUM humic acid (C-FAH and fulvic acid (C-FAF. Biogenic aggregates were found in smaller quantities and showed higher TOC, C-HUM and C-FAH, compared to intermediate and physicogenic aggregates. Thus, biogenic aggregates have potential to be used as soil quality indicators for structured environments, which are able to maintain its intrinsic formation processes.

  15. TGP, an extremely stable, non-aggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Devin W.; Don Paul, Craig; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Traore, Daouda A.K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization. PMID:25287913

  16. Highly Stable Trypsin-Aggregate Coatings on Polymer Nanofibers for Repeated Protein Digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chan; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Lee, Sang-mok; Ahn, Hye-kyung; Nair, Sujith; Kim, Seong H.; Kim, Beom S.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Camp, David G.; Grate, Jay W.; Smith, Richard D.; Koo, Yoon-mo; Gu, Man Bock; Kim, Jungbae

    2009-04-01

    A stable and robust trypsin-based biocatalytic system was developed and demonstrated for proteomic applications. The system utilizes polymer nanofibers coated with trypsin aggregates for immobilized protease digestions. After covalently attaching an initial layer of trypsin to the polymer nanofibers, highly concentrated trypsin molecules are crosslinked to the layered trypsin by way of a glutaraldehyde treatment. This new process produced a 300-fold increase in trypsin activity compared with a conventional method for covalent trypsin immobilization and proved to be robust in that it still maintained a high level of activity after a year of repeated recycling. This highly stable form of immobilized trypsin was also resistant to autolysis, enabling repeated digestions of bovine serum albumin over 40 days and successful peptide identification by LC-MS/MS. Finally, the immobilized trypsin was resistant to proteolysis when exposed to other enzymes (i.e. chymotrypsin), which makes it suitable for use in “real-world” proteomic applications. Overall, the biocatalytic nanofibers with enzyme aggregate coatings proved to be an effective approach for repeated and automated protein digestion in proteomic analyses.

  17. Linking soil permeability and soil aggregate stability with root development: a pots experiment (preliminary results)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergani, Chiara; Graf, Frank; Gerber, Werner

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying and monitoring the contribution of vegetation to the stability of the slopes is a key issue for implementing effective soil bioengineering measures. This topic is being widely investigated both from the hydrological and mechanical point of view. Nevertheless, due to the high variability of the biological components, we are still far from a comprehensive understanding of the role of plants in slope stabilization, especially if the different succession phases and the temporal development of vegetation is considered. Graf et al., 2014, found within the scope of aggregate stability investigations that the root length per soil volume of alder specimen grown for 20 weeks under laboratory conditions is comparable to the one of 20 years old vegetation in the field. This means that already relatively short time scales can provide meaningful information at least for the first stage of colonization of soil bioengineering measures, which is also the most critical. In the present study we analyzed the effect of root growth on two soil properties critical to evaluate the performance of vegetation in restoring and re-stabilizing slopes: permeability and soil aggregate stability. We set up a laboratory experiment in order to work under controlled conditions and limit as much as possible the natural variability. Alnus incana was selected as the study species as it is widely used in restoration projects in the Alps, also because of its capacity to fix nitrogen and its symbiosis with both ecto and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. After the first month of growth in germination pots, we planted one specimen each in big quasi cylindrical pots of 34 cm diameter and 35 cm height. The pots were filled with the soil fraction smaller than 10 mm coming from an oven dried moraine collected in a subalpine landslide area (Hexenrübi catchment, central Switzerland). The targeted dry unit weight was 16 kN/m3. The plants have been maintained at a daily temperature of 25°C and relative

  18. Fourier and granulometry methods on 3D images of soil surfaces for evaluating soil aggregate size distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.; Green, O.; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to present and compare two methods for evaluating soil aggregate size distribution based on high resolution 3D images of the soil surface. The methods for analyzing the images are discrete Fourier transform and granulometry. The results of these methods correlate...... with a measured weight distribution of the soil aggregates. The results have shown that it is possible to distinguish between the cultivated and the uncultivated soil surface. A sensor system suitable for capturing in-situ high resolution 3D images of the soil surface is also described. This sensor system...

  19. Aggregate Indices Method in Soil Quality Evaluation Using the Relative Soil Quality Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Ngoc Pham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new approach to assess the soil quality by aggregate indices using the Relative Soil Quality Index (RSQI proposed by Ho Ngoc Pham. RSQI is integrated from the individual indices into a simple formula for overall assessment of the soil quality. RSQI is different from other approaches. Particularly, the individual indices and the weighting factors of Pham are calculated from the analytical laboratory data and the environmental standards, respectively, and not self-regulated as in methods of some other authors. In this paper, the authors applied the RSQI to assess the Soil Environmental Quality of rice intensive cultivation areas through a case study in Haiduong province in 2013. The RSQI is calculated for sampling points in 12 districts and simulated the Soil Environmental Quality on GIS map. The results show that the Soil Environmental Quality of rice intensive cultivation areas in Haiduong is predominantly divided into three levels: good, moderate, and poor. According to the report of General Statistics Office for Haiduong province, rice intensive cultivation areas in 2013 achieved a relatively high average rice yield of 5.90 tonnes per hectare; it means actual soil properties are in line with results of the research.

  20. Effects of Pedogenic Fe Oxides on Soil Aggregate-Associated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefaw Berhe, A.; Jin, L.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon sequestration is intimately related to the soil structure, mainly soil aggregate dynamics. Carbon storage in soil aggregates has been recognized as an important carbon stabilization mechanism in soils. Organic matter and pedogenic Fe oxides are major binding agents that facilitate soil aggregate formation and stability. However, few studies have investigated how different forms of pedogenic Fe oxides can affect soil carbon distribution in different aggregate-size fractions. We investigated sequentially extracted pedogenic Fe oxides (in the order of organically complexed Fe extracted with sodium pyrophosphate, poorly-crystalline Fe oxides extracted with hydroxylamine hydrochloride, and crystalline Fe oxides extracted with dithionite hydrochloride) and determined the amount and nature of C in macroaggregates (2-0.25mm), microaggregates (0.25-0.053mm), and two silt and clay fractions (0.053-0.02mm, and <0.02mm) in Musick soil from Sierra Nevada mountain in California. We also determined how pedogenic Fe oxides affect soil carbon distribution along soil depth gradients. Findings of our study revealed that the proportion of organic matter complexed Fe decreased, but the proportion of crystalline Fe increased with increasing soil depths. Poorly crystalline Fe oxides (e.g. ferrihydrite) was identified as a major Fe oxide in surface soil, whereas crystalline Fe oxides (e.g. goethite) were found in deeper soil layers. These results suggest that high concentration of organic matter in surface soil suppressed Fe crystallization. Calcium cation was closely related to the pyrophosphate extractable Fe and C, which indicates that calcium may be a major cation that contribute to the organic matter complexed Fe and C pool. Increasing concentrations of extractable Fe and C with decreasing aggregate size fractions also suggests that Fe oxides play an important role in formation and stability of silt and clay fractions, and leading to further stabilization of carbon in soil

  1. [Characteristics of soil water movement using stable isotopes in red soil hilly region of northwest Hunan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ri-Chang; Chen, Hong-Song; Song, Xian-Fang; Wang, Ke-Lin; Yang, Qing-Qing; Meng, Wei

    2009-09-15

    Stable isotope techniques provide a new approach to study soil water movement. The process of water movement in soils under two kinds of plant types (oil tea and corn) were studied based on the observed values of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes of precipitation and soil water at different depths in red-soil sloping land. The results showed that stable isotopes of precipitation in this area had obvious seasonal effect and rainfall effect. The stable isotopes at 0-50 cm depth in oil tea forestland and at 0-40 cm depth in corn cropland increased with the increase in depth, respectively, but they had the opposite tendency after rainfall in arid time. The stable isotopes decreased with the increase in depth below 50 cm depth in oil tea forestland and below 40 cm depth in corn cropland where evaporation influence was weak. The infiltrate rate of soil in oil tea land was affected by precipitation obviously, and it was about 50-100 mm/d after 2-3 days in heavy rain, slowed sharply later, and soil water at 50 cm depth often became a barrier layer. The permeability of soil in corn land was poor and the infiltration rate was lower. The change of stable isotopes in soil water in red soil hilly region was mainly affected by the mixing water which was formed by the antecedent precipitation, and evaporation effect took the second place. The evaporation intensity in oil tea land was lower than that in corn land, but the evaporation depth was higher.

  2. Soil aggregate stability and erodibility in different gully sites in parts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper assesses soil aggregate stability and erodibility in different gully sites in parts of Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria with the aim to provide quantitative information on the variation of some soil properties and their interaction with eroding agents and how this affects soil erosion on the sites. The gullies selected are found ...

  3. Differences in SOM decomposition and temperature sensitivity among soil aggregate size classes in a temperate grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Dan; Wen, Xuefa; Yu, Guirui; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Rongfu

    2015-01-01

    The principle of enzyme kinetics suggests that the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is inversely related to organic carbon (C) quality, i.e., the C quality-temperature (CQT) hypothesis. We tested this hypothesis by performing laboratory incubation experiments with bulk soil, macroaggregates (MA, 250-2000 μm), microaggregates (MI, 53-250 μm), and mineral fractions (MF, temperature and aggregate size significantly affected on SOM decomposition, with notable interactive effects (Psoil and soil aggregates increased with increasing incubation temperature in the following order: MA>MF>bulk soil >MI(P soil, MF, and MI. Similarly, the activation energies (Ea) for MA, bulk soil, MF, and MI were 48.47, 33.26, 27.01, and 23.18 KJ mol-1, respectively. The observed significant negative correlations between Q10 and C quality index in bulk soil and soil aggregates (Psoil aggregates. Cumulative C emission differed significantly among aggregate size classes (P temperature is closely associated withsoil aggregation and highlights the complex responses of ecosystem C budgets to future warming scenarios.

  4. Runoff and Sediment Production under the Similar Rainfall Events in Different Aggregate Sizes of an Agricultural Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. F. Eslami

    2016-09-01

    soil loss (sediment. Ten same rainfall events with 60 mm h-1 in intensity for 30 min were applied using a designed rainfall simulator in the lab. The rainfall simulator had a rainfall plate with a dimension of 100 cm × 120 cm which has been fixed on a metal frame with 3m height from the ground surface. Runoff and sediment samples were collected using a plastic container placed the out-let of the flumes. Runoff generation of each flume was determined based on multiplying total content volume of the tank by volume proportion of water in the sample. Soil loss for each event was determined using multiply the container volume and sediment concentration of the uniform sample. Initial soil moisture was measured in the aggregate samples before each rainfall event in order to investigate its effect on the runoff and sediment variations in the event scales. Runoff, soil loss and initial soil moisture data were evaluated for normality before any statistical analysis using SPSS version 18 software. Differences of runoff and soil loss among different rainfall events were analyzed using the Duncan's test. Results and Discussion: Based on the results, the soil was calcareous having 16% equivalent calcium carbonate. Low amount of organic matter (0.6%. The measured aggregate stability showed to be very low, indicating high susceptibility of the aggregates to water erosion processes. Significant differences were found among the rainfall events in runoff (p< 0.05, sediment (p< 0.001 and sediment concentration (p< 0.001 which were associated with aggregate breakdown by raindrop impacts in the rainfall events. Runoff and sediment were strongly increased from each event to other event. Significant relationship was found between sediment and runoff in the events (R2= 0.89, p< 0.001. However, sediment showed to have higher increasing trend as compared to runoff variation pattern in the event scale. Sediment value was very low in the first rainfall event due to high portions of the water-stable

  5. Effects of sandy desertified land rehabilitation on soil carbon sequestration and aggregation in an arid region in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yong Zhong; Wang, Xue Fen; Yang, Rong; Lee, Jaehoon

    2010-11-01

    The rehabilitation of sandy desertified land in semi-arid and arid regions has a great potential to increase carbon sequestration and improve soil quality. Our objective was to investigate the changes in the soil carbon pool and soil properties of surface soil (0-15 cm) under different types of rehabilitation management. Our study was done in the short-term (7 years) and long-term (32 years) desertification control sites in a marginal oasis of northwest China. The different management treatments were: (1) untreated shifting sand land as control; (2) sand-fixing shrubs with straw checkerboards; (3) poplar (Populus gansuensis) shelter forest; and (4) irrigated cropland after leveling sand dune. The results showed that the rehabilitation of severe sandy desertified land resulted in significant increases in soil organic C (SOC), inorganic C, and total N concentrations, as well as enhanced soil aggregation. Over a 7-year period of revegetation and cultivation, SOC concentration in the recovered shrub land, forest land and irrigated cropland increased by 4.1, 14.6 and 11.9 times compared to the control site (shifting sand land), and increased by 11.2, 17.0 and 23.0 times over the 32-year recovery period. Total N, labile C (KMnO(4)-oxidation C), C management index (CMI) and inorganic C (CaCO(3)-C) showed a similar increasing trend as SOC. The increased soil C and N was positively related to the accumulation of fine particle fractions. The accumulation of silt and clay, soil C and CaCO(3) enhanced the formation of aggregates, which was beneficial to mitigate wind erosion. The percentage of >0.25 mm dry aggregates increased from 18.0% in the control site to 20.0-87.2% in the recovery sites, and the mean weight diameter (MWD) of water-stable aggregates significantly increased, with a range of 0.09-0.30 mm at the recovery sites. Long-term irrigation and fertilization led to a greater soil C and N accumulation in cropland than in shrub and forest lands. The amount of soil C

  6. Applicability of recycled aggregates in concrete piles for soft soil improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros-Junior, Ronaldo A; Balestra, Carlos Et; Lima, Maryangela G

    2017-01-01

    The expressive generation of construction and demolition waste is stimulating several studies for reusing this material. The improvement of soft soils by concrete compaction piles has been widely applied for 40 years in some Brazilian cities. This technique is used to improve the bearing capacity of soft soils, allowing executing shallow foundations instead of deep foundations. The compaction piles use a high volume of material. This article explored the possibility of using recycled aggregates from construction waste to replace the natural aggregates in order to improve the bearing capacity of the soft soil, regarding its compressive strength. Construction wastes from different stages of a construction were used in order to make samples of concrete with recycled aggregates. The strength of concretes with natural aggregates was compared with the strength of concretes with recycled (fine and coarse) aggregates. Results show that all samples met the minimum compressive strength specified for compaction piles used to improve the bearing capacity of soft soils. The concrete with recycled aggregate from the structural stage had even higher resistances than the concrete with natural aggregates. This behaviour was attributed to the large amount of cementitious materials in the composition of this type of concrete. It was also observed that concrete with recycled fine aggregate has a superior resistance to concrete with recycled coarse aggregate.

  7. [Effects of Tillage on Distribution of Heavy Metals and Organic Matter Within Purple Paddy Soil Aggregates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qiong-bin; Zhao, Xiu-lan; Chang, Tong-ju; Lu, Ji-wen

    2016-05-15

    A long-term experiment was utilized to study the effects of tillage methods on the contents and distribution characteristics of organic matter and heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Fe and Mn) in aggregates with different sizes (including 1-2, 0.25-1, 0.05-0.25 mm and soil under two tillage methods including flooded paddy field (FPF) and paddy-upland rotation (PR). The relationship between heavy metals and organic matter in soil aggregates was also analyzed. The results showed that the aggregates of two tillage methods were dominated by 0.05-0.25 mm and organic matter in each aggregate decreased with the decrease of aggregate sizes, however, compared to PR, FPF could significantly increase the contents of organic matter in soils and aggregates. The tillage methods did not significantly affect the contents of heavy metals in soils, but FPF could enhance the accumulation and distribution of aggregate, organic matter and heavy metals in aggregates with diameters of 1-2 mm and 0.25-1 mm. Correlation analysis found that there was a negative correlation between the contents of heavy metals and organic matter in soil aggregates, but a positive correlation between the amounts of heavy metal and organic matter accumulated in soil aggregates. From the slope of the correlation analysis equations, we could found that the sensitivities of heavy metals to the changes of soil organic matters followed the order of Mn > Zn > Pb > Cu > Fe > Cd under the same tillage. When it came to the same heavy metal, it was more sensitive in PR than in FPF.

  8. [Impact of land use type on stability and organic carbon of soil aggregates in Jinyun Mountain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Lin; Jiang, Chang-Sheng; Hao, Qing-Ju

    2014-12-01

    Soil aggregates have the important effect on soil fertility, soil quality and the sustainable utilization of soil, and they are the mass bases of water and fertilizer retention ability of soil and the supply or release of soil nutrients. In this paper, in order to study the impact of land use type on stability and organic carbon of soil aggregates in Jinyun Mountain, we separated four land use types of soil, which are woodland, abandoned land, orchard and sloping farmland by wet sieving method, then we got the proportion of large macroaggregates (> 2 mm), small macroaggregates (0.25-2 mm), microaggregates (53 μm-0.25 mm) and silt + clay (soil depth of 0-60 cm and calculated the total content of organic carbon of all aggregates fraction in each soil. The results showed that reclamation of woodland will lead to fragmentation of macroaggregates and deterioration of soil structure, and the proportion of macroaggrgates (> 0.25 mm) were 44.62% and 32.28% respectively in the soils of orchard and sloping farmland, which reduced 38.58% (P soil fraction from silt + clay to large macroaggregates and small macroaggregates, so it will improve the soil structure. MWD (mean weight diameter) and GMD (geometric mean diameter) are important indicators of evaluating the stability of soil aggregates. We found the MWD and GWD in soil depth of 0-60 cm in orchards and sloping farmland were significantly lower than those in woodland (P will lead to the decrease of stability of soil aggregates, and they will be separated more easily by water. However, after changing the sloping farmland to abandoned land will enhance the stability of soil aggregates, and improve the ability of soil to resist external damage. The organic carbon content in each soil aggregate of four land use types decreased with the increase of soil depth. In soil depth of 0-60 cm, the storage of organic carbon of large macroaggregates in each soil are in orders of woodland (14.98 Mg x hm(-2)) > abandoned land (8.71 Mg x

  9. Nitrogen addition alters elemental stoichiometry within soil aggregates in a temperate steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jinfei; Wang, Ruzhen; Liu, Heyong; Feng, Xue; Xu, Zhuwen; Jiang, Yong

    2016-11-01

    Ongoing increases in anthropogenic nitrogen (N) inputs have largely affected soil carbon (C) and nutrient cycling in most terrestrial ecosystems. Numerous studies have concerned the effects of elevated N inputs on soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic N (DIN), available phosphorus (AP), exchangeable calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg), and available iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn). However, few have emphasized the stoichiometric traits of these soil parameters, especially within different soil aggregate fractions. In a semiarid grassland of Inner Mongolia, we studied the effect of N addition on the ratios of DOC : DIN, DOC : AP, DIN : AP, exchangeable Ca : Mg, available Fe : Mn within three soil aggregate classes of large macroaggregates (> 2000 µm), small macroaggregates (250-2000 µm), and microaggregates (soil aggregates. The soil DOC : AP ratio significantly decreased along with increasing N gradients within large macroaggregates and microaggregates. Nitrogen significantly decreased the ratio of exchangeable Ca : Mg within soil macroaggregates. The ratio of available Fe : Mn decreased with N addition within three soil aggregate classes. Alteration of elemental stoichiometry within soil fractions that are characterized by different nutrient retention capacity will influence the chemical composition of soil microorganisms and plant quality.

  10. Carbon sequestration potential of soils in southeast Germany derived from stable soil organic carbon saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmeier, Martin; Hübner, Rico; Spörlein, Peter; Geuß, Uwe; Hangen, Edzard; Reischl, Arthur; Schilling, Bernd; von Lützow, Margit; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2014-02-01

    Sequestration of atmospheric carbon (C) in soils through improved management of forest and agricultural land is considered to have high potential for global CO2 mitigation. However, the potential of soils to sequester soil organic carbon (SOC) in a stable form, which is limited by the stabilization of SOC against microbial mineralization, is largely unknown. In this study, we estimated the C sequestration potential of soils in southeast Germany by calculating the potential SOC saturation of silt and clay particles according to Hassink [Plant and Soil 191 (1997) 77] on the basis of 516 soil profiles. The determination of the current SOC content of silt and clay fractions for major soil units and land uses allowed an estimation of the C saturation deficit corresponding to the long-term C sequestration potential. The results showed that cropland soils have a low level of C saturation of around 50% and could store considerable amounts of additional SOC. A relatively high C sequestration potential was also determined for grassland soils. In contrast, forest soils had a low C sequestration potential as they were almost C saturated. A high proportion of sites with a high degree of apparent oversaturation revealed that in acidic, coarse-textured soils the relation to silt and clay is not suitable to estimate the stable C saturation. A strong correlation of the C saturation deficit with temperature and precipitation allowed a spatial estimation of the C sequestration potential for Bavaria. In total, about 395 Mt CO2 -equivalents could theoretically be stored in A horizons of cultivated soils - four times the annual emission of greenhouse gases in Bavaria. Although achieving the entire estimated C storage capacity is unrealistic, improved management of cultivated land could contribute significantly to CO2 mitigation. Moreover, increasing SOC stocks have additional benefits with respect to enhanced soil fertility and agricultural productivity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Aggregate Stability in Soil with Humic and Histic Horizons in a Toposequence under Araucaria Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hanke

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Aggregate stability is one of the most important factors in soil conservation and maintenance of soil environmental functions. The objective of this study was to investigate the aggregate stability mechanisms related to chemical composition of organic matter in soil profiles with humic and histic horizons in a toposequence under Araucaria moist forest in southern Brazil. The soils sampled were classified as Humic Hapludox (highest position, Fluvaquentic Humaquepts (lowest slope position, and Typic Haplosaprists (floodplain. The C and N contents were determined in bulk soil samples. The chemical composition of soil organic matter was evaluated by infrared spectroscopy. Aggregate stability was determined by applying increasing levels of ultrasound energy. Carbon content increased from the top of the slope to the alluvial plain. Higher ultrasonic energy values for clay dispersion were observed in the C-rich soils in the lower landscape positions, indicating that organic compounds play an important role in the structural stabilization of these profiles. Both aliphatic and carbohydrate-like structures were pertinent to aggregate stability. In the Oxisol, organo-mineral interaction between carbohydrates and the clay mineral surface was the most important mechanism affecting aggregation. In soils with a higher C content (Humaquepts and Haplosaprists, stabilization is predominantly conferred by the aliphatic groups, which is probably due to the structural protection offered by these hydrophobic organic groups.

  12. Effect of Soil Water Content on the Distribution of Diuron into Organomineral Aggregates of Highly Weathered Tropical Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regitano, Jussara B; Rocha, Wadson S D; Bonfleur, Eloana J; Milori, Debora; Alleoni, Luís R F

    2016-05-25

    We evaluated the effects of soil water content on the retention of diuron and its residual distribution into organomineral aggregates in four Brazilian oxisols. (14)C-Diuron was incubated for days at 25, 50, and 75% of maximum water-holding capacity for each soil. After 42 days, the physical fractionation method was used to obtain >150, 53-150, 20-53, 2-20, and Diuron retention increased with increasing soil water content for all soils. At lower soil water content, diuron's retention was higher in the sandier soil. It was mostly retained in the fine (53 μm). The sorption coefficients (Kd and Koc) generated by batch studies should be carefully used because they do not provide information about aggregation and diffusion effects on pesticides soil sorption.

  13. Algal Compost Effects on Soil Nutrient Status and Aggregate Stab ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted in the Soil Science laboratory of Micheal Okpara University of Agriculture Umudike, to investigate the effect of algal compost on soil nutrient status indices such as soil pH, cation exchange capacity, organic matter, total nitrogen and available phosphorus as well as soil structural stability.

  14. Changes of Soil Aggregate Stability as a Result of the Effect of Freeze-thaw Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Žabenská

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present research was to assess the changes in soil erodibility during the non-vegetation period as one of the factors affecting the snowmelt erosion. The temperature fluctuation was simulated with the use of a climatic chamber ex situ. The soil surface was for simplicity reasons considered without any plant or snow cover. The paper deals with the rate of soil erodibility determination – the soil erodibility should increase due to the decrease of soil aggregate stability depending on the number of freeze-thaw cycles and initial soil moisture. Soil samples (taken from three sites were subjected to freeze-thaw cycles under laboratory conditions. Changes in soil agreggate stability were monitored as one of the main soil characteristics which determine the soil erodibility. Two methods were used to determine the soil macroaggregate stability (soil aggregate fraction 1–2 mm: standard single-sieve method of wet sieving (Kemper and Rosenau, 1986, and dry aggregate analysis using a set of flat sieves with a diameter of 1 mm and 0.5 mm. The results of each method are controversial. Intended hypothesis has not been clearly confirmed.

  15. Changes in land use alter soil quality and aggregate stability in the highlands of northern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delelegn, Yoseph T; Purahong, Witoon; Blazevic, Amila; Yitaferu, Birru; Wubet, Tesfaye; Göransson, Hans; Godbold, Douglas L

    2017-10-19

    Land use change alters biodiversity and soil quality and thus affects ecosystem functions. This study investigated the effects of changes in land use on major soil quality indicators. Soil samples were taken from a depth of 0-10 cm (top soil) under four major land uses (cropland, grassland, area exclosure, eucalyptus plantation) with similar land use change histories for analysis, and soil from a nearby natural forest was used as a reference. Land use change from natural forest to cropland and grassland significantly decreased major soil quality indicators such as soil organic C (SOC), total soil N (TSN), molybdate-reactive bicarbonate-extractable P, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) spore density, but compared to the cropland, change to area exclosure and eucalyptus plantation significantly improved SOC, TSN and soil aggregate stability (SAS). In addition, we assessed the correlation among indicators and found that SOC, TSN and SAS significantly correlate with many other soil quality indicators. The study highlights that the conversion of natural forest to cropland results in decline of soil quality and aggregate stability. However, compared to cropland, application of area exclosure and afforestation on degraded lands restores soil quality and aggregate stability.

  16. Stable coexistence of ecologically identical species: conspecific aggregation via reproductive interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruokolainen, Lasse; Hanski, Ilkka

    2016-05-01

    Stable coexistence of ecologically identical species is not possible according to the established ecological theory. Many coexistence mechanisms have been proposed, but they all involve some form of ecological differentiation among the competing species. The aggregation model of coexistence would predict coexistence of identical species if there would be a mechanism that generates spatially aggregated distributions that are not completely correlated among the species. Our aim is to demonstrate that continued dispersal, triggered by reproductive interference between ecologically identical species, is such a mechanism. This study has been motivated by species using ephemeral patchy resources, such as decomposing fruits, fungal sporophores, carrion, and dung. We analyse an individual-based model with sexual reproduction, in which the progeny develops in ephemeral resource patches and the new generation disperses to a new set of patches. We assume spatially restricted dispersal, that patches differ in detectability, and that unmated females continue dispersal. In the model, reproductive interference (males spend some time searching for and/or attempting to mate with heterospecific females) reduces the mating rate of females, especially in the less common species, which leads to increased dispersal and reduces spatial correlation in species' distributions. For a wide range of parameter values, coexisting species show a systematic difference in their relative abundances due to two opposing forces: (1) uncommon species have reduced growth rate (Allee effect), which decreases abundance; (2) an abundance difference between the species reduces interspecific spatial correlation, which in turn reduces interspecific competition and allows the rarer species to persist at low density. Our results demonstrate a new mechanism for coexistence that is not based on ecological differentiation between species. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2016 British Ecological

  17. Adsorption and desorption of Cu2+ on paddy soil aggregates pretreated with different levels of phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jun; Wang, Wenqin; Wu, Wenchen; Gao, Jianbo; Dong, Changxun

    2017-05-01

    Interactions between anions and cations are important for understanding the behaviors of chemical pollutants and their potential risks in the environment. Here we prepared soil aggregates of a yellow paddy soil from the Taihu Lake region, and investigated the effects of phosphate (P) pretreatment on adsorption-desorption of Cu 2+ of soil aggregates, free iron oxyhydrates-removed soil aggregates, goethite, and kaolinite with batch adsorption method. The results showed that Cu 2+ adsorption was reduced on the aggregates pretreated with low concentrations of P, and promoted with high concentrations of P, showing a V-shaped change. Compared with the untreated aggregates, the adsorption capacity of Cu 2+ was reduced when P application rates were lower than 260, 220, 130 and 110mg/kg for coarse, clay, silt and fine sand fractions, respectively. On the contrary, the adsorption capacity of Cu 2+ was higher on P-pretreated soil aggregates than on the control ones when P application rates were greater than those values. However, the desorption of Cu 2+ was enhanced at low levels of P, but suppressed at high levels of P, displaying an inverted V-shaped change over P adsorption. The Cu 2+ adsorption by the aggregate particles with and without P pretreatments was well described by the Freundlich equation. Similar results were obtained on P-pretreated goethite. However, such P effects on Cu 2+ adsorption-desorption were not observed on kaolinite and free iron oxyhydrates-removed soil aggregates. The present results indicate that goethite is one of the main soil substances responsible for the P-induced promotion and inhibition of Cu 2+ adsorption. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Aggregate formation and soil carbon sequestration by earthworms at the ORNL FACE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-de Leon, Y.; Gonzalez-Meler, M. A.; Lugo-Perez, J.; Wise, D. H.; Jastrow, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Earthworms have an important role in soil carbon sequestration, but their contribution to carbon sequestration in soils exposed to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations has been largely overlooked. Previous studies at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Free Air CO2 Experiment (ORNL FACE) site showed that the formation of soil aggregates is a key mechanism for soil carbon sequestration. We did a microcosm experiment to quantify earthworm-mediated aggregate formation and compare between two earthworm species with different feeding habits (endogeic vs. epi-edogeic). In addition, we wanted to identify the carbon source (soil, leaf litter or root litter) within aggregates formed by earthworms. We used 13C-depleted soil and 15N-enriched sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) leaf and root litter collected from the ORNL FACE site to assess soil aggregate formation of the native, endogeic earthworm Diplocardia sp. and European, epi-endogeic earthworm Lumbricus rubellus. Both earthworm species are present at the ORNL FACE site. We crushed, sieved ( 250 μm) were higher in treatments with earthworms (III and IV) than in treatments without earthworms (I and II) (p = 0.02). Within macroaggregates, most of the carbon was soil-derived. Leaf and root-derived carbon was found in treatment IV only. Our results suggest that earthworms at the ORNL FACE site directly contribute to the formation of soil aggregates, thus contributing to soil carbon sequestration. Carbon source within macroaggregates correspond with earthworm feeding habits, with endogeic earthworms (Diplocardia sp.) feeding mostly on mineral soil and epi-endogeic earthworm (L. rubellus) feeding on both plant residues and soil organic matter.

  19. Topsoil and Deep Soil Organic Carbon Concentration and Stability Vary with Aggregate Size and Vegetation Type in Subtropical China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiang-Min; Chen, Fu-Sheng; Wan, Song-Ze; Yang, Qing-Pei; Shi, Jian-Min

    2015-01-01

    The impact of reforestation on soil organic carbon (OC), especially in deep layer, is poorly understood and deep soil OC stabilization in relation with aggregation and vegetation type in afforested area is unknown. Here, we collected topsoil (0–15 cm) and deep soil (30–45 cm) from six paired coniferous forests (CF) and broad-leaved forests (BF) reforested in the early 1990s in subtropical China. Soil aggregates were separated by size by dry sieving and OC stability was measured by closed-jar alkali-absorption in 71 incubation days. Soil OC concentration and mean weight diameter were higher in BF than CF. The cumulative carbon mineralization (Cmin, mg CO2-C kg-1 soil) varied with aggregate size in BF and CF topsoils, and in deep soil, it was higher in larger aggregates than in smaller aggregates in BF, but not CF. The percentage of soil OC mineralized (SOCmin, % SOC) was in general higher in larger aggregates than in smaller aggregates. Meanwhile, SOCmin was greater in CF than in BF at topsoil and deep soil aggregates. In comparison to topsoil, deep soil aggregates generally exhibited a lower Cmin, and higher SOCmin. Total nitrogen (N) and the ratio of carbon to phosphorus (C/P) were generally higher in BF than in CF in topsoil and deep soil aggregates, while the same trend of N/P was only found in deep soil aggregates. Moreover, the SOCmin negatively correlated with OC, total N, C/P and N/P. This work suggests that reforested vegetation type might play an important role in soil OC storage through internal nutrient cycling. Soil depth and aggregate size influenced OC stability, and deep soil OC stability could be altered by vegetation reforested about 20 years. PMID:26418563

  20. Effects of Combined Application of Biogas Slurry and Chemical Fertilizer on Soil Aggregation and C/N Distribution in an Ultisol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuebo; Fan, Jianbo; Xu, Lei; Zhou, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Unreasonable use of chemical fertilizer (CF) on agricultural soil leads to massive losses of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) in tropical and subtropical areas, where soil conditions are unfavorable for aggregate formation. This study evaluated the effects of combined application of biogas slurry (BS) plus CF on soil aggregation and aggregate—associated C/N concentration and storage in an Ultisol. Six treatments included: no fertilizer (T1), CF only (T2), partial (15% (T3), 30% (T4) and 45% (T5)) substitution of TN with BS and BS only (T6). Soil mechanical—stable aggregates (MSAs) formation and stability as well as MSAs—associated C/N concentration and storage were observed in different aggregate sizes (>5, 5–2, 2–1, 1.0–0.5, 0.50–0.25 and 5 mm significantly increased with BS substitution (T5), while the proportions of MSAs 1.0–0.5 mm, MSAs 0.50–0.25 mm and MSAs soil aggregation stability as well as resulted in significantly higher SOC and TN concentrations and storage in MSAs >0.5 mm that constituted 72–82% of MSAs. Stepwise regression analysis showed that MSAs >5 mm, SOC in MSAs >5 mm and TN in MSAs >5 mm were the dominant variables affecting aggregate stability. Meanwhile SOC in MSAs soils. Therefore, certain rate of combined application of BS plus CF is an effective, eco—friendly way to improve soil quality in an Ultisol. PMID:28125647

  1. Stability of aggregates of some weathered soils in south-eastern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    *According to Soil Survey Staff (1999), S = sand, SCL = sandy clay loam, SL = sandy loam, CL = clay loam, C = clay,. SC = sandy clay. Two textures in the same location means ..... Principal component analysis of aggregate stability indices after varimax rotation using. MWDw component. Components. Soil properties. 1. 2. 3.

  2. Factors influencing soil aggregation and particulate organic matter responses to bioenergy crops across a topographic gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd A. Ontl; Cynthia A. Cambardella; Lisa A. Schulte; Randall K. Kolka

    2015-01-01

    Bioenergy crops have the potential to enhance soil carbon (C) pools from increased aggregation and the physical protection of organic matter; however, our understanding of the variation in these processes over heterogeneous landscapes is limited. In particular, little is known about the relative importance of soil properties and root characteristics for the physical...

  3. Earthworms, soil-aggregates and organic matter decomposition in agro-ecosystems in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinissen, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    The relationships between earthworm populations, soil aggregate stability and soil organic matter dynamics were studied at an experimental farm in The Netherlands.

    Arable land in general is not favourable for earthworm growth. In the Lovinkhoeve fields under conventional management

  4. Phosphate stable oxygen isotope variability within a temperate agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Steven J; Harris, Paul; Peukert, Sabine; Guo, Rongrong; Tamburini, Federica; Blackwell, Martin S A; Howden, Nicholas J K; McGrath, Steve

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we conduct a spatial analysis of soil total phosphorus (TP), acid extractable phosphate (PO 4 ) and the stable oxygen (O) isotope ratio within the PO 4 molecule (δ 18 O PO 4 ) from an intensively managed agricultural grassland site. Total P in the soil was found to range from 736 to 1952 mg P kg - 1 , of which between 12 and 48% was extractable using a 1 M HCl (HCl PO 4 ) solution with the two variables exhibiting a strong positive correlation. The δ 18 O PO 4 of the extracted PO 4 ranged from 17.0 to 21.6‰ with a mean of 18.8‰ (± 0.8). While the spatial variability of Total P has been researched at various scales, this is the first study to assess the variability of soil δ 18 O PO 4 at a field-scale resolution. We investigate whether or not δ 18 O PO 4 variability has any significant relationship with: (i) itself with respect to spatial autocorrelation effects; and (ii) HCl PO 4 , elevation and slope - both globally and locally. Results indicate that δ 18 O PO 4 was not spatially autocorrelated; and that δ 18 O PO 4 was only weakly related to HCl PO 4 , elevation and slope, when considering the study field as a whole. Interestingly, the latter relationships appear to vary in strength locally. In particular, the δ 18 O PO 4 to HCl PO 4 relationship may depend on the underlying soil class and/or on different field managements that had operated across an historical north-south field division of the study field, a division that had been removed four years prior to this study.

  5. Tracing anthropogenic thallium in soil using stable isotope compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Michael; Xiao, Tangfu; Kreissig, Katharina; Brett, Alex; Coles, Barry J; Rehkämper, Mark

    2014-08-19

    Thallium stable isotope data are used in this study, for the first time, to apportion Tl contamination in soils. In the late 1970s, a cement plant near Lengerich, Germany, emitted cement kiln dust (CKD) with high Tl contents, due to cocombustion of Tl-enriched pyrite roasting waste. Locally contaminated soil profiles were obtained down to 1 m depth and the samples are in accord with a binary mixing relationship in a diagram of Tl isotope compositions (expressed as ε(205)Tl, the deviation of the (205)Tl/(203)Tl ratio of a sample from the NIST SRM 997 Tl isotope standard in parts per 10(4)) versus 1/[Tl]. The inferred mixing endmembers are the geogenic background, as defined by isotopically light soils at depth (ε(205)Tl ≈ -4), and the Tl emissions, which produce Tl-enriched topsoils with ε(205)Tl as high as ±0. The latter interpretation is supported by analyses of the CKD, which is also characterized by ε(205)Tl ≈ ± 0, and the same ε(205)Tl value was found for a pyrite from the deposit that produced the cocombusted pyrite roasting waste. Additional measurements for samples from a locality in China, with outcrops of Tl sulfide mineralization and associated high natural Tl backgrounds, reveal significant isotope fractionation between soils (ε(205)Tl ≈ +0.4) and locally grown green cabbage (ε(205)Tl between -2.5 and -5.4). This demonstrates that biological isotope fractionation cannot explain the isotopically heavy Tl in the Lengerich topsoils and the latter are therefore clearly due to anthropogenic Tl emissions from cement processing. Our results thus establish that isotopic data can reinforce receptor modeling for the toxic trace metal Tl.

  6. Aggregates morphometry in a Latosol (Oxisol under different soil management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Eloize Carducci

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Changes in soil physical properties are inherent in land use, mainly in superficial layers. Structural alterations can directly influence distribution, stability and especially morphometry of soil aggregates, which hence will affect pore system and the dynamic process of water and air in soil. Among the methods used to measure these changes, morphometry is a complementary tool to the classic methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate structural quality of a Latosol (Oxisol, under different management systems, using morphometric techniques. Treatments consisted of soil under no-tillage (NT; pasture (P, in which both had been cultivated for ten years, and an area under native vegetation (NV – Savannah like vegetation. Aggregates were sampled at depths of 0-0.10 and 0.10-0.20 m, retained on sieves with 9.52 – 4.76 mm, 4.76 – 1.0mm, 1.0 – 0.5mm diameter ranges. Aggregate morphometry was assessed by 2D images from scanner via QUANTPORO software. The analyzed variables were: area, perimeter, aspect, roughness, Ferret diameter and compactness. Moreover, disturbed samples were collected at the same depths to determine particle size, aggregate stability in water, water-dispersible clay, clay flocculation index and organic matter content. It was observed that different soil management systems have modified soil aggregate morphology as well as physical attributes; and management effects’ magnitude increased from NT to P.

  7. Abundant and stable char residues in soils: implications for soil fertility and carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, J-D; Johnson, R L; Lehmann, J; Olk, D C; Neves, E G; Thompson, M L; Schmidt-Rohr, K

    2012-09-04

    Large-scale soil application of biochar may enhance soil fertility, increasing crop production for the growing human population, while also sequestering atmospheric carbon. But reaching these beneficial outcomes requires an understanding of the relationships among biochar's structure, stability, and contribution to soil fertility. Using quantitative (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we show that Terra Preta soils (fertile anthropogenic dark earths in Amazonia that were enriched with char >800 years ago) consist predominantly of char residues composed of ~6 fused aromatic rings substituted by COO(-) groups that significantly increase the soils' cation-exchange capacity and thus the retention of plant nutrients. We also show that highly productive, grassland-derived soils in the U.S. (Mollisols) contain char (generated by presettlement fires) that is structurally comparable to char in the Terra Preta soils and much more abundant than previously thought (~40-50% of organic C). Our findings indicate that these oxidized char residues represent a particularly stable, abundant, and fertility-enhancing form of soil organic matter.

  8. Synchrotron-based micro and nanotomographic investigations of soil aggregate microbial and pore structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemner, K. M.; O'Brien, S.; Whiteside, M. D.; Sholto-Douglas, D.; Antipova, O.; Bailey, V.; Boyanov, M.; Dohnalkova, A.; Gursoy, D.; Kovarik, L.; Lai, B.; Roehrig, C.; Vogt, S.

    2017-12-01

    Soil is a highly complex network of pore spaces, minerals, and organic matter (e.g., roots, fungi, and bacteria), making it physically heterogeneous over nano- to macro-scales. Such complexity arises from feedbacks between physical processes and biological activity that generate a dynamic, self-organizing 3D complex. Since we first demonstrated the utility of synchrotron-based transmission tomography to image internal soil aggregate structure [Kemner et al., 1998], we and many other researchers have made use of and have advanced the application of this technique. However, our understanding of how microbes and microbial metabolism are distributed throughout soil aggregates is limited, because no technique is available to image the soil pore network and the life that inhabits it. X-ray transmission microtomography can provide highly detailed 3D renderings of soil structure but cannot distinguish cells from other electron-light material such as air or water. However, the use of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) as a reporter of bacterial presence enables us to overcome this constraint, instilling bacterial cells with enough contrast to detect them and their metabolic functions in their opaque soil habitat, with hard x-rays capable of penetrating 3D soil structures at high resolution. Previous transmission tomographic imaging of soil aggregates with high energy synchrotron x-rays has demonstrated 700 nm3 voxel spatial resolution. These and recent results from nanotomographic x-ray transmission imaging of soil aggregates with 30 nm3 voxel resolution will be presented. In addition, results of submicron voxel-sized x-ray fluorescence 3D imaging to determine microbial distributions within soil aggregates and the critical role to be played by the upgrade of the Advanced Photon Source for 100-1000X increases in hard x-ray brilliance will also be presented. *Kemner, et al., SPIE 3449, 45-53, 1998

  9. Carbohydrates and thermal properties indicate a decrease in stable aggregate carbon following forest colonization of mountain grassland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guidi, Claudia; Cannella, David; Leifeld, Jens

    2015-01-01

    In mountainous areas of Europe, the abandonment of grasslands followed by forest expansion is the dominant land-use change. Labile (i.e. easily decomposable) litter represents the major source for soil microbial products, which promote soil aggregation and long-term C stabilization. Our objective......-use gradient in the Southern Alps (Italy) following analysis of carbohydrate monomers and thermal analysis of mineral soil and physical soil fractions. The land-use gradient comprised managed grassland, two transitional phases in which grassland abandonment led to colonization by Picea abies (L.) Karst......., and an old forest dominated by Fagus sylvatica L. and P. abies.Grassland abandoned for 10years tended to have higher levels of carbohydrate and thermally labile soil C than managed grassland and old forest, presumably caused by differences in the quality and amount of litter input. Carbohydrates...

  10. Impact of Spatial Soil and Climate Input Data Aggregation on Regional Yield Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Holger; Zhao, Gang; Asseng, Senthold; Bindi, Marco; Biernath, Christian; Constantin, Julie; Coucheney, Elsa; Dechow, Rene; Doro, Luca; Eckersten, Henrik; Gaiser, Thomas; Grosz, Balázs; Heinlein, Florian; Kassie, Belay T; Kersebaum, Kurt-Christian; Klein, Christian; Kuhnert, Matthias; Lewan, Elisabet; Moriondo, Marco; Nendel, Claas; Priesack, Eckart; Raynal, Helene; Roggero, Pier P; Rötter, Reimund P; Siebert, Stefan; Specka, Xenia; Tao, Fulu; Teixeira, Edmar; Trombi, Giacomo; Wallach, Daniel; Weihermüller, Lutz; Yeluripati, Jagadeesh; Ewert, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We show the error in water-limited yields simulated by crop models which is associated with spatially aggregated soil and climate input data. Crop simulations at large scales (regional, national, continental) frequently use input data of low resolution. Therefore, climate and soil data are often generated via averaging and sampling by area majority. This may bias simulated yields at large scales, varying largely across models. Thus, we evaluated the error associated with spatially aggregated soil and climate data for 14 crop models. Yields of winter wheat and silage maize were simulated under water-limited production conditions. We calculated this error from crop yields simulated at spatial resolutions from 1 to 100 km for the state of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. Most models showed yields biased by climate and soil data were aggregated. Distinct error patterns indicate that the rMAE may be estimated from few soil variables. Illustrating the range of these aggregation effects across models, this study is a first step towards an ex-ante assessment of aggregation errors in large-scale simulations.

  11. Using multi-scale stable isotopes analyses to study the microbial processes of soil organic matter stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, P.; Remusat, L.; Zeller, B.; Bode, S.; Brewer, E.; Boeckx, P. F.; Derrien, D.

    2012-12-01

    stabilization efficiency for the microorganisms found in there and/ or the transfer of the microbial biomasses from plant debris to microbial aggregates, likely along with the transfers of decaying litter residues. Combining several complementary stable isotope approaches, we showed that microbial products are stabilized (i) directly through immobilization within the microbial biomass and (ii) indirectly through an abundant production of extracellular microbial products. We also demonstrated that such combination techniques does not only suits for the study of fine-scale processes, but also provide new insights on the ecology of microbial processes in an environment as complex as soil.

  12. Soil aggregate stability as an indicator for eco-engineering effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Eco-engineering aims at stabilising soil and slopes by applying technical and biological measures. Engineering structures are commonly well defined, immediately usable and operative, and their stability effects quantifiable and verifiable. Differently, the use of plants requires more restrictive boundary conditions and the protection potential is rarely easily calculable and develop-ing as a function of growth rate. Although the use of vegetation is widely appreciated and their stabilising effect recognised, there is an increasing demand on sound facts on its efficiency, in particular, in relation to time. Conclusively, a certain necessity has been recognised to monitor, assess and quantify the effectiveness of ecological restora-tion measures in order to facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge. Recent theoretical models emphasize the im-portance of taking an integrated monitoring approach that considers multiple variables. However, limited financial and time resources often prevent such comprehensive assessments. A solution to this problem may be to use integrated indicators that reflect multiple aspects and, therefore, allow extensive information on ecosystem status to be gathered in a relatively short time. Among various other indicators, such as fractal dimension of soil particle size distribution or microbiological parameters, soil aggregate stability seems the most appropriate indicator with regard to protecting slopes from superficial soil failure as it is critical to both plant growth and soil structure. Soil aggregation processes play a crucial role in re-establishing soil structure and function and, conclusively, for successful and sustainable re-colonisation. Whereas the key role of soil aggregate stability in ecosystem functioning is well known concerning water, gas, and nutrient fluxes, only limited information is available with regard to soil mechanical and geotechnical aspects. Correspondingly, in the last couple of years several studies

  13. Soil Carbon Characteristics of a Fluvisol Affected by Aggregates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    105 – 111. Blom, L.and Eddhausen, L. (1985). Direct titration of carbon dioxide. Analytical Chemistry 13: 120 –. 128. Boyle, M., and Paul, E. A. (1989). Carbon and nitrogen kinetics in soil prevcously amended with sewage sludge. Soil Science Society America. Journal 53:99 – 103. Cambardella, C. A.and Elliott, E. T. (1992).

  14. Effects of biodegradable plastics on the predominant culturable bacteria associated with soil aggregate formation and stability after 9 months of incubation in natural soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    An in vitro study of the effects of biodegradable plastics on the predominant soil aggregating bacteria associated to soil aggregate formation and stability after 9 months of incubation in soil. Caesar-TonThat TC, Fukui R*, Caesar AJ., Lartey, RT, and Gaskin, JF. USDA-Agricultural Research Service, ...

  15. Using Color, Texture and Object-Based Image Analysis of Multi-Temporal Camera Data to Monitor Soil Aggregate Breakdown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ymeti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing has shown its potential to assess soil properties and is a fast and non-destructive method for monitoring soil surface changes. In this paper, we monitor soil aggregate breakdown under natural conditions. From November 2014 to February 2015, images and weather data were collected on a daily basis from five soils susceptible to detachment (Silty Loam with various organic matter content, Loam and Sandy Loam. Three techniques that vary in image processing complexity and user interaction were tested for the ability of monitoring aggregate breakdown. Considering that the soil surface roughness causes shadow cast, the blue/red band ratio is utilized to observe the soil aggregate changes. Dealing with images with high spatial resolution, image texture entropy, which reflects the process of soil aggregate breakdown, is used. In addition, the Huang thresholding technique, which allows estimation of the image area occupied by soil aggregate, is performed. Our results show that all three techniques indicate soil aggregate breakdown over time. The shadow ratio shows a gradual change over time with no details related to weather conditions. Both the entropy and the Huang thresholding technique show variations of soil aggregate breakdown responding to weather conditions. Using data obtained with a regular camera, we found that freezing–thawing cycles are the cause of soil aggregate breakdown.

  16. Using Color, Texture and Object-Based Image Analysis of Multi-Temporal Camera Data to Monitor Soil Aggregate Breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ymeti, Irena; van der Werff, Harald; Shrestha, Dhruba Pikha; Jetten, Victor G; Lievens, Caroline; van der Meer, Freek

    2017-05-30

    Remote sensing has shown its potential to assess soil properties and is a fast and non-destructive method for monitoring soil surface changes. In this paper, we monitor soil aggregate breakdown under natural conditions. From November 2014 to February 2015, images and weather data were collected on a daily basis from five soils susceptible to detachment (Silty Loam with various organic matter content, Loam and Sandy Loam). Three techniques that vary in image processing complexity and user interaction were tested for the ability of monitoring aggregate breakdown. Considering that the soil surface roughness causes shadow cast, the blue/red band ratio is utilized to observe the soil aggregate changes. Dealing with images with high spatial resolution, image texture entropy, which reflects the process of soil aggregate breakdown, is used. In addition, the Huang thresholding technique, which allows estimation of the image area occupied by soil aggregate, is performed. Our results show that all three techniques indicate soil aggregate breakdown over time. The shadow ratio shows a gradual change over time with no details related to weather conditions. Both the entropy and the Huang thresholding technique show variations of soil aggregate breakdown responding to weather conditions. Using data obtained with a regular camera, we found that freezing-thawing cycles are the cause of soil aggregate breakdown.

  17. Potential Carbon Transport: Linking Soil Aggregate Stability and Sediment Enrichment for Updating the Soil Active Layer within Intensely Managed Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacha, K.; Papanicolaou, T.; Abban, B. K.; Wilson, C. G.

    2014-12-01

    Currently, many biogeochemical models lack the mechanistic capacity to accurately simulate soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics, especially within intensely managed landscapes (IMLs) such as those found in the U.S. Midwest. These modeling limitations originate by not accounting for downslope connectivity of flowpathways initiated and governed by landscape processes and hydrologic forcing, which induce dynamic updates to the soil active layer (generally top 20-30cm of soil) with various sediment size fractions and aggregates being transported and deposited along the downslope. These hydro-geomorphic processes, often amplified in IMLs by tillage events and seasonal canopy, can greatly impact biogeochemical cycles (e.g., enhanced mineralization during aggregate breakdown) and in turn, have huge implications/uncertainty when determining SOC budgets. In this study, some of these limitations were addressed through a new concept, Potential Carbon Transport (PCT), a term which quantifies a maximum amount of material available for transport at various positions of the landscape, which was used to further refine a coupled modeling framework focused on SOC redistribution through downslope/lateral connectivity. Specifically, the size fractions slaked from large and small aggregates during raindrop-induced aggregate stability tests were used in conjunction with rainfall-simulated sediment enrichment ratio (ER) experiments to quantify the PCT under various management practices, soil types and landscape positions. Field samples used in determining aggregate stability and the ER experiments were collected/performed within the historic Clear Creek Watershed, home of the IML Critical Zone Observatory, located in Southeastern Iowa.

  18. Enhancing soil begins with soil biology and a stable soil microclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protection of the soil resource from erosion requires reducing the surface impact from raindrop energy and maintaining soil structure and stability to allow more efficient infiltration of water into the soil column. These two processes are linked with practices associated with enhancing and maintain...

  19. A new Insight Into Microscale Soil Organic Matter Dynamics - From Single Particles to Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, C. W.; Heister, K.; Hillion, F.; Herrmann, A. M.; Koegel-Knabner, I.

    2008-12-01

    Both mineral interactions and the spatial inaccessibility due to aggregation are key-factors affecting the stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM). Knowledge about the factors controlling the preservation of SOM and underlying stabilization mechanisms has improved significantly over the last years. Nevertheless, in situ processes remain almost unclear and are still challenging to evaluate. In the presented work, we studied the alteration of spatial distribution of fresh introduced OM over time on single particles and in intact soil aggregates. Single particles of a fine silt and clay mixture (resin embedded. Samples were then analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS50). We will demonstrate the spatial distribution of OM on single particles and in intact soil aggregates at the microscale by SEM and nanoSIMS. In addition, with the isotopic sensitivity of nanoSIMS, we are able to follow the fate of 13C and 15N, which is expected to be influenced by diffusion, sorption and microbial activity. From these results, we propose how OM in soil can be stabilized on single soil particles and at complex soil aggregates.

  20. [Ecological stoichiometry of soil carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus within soil aggregates in tea plantations with different ages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Zheng, Zi-cheng; Li, Ting-xuan

    2015-01-01

    This study selected 4 tea plantations with different ages (12-15, 20-22, 30-33 and >50 year-old) located in Ya' an, Sichuan Province, China to investigate the distribution patterns of soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) , and to examine the ecological stoichiometric characteristics of C, N and P within soil aggregates. The results showed that the coefficients of variation of SOC, TN and TP were 17.5%, 16.3% and 9.4%, respectively in the 0-20 cm soil layer and were 24.0%, 21.0% and 9.2%, respectively in the 20-40 cm soil layer. The spatial variation of TP was lower than that of SOC and TN but there were significant positive correlations among them. SOC and TN were distributed in the small-size aggregates and both of them had the greatest values in the >50 year-old tea plantation, however, the distribution of TP was relatively uniform among aggregates and ages. The coefficients of variation of C/N, C/P, and N/P were 9.4%, 14.0% and 14.9%, respectively in the 0-20 cm soil layer and were 7.4%, 24.9% and 21.8%, respectively in the 20-40 cm soil layer. Variation of C/N was lower than that of C/P and N/P. Averaged C/P and N/P values in the small-size aggregates were higher than in aggregates of other sizes, and the maximum values were in the >50 year-old plantation. C/N, C/P and N/P had good indication for soil organic carbon storage.

  1. Aggregation-induced reversal of transport distances of soil organic matter: are our balances correct?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaxian; Kuhn, Nikolaus

    2014-05-01

    The effect of soil erosion on global carbon cycling, especially as a source or sink of green-house gases (GHGs), is the subject of intense debate. The controversy arises mostly from the lack of information on the fate of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC) as it moves from the site of erosion to the site of longer-term deposition. This requires improved understanding the transport distances of eroded SOC, which is principally related to the settling velocities of sediment fractions that carry the eroded SOC. For aggregated soils, settling velocities are affected by their actual aggregate size rather than the mineral grain size distribution. Aggregate stability is, in turn, strongly influenced by soil organic matter. This study aims at identifying the effect of aggregation on the transport distances of eroded SOC and its susceptibility to mineralization after transport and deposition. A rainfall simulation was carried out on a silty loam soil. The eroded sediments were fractionated by a settling tube apparatus into six different size classes according to their settling velocities and likely transport distances. Weight, SOC concentration and instantaneous respiration rates of the fractions of the six classes were measured. Our results show that: 1) 41% of the eroded SOC was transported with coarse aggregates that would be likely re-distributed across landscapes; 2) erosion was prone to accelerate the mineralization of eroded organic carbon immediately after erosion, compared to undisturbed aggregates; 3) erosion might make a higher contribution to atmospheric CO2 than the estimation made without considering the effects of aggregation and extra SOC mineralization during transport.

  2. Temporal dynamics for soil aggregates determined using X-ray CT scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garbout, Amin; Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Hansen, Søren Baarsgaard

    2013-01-01

    of the aggregate clusters increased with time irrespective of tillage and plant treatments. The sphericity decreased with time. The structure model index (SMI) was not sensitive to effects of time and treatments. This means that with time the aggregate clusters became less round and more elongated, but they kept...... a rough surface. The 3D CT scanner image analysis based on quantification of morphometric parameters has the potential to provide new fundamental insight into soil aggregate formation and the effect of different treatments despite the limitations of its spatial resolution. In our study, time was the most...... important factor affecting the changes in aggregate shape and structure. Contrary to what we had expected, there was no significant effect of seven years of different tillage treatments on the measured parameters at any time of measurement. The segmentation method used to separate aggregate from air...

  3. Microbial properties of soil aggregates created by earthworms and other factors: spherical and prismatic soil aggregates from unreclaimed post-mining sites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frouz, J.; Krištůfek, Václav; Livečková, M.; van Loo, D.; Jacobs, P.; van Hoorebeke, L.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 1 (2011), s. 36-43 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06066; GA MŠk 2B08023; GA AV ČR 1QS600660505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : microbial properties * earthworms * spherical and prismatic soil aggregates Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.677, year: 2011

  4. Soil aggregate stabilization and carbon sequestration: Feedbacks through organomineral associations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jastrow, J.D.; Miller, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    Primary production (specifically, the rate and quality of C transfer below ground) and soil microbial activity (specifically, the rates of C transformation and decay) are recognized as the overall biological processes governing soil organic C (SOC) dynamics. These two processes and, hence, SOC cycling and storage are controlled by complex underlying biotic and abiotic interactions and feedbacks, most of which can be tied in one way or another to the influences of the five state factors related to soil formation, and many of which are sensitive to management practices. Overall, C input rates and quality are largely dependent on climate (especially temperature and precipitation), vegetation type and landscape, soil type, and management practices. Decomposition processes and turnover rates, however, are greatly influenced by climate, the type and quality of organic matter (e.g., N content and the ratios of C:N and lignin:N), chemical or physicochemical associations of organic matter (OM) with soil mineral components, and the location of OM within the soil.

  5. Effects of chlorpyrifos on soil carboxylesterase activity at an aggregate-size scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C; Sandoval, Marco

    2017-08-01

    The impact of pesticides on extracellular enzyme activity has been mostly studied on the bulk soil scale, and our understanding of the impact on an aggregate-size scale remains limited. Because microbial processes, and their extracellular enzyme production, are dependent on the size of soil aggregates, we hypothesized that the effect of pesticides on enzyme activities is aggregate-size specific. We performed three experiments using an Andisol to test the interaction between carboxylesterase (CbE) activity and the organophosphorus (OP) chlorpyrifos. First, we compared esterase activity among aggregates of different size spiked with chlorpyrifos (10mgkg -1 wet soil). Next, we examined the inhibition of CbE activity by chlorpyrifos and its metabolite chlorpyrifos-oxon in vitro to explore the aggregate size-dependent affinity of the pesticides for the active site of the enzyme. Lastly, we assessed the capability of CbEs to alleviate chlorpyrifos toxicity upon soil microorganisms. Our principal findings were: 1) CbE activity was significantly inhibited (30-67% of controls) in the microaggregates (1.0mm) compared with the corresponding controls (i.e., pesticide-free aggregates), 2) chlorpyrifos-oxon was a more potent CbE inhibitor than chlorpyrifos; however, no significant differences in the CbE inhibition were found between micro- and macroaggregates, and 3) dose-response relationships between CbE activity and chlorpyrifos concentrations revealed the capability of the enzyme to bind chlorpyrifos-oxon, which was dependent on the time of exposure. This chemical interaction resulted in a safeguarding mechanism against chlorpyrifos-oxon toxicity on soil microbial activity, as evidenced by the unchanged activity of dehydrogenase and related extracellular enzymes in the pesticide-treated aggregates. Taken together, these results suggest that environmental risk assessments of OP-polluted soils should consider the fractionation of soil in aggregates of different size to measure

  6. Effects of Straw Incorporation on Soil Nutrients, Enzymes, and Aggregate Stability in Tobacco Fields of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiguang Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To determine the effects of straw incorporation on soil nutrients, enzyme activity, and aggregates in tobacco fields, we conducted experiments with different amounts of wheat and maize straw in Zhucheng area of southeast Shandong province for three years (2010–2012. In the final year of experiment (2012, straw incorporation increased soil organic carbon (SOC and related parameters, and improved soil enzyme activity proportionally with the amount of straw added, except for catalase when maize straw was used. And maize straw incorporation was more effective than wheat straw in the tobacco field. The percentage of aggregates >2 mm increased with straw incorporation when measured by either dry or wet sieving. The mean weight diameter (MWD and geometric mean diameter (GMD in straw incorporation treatments were higher than those in the no-straw control (CK. Maize straw increased soil aggregate stability more than wheat straw with the same incorporation amount. Alkaline phosphatase was significantly and negatively correlated with soil pH. Sucrase and urease were both significantly and positively correlated with soil alkali-hydrolysable N. Catalase was significantly but negatively correlated with soil extractable K (EK. The MWD and GMD by dry sieving had significantly positive correlations with SOC, total N, total K, and EK, but only significantly correlated with EK by wet sieving. Therefore, soil nutrients, metabolic enzyme activity, and aggregate stability might be increased by increasing the SOC content through the maize or wheat straw incorporation. Moreover, incorporation of maize straw at 7500 kg·hm−2 was the best choice to enhance soil fertility in the tobacco area of Eastern China.

  7. Bacterial exopolysaccharide and biofilm formation stimulate chickpea growth and soil aggregation under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha Waheed Qurashi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To compensate for stress imposed by salinity, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide production are significant strategies of salt tolerant bacteria to assist metabolism. We hypothesized that two previously isolated salt-tolerant strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1 and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4 have an ability to improve plant growth, These strains can form biofilm and accumulate exopolysacharides at increasing salt stress. These results showed that bacteria might be involved in developing microbial communities under salt stress and helpful in colonizing of bacterial strains to plant roots and soil particles. Eventually, it can add to the plant growth and soil structure. We investigated the comparative effect of exopolysacharide and biofilm formation in two bacterial strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1 and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4 in response to varying salt stress. We found that biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide accumulation increased at higher salinity. To check the effect of bacterial inoculation on the plant (Cicer arietinum Var. CM-98 growth and soil aggregation, pot experiment was conducted by growing seedlings under salt stress. Inoculation of both strains increased plant growth at elevated salt stress. Weight of soil aggregates attached with roots and present in soil were added at higher salt concentrations compared to untreated controls. Soil aggregation was higher at plant roots under salinity. These results suggest the feasibility of using above strains in improving plant growth and soil fertility under salinity.

  8. Water stability of soil aggregates in different systems of Chernozem tillage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslava Bartlová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of various agrotechnical measures on macrostructural changes in the ploughing layer and subsoil were studied within the period of 2008–2010. Soil macrostructure was evaluated on the base of water stability of soil aggregates. Altogether three variants of soil tillage were established, viz. ploughing to the depth of 0.22 m (Variant 1, deep soil loosening to the depth of 0.35–0.40 m (Variant 2, and shallow tillage to the depth of 0.15 m (Variant 3. Experiments were established on a field with Modal Chernozem in the locality Hrušovany nad Jevišovkou (maize-growing region, altitude of 210 m, average annual sum of precipitation 461 mm. In the first experimental year, winter rape was the cultivated crop and it was followed by winter wheat, maize and spring wheat in subsequent years. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of different methods of tillage on water stability of soil aggregates and on yields of individual crops. An overall analysis of results revealed a positive effect of cultivation without ploughing on water stability of soil aggregates. In the variant with ploughing was found out a statistically significant decrease of this stability. At the same time it was also found out that both minimum tillage and deep soil loosening showed a positive effect on yields of crops under study (above all of maize and winter wheat.

  9. Influence of low temperatures on aggregate disruption of heavy clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Kozlovsky Dufková

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy clay soils that are normally resistant to wind erosion, from study site Ostrožská Nová Ves si­tua­ted in the foothills of the Bílé Karpaty Mountains, Czech Republic, were a subject of laboratory analyses. The analyses should found out the influence of overwinter processes on disruption of soil aggregates and thus reason of vulnerability to soil loss by wind. Two overwinter processes were observed – freezing and thawing, and freeze-drying of the soil. Both processes have indicated the increasing of erodible fraction in dependence of water content of analysed soils. Exposed frozen clay soils that freeze-dries during the winter in the foothills of Bílé Karpaty, leaves soils highly erodible in late winter and early spring.

  10. Initial aggregate formation and soil carbon storage from lipid-extracted algae amendment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Lewis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic C (SOC storage results when organic matter inputs to soil exceed losses through decomposition, and is strongly influenced by organic matter effects on soil aggregation. We evaluated the initial effects of lipid-extracted algae (LEA, a byproduct of biofuel production, on soil aggregate formation and SOC storage. In situ field incubations were conducted by amending soil with (1 1.5% LEA, (2 3.0% LEA, (3 1.5% LEA + 1.5% wheat straw (WS and (4 soil plus inorganic N (140 kg ha−1 NH4NO3 and P [112 kg ha−1 Ca(H2PO42·H2O] as the control. Soil samples were collected 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after treatment application at 0–5, 5–15, and 15–30 cm. Soil was separated into macroaggregate (>250 µm, microaggregate (250–53 µm, and silt and clay (<53 µm fractions by dry-sieving, and mean weight diameter was calculated. Soils and soil fractions were analyzed to determine C concentrations and associated δ13C values. Mean weight diameter 12 months after 3.0% LEA application was greater than the 1.5% LEA + 1.5% WS addition at the 5–15 cm depth. Soil amended with 1.5% LEA, 3.0% LEA or 1.5% LEA + 1.5% WS resulted in greater SOC after 12 months for all soil size fractions and depths. δ13C indicated that most LEA-C was initially associated with the silt and clay fraction, but later became more strongly associated with the macro- and microaggregate fractions after 12 months. Soil application of LEA enhanced initial aggregate formation and SOC storage by increasing aggregate MWD and macro- and microaggregate associated SOC over time. As the world population grows and resources become more limited, use of alternative energy sources, soil conservation, and environmental protection must be top research priorities. Our research emphasized all three and demonstrated that LEA can enhance soil structure and C storage.

  11. Quantifying and isolating stable soil organic carbon using long-term bare fallow experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Barré

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The stability of soil organic matter (SOM is a major source of uncertainty in predicting atmospheric CO2 concentration during the 21st century. Isolating the stable soil carbon (C from other, more labile, C fractions in soil is of prime importance for calibrating soil C simulation models, and gaining insights into the mechanisms that lead to soil C stability. Long-term experiments with continuous bare fallow (vegetation-free treatments in which the decay of soil C is monitored for decades after all inputs of C have stopped, provide a unique opportunity to assess the quantity of stable soil C. We analyzed data from six bare fallow experiments of long-duration (>30 yrs, covering a range of soil types and climate conditions, and sited at Askov (Denmark, Grignon and Versailles (France, Kursk (Russia, Rothamsted (UK, and Ultuna (Sweden. A conceptual three pool model dividing soil C into a labile pool (turnover time of a several years, an intermediate pool (turnover time of a several decades and a stable pool (turnover time of a several centuries or more fits well with the long term C decline observed in the bare fallow soils. The estimate of stable C ranged from 2.7 g C kg−1 at Rothamsted to 6.8 g C kg−1 at Grignon. The uncertainty associated with estimates of the stable pool was large due to the short duration of the fallow treatments relative to the turnover time of stable soil C. At Versailles, where there is least uncertainty associated with the determination of a stable pool, the soil contains predominantly stable C after 80 years of continuous bare fallow. Such a site represents a unique research platform for characterization of the nature of stable SOM and its vulnerability to global change.

  12. Increases in soil aggregation following phosphorus additions in a tropical premontane forest are not driven by root and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa eCamenzind

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropical ecosystems have an important role in global change scenarios, in part because they serve as a large terrestrial carbon pool. Carbon protection is mediated by soil aggregation processes, whereby biotic and abiotic factors influence the formation and stability of aggregates. Nutrient additions may affect soil structure indirectly by simultaneous shifts in biotic factors, mainly roots and fungal hyphae, but also via impacts on abiotic soil properties. Here, we tested the hypothesis that soil aggregation will be affected by nutrient additions primarily via changes in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF hyphae and root length in a pristine tropical forest system. Therefore, the percentage of water-stable macroaggregates (> 250µm (WSA and the soil mean weight diameter (MWD was analyzed, as well as nutrient contents, pH, root length and AMF abundance. Phosphorus additions significantly increased the amount of WSA, which was consistent across two different sampling times. Despite a positive effect of phosphorus additions on extraradical AMF biomass, no relationship between WSA and extra-radical AMF nor roots was revealed by regression analyses, contrary to the proposed hypothesis. These findings emphasize the importance of analyzing soil structure in understudied tropical systems, since it might be affected by increasing nutrient deposition expected in the future.

  13. Modification of strength properties of soil-aggregate system on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    varying doses of cement is checked by conducting wetting and drying test. 2. Material and Methods. Stabilization in a broad sense includes various methods incorporated for modifying the properties of a soil to enhance its performance. It is being used for a variety of engineering works, the most common application being in ...

  14. Estimating the collapse of aggregated fine soil structure in a mountainous forested catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouri, Goro; Shinoda, Seirou; Golosov, Valentin; Chalov, Sergey; Shiiba, Michiharu; Hori, Tomoharu; Oki, Taikan

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the relationship of forest soil dryness and antecedent rainfall with suspended sediment (SS) yield due to extreme rainfall events and how this relationship affects the survival of forest plants. Several phenomena contribute to this relationship: increasing evaporation (amount of water vapour discharged from soil) due to increasing air temperature, decreasing moisture content in the soil, the collapse of aggregates of fine soil particles, and the resulting effects on forest plants. To clarify the relationships among climate variation, the collapse of soil particle aggregates, and rainfall-runoff processes, a numerical model was developed to reproduce such aggregate collapse in detail. The validity of the numerical model was confirmed by its application to the granitic mountainous catchment of the Nagara River basin in Japan and by comparison with observational data. The simulation suggests that important problems, such as the collapse of forest plants in response to decreases in soil moisture content and antecedent rainfall, will arise if air temperature continues to increase. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. [Effect of L-arginine on platelet aggregation, endothelial function adn exercise tolerance in patients with stable angina pectoris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozykin, A V; Noeva, E A; Balakhonova, T V; Pogorelova, O A; Men'shikov, M Iu

    2000-01-01

    Examination of the action of donor NO (L-arginine) on platelet aggregation, endothelial function and exercise tolerance in patients with stable angina of effort (SAE). 42 patients with SAE (functional class I-II) and 10 healthy volunteers (control group) were assigned to two groups. 22 patients of group 1 were randomized to cross-over. They received cardiket (60 mg/day for 10 days or cardiket (60 mg/day) in combination with L-arginine (15 g/day for 10 days). 20 SAE patients of group 2 and control group received L-arginine (15 g/day for 10 days). In each group blood lipids were examined, and bicycle exercise test (BET) was performed. In addition, platelet aggregation and endothelial function were studied in group 2 and control group before and after the course of L-arginine. Compared to control group, endothelial function significantly improved in group 2 (from 5.0 +/- 2.9 to 7.8 +/- 4.1% vs 7.1 +/- 1.9 to 6.6 +/- 4.8%) (M +/- SD). BET duration increased in all the patients. After ADP addition in concentrations 1.5, 2.0, and 5.0 micromol/l platelet aggregation declined in 17 patients except 3 in whom the aggregation remained unchanged. Positive effect of L-arginine on endothelial function, exercise tolerance and platelet aggregation was observed in patients with stable angina of effort (functional class I-II). Therefore, arginine can be recommended as an adjuvant in the treatment of patients with ischemic heart disease.

  16. Caespitosa and decumbens Poaceae fertilized with NPK: effects on soil aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dácio Jerônimo de Almeida

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The disintegration of soil particles affects its productive capacity, resulting in compression, erosion and nutrient losses. This study aimed at evaluating the aggregates quality and stability of a Yellow Latosol, in a randomized blocks design represented by Urochloa decumbens and Urochloa brizantha, with and without mineral fertilization, and two sampling forms (rows and between rows, in three sampling depths. The undeformed soil samples collected were shattered and passed through a 9.52 mm sieve and, after drying, through a 2.00 mm, 1.00 mm, 0.50 mm and 0.25 mm sieves, according to the following diameters classes: 9.52-2.00 mm, 2.00-1.00 mm, 1.00-0.50 mm and 0.50-0.25 mm, by using dry sieving. These aggregates were also separated by wet sieving and the dispersed clay and root dry matter were determined. Aggregates larger than 2.00 mm showed high stability, in the 0.00-0.05 m layer, when compared to the aggregates from smaller classes, with no effect of sampling and fertilization site on the aggregates size and stability. There was no difference for the two species analyzed, sampling method and fertilization on the aggregates formation and stability.

  17. Soil aggregation, organic carbon and CO2 emission in different land uses in Brazilian Savanna, Triangulo Mineiro region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Silva Borges

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil aggregation and carbon distribution are important indicators of soil quality. Moreover, these attributes are closely related to CO2 fluxes in the soil-atmosphere interface. We sought to evaluate soil aggregation, organic carbon distribution and CO2 evolution in different land uses of Minas Gerais Triangle. Four different land uses were selected: (1 Panicum maximum, (2 Panicum maximum Jacqvr. (Tanzânia, (3 sugarcane, and (4 native Cerrado (control. In each land-use type, soil samples from a 0-10 cm layer were collected. The samples were air-dried and sieved in order to obtain aggregates sized 4-2 mm. The samples were submitted to wet-sieving to evaluate stability and also to obtain aggregates of different sizes: 4-2 mm; 2-1 mm; 1-0.5 mm; and 0.5-0.25 mm. Total organic carbon, humic substances and texture were determined for each aggregate size fraction. The CO2 emission was measured in field and lab conditions, both by the capture in NaOH solution method. The native Cerrado and Panicum maximum Jacqvr. (Tanzânia areas (mostly clay showed the highest soil aggregation. The conventional soil tillage adopted in sugarcane areas contributed significantly to aggregate disruption. In all of the areas, the largest aggregates had higher organic carbon and humic substances. Organic carbon content and soil texture seem to be closely associated with CO2 emissions in the areas studied.

  18. Quantifying and isolating stable soil organic carbon using long-term bare fallow experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barré, P; Eglin, T; Christensen, Bent Tolstrup

    2010-01-01

    The stability of soil organic matter (SOM) is a major source of uncertainty in predicting atmospheric CO2 concentration during the 21st century. Isolating the stable soil carbon (C) from other, more labile, C fractions in soil is of prime importance for calibrating soil C simulation models......, and gaining insights into the mechanisms that lead to soil C stability. Long-term experiments with continuous bare fallow (vegetation-free) treatments in which the decay of soil C is monitored for decades after all inputs of C have stopped, provide a unique opportunity to assess the quantity of stable soil C....... We analyzed data from six bare fallow experiments of long-duration (>30 yrs), covering a range of soil types and climate conditions, and sited at Askov (Denmark), Grignon and Versailles (France), Kursk (Russia), Rothamsted (UK), and Ultuna (Sweden). A conceptual three pool model dividing soil C...

  19. CAG Expansions Are Genetically Stable and Form Nontoxic Aggregates in Cells Lacking Endogenous Polyglutamine Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley A. Zurawel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteins containing polyglutamine (polyQ regions are found in almost all eukaryotes, albeit with various frequencies. In humans, proteins such as huntingtin (Htt with abnormally expanded polyQ regions cause neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington’s disease (HD. To study how the presence of endogenous polyQ aggregation modulates polyQ aggregation and toxicity, we expressed polyQ expanded Htt fragments (polyQ Htt in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In stark contrast to other unicellular fungi, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. pombe is uniquely devoid of proteins with more than 10 Q repeats. We found that polyQ Htt forms aggregates within S. pombe cells only with exceedingly long polyQ expansions. Surprisingly, despite the presence of polyQ Htt aggregates in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, no significant growth defect was observed in S. pombe cells. Further, PCR analysis showed that the repetitive polyQ-encoding DNA region remained constant following transformation and after multiple divisions in S. pombe, in contrast to the genetic instability of polyQ DNA sequences in other organisms. These results demonstrate that cells with a low content of polyQ or other aggregation-prone proteins can show a striking resilience with respect to polyQ toxicity and that genetic instability of repetitive DNA sequences may have played an important role in the evolutionary emergence and exclusion of polyQ expansion proteins in different organisms.

  20. Food choice of Antarctic soil arthropods clarified by stable isotope signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhorst, S.F.; Ronfort, C.; Huiskes, A.H.L.; Convey, P.; Aerts, R.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Antarctic soil ecosystems are amongst the most simplified on Earth and include only few soil arthropod species, generally believed to be opportunistic omnivorous feeders. Using stable isotopic analyses, we investigated the food choice of two common and widely distributed Antarctic soil arthropod

  1. Changes in the geometric structure of pores and aggregates as indicators of the structural degradation of cultivated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvortsova, E. B.

    2009-11-01

    As shown by the example of loamy soils of the European territory of Russia, the geometric parameters of soil structure, along with the agrophysical soil parameters, should be taken into account for the comprehensive assessment of the physical degradation of cultivated soils. Different variants of the geometric transformation of soil structure in the plow horizons are analyzed. The shape and orientation of soil pores in thin sections prepared from undisturbed oriented soil samples are considered to be the main diagnostic indices. A computer-aided analysis of soil pores in thin sections made it possible to distinguish and characterize different levels of the geometric transformation of soil structure upon soil compaction: (a) without the disturbance of the shape and orientation of the aggregates, (b) with the transformation of soil aggregates from the crumb (granular) to the angular blocky shape, (c) with the development of a platy structure characterized by the predominantly horizontal orientation of the pores and aggregates, and (d) the complete disappearance of separate aggregates with the formation of a massive soil structure. The validity of the assessments of the geometric transformation of the soil pore space against the background of a considerable spatial variability in the geometric properties of soil structure in the plow horizon is discussed. The structural-functional specificity of the distinguished levels of the geometric transformation of soil structure is outlined.

  2. Soil aggregation and organic carbon of Oxisols under coffee in agroforestry systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Pinto Guimarães

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Intensive land use can lead to a loss of soil physical quality with negative impacts on soil aggregates, resistance to root penetration, porosity, and bulk density. Organic and agroforestry management systems can represent sustainable, well-balanced alternatives in the agroecosystem for promoting a greater input of organic matter than the conventional system. Based on the hypothesis that an increased input of organic matter improves soil physical quality, this study aimed to evaluate the impact of coffee production systems on soil physical properties in two Red-Yellow Oxisols (Latossolos Vermelho-Amarelos in the region of Caparaó, Espirito Santo, Brazil. On Farm 1, we evaluated the following systems: primary forest (Pf1, organic coffee (Org1 and conventional coffee (Con1. On Farm 2, we evaluated: secondary forest (Sf2, organic coffee intercropped with inga (Org/In2, organic coffee intercropped with leucaena and inga (Org/In/Le2, organic coffee intercropped with cedar (Org/Ced2 and unshaded conventional coffee (Con2. Soil samples were collected under the tree canopy from the 0-10, 10-20 and 20-40 cm soil layers. Under organic and agroforestry coffee management, soil aggregation was higher than under conventional coffee. In the agroforestry system, the degree of soil flocculation was 24 % higher, soil moisture was 80 % higher, and soil resistance to penetration was lower than in soil under conventional coffee management. The macroaggregates in the organic systems, Org/In2, Org/In/Le2, and Org/Ced2 contained, on average, 29.1, 40.1 and 34.7 g kg-1 organic carbon, respectively. These levels are higher than those found in the unshaded conventional system (Con2, with 20.2 g kg-1.

  3. Magnetic engineering of stable rod-shaped stem cell aggregates: circumventing the pitfall of self-bending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, V; Fayol, D; Reffay, M; Luciani, N; Bacri, J-C; Gay, C; Wilhelm, C

    2015-02-01

    A current challenge for tissue engineering while restoring the function of diseased or damaged tissue is to customize the tissue according to the target area. Scaffold-free approaches usually yield spheroid shapes with the risk of necrosis at the center due to poor nutrient and oxygen diffusion. Here, we used magnetic forces developed at the cellular scale by miniaturized magnets to create rod-shaped aggregates of stem cells that subsequently matured into a tissue-like structure. However, during the maturation process, the tissue-rods spontaneously bent and coiled into sphere-like structures, triggered by the increasing cell-cell adhesion within the initially non-homogeneous tissue. Optimisation of the intra-tissular magnetic forces successfully hindered the transition, in order to produce stable rod-shaped stem cells aggregates.

  4. Geotechnical characteristics and stability analysis of rock-soil aggregate slope at the Gushui Hydropower Station, southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia-wen; Shi, Chong; Xu, Fu-gang

    2013-01-01

    Two important features of the high slopes at Gushui Hydropower Station are layered accumulations (rock-soil aggregate) and multilevel toppling failures of plate rock masses; the Gendakan slope is selected for case study in this paper. Geological processes of the layered accumulation of rock and soil particles are carried out by the movement of water flow; the main reasons for the toppling failure of plate rock masses are the increasing weight of the upper rock-soil aggregate and mountain erosion by river water. Indoor triaxial compression test results show that, the cohesion and friction angle of the rock-soil aggregate decreased with the increasing water content; the cohesion and the friction angle for natural rock-soil aggregate are 57.7 kPa and 31.3° and 26.1 kPa and 29.1° for saturated rock-soil aggregate, respectively. The deformation and failure mechanism of the rock-soil aggregate slope is a progressive process, and local landslides will occur step by step. Three-dimensional limit equilibrium analysis results show that the minimum safety factor of Gendakan slope is 0.953 when the rock-soil aggregate is saturated, and small scale of landslide will happen at the lower slope.

  5. Spatial aggregation for crop modelling at regional scales: the effects of soil variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coucheney, Elsa; Villa, Ana; Eckersten, Henrik; Hoffmann, Holger; Jansson, Per-Erik; Gaiser, Thomas; Ewert, Franck; Lewan, Elisabet

    2017-04-01

    Modelling agriculture production and adaptation to the environment at regional or global scale receives much interest in the context of climate change. Process-based soil-crop models describe the flows of mass (i.e. water, carbon and nitrogen) and energy in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. As such, they represent valuable tools for predicting agricultural production in diverse agro-environmental contexts as well as for assessing impacts on the environment; e.g. leaching of nitrates, changes in soil carbon content and GHGs emissions. However, their application at regional and global scales for climate change impact studies raises new challenges related to model input data, calibration and evaluation. One major concern is to take into account the spatial variability of the environmental conditions (e.g. climate, soils, management practices) used as model input and because the impacts of climate change on cropping systems depend strongly on the site conditions and properties (1). For example climate change effects on yield can be either negative or positive depending on the soil type (2). Additionally, the use of different methods of upscaling and downscaling adds new sources of modelling uncertainties (3). In the present study, the effect of aggregating soil input data by area majority of soil mapping units was explored for spatially gridded simulations with the soil-vegetation model CoupModel for a region in Germany (North Rhine-Westphalia, NRW). The data aggregation effect (DAE) was analysed for wheat yield, water drainage, soil carbon mineralisation and nitrogen leaching below the root zone. DAE was higher for soil C and N variables than for yield and drainage and were strongly related to the spatial coverage of specific soils within the study region. These 'key soils' were identified by a model sensitivity analysis to soils present in the NRW region. The spatial aggregation of the key soils additionally influenced the DAE. Our results suggest that a spatial

  6. In Situ Earthworm Breeding to Improve Soil Aggregation, Chemical Properties, and Enzyme Activity in Papayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimin Xiang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The long-term use of mineral fertilizers has decreased the soil fertility in papaya (Carica papaya L. orchards in South China. In situ earthworm breeding is a new sustainable practice for improving soil fertility. A field experiment was conducted to compare the effects of four treatments consisting of the control (C, chemical fertilizer (F, compost (O, and in situ earthworm breeding (E on soil physico-chemical properties and soil enzyme activity in a papaya orchard. The results showed that soil chemical properties, such as pH, soil organic matter (SOM, total nitrogen (TN, available nitrogen (AN, and total phosphorus (TP were significantly improved with the E treatment but declined with the F treatment. On 31 October 2008, the SOM and TN with the O and E treatments were increased by 26.3% and 15.1%, respectively, and by 32.5% and 20.6% compared with the F treatment. Furthermore, the O and E treatments significantly increased the activity of soil urease and sucrase. Over the whole growing season, soil urease activity was 34.4%~40.4% and 51.1%~58.7% higher with the O and E treatments, respectively, than that with the C treatment. Additionally, the activity of soil sucrase with the E treatment was always the greatest of the four treatments, whereas the F treatment decreased soil catalase activity. On 11 June 2008 and 3 July 2008, the activity of soil catalase with the F treatment was decreased by 19.4% and 32.0% compared with C. Soil bulk density with the four treatments was in the order of O ≤ E < F < C. The O- and E-treated soil bulk density was significantly lower than that of the F-treated soil. Soil porosity was in the order of C < F < E < O. Soil porosity with the O and E treatments was 6.0% and 4.7% higher, respectively, than that with the F treatment. Meanwhile, the chemical fertilizer applications significantly influenced the mean weight diameter (MWD of the aggregate and proportion of different size aggregate fractions. The E treatment

  7. Changes in soil aggregate stability under different irrigation doses of waste water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morugán, Alicia; García-Orenes, Fuensanta; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Arcenegui, Victoria; Bárcenas, Gema

    2010-05-01

    Freshwater availability and soil degradation are two of the most important environmental problems in the Mediterranean area acerbated by incorrect agricultural use of irrigation in which organic matter is not correctly managed, the use of low quality water for irrigation, and the inefficiency of dose irrigation. For these reasons strategies for saving water and for the restoration of the mean properties of soil are necessary. The use of treated waste water for the irrigation of agricultural land could be a good solution to these problems, as it reduces the utilization of fresh water and could potentially improve key soil properties. In this work we have been studying, for more than three years, the effects on soil properties of different doses of irrigation with waste water. Here we show the results on aggregate stability. The study is located in an agricultural area at Biar (Alicante, SE of Spain), with a crop of grape (Vitis labrusca). Three types of waters are being used in the irrigation of the soil: fresh water (control) (TC), and treated waste water from secondary (T2) and tertiary treatment (T3). Three different doses of irrigation have been applied to fit the efficiency of the irrigation to the crop and soil type: D10 (10 L m-2 every week during 17 months), D50 (50 L m-2 every fifteen days during 14 moths) and D30 (30 L m-2 every week during 6 months up to present day). The results showed a clear decrease of aggregate stability during the period we used the second dose (D50) independent of the type of water used. That dose of irrigation and frequency produced strong wetting and drying cycles (WD) in the soil, and this is suspected to be the main factor responsible for the results. When we changed the dose of irrigation to D30, reducing the quantity per event and increasing the frequency, the soil aggregate stability started to improve. This dose avoids strong drying periods between irrigation events and the aggregate stability is confirmed to be slowly

  8. Stable isotopic constraints on global soil organic carbon turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Houlton, Benjamin Z.; Liu, Dongwei; Hou, Jianfeng; Cheng, Weixin; Bai, Edith

    2018-02-01

    Carbon dioxide release during soil organic carbon (SOC) turnover is a pivotal component of atmospheric CO2 concentrations and global climate change. However, reliably measuring SOC turnover rates on large spatial and temporal scales remains challenging. Here we use a natural carbon isotope approach, defined as beta (β), which was quantified from the δ13C of vegetation and soil reported in the literature (176 separate soil profiles), to examine large-scale controls of climate, soil physical properties and nutrients over patterns of SOC turnover across terrestrial biomes worldwide. We report a significant relationship between β and calculated soil C turnover rates (k), which were estimated by dividing soil heterotrophic respiration rates by SOC pools. ln( - β) exhibits a significant linear relationship with mean annual temperature, but a more complex polynomial relationship with mean annual precipitation, implying strong-feedbacks of SOC turnover to climate changes. Soil nitrogen (N) and clay content correlate strongly and positively with ln( - β), revealing the additional influence of nutrients and physical soil properties on SOC decomposition rates. Furthermore, a strong (R2 = 0.76; p global models of soil C turnover and thereby improving predictions of multiple global change influences over terrestrial C-climate feedback.

  9. Study of soil aggregate breakdown dynamics under low dispersive ultrasonic energies with sedimentation and X-ray attenuation**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomakers, Jasmin; Zehetner, Franz; Mentler, Axel; Ottner, Franz; Mayer, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    It has been increasingly recognized that soil organic matter stabilization is strongly controlled by physical binding within soil aggregates. It is therefore essential to measure soil aggregate stability reliably over a wide range of disruptive energies and different aggregate sizes. To this end, we tested high-accuracy ultrasonic dispersion in combination with subsequent sedimentation and X-ray attenuation. Three arable topsoils (notillage) from Central Europe were subjected to ultrasound at four different specific energy levels: 0.5, 6.7, 100 and 500 J cm−3, and the resulting suspensions were analyzed for aggregate size distribution by wet sieving (2 000-63 μm) and sedimentation/X-ray attenuation (63-2 μm). The combination of wet sieving and sedimentation technique allowed for a continuous analysis, at high resolution, of soil aggregate breakdown dynamics after defined energy inputs. Our results show that aggregate size distribution strongly varied with sonication energy input and soil type. The strongest effects were observed in the range of low specific energies (energies are required to capture the full range of aggregate stability and release of soil organic matter upon aggregate breakdown. PMID:27099408

  10. Stable isotopic constraints on global soil organic carbon turnover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide release during soil organic carbon (SOC turnover is a pivotal component of atmospheric CO2 concentrations and global climate change. However, reliably measuring SOC turnover rates on large spatial and temporal scales remains challenging. Here we use a natural carbon isotope approach, defined as beta (β, which was quantified from the δ13C of vegetation and soil reported in the literature (176 separate soil profiles, to examine large-scale controls of climate, soil physical properties and nutrients over patterns of SOC turnover across terrestrial biomes worldwide. We report a significant relationship between β and calculated soil C turnover rates (k, which were estimated by dividing soil heterotrophic respiration rates by SOC pools. ln( − β exhibits a significant linear relationship with mean annual temperature, but a more complex polynomial relationship with mean annual precipitation, implying strong-feedbacks of SOC turnover to climate changes. Soil nitrogen (N and clay content correlate strongly and positively with ln( − β, revealing the additional influence of nutrients and physical soil properties on SOC decomposition rates. Furthermore, a strong (R2 = 0.76; p < 0.001 linear relationship between ln( − β and estimates of litter and root decomposition rates suggests similar controls over rates of organic matter decay among the generalized soil C stocks. Overall, these findings demonstrate the utility of soil δ13C for independently benchmarking global models of soil C turnover and thereby improving predictions of multiple global change influences over terrestrial C-climate feedback.

  11. Nitrogen-mediated effects of elevated CO2 on intra-aggregate soil pore structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Joshua S; Giménez, Daniel; Subroy, Vandana; Heck, Richard J; Prior, Stephen A; Runion, G Brett; Torbert, H Allen

    2017-04-01

    Soil pore structure has a strong influence on water retention, and is itself influenced by plant and microbial dynamics such as root proliferation and microbial exudation. Although increased nitrogen (N) availability and elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentrations (eCO 2 ) often have interacting effects on root and microbial dynamics, it is unclear whether these biotic effects can translate into altered soil pore structure and water retention. This study was based on a long-term experiment (7 yr at the time of sampling) in which a C 4 pasture grass (Paspalum notatum) was grown on a sandy loam soil while provided factorial additions of N and CO 2 . Through an analysis of soil aggregate fractal properties supported by 3D microtomographic imagery, we found that N fertilization induced an increase in intra-aggregate porosity and a simultaneous shift toward greater accumulation of pore space in larger aggregates. These effects were enhanced by eCO 2 and yielded an increase in water retention at pressure potentials near the wilting point of plants. However, eCO 2 alone induced changes in the opposite direction, with larger aggregates containing less pore space than under control conditions, and water retention decreasing accordingly. Results on biotic factors further suggested that organic matter gains or losses induced the observed structural changes. Based on our results, we postulate that the pore structure of many mineral soils could undergo N-dependent changes as atmospheric CO 2 concentrations rise, having global-scale implications for water balance, carbon storage, and related rhizosphere functions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Bacteria and fungi can contribute to nutrients bioavailability and aggregate formation in degraded soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Muhammad Imtiaz; Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; Shahzad, Tanvir; Almeelbi, Talal; Ismail, Iqbal M I; Oves, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Intensive agricultural practices and cultivation of exhaustive crops has deteriorated soil fertility and its quality in agroecosystems. According to an estimate, such practices will convert 30% of the total world cultivated soil into degraded land by 2020. Soil structure and fertility loss are one of the main causes of soil degradation. They are also considered as a major threat to crop production and food security for future generations. Implementing safe and environmental friendly technology would be viable solution for achieving sustainable restoration of degraded soils. Bacterial and fungal inocula have a potential to reinstate the fertility of degraded land through various processes. These microorganisms increase the nutrient bioavailability through nitrogen fixation and mobilization of key nutrients (phosphorus, potassium and iron) to the crop plants while remediate soil structure by improving its aggregation and stability. Success rate of such inocula under field conditions depends on their antagonistic or synergistic interaction with indigenous microbes or their inoculation with organic fertilizers. Co-inoculation of bacteria and fungi with or without organic fertilizer are more beneficial for reinstating the soil fertility and organic matter content than single inoculum. Such factors are of great importance when considering bacteria and fungi inocula for restoration of degraded soils. The overview of presented mechanisms and interactions will help agriculturists in planning sustainable management strategy for reinstating the fertility of degraded soil and assist them in reducing the negative impact of artificial fertilizers on our environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Limitations in Determining Multifractal Spectra from Pore-Solid Soil Aggregate Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravchenko, A N; Martin, M A; Smucker, A J.M.; Rivers, M L [MSU; (UCDM); (UC)

    2011-11-16

    Multifractal methods have the potential to be useful tools for characterizing spatial distributions of soil pores from microtomographic images of undisturbed soil cores and soil aggregates. The objective of this study was to examine the limitations of multifractal analyses in binary (void and solid) soil images and to explore conditions under which multifractal spectra can be obtained. Multifractal characteristics of binary soil images are bounded within certain limiting values corresponding to nonfractal scaling. In this study, we first addressed the theoretical limitations of multifractal analysis of binary images and examined the nonfractal scaling boundaries in multifractal calculations by the method of moments. Then we developed boundary conditions for multifractal calculations by the direct method. Results revealed that fractal scaling is potentially possible only across a relatively narrow range of cell sizes restricted by the nonfractal scaling boundaries. Moreover, the range of cell sizes where fractal scaling is potentially possible varies with pore size. That is, in multifractal calculations it changes continuously with changes in the q value. For the soil aggregates examined in this study, this range varied from two to eight pixels for low q values to 128 pixels for high q values. The varying range makes calculations of true multifractal spectra for binary soil image data impossible. These results are consistent with a general theoretical notion that binary soil images are not multifractal in a strict mathematical sense. We suggest, however, that application of multifractal formalism can generate 'pseudo-multifractal spectra' that might still be useful for summarizing pore distribution information and for comparing pore data among different agricultural management regimes and soil type.

  14. [Humus composition and stable carbon isotope natural abundance in paddy soil under long-term fertilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Yang, Lin-Zhang; Ci, En; Wang, Yan; Yin, Shi-Xue; Shen, Ming-Xing

    2008-09-01

    Soil samples were collected from an experimental paddy field with long-term (26 years) fertilization in Taihu Lake region of Jiangsu Province to study the effects of different fertilization on the organic carbon distribution and stable carbon isotope natural abundance (delta 13C) in the soil profile, and on the humus composition. The results showed that long-term fertilization increased the organic carbon content in top soil significantly, and there was a significantly negative exponential correlation between soil organic carbon content and soil depth (P organic carbon content in 10-30 cm soil layer under chemical fertilizations and in 20-40 cm soil layer under organic fertilizations was relatively stable. Soil delta 13C increased gradually with soil depth, its variation range being from -24% per thousand to -28 per thousand, and had a significantly negative linear correlation with soil organic carbon content (P soil layer, the delta 13C in treatments organic manure (M), M + NP, M + NPK, M + straw (R) + N, and R + N decreased significantly; while in 30-50 cm soil layer, the delta 13C in all organic fertilization treatments except R + N increased significantly. Tightly combined humus (humin) was the main humus composition in the soil, occupying 50% or more, and the rest were loosely and stably combined humus. Long-term fertilization increased the content of loosely combined humus and the ratio of humic acid (HA) to fulvic acid (FA).

  15. Molecular modelling studies of clay-exopolysaccharide complexes: Soil aggregation and water retention phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henao, Lina J. [Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolecules Vegetales (CERMAV-CNRS), BP53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Mazeau, Karim, E-mail: karim.mazeau@cermav.cnrs.fr [Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolecules Vegetales (CERMAV-CNRS), BP53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2009-10-15

    In soils, the bacterial exopolysaccharides (EPS) aggregate mineral particles, enhancing their cohesion and their ability to retain water. These phenomena have been studied at the atomic scale by molecular modelling; we have considered seven rhizospheric polysaccharides interacting with the basal surfaces of montmorillonite. Models accounted for the aggregation phenomena induced by EPS: some segments of the polysaccharide were adsorbed on the mineral surfaces while others formed loops and bridges linking two surfaces. Adsorption energies were favourable and depended mostly on the interacting area. Cohesion of aggregates was estimated by the adhesion work, predicted values differed from one EPS to the other, suggesting that the chemical structure influences interaction strength with the mineral surface. Mechanisms of water uptake and release have also been investigated: hydration energies revealed that EPS strongly retain water at low water concentrations.

  16. Quantification of Labile Soil Mercury by Stable Isotope Dilution Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetaya, Waleed; Huang, Jen-How; Osterwalder, Stefan; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that can cause severe health problems to humans. Mercury is emitted to the atmosphere from both natural and anthropogenic sources and can be transported over long distances before it is deposited to aquatic and terrestrial environments. Aside from accumulation in soil solid phases, Hg deposited in soils may migrate to surface- and ground-water or enter the food chain, depending on its lability. There are many operationally-defined extraction methods proposed to quantify soil labile metals. However, these methods are by definition prone to inaccuracies such as non-selectivity, underestimation or overestimation of the labile metal pool. The isotopic dilution technique (ID) is currently the most promising method for discrimination between labile and non-labile metal fractions in soil with a minimum disturbance to soil-solid phases. ID assesses the reactive metal pool in soil by defining the fraction of metal both in solid and solution phases that is isotopically-exchangeable known as the 'E-value'. The 'E-value' represents the metal fraction in a dynamic equilibrium with the solution phase and is potentially accessible to plants. This is carried out by addition of an enriched metal isotope to soil suspensions and quantifying the fraction of metal that is able to freely exchange with the added isotope by measuring the equilibrium isotopic ratio by ICP-MS. E-value (mg kg-1) is then calculated as follows: E-Value = (Msoil/ W) (CspikeVspike/ Mspike) (Iso1IAspike -Iso2IAspikeRss / Iso2IAsoil Rss - Iso1IAsoil) where M is the average atomic mass of the metal in the soil or the spike, W is the mass of soil (kg), Cspike is the concentration of the metal in the spike (mg L-1), Vspike is the volume of spike (L), IA is isotopic abundance, and Rss is the equilibrium ratio of isotopic abundances (Iso1:Iso2). Isotopic dilution has been successfully applied to determine E-values for several elements. However, to our knowledge, this method has not yet

  17. Field Scale Variation in Water Dispersible Colloids from Aggregates and Intact Soil Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per; Ferré, Ty P A

    . It is, however, difficult to quantify the amount of colloids ready available to participate in colloid-facilitated transport. In literature, the part of the colloidal fraction that readily disperses into suspension is referred to as water-dispersible clay (WDC). In this study we used two methods......Colloid-facilitated transport can play an important role in the transport of chemicals through the soil profile. The negative surface charge and large surface area makes colloids perfect carriers for strongly sorbing chemicals, like phosphorus and certain pesticides, in highly structured soils...... for measuring the amount of WDC (soil sampled from an agricultural 1.69 ha field in a 15 x 15 m grid (65 points). In method no. 1 laser diffraction was applied to continuously measure the particle size distribution of 1-2 mm intact soil aggregates at two initial moisture...

  18. Fingerprints of four crop models as affected by soil input data aggregation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Angulo, C.; Gaiser, T.; Rötter, R. P.; Børgesen, C. D.; Hlavinka, Petr; Trnka, Miroslav; Ewert, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 61, NOV 2014 (2014), s. 35-48 ISSN 1161-0301 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0248; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.4.31.0056; GA MZe QJ1310123 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : crop model * soil data * spatial resolution * yield distribution * aggregation Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.704, year: 2014

  19. Impact of long-term fertilization practices on the soil aggregation and humic substances under double-cropped rice fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haiming; Xiao, Xiaoping; Li, Chao; Wang, Ke; Guo, Lijun; Cheng, Kaikai; Sun, Geng; Pan, Xiaochen

    2018-02-06

    Soil organic matter (SOM) content and soil aggregation are essential components of soil structure, which plays an important role in soil quality and fertility. Also, the SOM content, aggregation, and humus substances in paddy field were affected by application of fertilization practices. However, there is still limited information about the effects of long-term different fertilization practices on soil aggregation and carbon content in the humic acid (C-HAF), fulvic acid (C-FAF), and humin (C-HUM) fractions under double-cropping rice (Oryza sativa L.) system in Southern China paddy fields. Therefore, the effects of long-term fertilizer application on soil aggregation and C-HUM, C-HAF, and C-FAF contents in 0-5-, 5-10-, and 10-20-cm soil depth under double-cropped rice fields in Southern China were investigated. The experiment located at NingXiang County in Hunan Province, China begins in 1986 and the experiment includes five treatments: without fertilizer input (CK), mineral fertilizer alone (MF), rice straw residues and mineral fertilizer (RF), 30% organic matter and 70% mineral fertilizer (LOM), and 60% organic matter and 40% mineral fertilizer (HOM). The results showed that the soil total organic carbon content in paddy soils with RF, LOM, and HOM treatments was significant higher (P soil aggregates with different fertilization treatments were decreased as HOM > LOM > RF > MF > CK. The HOM treatment had the highest percentage of soil aggregates in each size class and the CK treatment had the lowest percentage of soil aggregates in each size class in 0-5-, 5-10-, and 10-20-cm soil depth at early and late rice maturity stages. The soil C-HAF, C-FAF, and C-HUM contents were increased by long-term combined application of manure with mineral fertilizer practices. Meanwhile, the results indicated that the soil C-HAF, C-FAF, and C-HUM contents with RF, LOM, and HOM treatments were significantly higher (P soil total organic carbon content, each size

  20. Soil aggregates, organic matter turnover and carbon balance in a Mediterranean eroded vineyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, Agata; Lo Papa, Giuseppe; Dazzi, Carmelo; Gristina, Luciano; Cerdà, Artemi

    2014-05-01

    The carbon cycle is being affected by the human impacts (Novara et al., 2011; Yan-Gui et al., 2013), and one of those is the intensification in the soil erosion in agriculture land (Cerdà et al., 2009; García Orenes et al., 2009). Vineyards also are affected by the human activities (Fernández Calviño, 2012). Vineyards in Sicily are cultivated on 110.000 ha, 10% of which on >10% slope. Deficiencies of soil organic matter are typical of the semi arid Mediterranean environment especially where traditional intensive cropping practices are adopted (Novara et al., 2012; 2013). These practices in vineyards could lead soil to intensive erosion processes (Novara et al., 2011). The fate of SOC under erosion processes is difficult to understand because of the influence of the erosion impact on SOC pathway, which depends on the different features of the process involved (detachment, transport and/or deposition). Soil erosion must be considered a net C source (Lal, 2003), as eroded soils have lower net primary productivity (NPP) (Dick and Gregorich, 2004) caused by reduction in the effective rooting depth and all in all determining decline in soil quality. Breakdown of aggregates and soil dispersion expose SOM to microbial/enzymatic processes and chemical soil properties (Dimoyiannis, 2012; Kocyigit and Demirci, 2012). Moreover the light fraction, transported by runoff, is labile and easily mineralized determining CO2 emission in the atmosphere (Jacinthe and Lal, 2004). Therefore, the carbon pool is lower in eroded than in un-eroded soil scapes and the rate of mineralization of soil organic matter is higher in sediments than in original soil. In this survey we show a research conducted on a slope sequence of three soil profiles in an irrigated vineyard located in Sambuca di Sicilia, Italy (UTM33-WGS84: 4169367N; 325011E). The SOC content was measured at depth intervals of 10 cm up to a depth of 60 cm in each pedon. Wet aggregate-size fractions with no prior chemical

  1. Dynamics of soil biogeochemical gas emissions shaped by remolded aggregate sizes and carbon configurations under hydration cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2018-01-01

    Changes in soil hydration status affect microbial community dynamics and shape key biogeochemical processes. Evidence suggests that local anoxic conditions may persist and support anaerobic microbial activity in soil aggregates (or in similar hot spots) long after the bulk soil becomes aerated. To facilitate systematic studies of interactions among environmental factors with biogeochemical emissions of CO 2 , N 2 O and CH 4 from soil aggregates, we remolded silt soil aggregates to different sizes and incorporated carbon at different configurations (core, mixed, no addition). Assemblies of remolded soil aggregates of three sizes (18, 12, and 6 mm) and equal volumetric proportions were embedded in sand columns at four distinct layers. The water table level in each column varied periodically while obtaining measurements of soil GHG emissions for the different aggregate carbon configurations. Experimental results illustrate that methane production required prolonged inundation and highly anoxic conditions for inducing measurable fluxes. The onset of unsaturated conditions (lowering water table) resulted in a decrease in CH 4 emissions while temporarily increasing N 2 O fluxes. Interestingly, N 2 O fluxes were about 80% higher form aggregates with carbon placement in center (anoxic) core compared to mixed carbon within aggregates. The fluxes of CO 2 were comparable for both scenarios of carbon sources. These experimental results highlight the importance of hydration dynamics in activating different GHG production and affecting various transport mechanisms about 80% of total methane emissions during lowering water table level are attributed to physical storage (rather than production), whereas CO 2 emissions (~80%) are attributed to biological activity. A biophysical model for microbial activity within soil aggregates and profiles provides a means for results interpretation and prediction of trends within natural soils under a wide range of conditions. © 2017 John

  2. EFFECTS OF CULTIVATED BRACHIARIA GRASSES ON SOIL AGGREGATION AND STABILITY IN THE SEMI-ARID TROPICS OF KENYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias M. Gichangi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil aggregation is a key short term indicators of soil quality attributed to changes in land management. A study was conducted to investigate changes in the size distribution and stability of soil aggregates in a structurally unstable sandy loam soil following cultivation of Brachiaria grass in semi-arid region of Kenya. Brachiaria grass cultivars included Brachiaria decumbens cv. Basilisk, B. brizantha cvs Marandu, MG4, Piata and Xaraes, B. humidicola cv. Llanero and B. hybrid cv. Mulato II which were compared with two locally cultivated forage grasses (Chloris gayana cv. KAT R3 and Pennisetum purpureum cv. Kakamega 1 and a bare plot (negative check. The grass treatments were evaluated with fertilisers application (40 kg P applied at sowing and 50 kg N ha−1 in each wet season and with no fertiliser applications. Aggregate size fractions were isolated using the wet sieving method. Aggregation based on the proportion of small macro-aggregates (250–2000 μm increased in soils cultivated with all grass types compared to the control and was greatest in soils under B. hybrid cv. Mulato II. Aggregate stability in terms of mean weight diameter (MWD differed among the grasses and was highest in soils under cv. Mulato II and cv. Marandu with MWD of 4.49 and 4.31 mm, respectively. Changes in small macro-aggregates fraction was positively correlated with particulate organic matter (POM (r=0.9104, P= 0.001, microbial biomass carbon (MBC (r=0.5474, P= 0.01, soil organic carbon (SOC (r=0.3654, P= 0.05 and root biomass (r=0.4977, P= 0.01. This indicated that the binding agents were important in the aggregation of soils cultivated with Brachiaria grasses.

  3. FATTY ACID STABLE ISOTOPE INDICATORS OF MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCE IN TROPICAL SOILS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soil microbial community plays an important role in tropical ecosystem functioning because of its importance in the soil organic matter (SOM) cycle. We have measured the stable carbon isotopic ratio (delta13C) of individual phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in a variety of tr...

  4. Soil development on stable landforms and implications for landscape studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Soil development parameters include a wide variety of morphological, chemical, and mineralogical parameters, but some of the best indicators of time and surface stability are derived from field morphology. Over long time-spans, the most common time function for soil development is exponential or logarithmic, in which rates decrease with increasing age. Over shorter time-spans in semi-arid and moister climates, Holocene and Pleistocene soil development functions appear as linear segments, with Holocene rates about 10 to 50 times those of Pleistocene rates. In contrast to significant temporal variation in rates, geographical variation in rates within (a) the southern Great Basin and (b) the east Central Valley of California is on the order of 2 or 3 times. When comparing soil development indices of the semi-arid Great Basin to those of moister central California, Holocene rates are similar, but Pleistocene rates are more than 10 times slower in the Great Basin. In a range of climatic settings, the reasons for declining rates over time are several and are complexly related to erosional history, fluxes in water and dust related to climatic changes, rates of primary mineral dissolution, and intrinsic soil processes. ?? 1990.

  5. Stimulation of microbial extracellular enzyme activities by elevated CO2 depends on soil aggregate size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorodnikov, M.; Blagodatskaya, E.; Blagodatsky, S.; Marhan, S.; Fangmeier, A.; Kuzyakov, Y.

    2009-04-01

    Increased belowground carbon (C) transfer by plant roots at elevated CO2 may change properties of the microbial community in the rhizosphere. Previous investigations that focused on total soil organic C or total microbial C showed contrasting results: small increase, small decrease or no changes. We evaluated the effect of 5 years of elevated CO2(550 ppm) on four extracellular enzymes: ß-glucosidase, chitinase, phosphatase, and sulfatase. We expected microorganisms to be differently localized in aggregates of various sizes and, therefore analyzed microbial biomass (Cmic by SIR) and enzyme activities in three aggregate-size classes: large macro- (>2 mm), small macro- (0.25-2 mm), and microaggregates (production, we activated microorganisms by substrate (glucose and nutrients) amendment. Although Ctotal and Cmic as well as the activities of ß-glucosidase, phosphatase, and sulfatase were unaffected in bulk soil and in aggregate-size classes by elevated CO2, significant changes were observed in potential enzyme production after substrate amendment. After adding glucose, enzyme activities under elevated CO2 were 1.2-1.9-fold higher than under ambient CO2. This indicates the increased activity of microorganisms, which leads to accelerated C turnover in soil under elevated CO2. Significantly higher chitinase activity in bulk soil and in large macroaggregates under elevated CO2 revealed an increased contribution of fungi to turnover processes. At the same time, less chitinase activity in microaggregates underlined microaggregate stability and the difficulties for fungal hyphae penetrating them. We conclude that quantitative and qualitative changes of C input by plants into the soil at elevated CO2 affect microbial community functioning, but not its total content. Future studies should therefore focus more on the changes of functions and activities, but less on the pools.

  6. Effects of earthworms on soil aggregate stability and carbon and nitrogen storage in a legume cover crop agroecosystem.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketterings, Q.M.; Blair, J.M.; Marinissen, J.C.Y.

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the effects of earthworms on soil aggregate size-distribution, water-stability, and the distribution of total C and N among aggregates of different sizes. Earthworm populations were experimentally manipulated (reduced, unaltered or increased) in field enclosures cropped to soybean

  7. ORGANIC CARBON AND CARBON STOCK: RELATIONS WITH PHYSICAL INDICATORS AND SOIL AGGREGATION IN AREAS CULTIVATED WITH SUGAR CANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Tolentino de Lima

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic carbon and carbon stock influence, directly or indirectly, most of soil aggregate stability indicators. The objective of this study was to quantify the production of dry biomass (DB, total organic carbon (TOC and carbon stock (CStk in soil, and to evaluate their influence on some indicators of aggregation in an Oxisol at a Cerrado biome in Uberaba-MG, Brazil. The design was completely randomized blocks, in two evaluation periods: three and six cuts, at six depths (0-0.1, 0.1-0.2, 0.2-0.3, 0.3-0.4, 0.4-0.5 and 0.5-0.6 m. It was evaluated: soil density (SD, volumetric humidity (VH, aggregate stability index (AEI, weighted mean diameter (WDA, mean diameter (GDA, index of aggregates with diameter greater than 2 mm (AI and sensitivity index (SI, replicated by 4. The best AEI of the soil and the highest TOC contents were found in the most superficial layers, 0 to 0.2 m, for both cuttings. The greater values of TOC and CStk, occurred at the sixth cut area, where there was a higher amount of DB on soil surface. The higher levels of organic matter did not provide higher AEI in the area of sixth cut, when compared to that of the third cut. The TOC and CStk levels in both areas generally had a positive influence on soil aggregation indicators for both cuts.

  8. Effects of experimental repeated fires in the soil aggregation and its temporal evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Julian; Gimeno, Eugenia; Andreu, Vicente; Gonzalez, Oscar; Rubio, Jose Luis

    2013-04-01

    Forest fires are an important problem in the Mediterranean and change our forest topsoils with still unknown consequences for important ecosystem services, such as water availability, plant growth and carbon sequestration. The total area affected by forest fires in Mediterranean countries of the European Union has declined since 1980, and the number of fires in this region tends to stabilize. However, in countries like Spain and Portugal the number of fires tends to increase. This fact seems to support future predictions indicating a general tendency to increase the number of forest fires, related to the climate change. According to European Forest Fire Information System (EFFIS), 102349 ha of the Spanish forest surface were burned in the summer of 2012 (01/06- 11/08/), of which 54186 ha were registered in the Valencia region. In this sense, to assess post-fire soil recovery aggregate stability has been used as an indicator in the Experimental Station of La Concordia (Valencia, Spain), where experimental fires were carried out in1995 and 2003, in a set of nine plots (20x4m). The soil studied is a Rendzic Leptosol. The stability of macroaggregates (SMS, Ø >250 μm), soil organic matter (SOM) and calcium carbonate contents, aggregates size and water erosion processes, were analysed in relation to fire severity and its recurrence, in two environments (under canopy, UC, and bare soils, BS), and in the short- and medium-term of two fires. In 1995, different fire treatments were applied to obtain different fire severities: three plots were burned with high severity fire, other three plots with moderate one, and the remainder plots were left unburned (control). In 2003, the same plots were burned again with low severity fires. The study was performed until summer of 2007. In general, soil environment explained significant differences in the soil properties between under canopy and bare soils. Only in the short-term of repeated fires, CaCO3 content, macroaggregate mean

  9. The Microbial Efficiency-Matrix Stabilization (MEMS) framework integrates plant litter decomposition with soil organic matter stabilization: do labile plant inputs form stable soil organic matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotrufo, M Francesca; Wallenstein, Matthew D; Boot, Claudia M; Denef, Karolien; Paul, Eldor

    2013-04-01

    The decomposition and transformation of above- and below-ground plant detritus (litter) is the main process by which soil organic matter (SOM) is formed. Yet, research on litter decay and SOM formation has been largely uncoupled, failing to provide an effective nexus between these two fundamental processes for carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling and storage. We present the current understanding of the importance of microbial substrate use efficiency and C and N allocation in controlling the proportion of plant-derived C and N that is incorporated into SOM, and of soil matrix interactions in controlling SOM stabilization. We synthesize this understanding into the Microbial Efficiency-Matrix Stabilization (MEMS) framework. This framework leads to the hypothesis that labile plant constituents are the dominant source of microbial products, relative to input rates, because they are utilized more efficiently by microbes. These microbial products of decomposition would thus become the main precursors of stable SOM by promoting aggregation and through strong chemical bonding to the mineral soil matrix. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Sodium Contents in Dairy Cow Urine and Soil Aggregate Sizes Influence the Amount of Nitrogen Lost from Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Hamamoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cow urine deposition on pasture soils is a major source of N-related environmental impacts in the dairy farming systems. The urine-N can potentially be lost to the ground water as nitrate (NO3- and to the atmosphere as nitrous oxide (N2O. These N-related environmental impacts are possibly related to the sodium (Na+ concentrations in urine. We sampled a pasture soil and separated it into three aggregate size groups (0–3, 3–5, and 5–7 mm. Then, cow urine with variable Na+ concentrations (4.3–6.1 g Na+ L−1 was added to the soil cores. We treated the cores with simulated heavy rains and measured the amounts of calcium (Ca2+, Na+, potassium (K+, and inorganic-N leached from the soils. N2O emission rates were also determined throughout the experimental period. Increasing Na+ concentration in urine decreased the loss of NO3- (−20%, after repeatedly applied simulated rain treatments (30 mm × 3, whereas it increased the loss of ammonium (31% and K+ (19%. For the loss of Ca2+ and the emissions of N2O, the effect of the Na+ concentrations was unclear. Field level studies and studies focusing on the mechanisms behind the changes in nutrient losses are needed.

  11. Stable carbon isotope depth profiles and soil organic carbon dynamics in the lower Mississippi Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, J.G.; Harden, J.W.; Fries, T.L.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of depth trends of 13C abundance in soil organic matter and of 13C abundance from soil-respired CO2 provides useful indications of the dynamics of the terrestrial carbon cycle and of paleoecological change. We measured depth trends of 13C abundance from cropland and control pairs of soils in the lower Mississippi Basin, as well as the 13C abundance of soil-respired CO2 produced during approximately 1-year soil incubation, to determine the role of several candidate processes on the 13C depth profile of soil organic matter. Depth profiles of 13C from uncultivated control soils show a strong relationship between the natural logarithm of soil organic carbon concentration and its isotopic composition, consistent with a model Rayleigh distillation of 13C in decomposing soil due to kinetic fractionation during decomposition. Laboratory incubations showed that initially respired CO 2 had a relatively constant 13C content, despite large differences in the 13C content of bulk soil organic matter. Initially respired CO2 was consistently 13C-depleted with respect to bulk soil and became increasingly 13C-depleted during 1-year, consistent with the hypothesis of accumulation of 13C in the products of microbial decomposition, but showing increasing decomposition of 13C-depleted stable organic components during decomposition without input of fresh biomass. We use the difference between 13C / 12C ratios (calculated as ??-values) between respired CO 2 and bulk soil organic carbon as an index of the degree of decomposition of soil, showing trends which are consistent with trends of 14C activity, and with results of a two-pooled kinetic decomposition rate model describing CO2 production data recorded during 1 year of incubation. We also observed inconsistencies with the Rayleigh distillation model in paired cropland soils and reasons for these inconsistencies are discussed. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Soil Compaction on Carbon and Nitrogen Sequestration in Soil and Wheat, Soil Physical Properties and Aggregates Stability (Case study: Northern of Aq Qala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Saieedifar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil compaction has become a widespread problem in the world and it is considered as one of the main factors affecting land degradation in arid and semi-arid agricultural land. Compaction in arable soils is a gradual phenomenon that appearing over time and most important factors that influence it include: soil properties, high clay content, low organic matter, and frequency of wet-dry in the soil, impervious layer of soil, load heavy agricultural implements and soil and water mismanagement. Compaction induced soil degradation affects about 68 million hectares of land globally. The vast majority of compaction in modern agriculture is caused by vehicular traffic. Carbon sequestration by long-term management operation of the plant and soil, not only increase the soil carbon storage but also lead to reduce the carbon exchange and greenhouse gases emissions like CO2 from the soil profile. The aim of this study was evaluating the effect of soil compaction on carbon and nitrogen sequestration of wheat and soil and some soil physical properties such as: aggregate stability, saturated soil moisture content, bulk density and soil porosity. Materials and Methods: This experiment was accomplished in which is located near Aq Qala in a randomized completely block design (with 4 treatments and 3 replications. Soil compaction was artificially created by using a 5/7 ton heavy tractor. The treatments arrangements were: 1 T1: control, 2 T2: twice passing of tractor, 3 T3: four time of passing tractor, and 4 T4: six time of passing heavy tractor. Utilize of all agricultural inputs (fertilizers, herbicides, etc. has been identical for all treatments. Since rain-fed farming is the common method to cultivation of cereals in the study area, so no complementary irrigation was carried out in this period. In this study, after the measurement of the parameters, the data were analyzed by using SPSS 16.0 Software. LSD test was used for comparison of means

  13. Direct Visualization of Aggregate Morphology and Dynamics in a Model Soil Organic–Mineral System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hufschmid, Ryan D.; Newcomb, Christina J.; Grate, Jay W.; De Yoreo, James J.; Browning, Nigel D.; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2017-04-03

    Interactions between mineral surfaces and organic matter are ubiquitous in soils and the environment. Through both physical and chemical mechanisms, organic-mineral assemblages prevent decomposition of soil organic matter by limiting accessibility or reducing efficacy of enzymes and microbes. To understand the mechanisms underlying organic-mineral interactions, researchers have begun to interrogate these systems at smaller length scales. Current techniques that maintain a hydrated state and allow researchers to characterize nanometer length scales are limited. Here we chose a model organic-mineral system and performed complementary imaging techniques that enable direct nanoscale observations in environmentally relevant conditions: cryogenic TEM and in-situ liquid cell TEM. We observed a three-fold increase in aggregate size of goethite nanoparticles upon addition of a model organic phosphate ligand and quantification of nanoparticle orientation reveals a preference for side-to-side interactions independent of the addition of an organic ligand. Additionally, in-situ liquid cell TEM experiments provides a dynamic view of the interactions allowing us to report velocities of mineral assemblages during aggregation and disaggregation, which could potentially provide binding energetics and kinetic parameters about organic-mineral and mineral-mineral systems.

  14. [Relationship between Fe, Al oxides and stable organic carbon, nitrogen in the yellow-brown soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Li-Sha; Wang, Dai-Zhang; Jiang, Xin; Rao, Wei; Zhang, Wen-Hao; Guo, Chun-Yan; Li, Teng

    2010-11-01

    The stable organic carbon and nitrogen of the different particles were gained by oxidation of 6% NaOCl in the yellow-brown soils. The relationships between the contents of selective extractable Fe/Al and the stable organic carbon/nitrogen were investigated. It shown that amounts of dithionite-citrate-(Fe(d)) and oxalate-(Fe(o)) and pyrophosphate extractable (Fe(p)) were 6-60.8 g x kg(-1) and 0.13-4.8 g x kg(-1) and 0.03-0.47 g x kg(-1) in 2-250 microm particles, respectively; 43.1-170 g x kg(-1) and 5.9-14.0 g x kg(-1) and 0.28-0.78 g x kg(-1) in nitrogen, higher in paddy yellow-brown soils than in arid yellow-brown soils, were 0.93-6.0 g x kg(-1) and 0.05-0.36 g x kg(-1) in 2-250 microm particles, respectively; 6.05-19.3 g x kg(-1) and 0.61-2.1 g x kg(-1) in nitrogen (C(stable)/N(stable)) were 9.50-22.0 in 2-250 microm particles and 7.43-11.54 in nitrogen were 14.3-50.0 and 11.9-55.6 in 2-250 microm particles, respectively; 53.72-88.80 and 40.64-70.0 in nitrogen are advantageously conserved in paddy yellow-brown soil. An extremely significant positive correlation of the stable organic carbon and nitrogen with selective extractable Fe/Al is observed. The most amounts between the stable organic carbon and nitrogen and selective extractable Fe/Al appear in clay particles, namely the clay particles could protect the soil organic carbon and nitrogen.

  15. The anisotropy of the structure and the microspatial pattern of the pores at the aggregate level of texturally differentiated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvortsova, E. B.; Rozhkov, V. A.

    2011-07-01

    The anisotropy of the soil pores in texturally differentiated soils is an important soil-genetic index. The morphological study of thin soil sections with vertical and horizontal orientation showed that the pore space of a texturally differentiated light gray forest soil at the aggregate level of organization has isotropic, anisotropic, and partially anisotropic structures in the different horizons. In the horizons with a platy structure, the anisotropy of the pore space is largely determined by the anisometry of the structural units. In the horizons with a massive structure not separated into aggregates, the anisotropic indices can be related to the structural features of the recent and relic biogenic pores. To reveal the total anisotropy of the soil pore space, the most informative and genetically determined indices should be studied: the shape, area, and orientation of the pores. In the soil studied, the variation of the pore sizes in the vertical thin sections was higher than in the horizontal thin sections, which agreed with the concept of the anisotropy of the entire soil profile. The fixed vertical and horizontal orientation of the soil thin sections allowed the obtained results to be integrated into the full-profile anisotropy of the soil properties. The vertical thin sections were found to be of greater information value for the profile-genetic analysis of the structure and variability of the soil pore space than their horizontal analogues.

  16. Neutral hydrolysable sugars, OC and N content across soil aggregate size fractions, as an effect of two different crop rotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeletti, Carlo; Giannetta, Beatrice; Kölbl, Angelika; Monaci, Elga; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Vischetti, Costantino

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the results regarding the effects of two 13 years long crop rotations, on the composition of mineral associated neutral sugars, organic carbon (OC) and N concentration, across different aggregate size fractions. The two cropping sequences were characterized by different levels of N input from plant residues and tillage frequency. We also analysed the changes that occurred in soil organic matter (SOM) chemical composition following the cultivation in the two soils of winter wheat and chickpea on the same soils. The analysis of OC and N content across soil aggregate fractions allowed getting an insight into the role played by SOM chemical composition in the formation of organo-mineral associations, while neutral sugars composition provided information on mineral associated SOM origin and decomposition processes, as pentoses derive mostly from plant tissues and hexoses are prevalently of microbial origin. Soil samples were collected from two adjacent fields, from the 0-10 cm layer, in November 2011 (T0). For 13 years before the beginning of the experiment, one soil was cultivated mostly with alfalfa (ALF), while a conventional cereal-sunflower-legume rotation (CON) was carried out on the other. Winter wheat and chickpea were sown on the two soils during the following 2 growing seasons and the sampling was repeated after 18 months (T1). A combination of aggregates size and density fractionation was used to isolate OM associated with mineral particles in: macro-aggregates (>212 μm), micro-aggregates ( 63 μm) and silt and clay size particles (carbohydrates contributions in every other fraction. GM/AX varied slightly between the soils. In conclusion, the crop rotation determined the accumulation of different levels of SOM in the two soils. The 18-months cultivation experiment determined an increase in the tillage intensity in ALF, and the introduction of N rich chickpea residues in CON. Consequently SOM chemical composition responded divergently in

  17. Influence of forest disturbance on stable nitrogen isotope ratios in soil and vegetation profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer D. Knoepp; Scott R. Taylor; Lindsay R. Boring; Chelcy F. Miniat

    2015-01-01

    Soil and plant stable nitrogen isotope ratios (15 N) are influenced by atmospheric nitrogen (N) inputs and processes that regulate organic matter (OM) transformation and N cycling. The resulting 15N patterns may be useful for discerning ecosystem differences in N cycling. We studied two ecosystems; longleaf pine wiregrass (...

  18. Using stable isotopes to resolve eco-hydrological dynamics of soil-plant-atmosphere feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbert, M.; Piayda, A.; Kübert, A.; Cuntz, M.; Werner, C.

    2016-12-01

    Water is the main driver of ecosystem productivity in most terrestrial ecosystems worldwide. Extreme events are predicted to increase in frequency in many regions and dynamic responses in soil-vegetation-atmosphere feedbacks play a privotal role in understanding the ecosystem water balance and functioning. In this regard, more interdisciplinary approaches, bridging hydrology, ecophysiology and atmospheric sciences are needed and particularly water stable isotopes are a powerful tracer of water transfer in soils and at the soil-plant interface (Werner and Dubbert 2016). Here, we present observations 2 different ecosystems. Water fluxes, atmospheric concentrations and their isotopic compositions were measured using laser spectroscopy. Soil moisture and its isotopic composition in several depths as well as further water sources in the ecosystem were monitored throughout the year. Using these isotopic approaches we disentangled soil-plant-atmosphere feedback processes controlling the ecosystem water cycle including vegetation effects on soil water infiltration and distribution, event water use of vegetation and soil fluxes, vegetational soil water uptake depths plasticity and partitioning of ecosystem water fluxes. In this regard, we review current strategies of ET partitioning and highlight pitfalls in the presented strategies (Dubbert et al. 2013, Dubbert et al.2014a). We demonstrate that vegetation strongly influenced water cycling, altering infiltration and distribution of precipitation. In conclusion, application of stable water isotope tracers delivers a process based understanding of interactions between soil, understorey and trees governing ecosystem water cycling necessary for prediction of climate change impact on ecosystem productivity and vulnerability. ReferencesDubbert, M. et al. (2013): Partitioning evapotranspiration - Testing the Craig and Gordon model with field measurements of oxygen isotope ratios of evaporative fluxes. Journal of Hydrology Dubbert

  19. The aggregate description of semi-arid vegetation with precipitation-generated soil moisture heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. White

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Meteorological measurements in the Walnut Gulch catchment in Arizona were used to synthesize a distributed, hourly-average time series of data across a 26.9 by 12.5 km area with a grid resolution of 480 m for a continuous 18-month period which included two seasons of monsoonal rainfall. Coupled surface-atmosphere model runs established the acceptability (for modelling purposes of assuming uniformity in all meteorological variables other than rainfall. Rainfall was interpolated onto the grid from an array of 82 recording rain gauges. These meteorological data were used as forcing variables for an equivalent array of stand-alone Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS models to describe the evolution of soil moisture and surface energy fluxes in response to the prevalent, heterogeneous pattern of convective precipitation. The calculated area-average behaviour was compared with that given by a single aggregate BATS simulation forced with area-average meteorological data. Heterogeneous rainfall gives rise to significant but partly compensating differences in the transpiration and the intercepted rainfall components of total evaporation during rain storms. However, the calculated area-average surface energy fluxes given by the two simulations in rain-free conditions with strong heterogeneity in soil moisture were always close to identical, a result which is independent of whether default or site-specific vegetation and soil parameters were used. Because the spatial variability in soil moisture throughout the catchment has the same order of magnitude as the amount of rain falling in a typical convective storm (commonly 10% of the vegetation's root zone saturation in a semi-arid environment, non-linearity in the relationship between transpiration and the soil moisture available to the vegetation has limited influence on area-average surface fluxes.

  20. Copper in soil fractions and runoff in a vineyard catchment: Insights from copper stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcsányi, Izabella; Chabaux, François; Granet, Mathieu; Meite, Fatima; Payraudeau, Sylvain; Duplay, Joëlle; Imfeld, Gwenaël

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the fate of copper (Cu) fungicides in vineyard soils and catchments is a prerequisite to limit the off-site impact of Cu. Using Cu stable isotopes, Cu retention in soils and runoff transport was investigated in relation to the use of Cu fungicides and the hydrological conditions in a vineyard catchment (Rouffach, Haut-Rhin, France; mean slope: 15%). The δ(65)Cu values of the bulk vineyard soil varied moderately through the depth of the soil profiles (-0.12 to 0.24‰±0.08‰). The values were in the range of those of the fungicides (-0.21 to 0.11‰) and included the geogenic δ(65)Cu value of the untreated soil (0.08‰). However, δ(65)Cu values significantly differed between particle-size soil fractions (-0.37±0.10‰ in fine clays and 0.23±0.07‰ in silt). Together with the soil mineralogy, the results suggested Cu isotope fractionation primarily associated with the clay and fine clay fractions that include both SOM and mineral phases. The vegetation did not affect the Cu isotope patterns in the vineyard soils. Cu export by runoff from the catchment accounted for 1% of the applied Cu mass from 11th May to 20(th) July 2011, covering most of the Cu use period. 84% of the exported Cu mass was Cu bound to suspended particulate matter (SPM). The runoff displayed δ(65)Cu values from 0.52 to 1.35‰ in the dissolved phase (stable isotopes may allow identifying the Cu distribution in the soil fractions and their contribution to Cu export in runoff from Cu-contaminated catchments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Biochar Improves Soil Aggregate Stability and Water Availability in a Mollisol after Three Years of Field Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yulan; Yang, Lijie; Yu, Chunxiao; Yin, Guanghua; Doane, Timothy A.; Wu, Zhijie; Zhu, Ping; Ma, Xingzhu

    2016-01-01

    A field experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of organic amendments on soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, bulk density, aggregate stability, field capacity and plant available water in a representative Chinese Mollisol. Four treatments were as follows: no fertilization (CK), application of inorganic fertilizer (NPK), combined application of inorganic fertilizer with maize straw (NPK+S) and addition of biochar with inorganic fertilizer (NPK+B). Our results showed that after three consecutive years of application, the values of soil bulk density were significantly lower in both organic amendment-treated plots than in unamended (CK and NPK) plots. Compared with NPK, NPK+B more effectively increased the contents of soil organic carbon, improved the relative proportion of soil macro-aggregates and mean weight diameter, and enhanced field capacity as well as plant available water. Organic amendments had no obvious effect on soil C/N ratio or wilting coefficient. The results of linear regression indicated that the improvement in soil water retention could be attributed to the increases in soil organic carbon and aggregate stability. PMID:27191160

  2. Biochar Improves Soil Aggregate Stability and Water Availability in a Mollisol after Three Years of Field Application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningning Ma

    Full Text Available A field experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of organic amendments on soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, bulk density, aggregate stability, field capacity and plant available water in a representative Chinese Mollisol. Four treatments were as follows: no fertilization (CK, application of inorganic fertilizer (NPK, combined application of inorganic fertilizer with maize straw (NPK+S and addition of biochar with inorganic fertilizer (NPK+B. Our results showed that after three consecutive years of application, the values of soil bulk density were significantly lower in both organic amendment-treated plots than in unamended (CK and NPK plots. Compared with NPK, NPK+B more effectively increased the contents of soil organic carbon, improved the relative proportion of soil macro-aggregates and mean weight diameter, and enhanced field capacity as well as plant available water. Organic amendments had no obvious effect on soil C/N ratio or wilting coefficient. The results of linear regression indicated that the improvement in soil water retention could be attributed to the increases in soil organic carbon and aggregate stability.

  3. Biochar Improves Soil Aggregate Stability and Water Availability in a Mollisol after Three Years of Field Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ningning; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Yulan; Yang, Lijie; Yu, Chunxiao; Yin, Guanghua; Doane, Timothy A; Wu, Zhijie; Zhu, Ping; Ma, Xingzhu

    2016-01-01

    A field experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of organic amendments on soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, bulk density, aggregate stability, field capacity and plant available water in a representative Chinese Mollisol. Four treatments were as follows: no fertilization (CK), application of inorganic fertilizer (NPK), combined application of inorganic fertilizer with maize straw (NPK+S) and addition of biochar with inorganic fertilizer (NPK+B). Our results showed that after three consecutive years of application, the values of soil bulk density were significantly lower in both organic amendment-treated plots than in unamended (CK and NPK) plots. Compared with NPK, NPK+B more effectively increased the contents of soil organic carbon, improved the relative proportion of soil macro-aggregates and mean weight diameter, and enhanced field capacity as well as plant available water. Organic amendments had no obvious effect on soil C/N ratio or wilting coefficient. The results of linear regression indicated that the improvement in soil water retention could be attributed to the increases in soil organic carbon and aggregate stability.

  4. Abundant and stable char residues in soils: Implications for soil fertility and carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large-scale soil application of biochar might enhance soil fertility and increase crop production, while also sequestering atmospheric carbon. Reaching these outcomes requires an undertanding of the chemical structure of biochar. Using advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy...

  5. On stable ground: Tackling soil erosion with nuclear techniques in Viet Nam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, Miklos

    2015-01-01

    Dao Thanh Canh never studied physics or chemistry in school, but he understands a thing or two about nuclear isotopes. Until a couple of years ago, much of his five acre farm on the hills of central Viet Nam was gradually sliding away. Thanks to nuclear techniques used in determining the exact cause and source of soil erosion, his land is now stable, and his coffee plantation profitable. “We were very worried as uncertainty loomed,” he said. “A few centimetres of the soil disappeared every year when we had big hail storms.” Thanh Canh is not alone. Soil degradation affects 1.9 billion hectares of land worldwide, close to two thirds of global soil resources.

  6. Effects of erosion in the fate of soil organic carbon and soil aggregation in a burned Mediterranean hill-slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Julian; Cammeraat, Erik; Gimeno-García, Eugenia; Andreu, Vicente

    2016-04-01

    that fire caused the homogenization of SOC content and AS in the different hill-slope positions, and only when erosion expose unburned organic matter to mineralization processes, SOC losses will increase in eroding sites, likely decreasing in transport and depositional ones. Ongoing work is related to the analyses of organic C in different soil fractions (determined by sieving and density) in order to understand C stabilization in post-fire soil, and its role in disaggregation and SOC redistribution by sediment in different hill-slope positions. Acknowledgements: This work has been supported by the Generalitat Valenciana through the VALi+d postdoctoral contract (APOSTD/2014/010). References: Bento-Goncalves, A., Vieira, A., Ubeda, X., Martin, D., 2012. Fire and soils: Key concepts and recent advances. Geoderma 191, 3-13. IPCC, 2014. Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability. Wang, X., Cammeraat, E.L.H., Cerli, C., Kalbitz, K., 2014. Soil aggregation and the stabilization of organic carbon as affected by erosion and deposition. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 72, 55-65.

  7. Recycled concrete aggregate as road base: Leaching constituents and neutralization by soil Interactions and dilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nautasha; Kluge, Matt; Chadik, Paul A; Townsend, Timothy G

    2018-02-01

    Recycled Concrete Aggregate (RCA) is often used as a replacement for natural aggregate in road construction activities because of its excellent mechanical properties, and this trend should increase as more transportation departments include RCA in specifications and design manuals. Concerns raised by some engineers and contractors include impacts from leachate generated by RCA, both from transport of metals to water sources and the impact of a high pH leachate on corrosion of underlying metal drainage pipes. In this study, RCA collected from various regions of Florida exhibited pH ranging from 10.5 to 12.3. Concentrations of Al, Ba, Cr, Fe, Mo, Na, Ni, Sb, and Sr measured using batch leaching tests exceeded applicable risk-based thresholds on at least some occasions, but the concentrations measured suggest that risk to water supplies should be controlled because of dilution and attenuation. Two mechanisms of pH neutralization were evaluated. Soil acidity plays a role, but laboratory testing and chemical modeling found that at higher liquid-to-solid ratios the acidity is exhausted. If high pH leachate did reach groundwater, chemical modeling indicated that groundwater dilution and carbonation would mitigate groundwater pH effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An alternative method for determining particle-size distribution of forest road aggregate and soil with large-sized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakjun Rhee; Randy B. Foltz; James L. Fridley; Finn Krogstad; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of particle-size distribution (PSD) of soil with large-sized particles (e.g., 25.4 mm diameter) requires a large sample and numerous particle-size analyses (PSAs). A new method is needed that would reduce time, effort, and cost for PSAs of the soil and aggregate material with large-sized particles. We evaluated a nested method for sampling and PSA by...

  9. C and N accumulations in soil aggregates determine nitrous oxide emissions from cover crop treated rice paddy soils during fallow season

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pramanik, Prabhat, E-mail: prabhat2003@gmail.com; Haque, Md. Mozammel; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Pil Joo, E-mail: pjkim@gnu.ac.kr

    2014-08-15

    Combination of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues are preferably applied in rice paddy soils to increase the rate of organic matter mineralization and to improve plant growth. However, organic matter addition facilitates methane (CH{sub 4}) emission from rice paddy soil. Mineralization of organic nitrogen (N) increases NO{sub 3}–N concentrations in soil, which are precursors for the formation of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). However, N{sub 2}O is a minor greenhouse gas emitted from submerged rice field and hence is not often considered during calculation of total global warming potential (GWP) during rice cultivation. The hypothesis of this study was that fluxes of N{sub 2}O emissions might be changed after removal of flooded water from rice field and the effect of cover crops on N{sub 2}O emissions in the fallow season might be interesting. However, the effects of N-rich plant residues on N{sub 2}O emission rates in the fallow season and its effect on annual GWP were not studied before. In this experiment, combination of barley (non-leguminous) and hairy vetch (leguminous) biomasses were applied at 9 Mg ha{sup −1} and 27 Mg ha{sup −1} rates in rice paddy soil. Cover crop application significantly increased CH{sub 4} emission flux while decreased N{sub 2}O emissions during rice cultivation. The lowest N{sub 2}O emission was observed in 27 Mg ha{sup −1} cover crop treated plots. Cover crop applications increased N contents in soil aggregates especially in smaller aggregates (< 250 μm), and that proportionately increased the N{sub 2}O emission potentials of these soil aggregates. Fluxes of N{sub 2}O emissions in the fallow season were influenced by the N{sub 2}O emission potentials of soil aggregates and followed opposite trends as those observed during rice cultivation. Therefore, it could be concluded that the doses of cover crop applications for rice cultivation should not be optimized considering only CH{sub 4}, but N{sub 2}O should also be

  10. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities and soil aggregation as affected by cultivation of various crops during the sugarcane fallow period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Viviane Truber

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Management systems involving crop rotation, ground cover species and reduced soil tillage can improve the soil physical and biological properties and reduce degradation. The primary purpose of this study was to assess the effect of various crops grown during the sugarcane fallow period on the production of glomalin and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in two Latosols, as well as their influence on soil aggregation. The experiment was conducted on an eutroferric Red Latosol with high-clay texture (680 g clay kg-1 and an acric Red Latosol with clayey texture (440 g kg-1 clay in Jaboticabal (São Paulo State, Brazil. A randomized block design involving five blocks and four crops [soybean (S, soybean/fallow/soybean (SFS, soybean/millet/soybean (SMS and soybean/sunn hemp/soybean (SHS] was used to this end. Soil samples for analysis were collected in June 2011. No significant differences in total glomalin production were detected between the soils after the different crops. However, total external mycelium length was greater in the soils under SMS and SHS. Also, there were differences in easily extractable glomalin, total glomalin and aggregate stability, which were all greater in the eutroferric Red Latosol than in the acric Red Latosol. None of the cover crops planted in the fallow period of sugarcane improved aggregate stability in either Latosol.

  11. Using stable isotopes to differentiate trophic feeding channels within soil food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotty, Felicity V; Adl, Sina M; Blackshaw, Rod P; Murray, Philip J

    2012-01-01

    The soil is probably the most diverse habitat there is, with organisms ranging in sizes from less than 1 μm to several metres in length. However, it is increasingly evident that we know little about the interactions occurring between these organisms, the functions that they perform as individual species, or together within their different feeding guilds. These interactions between groups of organisms and physical and chemical processes shape the soil as a habitat and influence the nature of the soil food web with consequences for the above-ground vegetation and food web. Protists are known as one of the most abundant groups of bacterivores within the soil; however, they are also consumers of a number of other food sources. Even though they are responsible for a large proportion of the mineralisation of bacterial biomass and have a large impact on the C and N cycles within the soil they are regularly overlooked when investigating the complete soil food web. Recently, stable isotopes have been used to determine trophic interactions and here we describe how this technique has been used to highlight linkages between protists and the soil food web. © 2012 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2012 International Society of Protistologists.

  12. Returning Winter Cover Crop Residue Influences Soil Aggregation and Humic Substances under Double-cropped Rice Fields

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    Haiming Tang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Residue management in cropping systems may improve soil quality. However, there are few studies on the effects of residue management on soil aggregation and carbon content in the humin (C-HUM, humic acid (C-HAF and fulvic acid (C-FAF fractions in South China. Therefore, the effects on soil aggregation and on the C-HUM, C-HAF, C-FAF from incorporating winter cover crop residues in a double-cropped rice (Oryza sativa L. system in South China fields were studied. The experiment has been conducted since winter 2004. Five winter cropping systems were used: rice-rice-ryegrass (Ry-R-R, rice-rice-Chinese milk vetch (Mv-R-R, rice-rice-potato (Po-R-R, rice-rice-rape (Ra-R-R and rice-rice with winter fallow (Fa-R-R. The results indicated that the organic C content in the paddy soil under the Ry-R-R, Mv-R-R, Po-R-R, and Ra-R-R systems was significantly higher than the content in the Fa-R-R system at the early rice and late rice maturity stages. The different sizes of aggregates under the five treatments showed similar trends. The Po-R-R systems had the highest percentage of soil aggregates in each size class and the Fa-R-R systems had the lowest percentage of soil aggregates in each size class in the 0.00-0.05, 0.05-0.10, and 0.10-0.20 m soil depth at the early rice and late rice maturity stages. The C-HUM, C-HAF, and C-FAF increased through long-term application of winter cover crop residues. Statistical analysis showed that the C-HAF under the Ra-R-R systems was significantly higher than that in the Fa-R-R systems at the early rice and late rice maturity stages. The C-FAF and C-HUM under the Mv-R-R systems was significantly higher than the C-FAF and C-HUM in the Fa-R-R systems at the early rice and late rice maturity stages. As a result, the soil organic C content, the soil aggregates in each size class, and the C-HUM, C-HAF, and C-FAF increased from application of winter cover crop residues in double-cropped rice systems.

  13. A modelling approach to find stable and reliable soil organic carbon values for further regionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bönecke, Eric; Franko, Uwe

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) and carbon (SOC) might be the most important components to describe soil fertility of agricultural used soils. It is sensitive to temporal and spatial changes due to varying weather conditions, uneven crops and soil management practices and still struggles with providing reliable delineation of spatial variability. Soil organic carbon, furthermore, is an essential initial parameter for dynamic modelling, understanding e.g. carbon and nitrogen processes. Alas it requires cost and time intensive field and laboratory work to attain and using this information. The objective of this study is to assess an approach that reduces efforts of laboratory and field analyses by using method to find stable initial soil organic carbon values for further soil process modelling and regionalization on field scale. The demand of strategies, technics and tools to improve reliable soil organic carbon high resolution maps and additionally reducing cost constraints is hence still facing an increasing attention of scientific research. Although, it is nowadays a widely used practice, combining effective sampling schemes with geophysical sensing techniques, to describe within-field variability of soil organic carbon, it is still challenging large uncertainties, even at field scale in both, science and agriculture. Therefore, an analytical and modelling approach might facilitate and improve this strategy on small and large field scale. This study will show a method, how to find reliable steady state values of soil organic carbon at particular points, using the approved soil process model CANDY (Franko et al. 1995). It is focusing on an iterative algorithm of adjusting the key driving components: soil physical properties, meteorological data and management information, for which we quantified the input and the losses of soil carbon (manure, crop residues, other organic inputs, decomposition, leaching). Furthermore, this approach can be combined with geophysical

  14. Biotic interactions mediate the influence of bird colonies on vegetation and soil chemistry at aggregation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natusch, Daniel James Deans; Lyons, Jessica Ann; Brown, Gregory P; Shine, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Colonial-nesting organisms can strongly alter the chemical and biotic conditions around their aggregation sites, with cascading impacts on other components of the ecosystem. In tropical Australia, Metallic Starlings (Aplonis metallica) nest in large colonies far above the forest canopy, in emergent trees. The ground beneath those trees is open, in stark contrast to the dense foliage all around. We surveyed the areas beneath 27 colony trees (and nearby randomly chosen trees lacking bird colonies) to quantify the birds' impacts on soil and vegetation characteristics, and to test alternative hypotheses about the proximate mechanisms responsible for the lack of live vegetation beneath colony trees. Nutrient levels were greatly elevated beneath colony trees (especially, those with larger colonies), potentially reaching levels toxic to older trees. However, seedlings thrived in the soil from beneath colony trees. The primary mechanism generating open areas beneath colony trees is disturbance by scavengers (feral pigs and native Turkeys) that are attracted in vast numbers to these nutrient hotspots. Seedlings flourished within exclosures inaccessible to vertebrate herbivores, but were rapidly consumed if unprotected. Our results contrast with previous studies of colonies of seabirds on remote islands, where a lack of large terrestrial herbivores results in bird colonies encouraging rather than eliminating vegetation in areas close to the nesting site. In our continental study system, scavengers may rapidly dilute the spatial heterogeneity generated by the massive nutrient subsidy from bird colonies. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  15. EXOPOLYSACCHARIDE PRODUCTION BY DROUGHT TOLERANT BACILLUS SPP. AND EFFECT ON SOIL AGGREGATION UNDER DROUGHT STRESS

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    Sandhya Vardharajula

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Exopolysaccharides (EPS of microbial origin with novel functionality, reproducible physico-chemical properties, are important class of polymeric materials. EPS are believed to protect bacterial cells from dessication, produce biofilms, thus enhancing the cells chances of bacterial colonizing special ecological niches. In rhizosphere, EPS are known to be useful to improve the moisture-holding capacity. Three Bacillus spp. strains identified by 16s rDNA sequence analysis as B. amyloliquefaciens strain HYD-B17; B. licheniformis strain HYTAPB18; B. subtilis strain RMPB44 were studied for the ability to tolerate matric stress and produce EPS under different water potentials. EPS production in all the three Bacillus spp strains increased with increasing water stress indicating correlation between drought stress tolerance and EPS production. Among the isolates, strain HYD-17 showed highest production of EPS. The exopolysaccharide composition of the three strains was further analyzed by HPLC. Drought stress influenced the ratio of sugars in EPS and glucose was found as major sugar in strains HYTAPB18 and RMPB44 whereas raffinose was major sugar found in strain HYD-B17. Inoculation of EPS producing Bacillus spp. strains in soil resulted in good soil aggregation under drought stress conditions at different incubation periods. This study shows that exposure to water stress conditions affects the composition and ratios of sugars in EPS produced by Bacillus spp. strains HYD-B17, HYTAPB18 and RMPB44 influencing abiotic stress tolerance of the microorganisms.

  16. Soil aggregation under different management systems Agregação de solo com diferentes manejos

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    Cibele Mascioli Rebello Portella

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Considering that the soil aggregation reflects the interaction of chemical, physical and biological soil factors, the aim of this study was evaluate alterations in aggregation, in an Oxisol under no-tillage (NT and conventional tillage (CT, since over 20 years, using as reference a native forest soil in natural state. After analysis of the soil profile (cultural profile in areas under forest management, samples were collected from the layers 0-5, 5-10, 10-20 and 20-40 cm, with six repetitions. These samples were analyzed for the aggregate stability index (ASI, mean weighted diameter (MWD, mean geometric diameter (MGD in the classes > 8, 8-4, 4-2, 2-1, 1-0.5, 0.5-0.25, and Considerando que a agregação reflete na interação dos fatores químicos, físicos e biológicos dos solos, o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a agregação de um Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico sob plantio direto (PD e preparo convencional (PC implantado há mais de 20 anos, utilizando-se como referência do estado natural uma mata nativa (M. Após análise do perfil de solo pelo método do perfil cultural nas áreas sob manejo e mata, foram coletadas amostras nas profundidades de 0-5, 5-10, 10-20 e 20-40 cm de profundidade, com seis repetições. A partir dessas amostras, foram determinados o índice de estabilidade dos agregados (IEA, o diâmetro médio ponderado (DMP, o diâmetro médio geométrico (DMG e as classes de diâmetro >8, 8-4, 4-2, 2-1, 1-0,5, 0,5-0,25 e < 0,25 mm, além das determinações físicas (granulometria, argila dispersa em água - AD, índice de floculação - IF e densidade do solo - Ds e químicas (carbono orgânico total - COT, nitrogênio total - N, cálcio trocável - Ca2+ e pH. Os resultados indicaram que o aumento da mobilização do solo (M < PD < PC resultou em diminuição da sua estabilidade, medida por meio de todos os indicadores de estabilidade analisados: DMP, DMG, IEA, distribuição de classes de agregados, AD e IF, concluindo

  17. Positive evolution features in soil restoration assessed by means of glomalin and its relationship to aggregate stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna Ramos, Lourdes; Miralles Mellado, Isabel; Gispert Negrell, María; Pardini, Giovanni; Solé Benet, Albert

    2014-05-01

    Restoration of limestone quarries in arid environments mainly consists of regenerating a highly degraded soil and/or creating a soil-like substrate with minimal physico-chemical and biological properties. In an experimental soil restoration in limestone quarries from Sierra de Gádor (Almería), SE Spain, with the aim to improve soil/substrate properties and to reduce evaporation and erosion, 18 plots 15 x 5 m were prepared to test organic amendments (sludge, compost, control) and different mulches (gravel, chopped forest residue, control). In order to evaluate the soil quality of the different treatments, their chemical, physical and biological properties were analyzed. Among the most efficient biological indicators are arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). AMF play an important role in aggregate stability due to the production of a glycoprotein called glomalin. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify, 5 years after the start the experiment, the content of total glomalin (TG) and to analyze its relationship with other soil parameters such as organic matter (OM) and aggregate stability soil (AE). Results indicated a remarkable effect of organic amendments on glomalin content, which was higher in the treatments with compost (6.96 mg g -1) than in sludge and control (0.54 and 0.40 mg g-1, respectively). Amendments also significantly influenced aggregate stability: the highest values were recorded in treatments with sludge and compost (23.14 and 25.09%, respectively) compared to control (13.37%). The gravel mulch had a negative influenced on AE: an average of 16% compared to 23.4% for chopped forest residues and 23.1% of control. Data showed a positive and significant correlation between values of TG and OM content (r = 0.95). We also found a positive and significant correlation between abundance of TG and AE when OM contents were lower than 4% (r = 0.93), however, there was no significant correlation to higher OM when it was higher than 4% (r = 0.34). This

  18. Changes of structural and aggregate composition of the mountain brown forest soils in the Republic of Armenia

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    Samvel Zalibek Kroyan

    2017-06-01

    A set of agro-technical measures is offered to improve the structural-aggregate composition, to maintain and enhance the fertility of brown mountain-forest soils. In particular, the improvement of fertility, the efficient use and conservation of brown mountain-forest soils require the development and application of scientifically based system of agro-technical measures. If possible, the minimum or zero agronomic forms of agricultural tillage must be applied in the system of adaptive-landscape agriculture for the restoration and conservation of agronomically valuable soil structure.

  19. Identity of active methanotrophs in landfill cover soil as revealed by DNA-stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cébron, Aurélie; Bodrossy, Levente; Chen, Yin; Singer, Andrew C; Thompson, Ian P; Prosser, James I; Murrell, J Colin

    2007-10-01

    A considerable amount of methane produced during decomposition of landfill waste can be oxidized in landfill cover soil by methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) thus reducing greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere. The identity of active methanotrophs in Roscommon landfill cover soil, a slightly acidic peat soil, was assessed by DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Landfill cover soil slurries were incubated with (13)C-labelled methane and under either nutrient-rich nitrate mineral salt medium or water. The identity of active methanotrophs was revealed by analysis of (13)C-labelled DNA fractions. The diversity of functional genes (pmoA and mmoX) and 16S rRNA genes was analyzed using clone libraries, microarrays and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that the cover soil was mainly dominated by Type II methanotrophs closely related to the genera Methylocella and Methylocapsa and to Methylocystis species. These results were supported by analysis of mmoX genes in (13)C-DNA. Analysis of pmoA gene diversity indicated that a significant proportion of active bacteria were also closely related to the Type I methanotrophs, Methylobacter and Methylomonas species. Environmental conditions in the slightly acidic peat soil from Roscommon landfill cover allow establishment of both Type I and Type II methanotrophs.

  20. Trophic position of soil nematodes in boreal forests as indicated by stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrin, Alexey; Tsurikov, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Despite the well-developed trophic classification of soil nematodes, their position in soil food webs is still little understood. Observed deviations from the typical feeding strategy indicate that a simplified trophic classification probably does not fully reflect actual trophic interactions. Furthermore, the extent and functional significance of nematodes as prey for other soil animals remains unknown. Stable isotope analysis (SIA) is powerful tool for investigating the structure of soil food webs, but its application to the study of soil nematodes has been limited to only a few studies. We used stable isotope analysis to gain a better understanding of trophic links of several groups of soil nematodes in two boreal forests on albeluvisol. We investigated four taxonomic groups of nematodes: Mononchida, Dorylaimida, Plectidae and Tylenchidae (mostly from the genus Filenchus), that according to the conventional trophic classification represent predators, omnivores, bacterivores and root-fungal feeders, respectively. To assess the trophic position of nematodes, we used a comparison against a set of reference species including herbivorous, saprophagous and predatory macro-invertebrates, oribatid and mesostigmatid mites, and collembolans. Our results suggest that trophic position of the investigated groups of soil nematodes generally corresponds to the conventional classification. All nematodes were enriched in 13C relative to Picea abies roots and litter, and mycorrhizal fungal mycelium. Root-fungal feeders Tylenchidae had δ15N values similar to those of earthworms, enchytraeids and Entomobrya collembolans, but slightly lower δ13C values. Bacterivorous Plectidae were either equal or enriched in 15N compared with saprophagous macroinvertebrates and most mesofauna species. Omnivorous Dorylaimida and predatory Mononchida were further enriched in 15N and their isotopic signature was similar to that of predatory arthropods. These data confirm a clear separation of

  1. Perennial grasses for recovery of the aggregation capacity of a reconstructed soil in a coal mining area in southern Brazil

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    Lizete Stumpf

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The construction of a soil after surface coal mining involves heavy machinery traffic during the topographic regeneration of the area, resulting in compaction of the relocated soil layers. This leads to problems with water infiltration and redistribution along the new profile, causing water erosion and consequently hampering the revegetation of the reconstructed soil. The planting of species useful in the process of soil decompaction is a promising strategy for the recovery of the soil structural quality. This study investigated the influence of different perennial grasses on the recovery of reconstructed soil aggregation in a coal mining area of the Companhia Riograndense de Mineração, located in Candiota-RS, which were planted in September/October 2007. The treatments consisted of planting: T1- Cynodon dactylon cv vaquero; T2 - Urochloa brizantha; T3 - Panicum maximun; T4 - Urochloa humidicola; T5 - Hemarthria altissima; T6 - Cynodon dactylon cv tifton 85. Bare reconstructed soil, adjacent to the experimental area, was used as control treatment (T7 and natural soil adjacent to the mining area covered with native vegetation was used as reference area (T8. Disturbed and undisturbed soil samples were collected in October/2009 (layers 0.00-0.05 and 0.10-0.15 m to determine the percentage of macro- and microaggregates, mean weight diameter (MWD of aggregates, organic matter content, bulk density, and macro- and microporosity. The lower values of macroaggregates and MWD in the surface than in the subsurface layer of the reconstructed soil resulted from the high degree of compaction caused by the traffic of heavy machinery on the clay material. After 24 months, all experimental grass treatments showed improvements in soil aggregation compared to the bare reconstructed soil (control, mainly in the 0.00-0.05 m layer, particularly in the two Urochloa treatments (T2 and T4 and Hemarthria altissima (T5. However, the great differences between the

  2. Influence of Scots pine encroachment into alpine grassland in the quality and stability of soil organic matter aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Carlos; Díaz-Pinés, Eugenio; Benito, Marta; José Fernández, María; Rubio, Agustín

    2013-04-01

    Ecotone areas are dynamic zones potentially suitable for detecting ecosystem sensitivity to climate change effects. Climate change scenarios proposed by IPCC predict a temperature increase in Mediterranean areas with the consequent altitudinal advance of Scots pine treeline (Pinus sylvestris L.) at the extent of grassland-shrubland areas. Therefore, variations in physical, chemical and biological properties of soils due to plant dynamics are expected. We present a study located in the grassland-forest ecotone of Scots pine on a Mediterranean mountain in Central Spain, considering three different vegetation types: high mountain grassland-shrubland, shrubland-Scots pine high mountain forest and Scots pine mountain forest. We worked on the hypothesis that different plant species compositions influence both the size distribution and aggregate protection of the organic carbon (C), as a result of the different quality of C inputs to the soil from different vegetation types. To test this assumption, topsoil samples were firstly separated into four aggregate fractions (6-2 mm, 2-0.250 mm, 0.250-0.053 mm and centrifuging and decanting the supernatants; and thirdly, different iPOM (coarse iPOM and fine iPOM) and mineral associated soil organic C were released from each remaining aggregate fraction by sonication at 300 J ml-1 and further quantified by wet sieving. We expect differences between light fraction, different iPOM and mineral associated soil organic C from the different aggregates fractions obtained among vegetation types as a result of different quality and quantity organic matter inputs to the soil. Thus, we will be able to predict (i) the evolution of protected soil organic matter with the encroachment of Scots pine on Mediterranean mountains due to climate change effects, (ii) the rate of macroaggregate formation and degradation in those vegetation areas, and (iii) whether they will behave as source or sink of atmospheric C.

  3. Comparação entre métodos para o estudo da estabilidade de agregados em solos Comparison of methods for aggregate stability studies in soils

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    MARCOS AURÉLIO CAROLINO DE SÁ

    2000-09-01

    wet sieving and the two other methods. The DRL samples had more stable aggregates than did SDR samples. The resistance to sonication was related to amount of organic matter, Fe oxides and gibbsite. The results of weighted mean diameter and amount of aggregates larger than 2 mm were the same for the A horizons of both soils. Water dropping caused more disruption on DRL B than on SDR B-horizon material which was more affected by the wet sieving method. The level of 15.88 J mL-1 allowed to detect more differences between the soils.

  4. IMPACT OF BRACHIARIA, ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZA, AND POTASSIUM ENRICHED RICE STRAW COMPOST ON ALUMINIUM, POTASSIUM AND STABILITY OF ACID SOIL AGGREGATES

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    Bariot Hafif

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acid soil is commonly grown with cassava, which in general, tolerate low soil  fertility and aluminum (Al toxicity. However, without any improvement efforts such soil will become worse. Intercropping cassava with Brachiaria decumbens (BD which adapts to acid soil and tolerates low fertility soils as well as application of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM and organic matters are among the important efforts to rehabilitate this soil. The experiment was conducted to  examine the impact of BD, AM, and potassium (K enriched rice straw compost on exchangeable Al, available K, and stability of soil aggregates. Experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design with three factors and three replications. The first factor was BD as cassava intercropping, the second factor was AM, and the third factor was 2 t ha-1 rice straw compost enriched with 0 kg, 50 kg, 100 kg, and 200 kg KCl ha-1. Brick pots (1 m length x 1 m width x 0.45 m depth filled with Kanhapludult soil was used for growing cassava in which row of BD was planted at 60 cm from cassava stem. K-enriched rice straw compost and AM (10 g per stem were applied around cassava stem at 2 and 12 days after planting, respectively. BD was cut every 30 days and the cutting was returned to the soil. Soil exchangeable Al was analyzed at 0, 3, 6 and 9 months after planting (MAP, while Al and K contents as well as aggregate stability were measured at 6 MAP. The results showed that planting BD decreased 33% exchangeable Al, which means that the root exudates of this grass was effective in detoxifying Al3+. Treatment of BD and/or in combination with AM was effective in preserving K added to the soil, increasing total polysaccharides, and improving soil aggregate stability. This indicated that planting BD and applying AM and Kenriched rice straw compost improved acid soil fertility, and therefore can be recommended in cassava cultivation.

  5. Aggregicoccus edonensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an unusually aggregating myxobacterium isolated from a soil sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Sakshi; Awal, Ram Prasad; Wink, Joachim; Mohr, Kathrin I; Rohde, Manfred; Stadler, Marc; Kämpfer, Peter; Glaeser, Stefanie P; Schumann, Peter; Garcia, Ronald; Müller, Rolf

    2015-03-01

    A novel myxobacterium, MCy1366(T) (Ar1733), was isolated in 1981 from a soil sample collected from a region near Tokyo, Japan. It displayed general myxobacterial features like Gram-negative-staining, rod-shaped vegetative cells, gliding on solid surfaces, microbial lytic activity, fruiting-body-like aggregates and myxospore-like structures. The strain was mesophilic, aerobic and showed a chemoheterotrophic mode of nutrition. It was resistant to many antibiotics such as cephalosporin C, kanamycin, gentamicin, hygromycin B, polymyxin and bacitracin, and the key fatty acids of whole cell hydrolysates were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0 2-OH. The genomic DNA G+C content of the novel strain was 65.6 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequence showed highest similarity (97.60 %) to 'Stigmatella koreensis' strain KYC-1019 (GenBank accession no. EF112185). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and MALDI-TOF MS data revealed a novel branch in the family Myxococcaceae. DNA-DNA hybridization showed only 28 % relatedness between the novel strain and the closest recognized species, Corallococcus exiguus DSM 14696(T) (97 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). A recent isolate from a soil sample collected in Switzerland, MCy10622, displayed 99.9 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with strain MCy1366(T) and showed almost the same characteristics. Since some morphological features like fruiting-body-like aggregates were barely reproducible in the type strain, the newly isolated strain, MCy10622, was also intensively studied. On the basis of a comprehensive taxonomic study, we propose a novel genus and species, Aggregicoccus edonensis gen. nov., sp. nov., for strains MCy1366(T) and MCy10622. The type strain of the type species is MCy1366(T) ( = DSM 27872(T) = NCCB 100468(T)). © 2015 Prof. Dr. Rolf Muller, Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Saarland University, Campus C2 3, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany.

  6. Disentangling drought-induced variation in ecosystem and soil respiration using stable carbon isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Stephan; Máguas, Cristina; Pereira, João S; Aires, Luis M; David, Teresa S; Werner, Christiane

    2010-08-01

    Combining C flux measurements with information on their isotopic composition can yield a process-based understanding of ecosystem C dynamics. We studied the variations in both respiratory fluxes and their stable C isotopic compositions (delta(13)C) for all major components (trees, understory, roots and soil microorganisms) in a Mediterranean oak savannah during a period with increasing drought. We found large drought-induced and diurnal dynamics in isotopic compositions of soil, root and foliage respiration (delta(13)C(res)). Soil respiration was the largest contributor to ecosystem respiration (R (eco)), exhibiting a depleted isotopic signature and no marked variations with increasing drought, similar to ecosystem respired delta(13)CO(2), providing evidence for a stable C-source and minor influence of recent photosynthate from plants. Short-term and diurnal variations in delta(13)C(res) of foliage and roots (up to 8 and 4 per thousand, respectively) were in agreement with: (1) recent hypotheses on post-photosynthetic fractionation processes, (2) substrate changes with decreasing assimilation rates in combination with increased respiratory demand, and (3) decreased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity in drying roots, while altered photosynthetic discrimination was not responsible for the observed changes in delta(13)C(res). We applied a flux-based and an isotopic flux-based mass balance, yielding good agreement at the soil scale, while the isotopic mass balance at the ecosystem scale was not conserved. This was mainly caused by uncertainties in Keeling plot intercepts at the ecosystem scale due to small CO(2) gradients and large differences in delta(13)C(res) of the different component fluxes. Overall, stable isotopes provided valuable new insights into the drought-related variations of ecosystem C dynamics, encouraging future studies but also highlighting the need of improved methodology to disentangle short-term dynamics of isotopic composition of R (eco).

  7. Micro nutrient status and their distribution in aggregate-size fractions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Micro nutrients are particularly sensitive to changes in land use and their availability in soil is influenced by their distribution and storage in stable aggregate fractions. Micro nutrient, (Fe, Mn and Zn) status and their storage in stable aggregate-size fractions in forested, rubber plantation, oil palm plantation, plantain plantation ...

  8. Effects of land use and management on aggregate stability and hydraulic conductivity of soils within River Njoro Watershed in Kenya

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    Zachary G. Mainuri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available There has been tremendous changes in land use and management in the River Njoro Watershed during the last three decades. Formerly large scale farms have been converted into smallholder farms and plantation forests have gradually been lost. These changes in land use and management have brought in different approaches that have triggered soil erosion and other forms of land degradation. The objective of this study was to trace the changes in land use and determine their effects on aggregate stability and hydraulic conductivity. A semi detailed soil survey of the watershed was undertaken following a three-tier approach comprising image interpretation, field surveys and laboratory analysis. The measured variables in the soil were analysed using ANOVA and correlation analysis. The major land uses were found to be forestland, agricultural land, grassland, and wetland. A strong soil type _ landscape relationship was observed within the watershed. Soils of slopes were moderately to severely eroded, shallow and less developed whereas those on summits, pen plains, uplands, plateaus and valleys were deep and well developed. Aggregate stability was the highest in forestland and decreased in the order of grassland, agricultural land and wetland respectively. The mean weight diameter under the various land use conditions was 0.68, 0.64, 0.58, and 0 41 respectively. Hydraulic conductivity was the highest in forest-land and decreased in the order of agricultural land, grassland and wetland respectively. There was significant negative correlation between hydraulic conductivity and the bulk density and clay content of the soils. Reduced aggregate stability and lowered hydraulic conductivity is likely to be responsible for some of the severe soil erosion and other forms of land degradation observed in the River Njoro Watershed.

  9. Characterization of growing microorganisms in soil by stable isotope probing with H218O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Egbert

    2007-04-01

    A new approach to characterize growing microorganisms in environmental samples based on labeling microbial DNA with H(2)(18)O is described. To test if sufficient amounts of (18)O could be incorporated into DNA to use water as a labeling substrate for stable isotope probing, Escherichia coli DNA was labeled by cultivating bacteria in Luria broth with H(2)(18)O and labeled DNA was separated from [(16)O]DNA on a cesium chloride gradient. Soil samples were incubated with H(2)(18)O for 6, 14, or 21 days, and isopycnic centrifugation of the soil DNA showed the formation of two bands after 6 days and three bands after 14 or 21 days, indicating that (18)O can be used in the stable isotope probing of soil samples. DNA extracted from soil incubated for 21 days with H(2)(18)O was fractionated after isopycnic centrifugation and DNA from 17 subsamples was used in terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. The TRFLP patterns clustered into three groups that corresponded to the three DNA bands. The fraction of total fluorescence contributed by individual terminal restriction fragments (TRF) to a TRFLP pattern varied across the 17 subsamples so that a TRF was more prominent in only one of the three bands. Labeling soil DNA with H(2)(18)O allows the identification of newly grown cells. In addition, cells that survive but do not divide during an incubation period can also be characterized with this new technique because their DNA remains without the label.

  10. 210Pb and stable lead content in fungi: Its transfer from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillen, J.; Baeza, A.; Ontalba, M.A.; Miguez, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    The uptake and transfer of natural radionuclides, other than 40 K, from soil to mushrooms has been somewhat overlooked in the literature. Their contribution to the dose due to the consumption of mushrooms was considered negligible. But the contribution of 210 Pb in areas unaffected by any recent radioactive fallout has been found to be significant, up to 35% of the annual dose commitment in Spain. More than 30 species of mushrooms were analyzed, and the 210 Pb detected was in the range of 0.75-202 Bq/kg d.w. A slight difference was observed between species with different nutritional mechanisms (saprophytes ≥ mycorrhizae). The 210 Pb content was correlated with the stable lead content, but not with its predecessor in the uranium radioactive series, 226 Ra. This suggested that 210 Pb was taken up from the soil by the same pathway as stable lead. The bioavailability of 210 Pb in soil was determined by means of a sequential extraction procedure (NH 4 OAc, 1M HCl, 6M HCl, and residue). About 30% of the 210 Pb present in the soil was available for transfer to mushrooms, more than other natural radionuclides in the same ecosystem. Lycoperdon perlatum, Hebeloma cylindrosporum, and Amanita curtipes presented the highest values of the available transfer factor, ATF. As reflected in their ATF values, the transfer from soil to mushroom of some natural and anthropogenic radionuclides was in the following order: 228,230,232 Th ∼ 40 K ≥ 137 Cs ≥ 234,238 U ∼ 226 Ra ≥ 90 Sr ≥ 210 Pb ∼ 239+240 Pu ∼ 241 Am.

  11. Ca, Sr and Ba stable isotopes reveal the fate of soil nutrients along a tropical climosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, Thomas D.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient biolifting is an important pedogenic process in which plant roots obtain inorganic nutrients such as phosphorus (P) and calcium (Ca) from minerals at depth and concentrate those nutrients at the surface. Here we use soil chemistry and stable isotopes of the alkaline earth elements Ca, strontium (Sr) and barium (Ba) to test the hypothesis that biolifting of P has been an important pedogenic process across a soil climosequence developed on volcanic deposits at Kohala Mountain, Hawaii. The geochemical linkage between these elements is revealed as generally positive site-specific relationships in soil mass gains and losses, particularly for P, Ba and Ca, using the ratio of immobile elements titanium and niobium (Ti/Nb) to link individual soil samples to a restricted compositional range of the chemically and isotopically diverse volcanic parent materials. At sites where P is enriched in surface soils relative to abundances in deeper soils, the isotope compositions of exchangeable Ca, Sr and Ba in the shallowest soil horizons (contrast the isotope composition of exchangeable Ba in deeper soil horizons (> 10 cm depth) at those sites is consistently heavier than the volcanic parent materials. The isotope compositions of exchangeable Ca and Sr trend toward heavier compositions with depth more gradually, reflecting increasing leakiness from these soils in the order Ba < Sr < Ca and downward transfer of light biocycled Ca and Sr to deeper exchange sites. Given the long-term stability of ecosystem properties at the sites where P is enriched in surface soils, a simple box model demonstrates that persistence of isotopically light exchangeable Ca, Sr and Ba in the shallowest soil horizons requires that the uptake flux to plants from those near-surface layers is less than the recycling flux returned to the surface as litterfall. This observation implicates an uptake flux from an additional source which we attribute to biolifting. We view the heavy exchangeable Ba

  12. Using Lead Concentrations and Stable Lead Isotope Ratios to Identify Contamination Events in Alluvial Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Saint-Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils contaminated with hydrocarbons (C10–C50, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, and other contaminants (e.g., As, Cd, Cu, Pb were recently discovered on the banks of the Saint-François and Massawippi rivers. Alluvial soils are contaminated over a distance of 100 kilometers, and the level of the contaminated-hydrocarbon layer in the soil profiles is among the highest at the Windsor and Richmond sites. Concentrations of lead and stable lead isotope ratios (204Pb/206Pb, 207Pb/206Pb, 208Pb/206Pb are also used to identify contamination events. The maximum and minimum values detected in soil profiles for arsenic, cadmium, and lead vary from 3.01 to 37.88 mg kg-1 (As, 0.11 to 0.81 mg kg-1 (Cd 12.32 to 149.13 mg kg-1 (Pb, respectively, while the 207Pb/206Pb isotopic ratio values are between 0.8545 and 0.8724 for all the profiles. The highest values of trace elements (As, Pb and Zn were detected in the hydrocarbon layer (C10–C50, most often located at the bottom of the profiles (160, 200, and 220 cm in depth. The various peaks recorded in the soils and the position of the profiles suggest that various contaminants were transported by the river on several occasions and infiltrated the soil matrix or deposited on floodplains during successive floods. Atmospheric particles which entered the river or deposited on riverbanks must also be considered as another source of pollution recorded in soils.

  13. INTERACTION’S EFFECT OF ORGANIC MATERIAL AND AGGREGATION ON EXTRACTION EFFICIENCY OF TPHS FROM PETROLEUM CONTAMINATED SOILS WITH MAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ganjidoust and Gh. Naghizadeh

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Microwave-Assisted Extraction (MAE is a type of low-temperature thermal desorption process that its numerous advantages have caused a wide spread use of it. Microwave heating is a potentially attractive technique as it provides volumetric heating process to improve heating efficiencies as compared with conventional techniques. The ability to rapidly heat the sample solvent mixture is inherent to MAE and the main advantage of this technique. Presently MAE has been shown to be one of the best technologies for removing environmental pollutants specially PAHs, phenols and PCBs from soils and sediments. Five different mixtures and types of aggregation (Sand, Top soil, Kaolinite besides three concentrations of crude oil as a contaminant (1000, 5000 and 10000 mg/L were considered. The results indicated that regardless of aggregation, the presence of humus component in soil reduces the efficiency. Minimum and maximum efficiencies were for sandy soil (containing organic components and kaolinite (without any organic content, respectively. According to the results of this research when some amount of humus and organic materials are available in the matrix, it causes the extraction efficiency to perform as a function of just humus materials but not aggregation. Increasing the concentration of crude oil reduced the efficiency with a sharp steep for higher concentration (5000-10000 mg/L and less steeper for lower concentration (1000-5000 mg/L. The concentration of the contaminant, works just as an independent function with extraction time and aggregation factors. The extraction period of 10 min. can be suggested as an optimum extraction time in FMAE for PAHs contaminated soils.

  14. Field investigations of soils at TA-19, TA-26, TA-73 and TA-0, SWMU aggregate 0-D and 016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFadden, L.D.

    1995-01-01

    Field based investigations of the general soil-geomorphic characteristics were carried out at TA-19, -26, -73, -0, Aggregate 0-D and -016 in order to provide information for utilization in ongoing and anticipated LANL ERP (Environmental Restoration Project) activities at these sites. These investigations show that soils exhibiting diverse morphologic character, varying ages, and relations to landforms characterize these sites. A review of recent and ongoing soils studies also shows that soil textural, chemical, and mineralogical characteristics may profoundly influence the migration and/or retardation of a variety of potential contaminants initially placed in direct contact with soils, or that encounter soils during subsurface percolation or discharge. Soil-geomorphic relations also provide important insights into recent site erosion, deposition or other surficial processes that must, be considered as part of environmental assessment of a given site and remediation; and, the planned geomorphic mapping activities at each site, as well as other associated activities (e.g, geophysical survey, site sampling) are accordingly appropriate and necessary with respect to identification of significant soil relations at each site. Specific and general recommendations in consideration of important findings regarding the possible impacts of soil development of the nature of contaminant behavior at various sites are provided to help guide sampling and analysis activities during ERP investigations outlined in the RFI Work Plan for Operational Unit-1071

  15. Modelling the effect of aggregates on N2O emission from denitrification in an agricultural peat soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kabat

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N2O emissions are highly variable in time, with high peak emissions lasting a few days to several weeks and low background emissions. This temporal variability is poorly understood which hampers the simulation of daily N2O emissions. In structured soils, like clay and peat, aggregates hamper the diffusion of oxygen, which leads to anaerobic microsites in the soil, favourable for denitrification. Diffusion of N2O out of the aggregates is also hampered, which leads to delayed emissions and increased reduction of N2O to N2. In this model simulation study we investigate the effect of aggregates in soils on the N2O emissions. We present a parameterization to simulate the effects of aggregates on N2O production by denitrification and on N2O reduction. The parameterization is based on the mobile-immobile model concept. It was implemented in a field-scale hydrological-biogeochemical model combination. We compared the simulated fluxes with observed fluxes from a fertilized and drained peat soil under grass. The results of this study show that aggregates strongly affect the simulated N2O emissions: peak emissions are lower, whereas the background emissions are slightly higher. Including the effect of aggregates caused a 40% decrease in the simulated annual emissions relative to the simulations without accounting for the effects of aggregates. The new parameterization significantly improved the model performance regarding simulation of observed daily N2O fluxes; r2 and RMSE improved from 0.11 and 198 g N2O-N ha−1 d−1 to 0.41 and 40 g N2O-N ha−1 d−1, respectively. Our analyses of the model results show that aggregates have a larger impact on the reduction than on the production of N2O. Reduction of N2O is more sensitive to changes in the drivers than production of N2O and is in that sense the key to understanding N2O emissions from denitrification. The effects of changing environmental conditions on reduction of N2O relative to N2O

  16. On-line stable isotope measurements during plant and soil gas exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakir, D.

    2001-01-01

    Recent techniques for on-line stable isotope measurements during plant and soil exchange of CO 2 and/or water vapor are briefly reviewed. For CO 2 , these techniques provide means for on-line measurements of isotopic discrimination during CO 2 exchange by leaves in the laboratory and in the field, of isotopic discrimination during soil respiration and during soil-atmosphere CO 2 exchange, and of isotopic discrimination in O 2 during plant respiration. For water vapor, these techniques provide means to measure oxygen isotopic composition of water vapor during leaf transpiration and for the analysis of sub microliter condensed water vapor samples. Most of these techniques involve on-line sampling of CO 2 and water vapor from a dynamic, intact soil or plant system. In the laboratory, these systems also allow on-line isotopic analysis by continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The information obtained with these on-line techniques is becoming increasingly valuable, and often critical, for ecophysiologial research and in the study of biosphere-atmosphere interactions. (author)

  17. Effects of Dry and Wet Sieving of Soil on Identification and Interpretation of Microbial Community Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Blaud, A.; Menon, M.; van der Zaan, B.; Lair, G.J.; Banwart, S.

    2016-01-01

    Soil aggregates are microhabitats for microorganisms, and directly influence microorganisms that live within and are influenced by microorganisms in return. Two methods are used to isolate soil aggregates by their size: dry sieving (sieving air-dried soil) and wet sieving (sieving soil in water). Wet-sieving methods are generally considered to represent separation of aggregate classes that are stable to physical disaggregation in water, a condition considered favorable for protecting soil str...

  18. Assessing the dynamics of the upper soil layer relative to soil management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, J.; Wacha, K.; Dold, C.

    2017-12-01

    The upper layer of the soil is the critical interface between the soil and the atmosphere and is the most dynamic in response to management practices. One of the soil properties most reflective to changes in management is the stability of the aggregates because this property controls infiltration of water and exchange of gases. An aggregation model has been developed based on the factors that control how aggregates form and the forces which degrade aggregates. One of the major factors for this model is the storage of carbon into the soil and the interaction with the soil biological component. To increase soil biology requires a stable microclimate that provides food, water, shelter, and oxygen which in turn facilitates the incorporation of organic material into forms that can be combined with soil particles to create stable aggregates. The processes that increase aggregate size and stability are directly linked the continual functioning of the biological component which in turn changes the physical and chemical properties of the soil. Soil aggregates begin to degrade as soon as there is no longer a supply of organic material into the soil. These processes can range from removal of organic material and excessive tillage. To increase aggregation of the upper soil layer requires a continual supply of organic material and the biological activity that incorporates organic material into substances that create a stable aggregate. Soils that exhibit stable soil aggregates at the surface have a prolonged infiltration rate with less runoff and a gas exchange that ensures adequate oxygen for maximum biological activity. Quantifying the dynamics of the soil surface layer provides a quantitative understanding of how management practices affect aggregate stability.

  19. Soils, County-wide soils cover - an aggregation of section-wide soil coverages with additional attributes. Primary attributes include mu symbol and ID, state symbol, name, category, percolation rate and passing percentage., Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Soils dataset current as of 2008. County-wide soils cover - an aggregation of section-wide soil coverages with additional attributes. Primary attributes include mu...

  20. Stable isotope study of soil water, WIPP site New Mexico: estimation of recharge to Rustler aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, A.R.; Phillips, F.M.; Vanlandingham, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    Defining the hydrologic setting of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is an important step for site characterization and performance assessment. From past research there is a controversy about the timing of recharge to the aquifers in the Rustler Formation which overlies the repository. The stable isotopic composition (δD and δD 18 O) of the water has been used in this argument but with ambiguous conclusions. Soil cores from WIPP have been sampled for δD, δD 18 O, Cl - and water content. The data indicate that there is a small amount of infiltration (.2 to 2 mm/yr) through the desert soil. The δD and δD 18 O analyses suggest that meteoric water in the area can have a stable isotope composition similar to that in the Rustler Fm. Further supporting evidence come from the isotopic composition of drip and pool waters in nearby Carlsbad Caverns. This indicates that the water in the Rustler Fm. need not have been recharged in the past (>10,000 yrs.) under different climatic conditions. (author) 8 figs., 2 tabs., 16 refs

  1. Parameter estimation for simulating binary homovalent cation transport in aggregated soils at variable ionic strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulin, R.; Papritz, A.; Flühler, H.; Selim, H. M.

    1991-01-01

    Miscible displacement of calcium by magnesium in column experiments with aggregate packings was fairly well described by the classical convection-dispersion transport model combined with an equilibrium ion-exchange isotherm (one-region model) when the model was fitted to the experimental breakthrough curves. Goodness of fit was not significantly better when a two-region model with first-order mass-transfer kinetics between mobile and immobile regions was used instead of the one-region model. However, the best-fit model parameter values for the cation-exchange capacity and the selectivity coefficient did not agree satisfactory with values determined independently from batch experiments of the two soils studied. Model calculations using independently determined ion-exchange as well as transport parameter values resulted in good predictions of the early phases of experimental breakthrough curves but did not adequately account for the tailing behaviour during later phases. In another approach parameters were calibrated by fitting the models to the first of two subsequent break-through steps of the experimental effluent curves. Extrapolation of the calibrated models to the second breakthrough step then resulted in improved predictions of the second breaktrough step, as compared to independent parameter estimation. However, neither of the two models did fully account for the immediate reaction of the effluent concentrations upon the second input step. It is suggested that, additional to classical ion-exchange processes, other cation retention and release mechanisms may have been involved in the observed transport behaviour. These processes, which have not been identified yet, appear to be effective on larger time scales than those of batch experiments and upon changes in the total ionic strength.

  2. Field study of time-dependent selenium partitioning in soils using isotopically enriched stable selenite tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Tullo, Pamela, E-mail: pamela.ditullo@univ-pau.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement (LCABIE), Université de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour/CNRS, UMR 5254, IPREM, Hélioparc, 2 Avenue du Président Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France); Andra, Research and Development Division, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Châtenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Pannier, Florence, E-mail: florence.pannier@univ-pau.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement (LCABIE), Université de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour/CNRS, UMR 5254, IPREM, Hélioparc, 2 Avenue du Président Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France); Thiry, Yves, E-mail: yves.thiry@andra.fr [Andra, Research and Development Division, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Châtenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Le Hécho, Isabelle, E-mail: isabelle.lehecho@univ-pau.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement (LCABIE), Université de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour/CNRS, UMR 5254, IPREM, Hélioparc, 2 Avenue du Président Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France); Bueno, Maïté, E-mail: maite.bueno@univ-pau.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement (LCABIE), Université de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour/CNRS, UMR 5254, IPREM, Hélioparc, 2 Avenue du Président Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France)

    2016-08-15

    A better understanding of selenium fate in soils at both short and long time scales is mandatory to consolidate risk assessment models relevant for managing both contamination and soil fertilization issues. The purpose of this study was thus to investigate Se retention processes and their kinetics by monitoring time-dependent distribution/speciation changes of both ambient and freshly added Se, in the form of stable enriched selenite-77, over a 2-years field experiment. This study clearly illustrates the complex reactivity of selenium in soil considering three methodologically defined fractions (i.e. soluble, exchangeable, organic). Time-dependent redistribution of Se-77 within solid-phases having different reactivity could be described as a combination of chemical and diffusion controlled processes leading to its stronger retention. Experimental data and their kinetic modeling evidenced that transfer towards less labile bearing phases are controlled by slow processes limiting the overall sorption of Se in soils. These results were used to estimate time needed for {sup 77}Se to reach the distribution of naturally present selenium which may extend up to several decades. Ambient Se speciation accounted for 60% to 100% of unidentified species as function of soil type whereas {sup 77}Se(IV) remained the more abundant species after 2-years field experiment. Modeling Se in the long-term without taking account these slow sorption kinetics would thus result in underestimation of Se retention. When using models based on K{sub d} distribution coefficient, they should be at least reliant on ambient Se which is supposed to be at equilibrium.

  3. The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on glomalin-related soil protein distribution, aggregate stability and their relationships with soil properties at different soil depths in lead-zinc contaminated area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Ban, Yihui; Tang, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP), a widespread glycoprotein produced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), is crucial for ecosystem functioning and ecological restoration. In the present study, an investigation was conducted to comprehensively analyze the effects of heavy metal (HM) contamination on AMF status, soil properties, aggregate distribution and stability, and their correlations at different soil depths (0–10, 10–20, 20–30, 30–40 cm). Our results showed that the mycorrhizal colonization (MC), hyphal length density (HLD), GRSP, soil organic matter (SOM) and soil organic carbon (SOC) were significantly inhibited by Pb compared to Zn at 0–20 cm soil depth, indicating that HM had significant inhibitory effects on AMF growth and soil properties, and that Pb exhibited greater toxicity than Zn at shallow layer of soil. Both the proportion of soil large macroaggregates (>2000 μm) and mean weight diameter (MWD) were positively correlated with GRSP, SOM and SOC at 0–20 cm soil depth (P soil particles together into large macroaggregates and improving aggregate stability. Furthermore, MC and HLD had significantly positive correlation with GRSP, SOM and SOC, suggesting that AMF played an essential role in GRSP, SOM and SOC accumulation and subsequently influencing aggregate formation and particle-size distribution in HM polluted soils. Our study highlighted that the introduction of indigenous plant associated with AMF might be a successful biotechnological tool to assist the recovery of HM polluted soils, and that proper management practices should be developed to guarantee maximum benefits from plant-AMF symbiosis during ecological restoration. PMID:28771531

  4. The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on glomalin-related soil protein distribution, aggregate stability and their relationships with soil properties at different soil depths in lead-zinc contaminated area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yurong; He, Chuangjun; Huang, Li; Ban, Yihui; Tang, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP), a widespread glycoprotein produced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), is crucial for ecosystem functioning and ecological restoration. In the present study, an investigation was conducted to comprehensively analyze the effects of heavy metal (HM) contamination on AMF status, soil properties, aggregate distribution and stability, and their correlations at different soil depths (0-10, 10-20, 20-30, 30-40 cm). Our results showed that the mycorrhizal colonization (MC), hyphal length density (HLD), GRSP, soil organic matter (SOM) and soil organic carbon (SOC) were significantly inhibited by Pb compared to Zn at 0-20 cm soil depth, indicating that HM had significant inhibitory effects on AMF growth and soil properties, and that Pb exhibited greater toxicity than Zn at shallow layer of soil. Both the proportion of soil large macroaggregates (>2000 μm) and mean weight diameter (MWD) were positively correlated with GRSP, SOM and SOC at 0-20 cm soil depth (P soil particles together into large macroaggregates and improving aggregate stability. Furthermore, MC and HLD had significantly positive correlation with GRSP, SOM and SOC, suggesting that AMF played an essential role in GRSP, SOM and SOC accumulation and subsequently influencing aggregate formation and particle-size distribution in HM polluted soils. Our study highlighted that the introduction of indigenous plant associated with AMF might be a successful biotechnological tool to assist the recovery of HM polluted soils, and that proper management practices should be developed to guarantee maximum benefits from plant-AMF symbiosis during ecological restoration.

  5. Combined use of stable isotopes and fallout radionuclides as soil erosion indicators in a forested mountain site, South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meusburger, K.; Mabit, L.; Alewell, C.; Park, J.H.; Sandor, T.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess and to validate the suitability of the stable nitrogen and carbon isotope signature as soil erosion indicators in a mountain forest site in South Korea. Our approach is based on the comparison of the isotope signature of ''stable'' landscape positions (reference sites), which are neither affected by erosion nor deposition, with eroding sites. For undisturbed soils we expect that the enrichment of δ 15 N and δ 13 C with soil depth, due to fractionation during decomposition, goes in parallel with a decrease in nitrogen and carbon content. Soil erosion processes potentially weaken this correlation. The 137 Cs method and the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) were applied for the soil erosion quantification. Erosion rates obtained with the 137 Cs method range from 0.9 t ha -1 yr -1 to 7 t ha -1 yr -1 . Considering the steep slopes of up to 40 and the erosive monsoon events (R factor of 6600 MJ mm ha -1 h -1 yr -1 ), the rates are plausible and within the magnitude of the RUSLE-modeled soil erosion rates, varying from 0.02 t ha -1 yr -1 to 5.1 t ha -1 yr -1 . The soil profiles of the reference sites showed significant (p < 0.0001) correlations between nitrogen and carbon content and its corresponding δ 15 N and δ 13 C signatures. In contrast, for the eroding sites this relationship was weaker and for the carbon not significant. These results confirm the usefulness of the stable carbon isotope signature as a qualitative indicator for soil disturbance. We could show further that the δ 15 N isotope signature can be used similarly for uncultivated sites. We thus propose that the stable δ 15 N and δ 13 C signature of soil profiles could serve as additional indicators confirming the accurate choice of the reference site in soil erosion studies using the 137 Cs method.

  6. Using fourier-transform mid-infrared spectroscopy to distinguish soil organic matter composition dynamics in aggregate fractions of two agroecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relationship between soil organic carbon (SOC) content and quality of SOC as impacted by land management is not well understood and may influence long-term storage of SOC. To better understand the potential for SOC storage in specific aggregate pools (i.e. physically protected intra-aggregate C)...

  7. Stable isotope switching (SIS): a new stable isotope probing (SIP) approach to determine carbon flow in the soil food web and dynamics in organic matter pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxfield, P J; Dildar, N; Hornibrook, E R C; Stott, A W; Evershed, R P

    2012-04-30

    Recent advances in stable isotope probing (SIP) have allowed direct linkage of microbial population structure and function. This paper details a new development of SIP, Stable Isotope Switching (SIS), which allows the simultaneous assessment of carbon (C) uptake, turnover and decay, and the elucidation of soil food webs within complex soils or sedimentary matrices. SIS utilises a stable isotope labelling approach whereby the (13)C-labelled substrate is switched part way through the incubation to a natural abundance substrate. A (13)CH(4) SIS study of landfill cover soils from Odcombe (Somerset, UK) was conducted. Carbon assimilation and dissimilation processes were monitored through bulk elemental analysis isotope ratio mass spectrometry and compound-specific gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry, targeting a wide range of biomolecular components including: lipids, proteins and carbohydrates. Carbon assimilation by primary consumers (methanotrophs) and sequential assimilation into secondary (Gram-negative and -positive bacteria) and tertiary consumers (Eukaryotes) was observed. Up to 45% of the bacterial membrane lipid C was determined to be directly derived from CH(4) and at the conclusion of the experiment ca. 50% of the bulk soil C derived directly from CH(4) was retained within the soil. This is the first estimate of soil organic carbon derived from CH(4) and it is comparable with levels observed in lakes that have high levels of benthic methanogenesis. SIS opens the way for a new generation of SIP studies aimed at elucidating total C dynamics (incorporation, turnover and decay) at the molecular level in a wide range of complex environmental and biological matrices. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Soil aggregate stability and size-selective sediment transport with surface runoff as affected by organic residue amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Pu; Arter, Christian; Liu, Xingyu; Keller, Martin; Schulin, Rainer

    2017-12-31

    Aggregate breakdown influences the availability of soil particles for size-selective sediment transport with surface runoff during erosive rainfall events. Organic matter management is known to affect aggregate stability against breakdown, but little is known about how this translates into rainfall-induced aggregate fragmentation and sediment transport under field conditions. In this study, we performed field experiments in which artificial rainfall was applied after pre-wetting on three pairs of arable soil plots (1.5×0.75m) six weeks after incorporating a mixture of grass and wheat straw into the topsoil of one plot in each pair (OI treatment) but not on the other plot (NI treatment). Artificial rainfall was applied for approximately 2h on each pair at an intensity of 49.1mmh -1 . In both treatments, discharge and sediment concentration in the discharge were correlated and followed a similar temporal pattern after the onset of surface runoff: After a sharp increase at the beginning both approached a steady state. But the onset of runoff was more delayed on the OI plots, and the discharge and sediment concentration were in average only roughly half as high on the OI as on the NI plots. With increasing discharge the fraction of coarse sediment increased. This relationship did not differ between the two treatments. Thus, due to the lower discharge, the fraction of fine particles in the exported sediment was larger in the runoff from the OI plots than from the NI plots. The later runoff onset and lower discharge rate was related to a higher initial aggregate stability on the OI plots. Terrestrial laser scanning proved to be a very valuable method to map changes in the micro-topography of the soil surfaces. It revealed a much less profound decrease in surface roughness on the OI than on the NI plots. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Aggregating available soil water holding capacity data for crop yield models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seubert, C. E.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Holt, D. A.; Baumgardner, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    The total amount of water available to plants that is held against gravity in a soil is usually estimated as the amount present at -0.03 MPa average water potential minus the amount present at -1.5 MPa water potential. This value, designated available water-holding capacity (AWHC), is a very important soil characteristic that is strongly and positively correlated to the inherent productivity of soils. In various applications, including assessing soil moisture status over large areas, it is necessary to group soil types or series as to their productivity. Current methods to classify AWHC of soils consider only total capacity of soil profiles and thus may group together soils which differ greatly in AWHC as a function of depth in the profile. A general approach for evaluating quantitatively the multidimensional nature of AWHC in soils is described. Data for 902 soil profiles, representing 184 soil series, in Indiana were obtained from the Soil Characterization Laboratory at Purdue University. The AWHC for each of ten 150-mm layers in each soil was established, based on soil texture and parent material. A multivariate clustering procedure was used to classify each soil profile into one of 4, 8, or 12 classes based upon ten-dimensional AWHC values. The optimum number of classes depends on the range of AWHC in the population of oil profiles analyzed and on the sensitivity of a crop to differences in distribution of water within the soil profile.

  10. C and N accumulations in soil aggregates determine nitrous oxide emissions from cover crop treated rice paddy soils during fallow season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Prabhat; Haque, Md Mozammel; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Pil Joo

    2014-08-15

    Combination of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues are preferably applied in rice paddy soils to increase the rate of organic matter mineralization and to improve plant growth. However, organic matter addition facilitates methane (CH4) emission from rice paddy soil. Mineralization of organic nitrogen (N) increases NO3-N concentrations in soil, which are precursors for the formation of nitrous oxide (N2O). However, N2O is a minor greenhouse gas emitted from submerged rice field and hence is not often considered during calculation of total global warming potential (GWP) during rice cultivation. The hypothesis of this study was that fluxes of N2O emissions might be changed after removal of flooded water from rice field and the effect of cover crops on N2O emissions in the fallow season might be interesting. However, the effects of N-rich plant residues on N2O emission rates in the fallow season and its effect on annual GWP were not studied before. In this experiment, combination of barley (non-leguminous) and hairy vetch (leguminous) biomasses were applied at 9 Mg ha(-1) and 27 Mg ha(-1) rates in rice paddy soil. Cover crop application significantly increased CH4 emission flux while decreased N2O emissions during rice cultivation. The lowest N2O emission was observed in 27 Mg ha(-1) cover crop treated plots. Cover crop applications increased N contents in soil aggregates especially in smaller aggregates (<250 μm), and that proportionately increased the N2O emission potentials of these soil aggregates. Fluxes of N2O emissions in the fallow season were influenced by the N2O emission potentials of soil aggregates and followed opposite trends as those observed during rice cultivation. Therefore, it could be concluded that the doses of cover crop applications for rice cultivation should not be optimized considering only CH4, but N2O should also be considered especially for fallow season to calculate total GWP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Storage and stability of organic carbon in soils as related to depth, occlusion within aggregates, and attachment to minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schrumpf

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual models suggest that stability of organic carbon (OC in soil depends on the source of plant litter, occlusion within aggregates, incorporation in organo-mineral complexes, and location within the soil profile. Density fractionation is a useful tool to study the relevance of OC stabilization in aggregates and in association with minerals, but it has rarely been applied to full soil profiles. We aim to determine factors shaping the depth profiles of physically unprotected and mineral associated OC and test their relevance for OC stability across a range of European soils that vary in vegetation, soil types, parent material, and land use. At each of the 12 study sites, 10 soil cores were sampled to 60 cm depth and subjected to density separation. Bulk soil samples and density fractions (free light fractions – fLF, occluded light fractions – oLF, heavy fractions – HF were analysed for OC, total nitrogen (TN, δ14C, and Δ14C. Bulk samples were also incubated to determine CO2 evolution per g OC in the samples (specific mineralization rates as an indicator for OC stability. Depth profiles of OC in the light fraction (LF-OC matched those of roots for undisturbed grassland and forest sites, suggesting that roots are shaping the depth distribution of LF-OC. Organic C in the HF declined less with soil depth than LF-OC and roots, especially at grassland sites. The decrease in Δ14C (increase in age of HF-OC with soil depth was related to soil pH as well as to dissolved OC fluxes. This indicates that dissolved OC translocation contributes to the formation of subsoil HF-OC and shapes the Δ14C profiles. The LF at three sites were rather depleted in 14C, indicating the presence of fossil material such as coal and lignite, probably inherited from the parent material. At the other sites, modern Δ14C signatures and positive correlations between specific mineralization rates and fLF-OC indicate the fLF is a potentially available energy and

  12. Effect of biochar application and soil temperature on characteristics of organic matter associated with aggregate-size and density fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Michael; Grunwald, Dennis; Marhan, Sven; Poll, Christian; Bamminger, Chris; Ludwig, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Potential increases in soil temperature due to climate change might result in intensified soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and thus higher CO2 emissions. Management options to increase and stabilize SOM include the application of biochar. However, the effects of biochar amendments under elevated soil temperatures on SOM dynamics are largely unknown. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of biochar application and elevated soil temperature on the amount and composition of OM associated with fractions of different turnover kinetics. Samples were taken from four treatments of the Hohenheim Climate Change Experiment with the factors temperature (ambient or elevated by 2.5 °C in 4 cm depth, six years before sampling) and biochar (control and 30 t / ha Miscanthus pyrolysis biochar, one year before sampling) in two depths (0 - 5 and 5 - 15 cm). Basal respiration and microbial biomass C were analyzed within an incubation experiment. Aggregate size-fractions were separated by wet-sieving and the free light, occluded light (oLF), and heavy fractions were isolated by density fractionation. All fractions were analyzed for organic C and δ13C as well as by infrared spectroscopy. Preliminary data suggest that biochar significantly increased basal respiration and that the microbial biomass C was significantly affected by elevated temperature. No biochar-C was found in the microbial biomass. Biochar and elevated temperature had only minor effects on the organic C associated with aggregate-size classes, although biochar was incorporated into all fractions already after one year of application. Biochar application significantly increased the organic C associated with oLF. In most samples affected by biochar, the proportion of C=O groups was significantly increased. The results suggest that already after one year, biochar-mineral interactions were formed leading to an aggregate occlusion of applied biochar. At least in the short-term, the effect of biochar on

  13. Afforestation impacts microbial biomass and its natural {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N abundance in soil aggregates in central China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Junjun; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Fan; Lei, Yao; Zhang, Quanfa; Cheng, Xiaoli, E-mail: xlcheng@fudan.edu.cn

    2016-10-15

    We investigated soil microbial biomass and its natural abundance of δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N in aggregates (> 2000 μm, 250–2000 μm, 53–250 μm and < 53 μm) of afforested (implementing woodland and shrubland plantations) soils, adjacent croplands and open area (i.e., control) in the Danjiangkou Reservoir area of central China. The afforested soils averaged higher microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) levels in all aggregates than in open area and cropland, with higher microbial biomass in micro-aggregates (< 250 μm) than in macro-aggregates (> 2000 μm). The δ{sup 13}C of soil microbial biomass was more enriched in woodland soils than in other land use types, while δ{sup 15}N of soil microbial biomass was more enriched compared with that of organic soil in all land use types. The δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N of microbial biomass were positively correlated with the δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N of organic soil across aggregates and land use types, whereas the {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N enrichment of microbial biomass exhibited linear decreases with the corresponding C:N ratio of organic soil. Our results suggest that shifts in the natural {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N abundance of microbial biomass reflect changes in the stabilization and turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) and thereby imply that afforestation can greatly impact SOM accumulation over the long-term. - Highlights: • Afforested soils averaged higher microbial biomass in all aggregates than cropland. • Microbial biomass was higher in micro-aggregates than in macro-aggregates. • δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N of microbe positively correlated with δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N of organic soil. • {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N enrichment of microbe was negatively related to with soil C:N ratio.

  14. Automatic Sieve-Shaker for Determining Soil Aggregate Stability and Dimensional Distribution Using a Vertical Oscillation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Dell’Aquila

    Full Text Available The soil aggregate stability is determined generally by sifting the soil samples in water using a sieve-shaker (wet sieving. The Author has developed an original model of automatic sieve-shaker using a vertical oscillation system to the aim of an its possible use to determine the soil aggregate stability and dimensional distribution. The purpose of this note is to describe the construction and performance of the prototype currently used in the Laboratory for the Soil Structure Study of the ISAFOM – CNR. The proposed sieve-shaker, with the introduction of some innovations (protected by Italy Patent 0001332102, realizes the submersion and levelling of the soil samples using a lifter to support the containers with the water. With 6 workplaces it allows to process simultaneously up to 6 soil samples according to different test cycles. By means of the control panel it is possible to set up various determinations with the stroke of 3 cm and the oscillation frequency from 4 up to 80 oscillations per minute. The performance of the proposed sieve-shaker was verified with a technical test to verify the performance of the 6 workplaces to oscillation speed increasing up to 60 oscillations per minute and an agronomic test. The results have been submitted to analysis of variance considering the plots of the field from which have been taken the samples for repetitions and the six workplaces of the proposed sieve-shaker for experimental theses. The differences between the various workplaces have not been significant. This demonstrates that the behavior of the various workplaces is uniform. The dispersion in water at constant shaking time and increasing oscillation speed has evidenced a very significant inverse relation between the index of aggregate stability in water (IASW and number of oscillations per minute. This result demonstrates a constant performance of the proposed sieve-shaker to varying of the oscillation speed. The agnonomic test has demonstrated

  15. Effect of soil surface conditions on runoff velocity and sediment mean aggregate diameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    César Ramos, Júlio; Bertol, Ildegardis; Paz González, Antonio; de Souza Werner, Romeu; Marioti, Juliana; Henrique Bandeira, Douglas; Andrighetti Leolatto, Lidiane

    2013-04-01

    Soil cover and soil management are the factors that most influence soil erosion by water, because they directly affect soil surface roughness and surface cover. The main effect of soil cover by crop residues consists in dissipation of kinetic energy of raindrops and also partly kinetic energy of runoff, so that the soil disaggregation is considerably reduced but, in addition, soil cover captures detached soil particles, retains water on its surface and decreases runoff volume and velocity. In turn, soil surface roughness, influences soil surface water storage and infiltration and also runoff volume and velocity, sediment retention and subsequently water and sediment losses. Based on the above rationale, we performed a field experiment to assess the influence of soil cover and soil surface roughness on decay of runoff velocity as well as on mean diameter of transported sediments (D50 index). The following treatments were evaluated: SRR) residues of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) on a smooth soil surfcace, SRV) residues of common vetch (Vicia sativa) on a smooth soil surface, SSR) scarification after cultivation of Italian ryegrass resulting in a rough surface, SSV) scarification after cultivation of common vetch resulting in a rough surface, and SBS) scarified bare soil with high roughness as a control. The field experiments was performed on an Inceptisol in South Brazil under simulated rainfall conditions during 2012. Experimental plots were 11 m long and 3.5 m wide with an area of 38.5 m2. Six successive simulated rainfall tests were applied using a rotating-boom rain simulator. During each test, rain intensity was 60 mmhr-1, whereas rain duration was 90 minutes. Runoff velocity showed no significant differences between cultivated treatments. However, when compared to bare soil treatment, SBS (0.178 m s-1) and irrespective of the presence of surface crop residues or scarification operations, cultivated soil treatments significantly reduced runoff velocity

  16. Effect of sustainable land management practices on soil aggregation and stabilization of organic carbon in semiarid mediterranean ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Franco, Noelia; Albaladejo, Juan; Almagro, María; Wiesmeier, Martin; Martínez-Mena, María

    2016-04-01

    Arid and semiarid regions represent about 47% of the total land area of the world (UNEP, 1992). At present, there is a priority interest for carbon (C) sequestration in drylands. These areas are considered as very fragile ecosystems with low organic carbon (OC) saturation, and potentially, high capacity for soil OC sequestration. In addition, the restoration of these areas is one of the major challenges for scientists, who will be able to identify and recommended the best land uses and sustainable land management (SLM) practices for soil conservation and mitigation of climate change in these environments. In this regard, in semiarid Mediterranean ecosystems there is an urgent need for the implementation of SLM practices regardless of land-use type (forest, agricultural and shrubland) to maintain acceptable levels of soil organic matter (SOM) and the physico-chemical protection of the OC. Long- and short-term effects of SLM practices on soil aggregation and SOC stabilization were studied in two land uses. The long-term experiment was conducted in a reforestation area with Pinus halepensis Mill., where two afforestation techniques were implemented 20 years ago: a) mechanical terracing with a single application of organic waste of urban soil refuse, and b) mechanical terracing without organic amendment. An adjacent shrubland was considered as the reference plot. The short-term experiment was conducted in a rain-fed almond (Prunus dulcis Mill., var. Ferragnes) orchard where two SLM practices were introduced 4 years ago: a) reduced tillage plus green manure, and b) no tillage. Reduced tillage was considered as the reference plot given that it is the habitual management practice. Four aggregate size classes were differentiated by sieving (large and small macroaggregates, microaggregates, and the silt plus clay fraction), and the microaggregates occluded within small macroaggregates (SMm) were isolated. In addition, different organic C fractions corresponding with active

  17. The impact of agriculture terraces on soil organic matter, aggregate stability, water repellency and bulk density. A study in abandoned and active farms in the Sierra de Enguera, Eastern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Burguet, Maria; Keesstra, Saskia; Prosdocimi, Massimo; Di Prima, Simone; Brevik, Erik; Novara, Agata; Jordan, Antonio; Tarolli, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion, land degradation, lack of organic matter, erodible soils, rock outcrops… are a consequence of the human abuse and misuse of the soil resources. And this is a worldwide environmental issue (Novara et al., 2011; Vanlauwe et al., 2015; Musinguzi et al., 2015; Pereira et al., 2015; Mwagno et al., 2016). Agriculture terraces are a strategy to reduce the soil erosion, improve the soil fertility and allow the ploughing (Cerdà et al., 2010; Li et al., 2014). Although this idea is well accepted there are few scientific evidences that demonstrate that soils in the terraced areas are more stable, fertile and sustainable that the soil in non terraced areas. In fact, the ploughing in comparison to the abandoned or not ploughed land results in the soil degradation (Lieskovský and Kenderessy, 2014; Gao et al., 2015; Parras-Alcántara et al., 2014). This is mainly due to the lack of vegetation that increase the surface runoff (Cerdà et al., 1998; Keesstra et al., 2007). And why is necessary to develop also in terraced landscapes soil erosion control strategies (Mekonnen et al., 2015a; Mekonnen et al., 2015b; Prosdocimi et al., 2016). Our objective was to assess the soil organic matter content (Walkley and Black, 1934), the soil bulk density (ring method), the aggregate stabilility (drop impact) and the water repellency (Water Drop Penetration Time test) in four study sites in the Sierra de Enguera. Two sites were terraced: one abandoned 40 years before the measurements and the other still active with olive crops. And two control sites non-terraced. We used the paired plot strategy to compare the impact of terracing and abandonment. At each site we collected randomly 50 soil samples at 0-2 cm, 4-6 and 8-10 cm depth. At each sampling point 100 WDPT measurements where carried out, and one sample for the bulk density, and one for the organic matter, and one for the soil aggregate stability were collected. The soil surface samples shown the largest differences. The

  18. Stabilization techniques for reactive aggregate in soil-cement base course : technical summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this research are 1) to identify the mineralogical properties of soil-cement bases which have heaved or can potentially heave, 2) to simulate expansion of cement-stabilized soil in the laboratory, 3) to correlate expansion with the ...

  19. Predicting aggregate properties of soil communities vs. comunity structure in an agricultural setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demšar, D.; Džeroski, S.; Debeljak, M.

    2006-01-01

    Increasing amounts of environmental data are being collected. With environmental data, we often encounter the situation of having to predict several target variables of similar type, such as biomasses of different species. This situation is usually handled by computing an aggregate target variabl...

  20. Stability of aggregates of some weathered soils in south-eastern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3 and Fe2O3, while the dithionite extractable Fe and Al was greater than their corresponding oxalate and pyrophosphate forms. The mean-weight diameter from dried aggregates (MWDd) and their corresponding wet mean-weight diameter ...

  1. Can organic matter hide from decomposers in the labyrinth of soil aggregates? Micro-engineered Soil Chips challenging foraging fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Edith C.; Aleklett, Kristin; Arellano Caicedo, Carlos G.; Bengtsson, Martin; Micaela Mafla Endara, Paola; Ohlsson, Pelle

    2017-04-01

    From the point of view of microorganisms, the soil environment is an enormously complex labyrinth with paths and dead-end streets, where resources and shelters are unevenly distributed. We study foraging strategies of soil organisms, especially fungi, and the possibility of physio-spatial stabilization of organic matter by "hiding" in occluded soil spaces. We manipulate growth habitat microstructure with lab-on-a-chip techniques, where we designed complex environments with channels and obstacle at dimensions of the size of hyphae, and construct them in the transparent, gas-permeable polymer PDMS. We fill those with different nutrient solutions or combine with mineral nutrient gradients, and inoculate them with soil organisms. We analyze organisms and substrates with microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and analytical chemistry. We compared different soil litter decomposers and an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus for their ability to forage through complex air-gap structures and attempt to classify them into functional traits concerning their mycelium directionality, space-exploring approach and ability to grow through acute angles and narrow constrictions. We identified structures which are very difficult to penetrate for most species, and compounds located behind such features may thus be spatially unavailable for decomposers. We discuss our approach in comparison to soil pore space tomographic analyses and findings we made in the pore space of colonized wood biochar.

  2. Degradation of Methyl Bromide and Methyl Chloride in Soil Microcosms: Use of Stable C Isotope Fractionation and Stable Isotope Probing to Identify Reactions and the Responsible Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L. G.; Warner, K. L.; Baesman, S. M.; Oremland, R. S.; McDonald, I. R.; Radajewski, S.; Murrell, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) and methyl chloride (MeCl) are important atmospheric trace gases that contribute directly to stratospheric ozone depletion. These compounds have natural and anthropogenic sources and sinks in both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Soils comprise the largest known sink for MeBr on the Earth's surface and are also a large sink for MeCl. However, the processes that influence the flux of these compounds from air to soil or soil to air are poorly understood at present. Bacteria in soil microcosm experiments oxidized both MeCl and MeBr, the former compound more rapidly than the latter. MeBr was also removed by chemical reactions while MeCl was not. Chemical degradation of MeBr accounted for more than half of its total loss. We applied new techniques to determine if different bacteria were responsible for degrading MeBr and MeCl. Stable isotope probing revealed that different populations of soil bacteria assimilated added 13C-labeled MeBr and MeCl. Soil bacterial oxidation of MeBr and MeCl was characterized by different kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). The KIE for MeBr oxidation by bacteria was 22 +/- 5 \\permil and the KIE for MeCl oxidation was 56 +/- 3 \\permil, suggesting that different bacteria were responsible for degrading each compound. The identity of the active MeBr and MeCl degrading bacteria in soil was determined by analysis of 16S rDNA sequences amplified from 13C-DNA fractions. The diverse population of active bacteria was reflected by the range of sequences found for the cmuA gene, which codes for the enzyme that catalyzes the initial step in the oxidation of MeBr and MeCl. The diversity and number of different bacteria actively degrading MeBr and MeCl in the soil and the number of bacteria identified that contain the enzyme capable of degrading methyl halides were in contrast to the limited number of methyl halide degrading bacteria that have been isolated thus far from soil and aquatic environments; thus suggesting that the

  3. Do aggregate stability and soil organic matter content increase following organic inputs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, Taru; Gísladóttir, Guðrún; van Leeuwen, Jeroen P.; Bloem, Jaap; Steffens, Markus; Vala Ragnarsdóttir, Kristin

    2014-05-01

    Agriculture is facing several challenges such as loss of soil organic matter (SOM); thus, sustainable farming management practices are needed. Organic farming is growing as an alternative to conventional farming; in Iceland approximately 1% and in Austria 16% of utilized agricultural area is under organic farming practice. We analyzed the effect of different farming practices (organic, and conventional) on soil physicochemical and microbiological properties in grassland soils in Iceland and cropland soils in Austria. Organic farms differed from conventional farms by absence of chemical fertilizers and pesticide use. At these farms, we investigated soil physicochemical (e.g. soil texture, pH, CAL-extractable P and K) and microbiological properties (fungal and bacterial biomass and activity). The effects of farming practices on soil macroaggregate stability and SOM quantity, quality and distribution between different fractions were studied following a density fractionation. In Iceland, we sampled six grassland sites on Brown (BA) and Histic (HA) Andosols; two sites on extensively managed grasslands, two sites under organic and two sites under conventional farming practice. In Austria, we sampled four cropland sites on Haplic Chernozems; two sites under organic and two sites under conventional farming practice. We found significantly higher macroaggregate stability in the organic compared to the conventional grasslands in Iceland. In contrast, slightly higher macroaggregation in conventional compared to the organic farming practice was found in croplands in Austria, although the difference was not significant. Macroaggregates were positively correlated with fungal biomass in Iceland, and with Feo and fungal activity in Austria. In Austria, SOM content and nutrient status (except for lower CAL-extractable P at one site) were similar between organic and conventional farms. Our results show that the organic inputs may have enhanced macroaggregation in organic farming

  4. Influence of 20-year organic and inorganic fertilization on organic carbon accumulation and microbial community structure of aggregates in an intensively cultivated sandy loam soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanjun Zhang

    Full Text Available To evaluate the long-term effect of compost (CM and inorganic fertilizer (NPK application on microbial community structure and organic carbon (OC accumulation at aggregate scale, soils from plots amended with CM, NPK and no fertilizer (control for 20 years (1989-2009 were collected. Soil was separated into large macroaggregate (>2,000 μm, small macroaggregate (250-2,000 μm, microaggregate (53-250 μm, silt (2-53 μm and clay fraction (<2 μm by wet-sieving, and their OC concentration and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA were measured. The 20-year application of compost significantly (P<0.05 increased OC by 123-134% and accelerated the formation of macroaggregates, but decreased soil oxygen diffusion coefficient. NPK mainly increased OC in macroaggregates and displayed weaker influence on aggregation. Bacteria distributed in all aggregates, while fungi and actinobacteria were mainly in macroaggregates and microaggregates. The ratio of monounsaturated to branched (M/B PLFAs, as an indicator for the ratio of aerobic to anaerobic microorganisms, increased inversely with aggregate size. Both NPK and especially CM significantly (P<0.05 decreased M/B ratios in all aggregates except the silt fraction compared with the control. The increased organic C in aggregates significantly (P<0.05 negatively correlated with M/B ratios under CM and NPK. Our study suggested that more efficient OC accumulations in aggregates under CM-treated than under NPK-treated soil was not only due to a more effective decrease of actinobacteria, but also a decrease of monounsaturated PLFAs and an increase of branched PLFAs. Aggregations under CM appear to alter micro-habitats to those more suitable for anaerobes, which in turn boosts OC accumulation.

  5. Plant litter chemistry alters the content and composition of organic carbon associated with soil mineral and aggregate fractions in invaded ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Mioko; Suseela, Vidya; Simpson, Myrna; Powell, Brian; Tharayil, Nishanth

    2017-10-01

    Through the input of disproportionate quantities of chemically distinct litter, invasive plants may potentially influence the fate of organic matter associated with soil mineral and aggregate fractions in some of the ecosystems they invade. Although context dependent, these native ecosystems subjected to prolonged invasion by exotic plants may be instrumental in distinguishing the role of plant-microbe-mineral interactions from the broader edaphic and climatic influences on the formation of soil organic matter (SOM). We hypothesized that the soils subjected to prolonged invasion by an exotic plant that input recalcitrant litter (Japanese knotweed, Polygonum cuspidatum) would have a greater proportion of plant-derived carbon (C) in the aggregate fractions, as compared with that in adjacent soil inhabited by native vegetation that input labile litter, whereas the soils under an invader that input labile litter (kudzu, Pueraria lobata) would have a greater proportion of microbial-derived C in the silt-clay fraction, as compared with that in adjacent soils that receive recalcitrant litter. At the knotweed site, the higher C content in soils under P. cuspidatum, compared with noninvaded soils inhabited by grasses and forbs, was limited to the macroaggregate fraction, which was abundant in plant biomarkers. The noninvaded soils at this site had a higher abundance of lignins in mineral and microaggregate fractions and suberin in the macroaggregate fraction, partly because of the greater root density of the native species, which might have had an overriding influence on the chemistry of the above-ground litter input. At the kudzu site, soils under P. lobata had lower C content across all size fractions at a 0-5 cm soil depth despite receiving similar amounts of Pinus litter. Contrary to our prediction, the noninvaded soils receiving recalcitrant Pinus litter had a similar abundance of plant biomarkers across both mineral and aggregate fractions, potentially because of

  6. Medium-term impact of tillage and residue management on soil aggregate stability, soil carbon and crop productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, B.K.; Vanlauwe, B.; Ayuke, F.; Gassner, A.; Hoogmoed, M.; Hurisso, T.T.; Koala, S.; Lelei, D.; Ndabamenye, T.; Six, J.; Pulleman, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Conservation agriculture is widely promoted for soil conservation and crop productivity increase, although rigorous empirical evidence from sub-Saharan Africa is still limited. This study aimed to quantify the medium-term impact of tillage (conventional and reduced) and crop residue management

  7. The SAWO (Small And Well Organized) avatar teaches the importance of the aggregates on the soil system and how to determine their stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Cerdà, Artemi; Jordán, Antonio; Úbeda, Xavier; Pereira, Paulo

    2015-04-01

    Soil structure is the key factor that determine the soil quality as control the organic matter turnnover, soil biology and soil erodibility (Cerdà, 1996; 1998; Wick et al., 2014; Gelaw, 2015). There is a need to understand better the factors and the processes that act on the soil aggregation and the dynamics of the soil aggregation, which will make easier to understand the soil system functioning (Jordán et al., 2011; Jordán et al., 2012; Pulido Moncada et al., 2013). Fire, mines, grazing and agricultura (Cerdà, 2000; Mataix Solera et al., 2011; Cerdà et al., 2012; Hallett et al., 2014; Lozano et al., 2013) determines how the soil structure is highly affected by the humankind. And this determines the sustainability of the land managements (García Orenes et al., 2012; K¨ropfl et al., 2013; Mekuria and Aynekulu, 2013; Taguas et al., 2013; Zhao et al., 2013). Aggregates are Small And Well Organized (SAWO) structures that allow the water to flow, the air fill the porous and the life to be diverse and abundant in the soil. The SAWO avatar will teach the importance of the functions and the services of the aggregates to students and other scientists, but also to any audience. This means that the experiments and the vocabulary to be used by SAWO will be very wide and rich. The Avatar SAWO will use different strategies and skills to teach the soil aggregation properties and characteristics. And also, how to measure. Easy to carry out experiments will be shown by SAWO to measure the aggregate stability in the field and in the laboratory, and the soil sampling in the field. The SAWO avatar will play a special attention to the impact of forest fires on aggregate stability changes and how to measure. The SAWO avatar will teach how to take samples in the field, how to transport and manage in the laboratory, and finally which measurements and test can be done to determine the aggregate stability. Acknowledgements To the "Ministerio de Economía and Competitividad" of

  8. Uncertainty of soil erosion modelling using open source high resolution and aggregated DEMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Mondal

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Digital Elevation Model (DEM is one of the important parameters for soil erosion assessment. Notable uncertainties are observed in this study while using three high resolution open source DEMs. The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE model has been applied to analysis the assessment of soil erosion uncertainty using open source DEMs (SRTM, ASTER and CARTOSAT and their increasing grid space (pixel size from the actual. The study area is a part of the Narmada river basin in Madhya Pradesh state, which is located in the central part of India and the area covered 20,558 km2. The actual resolution of DEMs is 30 m and their increasing grid spaces are taken as 90, 150, 210, 270 and 330 m for this study. Vertical accuracy of DEMs has been assessed using actual heights of the sample points that have been taken considering planimetric survey based map (toposheet. Elevations of DEMs are converted to the same vertical datum from WGS 84 to MSL (Mean Sea Level, before the accuracy assessment and modelling. Results indicate that the accuracy of the SRTM DEM with the RMSE of 13.31, 14.51, and 18.19 m in 30, 150 and 330 m resolution respectively, is better than the ASTER and the CARTOSAT DEMs. When the grid space of the DEMs increases, the accuracy of the elevation and calculated soil erosion decreases. This study presents a potential uncertainty introduced by open source high resolution DEMs in the accuracy of the soil erosion assessment models. The research provides an analysis of errors in selecting DEMs using the original and increased grid space for soil erosion modelling.

  9. The key microorganisms for anaerobic degradation of pentachlorophenol in paddy soil as revealed by stable isotope probing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Hui [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Chengshuai [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550009 (China); Li, Fangbai, E-mail: cefbli@soil.gd.cn [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Luo, Chunling [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Chen, Manjia; Hu, Min [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • SIP suggested that Dechloromonas can mineralize PCP in soil. • Methanosaeta and Methanocella acquired PCP-derived carbon. • Lactate enhanced microbial degradation of PCP in soil. - Abstract: Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a common residual persistent pesticide in paddy soil and has resulted in harmful effect on soil ecosystem. The anaerobic microbial transformation of PCP, therefore, has been received much attentions, especially the functional microbial communities for the reductive transformation. However, the key functional microorganisms for PCP mineralization in the paddy soil still remain unknown. In this work, DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP) was applied to explore the key microorganisms responsible for PCP mineralization in paddy soil. The SIP results indicated that the dominant bacteria responsible for PCP biodegradation belonged to the genus Dechloromonas of the class β-Proteobacteria. In addition, the increased production of {sup 13}CH{sub 4} and {sup 13}CO{sub 2} indicated that the addition of lactate enhanced the rate of biodegradation and mineralization of PCP. Two archaea classified as the genera of Methanosaeta and Methanocella of class Methanobacteria were enriched in the heavy fraction when with lactate, whereas no archaea was detected in the absence of lactate. These findings provide direct evidence for the species of bacteria and archaea responsible for anaerobic PCP or its breakdown products mineralization and reveal a new insight into the microorganisms linked with PCP degradation in paddy soil.

  10. Comparison of aggregate stability within six soil profiles under conventional tillage using various laboratory tests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodešová, R.; Rohošková, M.; Žigová, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 3 (2009), s. 550-554 ISSN 0006-3088 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/08/0434 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : fast wetting test * slow wetting test * shaking after pre-wetting test * wet sewing Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science Impact factor: 0.617, year: 2009

  11. 'Fingerprints' of four crop models as affected by soil input data aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angulo, Carlos; Gaiser, Thomas; Rötter, Reimund P

    2014-01-01

    . In this study we used four crop models (SIMPLACE, DSSAT-CSM, EPIC and DAISY) differing in the detail of modeling above-ground biomass and yield as well as of modeling soil water dynamics, water uptake and drought effects on plants to simulate winter wheat in two (agro-climatologically and geo-morphologically...

  12. Experimental Study of Geotextile Effect on Improving Soil Bearing Capacity in Aggregate Surfaced Roads

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdi Taghipour Masoumi; Ali Abdi Kordani; Mahmoud Nazirizad

    2017-01-01

    Geosynthetics utilization plays an important role in the construction of highways with no additive layers, such as asphalt concrete or cement concrete, or in a subgrade layer which affects the bearing capacity of unbounded layers. This laboratory experimental study was carried out to evaluate changes in the load bearing capacity of reinforced soil with these materials in highway roadbed with regard to geotextile properties. California Bearing Ratio (CBR) test samples were prepared with two ty...

  13. Molecular and biochemical characterization of soil isolates of Aspergillus niger aggregate and an assessment of their antagonism against Rhizoctonia solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Khan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Sixteen Aspergillus niger aggregate isolates collected from different crop fi elds were subjected to RAPDPCR using 20 Operon primers and 8 synthetic primers. Twenty-two primers led to the amplifi cation of 727 fragments ranging from 3500 bp (OPA 11 to 200 bp (primer 06. Two bands were monomorphic, while the rest were polymorphic. Three amplicons produced by OPA 16 were recorded as isolate-specifi c as 2300 bp by AnC2 and AnR3, and as 2800 bp by AnC2 only. The highest genetic similarity (0.79 was measured between AnC2 and AnR3, and the lowest (0.17 between AnC2 and AnR2. Multivariate analysis of genetic similarity revealed three major clusters, named group I, group II and group III. All isolates were ochratoxin A negative (<1 ng g-1. Isolates AnC2 and AnR3, which produced HCN and solubilized the greatest amount of phosphorus, belonged to group I. These isolates also signifi cantly increased eggplant yield and caused the greatest inhibition of colonization by R. solani in dual culture. They also suppressed the root rot on eggplant and the soil population of R. solani in pot soil.

  14. A novel method for collection of soil-emitted nitric oxide (NO) for natural abundance stable N isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Z.; Elliott, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    The global inventory of NO emissions is poorly constrained with a large portion of the uncertainty attributed to soil NO emissions that result from soil abiotic and microbial processes. While natural abundance stable N isotopes (δ15N) in various soil N-containing compounds have proven to be a robust tracer of soil N cycling, soil δ15N-NO is rarely quantified mainly due to the diffuse nature, low concentrations, and high reactivity of soil-emitted NO. Here, we present the development and application of a dynamic flux chamber system capable of simultaneously measuring soil NO fluxes and collecting NO for δ15N-NO measurements. The system couples a widely used flow-through soil chamber with a NO collection train, in which NO can be converted to NO2 through O3 titration in a Teflon reaction coil, followed by NO2 collection in a 20% triethanolamine (TEA) solution as nitrite and nitrate for δ15N analysis using the denitrifier method. The efficiency of NO-NO2 conversion in the reaction coil and the recovery of NO in the TEA solution were determined experimentally and found to be quantitative (>99%) over a 10 to 749 ppbv NO mixing ratio range. An analytical NO tank (δ15N-NO=71.0±0.4‰) was used to calibrate the method for δ15N-NO analysis. The resulting accuracy and precision (1σ) of the method across various environmental conditions were 1.6‰ and 1.2‰, respectively. Using this new method, controlled laboratory incubations have been conducted to characterize NO emissions induced by rewetting of air-dried surface soil sampled from an urban forest. Pulsed NO emissions, up to 30 times higher than maximum soil NO emissions under steady state, were triggered upon the rewetting and lasted for next 36 hours. While the measured δ15N-NO over the course of the NO pulsing ranged from -52.0‰ and -34.6‰, reinforcing the notion that soil δ15N-NO is lower than those of fossil-fuel combustion sources, a transient δ15N-NO shift was captured immediately after the

  15. The Role of Priming in the Development of Stable and Radioactive Carbon Isotope Profiles of Soil Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serach, L.; Breecker, D.

    2017-12-01

    The stability of soil carbon (C) is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in global C cycle models and is central to identifying potential feedbacks to a warming climate. The role that more stable soil organic matter (SOM) pools could have in these feedbacks is highly uncertain. Stable C isotope (δ13C) and radiocarbon (14C) SOM profiles are used to understand the processes involved in soil C stabilization. In this study, we use a 1-dimensional, 3 pool soil C model to simulate the development of SOM δ13C and 14C profiles in a well-drained forest soil. Under the simplest model scenario where decomposition rate constants for each SOM pool remain fixed, model runs exhibit a buildup of slowly degrading C in the shallow subsurface (0-5cm) where fresh, labile C typically dominates in natural soils. Additionally, magnitudes of trends in SOM δ13C and 14C profiles were inconsistent with those observed in natural profiles, suggesting a deficiency in this version of the model. We hypothesize that the observed disparity between modeled and natural profiles is due to the absence of priming in the model. Priming effects presume a change in decomposition rate constants for recalcitrant C pools upon the addition of labile C to the soil. As such, priming effects were simulated in the model by making decomposition rate constants a function of labile C input (e.g., root C and leaf litter). The incorporation of priming into the model yields larger, more realistic shifts in SOM δ13C profiles and trends in 14C profiles that vary based on the sensitivity of recalcitrant pools to labile C addition. So far, the results from this study support the hypothesis that SOM δ13C and 14C profiles cannot be explained without priming. These results highlight the importance of priming to our understanding of the persistence of stable C in the soil and our ability to use SOM δ13C and 14C trends as a means to quantify C stability.

  16. Changes in carbon stability and microbial activity in size fractions of micro-aggregates in a rice soil chronosequence under long term rice cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Genxing; Liu, Yalong; Wang, Ping; Li, Lianqinfg; Cheng, Kun; Zheng, Jufeng; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jinwei; Bian, Rongjun; Ding, Yuanjun; Ma, Chong

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown soil carbon sequestration through physical protection of relative labile carbon intra micro-aggregates with formation of large sized macro-aggregates under good management of soil and agricultural systems. While carbon stabilization had been increasingly concerned as ecosystem properties, the mechanisms underspin bioactivity of soil carbon with increased carbon stability has been still poorly understood. In this study, topsoil samples were collected from rice soils derived from salt marsh under different length of rice cultivation up to 700 years from eastern China. Particle size fractions (PSF) of soil aggregates were separated using a low energy dispersion protocol. Carbon fractions in the PSFs were analyzed either with FTIR spectroscopy. Soil microbial community of bacterial, fungal and archaeal were analyzed with molecular fingerprinting using specific gene primers. Soil respiration and carbon gain from amended maize as well as enzyme activities were measured using lab incubation protocols. While the PSFs were dominated by the fine sand (200-20μm) and silt fraction (20-2μm), the mass proportion both of sand (2000-200μm) and clay (concentrated in both sand and clay fractions but that of fungi in sand fraction, and sharply decreased with the decreasing size of aggregate fraction. Gene abundance of archaeal followed a similar trend to that of bacterial but showing an increasing trend with prolonged rice cultivation in both sand and clay fractions. Change in community diversity with sizes of aggregate fractions was found of fungi and weakly of bacterial but not of archaeal. Soil respiration ratio (Respired CO2-C to SOC) was highest in silt fraction, followed by the fine sand fraction but lowest in sand and clay fractions in the rice soils cultivated over 100 years. Again, scaled by total gen concentration, respiration was higher in silt fraction than in other fractions for these rice soils. For the size fractions other than clay

  17. Using species-specific enriched stable isotopes to study the effect of fresh mercury inputs in soil-earthworm systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, C Rodríguez; Jiménez-Moreno, M; Bernardo, F J Guzmán; Martín-Doimeadios, R C Rodríguez; Nevado, J J Berzas

    2018-01-01

    The fate of mercury (Hg) in the soil-earthworm system is still far from being fully understood, especially regarding recurrent and challenging questions about the importance of the reactivity of exogenous Hg species. Thus, to predict the potential effect of Hg inputs in terrestrial ecosystems, it is necessary to evaluate separately the reactivity of the endogenous and exogenous Hg species and, for this purpose, the use of enriched stable isotope tracers is a promising tool. In the present work, earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) were exposed to historically Hg contaminated soils from the Almadén mining district, Spain. The soils were either non-spiked, which contain only endogenous or native Hg naturally occurring in the soil, or spiked with isotopically enriched inorganic Hg ( 199 IHg), representing exogenous or spiked Hg apart from the native one. The differential reactivity of endogenous and exogenous Hg in the soil conditioned the processes of methylation, mobilization, and assimilation of inorganic Hg by earthworms. Both endogenous and exogenous Hg species also behave distinctly regarding their bioaccumulation in earthworms, as suggested by the bioaccumulation factors, being the endogenous methylmercury (MeHg) the species more readily bioaccumulated by earthworms and in a higher extent. To the best of our knowledge, this work demonstrates for the first time the potential of enriched stable isotopes to study the effects of fresh Hg inputs in soil-earthworm systems. The findings of this work can be taken as a case study on the dynamics of Hg species in complex terrestrial systems and open a new door for future experiments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of active methylotroph populations in an acidic forest soil by stable-isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radajewski, Stefan; Webster, Gordon; Reay, David S; Morris, Samantha A; Ineson, Philip; Nedwell, David B; Prosser, James I; Murrell, J Colin

    2002-08-01

    Stable-isotope probing (SIP) is a culture-independent technique that enables the isolation of DNA from micro-organisms that are actively involved in a specific metabolic process. In this study, SIP was used to characterize the active methylotroph populations in forest soil (pH 3.5) microcosms that were exposed to (13)CH(3)OH or (13)CH(4). Distinct (13)C-labelled DNA ((13)C-DNA) fractions were resolved from total community DNA by CsCl density-gradient centrifugation. Analysis of 16S rDNA sequences amplified from the (13)C-DNA revealed that bacteria related to the genera Methylocella, Methylocapsa, Methylocystis and Rhodoblastus had assimilated the (13)C-labelled substrates, which suggested that moderately acidophilic methylotroph populations were active in the microcosms. Enrichments targeted towards the active proteobacterial CH(3)OH utilizers were successful, although none of these bacteria were isolated into pure culture. A parallel analysis of genes encoding the key enzymes methanol dehydrogenase and particulate methane monooxygenase reflected the 16S rDNA analysis, but unexpectedly revealed sequences related to the ammonia monooxygenase of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) from the beta-subclass of the PROTEOBACTERIA: Analysis of AOB-selective 16S rDNA amplification products identified Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira sequences in the (13)C-DNA fractions, suggesting certain AOB assimilated a significant proportion of (13)CO(2), possibly through a close physical and/or nutritional association with the active methylotrophs. Other sequences retrieved from the (13)C-DNA were related to the 16S rDNA sequences of members of the Acidobacterium division, the beta-Proteobacteria and the order Cytophagales, which implicated these bacteria in the assimilation of reduced one-carbon compounds or in the assimilation of the by-products of methylotrophic carbon metabolism. Results from the (13)CH(3)OH and (13)CH(4) SIP experiments thus provide a rational basis for further

  19. An enriched stable isotope technique to estimate the availability of soil zinc to Lumbricus terrestris (L.) across a salinization gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Derek W; Lev, Steven M; Snodgrass, Joel W; Ownby, David R; Prince, Lisa M; Casey, Ryan E

    2011-03-01

    An enriched stable isotope approach was developed to evaluate Zn bioavailability to Lumbricus terrestris. The decrease in (68)Zn/(66) Zn in organ tissues was used to assess the relative magnitude of the bioavailable soil Zn pool. This tool was then used to specifically evaluate bioavailability as a function of soil cation distribution. Storm-water pond soils were modified using two treatment regimens whereby H(2)O-extractable Zn was varied either by different ZnCl(2) amendments or by constant ZnCl(2) amendment followed by varying the soil cation distribution through salt amendments (NaCl or CaCl(2)). Earthworms previously equilibrated in (68) Zn-spiked soil were introduced to experimental soils, and after 2 d, removed for analysis of isotopic ratios in specific tissues. Despite a wide range of H(2)O-extractable Zn values produced by the salt treatments (0.007-24.3 mg/kg), a significant relationship between Zn turnover rate in earthworm tissues and H(2)O-extractable Zn in the salt-treated soils was not observed. Rather, considering both treatment regimens, turnover rate better correlated with Zn present in broader pools, such as that extracted by 6M HNO(3). The bioavailability of trace metals to earthworms may be poorly characterized by loosely bound fractions such as the pore water. Additionally, the turnover rate of (68)Zn in anterior organ tissues may be an effective tool to evaluate the relative magnitude of the bioavailable soil Zn pool. Copyright © 2010 SETAC.

  20. Combined use of fallout radionuclides and stable isotopes for investigating soil erosion processes in a Moroccan watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmansour, Moncef; Mabit, Lionel; Zouagui, Anis; Amenzou, Nouredinne; Sabir, Mohamed; Nouira, Asmae; Brandt, Christian; Rasche, Frank; Naimi, Mustapha; Chikhaoui, Mohamed; Marah, Hamid; Benkdad, Azzouz; Taous, Fouad

    2015-04-01

    On-site and off-site impacts associated with land degradation by soil erosion are a major concern in Morocco. This study aimed to use fallout radionuclides (FRNs): Caesium-137 (137Cs), excess Lead-210 (210Pbex) and Beryllium-7 (7Be) in combination with carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes (i.e. Carbon-13 (13C) and Nitrogen-15 (15N)) in estimating soil loss in the "My Bouchta" watershed and the origin of sediment deposits in a downstream water reservoir (i.e. "Talembout"). Using 137Cs, the net soil erosion rate, for the "My Bouchta" watershed over a period of 50 years, was estimated at 23 t/ha/yr with a main sediment contribution (> 90{%}) from the agricultural fields, the forest and shrub fields contributing to less than 10{%} of the overall sediment production. This result indicates clearly the role and the effectiveness of the forest plantations and vegetation cover to protect soil resource against erosion processes. The use of the 210Pb^ex technique in three different fields further highlighted that soil erosion rates over a period of 100 years were lower than those obtained by 137Cs reflecting the increase of soil loss during the last decades. Tests of fallout 7Be associated with short rainfall events in four fields confirmed the results obtained with 137Cs, that areas under natural vegetation were protected against erosion. Sedimentation rates were assessed for the "Talembout" water reservoir and the mean values obtained for two sediment cores using 210Pbex and the Constant Rate of Supply (CRS) model were about 0.51-0.58 g/cm^2/yr. The obtained results showed also a significant yearly increase of the sedimentation rate. The results derived from the stable isotopes depth profiles indicated similar behavior for forest and shrub fields. Furthermore, strong correlation between δ13C and total C was observed for this type of land use while for the agricultural fields, the correlation was not significant. In addition, the sediment profile of N-15 indicated an

  1. In-situ studies of microbial CH4 oxidation efficiency in Arctic wetland soils. Applications of stable carbon isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preuss, Inken-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Arctic wetland soils are significant sources of the climate-relevant trace gas methane (CH 4 ). The observed accelerated warming of the Arctic is expected to cause deeper permafrost thawing followed by increased carbon mineralization and CH 4 formation in water-saturated permafrost-affected tundra soils thus creating a positive feedback to climate change. Aerobic CH 4 oxidation is regarded as the key process reducing CH 4 emissions from wetlands, but quantification of turnover rates has remained difficult so far. This study improved the in-situ quantification of microbial CH 4 oxidation efficiency in arctic wetland soils in Russia's Lena River Delta based on stable isotope signatures of CH 4 . In addition to the common practice of determining the stable isotope fractionation during oxidation, additionally the fractionation effect of diffusion, an important gas transport mechanism in tundra soils, was investigated for both saturated and unsaturated conditions. The isotopic fractionation factors α ox and α diff were used to calculate the CH 4 oxidation efficiency from the CH 4 stable isotope signatures of wet polygonal tundra soils of different hydrology. Further, the method was used to study the short-term effects of temperature increase with a climate manipulation experiment. For the first time, the stable isotope fractionation of CH 4 diffusion through water-saturated soils was determined with α diff = 1.001 ± 0.0002 (n = 3). CH 4 stable isotope fractionation during diffusion through air-filled pores of the investigated polygonal tundra soils was α diff = 1.013 ± 0.003 (n = 18). For the studied sites the fractionation factor for diffusion under saturated conditions α diff = 1.001 seems to be of utmost importance for the quantification of the CH 4 oxidation efficiency, since most of the CH 4 is oxidized in the saturated part at the aerobic-anaerobic interface. Furthermore, it was found that α ox differs widely between sites and horizons (mean α ox = 1

  2. Magnetic Cross-Linked Enzyme Aggregates (mCLEAs) of Candida antarctica Lipase: An Efficient and Stable Biocatalyst for Biodiesel Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Izquierdo, Álvaro; Picó, Enrique A.; López, Carmen; Serra, Juan L.; Llama, María J.

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme-catalyzed production of biodiesel is the object of extensive research due to the global shortage of fossil fuels and increased environmental concerns. Herein we report the preparation and main characteristics of a novel biocatalyst consisting of Cross-Linked Enzyme Aggregates (CLEAs) of Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) which are covalently bound to magnetic nanoparticles, and tackle its use for the synthesis of biodiesel from non-edible vegetable and waste frying oils. For this purpose, insolubilized CALB was covalently cross-linked to magnetic nanoparticles of magnetite which the surface was functionalized with –NH2 groups. The resulting biocatalyst combines the relevant catalytic properties of CLEAs (as great stability and feasibility for their reutilization) and the magnetic character, and thus the final product (mCLEAs) are superparamagnetic particles of a robust catalyst which is more stable than the free enzyme, easily recoverable from the reaction medium and reusable for new catalytic cycles. We have studied the main properties of this biocatalyst and we have assessed its utility to catalyze transesterification reactions to obtain biodiesel from non-edible vegetable oils including unrefined soybean, jatropha and cameline, as well as waste frying oil. Using 1% mCLEAs (w/w of oil) conversions near 80% were routinely obtained at 30°C after 24 h of reaction, this value rising to 92% after 72 h. Moreover, the magnetic biocatalyst can be easily recovered from the reaction mixture and reused for at least ten consecutive cycles of 24 h without apparent loss of activity. The obtained results suggest that mCLEAs prepared from CALB can become a powerful biocatalyst for application at industrial scale with better performance than those currently available. PMID:25551445

  3. Preparation of Stable Cross-Linked Enzyme Aggregates (CLEAs of a Ureibacillus thermosphaericus Esterase for Application in Malathion Removal from Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya V. Samoylova

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the active and stable cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs of the thermostable esterase estUT1 of the bacterium Ureibacillus thermosphaericus were prepared for application in malathion removal from municipal wastewater. Co-expression of esterase with an E. coli chaperone team (KJE, ClpB, and ELS increased the activity of the soluble enzyme fraction up to 200.7 ± 15.5 U mg−1. Response surface methodology (RSM was used to optimize the preparation of the CLEA-estUT1 biocatalyst to maximize its activity and minimize enzyme loss. CLEA-estUT1 with the highest activity of 29.4 ± 0.5 U mg−1 (90.6 ± 2.7% of the recovered activity was prepared with 65.1% (w/v ammonium sulfate, 120.6 mM glutaraldehyde, and 0.2 mM bovine serum albumin at 5.1 h of cross-linking. The biocatalyst has maximal activity at 80 °С and pH 8.0. Analysis of the properties of CLEA-estUT1 and free enzyme at 50–80 °C and pH 5.0–10.0 showed higher stability of the biocatalyst. CLEA-estUT1 showed marked tolerance against a number of chemicals and high operational stability and activity in the reaction of malathion hydrolysis in wastewater (up to 99.5 ± 1.4%. After 25 cycles of malathion hydrolysis at 37 °С, it retained 55.2 ± 1.1% of the initial activity. The high stability and reusability of CLEA-estUT1 make it applicable for the degradation of insecticides.

  4. Magnetic Cross-Linked Enzyme Aggregates (mCLEAs of Candida antarctica lipase: an efficient and stable biocatalyst for biodiesel synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Cruz-Izquierdo

    Full Text Available Enzyme-catalyzed production of biodiesel is the object of extensive research due to the global shortage of fossil fuels and increased environmental concerns. Herein we report the preparation and main characteristics of a novel biocatalyst consisting of Cross-Linked Enzyme Aggregates (CLEAs of Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB which are covalently bound to magnetic nanoparticles, and tackle its use for the synthesis of biodiesel from non-edible vegetable and waste frying oils. For this purpose, insolubilized CALB was covalently cross-linked to magnetic nanoparticles of magnetite which the surface was functionalized with -NH2 groups. The resulting biocatalyst combines the relevant catalytic properties of CLEAs (as great stability and feasibility for their reutilization and the magnetic character, and thus the final product (mCLEAs are superparamagnetic particles of a robust catalyst which is more stable than the free enzyme, easily recoverable from the reaction medium and reusable for new catalytic cycles. We have studied the main properties of this biocatalyst and we have assessed its utility to catalyze transesterification reactions to obtain biodiesel from non-edible vegetable oils including unrefined soybean, jatropha and cameline, as well as waste frying oil. Using 1% mCLEAs (w/w of oil conversions near 80% were routinely obtained at 30°C after 24 h of reaction, this value rising to 92% after 72 h. Moreover, the magnetic biocatalyst can be easily recovered from the reaction mixture and reused for at least ten consecutive cycles of 24 h without apparent loss of activity. The obtained results suggest that mCLEAs prepared from CALB can become a powerful biocatalyst for application at industrial scale with better performance than those currently available.

  5. Microbial food web mapping: linking carbon cycling and community structure in soils through pyrosequencing enabled stable isotope probing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, Daniel H. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Soil represents a massive reservoir of active carbon and climate models vary dramatically in predicting how this carbon will respond to climate change over the coming century. A major cause of uncertainty is that we still have a very limited understand the microorganisms that dominate the soil carbon cycle. The vast majority of soil microbes cannot be cultivated in the laboratory and the diversity of organisms and enzymes that participate in the carbon cycle is staggeringly complex. We have developed a new toolbox for exploring the carbon cycle and the metabolic and ecological characteristics of uncultivated microorganisms. The high-resolution nucleic acid stable isotope probing approach that we have developed makes it possible to characterize microbial carbon cycling dynamics in soil. The approach allows us to track multiple 13C-labeled substrates into thousands of microbial taxa over time. Using this approach we have discovered several major lineages of uncultivated microorganisms that participate in cellulose metabolism and are found widely in soils (including Verrucomicrobia and Chloroflexi, which have not previously been implicated as major players in the soil carbon cycle). Furthermore, isotopic labelling of nucleic acids enables community genomics and permits genome fragment binning for a majority of these cellulolytic microorganisms allowing us to explore the metabolic underpinnings of cellulose degradation. This approach has allowed us to describe unexpected dynamics of carbon metabolism with different microbial taxa exhibiting characteristic patterns of carbon substrate incorporation, indicative of distinct ecological strategies. The data we describe allows us to characterize the activity of novel microorganisms as they occur in the environment and these data provide a basis for understanding how the physiological traits of discrete microorganisms sum to govern the complex responses of the soil carbon cycle.

  6. Agregação e estabilidade de agregados do solo em sistemas agropecuários em Mato Grosso do Sul Soil aggregation and aggregate stability under crop-pasture systems in Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio Cesar Salton

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Sistemas de manejo do solo, incluindo lavouras em plantio direto, lavouras (soja em rotação com pastagens em plantio direto e pastagens permanentes (Brachiaria sp., foram avaliados quanto à agregação do solo e estabilidade dos agregados. Em três experimentos de longa duração (9 e 11 anos localizados em Mato Grosso do Sul, o solo foi amostrado nas camadas de 0 a 5, 5 a 10 e 10 a 20 cm, para determinação da estabilidade dos agregados em água e a seco. Foram calculados o diâmetro médio ponderado (DMP e o índice de estabilidade dos agregados (IEA. Em todos os experimentos, nos sistemas com pastagens, seja de forma isolada ou em rotação com lavouras, foi verificado maior volume do solo, constituindo agregados com tamanho superior a 4,76 mm. Os sistemas com pastagens também apresentaram maior DMP e maior IEA em todos os experimentos. O sistema apenas com lavouras apresentou, nos três experimentos, o maior volume de solo com agregados de tamanho entre 0,25 e 2,00 mm. Esses efeitos ocorreram de forma semelhante em todas as profundidades avaliadas. Entre os locais, observou-se o efeito do teor de argila na agregação, sendo maior em Maracaju e menor em Campo Grande. Foi observada estreita relação entre a estabilidade dos agregados e o teor de C no solo. A formação de macroagregados parece estar relacionada à presença de raízes, que são mais abundantes sob pastagem de gramíneas.Soil management systems, with crops under no-tillage (NT, crops (soybean in rotation with pastures under NT and permanent pastures (Brachiaria sp., were evaluated for soil aggregation and aggregate stability. Three long-term experiments (9 and 11 years in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul were sampled in the layers 0-5, 5-10 and 10-20 cm for determination of the aggregate stability in wet and dry sieving. The mean weight diameter (MWD and the aggregate stability index (IAS were calculated. In all experiments, the greatest soil volume was verified in the

  7. Stable isotope analysis (δ (13)C and δ (15)N) of soil nematodes from four feeding groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melody, Carol; Griffiths, Bryan; Dyckmans, Jens; Schmidt, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Soil nematode feeding groups are a long-established trophic categorisation largely based on morphology and are used in ecological indices to monitor and analyse the biological state of soils. Stable isotope ratio analysis ((13)C/(12)C and (15)N/(14)N, expressed as δ (13)C and δ (15)N) has provided verification of, and novel insights into, the feeding ecology of soil animals such as earthworms and mites. However, isotopic studies of soil nematodes have been limited to date as conventional stable isotope ratio analysis needs impractically large numbers of nematodes (up to 1,000) to achieve required minimum sample weights (typically >100 µg C and N). Here, micro-sample near-conventional elemental analysis-isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (μEA-IRMS) of C and N using microgram samples (typically 20 µg dry weight), was employed to compare the trophic position of selected soil nematode taxa from four feeding groups: predators (Anatonchus and Mononchus), bacterial feeders (Plectus and Rhabditis), omnivores (Aporcelaimidae and Qudsianematidae) and plant feeder (Rotylenchus). Free-living nematodes were collected from conventionally and organically managed arable soils. As few as 15 nematodes, for omnivores and predators, were sufficient to reach the 20 µg dry weight target. There was no significant difference in δ (15)N (p = 0.290) or δ (13)C (p = 0.706) between conventional and organic agronomic treatments but, within treatments, there was a significant difference in N and C stable isotope ratios between the plant feeder, Rotylenchus (δ (15)N = 1.08 to 3.22 mUr‰, δ (13)C = -29.58 to -27.87 mUr) and all other groups. There was an average difference of 9.62 mUr in δ (15)N between the plant feeder and the predator group (δ (15)N = 9.89 to 12.79 mUr, δ (13)C = -27.04 to -25.51 mUr). Isotopic niche widths were calculated as Bayesian derived standard ellipse areas and were smallest for the plant feeder (1.37 mUr(2)) and the predators (1.73 mUr(2)), but largest for

  8. Stable isotope analysis (δ13C and δ15N of soil nematodes from four feeding groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Melody

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil nematode feeding groups are a long-established trophic categorisation largely based on morphology and are used in ecological indices to monitor and analyse the biological state of soils. Stable isotope ratio analysis (13C/12C and 15N/14N, expressed as δ13C and δ15N has provided verification of, and novel insights into, the feeding ecology of soil animals such as earthworms and mites. However, isotopic studies of soil nematodes have been limited to date as conventional stable isotope ratio analysis needs impractically large numbers of nematodes (up to 1,000 to achieve required minimum sample weights (typically >100 µg C and N. Here, micro-sample near-conventional elemental analysis–isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (μEA–IRMS of C and N using microgram samples (typically 20 µg dry weight, was employed to compare the trophic position of selected soil nematode taxa from four feeding groups: predators (Anatonchus and Mononchus, bacterial feeders (Plectus and Rhabditis, omnivores (Aporcelaimidae and Qudsianematidae and plant feeder (Rotylenchus. Free-living nematodes were collected from conventionally and organically managed arable soils. As few as 15 nematodes, for omnivores and predators, were sufficient to reach the 20 µg dry weight target. There was no significant difference in δ15N (p = 0.290 or δ13C (p = 0.706 between conventional and organic agronomic treatments but, within treatments, there was a significant difference in N and C stable isotope ratios between the plant feeder, Rotylenchus (δ15N = 1.08 to 3.22 mUr‰, δ13C = –29.58 to –27.87 mUr and all other groups. There was an average difference of 9.62 mUr in δ15N between the plant feeder and the predator group (δ15N = 9.89 to 12.79 mUr, δ13C = –27.04 to –25.51 mUr. Isotopic niche widths were calculated as Bayesian derived standard ellipse areas and were smallest for the plant feeder (1.37 mUr2 and the predators (1.73 mUr2, but largest for omnivores (3.83 mUr2

  9. Relationship between climate and vegetation and the stable carbon isotope chemistry of soils in the eastern Mojave Desert, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amundson, R.G.; Chadwick, O.A.; Sowers, J.M.; Doner, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the stable C-isotope composition of the soil environment and modern climate and vegetation was determined empirically along a present-day climatic transect in the eastern Mojave Desert. The δ 13 C of the soil CO 2 and carbonates decreased with increasing elevation and plant density, even though plant assemblages at all elevations were isotopically similar. Several factors, including differences in the ratios of pedogenic of limestone calcite and differences in past vegetation, were considered as explanations of this trend, However, it appears that in the sparsely vegetated Mojave Desert, the δ 13 C of pedogenic carbonate is controlled by differences in plant density and biological activity. This relationship may provide a tool for assessing past vegetational densities, as long as the vegetation is isotopically homogeneous. (author)

  10. Compound-specific 15N stable isotope probing of N assimilation by the soil microbial biomass: a new methodological paradigm in soil N cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charteris, A. F.; Knowles, T. D. J.; Michaelides, K.; Evershed, R. P.

    2015-10-01

    A compound-specific nitrogen-15 stable isotope probing (15N-SIP) technique is described which allows investigation of the fate of inorganic- or organic-N amendments to soils. The technique uses gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) to determine the δ15N values of individual amino acids (AAs; determined as N-acetyl, O-isopropyl derivatives) as proxies of biomass protein production. The δ15N values are used together with AA concentrations to quantify N assimilation of 15N-labelled substrates by the soil microbial biomass. The utility of the approach is demonstrated through incubation experiments using inorganic 15N-labelled substrates ammonium (15NH4+) and nitrate (15NO3-) and an organic 15N-labelled substrate, glutamic acid (15N-Glu). Assimilation of all the applied substrates was undetectable based on bulk soil properties, i.e. % total N (% TN), bulk soil N isotope composition and AA concentrations, all of which remained relatively constant throughout the incubation experiments. In contrast, compound-specific AA δ15N values were highly sensitive to N assimilation, providing qualitative and quantitative insights into the cycling and fate of the applied 15N-labelled substrates. The utility of this 15N-AA-SIP technique is considered in relation to other currently available methods for investigating the microbially-mediated assimilation of nitrogenous substrates into the soil organic N pool. This approach will be generally applicable to the study of N cycling in any soil, or indeed, in any complex ecosystem.

  11. A Conceptual Approach to Assimilating Remote Sensing Data to Improve Soil Moisture Profile Estimates in a Surface Flux/Hydrology Model. 2; Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schamschula, Marius; Crosson, William L.; Inguva, Ramarao; Yates, Thomas; Laymen, Charles A.; Caulfield, John

    1998-01-01

    This is a follow up on the preceding presentation by Crosson. The grid size for remote microwave measurements is much coarser than the hydrological model computational grids. To validate the hydrological models with measurements we propose mechanisms to aggregate the hydrological model outputs for soil moisture to allow comparison with measurements. Weighted neighborhood averaging methods are proposed to facilitate the comparison. We will also discuss such complications as misalignment, rotation and other distortions introduced by a generalized sensor image.

  12. Population structure of manganese-oxidizing bacteria in stratified soils and properties of manganese oxide aggregates under manganese-complex medium enrichment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihong Yang

    Full Text Available Manganese-oxidizing bacteria in the aquatic environment have been comprehensively investigated. However, little information is available about the distribution and biogeochemical significance of these bacteria in terrestrial soil environments. In this study, stratified soils were initially examined to investigate the community structure and diversity of manganese-oxidizing bacteria. Total 344 culturable bacterial isolates from all substrata exhibited Mn(II-oxidizing activities at the range of 1 µM to 240 µM of the equivalent MnO2. The high Mn(II-oxidizing isolates (>50 mM MnO2 were identified as the species of phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Seven novel Mn(II-oxidizing bacterial genera (species, namely, Escherichia, Agromyces, Cellulomonas, Cupriavidus, Microbacterium, Ralstonia, and Variovorax, were revealed via comparative phylogenetic analysis. Moreover, an increase in the diversity of soil bacterial community was observed after the combined enrichment of Mn(II and carbon-rich complex. The phylogenetic classification of the enriched bacteria represented by predominant denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis bands, was apparently similar to culturable Mn(II-oxidizing bacteria. The experiments were further undertaken to investigate the properties of the Mn oxide aggregates formed by the bacterial isolates with high Mn(II-oxidizing activity. Results showed that these bacteria were closely encrusted with their Mn oxides and formed regular microspherical aggregates under prolonged Mn(II and carbon-rich medium enrichment for three weeks. The biotic oxidation of Mn(II to Mn(III/IV by these isolates was confirmed by kinetic examinations. X-ray diffraction assays showed the characteristic peaks of several Mn oxides and rhodochrosite from these aggregates. Leucoberbelin blue tests also verified the Mn(II-oxidizing activity of these aggregates. These results demonstrated that Mn oxides were formed at certain amounts under the

  13. Evaluation of stable isotopes of water to determine rainwater infilitration in soils under conservation reserve program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) is a USDA program introduced in 1985 to reduce soil erosion by increasing vegetative cover of highly erodible land. Participation in the CRP is done via contracts (10-15 years in length) and currently the total area of land under contract is set to decline as p...

  14. Disruption of mycorrhizal extraradical mycelium and changes in leaf water status and soil aggregate stability in rootbox-grown trifoliate orange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Ning eZou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizas possess well developed extraradical mycelium (ERM network that enlarge the surrounding soil for better acquisition of water and nutrients, besides soil aggregation. Distinction in ERM functioning was studied under a rootbox system, which consisted of root+hyphae and root-free hyphae compartments separated by 37-μm nylon mesh with an air gap. Trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata seedlings were inoculated with Funneliformis mosseae in root+hyphae compartment, and the ERM network was established between the two compartments. The ERM network of air gap was disrupted before 8 h of the harvest (one time disruption or multiple disruptions during seedlings acclimation. Our results showed that mycorrhizal inoculation induced a significant increase in growth (plant height, stem diameter, and leaf, stem, and root biomass and physiological characters (leaf relative water content, leaf water potential, and transpiration rate, irrespective of ERM status. Easily-extractable glomalin-related soil protein (EE-GRSP and total GRSP (T-GRSP concentration and mean weight diameter (MWD, an indicator of soil aggregate stability were significantly higher in mycorrhizosphere of root+hyphae and root-free hyphae compartments than non-mycorrhizosphere. One time disruption of ERM network did not influence plant growth and soil properties but only notably decreased leaf water. Periodical disruption of ERM network at weekly interval markedly inhibited the mycorrhizal roles on plant growth, leaf water, GRSP production, and MWD in root+hyphae and hyphae chambers. EE-GRSP was the most responsive GRSP fraction to changes in leaf water and MWD under root+hyphae and hyphae conditions. It suggests that effect of peridical disruption of ERM network was more impactful than one-time disruption of ERM network with regard to leaf water, plant growth, and aggregate stability responses, thereby, implying ERM network aided in developing the host plant metabolically

  15. The ability of selected pupal parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) to locate stable fly hosts in a soiled equine bedding substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzer, Jimmy B; Kaufman, Phillip E; Geden, Christopher J; Hogsette, Jerome A

    2011-02-01

    The ability of Spalangia cameroni Perkins, Spalangia endius Walker, and Muscidifurax raptorellus Kogan and Legner to locate and attack stable fly hosts was evaluated under laboratory conditions. Postfeeding third-instar stable fly larvae were released and allowed to pupate in two arena types: large 4.8 liter chambers containing a field-collected, soiled equine bedding substrate; or 120-ml plastic cups containing wood chips. At the time of fly pupariation, parasitoids were released and permitted 72 h to locate and attack hosts. On average, parasitism rates of freely accessible stable fly pupae in cups were not significantly different between parasitoid species. However, parasitism rates in chambers containing either Spalangia spp. were ≈50-fold more than M. raptorellus. Additional intraspecies analysis revealed that parasitism rates both by S. cameroni and S. endius were not significantly different when pupae were freely accessible or within bedding, whereas M. raptorellus attacked significantly more pupae in cups than in the larger chambers where hosts were distributed within bedding. These results suggest that Spalangia spp. are more suited to successfully locate and attack hosts in habitats created by equine husbandry in Florida. Therefore, commercially available parasitoid mixtures containing Muscidifurax spp. may be ineffective if used as a control measure at Florida equine facilities. © 2011 Entomological Society of America

  16. Sensitivity of catchment-aggregated estimates of soil carbon dioxide efflux to topography under different climatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, K. L.; Creed, I. F.; Beall, F. D.; BourbonnièRe, R. A.

    2008-09-01

    Soil respiration (Rs) is an important component of regional carbon budgets in forested landscapes. Within a sugar maple forest on the Algoma Highlands of the Canadian Shield, mosaics of topographic features create gradients in environmental conditions and carbon pools that influence the pattern of Rs within the region. The sensitivity of catchment-aggregated Rs (CAR) to different spatial partitioning schemes of the landscape under different climate scenarios was examined in two contrasting catchments: one dominated by uplands (C35); the other containing uplands, critical transition zones (transiently saturated areas in isolated depressions or adjacent to wetlands, streams and lakes) and wetlands. CAR was estimated using a six topographic feature representation of the catchments including crest, backslope, footslope, toeslope, inner and outer wetland. CAR was underestimated (-7.4%) or overestimated (30.8%) if coarser spatial partitions were used, but the amount of error differed between catchments and with climatic conditions. A single feature (upland) partitioning scheme performed poorly under all climatic conditions (warm-wet, warm-dry, cool-wet and cool-dry). A two feature (upland and wetland) partitioning scheme showed improvement, but a partitioning scheme with a minimum of three features (upland, transition and wetland) was needed for accurate estimates of CAR in topographically varying catchments. The critical transition zone had the highest rates of Rs under all climate scenarios, and the critical transition zone and wetland became increasingly larger contributors to CAR under warmer and drier conditions. These observations point to the importance of accounting for the differential contribution of topographic features to Rs in carbon budget models. Failure to do so may lead to inaccurate estimates of landscape-scale Rs.

  17. Estabilidad estructural y P en fracciones de agregados en la cuenca del Aº El Divisorio (Coronel Pringles, BA Structural stability and phosphorus in soil aggregate fractions in El Divisorio stream catchment area (Coronel Pringles, Buenos Aires province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Cacchiarelli

    2008-07-01

    aggregates. Sixteen locations were selected along the stream in farmers' fields. Soil samples from the surface 5 cm-layer were collected in the upper, intermediate and lower positions (L, M and B respectively on each location. Structural stability was determined by the difference between dry and wet mean weight diameters. Soil Po and Pi were measured in each wet aggregate fraction. The values of structural stability were high; however, a great amount of fine material (<1 mm was present, probably as a consequence of the destruction of less stable aggregates due to agricultural mechanic forces. A large concentration of P was present in this fraction, representing around 30% of total soil P. Pi concentration was similar among all fractions in L and M (200-240 mg P kg-1 while it was significantly higher in B (360-400 mg P kg-1. These differences may be attributed to finer texture and weaker stability in the B positions. Differences among landscape positions were less evident for Po, although greater concentrations were encountered in B in most aggregate fractions. According to these results, P losses could be of significant magnitudes even at low storm intensities, because the small soil particles that are carried in runoff water contribute with great amounts of P. Management practices tending to reduce the impact of agricultural P on water quality should be aimed to reduce the risk related to B positions due to their higher P content and lower structural stability.

  18. Aggregates characterization of soils under cultivation in cerrado, MSCaracterização dos agregados em solos sob cultivo no cerrado, MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itaynara Batista

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Impacts on the environment and soil biological activity result in changes in the processes of formation of biogenic and fisiogenic aggregates. Aiming to evaluate the influence on physical and biological genesis of aggregates of Cerrado soils and determine the main environmental factors that determine the characteristics of households in the area of production under integrated crop-livestock (ICL, was developed this study in Farm Cabeceira, Maracaju-MS, in areas of ICL. The areas evaluated were: Savana, pasture/maize, corn/cotton and cotton/soybeans being evaluated during the dry (May/2009 and rainy (March 2010 season. To identify the pathways of aggregation were used morphological patterns, and established three clusters: fisiogenic, biogenic and intermediates. The aggregates were analyzed for exchangeable cations, carbon and aggregate stability, soil was analyzed for the exchangeable cations, particle size fractionation of soil organic matter, oxidizable fractions of total organic carbon, particle size analysis and soil macrofauna. In all areas studied, in the dry season, the highest values were quantified aggregate intermediates, while in the rainy season, in general, no differences were observed aggregates formed by different routes in areas except cotton/soybeans. The aggregates showed positive correlation with biogenic carbon and were found in lesser amounts compared to fisiogenic and intermediates. The different types of aggregates formed, besides having different characteristics morphological also differ as to chemical characteristics. Impactos sobre o ambiente do solo e a atividade biológica resultam em alterações nos processos de formação de agregados biogênicos e fisiogênicos. Com o objetivo de avaliar a influência física e biológica na gênese de agregados dos solos do Cerrado, bem como determinar quais os principais fatores do ambiente que determinam as características dos agregados em área de produção sob sistema de

  19. Morfologia de agregados do solo avaliada por meio de análise de imagens Morphology of soil aggregates evaluated by images analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Olszevski

    2004-10-01

    deterioration of soil physical properties, mainly due to modifications in the soil structure pattern. Once the structural changes could affect the morphology aggregates in different ways, the search for new methods of studying soil macro-morphological characteristics must be prioritized to allow the observation of modified characteristics in cultivated soils. Therefore, this study was carried out to adapt and test a digital method for a qualitative macro-morphological analysis of soil aggregates of Rodhic Haplustox in samples taken in 1998, aiming to detect morphological modifications caused by human activities. From an original set of eleven, five replicated treatments were selected: no till, cinzel plow, heavy disk harrow, disk plow and chisel plow, carried out annually. The shape of the different soil aggregates was from images obtained using a scanner (HP 6100C with 1200 dpi optical resolution which were then processed by the computer program UTHSCSA Image Tool. This program furnishes values of different aggregate indexes: roundness, compactness and lengthiness. The roundness index depends on the perimeter measurement (external roughness and the compactness and lengthiness indexes depend on the measurement of the length of the longest axle (long edges. Generally, the management systems used during three consecutive years did not modify the aggregate morphology of the clayey Rodhic Haplustox for the analyzed variables. Image analysis sensitively detected alterations in soil aggregate morphology promising considerable usefulness as a novel tool for on soil structure studies.

  20. Elevated CO2 and Tree Species Affect Microbial  Activity and Associated Aggregate Stability in Soil  Amended with Litter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwan M. J. Al‐Maliki

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available (1 Elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2 may affect organic inputs to woodland soils with potential consequences for C dynamics and associated aggregation; (2 The Bangor Free Air Concentration Enrichment experiment compared ambient (330 ppmv and elevated (550 ppmv CO2 regimes over four growing seasons (2005–2008 under Alnus glutinosa, Betula pendula and Fagus sylvatica. Litter from the experiment (autumn 2008 and Lumbricus terrestris were added to mesocosm soils. Microbial properties and aggregate stability were investigated in soil and earthworm casts. Soils taken from the field experiment in spring 2009 were also investigated; (3 eCO2 litter had lower N and higher C:N ratios. F. sylvatica and B. pendula litter had lower N and P than A. glutinosa; F. sylvatica had higher cellulose. In mesocosms, eCO2 litter decreased respiration, mineralization constant (respired C:total organic C and soluble carbon in soil but not earthworm casts; microbial‐C and fungal hyphal length differed by species (A. glutinosa = B. pendula > F. sylvatica not CO2 regime. eCO2 increased respiration in field aggregates but increased stability only under F. sylvatica; (4 Lower litter quality under eCO2 may restrict its initial decomposition, affecting C stabilization in aggregates. Later resistant materials may support microbial activity and increase aggregate stability. In woodland, C and soil aggregation dynamics may alter under eCO2, but outcomes may be influenced by tree species and earthworm activity.

  1. Colloid Release From Differently Managed Loess Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Schjønning, Per; Møldrup, Per

    2012-01-01

    The content of water-dispersible colloids (WDC) in a soil can have a major impact on soil functions, such as permeability to water and air, and on soil strength, which can impair soil fertility and workability. In addition, the content of WDC in the soil may increase the risk of nutrient loss...... and of colloid-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing compounds. In the present study, soils from the Bad Lauchstadt long-term static fertilizer experiment with different management histories were investigated to relate basic soil properties to the content of WDC, the content of water-stable aggregates (WSA......), and aggregate tensile strength. Our studies were carried out on soils on identical parent material under controlled management conditions, enabling us to study the long-term effects on soil physical properties with few explanatory variables in play. The content of WDC and the amount of WSA were measured...

  2. Micromorphological analysis on the influence of the soil mineral composition on short-term aggregation in semi-arid Mediterranean soils Analisis micromorfológico de la influencia de la composición mineral del suelo sobre la agregación a corto plazo en suelos semiáridos de clima mediterráneo Análise micromorfológica da influencia da composição mineral do solo na agregação a curto prazo em solos semiáridos de clima mediterrânico

    OpenAIRE

    Inigo Virto; Oihane Fernández-Ugalde; Pierre Barré; Maria José Imaz; Alberto Enrique; Paloma Bescansa; Rosa María Poch

    2013-01-01

    Aggregation in soils is the result of the interaction of the soil organic components and soil minerals. The reactivity of the mineral phase is acknowledged to interfere with aggregates formation and stabilization, but its influence on aggregation in semi-arid Mediterranean soils remains mostly unknown. In this study, we used micromorphological analysis of aggregates formed in a 28-d incubation in two agricultural soils differing only in the composition of the mineral phase in the upper Ap hor...

  3. Membrane inlet laser spectroscopy to measure H and O stable isotope compositions of soil and sediment pore water with high sample throughput.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerter, Erik J; Perelet, Alexei; Pardyjak, Eric; Bowen, Gabriel

    2017-01-15

    The fast and accurate measurement of H and O stable isotope compositions (δ 2 H and δ 18 O values) of soil and sediment pore water remains an impediment to scaling-up the application of these isotopes in soil and vadose hydrology. Here we describe a method and its calibration to measuring soil and sediment pore water δ 2 H and δ 18 O values using a water vapor-permeable probe coupled to an isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy analyzer. We compare the water vapor probe method with a vapor direct equilibration method, and vacuum extraction with liquid water analysis. At a series of four study sites in a managed desert agroecosystem in the eastern Great Basin of North America, we use the water vapor probe to measure soil depth profiles of δ 2 H and δ 18 O values. We demonstrate the accuracy of the method to be equivalent to direct headspace equilibration and vacuum extraction techniques, with increased ease of use in its application, and with analysis throughput rates greater than 7 h -1 . The soil depth H and O stable isotope profiles show that soil properties such as contrasting soil texture and pedogenic soil horizons control the shape of the isotope profiles, which are reflective of local evaporation conditions within the soils. We conclude that this water vapor probe method has potential to yield large numbers of H and O stable isotope analyses of soil and sediment waters within shorter timeframes and with increased ease than with currently existing methods. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Spectral analysis software improves confidence in plant and soil water stable isotope analyses performed by isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, A G; Goldsmith, G R; Matimati, I; Dawson, T E

    2011-08-30

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for large errors to occur when analyzing waters containing organic contaminants using isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS). In an attempt to address this problem, IRIS manufacturers now provide post-processing spectral analysis software capable of identifying samples with the types of spectral interference that compromises their stable isotope analysis. Here we report two independent tests of this post-processing spectral analysis software on two IRIS systems, OA-ICOS (Los Gatos Research Inc.) and WS-CRDS (Picarro Inc.). Following a similar methodology to a previous study, we cryogenically extracted plant leaf water and soil water and measured the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of identical samples by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and IRIS. As an additional test, we analyzed plant stem waters and tap waters by IRMS and IRIS in an independent laboratory. For all tests we assumed that the IRMS value represented the "true" value against which we could compare the stable isotope results from the IRIS methods. Samples showing significant deviations from the IRMS value (>2σ) were considered to be contaminated and representative of spectral interference in the IRIS measurement. Over the two studies, 83% of plant species were considered contaminated on OA-ICOS and 58% on WS-CRDS. Post-analysis, spectra were analyzed using the manufacturer's spectral analysis software, in order to see if the software correctly identified contaminated samples. In our tests the software performed well, identifying all the samples with major errors. However, some false negatives indicate that user evaluation and testing of the software are necessary. Repeat sampling of plants showed considerable variation in the discrepancies between IRIS and IRMS. As such, we recommend that spectral analysis of IRIS data must be incorporated into standard post-processing routines. Furthermore, we suggest that the results from spectral analysis be

  5. Old and stable soil organic matter is not necessarily chemically recalcitrant: Implications for modeling concepts and temperature sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleber, M.; Nico, P.S.; Plante, A.; Filley, T.; Kramer, M.; Swanston, C.; Sollins, P.

    2010-03-01

    Soil carbon turnover models generally divide soil carbon into pools with varying intrinsic decomposition rates. Although these decomposition rates are modified by factors such as temperature, texture, and moisture, they are rationalized by assuming chemical structure is a primary controller of decomposition. In the current work, we use near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy in combination with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and alkaline cupric oxide (CuO) oxidation to explore this assumption. Specifically, we examined material from the 2.3-2.6 kg L{sup -1} density fraction of three soils of different type (Oxisol, Alfisol, Inceptisol). The density fraction with the youngest {sup 14}C age (Oxisol, 107 years) showed the highest relative abundance of aromatic groups and the lowest O-alkyl C/aromatic C ratio as determined by NEXAFS. Conversely, the fraction with the oldest C (Inceptisol, 680 years) had the lowest relative abundance of aromatic groups and highest O-alkyl C/aromatic C ratio. This sample also had the highest proportion of thermally labile materials as measured by DSC, and the highest ratio of substituted fatty acids to lignin phenols as indicated by CuO oxidation. Therefore, the organic matter of the Inceptisol sample, with a {sup 14}C age associated with 'passive' pools of carbon (680 years), had the largest proportion of easily metabolizable organic molecules with low thermodynamic stability, whereas the organic matter of the much younger Oxisol sample (107 years) had the highest proportion of supposedly stable organic structures considered more difficult to metabolize. Our results demonstrate that C age is not necessarily related to molecular structure or thermodynamic stability, and we suggest that soil carbon models would benefit from viewing turnover rate as codetermined by the interaction between substrates, microbial actors, and abiotic driving variables. Furthermore, assuming that old carbon is composed

  6. Effects of long-term soil management on the mutual interaction among soil organic matter, microbial activity and aggregates in vineyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vineyard soils are often sensitive to soil organic matter (SOM) loss and topsoil degradation. Management practices to enhance soil conservation principally focus on increasing carbon (C) inputs whereas mitigating impacts of disturbance through reduced tillage has been considered less commonly. Also,...

  7. Response of microbial extracellular enzyme activities and r- vs. K- selected microorganisms to elevated atmospheric CO2 depends on soil aggregate size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorodnikov, Maxim; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatskiy, Sergey; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Increased belowground carbon (C) transfer by plant roots under elevated atmospheric CO2 and the contrasting environment in soil macro- and microaggregates could affect properties of the microbial community in the rhizosphere. We evaluated the effect of 5 years of elevated CO2 (550 ppm) on four extracellular enzymes: ß-glucosidase, chitinase, phosphatase, and sulfatase along with the contribution of fast- (r-strategists) and slow-growing microorganisms (K-strategists) in soil aggregates. We fractionated the bulk soil from the ambient and elevated CO2 treatments of FACE-Hohenheim (Stuttgart) into large macro- (>2 mm), small macro- (0.25-2.00 mm), and microaggregates (production after substrate amendment. After adding glucose, enzyme activities under elevated CO2 were 1.2-1.9-fold higher than under ambient CO2. In addition, µ values were significantly higher under elevated than ambient CO2 for bulk soil, small macroaggregates, and microaggregates. Based on changes in µ, GMB, and lag-period, we conclude that elevated atmospheric CO2 stimulated the r-selected microorganisms, especially in soil microaggregates. In contrast, significantly higher chitinase activity in bulk soil and in large macroaggregates under elevated CO2 revealed an increased contribution of fungi to turnover processes. We conclude that quantitative and qualitative changes of C input by plants into the soil at elevated CO2 affect microbial community functioning, but not its total content. An increase in r-selected microorganisms could accelerate C turnover in terrestrial ecosystems under a future CO2-elevated atmosphere.

  8. Micro-arthropod communities under human disturbance: is taxonomic aggregation a valuable tool for detecting multivariate change? Evidence from Mediterranean soil oribatid coenoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Tancredi; Migliorini, Massimo

    2006-07-01

    Animal communities are sensitive to environmental disturbance, and several multivariate methods have recently been developed to detect changes in community structure. The complex taxonomy of soil invertebrates constrains the use of the community level in monitoring environmental changes, since species identification requires expertise and time. However, recent literature data on marine communities indicate that little multivariate information is lost in the taxonomic aggregation of species data to high rank taxa. In the present paper, this hypothesis was tested on two oribatid mite (Oribatida, Acari) assemblages under two different kinds of disturbance: metal pollution and fires. Results indicate that data sets built at the genus and family systematic rank can detect the effects of disturbance with little loss of information. This is an encouraging result in view of the use of the community level as a preliminary tool for describing patterns of human-disturbed soil ecosystems.

  9. The CSSIAR v.1.00 Software: A new tool based on SIAR to assess soil redistribution using Compound Specific Stable Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergio, de los Santos-Villalobos; Claudio, Bravo-Linares; dos Anjos Roberto, Meigikos; Renan, Cardoso; Max, Gibbs; Andrew, Swales; Lionel, Mabit; Gerd, Dercon

    Soil erosion is one of the biggest challenges for food production around the world. Many techniques have been used to evaluate and mitigate soil degradation. Nowadays isotopic techniques are becoming a powerful tool to assess soil apportionment. One of the innovative techniques used is the Compound Specific Stable Isotopes (CSSI) analysis, which has been used to track down sediments and specify their sources by the isotopic signature of δ13 C in specific fatty acids. The application of this technique on soil apportionment has been recently developed, however there is a lack of user-friendly Software for data processing and interpretation. The aim of this article is to introduce a new open source tool for working with data sets generated by the use of the CSSI technique to assess soil apportionment, called the CSSIARv1.00 Software

  10. The CSSIAR v.1.00 Software: A new tool based on SIAR to assess soil redistribution using Compound Specific Stable Isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de los Santos-Villalobos Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion is one of the biggest challenges for food production around the world. Many techniques have been used to evaluate and mitigate soil degradation. Nowadays isotopic techniques are becoming a powerful tool to assess soil apportionment. One of the innovative techniques used is the Compound Specific Stable Isotopes (CSSI analysis, which has been used to track down sediments and specify their sources by the isotopic signature of δ13C in specific fatty acids. The application of this technique on soil apportionment has been recently developed, however there is a lack of user-friendly Software for data processing and interpretation. The aim of this article is to introduce a new open source tool for working with data sets generated by the use of the CSSI technique to assess soil apportionment, called the CSSIARv1.00 Software

  11. Análisis de la estabilidad de agregados por el método de le bissonnais en tres órdenes de suelos Application of the le bissonnais method to assess aggregate stability in three soils orders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Adrián Gabioud

    2011-12-01

    ­gregación, propios de cada suelo y sistemas productivos que, mediante la determinación de valores umbrales permitirá conocer tendencias del recurso y así generar alertas tempranas de procesos de degradación.Since aggregate stability is a dynamic characteristic, it is considered a sensitive indicator of a soil undergoing a process of recovery or degradation. In Argentina, different laboratory methods have been used to analyze the aggregate stability variation with respect to soil use. Le Bissonnais method, which is based on the classic Henin method, was developed by the INRA of France. This method provides the mean weighted diameter (DMP of stable aggregates with three pretreatments: fast wetting (DMPE, mechanical disintegration followed by re-wetting with ethanol (DMPD, and slow wetting (DMPC. The average value is then used to determine a value that summarizes the information (DMPm. At a global level, this method has been used on different soils under varying climatic conditions. However, since its performance on Argentinian soils is not yet known, the aims of this work were: i to evaluate the method of Le Bissonnais as an indicator of degradation in three types of soil (Mollisol, Vertisol and Alfisol with different degrees of intervention; ii to relate the DMP with organic carbon content; iii to correlate the methodologies of Le Bissonnais and Hénin and iv to quantify the time consumed by the aggregate stability procedure. Le Bissonnais method discriminated different use and management conditions in the three soils, reflecting trends towards either deterioration or recovery. We found a significant and positive relationship between carbon content and aggregate stability (R²=0.30, and a significant correlation between both methods (r=0.51. The latter varied according to the soil, existing a high degree of correlation in the Mollisols, an intermediate degree of correlation in the Alfisol and no correlation in the Vertisol. There were associations between the coefficients of

  12. Differential soil water sourcing of managed Loblolly Pine and Sweet Gum revealed by stable isotopes in the Upper Coastal Plain, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockman, L. E.; Younger, S. E.; Jackson, C. R.; McDonnell, J.; Janzen, K. F.

    2017-12-01

    Stable isotope signatures of stem water can illuminate where in the soil profile different types of trees are accessing soil water and thereby contribute to our understanding of water movement through the soil plant atmosphere continuum. The objective of this study was to use 2H and 18O isotopes to characterize water sources of fourteen-year-old intensively managed Loblolly Pine and Sweet Gum stands in replicated (n=3) paired plots. In order to differentiate the isotopic signatures of tree and soil water, both species and five soil depths were sampled monthly for one year. Tree sap and soil water were extracted cryogenically and their isotopic signatures were determined. Although plant water uptake is generally considered a non-fractionating process, our dataset suggests a source of fractionation in 2H signatures in both species and during most of the thirteen sampling events. As a result, only the 18O isotopic data were used to determine the vertical distribution of soil water contributions to stem water. Statistically, we grouped the five soil sampling depths into three isotopic horizons. Shallow, intermediate and deep soil represent sampling depths of 0-10cm, 30-70cm and 100-125cm, respectively. These isotopic horizons were used in a direct inference approach and Bayesian mixing model analysis to determine the origin of stem water. In this study, Loblolly Pine used more water from intermediate and deep soil while Sweet Gum used more water from shallow and intermediate soil. In the winter months, January through March, Loblolly Pine transpired primarily deep soil where as Sweet Gum mainly utilized shallow soil for transpiration. These results indicate that both species have opportunistic water use patterns with seasonal variation.

  13. Quantitative analysis of liquid penetration kinetics and slaking of aggregates as related to solid-liquid interfacial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Marc-O.; Woche, Susanne K.; Bachmann, Jörg

    2012-06-01

    SummaryAggregate stability is frequently shown to be enhanced by strong soil water repellency, however, there is limited systematic evidence on this effect for moderately (subcritically) water repellent soils. This study aimed to investigate the specific effects of interfacial properties on the liquid penetration kinetics in relation to the stability of subcritically water repellent aggregates (4-6.3 mm) from various arable and forest soils against breakdown by slaking. In contrast to many other studies, where aggregate stability was determined by wet sieving, we here assessed the stability by immersion of air-dry aggregates in water-ethanol solutions with surface tensions ranging from 30 to 70 mN m-1. This approach allowed a highly sensitive discrimination of different stability levels and the determination of breakdown kinetics also for less stable aggregates. Interfacial properties were characterized in terms of contact angle measured on crushed aggregates, θc, and calculated for intact aggregates, θi, based on infiltration measurements with water and ethanol. Aggregate stability turned out to be higher in forest soils compared to arable soils with topsoil aggregates generally found to be more stable than subsoil aggregates. For water repellent aggregates, characterized by contact angles >40° and low water infiltration rates (0.25 mm3 s-0.5) more than 80% of the aggregates were disrupted. In accordance, we found a close relationship between aggregate stability and wettability with differences between θc and θi being generally small. In addition, aggregate stability turned out to be related to organic carbon content. However, correlation analysis revealed that both persistence of aggregate stability and kinetics of aggregate breakdown were more strongly affected by the contact angle, θc (r = 0.90 and r = -0.83, respectively) and θi (r = 0.89 and r = -0.76, respectively) than the organic carbon content (r = 0.62 and -0.52, respectively), suggesting that

  14. Biological and physical factors controlling aggregate stability under different climatic conditions in Southern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ángel Gabarrón-Galeote, Miguel; Damián Ruiz-Sinoga, Jose; Francisco Martinez-Murillo, Juan; Lavee, Hanoch

    2013-04-01

    Soil aggregation is a key factor determining the soil structure. The presence of stable aggregates is essential to maintain a good soil structure, that in turn plays an important role in sustaining agricultural productivity and preserving environmental quality. A wide range of physical and biological soil components are involved in the aggregate formation and stabilization, namely clay mineral content; the quantity and quality of organic matter, that can be derived from plants, fungal hyphae, microorganism and soil animals; and the soil water content. Climatic conditions, through their effect on soil water content, vegetation cover and organic matter content, are supposed to affect soil aggregation. Thus the main objective of this research is to analyse the effect of organic matter, clay content and soil water content on aggregate stability along a climatic transect in Southern Spain. This study was conducted in four catchments along a pluviometric gradient in the South of Spain (rainfall depth decreases from west to east from more than 1000 mm year-1 to less than 300 mm year-1) and was based on a methodology approximating the climatic gradient in Mediterranean conditions. The selected sites shared similar conditions of geology, topography and soil use, which allowed making comparisons among them and relating the differences to the pluviometric conditions. In February 2007, 250 disturbed and undisturbed samples from the first 5cm of the soil were collected along the transect. We measured the aggregate stability, organic matter, clay content and bulk density of every sample. In the field we measured rainfall, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind direction, solar radiation, potential evapotranspiration, soil water content, vegetation cover and presence of litter. Our results suggest that aggregate stability is a property determined by a great number of highly variable factors, which can make extremely difficult to predict its behavior taking in

  15. How do soil types affect stable isotope ratios of 2H and 18O under evaporation: A Fingerprint of the Niipele subbasin of the Cuvelai - Etosha basin, Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaj, Marcel; Beyer, Matthias; Hamutoko, Josefina; Uugulu, Shoopi; Wanke, Heike; Koeniger, Paul; Kuells, Christoph; Lohe, Christoph; Himmelsbach, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Northern Namibia is a region with high population growth, limited water resources and a transboundary aquifer system where groundwater recharge and groundwater flow processes are not well understood. This study is an interdisciplinary approach within the frame of SASSCAL (Southern African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management) to improve the understanding of links between hydrological, geochemical and ecological processes to locate areas that contribute to recharge a shallow aquifer system in the Cuvelai-Etosha basin. Results of a field campaign are presented, conducted in November 2013 which is the first of a series planned between the years 2013 and 2016. Soil samples were taken in the semi-arid subbasin of the Cuvelai Etosha surface water basin before the rainy season. Potential evaporation, temperature measurements and infiltration tests were performed at two sites with different soil characteristics. Soil samples were taken under natural conditions to a maximum depth of 4 meters. Additionally to environmental isotope signals (stable isotopes 2H, and 18O and water of known isotopic composition (local groundwater) has been applied to the same plots. Soil samples were taken to a depth of 1 m with an interval of 10 cm after 24 and 48 hours for an investigation of evaporation impact on stable isotope ratios. The soil water is extracted cryogenically from the soil samples in the laboratory and subsequently analyzed using a Picarro L2120-i cavity-ringdown (CRD) water vapor analyzer after vaporization. Results of the direct measurement of different soil types indicate that evaporation from a saturated soil can exceed potential evaporation from an open water surface1. This implies, alternative methods are needed for the determination of evaporation which will be discussed here. 1Brutsaert W.; Parlanget M.B. (1998): Hydrologic cycle explains the evaporation paradox. In: Nature (396), p. 30.

  16. Investigating the Relationship Between Soil Water Mobility and Stable Isotope Composition with Implications for the Ecohydrologic Separation Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuler, J.; McNamara, J. P.; Benner, S. G.; Kohn, M. J.; Evans, S.

    2017-12-01

    The ecohydrologic separation (ES) hypothesis states that streams and plants return different soil water compartments to the atmosphere and that these compartments bear distinct isotopic compositions that can be used to infer soil water mobility. Recent studies have found isotopic evidence for ES in a variety of ecosystems, though interpretations of these data vary. ES investigations frequently suffer from low sampling frequencies as well as incomplete or missing soil moisture and matric potential data to support assumptions of soil water mobility. We sampled bulk soil water every 2-3 weeks in the upper 1 m of a hillslope profile from May 2016 to July 2017 in a semi-arid watershed outside Boise, ID. Twig samples of three plant species were also collected concurrently. Plant and soil water samples extracted via cryogenic vacuum distillation were analyzed for δ2H and δ18O composition. Soil moisture and soil matric potential sensors were installed at five and four depths in the profile, respectively. Shallow bulk soil water was progressively enriched in both isotopes over the growing season and plotted along a soil evaporation line in a plot of δ2H versus δ18O. Plant water during the growing season plotted below both the Local Meteoric Water Line and soil evaporation line. Plant water isotopic composition could not be traced to any source sampled in this study. Additionally, soil moisture and matric potential data revealed that soils were well-drained and that mobile soil water was unavailable throughout most of the growing season at the depths sampled. Soil water isotopic composition alone failed to predict mobility as observed in soil moisture and matric potential data. These results underscore the need for standard hydrologic definitions for the mobile and immobile compartments of soil water in future studies of the ES hypothesis and ecohydrologic processes in general.

  17. Year-round metagenomes reveal remarkably stable microbial communities in agricultural soils and novel ammonia oxidizers responding to fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insight to what underlies the seasonal dynamics of indigenous soil microbial communities in agricultural soils, especially after major activities such as nitrogen fertilization, remain elusive. More detailed understanding of population dynamics will have important implications for modeling efforts a...

  18. Sources of variability in fatty acid (FA) biomarkers in the application of compound-specific stable isotopes (CSSIs) to soil and sediment fingerprinting and tracing: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiffarth, D.G.; Petticrew, E.L.; Owens, P.N.; Lobb, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    Determining soil redistribution and sediment budgets in watersheds is often challenging. One of the methods for making such determinations employs soil and sediment fingerprinting techniques, using sediment properties such as geochemistry, fallout radionuclides, and mineral magnetism. These methods greatly improve the estimation of erosion and deposition within a watershed, but are limited when determining land use-based soil and sediment movement. Recently, compound-specific stable isotopes (CSSIs), which employ fatty acids naturally occurring in the vegetative cover of soils, offer the possibility of refining fingerprinting techniques based on land use, complementing other methods that are currently in use. The CSSI method has been met with some success; however, challenges still remain with respect to scale and resolution due to a potentially large degree of biological, environmental and analytical uncertainty. By better understanding the source of tracers used in CSSI work and the inherent biochemical variability in those tracers, improvement in sample design and tracer selection is possible. Furthermore, an understanding of environmental and analytical factors affecting the CSSI signal will lead to refinement of the approach and the ability to generate more robust data. This review focuses on sources of biological, environmental and analytical variability in applying CSSI to soil and sediment fingerprinting, and presents recommendations based on past work and current research in this area for improving the CSSI technique. A recommendation, based on current information available in the literature, is to use very-long chain saturated fatty acids and to avoid the use of the ubiquitous saturated fatty acids, C 16 and C 18 . - Highlights: • Compound-specific stable isotopes (CSSIs) of carbon may be used as soil tracers. • The variables affecting CSSI data are: biological, environmental and analytical. • Understanding sources of variability will lead to more

  19. Soil aggregation and bacterial community structure as affected by tillage and cover cropping in the Brazilian Cerrados

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peixoto, R. S.; Coutinho, H. L. C.; Madari, B.; Machado, P. L. O. A.; Rumjanek, N. G.; Van Elsas, J. D.; Seldin, L.; Rosado, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    Microbial-based indicators of soil quality are believed to be more dynamic than those based on physical and chemical properties. Recent developments in molecular biology based techniques have led to rapid and reliable tools to characterize microbial community structures. We determined the effects of

  20. Combining Old and New Stable Isotope Techniques to Evaluate the Impact of Conservation Tillage on Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics and Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Clercq, T.; Xu, H.; Mercklx, R.; Heiling, M.; Dercon, G.; Resch, C.

    2016-01-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is a major carbon pool. It is a crucial factor for soil quality including several soil physical properties and a major nutrient source for crops. It also plays a significant role in the global carbon cycle. Soils can act as a carbon sink or source depending on land use and agricultural management practices. Some practices such as conservation tillage or no-tillage could increase SOM stocks, particularly in the topsoil, but in the long term it remains to be seen if and how this SOM is stabilized (De Clercq et al., 2015; Govaerts et al., 2009). In order to evaluate the sustainability and efficiency of soil carbon sequestration measures and the impact of different management and environmental factors, information on SOM stability and mean residence time (MRT) is required. However, this information on SOM stability and MRT is expensive to determine via radiocarbon dating, precluding a wide spread use of stability measurements in soil science. But alternative methods based on stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes, can provide this information at a fraction of the cost

  1. Stable isotope composition (δ(13)C and δ(15)N values) of slime molds: placing bacterivorous soil protozoans in the food web context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiunov, Alexei V; Semenina, Eugenia E; Aleksandrova, Alina V; Tsurikov, Sergey M; Anichkin, Alexander E; Novozhilov, Yuri K

    2015-08-30

    Data on the bulk stable isotope composition of soil bacteria and bacterivorous soil animals are required to estimate the nutrient and energy fluxes via bacterial channels within detrital food webs. We measured the isotopic composition of slime molds (Myxogastria, Amoebozoa), a group of soil protozoans forming macroscopic spore-bearing fruiting bodies. An analysis of largely bacterivorous slime molds can provide information on the bulk stable isotope composition of soil bacteria. Fruiting bodies of slime molds were collected in a monsoon tropical forest of Cat Tien National Park, Vietnam, and analyzed by continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Prior to stable isotope analysis, carbonates were removed from a subset of samples by acidification. To estimate the trophic position of slime molds, their δ(13) C and δ(15) N values were compared with those of plant debris, soil, microbial destructors (litter-decomposing, humus-decomposing, and ectomycorrhizal fungi) and members of higher trophic levels (oribatid mites, termites, predatory macroinvertebrates). Eight species of slime molds represented by at least three independent samples were 3-6‰ enriched in (13) C and (15) N relative to plant litter. A small but significant difference in the δ(13) C and δ(15) N values suggests that different species of myxomycetes can differ in feeding behavior. The slime molds were enriched in (15) N compared with litter-decomposing fungi, and depleted in (15) N compared with mycorrhizal or humus-decomposing fungi. Slime mold sporocarps and plasmodia largely overlapped with oribatid mites in the isotopic bi-plot, but were depleted in (15) N compared with predatory invertebrates and humiphagous termites. A comparison with reference groups of soil organisms suggests strong trophic links of slime molds to saprotrophic microorganisms which decompose plant litter, but not to humus-decomposing microorganisms or to mycorrhizal fungi. Under the assumption that slime molds are

  2. Identification of long-term carbon sequestration in soils with historical inputs of biochar using novel stable isotope and spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C.; Kerré, Bart; Hardy, Brieuc; Dufey, Joseph; Smolders, Erik

    2013-04-01

    Biochar is the collective term for organic matter (OM) that has been produced by pyrolysis of biomass, e.g. during production of charcoal or during natural processes such as bush fires. Biochar production and application is now suggested as one of the economically feasible options for global C-sequestration strategies. The C-sequestration in soil through application of biochar is not only related to its persistence (estimated lifetime exceeds 1000 year in soil), but also due to indirect effects such as its potential to adsorb and increase OM stability in soil. Historical charcoal production sites that had been in use >200 years ago in beech/oak forests have been localized in the south of Belgium. Aerial photography identified black spots in arable land on former forest sites. Soil sampling was conducted in an arable field used for maize production near Mettet (Belgium) where charcoal production was intensive until late 18th century. Soils were sampled in a horizontal gradient across the 'black soils' that extend of few decametres, collecting soil from the spots (Biochar Amended, BA) as well as from the non-biochar amended (NBA). Stable C isotope composition was used to estimate the long-term C-sequestration derived from crops in these soils where maize had been produced since about 15 years. Because C in the biochar originates in forest wood (C3 plants), its isotopic signature (δ13C) differs from the maize (a C4 plant). The C and N content and the δ13C were determined for bulk soil samples and for microaggregate size fractions separated by wet sieving. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) coupled to optical microscopy was used to obtaining fingerprints of biochar and OM composition for soil microaggregates. The total C content in the BA soil (5.5%) and the C/N ratio (16.9) were higher than for NBA (C content 2.7%; C/N ratio 12.6), which confirms the persistence of OM in the BA. The average isotopic signature of bulk soil from BA (-26.08) was slightly

  3. Characterization of Growing Soil Bacterial Communities across a pH gradient Using H218O DNA-Stable Isotope Probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty-Bernard, A. T.; Schwartz, E.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have established consistent relationships between pH and bacterial diversity and community structure in soils from site-specific to landscape scales. However, these studies rely on DNA or PLFA extraction techniques from bulk soils that encompass metabolically active and inactive, or dormant, communities, and loose DNA. Dormant cells may comprise up to 80% of total live cells. If dormant cells dominate a particular environment, it is possible that previous interpretations of the soil variables assumed to drive communities could be profoundly affected. We used H218O stable isotope probing and bar-coded illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes to monitor the response of actively growing communities to changes in soil pH in a soil microcosm over 14 days. This substrate-independent approach has several advantages over 13C or 15N-labelled molecules in that all growing bacteria should be able to make use of water, allowing characterization of whole communities. We hypothesized that Acidobacteria would increasingly dominate the growing community and that Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes would decline, given previously established responses by these taxa to soil pH. Instead, we observed the reverse. Actinobacteria abundance increased three-fold from 26 to 76% of the overall community as soil pH fell from pH 5.6 to pH 4.6. Shifts in community structure and decreases in diversity with declining soil pH were essentially driven by two families, Streptomyceaca and Microbacteracea, which collectively increased from 2 to 40% of the entire community. In contrast, Acidobacteria as a whole declined although numbers of subdivision 1 remained stable across all soil pH levels. We suggest that the brief incubation period in this SIP study selected for growth of acid-tolerant Actinobacteria over Acidobacteria. Taxa within Actinomycetales have been readily cultured over short time frames, suggesting rapid growth patterns. Conversely, taxa within Acidobacteria have been

  4. Bacteria capable of degrading anthracene, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene as revealed by DNA based stable-isotope probing in a forest soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Mengke [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Jiang, Longfei [College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Zhang, Dayi [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Luo, Chunling, E-mail: clluo@gig.ac.cn [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wang, Yan [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Yu, Zhiqiang [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Yin, Hua [College of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhang, Gan [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • Investigate PAHs degraders in forest carbon-rich soils via DNA-SIP. • Rhodanobacter is identified to metabolite anthracene for the first time. • The first fluoranthene degrader belongs to Acidobacteria. • Different functions of PAHs degraders in forest soils from contaminated soils. - Abstract: Information on microorganisms possessing the ability to metabolize different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in complex environments helps in understanding PAHs behavior in natural environment and developing bioremediation strategies. In the present study, stable-isotope probing (SIP) was applied to investigate degraders of PAHs in a forest soil with the addition of individually {sup 13}C-labeled phenanthrene, anthracene, and fluoranthene. Three distinct phylotypes were identified as the active phenanthrene-, anthracene- and fluoranthene-degrading bacteria. The putative phenanthrene degraders were classified as belonging to the genus Sphingomona. For anthracene, bacteria of the genus Rhodanobacter were the putative degraders, and in the microcosm amended with fluoranthene, the putative degraders were identified as belonging to the phylum Acidobacteria. Our results from DNA-SIP are the first to directly link Rhodanobacter- and Acidobacteria-related bacteria with anthracene and fluoranthene degradation, respectively. The results also illustrate the specificity and diversity of three- and four-ring PAHs degraders in forest soil, contributes to our understanding on natural PAHs biodegradation processes, and also proves the feasibility and practicality of DNA-based SIP for linking functions with identity especially uncultured microorganisms in complex microbial biota.

  5. Variabilidade espacial da agregação do solo avaliada pela geometria fractal e geoestatística Spatial variability of soil aggregation evaluated by fractal geometry and geostatistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. P. Carvalho

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo explorar a aplicabilidade da teoria de fractais no estudo da variabilidade espacial em agregação de solo. A geometria de fractais tem sido proposta como um modelo para a distribuição de tamanho de partículas. A distribuição do tamanho de agregados do solo, expressos em termos de massa, é apresentada. Os parâmetros do modelo, tais como: a dimensão fractal D, medida representativa da fragmentação do solo (quanto maior seu valor, maior a fragmentação, e o tamanho do maior agregado R L foram definidos como ferramentas descritivas para a agregação do solo. Os agregados foram coletados em uma profundidade de 0-10 cm de um Latossolo Vermelho distrófico típico álico textura argilosa, em Angatuba, São Paulo. Uma grade regular de 100 x 100 m foi usada e a amostragem realizada em 76 pontos nos quais se determinou a distribuição de agregados por via úmida, usando água, álcool e benzeno como pré-tratamentos. Pelo exame de semivariogramas, constatou-se a ocorrência de dependência espacial. A krigagem ordinária foi usada como interpolador e mapas de contorno mostraram-se de grande utilidade na descrição da variabilidade espacial de agregação do solo.This work explored the applicability of the fractal theory for studies into space variability of soil aggregation. Fractal geometry has become a model for soil size particle distribution. The distribution of soil aggregates in terms of its mass was obtained, and model parameters such as the fractal dimension D, which is a representative measure of the soil fragmentation (the larger its value, the larger the fragmentation, and the largest aggregate size R L were defined as descriptive tools for soil aggregation. The aggregates were collected at a depth of 0-10 cm of a Clayey Ferrasol in Angatuba, São Paulo. A regular grid of 100 x 100 m was used and samples collected from 76 points, where the aggregate distribution was determined by humid way (water

  6. Higher temperature sensitivity for stable than for labile soil organic carbon - Evidence from incubations of long-term bare fallow soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefèvre, Romain; Barré, Pierre; Moyano, Fernando E.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of climate change on the stability of soil organic carbon (SOC)remains a major source of uncertainty in predicting future changes in atmospheric CO2 levels. One unsettled issue is whether the mineralization response to temperature depends on SOC mineralization rate. Long-term (>25 years......) bare fallow experiments (LTBF) in which the soil is kept free of any vegetation and organic inputs, and their associated archives of soil samples represent a unique research platform to examine this issue as with increasing duration of fallow, the lability of remaining total SOC decreases. We retrieved...... soils from LTBF experiments situated at Askov (Denmark), Grignon (France), Ultuna (Sweden), and Versailles (France) and sampled at the start of the experiments and after 25, 50, 52, and 79 years of bare fallow, respectively. Soils were incubated at 4, 12, 20, and 35 °C and the evolved CO2 monitored...

  7. In situ unsaturated zone water stable isotope (2H and 18O) measurements in semi-arid environments: a soil water balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaj, Marcel; Beyer, Matthias; Koeniger, Paul; Wanke, Heike; Hamutoko, Josefina; Himmelsbach, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Stable isotopes (deuterium, 2H, and oxygen-18, 18O) of soil water were measured in the field using a liquid water isotope analyzer (tunable off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscope, OA-ICOS, LGR) and commercially available soil gas probes (BGL-30, UMS, Munich) in the semi-arid Cuvelai-Etosha Basin (CEB), Namibia. Results support the applicability of an in situ measurement system for the determination of stable isotopes in soil pore water. High spatial and temporal resolution was achieved in the study area with reasonable accuracy and measurements were in agreement with laboratory-based cryogenic vacuum extraction and subsequent cavity ring-down laser spectroscopic isotope analysis (CRDS, L2120-i, Picarro Inc.). After drift and span correction of the in situ isotope data, precision for over 140 measurements taken during two consecutive field campaigns (June and November 2014) was 1.8 and 0.48 ‰ for δ2H and δ18O, respectively. Mean measurement trueness is determined using quality check standards and was 5 and 0.3 ‰ for δ2H and δ18O, respectively. The isotope depth profiles are used quantitatively to calculate a soil water balance. The contribution of transpiration to total evapotranspiration ranged between 72 and 92 %. Shortly after a rain event, the contribution of transpiration was much lower, at 35 to 50 %. Potential limitations of such an in situ system are related to environmental conditions which could be minimized by using a temperature-controlled chamber for the laser spectrometer. Further, the applicability of the system using previously oven-dried soil material might be limited by physicochemical soil properties (i.e., clay minerals). Uncertainty in the in situ system is suggested to be reduced by improving the calibration procedure and further studying fractionation effects influencing the isotope ratios in the soil water, especially at low water contents. Furthermore, the influence of soil-respired CO2 on isotope values within the root zone

  8. Assessment of Soil Organic Carbon Stability in Agricultural Systems by Using Natural Abundance Signals of Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Clercq, Tim; Heiling, Maria; Aigner, Martina

    2013-01-01

    Information on the stability and age of soil organic matter (SOM) pools is of vital importance for assessing the impact of soil management and environmental factors on SOM, an important part of the global carbon (C) cycle. The terrestrial soil organic C pool, up to a depth of 1 m, contains about 1500 Pg C (Batjes, 1996). This is about 2.5 times more organic C than the vegetation (650 Pg C) and about twice as much as in the atmosphere (750 Pg C) (Batjes, 1998), but the assessment of the stability and age of SOM using 14 C radio carbon technique are expensive. Conen et al. (2008) developed a model to estimate the SOM stability based on the isotopic discrimination of 15 N natural abundance by soil micro-organisms and the change in C/N ratio during organic matter decomposition, for steady state, Alpine and permanent grasslands. In the framework of the IAEA funded coordinated research project (CRP) on Soil Quality and Nutrient Management for Sustainable Food Production in Mulch based Cropping Systems in sub-Saharan Africa, research was initiated to use this model in agricultural systems for developing a cost effective and affordable technique for Member States to determine the stability of SOM. As part of this research, soil samples were taken and analysed in four long term field experiments, established on soils with low and high SOM, in Austria and Belgium. The participating institutions are the Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES), the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences in Vienna (BOKU), the University of Leuven (KUL), the Soil Service of Belgium (BDB) and the Centre Wallon de Recherches Agronomiques (CRA-W)

  9. Particle-size fractionation and stable carbon isotope distribution applied to the study of soil organic matter dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerri, C.; Feller, C.; Balesdent, J.; Victoria, R.; Plenecassagne, A.

    1985-01-01

    The present Note concerns the dynamics of organic matter in soils under forest (C 3 -type vegetation) and 12 and 50 years old sugar-cane (C 4 -type vegetation) cultivation. The decomposition rate of ‘forest organic matter” and the accumulation rate of “sugar-cane organic matter” are estimated through 13 C measurements of total soil and different organic fractions (particle-size, fractionation) [fr

  10. [Distribution characteristics of soil humus fractions stable carbon isotope natural abundance (delta 13C) in paddy field under long-term ridge culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiao-hong; Luo, You-jin; Ren, Zhen-jiang; Lü, Jia-ke; Wei, Chao-fu

    2011-04-01

    A 16-year field experiment was conducted in a ridge culture paddy field in the hilly region of Sichuan Basin, aimed to investigate the distribution characteristics of stable carbon isotope natural abundance (delta 13C) in soil humus fractions. The soil organic carbon (SOC) content in the paddy field under different cultivation modes ranked in the order of wide ridge culture > ridge culture > paddy and upland rotation. In soil humus substances (HS), humin (HU) was the main composition, occupying 21% - 30% of the total SOC. In the extracted soil carbon, humic acid (HA) dominated, occupying 17% - 21% of SOC and 38% - 65% of HS. The delta 13C value of SOC ranged from -27.9 per thousand to -25.6 per thousand, and the difference of the delta 13C value between 0-5 cm and 20-40 cm soil layers was about 1.9 per thousand. The delta 13C value of HA under different cultivation modes was 1 per thousand - 2 per thousand lower than that of SOC, and more approached to the delta 13C value of rapeseed and rice residues. As for fulvic acid (FA), its delta 13C value was about 2 per thousand and 4 per thousand higher than that of SOC and HA, respectively. The delta 13C value of HU in plough layer (0-20 cm) and plow layer (20-40 cm) ranged from -23.7 per thousand - -24.9 per thousand and -22.6 per thousand - -24.2 per thousand, respectively, reflecting the admixture of young and old HS. The delta 13C value in various organic carbon fractions was HU>FA>SOC>rapeseed and rice residues>HA. Long-term rice planting benefited the increase of SOC content, and cultivation mode played an important role in affecting the distribution patterns of soil humus delta 13C in plough layer and plow layer.

  11. Highly stable rice-straw-derived charcoal in 3700-year-old ancient paddy soil: evidence for an effective pathway toward carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mengxiong; Yang, Min; Han, Xingguo; Zhong, Ting; Zheng, Yunfei; Ding, Pin; Wu, Weixiang

    2016-01-01

    Recalcitrant charcoal application is predicted to decelerate global warming through creating a long-term carbon sink in soil. Although many studies have showed high stability of charcoal derived from woody materials, few have focused on the dynamics of straw-derived charcoal in natural environment on a long timescale to evaluate its potential for agricultural carbon sequestration. Here, we examined straw-derived charcoal in an ancient paddy soil dated from ~3700 calendar year before present (cal. year BP). Analytical results showed that soil organic matter consisted of more than 25% of charcoal in charcoal-rich layer. Similarities in morphology and molecular structure between the ancient and the fresh rice-straw-derived charcoal indicated that ancient charcoal was derived from rice straw. The lower carbon content, higher oxygen content, and obvious carbonyl of the ancient charcoal compared with fresh rice straw charcoal implied that oxidation occurred in the scale of thousands years. However, the dominant aromatic C of ancient charcoal indicated that rice-straw-derived charcoal was highly stable in the buried paddy soil due to its intrinsic chemical structures and the physical protection of ancient paddy wetland. Therefore, it may suggest that straw charcoal application is a potential pathway for C sequestration considering its longevity.

  12. Perennial Grass Based Crop Rotations in Virginia: Effects on Soil Quality, Disease Incidence, and Cotton and Peanut Growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Weeks, Jr., James Michael

    2008-01-01

    In 2003 eight peanut and cotton crop rotations were established in southeastern Virginia, 4 of which included 2 or 3 years of tall fescue or orchardgrass grown as high-value hay crops. Each crop rotation was evaluated for changes in soil quality indicators including soil carbon and nitrogen, water stable soil aggregates, plant available water content, bulk density, cone index values, and soil moisture. Cotton and peanut growth and yield were also observed to evaluate ch...

  13. Rydberg aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüster, S.; Rost, J.-M.

    2018-02-01

    We review Rydberg aggregates, assemblies of a few Rydberg atoms exhibiting energy transport through collective eigenstates, considering isolated atoms or assemblies embedded within clouds of cold ground-state atoms. We classify Rydberg aggregates, and provide an overview of their possible applications as quantum simulators for phenomena from chemical or biological physics. Our main focus is on flexible Rydberg aggregates, in which atomic motion is an essential feature. In these, simultaneous control over Rydberg–Rydberg interactions, external trapping and electronic energies, allows Born–Oppenheimer surfaces for the motion of the entire aggregate to be tailored as desired. This is illustrated with theory proposals towards the demonstration of joint motion and excitation transport, conical intersections and non-adiabatic effects. Additional flexibility for quantum simulations is enabled by the use of dressed dipole–dipole interactions or the embedding of the aggregate in a cold gas or Bose–Einstein condensate environment. Finally we provide some guidance regarding the parameter regimes that are most suitable for the realization of either static or flexible Rydberg aggregates based on Li or Rb atoms. The current status of experimental progress towards enabling Rydberg aggregates is also reviewed.

  14. Coupled Metagenomic and Chemical Analyses of Degrading Fungal Necromass and Implications for Fungal contributions to Stable Soil Organic Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerton-Warburton, L. M.; Schreiner, K. M.; Morgan, B. S. T.; Schultz, J.; Blair, N. E.

    2016-12-01

    Fungi comprise a significant portion of total soil biomass, the turnover of which must represent a dominant flux within the soil carbon cycle. Fungal organic carbon (OC) can turn over on time scales of days to months, but this process is poorly understood. Here, we examined temporal changes in the chemical and microbial community composition of fungal necromass during a 2-month decomposition experiment in which Fusarium avenaceum (a common saprophyte) was exposed to a natural soil microbial community. Over the course of the experiment, residual fungal necromass was harvested and analyzed using FTIR and thermochemolysis-GCMS to examine chemical changes in the tissue. In addition, genomic DNA was extracted from tissues, amplified with barcoded ITS primers, and sequenced using the high-throughput Illumina platform to examine changes in microbial community composition. Up to 80% of the fungal necromass turned over in the first week. This rapid degradation phase corresponded to colonization of the necromass by known chitinolytic soil fungi including Mortierella species. Members of the Zygomycota and Ascomycota were among the dominant fungal groups involved in degradation with very small contributions from Basidiomycota. At the end of the 2-month degradation, only 15% of the original necromass remained. The residual material was rich in amide and C-O moieties which is consistent with previous work predicting that peptidoglycans are the main residual product from microbial tissue degradation. Straight-chain fatty acids exhibited varying degradation profiles, with some fatty acids (e.g. C16, C18:1) degrading more rapidly than bulk tissue while others maintained steady concentrations relative to bulk OC (C18) or increased in concentration throughout the degradation sequence (C24). These results indicate that the turnover of fungal necromass has the potential to rapidly and significantly influence a variety of soil OC properties including C/N ratios, lipid biomarker

  15. Coupled Metagenomic and Chemical Analyses of Degrading Fungal Necromass and Implications for Microbial Contributions to Stable Soil OC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, K. M.; Morgan, B. S. T.; Schultz, J.; Blair, N. E.; Egerton-Warburton, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fungi comprise a significant portion of total soil biomass, the turnover of which must represent a dominant flux within the soil carbon cycle. Fungal OC can turn over on time scales of days to months, but this process is poorly understood. Here, we examined temporal changes in the chemical and microbial community composition of fungal necromass during a 2 month decomposition experiment in which Fusarium avenaceum (a common saprophyte) was exposed to a natural soil microbial community. Over the course of the experiment, residual fungal necromass was harvested and analyzed using FTIR and thermochemolysis-GCMS to examine chemical changes in the tissue. Additionally, genomic DNA was extracted from tissues, amplified with barcoded ITS primers, and sequenced using the high-throughput Illumina platform to examine changes in microbial community composition. Up to 80% of the fungal necromass turned over in the first week. This rapid degradation phase corresponded to colonization of the necromass by known chitinolytic soil fungi including Mortierella species. Zygomycetes and Ascomycetes were among the dominant fungal species involved in degradation with very small contributions from Basidiomycetes. At the end of the 2 month degradation, only 15% of the original necromass remained. The residual material was rich in amide and C-O moieties which is consistent with previous work predicting that peptidoglycans are the main residual product from microbial tissue degradation. Straight-chain fatty acids exhibit varying degradation profiles, with some fatty acids (e.g. C16 and C18:1) degrading more rapidly than bulk tissue, others maintaining steady concentrations relative to bulk OC (e.g. C18), and some increasing in concentration throughout the degradation (e.g. C24). These results indicate that the turnover of fungal necromass has the potential to significantly influence a variety of soil OC properties, including C/N ratios, lipid biomarker distributions, and OC turnover times.

  16. Enhanced decomposition of stable soil organic carbon and microbial catabolic potentials by long-term field warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenting; Liang, Junyi; Hale, Lauren E; Jung, Chang Gyo; Chen, Ji; Zhou, Jizhong; Xu, Minggang; Yuan, Mengting; Wu, Liyou; Bracho, Rosvel; Pegoraro, Elaine; Schuur, Edward A G; Luo, Yiqi

    2017-11-01

    Quantifying soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition under warming is critical to predict carbon-climate feedbacks. According to the substrate regulating principle, SOC decomposition would decrease as labile SOC declines under field warming, but observations of SOC decomposition under warming do not always support this prediction. This discrepancy could result from varying changes in SOC components and soil microbial communities under warming. This study aimed to determine the decomposition of SOC components with different turnover times after subjected to long-term field warming and/or root exclusion to limit C input, and to test whether SOC decomposition is driven by substrate lability under warming. Taking advantage of a 12-year field warming experiment in a prairie, we assessed the decomposition of SOC components by incubating soils from control and warmed plots, with and without root exclusion for 3 years. We assayed SOC decomposition from these incubations by combining inverse modeling and microbial functional genes during decomposition with a metagenomic technique (GeoChip). The decomposition of SOC components with turnover times of years and decades, which contributed to 95% of total cumulative CO 2 respiration, was greater in soils from warmed plots. But the decomposition of labile SOC was similar in warmed plots compared to the control. The diversity of C-degradation microbial genes generally declined with time during the incubation in all treatments, suggesting shifts of microbial functional groups as substrate composition was changing. Compared to the control, soils from warmed plots showed significant increase in the signal intensities of microbial genes involved in degrading complex organic compounds, implying enhanced potential abilities of microbial catabolism. These are likely responsible for accelerated decomposition of SOC components with slow turnover rates. Overall, the shifted microbial community induced by long-term warming accelerates the

  17. Construction aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Part of a special section on industrial minerals in 1993. The 1993 production of construction aggregates increased 6.3 percent over the 1992 figure, to reach 2.01 Gt. This represents the highest estimated annual production of combined crushed stone and construction sand and gravel ever recorded in the U.S. The outlook for construction aggregates and the issues facing the industry are discussed.

  18. Evaluation of aggregate microstructures following natural regeneration in bauxite residue as characterized by synchrotron-based X-ray micro-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Liao, Jiaxin; Xue, Shengguo; Hartley, William; Zou, Qi; Wu, Hao

    2016-12-15

    Bauxite residue often has poor physical conditions which impede plant growth. Native plant encroachment on a bauxite residue disposal area in Central China reveals that natural regeneration may improve its physicochemical properties. Residue samples collected from three different disposal ages were assessed to evaluate residue micromorphology and three-dimensional (3D) aggregate microstructure under natural regeneration. The residue aggregates in different disposal ages were divided in two sections: macro-aggregate (2-1mm) and micro-aggregate (0.25-0.05mm). Residue aggregate micromorphology was determined by scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and the residue aggregate microstructure was determined by synchrotron-based X-ray micro-computed tomography (SR-μCT) and image analysis techniques. Natural regeneration may improve residue aggregate stability and form a stable aggregate structure. Calcium content increased whilst sodium content decreased significantly on the surface of residue aggregates. Under natural soil-forming processes bauxite residue porosity, specific surface area, average length of paths, and average tortuosity of paths all significantly increased. This demonstrated that natural regeneration may stimulate the formation of stable aggregate structure in residues. Further understanding should focus on particle interaction forces and agglomeration mechanisms with the addition of external ameliorations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Stable and Flexible CuInS2/ZnS:Al-TiO2 Film for Solar-Light-Driven Photodegradation of Soil Fumigant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lili; Li, Zhichun; Sun, Mingxing; Shen, Guoqing; Li, Liang

    2016-08-10

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are suitable light absorbers for photocatalysis because of their unique properties. However, QDs generally suffer from poor photochemical stability against air, limiting their applications in photocatalysis. In this study, a stable solar-light-driven QDs-containing photocatalytic film was developed to facilitate photocatalytic degradation of the soil fumigant 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D). Highly stable CuInS2/ZnS:Al core/shell QDs (CIS/ZnS:Al QDs) were synthesized by doping Al into the ZnS shell and controlling ZnS:Al shell thickness; the CIS/ZnS:Al QDs were subsequently combined with TiO2 to form a CIS/ZnS:Al-TiO2 photocatalyst. The optimized ZnS:Al shell thickness for 1,3-D photodegradation was approximately 1.3 nm, which guaranteed and balanced the good photocatalytic activity and stability of the CIS/ZnS:Al-TiO2 photocatalyst. The photodegradation efficiency of 1,3-D can be maintained up to more than 80% after five cycles during recycling experiment. When CIS/ZnS:Al-TiO2 was deposited as photocatalytic film on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrate, over 99% of cis-1,3-D and 98% of trans-1,3-D were depleted as they passed through the film during 15 h of irradiation under natural solar light. This study demonstrated that the stable CIS/ZnS:Al-TiO2 photocatalyst both in powder and film form is a promising agent for photodegradation and emission reduction of soil fumigants.

  20. Stabilities of ant nests and their adjacent soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echezona, B. C.; Igwe, C. A.

    2012-10-01

    Nests habour ants and termites and protect them from harsh environmental conditions. The structural stabilities of nests were studied to ascertain their relative vulnerability to environmental stresses. Arboreal-ant nests were pried from different trees, while epigeous-termite nests were excavated from soil surface within the sample area. Soils without any visible sign of ant or termite activity were also sampled 6 m away from the nests as control. Laboratory analysis result showed that irrespective of the tree hosts, the aggregate stabilities of the ant nests were lower than those of the ground termite, with nests formed on Cola nitida significantly showing lower aggregate stability (19.7%) than other antnest structures. Clay dispersion ratio, moisture content, water stable aggregate class 2.00 mm but path analysis demonstrated that water stable aggregate class <0.25 mm contributed most to the higher aggregate stability of the termite nest than the other nest. Nest aggregates had greater structural stability compared to the control soil. The higher structural stability of termite nests over other nest and soil was considered a better adaptive mechanism against body desiccation.

  1. Characterization of Dissolved Organic Matter in Surface, Soil, and Ground Waters of a Small (10 ha) Catchment Using Stable Isotopes (C, N, S) and Chemical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentress, J.; Lajtha, K.; Jones, J.; Kendall, C.

    2007-12-01

    In order to better understand sources of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in streams at the small watershed scale, we initiated a one-year investigation of the chemical and isotopic characteristics of DOM at the HJ Andrews Research Forest in Blue River, OR. These data will be used to test two mechanistic hypotheses to explain observed hysteresis patterns where dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in surface flow are greatest during the ascending limb of the hydrograph during storms and over the water year, with decreased DOC concentrations in surface flow during the descending limb of the hydrograph: Hypothesis 1) A flushing effect with no change in dominant flowpaths; Stream DOC concentrations directly reflect the DOC concentrations in the soil that are initially high and decrease during the event and throughout the water year due to the flushing of DOC. Hypothesis 2) A change in dominance from near-surface to subsurface hydrologic flowpaths during the event, with high-DOC sources in near-surface flowpaths dominating early and low-DOC sources in groundwater dominating later in the event. In order to address this ambiguity, the characterization of DOM using stable isotopes and other fingerprinting techniques (e.g. SUVA, C:N) was used to identify sources of organic matter to streams throughout an individual storm event and through the water year. If the first hypothesis (flushing effect) is correct, DOM in surface water should carry a similar fingerprint to the DOM in soil waters throughout the rain event and water year. If the second hypothesis (change in flowpaths) is correct, the fingerprint of DOM in the surface water should closely resemble that of soil water early in the event and change to reflect a mix of the two fingerprinted DOM sources - groundwater and soil water - later in the event. In addition to established chemical characterization methods like SUVA and C:N, a new technique of DOM isolation via solid-phase extraction using C-18 resin was used

  2. Calcium biogeochemical cycle at the beech tree-soil solution interface from the Strengbach CZO (NE France): insights from stable Ca and radiogenic Sr isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Anne-Désirée; Gangloff, Sophie; Labolle, François; Chabaux, François; Stille, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Calcium (Ca) is the fourth most abundant element in mineral nutrition and plays key physiological and structural roles in plant metabolism. At the soil-water-plant scale, stable Ca isotopes are a powerful tool for the identification of plant-mineral interactions and recycling via vegetation. Radiogenic Sr isotopes are often used as tracers of Ca sources and mixtures of different reservoirs. In this study, stable Ca and radiogenic Sr are combined and analysed in several organs from two beech trees that were collected in June and September in the Strengbach critical zone observatory (CZO) (NE France) and in corresponding soil solutions. At the beech-tree scale, this study confirms the field Ca adsorption (i.e., physico-chemical mechanism and not vital effects) on carboxyl acid groups of pectin in the apoplasm of small roots. The analysis of the xylem sap and corresponding organs shows that although the Strengbach CZO is nutrient-poor, Ca seems to be non-limiting for tree-growth. Different viscosities of xylem sap between the stemwood and branches or leaves can explain δ44/40Ca values in different tree-organs. The bark and phloem 40Ca-enrichments could be due to Ca-oxalate precipitation in the bark tissues and in the phloem. The results from this study regarding the combination of these two isotopic systems show that the isotopic signatures of the roots are dominated by Ca fractionation mechanisms and Sr, and thus Ca, source variations. In contrast, translocation mechanisms are only governed by Ca fractionation processes. This study showed that at the root-soil solution interface, litter degradation was not the main source of Ca and Sr and that the soil solutions are not the complement of uptake by roots for samples from the 2011/2013 period. The opposite is observed for older samples. These observations indicate the decreasing contribution of low radiogenic Sr fluxes, such as recycling, alimenting the soil solutions. Such reduced importance of nutrient uptake and

  3. Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily Moghaddas; Ken Hubbert

    2014-01-01

    When managing for resilient forests, each soil’s inherent capacity to resist and recover from changes in soil function should be evaluated relative to the anticipated extent and duration of soil disturbance. Application of several key principles will help ensure healthy, resilient soils: (1) minimize physical disturbance using guidelines tailored to specific soil types...

  4. Monitoring the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a co-contaminated soil using stable isotope labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawra, Anna; Friesl-Hanl, Wolfgang; Watzinger, Andrea; Soja, Gerhard; Puschenreiter, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Conventional remediation techniques like "dig and dump" are costly and limited in scale. Plant- and microbe-based alternatives, e.g. phytoremediation options, offer a cheap and environmentally friendly approach that can be applied on larger areas. However, the application of phytoremediation techniques to co-contaminated sites may be hindered due to a potential inhibition of biodegradation processes by the presence of heavy metals in soil. Therefore, the objective of this study is to test the hypothesis that the degradation of organic pollutants can be enhanced by immobilising potentially toxic heavy metals. This study aims to identify the influence of heavy metal immobilisation on the degradation of organic pollutants, and to determine chemical, physical and biological measures further accelerating these processes. The influence of heavy metals on organic pollutant degradation dynamics is assessed using 13C-phospholipid fatty acid analysis (13C-PLFA). Application of 13C-labeled phenanthrene allows the identification of microbial groups responsible for the degradation process. For metal immobilisation and enhanced biodegradation, distinct mineral and organic soil amendments (iron oxides, gravel sludge, biochar) are deployed, partly in combination with fast-growing and pollution-tolerant woody plants (willow, black locust and alder). Results of an incubation batch experiment show a fast degradation of the phenanthrene label within the first two weeks by various microbial groups (gram negative bacteria as indicated by the cy17:0 peak) resulting in a decrease by up to 80% of the total PAH concentration (Σ 16 EPA PAHs) measured in soil. A similar trend was observed in the greenhouse pot experiment, whereby heavy metal accumulation in the woody plants growing on the co-contaminated soil significantly varied with plant species (willow > black locust, alder).

  5. Characteristics of soil stability and carbon sequestration under water storage and drainage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Han, J. C.; Chen, C.; Yang, J. J.

    2017-07-01

    This research was conducted to investigate the influence of saline alkali soil on soil physical properties, stability and organic carbon storage under water storage and drainage, and to provide scientific basis for improving soil quality in Fuping County of Shaanxi Province, China. Saline alkali soil model test was conducted and the process was assessed with two different methods: i) traditional drainage and ecological water storage, measure and analyze 0-30 cm soil bulk density, porosity, field water capacity, mean mass diameter (MWD), geological mean diameter (GMD), stability of water stable aggregate (WASR), aggregate destruction rate (PAD), fractal dimension (D) and; ii) organic carbon storage, comprehensively analyze the relationship between stability index and soil organic carbon. The results show that: (1) compared with traditional drainage treatment, water treatment may effectively reduce the soil bulk density by 1.3%-4.2%, and improve soil porosity and field capacity at the same time; (2) under dry and wet screen treatment, soil stability, the water storing treatment is higher than the drainage treatment. Performance trend of soil MWD and GMD increases with the increase of soil depth. The stability of soil water stable aggregates increased 14.5%-53.4%. The average aggregate destruction rate was 3.2% lower than that of the drainage treatment and the difference is obvious (Pfractal dimension and soil organic carbon storage. The correlation coefficient is, respectively, R2=0.86 and R2=0.94, and the difference is obvious (P<0.05). To sum up, the water storage treatment can effectively improve the soil quality, improve soil stability and soil organic carbon storage, which can be a good control of saline alkali soil.

  6. Tillage System and Cover Crop Effects on Soil Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdollahi, Lotfollah; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2014-01-01

    , penetration resistance, and visual evaluation of soil structure (VESS). In the laboratory, aggregate strength, water-stable aggregates (WSA), and clay dispersibility were measured. The analyzed chemical and biological properties included soil organic C (SOC), total N, microbial biomass C, labile P and K...... benefit of using a combination of cover crops and direct drilling to produce a better soil friability. The usefulness of the VESS method for soil structural evaluation was supported by the high positive correlation of MWD with VESS scores.......Optimal use of management systems including tillage and winter cover crops is recommended to improve soil quality and sustain agricultural production. The effects on soil properties of three tillage systems (as main plot) including direct drilling (D), harrowing to a depth of 8 to 10 cm (H...

  7. Life cycle of soil sggregates: from root residue to microbial and physical hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzehei, T. A.; Or, D.

    2017-12-01

    Soil aggregation is a physical state of soil in which clumps of primary soil particles are held together by biological and/or chemical cementing agents. Aggregations plays important role in storage and movement of water and essential gases, nutrient cycling, and ultimately supporting microbial and plant life. It is also one of the most dynamic and sensitive soil qualities, which readily responds to disturbances such as cultivation, fire, drought, flooding, and changes in vegetation. Soil aggregation that is primarily controlled by organic matter generally exhibits hierarchical organization of soil constituents into stable units that range in size from a few microns to centimeters. However, this conceptual model of soil aggregation as the key unifying mechanism remains poorly quantified and is rarely included in predictive soil models. Here we provide a biophysical framework for quantitative and predictive modeling of soil aggregation and its attendant soil characteristics. The framework treats aggregates as hotspots of biological, chemical and physical processes centered around roots and root residue. We keep track of the life cycle of an individual aggregate from it genesis in the rhizosphere, fueled by rhizodeposition and mediated by vigorous microbial activity, until its disappearance when the root-derived resources are depleted. The framework synthesizes current understanding of microbial life in porous media; water holding and soil binding capacity of biopolymers; and environmental controls on soil organic matter dynamics. The framework paves a way for integration of processes that are presently modeled as disparate or poorly coupled processes, including storage and protection of carbon, microbial activity, greenhouse gas fluxes, movement and storage of water, resistance of soils against erosion.

  8. High Resolution DNA Stable Isotope Probing Reveals that Root Exudate Addition to Soil Changes the Identity of the Microbes that Degrade Cellulose but not the Rate of Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A.; Pepe-Ranney, C. P.; Nguyen, A. V. T.; Buckley, D. H.

    2015-12-01

    Plant roots release compounds, such as root exudates, which can alter soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and have large impacts on soil carbon (C) retention. The changes in SOM turnover resulting from the addition of organic and/or inorganic substrates are termed 'priming effects'. In this study we examine the effects of root exudates on the priming of cellulose added as particulate organic matter. We amended soil microcosms with 13C-cellulose in the presence or absence of artificial root exudate additions and incubated over time for 45 days. Soils receiving the root exudate (RE) were given either one large dose or multiple, small doses of RE. In each treatment we tracked operational taxonomic units (OTUs) assimilating 13C from cellulose (herein, known as a 'responder') over time using DNA stable isotope probing coupled with next generation sequencing. In all treatments the same amount of cellulose-13C was respired indicating the addition of RE did not result in the priming of cellulose decomposition. However, cellulose responders were different depending on treatment and time of sampling (days 14, 28 and 45). We identified a total of 10,361 OTUs, of which there were 369 cellulose responders in the cellulose only treatment, 273 in the repeated, small dose RE treatment, and 358 in the RE single, large dose treatment. Most of the cellulose responders found in all treatments belonged to phyla Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Chloroflexi. The response time of phyla varies; for instance, more OTUs in Bacteroidetes were observed on day 14 and diminish with each subsequent sampling time. On the other hand, OTUs in Verrucomicrobia increased in response over time. Our study shows no priming effect resulting from the addition of root exudates, although the identity of the microbial mediators of cellulose decomposition varies in each treatment.

  9. Detailed assessment of isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the stable isotope analysis of plant and soil waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liangju; Xiao, Honglang; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Lixin; Cheng, Guodong; Zhou, Maoxian; Yin, Li; McCabe, Matthew F

    2011-10-30

    As an alternative to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), the isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS) approach has the advantage of low cost, continuous measurement and the capacity for field-based application for the analysis of the stable isotopes of water. Recent studies have indicated that there are potential issues of organic contamination of the spectral signal in the IRIS method, resulting in incorrect results for leaf samples. To gain a more thorough understanding of the effects of sample type (e.g., leaf, root, stem and soil), sample species, sampling time and climatic condition (dry vs. wet) on water isotope estimates using IRIS, we collected soil samples and plant components from a number of major species at a fine temporal resolution (every 2 h for 24-48 h) across three locations with different climatic conditions in the Heihe River Basin, China. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the extracted water from these samples were measured using both an IRMS and an IRIS instrument. The results show that the mean discrepancies between the IRMS and IRIS approaches for δ(18) O and δD, respectively, were: -5.6‰ and -75.7‰ for leaf water; -4.0‰ and -23.3‰ for stem water; -3.4‰ and -28.2‰ for root water; -0.5‰ and -6.7‰ for xylem water; -0.06‰ and -0.3‰ for xylem flow; and -0.1‰ and 0.3‰ for soil water. The order of the discrepancy was: leaf > stem ≈ root > xylem > xylem flow ≈ soil. In general, species of the same functional types (e.g., woody vs. herbaceous) within similar habitats showed similar deviations. For different functional types, the differences were large. Sampling at nighttime did not remove the observed deviations. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Stable isotopic composition of soil calcite (O, C) and gypsum (S) overlying Cu deposits in the Atacama Desert, Chile: Implications for mineral exploration, salt sources, and paleoenvironmental reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leybourne, Matthew I.; Cameron, Eion M.; Reich, Martin; Palacios, Carlos; Faure, Kevin; Johannesson, Karen H.

    2013-01-01

    groundwater and atmospheric CO 2 . At the Spence deposit, soils only rarely contain sufficient SO 4 for S isotope analysis; the SO 4 -bearing soils occur only above the fracture zones in the gravel. Results are uniform (3.7–4.9‰ δ 34 S CDT ), which is near the middle of the range for SO 4 in groundwater (0.9–7.3‰). Sulfur in soils at the Gaby Sur deposit (3.8–6.1‰ δ 34 S CDT ) is dominated by gypsum, which primarily occurs on the flanks and tops of hills, suggesting deposition from SO 4 -rich fogs. Sulfate in Gaby Sur deposit gypsum is possibly derived by condensation of airborne SO 4 from volcanic SO 2 from the nearby Andes. At the Gaby Sur deposit and Tamarugal anomaly, pedogenic stable isotopes cannot distinguish between S from porphyry or redeposited SO 4 from interior salars. The three sites studied have had different histories of salt accumulation and display variable influence of groundwater, which is interpreted to have been forced to the surface during earthquakes. The clear accumulation of salts associated with fractures at the Spence deposit, and shifts in the isotopic composition of carbonate and sulfate in the fractures despite clear evidence of relatively recent removal of salts indicates that transfer from groundwater is an ongoing process. The interpretation that groundwaters can influence the isotopic composition of pedogenic calcrete and gypsum has important implications for previous studies that have not considered this mechanism

  11. Micromorphology and stable-isotope geochemistry of historical pedogenic siderite formed in PAH-contaminated alluvial clay soils, Tennessee, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driese, S.G.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Roberts, J.A.; Fowle, D.A.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Smith, J.J.; Vulava, V.M.; McKay, L.D.

    2010-01-01

    Alluvial clay soil samples from six boreholes advanced to depths of 400-450 cm (top of limestone bedrock) from the Chattanooga Coke Plant (CCP) site were examined micromorphologically and geochemically in order to determine if pedogenic siderite (FeCO3) was present and whether siderite occurrence was related to organic contaminant distribution. Samples from shallow depths were generally more heavily contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) than those at greater depth. The upper 1 m in most boreholes consisted of mixtures of anthropogenically remolded clay soil fill containing coal clinker, cinder grains, and limestone gravel; most layers of coarse fill were impregnated with creosote and coal tar. Most undisturbed soil (below 1 m depth) consisted of highly structured clays exhibiting fine subangular blocky ped structures, as well as redox-related features. Pedogenic siderite was abundant in the upper 2 m of most cores and in demonstrably historical (< 100 years old) soil matrices. Two morphologies were identified: (1) sphaerosiderite crystal spherulites ranging from 10 to 200 um in diameter, and (2) coccoid siderite comprising grape-like "clusters" of crystals 5-20 ??n in diameter. The siderite, formed in both macropores and within fine-grained clay matrices, indicates development of localized anaerobic, low-Eh conditions, possibly due to microbial degradation of organic contaminants. Stable-isotope compositions of the siderite have ??13C values spanning over 25%o (+7 to - 18%o VPDB) indicating fractionation of DIC by multiple microbial metabolic pathways, but with relatively constant ??18O values from (-4.8 ?? 0.66%o VPDB) defining a meteoric sphaerosiderite line (MSL). Calculated isotope equilibrium water ??18O values from pedogenic siderites at the CCP site are from 1 to 5 per mil lighter than the groundwater ??18O values that we estimate for the site. If confirmed by field studies in progress, this observation might call for a reevaluation of

  12. Growth, Survival, and Death of Bacteria and Fungi Following Wet-up of Seasonally Dried Soil Revealed by Heavy Water Stable Isotope Probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazewicz, S.; Nuccio, E. E.; Lim, H.; Schwartz, E.; Brodie, E.; Firestone, M.

    2013-12-01

    The rapid increase in microbial activity that occurs when a dry soil is rewetted has been well documented and is of great interest due to implications of changing precipitation patterns on soil C dynamics. Several studies have shown minor net changes in microbial population diversity or abundance following wet-up, but the gross population dynamics of bacteria and fungi resulting from soil wet-up are virtually unknown due to the technical difficulties associated with such measurements. Here we applied DNA stable isotope probing with H218O coupled with quantitative PCR and high throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to characterize taxonomic composition of bacteria and to describe new growth, survival, and mortality of bacteria and fungi following the rewetting of a seasonally dried California annual grassland soil. Total microbial abundance revealed little change throughout the 7-day post-wet incubation, but there was substantial turnover of both bacterial and fungal populations (49 and 52% respectively). New growth was linear between 24 and 168 hours for both bacteria and fungi with average growth rates of 2.3 x 108 bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies gdw-1 h-1 and 4.3 x 107 fungal ITS copies gdw-1 h-1. While bacteria and fungi differed in their mortality and survival characteristics during the 7-day incubation, mortality that occurred within the first 3 hours was similar with 25 and 27% of bacterial and fungal gene copies disappearing from the pre-wet community, respectively. The rapid disappearance of gene copies indicates that cell death, occurring either during the extreme dry down period (preceding 5 months) or during the rapid change in water-potential due to wet-up, generates a significant pool of available C that likely contributes to the large pulse in CO2 associated with wet-up. Sequential bacterial growth patterns observed at the phylum and order levels suggest that an ecologically coherent response was observable at coarse taxonomic levels with

  13. Stable isotope approach to fission product element studies of soil-to-plant transfer and in vitro modelling of ruminant digestion using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, Paul; Owen, L.M.W.; Crews, H.M.

    1995-01-01

    A stable isotope approach has been used to investigate two aspects of the behaviour of fission product elements in the environment and food chains using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Limits of detection (dry mass LODs) of 0.053 mg kg -1 for Sr, 0.011 mg kg -1 for Cs and 0.084 mg kg -1 for Ce were low enough to allow the determination of soil-to-plant transfer factors for soft fruit and the application of the approach to an in vitro model of ruminant digestion. The multi-element measurement capability of ICP-MS also permitted the analysis of selected nutrients, including zinc, in in vitro experiments. (author)

  14. Effects of Land Use on Concentrations and Chemical Forms of Phosphorus in Different-Size Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, E. H.; Demisie, W.; Zhang, M.

    2017-12-01

    Land use has been recognized as an important driver of environmental change on all spatial and temporal scales. This study was conducted to determine the effects of land uses on phosphorus concentration in bulk soil and in water-stable aggregates in different soils. The study was conducted on three soil types (Ferrosols, Cambosols, and Primosols), which were collected from three different locations from southeast China and under three land uses (Uncultivated, Vegetable and forest land) the region is characterized as a hill and plain area. Accordingly, a total of 24 soil samples were collected. The results showed that average contents of total P were 0.55-1.55 g/kg, 0.28-1.03 g/kg and 0.14-0.8 g/kg for the soils: Cambosols, Ferrosols and Primosols respectively. Vegetable and forest land led to higher total phosphorus contents in these soils than in the uncultivated land. An aggregate fraction of >2 mm under forest land made up the largest percentage (30 up to 70%), whereas the size fraction phosphorus, organic phosphorus and Olsen P and phosphorus forms in the soils. It implies that the conversion of natural ecosystem to vegetable land increased the phosphorus proportion in the soils, which could have negative impact on the environmental quality.

  15. Direct and indirect effects of glomalin, mycorrhizal hyphae, and roots on aggregate stability in rhizosphere of trifoliate orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiang-Sheng; Cao, Ming-Qin; Zou, Ying-Ning; He, Xin-hua

    2014-07-25

    To test direct and indirect effects of glomalin, mycorrhizal hyphae, and roots on aggregate stability, perspex pots separated by 37-μm nylon mesh in the middle were used to form root-free hyphae and root/hyphae chambers, where trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) seedlings were colonized by Funneliformis mosseae or Paraglomus occultum in the root/hyphae chamber. Both fungal species induced significantly higher plant growth, root total length, easily-extractable glomalin-related soil protein (EE-GRSP) and total GRSP (T-GRSP), and mean weight diameter (an aggregate stability indicator). The Pearson correlation showed that root colonization or soil hyphal length significantly positively correlated with EE-GRSP, difficultly-extractable GRSP (DE-GRSP), T-GRSP, and water-stable aggregates in 2.00-4.00, 0.50-1.00, and 0.25-0.50 mm size fractions. The path analysis indicated that in the root/hyphae chamber, aggregate stability derived from a direct effect of root colonization, EE-GRSP or DE-GRSP. Meanwhile, the direct effect was stronger by EE-GRSP or DE-GRSP than by mycorrhizal colonization. In the root-free hyphae chamber, mycorrhizal-mediated aggregate stability was due to total effect but not direct effect of soil hyphal length, EE-GRSP and T-GRSP. Our results suggest that GRSP among these tested factors may be the primary contributor to aggregate stability in the citrus rhizosphere.

  16. Which soil tillage is better in terms of the soil organic matter and soil structure changes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMÍR ŠIMANSKÝ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to evaluate effects of minimum (MT and conventional tillage (CT on soil organic matter and soil structure in haplic Chernozems and mollic Fluvisols. The content of soil organic carbon (Corg as well as parameters of stability and vulnerability of soil structure were quantified. The results showed that soil type had statistically significant influence on Corg. In haplic Chernozems the Corg content near the surface (0–0.1 m was significantly higher under MT (by 6% compared to CT, however, in layer 0–0.3 m under CT the average Corg content was by 16% higher than under MT. In mollic Fulvisols under MT, the average Corg content (17.5 ± 5.4 g*kg-1 was significantly less for the 0–0.3 m layer than the CT (22.7 ± 0.4 g*kg-1. In Chernozems, total content of water-stable micro-aggregates (WSAmi was higher in MT (90.8% than in CT (69.5%. In mollic Fluvisols, the average content of WSAmi was higher in CT (62.5% than in MT (53.2%. The low aggregate stability and the high structure vulnerability were reflected also due to the high contents of WSAmi in both soils. The stability of aggregates was a higher in mollic Fluvisols than in haplic Chernozems. In haplic Chernozems, better soil structure stability was under CT than MT, on the other hand, in mollic Fluvisols, the average value of coefficient of aggregate stability was lower by 32% in CT than MT.

  17. Long-term rice cultivation stabilizes soil organic carbon and promotes soil microbial activity in a salt marsh derived soil chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Yalong; Li, Lianqing; Cheng, Kun; Zheng, Jufeng; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jinwei; Joseph, Stephen; Pan, Genxing

    2015-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration with enhanced stable carbon storage has been widely accepted as a very important ecosystem property. Yet, the link between carbon stability and bio-activity for ecosystem functioning with OC accumulation in field soils has not been characterized. We assessed the changes in microbial activity versus carbon stability along a paddy soil chronosequence shifting from salt marsh in East China. We used mean weight diameter, normalized enzyme activity (NEA) and carbon gain from straw amendment for addressing soil aggregation, microbial biochemical activity and potential C sequestration, respectively. In addition, a response ratio was employed to infer the changes in all analyzed parameters with prolonged rice cultivation. While stable carbon pools varied with total SOC accumulation, soil respiration and both bacterial and fungal diversity were relatively constant in the rice soils. Bacterial abundance and NEA were positively but highly correlated to total SOC accumulation, indicating an enhanced bio-activity with carbon stabilization. This could be linked to an enhancement of particulate organic carbon pool due to physical protection with enhanced soil aggregation in the rice soils under long-term rice cultivation. However, the mechanism underpinning these changes should be explored in future studies in rice soils where dynamic redox conditions exist. PMID:26503629

  18. Long-term rice cultivation stabilizes soil organic carbon and promotes soil microbial activity in a salt marsh derived soil chronosequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Yalong; Li, Lianqing; Cheng, Kun; Zheng, Jufeng; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jinwei; Joseph, Stephen; Pan, Genxing

    2015-10-27

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration with enhanced stable carbon storage has been widely accepted as a very important ecosystem property. Yet, the link between carbon stability and bio-activity for ecosystem functioning with OC accumulation in field soils has not been characterized. We assessed the changes in microbial activity versus carbon stability along a paddy soil chronosequence shifting from salt marsh in East China. We used mean weight diameter, normalized enzyme activity (NEA) and carbon gain from straw amendment for addressing soil aggregation, microbial biochemical activity and potential C sequestration, respectively. In addition, a response ratio was employed to infer the changes in all analyzed parameters with prolonged rice cultivation. While stable carbon pools varied with total SOC accumulation, soil respiration and both bacterial and fungal diversity were relatively constant in the rice soils. Bacterial abundance and NEA were positively but highly correlated to total SOC accumulation, indicating an enhanced bio-activity with carbon stabilization. This could be linked to an enhancement of particulate organic carbon pool due to physical protection with enhanced soil aggregation in the rice soils under long-term rice cultivation. However, the mechanism underpinning these changes should be explored in future studies in rice soils where dynamic redox conditions exist.

  19. Agregação de Latossolo Vermelho sob diferentes sistemas de preparo do solo, após um único cultivo com girassol Soil aggregation of Red Latosols under different tillage systems after sunflower cropping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria R. G. Ungaro

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se, no presente trabalho, o efeito de um único cultivo de girassol na agregação de Latossolo Vermelho submetidos a diferentes sistemas de preparo, em número de quatro: grade aradora + grade niveladora (GA, grade niveladora (GN, semeadura direta na palha (SP e plantio direto (PD, no outono-inverno; exceto no PD, foi passado o escarificador + grade niveladora na primavera-verão semeando-se, em seguida, a soja e, no outono-inverno o girassol. As avaliações dos agregados de solo foram feitas antes do plantio e após a colheita do girassol, em propriedades particulares em Cândido Mota e Pedrinhas Paulista, SP, cujo cultivo do girassol melhorou a agregação, independentemente do sistema de preparo utilizado.The objective of the present research was to evaluate the effect of single sunflower crop on soil aggregation under different tillage systems. Four tillage systems were used: heavy disk harrow + leveling harrow (GA, leveling harrow (GN, sowing on straw (SP without tillage (PD, in the autumn-winter, and chisel plow + leveling harrow in the spring-summer cultivation, except for PD treatment. The research was conducted under field conditions in Candido Mota and Pedrinhas Paulista, Sao Paulo State. Soybean was sowed in the spring-summer season and sunflower in the autumn-winter. The soil aggregates were evaluated before sowing and after sunflower harvest. The use of sunflower crop induced a better soil aggregation in both places, for all tillage systems.

  20. Groundwater discharge by evapotranspiration, flow of water in unsaturated soil, and stable isotope water sourcing in areas of sparse vegetation, Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreo, Michael T.; Andraski, Brian J.; Garcia, C. Amanda

    2017-08-29

    This report documents methodology and results of a study to evaluate groundwater discharge by evapotranspiration (GWET) in sparsely vegetated areas of Amargosa Desert and improve understanding of hydrologic-continuum processes controlling groundwater discharge. Evapotranspiration and GWET rates were computed and characterized at three sites over 2 years using a combination of micrometeorological, unsaturated zone, and stable-isotope measurements. One site (Amargosa Flat Shallow [AFS]) was in a sparse and isolated area of saltgrass (Distichlis spicata) where the depth to groundwater was 3.8 meters (m). The second site (Amargosa Flat Deep [AFD]) was in a sparse cover of predominantly shadscale (Atriplex confertifolia) where the depth to groundwater was 5.3 m. The third site (Amargosa Desert Research Site [ADRS]), selected as a control site where GWET is assumed to be zero, was located in sparse vegetation dominated by creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) where the depth to groundwater was 110 m.Results indicated that capillary rise brought groundwater to within 0.9 m (at AFS) and 3 m (at AFD) of land surface, and that GWET rates were largely controlled by the slow but relatively persistent upward flow of water through the unsaturated zone in response to atmospheric-evaporative demands. Greater GWET at AFS (50 ± 20 millimeters per year [mm/yr]) than at AFD (16 ± 15 mm/yr) corresponded with its shallower depth to the capillary fringe and constantly higher soil-water content. The stable-isotope dataset for hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen (δ18O) illustrated a broad range of plant-water-uptake scenarios. The AFS saltgrass and AFD shadscale responded to changing environmental conditions and their opportunistic water use included the time- and depth-variable uptake of unsaturated-zone water derived from a combination of groundwater and precipitation. These results can be used to estimate GWET in other areas of Amargosa Desert where hydrologic conditions are similar.

  1. Stable isotope-based approach to validate effects of understory vegetation on shallow soil water movement in a Japanese cypress plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakashita, W.; Onda, Y.; Boutefnouchet, M. R.; Kato, H.; Gomi, T.

    2017-12-01

    Evapotranspiration is an important controlling factor of the hydrological cycle in forested watershed. In general, the evapotranspiration is partitioned into three components (evaporation, transpiration, and interception). In a Japanese cypress plantation, our previous work using hydrometric method revealed that total evapotranspiration rate was 47.5% of the total rainfall amount during the growing season. This research also provided the contribution rates of three evapotranspiration components. Our previous study reported the difference of forest floor evaporation between pre-thinning and post-thinning periods (pre-thinning: Nov 2010-Oct 2011; post-thinning: Nov 2011-Oct 2012), indicating that a significant change appeared in the evaporation flux after the thinning. To examine the long-term changes of evapotranspiration, we have to consider the influence of increased understory vegetation. However, hydrometric-based method using such as weighting lysimeter is sensitive to vegetation conditions inside and outside lysimeter. This disadvantage makes it difficult to evaluate the contribution rates of each evapotranspiration components. In this study, we focus on the isotope-based method to obtain each flux of evapotranspiration under the condition including understory vegetation. Our study site is Mt. Karasawa, Tochigi Prefecture, in central Japan (139°36'E, 36°22'N; 198 m a.s.l.), and we prepare both sparse and dense areas of understory vegetation. In these two plots, we collect soil water samples from shallow depth profiles after various intensity precipitation events. Throughfall and understory-intercepted water are also obtained. Stable water isotope measurements of these samples may provide information about (a) effects of understory vegetation on shallow soil water movement and (b) interception flux of understory vegetation. In this paper, we report the results and interpretations of our measurements.

  2. [Effects of land use and environmental factors on the variability of soil quality indicators in hilly Loess Plateau region of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming-Xiang; Liu, Guo-Bin; Zhao, Yun-Ge

    2011-02-01

    Classical statistics methods were adopted to analyze the soil quality variability, its affecting factors, and affecting degree at a regional scale (700 km2) in the central part of hilly Loess Plateau region of China. There existed great differences in the variability of test soil quality indicators. Soil pH, structural coefficient, silt content, specific gravity, bulk density, total porosity, capillary porosity, and catalase activity were the indicators with weak variability; soil nutrients (N, P, and K) contents, CaCO3 content, cation exchange capacity (CEC), clay content, micro-aggregate mean mass diameter, aggregate mean mass diameter, water-stable aggregates, respiration rate, microbial quotient, invertase and phosphatase activities, respiratory quotient, and microbial carbon and nitrogen showed medium variation; while soil labile organic carbon and phosphorus contents, erosion-resistance, permeability coefficient, and urease activity were the indicators with strong variability. The variability of soil CaCO3, total P and K, CEC, texture, and specific gravity, etc. was correlated with topography and other environmental factors, while the variability of dynamic soil quality indicators, including soil organic matter content, nitrogen content, water-stable aggregates, permeability, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, enzyme activities, and respiration rate, was mainly correlated with land use type. Overall, land use pattern explained 97% of the variability of soil quality indicators in the region. It was suggested that in the evaluation of soil quality in hilly Loess Plateau region, land use type and environmental factors should be fully considered.

  3. Parameter estimation of stable models and with minimum phase in dynamic aggregation of voltage regulators; Estimacao de parametros de modelos estaveis e de fase minima na agregacao dinamica de reguladores de tensao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, E.J.S. Pires de [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Eletrica], E-mail: pires@ele.puc-rio.br

    2009-07-01

    The dynamic aggregation of coherent generating unit models has been solved as an unconstrained optimization problem. In this process, negative time constants may be obtained, which characterize unstable or non-minimal phase models. The comparison of the solutions of the dynamic aggregation problem of voltage regulator models obtained with both the original formulation and the squared-variable transformation is the objective of this paper. Initial values are within the range from +100% to -90% in relation to the estimated parameters. The New England system including models of the Brazilian system is considered in the studies. (author)

  4. A study of radionuclides, metals and stable lead isotope ratios in sediments and soils in the vicinity of natural U-mineralisation areas in the Northern Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frostick, A.; Bollhoefer, A.; Parry, D.

    2011-01-01

    Australian guidelines recommend that tailings materials from uranium (U) mining and milling be contained without any detrimental impact on the environment for at least 1000 years. Natural analogue sites are being investigated to determine if they can provide data on the rates of natural erosion processes which occur over these timescales, for input into predictive geomorphic computer models. This paper presents radionuclide, metal and stable lead (Pb) isotope data from sediment cores and surface soils in the vicinity of two mineralised areas in the Alligator Rivers Region. Surface scrapes from the natural Anomaly no. 2, south of the Ranger mineral lease, exhibit radiogenic 206 Pb/ 207 Pb and 208 Pb/ 207 Pb ratios, and elevated U and metal concentrations typical for a near surface U anomaly. In contrast, samples taken from the Koongarra mineral lease (KML) show radionuclide activity and metal concentrations similar to natural areas elsewhere in the Alligator Rivers Region and Pb isotope ratios are closer to present day average crustal ratios (PDAC), as the orebodies at KML are covered by surficial sand. A sediment core collected from Anbangbang Billabong, downstream of KML, exhibits small variations in Pb isotope ratios that indicate that approximately 1% of the upper sediments in the sediment core may be derived from material originating from the U anomaly at Koongarra.

  5. A study of radionuclides, metals and stable lead isotope ratios in sediments and soils in the vicinity of natural U-mineralisation areas in the Northern Territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frostick, A., E-mail: Alison.Frostick@cdu.edu.au [Charles Darwin University, School of Environment and Life Sciences, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); ERISS, GPO Box 461, Darwin NT 0801 (Australia); Bollhoefer, A. [ERISS, GPO Box 461, Darwin NT 0801 (Australia); Parry, D. [AIMS, PO Box 41775, Casuarina NT 0811 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    Australian guidelines recommend that tailings materials from uranium (U) mining and milling be contained without any detrimental impact on the environment for at least 1000 years. Natural analogue sites are being investigated to determine if they can provide data on the rates of natural erosion processes which occur over these timescales, for input into predictive geomorphic computer models. This paper presents radionuclide, metal and stable lead (Pb) isotope data from sediment cores and surface soils in the vicinity of two mineralised areas in the Alligator Rivers Region. Surface scrapes from the natural Anomaly no. 2, south of the Ranger mineral lease, exhibit radiogenic {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios, and elevated U and metal concentrations typical for a near surface U anomaly. In contrast, samples taken from the Koongarra mineral lease (KML) show radionuclide activity and metal concentrations similar to natural areas elsewhere in the Alligator Rivers Region and Pb isotope ratios are closer to present day average crustal ratios (PDAC), as the orebodies at KML are covered by surficial sand. A sediment core collected from Anbangbang Billabong, downstream of KML, exhibits small variations in Pb isotope ratios that indicate that approximately 1% of the upper sediments in the sediment core may be derived from material originating from the U anomaly at Koongarra.

  6. Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenschuss, A.; Huber, S.; Riss, A.; Schwarz, S.; Tulipan, M.

    2001-01-01

    For Austria there exists a comprehensive soil data collection, integrated in a GIS (geographical information system). The content values of pollutants (cadmium, mercury, lead, copper, mercury, radio-cesium) are given in geographical charts and in tables by regions and by type of soil (forests, agriculture, greenland, others) for the whole area of Austria. Erosion effects are studied for the Austrian region. Legal regulations and measures for an effective soil protection, reduction of soil degradation and sustainable development in Austria and the European Union are discussed. (a.n.)

  7. Contribution of Amynthas gracilis (Megascolecidae and Octolasion cyaneum (Lumbricidae to soil physicalstability: a mesocosm experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Falco

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of the introduced species Amynthas gracilis (Kinberg, 1867 and Octolasion cyaneum (Savigny, 1826 to the physical stability of the soil was evaluated in a mesocosm experiment. Pore formation and stable aggregates were measured; as well as changes in bulk density, porosity, and soil moisture. Mesocosm pots were organized into three treatments: 1- soil + Amynthas gracilis, 2- soil + Octolasion cyaneum and 3- soil (control containers. The experiment ran for 13 weeks and it was conducted in controlled conditions in a greenhouse. At the end of the experiment both treatments with earthworms had higher number of pores and stable aggregates at the two considered depths (0 - 5 cm and 5 - 10 cm. The presence of both earthworm species favors the formation of a significantly higher proportion of stable aggregates larger than 5 mm (60%, when compared to the control without worms. These structures helped maintaining bulk density and porosity and improved water circulation. The results show that when compared to the control, both treatments had a lower loss of pore space, lower bulk density, and higher soil moisture, all attributable to earthworm presence. It is concluded that, despite both being introduced species, in intensive agricultural systems, A. gracilis and O. cyaneum can contribute to the maintenance of soil physical stability thus helping to preserve the sustainability of agro-ecosystems, even if native species became rare or locally extinct.

  8. Burning crop residues under no-till in semi-arid land, Northern Spain - effects on soil organic matter, aggregation, and earthwor populations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Virto, I.; Imaz, M.J.; Enrique, A.; Hoogmoed, W.B.; Bescansa, P.

    2007-01-01

    Stubble burning has traditionally been used in semi-arid land for pest and weed control, and to remove the excess of crop residues before seeding in no-tillage systems. We compared differences in soil properties in a long-term (10 years) tillage trial on a carbonated soil in semi-arid north-east

  9. The spatial distribution of exoenzyme activities across the soil micro-landscape, as measured in micro- and macro-aggregates, and ecosystem processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Haryun; Nunan, Naoise; Dechesne, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    of spatial clustering of EEA and the overall intensity of the EEA was identified in the two loamy soils, indicating that the microscale spatial ecology of microbial activity may have a significant impact on biogeochemical cycles. No relationship was found between microbial community structure and EEA......The spatial ecology of soil microbial communities and their functioning is an understudied aspect of soil microbial ecology. Much of our understanding of the spatial organisation of microbial communities has been obtained at scales that are inappropriate for identifying how microbial functioning...... and spatial patterns are related. In order to reveal the spatial strategies of soil microorganisms, we measured the microscale spatial distribution of 6 exoenzyme activities (EEA) and related them to the catalytic potential of three soils. The relationship between EEA profiles and microbial community...

  10. Contact angles of wetting and water stability of soil structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodov, V. A.; Yaroslavtseva, N. V.; Yashin, M. A.; Frid, A. S.; Lazarev, V. I.; Tyugai, Z. N.; Milanovskiy, E. Yu.

    2015-06-01

    From the soddy-podzolic soils and typical chernozems of different texture and land use, dry 3-1 mm aggregates were isolated and sieved in water. As a result, water-stable aggregates and water-unstable particles composing dry 3-1 mm aggregates were obtained. These preparations were ground, and contact angles of wetting were determined by the static sessile drop method. The angles varied from 11° to 85°. In most cases, the values of the angles for the water-stable aggregates significantly exceeded those for the water-unstable components. In terms of carbon content in structural units, there was no correlation between these parameters. When analyzing the soil varieties separately, the significant positive correlation between the carbon content and contact angle of aggregates was revealed only for the loamy-clayey typical chernozem. Based on the multivariate analysis of variance, the value of contact wetting angle was shown to be determined by the structural units belonging to water-stable or water-unstable components of macroaggregates and by the land use type. In addition, along with these parameters, the texture has an indirect effect.

  11. Efficacy of Natural Polymer Derivatives on Soil Physical Properties and Erosion on an Experimental Loess Hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun’e; Wang, Zhanli; Li, Yuanyuan

    2017-01-01

    Raindrops disperse large soil aggregates into smaller particles, which can clog soil pores, cause soil crusting, reduce rainfall infiltration and increase soil loss. It was found that natural polymer derivatives were effective in improving soil physical properties and decreasing soil erosion on an experimental loess hillslope. This study investigated the effect of new natural polymer derivatives (Jag S and Jag C162) on soil properties, rainfall infiltration and sediment yield at four rates of sprayed polymers (0, 1, 3 and 5 g/m2), three rainfall intensities (1, 1.5 and 2 mm/min) and a slope gradient of 15° with a silt loam soil through simulated rain. The results showed that both Jag S and Jag C162 significantly increased the shear strength and improved the aggregates composition of the soil surface. The water-stable soil aggregates >0.25 mm increased from 9% to 50% with increasing rates of Jag S and Jag C162. Jag S and Jag C162 also effectively increased rainfall infiltration and final infiltration rate, and reduced erosion compared to controls without natural polymer derivatives added. However, higher rates of Jag S produced lower infiltration rates. Although both Jag S and Jag C162 effectively influenced soil physical properties and erosion, the effect of Jag C162 was more significant than that of Jag S. PMID:29271899

  12. Efficacy of Natural Polymer Derivatives on Soil Physical Properties and Erosion on an Experimental Loess Hillslope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun'e; Wang, Zhanli; Li, Yuanyuan

    2017-12-22

    Raindrops disperse large soil aggregates into smaller particles, which can clog soil pores, cause soil crusting, reduce rainfall infiltration and increase soil loss. It was found that natural polymer derivatives were effective in improving soil physical properties and decreasing soil erosion on an experimental loess hillslope. This study investigated the effect of new natural polymer derivatives (Jag S and Jag C162) on soil properties, rainfall infiltration and sediment yield at four rates of sprayed polymers (0, 1, 3 and 5 g/m²), three rainfall intensities (1, 1.5 and 2 mm/min) and a slope gradient of 15° with a silt loam soil through simulated rain. The results showed that both Jag S and Jag C162 significantly increased the shear strength and improved the aggregates composition of the soil surface. The water-stable soil aggregates >0.25 mm increased from 9% to 50% with increasing rates of Jag S and Jag C162. Jag S and Jag C162 also effectively increased rainfall infiltration and final infiltration rate, and reduced erosion compared to controls without natural polymer derivatives added. However, higher rates of Jag S produced lower infiltration rates. Although both Jag S and Jag C162 effectively influenced soil physical properties and erosion, the effect of Jag C162 was more significant than that of Jag S.

  13. Chernozem aggregate waterstability loss investigation in a long-term bare fallow experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyeva, N. A.; Milanovskiy, E. Y.

    2009-04-01

    The research is focused on mechanisms of aggregate waterstability controlled by soil organic matter (SOM). The objects of the research are two contrast variants of typical chernozem - under native grassland and under a 60-year bare fallow experimental plot (100 m2) on the territory of Central Chernozem Biosphere Reserve, Russia. Seasonal plowing and deficiency of fresh plant residues (due to weeding out) resulted in a rapid mineralization of SOM. The Corg content in the 0-20 cm topsoil under native grassland is 6-4.5 %. For the last two decades Corg content under bare fallow has stabilized on the 2.6% level and is therefore assumed to represent stable SOM pool. However excellent aggregate waterstability of chernozem is completely lost under bare fallow. Therefore the aim of our study is to reveal the role of different SOM pools spatial and functional organization in aggregate waterstability formation. Bulk soil samples were collected from 2 m grassland profile and 1.5 m bare fallow profile with 10 cm interval and simultaneous measurements of soil field density and moisture. Following samples were analysed: bulk samples, dry and wet-sieving aggregates, undisturbed and pulverized aggregates, granule-densimetric fractions obtained by sedimentation of bulk samples (clay 5 mkm) with following densimetric fractionation in bromoform (light ? 2.4 g/cm3), and above mentioned samples after removal of SOM by hydrogen peroxide. Isolation of aggregates and granule-densimetric fractionation were carried out for bulk soils at 0-20, 40-50 and 80-90 cm depth. We use elemental analysis (C, H, N), size exclusion and hydrophobic interaction chromatography of humic substances (HS), laser diffraction particle size analysis, specific surface area (SSA) measurements by nitrogen adsorption and micromorphological examination of thin sections. Detailed characteristics obtained for aggregates and granule-densimetric fractions from a typical chernozem soil under native grassland and under 60

  14. Production and Properties of a Thermostable, pH—Stable Exo-Polygalacturonase Using Aureobasidium pullulans Isolated from Saharan Soil of Algeria Grown on Tomato Pomace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Bennamoun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Polygalacturonase is a valuable biocatalyst for several industrial applications. Production of polygalacturonase using the Aureobasidium pullulans stain isolated from Saharan soil of Algeria was investigated. Its capacity to produce polygalacturonase was assessed under submerged culture using tomato pomace as an abundant agro-industrial substrate. Optimization of the medium components, which enhance polygalacturonase activity of the strain Aureobasidium pullulans, was achieved with the aid of response surface methodology. The composition of the optimized medium was as follows: tomato pomace 40 g/L, lactose 1.84 g/L, CaCl20.09 g/L and pH 5.16. Practical validation of the optimum medium provided polygalacturonase activity of 22.05 U/mL, which was 5-fold higher than in unoptimized conditions. Batch cultivation in a 20 L bioreactor performed with the optimal nutrients and conditions resulted in a high polygalacturonase content (25.75 U/mL. The enzyme showed stability over a range of temperature (5–90 °C with an optimum temperature of 60 °C with pH 5.0, exhibiting 100% residual activity after 1h at 60 °C. This enzyme was stable at a broad pH range (5.0–10. The enzyme proved to be an exo-polygalacturonase, releasing galacturonic acid by hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid. Moreover, the exo-polygalacturonase was able to enhance the clarification of both apple and citrus juice. As a result, an economical polygalacturonase production process was defined and proposed using an industrial food by-product.

  15. Effect of CH4 and O2 variations on rates of CH4 oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teh, Yit Arn; Conrad, Mark; Silver, Whendee L.; Carlson, Charlotte M.

    2003-10-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria are the primary sink for CH{sub 4} in reduced soils, and account for as much as 90 percent of all CH{sub 4} produced. Methanotrophic bacteria strongly discriminate against the heavy isotopes of carbon, resulting in CH{sub 4} emissions that are significantly more enriched in {sup 13}C than the original source material. Previous studies have used an isotope mass balance approach to quantify CH{sub 4} sources and sinks in the field, based on the assumption that the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation is a constant. This study quantifies the effect of systematic variations in CH{sub 4} and O{sub 2} concentrations on rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils. Soils were collected from the 0-15 cm depth, and incubated with varying concentrations of CH{sub 4} (100 ppmv, 500 ppmv, 1000 ppmv, and 5000 ppmv) or O{sub 2} (3 percent, 5 percent, 10 percent, and 21 percent). The isotope fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was calculated for each incubation using a Rayleigh fractionation model. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 100 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the lowest rate of CH{sub 4} uptake, and the other 3 treatments showing similar rates of CH{sub 4} uptake. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation did not vary significantly between the different O{sub 2} treatments. The fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between the different CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 5000 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the largest {sup 13}C-enrichment of residual CH{sub 4}. In treatments where CH{sub 4} concentration was not rate-limiting (> 500 ppmv CH{sub 4}), the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was negatively correlated with CH{sub 4} oxidation rate (P < 0.003, r{sup 2} = 0.86). A multiple regression model that included initial CH{sub 4} concentration and CH{sub 4} oxidation rate as independent variables

  16. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  17. [Effects of biological regulated measures on active organic carbon and erosion-resistance in the Three Gorges Reservoir region soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ru; Huang, Lin; He, Bing-Hui; Zhou, Li-Jiang; Yu, Chuan; Wang, Feng

    2013-07-01

    To gain a better knowledge of characteristics of soils and provide a scientific basis for soil erosion control in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area, contents of aggregates and total soil organic carbon (SOC), as well as soil active organic carbon fractions including particulate organic carbon (POC), readily oxidized organic carbon (ROC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC) in the 0-30 cm soil layer under seven different biological regulated measures were studied by the field investigation combined with the laboratory analysis. Results showed that the content of the SOC and active organic carbon fractions decreased with the increasing soil depth; the content of the SOC and active organic carbon fractions in 0-10 cm was significantly higher than that in 20-30 cm. The stability of soil aggregates were also significantly influenced by biological regulated measures, the content of > 0.25 mm water-stable aggregates in seven types of biological regulated measures was in the order of Koelreuteria bipinnata + Cassia suffruticasa > hedgerows > closed forest > natural restoration > economic forest > traditional planting > control plot, moreover, the content of 0.25 mm water-stable aggregates correlated positively with the content of SOC. Soils under different biological regulated measures all demonstrated fractal features, and soil under the measure of Koelreuteria bipinnata + Cassia suffruticasa was found to have the lowest value of fractal dimension and soil erodiable K, indicating a relatively strong structure stability and erosion-resistant capacity. Negative correlation was observed when compared the content of active organic carbon fractions with the soil erodiable K. It can be concluded that properties of soil can be managed through biological regulated measures; thence had an influence on the soil erosion-resistant capacity.

  18. Recycled aggregates concrete: aggregate and mix properties

    OpenAIRE

    González-Fonteboa, B.; Martínez-Abella, F.

    2005-01-01

    This study of structural concrete made with recycled concrete aggregate focuses on two issues: 1. The characterization of such aggregate on the Spanish market. This involved conducting standard tests to determine density, water absorption, grading, shape, flakiness and hardness. The results obtained show that, despite the considerable differences with respect to density and water absorption between these and natural aggregates, on the whole recycled aggregate is apt for use in concrete produc...

  19. Transport of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagee, Omer; Dror, Ishai; Berkowitz, Brian

    2012-07-01

    The effect of soil properties on the transport of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was studied in a set of laboratory column experiments, using different combinations of size fractions of a Mediterranean sandy clay soil. The AgNPs with average size of ~30nm yielded a stable suspension in water with zeta potential of -39mV. Early breakthrough of AgNPs in soil was observed in column transport experiments. AgNPs were found to have high mobility in soil with outlet relative concentrations ranging from 30% to 70%, depending on experimental conditions. AgNP mobility through the column decreased when the fraction of smaller soil aggregates was larger. The early breakthrough pattern was not observed for AgNPs in pure quartz columns nor for bromide tracer in soil columns, suggesting that early breakthrough is related to the nature of AgNP transport in natural soils. Micro-CT and image analysis used to investigate structural features of the soil, suggest that soil aggregate size strongly affects AgNP transport in natural soil. The retention of AgNPs in the soil column was reduced when humic acid was added to the leaching solution, while a lower flow rate (Darcy velocity of 0.17cm/min versus 0.66cm/min) resulted in higher retention of AgNPs in the soil. When soil residual chloride was exchanged by nitrate prior to column experiments, significantly improved mobility of AgNPs was observed in the soil column. These findings point to the importance of AgNP-soil chemical interactions as a retention mechanism, and demonstrate the need to employ natural soils rather than glass beads or quartz in representative experimental investigations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Soil friability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2011-01-01

    This review gathers and synthesizes literature on soil friability produced during the last three decades. Soil friability is of vital importance for crop production and the impact of crop production on the environment. A friable soil is characterized by an ease of fragmentation of undesirably large...... aggregates/clods and a difficulty in fragmentation of minor aggregates into undesirable small elements. Soil friability has been assessed using qualitative field methods as well as quantitative field and laboratory methods at different scales of observation. The qualitative field methods are broadly used...... by scientists, advisors and farmers, whereas the quantitative laboratory methods demand specialized skills and more or less sophisticated equipment. Most methods address only one aspect of soil friability, i.e. either the strength of unconfined soil or the fragment size distribution after applying a stress. All...

  1. Soil aggregation in a crop-livestock integration system under no-tillage Agregação do solo em sistema de integração lavoura-pecuária em plantio direto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edicarlos Damacena de Souza

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Grazing intensities can influence soil aggregation, which can be temporarily and permanently affected. The objective of this study was to evaluate the aggregate stability in water at the end of a soybean cycle and during pasture development in a crop-livestock integration system under no-tillage and grazing intensities. The experiment was initiated in 2001, in a dystrophic Red Latosol, after soybean harvest. Treatments consisted of pasture (black oat + Italian ryegrass at heights of 10, 20 and 40 cm, grazed by young cattle, and a control (no grazing, followed by soybean cultivation, in a randomized block design. Soil samples were collected at the end of the soybean cycle (May/2007, during animal grazing (September/2007 and at the end of the grazing cycle (November/2007. The grazing period influences aggregate distribution, since in the September sampling (0-5 cm layer, there was a higher proportion of aggregates > 4.76 mm at all grazing intensities. Soil aggregation is higher in no-tillage crop-livestock integration systems in grazed than in ungrazed areas.As intensidades de pastejo podem influenciar o estado de agregação do solo, que pode sofrer alterações temporárias ou permanentes. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a estabilidade dos agregados em água ao final do ciclo da soja e durante o desenvolvimento da pastagem em sistema de integração lavoura-pecuária em plantio direto submetido a intensidades de pastejo. O experimento foi iniciado em 2001, em um Latossolo Vermelho distrófico, após a colheita da soja. Os tratamentos constaram de alturas de manejo da pastagem (aveia-preta + azevém: 10, 20 e 40 cm, com bovinos jovens, e sem pastejo, seguido do cultivo de soja, em delineamento de blocos ao acaso. Amostras de solo foram retiradas nas camadas de 0 a 5, 5 a 10 e 10 a 20 cm. As amostras foram coletadas ao final do ciclo da soja (maio/2007, em pleno pastejo pelos animais (setembro/2007 e ao final do pastejo (novembro/2007. O tempo

  2. Genetic and agroindustrial features of meadow brown irrigated soils of Republic of Armenia in terms of climate change and desertification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.Gh. Ghazaryan

    2016-12-01

    In the case of prolonged and indiscriminate use the destruction of agronomically valuable structure and reduction of the content of water-stable aggregates occur in humus horizons. This paper provides suggestions of the ways for improving and increasing the fertility of these soils in the conditions of global climate change.

  3. Light Induced Aggregation of Specific Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Gopannagari, Madhusudana; Chaturvedi, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    We report optically induced aggregation and consequent separation of specific diameter of pristine single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) from stable solution. Well dispersed solution of pristine SWNTs, without any surfactant or functionalization, show rapid aggregation by uniform exposure to UV, visible and NIR illumination. Optically induced aggregation linearly increases with consequent increase in the intensity of light. Aggregated SWNTs were separated from the dispersed supernatant and ch...

  4. [Soil physical properties of different hedgerow systems in upper reaches of Yangtze River].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Qiang; Zhang, Hong-Jiang; Cheng, Jin-Hua; Wang, Xing; Lü, Wen-Xing

    2011-02-01

    Based on the investigation of present hedgerows in the upper reaches of Yangtze River, this paper analyzed the soil physical properties at different positions of three kinds of hedgerows (arbor, shrub, and grass). Comparing with those between the hedgerows, the soil physical properties within the hedgerows improved significantly. The average values of soil porosity, moisture content, saturated conductivity, water stable aggregates content, anti-erodibility index, anti-scouribility index, and clay content within the arbor, grass, and shrub hedgerows increased by 18.8%, 30.1%, 12.9%, 139.3%, 108.3%, 95.9%, and 25.5%, and the soil bulk density and sand content averagely decreased by 17.3% and 9.6%, respectively. The soil properties within the three hedgerows differed significantly. The soil anti-scouribility index within arbor hedgerow was the highest; the soil porosity, moisture content, saturated conductivity, anti-scouribility index, water-stable aggregates content, and clay content within the shrub hedgerow were higher than those within the tree and grass hedgerows; while the soil bulk density within the shrub hedgerows was lower than that within the tree and grass hedgerows. Because of the differences in the affecting degree of hedgerow on the soil physical properties at different positions of the three hedgerow systems, the related parameters presented definite horizontal variation at steep lands within, before, and behind the hedgerows, and between the hedgerows. The coefficient of variation (CV) of soil moisture content, anti-erodibility index, saturated conductivity, and clay content of arbor hedgerows was bigger than that of shrub and grass hedgerows, while the CV of soil bulk density, porosity, water-stable aggregates content, and anti-scouribility index of shrub hedgerow was bigger than that of arbor and grass hedgerows.

  5. Mineralogia, química e estabilidade de agregados do tamanho de silte de solos da Região Sudeste do Brasil Mineralogy, chemistry and stability of silt-size aggregates of soils from the Southeast Region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Tadeu Vitorino

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar a relação da composição mineralógica e química do solo com a estabilidade de agregados do tamanho de silte, foram realizados estudos utilizando-se amostras de horizontes A e B de diversos solos da Região Sudeste do Brasil. Amostras de TFSA foram dispersas a 12.000 rpm por 20 minutos e a fração silte foi separada por esgotamento da fração argila, constituindo-se na fração denominada pseudo-silte, a qual foi sonificada, separando-se a fração argila desagregada (por sifonamento da fração silte propriamente dita. Estudos de correlação mostraram que as composições mineralógica e química dos solos têm efeito marcante na dispersão de argila, com reflexos na fração silte. Maiores teores de gibbsita refletem em maior estabilidade dos agregados do tamanho de silte ao passo que a caulinita proporciona efeito inverso. As formas de Al determinadas na fração pseudo-silte estão associadas à maior dificuldade de dispersão da fração argila dos solos.The objective of this work was to evaluate the relationship of soil mineralogical and chemical composition with stability of silt-size aggregates. The studies were carried out using samples of A and B horizons of some soils from the Southeast Region of Brazil. Fine-earth samples were dispersed at 12,000 rpm during 20 minutes and the silt fraction was separated through clay fraction drain, constituting the fraction named pseudo-silt, which was sonificated, separating the desegregated clay fraction (by sonication from the properly named silt fraction. Correlation analyses showed that the soil mineralogical and chemical compositions have marked influence upon clay dispersion, with reflections on the silt fraction. Higher amounts of gibbsite reflect in higher stability of silt-size aggregates, while the kaolinite promotes inverse effect. The Al forms determined on the pseudo-silt fraction are associated with higher difficult of dispersion of clay fraction of

  6. [Effects and mechanisms of plant roots on slope reinforcement and soil erosion resistance: a research review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yan-Mei; Xia, Han-Ping; Li, Zhi-An; Cai, Xi-An

    2007-04-01

    Plant roots play an important role in resisting the shallow landslip and topsoil erosion of slopes by raising soil shear strength. Among the models in interpreting the mechanisms of slope reinforcement by plant roots, Wu-Waldron model is a widely accepted one. In this model, the reinforced soil strength by plant roots is positively proportional to average root tensile strength and root area ratio, the two most important factors in evaluating slope reinforcement effect of plant roots. It was found that soil erosion resistance increased with the number of plant roots, though no consistent quantitative functional relationship was observed between them. The increase of soil erosion resistance by plant roots was mainly through the actions of fiber roots less than 1 mm in diameter, while fiber roots enhanced the soil stability to resist water dispersion via increasing the number and diameter of soil water-stable aggregates. Fine roots could also improve soil permeability effectively to decrease runoff and weaken soil erosion.

  7. A study of soil surface characteristics in a small watershed in the hilly, gullied area on the Chinese Loess Plateau

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu Guobin,; Xu Mingxiang,; Ritsema, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    Soil surface characteristics are closely related to soil surface depressional storage, infiltration, runoff generation and soil erosion, especially in highly erodible loess soil. Soil surface random roughness, soil cohesion and aggregate stability are necessary parameters in the Limburg Soil Erosion

  8. Effects of plastic mulches and high tunnel raspberry production systems on soil physicochemical quality indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagała-Świątkiewicz, Iwona; Siwek, Piotr

    2018-01-01

    In horticulture, degradable materials are desirable alternatives to plastic films. Our aim was to study the impact of soil plastic mulching on the soil properties in the high tunnel and open field production systems of raspberry. The raised beds were mulched with a polypropylene non-woven and two degradable mulches: polypropylene with a photodegradant and non-woven polylactide. The results indicated that the system of raspberry production, as well as the type of mulching had significant impact on soil organic carbon stock, moisture content and water stable aggregate amount. Soils taken from the open field system had a lower bulk density and water stability aggregation index, but higher organic carbon and capillary water content as compared to soils collected from high tunnel conditions. In comparison with the open field system, soil salinity was also found to be higher in high tunnel, as well as with higher P, Mg, Ca, S, Na and B content. Furthermore, mulch covered soils had more organic carbon amount than the bare soils. Soil mulching also enhanced the water capacity expressed as a volume of capillary water content. In addition, mulching improved the soil structure in relation to the bare soil, in particular, in open field conditions. The impact of the compared mulches on soil quality indicators was similar.

  9. Maximum possible age of a petrel breeding colony near Punakaiki (South Island, New Zealand) from radiocarbon and stable isotope analysis of soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawke, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    The lifetime of individual petrel colonies is poorly known. This study used radiocarbon, 13 C, and 15 N analysis of soil to determine the maximum possible age of a colony presently occupied by Westland petrels. A sample of Ap horizon soil in lithic contact was selected for analysis, as soil least likely to have been redistributed by petrel burrowing. Chemical removal of mobile organic matter decreased δ 15 N from 14.0 permille (typical of breeding colony soils) to 6.1 permille (within the range of temperate forest soils without sea-bird breeding). δ 13 C values changed little, from -27.1 permille (untreated soil) to -28.4 permille (treated soil), and were typical of forest soil with with C 3 vegetation and no incorporation of marine C. Duplicate AMS radiocarbon analysis of treated sample yielded a combined conventional radiocarbon age of 864 ± 32 BP, indicating that sea-bird breeding could not have occurred at the site for more than 740-960 calendar years. Initial colony occupation may have occurred much later than this, and not been continuous. Sea bird species other than Westland petrels may also have used the site. (author). 30 refs., 2 figs

  10. Compressibility of Oxisol aggregates under no-till in response to soil water potential Compressibilidade de agregados de Latossolo Vermelho sob plantio direto em resposta ao potencial da água do solo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Tavares Filho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The system of no-till sowing stands out as being a technology that suits the objectives of more rational use of the soil and greater protection against the erosion. However, through till, any of it, occurs modifications of the soil's structure. This current work aims to study the influence of the energy state of the water and of the organic matter on the mechanism of compaction of Red Oxisol under no-till management system. Humid and non-deformed sample were collected in horizon AP of two agricultural areas under no-till, with and without rotation of cultures. In the laboratory, these samples were broken into fragments and sifted to obtain aggregates of 4 to 5 mm sized, which were placed in equilibrium under four matrix potentials. Thereafter, they were exposed to uni-dimensional compression with pressures varying from 32 to 1,000 kPa. The results in such a way show that the highest compressibility of aggregates both for the tilling with rotation of cultures as for the tilling without rotation of cultures, occurred for matrix potential -32 kPa (humidity of 0.29-0.32 kg kg-1, respectively, while the minor occurred for the potentials of -1 and -1,000 kPa (humidity of 0.35 and 0.27 kg kg-1, respectively, indicating that this soil should not be worked with humidity ranging around 0.29 to 0.32 kg kg-1 and the highest reduction of volume of aggregates was obtained for the mechanical pressures lower than 600 inferior kPa, indicating that these soils showed to be very influenced by compression, when exposed to mechanical work. Also, the aggregates of soil under no-till and rotation of crops presented higher sensitivity to the compression than the aggregates of soil under no-till and without rotation of crops, possibly for having better structural conditions given to a higher content of organic matter.O sistema de semeadura direta destaca-se como uma tecnologia que atende aos objetivos de uso mais racional do solo e maior proteção contra a eros

  11. Wettability, soil organic matter and structure-properties of typical chernozems under the forest and under the arable land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykova, Galina; Umarova, Aminat; Tyugai, Zemfira; Milanovskiy, Evgeny; Shein, Evgeny

    2017-04-01

    Intensive tillage affects the properties of soil: decrease in content of soil organic matter and in hydrophobicity of the soil's solid phase, the reduction of amount of water stable aggregates - all this leads to deterioration of the structure of the soil and affects the process of movement of moisture in the soil profile. One of the hypotheses of soil's structure formation ascribes the formation of water stable aggregates with the presence of hydrophobic organic substances on the surface of the soil's solid phase. The aim of this work is to study the effect of tillage on properties of typical chernozems (pachic Voronic Chernozems, Haplic Chernozems) (Russia, Kursk region), located under the forest and under the arable land. The determination of soil-water contact angle was performed by a Drop Shape Analyzer DSA100 (Krüss GmbH, Germany) by the static sessile drop method. For all samples the content of total and organic carbon by dry combustion in oxygen flow and the particle size distribution by the laser diffraction method on the device Analysette 22 comfort, FRITCH, Germany were determined. The estimation of aggregate composition was performed by dry sieving (AS 200, Retsch, Germany), the content of water stable aggregates was estimated by the Savvinov method. There was a positive correlation between the content of organic matter and soil's wettability in studied soils, a growth of contact angle with the increasing the content of organic matter. Under the forest the content of soil organic matter was changed from 6,41% on the surface up to 1,9% at the depth of 100 cm. In the Chernozem under the arable land the organic carbon content in arable horizon is almost two times less. The maximum of hydrophobicity (78.1o) was observed at the depth of 5 cm under the forest. In the profile under the arable land the contact angle value at the same depth was 50o. The results of the structure analysis has shown a decrease in the content of agronomically valuable and water

  12. Functional soil organic carbon pools for major soil units and land uses in southern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Wiesmeier, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Soil management, especially the type and intensity of land use, affect the carbon cycle to a high extent as they modify carbon sequestration in a specific soil. Thus man is intervening in the natural carbon cycle on a global scale. In our study, the amount of active, intermediate and passive SOC pools was determined for major soil types and land uses of Bavaria in southern Germany. Our SOC inventory revealed only slightly lower total SOC stocks in cropland soils compared to forest soils, when both top- and subsoils were considered. In cropland and grassland soils around 90% of total SOC stocks can be assigned to the intermediate and passive SOC pool. High SOC stocks in grassland soils are partly related to a higher degree of soil aggregation compared to cropland soils. The contribution of intermediate SOC in cropland soils was similar to that in grassland soils due to an increased proportion of SOM associated with silt and clay particles. The cultivation-induced loss of SOC due to aggregate disruption is at least partly compensated by increased formation of organo-mineral associations as a result of tillage that continuously promotes the contact of crop residues with reactive mineral surfaces. Contrary, forest soils were characterized by distinctly lower proportions of intermediate and passive SOC and a high amount of active SOC in form of litter and particulate organic matter which accounted for almost 40% of total SOC stocks. The determination of the current SOC content of silt and clay fractions for major soil units and land uses allowed an estimation of the C saturation deficit corresponding to the long-term C sequestration potential. The results showed that cropland soils have a low level of C saturation of around 50% and could store considerable amounts of additional SOC. A relatively high C sequestration potential was also determined for grassland soils. In contrast, forest soils had a low C sequestration potential as they were almost C saturated. The high

  13. Interaction of Land Management Intensity and Micro-topography Controls on Geochemistry of Raindrop-Liberated/Mobilized Soil Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, T.; Filley, T. R.; Berry, T.; Singh, S.; Hughes, M.; Tong, Y.; Papanicolaou, T.; Wacha, K.; Wilson, C. G.; Chaubey, I.

    2017-12-01

    The dynamics of raindrop-induced breakdown of soil aggregates, a critical factor in the initial process of surface erosion and lateral redistribution of soil, are strongly tied to land use intensity. What is unclear however is the relative control of rain and mechanical disturbance on the development of landscape-level heterogeneity in surface soil geochemistry. We used artificial rainfall simulated experiments including an aggregate stability test and time course rainfall-erosional test to evaluate the role of management intensity and micro-topography on the geochemistry of raindrop-liberated/mobilized particles from landscapes in southeastern Iowa. Comparing restored prairie, conservation tillage, and conventional tillage sites we found, and with a trend toward increasing tillage intensity, a decrease in aggregate stability and raindrop-liberated particles that were lower in organic carbon, nitrogen, and plant-derived biopolymers, while containing higher proportions of microbially-processed nitrogen than the raindrop stable aggregates. Time evolution of the geochemistry (e.g. elemental, stable isotope, and biopolymer composition) of transported soil particles exhibited distinct patterns based upon both position of the hillslope and oriented soil roughness. Additionally, in the restored prairie, raindrop liberated particles had identical geochemical composition to the raindrop stable aggregates. Our results demonstrate that agricultural sites under intensive tillage have not only a greater potential to liberate and mobilize soil particles during storms, but the mobilized particles will have a distinct chemical character based on tillage intensity, hillslope position and oriented roughness thus lead to a greater potential for landscape level heterogeneity in surface and buried soil chemistry upon mobilization and burial.

  14. Inter-relação biomassa vegetal subterrânea-estabilidade de agregados-erosão hídrica em solo submetido a diferentes formas de manejo Interrelation of underground plant biomass with soil aggregate stability and rainfall erosion of a soil under different managements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Bochi da Silva Volk

    2008-08-01

    ão-mobilizado quanto recém-mobilizado, ela foi pequena somente naquelas seqüências culturais que propiciaram altos valores de massa de raízes mortas das plantas e de diâmetro médio ponderado de agregados do solo. No solo recém-mobilizado e descoberto, a diminuição da perda de solo também se deveu à rugosidade superficial criada pelo preparo. As relações da perda total de água e da perda total de solo, com a massa de raízes mortas das plantas e com o diâmetro médio ponderado de agregados do solo, foram significativas a 5 %.Increasing underground plant biomass and soil aggregate stability by application of adequate management practices enhances the quality in terms of water infiltration and erosion resistance. Based on this premise, an erosion study using simulated rainfall was carried out in the field, at an experimental station of the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul - EEA/UFRGS, in Eldorado do Sul, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, in the summer of 2003/2004, in a 7.5 year soil management experiment. The purpose of the research was to investigate relationships between management and erosion variables, related to a given history of soil use and management and to the momentary, surface physical conditions created by tillage and residue-cover treatments, applied immediately before erosion tests. A sandy clay loam Ultisol with 0.115 m m-1 average slope steepness was used. Four crop sequences were studied in no-till, under tillage (disking and under mulch-cover (crop residue. Three erosion tests of simulated rainfall were performed with a rotating-boom rainfall simulator, each of them at a rainfall intensity of 64 mm h-1 during 1.5 h. The root mass of dead plants, soil aggregate mean-weight diameter, soil and water loss were determined. In the freshly-tilled soil (loose and rough surface water infiltration in the soil was higher, contrasting with the lower water loss than in the untilled soil (firm and smooth surface, even though the former was bare and the later

  15. The Effect of Zeolite on Aggregate Stability Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sohrab

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil structural stability affects the profitability and sustainability of agricultural systems. Particle size distribution (PSD and aggregate stability are the important characteristics of soil. Aggregate stability has a significant impact on the development of the root system, water and carbon cycle and soil resistance against soil erosion. Soil aggregate stability, defined as the ability of the aggregates to remain intact when subject to a given stress, is an important soil property that affects the movement and storage of water, aeration, erosion, biological activity and growth of crops. Dry soil aggregate stability (Mean Weight Diameter (MWD, Geometric Mean Diameter (GMD and Wet Aggregate Stability (WAS are important indices for evaluating soil aggregate stability.To improve soil physical properties, including modifying aggregate, using various additives (organic, inorganic and chemicals, zeolites are among what has been studied.According to traditional definition, zeolites are hydratealuminosilicates of alkaline and alkaline-earth minerals. Their structure is made up of a framework of[SiO4]−4 and [AlO4]−5 tetrahedron linked to each other's cornersby sharing oxygen atoms. The substitution of Si+4 by Al+3 intetrahedral sites results inmore negative charges and a high cation exchange capacity.Zeolites, as natural cation exchangers, are suitable substitutes to remove toxic cations. Among the natural zeolites,Clinoptilolite seems to be the most efficient ion exchanger and ion-selective material forremoving and stabilizing heavy metals.Due to theexisting insufficient technical information on the effects of using different levels of zeolite on physical properties of different types of soils in Iran, the aim of this research was to assess the effects of two different types of zeolite (Clinoptilolite natural zeolite, Z4, and Synthetic zeolite, A4 on aggregate stability indicesof soil. Materials and Methods: In this study at first

  16. Environmentalism and natural aggregate mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, L.J.; Langer, W.H.; Sachs, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    Sustaining a developed economy and expanding a developing one require the use of large volumes of natural aggregate. Almost all human activity (commercial, recreational, or leisure) is transacted in or on facilities constructed from natural aggregate. In our urban and suburban worlds, we are almost totally dependent on supplies of water collected behind dams and transported through aqueducts made from concrete. Natural aggregate is essential to the facilities that produce energy-hydroelectric dams and coal-fired powerplants. Ironically, the utility created for mankind by the use of natural aggregate is rarely compared favorably with the environmental impacts of mining it. Instead, the empty quarries and pits are seen as large negative environmental consequences. At the root of this disassociation is the philosophy of environmentalism, which flavors our perceptions of the excavation, processing, and distribution of natural aggregate. The two end-member ideas in this philosophy are ecocentrism and anthropocentrism. Ecocentrism takes the position that the natural world is a organism whose arteries are the rivers-their flow must not be altered. The soil is another vital organ and must not be covered with concrete and asphalt. The motto of the ecocentrist is "man must live more lightly on the land." The anthropocentrist wants clean water and air and an uncluttered landscape for human use. Mining is allowed and even encouraged, but dust and noise from quarry and pit operations must be minimized. The large volume of truck traffic is viewed as a real menace to human life and should be regulated and isolated. The environmental problems that the producers of natural aggregate (crushed stone and sand and gravel) face today are mostly difficult social and political concerns associated with the large holes dug in the ground and the large volume of heavy truck traffic associated with quarry and pit operations. These concerns have increased in recent years as society's demand for

  17. Heterogeneity of elemental composition and natural abundance of stables isotopes of C and N in soils and leaves of mangroves at their southernmost West Atlantic range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. P. Tognella

    Full Text Available Abstract Mangrove communities were selected in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, near their southernmost limit of distribution, to study mineral nutrient relation in soils and plants. Communities included three true mangrove species, Rhizophora mangle, Laguncularia racemosa and Avicennia germinans, and two associated species, the fern Acrostichum danaeifolium, and the grass Spartina densiflora. The sites included communities in the lower Río Tavares near Florianopolis city, Sonho beach near Palhoça city, and the Santo Antonio lagoon. These sites included a full range of mangroves under humid climate where winter temperatures, instead of salinity, may be the main factor regulating their productive capacity and species composition. Soil salinity was determined by the concentration of soluble Na, and soil C and N were linearly correlated indicating their association in organic matter. Tavares site showed higher specific conductivity, and concentrations of Na and Mg in the soil layer below 40 cm depth, indicating larger influence of marine water. Isotopic signature of C increased with soil depth suggesting that microorganisms decomposing organic matter are releasing 13C depleted CO2. Nitrogen isotopic signature decreased with soil depth, indicating enrichment in 15N possibly as a result of denitrification in the upper soil layers. Mineral elements in leaf tissues showed A. schaueriana with higher concentrations of N, P, Na, K, Cu, Zn, and Na/Ca ratio. Spartina densiflora was characterized by the lowest N and K concentrations, and the highest concentrations of Al and Fe. Rhizophora mangle and L. racemosa had the highest Ca concentrations. Carbon isotopic signatures identified S. densiflora as a C4 plant, and A. schaueriana as the mangrove species occupying comparatively more water stressed microsites than the rest. Leaf nitrogen isotopic signatures were positive, in correspondence with the soil values. The results support the hypothesis that

  18. In-soil radon anomalies as precursors of earthquakes: a case study in the SE slope of Mt. Etna in a period of quite stable weather conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizzini, Fabio; Brai, Maria

    2012-01-01

    In-soil radon concentrations as well as climatic parameters (temperature, atmospheric pressure and relative humidity) were collected in St. Venerina (Eastern Sicily – Italy) from March 19th to May 22nd 2009, close to an active fault system called Timpe Fault System (TFS), which is strictly linked to the geodynamics of Mt. Etna. During the monitoring period no drastic climatic variations were observed and, on the other hand, important seismic events were recorded close to the monitoring site. A seismic swarm composed of 5 earthquakes was observed in the Milo area on March 25th (M max = 2.7) at just 5.1 km from the site, and on May 13th an earthquake of 3.6 magnitude was recorded in the territory of St. Venerina, at just 3.2 km from the site; the earthquake was felt by the population and reported by all local and regional media. The in-soil radon concentrations have shown anomalous increases possibly linked to the earthquakes recorded, but certainly not attributable to local meteorology. To verify this assumption the average radon concentration and the standard deviation (σ) have been calculated and the regions of ±1.5σ and ±2σ deviation from the average concentration have been investigated. Moreover, to further minimise the contribution of the meteorological parameters on the in-soil radon fluctuations, a multiple regressions method has been used. To distinguish those earthquakes which could generate in-soil radon anomalies as precursors, the Dobrovolsky radius has been applied. The results obtained suggests that a clear correlation between earthquakes and in-soil radon increases exist, and that the detection of the in-soil radon anomalies becomes surely simpler in particular favourable conditions: weather stability, earthquakes within the Dobrovolsky radius and close to the monitoring area. Moreover, the absence of large variations of the climatic parameters, which could generate incoherent noise components to the radon signal, has made the radon

  19. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets, with a few more additions - with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers - exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the foree of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc. (orig.)

  20. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc

  1. Relating soil biochemistry to sustainable crop production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amino acids, amino sugars, carbohydrates, phenols, and fatty acids together comprise appreciable proportions of soil organic matter (SOM). Their cycling contribute to soil processes, including nitrogen availability, carbon sequestration and aggregation. For example, soil accumulation of phenols has ...

  2. Increased soil stable nitrogen isotopic ratio following phosphorus enrichment: historical patterns and tests of two hypotheses in a phosphorus-limited wetland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inglett, P.W.; Reddy, K.R.; Newmann, S.

    2007-01-01

    on the δ15N of NH4+ and significantly increased the δ15N of water-extractable organic N. Measurements of surface soils collected during a field mesocosm experiment also revealed no significant effect of P on δ15N even after 5 years of P addition. In contrast, δ15N of leaf and root tissues of hydroponically...

  3. Atributos físicos e químicos de agregados pedogênicos e de coprólitos de minhocas em diferentes classes de solos da Paraíba Physical and chemical attributes of pedogenic aggregates and earthworm casts in different soil classes of Paraíba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís de França da Silva Neto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A estrutura do solo é constituída de agregados pedogênicos e biogênicos, formados respectivamente pela hierarquização de agregados e pela ação da macrofauna, sobretudo a das minhocas. Neste estudo, objetivou-se a comparação entre agregados do solo (pedogênicos e coprólitos de minhocas (biogênicos de diferentes tamanhos e classes de solos. As coletas de amostras indeformadas de solos e coprólitos de minhocas (Pontoscolex corethrurus Muller, 1857 foram realizadas em quatro solos de classes diferentes do Estado da Paraíba (Latossolo Amarelo, Argissolo Vermelho Amarelo, Luvissolo Crômico e Nitossolo Vermelho. As caracterizações físicas e químicas de agregados e coprólitos foram realizadas após secagem à sombra e separação em três classes de diâmetros (20,0 - 9,52; 9,52 - 6,35 e 6,35 - 4,76 mm. A granulometria mostrou ser similar para cada tipo de agregado (pedogênico e biogênico, independentemente do tamanho dos agregados. Em geral, os coprólitos apresentaram maiores proporções de argila, silte e areia fina e menor proporção da fração areia grossa, maior estabilidade e maiores teores de carbono orgânico e cátions trocáveis, comparativamente aos agregados pedogênicos. Os resultados refletem um processo genético peculiar e sugerem a importância dos agregados biogênicos como indicadores da qualidade do solo.The soil structure is composed by pedogenic and biogenic aggregates, formed respectively by aggregate hierarchy and macrofauna activity, especially by earthworms. The objective of this study was to compare soil aggregates and earthworm casts with different aggregate-size classes and soil classes. The sampling of undisturbed soil and earthworm casts (Pontoscolex corethrurus, Muller, 1857 was made in four soils of different classes in the State of Paraíba (Oxisol, Ultisol, Alfisol and Nitisol. The chemical and physical evaluations of aggregates and earthworm casts were determined after dry and split into

  4. RECIPROCAL RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN AGGREGATE STABILITY AND ORGANIC CARBON CHARACTERISTICS IN A FORESTED ECOSYSTEM OF NORTHERN NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halima Mohammed Lawal

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic matter associated with different size aggregates differ in structure and function; therefore, play different roles in soil organic carbon (SOC turnover. This study assessed the relationship between aggregate stability and soil organic carbon fractions in a forested soil. Aggregate stability characterized by mean weight diameter (MWD was correlated with the various pools of SOC in a regression model. Mean weight diameter presented a 46% influence on total organic carbon (TOC while, TOC accounts for 21.8% 0f aggregate stability. The unprotected and physically protected soil organic carbon did not significantly dictate stability of these soils. However, chemically protected and biochemically protected SOC influenced significantly aggregate stability of these forested soils.

  5. Concretes with red mud coarse aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dênio Ramam Carvalho de Oliveira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Red mud (RM is a mineral waste, residue of the Bayer process used to obtain alumina from bauxite. While the exploration of rolled pebble damages the environment and is much more controlled by the government, the huge RM disposal areas do not stop increasing and polluting soil, rivers and groundwater sources in Amazon. In this work, the material mixtures used to produce coarse aggregates presented up to 80% of RM, 30% of metakaolin and 30% of active silica as recycled waste. Several tests were carried out to determine the aggregates physical properties and to evaluate the mechanical performance of the concretes with the new aggregates, including hydraulic abrasion strength, and the results were compared to the reference ones, i.e. rolled pebble concretes. Additionally, the sintering process neutralizes any toxic substance as occur in some RM products like tiles and bricks, and these results have encouraged an industrial or semi-industrial production of RM aggregates for concretes.

  6. In-soil radon anomalies as precursors of earthquakes: a case study in the SE slope of Mt. Etna in a period of quite stable weather conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizzini, Fabio; Brai, Maria

    2012-11-01

    In-soil radon concentrations as well as climatic parameters (temperature, atmospheric pressure and relative humidity) were collected in St. Venerina (Eastern Sicily - Italy) from March 19th to May 22nd 2009, close to an active fault system called Timpe Fault System (TFS), which is strictly linked to the geodynamics of Mt. Etna. During the monitoring period no drastic climatic variations were observed and, on the other hand, important seismic events were recorded close to the monitoring site. A seismic swarm composed of 5 earthquakes was observed in the Milo area on March 25th (M(max) = 2.7) at just 5.1 km from the site, and on May 13th an earthquake of 3.6 magnitude was recorded in the territory of St. Venerina, at just 3.2 km from the site; the earthquake was felt by the population and reported by all local and regional media. The in-soil radon concentrations have shown anomalous increases possibly linked to the earthquakes recorded, but certainly not attributable to local meteorology. To verify this assumption the average radon concentration and the standard deviation (σ) have been calculated and the regions of ±1.5σ and ±2σ deviation from the average concentration have been investigated. Moreover, to further minimise the contribution of the meteorological parameters on the in-soil radon fluctuations, a multiple regressions method has been used. To distinguish those earthquakes which could generate in-soil radon anomalies as precursors, the Dobrovolsky radius has been applied. The results obtained suggests that a clear correlation between earthquakes and in-soil radon increases exist, and that the detection of the in-soil radon anomalies becomes surely simpler in particular favourable conditions: weather stability, earthquakes within the Dobrovolsky radius and close to the monitoring area. Moreover, the absence of large variations of the climatic parameters, which could generate incoherent noise components to the radon signal, has made the radon fluctuations

  7. Bromide as a tracer for studying water movement and nitrate displacement in soils: comparison with stable isotope tracers; Bromid als Tracer zur Untersuchung der Wasserbewegung und der Nitratverlagerung in Boeden: Vergleich mit stabilisotopen Tracern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russow, R.; Knappe, S. [UFZ - Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Bad Lauchstaedt (Germany). Sektion Bodenforschung

    1999-02-01

    Tracers are an ideal means of studying water movement and associated nitrate displacement. Often bromide is preferred as a tracer because it is considered a representative tracer for water and because, being a conservative tracer (i.e. not involved in chemical and biological soil processes), it can be used for studying anion transport in soils. Moreover, it is less expensive and easier to measure than the stable isotopes deuterium and {sup 15}N. Its great advantage over radioactive tracers (e.g. tritium), which outweighs their extreme sensitivity and ease of measurement and which it has in common with stable isotopes, is that it does not require radiation protection measures. However, there are also constraints on the use of bromide as a tracer in soil/water/plant systems. Our own studies on different soils using D{sub 2}O, bromide and [{sup 15}N]-nitrate in lysimeters suggest that the above assumptions on bromide tracers need not always be valid under conditions as they prevail in biologically active soils. As the present paper shows, these studies permit a good assessment of the possibilities and limits to these tracers. [Deutsch] Fuer die Untersuchung der Wasserbewegung sowie der daran gekoppelten Nitrat-Verlagerung ist der Einsatz von Tracern das Mittel der Wahl. Dabei wird Bromid als Tracer haeufig bevorzugt, da es allgemein als ein repraesentativer Tracer fuer Wasser und als konservativer Tracer (nicht involviert in chemische und biologische Bodenprozesse) zur Untersuchung des Anionentransportes in Boeden angesehen wird und es gegenueber den stabilen Isotopen Deuterium und {sup 15}N billiger und einfacher zu bestimmen ist. Gegenueber den radioaktiven Tracern (z.B. Tritium), die zwar sehr empfindlich und einfach messbar sind, besteht der grosse Vorteil, dass, wie bei den stabilen Isotopen, keine Strahlenschutzmassnahmen ergriffen werden muessen. Es gibt jedoch auch einschraenkende Hinweise fuer die Verwendung von Bromid als Tracer im System Boden

  8. Biphenyl-metabolizing bacteria in the rhizosphere of horseradish and bulk soil contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls as revealed by stable isotope probing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlík, Ondřej; Ječná, K.; Macková, M.; Vlček, Čestmír; Hroudová, Miluše; Demnerová, K.; Pačes, Václav; Macek, Tomáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 20 (2009), s. 6471-6477 ISSN 0099-2240 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08031 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA525/09/1058 Program:GA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : stable isotope probing * biphenyl * 16S rRNA gene * functional gene * remediation Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 3.686, year: 2009

  9. The structure of microbial community in aggregates of a typical chernozem aggregates under contrasting variants of its agricultural use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, E. A.; Kutovaya, O. V.; Tkhakakhova, A. K.; Chernov, T. I.; Pershina, E. V.; Markina, L. G.; Andronov, E. E.; Kogut, B. M.

    2015-11-01

    The taxonomic structure of microbiomes in aggregates of different sizes from typical chernozems was investigated using sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The aggregate fractions of 7 mm obtained by sieving of the soil samples at natural moisture were used for analysis. The highest prokaryote biomass (bacteria, archaea) was determined in the fractions permanent black fallow > permanent winter wheat. The greatest number of fungi was recorded in the fraction chernozem than the size of aggregate fractions did. The most diverse microbial community was recorded in the soil samples of the fallow; the statistically significant maximums of the Shannon diversity indices and indices of phylogenetic diversity (PD) were recorded in the fractions <0.25 and 2-5 mm from the fallow soil. On the whole, the fine soil fractions (<0.25 mm) were characterized by higher diversity indices in comparison with those of the coarser aggregate fractions.

  10. Increase in soil stable carbon isotope ratio relates to loss of organic carbon: results from five long-term bare fallow experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menichetti, Lorenzo; Houot, Sabine; van Oort, Folkert

    2015-01-01

    and covering a latitudinal range of 11°. The bare fallow soils lost 33–65 % of their initial SOC content and showed a mean annual δ13C increase of 0.008–0.024 ‰. The 13C enrichment could be related empirically to SOC losses by a Rayleigh distillation equation. A more complex mechanistic relationship was also...... examined. The overall estimate of the fractionation coefficient (ε) was −1.2 ± 0.3 ‰. This coefficient represents an important input to studies of long-term SOC dynamics in agricultural soils that are based on variations in 13C natural abundance. The variance of ε may be ascribed to site characteristics...... some impact on isotope abundance and fractionation....

  11. Temporal variability of selected chemical and physical properties of topsoil of three soil types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirku, Veronika; Kodesova, Radka; Nikodem, Antonin; Muhlhanselova, Marcela; Zigova, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Temporal variability of soil properties measured in surface horizons of three soil types (Haplic Cambisol, Greyic Phaeozem, Haplic Luvisol) was studied in years 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010. Undisturbed soil samples were taken every month to evaluate the actual field soil-water content, bulk density, porosity and hydraulic properties. The grab soil samples were taken every month to evaluate aggregate stability using the WSA (water stable aggregates) index, pHH2O and pHKCl, soil organic matter content and quality. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity for pressure head of -2 cm was measured directly in the field using the minidisk tension infiltrometer. In addition soil structure was documented on micromorphological images. In some cases, the similar trends of the pHH2O , pHKCl , A400/A600, rod, P, θfield or WSA values were observed in different soils. Interestingly, the similar trends were found mostly for the Haplic Cambisol and the Greyic Phaeozem despite the fact that these soils considerably differed (different soil substrate, pedogenetic processes, etc.) and that variable crops (winter wheat and spring wheat) were planted at both locations during two years (2007 and 2006). Mostly different trends were observed for the Haplic Luvisol and the Greyic Phaeozem (soil of the same substrate). The reason could be attributed to a high vulnerability of the Haplic Luvisol to soil degradation in comparison to that of the Greyic Phaeozem. Parameters of hydraulic properties were highly variable and did not show similar trends for different soils (except the saturated soil water content and the slope of the retention curve at the inflection point for Haplic Cambisol and Greyic Phaeozem). Soil structure, aggregate stability and soil hydraulic properties were interrelated and depended on plant growth, rainfall compaction and tillage. The drier conditions in some soils positively influenced the soil aggregate stability, the slope of the retention curve at the inflection point and

  12. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  13. Linking plants, fungi and soil mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Anil; Graf, Frank

    2017-04-01

    their plant partners, the fungi themselves need to have access to water and nutrients. For this purpose, a resilient soil matrix consisting of stable micro- and macro-aggregates is an indispensable prerequisite. Luckily, the fungi are among the pioneers in assembling stable aggregates. The fungal hyphae intensively penetrate the unstructured soil body, enmeshing small organic and inorganic soil particles and form and cement them to micro- and macro-aggregates. On the one hand, growing hyphae are able to align primary particles and, on the other hand, exert pressure on surrounding particles and compounds forcing them together, such as clay and organic matter. Under physiological (or neutral) pH values, the fungal mycelia have a net negative charge. It is suggested that negatively charged fungal polysaccharides are bound to negatively charged clay minerals by bridges of polyvalent cations which have been proven to be stronger than some direct bonds between clay and organic matter. The formation of aggregates up to a size of 2 mm is associated with hyphal length of fungi. With regard to the assemblage of aggregates >2 mm both fungal mycelia and roots are involved. Indirectly, the mycorrhizal fungi affect the aggregate establishment through their host plants, particularly by accelerating the development of their root network and by serving as a distribution vector for associated micro-organisms, mainly bacteria and archaea, additionally contributing to cementation. Therefore, root-reinforcement as addressed for quantification of vegetation effects on slope stability almost ever is a combined contribution of fungal mycelia and root networks. With soil aggregates as the "bricks" for building a stable soil matrix and pore structure, root-reinforcement strongly depends on aggregate strength controlling potential, efficiency, and sustainability of growth and development of the protective vegetation. From a geotechnical point of view, aggregation of fines may be such pronounced

  14. Feedbacks Between Soil Structure and Microbial Activities in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, V. L.; Smith, A. P.; Fansler, S.; Varga, T.; Kemner, K. M.; McCue, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    Soil structure provides the physical framework for soil microbial habitats. The connectivity and size distribution of soil pores controls the microbial access to nutrient resources for growth and metabolism. Thus, a crucial component of soil research is how a soil's three-dimensional structure and organization influences its biological potential on a multitude of spatial and temporal scales. In an effort to understand microbial processes at scale more consistent with a microbial community, we have used soil aggregates as discrete units of soil microbial habitats. Our research has shown that mean pore diameter (x-ray computed tomography) of soil aggregates varies with the aggregate diameter itself. Analyzing both the bacterial composition (16S) and enzyme activities of individual aggregates showed significant differences in the relative abundances of key members the microbial communities associated with high enzyme activities compared to those with low activities, even though we observed no differences in the size of the biomass, nor in the overall richness or diversity of these communities. We hypothesize that resources and substrates have stimulated key populations in the aggregates identified as highly active, and as such, we conducted further research that explored how such key populations (i.e. fungal or bacterial dominated populations) alter pathways of C accumulation in aggregate size domains and microbial C utilization. Fungi support and stabilize soil structure through both physical and chemical effects of their hyphal networks. In contrast, bacterial-dominated communities are purported to facilitate micro- and fine aggregate stabilization. Here we quantify the direct effects fungal versus bacterial dominated communities on aggregate formation (both the rate of aggregation and the quality, quantity and distribution of SOC contained within aggregates). A quantitative understanding of the different mechanisms through which fungi or bacteria shape aggregate

  15. Micromorphological analysis on the influence of the soil mineral composition on short-term aggregation in semi-arid Mediterranean soils Analisis micromorfológico de la influencia de la composición mineral del suelo sobre la agregación a corto plazo en suelos semiáridos de clima mediterráneo Análise micromorfológica da influencia da composição mineral do solo na agregação a curto prazo em solos semiáridos de clima mediterrânico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inigo Virto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aggregation in soils is the result of the interaction of the soil organic components and soil minerals. The reactivity of the mineral phase is acknowledged to interfere with aggregates formation and stabilization, but its influence on aggregation in semi-arid Mediterranean soils remains mostly unknown. In this study, we used micromorphological analysis of aggregates formed in a 28-d incubation in two agricultural soils differing only in the composition of the mineral phase in the upper Ap horizon (a carbonate-depleted Palexeralf with 21.5% clay, and a contiguous carbonate-rich Typic Calcixerept with 20.9% clay before decarbonation which was reduced to 10.4% upon decarbonation. The two soils belong to the same agricultural field and have had similar management for decades. Soil samples were completely disaggregated into their fractions 2 mm formed during the incubation were separated at days 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 and used to prepare thin sections. Macroaggregates were more abundant at day 3, and then decreased in number in the two soils, which indicates a dependency between organic matter decomposition and stable macroaggregates formation. They contained a greater proportion of smaller aggregates in the decarbonated soil. Micromorphological analysis revealed significant differences in the fabric and physical characteristics of these macroaggregates, in which bonds among primary particles were observed to be led by clays in the Palexeralf while the coarse fraction appeared embedded in a micromass with crystallitic b-fabric corresponding to carbonates in the Calcixerept. This resulted in a more compact fabric and less porosity in macroaggregates in the Calcixerept. Image analysis of thin sections was used to quantify and characterize the pore system of macroaggregates. Porosity (pores > 20 ?m was more than double (36.9% for 15.6% within macroaggregates in the decarbonated soil, with more elongated pores. Although in both soils most pores were 20 to

  16. Global Comparison Aggregation Services

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Hongwei; Madnick, Stuart; Siegel, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Web aggregation has been available regionally for several years, but this service has not been offered globally. As an example, using multiple regional comparison aggregators, we analyze the global prices for a Sony camcorder, which differ by more than three times. We further explain that lack of global comparison aggregation services partially contribute to such huge price dispersion. We also discuss difficulties encountered in the manual integration of global web sources. Motivated by this ...

  17. Crescimento inicial de Acácia em condicionador formado de fibra de coco e resíduo agregante Initial growth of Acacia mangium Willd in soil conditioner formed of coconut fiber and aggregating residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo F. Duarte

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Propôs-se, neste trabalho, avaliar manta (condicionador do solo formada de fibra de coco e resíduo agregante com diferentes substratos no crescimento inicial de plantas de Acacia mangium Willd. Utilizou-se o delineamento de blocos ao acaso, com 13 tratamentos e três repetições, distribuídos em esquema fatorial (6 x 2 + 1, sendo 6 proporções de fibra de coco e resíduo agregante (100 e 0%, 90 e 10%, 80 e 20%, 70 e 30%, 60 e 40%, 50 e 50%, 2 substratos contendo lodo de esgoto (terra de subsolo de Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo (LVA + lodo de esgoto na proporção 2:1 e esterco bovino (terra de subsolo de Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo (LVA + esterco bovino curtido na relação 3:1, e a testemunha como tratamento adicional, terra de subsolo de Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo (LVA. Após 173 dias da semeadura a manta, contendo LVa+ esterco bovino curtido (3:1, foi superior ao substrato com terra de subsolo de LVA e lodo de esgoto (2:1 no desenvolvimento inicial de A. mangium Willd em altura e comprimento da raiz. Mantas contendo aproximadamente de 90 a 100% de fibra de coco e de 0 a 10% de resíduo agregante proporcionaram melhores características de crescimento de A. mangium Willd em condições de campo.The purpose of this work was to evaluate litter layer (soil conditioner formed of coconut fiber and aggregating residue with different substrate in the initial growth of Acacia mangium Willd plants. A completely randomized block was utilized, with 13 treatments and three replications, in a factorial arrangement (6 x 2 + 1, with 6 proportions of fiber of coconut and aggregating residue (100 and 0%, 90 and 10%, 80 and 20%, 70 and 30%, 60 and 40%, 50 and 50%, 2 substrates, one containing sewage sludge (subsoil of Red-Yellow Latosol (LVA plus sewage sludge in the proportion 2:1 and the other with bovine manure (subsoil of Red-Yellow Latosol (LVA plus decomposed bovine manure in the relation 3:1, and the control as additional treatment, subsoil of Red

  18. Kinetics of Thermal Denaturation and Aggregation of Bovine Serum Albumin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera A Borzova

    Full Text Available Thermal aggregation of bovine serum albumin (BSA has been studied using dynamic light scattering, asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation and analytical ultracentrifugation. The studies were carried out at fixed temperatures (60°C, 65°C, 70°C and 80°C in 0.1 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, at BSA concentration of 1 mg/ml. Thermal denaturation of the protein was studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Analysis of the experimental data shows that at 65°C the stage of protein unfolding and individual stages of protein aggregation are markedly separated in time. This circumstance allowed us to propose the following mechanism of thermal aggregation of BSA. Protein unfolding results in the formation of two forms of the non-native protein with different propensity to aggregation. One of the forms (highly reactive unfolded form, Uhr is characterized by a high rate of aggregation. Aggregation of Uhr leads to the formation of primary aggregates with the hydrodynamic radius (Rh,1 of 10.3 nm. The second form (low reactive unfolded form, Ulr participates in the aggregation process by its attachment to the primary aggregates produced by the Uhr form and possesses ability for self-aggregation with formation of stable small-sized aggregates (Ast. At complete exhaustion of Ulr, secondary aggregates with the hydrodynamic radius (Rh,2 of 12.8 nm are formed. At 60°C the rates of unfolding and aggregation are commensurate, at 70°C the rates of formation of the primary and secondary aggregates are commensurate, at 80°C the registration of the initial stages of aggregation is complicated by formation of large-sized aggregates.

  19. Kinetics of colloidal fractal aggregation by differential dynamic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, F.; D'Angelo, A.; Lee, M.; Lotti, A.; Pigazzini, M. C.; Singh, K.; Cerbino, R.

    2011-11-01

    We study the kinetics of an aggregation process induced by adding salt to a stable colloidal suspension of 73 nm (diameter) particles. Despite the subdiffraction size of the colloidal particles, the process is monitored via optical microscopy, which is used here to obtain time-resolved scattering information about the colloidal aggregates. The radius of the aggregates is determined as a function of time and their fractal dimension is extracted. Our results are compatible with a diffusion limited aggregation process, as independently confirmed by spectral turbidimetry measurements on the same sample.

  20. Enhancement of physical and hydrological properties of a sandy loam soil via application of different biochar particle sizes during incubation period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Esmaeelnejad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In spite of many studies that have been carried out, there is a knowledge-gap as to how different sizes of biochars alter soil properties. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different sizes of biochars on soil properties. The biochars were produced at two pyrolysis temperatures (350 and 550°C from two feedstocks (rice husk and apple wood chips. Produced biochars were prepared at two diameters (1-2 mm and <1 mm and mixed with soil at a rate of 2% (w/w. Multiple effects of type, temperature and size of biochars were significant, so as the mixture of soil and finer woodchip biochars produced at 550°C had significant effects on all soil properties. Soil aggregation and stabilization of macro-aggregates, values of mean weight diameter and water stable aggregates were improved due to increased soil organic matter as binding agents and microbial biomass. In addition, plant available water capacity, air capacity, S-index, meso-pores and water retention content were significantly increased compared to control. But, saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks was reduced due to blockage of pores by biochar particles, reduction of pore throat size and available space for flow and also, high field capacity of biochars. So, application of biochar to soil, especially the finest particles of high-tempered woody biochars, can improve physical and hydrological properties of coarse-textured soils and reduce their water drainage by modification of Ks.

  1. Enhancement of physical and hydrological properties of a sandy loam soil via application of different biochar particle sizes during incubation period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esmaeelnejad, L.; Shorafa, M.; Gorji, M.; Hosseini, S.M.

    2016-11-01

    In spite of many studies that have been carried out, there is a knowledge-gap as to how different sizes of biochars alter soil properties. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different sizes of biochars on soil properties. The biochars were produced at two pyrolysis temperatures (350 and 550°C) from two feedstocks (rice husk and apple wood chips). Produced biochars were prepared at two diameters (1-2 mm and <1 mm) and mixed with soil at a rate of 2% (w/w). Multiple effects of type, temperature and size of biochars were significant, so as the mixture of soil and finer woodchip biochars produced at 550°C had significant effects on all soil properties. Soil aggregation and stabilization of macro-aggregates, values of mean weight diameter and water stable aggregates were improved due to increased soil organic matter as binding agents and microbial biomass. In addition, plant available water capacity, air capacity, S-index, meso-pores and water retention content were significantly increased compared to control. But, saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) was reduced due to blockage of pores by biochar particles, reduction of pore throat size and available space for flow and also, high field capacity of biochars. So, application of biochar to soil, especially the finest particles of high-tempered woody biochars, can improve physical and hydrological properties of coarse-textured soils and reduce their water drainage by modification of Ks. (Author)

  2. Synthesis, characterization, and controlled aggregation of biotemplated polystyrene nanodisks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekobo, Samuel; Richter, Andrew G.; Dergunov, Sergey A.; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Urban, Volker S.; Yan, Bing; Pinkhassik, Eugene

    2011-12-01

    Cross-linked polystyrene nanodisks were prepared by controlled polymerization of styrene and divinylbenzene in the interior of bicelles, discoidal lipid aggregates. Aggregation behavior of polymer nanodisks was studied in water, organic solvents, and solid phase. Nanodisks form stable dispersions in aqueous solutions of surfactants, such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Varying SDS/nanodisk ratio allowed us to control the size of nanodisk aggregates. Nanodisks are readily solubilized in nonpolar organic solvents, such as toluene and carbon tetrachloride, to yield stable monodisperse suspensions. These findings open opportunities for creating nanodisk-based nanocomposite materials. Stable nanodisk suspension in toluene enabled small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements. SANS data confirmed the nanodisk diameter and allowed accurate measurement of nanodisk thickness (19.5 ± 1.0 Å). In solid phase, nanodisks aggregate in sub-micron platelets.

  3. {sup 14}C dating and stable carbon isotopes of soil organic matter in the Southeastern region of Sao Paulo State; e

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mofatto, Milene; Pessenda, Luiz Carlos Ruiz; Bendassoli, Jose Albertino; Leite, Acacio Zuniga [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: mofatto@cena.usp.br; pessenda@cena.usp.br; Oliveira, Paulo de Oliveira [Universidade de Guarulhos, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: paulo@bjd.com.br; Garcia, Ricardo Jose Francischetti [Herbario da Prefeitura Municipal de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: rjfgarcia@estadao.com.br

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this research is to characterize the isotopic composition ({sup 13}C, {sup 14}C) of soil organic matter (SOM) in the Parque Estadual da Serra do Mar-Nucleo Curucutu, Sao Paulo state, Southeastern Brazil. The isotopic composition ({delta}{sup 13}C) of SOM will be used as an indicator of vegetation types from the local ecosystems and {sup 14}C dating (humin fraction) used to determine the chronology. The results from SOM indicated vegetation changes in the last 10,000 years, where, a less dense vegetation occurred in the past, with C{sub 3} plant predominant and/or a mixture of C{sub 3} and C{sub 4}. (author)

  4. A stable lipid-induced aggregate of alpha-synuclein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drescher, Malte; van Rooijen, Bart D; Veldhuis, Gertjan; Subramaniam, Vinod; Huber, Martina

    2010-01-01

    The Parkinson's disease-related protein alpha-Synuclein (alphaS) is a 140 residue intrinsically disordered protein. Its membrane-binding properties are thought to be relevant for its physiological or pathologic activity. Here, the interaction of alphaS with POPG

  5. A Stable Lipid-Induced Aggregate of alpha-Synuclein

    OpenAIRE

    Drescher, Malte; Rooijen, Bart D. van; Veldhuis, Gertjan; Subramaniam, Vinod; Huber, Martina

    2010-01-01

    The Parkinson’s disease-related protein α-Synuclein (αS) is a 140 residue intrinsically disordered protein. Its membrane-binding properties are thought to be relevant for its physiological or pathologic activity. Here, the interaction of αS with POPG [1-Palmitoyl-2-Oleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-(Phosphorac-(1-glycerol))] small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) is investigated by spin-label EPR using double electron−electron resonance (DEER). Intermolecular distances between four single mutants reveal that we...

  6. Platelet activation and aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Sander; Larsen, O H; Christiansen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces a new laboratory model of whole blood platelet aggregation stimulated by endogenously generated thrombin, and explores this aspect in haemophilia A in which impaired thrombin generation is a major hallmark. The method was established to measure platelet aggregation initiated...

  7. Testing the Visual Soil Assessment tool on Estonian farm fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reintam, Endla; Are, Mihkel; Selge, Are

    2017-04-01

    Soil quality estimation plays important role in decision making on farm as well on policy level. Sustaining the production ability and good health of the soil the chemical, physical and biological indicators should be taken into account. The system to use soil chemical parameters is usually quite well established in most European counties, including Estonia. However, measuring soil physical properties, such bulk density, porosity, penetration resistance, structural stability ect is time consuming, needs special tools and is highly weather dependent. In that reason these parameters are excluded from controllable quality parameters in policy in Estonia. Within the project "Interactive Soil Quality Assessment in Europe and China for Agricultural Productivity and Environmental Resilience" (iSQAPER) the visual soil assessment (VSA) tool was developed for easy detection of soil quality as well the different soil friendly agricultural management practices (AMP) were detected. The aim of current study was to test the VSA tool on Estonian farm fields under different management practices and compare the results with laboratory measurements. The main focus was set on soil physical parameters. Next to the VSA, the undisturbed soil samples were collected from the depth of 5-10 cm and 25-30 cm. The study revealed that results of a visually assessed soil physical parameters, such a soil structure, soil structural stability, soil porosity, presence of tillage pan, were confirmed by laboratory measurements in most cases. Soil water stable structure measurement on field (on 1 cm2 net in one 1 l box with 4-6 cm air dry clods for 5-10 min) underestimated very well structured soil on grassland and overestimated the structure aggregates stability of compacted soil. The slightly better soil quality was detected under no-tillage compared to ploughed soils. However, the ploughed soil got higher quality points compared with minimum tillage. The slurry application (organic manuring) had

  8. Aggregates from mineral wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baic Ireneusz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem concerning the growing demand for natural aggregates and the need to limit costs, including transportation from remote deposits, cause the increase in growth of interest in aggregates from mineral wastes as well as in technologies of their production and recovery. The paper presents the issue related to the group of aggregates other than natural. A common name is proposed for such material: “alternative aggregates”. The name seems to be fully justified due to adequacy of this term because of this raw materials origin and role, in comparison to the meaning of natural aggregates based on gravel and sand as well as crushed stones. The paper presents characteristics of the market and basic application of aggregates produced from mineral wastes, generated in the mining, power and metallurgical industries as well as material from demolished objects.

  9. Tree vegetation and waste amendments to improve the physical condition of copper mine soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, V; Vega, F A; Andrade, M L; Covelo, E F

    2013-01-01

    Mine soils are often physically degraded, which hinders plants development. The untreated soils at the depleted copper mine in Touro (Galicia, north-west Spain) have no vegetation and are probably physically degraded. These mine soils were reclaimed both by planting trees and amending with waste (sewage sludge and paper mill residues). The purpose was to determine the effect of these treatments on the physical quality of the soils of the Touro mine under field conditions. We evaluated the physical situation of both the settling pond and the mine tailings in Touro, then comparing them with their respective treated areas: vegetated, amended or with both treatments at the same time. We corroborated that the physical degradation of untreated soils was considerable: low porosity, high density and less than 50% of water stable aggregates. The trees that were planted increased porosity, probably due to root activity. The added amendments increased the mean weight diameter (MWD), the percentage of water stable aggregates (WSA) and the stability index (SI) due to the high organic carbon content in the added wastes. We verified that using both treatments at the same time is better than using only one to improve the physical situation of mine soils. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of biochar on reclaimed tidal land soil properties and maize (Zea mays L.) response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyuck-Soo; Kim, Kwon-Rae; Yang, Jae E; Ok, Yong Sik; Owens, Gary; Nehls, Thomas; Wessolek, Gerd; Kim, Kye-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Reclaimed tidal land soil (RTLS) often contains high levels of soluble salts and exchangeable Na that can adversely affect plant growth. The current study examined the effect of biochar on the physicochemical properties of RTLS and subsequently the influence on plant growth performance. Rice hull derived biochar (BC) was applied to RTLS at three different rates (1%, 2%, and 5% (w/w)) and maize (Zea mays L.) subsequently cultivated for 6weeks. While maize was cultivated, 0.1% NaCl solution was supplied from the bottom of the pots to simulate the natural RTLS conditions. Biochar induced changes in soil properties were evaluated by the water stable aggregate (WSA) percentage, exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), soil organic carbon contents, cation exchange capacity, and exchangeable cations. Plant response was measured by growth rate, nutrient contents, and antioxidant enzyme activity of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR). Application of rice hull derived biochar increased the soil organic carbon content and the percentage of WSA by 36-69%, while decreasing the ESP. The highest dry weight maize yield was observed from soil which received 5% BC (w/w), which was attributed to increased stability of water-stable aggregates and elevated levels of phosphate in BC incorporated soils. Moreover, increased potassium, sourced from the BC, induced mitigation of Na uptake by maize and consequently, reduced the impact of salt stress as evidenced by overall declines in the antioxidant activities of APX and GR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Environmental Controls of Soil Organic Carbon in Soils Across Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, Carlos Alberto; Paz, Claudia; Phillips, Oliver; Nonato Araujo Filho, Raimundo; Lloyd, Jon

    2015-04-01

    (kaolinitic) and thus the clay plus silt fraction was the best correlate for SOC but with crystalline iron oxides (dithionite-citrate minus ammonium oxalate - oxalic acid extractable iron) being also correlated to SOC in these soils (R2 = 0.74). Most of SOC in these soils was found on the clay+silt fraction and in stable, clay rich aggregates. However, SOC of high activity clays and other less weathered soils such as Alisols, Cambisols and Plinthosols showed no correlation with particle size or iron oxides, being mostly stabilized by aluminium complexes. We found SOC of these soils to be better explained by a three way interaction among soil pH, carbon quality and dithionite-citrate extractable Al (R2 = 0.85). Consistent with this observation, SOC in the less weathered soils was mostly found in the colloidal fraction (75%). SOC of Podzols and Arenosols on the other hand had only a small but significant influence from their clay plus silt fraction (R2 = 0.31), with particulate organic matter accounting for most of its SOC.

  12. Measurement of zinc stable isotope ratios in biogeochemical matrices by double-spike MC-ICPMS and determination of the isotope ratio pool available for plants from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Tim; Schönbächler, Maria; Rehkämper, Mark; Dong, Schuofei; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Kirk, Guy J D; Coles, Barry J; Weiss, Dominik J

    2010-12-01

    Analysis of naturally occurring isotopic variations is a promising tool for investigating Zn transport and cycling in geological and biological settings. Here, we present the recently installed double-spike (DS) technique at the MAGIC laboratories at Imperial College London. The procedure improves on previous published DS methods in terms of ease of measurement and precisions obtained. The analytical method involves addition of a (64)Zn-(67)Zn double-spike to the samples prior to digestion, separation of Zn from the sample matrix by ion exchange chromatography, and isotopic analysis by multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The accuracy and reproducibility of the method were validated by analyses of several in-house and international elemental reference materials. Multiple analyses of pure Zn standard solutions consistently yielded a reproducibility of about ±0.05‰ (2 SD) for δ(66)Zn, and comparable precisions were obtained for analyses of geological and biological materials. Highly fractionated Zn standards analyzed by DS and standard sample bracketing yield slightly varying results, which probably originate from repetitive fractionation events during manufacture of the standards. However, the δ(66)Zn values (all reported relative to JMC Lyon Zn) for two less fractionated in-house Zn standard solutions, Imperial Zn (0.10 ± 0.08‰: 2 SD) and London Zn (0.08 ± 0.04‰), are within uncertainties to data reported with different mass spectrometric techniques and instruments. Two standard reference materials, blend ore BCR 027 and ryegrass BCR 281, were also measured, and the δ(66)Zn were found to be 0.25 ± 0.06‰ (2 SD) and 0.40 ± 0.09‰, respectively. Taken together, these standard measurements ascertain that the double-spike methodology is suitable for accurate and precise Zn isotope analyses of a wide range of natural samples. The newly installed technique was consequently applied to soil samples and soil leachates to

  13. Structural study of aggregated β-carotene by absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li Ping; Wei, Liang Shu

    2017-10-01

    By UV-visible absorption spectroscope, the aggregated β-carotene in hydrated ethanol was studied in the temperature range of 5 55°C, with different ethanol/water ratio. And the structural evolutions of these aggregates with time were detected. The spectrophotometric analysis showed that the aggregate of β-carotene formed in 1:1 ethanol/water solution transfered from H-type to J-type with temperature increase. In 2:1 ethanol/water solution a new type of aggregate with strong coupling was predicated by the appearing absorption peak located at about 550 nm. In the time scales of 48 houses all the aggregated structures were stable, but the absorption intensity decreased with time. It was concluded that the types of aggregated β-carotene which wouldn't change with time depended on the solvent composition and temperature.

  14. Wind energy aggregation: A coalitional game approach

    KAUST Repository

    Baeyens, E.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we explore the extent to which a group of N wind power producers can exploit the statistical benefits of aggregation and quantity risk sharing by forming a willing coalition to pool their variable power to jointly offer their aggregate power output as single entity into a forward energy market. We prove that wind power generators will always improve their expected profit when they aggregate their generated power and use tools from coalitional game theory to design fair sharing mechanisms to allocate the payoff among the coalition participants. We show that the corresponding coalitional game is super-additive and has a nonempty core. Hence, there always exists a mechanism for profit-sharing that makes the coalition stable. However, the game is not convex and the celebrated Shapley value may not belong to the core of the game. An allocation mechanism that minimizes the worst-case dissatisfaction is proposed. © 2011 IEEE.

  15. [Environmental safety assessment on the new super absorbent polymers applied into a soil-Chinese cabbage system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xi; He, Ji-Zheng; Zheng, Yuan-Ming; Zheng, Ming-Lan

    2014-02-01

    Super absorbent polymers (SAPs), a new water retention material, have a potential for application in water-saving agricultural production. In this study, we investigated the effects of SAPs, synthesized from natural plant extracts, on Chinese cabbage fresh weight, soil water content, soil water stable aggregates, soil microbial biomass (carbon) and soil microbial respiration under three water conditions (excessive, normal and deficient) and two SAPs application strategies (bulk treatment and spraying treatment). The results showed that the SAPs significantly promoted the soil water content, water-stable aggregates (> 0.25 mm) and the soil microbial activities, especially under the water deficient conditions. Meanwhile, SAP application strategy was of great significance to the effects on Chinese cabbage and soil properties. Compared with the control treatment under normal water condition, spraying treatment of Jaguar C (S-JC) could reduce irrigation water amount by about 25% without reducing the crop production. Furthermore, compared with the control treatment under the same water condition with S-JC (deficient), it could increase Chinese cabbage production by 287%. Thus, SAPs is an environmental friendly water-saving technique in agricultural production.

  16. Impact of monovalent cations on soil structure. Part I. Results of an Iranian soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Elham; Emami, Hojat; Keller, Thomas; Fotovat, Amir; Khorassani, Reza

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of monovalent cations on clay dispersion, aggregate stability, soil pore size distribution, and saturated hydraulic conductivity on agricultural soil in Iran. The soil was incubated with treatment solutions containing different concentrations (0-54.4 mmol l-1) of potassium and sodium cations. The treatment solutions included two levels of electrical conductivity (EC=3 or 6 dS m-1) and six K:Na ratios per electrical conductivity level. At both electrical conductivity levels, spontaneously dispersible clay increased with increasing K concentration, and with increasing K:Na ratio. A negative linear relationship between percentage of water-stable aggregates and spontaneously dispersible clay was observed. Clay dispersion generally reduced the mean pore size, presumably due to clogging of pores, resulting in increased water retention. At both electrical conductivity levels, hydraulic conductivity increased with increasing exchangeable potassium percentage at low exchangeable potassium percentage values, but decreased with further increases in exchangeable potassium percentage at higher exchangeable potassium percentage. This is in agreement with earlier studies, but seems in conflict with our data showing increasing spontaneously dispersible clay with increasing exchangeable potassium percentage. Our findings show that clay dispersion increased with increasing K concentration and increasing K:Na ratio, demonstrating that K can have negative impacts on soil structure.

  17. Aggregated Computational Toxicology Online Resource

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Aggregated Computational Toxicology Online Resource (AcTOR) is EPA's online aggregator of all the public sources of chemical toxicity data. ACToR aggregates data...

  18. Purification, biochemical characterization and structural modelling of alkali-stable β-1,4-xylan xylanohydrolase from Aspergillus fumigatus R1 isolated from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Rehan Ahmed; Jagtap, Sharmili; Mandal, Madan Kumar; Mandal, Suraj Kumar

    2016-02-04

    Aspergillus fumigatus R1 produced xylanase under submerged fermentation which degrades the complex hemicelluloses contained in agricultural substrates. Xylanases have gained considerable attention because of their tremendous applications in industries. The purpose of our study was to purify xylanase and study its biochemical properties. We have predicted the secondary structure of purified xylanase and evaluated its active site residues and substrate binding sites based on the global and local structural similarity. Various microorganisms were isolated from Puducherry soil and screened by Congo-red test. The best isolate was identified to be Aspergillus fumigatus R1. The production kinetics showed the highest xylanase production (208 IU/ml) by this organism in 96 h using 1 % rice bran as the only carbon source. The purification of extracellular xylanase was carried out by fractional ammonium sulphate precipitation (30-55 %), followed by extensive dialysis and Bio-Gel P-60 Gel-filtration chromatography. The enzyme was purified 58.10 folds with a specific activity of 38196.22 IU/mg. The biochemical characterization of the pure enzyme was carried out for its optimum pH and temperature (5.0 and 50(0)C), pH and temperature stability, molecular mass (Mr) (24.5 kDa) and pI (6.29). The complete sequence of protein was obtained by mass spectrometry analysis. Apparent Km and Vmax values of the xylanase for birchwood xylan were 11.66 mg/ml and 87.6 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) respectively. Purified xylanase was analyzed by mass-spectrometry which revealed 2 unique peptides. Xylanase under current study showed significant production using agricultural residues and a broad range of pH stability in the alkaline region. Xylanase produced by Aspergillus fumigatus R1 could serve as the enzyme of choice in industries.

  19. LBA-ECO ND-08 Soil Respiration, Soil Fractions, Carbon and Nitrogen, Para, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides (1) carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) concentration measurements of two soil aggregate fractions (250-2000 micon, small macro-aggregates...

  20. Recycled aggregates concrete: aggregate and mix properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Fonteboa, B.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This study of structural concrete made with recycled concrete aggregate focuses on two issues: 1. The characterization of such aggregate on the Spanish market. This involved conducting standard tests to determine density, water absorption, grading, shape, flakiness and hardness. The results obtained show that, despite the considerable differences with respect to density and water absorption between these and natural aggregates, on the whole recycled aggregate is apt for use in concrete production. 2. Testing to determine the values of basic concrete properties: mix design parameters were established for structural concrete in non-aggressive environments. These parameters were used to produce conventional concrete, and then adjusted to manufacture recycled concrete aggregate (RCA concrete, in which 50% of the coarse aggregate was replaced by the recycled material. Tests were conducted to determine the physical (density of the fresh and hardened material, water absorption and mechanical (compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and modulus of elasticity properties. The results showed that, from the standpoint of its physical and mechanical properties, concrete in which RCA accounted for 50% of the coarse aggregate compared favourably to conventional concrete.

    Se aborda el estudio de hormigones estructurales fabricados con áridos reciclados procedentes de hormigón, incidiéndose en dos aspectos: 1. Caracterización de tales áridos, procedentes del mercado español. Para ello se llevan a cabo ensayos de densidad, absorción, granulometría, coeficiente de forma, índice de lajas y dureza. Los resultados obtenidos han puesto de manifiesto que, a pesar de que existen diferencias notables (sobre todo en cuanto a densidad y absorción con los áridos naturales, las características de los áridos hacen posible la fabricación de hormigones. 2. Ensayos sobre propiedades básicas de los hormigones: se establecen parámetros de dosificaci

  1. Formation and Stability of Microbially Derived Soil Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, M. P.; Creamer, C.; Foster, A. L.; Lawrence, C. R.; Mcfarland, J. W.; Schulz, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    Soil carbon is vital to soil health, food security, and climate change mitigation, but the underlying mechanisms controlling the stabilization and destabilization of soil carbon are still poorly understood. There has been a conceptual paradigm shift in how soil organic matter is formed which now emphasizes the importance of microbial activity to build stable (i.e. long-lived) and mineral-associated soil organic matter. In this conceptual model, the consumption of plant carbon by microorganisms, followed by subsequent turnover of microbial bodies closely associated with mineral particles, produces a layering of amino acid and lipid residues on the surfaces of soil minerals that remains protected from destabilization by mineral-association and aggregation processes. We tested this new model by examining how isotopically labeled plant and microbial C differ in their fundamental stabilization and destabilization processes on soil minerals through a soil profile. We used a combination of laboratory and field-based approaches to bridge multiple spatial scales, and used soil depth as well as synthetic minerals to create gradients of soil mineralogy. We used Raman microscopy as a tool to probe organic matter association with mineral surfaces, as it allows for the simultaneous quantification and identification of living microbes, carbon, minerals, and isotopes through time. As expected, we found that the type of minerals present had a strong influence on the amount of C retained, but the stabilization of new C critically depends on growth, death, and turnover of microbial cells. Additionally, the destabilization of microbial residue C on mineral surfaces was little affected by flushes of DOC relative to wet-dry cycles alone. We believe this new insight into microbial mechanisms of C stabilization in soils will eventually lead to new avenues for measuring and modeling SOM dynamics in soils, and aid in the management of soil C to mediate global challenges.

  2. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  3. Soil carbon stabilization and turnover at alley-cropping systems, Eastern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medinski, T.; Freese, D.

    2012-04-01

    Alley-cropping system is seen as a viable land-use practice for mitigation of greenhouse gas CO2, energy-wood production and soil carbon sequestration. The extent to which carbon is stored in soil varies between ecosystems, and depends on tree species, soil types and on the extent of physical protection of carbon within soil aggregates. This study investigates soil carbon sequestration at alley-cropping systems presented by alleys of fast growing tree species (black locust and poplar) and maize, in Brandenburg, Eastern Germany. Carbon accumulation and turnover are assessed by measuring carbon fractions differing in decomposition rates. For this purpose soil samples were fractionated into labile and recalcitrant soil-size fractions by wet-sieving: macro (>250 µm), micro (53-250 µm) and clay + silt (<53 µm), followed by determination of organic carbon and nitrogen by gas-chromatography. Soil samples were also analysed for the total C&N content, cold-water extractable OC, and microbial C. Litter decomposition was evaluated by litter bags experiment. Soil CO2 flux was measured by LiCor automated device LI-8100A. No differences for the total and stable (clay+silt, <53 µm) carbon fraction were observed between treatment. While cold water-extractable carbon was significantly higher at maize alley compared to black locust alley. This may indicate faster turnover of organic matter at maize alley due to tillage, which influenced greater incorporation of plant residues into the soil, greater soil respiration and microbial activity.

  4. Instability improvement of the subgrade soils by lime addition at Borg El-Arab, Alexandria, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shinawi, A.

    2017-06-01

    Subgrade soils can affect the stability of any construction elsewhere, instability problems were found at Borg El-Arab, Alexandria, Egypt. This paper investigates geoengineering properties of lime treated subgrade soils at Borg El-Arab. Basic laboratory tests, such as water content, wet and dry density, grain size, specific gravity and Atterberg limits, were performed for twenty-five samples. Moisture-density (compaction); California Bearing Ratio (CBR) and Unconfined Compression Strength (UCS) were conducted on treated and natural soils. The measured geotechnical parameters of the treated soil shows that 6% lime is good enough to stabilize the subgrade soils. It was found that by adding lime, samples shifted to coarser side, Atterberg limits values of the treated soil samples decreased and this will improve the soil to be more stable. On the other hand, Subgrade soils improved as a result of the bonding fine particl