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Sample records for stable radiometal antibody

  1. Radiolabeled antibody in tumor imaging and therapy: iodine and radiometal chelates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, W.T.A.

    1987-01-01

    The use of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody in tumor imaging and therapy was evaluated using the Rauscher murine erythroleukemia. Antibody labeled with radioiodine or with DTPA-based radiometal chelates was compared with respect to in vitro and in vivo chemical stability of isotope incorporation, tumor targeting and catabolism, and efficacy. The radiometals studied were: 47 scandium, for imaging and therapy; 67 gallium and 111 indium for imaging; and 90 yttrium and 212 bismuth for therapy. Experiments using 153 Gd-labeled antibody demonstrated that insufficient gadolinium could be targeted to the tumor for use as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging. Labeling was efficient and resulted in 70 to 90 percent incorporation of all isotopes except 67 Ga, which was only adventitiously bound to immunoglobulin. As assessed by reduction of splenomegaly, 90 Y-labeled specific antibody was 2- to 3-fold more potent in tumor therapy than control immunoglobulin whereas 131 I-labeled preparations were equipotent. Treatment with 90 Y-labeled antibody produced mild, reversible leukopenia, whereas marrow suppression limited the administrable dose of 131 I-labeled immunoglobulin. In vitro. 212 Bi-labeled specific antibody again appeared 2- to 3-fold more potent in cell killing than control antibody

  2. Extracorporeal adsorption therapy: A Method to improve targeted radiation delivered by radiometal-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemecek, Eneida R.; Green, Damian J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Pagal, John M.; Lin, Yukang; Gopal, A. K.; Durack, Lawrence D.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Wilbur, D. S.; Nilsson, Rune; Sandberg, Bengt; Press, Oliver W.

    2008-04-01

    Many investigators have demonstrated the ability to treat hematologic malignancies with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting hematopoietic antigens such as anti-CD20 and anti-CD45. [1-5] Although the remission rates achieved with radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are relatively high, many patients subsequently relapse presumably due to suboptimal delivery of enough radiation to eradicate the malignancy. The dose-response of leukemia and lymphoma to radiation has been proven. Substantial amounts of radiation can be delivered by RIT if followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation to rescue the bone marrow from myeloablation.[ref] However, the maximum dose of RIT that can be used is still limited by toxicity to normal tissues affected by nonspecific delivery of radiation. Efforts to improve RIT focus on improving the therapeutic ratios of radiation in target versus non-target tissues by removing the fraction of radioisotope that fails to bind to target tissues and circulates freely in the bloodstream perfusing non-target tissues. Our group and others have explored several alternatives for removal of unbound circulating antibody. [refs] One such method, extracorporeal adsorption therapy (ECAT) consists of removing unbound antibody by a method similar to plasmapheresis after critical circulation time and distribution of antibody into target tissues have been achieved. Preclinical studies of ECAT in murine xenograft models demonstrated significant improvement in therapeutic ratios of radioactivity. Chen and colleagues demonstrated that a 2-hour ECAT procedure could remove 40 to 70% of the radioactivity from liver, lung and spleen. [ref] Although isotope concentration in the tumor was initially unaffected, a 50% decrease was noted approximately 36 hours after the procedure. This approach was also evaluated in a limited phase I pilot study of patients with refractory B-cell lymphoma. [ref] After radiographic confirmation of tumor localization of a test dose of anti-CD20

  3. Therapeutic advantages of Auger electron- over beta-emitting radiometals or radioiodine when conjugated to internalizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, T M; Béhé, M; Löhr, M; Sgouros, G; Angerstein, C; Wehrmann, E; Nebendahl, K; Becker, W

    2000-07-01

    Recent studies suggest a higher anti-tumour efficacy of internalizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) when labelled with Auger electron emitters, as compared with beta-emitters. The aim of this study was to compare the anti-tumour efficacy and toxicity of the internalizing MAb, CO17-1A, labelled with Auger electron emitters (125I, (111)In) versus conventional beta(-)-emitters (131I, 90Y) in a colon cancer model, and to assess whether the residualizing radiometals may have therapeutic advantages over the conventionally iodinated conjugates. Biodistribution studies of 125I-, (111)In- or 88Y-labelled CO17-1A were performed in nude mice bearing subcutaneous human colon cancer xenografts. For therapy, the mice were injected with either unlabelled or 125I-, 131I-, (111)In- or 90Y-labelled CO17-1A IgG2a, whereas control groups were left untreated or were given a radiolabelled isotype-matched irrelevant antibody. The influence of internalization was assessed by comparing the results with those obtained with an anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibody which does not internalize to a relevant extent. The maximum tolerated activities (MTA) and doses (MTD) of each agent were determined. Myelotoxicity and potential second-organ toxicities, as well as tumour growth, were monitored. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was performed in order to enable dose intensification. Radiometals showed significantly better tumour-to-blood ratios than the respective iodinated conjugates. The MTAs of 131I- and 125I-CO17-1A without artificial support were 11.1 MBq (300 microCi) and 111 MBq (3 mCi), respectively; the MTA of the metals was reached at 4 MBq (100 microCi) for 90Y-, and at 85 MBq (2.3 mCi) for (111)In-CO17-1A. Myelotoxicity was dose limiting in all cases. BMT enabled an increase in the MTA to 15 MBq (400 microCi) of 131I-labelled CO17-1A, to 4.4 MBq (120 microCi) of 90Y-labelled CO17-1A, and to 118 MBq (3.2 mCi) of (111)In-labelled CO17-1A, while the MTA of 125I-CO17-1A had not been

  4. [Antimalaria fluorescent antibodies evolution in young children living in a stable malaria area (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozais, J P; Ky, D T; Doucet, J

    1979-01-01

    The detection of malarial fluorescent antibodies have been performed in an Abidjan dispensary on 30 newborn babies with their mothers, 30 children 3 months old and 120 children from 6 to 24 months. This survey took place during the small rainy season and it demonstrates that: --synthesis of specific antibodies is significantly starting after the 3rd month; --the rise, after six months, of the malarial antibodies is parallel to the plasmodic index checked during the same period in the same area; --the rate of antibodies in 2 years old babies is almost the same that in adults; --living conditions in rural areas accelerate the synthesis of antibodies which, adversely, is slowed down by regular chemoprophylaxis; --Plasmodium berghei is a valuable antigen for mass survey; --Abidjan town is an hypoendemic zone of stable malaria in a mesoendemic area.

  5. PHOCUS radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Nyström

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available PHOCUS – Particles, Hydrogen and Oxygen Chemistry in the Upper Summer Mesosphere is a Swedish sounding rocket experiment, launched in July 2011, with the main goal of investigating the upper atmosphere in the altitude range 50–110 km. This paper describes the SondRad instrument in the PHOCUS payload, a radiometer comprising two frequency channels (183 GHz and 557 GHz aimed at exploring the water vapour concentration distribution in connection with the appearance of noctilucent (night shining clouds. The design of the radiometer system has been done in a collaboration between Omnisys Instruments AB and the Group for Advanced Receiver Development (GARD at Chalmers University of Technology where Omnisys was responsible for the overall design, implementation, and verification of the radiometers and backend, whereas GARD was responsible for the radiometer optics and calibration systems.

    The SondRad instrument covers the water absorption lines at 183 GHz and 557 GHz. The 183 GHz channel is a side-looking radiometer, while the 557 GHz radiometer is placed along the rocket axis looking in the forward direction. Both channels employ sub-harmonically pumped Schottky mixers and Fast Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FFTS backends with 67 kHz resolution.

    The radiometers include novel calibration systems specifically adjusted for use with each frequency channel. The 183 GHz channel employs a continuous wave CW pilot signal calibrating the entire receiving chain, while the intermediate frequency chain (the IF-chain of the 557 GHz channel is calibrated by injecting a signal from a reference noise source through a directional coupler.

    The instrument collected complete spectra for both the 183 GHz and the 557 GHz with 300 Hz data rate for the 183 GHz channel and 10 Hz data rate for the 557 GHz channel for about 60 s reaching the apogee of the flight trajectory and 100 s after that. With lossless data compression using variable

  6. Biological Characterization of a Stable Effector Functionless (SEFL) Monoclonal Antibody Scaffold in Vitro*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ling; Jacobsen, Frederick W.; Everds, Nancy; Zhuang, Yao; Yu, Yan Bin; Li, Nianyu; Clark, Darcey; Nguyen, Mai Phuong; Fort, Madeline; Narayanan, Padma; Kim, Kei; Stevenson, Riki; Narhi, Linda; Gunasekaran, Kannan; Bussiere, Jeanine L.

    2017-01-01

    The stable effector functionLess (SEFL) antibody was designed as an IgG1 antibody with a constant region that lacks the ability to interact with Fcγ receptors. The engineering and stability and pharmacokinetic assessments of the SEFL scaffold is described in the accompanying article (Jacobsen, F. W., Stevenson, R., Li, C., Salimi-Moosavi, H., Liu, L., Wen, J., Luo, Q., Daris, K., Buck, L., Miller, S., Ho, S-Y., Wang, W., Chen, Q., Walker, K., Wypych, J., Narhi, L., and Gunasekaran, K. (2017) J. Biol. Chem. 292). The biological properties of these SEFL antibodies were assessed in a variety of human and cynomolgus monkey in vitro assays. Binding of parent molecules and their SEFL variants to human and cynomolgus monkey FcγRs were evaluated using flow cytometry-based binding assays. The SEFL variants tested showed decreased binding affinity to human and cynomolgus FcγRs compared with the wild-type IgG1 antibody. In addition, SEFL variants demonstrated no antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro against Daudi cells with cynomolgus monkey peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and had minimal complement-dependent cytotoxicity activity similar to that of the negative control IgG2 in a CD20+ human Raji lymphoma cell line. SEFL mutations eliminated off-target antibody-dependent monocyte phagocytosis of cynomolgus monkey platelets, and cynomolgus platelet activation in vitro. These experiments demonstrate that the SEFL modifications successfully eliminated Fc-associated effector binding and functions. PMID:27994063

  7. A stable reagent system for screening and identifying red blood cell irregular antibodies: application to commercial antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, L; Pellerin, C; Marchand-Arvier, M; Vigneron, C

    1998-01-01

    Development of a new solid-phase system for screening and identifying irregular red cell antibodies. Red blood cell membranes were prepared by a semi-automated procedure in which the hemolysate solution was passed through a hollow-fiber system. The membranes were fixed to the solid phase (microtiter plates) by centrifugation and incubated with 8% fat-free milk. Antibodies added to the microtiter plate were detected by anti-human antibodies adsorbed onto yellow latex particles. The system had good sensitivity (titer antibodies that are important in transfusion.

  8. Vaccination against Streptococcus pneumoniae does not induce antibodies against HLA or MICA in clinically stable kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Monika; Heinemann, Falko M; Horn, Peter A; Witzke, Oliver

    2013-10-01

    There are concerns in the community that immune activation after vaccination could lead to (subclinical) rejection. Our aim was to define if pneumococcal vaccination induced HLA antibodies using highly sensitive methods. Forty-nine kidney transplant recipients were immunized with Pneumovax 23. The median interval between transplantation and vaccination was 6.5 years, the median serum creatinine concentration 1.3, 1.3 and 1.4 mg/dL pre-vaccination, at month 1 and 15 post-vaccination, respectively. In none of the patients biopsy-proven acute rejection was diagnosed within three years post-vaccination. Pneumococcal, HLA class I and II and major histocompatibility class I-related chain A (MICA) antibodies were determined by Luminex™ technology (xMAP™ Pneumococcal Immunity Panel and LABScreen™ Mixed beads, respectively) and HLA antibodies also by ELISA (Lambda Antigen Tray™). While pneumococcal antibodies were significantly higher at month 1 and 15 post- vs. pre-vaccination (p<0.0001 each), HLA/MICA antibodies remained unchanged as determined by Luminex™ and ELISA. Positive Luminex™ reactions were present in 63%, 67% and 63% (HLA class I), 47%, 47% and 55% (HLA class II) and 29%, 29% and 29% (MICA) pre-vaccination, at month 1 and 15, respectively. In clinically stable kidney transplant recipients there is no evidence for an increase in HLA antibodies after pneumococcal vaccination. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiometer on a Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Gill, John J.; Mehdi, Imran; Lee, Choonsup; Schlecht, Erich T.; Skalare, Anders; Ward, John S.; Siegel, Peter H.; Thomas, Bertrand C.

    2009-01-01

    The radiometer on a chip (ROC) integrates whole wafers together to p rovide a robust, extremely powerful way of making submillimeter rece ivers that provide vertically integrated functionality. By integratin g at the wafer level, customizing the interconnects, and planarizing the transmission media, it is possible to create a lightweight asse mbly performing the function of several pieces in a more conventiona l radiometer.

  10. Isolation of a Highly Thermal Stable Lama Single Domain Antibody Specific for Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxin B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrano-González Joseline

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Camelids and sharks possess a unique subclass of antibodies comprised of only heavy chains. The antigen binding fragments of these unique antibodies can be cloned and expressed as single domain antibodies (sdAbs. The ability of these small antigen-binding molecules to refold after heating to achieve their original structure, as well as their diminutive size, makes them attractive candidates for diagnostic assays. Results Here we describe the isolation of an sdAb against Staphyloccocus aureus enterotoxin B (SEB. The clone, A3, was found to have high affinity (Kd = 75 pM and good specificity for SEB, showing no cross reactivity to related molecules such as Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA, Staphylococcal enterotoxin D (SED, and Shiga toxin. Most remarkably, this anti-SEB sdAb had an extremely high Tm of 85°C and an ability to refold after heating to 95°C. The sharp Tm determined by circular dichroism, was found to contrast with the gradual decrease observed in intrinsic fluorescence. We demonstrated the utility of this sdAb as a capture and detector molecule in Luminex based assays providing limits of detection (LODs of at least 64 pg/mL. Conclusion The anti-SEB sdAb A3 was found to have a high affinity and an extraordinarily high Tm and could still refold to recover activity after heat denaturation. This combination of heat resilience and strong, specific binding make this sdAb a good candidate for use in antibody-based toxin detection technologies.

  11. A radiometer-pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Radiometer-pyrometer measures the spectral absorption, emission, and temperature of gases. The major problems involved in spectroradiometric measurements are nonuniform spectral sensitivity, nonlinearity, poor absolute accuracy, wide range of intensities, and wide range of wavelengths.

  12. Increased circulating follicular regulatory T cells are associated with lower auto-antibodies in stable remission rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Wang, Dongwei; Lu, Songsong; Xu, Qinzhu; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Jingzhong; Song, Ying; Wang, Hui

    2018-01-30

    To examine expression and function changes of circulating CD4 + CXCR5 + FoxP3 + Follicular regulatory T (TFR) cells in active and stable remission rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and to clarify the role of TFR cells in the pathogenesis of RA. TFR and follicular helper T cells (TFH) levels in peripheral blood of 39 active RA patients, 39 stable remission RA patients and 33 healthy controls were detected by flow cytometry. The function of TFR cells was measured by co-culturing with TFH and B cells. The activated CD45RA - FoxP3 hi TFR cells were analyzed as well. Clinical indicators including serum levels of Ig and auto-antibodies were tested and correlations with TFR cells were systematically analyzed. DAS28 scores were further calculated and correlation analysis with TFR was conducted as well. The level of CD4 + CXCR5 + FOXP3 + TFR cells and the ratio of TFR/TFH in peripheral blood of stable remission RA patients were significantly increased compared with active RA patients and healthy controls. The function of TFR was enhanced and the activated CD45RA - FoxP3 hi TFR subset was increased in stable remission RA patients compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, TFR cells in RA patients were inversely correlated with Ig G, RF, anti-CCP, as well as DAS28 scores. Circulating TFR cells were increased as RA patients develop to a stable state and increased TFR cells could suppress autoimmunity of RA patients to stabilize their condition. Our results provide novel insight into the pathogenesis process of RA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. BETA digital beta radiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovikov, N.V.; Kosinov, G.A.; Fedorov, Yu.N.

    1989-01-01

    Portable transportable digital beta radiometer providing for measuring beta-decay radionuclide specific activity in the range from 5x10 -9 up to 10 -6 Cu/kg (Cu/l) with error of ±25% is designed and introduced into commercial production for determination of volume and specific water and food radioactivity. The device specifications are given. Experience in the BETA radiometer application under conditions of the Chernobyl' NPP 30-km zone has shown that it is convenient for measuring specific activity of the order of 10 -8 Cu/kg, and application of a set of different beta detectors gives an opportunity to use it for surface contamination measurement in wide range of the measured value

  14. Portable Diagnostic Radiometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    APPENDIX : The specimen is received in formalin and consists of a vermiform appendix and inesoappendix measuring 5.7 cm. in length by 0.8 cm. in...increase in temperature caused by an inflamed appendix . Preliminary tests on a limited number of patients " "’ " are reported. FO R% .% DD 1473...patient measured with the breadboard radiometer. Fig. 8. Sketches showing the location of the appendix in the body. Fig. 9. Chart of the second patient

  15. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; Biswas, Sayak K.; James, Mark W.; Roberts, J. Brent; Jones, W. Linwood; Johnson, James; Farrar, Spencer; Sahawneh, Saleem; Ruf, Christopher S.; Morris, Mary; hide

    2014-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a synthetic thinned array passive microwave radiometer designed to allow retrieval of surface wind speed in hurricanes, up through category five intensity. The retrieval technology follows the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which measures surface wind speed in hurricanes along a narrow strip beneath the aircraft. HIRAD maps wind speeds in a swath below the aircraft, about 50-60 km wide when flown in the lower stratosphere. HIRAD has flown in the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment in 2010 on a WB-57 aircraft, and on a Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) in 2012 and 2013 as part of NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storms Sentinel (HS3) program. The GRIP program included flights over Hurricanes Earl and Karl (2010). The 2012 HS3 deployment did not include any hurricane flights for the UAS carrying HIRAD. The 2013 HS3 flights included one flight over the predecessor to TS Gabrielle, and one flight over Hurricane Ingrid. This presentation will describe the HIRAD instrument, its results from the 2010 and 2013 flights, and potential future developments.

  16. Calibration of Correlation Radiometers Using Pseudo-Random Noise Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Pantoja

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The calibration of correlation radiometers, and particularly aperture synthesis interferometric radiometers, is a critical issue to ensure their performance. Current calibration techniques are based on the measurement of the cross-correlation of receivers’ outputs when injecting noise from a common noise source requiring a very stable distribution network. For large interferometric radiometers this centralized noise injection approach is very complex from the point of view of mass, volume and phase/amplitude equalization. Distributed noise injection techniques have been proposed as a feasible alternative, but are unable to correct for the so-called “baseline errors” associated with the particular pair of receivers forming the baseline. In this work it is proposed the use of centralized Pseudo-Random Noise (PRN signals to calibrate correlation radiometers. PRNs are sequences of symbols with a long repetition period that have a flat spectrum over a bandwidth which is determined by the symbol rate. Since their spectrum resembles that of thermal noise, they can be used to calibrate correlation radiometers. At the same time, since these sequences are deterministic, new calibration schemes can be envisaged, such as the correlation of each receiver’s output with a baseband local replica of the PRN sequence, as well as new distribution schemes of calibration signals. This work analyzes the general requirements and performance of using PRN sequences for the calibration of microwave correlation radiometers, and particularizes the study to a potential implementation in a large aperture synthesis radiometer using an optical distribution network.

  17. Correlation Radiometer ASIC, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project aims to develop an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for the NASA's microwave correlation radiometers required for space and...

  18. A Multifrequency Radiometer System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    1977-01-01

    A radiometer system having four channels: 5 GHz, l7 GHz, 34 GHz, all vertical polarization, and a 34 GHz sky horn, will be described. The system which is designed for collecting glaciological and oceanographic data is intended for airborne use and imaging is achieved by means of a multifrequency...... conically scanning antenna. Implementation of the noise-injection technique ensures the high absolute accuracy needed for oceanographic purposes. The collected data can be preprocessed in a microcomputer system and displayed in real time. Simultaneously, the data are recorded digitally on tape for more...

  19. Wideband Agile Digital Microwave Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, Todd C.; Brown, Shannon T.; Ruf, Christopher; Gross, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to take the initial steps needed to develop a field programmable gate array (FPGA)- based wideband digital radiometer backend (>500 MHz bandwidth) that will enable passive microwave observations with minimal performance degradation in a radiofrequency-interference (RFI)-rich environment. As manmade RF emissions increase over time and fill more of the microwave spectrum, microwave radiometer science applications will be increasingly impacted in a negative way, and the current generation of spaceborne microwave radiometers that use broadband analog back ends will become severely compromised or unusable over an increasing fraction of time on orbit. There is a need to develop a digital radiometer back end that, for each observation period, uses digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms to identify the maximum amount of RFI-free spectrum across the radiometer band to preserve bandwidth to minimize radiometer noise (which is inversely related to the bandwidth). Ultimately, the objective is to incorporate all processing necessary in the back end to take contaminated input spectra and produce a single output value free of manmade signals to minimize data rates for spaceborne radiometer missions. But, to meet these objectives, several intermediate processing algorithms had to be developed, and their performance characterized relative to typical brightness temperature accuracy re quirements for current and future microwave radiometer missions, including those for measuring salinity, soil moisture, and snow pack.

  20. Antibody complement-mediated hemolytic studies with kodecytes reveal that human complement utilized in the classical pathway is more stable than generally accepted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Holly; Bovin, Nicolai; Henry, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    Complement has significant status in the field of transfusion medicine. The accepted stability profile of complement is based on historical studies of diluted human serum hemolyzing rabbit heterophile antibody-sensitized sheep red blood cells (RBCs). Contemporary tools are available to reevaluate these historical observations using human heterophile antibodies, undiluted serum, and antigen-modified human RBCs. Human RBCs were made into "animal-like" kodecytes with heterophile Galα3Galβ4GlcNAcβ function-spacer-lipid constructs. These α-Gal-kodecytes were prepared with an antigen dilution capable of consistently producing 50% antibody-mediated hemolysis against human α1-3galactose heterophile antibodies and undiluted standardized serum. Standardized human serum aliquots from a two-donor pool stored at -85, -20, 4, 22, and 37°C for durations of up to 150 days were evaluated for loss of hemolytic activity. Where practical methodologic procedures were aligned with historical studies. Comparison of the historical assay with the α-Gal-kodecyte assay against complement activity standards showed concordance. However, in most scenarios complement was found to be more than twice as stable as generally accepted. At least 60% of complement hemolytic activity was observed in serum stored at 22°C for 1 week or 2 months at 4°C. No loss of hemolytic activity was observed after 5 months' storage at temperatures below -20°C. An alternative method using undiluted serum and modified human RBCs observed that classical-pathway complement hemolytic activity in stored human serum is at least twice as stable as previously accepted. © 2016 AABB.

  1. Microfluidic Radiometal Labeling Systems for Biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichert, D E; Kenis, P J. A.

    2011-12-29

    In a typical labeling procedure with radiometals, such as Cu-64 and Ga-68; a very large (~ 100-fold) excess of the non-radioactive reactant (precursor) is used to promote rapid and efficient incorporation of the radioisotope into the PET imaging agent. In order to achieve high specific activities, careful control of reaction conditions and extensive chromatographic purifications are required in order to separate the labeled compounds from the cold precursors. Here we propose a microfluidic approach to overcome these problems, and achieve high specific activities in a more convenient, semi-automated fashion and faster time frame. Microfluidic reactors, consisting of a network of micron-sized channels (typical dimensions in the range 10 - 300¼m), filters, separation columns, electrodes and reaction loops/chambers etched onto a solid substrate, are now emerging as an extremely useful technology for the intensification and miniaturization of chemical processes. The ability to manipulate, process and analyze reagent concentrations and reaction interfaces in both space and time within the channel network of a microreactor provides the fine level of reaction control that is desirable in PET radiochemistry practice. These factors can bring radiometal labeling, specifically the preparation of radio-labeled biomolecules such as antibodies, much closer to their theoretical maximum specific activities.

  2. Analyzing Non Stationary Processes in Radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The lack of well-developed techniques for modeling changing statistical moments in our observations has stymied the application of stochastic process theory for many scientific and engineering applications. Non linear effects of the observation methodology is one of the most perplexing aspects to modeling non stationary processes. This perplexing problem was encountered when modeling the effect of non stationary receiver fluctuations on the performance of radiometer calibration architectures. Existing modeling approaches were found not applicable; particularly problematic is modeling processes across scales over which they begin to exhibit non stationary behavior within the time interval of the calibration algorithm. Alternatively, the radiometer output is modeled as samples from a sequence random variables; the random variables are treated using a conditional probability distribution function conditioned on the use of the variable in the calibration algorithm. This approach of treating a process as a sequence of random variables with non stationary stochastic moments produce sensible predictions of temporal effects of calibration algorithms. To test these model predictions, an experiment using the Millimeter wave Imaging Radiometer (MIR) was conducted. The MIR with its two black body calibration references was configured in a laboratory setting to observe a third ultra-stable reference (CryoTarget). The MIR was programmed to sequentially sample each of the three references in approximately a 1 second cycle. Data were collected over a six-hour interval. The sequence of reference measurements form an ensemble sample set comprised of a series of three reference measurements. Two references are required to estimate the receiver response. A third reference is used to estimate the uncertainty in the estimate. Typically, calibration algorithms are designed to suppress the non stationary effects of receiver fluctuations. By treating the data sequence as an ensemble

  3. Compact Radiometers Expand Climate Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles, NASA plans to embark on the Soil Moisture Active and Passive mission in 2015. To prepare, Goddard Space Flight Center provided Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding to ProSensing Inc., of Amherst, Massachusetts, to develop a compact ultrastable radiometer for sea surface salinity and soil moisture mapping. ProSensing incorporated small, low-cost, high-performance elements into just a few circuit boards and now offers two lightweight radiometers commercially. Government research agencies, university research groups, and large corporations around the world are using the devices for mapping soil moisture, ocean salinity, and wind speed.

  4. Radiometer Testbed Development for SWOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Brown, Shannon; Gaier, Todd; Dawson, Douglas; Harding, Dennis; Fu, Lee-Lueng; Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Conventional altimeters include nadir looking colocated 18-37 GHz microwave radiometer to measure wet tropospheric path delay. These have reduced accuracy in coastal zone (within 50 km from land) and do not provide wet path delay over land. The addition of high frequency channels to Jason-class radiometer will improve retrievals in coastal regions and enable retrievals over land. High-frequency window channels, 90, 130 and 166 GHz are optimum for improving performance in coastal region and channels on 183 GHz water vapor line are ideal for over-land retrievals.

  5. Digital Array Gas Radiometer (DAGR) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation proposed here is a digital array gas radiometer (DAGR), a new design for a gas filter correlation radiometer (GFCR) to accurately measure and monitor...

  6. Microwave Radiometer Linearity Measured by Simple Means

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Modern spaceborne radiometer systems feature an almost perfect on-board calibration, hence the primary calibration task to be carried out before launch is a check of radiometer linearity. This paper describes two ways of measuring linearity of microwave radiometers only requiring relatively simple...

  7. Nature of the bifunctional chelating agent used for radioimmunotherapy with yttrium-88 monoclonal antibodies: critical factors in determining in vivo survival and organ toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozak, R.W.; Raubitschek, A.; Mirzadeh, S.; Brechbiel, M.W.; Junghaus, R.; Gansow, O.A.; Waldmann, T.A. (Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1989-05-15

    One factor that is critical to the potential effectiveness of radioimmunotherapy is the design of radiometal-chelated antibodies that will be stable in vivo. Stability in vivo depends on the condition that both the chelate linkage and radiolabeling procedures not alter antibody specificity and biodistribution. In addition, synthesis and selection of the chelating agent is critical for each radiometal in order to prevent inappropriate release of the radiometal in vivo. In the present study, we compare the in vivo stability of seven radioimmunoconjugates that use different polyaminocarboxylate chelating agents to complex yttrium-88 to the mouse anti-human interleukin-2 receptor monoclonal antibody, anti-Tac. Chelate linkage and radiolabeling procedures did not alter the immunospecificity of anti-Tac. In order to assess whether yttrium was inappropriately released from the chelate-coupled antibody in vivo, iodine-131-labeled and yttrium-88 chelate-coupled antibodies were simultaneously administered to the same animals to correlate the decline in yttrium and radioiodinated antibody activity. The four stable yttrium-88 chelate-coupled antibodies studied displayed similar iodine-131 and yttrium-88 activity, indicating minimal elution of yttrium-88 from the complex. In contrast, the unstable yttrium-88 chelate-coupled antibodies had serum yttrium-88 activities that declined much more rapidly than their iodine-131 activities, suggesting loss of the radiolabel yttrium-88 from the chelate. Furthermore, high rates of yttrium-88 elution correlated with deposition in bone. Four chelating agents emerged as promising immunotherapeutic reagents: isothiocyanate benzyl DTPA and its derivatives 1B3M, MX, and 1M3B.

  8. Gamma-radiometer TIM-140

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Is intended for in-vita determination of specific activity of cesium 137 in muscular tissues of cattle. Is used for realization of contact measurements: using the convenient in operation bar compensating the weight of detecting unit the radiometer is kept in the area of the coxofemoral part or scapula of an animal. The mode of sample-free measurements of specific activity of cesium 137 in parts of an animal carcass is provided. It can be used on cattle-breeding farms, in meat factories and personal facilities. Minimal detected specific activity (MDA) of cesium 137 in muscular tissues of cattle is 100 Bq/kg. Time of MDA measurement is 200 sec (allowable relative error is 35%). The level of gamma-background is 0,05 mR/h. The gamma-radiometer is intended for express testing and high accuracy of measurements, including the measurements in conditions of the raised radiation background

  9. Microwave Radiometer Systems, Design and Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Vine, David Le

    Two important microwave remote sensors are the radar and the radiometer. There have been a number of books written on various aspects of radar, but there have been only a few written on microwave radiometers, especially on subjects of how to design and build radiometer systems. This book, which...... is the second edition of a book originally published in 1989, attempts to fill this void. The background for this book is many years of work with radiometer systems including design and manufacture of airborne imaging radiometer systems, laboratory as well as airborne field experiments with the systems......, and design of future spaceborne imagers. This book would not have been possible without the support and encouragement of several colleagues. Søren Nørvang Madsen, who is working with synthetic aperture radar systems, and, before him, Finn søndergaard have both contributed much to the work with radiometer...

  10. Microwave Radiometry and Radiometers for Ocean Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    2008-01-01

    The microwave radiometer system measures, within its bandwidth, the naturally emitted radiation – the brightness temperature – of substances within its antenna’s field of view. Thus a radiometer is really a sensitive and calibrated microwave receiver. The radiometer can be a basic total power rad...... of the sea from space, the intervening atmosphere will disturb the process, and corrections might be required. Also, at some frequencies and for some applications, the Faraday rotation in the Ionosphere must be taken into account....

  11. The Radiometer Atmospheric Cubesat Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, B.; Bryk, M.; Clark, J.; Donahue, K.; Ellyin, R.; Misra, S.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Statham, S.; Steinkraus, J.; Lightsey, E. G.; Fear, A.; Francis, P.; Kjellberg, H.; McDonald, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has been developing the Radiometer Atmospheric CubeSat Experiment (RACE) since 2012, which consists of a water vapor radiometer integrated on a 3U CubeSat platform. RACE will measure 2 channels of the 183 GHz water vapor line, and will be used to validate new low noise amplifier (LNA) technology and a novel amplifier based internal calibration subsystem. The 3U spacecraft is provided by the University of Texas at Austin's Satellite Design Laboratory. RACE will advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of the 183 GHz receiver subsystem from TRL 4 to TRL 6 and a CubeSat 183 GHz radiometer system from TRL 4 to TRL 7. Measurements at 183 GHz are used to retrieve integrated products and vertical profiles of water vapor. Current full scale satellite missions that can utilize the technology include AMSU, ATMS, SSMIS and Megha-Tropiques. The LNAs are designed at JPL, based on a 35 nm indium phosphide (InP) high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMT) technology developed by Northrop Grumman. The resulting single chip LNAs require only 25 mW of power. Current pre-launch instrument performance specifications include an RF gain of over 30 dB and a room noise figure of 5dB. If a coupler based calibration system is shown to be sufficient, future receiver systems will have noise figures temperature is approximately 0.55 dB/K. The NEDT of the system is CubeSat Launch Initiative (CSLI) selection, RACE is manifested for launch on the Orbital 3 (Orb-3) mission scheduled for October 2014. RACE will be deployed from the International Space Station (ISS) by NanoRacks.

  12. A Scanning Microwave Radar and Radiometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    1995-01-01

    The Scanning Microwave Radar and Radiometer (SMRR) is a line scanner featuring a combined radar and radiometer system operating around 35 and 94 GHz. The layout of the SMRR is shown. The 2 offset antenna parabolas scan in synchronism, the receiver antenna has the highest gain in order to ensure...

  13. Fabrication of highly stable glyco-gold nanoparticles and development of a glyco-gold nanoparticle-based oriented immobilized antibody microarray for lectin (GOAL) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-De; Adak, Avijit K; Yu, Ching-Ching; Hsiao, Wei-Chen; Lin, Hong-Jyune; Chen, Mu-Lin; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2015-03-02

    The design of high-affinity lectin ligands is critical for enhancing the inherently weak binding affinities of monomeric carbohydrates to their binding proteins. Glyco-gold nanoparticles (glyco-AuNPs) are promising multivalent glycan displays that can confer significantly improved functional affinity of glyco-AuNPs to proteins. Here, AuNPs are functionalized with several different carbohydrates to profile lectin affinities. We demonstrate that AuNPs functionalized with mixed thiolated ligands comprising glycan (70 mol %) and an amphiphilic linker (30 mol %) provide long-term stability in solutions containing high concentrations of salts and proteins, with no evidence of nonspecific protein adsorption. These highly stable glyco-AuNPs enable the detection of model plant lectins such as Concanavalin A, wheat germ agglutinin, and Ricinus communis Agglutinin 120, at subnanomolar and low picomolar levels through UV/Vis spectrophotometry and dynamic light scattering, respectively. Moreover, we develop in situ glyco-AuNPs-based agglutination on an oriented immobilized antibody microarray, which permits highly sensitive lectin sensing with the naked eye. In addition, this microarray is capable of detecting lectins presented individually, in other environmental settings, or in a mixture of samples. These results indicate that glyconanoparticles represent a versatile and highly sensitive method for detecting and probing the binding of glycan to proteins, with significant implications for the construction of a variety of platforms for the development of glyconanoparticle-based biosensors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Radiometer Design Analysis Based Upon Measurement Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Paul E.; Lang, Roger H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces a method for predicting the performance of a radiometer design based on calculating the measurement uncertainty. The variety in radiometer designs and the demand for improved radiometric measurements justify the need for a more general and comprehensive method to assess system performance. Radiometric resolution, or sensitivity, is a figure of merit that has been commonly used to characterize the performance of a radiometer. However when evaluating the performance of a calibration design for a radiometer, the use of radiometric resolution has limited application. These limitations are overcome by considering instead the measurement uncertainty. A method for calculating measurement uncertainty for a generic radiometer design including its calibration algorithm is presented. The result is a generalized technique by which system calibration architectures and design parameters can be studied to optimize instrument performance for given requirements and constraints. Example applications demonstrate the utility of using measurement uncertainty as a figure of merit.

  15. SMEX02 Aircraft Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR) is an airborne microwave imaging radiometer developed and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

  16. CAMEX-3 POLARIMETRIC SCANNING RADIOMETER (PSR) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR) is a versatile airborne microwave imaging radiometer developed by the Georgia Institute of Technology and the NOAA...

  17. Macrocyclic Radiochelates for Antibody Imaging and Therapy of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewis, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Conjugation of bifunctional chelating agents allows monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to be labeled with radiometals for delivery of diagnostic or therapeutic radiation to primary breast tumors or metastatic disease...

  18. Shortwave Radiometer Calibration Methods Comparison and Resulting Solar Irradiance Measurement Differences: A User Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Reda, Ibrahim; Robinson, Justin

    2016-11-21

    Banks financing solar energy projects require assurance that these systems will produce the energy predicted. Furthermore, utility planners and grid system operators need to understand the impact of the variable solar resource on solar energy conversion system performance. Accurate solar radiation data sets reduce the expense associated with mitigating performance risk and assist in understanding the impacts of solar resource variability. The accuracy of solar radiation measured by radiometers depends on the instrument performance specification, installation method, calibration procedure, measurement conditions, maintenance practices, location, and environmental conditions. This study addresses the effect of different calibration methods provided by radiometric calibration service providers, such as NREL and manufacturers of radiometers, on the resulting calibration responsivity. Some of these radiometers are calibrated indoors and some outdoors. To establish or understand the differences in calibration methodology, we processed and analyzed field-measured data from these radiometers. This study investigates calibration responsivities provided by NREL's broadband outdoor radiometer calibration (BORCAL) and a few prominent manufacturers. The BORCAL method provides the outdoor calibration responsivity of pyranometers and pyrheliometers at 45 degree solar zenith angle, and as a function of solar zenith angle determined by clear-sky comparisons with reference irradiance. The BORCAL method also employs a thermal offset correction to the calibration responsivity of single-black thermopile detectors used in pyranometers. Indoor calibrations of radiometers by their manufacturers are performed using a stable artificial light source in a side-by-side comparison between the test radiometer under calibration and a reference radiometer of the same type. In both methods, the reference radiometer calibrations are traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR). These

  19. Intracytoplasmic stable expression of IgG1 antibody targeting NS3 helicase inhibits replication of highly efficient hepatitis C Virus 2a clone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clementi Massimo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major public health problem with more than 170 million cases of chronic infections worldwide. There is no protective vaccine currently available for HCV, therefore the development of novel strategy to prevent chronic infection is important. We reported earlier that a recombinant human antibody clone blocks viral NS3 helicase activity and inhibits replication of HCV 1b virus. This study was performed further to explore the mechanism of action of this recombinant antibody and to determine whether or not this antibody inhibits replication and infectivity of a highly efficient JFH1 HCV 2a virus clone. Results The antiviral effect of intracellular expressed antibody against the HCV 2a virus strain was examined using a full-length green fluorescence protein (GFP labeled infectious cell culture system. For this purpose, a Huh-7.5 cell line stably expressing the NS3 helicase gene specific IgG1 antibody was prepared. Replication of full-length HCV-GFP chimera RNA and negative-strand RNA was strongly inhibited in Huh-7.5 cells stably expressing NS3 antibody but not in the cells expressing an unrelated control antibody. Huh-7.5 cells stably expressing NS3 helicase antibody effectively suppressed infectious virus production after natural infection and the level of HCV in the cell free supernatant remained undetectable after first passage. In contrast, Huh-7.5 cells stably expressing an control antibody against influenza virus had no effect on virus production and high-levels of infectious HCV were detected in culture supernatants over four rounds of infectivity assay. A recombinant adenovirus based expression system was used to demonstrate that Huh-7.5 replicon cell line expressing the intracellular antibody strongly inhibited the replication of HCV-GFP RNA. Conclusion Recombinant human anti-HCV NS3 antibody clone inhibits replication of HCV 2a virus and infectious virus production. Intracellular

  20. GRIP HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER (HIRAD) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) V1 dataset contains measurements of brightness temperature taken at 4, 5, 6 and 6.6 GHz, as well as MERRA 2 m wind...

  1. GRIP HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER (HIRAD) V0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — HIRAD is a hurricane imaging, single-pol passive C-band radiometer with both cross-track and along-track resolution that measures strong ocean surface winds through...

  2. Microwave Radiometry and Radiometers for Ocean Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    2008-01-01

    aperture radiometer technique, both yielding imaging capability without scanning. Typical applications of microwave radiometry concerning oceans are: sea salinity, sea surface temperature, wind speed and direction, sea ice detection and classification. However, in an attempt to measure properties...

  3. Digital Array Gas Radiometer (DAGR) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The digital array gas radiometer (DAGR) is a new sensor design for accurate measurement and monitoring of trace gases in the boundary layer from space, aircraft, or...

  4. Challenges in application of Active Cold Loads for microwave radiometer calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Balling, Jan E.; Skou, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Two Active Cold Loads (ACLs) for microwave radiometer calibration, operating at X-band, are evaluated with respect to important stability parameters. Using a stable radiometer system as test bed, absolute levels of 77 K and 55 K are found. This paper identifies and summarizes potential challenges...... and uncertainties in future application of ACLs in air and space borne missions, and important parameters, such as temperature sensitivity and long term stability are addressed. For the devices under test, temperature sensitivities are found to be in the range from 0.2 K/°C to 0.4 K/°C, and typical long term drift...

  5. Involvement of HLDF protein and anti-HLDF antibodies in the mechanisms of blood pressure regulation in healthy individuals and patients with stable hypertension and hypertensive crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elistratova, E I; Gruden, M A; Sherstnev, V V

    2012-09-01

    We studied the relationships between the blood serum levels of human leukemia differentiation factor HLDF, idiotypic and anti-idiotypic antibodies to HLDF, and clinical indicators of cardiovascular function in apparently healthy individuals and patients with essential hypertension and cerebral hypertensive crisis. Markedly reduced HLDF levels and anti-HLDF antibody titers were found in the blood of the examined patients. Correlations between HLDF levels, duration of hypertension, and systolic and diastolic BP were revealed. These findings suggest that the studied molecular factors are involved in the mechanisms of BP regulation under normal conditions and during hypertension development. The protein HLDF and anti-HLDF antibodies can be considered as biomarkers for early diagnosis of hypertension and its cerebral complications.

  6. Novel Cyclotron-Based Radiometal Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGrado, Timothy R. [Mayo Clinic (United States)

    2013-10-31

    Accomplishments: (1) Construction of prototype solution target for radiometal production; (2) Testing of prototype target for production of following isotopes: a. Zr-89. Investigation of Zr-89 production from Y-89 nitrate solution. i. Defined problems of gas evolution and salt precipitation. ii. Solved problem of precipitation by addition of nitric acid. iii. Solved gas evolution problem with addition of backpressure regulator and constant degassing of target during irradiations. iv. Investigated effects of Y-89 nitrate concentration and beam current. v. Published abstracts at SNM and ISRS meetings; (3) Design of 2nd generation radiometal solution target. a. Included reflux chamber and smaller target volume to conserve precious target materials. b. Included aluminum for prototype and tantalum for working model. c. Included greater varicosities for improved heat transfer; and, (4) Construction of 2nd generation radiometal solution target started.

  7. Novel Cyclotron-Based Radiometal Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGrado, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Accomplishments: (1) Construction of prototype solution target for radiometal production; (2) Testing of prototype target for production of following isotopes: a. Zr-89. Investigation of Zr-89 production from Y-89 nitrate solution. i. Defined problems of gas evolution and salt precipitation. ii. Solved problem of precipitation by addition of nitric acid. iii. Solved gas evolution problem with addition of backpressure regulator and constant degassing of target during irradiations. iv. Investigated effects of Y-89 nitrate concentration and beam current. v. Published abstracts at SNM and ISRS meetings; (3) Design of 2nd generation radiometal solution target. a. Included reflux chamber and smaller target volume to conserve precious target materials. b. Included aluminum for prototype and tantalum for working model. c. Included greater varicosities for improved heat transfer; and, (4) Construction of 2nd generation radiometal solution target started

  8. The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer: Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Biswas, S. K.; Cecil, D.; Jones, W. L.; Johnson, J.; Farrar, S.; Sahawneh, S.; Ruf, C. S.; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is an airborne passive microwave radiometer designed to provide high resolution, wide swath imagery of surface wind speed in tropical cyclones from a low profile planar antenna with no mechanical scanning. Wind speed and rain rate images from HIRAD's first field campaign (GRIP, 2010) are presented here followed, by a discussion on the performance of the newly installed thermal control system during the 2012 HS3 campaign. The paper ends with a discussion on the next generation dual polarization HIRAD antenna (already designed) for a future system capable of measuring wind direction as well as wind speed.

  9. GPM Ground Validation Duke Microwave Radiometer (MWR) IPHEx V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Duke Microwave Radiometer (MWR) IPHEx dataset consists of data collected by the MWR, which is a sensitive microwave radiometer that detects...

  10. GRIP HIGH-ALTITUDE MMIC SOUNDING RADIOMETER (HAMSR) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP High-Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) dataset was collectd by the High Altitude monolithic microwave integrated Circuit (MMIC) Sounding Radiometer...

  11. A radiometer for stochastic gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Ballmer, Stefan W.

    2005-01-01

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration recently reported a new upper limit on an isotropic stochastic background of gravitational waves obtained based on the data from the 3rd LIGO science Run (S3). Now I present a new method for obtaining directional upper limits that the LIGO Scientific Collaboration intends to use for future LIGO science runs and that essentially implements a gravitational wave radiometer.

  12. SMAP Radiometer Soil Moisture Downscaling in CONUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, B.; Lakshmi, V.; Bindlish, R.; Jackson, T. J.

    2017-12-01

    Remote sensing technology has been providing soil moisture observations for the study of the global hydrological cycle for land-air interactions, ecology and agriculture. Passive microwave sensors that have provided operational products include AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System), AMSR2 (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2), SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity), as and SMAP (Soil Moisture Active/Passive). The SMAP radiometer provides soil moisture with a grid resolution of 9 km. However, higher spatial resolution soil moisture is still required for various applications in weather, agriculture and watershed studies. This study focuses on providing a higher resolution product by downscaling the SMAP soil moisture over CONUS (Contiguous United States). This algorithm is based on the long term thermal inertia relationship between daily temperature variation and average soil moisture modulated by vegetation. This relationship is modeled using the variables from the NLDAS (North America Land Data Assimilation System) and LTDR (Land Long Term Data Record) from 1981-2016 and is applied to calculate 1 km soil moisture from MODIS land data products and then used to downscale SMAP Level-3 9 km radiometer soil moisture to 1 km over CONUS. The downscaled results are evaluated by comparison with in situ observations from ISMN (International Soil Moisture Network), SMAPVEX (SMAP Validation Experiment), MESONET (Mesoscale Network), Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) and other established networks.

  13. Calibration of aerosol radiometers. Special aerosol sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkina, S.K.; Zalmanzon, Yu.E.; Kuznetsov, Yu.V.; Fertman, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Problems of calibration of artificial aerosol radiometry and information-measurement systems of radiometer radiation control, in particular, are considered. Special aerosol source is suggested, which permits to perform certification and testing of aerosol channels of the systems in situ without the dismantling

  14. Heat capacity mapping radiometer for AEM spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnek, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    The operation, maintenance, and integration of the applications explorer mission heat capacity mapping radiometer is illustrated in block diagrams and detail schematics of circuit functions. Data format and logic timing diagrams are included along with radiometric and electronic calibration data. Mechanical and electrical configuration is presented to provide interface details for integration of the HCMR instrument to AEM spacecraft.

  15. Dual Microwave Radiometer Experiment Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, Roger [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Passive microwave radiometers (MWRs) are the most commonly used and accurate instruments the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Research Facility has to retrieve cloud liquid water path (LWP). The MWR measurements (microwave radiances or brightness temperatures) are often used to derive LWP using climatological constraints, but are frequently also combined with measurements from radar and other instruments for cloud microphysical retrievals. Nominally this latter approach improves the retrieval of LWP and other cloud microphysical quantities (such as effective radius or number concentration), but this also means that when MWR data are poor, other cloud microphysical quantities are also negatively affected. Unfortunately, current MWR data is often contaminated by water on the MWR radome. This water makes a substantial contribution to the measured radiance and typically results in retrievals of cloud liquid water and column water vapor that are biased high. While it is obvious when the contamination by standing water is large (and retrieval biases are large), much of the time it is difficult to know with confidence that there is no contamination. At present there is no attempt to estimate or correct for this source of error, and identification of problems is largely left to users. Typically users are advised to simply throw out all data when the MWR “wet-window” resistance-based sensor indicates water is present, but this sensor is adjusted by hand and is known to be temperamental. In order to address this problem, a pair of ARM microwave radiometers was deployed to the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, Washington, USA. The radiometers were operated such that one radiometer was scanned under a cover that (nominally) prevents this radiometer radome from gathering water and permits measurements away from zenith; while the other radiometer is operated normally – open or uncovered - with the radome exposed to the sky

  16. Wideband filter radiometers for blackbody temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, L. P.; Bamber, C.; Gaertner, A. A.; Gerson, R. K.; Woods, D. J.; Woolliams, E. R.

    2010-10-01

    The use of high-temperature blackbody (HTBB) radiators to realize primary spectral irradiance scales requires that the operating temperature of the HTBB be accurately determined. We have developed five filter radiometers (FRs) to measure the temperature of the National Research Council of Canada's HTBB. The FRs are designed to minimize sensitivity to ambient temperature fluctuations. They incorporate air-spaced colored glass filters and a Si photodiode detector that are housed in a cell whose temperature is controlled to ±0.1°C by means of annular thermoelectric elements at the front and rear of the cell. These wideband filter radiometers operate in four different wavelength bands. The spectral responsivity measurements were performed in an underfill geometry for a power-mode calibration that is traceable to NRC's cryogenic radiometer. The spectral temperature sensitivity of each of these FRs has been measured. The apertures for these FRs were cold-formed by swaging machine-cut apertures onto precision dowel pins. A description of the filter radiometer design, fabrication and testing, together with a detailed uncertainty analysis, is presented. We derive the equations that relate the spectral irradiance measured by the FRs to the spectral radiance and temperature of the HTBB, and deal specifically with the change of index of refraction over the path of the radiation from the interior of the HTBB to the FRs. We believe these equations are more accurate than recently published derivations. Our measurements of the operating temperature of our HTBB working at temperatures near 2500 K, 2700 K and 2900 K, together with measurements using a pyrometer, show agreement between the five filter radiometers and with the pyrometer to within the estimated uncertainties.

  17. Quality not quantity for transglutaminase antibody 2: the performance of an endomysial and tissue transglutaminase test in screening coeliac disease remains stable over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swallow, K; Wild, G; Sargur, R; Sanders, D S; Aziz, I; Hopper, A D; Egner, W

    2013-01-01

    National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) and European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) guidance for the diagnosis of coeliac disease has been published. However, there is some controversy regarding the advice on the use of stratifying levels of immunoglobulin (IgA) tissue transglutaminase antibody (TG2) test positivity in the absence of test standardization and the vagueness of the indication to test equivocal samples. Using repeat service audit, we demonstrate that a combination of TG2 followed by IgA endomysial antibodies (EMA) is the best strategy for all degrees of mucosal abnormality using our test combination. Reliance upon immunoassay titre is not as effective, and cannot be applied consistently across populations in the absence of assay standardization. Guidelines advocating the use of tests should involve experts in laboratory diagnostics and external quality assurance to ensure that errors of generalization do not occur and that test performance is achievable in routine diagnostic use. © 2012 British Society for Immunology.

  18. Metal chelate conjugated monoclonal antibodies, wherein the metal is an α emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gansow, O.A.; Strand, M.

    1984-01-01

    Methods of manufacturing and purifying metal chelate conjugated monoclonal antibodies are described, wherein the chelated metal emits alpha radiation. The conjugates are suited for therapeutic uses being substantially free of nonchelated radiometal. (author)

  19. The Impact of Indoor and Outdoor Radiometer Calibration on Solar Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Reda, Ibrahim; Robinson, Justin

    2016-06-02

    This study addresses the effect of calibration methodologies on calibration responsivities and the resulting impact on radiometric measurements. The calibration responsivities used in this study are provided by NREL's broadband outdoor radiometer calibration (BORCAL) and a few prominent manufacturers. The BORCAL method provides outdoor calibration responsivity of pyranometers and pyrheliometers at a 45 degree solar zenith angle and responsivity as a function of solar zenith angle determined by clear-sky comparisons to reference irradiance. The BORCAL method also employs a thermal offset correction to the calibration responsivity of single-black thermopile detectors used in pyranometers. Indoor calibrations of radiometers by their manufacturers are performed using a stable artificial light source in a side-by-side comparison of the test radiometer under calibration to a reference radiometer of the same type. These different methods of calibration demonstrated 1percent to 2 percent differences in solar irradiance measurement. Analyzing these values will ultimately enable a reduction in radiometric measurement uncertainties and assist in developing consensus on a standard for calibration.

  20. Remote Sensing of Surface Soil Moisture using Semi-Concurrent Radar and Radiometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Ouellette, J. D.; Colliander, A.; Cosh, M. H.; Caldwell, T. G.; Walker, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Radar backscatter and radiometer brightness temperature both have well-documented sensitivity to surface soil moisture, particularly in the microwave regime. While radiometer-derived soil moisture retrievals have been shown to be stable and accurate, they are only available at coarse spatial resolutions on the order of tens of kilometers. Backscatter from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is similarly sensitive to soil moisture but can yield higher spatial resolutions, with pixel sizes about an order of magnitude smaller. Soil moisture retrieval from radar backscatter is more difficult, however, due to the combined sensitivity of radar scattering to surface roughness, vegetation structure, and soil moisture. The algorithm uses a time-series of SAR data to retrieval soil moisture information, constraining the SAR-derived soil moisture estimates with radiometer observations. This effectively combines the high spatial resolution offered by SAR with the precision offered by passive radiometry. The algorithm is a change detection approach which maps changes in the radar backscatter to changes in surface soil moisture. This new algorithm differs from existing retrieval techniques in that it does not require ancillary vegetation information, but assumes vegetation and surface roughness are stable between pairs of consecutive radar overpasses. Furthermore, this method does not require a radar scattering model for the vegetation canopy, nor the use of a training data set. The algorithm works over a long time series, and is constrained by hard bounds which are defined using a coarse-resolution radiometer soil moisture product. The presentation will include soil moisture retrievals from Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) SAR data. Two sets of optimization bounds will constrain the radar change detection algorithm: one defined by SMAP radiometer retrievals and one defined by WindSat radiometer retrievals. Retrieved soil moisture values will be presented on a world map and will

  1. A new radiometer for earth radiation budget studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for radiation balance studies. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on (small) satellites, aircraft, or Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs). Some considerations for the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite are given. 17 refs.

  2. GPM GROUND VALIDATION DUAL POLARIZATION RADIOMETER GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Dual Polarization Radiometer GCPEx dataset includes brightness temperature measurements at frequencies 90 GHz (not polarized) and 150 GHz...

  3. GPM GROUND VALIDATION DUAL POLARIZATION RADIOMETER GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Dual Polarization Radiometer GCPEx dataset provides brightness temperature measurements at frequencies 90 GHz (not polarized) and 150 GHz...

  4. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ENVIRONMENT CANADA (EC) RADIOMETER GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Environment Canada (EC) Radiometer GCPEx dataset contains retrievals of temperature, water vapor, relative humidity, liquid water profiles...

  5. GRIP HIGH-ALTITUDE MMIC SOUNDING RADIOMETER (HAMSR) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Altitude monolithic microwave integrated Circuit (MMIC) Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) is a microwave atmospheric sounder developed by JPL under the NASA...

  6. Antibodies derived from a toxoid MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) show neutralizing activities against heat-labile toxin (LT), heat-stable toxins (STa, STb), and Shiga toxin 2e (Stx2e) of porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Dana; Ruan, Xiaosai; Nandre, Rahul; Duan, Qiangde; Hashish, Emad; Casey, Thomas A; Zhang, Weiping

    2017-04-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are the main cause of diarrhea in pigs. Pig diarrhea especially post-weaning diarrhea remains one of the most important swine diseases. ETEC bacterial fimbriae including K88, F18, 987P, K99 and F41 promote bacterial attachment to intestinal epithelial cells and facilitate ETEC colonization in pig small intestine. ETEC enterotoxins including heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxins type Ia (porcine-type STa) and type II (STb) stimulate fluid hyper-secretion, leading to watery diarrhea. Blocking bacteria colonization and/or neutralizing enterotoxicity of ETEC toxins are considered effective prevention against ETEC diarrhea. In this study, we applied the MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) strategy to create toxoid MEFAs that carried antigenic elements of ETEC toxins, and examined for broad antitoxin immunogenicity in a murine model. By embedding STa toxoid STa P12F (NTFYCCELCCNFACAGCY), a STb epitope (KKDLCEHY), and an epitope of Stx2e A subunit (QSYVSSLN) into the A1 peptide of a monomeric LT toxoid (LT R192G ), two toxoid MEFAs, 'LT R192G -STb-Stx2e-STa P12F ' and 'LT R192G -STb-Stx2e-3xSTa P12F ' which carried three copies of STa P12F , were constructed. Mice intraperitoneally immunized with each toxoid MEFA developed IgG antibodies to all four toxins. Induced antibodies showed in vitro neutralizing activities against LT, STa, STb and Stx2e toxins. Moreover, suckling piglets born by a gilt immunized with 'LT R192G -STb-Stx2e-3xSTa P12F ' were protected when challenged with ETEC strains, whereas piglets born by a control gilt developed diarrhea. Results from this study showed that the toxoid MEFA induced broadly antitoxin antibodies, and suggested potential application of the toxoid MEFA for developing a broad-spectrum vaccine against ETEC diarrhea in pigs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Conceptual radiometer design studies for Earth observations from low Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    A conceptual radiometer design study was performed to determine the optimum design approach for spaceborne radiometers in low Earth orbit. Radiometric system configurations which included total power radiometers, unbalanced Dicke radiometers, and balanced Dicke, or as known as noise injection, radiometers were studied. Radiometer receiver configurations which were analyzed included the direct detection radiometer receiver, the double sideband homodyne radiometer receiver, and the single sideband heterodyne radiometer receiver. Radiometer system performance was also studied. This included radiometric sensitivity analysis of the three different radiometer system configurations studied. Both external and internal calibration techniques were analyzed. An accuracy analysis with and without mismatch losses was performed. It was determined that the balanced Dicke radiometer system configuration with direct detection receivers and external calibrations was optimum where frequent calibration such as once per minute were not feasible.

  8. Genetic Fusions of Heat-Labile Toxoid (LT) and Heat-Stable Toxin b (STb) of Porcine Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Elicit Protective Anti-LT and Anti-STb Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiping; Francis, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC)-associated diarrhea causes a substantial economic loss to swine producers worldwide. The majority of ETEC strains causing porcine diarrhea, especially postweaning diarrhea (PWD), produce heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxin b (STb). LT is commonly used in vaccine development, but STb has not been included because of its poor immunogenicity. As a virulence factor in porcine diarrhea, STb needs to be included as an antigen for development of broad-spectrum vaccines. In this study, we used an LT toxoid (LTR192G [hereafter, LT192]) derived from porcine ETEC to carry a mature STb peptide for LT192-STb fusions to enhance STb immunogenicity for potential vaccine application. Anti-LT and anti-STb antibodies were detected in immunized rabbits and pigs. In addition, when challenged with an STb-positive ETEC strain, all 10 suckling piglets borne by immunized gilts remained healthy, whereas 7 out 9 piglets borne by unimmunized gilts developed moderate diarrhea. This study indicates that the LT192-STb fusion enhanced anti-STb immunogenicity and suggests the LT192-STb fusion antigen can be used in future vaccine development against porcine ETEC diarrhea. PMID:20505006

  9. The DC-8 Submillimeter-Wave Cloud Ice Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Steven J.; Batelaan, Paul; Siegel, Peter; Evans, K. Franklin; Evans, Aaron; Balachandra, Balu; Gannon, Jade; Guldalian, John; Raz, Guy; Shea, James

    2000-01-01

    An airborne radiometer is being developed to demonstrate the capability of radiometry at submillimeter-wavelengths to characterize cirrus clouds. At these wavelengths, cirrus clouds scatter upwelling radiation from water vapor in the lower troposphere. Radiometric measurements made at multiple widely spaced frequencies permit flux variations caused by changes in scattering due to crystal size to be distinguished from changes in cloud ice content. Measurements at dual polarizations can also be used to constrain the mean crystal shape. An airborne radiometer measuring the upwelling submillimeter-wave flux should then able to retrieve both bulk and microphysical cloud properties. The radiometer is being designed to make measurements at four frequencies (183 GHz, 325 GHz, 448 GHz, and 643 GHz) with dual-polarization capability at 643 GHz. The instrument is being developed for flight on NASA's DC-8 and will scan cross-track through an aircraft window. Measurements with this radiometer in combination with independent ground-based and airborne measurements will validate the submillimeter-wave radiometer retrieval techniques. The goal of this effort is to develop a technique to enable spaceborne characterization of cirrus, which will meet a key climate measurement need. The development of an airborne radiometer to validate cirrus retrieval techniques is a critical step toward development of spaced-based radiometers to investigate and monitor cirrus on a global scale. The radiometer development is a cooperative effort of the University of Colorado, Colorado State University, Swales Aerospace, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory and is funded by the NASA Instrument Incubator Program.

  10. Novel multi-beam radiometers for accurate ocean surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, C.; Pontoppidan, K.; Nielsen, P. H.

    2014-01-01

    Novel antenna architectures for real aperture multi-beam radiometers providing high resolution and high sensitivity for accurate sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean vector wind (OVW) measurements are investigated. On the basis of the radiometer requirements set for future SST/OVW missions, co...

  11. L-Band Polarimetric Correlation Radiometer with Subharmonic Sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotbøll, Jesper; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels

    2001-01-01

    A novel L-band radiometer trading analog complexity for digital ditto has been designed and built. It is a fully polarimetric radiometer of the correlation type and it is based on the sub-harmonic sampling principle in which the L-band signal is directly sampled by a fast A to D converter...

  12. A novel L-band polarimetric radiometer featuring subharmonic sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotbøll, J.; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels

    2003-01-01

    A novel L-band radiometer trading analog components for digital circuits has been designed, built and operated. It is a fully polarimetric radiometer of the correlation type, and it is based on the subharmonic sampling principle in which the L-band signal is directly sampled by a fast A to D...

  13. Etched track radiometers in radon measurements: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolaev, V A

    1999-01-01

    Passive radon radiometers, based on alpha particle etched track detectors, are very attractive for the assessment of radon exposure. The present review considers various devices used for measurement of the volume activity of radon isotopes and their daughters and determination of equilibrium coefficients. Such devices can be classified into 8 groups: (i) open or 'bare' detectors, (ii) open chambers, (iii) sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn chambers with an inlet filter, (iv) advanced sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn radiometers, (v) multipurpose radiometers, (vi) radiometers based on a combination of etched track detectors and an electrostatic field, (vii) radiometers based on etched track detectors and activated charcoal and (viii) devices for the measurement of radon isotopes and/or radon daughters by means of track parameter measurements. Some of them such as the open detector and the chamber with an inlet filter have a variety of modifications and are applied widely both in geophysical research and radon dosimetric surveys. At the...

  14. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ADVANCED MICROWAVE PRECIPITATION RADIOMETER (AMPR) MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Advanced Microwave Precipitaiton Radiometer (AMPR) MC3E dataset was collected by the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR)...

  15. Characterizations of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanning radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Avis, Lee M.; Halyo, Nesim; Gibson, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    NASA's Earth Radiation Budget Experiment employs the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite and the NOAA 9 and 10 spacecraft to obtain absolute measurements of incoming solar radiation, shortwave earth-reflected solar radiation, and longwave earth-emitted radiation, using both scanning and nonscanning radiometers. Each of the three remote-sensing spacecraft carry narrow FOV scanning radiometers whose detection sensors are thermistor bolometers. Attention is presently given to the calibration models and methods employed in characterizing the scanning radiometers' output signals; the design features of the scanners and flight calibration systems are presented.

  16. Special aerosol sources for certification and test of aerosol radiometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkina, S.K.; Zalmanzon, Y.E.; Kuznetsov, Y.V.; Rizin, A.I.; Fertman, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of the development and practical application of new radionuclide source types (Special Aerosol Sources (SAS)), that meet the international standard recommendations, which are used for certification and test of aerosol radiometers (monitors) using model aerosols of plutonium-239, strontium-yttrium-90 or uranium of natural isotope composition and certified against Union of Soviet Socialist Republics USSR national radioactive aerosol standard or by means of a reference radiometer. The original technology for source production allows the particular features of sampling to be taken into account as well as geometry and conditions of radionuclides radiation registration in the sample for the given type of radiometer. (author)

  17. Special aerosol sources for certification and test of aerosol radiometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkina, S.K.; Zalmanzon, Y.E.; Kuznetsov, Y.V.; Rizin, A.I.; Fertman, D.E. (Union Research Institute of Instrumentation, Moscow (USSR))

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of the development and practical application of new radionuclide source types (Special Aerosol Sources (SAS)), that meet the international standard recommendations, which are used for certification and test of aerosol radiometers (monitors) using model aerosols of plutonium-239, strontium-yttrium-90 or uranium of natural isotope composition and certified against Union of Soviet Socialist Republics USSR national radioactive aerosol standard or by means of a reference radiometer. The original technology for source production allows the particular features of sampling to be taken into account as well as geometry and conditions of radionuclides radiation registration in the sample for the given type of radiometer. (author).

  18. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  19. Simple and general procedure for the synthesis of semi-rigid chelating agents for radiometal complexation studies and its application to semi-rigid functionalised ligands (BCA) synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loussouarn, A.; Faivre-Chauvet, A.; Chatal, J.-F.; Gestin, J.-F. [INSERM, Nantes (France). Inst. de Biologie

    1999-07-01

    Immunotherapy with radiolabeled antibodies should allow fairly specific targeting of certain cancers. However, iodine-131 may not be the best isotope for tumour therapy because of its limited specific activity, low beta-energy, relatively long half-life and strong gamma emission. Another approach to improve therapeutic efficacy is the use of replacement isotopes with better physical properties. Chelators that can hold radiometals with high stability under physiological conditions are essential to avoid excessive radiation damage to non-target cells. Moreover, the development of new bifunctional chelating agents is essential for this purpose. Accordingly, our efforts have been directed, for several years, to the synthesis of original chelating agents likely to form stable complexes in vivo with the numerous potential candidates for such applications. The stability of a non-macrocyclic ligand can be favourably influenced by the preorganization of the open chain. In fact, a semi-rigid structure such as that of trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane limits the rotation of the ethylene bridge, so that the purpose of the cyclohexane design is to preorient the four pendent arms in a skew position. Therefore, we have developed a new simple and efficient synthesis pathway from trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane to provide access to a new class of semi-rigid chelating agents. This same reactional scheme will be apply to our reactional intermediary, (1R{sup *}, 2R{sup *}, 4S{sup *})-4-acetamido-1,2-diaminocyclohexane dihydrochloride, which will allow the synthesis of these same chelating agents, though functionalised back of the cycle by a termination allowed coupling to an antibody or any other biological substance such as a hapten. (orig.)

  20. Simple and general procedure for the synthesis of semi-rigid chelating agents for radiometal complexation studies and its application to semi-rigid functionalised ligands (BCA) synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loussouarn, A.; Faivre-Chauvet, A.; Chatal, J.-F.; Gestin, J.-F.

    1999-01-01

    Immunotherapy with radiolabeled antibodies should allow fairly specific targeting of certain cancers. However, iodine-131 may not be the best isotope for tumour therapy because of its limited specific activity, low beta-energy, relatively long half-life and strong gamma emission. Another approach to improve therapeutic efficacy is the use of replacement isotopes with better physical properties. Chelators that can hold radiometals with high stability under physiological conditions are essential to avoid excessive radiation damage to non-target cells. Moreover, the development of new bifunctional chelating agents is essential for this purpose. Accordingly, our efforts have been directed, for several years, to the synthesis of original chelating agents likely to form stable complexes in vivo with the numerous potential candidates for such applications. The stability of a non-macrocyclic ligand can be favourably influenced by the preorganization of the open chain. In fact, a semi-rigid structure such as that of trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane limits the rotation of the ethylene bridge, so that the purpose of the cyclohexane design is to preorient the four pendent arms in a skew position. Therefore, we have developed a new simple and efficient synthesis pathway from trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane to provide access to a new class of semi-rigid chelating agents. This same reactional scheme will be apply to our reactional intermediary, (1R * , 2R * , 4S * )-4-acetamido-1,2-diaminocyclohexane dihydrochloride, which will allow the synthesis of these same chelating agents, though functionalised back of the cycle by a termination allowed coupling to an antibody or any other biological substance such as a hapten. (orig.)

  1. Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) Handbook With subsections for derivative instruments: Multifilter Radiometer (MFR) Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodges, Gary B. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.; Michalsky, Joseph J. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.

    2016-03-01

    The visible Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) is a passive instrument that measures global and diffuse components of solar irradiance at six narrowband channels and one open, or broadband, channel (Harrison et al. 1994). Direct irradiance is not a primary measurement, but is calculated using diffuse and global measurements. To collect one data record, the MFRSR takes measurements at four different shadowband positions. The first measurement is taken with the shadowband in the nadir (home) position. The next three measurements are, in order, the first side-band, sun-blocked, and second side-band. The side-band measurements are used to correct for the portion of the sky obscured by the shadowband. The nominal wavelengths of the narrowband channels are 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere’s aerosol optical depth at each wavelength. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Harrison and Michalsky 1994) and other atmospheric constituents.

  2. GALILEO PROBE NET FLUX RADIOMETER DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Galileo Probe Net Flux Radiometer (NFR) measured net and upward radiation fluxes in Jupiter's atmosphere between about 0.44 bars and 14 bars, using five spectral...

  3. Hurricane Satellite (HURSAT) from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Huricane Satellite (HURSAT)-Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) is used to extend the HURSAT data set such that appling the Objective Dvorak technique...

  4. Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) was successfully launched into sun-synchronous polar orbit aboard Terra, NASA's first Earth Observing System (EOS)...

  5. NAMMA HIGH ALTITUDE MMIC SOUNDING RADIOMETER (HAMSR) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) dataset consists of data collected by HAMSR, which is a 25-channel microwave atmospheric sounder operating...

  6. The development of the advanced cryogenic radiometer facility at NRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamouras, A.; Todd, A. D. W.; Côté, É.; Rowell, N. L.

    2018-02-01

    The National Research Council (NRC) of Canada has established a next generation facility for the primary realization of optical radiant power. The main feature of this facility is a new cryogenic electrical substitution radiometer with a closed-cycle helium cryocooler. A monochromator-based approach allows for detector calibrations at any desired wavelength. A custom-designed motion apparatus includes two transfer standard radiometer mounting ports which has increased our measurement capability by allowing the calibration of two photodetectors in one measurement cycle. Measurement uncertainties have been improved through several upgrades, including newly designed and constructed transimpedance amplifiers for the transfer standard radiometers, and a higher power broadband light source. The most significant improvements in uncertainty arise from the enhanced characteristics of the new cryogenic radiometer including its higher cavity absorptance and reduced non-equivalence effects.

  7. Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodges, GB; Michalsky, JJ

    2011-02-07

    The visible Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) is a passive instrument that measures global and diffuse components of solar irradiance at six narrowband channels and one open, or broadband, channel (Harrison et al. 1994). Direct irradiance is not a primary measurement, but is calculated using the diffuse and global measurements. To collect one data record, the MFRSR takes measurements at four different shadowband positions. The first measurement is taken with the shadowband in the nadir (home) position. The next three measurements are, in order, the first side-band, sun-blocked, and second side-band. The side-band measurements are used to correct for the portion of the sky obscured by the shadowband. The nominal wavelengths of the narrowband channels are 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's aerosol optical depth at each wavelength. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Harrison and Michalsky 1994) and other atmospheric constituents.

  8. Analisys of noise injection networks for interferometric radiometer calibration

    OpenAIRE

    Corbella Sanahuja, Ignasi; Camps Carmona, Adriano José; Torres Torres, Francisco; Bará Temes, Francisco Javier

    2000-01-01

    Abstract: The spatial resolution of current space-borne Earth observation radiometers is limited by the physical antenna aperture. This is especially critical at L-band, which exhibits high sensitivity to soil moisture and sea surface salinity. Interferometric radiometers (InR's) are currently being studied by several space agencies as a feasible alternative to overcome this problem. However, their calibration is a crucial issue since most techniques inherited from radio astronomy cannot b...

  9. Characterization of a Compact Water Vapor Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Ajay; Selina, Rob

    2018-01-01

    We report on laboratory test results of the Compact Water Vapor Radiometer (CWVR) prototype for the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), a five-channel design centered around the 22 GHz water vapor line. Fluctuations in perceptible water vapor cause fluctuations in atmospheric brightness emission, which are assumed to be proportional to phase fluctuations of the astronomical signal seen by an antenna. The design is intended to support empirical radiometric phase corrections for each baseline in the array.The dynamic range, channel isolation, and gain stability of the device were characterized. The device has a useful dynamic range of order 18 dB after calibration, and the CWVR channel isolation requirement of law region, and a K-band noise diode was used as the broadband input power source to the CWVR over a period of 64 hours. Results indicate that the fluctuations in output counts are negatively correlated to the CWVR enclosure ambient temperature, with a change of ~ 405 counts per 1° C change in temperature.A correction for the CWVR ambient temperature makes a considerable improvement in stability for τ > 102.6 sec. With temperature corrections, the single channel and channel difference gain stability per channel is < 2 x 10-4 over τ = 2.5 - 103 sec, which meets the < 2 x 10-4 requirement. The observable gain stability is < 2.5 x 10-4 over τ = 2.5 - 103 sec, which meets the < 2.5 x 10-4 requirement.Overall, the test results indicate that the CWVR meets required specifications for dynamic range, channel isolation, and gain stability in order to proceed with testing on a pair of VLA antennas.

  10. Intercomparison Between Microwave Radiometer and Radiosonding Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toanca, Florica; Stefan, Sabina

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to compare relative humidity and temperature vertical profiles measured by ground based Microwave Radiometer (MWR) RPG HATPRO installed at the Romanian Atmospheric Observatory (Magurele, 44.35 N, 26.03 E) and by radio-sounding (RS) (Baneasa, 44.30 N, 26.04 E) provided by National Meteorological Administration. MWR uses passive microwave detection in the 22.335 to 31.4 GHz and 51to 58 GHz bands to obtain the vertical profiles of temperature and relative humidity up to 10km with a temporal resolution of several minutes. The reliability of atmospheric temperature and relative humidity profiles retrieved continuously by the MWR for the winter and summer of year 2013 was studied. The study was conducted, comparing the temperature and humidity profiles from the MWR with the ones from the radio soundings at 0:00 a.m. Two datasets of the humidity show a fairly good agreement for the interval between ground and 1.5 km in the January month for winter and up to 2 km in the July month for summer. Above 2 km, for the both seasons, the humidity profiles present in most of the selected cases the same trend evolution. The temperature vertical profiles agreed in 95% of the cases during summer and 85% during winter. It is very important for intercomparison that for both seasons almost all temperature vertical profiles highlight temperature inversions. Two cases have been analyzed in order to find possible explanations for the discrepancies between vertical profiles, focusing on advantages and disadvantages of MWR measurements.

  11. APHID: A Wideband, Multichannel Radiometer for Phase Delay Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staguhn, J.; Harris, A. I.; Munday, L. G.; Woody, D. P.

    Atmospheric phase fluctuations of mm and sub-mm signals are predominantly caused by line of sight fluctuations in the amount of water vapor. Measurements of the line emission from tropospheric water vapor can be used to track and correct these fluctuations. We present model calculations which led to the design of a multichannel water vapor radiometer for phase correction of millimeter arrays. Our particular emphasis is on designing a phase correction scheme for mid-latitude sites (BIMA, OVRO), and for high-altitude sites. The instrument being implemented at OVRO and BIMA is a cooled double-sideband heterodyne receiver centered on the 22.2GHz water vapor line with a 0.5 - 4.0GHz IF. The back end is a 16 channel analog lag correlator similar to the WASP spectrometer (Harris et al 1998). We present two applications for the multichannel radiometer. A line fit to the observed spectra is expected to provide sufficient accuracy for mm phase correction with the 22 GHZ line. The radiometer can also be used for the determination of the vertical water vapor distribution from the observed line shape. We discuss how this information can be used to improve the accuracy of water vapor radiometers which have too few channels to observe the line shape, and for phase correction schemes which are based on a 183 GHz water line radiometer.

  12. Progress in Low-Power Digital Microwave Radiometer Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Kim, Edward J.

    2004-01-01

    Three component technologies were combined into a digital correlation microwave radiometer. The radiometer comprises a dual-channel X-band superheterodyne receiver, low-power high-speed cross-correlator (HSCC), three-level ADCs, and a correlated noise source (CNS). The HSCC dissipates 10 mW and operates at 500 MHz clock speed. The ADCs are implemented using ECL components and dissipate more power than desired. Thus, a low-power ADC development is underway. The new ADCs arc predicted to dissipated less than 200 mW and operate at 1 GSps with 1.5 GHz of input bandwidth. The CNS provides different input correlation values for calibration of the radiometer. The correlation channel had a null offset of 0.0008. Test results indicate that the correlation channel can be calibrated with 0.09% error in gain.

  13. Optimization of procedure for calibration with radiometer/photometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detilly, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    A test procedure for the radiometer/photometer calibrations mark International Light at the Laboratorio de Fotometria y Tecnologia Laser (LAFTA) de la Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica de la Universidad de Costa Rica is established. Two photometric banks are used as experimental set and two calibrations were performed of the International Light. A basic procedure established in the laboratory, is used for calibration from measurements of illuminance and luminous intensity. Some dependent variations of photometric banks used in the calibration process, the programming of the radiometer/photometer and the applied methodology showed the results. The procedure for calibration with radiometer/photometer can be improved by optimizing the programming process of the measurement instrument and possible errors can be minimized by using the recommended procedure. (author) [es

  14. Antiprothrombin Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Žigon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, the presence of a group of pathogenic autoantibodies called antiphospholipid antibodies causes thrombosis and pregnancy complications. The most frequent antigenic target of antiphospholipid antibodies are phospholipid bound β2-glycoprotein 1 (β2GPI and prothrombin. The international classification criteria for APS connect the occurrence of thrombosis and/or obstetric complications together with the persistence of lupus anticoagulant, anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL and antibodies against β2GPI (anti-β2GPI into APS. Current trends for the diagnostic evaluation of APS patients propose determination of multiple antiphospholipid antibodies, among them also anti-prothrombin antibodies, to gain a common score which estimates the risk for thrombosis in APS patients. Antiprothrombin antibodies are common in APS patients and are sometimes the only antiphospholipid antibodies being elevated. Methods for their determination differ and have not yet been standardized. Many novel studies confirmed method using phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT ELISA as an antigen on solid phase encompass higher diagnostic accuracy compared to method using prothrombin alone (aPT ELISA. Our research group developed an in-house aPS/PT ELISA with increased analytical sensitivity which enables the determination of all clinically relevant antiprothrombin antibodies. aPS/PT exhibited the highest percentage of lupus anticoagulant activity compared to aCL and anti-β2GPI. aPS/PT antibodies measured with the in-house method associated with venous thrombosis and presented the strongest independent risk factor for the presence of obstetric complications among all tested antiphospholipid antibodies

  15. Microwave radiometer to retrieve temperature profiles from the surface to the stratopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Stähli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available TEMPERA (TEMPERature RAdiometer is a new ground-based radiometer which measures in a frequency range from 51–57 GHz radiation emitted by the atmosphere. With this instrument it is possible to measure temperature profiles from ground to about 50 km. This is the first ground-based instrument with the capability to retrieve temperature profiles simultaneously for the troposphere and stratosphere. The measurement is done with a filterbank in combination with a digital fast Fourier transform spectrometer. A hot load and a noise diode are used as stable calibration sources. The optics consist of an off-axis parabolic mirror to collect the sky radiation. Due to the Zeeman effect on the emission lines used, the maximum height for the temperature retrieval is about 50 km. The effect is apparent in the measured spectra. The performance of TEMPERA is validated by comparison with nearby radiosonde and satellite data from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Aura satellite. In this paper we present the design and measurement method of the instrument followed by a description of the retrieval method, together with a validation of TEMPERA data over its first year, 2012.

  16. Cloud Absorption Radiometer Autonomous Navigation System - CANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Duncan; Gatebe, Charles; McCune, Bill; Hellwig, Dustan

    2013-01-01

    CAR (cloud absorption radiometer) acquires spatial reference data from host aircraft navigation systems. This poses various problems during CAR data reduction, including navigation data format, accuracy of position data, accuracy of airframe inertial data, and navigation data rate. Incorporating its own navigation system, which included GPS (Global Positioning System), roll axis inertia and rates, and three axis acceleration, CANS expedites data reduction and increases the accuracy of the CAR end data product. CANS provides a self-contained navigation system for the CAR, using inertial reference and GPS positional information. The intent of the software application was to correct the sensor with respect to aircraft roll in real time based upon inputs from a precision navigation sensor. In addition, the navigation information (including GPS position), attitude data, and sensor position details are all streamed to a remote system for recording and later analysis. CANS comprises a commercially available inertial navigation system with integral GPS capability (Attitude Heading Reference System AHRS) integrated into the CAR support structure and data system. The unit is attached to the bottom of the tripod support structure. The related GPS antenna is located on the P-3 radome immediately above the CAR. The AHRS unit provides a RS-232 data stream containing global position and inertial attitude and velocity data to the CAR, which is recorded concurrently with the CAR data. This independence from aircraft navigation input provides for position and inertial state data that accounts for very small changes in aircraft attitude and position, sensed at the CAR location as opposed to aircraft state sensors typically installed close to the aircraft center of gravity. More accurate positional data enables quicker CAR data reduction with better resolution. The CANS software operates in two modes: initialization/calibration and operational. In the initialization/calibration mode

  17. Using Sky, Ocean, Land and Ice to Intercalibrate Satellite-borne L-Band Radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabot, F.; Anterrieu, E.; Kerr, Y. H.

    2016-12-01

    Since the launch of the SMOS mission in 2009, two other satellites carrying L-band radiometers joined it on orbit. Aquarius was launched in June 2011 and SMAP in January 2015. Unfortunately, Aquarius ceased operation later that year. All 3 instruments have been operating simultaneously between April and June 2015. Although this golden age of L-band on orbit radiometry was short lived, it allowed for sound comparison of the performances of these 3 radiometers. Moreover, its untimely termination emphasizes the need for reliable inter calibration to build long term consistent archives of brightness temperature and higher level products.Still, since all these instruments do not share the same technology and even principle of acquisitions, direct comparison and synergistic use of their measurements is not straightforward. The objective of this presentation is to demonstrate a set of methods to make them inter-comparable, down to a common reference. Instead of a ground reference, we use here SMOS as a transfer radiometer.This method has been applied over different types of surfaces: i) making use of a stable target to assess the consistency and stability of both data sets. This is done over the area surrounding Dome Concordia in Antarctica. After careful selection and filtering, statistics of the comparison are retrieved along with long term trends in both data sets. ii) Once every so often, satellites overpass the same area within a very short time period. Due to different orbit inclinations these alignments occur essentially along the equator, but over different surfaces of land and ocean, giving access to wide dynamic range in brightness temperature. iii) At last, all radiometers are aimed at the deep sky for calibration purposes. But despite this use of a common reference, it can be shown that the retrieved brightness temperature exhibit some differences, traceable to the differences in calibration strategies and acquisition principles.This presentation will briefly

  18. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets, with a few more additions - with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers - exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the foree of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc. (orig.)

  19. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc

  20. Digital processor breadboard for RFI detection and mitigation in spaceborne radiometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Skou, Niels; Kovanen, Arhippa

    2014-01-01

    The increasing problem with Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) in protected radiometer frequency bands has inspired the development and implementation of methods for detecting RFI. With increasing demands for next generation spaceborne radiometers, it becomes necessary to include RFI detection in...

  1. CAMEX-4 CONICALLY-SCANNING TWO-LOOK AIRBORNE RADIOMETER (C-STAR) V1a

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-4 Conically-Scanning Two-Look Airborne Radiometer (C-STAR) dataset was collected by the Conically-Scanning Two-look Airborne Radiometer (C-STAR), which was...

  2. SMAP L3 Radiometer Global Daily 36 km EASE-Grid Soil Moisture V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Daily global composite of up-to 30 half-orbit L2_SM_P soil moisture estimates based on radiometer brightness temperature measurements acquired by the SMAP radiometer...

  3. HURRICANE AND SEVERE STORM SENTINEL (HS3) HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER (HIRAD) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) was collected by the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD), which was a multi-band...

  4. GPM GROUND VALIDATION CONICAL SCANNING MILLIMETER-WAVE IMAGING RADIOMETER (COSMIR) MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (COSMIR) MC3E dataset used the Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer...

  5. GPM GROUND VALIDATION CONICAL SCANNING MILLIMETER-WAVE IMAGING RADIOMETER (COSMIR) GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (COSMIR) GCPEx dataset used the Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer...

  6. SMAP Enhanced L3 Radiometer Global Daily 9 km EASE-Grid Soil Moisture V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Daily global composite of up to 30 half-orbit L2_SM_P soil moisture estimates based on radiometer brightness temperature measurements acquired by the SMAP radiometer...

  7. High resolution soil moisture radiometer. [large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilheit, T. T.

    1978-01-01

    An electrically scanned pushbroom phased antenna array is described for a microwave radiometer which can provide agriculturally meaningful measurements of soil moisture. The antenna size of 100 meters at 1400 MHz or 230 meters at 611 MHz requires several shuttle launches and orbital assembly. Problems inherent to the size of the structure and specific instrument problems are discussed as well as the preliminary design.

  8. Dense Focal Plane Arrays for Pushbroom Satellite Radiometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iupikov, O. A.; Ivashina, M. V.; Pontoppidan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Performance of a dense focal plane array feeding an offset toroidal reflector antenna system is studied and discussed in the context of a potential application in multi-beam radiometers for ocean surveillance. We present a preliminary design of the array feed for the 5-m diameter antenna at X...

  9. Calibration of the solar UV radiometers in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leszczynski, K.; Jokela, K.; Visuri, R.; Ylianttila, L. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland). Non-Ionizing Radiation Lab.

    1996-12-31

    In this report, the main emphasis is given to (1) the problems associated with the basic calibration of the spectroradiometer and (2) the year-to-year variability of the calibrations of the solar UV network radiometers. Also, the results from intercomparisons of the Brewer and OL 742 spectroradiometers are included

  10. Characterisation of optical filters for broadband UVA radiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Luciana C; Coelho, Carla T; Corrêa, Jaqueline S P M; Menegotto, Thiago; Da Silva, Thiago Ferreira; De Souza, Muriel Aparecida; Da Silva, Elisama Melo; De Lima, Maurício Simões; De Alvarenga, Ana Paula Dornelles

    2016-01-01

    Optical filters were characterized in order to know its suitability for use in broadband UVA radiometer head for spectral irradiance measurements. The spectral transmittance, the angular dependence and the spatial uniformity of the spectral transmittance of the UVA optical filters were investigated. The temperature dependence of the transmittance was also studied. (paper)

  11. Measurement of small antenna reflector losses for radiometer calibration budget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    1997-01-01

    Antenna reflector losses play an important role in the calibration budget for a microwave radiometer. If the losses are small, they are difficult to measure by traditional means. However, they can be assessed directly by radiometric means using the sky brightness temperature as incident radiation...

  12. Accurate antenna reflector loss measurements for radiometer calibration budget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    1996-01-01

    Antenna reflector losses may play an important role in the calibration budget for a microwave radiometer. If the losses are small they are difficult to measure by traditional means. However, they can be assessed directly by radiometric means using the sky brightness temperature as incident...

  13. A Novel Miniature Wide-band Radiometer for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykulska-Lawrence, H. M.

    2016-12-01

    Design, development and testing of a novel miniaturised infrared radiometer is described. The instrument opens up new possibilities in planetary science of deployment on smaller platforms - such as unmanned aerial vehicles and microprobes - to enable study of a planet's radiation balance, as well as terrestrial volcano plumes and trace gases in planetary atmospheres, using low-cost long-term observations. Thus a key enabling development is that of miniaturised, low-power and well-calibrated instrumentation. The talk reports advances in miniature technology to perform high accuracy visible / IR remote sensing measurements. The infrared radiometer is akin to those widely used for remote sensing for earth and space applications, which are currently either large instruments on orbiting platforms or medium-sized payloads on balloons. We use MEMS microfabrication techniques to shrink a conventional design, while combining the calibration benefits of large (>1kg) type radiometers with the flexibility and portability of a integrated within the device and a micromirror switches the input to the detector between the measured signal and the calibration target. Achieving two well-calibrated radiometer channels within a small (<10g) payload is made possible by using modern micromachining techniques.

  14. Calibration OGSE for a multichannel radiometer for Mars atmosphere studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, J. J.; Álvarez, F. J.; Gonzalez-Guerrero, M.; Apéstigue, V.; Martin, I.; Fernández, J. M.; Fernán, A. A.; Arruego, I.

    2017-09-01

    This work describes several OGSEs (Optical Ground Support Equipment) developed by INTA (Spanish Institute of Aerospace Technology - Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial) for the calibration and characterization of their self-manufactured multichannel radiometers (Solar Irradiance Sensors - SIS) for planetary atmospheric studies in the frame of some Martian missions at which INTA is participating.

  15. The Odin satellite - II. Radiometer data processing and calibration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olberg, M; Frisk, U; Lecacheux, A; Olofsson, AOH; Baron, P; Bergman, P; Florin, G; Hjalmarson, A; Larsson, B; Murtagh, D; Olofsson, G; Pagani, L; Sandqvist, A; Teyssier, D; Torchinsky, SA; Volk, K

    The radiometer on-board the Odin satellite comprises four different sub-mm receivers covering the 486 - 581 GHz frequency range and one fixed frequency 119 GHz receiver. Two auto-correlators and one acousto-optical spectrometer serve as backends. This article gives an overview over the processing of

  16. The design of an in-water optical radiometer

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desa, E.S; Desa, B.A.E.; DeSa, E.J.

    insights into the role playEd. by absorption and scattering processes in the optical properties of water masses. In this paper, we shall describe our design approach to current development effort on a profiling optical radiometer that will measure upwelling...

  17. Measurements on Active Cold Loads for Radiometer Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels; Balling, Jan E.

    2009-01-01

    Two semiconductor active cold loads (ACLs) to be used as cold references in spaceborne microwave radiometers have been developed. An X-band frequency was chosen, and the target noise temperature value was in the 50-100-K range. The ACLs are characterized in the operating temperature range of 0deg...

  18. Performance Measurements on Active Cold Loads for Radiometer Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Balling, Jan E.

    2007-01-01

    Two semi-conductor Active Cold Loads (ACLs) to be used as cold references in spaceborne microwave radiometers have been developed. An X-band frequency has been chosen, and the target noise temperature value is in the 50 to 100 K range. The ACLs are to be characterized in the operating temperature...

  19. Measurements on Active Cold Loads for Radiometer Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Balling, Jan E.

    2008-01-01

    Two semi-conductor Active Cold Loads (ACLs) to be used as cold references in spaceborne microwave radiometers have been developed. An X-band frequency was chosen, and the target noise temperature value was in the 50 to 100 K range. The ACLs are characterized in the operating temperature range 0 50...

  20. Brightness-temperature retrival methods in synthetic aperture radiometers

    OpenAIRE

    Corbella Sanahuja, Ignasi; Torres Torres, Francisco; Camps Carmona, Adriano José; Duffo Ubeda, Núria; Vall-Llossera Ferran, Mercedes Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    Bightness-temperature retrieval techniques for synthetic aperture radiometers are reviewed. Three different approaches to combine measured visibility and antenna temperatures, along with instrument characterization data, into a general equation to invert are presented. Discretization and windowing techniques are briefly discussed, and formulas for reciprocal grids using rectangular and hexagonal samplings are given. Two known techniques are used to invert the equation, namel...

  1. A New Way to Demonstrate the Radiometer as a Heat Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladkouski, V. I.; Pinchuk, A. I.

    2015-01-01

    While the radiometer is readily available as a toy, A. E. Woodruff notes that it is also a very useful tool to help us understand how to resolve certain scientific problems. Many physicists think they know how the radiometer works, but only a few actually understand it. Here we present a demonstration that shows that a radiometer can be thought of…

  2. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  3. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) L-Band Microwave Radiometer Post-Launch Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Misra, Sidharth; Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Hudson, Derek; Le Vine, David M.; De Amici, Giovanni; Mohammed, Priscilla N.; Yueh, Simon H.; Meissner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP microwave radiometer is a fully-polarimetric L-band radiometer flown on the SMAP satellite in a 6 AM/ 6 PM sun-synchronous orbit at 685 km altitude. Since April, 2015, the radiometer is under calibration and validation to assess the quality of the radiometer L1B data product. Calibration methods including the SMAP L1B TA2TB (from Antenna Temperature (TA) to the Earth's surface Brightness Temperature (TB)) algorithm and TA forward models are outlined, and validation approaches to calibration stability/quality are described in this paper including future work. Results show that the current radiometer L1B data satisfies its requirements.

  4. Rotating shadowband radiometer development and analysis of spectral shortwave data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L.; Min, Q. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Our goals in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program are improved measurements of spectral shortwave radiation and improved techniques for the retrieval of climatologically sensitive parameters. The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) that was developed during the first years of the ARM program has become a workhorse at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site, and it is widely deployed in other climate programs. We have spent most of our effort this year developing techniques to retrieve column aerosol, water vapor, and ozone from direct beam spectral measurements of the MFRSR. Additionally, we have had some success in calculating shortwave surface diffuse spectral irradiance. Using the surface albedo and the global irradiance, we have calculated cloud optical depths. From cloud optical depth and liquid water measured with the microwave radiometer, we have calculated effective liquid cloud particle radii. The rest of the text will provide some detail regarding each of these efforts.

  5. Thermoelectric temperature control system for the pushbroom microwave radiometer (PBMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon-Townes, L. A.; Averill, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    A closed loop thermoelectric temperature control system is developed for stabilizing sensitive RF integrated circuits within a microwave radiometer to an accuracy of + or - 0.1 C over a range of ambient conditions from -20 C to +45 C. The dual mode (heating and cooling) control concept utilizes partial thermal isolation of the RF units from an instrument deck which is thermally controlled by thermoelectric coolers and thin film heaters. The temperature control concept is simulated with a thermal analyzer program (MITAS) which consists of 37 nodes and 61 conductors. A full scale thermal mockup is tested in the laboratory at temperatures of 0 C, 21 C, and 45 C to confirm the validity of the control concept. A flight radiometer and temperature control system is successfully flight tested on the NASA Skyvan aircraft.

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-04-01

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  7. Wind Compensation by Radiometer Arrays in High Altitude Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    échauffés execent sur les autres à des distances sensibles. Annales de Chimie et de Physique 29:57-62 2. Crookes W (1874) On attraction and repulsion...For both altitudes, the computational domain is approximately 40 mean free paths in the radial direction. Since radial coordinate of the radiometer...is assumed to be 10 K and 30 K for 60 and 80 km, respectively. Comparison of the flow velocity profiles along the radial coordinate , obtained by

  8. A new real time infrared background discrimination radiometer (BDR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopolovich, Z.; Cabib, D.; Buckwald, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a new radiometer (BDR) that has been developed, which discriminates small differences between an object and its surrounding background, and is able to measure an object's changing contrast when the contrast of a moving object is to be measured against a changing background. The difference in radiant emittance of a small object against its background or of two objects with respect to each other and this difference is small compared to the emittance itself. Practical examples of such measurements are contrast measurements of airplanes and missiles in flight, contrast measurements of small, weak objects on a warm background and uniformity measurements of radiant emittance from an object's surface. Previous instruments were unable to make such measurements since the process of contrast measurement with a fixed field of view radiometer is too slow for implementation on flying objects; detection of a small difference between two large DC signals is impossible in a traditional fixed field of view radiometer when the instrument itself is saturated

  9. Manual of program operation for data analysis from radiometer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Mello, L.A.R. da; Migliora, C.G.S.

    1987-12-01

    This manual describes how to use the software to retrieve and analyse data from radiometer systems and raingauges used in the 12 GHz PROPAGATION MEASUREMENTS/CANADA - TELEBRAS COOPERATION PROGRAM. The data retrieval and analisys is being carried out by CETUC, as part of the activities of the project Simulacao de Enlaces Satelite (SES). The software for these tasks has been supplied by the Canadian Research Centre (CRC), together with the measurement equipment. The two following sections describe the use of the data retrieval routines and the data analysis routines of program ATTEN. Also, a quick reference guide for commands that can be used when a microcomputer is local or remotely connected to a radiometer indoor unit is included as a last section. A more detailed description of these commands, their objectives and cautions that should de taken when using them can be found in the manual ''12 GHz Propagation Measurements System - Volume 1 - Dual Slope Radiometer and Data Aquisition System'', supplied by Diversitel Communications Inc. (author) [pt

  10. Principles for computational design of binding antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Dror; Pszolla, M Gabriele; Lapidoth, Gideon D; Norn, Christoffer; Dym, Orly; Unger, Tamar; Albeck, Shira; Tyka, Michael D; Fleishman, Sarel J

    2017-10-10

    Natural proteins must both fold into a stable conformation and exert their molecular function. To date, computational design has successfully produced stable and atomically accurate proteins by using so-called "ideal" folds rich in regular secondary structures and almost devoid of loops and destabilizing elements, such as cavities. Molecular function, such as binding and catalysis, however, often demands nonideal features, including large and irregular loops and buried polar interaction networks, which have remained challenging for fold design. Through five design/experiment cycles, we learned principles for designing stable and functional antibody variable fragments (Fvs). Specifically, we ( i ) used sequence-design constraints derived from antibody multiple-sequence alignments, and ( ii ) during backbone design, maintained stabilizing interactions observed in natural antibodies between the framework and loops of complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 2. Designed Fvs bound their ligands with midnanomolar affinities and were as stable as natural antibodies, despite having >30 mutations from mammalian antibody germlines. Furthermore, crystallographic analysis demonstrated atomic accuracy throughout the framework and in four of six CDRs in one design and atomic accuracy in the entire Fv in another. The principles we learned are general, and can be implemented to design other nonideal folds, generating stable, specific, and precise antibodies and enzymes.

  11. The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) - precision infrared radiometer (PIR) platform in Fairbanks: Scientific objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamnes, K.; Leontieva, E. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) and precision infrared radiometer (PIR) have been employed at the Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks to check their performance under arctic conditions. Drawing on the experience of the previous measurements in the Arctic, the PIR was equipped with a ventilator to prevent frost and moisture build-up. We adopted the Solar Infrared Observing Sytem (SIROS) concept from the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) to allow implementation of the same data processing software for a set of radiation and meteorological instruments. To validate the level of performance of the whole SIROS prior to its incorporation into the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Cloud and Radiation Testbed Site instrumental suite for flux radiatin measurements, the comparison between measurements and model predictions will be undertaken to assess the MFRSR-PIR Arctic data quality.

  12. Antibody biotechnology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-06

    Jul 6, 2009 ... and automated, the hybrid cells can be stored for many years in liquid nitrogen and antibodies production is homogeneous. The hybridoma method .... they may be modified to vehicle active molecules such as radio-isotopes, toxins, cytokines, enzyme etc. In these cases, the therapeutic effect is due to ...

  13. Catalytic Antibodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ability of the highly evolved machinery of immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex ... to Pauling, if the structure of the antigen binding site of antibodies were to be produced in a random ..... where the immune system of the body is destructive, as in autoimmune disorders or after organ transplant.

  14. Catalytic Antibodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While chemistry provides the framework for understanding the structure and function of biomolecules, the immune sys- tem provides a highly evolved natural process to generate one class of complex biomolecules – the antibodies. A combination of the two could be exploited to generate new classes of molecules with novel ...

  15. A monoclonal antibody raised against a thermo-stabilised β1-adrenoceptor interacts with extracellular loop 2 and acts as a negative allosteric modulator of a sub-set of β1-adrenoceptors expressed in stable cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soave, Mark; Cseke, Gabriella; Hutchings, Catherine J; Brown, Alastair J H; Woolard, Jeanette; Hill, Stephen J

    2018-01-01

    Recent interest has focused on antibodies that can discriminate between different receptor conformations. Here we have characterised the effect of a monoclonal antibody (mAb3), raised against a purified thermo-stabilised turkey β 1 -adrenoceptor (β 1 AR-m23 StaR), on β 1 -ARs expressed in CHO-K1 or HEK 293 cells. Immunohistochemical and radioligand-binding studies demonstrated that mAb3 was able to bind to ECL2 of the tβ 1 -AR, but not its human homologue. Specific binding of mAb3 to tβ 1 -AR was inhibited by a peptide based on the turkey, but not the human, ECL2 sequence. Studies with [ 3 H]-CGP 12177 demonstrated that mAb3 prevented the binding of orthosteric ligands to a subset (circa 40%) of turkey β 1 -receptors expressed in both CHO K1 and HEK 293 cells. MAb3 significantly reduced the maximum specific binding capacity of [ 3 H]-CGP-12177 without influencing its binding affinity. Substitution of ECL2 of tβ 1 -AR with its human equivalent, or mutation of residues D186S, P187D, Q188E prevented the inhibition of [ 3 H]-CGP 12177 binding by mAb3. MAb3 also elicited a negative allosteric effect on agonist-stimulated cAMP responses. The identity of the subset of turkey β 1 -adrenoceptors influenced by mAb3 remains to be established but mAb3 should become an important tool to investigate the nature of β 1 -AR conformational states and oligomeric complexes. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of a novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies against Salmonella, employing a stable coating of lipopolysaccharide-derived antigens covalently attached to polystyrene microwells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiuff, C.; Jauho, E. S.; Stryhn, H.

    2000-01-01

    Polysaccharides derived from Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharide (LPS) representing the O-antigen factors 1, 4, 5, and 12 and the O-antigen factors 6 and 7 from Salmonella choleraesuis LPS were derivatized with the photoreactive compound anthraquinone and subsequently covalently coupled...... of a panel of pig sera as determined by a conventional ELISA on the basis of passive coating of the two Salmonella LPS antigens (the mix-ELISA). The covalent anthraquinone mix-ELISA shows promise as a stable and durable alternative to the existing conventional ELISA for serological surveillance of Salmonella...

  17. Boreal Inundation Mapping with SMAP Radiometer Data for Methane Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungbum; Brisco, Brian; Poncos, Valentin

    2017-04-01

    Inundation and consequent anoxic condition induce methane release, which is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. Boreal regions contain large amounts of organic carbon, which is a potentially major methane emission source under climatic warming conditions. Boreal wetlands in particular are one of the largest sources of uncertainties in global methane budget. Wetland spatial extent together with the gas release rate remains highly unknown. Characterization of the existing inundation database is poor, because of the inundation under clouds and dense vegetation. In this work, the inundation extent is derived using brightness temperature data acquired by the L-band Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite, which offers the L-band capabilities to penetrate clouds and vegetation at 3-day revisit. The fidelity of the SMAP watermask is assessed as a first step in this investigation by comparing with the following data sets: 3-m resolution maps derived using Radarsat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data in northern Canada and multi-sensor climatology over Siberia. Because Radarsat coverages are limited despite its high spatial resolution, at the time and location where Radarsats are not available, we also compare with 3-km resolution SMAP SAR data that are concurrent with the SMAP radiometer data globally until July 2015. Inundation extents were derived with Radarsat, SMAP SAR, and SMAP radiometer over the 60 km x 60km area at Peace Athabasca Delta (PAD), Canada on 6 days in spring and summer 2015. The SMAP SAR results match the locations of Radarsat waterbodies. However, the SMAP SAR underestimates the water extent, mainly over mixed pixels that have subpixel land presence. The threshold value (-3 dB) applied to the SMAP SAR was determined previously over the global domain. The threshold is dependent on the type of local landcover within a mixed pixel. Further analysis is needed to locally optimize the threshold. The SMAP radiometer water fraction over Peace

  18. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo e Souza, I.T. de; Okada, H.

    1990-05-01

    Since the description by Kohler and Milstein 1975 of their technique for producing monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity, it has become a mainstay in most laboratories that utilize immunochemical techniques to study problems in basic, applied or clinical research. Paradoxically, the very success of monoclonal antibodies has generated a literature which is now so vast and scattered that it has become difficult to obtain a perspective. This brief review represents the distillation of many publications relating to the production and use of monoclonaal antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals. Significant advances were made possible in the last few years by combined developments in the fields of tumor-associated antigens and of monoclonal antibodies. In fact monoclonal antibodies against some well defined tumor-associated antigens, has led to significantly greater practical possibilities for producing highly specific radiolabeled antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of human tumors. One of the main requirements of this methodology is the availability of stable radiopharmaceutical reagents which after labeling in vivo injection retain the capacity of specific interaction with the defined antigen and their molecular integrity. Since injection into human is the objetive of this kind of study all the specifications of radiopharmaceutical have to be fulfilled e.g. sterility, apirogenicity and absence of toxicity. (author) [pt

  19. Advanced Passive Microwave Radiometer Technology for GPM Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric A.; Im, Eastwood; Kummerow, Christian; Principe, Caleb; Ruf, Christoper; Wilheit, Thomas; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An interferometer-type passive microwave radiometer based on MMIC receiver technology and a thinned array antenna design is being developed under the Instrument Incubator Program (TIP) on a project entitled the Lightweight Rainfall Radiometer (LRR). The prototype single channel aircraft instrument will be ready for first testing in 2nd quarter 2003, for deployment on the NASA DC-8 aircraft and in a ground configuration manner; this version measures at 10.7 GHz in a crosstrack imaging mode. The design for a two (2) frequency preliminary space flight model at 19 and 35 GHz (also in crosstrack imaging mode) has also been completed, in which the design features would enable it to fly in a bore-sighted configuration with a new dual-frequency space radar (DPR) under development at the Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) in Tokyo, Japan. The DPR will be flown as one of two primary instruments on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's core satellite in the 2007 time frame. The dual frequency space flight design of the ERR matches the APR frequencies and will be proposed as an ancillary instrument on the GPM core satellite to advance space-based precipitation measurement by enabling better microphysical characterization and coincident volume data gathering for exercising combined algorithm techniques which make use of both radar backscatter and radiometer attenuation information to constrain rainrate solutions within a physical algorithm context. This talk will discuss the design features, performance capabilities, applications plans, and conical/polarametric imaging possibilities for the LRR, as well as a brief summary of the project status and schedule.

  20. Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) User's Manual: Windows Version 4.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreas, Afshin M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wilcox, Stephen M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-02-29

    The Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) software is a data acquisition and data archival system for performing Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL). RCC provides a unique method of calibrating broadband atmospheric longwave and solar shortwave radiometers using techniques that reduce measurement uncertainty and better characterize a radiometer's response profile. The RCC software automatically monitors and controls many of the components that contribute to uncertainty in an instrument's responsivity. This is a user's manual and guide to the RCC software.

  1. Nimbus-3 Medium-Resolution Infrared Radiometer (MRIR) Level 1 Meteorological Radiation Data V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nimbus-3 Medium-Resolution Infrared Radiometer (MRIR) Level 1 Meteorological Radiance Data contain radiances expressed as equivalent blackbody temperatures along...

  2. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ADVANCED MICROWAVE RADIOMETER RAIN IDENTIFICATION (ADMIRARI) GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Advanced Microwave Radiometer Rain Identification (ADMIRARI) GCPEx dataset measures brightness temperatures at three frequencies (10.7,...

  3. Integrating a Microwave Radiometer into Radar Hardware for Simultaneous Data Collection Between the Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLinden, Matthew; Piepmeier, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The conventional method for integrating a radiometer into radar hardware is to share the RF front end between the instruments, and to have separate IF receivers that take data at separate times. Alternatively, the radar and radiometer could share the antenna through the use of a diplexer, but have completely independent receivers. This novel method shares the radar's RF electronics and digital receiver with the radiometer, while allowing for simultaneous operation of the radar and radiometer. Radars and radiometers, while often having near-identical RF receivers, generally have substantially different IF and baseband receivers. Operation of the two instruments simultaneously is difficult, since airborne radars will pulse at a rate of hundreds of microseconds. Radiometer integration time is typically 10s or 100s of milliseconds. The bandwidth of radar may be 1 to 25 MHz, while a radiometer will have an RF bandwidth of up to a GHz. As such, the conventional method of integrating radar and radiometer hardware is to share the highfrequency RF receiver, but to have separate IF subsystems and digitizers. To avoid corruption of the radiometer data, the radar is turned off during the radiometer dwell time. This method utilizes a modern radar digital receiver to allow simultaneous operation of a radiometer and radar with a shared RF front end and digital receiver. The radiometer signal is coupled out after the first down-conversion stage. From there, the radar transmit frequencies are heavily filtered, and the bands outside the transmit filter are amplified and passed to a detector diode. This diode produces a DC output proportional to the input power. For a conventional radiometer, this level would be digitized. By taking this DC output and mixing it with a system oscillator at 10 MHz, the signal can instead be digitized by a second channel on the radar digital receiver (which typically do not accept DC inputs), and can be down-converted to a DC level again digitally. This

  4. Prototype of Cryogenic Solar Absolute Radiometer and Transfer Radiometer for On-Board Calibration of Spectral Earth Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajiczek, L.; Winkler, R.; Hobson, T.; Green, P.; Fox, N.

    2018-02-01

    We describe a prototype calibration system for the Traceable Radiometry Underpinning Terrestrial- and Helio-Studies (TRUTHS) satellite mission. We outline the design and testing of key system components, including the Cryogenic Solar Absolute Radiometer (CSAR). CSAR is designed to make Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) measurements with a standard uncertainty of < 0.01 % and provide SI-traceable calibration of a hyperspectral Earth imager (EI) over the wavelength range 320 nm – 2450 nm. The EI is designed to make Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) and spectral radiance measurements with a standard uncertainty of < 0.3 %.

  5. Modeling the frequency response of microwave radiometers with QUCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zonca, A; Williams, B; Rubin, I; Meinhold, P; Lubin, P; Roucaries, B; D'Arcangelo, O; Franceschet, C; Mennella, A; Bersanelli, M; Jahn, S

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of the frequency response of coherent radiometric receivers is a key element in estimating the flux of astrophysical emissions, since the measured signal depends on the convolution of the source spectral emission with the instrument band shape. Laboratory Radio Frequency (RF) measurements of the instrument bandpass often require complex test setups and are subject to a number of systematic effects driven by thermal issues and impedance matching, particularly if cryogenic operation is involved. In this paper we present an approach to modeling radiometers bandpasses by integrating simulations and RF measurements of individual components. This method is based on QUCS (Quasi Universal Circuit Simulator), an open-source circuit simulator, which gives the flexibility of choosing among the available devices, implementing new analytical software models or using measured S-parameters. Therefore an independent estimate of the instrument bandpass is achieved using standard individual component measurements and validated analytical simulations. In order to automate the process of preparing input data, running simulations and exporting results we developed the Python package python-qucs and released it under GNU Public License. We discuss, as working cases, bandpass response modeling of the COFE and Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) radiometers and compare results obtained with QUCS and with a commercial circuit simulator software. The main purpose of bandpass modeling in COFE is to optimize component matching, while in LFI they represent the best estimation of frequency response, since end-to-end measurements were strongly affected by systematic effects.

  6. Validation of ocean color sensors using a profiling hyperspectral radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondrusek, M. E.; Stengel, E.; Rella, M. A.; Goode, W.; Ladner, S.; Feinholz, M.

    2014-05-01

    Validation measurements of satellite ocean color sensors require in situ measurements that are accurate, repeatable and traceable enough to distinguish variability between in situ measurements and variability in the signal being observed on orbit. The utility of using a Satlantic Profiler II equipped with HyperOCR radiometers (Hyperpro) for validating ocean color sensors is tested by assessing the stability of the calibration coefficients and by comparing Hyperpro in situ measurements to other instruments and between different Hyperpros in a variety of water types. Calibration and characterization of the NOAA Satlantic Hyperpro instrument is described and concurrent measurements of water-leaving radiances conducted during cruises are presented between this profiling instrument and other profiling, above-water and moored instruments. The moored optical instruments are the US operated Marine Optical BuoY (MOBY) and the French operated Boussole Buoy. In addition, Satlantic processing versions are described in terms of accuracy and consistency. A new multi-cast approach is compared to the most commonly used single cast method. Analysis comparisons are conducted in turbid and blue water conditions. Examples of validation matchups with VIIRS ocean color data are presented. With careful data collection and analysis, the Satlantic Hyperpro profiling radiometer has proven to be a reliable and consistent tool for satellite ocean color validation.

  7. Plasmodium falciparum Liver Stage Infection and Transition to Stable Blood Stage Infection in Liver-Humanized and Blood-Humanized FRGN KO Mice Enables Testing of Blood Stage Inhibitory Antibodies (Reticulocyte-Binding Protein Homolog 5 In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lander Foquet

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The invention of liver-humanized mouse models has made it possible to directly study the preerythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum. In contrast, the current models to directly study blood stage infection in vivo are extremely limited. Humanization of the mouse blood stream is achievable by frequent injections of human red blood cells (hRBCs and is currently the only system with which to study human malaria blood stage infections in a small animal model. Infections have been primarily achieved by direct injection of P. falciparum-infected RBCs but as such, this modality of infection does not model the natural route of infection by mosquito bite and lacks the transition of parasites from liver stage infection to blood stage infection. Including these life cycle transition points in a small animal model is of relevance for testing therapeutic interventions. To this end, we used FRGN KO mice that were engrafted with human hepatocytes and performed a blood exchange under immune modulation to engraft the animals with more than 50% hRBCs. These mice were infected by mosquito bite with sporozoite stages of a luciferase-expressing P. falciparum parasite, resulting in noninvasively measurable liver stage burden by in vivo bioluminescent imaging (IVIS at days 5–7 postinfection. Transition to blood stage infection was observed by IVIS from day 8 onward and then blood stage parasitemia increased with a kinetic similar to that observed in controlled human malaria infection. To assess the utility of this model, we tested whether a monoclonal antibody targeting the erythrocyte invasion ligand reticulocyte-binding protein homolog 5 (with known growth inhibitory activity in vitro was capable of blocking blood stage infection in vivo when parasites emerge from the liver and found it highly effective. Together, these results show that a combined liver-humanized and blood-humanized FRGN mouse model infected with luciferase-expressing P. falciparum will be a

  8. Physical, biological, and chemical data from radiometer, profiling reflectance radiometer, and CTD casts in a world-wide distribution as part of the SeaWiFS/SIMBIOS project from 13 September 1981 to 16 December 1999 (NODC Accession 0000632)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, biological, and chemical data were collected using radiometer, profiling reflectance radiometer, and CTD casts in a world-wide distribution from 13...

  9. Stable Isotope Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tissue samples (skin, bone, blood, muscle) are analyzed for stable carbon, stable nitrogen, and stable sulfur analysis. Many samples are used in their entirety for...

  10. Wind direction over the ocean determined by an airborne, imaging, polarimetric radiometer system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Brian; Skou, Niels

    2001-01-01

    The speed and direction of winds over the ocean can be determined by polarimetric radiometers. This has been established by theoretical work and demonstrated experimentally using airborne radiometers carrying out circle flights and thus measuring the full 360° azimuthal response from the sea surf...

  11. CAROLS: A New Airborne L-Band Radiometer for Ocean Surface and Land Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zribi, Mehrez; Parde, Mickael; Boutin, Jacquline

    2011-01-01

    The "Cooperative Airborne Radiometer for Ocean and Land Studies" (CAROLS) L-Band radiometer was designed and built as a copy of the EMIRAD II radiometer constructed by the Technical University of Denmark team. It is a fully polarimetric and direct sampling correlation radiometer. It is installed ...... is conforming to specification and is a useful tool for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite validation as well as for specific studies on surface soil moisture or ocean salinity.......The "Cooperative Airborne Radiometer for Ocean and Land Studies" (CAROLS) L-Band radiometer was designed and built as a copy of the EMIRAD II radiometer constructed by the Technical University of Denmark team. It is a fully polarimetric and direct sampling correlation radiometer. It is installed...... flights were carried out over South West France, the Valencia site and the Bay of Biscay (Atlantic Ocean) in 2007, 2008 and 2009, in coordination with in situ field campaigns. In order to validate the CAROLS data, various aircraft flight patterns and maneuvers were implemented, including straight...

  12. Spaceborne L-band Radiometers: Push-broom or Synthetic Aperture?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    2004-01-01

    L-band radiometers can measure ocean salinity and soil moisture from space. A synthetic aperture radiometer system, SMOS, is under development by ESA for launch in 2007. A real aperture push-broom system, Aquarius, has been approved by NASA for launch in 2008. Pros et cons of the two fundamentally...

  13. Compact Front-end Prototype for Next Generation RFI-rejecting Polarimetric L-band Radiometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Brian Sveistrup; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Realizing the need for lower noise figure and smaller physical size in todays higly sensitive radiometers, this paper presents a new compact analog front-end (AFE) for use with the existing L-band (1400-1427 MHz) radiometer designed and operated by the Technical University of Denmark. Using subha...

  14. A simple method to minimize orientation effects in a profiling radiometer

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Talaulikar, M.; Desa, E.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; SrinivasaKumar, T.; Lotlikar, A.

    -fall radiometer is found to be a better option for measuring underwater light parameters as it avoids the effects of ship shadow and is easy to operate, the measurements demand profiling the radiometer vertical in water with minimum tilt. Here we present...

  15. Microwave Radiometers from 0.6 to 22 GHz for Juno, A Polar Orbiter Around Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingree, P.; Janssen, M.; Oswald, J.; Brown, S.; Chen, J.; Hurst, K.; Kitiyakara, A.; Maiwald, F.; Smith, S.

    2008-01-01

    A compact instrument called the MWR (MicroWave Radiometer) is under development at JPL for Juno, the next NASA New Frontiers mission, scheduled to launch in 2011. It's purpose is to measure the thermal emission from Jupiter's atmosphere at six selected frequencies from 0.6 to 22 GHz, operating in direct detection mode, in order to quantify the distributions and abundances of water and ammonia in Jupiter's atmosphere. The goal is to understand the previously unobserved dynamics of the sub-cloud atmosphere, and to discriminate among models for planetary formation in our solar system. As part of a deep space mission aboard a solar-powered spacecraft, MWR is designed to be compact, lightweight, and low power. The receivers and control electronics are protected by a radiation-shielding enclosure on the Juno spacecraft that would provide a benign and stable operating temperature environment. All antennas and RF transmission lines outside the vault must withstand low temperatures and the harsh radiation environment surrounding Jupiter. This paper describes the concept of the MWR instrument and presents results of one breadboard receiver channel.

  16. Soil Moisture ActivePassive (SMAP) L-Band Microwave Radiometer Post-Launch Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Misra, Sidharth; Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Hudson, Derek; Le Vine, David M.; De Amici, Giovanni; Mohammed, Priscilla N.; Yueh, Simon H.; Meissner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP microwave radiometer is a fully-polarimetric L-band radiometer flown on the SMAP satellite in a 6 AM/ 6 PM sun-synchronous orbit at 685 km altitude. Since April, 2015, the radiometer is under calibration and validation to assess the quality of the radiometer L1B data product. Calibration methods including the SMAP L1B TA2TB (from Antenna Temperature (TA) to the Earth’s surface Brightness Temperature (TB)) algorithm and TA forward models are outlined, and validation approaches to calibration stability/quality are described in this paper including future work. Results show that the current radiometer L1B data satisfies its requirements.

  17. In-flight shortwave calibrations of the active cavity radiometers using tungsten lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Susan; Lee, Robert B.; Gibson, Michael A.; Wilson, Robert S.; Bolden, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) active cavity radiometers are used to measure the incoming solar, reflected shortwave solar, and emitted longwave radiations from the Earth and atmosphere. The radiometers are located on the NASA's Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and the NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 spacecraft platforms. Two of the radiometers, one wide field of view (WFOV) and one medium field of view (MFOV), measure the total radiation in the spectral region of 0.2 to 50 microns and the other two radiometers (WFOV and MFOV) measure the shortwave radiation in the spectral region of 0.2 to 5.0 microns. For the in-flight calibrations, tungsten lamp and the sun are used as calibration sources for shortwave radiometers. Descriptions of the tungsten lamp and solar calibration procedures and mechanisms are presented. The tungsten lamp calibration measurements are compared with the measurements of solar calibration for ERBS and NOAA-9 instruments.

  18. Retrieval of atmospheric parameters by radiometer at frequency of terahertz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang-man; Guo, Li-xin; Lin, Le-Ke; Li, Hai-ying; Zhao, Yi-yang; Shu, Ting-ting; Cheng, Xian-hai

    2013-08-01

    There has been intense interest in the use of millimeter wave and terahertz technology for the detection of weapons, explosives and other threats. System based on electromagnetic radiation between 30 GHz and 3 THz have advantages that radiation penetrates many common materials, wavelengths are short enough to give adequate spatial resolution and radiation at these frequencies is safe to use on people. It is also applied to the retrieval of tropospheric parameters with the ground-based radiometer system. Tropospheric temperature, humidity and cloud liquid water are key elements in meteorology. Since the 151 GHz channel strongly depends on cloud liquid water, the retrieval accuracy of atmospheric parameters is improved by the inclusion of a channel at 151 GHz. The new retrieval model which uses 123 GHz, 127 GHz and 168 GHz is proposed. Simulations of retrieval are presented based on the radiosonde dataset of Beijing China and the retrieving errors of different methods are compared.

  19. Estimating atmospheric temperature profile by an airborne microwave radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Xu, Jian; Kenntner, Mareike; Schreier, Franz; Doicu, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    As the rising atmospheric issues such as climate change, air pollution, and ozone depletion have extracted extensive attraction worldwide, observing and modeling of atmospheric quantities becomes critical to our understanding of the environment. This work focuses on the performance of an airborne passive microwave radiometer called MTP (Microwave Temperature Profiler). We aim to obtain vertically distributed atmospheric temperature from intensities measured by the instrument in terms of three frequencies and ten viewing angles. A retrieval program TIRAMISU (Temperature InveRsion Algorithm for MIcrowave SoUnding) has been utilized for processing the MTP data. To solve this severely ill-posed inverse problem, an analysis of different ways of constructing the penalty term onto the Tikhonov-type objective function is conducted. This numerical analysis can help us to better understand pros and cons of these regularization methods and to investigate the measurement capabilities of MTP.

  20. COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers - Instrument design and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoot, G.; Bennett, C.; Weber, R.; Maruschak, J.; Ratliff, R.; Janssen, M.; Chitwood, J.; Hilliard, L.; Lecha, M.; Mills, R.; Patschke, R.; Richards, C.; Backus, C.; Mather, J.; Hauser, M.; Weiss, R.; Wilkinson, D.; Gulkis, S.; Boggess, N.; Cheng, E.; Kelsall, T.; Lubin, P.; Meyer, S.; Moseley, H.; Murdock, T.; Shafer, R.; Silverberg, R.; Wright, E.

    1990-09-01

    Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMRs) at frequencies of 31.5, 53, and 90 GHz have been designed and built to map the large angular scale variations in the brightness temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The instrument is being flown aboard NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, launched on November 18, 1989. Each receiver input is switched between two antennas pointing 60 deg apart on the sky. The satellite is in near-polar orbit with the orbital plane precessing at 1 deg per day, causing the beams to scan the entire sky in 6 months. In 1 year of observation, the instruments are capable of mapping the sky to an rms sensitivity of 0.1 mK per 7 deg field of view. The mission and the instrument have been carefully designed to minimize the need for systematic corrections to the data.

  1. Retrieving cloudy atmosphere parameters from RPG-HATPRO radiometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostsov, V. S.

    2015-03-01

    An algorithm for simultaneously determining both tropospheric temperature and humidity profiles and cloud liquid water content from ground-based measurements of microwave radiation is presented. A special feature of this algorithm is that it combines different types of measurements and different a priori information on the sought parameters. The features of its use in processing RPG-HATPRO radiometer data obtained in the course of atmospheric remote sensing experiments carried out by specialists from the Faculty of Physics of St. Petersburg State University are discussed. The results of a comparison of both temperature and humidity profiles obtained using a ground-based microwave remote sensing method with those obtained from radiosonde data are analyzed. It is shown that this combined algorithm is comparable (in accuracy) to the classical method of statistical regularization in determining temperature profiles; however, this algorithm demonstrates better accuracy (when compared to the method of statistical regularization) in determining humidity profiles.

  2. Total ozone retrieval from satellite multichannel filter radiometer measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovill, J.E.; Sullivan, T.J.; Weichel, R.L.; Ellis, J.S.; Huebel, J.G.; Korver, J.; Weidhaas, P.P.; Phelps, F.A.

    1978-01-01

    A total ozone retrieval model has been developed to process radiance data gathered by a satellite-mounted multichannel filter radiometer (MFR). Extensive effort went into theoretical radiative transfer modeling, a retrieval scheme was developed, and the technique was applied to the MFR radiance measurements. The high quality of the total ozone retrieval results was determined through comparisons with Dobson measurements. Included in the report are global total ozone maps for 20 days between May 12 and July 5, 1977. A comparison of MFR results for 13 days in June 1977 with Dobson spectrophotometer measurements of ozone for the same period showed good agreement: there was a root-mean-square difference of 6.2% (equivalent to 20.2 m.atm.cm). The estimated global total ozone value for June 1977 (296 m.atm.cm) was in good agreement with satellite backscatter ultraviolet data for June 1970 (304 m.atm.cm) and June 1971

  3. Method and apparatus for precision control of radiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estey, R.S.; Hanna, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    A radiometer controller of a radiation detector is provided with a calibration method and apparatus comprised of mounting all temperature sensitive elements of the controller in thermostatically controlled ovens during calibration and measurements, using a selected temperature that is above any which might be reached in the field. The instrument is calibrated in situ by adjusting heater power (EI) to the receptor cavity in the radiometer detector to a predetermined full scale level as displayed by a meter. Then with the heater de-energized and the receptor cavity covered, the voltage output, (E /SUB o/ ) is set to zero as displayed by the meter. Next the preset power is applied to the heater and the output of the radiant measurement channel is applied to the panel meter. With this preset heater power producing the proper heat, the gain of the measurement channel is adjusted to bring the meter dispaly to full scale. The function switch is then set back to apply the measured radiant power signal to the meter. Once the radiation cavity is uncovered, radiant energy absorbed by the radiation cavity is displayed by the meter with an accuracy that heretofore has not been available. A reference voltage E /SUB R/ is used to calibrate the meter initially and at any time thereafter deemed necessary. To adjust the heater power to the predetermined full scale level, current and voltage values applied to the heater winding are separately derived from a bridge-like circuit connected between a source of heater power and ground, and applied to precision analog multiplier mounted in a thermostatically controlled oven

  4. Icecube: Spaceflight Validation of an 874-GHz Submillimeter Wave Radiometer for Ice Cloud Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D. L.; Esper, J.; Ehsan, N.; Piepmeier, J. R.; Racette, P.

    2014-12-01

    Ice clouds play a key role in the Earth's radiation budget, mostly through their strong regulation of infrared radiation exchange. Submillimeter wave remote sensing offers a unique capability to improve cloud ice measurements from space. At 874 GHz cloud scattering produces a larger brightness temperature depression from cirrus than lower frequencies, which can be used to retrieve vertically-integrated cloud ice water path (IWP) and ice particle size. The objective of the IceCube project is to retire risks of 874-GHz receiver technology by raising its TRL from 5 to 7. The project will demonstrate, on a 3-U CubeSat in a low Earth orbit (LEO) environment, the 874-GHz receiver system with noise equivalent differential temperature (NEDT) of ~0.2 K for 1-second integration and calibration error of 2.0 K or less as measured from deep-space observations. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is partnering with Virginia Diodes, Inc (VDI) to qualify commercially available 874-GHz receiver technology for spaceflight, and demonstrate the radiometer performance. The instrument (submm-wave cloud radiometer, or SCR), along with the CubeSat system developed and integrated by GSFC, will be ready for launch in two years. The instrument subsystem includes a reflector antenna, sub-millimeter wave mixer, frequency multipliers and stable local oscillator, an intermediate frequency (IF) circuit with noise injection, and data-power boards. The mixer and frequency multipliers are procured from VDI with GSFC insight into fabrication and testing processes to ensure scalability to spaceflight beyond TRL 7. The remaining components are a combination of GSFC-designed and commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) at TRLs of 5 or higher. The spacecraft system is specified by GSFC and comprises COTS components including three-axis stabilizer and sun sensor, GPS receiver, deployable solar arrays, UHF radio, and 2 GB of on-board storage. The spacecraft and instrument are integrated and flight qualified

  5. Stable convergence and stable limit theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Häusler, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a concise but complete exposition of the mathematical theory of stable convergence and give various applications in different areas of probability theory and mathematical statistics to illustrate the usefulness of this concept. Stable convergence holds in many limit theorems of probability theory and statistics – such as the classical central limit theorem – which are usually formulated in terms of convergence in distribution. Originated by Alfred Rényi, the notion of stable convergence is stronger than the classical weak convergence of probability measures. A variety of methods is described which can be used to establish this stronger stable convergence in many limit theorems which were originally formulated only in terms of weak convergence. Naturally, these stronger limit theorems have new and stronger consequences which should not be missed by neglecting the notion of stable convergence. The presentation will be accessible to researchers and advanced students at the master's level...

  6. The Impact of Indoor and Outdoor Radiometer Calibration on Solar Measurements: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Reda, Ibrahim; Robinson, Justin

    2016-07-01

    Accurate solar radiation data sets are critical to reducing the expenses associated with mitigating performance risk for solar energy conversion systems, and they help utility planners and grid system operators understand the impacts of solar resource variability. The accuracy of solar radiation measured by radiometers depends on the instrument performance specification, installation method, calibration procedure, measurement conditions, maintenance practices, location, and environmental conditions. This study addresses the effect of calibration methodologies and the resulting calibration responsivities provided by radiometric calibration service providers such as the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and manufacturers of radiometers. Some of these radiometers are calibrated indoors, and some are calibrated outdoors. To establish or understand the differences in calibration methodology, we processed and analyzed field-measured data from these radiometers. This study investigates calibration responsivities provided by NREL's broadband outdoor radiometer calibration (BORCAL) and a few prominent manufacturers. The reference radiometer calibrations are traceable to the World Radiometric Reference. These different methods of calibration demonstrated 1% to 2% differences in solar irradiance measurement. Analyzing these values will ultimately assist in determining the uncertainties of the radiometer data and will assist in developing consensus on a standard for calibration.

  7. Evaluation of Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron; Wilcox, Stephen; Stoffel, Thomas

    2015-12-23

    This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances. These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband radiometers, and a pyranometer with fixed internal shading and are all deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. Data from 32 global horizontal irradiance and 19 direct normal irradiance radiometers are presented. The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances.

  8. stableGP

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The code in the stableGP package implements Gaussian process calculations using efficient and numerically stable algorithms. Description of the algorithms is in the...

  9. Nimbus-2 Level 2 Medium Resolution Infrared Radiometer (MRIR) V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nimbus II Medium Resolution Infrared Radiometer (MRIR) was designed to measure electromagnetic radiation emitted and reflected from the earth and its atmosphere...

  10. NPP Visible Infrared Imager-Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Particulate Inorganic Carbon (PIC) Global Mapped Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Visible and Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a multi-disciplinary instrument that is being flown on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) series of...

  11. NPP Visible Infrared Imager-Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Ocean Color (OC) Regional Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Visible and Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a multi-disciplinary instrument that is being flown on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) series of...

  12. Effect of vegetation on soil moisture sensing observed from orbiting microwave radiometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The microwave radiometric measurements made by the Skylab 1.4 GHz radiometer and by the 6.6 GHz and 10.7 GHz channels of the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer were analyzed to study the large-area soil moisture variations of land surfaces. Two regions in Texas, one with sparse and the other with dense vegetation covers, were selected for the study. The results gave a confirmation of the vegetation effect observed by ground-level microwave radiometers. Based on the statistics of the satellite data, it was possible to estimate surface soil moisture in about five different levels from dry to wet conditions with a 1.4 GHz radiometer, provided that the biomass of the vegetation cover could be independently measured. At frequencies greater than about 6.6 GHz, the radiometric measurements showed little sensitivity to moisture variation for vegetation-covered soils. The effects of polarization in microwave emission were studied also. (author)

  13. NPP Visible Infrared Imager-Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Quasi-Analytical Algorithm (GSM) Global Binned Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Visible and Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a multi-disciplinary instrument that is being flown on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) series of...

  14. Evaluating Solar Resource Data Obtained from Multiple Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Andreas, A.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2014-09-01

    Solar radiation resource measurements from radiometers are used to predict and evaluate the performance of photovoltaic and concentrating solar power systems, validate satellite-based models for estimating solar resources, and advance research in solar forecasting and climate change. This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances (GHI) and direct normal irradiances (DNI). These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband irradiometers, and a pyranometer with a shading ring deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL). The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference GHI and DNI.

  15. The Aquarius Ocean Salinity Mission High Stability L-band Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerano, Fernando A.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey; Triesky, Michael; Horgan, Kevin; Forgione, Joshua; Caldwell, James; Wilson, William J.; Yueh, Simon; Spencer, Michael; McWatters, Dalia; hide

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Earth Science System Pathfinder (ESSP) mission Aquarius, will measure global ocean surface salinity with approx.120 km spatial resolution every 7-days with an average monthly salinity accuracy of 0.2 psu (parts per thousand). This requires an L-band low-noise radiometer with the long-term calibration stability of less than or equal to 0.15 K over 7 days. The instrument utilizes a push-broom configuration which makes it impractical to use a traditional warm load and cold plate in front of the feedhorns. Therefore, to achieve the necessary performance Aquarius utilizes a Dicke radiometer with noise injection to perform a warm - hot calibration. The radiometer sequence between antenna, Dicke load, and noise diode has been optimized to maximize antenna observations and therefore minimize NEDT. This is possible due the ability to thermally control the radiometer electronics and front-end components to 0.1 Crms over 7 days.

  16. Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) Monthly Mean Atmospheric Liquid Water (ALW) By Prabhakara

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SMMR_ALW_PRABHAKARA data are Special Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) Monthly Mean Atmospheric Liquid Water (ALW) data by Prabhakara.The Prabhakara Scanning...

  17. Optimizing Performance of a Microwave Salinity Mapper: STARRS L-Band Radiometer Enhancements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burrage, Derek M; Wesson, Joel C; Goodberlet, Mark A; Miller, Jerry L

    2007-01-01

    Airborne microwave radiometers for salinity remote sensing have advanced to a point where operational surveys can be conducted over the inner continental shelf to observe the evolution of freshwater...

  18. SAFARI 2000 Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer Data, Southern Africa, Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) was deployed on the University of Washington CV-580 during the dry season component of the Southern African...

  19. NPP Visible Infrared Imager-Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Remote-Sensing Reflectance (RRS) Global Mapped Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Visible and Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a multi-disciplinary instrument that is being flown on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) series of...

  20. NPP Visible Infrared Imager-Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Chlorophyll (CHL) Global Mapped Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Visible and Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a multi-disciplinary instrument that is being flown on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) series of...

  1. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Aerosol Detection Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of suspended matter from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)...

  2. CAMEX-4 CONICALLY-SCANNING TWO-LOOK AIRBORNE RADIOMETER (C-STAR) V1a

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Conically-Scanning Two-look Airborne Radiometer (C-STAR) was deployed during the Fourth Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-4). C-STAR data were collected...

  3. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ADVANCED MICROWAVE PRECIPITATION RADIOMETER (AMPR) MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) instrument played a key role in the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). The AMPR...

  4. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ADVANCED MICROWAVE RADIOMETER RAIN IDENTIFICATION (ADMIRARI) GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Advanced Microwave Radiometer Rain Identification (ADMIRARI) GCPEx dataset measures brightness temperature at three frequencies (10.7, 21.0...

  5. An optical scanning subsystem for a UAS-enabled hyperspectral radiometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hyperspectral radiometers will be integrated with an optical scanning subsystem to measure remote sensing reflectance spectra over the ocean.  The entire scanning...

  6. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Mask Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains a high quality Environmental Data Record (EDR) of cloud masks from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard...

  7. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Snow Cover Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of snow cover from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument...

  8. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Sensor Data Record (SDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sensor Data Records (SDRs), or Level 1b data, from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) are the calibrated and geolocated radiance and reflectance...

  9. SAFARI 2000 Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer Data, Southern Africa, Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) was deployed on the University of Washington CV-580 during the dry season component of the Southern African Regional...

  10. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Smoothed Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Smoothed Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from NDE is a weekly product derived from the VIIRS...

  11. Novel Low-Impact Integration of a Microwave Radiometer into Cloud Radar System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of the Novel Low-Impact Integration of a Microwave Radiometer into Cloud Radar System project is a passive channel into the NASA Goddard Space Flight...

  12. Next-Generation Thermal Infrared Multi-Body Radiometer Experiment (TIMBRE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, M.; Mariani, G.; Johnson, B.; Brageot, E.; Hayne, P.

    2016-10-01

    We have developed an instrument concept called TIMBRE which belongs to the important class of instruments called thermal imaging radiometers (TIRs). TIMBRE is the next-generation TIR with unparalleled performance compared to the state-of-the-art.

  13. SMAP L2 Radiometer Half-Orbit 36 km EASE-Grid Soil Moisture V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Passive soil moisture estimates onto a 36-km global Earth-fixed grid, based on radiometer measurements acquired when the SMAP spacecraft is travelling from North to...

  14. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ADVANCED MICROWAVE PRECIPITATION RADIOMETER (AMPR) IPHEX V2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) IPHEx dataset was acquired by the AMPR instrument during the IPHEx field campaign in...

  15. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ADVANCED MICROWAVE PRECIPITATION RADIOMETER (AMPR) IPHEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) IPHEx dataset was acquired by the AMPR instrument during the IPHEx field campaign in...

  16. The ORA occultation radiometer on EURECA; Instrument description and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arijs, E.; Nevejans, D.; Fussen, D.; Frederick, P.; van Ransbeeck, E.; Taylor, F. W.; Calcutt, S. B.; Werrett, S. T.; Hepplewhite, C. L.; Pritchard, T. M.; Burchell, I.; Rodgers, C. D.

    A short description is given of the Occultation Radiometer which has been flown recently on the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA). A brief outline of the scientific rationale, instrument characteristics and status of the data reduction is presented.

  17. Time series inversion of spectra from ground-based radiometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Christensen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Retrieving time series of atmospheric constituents from ground-based spectrometers often requires different temporal averaging depending on the altitude region in focus. This can lead to several datasets existing for one instrument, which complicates validation and comparisons between instruments. This paper puts forth a possible solution by incorporating the temporal domain into the maximum a posteriori (MAP retrieval algorithm. The state vector is increased to include measurements spanning a time period, and the temporal correlations between the true atmospheric states are explicitly specified in the a priori uncertainty matrix. This allows the MAP method to effectively select the best temporal smoothing for each altitude, removing the need for several datasets to cover different altitudes. The method is compared to traditional averaging of spectra using a simulated retrieval of water vapour in the mesosphere. The simulations show that the method offers a significant advantage compared to the traditional method, extending the sensitivity an additional 10 km upwards without reducing the temporal resolution at lower altitudes. The method is also tested on the Onsala Space Observatory (OSO water vapour microwave radiometer confirming the advantages found in the simulation. Additionally, it is shown how the method can interpolate data in time and provide diagnostic values to evaluate the interpolated data.

  18. A concept for global crop forecasting. [using microwave radiometer satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, U. M.; Wright, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    The mission, instrumentation, and design concepts for microwave radiometer satellites for continuous crop condition forecasting and monitoring on a global basis are described. Soil moisture affects both crop growth and the dielectric properties of the soil, and can be quantified by analysis of reflected radiance passively received by orbiting spacecraft. A dedicated satellite reading a swath 200 km across, with 1 km and 1 K temperature resolution, could track the time-varying changes of solid moisture, sea ice, and water surface temperature. Launched by the Shuttle into an interim orbit, a boost would place the satellite in a 400 or 700 km orbit. Resolution requirements indicate a 45-725 m diam antenna, with 70 dB gain, operating at frequencies of 1.08, 2.03, and 4.95 GHz to ensure atmospheric transparency. Alternative structural concepts include either double-layer tetrahedral or single-layer geodesic trusses as the basic structural members. An analysis of the electrostatic positioning of the parabolic antenna membrane is outlined.

  19. The Planck-LFI Radiometer Electronics Box Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herreros, J M; Gomez, M F; Rebolo, R; Chulani, H; Rubino-Martin, J A; Hildebrandt, S R; Bersanelli, M; Franceschet, C; Butler, R C; Miccolis, M; Pena, A; Pereira, M; Torrero, F; Lopez, M; Alcala, C

    2009-01-01

    The Radiometer Electronics Box Assembly (REBA) is the control and data processing on board computer of the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) of the Planck mission (ESA). The REBA was designed and built incorporating state of the art processors, communication interfaces and real time operating system software in order to meet the scientific performance of the LFI. We present a technical summary of the REBA, including a physical, functional, electrical, mechanical and thermal description. Aspects of the design and development, the assembly, the integration and the verification of the equipment are provided. A brief description of the LFI on board software is given including the Low-Level Software and the main functionalities and architecture of the Application Software. The compressor module, which has been developed as an independent product, later integrated in the application, is also described in this paper. Two identical engineering models EM and AVM, the engineering qualification model EQM, the flight model FM and flight spare have been manufactured and tested. Low-level and Application software have been developed. Verification activities demonstrated that the REBA hardware and software fulfil all the specifications and perform as required for flight operation.

  20. A cryogenic electrical substitution radiometer for hard X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Mueller, P.; Ulm, G.

    2007-01-01

    Cryogenic electrical substitution radiometers (ESR) are well established in radiometry to determine radiant power with low uncertainties from the infrared to the soft X-ray region. The absorbers are made of copper to achieve a small time constant. At higher photon energies, the use of copper prevents the operation of ESR due to increasing transmittance. A new absorber design for hard X-rays has been developed at the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at BESSY II. In the first place, extensive simulations were performed for a variety of materials and absorber geometries using the Monte Carlo simulation code Geant4. The accuracy of the simulations was verified comparing them to scattering experiments performed at a 7 T wavelength shifter beamline at BESSY II. It was shown that Geant4 describes the photo-effect, including fluorescence as well as Compton- and Rayleigh scattering, with high accuracy. The simulations and experiments resulted in an absorber with a gold base 500 μm in thickness, inclined by 30 deg., and a cylindrical shell made of copper 80 μm in thickness to reduce losses caused mainly by fluorescence. The absorber was manufactured at PTB by means of electroforming and was implemented into an existing ESR. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation of high spectral purity was used to calibrate silicon photodiodes against the ESR for photon energies up to 60 keV with relative uncertainties below 1%

  1. A cryogenic electrical substitution radiometer for hard X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: Martin.Gerlach@ptb.de; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Mueller, P.; Ulm, G. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-09-21

    Cryogenic electrical substitution radiometers (ESR) are well established in radiometry to determine radiant power with low uncertainties from the infrared to the soft X-ray region. The absorbers are made of copper to achieve a small time constant. At higher photon energies, the use of copper prevents the operation of ESR due to increasing transmittance. A new absorber design for hard X-rays has been developed at the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at BESSY II. In the first place, extensive simulations were performed for a variety of materials and absorber geometries using the Monte Carlo simulation code Geant4. The accuracy of the simulations was verified comparing them to scattering experiments performed at a 7 T wavelength shifter beamline at BESSY II. It was shown that Geant4 describes the photo-effect, including fluorescence as well as Compton- and Rayleigh scattering, with high accuracy. The simulations and experiments resulted in an absorber with a gold base 500 {mu}m in thickness, inclined by 30 deg., and a cylindrical shell made of copper 80 {mu}m in thickness to reduce losses caused mainly by fluorescence. The absorber was manufactured at PTB by means of electroforming and was implemented into an existing ESR. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation of high spectral purity was used to calibrate silicon photodiodes against the ESR for photon energies up to 60 keV with relative uncertainties below 1%.

  2. A cryogenic electrical substitution radiometer for hard X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Müller, P.; Ulm, G.

    2007-09-01

    Cryogenic electrical substitution radiometers (ESR) are well established in radiometry to determine radiant power with low uncertainties from the infrared to the soft X-ray region. The absorbers are made of copper to achieve a small time constant. At higher photon energies, the use of copper prevents the operation of ESR due to increasing transmittance. A new absorber design for hard X-rays has been developed at the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at BESSY II. In the first place, extensive simulations were performed for a variety of materials and absorber geometries using the Monte Carlo simulation code Geant4. The accuracy of the simulations was verified comparing them to scattering experiments performed at a 7 T wavelength shifter beamline at BESSY II. It was shown that Geant4 describes the photo-effect, including fluorescence as well as Compton- and Rayleigh scattering, with high accuracy. The simulations and experiments resulted in an absorber with a gold base 500 μm in thickness, inclined by 30°, and a cylindrical shell made of copper 80 μm in thickness to reduce losses caused mainly by fluorescence. The absorber was manufactured at PTB by means of electroforming and was implemented into an existing ESR. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation of high spectral purity was used to calibrate silicon photodiodes against the ESR for photon energies up to 60 keV with relative uncertainties below 1%.

  3. Jupiter's global ammonia distribution inferred from Juno Microwave Radiometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Ingersoll, Andrew; Ewald, Shawn; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Janssen, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The Juno microwave radiometer (Juno/MWR) has made several observations of Jupiter's atmosphere by measuring the thermal emission from pressure levels down to a few hundred bars. The main objective of Juno/MWR is to determine Jupiter's deep water abundance because water is the key to understand Jovian meteorology that we observe at the cloud level, and because the deep water abundance hints at a giant planet's volatile and heavy element history. Since ammonia is the major opacity source in the Juno/MWR channels, it is especially important to figure out the ammonia distribution before we can conclude anything on the water abundance. At this stage of our analysis, we have inverted a global map (vertical and latitudinal) of ammonia distribution from the observed brightness temperatures at six wavelengths using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique. This method fully calibrates error and explores a wide range of the parameter space to avoid falling into a local minimum. The robustness of the retrieval is explained by matching the features in the ammonia distribution with the features in the microwave spectra. We will also announce the initial result of the retrieval of water abundance using the same technique.

  4. Simulation of Antenna Brightness Temperatures for the Juno Microwave Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyafuso, F. A.; Gulkis, S.; Adumitroaie, V.; Janssen, M. A.; Atreya, S. K.; Brown, S. T.; Bellotti, A.; Li, C.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Santos-Costa, D.; Williamson, R.; Jewell, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    A major objective of the Juno mission is the determination of global Jovian water and ammonia abundances from measurements by the Juno Microwave Radiometer (MWR). To this end, an instrument simulator has been developed to compute antenna brightness temperatures starting from a simplified atmospheric model of Jupiter involving a small set of tunable (and retrievable) parameters. The atmospheric model is the first element in a pipeline comprised of a number of components, including a model for the radiative transfer, a calculation of the instantaneous position and orientation of the antennae, and a set of precomputed skymaps of synchrotron emission and galactic background radiation. The output of this forward model is a time-ordered series of antenna brightness temperatures which can then be compared to measured data. Here, we primarily focus on details of this calculation but also present preliminary comparisons to MWR data and discuss potential improvements that will be needed to better fit the measurements and retrieve Jupiter's global water and ammonia abundances, hence the oxygen and nitrogen elemental ratios.

  5. Total ozone retrieval from satellite multichannel filter radiometer measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovill, J.E.; Sullivan, T.J.; Weichel, R.L.; Ellis, J.S.; Huebel, J.G.; Korver, J.; Weidhaas, P.P.; Phelps, F.A.

    1978-05-25

    A total ozone retrieval model has been developed to process radiance data gathered by a satellite-mounted multichannel filter radiometer (MFR). Extensive effort went into theoretical radiative transfer modeling, a retrieval scheme was developed, and the technique was applied to the MFR radiance measurements. The high quality of the total ozone retrieval results was determined through comparisons with Dobson measurements. Included in the report are global total ozone maps for 20 days between May 12 and July 5, 1977. A comparison of MFR results for 13 days in June 1977 with Dobson spectrophotometer measurements of ozone for the same period showed good agreement: there was a root-mean-square difference of 6.2% (equivalent to 20.2 m.atm.cm). The estimated global total ozone value for June 1977 (296 m.atm.cm) was in good agreement with satellite backscatter ultraviolet data for June 1970 (304 m.atm.cm) and June 1971 (preliminary data--299 m.atm.cm).

  6. Regolith Formation Rates and Evolution from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayne, P. O.; Ghent, R. R.; Bandfield, J. L.; Vasavada, A. R.; Williams, J. P.; Siegler, M. A.; Lucey, P. G.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Elder, C. M.; Paige, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Fragmentation and overturn of lunar surface materials produces a layer of regolith, which increases in thickness through time. Experiments on the lunar surface during the Apollo era, combined with remote sensing, found that the upper 10's of cm of regolith exhibit a rapid increase in density and thermal conductivity with depth. This is interpreted to be the signature of impact gardening, which operates most rapidly in the uppermost layers. Gravity data from the GRAIL mission showed that impacts have also extensively fractured the deeper crust. The breakdown and mixing of crustal materials is therefore a central process to lunar evolution and must be understood in order to interpret compositional information from remote sensing and sample analysis. Recently, thermal infrared data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Diviner radiometer were used to provide the first remote observational constraints on the rate of ejecta breakdown around craters L., Campbell, B. A., Allen, C. C., Carter, L. M., & Paige, D. A. (2014). Constraints on the recent rate of lunar ejecta breakdown and implications for crater ages. Geology, 42(12), 1059-1062.

  7. Determination of total ozone from DMSP multichannel filter radiometer measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luther, F.M.; Weichel, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The multichannel filter radiometer (MFR) infrared sensor was first flown in 1977 on a Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Block 5D series satellite operated by the US Air Force. The first four satellites in this series carried MFR sensors from which total atmospheric column ozone amounts may be derived. The MFR sensor was the first cross-track scanning sensor capable of measuring ozone. MFR sensor infrared measurements are taken day and night. The satellites are in polar sun-synchronous orbits providing daily global coverage. The series of four sensors spans a data period of nearly three years. The MFR sensor measures infrared radiances for 16 channels. Total ozone amounts are determined from sets of radiance measurements using an empirical relationship that is developed using linear regression analysis. Total ozone is modeled as a linear combination of terms involving functions of the MFR radiances for four channels (1, 3, 7 and 16) and the secant of the zenith angle. The MFR scans side to side in discrete steps of 40. The MFR sensor takes infrared radiance measurements at 25 cross-track scanning locations every 32 seconds. The instrument could take a theoretical maximum of 67,500 measurements per day, although typically 35,000 - 45,000 measurements are taken per day

  8. Modeling and Analysis of the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRad) is a payload carried by an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) at altitudes up to 60,000 ft with the purpose of measuring ocean surface wind speeds and near ocean surface rain rates in hurricanes. The payload includes several components that must maintain steady temperatures throughout the flight. Minimizing the temperature drift of these components allows for accurate data collection and conclusions to be drawn concerning the behavior of hurricanes. HIRad has flown on several different UAVs over the past two years during the fall hurricane season. Based on the data from the 2011 flight, a Thermal Desktop model was created to simulate the payload and reproduce the temperatures. Using this model, recommendations were made to reduce the temperature drift through the use of heaters controlled by resistance temperature detector (RTD) sensors. The suggestions made were implemented for the 2012 hurricane season and further data was collected. The implementation of the heaters reduced the temperature drift for a portion of the flight, but after a period of time, the temperatures rose. With this new flight data, the thermal model was updated and correlated. Detailed analysis was conducted to determine a more effective way to reduce the temperature drift. The final recommendations made were to adjust the set temperatures of the heaters for 2013 flights and implement hardware changes for flights beyond 2013.

  9. Thermal Modeling and Analysis of the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRad)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRad) is a payload carried by an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) at altitudes up to 60,000 ft with the purpose of measuring ocean surface wind speeds and near ocean surface rain rates in hurricanes. The payload includes several components that must maintain steady temperatures throughout the flight. Minimizing the temperature drift of these components allows for accurate data collection and conclusions to be drawn concerning the behavior of hurricanes. HIRad has flown on several different UAVs over the past two years during the fall hurricane season. Based on the data from the 2011 flight, a Thermal Desktop model was created to simulate the payload and reproduce the temperatures. Using this model, recommendations were made to reduce the temperature drift through the use of heaters controlled by resistance temperature detector (RTD) sensors. The suggestions made were implemented for the 2012 hurricane season and further data was collected. The implementation of the heaters reduced the temperature drift for a portion of the flight, but after a period of time, the temperatures rose. With this new flight data, the thermal model was updated and correlated. Detailed analysis was conducted to determine a more effective way to reduce the temperature drift. The final recommendations made were to adjust the set temperatures of the heaters for 2013 flights and implement hardware changes for flights beyond 2013.

  10. CIRiS: Compact Infrared Radiometer in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterman, D. P.; Collins, S.; Ferguson, J.; Good, W.; Kampe, T.; Rohrschneider, R.; Warden, R.

    2016-09-01

    The Compact Infrared Radiometer in Space (CIRiS) is a thermal infrared radiometric imaging instrument under development by Ball Aerospace for a Low Earth Orbit mission on a CubeSat spacecraft. Funded by the NASA Earth Science Technology Office's In-Space Validation of Earth Science Technology (InVEST) program, the mission objective is technology demonstration for improved on-orbit radiometric calibration. The CIRiS calibration approach uses a scene select mirror to direct three calibration views to the focal plane array and to transfer the resulting calibrated response to earth images. The views to deep space and two blackbody sources, including one at a selectable temperature, provide multiple options for calibration optimization. Two new technologies, carbon nanotube blackbody sources and microbolometer focal plane arrays with reduced pixel sizes, enable improved radiometric performance within the constrained 6U CubeSat volume. The CIRiS instrument's modular design facilitates subsystem modifications as required by future mission requirements. CubeSat constellations of CIRiS and derivative instruments offer an affordable approach to achieving revisit times as short as one day for diverse applications including water resource and drought management, cloud, aerosol, and dust studies, and land use and vegetation monitoring. Launch is planned for 2018.

  11. PERBANDINGAN PENGUKURAN RADIOMETER DAN RADIOSONDE PADA MUSIM HUJAN DI DRAMAGA BOGOR

    OpenAIRE

    Athoillah, Ibnu; Dewi, Saraswati; Renggono, Findy

    2016-01-01

    IntisariBalai Besar Teknologi Modifikasi Cuaca (BB-TMC) BPPT bekerjasama dengan Badan Meteorologi Klimatologi dan Geofisika (BMKG) melakukan kegiatan Intensive Observation Period (IOP) selama puncak musim hujan pada tanggal 18 Januari - 16 Februari 2016 di wilayah Jabodetabek. Salah satu peralatan yang digunakan untuk observasi adalah Radiometer dan Radiosonde. Pada penelitian ini akan difokuskan bagaimana perbandingan hasil dari pengukuran Radiometer dan Radiosonde selama kegiatan IOP teruta...

  12. Measurement of incoming radiation below forest canopies: A comparison of different radiometer configurations

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, Clare; Rutter, Nick; Zahner, Franziska; Jonas, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based, sub-canopy measurements of incoming shortwave and longwave radiation are frequently used to drive and validate energy balance and snowmelt models. These sub-canopy measurements are frequently obtained using different configurations (linear or distributed; stationary or moving) of radiometer arrays that are installed to capture the spatial and temporal variability of longwave and shortwave radiation. Three different radiometer configurations (stationary distributed, stationary li...

  13. Development of a Miniature L-band Radiometer for Education Outreach in Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Lyon B.

    2004-01-01

    Work performed under this grant developed a 1.4-Mhz radiometer for use in soil moisture remote sensing from space. The resulting instrument was integrated onto HuskySat. HuskySat is a 30-kg nanosatellite built under sponsorship from the Air Force Research Laboratory and NASA. This report consists of the interface document for the radiometer (the Science Payload of HuskySat) as detailed in the vehicle design report.

  14. Characterization of antibody-chelator conjugates: Determination of chelator content by terbium fluorescence titration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, K.D.; Schnobrich, K.E.; Johnson, D.K. (Abbott Laboratories, Department 90M, Abbott Park, IL (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Fluorescence titrations were performed by adding varying mole ratios of terbium(III) to antibody conjugates formed by benzyl isothiocyanate derivatives of three different polyaminopolycarboxylate chelators (NTA, EDTA, and DTPA) and the results compared to values for average chelator content obtained by cobalt-57 binding assays. For two different murine monoclonal antibodies, the average chelator content obtained by terbium fluorescence titration correlated closely with that measured by the cobalt-57 binding assay. It is concluded that lanthanide fluorescence titrations provide a useful alternative to radiometal binding assays for the determination of chelator content in protein-chelator conjugates.

  15. Correlation function analysis of the COBE differential microwave radiometer sky maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lineweaver, Charles Howe [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Space Sciences Lab.

    1994-08-01

    The Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) aboard the COBE satellite has detected anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. A two-point correlation function analysis which helped lead to this discovery is presented in detail. The results of a correlation function analysis of the two year DMR data set is presented. The first and second year data sets are compared and found to be reasonably consistent. The positive correlation for separation angles less than ~20° is robust to Galactic latitude cuts and is very stable from year to year. The Galactic latitude cut independence of the correlation function is strong evidence that the signal is not Galactic in origin. The statistical significance of the structure seen in the correlation function of the first, second and two year maps is respectively > 9σ, > 10σ and > 18σ above the noise. The noise in the DMR sky maps is correlated at a low level. The structure of the pixel temperature covariance matrix is given. The noise covariance matrix of a DMR sky map is diagonal to an accuracy of better than 1%. For a given sky pixel, the dominant noise covariance occurs with the ring of pixels at an angular separation of 60° due to the 60° separation of the DMR horns. The mean covariance of 60° is 0.45%$+0.18\\atop{-0.14}$ of the mean variance. The noise properties of the DMR maps are thus well approximated by the noise properties of maps made by a single-beam experiment. Previously published DMR results are not significantly affected by correlated noise.

  16. Development of Tetravalent, Bispecific CCR5 Antibodies with Antiviral Activity against CCR5 Monoclonal Antibody-Resistant HIV-1 Strains▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanzer, Jürgen; Jekle, Andreas; Nezu, Junichi; Lochner, Adriane; Croasdale, Rebecca; Dioszegi, Marianna; Zhang, Jun; Hoffmann, Eike; Dormeyer, Wilma; Stracke, Jan; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Ji, Changhua; Heilek, Gabrielle; Cammack, Nick; Brandt, Michael; Umana, Pablo; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we describe novel tetravalent, bispecific antibody derivatives that bind two different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5. The basic protein formats that we applied were derived from Morrison-type bispecific antibodies: whole IgGs to which we connected single-chain antibodies (scFvs) via (Gly4Ser)n sequences at either the C or N terminus of the light chain or heavy chain. By design optimization, including disulfide stabilization of scFvs or introduction of 30-amino-acid linkers, stable molecules could be obtained in amounts that were within the same range as or no less than 4-fold lower than those observed with monoclonal antibodies in transient expression assays. In contrast to monospecific CCR5 antibodies, bispecific antibody derivatives block two alternative docking sites of CCR5-tropic HIV strains on the CCR5 coreceptor. Consequently, these molecules showed 18- to 57-fold increased antiviral activities compared to the parent antibodies. Most importantly, one prototypic tetravalent CCR5 antibody had antiviral activity against virus strains resistant to the single parental antibodies. In summary, physical linkage of two CCR5 antibodies targeting different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5 resulted in tetravalent, bispecific antibodies with enhanced antiviral potency against wild-type and CCR5 antibody-resistant HIV-1 strains. PMID:21300827

  17. Pushbroom microwave radiometer results from HAPEX-MOBILHY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, W.E.; Cuenca, R.H.; Schmugge, T.J.; Wang, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA C-130 remote sensing aircraft was in Toulouse, France from 25 May through 4 July 1986, for participation in the HAPEX-MOBILHY program. Spectral and radiometric data were collected by C-130 borne sensors in the visible, infrared, and microwave wavelengths. These data provided information on the spatial and temporal variations of surface parameters such as vegetation indices, surface temperature, and surface soil moisture. The Pushbroom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) was used to collect passive microwave brightness temperature data. This four-beam sensor operates at the 21-cm wavelength, providing cross-track coverage approximately 1.2 times the aircraft altitude. Observed brightness temperatures for the period were high, ranging from above 240 K about 290 K. Brightness temperature images appeared to correspond well to spatial and temporal soil moisture variation. Previous research has demonstrated that an approximately linear relationship exists between the surface emissivity and surface soil moisture. For these data, however, regression analysis did not indicate a strong linear relationship (r 2 = 0.32 and r 2 = 0.42 respectively) because of the limited range of soil moisture conditions encountered and the small number of ground measurements. When results from wetter soil conditions encountered in another experiment were included, the regression improved dramatically. Based on similar research with the PBMR and an understanding of the ground data collection program, this result was examined to produce recommendations for improvements to future passive microwave research and data collection programs. Examples of surface soil moisture maps generated with PBMR data are presented which appear to be representative of the actual soil moisture conditions

  18. Calibration OGSEs for multichannel radiometers for Mars atmosphere studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, J. J.; J Álvarez, F.; Gonzalez-Guerrero, M.; Apéstigue, V.; Martín, I.; Fernández, J. M.; Fernán, A. A.; Arruego, I.

    2018-02-01

    This work describes several Optical Ground Support Equipment (OGSEs) developed by INTA (Spanish Institute of Aerospace Technology—Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial) for the calibration and characterization of their self-manufactured multichannel radiometers (solar irradiance sensors—SIS) developed for working on the surface of Mars and studying the atmosphere of that planet. Nowadays, INTA is developing two SIS for the ESA ExoMars 2020 and for the JPL/NASA Mars 2020 missions. These calibration OGSEs have been improved since the first model in 2011 developed for Mars MetNet Precursor mission. This work describes the currently used OGSE. Calibration tests provide an objective evidence of the SIS performance, allowing the conversion of the electrical sensor output into accurate physical measurements (irradiance) with uncertainty bounds. Calibration results of the SIS on board of the Dust characterisation, Risk assessment, and Environment Analyzer on the Martian Surface (DREAMS) on board the ExoMars 2016 Schiaparelli module (EDM—entry and descent module) are also presented, as well as their error propagation. Theoretical precision and accuracy of the instrument are determined by these results. Two types of OGSE are used as a function of the pursued aim: calibration OGSEs and Optical Fast Verification (OFV) GSE. Calibration OGSEs consist of three setups which characterize with the highest possible accuracy, the responsivity, the angular response and the thermal behavior; OFV OGSE verify that the performance of the sensor is close to nominal after every environmental and qualification test. Results show that the accuracy of the calibrated sensors is a function of the accuracy of the optical detectors and of the light conditions. For normal direct incidence and diffuse light, the accuracy is in the same order of uncertainty as that of the reference cell used for fixing the irradiance, which is about 1%.

  19. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  20. Platelet antibodies blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    This blood test shows if you have antibodies against platelets in your blood. Platelets are a part of the blood ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Platelet antibody - blood. In: Chernecky ... caused by platelet destruction, hypersplenism, or hemodilution. ...

  1. A Common Calibration Source Framework for Fully-Polarimetric and Interferometric Radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward J.; Davis, Brynmor; Piepmeier, Jeff; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Two types of microwave radiometry--synthetic thinned array radiometry (STAR) and fully-polarimetric (FP) radiometry--have received increasing attention during the last several years. STAR radiometers offer a technological solution to achieving high spatial resolution imaging from orbit without requiring a filled aperture or a moving antenna, and FP radiometers measure extra polarization state information upon which entirely new or more robust geophysical retrieval algorithms can be based. Radiometer configurations used for both STAR and FP instruments share one fundamental feature that distinguishes them from more 'standard' radiometers, namely, they measure correlations between pairs of microwave signals. The calibration requirements for correlation radiometers are broader than those for standard radiometers. Quantities of interest include total powers, complex correlation coefficients, various offsets, and possible nonlinearities. A candidate for an ideal calibration source would be one that injects test signals with precisely controllable correlation coefficients and absolute powers simultaneously into a pair of receivers, permitting all of these calibration quantities to be measured. The complex nature of correlation radiometer calibration, coupled with certain inherent similarities between STAR and FP instruments, suggests significant leverage in addressing both problems together. Recognizing this, a project was recently begun at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center to develop a compact low-power subsystem for spaceflight STAR or FP receiver calibration. We present a common theoretical framework for the design of signals for a controlled correlation calibration source. A statistical model is described, along with temporal and spectral constraints on such signals. Finally, a method for realizing these signals is demonstrated using a Matlab-based implementation.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111 In, 67 Ga and 131 I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  3. PHyTIR - A Prototype Thermal Infrared Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jau, Bruno M.; Hook, Simon J.; Johnson, William R.; Foote, Marc C.; Paine, Christopher G.; Pannell, Zack W.; Smythe, Robert F.; Kuan, Gary M.; Jakoboski, Julie K.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the PHyTIR (Prototype HyspIRI Thermal Infrared Radiometer) instrument, which is the engineering model for the proposed HyspIRI (Hyperspectral Infrared Imager) earth observing instrument. The HyspIRI mission would be comprised of the HyspIRI TIR (Thermal Infrared Imager), and a VSWIR (Visible Short-Wave Infra-Red Imaging Spectrometer). Both instruments would be used to address key science questions related to the earth's carbon cycle, ecosystems, climate, and solid earth properties. Data gathering of volcanic activities, earthquakes, wildfires, water use and availability, urbanization, and land surface compositions and changes, would aid the predictions and evaluations of such events and the impact they create. Even though the proposed technology for the HyspIRI imager is mature, the PHyTIR prototype is needed to advance the technology levels for several of the instrument's key components, and to reduce risks, in particular to validate 1) the higher sensitivity, spatial resolution, and higher throughput required for this focal plane array, 2) the pointing accuracy, 2) the characteristics of several spectral channels, and 4) the use of ambient temperature optics. The PHyTIR telescope consists of the focal plane assembly that is housed within a cold housing located inside a vacuum enclosure; all mounted to a bulkhead, and an optical train that consists of 3 powered mirrors; extending to both sides of the bulkhead. A yoke connects the telescope to a scan mirror. The rotating mirror enables to scan- a large track on the ground. This structure is supported by kinematic mounts, linking the telescope assembly to a base plate that would also become the spacecraft interface for HyspIRI. The focal plane's cooling units are also mounted to the base plate, as is an overall enclosure that has two viewing ports with large exterior baffles, shielding the focal plane from incoming stray light. PHyTIR's electronics is distributed inside and near the vacuum

  4. Low Average Sidelobe Slot Array Antennas for Radiometer Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengarajan, Sembiam; Zawardzki, Mark S.; Hodges, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    In radiometer applications, it is required to design antennas that meet low average sidelobe levels and low average return loss over a specified frequency bandwidth. It is a challenge to meet such specifications over a frequency range when one uses resonant elements such as waveguide feed slots. In addition to their inherent narrow frequency band performance, the problem is exacerbated due to modeling errors and manufacturing tolerances. There was a need to develop a design methodology to solve the problem. An iterative design procedure was developed by starting with an array architecture, lattice spacing, aperture distribution, waveguide dimensions, etc. The array was designed using Elliott s technique with appropriate values of the total slot conductance in each radiating waveguide, and the total resistance in each feed waveguide. Subsequently, the array performance was analyzed by the full wave method of moments solution to the pertinent integral equations. Monte Carlo simulations were also carried out to account for amplitude and phase errors introduced for the aperture distribution due to modeling errors as well as manufacturing tolerances. If the design margins for the average sidelobe level and the average return loss were not adequate, array architecture, lattice spacing, aperture distribution, and waveguide dimensions were varied in subsequent iterations. Once the design margins were found to be adequate, the iteration was stopped and a good design was achieved. A symmetric array architecture was found to meet the design specification with adequate margin. The specifications were near 40 dB for angular regions beyond 30 degrees from broadside. Separable Taylor distribution with nbar=4 and 35 dB sidelobe specification was chosen for each principal plane. A non-separable distribution obtained by the genetic algorithm was found to have similar characteristics. The element spacing was obtained to provide the required beamwidth and close to a null in the E

  5. The Radiometer Atmospheric Cubesat Experiment Post-Launch Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, B.; Misra, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed the Radiometer Atmospheric CubeSat Experiment (RACE) that was lost during the Orbital 3 (Orb-3) launch anomaly on October 28, 2014. The 3U CubeSat mission would have measured 2 channels of the 183 GHz water vapor line and raised the technology readiness level (TRL) of various subsystems to 6. Despite the launch failure, several hundreds of hours of instrument operation data was taken, including measurements in thermal vacuum of the complete spacecraft system. These data is used to evaluate the 35 nm Indium Phosphide (InP) receivers, and the low noise amplifier (LNA) based internal calibration system. The thermal vacuum measurements included frequent observations of a 'cold' and 'hot' target allowing for various receiver parameters to be calculated. The payload thermal vacuum data show that the receiver front ends performed as expected in terms of the gain (>35 dB) and drift (0.06 dB/K). The data also shows that integration could be performed with decreasing noise up to ~30 seconds, allowing for the system to be calibrated within that time period. The expected spacecraft calibration period would have been every 12 seconds. The injected noise from the load terminated LNA show magnitudes from 50 - 150 K that can be tuned which would meet most requirements. However the temperature coefficient is large at ~3 K/K which is over an order of magnitude larger than typical noise diodes. For nanosatellite class spacecraft, the power required to properly maintain the physical temperature range (±0.1K) would be challenging. On larger spacecraft, this methodology may still be viable, depending on the availability of suitable noise diodes at 183 GHz. While the CubeSat did not take measurements in space, the ground data in the relevant environment and extensive testing allows us to raise the following subsystems to TRL 6: 1) 183 GHz 35 nm InP receiver, 2) 183 GHz direct detect receiver and 3) 183 GHz LNA based calibration system.

  6. A sea ice concentration estimation algorithm utilizing radiometer and SAR data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Karvonen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the possibility of combining the high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR segmentation and ice concentration estimated by radiometer brightness temperatures. Here we present an algorithm for mapping a radiometer-based concentration value for each SAR segment. The concentrations are estimated by a multi-layer perceptron (MLP neural network which has the AMSR-2 (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 polarization ratios and gradient ratios of four radiometer channels as its inputs. The results have been compared numerically to the gridded Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI ice chart concentrations and high-resolution AMSR-2 ASI (ARTIST Sea Ice algorithm concentrations provided by the University of Hamburg and also visually to the AMSR-2 bootstrap algorithm concentrations, which are given in much coarser resolution. The differences when compared to FMI daily ice charts were on average small. When compared to ASI ice concentrations, the differences were a bit larger, but still small on average. According to our comparisons, the largest differences typically occur near the ice edge and sea–land boundary. The main advantage of combining radiometer-based ice concentration estimation and SAR segmentation seems to be a more precise estimation of the boundaries of different ice concentration zones.

  7. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  8. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  9. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    After Maynard-Smith and Price [1] mathematically derived why a given behaviour or strategy was adopted by a certain proportion of the population at a given time, it was shown that a strategy which is currently stable in a population need not be stable in evolutionary time (across generations). Additionally it was sug-.

  10. Radiolabeled antibody imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies, in particular monoclonal antibodies, offer the potential for the specific nuclear imaging of malignant and benign diseases in man. If this imaging potential is realized, they may also have a large role in cancer treatment. This paper reviews: (1) what monoclonal antibodies are and how they differ from polyclonal antibodies, (2) how they are produced and radiolabeled, (3) the results of preclinical and clinical trials in cancer imaging, including the utility of SPECT and antibody fragments, (4) the role of antibodies in the diagnosis of benign diseases, (5) alternate routes of antibody delivery, (6) the role of these agents in therapy, and (7) whether this technology ''revolutionizes'' the practice of nuclear radiology, or has a more limited complementary role in the imaging department

  11. CHARM: A CubeSat Water Vapor Radiometer for Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Boon; Mauro, David; DeRosee, Rodolphe; Sorgenfrei, Matthew; Vance, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Ames Research Center (ARC) are partnering in the CubeSat Hydrometric Atmospheric Radiometer Mission (CHARM), a water vapor radiometer integrated on a 3U CubeSat platform, selected for implementation under NASA Hands-On Project Experience (HOPE-3). CHARM will measure 4 channels at 183 GHz water vapor line, subsets of measurements currently performed by larger and more costly spacecraft (e.g. ATMS, AMSU-B and SSMI/S). While flying a payload that supports SMD science objectives, CHARM provides a hands-on opportunity to develop technical, leadership, and project skills. CHARM will furthermore advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of the 183 GHz receiver subsystem from TRL 4 to TRL 6 and the CubeSat 183 GHz radiometer system from TRL 4 to TRL 7.

  12. New improved algorithm for sky calibration of L-band radiometers JLBARA and ELBARA II

    KAUST Repository

    Dimitrov, Marin

    2012-03-01

    We propose a new algorithm for sky calibration of the L-band radiometers JLBARA and ELBARA II, introducing the effective transmissivities of the instruments. The suggested approach was tested using experimental data obtained at the Selhausen test site, Germany. It was shown that for JLBARA the effective transmissivities depend strongly on the air temperature and decrease with increasing air temperature, while for ELBARA II such strong dependence was not observed. It was also shown that the effective transmissivities account for the antenna and feed cable loss effects, and for the variations of the radiometer gain due to air temperature changes. The new calibration algorithm reduces significantly the bias of brightness temperature estimates for both radiometers, especially for JLBARA. © 2012 IEEE.

  13. Using High-Resolution Hand-Held Radiometers To Measure In-Situ Thermal Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Douglas M.; Krintz, Donald F.

    1984-03-01

    A field study was carried out to investigate the accuracy of using high-resolution radiometers to determine the in situ thermal resistance of building components having conventional residential construction. Two different types of radiometers were used to determine the thermal resistances of the walls of six test buildings located at the National Bureau of Standards. These radiometer thermal resistance measurements were compared to reference thermal resistance values determined from steady-state series resistance predictions, time-averaged heat-flow-sensor measurements, and guarded-hot-box measurements. When measurements were carried out 5 hours after sunset when the outdoor temperature was relatively steady and the heating plant was operated in a typical cyclic fashion, the following results were obtained: for lightweight wood-frame cavity walls, the radiometer procedures were found to distinguish wall thermal resistance 4.4 h.ft2- °F/Btu (0.77 m2•K/W) systematically higher than corresponding reference values. Such a discrimination will per-mit insulated and uninsulated walls to be distinguished. However, in the case of walls having large heat capacity (e.g., masonry and log), thermal storage effects produced large time lags between the outdoor diurnal temperature variation and the heat-flow response at the inside surface. This phenomenon caused radiometer thermal resistances to deviate substantially from corresponding reference values. This study recommends that the ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 101-1981 be modified requiring the heating plant to be operated in a typical cyclic fashion instead of being turned off prior to and during radiometer measurements.

  14. Normal modified stable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses two classes of distributions, and stochastic processes derived from them: modified stable (MS) laws and normal modified stable (NMS) laws. This extends corresponding results for the generalised inverse Gaussian (GIG) and generalised hyperbolic (GH) or normal generalised inverse...... Gaussian (NGIG) laws. The wider framework thus established provides, in particular, for added flexibility in the modelling of the dynamics of financial time series, of importance especially as regards OU based stochastic volatility models for equities. In the special case of the tempered stable OU process...

  15. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letolle, R.; Mariotti, A.; Bariac, T.

    1991-06-01

    This report reviews the historical background and the properties of stable isotopes, the methods used for their measurement (mass spectrometry and others), the present technics for isotope enrichment and separation, and at last the various present and foreseeable application (in nuclear energy, physical and chemical research, materials industry and research; tracing in industrial, medical and agronomical tests; the use of natural isotope variations for environmental studies, agronomy, natural resources appraising: water, minerals, energy). Some new possibilities in the use of stable isotope are offered. A last chapter gives the present state and forecast development of stable isotope uses in France and Europe

  16. Development of an improved Newtonian total radiometer, its evaluation and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castrejon G, R.; Morales, A.

    1998-01-01

    Measuring of radiant energy by optical non intrusive means is an important topic of research in many areas of science and technology. Precise evaluation of thermal energy emitted by hot bodies leads to a better understanding of the energy interchange phenomena between the body and its surroundings. To this end, a wide spectrum optical radiometer was developed. In this article we describe the construction and evaluation of this instrument and the physical principles involved in its design and operation. Among other advantages, the linear response of the instrument allows easily a precise calibration. Additionally, we give a procedure to obtain a known source of radiation that was used to calibrate the radiometer. (Author)

  17. Short-term Prediction and Detection of Dynamic Atmospheric Effects by Microwave Radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Dvorak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Specific utilization of a microwave radiometer for online monitoring, detection and, especially, prediction of particular dynamic atmospheric effects such as precipitation and cloudiness is proposed in the paper. The ground-based microwave radiometer and meteorological stations were incorporated into the measurement campaign in order to observe actual brightness temperature changes. The characteristics of atmospheric parameters recorded over a period of 14 months were evaluated and new applications for rain forecasting and cloud detection, based on signal variance, were proposed and validated.

  18. Microwave Radiometer Technology Acceleration Mission (MiRaTA): Advancing Weather Remote Sensing with Nanosatellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoy, K.; Blackwell, W. J.; Bishop, R. L.; Erickson, N.; Fish, C. S.; Neilsen, T. L.; Stromberg, E. M.; Bardeen, J.; Dave, P.; Marinan, A.; Marlow, W.; Kingsbury, R.; Kennedy, A.; Byrne, J. M.; Peters, E.; Allen, G.; Burianek, D.; Busse, F.; Elliott, D.; Galbraith, C.; Leslie, V. V.; Osaretin, I.; Shields, M.; Thompson, E.; Toher, D.; DiLiberto, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Microwave Radiometer Technology Acceleration (MiRaTA) is a 3U CubeSat mission sponsored by the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO). Microwave radiometer measurements and GPS radio occultation (GPSRO) measurements of all-weather temperature and humidity provide key contributions toward improved weather forecasting. The MiRaTA mission will validate new technologies in both passive microwave radiometry and GPS radio occultation: (1) new ultra-compact and low-power technology for multi-channel and multi-band passive microwave radiometers, and (2) new GPS receiver and patch antenna array technology for GPS radio occultation retrieval of both temperature-pressure profiles in the atmosphere and electron density profiles in the ionosphere. In addition, MiRaTA will test (3) a new approach to spaceborne microwave radiometer calibration using adjacent GPSRO measurements. The radiometer measurement quality can be substantially improved relative to present systems through the use of proximal GPSRO measurements as a calibration standard for radiometric observations, reducing and perhaps eliminating the need for costly and complex internal calibration targets. MiRaTA will execute occasional pitch-up maneuvers so that the radiometer and GPSRO observations sound overlapping volumes of atmosphere through the Earth's limb. To validate system performance, observations from both microwave radiometer (MWR) and GPSRO instruments will be compared to radiosondes, global high-resolution analysis fields, other satellite observations, and to each other using radiative transfer models. Both the radiometer and GPSRO payloads, currently at TRL5 but to be advanced to TRL7 at mission conclusion, can be accommodated in a single 3U CubeSat. The current plan is to launch from an International Space Station (ISS) orbit at ~400 km altitude and 52° inclination for low-cost validation over a ~90-day mission to fly in 2016. MiRaTA will demonstrate high fidelity, well-calibrated radiometric

  19. Spectral irradiance measurement and actinic radiometer calibration for UV water disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperfeld, Peter; Barton, Bettina; Pape, Sven; Towara, Anna-Lena; Eggers, Jutta; Hopfenmüller, Gabriel

    2014-12-01

    In a joint project, sglux and PTB investigated and developed methods and equipment to measure the spectral and weighted irradiance of high-efficiency UV-C emitters used in water disinfection plants. A calibration facility was set up to calibrate the microbicidal irradiance responsivity of actinic radiometers with respect to the weighted spectral irradiance of specially selected low-pressure mercury and medium-pressure mercury UV lamps. To verify the calibration method and to perform on-site tests, spectral measurements were carried out directly at water disinfection plants in operation. The weighted microbicidal irradiance of the plants was calculated and compared to the measurements of various actinic radiometers.

  20. Processor breadboard for on-board RFI detection and mitigation in MetOp-SG radiometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Kristensen, Steen S.; Kovanen, Arhippa

    2015-01-01

    Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) is an increasing threat to proper operation of space-borne Earth viewing microwave radiometer systems. There is a steady growth in active services, and tougher requirements to sensitivity and fidelity of future radiometer systems. Thus it has been decided...... that the next generation MetOp satellites must include some kind of RFI detection and mitigation system at Ku band. This paper describes a breadboard processor that detects and mitigates RFI on-board the satellite. Thus cleaned data can be generated in real time, and following suitable integration, downloaded...

  1. Upgraded ECE radiometer on the Tore Supra Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segui, J.L.; Molina, D.; Goniche, M.; Maget, P.; Udintsev, V.S. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Antar, G.Y. [Center for Energy Research, UCSD, La Jolla CA (United States); Kraemer-Flecken, A. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik

    2004-07-01

    An upgraded 32-channel heterodyne radiometer, 1 GHz spaced, is used on the Tore-Supra tokamak to measure the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) in the frequency range 78-110 GHz for the ordinary mode (O1) and 94-126.5 GHz for the extraordinary mode (X2). From now radial resolution is essentially limited by ECE relativistic effects related to electron temperature and density, not by the channels frequency spacing. For example, this leads to precise electron temperature mapping during magneto hydrodynamic activities (MHD). In the equatorial plane, we use a dual polarisation Gaussian optics lens antenna. It has low spreading and a perpendicular line-of-sight that gives ECE measurements very low refraction and Doppler effects. Assuming that the plasma is a black body and there is no overlap between ECE harmonics, one can deduce the electron temperature profile by using the first harmonic ordinary mode (O1) or the second harmonic extraordinary mode (X2). The principle radio frequency emitter (RF) has its frequencies down shifted into intermediary frequencies (IF) that span from 2 to 18 GHz in the single side band mode (SSB). It is amplified by low noise IF amplifiers before forming channels. A separate O/X mode RF front-end allows the use of an IF electronic mode selector. This gives the potentiality of simultaneous O/X mode measurements in the 94-110 GHz. RF and IF filters reject the gyrotron frequency (118 GHz) in order to perform electron temperature measurements during electron cyclotron resonance heated plasmas. A precise absolute spectral calibration is performed outside the tokamak vacuum vessel by using a 600 deg C black body hot source, a double coherent digital signal averaging (trigger, turn and clock) on the waveform generated by a mechanical chopper, and a simulated tokamak window. The use of differential electronics and strong electromagnetic shielding improves also the calibration precision. The fast and slow data acquisition systems are free of aliasing

  2. Upgraded ECE radiometer on the Tore Supra Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segui, J.L.; Molina, D.; Goniche, M.; Maget, P.; Udintsev, V.S.; Kraemer-Flecken, A.

    2004-01-01

    An upgraded 32-channel heterodyne radiometer, 1 GHz spaced, is used on the Tore-Supra tokamak to measure the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) in the frequency range 78-110 GHz for the ordinary mode (O1) and 94-126.5 GHz for the extraordinary mode (X2). From now radial resolution is essentially limited by ECE relativistic effects related to electron temperature and density, not by the channels frequency spacing. For example, this leads to precise electron temperature mapping during magneto hydrodynamic activities (MHD). In the equatorial plane, we use a dual polarisation Gaussian optics lens antenna. It has low spreading and a perpendicular line-of-sight that gives ECE measurements very low refraction and Doppler effects. Assuming that the plasma is a black body and there is no overlap between ECE harmonics, one can deduce the electron temperature profile by using the first harmonic ordinary mode (O1) or the second harmonic extraordinary mode (X2). The principle radio frequency emitter (RF) has its frequencies down shifted into intermediary frequencies (IF) that span from 2 to 18 GHz in the single side band mode (SSB). It is amplified by low noise IF amplifiers before forming channels. A separate O/X mode RF front-end allows the use of an IF electronic mode selector. This gives the potentiality of simultaneous O/X mode measurements in the 94-110 GHz. RF and IF filters reject the gyrotron frequency (118 GHz) in order to perform electron temperature measurements during electron cyclotron resonance heated plasmas. A precise absolute spectral calibration is performed outside the tokamak vacuum vessel by using a 600 deg C black body hot source, a double coherent digital signal averaging (trigger, turn and clock) on the waveform generated by a mechanical chopper, and a simulated tokamak window. The use of differential electronics and strong electromagnetic shielding improves also the calibration precision. The fast and slow data acquisition systems are free of aliasing

  3. Analysing Stable Time Series

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adler, Robert

    1997-01-01

    We describe how to take a stable, ARMA, time series through the various stages of model identification, parameter estimation, and diagnostic checking, and accompany the discussion with a goodly number...

  4. Development of a High-Stability Microstrip-based L-band Radiometer for Ocean Salinity Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerano, Fernando A.; Horgan, Kevin A.; Wilson, William J.; Tanner, Alan B.

    2004-01-01

    The development of a microstrip-based L-band Dicke radiometer with the long-term stability required for future ocean salinity measurements to an accuracy of 0.1 psu is presented. This measurement requires the L-band radiometers to have calibration stabilities of less than or equal to 0.05 K over 2 days. This research has focused on determining the optimum radiometer requirements and configuration to achieve this objective. System configuration and component performance have been evaluated with radiometer test beds at both JPL and GSFC. The GSFC testbed uses a cryogenic chamber that allows long-term characterization at radiometric temperatures in the range of 70 - 120 K. The research has addressed several areas including component characterization as a function of temperature and DC bias, system linearity, optimum noise diode injection calibration, and precision temperature control of components. A breadboard radiometer, utilizing microstrip-based technologies, has been built to demonstrate this long-term stability.

  5. Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Radiometer Subband Calibration and Calibration Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; De Amici, Giovanni; Mohammed, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP is one of four first-tier missions recommended by the US National Research Council's Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space (Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond, Space Studies Board, National Academies Press, 2007)]. The observatory was launched on Jan 31, 2015. The goal of the SMAP is to measure the global soil moisture and freeze/thaw from space. The L-band radiometer is the passive portion of the spaceborne instrument. It measures all four Stokes antenna temperatures and outputs counts. The Level 1B Brightness Temperature (L1B_TB) science algorithm converts radiometer counts to the Earths surface brightness temperature. The results are reported in the radiometer level 1B data product together with the calibrated antenna temperature (TA) and all of the corrections to the unwanted sources contribution. The calibrated L1B data product are required to satisfy the overall radiometer error budget of 1.3 K needed to meet the soil moisture requirement of 0.04 volumetric fraction uncertainty and the calibration drift requirement of no larger than 0.4 K per month.

  6. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Radiometer Subband Calibration and Calibration Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; De Amici, Giovanni; Mohammed, Priscilla N.

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP is one of four first-tier missions recommended by the US National Research Council's Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space (Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond, Space Studies Board, National Academies Press, 2007). The observatory was launched on Jan 31, 2015. The goal of the SMAP is to measure the global soil moisture and freeze/thaw from space. The L-band radiometer is the passive portion of the spaceborne instrument. It measures all four Stokes antenna temperatures and outputs counts. The Level 1B Brightness Temperature (L1B_TB) science algorithm converts radiometer counts to the Earths surface brightness temperature. The results are reported in the radiometer level 1B data product together with the calibrated antenna temperature (TA) and all of the corrections to the unwanted sources contribution. The calibrated L1B data product are required to satisfy the overall radiometer error budget of 1.3 K needed to meet the soil moisture requirement of 0.04 volumetric fraction uncertainty and the calibration drift requirement of no larger than 0.4 K per month.

  7. L-Band Radiometers Measuring Salinity From Space: Atmospheric Propagation Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Hofman-Bang, Dorthe

    2005-01-01

    Microwave radiometers can measure sea surface salinity from space using L-band frequencies around 1.4 GHz. However, requirements to the accuracy of the measurements, in order to be satisfactory for the user, are so stringent that the influence of the intervening atmosphere cannot be neglected...

  8. Airborne L-band radiometer mapping of the dome-C area in Antarctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl

    2015-01-01

    A 350 km × 350 km area near the Concordia station on the high plateau of Dome-C in Antarctica has been mapped by an airborne L-band radiometer system. The area was expected to display a rather uniform brightness temperature (TB) close to the yearly mean temperature-well suited for calibration...

  9. Mapping of the DOME-C area in Antarctica by an airborne L-band radiometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl

    2014-01-01

    A 350 × 350 km area near the Concordia station on the high plateau of Dome C in Antarctica has been mapped by an airborne L-band radiometer system. The area was expected to display a rather uniform brightness temperature close to the yearly mean temperature — well suited for calibration checks...

  10. Hybrid PSO-ASVR-based method for data fitting in the calibration of infrared radiometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sen; Li, Chengwei

    2016-06-01

    The present paper describes a hybrid particle swarm optimization-adaptive support vector regression (PSO-ASVR)-based method for data fitting in the calibration of infrared radiometer. The proposed hybrid PSO-ASVR-based method is based on PSO in combination with Adaptive Processing and Support Vector Regression (SVR). The optimization technique involves setting parameters in the ASVR fitting procedure, which significantly improves the fitting accuracy. However, its use in the calibration of infrared radiometer has not yet been widely explored. Bearing this in mind, the PSO-ASVR-based method, which is based on the statistical learning theory, is successfully used here to get the relationship between the radiation of a standard source and the response of an infrared radiometer. Main advantages of this method are the flexible adjustment mechanism in data processing and the optimization mechanism in a kernel parameter setting of SVR. Numerical examples and applications to the calibration of infrared radiometer are performed to verify the performance of PSO-ASVR-based method compared to conventional data fitting methods.

  11. An RFI Detection Algorithm for Microwave Radiometers Using Sparse Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed-Tano, Priscilla N.; Korde-Patel, Asmita; Gholian, Armen; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Schoenwald, Adam; Bradley, Damon

    2017-01-01

    Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) is a threat to passive microwave measurements and if undetected, can corrupt science retrievals. The sparse component analysis (SCA) for blind source separation has been investigated to detect RFI in microwave radiometer data. Various techniques using SCA have been simulated to determine detection performance with continuous wave (CW) RFI.

  12. Hybrid PSO-ASVR-based method for data fitting in the calibration of infrared radiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Sen; Li, Chengwei, E-mail: heikuanghit@163.com [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2016-06-15

    The present paper describes a hybrid particle swarm optimization-adaptive support vector regression (PSO-ASVR)-based method for data fitting in the calibration of infrared radiometer. The proposed hybrid PSO-ASVR-based method is based on PSO in combination with Adaptive Processing and Support Vector Regression (SVR). The optimization technique involves setting parameters in the ASVR fitting procedure, which significantly improves the fitting accuracy. However, its use in the calibration of infrared radiometer has not yet been widely explored. Bearing this in mind, the PSO-ASVR-based method, which is based on the statistical learning theory, is successfully used here to get the relationship between the radiation of a standard source and the response of an infrared radiometer. Main advantages of this method are the flexible adjustment mechanism in data processing and the optimization mechanism in a kernel parameter setting of SVR. Numerical examples and applications to the calibration of infrared radiometer are performed to verify the performance of PSO-ASVR-based method compared to conventional data fitting methods.

  13. Thermal, Thermophysical, and Compositional Properties of the Moon Revealed by the Diviner Lunar Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhagen, B. T.; Paige, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    The Diviner Lunar Radiometer is the first multispectral thermal instrument to globally map the surface of the Moon. After over three years in operation, this unprecedented dataset has revealed the extreme nature of the Moon's thermal environment, thermophysical properties, and surface composition.

  14. Future spaceborne ocean missions using high sensitivity multiple-beam radiometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup

    2014-01-01

    Design considerations concerning a scanning as well as a push-broom microwave radiometer system are presented. Strict requirements to spatial and radiometric resolution leads to a multiple-beam scanner achieving good sensitivity through integration over many beams, or to a push-broom system where...

  15. Antibodies Against Melanin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... Departments of Internal Medicine and Anatomical Pathology, University of Stellenbosch and MRC. Pigment Metabolism Research Unit, ... at the production of antibodies against natural melanoprotein. and a consideration of our negative .... the random polymerization of several monomers, antibody formed ...

  16. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  17. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  18. Improved characterization of scenes with a combination of MMW radar and radiometer information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Stephan; Peichl, Markus; Schreiber, Eric; Anglberger, Harald

    2017-05-01

    For security related applications MMW radar and radiometer systems in remote sensing or stand-off configurations are well established techniques. The range of development stages extends from experimental to commercial systems on the civil and military market. Typical examples are systems for personnel screening at airports for concealed object detection under clothing, enhanced vision or landing aid for helicopter and vehicle based systems for suspicious object or IED detection along roads. Due to the physical principle of active (radar) and passive (radiometer) MMW measurement techniques the appearance of single objects and thus the complete scenario is rather different for radar and radiometer images. A reasonable combination of both measurement techniques could lead to enhanced object information. However, some technical requirements should be taken into account. The imaging geometry for both sensors should be nearly identical, the geometrical resolution and the wavelength should be similar and at best the imaging process should be carried out simultaneously. Therefore theoretical and experimental investigations on a suitable combination of MMW radar and radiometer information have been conducted. First experiments in 2016 have been done with an imaging linescanner based on a cylindrical imaging geometry [1]. It combines a horizontal line scan in azimuth with a linear motion in vertical direction for the second image dimension. The main drawback of the system is the limited number of pixel in vertical dimension at a certain distance. Nevertheless the near range imaging results where promising. Therefore the combination of radar and radiometer sensor was assembled on the DLR wide-field-of-view linescanner ABOSCA which is based on a spherical imaging geometry [2]. A comparison of both imaging systems is discussed. The investigations concentrate on rather basic scenarios with canonical targets like flat plates, spheres, corner reflectors and cylinders. First

  19. Preliminary Evaluation of the SMAP Radiometer Soil Moisture Product over China Using In Situ Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yayong Sun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP satellite makes coincident global measurements of soil moisture using an L-band radar instrument and an L-band radiometer. It is crucial to evaluate the errors in the newest L-band SMAP satellite-derived soil moisture products, before they are routinely used in scientific research and applications. This study represents the first evaluation of the SMAP radiometer soil moisture product over China. In this paper, a preliminary evaluation was performed using sparse in situ measurements from 655 China Meteorological Administration (CMA monitoring stations between 1 April 2015 and 31 August 2016. The SMAP radiometer-derived soil moisture product was evaluated against two schemes of original soil moisture and the soil moisture anomaly in different geographical zones and land cover types. Four performance metrics, i.e., bias, root mean square error (RMSE, unbiased root mean square error (ubRMSE, and the correlation coefficient (R, were used in the accuracy evaluation. The results indicated that the SMAP radiometer-derived soil moisture product agreed relatively well with the in situ measurements, with ubRMSE values of 0.058 cm3·cm−3 and 0.039 cm3·cm−3 based on original data and anomaly data, respectively. The values of the SMAP radiometer-based soil moisture product were overestimated in wet areas, especially in the Southwest China, South China, Southeast China, East China, and Central China zones. The accuracies over croplands and in Northeast China were the worst. Soil moisture, surface roughness, and vegetation are crucial factors contributing to the error in the soil moisture product. Moreover, radio frequency interference contributes to the overestimation over the northern portion of the East China zone. This study provides guidelines for the application of the SMAP-derived soil moisture product in China and acts as a reference for improving the retrieval algorithm.

  20. First TSI observations of the new Compact Lightweight Absolute Radiometer (CLARA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, B.; Finsterle, W.; Koller, S.; Levesque, P. L.; Pfiffner, D.; Schmutz, W. K.

    2017-12-01

    Continuous and precise Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) measurements are indispensable to evaluate the influence of short- and long-term solar radiative emission variations on the Earth's energy budget. The existence of a potentially long-term trend in the suns activity and whether or not such a trend could be climate effective is still a matter of debate. The Compact Lightweight Absolute Radiometer (CLARA) is one of PMOD/WRC's future contributions to the almost seamless series of space borne TSI measurements since 1978. CLARA is one of three payloads of the Norwegian micro satellite NORSAT-1, along with Langmuir probes for space plasma research and an Automatic Identification System (AIS) receiver to monitor maritime traffic in Norwegian waters. NORSAT-1 was launched July 14th 2017 and the nominal operation of CLARA will start after the instrument commissioning beginning August 21st2017. We present the design, calibration and first TSI observations of CLARA, a new generation of active cavity Electrical Substitution Radiometers (ESR) comprising the latest radiometer developments of PMOD/WRC: i) A three-cavity design for degradation tracking and redundancy, ii) a digital control loop with feed forward system allowing for measurement cadences of 30s, iii) an aperture arrangement to reduce internal scattered light and iv) a new cavity and heatsink design to minimize non-equivalence, size and weight of the instrument. CLARA was end-to-end calibrated against the SI traceable cryogenic radiometer of the TSI Radiometer Facility (TRF) in Boulder (Colorado). The absolute measurement uncertainties for the three SI-traceable TSI detectors of CLARA are 567, 576 and 912 ppm (k = 1).

  1. Calibration of ground-based microwave radiometers - Accuracy assessment and recommendations for network users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospichal, Bernhard; Küchler, Nils; Löhnert, Ulrich; Crewell, Susanne; Czekala, Harald; Güldner, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) are becoming widely used in atmospheric remote sensing and start to be routinely operated by national weather services and other institutions. However, common standards for calibration of these radiometers and a detailed knowledge about the error characteristics is needed, in order to assimilate the data into models. Intercomparisons of calibrations by different MWRs have rarely been done. Therefore, two calibration experiments in Lindenberg (2014) and Meckenheim (2015) were performed in the frame of TOPROF (Cost action ES1303) in order to assess uncertainties and differences between various instruments. In addition, a series of experiments were taken in Oklahoma in autumn 2014. The focus lay on the performance of the two main instrument types, which are currently used operationally. These are the MP-Profiler series by Radiometrics Corporation as well as the HATPRO series by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG). Both instrument types are operating in two frequency bands, one along the 22 GHz water vapour line, the other one at the lower wing of the 60 GHz oxygen absorption complex. The goal was to establish protocols for providing quality controlled (QC) MWR data and their uncertainties. To this end, standardized calibration procedures for MWR were developed and recommendations for radiometer users were compiled. We focus here mainly on data types, integration times and optimal settings for calibration intervals, both for absolute (liquid nitrogen, tipping curve) as well as relative (hot load, noise diode) calibrations. Besides the recommendations for ground-based MWR operators, we will present methods to determine the accuracy of the calibration as well as means for automatic data quality control. In addition, some results from the intercomparison of different radiometers will be discussed.

  2. Dosimetry of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies used for therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, M.J.; Hooker, G.R.; Epenetos, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    The present state of radiotherapy using labeled antibodies is reviewed. From the point of view of dosimetry, antibody therapy does not seem to have reached a stable and practicable enough state to provide an input to any but rather tentative dosimetry models. These, therefore, should not be taken too far until the problems of antibody targeting have been more fully developed. Some of the instrumental techniques for acquiring dosimetric data under clinical conditions are discussed as are some of the techniques of therapy in use today. 8 references, 3 figures

  3. Preparation and quality control of radiometal-DOTARituximab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalilian, A.R.; Kamali-dehghan, M.; Moradkhani, S.; Saddadi, F.; Mirsadeghi, L.

    2008-01-01

    In this work Rituximab has been labeled by Ga-67 using a new one-step method for in-situ preparation of macrocyclic bifunctional chelating agent, N-succinimidyl-1,4,7,10- tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTANHS). DOTA-NHS was prepared at 25 deg. C using DOTA, Nhydroxy succinimide (NHS) in CH Cl in one step. DOTA- 2 2 Rituximab was obtained by the addition of 1 ml of a Rituximab pharmaceutical solution (5 mg/ml, in phosphate buffer, pH=7.8) to a glass tube pre-coated with DOTA-NHS (0.01-0.1 mg) at 25 deg. C with continuous mild stirring for 15 hours. Radiolabeling was performed at 37 deg. C in 3 hrs using Ga-67 Chlorides or Cu-64 Acetate. Thin layer radiochromatography demonstrated an overall radiochemical purity of 90-95% at optimized conditions (specific activity =30 GBq/mg, labeling efficacy= 82%). The final isotonic radio-metal-DOTA-Rituximab complex was checked by gel electrophoresis for radiolysis. TLC was performed to ensure that only one species was present after filtration through a 0.22 μm filter. Preliminary bio-distribution studies of the Ga-67 immunoconjugate in normal rat model performed to determine complex distribution of the radioimmunoconjugate up to 28hrs by imaging and organ counting after sacrificing the rats. In this study a facile method for incorporation of metal chelating moiety into peptides and antibody structure is presented. (author)

  4. Antibody engineering: methods and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chames, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    "Antibody Engineering: Methods and Protocols, Second Edition was compiled to give complete and easy access to a variety of antibody engineering techniques, starting from the creation of antibody repertoires and efficient...

  5. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... You appear to have an allergic response to insulin Insulin no longer seems to control your diabetes

  6. HIV antibody characterization as a method to quantify reservoir size during curative interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbelo, Peter D; Bayat, Ahmad; Rhodes, Craig S; Hoh, Rebecca; Martin, Jeffrey N; Fromentin, Rémi; Chomont, Nicolas; Hütter, Gero; Kovacs, Joseph A; Deeks, Steven G

    2014-05-15

    Quantitative humoral profiling of recent samples from a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adult who was cured following a delta32/delta32 CCR5 stem cell transplant in 2007 revealed no antibodies against p24, matrix, nucleocapsid, integrase, protease, and gp120, but low levels of antibodies against reverse transcriptase, tat, and gp41. Antibody levels to these HIV proteins persisted at high and stable levels in most noncontrollers, elite controllers, and antiretroviral-treated subjects, but a rare subset of controllers had low levels of antibodies against matrix, reverse transcriptase, integrase, and/or protease. Comprehensive HIV antibody profiles may prove useful for monitoring curative interventions.

  7. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 9. Evolutionary Stable Strategy: Application of Nash Equilibrium in Biology. General ... Using some examples of classical games, we show how evolutionary game theory can help understand behavioural decisions of animals.

  8. The Stable Concordance Genus

    OpenAIRE

    Kearney, M. Kate

    2013-01-01

    The concordance genus of a knot is the least genus of any knot in its concordance class. Although difficult to compute, it is a useful invariant that highlights the distinction between the three-genus and four-genus. In this paper we define and discuss the stable concordance genus of a knot, which describes the behavior of the concordance genus under connected sum.

  9. Manifolds admitting stable forms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Le, Hong-Van; Panák, Martin; Vanžura, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 1 (2008), s. 101-11 ISSN 0010-2628 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP201/05/P088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : stable forms * automorphism groups Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  10. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  11. Interactive Stable Ray Tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal Corso, Alessandro; Salvi, Marco; Kolb, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Interactive ray tracing applications running on commodity hardware can suffer from objectionable temporal artifacts due to a low sample count. We introduce stable ray tracing, a technique that improves temporal stability without the over-blurring and ghosting artifacts typical of temporal post-pr...

  12. The stable subgroup graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Tolue

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce stable subgroup graph associated to the group $G$. It is a graph with vertex set all subgroups of $G$ and two distinct subgroups $H_1$ and $H_2$ are adjacent if $St_{G}(H_1\\cap H_2\

  13. Precipitation Estimation Using Combined Radar/Radiometer Measurements Within the GPM Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission specifically designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors. The GPM mission centers upon the deployment of a Core Observatory in a 65o non-Sun-synchronous orbit to serve as a physics observatory and a transfer standard for intersatellite calibration of constellation radiometers. The GPM Core Observatory will carry a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a conical-scanning multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR will be the first dual-frequency radar in space to provide not only measurements of 3-D precipitation structures but also quantitative information on microphysical properties of precipitating particles needed for improving precipitation retrievals from microwave sensors. The DPR and GMI measurements will together provide a database that relates vertical hydrometeor profiles to multi-frequency microwave radiances over a variety of environmental conditions across the globe. This combined database will be used as a common transfer standard for improving the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. For global coverage, GPM relies on existing satellite programs and new mission opportunities from a consortium of partners through bilateral agreements with either NASA or JAXA. Each constellation member may have its unique scientific or operational objectives but contributes microwave observations to GPM for the generation and dissemination of unified global precipitation data products. In addition to the DPR and GMI on the Core Observatory, the baseline GPM constellation consists of the following sensors: (1) Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) instruments on the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, (2) the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-2 (AMSR-2) on the GCOM-W1

  14. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  15. Antibody affinity maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    surface expression of various antibody formats in the generated knockout strain. Functional scFv and scFab fragments were efficiently displayed on yeast whereas impaired chain assembly and heavy chain degradation was observed for display of full-length IgG molecules. To identify the optimal polypeptide......-antibody interface and the antibody intraface.the microenvironment and ecology of Acaryochloris and Prochloron, and in this thesis we attempted to further describe the distribution, growth characteristics and adaptive/regulatory mechanisms of these two cyanobacteria, both in their natural habitat and under defined...

  16. Clinical outcome of patients with coexistent antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and antibodies against glomerular basement membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindic, Jelka; Vizjak, Alenka; Ferluga, Dusan; Kovac, Damjan; Ales, Andreja; Kveder, Radoslav; Ponikvar, Rafael; Bren, Andrej

    2009-08-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and antibodies against glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) rarely coexist. Both antibodies may be associated with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and pulmonary hemorrhage. We describe the clinical, serological and histological features of our patients with dual antibodies. From 1977 to 2008, 48 patients with anti-GBM antibody-associated renal disease were observed. Eight out of the 30 tested patients (26.7%), all females, had positive myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA coexistent with anti-GBM antibodies. The patients' mean age was 63.4 +/- 7.8 years. Five presented with pulmonary-renal syndrome, all but one were dialysis-dependent on admission. They had constitutional symptoms and different organ involvement. The kidney biopsies revealed intense linear staining for immunoglobulin G and C3 along the glomerular and distal tubular basement membrane associated with irregular diffuse or focal extracapillary crescentic glomerulonephritis with necrosis of varying extent. Lesions of varying ages were characteristically expressed. Seven patients were treated with methylprednisolone and plasma exchange, four with cyclophosphamide, and one with intravenous immunoglobulin. After 28-74 months, there were three dialysis-dependent survivors and one patient with stable chronic renal disease. Two clinical relapses with pulmonary involvement and MPO-ANCA positivity without anti-GBM antibodies occurred in two dialysis-dependent patients. In summary, screening for ANCA and anti-GBM antibodies should be undertaken in patients with clinical signs of systemic vasculitis. In dialysis-dependent patients, the goal of treatment is to limit the damage of other involved organs and not to preserve renal function. Careful follow-up is necessary due to the relapsing nature of the ANCA component of the disease.

  17. Calibration Performance and Capabilities of the New Compact Ocean Wind Vector Radiometer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S. T.; Focardi, P.; Kitiyakara, A.; Maiwald, F.; Montes, O.; Padmanabhan, S.; Redick, R.; Russell, D.; Wincentsen, J.

    2014-12-01

    The paper describes performance and capabilities of a new satellite conically imaging microwave radiometer system, the Compact Ocean Wind Vector Radiometer (COWVR), being built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for an Air Force demonstration mission. COWVR is an 18-34 GHz fully polarimetric radiometer designed to provide measurements of ocean vector winds with an accuracy that meets or exceeds that provided by WindSat, but using a simpler design which has both calibration and cost advantages. Heritage conical radiometer systems, such as WindSat, AMSR, GMI or SSMI(S), all have a similar overall architecture and have exhibited significant intra-channel and inter-sensor calibration biases, due in part to the relative independence of the radiometers between the different polarizations and frequencies in the system. The COWVR system uses a broadband compact hybrid combining architecture and Electronic Polarization Basis Rotation to minimize the number of free calibration parameters between polarization and frequencies, as well as providing a definitive calibration reference from the modulation of the mean polarized signal from the Earth. This second calibration advantage arises because the sensor modulates the incoming polarized signal at the input antenna aperture in a known way based only on the instrument geometry which forces relative calibration consistency between the polarimetric channels of the sensor and provides a gain and offset calibration independent of a model or other ancillary data source, which has typically been a weakness in the calibration and inter-calibration of heritage microwave sensors. This paper will give a description of the COWVR instrument and an overview of the technology demonstration mission. We will discuss the overall calibration approach for this system, its advantages over existing systems and how many of the calibration issues that impact existing satellite radiometers can be eliminated in future operational systems based on

  18. Development of a Compact High Altitude Imager and Sounding Radiometer (CHAISR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, R. K. Y.; Min, S.; Cho, Y. J.; Kim, K. H.; Ha, J. C.; Joo, S. W.

    2017-12-01

    Joint Civilian-Military Committee, under Advisory Council on Science and Technology, Korea, has approved a technology demonstration project for developing a lightweight HALE UAV (High-Altitude, Long Endurance). It aims to operate at lower stratosphere, i.e. altitude of 16 20 km, offering unique observational platform to atmospheric research community as pseudo-satellite. NIMS (National Institute of Meteorological Sciences, Korea) is responsible for a payload for atmospheric science, a Compact High Altitude Imager and Sounding Radiometer (CHAISR) to demonstrate scientific observations at lower stratosphere in the interest of improving numerical weather prediction model. CHAISR consists of three microwave radiometers (MWR) with 16 channel, and medium resolution cameras operating in a visible and infrared spectrum. One of the technological challenges for CHAISR is to accommodate those instruments within 50 W of power consumption. CHAISR will experience temperature up to -75°C, while pressure as low as 50 hPa at operational altitude. It requires passive thermal control of the payload to keep electronic subsystems warm enough for instrument operation with minimal power available. Safety features, such as payload power management and thermal control, are considered with minimal user input. Three radiometers measure atmospheric brightness temperature at frequency at around 20, 40, and 50 GHz. Retrieval process yields temperature and humidity profiles with cross track scan along the flight line. Estimated total weight of all radiometer hardware, from the antennas to data acquisition system, is less than 0.8 kg and a maximum power consumption is 15.2 W. With not enough power for blackbody calibration target, radiometers use zenith sky view at lower stratosphere as an excellent calibration target for a conventional tipping-curve calibration. Spatial distributions of clouds from visible and surface temperature from thermal cameras are used as additional information for

  19. A Radar/Radiometer Instrument for Mapping Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Peter H.; Hilliard, Laurence; Rincon, Rafael; LeVine, David; Mead, James

    2003-01-01

    The RadSTAR instrument combines an L-band, digital beam-forming radar with an L-band synthetic aperture, thinned array (STAR) radiometer. The RadSTAR development will support NASA Earth science goals by developing a novel, L-band scatterometer/ radiometer that measures Earth surface bulk material properties (surface emissions and backscatter) as well as surface characteristics (backscatter). Present, real aperture airborne L-Band active/passive measurement systems such as the JPUPALS (Wilson, et al, 2000) provide excellent sampling characteristics, but have no scanning capabilities, and are extremely large; the huge JPUPALS horn requires a the C-130 airborne platform, operated with the aft loading door open during flight operation. The approach used for the upcoming Aquarius ocean salinity mission or the proposed Hydros soil mission use real apertures with multiple fixed beams or scanning beams. For real aperture instruments, there is no upgrade path to scanning over a broad swath, except rotation of the whole aperture, which is an approach with obvious difficulties as aperture size increases. RadSTAR will provide polarimetric scatterometer and radiometer measurements over a wide swath, in a highly space-efficient configuration. The electronic scanning approaches provided through STAR technology and digital beam forming will enable the large L-band aperture to scan efficiently over a very wide swath. RadSTAR technology development, which merges an interferometric radiometer with a digital beam forming scatterometer, is an important step in the path to space for an L-band scatterometer/radiometer. RadSTAR couples a patch array antenna with a 1.26 GHz digital beam forming radar scatterometer and a 1.4 GHz STAR radiometer to provide Earth surface backscatter and emission measurements in a compact, cross-track scanning instrument with no moving parts. This technology will provide the first L-band, emission and backscatter measurements in a compact aircraft instrument

  20. Development of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) radiometer derived landscape freeze/thaw product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliander, A.; Xu, X.; Dunbar, R. S.; Derksen, C.; Kim, Y.; Kimball, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    A baseline SMAP mission objective was to determine the land surface binary freeze/thaw (FT) state for northern (>45°N) regions with 80% spatial classification accuracy at 3 km resolution and 2-day average intervals. These requirements were initially achieved from the SMAP radar until the sensor failed in July 2015. The FT algorithm is now transitioning to using SMAP radiometer inputs. The main compromises of this change are a coarse (36 km) radiometer footprint, enhanced noise and potential FT signal degradation from seasonal vegetation biomass, soil moisture and surface inundation changes. The new daily passive FT product (L3_FT_P) is based on the same seasonal threshold algorithm as the radar derived product (L3_FT_A): instantaneous SMAP measurements are compared to reference signatures acquired during seasonal frozen and thawed states. Instead of radar inputs, the normalized polarization ratio (NPR) is calculated from SMAP radiometer measurements. The L3_FT_P algorithm is applied using NPR inputs, whereby NPR decreases and increases are associated with respective landscape freezing and thawing. A lower NPR under frozen conditions is due to smaller V-pol brightness temperature increases and larger H-pol increases. Using in situ measurements from core validation sites, the temporal behavior of backscatter and NPR measurements were evaluated during the spring 2015 radar and radiometer overlap period. The transition from frozen to thawed states produced a NPR response similar in timing and magnitude to the radar response, resulting in similar freeze to thaw seasonal transition dates. While the post-thaw radar backscatter consistently remained at elevated values relative to the frozen state, the NPR drifted downwards following the main thaw transition (due to de-polarization of the scene), which may introduce false freeze classification errors. Both radar and radiometer results tended to lead observed soil thawing due to strong sensitivity of the microwave

  1. Development of an Internally-Calibrated Wide-Band Airborne Microwave Radiometer to Provide High-Resolution Wet-Tropospheric Path Delay Measurements for SWOT (HAMMR - High-frequency Airborne Microwave and Millimeter-wave Radiometer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of an Internally-Calibrated Wide-Band Airborne Microwave Radiometer to Provide High-Resolution Wet-Tropospheric Path Delay Measurements for SWOT (HAMMR -...

  2. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes cold sores (oral herpes). HSV-2 causes genital herpes. How the Test is Performed A blood sample ... person has ever been infected with oral or genital herpes . It looks for antibodies to herpes simplex virus ...

  3. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R [Berkeley, CA; Kehoe, John [Saint Davids, PA; Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  4. Bifunctional antibodies for radioimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatal, J F; Faivre-Chauvet, A; Bardies, M; Peltier, P; Gautherot, E; Barbet, J

    1995-04-01

    In two-step targeting technique using bifunctional antibodies, a nonradiolabeled immunoconjugate with slow uptake kinetics (several days) is initially injected, followed by a small radiolabeled hapten with fast kinetics (several hours) that binds to the bispecific immunoconjugate already taken up by the tumor target. In patients with colorectal or medullary thyroid cancer, clinical studies performed with an anti-CEA/anti-DTPA-indium bifunctional antibody and an indium-111-labeled di-DTPA-TL bivalent hapten showed that tumor uptake was not modified compared to results for F(ab')2 fragments of the same anti-CEA antibody directly labeled with indium-111, whereas the radioactivity of normal tissues was significantly reduced (3- to 6-fold). The fast tumor uptake kinetics (several hours) and high or very high tumor-to-normal tissue ratios obtained with the bifunctional antibody technique are favorable parameters for efficient radioimmunotherapy.

  5. Antibody Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibody Blood Tests Researchers have discovered that people with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of ... do I do if I have a negative blood test (or panel) but I’m still having symptoms? ...

  6. Stable isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibari, Elghali; Taous, Fouad; Marah, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    This report presents results related to stable isotopes analysis carried out at the CNESTEN DASTE in Rabat (Morocco), on behalf of Senegal. These analyzes cover 127 samples. These results demonstrate that Oxygen-18 and Deuterium in water analysis were performed by infrared Laser spectroscopy using a LGR / DLT-100 with Autosampler. Also, the results are expressed in δ values (‰) relative to V-SMOW to ± 0.3 ‰ for oxygen-18 and ± 1 ‰ for deuterium.

  7. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  8. The impact of passband characteristics on imaging microwave radiometer brightness temperatures over the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettenhausen, Michael H.; Adams, Ian S.

    2013-05-01

    Radiative transfer modeling is used to estimate the effects of nonideal receiver frequency passband characteristics on the measured brightness temperatures from imaging microwave radiometers over the ocean. The analysis includes microwave frequencies from 6 to 40 GHz and applies to the lower frequency channels of conically scanning, space-based radiometers such as AMSR-E, SSMI, SSMIS, and WindSat. The analysis demonstrates that frequency passband characteristics can have significant effects on the brightness temperatures for microwave imaging channels. The largest effects are due to shifts in the center frequency of the passband. The imaging channels near the water vapor resonance at 22.235 GHz are most sensitive to passband characteristics. The effects for these channels depend on the water vapor in the scene.

  9. SMOS Rehearsal Campaign 2008: Radiometer Data Analysis and Soil Moisture Retrieval Using the LPRM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Amico, Johanna T.; Loew, Alexander; Schlenz, Florian; Mauser, Wolfram

    2009-11-01

    In the context of the calibration and validation activities for ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Mission, an airborne rehearsal campaign was conducted over parts of the Upper Danube catchment (Southern Germany) in April 2008. On four days in the course of three weeks, two radiometers, namely EMIRAD (owned by the Technical University of Denmark) and HUT-2D (owned by the Helsinki University of Technology), were flown over the Vils test site while intensive ground measurements were taken. The results of the data analysis as well as of the comparison of the radiometer data with the in situ measurements are presented. Also, a soil moisture retrieval using the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM) developed by [1] is performed and discussed.

  10. Large area mapping of soil moisture using the ESTAR passive microwave radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, T. J.; Levine, D. M.; Swift, C. T.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    Investigations designed to study land surface hydrologic-atmospheric interactions, showing the potential of L band passive microwave radiometry for measuring surface soil moisture over large areas, are discussed. Satisfying the data needs of these investigations requires the ability to map large areas rapidly. With aircraft systems this means a need for more beam positions over a wider swath on each flightline. For satellite systems the essential problem is resolution. Both of these needs are currently being addressed through the development and verification of Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) technology. The ESTAR L band radiometer was evaluated for soil moisture mapping applications in two studies. The first was conducted over the semiarid rangeland Walnut Gulch watershed located in south eastern Arizona (U.S.). The second was performed in the subhumid Little Washita watershed in south west Oklahoma (U.S.). Both tests showed that the ESTAR is capable of providing soil moisture with the same level of accuracy as existing systems.

  11. Analysis of RFI Identification and Mitigation in CAROLS Radiometer Data Using a Hardware Spectrum Analyser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Caudoux

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A method to identify and mitigate radio frequency interference (RFI in microwave radiometry based on the use of a spectrum analyzer has been developed. This method has been tested with CAROLS L-band airborne radiometer data that are strongly corrupted by RFI. RFI is a major limiting factor in passive microwave remote sensing interpretation. Although the 1.400–1.427 GHz bandwidth is protected, RFI sources close to these frequencies are still capable of corrupting radiometric measurements. In order to reduce the detrimental effects of RFI on brightness temperature measurements, a new spectrum analyzer has been added to the CAROLS radiometer system. A post processing algorithm is proposed, based on selective filters within the useful bandwidth divided into sub-bands. Two discriminant analyses based on the computation of kurtosis and Euclidian distances have been compared evaluated and validated in order to accurately separate the RF interference from natural signals.

  12. Design and first plasma measurements of the ITER-ECE prototype radiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, M. E.; Brookman, M. W.; Rowan, W. L. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Danani, S. [ITER-India/Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Bryerton, E. W.; Dougherty, P. [Virginia Diodes, Inc., Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    On ITER, second harmonic optically thick electron cyclotron emission (ECE) in the range of 220-340 GHz will supply the electron temperature (T{sub e}). To investigate the requirements and capabilities prescribed for the ITER system, a prototype radiometer covering this frequency range has been developed by Virginia Diodes, Inc. The first plasma measurements with this instrument have been carried out on the DIII-D tokamak, with lab bench tests and measurements of third through fifth harmonic ECE from high T{sub e} plasmas. At DIII-D the instrument shares the transmission line of the Michelson interferometer and can simultaneously acquire data. Comparison of the ECE radiation temperature from the absolutely calibrated Michelson and the prototype receiver shows that the ITER radiometer provides accurate measurements of the millimeter radiation across the instrument band.

  13. Ozone, spectral irradiance and aerosol measurements with the Brewer spectro radiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marenco, F.; Di Sarra, A.

    2001-01-01

    In this technical report a detailed description of the Brewer spectro radiometer, a widespread instrument for ozone and ultraviolet radiation, is given. The methodologies used to measure these quantities and for instrument calibration are described in detail. Finally a new methodology, developed by ENEA to derive the aerosol optical depth from the Brewer routine total ozone measurements, is described. This methodology is based on Langley extrapolation, on the determination of the transmissivity of the Brewer neutral density filters, and on a statistically significant number of half days of measurements obtained in could-free conditions. Results of this method, obtained with the Brewer of the ENEA station for climate observations Roberto Sarao, located in the island of Lampedusa, are reported. These results confirm the validity of the method, thanks to independent measurements taken in 1999 with a Multi filter Rotating Shadow band Radiometer. This methodology allows researchers to obtain an aerosol climatology from ozone measurements obtained at several sites world-wide [it

  14. Nimbus-1 High-Resolution Infrared Radiometer (HRIR) Imagery of Cloud Cover at Night on 70 mm Film V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The HRIRN1IM data product contains scanned negatives of photofacsimile 70mm film strips from the Nimbus-1 High-Resolution Infrared Radiometer. The images contain...

  15. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Optical Thickness (COT) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Cloud Optical Thickness (COT) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite...

  16. HURRICANE AND SEVERE STORM SENTINEL (HS3) GLOBAL HAWK HIGH ALTITUDE MMIC SOUNDING RADIOMETER (HAMSR) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) Global Hawk High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) dataset includes measurements gathered by the HAMSR...

  17. Development of Breakthrough Technology for Spaceflight Microwave Radiometers? RFI Noise Detection and Mitigation Based on the HHT2 Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microwave active/passive radiometer is the premier instrument for remote sensing of Earth. However, it carries the price of non-linear response by its horn-receiver...

  18. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Height (Top and Base) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of cloud height (top and base) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite...

  19. Nimbus-2 High-Resolution Infrared Radiometer (HRIR) Imagery of Cloud Cover at Night on 70 mm Film V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The HRIRN2IM data product contains scanned negatives of photofacsimile 70mm film strips from the Nimbus-2 High-Resolution Infrared Radiometer. The images contain...

  20. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Land Surface Temperature (LST) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Land Surface Temperature (LST) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite...

  1. Wide-band Millimeter and Sub-Millimeter Wave Radiometer Instrument to Measure Tropospheric Water and Cloud ICE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop, fabricate and test a new, multi-frequency millimeter and sub-millimeter-wave radiometer instrument to provide critically-needed measurements...

  2. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Top Height (CTH) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the...

  3. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Ice Surface Temperature (IST) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the...

  4. Design studies of large aperture, high-resolution Earth science microwave radiometers compatible with small launch vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Lyle C.; Bailey, M. C.; Harrington, Richard F.; Kendall, Bruce M.; Campbell, Thomas G.

    1994-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution microwave radiometer sensing from space with reasonable swath widths and revisit times favors large aperture systems. However, with traditional precision antenna design, the size and weight requirements for such systems are in conflict with the need to emphasize small launch vehicles. This paper describes tradeoffs between the science requirements, basic operational parameters, and expected sensor performance for selected satellite radiometer concepts utilizing novel lightweight compactly packaged real apertures. Antenna, feed, and radiometer subsystem design and calibration are presented. Preliminary results show that novel lightweight real aperture coupled with state-of-the-art radiometer designs are compatible with small launch systems, and hold promise for high-resolution earth science measurements of sea ice, precipitation, soil moisture, sea surface temperature, and ocean wind speeds.

  5. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Ocean Color/Chlorophyll (OCC) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Ocean Color/Chlorophyll (OCC) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite...

  6. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Type and Phase Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of cloud type and phase from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)...

  7. NPP Visible Infrared Imager-Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Diffuse Attenuation Coefficient for Downwelling Irradiance (KD) Global Mapped Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Visible and Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a multi-disciplinary instrument that is being flown on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) series of...

  8. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Volcanic Ash Detection and Height Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of volcanic ash from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer (VIIRS) instrument...

  9. SMAP L3 Radar/Radiometer Global Daily 9 km EASE-Grid Soil Moisture V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Daily global composite of up-to 15 half-orbit L2_SM_AP soil moisture estimates based on radiometer brightness temperature and radar backscatter measurements acquired...

  10. Nimbus-6 High Resolution Infrared Radiometer (HIRS) Level 1 Calibrated Radiances for the Global Atmospheric Research Program (GARP) V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nimbus-6 High Resolution Infrared Radiometer (HIRS) Level 1 Calibrated Radiances for the Global Atmospheric Research Program (GARP) data product contains daily...

  11. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Cover Layer (CCL) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Cloud Cover Layers (CCL) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)...

  12. HURRICANE AND SEVERE STORM SENTINEL (HS3) GLOBAL HAWK HIGH ALTITUDE MMIC SOUNDING RADIOMETER (HAMSR) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) Global Hawk High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) datasets include measurements gathered by the HAMSR...

  13. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Ice Thickness and Age Environmental Data Records (EDRs) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Ice Thickness and Age from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)...

  14. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Near Constant Contrast (NCC) Imagery Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the...

  15. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Sea Ice Characterization (SIC) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Sea Ice Characterization (SIC) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument...

  16. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Top Temperature (CTT) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the...

  17. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Imagery (not Near Constant Contrast) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the...

  18. JPSS NOAA Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Top Pressure (CTP) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the...

  19. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Base Height (CBH) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Cloud Base Heights (CBH) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite...

  20. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Effective Particle Size (CEPS) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Cloud Effective Particle Size (CEPS) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer...

  1. SMAP Enhanced L1C Radiometer Half-Orbit 9 km EASE-Grid Brightness Temperatures V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SMAP Level 1C_TB_E product provides radiometer brightness temperatures in half-orbit granules, gridded at 9 km grid resolution, on 3 EASE2 Earth-fixed grids - 1)...

  2. SMAP L1C Radiometer Half-Orbit 36 km EASE-Grid Brightness Temperatures V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SMAP Level 1C_TB product provides radiometer brightness temperatures in half-orbit granules, gridded at 36 km grid resolution, on 3 EASE2 Earth-fixed grids - 1)...

  3. Global Land Surface Temperature From the Along-Track Scanning Radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghent, D. J.; Corlett, G. K.; Göttsche, F.-M.; Remedios, J. J.

    2017-11-01

    The Leicester Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) and Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR) Processor for LAnd Surface Temperature (LASPLAST) provides global land surface temperature (LST) products from thermal infrared radiance data. In this paper, the state-of-the-art version of LASPLAST, as deployed in the GlobTemperature project, is described and applied to data from the Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR). The LASPLAST retrieval formulation for LST is a nadir-only, two-channel, split-window algorithm, based on biome classification, fractional vegetation, and across-track water vapor dependences. It incorporates globally robust retrieval coefficients derived using highly sampled atmosphere profiles. LASPLAST benefits from appropriate spatial resolution auxiliary information and a new probabilistic-based cloud flagging algorithm. For the first time for a satellite-derived LST product, pixel-level uncertainties characterized in terms of random, locally correlated, and systematic components are provided. The new GlobTemperature GT_ATS_2P Version 1.0 product has been validated for 1 year of AATSR data (2009) against in situ measurements acquired from "gold standard reference" stations: Gobabeb, Namibia, and Evora, Portugal; seven Surface Radiation Budget stations, and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement station at Southern Great Plains. These data show average absolute biases for the GT_ATS_2P Version 1.0 product of 1.00 K in the daytime and 1.08 K in the nighttime. The improvements in data provenance including better accuracy, fully traceable retrieval coefficients, quantified uncertainty, and more detailed information in the new harmonized format of the GT_ATS_2P product will allow for more significant exploitation of the historical LST data record from the ATSRs and a valuable near-real-time service from the Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometers (SLSTRs).

  4. On-board digital RFI and polarimetry processor for future spaceborne radiometer systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Ruokokoski, T.

    2012-01-01

    Man-made Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) is an increasingly threatening problem for passive microwave radiometry from space. The problem is presently very evident in L-band data from SMOS, but it is realized that it is already now a problem at other traditional radiometer bands at C, X, and Ku...... of such an RFI processor is discussed, and resource demands on the spacecraft are indicated....

  5. Atmospheric water distribution in cyclones as seen with Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometers (SMMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsaros, K. B.; Mcmurdie, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    Passive microwave measurements are used to study the distribution of atmospheric water in midlatitude cyclones. The integrated water vapor, integrated liquid water, and rainfall rate are deduced from the brightness temperatures at microwave frequencies measured by the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMRR) flown on both the Seasat and Nimbus 7 satellites. The practical application of locating fronts by the cyclone moisture pattern over oceans is shown, and the relationship between the quantity of coastal rainfall and atmospheric water content is explored.

  6. Weight estimates and packaging techniques for the microwave radiometer spacecraft. [shuttle compatible design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J. K.; Wright, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Estimates of total spacecraft weight and packaging options were made for three conceptual designs of a microwave radiometer spacecraft. Erectable structures were found to be slightly lighter than deployable structures but could be packaged in one-tenth the volume. The tension rim concept, an unconventional design approach, was found to be the lightest and transportable to orbit in the least number of shuttle flights.

  7. Air pollution - Remote detection of several pollutant gases with a laser heterodyne radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, R. T.; Shumate, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    An infrared heterodyne radiometer with a spectral resolution of 0.04 reciprocal centimeters has been used to remotely detect samples of ozone, sulfur dioxide, ammonia, and ethylene at room temperature, and samples of nitric oxide at 390 K. Each gas was observed in a background of nitrogen or oxygen at atmospheric pressure. Sensitivities to some of these gases are adequate for detection of ambient concentrations as low as a few parts per billion.

  8. Validation of multi-channel scanning microwave radiometer on-board Oceansat-1

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.; Pankajakshan, T.; Harikrishnan, M.

    the National Dairy Development Board and its subsidiary DOFCO and the Department of Biotechnology, New Delhi. NCB was supported by a Research Fellowship from the Council of Scientific and Industrial Researc h (CSIR), India. We thank A. K. Pradhan, Anil... Grover and Arun Jagannath for support with materials and helpful discussions. Received 21 February 2004; revised accepted 24 June 2004 Validation of multi - channel scanning microwave radiometer on - board Oceansat - I P. M...

  9. The Cubesat Radiometer Radio Frequency Interference Technology Validation (CubeRRT) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, S.; Johnson, J. T.; Ball, C.; Chen, C. C.; Smith, G.; McKelvey, C.; Andrews, M.; O'Brien, A.; Kocz, J.; Jarnot, R.; Brown, S. T.; Piepmeier, J. R.; Lucey, J.; Miles, L. R.; Bradley, D.; Mohammed, P.

    2016-12-01

    Passive microwave measurements made below 40GHz have experienced increased amounts of man-made radio frequency interference (RFI) over the past couple of decades. Such RFI has had a degenerative impact on various important geophysical retrievals such as soil-moisture, sea-surface salinity, atmospheric water vapor, precipitation etc. The commercial demand for spectrum allocation has increased over the past couple of years - infringing on frequencies traditionally reserved for scientific uses such as Earth observation at passive microwave frequencies. With the current trend in shared spectrum allocations, future microwave radiometers will have to co-exist with terrestrial RFI sources. The CubeSat Radiometer Radio Frequency Interference Technology Validation (CubeRRT) mission is developing a 6U Cubesat system to demonstrate RFI detection and filtering technologies for future microwave radiometer remote sensing missions. CubeRRT will operate between 6-40GHz, and demonstrate on-board real-time RFI detection on Earth brightness temperatures tuned over 1GHz steps. The expected launch date for CubeRRT is early 2018. Digital subsystems for higher frequency microwave radiometry require a larger bandwidth, as well as more processing power and on-board operation capabilities for RFI filtering. Real-time and on-board RFI filtering technology development is critical for future missions to allow manageable downlink data volumes. The enabling CubeRRT technology is a digital FPGA-based spectrometer with a bandwidth of 1 GHz that is capable of implementing advanced RFI filtering algorithms that use the kurtosis and cross-frequency RFI detection methods in real-time on board the spacecraft. The CubeRRT payload consists of 3 subsystems: a wideband helical antenna, a tunable analog radiometer subsystem, and a digital backend. The following presentation will present an overview of the system and results from the latest integration and test.

  10. Absolute intensity calibration of the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X.; Zhao, H. L.; Liu, Y., E-mail: liuyong@ipp.ac.cn; Li, E. Z.; Han, X.; Ti, A.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhang, X. D. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    This paper presents the results of the in situ absolute intensity calibration for the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. The hot/cold load method is adopted, and the coherent averaging technique is employed to improve the signal to noise ratio. Measured spectra and electron temperature profiles are compared with those from an independent calibrated Michelson interferometer, and there is a relatively good agreement between the results from the two different systems.

  11. GROMOS-C, a novel ground-based microwave radiometer for ozone measurement campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, S.; Murk, A.; Kämpfer, N.

    2015-07-01

    Stratospheric ozone is of major interest as it absorbs most harmful UV radiation from the sun, allowing life on Earth. Ground-based microwave remote sensing is the only method that allows for the measurement of ozone profiles up to the mesopause, over 24 hours and under different weather conditions with high time resolution. In this paper a novel ground-based microwave radiometer is presented. It is called GROMOS-C (GRound based Ozone MOnitoring System for Campaigns), and it has been designed to measure the vertical profile of ozone distribution in the middle atmosphere by observing ozone emission spectra at a frequency of 110.836 GHz. The instrument is designed in a compact way which makes it transportable and suitable for outdoor use in campaigns, an advantageous feature that is lacking in present day ozone radiometers. It is operated through remote control. GROMOS-C is a total power radiometer which uses a pre-amplified heterodyne receiver, and a digital fast Fourier transform spectrometer for the spectral analysis. Among its main new features, the incorporation of different calibration loads stands out; this includes a noise diode and a new type of blackbody target specifically designed for this instrument, based on Peltier elements. The calibration scheme does not depend on the use of liquid nitrogen; therefore GROMOS-C can be operated at remote places with no maintenance requirements. In addition, the instrument can be switched in frequency to observe the CO line at 115 GHz. A description of the main characteristics of GROMOS-C is included in this paper, as well as the results of a first campaign at the High Altitude Research Station at Jungfraujoch (HFSJ), Switzerland. The validation is performed by comparison of the retrieved profiles against equivalent profiles from MLS (Microwave Limb Sounding) satellite data, ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast) model data, as well as our nearby NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric

  12. Pregnancies in women with systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, K

    2016-01-01

    of Pregnancy Outcome: Biomarkers in Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (PROMISSE) study, so far the largest multicentre cohort study of pregnant women with underlying stable SLE, has given some important answers to long-discussed questions. Future studies on data collected from...

  13. A W-Band Radiometer with the Offset Parabolic Antenna for Radiometric Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the development of a W-band noise-adding radiometer which combines the millimeter-wave (MMW radiometric measurements with a high-resolution imager. The offset parabolic antenna is presented to achieve an accurate measurement and a high resolution. To reduce the cross-polarization level of the antenna, a multimode feed horn with a multistep structure is proposed to match the focal region fields of the reflector. It has advantages over the corrugated horns in lower mass and easier manufacturing. In addition, due to an unavoidable settling time for the noise-adding radiometer output signal passing through the low-pass filter, a theoretical criterion for the optimum duty cycle determination to reject extraneous contributions from the transient is proposed in this paper. The appropriate duty cycle threshold is 0.33 for the developed W-band radiometer. Also, a geometric correction method is presented to correct the obtained passive image suffering from a distortion for a better image interpretation. Preliminary experimental results are given to illustrate and verify the presented techniques.

  14. Vitamin D synthesis measured with a multiband filter radiometer in Río Gallegos, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orte, Facundo; Wolfram, Elian; Salvador, Jacobo; D'Elia, Raúl; Bulnes, Daniela; Leme, N. Paes; Quel, Eduardo

    2013-05-01

    Vitamin D plays an important role in human health. Vitamin D production from the sun is affected by UVB solar radiation. This paper presents a simple method for retrieving vitamin D-weighted UV by using a multiband filter radiometer GUV-541 installed at the Atmospheric Observatory of Southern Patagonia (OAPA) (51 ° 33' S, 69° 19' W), Río Gallegos. The methodology used combines irradiance measurements from a multiband filter radiometer with spectral irradiance modeled by the SOS radiative transfer code (developed by Lille University of Science and Technology (USTL)). The spectrum modeled is weighted with vitamin D action spectra published by the International Commission on Illumination (CIE), which describes the relative effectiveness of different wavelengths in the generation of this particular biological response. This method is validated using the vitamin D-weighted UV derived from a Brewer MKIII spectrophotometer (SN 124) belonging to the National Institute for Spatial Research (INPE), Brazil, which is able to measure solar spectra between 290 and 325nm. The method presents a good correlation between the two independent instruments. This procedure increases the instrumental capabilities of the multiband filter radiometer. Moreover, it evaluates the annual variation of vitamin D-weighted UV doses from exposure to ultraviolet radiation. These values are likely to be lower than suitable levels of vitamin D during winter and part of spring and autumn at these latitudes.

  15. Topographic Effects on the Surface Emissivity of a Mountainous Area Observed by a Spaceborne Microwave Radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank S. Marzano

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A simulation study to understand the influence of topography on the surfaceemissivity observed by a satellite microwave radiometer is carried out. We analyze theeffects due to changes in observation angle, including the rotation of the polarization plane.A mountainous area in the Alps (Northern Italy is considered and the information on therelief extracted from a digital elevation model is exploited. The numerical simulation refersto a radiometric image, acquired by a conically-scanning radiometer similar to AMSR-E,i.e., flying at 705 km of altitude with an observation angle of 55°. To single out the impacton surface emissivity, scattering of the radiation due to the atmosphere or neighboringelevated surfaces is not considered. C and X bands, for which atmospheric effects arenegligible, and Ka band are analyzed. The results indicate that the changes in the localobservation angle tend to lower the apparent emissivity of a radiometric pixel with respectto the corresponding flat surface characteristics. The effect of the rotation of thepolarization plane enlarges (vertical polarization, or attenuates (horizontal polarizationthis decrease. By doing some simplifying assumptions for the radiometer antenna, theconclusion is that the microwave emissivity at vertical polarization is underestimated,whilst the opposite occurs for horizontal polarization, except for Ka band, for which bothunder- and overprediction may occur. A quantification of the differences with respect to aflat soil and an approximate evaluation of their impact on soil moisture retrieval areyielded.

  16. Intercomparison of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with other techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Schranz, Franziska; Steinbrecht, Wolfgang; Haefele, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    In this work the stratospheric performance of a relatively new microwave temperature radiometer (TEMPERA) has been evaluated. With this goal in mind, almost 3 years of temperature measurements (January 2014-September 2016) from the TEMPERA radiometer were intercompared with simultaneous measurements from other techniques: radiosondes, MLS satellite and Rayleigh lidar. This intercomparison campaign was carried out at the aerological station of MeteoSwiss at Payerne (Switzerland). In addition, the temperature profiles from TEMPERA were used to validate the temperature outputs from the SD-WACCM model. The results showed in general a very good agreement between TEMPERA and the different instruments and the model, with a high correlation (higher than 0.9) in the temperature evolution at different altitudes between TEMPERA and the different data sets. An annual pattern was observed in the stratospheric temperature with generally higher temperatures in summer than in winter and with a higher variability during winter. A clear change in the tendency of the temperature deviations was detected in summer 2015, which was due to the repair of an attenuator in the TEMPERA spectrometer. The mean and the standard deviations of the temperature differences between TEMPERA and the different measurements were calculated for two periods (before and after the repair) in order to quantify the accuracy and precision of this radiometer over the campaign period. The results showed absolute biases and standard deviations lower than 2 K for most of the altitudes. In addition, comparisons proved the good performance of TEMPERA in measuring the temperature in the stratosphere.

  17. Natural and Man-made Antibody Repertories for Antibody Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C eAlmagro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies are the fastest-growing segment of the biologics market. The success of antibody-based drugs resides in their exquisite specificity, high potency, stability, solubility, safety and relatively inexpensive manufacturing process in comparison with other biologics. We outline here the structural studies and fundamental principles that define how antibodies interact with diverse targets. We also describe the antibody repertoires and affinity maturation mechanisms of human, mice and chickens, plus the use of novel single-domain antibodies in camelids and sharks. These species all utilize diverse evolutionary solutions to generate specific and high affinity antibodies and illustrate the plasticity of natural antibody repertoires. In addition, we discuss the multiple variations of man-made antibody repertoires designed and validated in the last two decades, which have served as tools to explore how the size, diversity and composition of a repertoire impact the antibody discovery process.

  18. Spatiotemporal Variability of Earth's Radiation Balance Components from Russian Radiometer IKOR-M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherviakov, M.

    2016-12-01

    The radiometer IKOR-M was created in National Research Saratov State University for satellite monitoring of the outgoing reflected short-wave radiation, which is one of the components of Earth's radiation budget. Such information can be used in different models of long-term weather forecasts, in researches of climate change trends and in calculation of absorbed solar radiation values and albedo of the Earth-atmosphere system. The IKOR-M product archive is available online at all times. A searchable catalogue of data products is continually updated and users may search and download data products via the Earth radiation balance components research laboratory website as soon as they become available. Two series of measurements from two different IKOR-M are available. The first radiometer had worked from October 2009 to August 2014 and second - from August 2014 to the present. Therefore, there is a period when both radiometers work at the same time. Top-of-atmosphere fluxes deduced from the "Meteor-M" No 1 measurement in August, 2014 show very good agreement with the fluxes determined from "Meteor-M" No 2. The scale relationship of the IKOR-M radiometers on "Meteor - M" No 1 and No 2 satellites found by comparing of the global distribution maps for monthly averaged albedo values. The seasonal and interannual variations of OSR, albedo and ASR were discussed. The variations between SW radiation budget components seem to be within observational uncertainty and natural variability governed by cloudiness, water vapor and aerosol variations. It was assessed spatial and temporal variations of albedo and the absorbed solar radiation over different regions. Latitudinal distributions of albedo and ASR were estimated in more detail. Meridional cross sections over oceans and land were used separately for this estimation. It was shown that the albedo and ASR data received from the radiometer IKOR-M can be used to detect El Nino in the Pacific Ocean. The reported study was funded by

  19. The NASA Airborne Earth Science Microwave Imaging Radiometer (AESMIR): A New Sensor for Earth Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward

    2003-01-01

    The Airborne Earth Science Microwave Imaging Radiometer (AESMIR) is a versatile new airborne imaging radiometer recently developed by NASA. The AESMIR design is unique in that it performs dual-polarized imaging at all standard passive microwave frequency bands (6-89 GHz) using only one sensor headscanner package, providing an efficient solution for Earth remote sensing applications (snow, soil moisture/land parameters, precipitation, ocean winds, sea surface temperature, water vapor, sea ice, etc.). The microwave radiometers themselves will incorporate state-of-the-art receivers, with particular attention given to instrument calibration for the best possible accuracy and sensitivity. The single-package design of AESMIR makes it compatible with high-altitude aircraft platforms such as the NASA ER-2s. The arbitrary 2-axis gimbal can perform conical and cross-track scanning, as well as fixed-beam staring. This compatibility with high-altitude platforms coupled with the flexible scanning configuration, opens up previously unavailable science opportunities for convection/precip/cloud science and co-flying with complementary instruments, as well as providing wider swath coverage for all science applications. By designing AESMIR to be compatible with these high-altitude platforms, we are also compatible with the NASA P-3, the NASA DC-8, C-130s and ground-based deployments. Thus AESMIR can provide low-, mid-, and high- altitude microwave imaging. Parallel filter banks allow AESMIR to simultaneously simulate the exact passbands of multiple satellite radiometers: SSM/I, TMI, AMSR, Windsat, SSMI/S, and the upcoming GPM/GMI and NPOESS/CMIS instruments --a unique capability among aircraft radiometers. An L-band option is also under development, again using the same scanner. With this option, simultaneous imaging from 1.4 to 89 GHz will be feasible. And, all receivers except the sounding channels will be configured for 4-Stokes polarimetric operation using high-speed digital

  20. A New Generation of Micro Satellite Radiometers for Atmospheric Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, jieying

    2017-04-01

    The need for low-cost, mission-flexible, and rapidly deployable space borne sensors that meet stringent performance requirements pervades the extreme weather monitoring programs, including especially the strong rainfall and typhoon. New technologies have enabled a novel approach toward this science observational goal, and in this paper we describe recent technology develop efforts to address the challenges above through the use of radiometers on a Micro-sized Microwave Atmospheric Satellite (Microsat), which operates in the type of constellation, and enable the capabilities of rapidly progressing. Recent work has involved the design and development of highly integrated radiometer component technologies that would enable the realization of a high-performance, multi-band sounder that would conform to the 3U CubeSat size (10 x 10 x 30 cm), weight, and power requirements. This paper partly focuses on the constellation to realize a scalable CubeSat-based system that will pave the path towards improved revisit rates over critical earth regions, and achieve state-of-the-art performance relative to current systems with respect to spatial, spectral, and radiometric resolution. As one of the important payloads on the platform, sub-millimeter radiometer is advised to house for providing atmospheric and oceanographic information all weather and all day. The first portion of the radiometer comprises a horn-fed reflector antenna, with a full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) beamwidth of 1.2°. Hence, the scanned beam has an approximate footprint diameter of 9.6 km at nadir incidence from a nominal altitude of 500 km. The antenna system is designed for a minimum 95% beam efficiency. Approximately 98 pixels are sampled for every scanning line, which covers a range of 1500km. The period of a round is about 94.47 minutes and re-visit period is four days. For the radiometer, which is a passive cross-track-scanning microwave spectrometer operating near the 118.75-GHz oxygen absorption

  1. Technetium-99m pertechnetate - a tracer for radiolabelling antibody for inflammation detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaharuddin Mohd; Wan Hamirul Bahrin Wan Kamal; Shahrin A Hamid; Ang Woan Tze; Rosnani Hashim

    1999-01-01

    The polyclonal antibody, Human Immunoglobulin G (HlgG) was reduced by using 2-mercaptoethanol with molar ratio of 1000:1 (i.e. mercaptoethanol:antibody). The reduction of the antibody, was carried out for 30 minutes at room temperature. The reduced antibody was purified by using Sephadex G-25 fine column. The antibody kit for the detection of inflammation was prepared aseptically in Class 1 Laminar Flow cabinet. The kit passed the sterility test. Upon reconstitution of the antibody kit with sodium pertechnetate-99m ( 99m Tc) solution, the labelling efficiency obtained was more than 95%. This preparation was stable up to 24-hour stored at room temperature. Gamma camera scans showed the accumulation of technetium-99m labelled antibody ( 99m Tc-HIgG) at the turpentine-induced inflammation of female Sprague-Dawley rats. This indicated the possibility of using 99m Tc-HIgG for inflammation detection. (author)

  2. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi

    2014-01-01

    to the antibody science in every project in antibody drug discovery. Recent experimental technologies allow for the rapid generation of large-scale data on antibody sequences, affinity, potency, structures, and biological functions; this should accelerate drug discovery research. Therefore, a robust bioinformatic...... infrastructure for these large data sets has become necessary. In this article, we first identify and discuss the typical obstacles faced during the antibody drug discovery process. We then summarize the current status of three sub-fields of antibody informatics as follows: (i) recent progress in technologies...... for antibody rational design using computational approaches to affinity and stability improvement, as well as ab-initio and homology-based antibody modeling; (ii) resources for antibody sequences, structures, and immune epitopes and open drug discovery resources for development of antibody drugs; and (iii...

  3. Marginally Stable Nuclear Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Altamirano, D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts result from unstable nuclear burning of the material accreted on neutron stars in some low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Theory predicts that close to the boundary of stability oscillatory burning can occur. This marginally stable regime has so far been identified in only a small number of sources. We present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bursting, high- inclination LMXB 4U 1323-619 that reveal for the first time in this source the signature of marginally stable burning. The source was observed during two successive RXTE orbits for approximately 5 ksec beginning at 10:14:01 UTC on March 28, 2011. Significant mHz quasi- periodic oscillations (QPO) at a frequency of 8.1 mHz are detected for approximately 1600 s from the beginning of the observation until the occurrence of a thermonuclear X-ray burst at 10:42:22 UTC. The mHz oscillations are not detected following the X-ray burst. The average fractional rms amplitude of the mHz QPOs is 6.4% (3 - 20 keV), and the amplitude increases to about 8% below 10 keV.This phenomenology is strikingly similar to that seen in the LMXB 4U 1636-53. Indeed, the frequency of the mHz QPOs in 4U 1323-619 prior to the X-ray burst is very similar to the transition frequency between mHz QPO and bursts found in 4U 1636-53 by Altamirano et al. (2008). These results strongly suggest that the observed QPOs in 4U 1323-619 are, like those in 4U 1636-53, due to marginally stable nuclear burning. We also explore the dependence of the energy spectrum on the oscillation phase, and we place the present observations within the context of the spectral evolution of the accretion-powered flux from the source.

  4. Antithyroglobulin Antibodies and Antimicrosomal Antibodies in Various Thyroid Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gwon Jun; Hong, Key Sak; Choi, Kang Won; Lee, Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Park, Sung Hoe; Chi, Je Geun; Lee, Sang Kook

    1979-01-01

    The authors investigated the incidence of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies and antimicrosomal antibodies measured by tanned red cell hemagglutination method in subjects suffering from various thyroid disorders. 1) In 15 normal patients, neither suffering from any thyroid diseases nor from any other autoimmune disorders, the antithyroglobulin antibodies were all negative, but the antimicrosomal antibody was positive only in one patient (6.7%). 2) The antithyroglobulin antibodies were positive in 31.5% (34 patients) of 108 patients with various thyroid diseases, and the antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 37.0% (40 patients). 3) of the 25 patients with Graves' diseases, 7 patients (28.0%) showed positive for the antithyroglobulin antibodies, and 9 (36.0%) for the antimicrosomal antibodies. There was no definite differences in clinical and thyroid functions between the groups with positive and negative results. 4) Both antibodies were positive in 16 (88.9%) and 17 (94.4%) patients respectively among 18 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, all of them were diagnosed histologically. 5) Three out of 33 patients with thyroid adenoma showed positive antibodies, and 3 of 16 patients with thyroid carcinoma revealed positive antibodies. 6) TRCH antibodies demonstrated negative results in 2 patients with subacute thyroiditis, but positive in one patient with idiopathic primary myxedema. 7) The number of patients with high titers(>l:802) was 16 for antithyroglobulin antibody, and 62.5% (10 patients) of which was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thirteen (65.0) of 20 patients with high titers (>l:802) for antimicrosomal antibody was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TRCH test is a simple, sensitive method, and has high reliability and reproducibility. The incidences and titers of antithyroglobulin antibody and antimicrosomal antibody are especially high in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  5. The effects of tether placement on antibody stability on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grawe, Rebecca W.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2017-06-01

    Despite their potential benefits, antibody microarrays have fallen short of performing reliably and have not found widespread use outside of the research setting. Experimental techniques have been unable to determine what is occurring on the surface of an atomic level, so molecular simulation has emerged as the primary method of investigating protein/surface interactions. Simulations of small proteins have indicated that the stability of the protein is a function of the residue on the protein where a tether is placed. The purpose of this research is to see whether these findings also apply to antibodies, with their greater size and complexity. To determine this, 24 tethering locations were selected on the antibody Protein Data Bank (PDB) ID: 1IGT. Replica exchange simulations were run on two different surfaces, one hydrophobic and one hydrophilic, to determine the degree to which these tethering sites stabilize or destabilize the antibody. Results showed that antibodies tethered to hydrophobic surfaces were in general less stable than antibodies tethered to hydrophilic surfaces. Moreover, the stability of the antibody was a function of the tether location on hydrophobic surfaces but not hydrophilic surfaces.

  6. Site-specifically radioiodinated antibody for targeting tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rea, D.W.; Ultee, M.E.; Belinka, B.A. Jr.; Coughlin, D.J.; Alvarez, V.L.

    1990-01-01

    Labeling of an antibody site specifically through its carbohydrate regions preserves its antigen-binding activity. Previously site-specific labeling studies have conjugated antibodies with metallic radioisotopes or drugs. We now report site-specific labeling with a new radioiodinated compound, 2-hydroxy-5-iodo-3-methylbenzoyl hydrazide, whose synthesis we described earlier. The compound is reacted with aldehyde groups produced by specific oxidation of the carbohydrate portion of the antibody with sodium m-periodate. Optimized conjugation conditions give good recovery of active antibody containing 10 groups per molecule. The conjugate is stable in solution for at least several weeks at both 4 and -70 degrees C. When injected into nude mice bearing LS174T human cancer xenografts, the conjugate of B72.3 antibody localizes well to tumor tissue, with low uptake by other organs. This biodistribution is similar to that of conjugate prepared by using solid-phase chloramine-T (Iodohead). There are only two significant differences. First, the carbohydrate conjugate is much less susceptible to dehalogenation, and thus shows much less thyroid uptake. Secondly, the biological half-life of the carbohydrate conjugate was about half that of the chloramine-T one. This could be due primarily to lysis of the hydrazine bond through which the antibody is attached to the compound, which would then be excreted rapidly by itself. The new reagent will be especially useful for antibodies which either cannot be labeled by chloramine-T methods, or whose activity is impaired by them

  7. Compositions, antibodies, asthma diagnosis methods, and methods for preparing antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    2017-01-17

    Methods for preparing an antibody are provided with the method including incorporating 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid into a protein to form an antigen, immunizing a mammalian host with the antigen, and recovering an antibody having an affinity for the antigen from the host. Antibodies having a binding affinity for a monohalotyrosine are provided as well as composition comprising an antibody bound with monohalotyrosine. Compositions comprising a protein having a 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid moiety are also provided. Methods for evaluating the severity of asthma are provide with the methods including analyzing sputum of a patient using an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of antibody bound to protein. Methods for determining eosinophil activity in bodily fluid are also provided with the methods including exposing bodily fluid to an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of bound antibody to determine the eosinophil activity.

  8. Applying Advances in GPM Radiometer Intercalibration and Algorithm Development to a Long-Term TRMM/GPM Global Precipitation Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, W. K.

    2016-12-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) Core Observatory, which was launched in February of 2014, provides a number of advances for satellite monitoring of precipitation including a dual-frequency radar, high frequency channels on the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), and coverage over middle and high latitudes. The GPM concept, however, is about producing unified precipitation retrievals from a constellation of microwave radiometers to provide approximately 3-hourly global sampling. This involves intercalibration of the input brightness temperatures from the constellation radiometers, development of an apriori precipitation database using observations from the state-of-the-art GPM radiometer and radars, and accounting for sensor differences in the retrieval algorithm in a physically-consistent way. Efforts by the GPM inter-satellite calibration working group, or XCAL team, and the radiometer algorithm team to create unified precipitation retrievals from the GPM radiometer constellation were fully implemented into the current version 4 GPM precipitation products. These include precipitation estimates from a total of seven conical-scanning and six cross-track scanning radiometers as well as high spatial and temporal resolution global level 3 gridded products. Work is now underway to extend this unified constellation-based approach to the combined TRMM/GPM data record starting in late 1997. The goal is to create a long-term global precipitation dataset employing these state-of-the-art calibration and retrieval algorithm approaches. This new long-term global precipitation dataset will incorporate the physics provided by the combined GPM GMI and DPR sensors into the apriori database, extend prior TRMM constellation observations to high latitudes, and expand the available TRMM precipitation data to the full constellation of available conical and cross-track scanning radiometers. This combined TRMM/GPM precipitation data record will thus provide a high-quality high

  9. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that you have a higher chance of developing thyroid disease in the future. Antithyroid microsomal antibodies may be ... PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 11. Weiss RE, Refetoff S. Thyroid function testing. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and ... Lupus Read more ...

  10. Antibodies Targeting EMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    determine their targets on the cell. The newly discovered antibodies will then be engineered for utility as new highly specific drugs and diagnostics in...are from the aldo-keto reductase family (AKRs). Remarkably, 3 of the top 10 genes with induction in the mesenchymal TES2b cells Figure 1. Amino

  11. Monoclonal antibodies in haematopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grignani, F.; Martelli, M.F.; Mason, D.Y.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains over 40 selections. Some of the titles are: Oncogene (c-myc, c-myb) amplification in acute myelogenous leukaemia; Ultrastructural characterization of leukaemic cells with monoloclonal antibodies; Origin of B-cell malignancies; Immunohistology of gut lymphomas; and Spurious evidence of lineage infidelity in monocytic leukaemia.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  13. Humanized Antibodies for Antiviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Co, Man Sung; Deschamps, Marguerite; Whitley, Richard J.; Queen, Cary

    1991-04-01

    Antibody therapy holds great promise for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disorders, and viral infections. Murine monoclonal antibodies are relatively easy to produce but are severely restricted for therapeutic use by their immunogenicity in humans. Production of human monoclonal antibodies has been problematic. Humanized antibodies can be generated by introducing the six hypervariable regions from the heavy and light chains of a murine antibody into a human framework sequence and combining it with human constant regions. We humanized, with the aid of computer modeling, two murine monoclonal antibodies against herpes simplex virus gB and gD glycoproteins. The binding, virus neutralization, and cell protection results all indicate that both humanized antibodies have retained the binding activities and the biological properties of the murine monoclonal antibodies.

  14. Development of a Two Dimensional Synthetic Aperture Radiometer at L-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, D. M.; Carver, K.; Goodberlet, M.; Popstefanija, I.; Mead, J.

    2000-01-01

    A radiometer that uses aperture synthesis in two dimensions is being built as part of research under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program. The instrument development team consists of engineers at the Goddard Space Flight Center, the University of Massachusetts and Quadrant Engineering. This will be an aircraft instrument operating at L-band which builds on the heritage of ESTAR. The choice of L-band was made because the problem of achieving adequate resolution in space is most critical at this wavelength and because a polarimetric, conical scanning airborne radiometer for future experiments to validate soil moisture and ocean salinity retrieval algorithms is not currently available. The instrument will be designed to fly on the NASA P-3 aircraft in a nadir pointing mode, although other options are possible. The antenna will consist of an array of modules arranged in a rectangular grid. Each module will be comprised of a printed circuit dual-polarized patch and integrated receiver. The distribution of modules within the rectangular array will be adjustable so that several different imaging configurations (e.g. "+","Y", "T") can be employed. The integrated receiver will provide amplification and conversion to IF. The IF signal will be routed to a processor where the required correlations performed. The I and Q channels will be created digitally and the correlations will be done digitally in this processor. The digitization will be done with sufficient bits to study the effects of quantization on radiometer performance. A computer/controller will store the data for conversion to an image and will also perform temperature control and other data interfacing and housekeeping tasks. The instrument is currently in the bread boarding phase of development. A design of the critical components has been completed and hardware is being assembled to test the individual elements. It is expected that a complete 2-channel correlator will be tested by the summer of 2000 and that the

  15. Radiometer uncertainty equation research of 2D planar scanning PMMW imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Taiyang; Xu, Jianzhong; Xiao, Zelong

    2009-07-01

    With advances in millimeter-wave technology, passive millimeter-wave (PMMW) imaging technology has received considerable concerns, and it has established itself in a wide range of military and civil practical applications, such as in the areas of remote sensing, blind landing, precision guidance and security inspection. Both the high transparency of clothing at millimeter wavelengths and the spatial resolution required to generate adequate images combine to make imaging at millimeter wavelengths a natural approach of screening people for concealed contraband detection. And at the same time, the passive operation mode does not present a safety hazard to the person who is under inspection. Based on the description to the design and engineering implementation of a W-band two-dimensional (2D) planar scanning imaging system, a series of scanning methods utilized in PMMW imaging are generally compared and analyzed, followed by a discussion on the operational principle of the mode of 2D planar scanning particularly. Furthermore, it is found that the traditional radiometer uncertainty equation, which is derived from a moving platform, does not hold under this 2D planar scanning mode due to the fact that there is no absolute connection between the scanning rates in horizontal direction and vertical direction. Consequently, an improved radiometer uncertainty equation is carried out in this paper, by means of taking the total time spent on scanning and imaging into consideration, with the purpose of solving the problem mentioned above. In addition, the related factors which affect the quality of radiometric images are further investigated under the improved radiometer uncertainty equation, and ultimately some original results are presented and analyzed to demonstrate the significance and validity of this new methodology.

  16. Aquarius L-band scatterometer and radiometer observations over a Tibetan Plateau site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; van der Velde, Rogier; Su, Zhongbo; Wen, Jun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the impact of freeze-thaw, soil moisture and vegetation on L-band backscatter and emission is studied using Aquarius scatterometer/radiometer measurements collected from August 2011 to May 2013 over the northeastern part of the Tibetan Plateau. The study area is the Maqu region that holds a regional-scale monitoring network consisting of twenty soil moisture/temperature stations, which is selected as one of the core international Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) sites for NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission. Comparisons of Aquarius scatterometer/radiometer measurements with soil moisture recorded by capacitance probes installed at a 5-cm soil depth illustrate that (i) L-band microwave observations are also sensitive to the amount of liquid water in soil below freezing point, and (ii) the sensitivity of Aquarius observations over the Maqu area dissipates above soil moisture contents of 0.3 m3 m-3. Further effects of vegetation become directly noticeable only within passive microwave observations at moisture levels larger than 0.4 m3 m-3. The impact of vegetation is studied in more detail through analysis of the Radar Vegetation Index (RVI). Although seasonal variability is captured, the dynamic range of the RVI is insufficient for a meaningful signal-to-noise. Further vegetation optical depth (τ) is estimated using the τ-ω concept by reconstructing the Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI) derived from Aquarius radiometer data. Peaks in the τ estimates are noted in the months January/February and July/August. Evidence suggests that the magnitude of τ is a measure for the frost depth when temperatures are below freezing point whereas the behavior of τ in the warm season is in line with the vegetation dynamics.

  17. Network operability of ground-based microwave radiometers: Calibration and standardization efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospichal, Bernhard; Löhnert, Ulrich; Küchler, Nils; Czekala, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) are already widely used by national weather services and research institutions all around the world. Most of the instruments operate continuously and are beginning to be implemented into data assimilation for atmospheric models. Especially their potential for continuously observing boundary-layer temperature profiles as well as integrated water vapor and cloud liquid water path makes them valuable for improving short-term weather forecasts. However until now, most MWR have been operated as stand-alone instruments. In order to benefit from a network of these instruments, standardization of calibration, operation and data format is necessary. In the frame of TOPROF (COST Action ES1303) several efforts have been undertaken, such as uncertainty and bias assessment, or calibration intercomparison campaigns. The goal was to establish protocols for providing quality controlled (QC) MWR data and their uncertainties. To this end, standardized calibration procedures for MWR have been developed and recommendations for radiometer users compiled. Based on the results of the TOPROF campaigns, a new, high-accuracy liquid-nitrogen calibration load has been introduced for MWR manufactured by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG). The new load improves the accuracy of the measurements considerably and will lead to even more reliable atmospheric observations. Next to the recommendations for set-up, calibration and operation of ground-based MWR within a future network, we will present homogenized methods to determine the accuracy of a running calibration as well as means for automatic data quality control. This sets the stage for the planned microwave calibration center at JOYCE (Jülich Observatory for Cloud Evolution), which will be shortly introduced.

  18. Total column water vapor estimation over land using radiometer data from SAC-D/Aquarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epeloa, Javier; Meza, Amalia

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study is retrieving atmospheric total column water vapor (CWV) over land surfaces using a microwave radiometer (MWR) onboard the Scientific Argentine Satellite (SAC-D/Aquarius). To research this goal, a statistical algorithm is used for the purpose of filtering the study region according to the climate type. A log-linear relationship between the brightness temperatures of the MWR and CWV obtained from Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) measurements was used. In this statistical algorithm, the retrieved CWV is derived from the Argentinian radiometer's brightness temperature which works at 23.8 GHz and 36.5 GHz, and taking into account CWVs observed from GNSS stations belonging to a region sharing the same climate type. We support this idea, having found a systematic effect when applying the algorithm; it was generated for one region using the previously mentioned criteria, however, it should be applied to additional regions, especially those with other climate types. The region we analyzed is in the Southeastern United States of America, where the climate type is Cfa (Köppen - Geiger classification); this climate type includes moist subtropical mid-latitude climates, with hot, muggy summers and frequent thunderstorms. However, MWR only contains measurements taken from over ocean surfaces; therefore the determination of water vapor over land is an important contribution to extend the use of the SAC-D/Aquarius radiometer measurements beyond the ocean surface. The CWVs computed by our algorithm are compared against radiosonde CWV observations and show a bias of about -0.6 mm, a root mean square (rms) of about 6 mm and a correlation of 0.89.

  19. Validation of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with other techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature trends has become recognized as an important indicator of climate change, because different climate forcing mechanisms exhibit distinct vertical warming and cooling patterns. For example, the cooling of the stratosphere is an indicator for climate change as it provides evidence of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing just like surface warming. Despite its importance, our understanding of the observed stratospheric temperature trend and our ability to test simulations of the stratospheric response to emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances remains limited. One of the main reason is because stratospheric long-term datasets are sparse and obtained trends differ from one another. Different techniques allow to measure stratospheric temperature profiles as radiosonde, lidar or satellite. The main advantage of microwave radiometers against these other instruments is a high temporal resolution with a reasonable good spatial resolution. Moreover, the measurement at a fixed location allows to observe local atmospheric dynamics over a long time period, which is crucial for climate research. This study presents an evaluation of the stratospheric temperature profiles from a newly ground-based microwave temperature radiometer (TEMPERA) which has been built and designed at the University of Bern. The measurements from TEMPERA are compared with the ones from other different techniques such as in-situ (radiosondes), active remote sensing (lidar) and passive remote sensing on board of Aura satellite (MLS) measurements. In addition a statistical analysis of the stratospheric temperature obtained from TEMPERA measurements during four years of data has been performed. This analysis evidenced the capability of TEMPERA radiometer to monitor the temperature in the stratosphere for a long-term. The detection of some singular sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) during the analyzed period shows the necessity of these

  20. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of proteins as very effective immunogens for the generation of antibodies is indisputable. Nevertheless, cases in which protein usage for antibody production is not feasible or convenient compelled the creation of a powerful alternative consisting of synthetic peptides. Synthetic peptides...... can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery...

  1. High-Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer for the Global Hawk Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shannon T.; Lim, Boon H.; Tanner, Alan B.; Tanabe, Jordan M.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Gaier, Todd C.; Soria, Mary M.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Denning, Richard F.; Stachnik, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Microwave imaging radiometers operating in the 50-183 GHz range for retrieving atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles from airborne platforms have been limited in the spatial scales of atmospheric structures that are resolved not because of antenna aperture size, but because of high receiver noise masking the small variations that occur on small spatial scales. Atmospheric variability on short spatial and temporal scales (second/ km scale) is completely unresolved by existing microwave profilers. The solution was to integrate JPL-designed, high-frequency, low-noise-amplifier (LNA) technology into the High-Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR), which is an airborne microwave sounding radiometer, to lower the system noise by an order of magnitude to enable the instrument to resolve atmospheric variability on small spatial and temporal scales. HAMSR has eight sounding channels near the 60-GHz oxygen line complex, ten channels near the 118.75-GHz oxygen line, and seven channels near the 183.31-GHz water vapor line. The HAMSR receiver system consists of three heterodyne spectrometers covering the three bands. The antenna system consists of two back-to-back reflectors that rotate together at a programmable scan rate via a stepper motor. A single full rotation includes the swath below the aircraft followed by observations of ambient (roughly 0 C in flight) and heated (70 C) blackbody calibration targets located at the top of the rotation. A field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is used to read the digitized radiometer counts and receive the reflector position from the scan motor encoder, which are then sent to a microprocessor and packed into data files. The microprocessor additionally reads telemetry data from 40 onboard housekeeping channels (containing instrument temperatures), and receives packets from an onboard navigation unit, which provides GPS time and position as well as independent attitude information (e.g., heading, roll, pitch, and yaw). The raw

  2. L-band Radiometer Calibration Consistency Assessment for the SMOS, SMAP, and Aquarius Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnat, Emmanuel; Le Vine, David

    2016-01-01

    Three L-band radiometers have been observing the Earth in order to retrieve soil moisture and ocean salinity. They use different instrument configurations and calibration and retrieval algorithms. In any case, the brightness temperature retrieved at the Earth surface should be consistent between all instruments. One reason for inconsistency would be the use of different approaches for the instrument calibration or the use of different models to retrieve surface brightness temperature. We report on the different approaches used for the SMOS, SMAP and Aquarius instruments and their impact on the observations consistency.

  3. A Model for Estimation of Rain Rate on Tropical Land from TRMM Microwave Imager Radiometer Observations

    OpenAIRE

    C., PRABHAKARA; R., IACOVAZZI; J. M., YOO; K. M., KIM; NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Center for Research on the Changing Earth System; EWHA Womans University; Science Systems and Applications, Inc.

    2005-01-01

    Over the tropical land regions scatter plots of the rain rate (R_), deduced from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) versus the observed 85GHz brightness temperature (T_) made by the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) radiometer, for a period of a season over a given geographic region of 3°×5°(lat×lon), indicate that there are two maxima in rain rate. One strong maximum occurs when T_ has a value of about 220K, and the other weaker one when T_ is much colder ~150K. Also these two maxima are vividly re...

  4. Construction of a radiometer for pyroelectric detector and presentation of a model for detector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, C.A. de.

    1987-01-01

    An expression has been developed for the pyroelectric voltage as a function of electric and thermal parameters of the detector. It has also been developed expressions for determination of unknown parameters from the experimentally obtained pyroelectric voltage curve as function of time and some other known information. It has also been shown figures of merit for characterization of the detectors, a study showing the detector performance dependence on each electric and thermal parameter and some illustrative experimental results. The radiometer designed and built for this work, is described. (author) [pt

  5. Polarimetric Signatures from a Crop Covered Land Surface Measured by an L-band Polarimetric Radiometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary results from field measurements of polarimetric azimuth signatures with the EMIRAD L-band polarimetric radiometer, performed over a land test site at the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique in Avignon, France. Scans of 180 degrees in azimuth were carried...... out in order to identify an eventual dependence of the Stokes vector on the look-direction. Results indicate a clear signature, for bare soil as well as for the crop-covered surface, and variations of more than 10 K are observed....

  6. Modelling of the L-band brightness temperatures measured with ELBARA III radiometer on Bubnow wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluba, Lukasz; Sagan, Joanna; Lukowski, Mateusz; Szlazak, Radoslaw; Usowicz, Boguslaw

    2017-04-01

    Microwave radiometry has become the main tool for investigating soil moisture (SM) with remote sensing methods. ESA - SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) satellite operating at L-band provides global distribution of soil moisture. An integral part of SMOS mission are calibration and validation activities involving measurements with ELBARA III which is an L-band microwave passive radiometer. It is done in order to improve soil moisture retrievals - make them more time-effective and accurate. The instrument is located at Bubnow test-site, on the border of cultivated field, fallow, meadow and natural wetland being a part of Polesie National Park (Poland). We obtain both temporal and spatial dependences of brightness temperatures for varied types of land covers with the ELBARA III directed at different azimuths. Soil moisture is retrieved from brightness temperature using L-band Microwave Emission of the Biosphere (L-MEB) model, the same as currently used radiative transfer model for SMOS. Parametrization of L-MEB, as well as input values are still under debate. We discuss the results of SM retrievals basing on data obtained during first year of the radiometer's operation. We analyze temporal dependences of retrieved SM for one-parameter (SM), two-parameter (SM, τ - optical depth) and three-parameter (SM, τ, Hr - roughness parameter) retrievals, as well as spatial dependences for specific dates. Special case of Simplified Roughness Parametrization, combining the roughness parameter and optical depth, is considered. L-MEB processing is supported by the continuous measurements of soil moisture and temperature obtained from nearby agrometeorological station, as well as studies on the soil granulometric composition of the Bubnow test-site area. Furthermore, for better estimation of optical depth, the satellite-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was employed, supported by measured in situ vegetation parameters (such as Leaf Area Index and Vegetation

  7. Sentinel-3 MWR Microwave Radiometer – Our contribution to the success of the Copernicus programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Palacios

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The MWR builds, together with the SRAL altimeter, the S3 topography mission. The MWR, developed by EADS CASA Espacio as prime contractor, provides information for tropospheric path correction of SRAL measurements. MWR data can also be used for determining surface emissivity and soil moisture over land, surface energy budget investigations and ice characterization. The MWR instrument is a Noise Injection Radiometer (NIR, working at two frequencies (23.8/36.5 GHz, embarking a dual frequency horn antenna pointing to the cold sky for embedded autonomous calibration.

  8. Preliminary Design of the Brazilian's National Institute for Space Research Broadband Radiometer for Solar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni, L. A.; Vieira, L. E. A.; Savonov, G. S.; Dal Lago, A.; Mendes, O.; Silva, M. R.; Guarnieri, F.; Sampaio, M.; Barbosa, M. J.; Vilas Boas, J. V.; Branco, R. H. F.; Nishimori, M.; Silva, L. A.; Carlesso, F.; Rodríguez Gómez, J. M.; Alves, L. R.; Vaz Castilho, B.; Santos, J.; Silva Paula, A.; Cardoso, F.

    2017-10-01

    The Total Solar Irradiance (TSI), which is the total radiation arriving at Earth's atmosphere from the Sun, is one of the most important forcing of the Earths climate. Measurements of the TSI have been made employing instruments on board several space-based platforms during the last four solar cycles. However, combining these measurements is still challenging due to the degradation of the sensor elements and the long-term stability of the electronics. Here we describe the preliminary efforts to design an absolute radiometer based on the principle of electrical substitution that is under development at Brazilian's National Institute for Space Research (INPE).

  9. Dual-Polarization, Multi-Frequency Antenna Array for use with Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, John

    2013-01-01

    Advancements in common aperture antenna technology were employed to utilize its proprietary genetic algorithmbased modeling tools in an effort to develop, build, and test a dual-polarization array for Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) applications. Final program results demonstrate the ability to achieve a lightweight, thin, higher-gain aperture that covers the desired spectral band. NASA employs various passive microwave and millimeter-wave instruments, such as spectral radiometers, for a range of remote sensing applications, from measurements of the Earth's surface and atmosphere, to cosmic background emission. These instruments such as the HIRAD, SFMR (Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer), and LRR (Lightweight Rainfall Radiometer), provide unique data accumulation capabilities for observing sea surface wind, temperature, and rainfall, and significantly enhance the understanding and predictability of hurricane intensity. These microwave instruments require extremely efficient wideband or multiband antennas in order to conserve space on the airborne platform. In addition, the thickness and weight of the antenna arrays is of paramount importance in reducing platform drag, permitting greater time on station. Current sensors are often heavy, single- polarization, or limited in frequency coverage. The ideal wideband antenna will have reduced size, weight, and profile (a conformal construct) without sacrificing optimum performance. The technology applied to this new HIRAD array will allow NASA, NOAA, and other users to gather information related to hurricanes and other tropical storms more cost effectively without sacrificing sensor performance or the aircraft time on station. The results of the initial analysis and numerical design indicated strong potential for an antenna array that would satisfy all of the design requirements for a replacement HIRAD array. Multiple common aperture antenna methodologies were employed to achieve exceptional gain over the entire

  10. Validation of multi-channel scanning microwave radiometer onboard OCEANSAT - 1

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.; Pankajakshan, T.; Harikrishnan, M.

    • ~ '. :.0- Proceedings ofCOT03, International Conference on Coastal and Ocean Technology, pp. 439-443 VALIDATION OF MULTI-CHANNEL SCANNING MICROWAVE RADIOMETER ONBOARD OCEANSAT - 1. P.M.Muraleedharan and T. Pankajakshan National Institute ofOceanography, Goa.... The 150 km grid is nearest in size to the spatial resolution of the 6.6 GHz channels. All the other frequency (and polarization) channels are generated in this grid (largest grid size). Hence this grid contains the geophysical data retrieved by. making use...

  11. Remote Sensing of the Earth s Atmosphere by the Spaceborne Occultation Radiometer, ORA: Final Inversion Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussen, Didier; Vanhellemont, Filip; Bingen, Christine

    2001-02-01

    We describe the final inversion algorithm developed to process solar occultation data measured in 1992 -1993 by the Occultation Radiometer (ORA) spaceborne experiment. First we develop a new method to improve the ORA total extinction altitude profiles retrieved with the previously described Natural Orthogonal Polynomial Expansion (NOPE) method. Using these improved profiles, we perform spectral inversion and obtain altitude density profiles for O3 and NO2 and extinction profiles for the aerosols. Validation of number density profiles between the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) and the ORA shows satisfactory agreement.

  12. Remote Sensing of the Earth 's Atmosphere by the Spaceborne Occultation Radiometer, ORA: Final Inversion Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussen, D; Vanhellemont, F; Bingen, C

    2001-02-20

    We describe the final inversion algorithm developed to process solar occultation data measured in 1992-1993 by the Occultation Radiometer (ORA) spaceborne experiment. First we develop a new method to improve the ORA total extinction altitude profiles retrieved with the previously described Natural Orthogonal Polynomial Expansion (NOPE) method. Using these improved profiles, we perform spectral inversion and obtain altitude density profiles for O(3) and NO(2) and extinction profiles for the aerosols. Validation of number density profiles between the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) and the ORA shows satisfactory agreement.

  13. Multichannel heterodyne radiometers with fast-scanning backward-wave oscillators for ECE measurement on HT-7 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.Y.; Poznyak, V.I.; Ploskirev, G.; Kalupin, D.; Wan, Y.X.; Xie, J.K.; Luo, J.R.; Li, J.G.; Gao, X.; Wan, B.N.; Zhang, X.D.; Wang, K.J.; Kuang, G.L.

    2001-01-01

    Two sets of fast-scanning heterodyne radiometer receiver systems employing backward-wave oscillators (BWOs) in 78-118 and 118-178 GHz were developed and installed for electron cyclotron emission (ECE) measurements on HT-7 superconducting tokamak. The double sideband (DSB) radiometer in 78-118 GHz measures 16 ECE frequency points with a scanning time period of 0.65 ms. The other radiometer in 118-178 GHz consists of one independent channel of DSB heterodyne receiver with intermediate frequency (IF) of 100-500 MHz and two channels of single sideband (SSB) heterodyne receiver that are sensitive to upper sideband and lower sideband individually; the IF frequency of the SSB channels are 1.5 GHz around the local oscillator frequencies with 1 GHz bandwidth. By employing a novel design, this unique radiometer measures 3 ECE frequency points at each of the 16 local oscillator frequency points in 118-178 GHz, and the full band can be swept in 0.65 ms period, thus the radiometer measures 48 ECE frequency points in 0.65 ms in principle. Each of the local oscillators' frequency points can be preset by program to meet specific physics interests. Horizontal view of ECE was installed to measure electron temperature profiles; vertically viewing optics along a perpendicular chord was also installed to study nonthermal ECE spectra. Preliminary measurement results were presented during ohmic and pellet injection plasmas

  14. MERITXELL: The Multifrequency Experimental Radiometer with Interference Tracking for Experiments over Land and Littoral-Instrument Description, Calibration and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querol, Jorge; Tarongí, José Miguel; Forte, Giuseppe; Gómez, José Javier; Camps, Adriano

    2017-05-10

    MERITXELL is a ground-based multisensor instrument that includes a multiband dual-polarization radiometer, a GNSS reflectometer, and several optical sensors. Its main goals are twofold: to test data fusion techniques, and to develop Radio-Frequency Interference (RFI) detection, localization and mitigation techniques. The former is necessary to retrieve complementary data useful to develop geophysical models with improved accuracy, whereas the latter aims at solving one of the most important problems of microwave radiometry. This paper describes the hardware design, the instrument control architecture, the calibration of the radiometer, and several captures of RFI signals taken with MERITXELL in urban environment. The multiband radiometer has a dual linear polarization total-power radiometer topology, and it covers the L-, S-, C-, X-, K-, Ka-, and W-band. Its back-end stage is based on a spectrum analyzer structure which allows to perform real-time signal processing, while the rest of the sensors are controlled by a host computer where the off-line processing takes place. The calibration of the radiometer is performed using the hot-cold load procedure, together with the tipping curves technique in the case of the five upper frequency bands. Finally, some captures of RFI signals are shown for most of the radiometric bands under analysis, which evidence the problem of RFI in microwave radiometry, and the limitations they impose in external calibration.

  15. Development of the Microwave Radiometer Technology Acceleration (MiRaTA) CubeSat for all-weather atmospheric sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoy, K.; Blackwell, W. J.; Marinan, A.; Bishop, R. L.; Leslie, V. V.; Shields, M.; Marlow, W.; Kennedy, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Microwave Radiometer Technology Acceleration (MiRaTA) is a 3U CubeSat mission sponsored by the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO). The science payload on MiRaTA consists of a tri-band microwave radiometer and GPS radio occultation (GPSRO) experiment. The microwave radiometer takes measurements of allweather temperature (V-band, 52-58 GHz), water vapor, and cloud ice (G-band, 175-191 & 207 GHz) to provide key contributions toward improved weather forecasting. The GPSRO experiment, called the Compact TEC (Total Electron Count)/Atmosphere GPS Sensor (CTAGS) measures profiles of temperature and pressure in the upper neutral atmosphere and electron density in the ionosphere. The MiRaTA mission will validate new technologies in both passive microwave radiometry and GPS radio occultation: (1) new ultra-compact and low-power technology for multi-channel and multi-band passive microwave radiometers, and (2) new GPS receiver and patch antenna array technology for both neutral atmosphere and ionospheric GPS radio occultation retrieval on a nanosatellite. In addition, MiRaTA will test (3) a new approach to spaceborne microwave radiometer calibration using adjacent GPSRO measurements.

  16. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.D. Zegers (Netty)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSynthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps

  17. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps that lead to the

  18. Variable Domain N-Linked Glycans Acquired During Antigen-Specific Immune Responses Can Contribute to Immunoglobulin G Antibody Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleur S. van de Bovenkamp

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin G (IgG can contain N-linked glycans in the variable domains, the so-called Fab glycans, in addition to the Fc glycans in the CH2 domains. These Fab glycans are acquired following introduction of N-glycosylation sites during somatic hypermutation and contribute to antibody diversification. We investigated whether Fab glycans may—in addition to affecting antigen binding—contribute to antibody stability. By analyzing thermal unfolding profiles of antibodies with or without Fab glycans, we demonstrate that introduction of Fab glycans can improve antibody stability. Strikingly, removal of Fab glycans naturally acquired during antigen-specific immune responses can deteriorate antibody stability, suggesting in vivo selection of stable, glycosylated antibodies. Collectively, our data show that variable domain N-linked glycans acquired during somatic hypermutation can contribute to IgG antibody stability. These findings indicate that introducing Fab glycans may represent a mechanism to improve therapeutic/diagnostic antibody stability.

  19. Replacing antibodies with modified DNA aptamers in vaccine potency assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trausch, Jeremiah J; Shank-Retzlaff, Mary; Verch, Thorsten

    2017-10-04

    Vaccine in vitro potency assays are vital regulatory tests that are used to confirm the presence and concentration of an antigen of interest in a form that directly or indirectly relates to protective activity in patients. Current assays come in many forms, but they almost exclusively use antibody reagents for selective detection of the target antigen. Antibodies provide specific recognition of vaccine antigens but also exhibit drawbacks such as stability limitations, cost, and lot-to-lot variation, which can make it challenging to maintain the reagent throughout the lifetime of the vaccine. We explored replacing antibodies with aptamers. Aptamers are macromolecules, such as nucleic acids, which can bind to their targets with high specificity and affinity, similar to that of antibodies. Some of the advantages of using aptamers over antibodies is that aptamers can be more stable, smaller, less expensive to produce, synthesized in vitro, and logistically easier to supply throughout the multi-decade lifespan of a commercial vaccine. We created modified DNA aptamers against the common vaccine carrier protein, CRM 197 . Several aptamers were discovered and one was chosen for further characterization. The binding kinetics of the aptamer revealed an off-rate 16-fold slower than anti-CRM 197 antibodies used for comparison. The aptamers were more sensitive than available antibodies in some assay formats and comparable in others. The aptamer epitope was mapped to the receptor-binding domain of CRM 197 , a site adjacent to a known antibody binding site. These data address some key aspects for a path forward in replacing antibodies with aptamers for use as critical reagents in vaccine assays. We further highlight the possibility of using nucleic acid reagents to develop next generation potency assays. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Diversity Against Adversity: How Adaptive Immune System Evolves Potent Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Muyoung; Zeldovich, Konstantin B.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2011-07-01

    Adaptive immunity is an amazing mechanism, whereby new protein functions—affinity of antibodies (Immunoglobulins) to new antigens—evolve through mutation and selection in a matter of a few days. Despite numerous experimental studies, the fundamental physical principles underlying immune response are still poorly understood. In considerable departure from past approaches, here, we propose a microscopic multiscale model of adaptive immune response, which consists of three essential players: The host cells, viruses, and B-cells in Germinal Centers (GC). Each moiety carries a genome, which encodes proteins whose stability and interactions are determined from their sequences using laws of Statistical Mechanics, providing an exact relationship between genomic sequences and strength of interactions between pathogens and antibodies and antibodies and host proteins (autoimmunity). We find that evolution of potent antibodies (the process known as Affinity Maturation (AM)) is a delicate balancing act, which has to reconcile the conflicting requirements of protein stability, lack of autoimmunity, and high affinity of antibodies to incoming antigens. This becomes possible only when antibody producing B cells elevate their mutation rates (process known as Somatic Hypermutation (SHM)) to fall into a certain range—not too low to find potency increasing mutations but not too high to destroy stable Immunoglobulins and/or already achieved affinity. Potent antibodies develop through clonal expansion of initial B cells expressing marginally potent antibodies followed by their subsequent affinity maturation through mutation and selection. As a result, in each GC the population of mature potent Immunoglobulins is monoclonal being ancestors of a single cell from initial (germline) pool. We developed a simple analytical theory, which provides further rationale to our findings. The model and theory reveal the molecular factors that determine the efficiency of affinity maturation

  1. Magnetic Purification of Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadge, Vijaykumar Laxman

    This work aimed at the development of magnetic nanoparticles for antibody purification and at the evaluation of their performance in Magnetic fishing and in a newly developed hybrid technology Magnetic Aqueous Two Phase Systems. Magnetic materials were produced by coprecipitation and solvothermal approaches. Natural polymers such as dextran, extracellular polysaccharide and gum Arabic were employed for coating of iron oxide magnetic supports. Polymer coated magnetic supports were then modified with synthetic antibody specific ligands,namely boronic acid, a triazine ligand (named 22/8) and an Ugi ligand (named A2C7I1). To optimize the efficacy of magnetic nanoparticles for antibody magnetic fishing, various solutions of pure and crude antibody solutions along with BSA as a non-specific binding protein were tested. The selectivity of magnetic nanoparticle for antibody, IgG, was found effective with boronic acid and ligand 22/8. Magnetic supports were then studied for their performance in high gradient magnetic separator for effective separation capability as well as higher volume handling capability. The magnetic materials were also supplemented to aqueous two phase systems, devising a new purification technology. For this purpose, magnetic particles modified with boronic acid were more effective. This alternative strategy reduced the time of operation,maximized separation capability (yield and purity), while reducing the amount of salt required. Boronic acid coated magnetic particles bound 170 +/- 10 mg hIgG/g MP and eluted 160 +/- 5 mg hIgG/g MP, while binding only 15 +/- 5 mg BSA/g MP. The affinity constant for the interaction between hIgG and APBA_MP was estimated as 4.9 x 105 M-1 (Ka) with a theoretical maximum capacity of 492 mg hIgG adsorbed/g MP (Qmax). APBA_MPs were also tested for antibody purification directly from CHO cell supernatants. The particles were able to bind 98% of IgG loaded and to recover 95% of pure IgG (purity greater than 98%) at extremely

  2. Antibody purification using affinity chromatography: a case study with a monoclonal antibody to ractopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhanhui; Liang, Qi; Wen, Kai; Zhang, Suxia; Shen, Jianzhong

    2014-11-15

    The application of antibodies to small molecules in the field of bioanalytics requires antibodies with stable biological activity and high purity; thus, there is a growing interest in developing rapid, inexpensive and effective procedures to obtain such antibodies. In this work, a ractopamine (RAC) derivative, N-4-aminobutyl ractopamine (ABR), was synthesized for preparing new specific affinity chromatography to purify a murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) against RAC from ascites. The performance of the new specific chromatography was compared with four other purification methods in terms of recovery, purity and biological activity of mAb. These four purification methods were prepared by using specific ligands (RAC and RAC-ovalbumin) and commercial ligands (protein G and protein A), respectively. The results showed that the highest recovery (88.1%) was achieved using the new chromatography; in comparison, the recoveries from the other methods were all below 70%. The purity of the mAbs from the new chromatography was 88.3%, while, the highest purity of 97.6% was from protein G chromatography and the lowest purity of 84.7% was from protein A chromatography. The biological activity of the purified mAb from all of the chromatography methods was comparable in enzyme-linked immunosorbent immunoassay (ELISA). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficacy and Safety of Bococizumab (RN316/PF-04950615), a Monoclonal Antibody Against Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin Type 9, in Hypercholesterolemic Japanese Subjects Receiving a Stable Dose of Atorvastatin or Treatment-Naive - Results From a Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Dose-Ranging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokote, Koutaro; Kanada, Shigeto; Matsuoka, Osamu; Sekino, Hisakuni; Imai, Keiji; Tabira, Junichi; Matsuoka, Nobushige; Chaudhuri, Sandip; Teramoto, Tamio

    2017-09-25

    A Phase 2, dose-ranging study of bococizumab, a monoclonal anti-proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 antibody, was conducted in Japanese subjects to assess its efficacy, safety, and tolerability in this population.Methods and Results:Two different hypercholesterolemic study populations were enrolled concurrently: Japanese subjects with uncontrolled low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) despite atorvastatin treatment (LDL-C ≥100 mg/dL; n=121), and Japanese subjects naive to lipid-lowering agents and with LDL-C ≥130 mg/dL (n=97). Subjects within each study population were randomized to bococizumab 50, 100, or 150 mg, or placebo, q14D for 16 weeks; an open-label ezetimibe 10 mg daily arm was also included for the atorvastatin-treated population. Significant, dose-dependent reductions in fasting LDL-C levels were observed in all bococizumab arms of both study populations at Weeks 12 and 16 (adjusted mean percent changes from baseline: 54.1-76.7% for atorvastatin-treated subjects and 47.7-66.8% for treatment-naive subjects; P<0.001 vs. placebo for all). Bococizumab also caused dose-dependent changes in other lipid parameters in both study populations at Weeks 12 and 16. No serious adverse events (AEs) related to bococizumab treatment occurred and all treatment-emergent AEs were mild or moderate in severity. No dose-dependent relationship between bococizumab treatment and development of anti-drug antibodies was observed. Bococizumab was well tolerated and significantly reduced fasting LDL-C in atorvastatin-treated and treatment-naive hypercholesterolemic Japanese subjects. (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT02055976.).

  4. Comparison of Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Patients With Progressive and Stable Vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanpanah, Mohammad Javad; Seyedi Noghabi, Seyed Ali; Taghavi, Morteza; Afzal Aghaee, Monavar; Zabolinejad, Naghmeh

    2016-01-01

    Activity of vitiligo has not been considered as a patient selection criteria in previous studies; we decided to compare the presence of elevated thyroid auto-antibodies in patients with progressive and stable vitiligo. Seventy-two patients with vitiligo were examined for thyroid problems and were divided into 2 groups of stable and progressive vitiligo according to their history and physical examination. Anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies (anti-TPO antibodies), thyroxine (T4), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were assessed for all patients. Elevated levels of anti-TPO antibodies were observed in 43.7% of the patients with stable vitiligo and in 37.5% of patients with progressive vitiligo, which was not statistically significant (P = .315). This study not only confirmed thyroid dysfunction in patients with vitiligo but also showed that there was no difference in thyroid dysfunction and anti-TPO antibody levels in the subgroups of patients with stable or progressive vitiligo. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Clinical use of antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Hoer, Gustav; Cox, P.H.; Buraggi, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    Use of monoclonal antibodies as tumour specific carrier molecules for therapeutic agents or as in vivo diagnostic reagents when labelled with radionuclides or NMR signal enhancers is attracting more and more attention. The potential is enormous but the technical problems are also considerable requiring the concerted action of many different scientific disciplines. This volume is based upon a symposium organised in Frankfurt in 1990 under the auspices of the European Association of Nuclear Medicines' Specialist Task Groups on Cardiology and the Utility of Labelled Antibodies. It gives a multidisciplinary review of the state of the art and of problems to be solved as well as recording the not inconsiderable successes which have been booked to date. The book will be of value as a reference to both clinicians and research scientists. refs.; figs.; tabs

  6. Island based radar and microwave radiometer measurements of stratus cloud parameters during the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisch, A.S. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Fairall, C.W.; Snider, J.B. [NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States); Lenshow, D.H.; Mayer, S.D. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, simultaneous measurements were made with a vertically pointing cloud sensing radar and a microwave radiometer. The radar measurements are used to estimate stratus cloud drizzle and turbulence parameters. In addition, with the microwave radiometer measurements of reflectivity, we estimated the profiles of cloud liquid water and effective radius. We used radar data for computation of vertical profiles of various drizzle parameters such as droplet concentration, modal radius, and spread. A sample of these results is shown in Figure 1. In addition, in non-drizzle clouds, with the radar and radiometer we can estimate the verticle profiles of stratus cloud parameters such as liquid water concentration and effective radius. This is accomplished by assuming a droplet distribution with droplet number concentration and width constant with height.

  7. Inference of sea surface temperature, near surface wind, and atmospheric water by Fourier analysis of Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer measures thermal microwave emission from the earth in both polarizations at wavelengths of 0.8, 1.4, 1.7, 2.8 and 4.6 cm. Similar instruments were launched on Nimbus 7 and Seasat. Both spatial resolution on the earth and relative sensitivity to different geophysical parameters change with wavelength. Therefore, spatial Fourier components of geophysical parameters are inferred from the corresponding Fourier components of the radiometer measurements, taking into account the different dependence of signal-to-noise ratio on spatial frequency for each radiometer wavelength. The geophysical parameters are sea surface temperature, near-surface wind speed, integrated water vapor mass, integrated liquid water mass, and the product of rainfall rate with height of the rain layer. The capabilities and limitations of the inversion method are illustrated by means of data from the North Atlantic and from tropical storms.

  8. Dynamical attraction to stable processes

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Albert M.; Talet, Marina

    2012-01-01

    We apply dynamical ideas within probability theory, proving an almost-sure invariance principle in log density for stable processes. The familiar scaling property (self-similarity) of the stable process has a stronger expression, that the scaling flow on Skorokhod path space is a Bernoulli flow. We prove that typical paths of a random walk with i.i.d. increments in the domain of attraction of a stable law can be paired with paths of a stable process so that, after applying a non-random regula...

  9. The Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS) for the BepiColombo mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesinger, H.; Helbert, J.; Mertis Co-I Team

    2010-01-01

    Scheduled for launch on board the BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) in 2014, the Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS) is an innovative instrument for studying the surface composition and mineralogy of planet Mercury. MERTIS combines an uncooled grating push broom IR-spectrometer (TIS) with a radiometer (TIR), which will operate in the wavelength region of 7-14 and 7-40 μm, respectively. The spatial resolution of the MERTIS observations will be about 500 m globally and better than 500 m for approximately 5-10% of the surface. The thermal infrared range offers unique diagnostic capabilities to study the surface composition of Mercury. In particular, feldspars can easily be detected and characterized, because they show several diagnostic spectral signatures in the 7-14 μm range: the Christiansen feature, reststrahlen bands, and the transparency feature. In addition, MERTIS will allow the identification and mapping of elemental sulfur, pyroxenes, olivines, and other complex minerals. The scientific objectives of MERTIS include: (1) characterization of Mercury's surface composition, (2) identification of rock-forming minerals, (3) mapping of the surface mineralogy, and (4) study of surface temperature variations and the thermal inertia. In preparation for the MERTIS data interpretation, we are performing spectral measurements of appropriate analogue materials in the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory (PEL) and are building a spectral library (Berlin Emissivity Database (BED)) of these materials for a variety of grain sizes.

  10. Development of electronics and data acquisition system for independent calibration of electron cyclotron emission radiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Praveena, E-mail: praveena@ipr.res.in; Raulji, Vismaysinh; Mandaliya, Hitesh; Patel, Jignesh; Siju, Varsha; Pathak, S.K.; Rajpal, Rachana; Jha, R.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Indigenous development of an electronics and data acquisition system to digitize signals for a desired time and automatization of calibration process. • 16 bit DAQ board with form factor of 90 × 89 mm. • VHDL Codes written for generating control signals for PC104 Bus, ADC and RAM. • Averaging process is done in two ways single point averaging and additive averaging. - Abstract: Signal conditioning units (SCU) along with Multichannel Data acquisition system (DAS) are developed and installed for automatization and frequent requirement of absolute calibration of ECE radiometer system. The DAS is an indigenously developed economical system which is based on Single Board Computer (SBC). The onboard RAM memory of 64 K for each channel enables the DAS for simultaneous and continuous acquisition. A Labview based graphical user interface provides commands locally or remotely to acquire, process, plot and finally save the data in binary format. The microscopic signals received from radiometer are strengthened, filtered by SCU and acquired through DAS for the set time and at set sampling frequency. Stored data are processed and analyzed offline with Labview utility. The calibration process has been performed for two hours continuously at different sampling frequency (100 Hz to 1 KHz) at two set of temperature like hot body and the room temperature. The detailed hardware and software design and testing results are explained in the paper.

  11. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) Wind Speed Retrievals and Assessment Using Dropsondes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; Biswas, Sayak K.

    2018-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is an experimental C-band passive microwave radiometer designed to map the horizontal structure of surface wind speed fields in hurricanes. New data processing and customized retrieval approaches were developed after the 2015 Tropical Cyclone Intensity (TCI) experiment, which featured flights over Hurricanes Patricia, Joaquin, Marty, and the remnants of Tropical Storm Erika. These new approaches produced maps of surface wind speed that looked more realistic than those from previous campaigns. Dropsondes from the High Definition Sounding System (HDSS) that was flown with HIRAD on a WB-57 high altitude aircraft in TCI were used to assess the quality of the HIRAD wind speed retrievals. The root mean square difference between HIRAD-retrieved surface wind speeds and dropsonde-estimated surface wind speeds was 6.0 meters per second. The largest differences between HIRAD and dropsonde winds were from data points where storm motion during dropsonde descent compromised the validity of the comparisons. Accounting for this and for uncertainty in the dropsonde measurements themselves, we estimate the root mean square error for the HIRAD retrievals as around 4.7 meters per second. Prior to the 2015 TCI experiment, HIRAD had previously flown on the WB-57 for missions across Hurricanes Gonzalo (2014), Earl (2010), and Karl (2010). Configuration of the instrument was not identical to the 2015 flights, but the methods devised after the 2015 flights may be applied to that previous data in an attempt to improve retrievals from those cases.

  12. Microwave Radiometers for Fire Detection in Trains: Theory and Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Alimenti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the theory of fire detection in moving vehicles by microwave radiometers. The system analysis is discussed and a feasibility study is illustrated on the basis of two implementation hypotheses. The basic idea is to have a fixed radiometer and to look inside the glass windows of the wagon when it passes in front of the instrument antenna. The proposed sensor uses a three-pixel multi-beam configuration that allows an image to be formed by the movement of the train itself. Each pixel is constituted by a direct amplification microwave receiver operating at 31.4 GHz. At this frequency, the antenna can be a 34 cm offset parabolic dish, whereas a 1 K brightness temperature resolution is achievable with an overall system noise figure of 6 dB, an observation bandwidth of 2 GHz and an integration time of 1 ms. The effect of the detector noise is also investigated and several implementation hypotheses are discussed. The presented study is important since it could be applied to the automatic fire alarm in trains and moving vehicles with dielectric wall/windows.

  13. Results from the Fourth WMO Filter Radiometer Comparison for aerosol optical depth measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazadzis, Stelios; Kouremeti, Natalia; Diémoz, Henri; Gröbner, Julian; Forgan, Bruce W.; Campanelli, Monica; Estellés, Victor; Lantz, Kathleen; Michalsky, Joseph; Carlund, Thomas; Cuevas, Emilio; Toledano, Carlos; Becker, Ralf; Nyeki, Stephan; Kosmopoulos, Panagiotis G.; Tatsiankou, Viktar; Vuilleumier, Laurent; Denn, Frederick M.; Ohkawara, Nozomu; Ijima, Osamu; Goloub, Philippe; Raptis, Panagiotis I.; Milner, Michael; Behrens, Klaus; Barreto, Africa; Martucci, Giovanni; Hall, Emiel; Wendell, James; Fabbri, Bryan E.; Wehrli, Christoph

    2018-03-01

    This study presents the results of the Fourth Filter Radiometer Comparison that was held in Davos, Switzerland, between 28 September and 16 October 2015. Thirty filter radiometers and spectroradiometers from 12 countries participated including reference instruments from global aerosol networks. The absolute differences of all instruments compared to the reference have been based on the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) criterion defined as follows: 95% of the measured data has to be within 0.005 ± 0.001/m (where m is the air mass). At least 24 out of 29 instruments achieved this goal at both 500 and 865 nm, while 12 out of 17 and 13 out of 21 achieved this at 368 and 412 nm, respectively. While searching for sources of differences among different instruments, it was found that all individual differences linked to Rayleigh, NO2, ozone, water vapor calculations and related optical depths and air mass calculations were smaller than 0.01 in aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 and 865 nm. Different cloud-detecting algorithms used have been compared. Ångström exponent calculations showed relatively large differences among different instruments, partly because of the high calculation uncertainty of this parameter in low AOD conditions. The overall low deviations of these AOD results and the high accuracy of reference aerosol network instruments demonstrated a promising framework to achieve homogeneity, compatibility and harmonization among the different spectral AOD networks in the near future.

  14. Thermal image study of detecting near-underground structures by means of infrared radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yoshizo; Fan, Zuofen; Liu, Chanliang; Inagaki, Terumi

    1995-03-01

    An infrared radiometer is used to detect several flaws of industrial structural elements, as one remote sensing device. The thermal image method (TIM) was carried out to analyze location and dimension of the internal flaws of mechanical components, like piping, vessel, slab and pile. Internal flaws were detected by visualizing abnormal behavior of radiation temperature distribution of the tested surface by solar and artificial heat injection. The induced nonuniform temperature shows the existence of the internal flaws imaged on the CRT display of the infrared radiometer. As one application subject, the TIM method was extensively applied to near-underground buried materials of ancient remains; such as corner stone, stone settlement, shell mound, and tomb. The paper represents basic experimental and analytical results of preliminary and demonstration model tests of the buried materials in the soil and rock by solar, direct, and indirect combustion heaters. After continuous irradiation heating, we measured and recorded transient radiation temperature distribution of the tested ground surface which inserts the model near-underground tests plates of stylene, concrete, stone and gravel, changing width and depth of the test plates. Nonuniform and discontinuous temperature distribution of the tested surface above the inserted plates shows the existence of near- underground buried materials. Furthermore, transient temperature and heat flow behavior was numerically analyzed by solving a transient two-dimensional heat-balance equation. Calculation results were quite useful to analyze the experimental heat flow behavior around the buried object.

  15. Several advanced microwave scanning radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) environmental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobl, Elena; Spencer, Roy

    2006-12-01

    The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) is a conically scanning, dual-polarization, total power microwave radiometer flying on NASA's Aqua satellite. It has been taking global observations for more than four years. The instrument was provided by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA, and it was built by Mitsubishi Electric Company. AMSR-E data provide information on the state of various hydrologic parameters in the atmosphere and on the Earth's surface. AMSR-E measures dual linearly polarized radiation (horizontal and vertical polarizations) at frequencies of 6.9, 10.7, 18.7, 36.5, and 89 GHz. These frequencies have diverse amounts of influence from a wide variety of lower atmospheric and surface variables. Examples of environmental results obtained from AMSR-E data are included. One of the most important new capabilities is global SST observations through clouds, including observations of the cold wakes behind hurricanes. The cold wake behind hurricane Katrina will be shown. A monthly, global soil moisture percentage map was developed from the AMSR-E retrievals, and as an additional benefit maps showing large RFI sources have been compiled. Maps of the snow water equivalent (SWE) and detailed maps of the Arctic sea ice will be shown.

  16. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer Wind Speed and Rain Rate Retrievals during the 2010 GRIP Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahawneh, Saleem; Farrar, Spencer; Johnson, James; Jones, W. Linwood; Roberts, Jason; Biswas, Sayak; Cecil, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing observations of hurricanes, from NOAA and USAF hurricane surveillance aircraft, provide vital data for hurricane research and operations, for forecasting the intensity and track of tropical storms. The current operational standard for hurricane wind speed and rain rate measurements is the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which is a nadir viewing passive microwave airborne remote sensor. The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer, HIRAD, will extend the nadir viewing SFMR capability to provide wide swath images of wind speed and rain rate, while flying on a high altitude aircraft. HIRAD was first flown in the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes, GRIP, NASA hurricane field experiment in 2010. This paper reports on geophysical retrieval results and provides hurricane images from GRIP flights. An overview of the HIRAD instrument and the radiative transfer theory based, wind speed/rain rate retrieval algorithm is included. Results are presented for hurricane wind speed and rain rate for Earl and Karl, with comparison to collocated SFMR retrievals and WP3D Fuselage Radar images for validation purposes.

  17. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column.

  18. Assessment of Radiometer Calibration with GPS Radio Occultation for the MiRaTA CubeSat Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinan, Anne D; Cahoy, Kerri L; Bishop, Rebecca L; Lui, Susan S; Bardeen, James R; Mulligan, Tamitha; Blackwell, William J; Leslie, R Vincent; Osaretin, Idahosa; Shields, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The Microwave Radiometer Technology Acceleration (MiRaTA) is a 3U CubeSat mission sponsored by the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO). The science payload on MiRaTA consists of a tri-band microwave radiometer and Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (GPSRO) sensor. The microwave radiometer takes measurements of all-weather temperature (V-band, 50-57 GHz), water vapor (G-band, 175-191 GHz), and cloud ice (G-band, 205 GHz) to provide observations used to improve weather forecasting. The Aerospace Corporation's GPSRO experiment, called the Compact TEC (Total Electron Content) and Atmospheric GPS Sensor (CTAGS), measures profiles of temperature and pressure in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (∼20 km) and electron density in the ionosphere (over 100 km). The MiRaTA mission will validate new technologies in both passive microwave radiometry and GPS radio occultation: (1) new ultra-compact and low-power technology for multi-channel and multi-band passive microwave radiometers, (2) the application of a commercial off the shelf (COTS) GPS receiver and custom patch antenna array technology to obtain neutral atmospheric GPSRO retrieval from a nanosatellite, and (3) a new approach to spaceborne microwave radiometer calibration using adjacent GPSRO measurements. In this paper, we focus on objective (3), developing operational models to meet a mission goal of 100 concurrent radiometer and GPSRO measurements, and estimating the temperature measurement precision for the CTAGS instrument based on thermal noise. Based on an analysis of thermal noise of the CTAGS instrument, the expected temperature retrieval precision is between 0.17 K and 1.4 K, which supports the improvement of radiometric calibration to 0.25 K.

  19. SU-E-I-14: Comparison of Iodine-Labeled and Indium-Labeled Antibody Biodistributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, L [Retired from City of Hope Medical Center, Arcadia, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is often assumed that animal biodistributions of novel proteins are not dependent upon the radiolabel used in their determination. In units of percent injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g), organ uptake results (u) may be obtained using either iodine or metal as radioactive labels. Iodination is preferred as it is a one-step process whereas metal labeling requires two chemical procedures and therefore more protein material. It is important to test whether the radioactive tag leads to variation in the uptake value. Methods: Uptakes of 3antibodies to Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) were evaluated in a nude mouse model bearing 150 to 300 mg LS174T human colon cancer xenografts. Antibodies included diabody (56 kDa), minibody (80kDa) and intact M5A (150 kDa) anti-CEA cognates. Both radioiodine and indium-111 labels were used with uptakes evaluated at 7 time(t) points out to 96 h. Ratios (R) of u(iodine-label)/u(indium-label) were determined for liver, spleen, kidneys, lung and tumor. Results: Hepatic loss was rapid for diabody and minibody; by 24 h their R values were only 2%; i.e., uptake of iodine was 2% of that of indium for these 2 antibodies. By contrast, R for the intact cognate was 50% at that time point. Splenic results were similar. Tumor uptake ratios did not depend upon the antibody type and were 50% at 24 h. Conclusions: Relatively rapid loss of iodine relative to indium in liver and spleen was observed in lower mass antibodies. Tumor ratios were larger and independent of antibody type. Aside from tumor, the R ratio of uptakes depended on the antibody type. R values decreased monotonically with time in all tissues and for all cognates. Using this ratio, one can possibly correct iodine-based u (t) results so that they resemble radiometal-derived biodistributions.

  20. Mathematical analysis of dengue virus antibody dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Sulanie; Perera, SSN

    2018-03-01

    Dengue is a mosquito borne viral disease causing over 390 million infections worldwide per annum. Even though information on how infection is controlled and eradicated from the body is lacking, antibodies are thought to play a major role in clearing the virus. In this paper, a non-linear conceptual dynamical model with humoral immune response and absorption effect has been proposed for primary dengue infection. We have included the absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells since this effect causes the virus density in the blood to decrease. The time delay that arises in the production of antibodies was accounted and is introduced through a continuous function. The basic reproduction number R0 is computed and a detailed stability analysis is done. Three equilibrium states, namely the infection free equilibrium, no immune equilibrium and the endemic equilibrium were identified and the existence and the stability conditions of these steady states were obtained. Numerical simulations proved the results that were obtained. By establishing the characteristic equation of the model at infection free equilibrium, it was observed that the infection free equilibrium is locally asymptotically stable if R0 1. Stability regions are identified for infection free equilibrium state with respect to the external variables and it is observed as the virus burst rate increases, the stability regions would decrease. These results implied that for higher virus burst rates, other conditions in the body must be strong enough to eliminate the disease completely from the host. The effect of time delay of antibody production on virus dynamics is discussed. It was seen that as the time delay in production of antibodies increases, the time for viral decline also increased. Also it was observed that the virus count goes to negligible levels within 7 - 14 days after the onset of symptoms as seen in dengue infections.

  1. ESTAR: The Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer for remote sensing measurement of soil moisture and ocean salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The product of a working group assembled to help define the science objectives and measurement requirements of a spaceborne L-band microwave radiometer devoted to remote sensing of surface soil moisture and sea surface salinity is presented. Remote sensing in this long-wavelength portion of the microwave spectrum requires large antennas in low-Earth orbit to achieve acceptable spatial resolution. The proposed radiometer, ESTAR, is unique in that it employs aperture synthesis to reduce the antenna area requirements for a space system.

  2. Performance and application of a multi-wavelength, ground-based microwave radiometer in intense convective weather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak Wai Chan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic and dynamic quantities, such as the K-index and GUSTEX (a wind gust estimate, are commonly used in the nowcasting of intense convective weather. In the past, they were derived from conventional upper-air ascent measurements, which were normally only available twice a day. In the tropics, the thermodynamic property of the troposphere could change rapidly in rain episodes and the conventional upper-air ascent data alone are not sufficient for nowcasting purposes. This paper discusses the use of a multi-wavelength, ground-based microwave radiometer to provide frequently updated (once every 5 minutes thermodynamic profiles of the troposphere up to 10 km for the nowcasting of severe convective weather during a field experiment in Hong Kong in 2004. The accuracy of the radiometer's measurements is first established by comparing with the temperature and humidity profiles of upper-air ascents and the integrated water vapour of Global Positioning System (GPS receivers. The humidity profile and K-index from the radiometer in a number of rainstorm cases are then studied. They are found to give useful indications of the accumulation of water vapour and the increasing degree of instability of the troposphere before the occurrence of the heavy rain. The continuous availability of the thermodynamic profiles from the radiometer also makes it possible to study the correlation between K-index and the degree of instability of the troposphere. In this study, the tropospheric instability is expressed in terms of the total number and the rate of lightning strikes within 20 km or so from the radiometer. It is found to have good correlation with the time-averaged K-index from the radiometer during the heavy rain episodes in the field experiment period. Furthermore, the feasibility of combining the thermodynamic profiles from the radiometer and wind profiles given by radar wind profilers in the continuous estimation of wind gusts is studied. The estimated

  3. Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) for the Retrieval of Vertical Aerosol Properties from Combined Lidar Radiometer Data: Development and Distribution in EARLINET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikovsky, A.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, Brent N.; Bril, A.; Goloub, P.; Tanre, D.; Pappalardo, G.; Wandinger, U.; Chaikovskaya, L.; Denisov, S.; hide

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed description of LIRIC (LIdar-Radiometer Inversion Code)algorithm for simultaneous processing of coincident lidar and radiometric (sun photometric) observations for the retrieval of the aerosol concentration vertical profiles. As the lidar radiometric input data we use measurements from European Aerosol Re-search Lidar Network (EARLINET) lidars and collocated sun-photometers of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The LIRIC data processing provides sequential inversion of the combined lidar and radiometric data by the estimations of column-integrated aerosol parameters from radiometric measurements followed by the retrieval of height-dependent concentrations of fine and coarse aerosols from lidar signals using integrated column characteristics of aerosol layer as a priori constraints. The use of polarized lidar observations allows us to discriminate between spherical and non-spherical particles of the coarse aerosol mode. The LIRIC software package was implemented and tested at a number of EARLINET stations. Inter-comparison of the LIRIC-based aerosol retrievals was performed for the observations by seven EARLNET lidars in Leipzig, Germany on 25 May 2009. We found close agreement between the aerosol parameters derived from different lidars that supports high robustness of the LIRIC algorithm. The sensitivity of the retrieval results to the possible reduction of the available observation data is also discussed.

  4. [Study of anti-idiotype antibodies to human monoclonal antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, R; Takahashi, N; Owaki, I; Kannagi, R; Endo, N; Morita, N; Inoue, M

    1992-02-01

    A human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 (IgM, lambda), was generated, which reacted specifically with a major of glycolipid present in LS174T colon cancer cells. The glycolipid antigen which reacted with the ll-50 antibody was expected to four sugar residues from its TLC mobility, and it was ascertained that the glycolipid antigen which reacted with ll-50 antibody might be Lc4 antigen [Gal beta 1----3 GLcNAc beta 1----3 Gal beta 1----4 Glc beta 1----1 Cer] judging from TLC immunostaining and ELISA when the reactivity of ll-50 antibody was tested using various pure glycolipids in 3-5 sugar residues as an antigen. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated ll-50 antibody. The serum of the Lc4 antigen recognized by ll-50 antibody was significantly higher in patients with malignant disorders than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). Three mouse monoclonal anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3 and C5 (all IgG1), were generated by the immunization of BALB/c mice with ll-50 antibody. These anti-idiotype antibodies specifically bound to to human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 and had a significant inhibitory activity towards the binding of ll-50 antibody to the Lc4 antigen. This indicated that these anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5, were paratope-related anti-idiotype antibodies. G3, B3, and C5 were expected to define the nearest idiotope because they could mutually inhibit ll-50 antibody. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5. As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by C5 (Id-C5+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by B3 (Id-B3+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher

  5. Prelaunch Performance of the 118 GHz Polarcube 3U Cubesat Temperature Sounding Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, L.; Gasiewski, A. J.; Gallaher, D. W.; Sanders, B. T.; Belter, R.; Kraft, D.; Castillo, J.; Gordon, J. A.; Hurowitz, M.

    2017-12-01

    The low cost PolarCube 3U CubeSat supports a 118.75 GHz imaging spectrometer for temperature profiling of the troposphere and surface temperature. It is a demonstrator for a constellation of LEO passive microwave sensors at V-band and other frequencies using 3U/6U CubeSats. Such a satellite constellation for weather forecasting will provide data at high spatial and temporal resolution to observe rapidly evolving mesoscale weather. The satellite's payload is an eight channel, double sideband passive microwave temperature sounder with cross-track scanning and will provide 18 km surface resolution from a 400 km orbit. The radiometer implements a two-point calibration using an internal PIN switch and view of cold space. Although the instrument is based on a well established classical design, the challenges lie in developing a sensitive spectrometer that fits in a 1.5U volume, is low cost, consumes 4 W power and satisfies the CubeSat weight and envelope constraints. PolarCube is scheduled for launch on a Virgin Galactic flight in summer, 2018. The estimated radiometer sensitivity, ΔTrms varies from 0.3 to 2 K across the eight channels. The 50 MHz to 7 GHz 8-channel filter bank (designed with surface mount capacitors and inductors) fits on a 9x5 cm2 RO4350B PCB and includes 2-stage amplification and detector circuitry. The scanning reflector with an 8 cm2 main aperture uses a 3D printed corrugated feed that includes a WR8 to WC8 waveguide transition with a 17° bend. Initial performance results from the instrument using the 3D printed feed and IF/VA board obtained from airborne measurements over Antarctica on the NASA DC8 in early November 2016 indicate a well-functioning radiometer. The end-to-end characterization of the payload with the satellite bus, performance results from vibration and thermal-vacuum tests and roof-top measurements will be presented.

  6. Baseline Observations of Hemispheric Sea Ice with the Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloersen, Per

    1998-01-01

    The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) on board the NASA Nimbus 7 satellite was designed to obtain data for sea surface temperatures (SSTs), near-surface wind speeds, sea ice coverage and type, rainfall rates over the oceans, cloud water content, snow water equivalent, and soil moisture. In this paper, I shall emphasize the sea ice observations and mention briefly some important SST observations. A prime factor contributing to the importance of SMMR sea ice observations lies in their successful integration into a long-term time series, presently being extended by observations from the series of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSMI) on board the DOD/DMSP F8, Fl1, and F12 satellites. This currently constitutes a 19-year data set. Almost half of this was provided by the SMMR. Unfortunately, the 4-year data set produced earlier by the single-channel Electrically Scanned Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) was not successfully integrated into the SMMR/SSMI data set. This resulted primarily from the lack of an overlap period to provide intersensor adjustment, but also because of the large difference between the algorithms to produce ice concentrations and large temporal gaps in the ESMR data. The lack of overlap between the SeaSat and Nimbus 7 SMMR data sets was an important consideration for also excluding the SeatSat one, but the spatial gaps especially in the Southern Hemisphere daily SeaSat observations was another. The sea ice observations will continue into the future by means of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) on board the ADEOS II and EOS satellites due to be launched in mid- and late-2000, respectively. Analysis of the sea ice data has been carried out by a number of different techniques. Long-term trends have been examined by means of ordinary least squares and band-limited regression. Oscillations in the data have been examined by band-limited Fourier analysis. Here, I shall present results from a novel combination of Principal

  7. Production of Y-86 and other radiometals for research purposes using a solution target system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehlke, Elisabeth; Hoehr, Cornelia; Hou, Xinchi; Hanemaayer, Victoire; Zeisler, Stefan; Adam, Michael J.; Ruth, Thomas J.; Celler, Anna; Buckley, Ken; Benard, Francois; Schaffer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Diagnostic radiometals are typically obtained from cyclotrons by irradiating solid targets or from radioisotope generators. These methods have the advantage of high production yields, but require additional solid target handling infrastructure that is not readily available to many cyclotron facilities. Herein, we provide an overview of our results regarding the production of various positron-emitting radiometals using a liquid target system installed on a 13 MeV cyclotron at TRIUMF. Details about the production, purification and quality control of 89 Zr, 68 Ga and for the first time 86 Y are discussed. Methods: Aqueous solutions containing 1.35–1.65 g/mL of natural-abundance zinc nitrate, yttrium nitrate, and strontium nitrate were irradiated on a 13 MeV cyclotron using a standard liquid target. Different target body and foil materials were investigated for corrosion. Production yields were calculated using theoretical cross-sections from the EMPIRE code and compared with experimental results. The radioisotopes were extracted from irradiated target material using solid phase extraction methods adapted from previously reported methods, and used for radiolabelling experiments. Results: We demonstrated production quantities that are sufficient for chemical and biological studies for three separate radiometals, 89 Zr (A sat = 360 MBq/μA and yield = 3.17 MBq/μA), 86 Y (A sat = 31 MBq/μA and yield = 1.44 MBq/μA), and 68 Ga (A sat = 141 MBq/μA and yield = 64 MBq/μA) from one hour long irradiations on a typical medical cyclotron. 68 Ga yields were sufficient for potential clinical applications. In order to avoid corrosion of the target body and target foil, nitrate solutions were chosen as well as niobium as target-body material. An automatic loading system enabled up to three production runs per day. The separation efficiency ranged from 82 to 99%. Subsequently, 68 Ga and 86 Y were successfully used to radiolabel DOTA-based chelators while

  8. The antibody Hijikata Tatsumi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éden Peretta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Considered one of the most influential modern dance representatives in Japan, Tatsumi Hijikata’s work was a milestone in the Japanese post-war experimental artistic scene. Heretic son of his time, he staged a fertile mix of artistic and cultural influences, overlapping subversive elements of European arts and philosophy with radical references from pre-modern Japanese culture. In this way he built the foundations of its unstable antibody, its political-artistic project of dissolution of a organism, both physical and social.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez, T; Díaz, A M; Zlotnik, H

    1990-01-01

    Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis whole-cell extracts were used as antigens to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Six stable hybrid cell lines secreting anti-Nocardia spp. MAbs were obtained. These were characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot (immunoblot), and immunofluorescence assay. Although all the MAbs exhibited different degrees of cross-reactivity with N. asteroides and N. brasiliensis antigens as well as with culture-filtrate antigens from Myco...

  10. Comparing the Accuracy of AMSRE, AMSR2, SSMI and SSMIS Satellite Radiometer Ice Concentration Products with One-Meter Resolution Visible Imagery in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, E. R.; Stanton, T. P.

    2016-12-01

    Determining ice concentration in the Arctic is necessary to track significant changes in sea ice edge extent. Sea ice concentrations are also needed to interpret data collected by in-situ instruments like buoys, as the amount of ice versus water in a given area determines local solar heating. Ice concentration products are now routinely derived from satellite radiometers including the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2), the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI), and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS). While these radiometers are viewed as reliable to monitor long-term changes in sea ice extent, their accuracy should be analyzed, and compared to determine which radiometer performs best over smaller features such as melt ponds, and how seasonal conditions affect accuracy. Knowledge of the accuracy of radiometers at high resolution can help future researchers determine which radiometer to use, and be aware of radiometer shortcomings in different ice conditions. This will be especially useful when interpreting data from in-situ instruments which deal with small scale measurements. In order to compare these passive microwave radiometers, selected high spatial resolution one-meter resolution Medea images, archived at the Unites States Geological Survey, are used for ground truth comparison. Sea ice concentrations are derived from these images in an interactive process, although estimates are not perfect ground truth due to exposure of images, shadowing and cloud cover. 68 images are retrieved from the USGS website and compared with 9 useable, collocated SSMI, 33 SSMIS, 36 AMSRE, and 14 AMSR2 ice concentrations in the Arctic Ocean. We analyze and compare the accuracy of radiometer instrumentation in differing ice conditions.

  11. The future of monoclonal antibody technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zider, Alexander; Drakeman, Donald L

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid growth of monoclonal antibody-based products, new technologies have emerged for creating modified forms of antibodies, including fragments, conjugates and multi-specific antibodies. We created a database of 450 therapeutic antibodies in development to determine which technologies and indications will constitute the “next generation” of antibody products. We conclude that the antibodies of the future will closely resemble the antibodies that have already been approved for commer...

  12. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  13. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Microwave Radiometer Radio-Frequency Interference (RFI) Mitigation: Initial On-Orbit Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Priscilla N.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Johnson, Joel T.; Aksoy, Mustafa; Bringer, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, launched in January 2015, provides global measurements of soil moisture using a microwave radiometer. SMAPs radiometer passband lies within the passive frequency allocation. However, both unauthorized in-band transmitters as well as out-of-band emissions from transmitters operating at frequencies adjacent to this allocated spectrum have been documented as sources of radio frequency interference (RFI) to the L-band radiometers on SMOS and Aquarius. The spectral environment consists of high RFI levels as well as significant occurrences of low level RFI equivalent to 0.1 to 10 K. The SMAP ground processor reports the antenna temperature both before and after RFI mitigation is applied. The difference between these quantities represents the detected RFI level. The presentation will review the SMAP RFI detection and mitigation procedure and discuss early on-orbit RFI measurements from the SMAP radiometer. Assessments of global RFI properties and source types will be provided, as well as the implications of these results for SMAP soil moisture measurements.

  14. A linear model to predict with a multi-spectral radiometer the amount of nitrogen in winter wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyniers, M.; Walvoort, D.J.J.; Baardemaaker, De J.

    2006-01-01

    The objective was to develop an optimal vegetation index (VIopt) to predict with a multi-spectral radiometer nitrogen in wheat crop (kg[N] ha-1). Optimality means that nitrogen in the crop can be measured accurately in the field during the growing season. It also means that the measurements are

  15. Diagnostics of the SMOS radiometer antenna system at the DTU-ESA spherical near-field antenna test facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, Cecilia; Frandsen, A.; Pivnenko, Sergey

    2007-01-01

    The recently developed Spherical Wave Expansion-to-Plane Wave Expansion (SWE-to-PWE) antenna diagnostics technique is employed in an investigation of the antenna system in the Microwave Imaging Radiometer using Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) for ESA’s Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission...

  16. Intermediate frequency band digitized high dynamic range radiometer system for plasma diagnostics and real-time Tokamak control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, W. A.; van Beveren, V.; Thoen, D. J.; Nuij, Pjwm; M.R. de Baar,; Donne, A. J. H.; Westerhof, E.; Goede, A. P. H.; Krijger, B.; van den Berg, M. A.; Kantor, M.; M. F. Graswinckel,; Hennen, B.A.; Schüller, F. C.

    2011-01-01

    An intermediate frequency (IF) band digitizing radiometer system in the 100-200 GHz frequency range has been developed for Tokamak diagnostics and control, and other fields of research which require a high flexibility in frequency resolution combined with a large bandwidth and the retrieval of the

  17. Intermediate frequency band digitized high dynamic range radiometer system for plasma diagnostics and real-time Tokamak control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, WA.; Van Beveren, V.; Thoen, D.J.; Nuij, P.J.W.M.; De Baar, M.R.; Donné, A.J.H.; Westerhof, E.; Goede, A.P.H.; Krijger, B.; Van den Berg, M.A.; Kantor, M.; Graswinckel, M.F.; Hennen, B.A.; Schüller, F.C.

    2011-01-01

    An intermediate frequency (IF) band digitizing radiometer system in the 100–200 GHz frequency range has been developed for Tokamak diagnostics and control, and other fields of research which require a high flexibility in frequency resolution combined with a large bandwidth and the retrieval of the

  18. Retrieving soil moisture for non-forested areas using PALS radiometer measurements in SMAPVEX12 field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper we investigate retrieval of soil moisture based on L-band brightness temperature under diverse conditions and land cover types. We apply the PALS (Passive Active L-band System) radiometer data collected in the SMAPVEX12 (Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012) field ex...

  19. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps...... elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity...... of the humanization experiment protocol....

  20. A Tissue Propagation Model for Validating Close-Proximity Biomedical Radiometer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonds, Q.; Herzig, P.; Weller, T.

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of thermally-generated electromagnetic emissions through stratified human tissue is studied herein using a non-coherent mathematical model. The model is developed to complement subsurface body temperature measurements performed using a close proximity microwave radiometer. The model takes into account losses and reflections as thermal emissions propagate through the body, before being emitted at the skin surface. The derivation is presented in four stages and applied to the human core phantom, a physical representation of a stomach volume of skin, muscle, and blood-fatty tissue. A drop in core body temperature is simulated via the human core phantom and the response of the propagation model is correlated to the radiometric measurement. The results are comparable, with differences on the order of 1.5 - 3%. Hence the plausibility of core body temperature extraction via close proximity radiometry is demonstrated, given that the electromagnetic characteristics of the stratified tissue layers are known.

  1. Implementation of Active Thermal Control (ATC) for the Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylov, Rebecca; Kwack, Eug; French, Richard; Dawson, Douglas; Hoffman, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Earth Observing Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Mission is scheduled to launch in November 2014 into a 685 kilometer near-polar, sun-synchronous orbit. SMAP will provide comprehensive global mapping measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state in order to enhance understanding of the processes that link the water, energy, and carbon cycles. The primary objectives of SMAP are to improve worldwide weather and flood forecasting, enhance climate prediction, and refine drought and agriculture monitoring during its three year mission. The SMAP instrument architecture incorporates an L-band radar and an L-band radiometer which share a common feed horn and parabolic mesh reflector. The instrument rotates about the nadir axis at approximately 15 revolutions per minute, thereby providing a conically scanning wide swath antenna beam that is capable of achieving global coverage within three days. In order to make the necessary precise surface emission measurements from space, the electronics and hardware associated with the radiometer must meet tight short-term (instantaneous and orbital) and long-term (monthly and mission) thermal stabilities. Maintaining these tight thermal stabilities is quite challenging because the sensitive electronics are located on a fast spinning platform that can either be in full sunlight or total eclipse, thus exposing them to a highly transient environment. A passive design approach was first adopted early in the design cycle as a low-cost solution. With careful thermal design efforts to cocoon and protect all sensitive components, all stability requirements were met passively. Active thermal control (ATC) was later added after the instrument Preliminary Design Review (PDR) to mitigate the threat of undetected gain glitches, not for thermal-stability reasons. Gain glitches are common problems with radiometers during missions, and one simple way to avoid gain glitches is to use the in-flight set point programmability that ATC

  2. The CLARA/NORSAT-1 solar absolute radiometer: instrument design, characterization and calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Benjamin; Levesque, Pierre-Luc; Kopp, Greg; Andersen, Bo; Beck, Ivo; Finsterle, Wolfgang; Gyo, Manfred; Heuerman, Karl; Koller, Silvio; Mingard, Nathan; Remesal Oliva, Alberto; Pfiffner, Daniel; Soder, Ricco; Spescha, Marcel; Suter, Markus; Schmutz, Werner

    2017-10-01

    The compact lightweight absolute radiometer (CLARA) experiment aims at measuring the total solar irradiance (TSI) in space and is scheduled to fly on the Norwegian NORSAT-1 micro satellite. The CLARA experiment will contribute to the long term monitoring of the TSI variability to support the analysis of potential long term trends in the Sun’s variability. CLARA is traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology radiometric scale and will provide further evidence for the TSI value on an absolute scale. In this paper we present the design, characterization, and calibration details of the CLARA instrument. The combined measurement uncertainty for the calibrated SI-traceable CLARA flight instrument is 567-912 ppm (k  =  1) depending on the measuring channel.

  3. Land Cover Classification Method using Combined Signatures of L-band Radar and Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliander, A.

    2011-12-01

    This study investigates the utility of combining L-band radar and radiometer measurements for more accurate land cover classification in terms of vegetation type and density. This investigation is relevant in the context of two NASA missions which employ L-band active and passive measurements. The first one, Aquarius, was launched in June 2011 and the second one, SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) is proposed for launch in late 2014. The results of this study can be applied in the observation situation of both of these missions to improve L-band land cover characterization for the benefit of retrieval accuracy of parameters such as soil moisture and freeze/thaw state. Brightness temperature, measured by radiometer, is the product of the physical temperature and emissivity of the target. Reflectivity describes how much of radiation incident on the surface reflects and scatters away from it to all directions. The sum of emissivity and reflectivity equals one. On the other hand, backscatter, measured by radar, expresses how much of radiation incident on the surface reflects back to the direction of the radar. The difference between reflectivity and backscatter can be quantified by introducing Normalized Reflection Difference (NRD), which is normalized difference between reflectivity and backscatter. In the proposed method the NRD value is merged with brightness temperature polarization index (MPI) and cross-polarized backscatter to classify the land cover of the measured area. The method is tested using the experimental data obtained with the PALS (Passive and Active L- band System) airborne instrument over numerous locations in US between 1999 and 2008. The PALS instrument performs coincidental radiometer and radar measurements. The in situ data recorded in the abovementioned campaigns allow classification based on not only vegetation type but also based on Vegetation Water Content (VWC), biomass, Leaf Area Index (LAI) soil texture and surface roughness. The

  4. Errors from Rayleigh-Jeans approximation in satellite microwave radiometer calibration systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Fuzhong; Zou, Xiaolei

    2013-01-20

    The advanced technology microwave sounder (ATMS) onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite is a total power radiometer and scans across the track within a range of ±52.77° from nadir. It has 22 channels and measures the microwave radiation at either quasi-vertical or quasi-horizontal polarization from the Earth's atmosphere. The ATMS sensor data record algorithm employed a commonly used two-point calibration equation that derives the earth-view brightness temperature directly from the counts and temperatures of warm target and cold space, and the earth-scene count. This equation is only valid under Rayleigh-Jeans (RJ) approximation. Impacts of RJ approximation on ATMS calibration biases are evaluated in this study. It is shown that the RJ approximation used in ATMS radiometric calibration results in errors on the order of 1-2 K. The error is also scene count dependent and increases with frequency.

  5. A synthetic aperture microwave radiometer to measure soil moisture and ocean salinity from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Hilliard, L. M.; Swift, C. T.; Ruf, C. S.; Garrett, L. B.

    1991-01-01

    A concept is presented for a microwave radiometer in space to measure soil moisture and ocean salinity as part of an 'Earth Probe' mission. The measurements could be made using an array of stick antennas. The L-band channel (1.4 GHz) would be the primary channel for determining soil moisture, with the S-band (2.65-GHz) and C-band (5.0-GHz) channels providing ancillary information to help correct for the effects of the vegetation canopy and possibly to estimate a moisture profile. A preliminary study indicates that an orbit at 450 km would provide coverage of better than 95 percent of the earth every 3 days. A 10-km resolution cell (at nadir) requires stick antennas about 9.5-m long at L-band. The S-band and C-band sticks would be substantially shorter (5 m and 2.7 m, respectively).

  6. Maturation and Hardening of the Stabilized Radiometer Platforms (STRAPS) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucholtz, A. [U.S. Naval Research Lab. Washington, DC (United States); Bluth, R. [U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States); Pfaff, B. [L-3 Communications, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of solar and infrared irradiance by instruments rigidly mounted to an aircraft have historically been plagued by the introduction of offsets and fluctuations into the data that are solely due to the pitch and roll movements of the aircraft. Two STabilized RAdiometer Platforms (STRAPs) were developed for the U.S. Navy in the early to mid-2000s to address this problem. The development was a collaborative effort between the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories. The STRAPs were designed and built by L-3 Communications Sonoma EO (formerly the small business Sonoma Design Group).

  7. Research on Ground Motion Metal Target Based on Rocket Projectile by Using Millimeter Wave Radiometer Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Dongyang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available How to detect the ground motion metal target effectively is an important guarantee for precision strike in the process of Rocket Projectile flight. Accordingly and in view of the millimeter- wave radiation characteristic of the ground motion metal target, a mathematical model was established based on Rocket Projectile about millimeter-wave detection to the ground motion metal target. Through changing various parameters in the process of Rocket Projectile flight, the detection model was studied by simulation. The parameters variation and effective range of millimeter wave radiometer were obtained in the process of rotation and horizontal flight. So a certain theoretical basis was formed for the precision strike to the ground motion metal target.

  8. Temperature Stability and Control Requirements for Thermal Vacuum/Thermal Balance Testing of the Aquarius Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes the specific temperature stability and control requirements for the thermal vacuum and thermal balance testing of the Aquarius Instrument at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The testing was conducted in the 10' wide x 15' deep Facility 225 Thermal Vacuum chamber. The temperature control stability requirements were less than .14 C RMS thermal variation over a seven-day period. The thermal test specification also called for the ability to impose a high-resolution sinusoidal variation for all heater zones. The special requirements of the Aquarius radiometer test necessitated the construction of a multi-function test fixture and the modification of two existing heater controller racks.

  9. Hyperspectral radiometer for automated measurement of global and diffuse sky irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuusk, Joel; Kuusk, Andres

    2018-01-01

    An automated hyperspectral radiometer for the measurement of global and diffuse sky irradiance, SkySpec, has been designed for providing the SMEAR-Estonia research station with spectrally-resolved solar radiation data. The spectroradiometer has been carefully studied in the optical radiometry laboratory of Tartu Observatory, Estonia. Recorded signals are corrected for spectral stray light as well as for changes in dark signal and spectroradiometer spectral responsivity due to temperature effects. Comparisons with measurements of shortwave radiation fluxes made at the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) station at Tõravere, Estonia, and with fluxes simulated using the atmospheric radiative transfer model 6S and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data showed that the spectroradiometer is a reliable instrument that provides accurate estimates of integrated fluxes and of their spectral distribution. The recorded spectra can be used to estimate the amount of atmospheric constituents such as aerosol and column water vapor, which are needed for the atmospheric correction of spectral satellite images.

  10. A Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer for Greenhouse Gas Measurements in the Atmospheric Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Emily Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Laser Heterodyne Radiometry is a technique adapted from radio receiver technology has been used to measure trace gases in the atmosphere since the 1960s.By leveraging advances in the telecommunications industry, it has been possible to miniaturize this technology.The mini-LHR (Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer) has been under development at NASA Goddard Space flight Center since 2009. This sun-viewing instrument measures carbon dioxide and methane in the atmospheric column and operates in tandem with an AERONET sun photometer producing a simultaneous measure of aerosols. The mini-LHR has been extensively field tested in a range of locations ranging in the continental US as well as Alaska and Hawaii and now operates autonomously with sensitivities of approximately 0.2 ppmv and approximately10 ppbv, for carbon dioxide and methane respectively, for 10 averaged scans under clear sky conditions.

  11. Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer for Measurements of CO2 in the Atmospheric Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, E. L.; Mclinden, M. L.; Miller, J. H.; Allan, G. R.; Lott, L. E.; Melroy, H. R.; Clarke, G. B.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a low-cost, miniaturized laser heterodyne radiometer for highly sensitive measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmospheric column. In this passive design, sunlight that has undergone absorption by CO2 in the atmosphere is collected and mixed with continuous wave laser light that is step-scanned across the absorption feature centered at 1,573.6 nm. The resulting radio frequency beat signal is collected as a function of laser wavelength, from which the total column mole fraction can be de-convolved. We are expanding this technique to include methane (CH4) and carbon monoxide (CO), and with minor modifications, this technique can be expanded to include species such as water vapor (H2O) and nitrous oxide (N2O).

  12. Aquarius L-Band Microwave Radiometer: Three Years of Radiometric Performance and Systematic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Hong, Liang; Pellerano, Fernando A.

    2015-01-01

    The Aquarius L-band microwave radiometer is a three-beam pushbroom instrument designed to measure sea surface salinity. Results are analyzed for performance and systematic effects over three years of operation. The thermal control system maintains tight temperature stability promoting good gain stability. The gain spectrum exhibits expected orbital variations with 1f noise appearing at longer time periods. The on-board detection and integration scheme coupled with the calibration algorithm produce antenna temperatures with NEDT 0.16 K for 1.44-s samples. Nonlinearity is characterized before launch and the derived correction is verified with cold-sky calibration data. Finally, long-term drift is discovered in all channels with 1-K amplitude and 100-day time constant. Nonetheless, it is adeptly corrected using an exponential model.

  13. Solar Irradiances Measured using SPN1 Radiometers: Uncertainties and Clues for Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badosa, Jordi; Wood, John; Blanc, Philippe; Long, Charles N.; Vuilleumier, Laurent; Demengel, Dominique; Haeffelin, Martial

    2014-12-08

    The fast development of solar radiation and energy applications, such as photovoltaic and solar thermodynamic systems, has increased the need for solar radiation measurement and monitoring, not only for the global component but also the diffuse and direct. End users look for the best compromise between getting close to state-of-the-art measurements and keeping capital, maintenance and operating costs to a minimum. Among the existing commercial options, SPN1 is a relatively low cost solar radiometer that estimates global and diffuse solar irradiances from seven thermopile sensors under a shading mask and without moving parts. This work presents a comprehensive study of SPN1 accuracy and sources of uncertainty, which results from laboratory experiments, numerical modeling and comparison studies between measurements from this sensor and state-of-the art instruments for six diverse sites. Several clues are provided for improving the SPN1 accuracy and agreement with state-of-the-art measurements.

  14. Pre-Launch Calibration and Performance Study of the Polarcube 3u Temperature Sounding Radiometer Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, L.; Gasiewski, A. J.; Sanders, B. T.; Rouw, C.; Alvarenga, G.; Gallaher, D. W.

    2016-12-01

    The positive impact of passive microwave observations of tropospheric temperature, water vapor and surface variables on short-term weather forecasts has been clearly demonstrated in recent forecast anomaly growth studies. The development of a fleet of such passive microwave sensors especially at V-band and higher frequencies in low earth orbit using 3U and 6U CubeSats could help accomplish the aforementioned objectives at low system cost and risk as well as provide for regularly updated radiometer technology. The University of Colorado's 3U CubeSat, PolarCube is intended to serve as a demonstrator for such a fleet of passive sounders and imagers. PolarCube supports MiniRad, an eight channel, double sideband 118.7503 GHz passive microwave sounder. The mission is focused primarily on sounding in Arctic and Antarctic regions with the following key remote sensing science and engineering objectives: (i) Collect coincident tropospheric temperature profiles above sea ice, open polar ocean, and partially open areas to develop joint sea ice concentration and lower tropospheric temperature mapping capabilities in clear and cloudy atmospheric conditions. This goal will be accomplished in conjunction with data from existing passive microwave sensors operating at complementary bands; and (ii) Assess the capabilities of small passive microwave satellite sensors for environmental monitoring in support of the future development of inexpensive Earth science missions. Performance data of the payload/spacecraft from pre-launch calibration will be presented. This will include- (i) characterization of the antenna sub-system comprising of an offset 3D printed feedhorn and spinning parabolic reflector and impact of the antenna efficiencies on radiometer performance, (ii) characterization of MiniRad's RF front-end and IF back-end with respect to temperature fluctuations and their impact on atmospheric temperature weighting functions and receiver sensitivity, (iii) results from roof

  15. Global climate monitoring with the advanced microwave scanning radiometer (AMSR and AMSR-E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobl, Elena S.; Spencer, Roy W.; Shibata, Akira; Imaoka, Keiji; Sasaki, Masayuki; Kachi, Misako

    2003-04-01

    The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometers (AMSR) are dual-polarized microwave radiometers having channel frequencies ranging from 6.9 GHz to 89 GHz, and were designed to retrieve global information on precipitation, sea surface temperature, oceanic surface winds and integrated cloud water and water vapor, vegetation, sea ice, and snow cover. Two AMSR's have been built by Mitsubishi Electric Corporation for the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The first instrument (AMSR-E) was launched in May 2002 on NASA's Aqua satellite. The second will be launched on the Japanese ADEOS-II satellite. The AMSRs provide the highest spatial resolution yet attained for a civilian spaceborne microwave sensor, with spatial resolutions ranging from 5 km at 89 GHz to 60 km at 6.9 GHz. A distributed array of six (seven for ADEOS-II AMSR) feedhorns are illuminated by a 1.6 m diameter offset parabolic reflector on AMSR-E, and a 2.0 m diameter reflector on AMSR for ADEOS-II. While National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) is responsible for the calibration of both AMSRs' data, for AMSR-E, science software for the retrieval of the various geophysical parameters has been independently developed by NASDA- and NASA-funded researchers. This software has been implemented for routine near-real time processing in both Japan and the United States. A future goal -- within two years -- is the development of joint algorithms for processing data from both AMSRs. Extensive product validation efforts, involving many different countries, are discussed. Initial data from AMSR-E are also presented.

  16. WindSat Space Borne Polarimetric Microwave Radiometer: Data Products and System Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truesdale, D.; Gaiser, P.; Bettenhausen, M. H.; Li, L.; Twarog, E.

    2017-12-01

    WindSat, a satellite-based multi-frequency polarimetric microwave radiometer developed by the Naval Research Laboratory for the U.S. Navy and the NPOESS Integrated Program Office (IPO), has collected over 14 years of fully-polarimetric microwave measurements from space since its launch in 2003. The primary WindSat mission was to demonstrate the capability to retrieve the ocean surface wind vector from a space-based microwave radiometer. The WindSat data is now being used to produce near-real-time products for the ocean surface wind vector, sea surface temperature (SST) and atmospheric columnar water vapor and cloud liquid water over the ocean at the U.S. Navy's Fleet Numerical Meteorological and Oceanographic Center (FNMOC). Several groups are assimilating WindSat data products into numerical weather models with positive results. In addition to providing environmental products over the ocean, the WindSat data set has been exploited for retrievals over land and ice. In particular, the WindSat channel set is well suited to retrieving soil moisture and land surface temperature. We have also built on heritage algorithms to derive sea ice concentration. This paper will provide highlights of WindSat environmental products. The success of the WindSat mission is directly traceable to the on-orbit sensor calibration. WindSat was designed with a one-year mission requirement and three year goal. Now in WindSat's fifteenth year on orbit, we continue to monitor the instrument performance and the calibration stability. Key system performance and calibration parameters include the receiver gains and NEDTs. These parameters are susceptible to component aging and changes in the payload thermal behavior. We will present trends in NEDT and receiver gains over the life of the mission. In addition to its primary mission, the long life of WindSat enables it to provide many forms of risk reduction and lessons learned for future microwave imagers.

  17. Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Polarization Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junqiang; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Waluschka, Eugene; Wang, Menghua

    2016-01-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is one of five instruments onboard the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite that launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, on October 28, 2011. It is a whiskbroom radiometer that provides +/-56.28deg scans of the Earth view. It has 22 bands, among which 14 are reflective solar bands (RSBs). The RSBs cover a wavelength range from 410 to 2250 nm. The RSBs of a remote sensor are usually sensitive to the polarization of incident light. For VIIRS, it is specified that the polarization factor should be smaller than 3% for 410 and 862 nm bands and 2.5% for other RSBs for the scan angle within +/-45deg. Several polarization sensitivity tests were performed prelaunch for SNPP VIIRS. The first few tests either had large uncertainty or were less reliable, while the last one was believed to provide the more accurate information about the polarization property of the instrument. In this paper, the measured data in the last polarization sensitivity test are analyzed, and the polarization factors and phase angles are derived from the measurements for all the RSBs. The derived polarization factors and phase angles are band, detector, and scan angle dependent. For near-infrared bands, they also depend on the half-angle mirror side. Nevertheless, the derived polarization factors are all within the specification, although the strong detector dependence of the polarization parameters was not expected. Compared to the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on both Aqua and Terra satellites, the polarization effect on VIIRS RSB is much smaller.

  18. Informal Preliminary Report on Comparisons of Prototype SPN-1 Radiometer to PARSL Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Charles N.

    2014-06-17

    The prototype SPN-1 has been taking measurements for several months collocated with our PNNL Atmospheric Remote Sensing Laboratory (PARSL) solar tracker mounted instruments at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) located in Richland, Washington, USA. The PARSL radiometers used in the following comparisons consist of an Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer (NIP) and a shaded Eppley model 8-48 “Black and White” pyrgeometer (B&W) to measure the direct and diffuse shortwave irradiance (SW), respectively. These instruments were calibrated in mid-September by comparison to an absolute cavity radiometer directly traceable to the world standard group in Davos, Switzerland. The NIP calibration was determined by direct comparison, while the B&W was calibrated using the shade/unshade technique. All PARSL data prior to mid-September have been reprocessed using the new calibration factors. The PARSL data are logged as 1-minute averages from 1-second samples. Data used in this report span the time period from June 22 through December 1, 2006. All data have been processed through the QCRad code (Long and Shi, 2006), which itself is a more elaborately developed methodology along the lines of that applied by the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) Archive (Long and Dutton, 2004), for quality control. The SPN-1 data are the standard total and diffuse SW values obtained from the analog data port of the instrument. The comparisons use only times when both the PARSL and SPN-1 data passed all QC testing. The data were further processed and analyzed by application of the SW Flux Analysis methodology (Long and Ackerman, 2000; Long and Gaustad, 2004, Long et al., 2006) to detect periods of clear skies, calculate continuous estimates of clear-sky SW irradiance and the effect of clouds on the downwelling SW, and estimate fractional sky cover.

  19. 1D-Var temperature retrievals from microwave radiometer and convective scale model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Martinet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the potential of ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR for providing accurate temperature retrievals by combining convective scale numerical models and brightness temperatures (BTs. A one-dimensional variational (1D-Var retrieval technique has been tested to optimally combine MWR and 3-h forecasts from the French convective scale model AROME. A microwave profiler HATPRO (Humidity and Temperature PROfiler was operated during 6 months at the meteorological station of Bordeaux (Météo France. MWR BTs were monitored against simulations from the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator 2 radiative transfer model. An overall good agreement was found between observations and simulations for opaque V-band channels but large errors were observed for channels the most affected by liquid water and water vapour emissions (51.26 and 52.28 GHz. 1D-Var temperature retrievals are performed in clear-sky and cloudy conditions using a screening procedure based on cloud base height retrieval from ceilometer observations, infrared radiometer temperature and liquid water path derived from the MWR observations. The 1D-Var retrievals were found to improve the AROME forecasts up to 2 km with a maximum gain of approximately 50 % in root-mean-square-errors (RMSE below 500 m. They were also found to outperform neural network retrievals. A static bias correction was proposed to account for systematic instrumental errors. This correction was found to have a negligible impact on the 1D-Var retrievals. The use of low elevation angles improves the retrievals up to 12 % in RMSE in cloudy-sky in the first layers. The present implementation achieved a RMSE with respect to radiosondes within 1 K in clear-sky and 1.3 K in cloudy-sky conditions for temperature.

  20. Optimal estimation of water vapour profiles using a combination of Raman lidar and microwave radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foth, Andreas; Pospichal, Bernhard

    2017-09-01

    In this work, a two-step algorithm to obtain water vapour profiles from a combination of Raman lidar and microwave radiometer is presented. Both instruments were applied during an intensive 2-month measurement campaign (HOPE) close to Jülich, western Germany, during spring 2013. To retrieve reliable water vapour information from inside or above the cloud a two-step algorithm is applied. The first step is a Kalman filter that extends the profiles, truncated at cloud base, to the full height range (up to 10 km) by combining previous information and current measurement. Then the complete water vapour profile serves as input to the one-dimensional variational (1D-VAR) method, also known as optimal estimation. A forward model simulates the brightness temperatures which would be observed by the microwave radiometer for the given atmospheric state. The profile is iteratively modified according to its error bars until the modelled and the actually measured brightness temperatures sufficiently agree. The functionality of the retrieval is presented in detail by means of case studies under different conditions. A statistical analysis shows that the availability of Raman lidar data (night) improves the accuracy of the profiles even under cloudy conditions. During the day, the absence of lidar data results in larger differences in comparison to reference radiosondes. The data availability of the full-height water vapour lidar profiles of 17 % during the 2-month campaign is significantly enhanced to 60 % by applying the retrieval. The bias with respect to radiosonde and the retrieved a posteriori uncertainty of the retrieved profiles clearly show that the application of the Kalman filter considerably improves the accuracy and quality of the retrieved mixing ratio profiles.

  1. Preclinical evaluation of somatostatin analogs bearing two macrocyclic chelators for high specific activity labeling with radiometals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storch, D.; Schmitt, J.S.; Waldherr, C.; Maecke, H.R.; Waser, B.; Reubi, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Radiometallated analogues of the regulatory peptide somatostatin are of interest in the in vivo localization and targeted radiotherapy of somatostatin receptor-overexpressing tumors. An important aspect of their use in vivo is a fast and efficient labeling (complexation) protocol for radiometals along with a high specific activity. We describe in this manuscript synthetic methods for the coupling of two chelators (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid = DOTA) to the bioactive peptide [Tyr 3 ,Thr 8 ]-octreotide (TATE) in order to increase the specific activity (radioactivity in Bq per mole peptide). The full chelator-linker-peptide conjugate was assembled on solid support using standard Fmoc chemistry. Two DOTA-chelators were linked to the peptide using lysine or N,N'-bis(3-aminopropyl)-glycine (Apg); in addition, pentasarcosine (Sar 5 ) was used as a spacer between the chelators and the peptide to probe its influence on biology and pharmacology. Complexation rates with In 3+ and Y 3+ salts and the corresponding radiometals were high, the bis-DOTA-derivatives showed higher complexation rates and gave higher specific activity than DOTA-TATE. Pharmacological and biological data of the complexed molecules did not show significant differences if compared to the parent peptide [ 111/nat In-DOTA]-TATE except for [( 111/nat In-DOTA) 2 -Apg]-TATE which showed a lower binding affinity and rate of internalization into tumor cells. The biodistribution of [( 111/nat In-DOTA)-Lys( 111/nat In-DOTA)]-TATE in the rat tumor model (AR4-2J) showed a high and specific (as shown by a blocking experiment) tracer uptake in somatostatin receptor-positive tissue but a lower tumor uptake compared to [ 111/nat In-DOTA]-TATE. (orig.)

  2. Theranostics Using Antibodies and Antibody-Related Therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moek, Kirsten L; Giesen, Danique; Kok, Iris C; de Groot, Derk Jan A; Jalving, Mathilde; Fehrmann, Rudolf S N; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; Brouwers, Adrienne H; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    In theranostics, radiolabeled compounds are used to determine a treatment strategy by combining therapeutics and diagnostics in the same agent. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody-related therapeutics represent a rapidly expanding group of cancer medicines. Theranostic approaches using these

  3. Shelf-Stable Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is an MRE? Is an MRE shelf stable? What foods are packaged in retort packages? What is aseptic ... type of package is used for aseptic processing? What foods are packaged in aseptic packages? Can I microwave ...

  4. Pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumbiegel, P.

    1986-11-01

    The relatively new field of pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes is reviewed. Scientific, juridical, and ethical questions are discussed concerning the application of these pharmaceuticals in human medicine. 13 C, 15 N, and 2 H are the stable isotopes mainly utilized in metabolic function tests. Methodical contributions are given to the application of 2 H, 13 C, and 15 N pharmaceuticals showing new aspects and different states of development in the field under discussion. (author)

  5. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for distribution for nondestructive research use on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Research Materials Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or is in reprocessing. For some of the high abundance naturally occurring isotopes, larger amounts can be made available; for example, Ca-40 and Fe-56

  6. Antibody targeting of Cathepsin S induces antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok Hang Fai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteolytic enzymes have been implicated in driving tumor progression by means of their cancer cell microenvironment activity where they promote proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. Therapeutic strategies have focused on attenuating their activity using small molecule inhibitors, but the association of proteases with the cell surface during cancer progression opens up the possibility of targeting these using antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC. Cathepsin S is a lysosomal cysteine protease that promotes the growth and invasion of tumour and endothelial cells during cancer progression. Our analysis of colorectal cancer patient biopsies shows that cathepsin S associates with the cell membrane indicating a potential for ADCC targeting. Results Here we report the cell surface characterization of cathepsin S and the development of a humanized antibody (Fsn0503h with immune effector function and a stable in vivo half-life of 274 hours. Cathepsin S is expressed on the surface of tumor cells representative of colorectal and pancreatic cancer (23%-79% positive expression. Furthermore the binding of Fsn0503h to surface associated cathepsin S results in natural killer (NK cell targeted tumor killing. In a colorectal cancer model Fsn0503h elicits a 22% cytotoxic effect. Conclusions This data highlights the potential to target cell surface associated enzymes, such as cathepsin S, as therapeutic targets using antibodies capable of elicitingADCC in tumor cells.

  7. Library of monoclonal antibodies against brush border membrane epithelial antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behar, M.; Katz, A.; Silverman, M.

    1986-01-01

    A purified fraction of proximal tubule brush border membranes (BBM) was prepared from dog kidney and used to immunize mice. The standard technique of hybridoma production was followed as described by Kohler and Milstein. Production of antibodies was detected by indirect immunofluorescence on dog kidney slices and by immunodot against the purified fraction on nitrocellulose. Five hybrids exhibited anti BBM activity. These were cloned twice and yielded stable cell lines producing IgG type monoclonal antibodies against BBM. They were designated A 1 , C 7 , D 3 , D 7 and H 4 . As a family these five monoclonals have broad tissue specificity, i.e. positive staining of the surface mucosa of intestinal kidney proximal tubules. D 3 exhibits even broader specificity for epithelium reacting with bile canaliculi and choroid plexus. The authors have verified that at least 4/5 antibodies are directed against BBM protein as revealed by immunoprecipitation of solubilized BBM and detected by Coomassie blue staining or autoradiography of lactoperoxidase labelled BBM. Most interestingly all antibodies bind to the surface of LL CPK 1 cells, a continuous pig kidney cell line of undefined origin but exhibiting many characteristics of proximal tubule cells. The library of monoclonal antibodies obtained provide important probes with which to study membrane biogenesis and polarization in epithelial cells

  8. Mapping stable direct and retrograde orbits around the triple system of asteroids (45) Eugenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, R. A. N.; Moraes, R. V.; Prado, A. F. B. A.; Winter, O. C.

    2017-12-01

    It is widely accepted that knowing the composition and the orbital evolution of asteroids might help us to understand the process of formation of the Solar system. It is also known that asteroids can represent a threat to our planet. Such an important role has made space missions to asteroids a very popular topic in current astrodynamics and astronomy studies. Taking into account the increasing interest in space missions to asteroids, especially to multiple systems, we present a study that aims to characterize the stable and unstable regions around the triple system of asteroids (45) Eugenia. The goal is to characterize the unstable and stable regions of this system and to make a comparison with the system 2001 SN263, which is the target of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) mission. A new concept was used for mapping orbits, by considering the disturbance received by the spacecraft from all perturbing forces individually. This method has also been applied to (45) Eugenia. We present the stable and unstable regions for particles with relative inclination between 0° and 180°. We found that (45) Eugenia presents larger stable regions for both prograde and retrograde cases. This is mainly because the satellites of this system are small when compared to the primary body, and because they are not close to each other. We also present a comparison between these two triple systems, and we discuss how these results can guide us in the planning of future missions.

  9. Antibodies and Plasmodium falciparum merozoites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramasamy, R; Ramasamy, M; Yasawardena, S

    There is considerable interest in using merozoite proteins in a vaccine against falciparum malaria. Observations that antibodies to merozoite surface proteins block invasion are a basis for optimism. This article draws attention to important and varied aspects of how antibodies to Plasmodium

  10. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 11. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise. Desirazu N Rao Bharath Wootla. General Article Volume 12 Issue ... Keywords. Catalytic antibodies; abzymes; hybridome technology; Diels– Alder reaction; Michaelis– Menten kinetics; Factor VIII.

  11. Antiphospholipid antibodies: standardization and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, R S; Friedline, J; Rogers, J S

    1997-09-01

    A phenomenon originally scorned as a laboratory nuisance has turned out to be an important cause of thromboembolism, fetal death, and other forms of human disease. Investigations of this inaptly named "lupus anticoagulant" has led to the discovery of at least two distinct types of autoimmune antibodies. In spite of recent discoveries regarding the pathophysiology of these antibodies, their clinical significance is still controversial.

  12. Educational paper: Primary antibody deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); M. van der Burg (Mirjam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPrimary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common primary immunodeficiencies and are characterized by a defect in the production of normal amounts of antigen-specific antibodies. PADs represent a heterogeneous spectrum of conditions, ranging from often asymptomatic selective IgA

  13. [Antibody induction after intrauterine interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, J; Giers, G; Bald, R; Hansmann, M; Hanfland, P

    1993-06-01

    Immunohematologic and clinical data, i.e., antibody profile, location of the placenta, mode of cordocentesis, obtained from 48 pregnant patients with irregular erythrocyte antibodies during the last 2 years have been retrospectively evaluated. All fetuses of the patients received intrauterine transfusions for the treatment of fetal erythroblastosis. In 16 (33%) patients (group I) a secondarily induced antibody was detected after the onset of intrauterine transfusion therapy. 32 (67%) patients (group II) did not further develop new antibody specificities. Group I exhibited a significantly different distribution in the location of the placenta (p pregnant women. In group I a 5-fold higher rate of anterior than posterior placenta location was found. The mode of cordocentesis differed significantly (p antibodies by invasive intrauterine interventions in our patients depended indirectly on the location of the placenta and directly on the mode of the puncture (trans- vs. paraplacental access).

  14. Development and characterization of three novel monoclonal antibodies against CA-125.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michurina, Tatiana; Kerzhner, Maxim; Klimovich, Boris

    2014-10-01

    Cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) is the most widely used tumor marker for ovarian cancer. Thus, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against CA-125 are valuable reagents for the development of diagnostic tests and immunotherapy. We describe here the generation and characterization of three novel hybridoma cell lines producing MAbs against CA-125. CA-125 purified from culture supernatant of ovarian carcinoma cell line OVCAR-3 by affinity chromatography, was used for immunization of BALB/c mice. Three stable cell lines (3C8, 2B6, and 5A12) were selected for production of antibodies against CA-125 and were expanded in mass culture. All three antibodies were shown to recognize linear epitopes. Antibodies 2B6 and 5A12 were determined to recognize epitope cluster B (M 11-like); MAb 3C8 was classified as group A-epitope binders (OC 125-like). The antibodies produced may be used for the development and improvement of CA-125 immunoassays.

  15. Stable Boundary Layer Education (STABLE) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The properties of, and the processes that occur in, the nocturnal stable boundary layer are not well understood, making it difficult to represent adequately in numerical models. The nocturnal boundary layer often is characterized by a temperature inversion and, in the Southern Great Plains region, a low-level jet. To advance our understanding of the nocturnal stable boundary layer, high temporal and vertical resolution data on the temperature and wind properties are needed, along with both large-eddy simulation and cloud-resolving modeling.

  16. Adsorption orientations and immunological recognition of antibodies on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhena, J. G.; Dumitru, A. C.; Herruzo, Elena T.; Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús I.; Garcia, Ricardo; Serena, P. A.; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid are combined to characterize the adsorption of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies over a hydrophobic surface modeled with a three-layer graphene slab. We consider explicitly the water solvent, simulating systems with massive sizes (up to 770 000 atoms), for four different adsorption orientations. Protocols based on steered MD to speed up the protein diffusion stage and to enhance the dehydration process are combined with long simulation times (>150 ns) in order to make sure that the final adsorption states correspond to actual stable configurations. Our MD results and the AFM images demonstrate that the IgG antibodies are strongly adsorbed, do not unfold, and retain their secondary and tertiary structures upon deposition. Statistical analysis of the AFM images shows that many of the antibodies adopt vertical orientations, even at very small coverages, which expose at least one Fab binding site for recognition events. Single molecule force spectroscopy experiments demonstrate the immunological response of the deposited antibodies by recognizing its specific antigens. The above properties together with the strong anchoring and preservation of the secondary structure, make graphene an excellent candidate for the development of immunosensors.Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid are combined to characterize the adsorption of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies over a hydrophobic surface modeled with a three-layer graphene slab. We consider explicitly the water solvent, simulating systems with massive sizes (up to 770 000 atoms), for four different adsorption orientations. Protocols based on steered MD to speed up the protein diffusion stage and to enhance the dehydration process are combined with long simulation times (>150 ns) in order to make sure that the final adsorption states correspond to actual stable configurations. Our

  17. The water vapour radiometer of Paranal: homogeneity of precipitable water vapour from two years of operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, Florian; Querel, Richard R.; Neureiter, Bianca

    2015-04-01

    A Low Humidity and Temperature Profiling (LHATPRO) microwave radiometer, manufactured by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG), is used to monitor sky conditions over ESO's Paranal observatory in support of VLT science operations. The unit measures several channels across the strong water vapour emission line at 183 GHz, necessary for resolving the low levels of precipitable water vapour (PWV) that are prevalent on Paranal (median ∼2.4 mm). The instrument consists of a humidity profiler (183-191 GHz), a temperature profiler (51-58 GHz), and an infrared camera (∼10 μm) for cloud detection. We present a statistical analysis of the homogeneity of all-sky PWV using 24 months of PWV observations. The question we tried to address was whether PWV is homogeneous enough across the sky such that service mode observations with the VLT can routinely be conducted with a user-provided constraint for PWV measured at zenith. We find the PWV over Paranal to be remarkably homogeneous across the sky down to 27.5° elevation with a median variation of 0.07 mm (rms). The homogeneity is a function of the absolute PWV but the relative variation is fairly constant at 2 to 3% (rms). Such variations will not be a significant issue for analysis of astronomical data. Users at ESO can specify PWV - measured at zenith - as an ambient constraint in service mode to enable, for instance, very demanding observations in the infrared. We conclude that in general it will not be necessary to add another observing constraint for PWV homogeneity to ensure integrity of observations. For demanding observations requiring very low PWV, where the relative variation is higher, the optimum support could be provided by observing with the LHATPRO in the same line-of-sight simultaneously. Such a mode of operations has already been tested but will have to be justified in terms of scientific gain before implementation can be considered. We plan to extend our analysis of PWV variations covering a larger parameters space

  18. An alternative method for calibration of narrow band radiometer using a radiative transfer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, J; Wolfram, E; D'Elia, R; Zamorano, F; Casiccia, C; Rosales, A; Quel, E

    2011-01-01

    The continual monitoring of solar UV radiation is one of the major objectives proposed by many atmosphere research groups. The purpose of this task is to determine the status and degree of progress over time of the anthropogenic composition perturbation of the atmosphere. Such changes affect the intensity of the UV solar radiation transmitted through the atmosphere that then interacts with living organisms and all materials, causing serious consequences in terms of human health and durability of materials that interact with this radiation. One of the many challenges that need to be faced to perform these measurements correctly is the maintenance of periodic calibrations of these instruments. Otherwise, damage caused by the UV radiation received will render any one calibration useless after the passage of some time. This requirement makes the usage of these instruments unattractive, and the lack of frequent calibration may lead to the loss of large amounts of acquired data. Motivated by this need to maintain calibration or, at least, know the degree of stability of instrumental behavior, we have developed a calibration methodology that uses the potential of radiative transfer models to model solar radiation with 5% accuracy or better relative to actual conditions. Voltage values in each radiometer channel involved in the calibration process are carefully selected from clear sky data. Thus, tables are constructed with voltage values corresponding to various atmospheric conditions for a given solar zenith angle. Then we model with a radiative transfer model using the same conditions as for the measurements to assemble sets of values for each zenith angle. The ratio of each group (measured and modeled) allows us to calculate the calibration coefficient value as a function of zenith angle as well as the cosine response presented by the radiometer. The calibration results obtained by this method were compared with those obtained with a Brewer MKIII SN 80 located in the

  19. Protective Capacity of the Human Anamnestic Antibody Response during Acute Dengue Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meihui; Züst, Roland; Toh, Ying Xiu; Pfaff, Jennifer M; Kahle, Kristen M; Davidson, Edgar; Doranz, Benjamin J; Velumani, Sumathy; Tukijan, Farhana; Wang, Cheng-I; Fink, Katja

    2016-12-15

    reduce viremia in a mouse model. In addition, a decrease of viremia in mice did not necessarily improve survival. The most protective antibodies were stable at pH 5, suggesting that antibody binding in the endosomes, after the antibody-virus complex is internalized, might be important to block virus spread in the organism. Copyright © 2016 Xu et al.

  20. Measurement of the single-shot pulse energy of a free electron laser using a cryogenic radiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masahiro, Kato; Norio, Saito; Yuichiro, Morishita; Takahiro, Tanaka [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), NMIJ, Tsukuba (Japan); Masahiro, Kato; Norio, Saito; Kai, Tiedtke; Pavle N, Juranic; Sorokin, A.A.; Richter, M.; Takahiro, Tanaka; Mitsuru, Nagasono; Makina, Yabashi; Kensuke, Tono; Tadashi, Togashi; Tetsuya, Ishikawa [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan); Kai, Tiedtke; Pavle N, Juranic; Sorokin, A.A.; Jastrow, U. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Sorokin, A.A. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Polytekhnicheskaya 26, St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Richter, M.; Kroth, U.; Schoppe, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, PTB, Berlin (Germany); Tadashi, Togashi; Hiroaki, Kimura; Haruhiko, Ohashi [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    The absolute single-shot pulse energy of the SPring 8 extreme ultraviolet (EUV) free electron laser (FEL) was measured using a cryogenic radiometer with a relative standard uncertainty of 3%. The temperature change of the cavity in the cryogenic radiometer caused by an incident FEL pulse was determined using a lock-in amplifier and an ac Wheatstone bridge. The measured pulse energies were compared with a gas-monitor detector developed by Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt/Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron/Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute (Ioffe) at a wavelength of 51.3 nm at the SPring-8 EUV-FEL in a shot-to-shot mode. The pulse energies measured using the two detectors agree within 2.0%. (authors)

  1. Radiation-stable polyolefin compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekers, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to compositions of olefinic polymers suitable for high energy radiation treatment. In particular, the invention relates to olefinic polymer compositions that are stable to sterilizing dosages of high energy radiation such as a gamma radiation. Stabilizers are described that include benzhydrol and benzhydrol derivatives; these stabilizers may be used alone or in combination with secondary antioxidants or synergists

  2. Monitoring of stable glaucoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M. Holtzer-Goor (Kim); N.S. Klazinga (Niek); M.A. Koopmanschap (Marc); H.G. Lemij (Hans); T. Plochg; E. van Sprundel (Esther)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractA high workload for ophthalmologists and long waiting lists for patients challenge the organization of ophthalmic care. Tasks that require less specialized skills, like the monitoring of stable (well controlled) glaucoma patients could be substituted from ophthalmologists to other

  3. GHRSST Level 2P North Atlantic Regional Bulk Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the NOAA-16 satellite (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for HIgh Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) dataset for the North Atlantic Region (NAR) from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on...

  4. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) and Aerosol Particle Size Parameter (APSP) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer...

  5. GHRSST Level 2P 1 m Depth Global Sea Surface Temperature from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi NPP satellite (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A global Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 2P dataset based on retrievals from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)....

  6. GHRSST Level 2P Global Subskin Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 on the GCOM-W satellite (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) was launched on 18 May 2012, onboard the Global Change Observation Mission - Water (GCOM-W) satellite developed...

  7. Nimbus-3 High-Resolution Infrared Radiometer (HRIR) Imagery of Cloud Cover at Day and Night on 70 mm Film V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The HRIRN3IM data product contains scanned negatives of photofacsimile 70mm film strips from the Nimbus-3 High-Resolution Infrared Radiometer. The images contain...

  8. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Snow Cover/Depth (SCD) Snow Fraction Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Snow Cover/Depth Fraction (SCF) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer...

  9. Nimbus-3 Medium-Resolution Infrared Radiometer (MRIR) Imagery of the Earth and Atmosphere at Daytime on 4" x 5" Film Sheets V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MRIRN3IM data product consists of 4 x 5 inch photographic film sheets from the Nimbus-3 Medium Resolution Infrared Radiometer. Each film sheet contains an entire...

  10. SMAP/Sentinel-1 L2 Radiometer/Radar 30-Second Scene 3 km EASE-Grid Soil Moisture V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level-2 (L2) soil moisture product provides estimates of land surface conditions retrieved by both the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) radiometer during...

  11. GHRSST Level 2P North Atlantic Regional Bulk Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the NOAA-17 satellite (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) dataset for the North Atlantic Region (NAR) from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on...

  12. GHRSST Level 2P North Atlantic Regional Bulk Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the NOAA-18 satellite (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for HIgh Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) dataset for the North Atlantic Region (NAR) from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on...

  13. GHRSST Level 3P Global Subskin Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the MetOp-A satellite (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A global Level 3 Group for HIgh Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) dataset from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the MetOp-A platform...

  14. GHRSST Level 3P North Atlantic Regional Subskin Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on NOAA-19 (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for HIgh Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) dataset for the North Atlantic Region (NAR) from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on...

  15. GHRSST Level 3C North Atlantic Regional Subskin Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on NOAA-19 (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) dataset for the North Atlantic Region (NAR) from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on...

  16. GHRSST Level 2P Global Sea Surface Temperature from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi NPP satellite (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Visible and Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a multi-disciplinary instrument that is being flown on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) series of...

  17. Nimbus-2 Medium-Resolution Infrared Radiometer (MRIR) Imagery of the Earth and Atmosphere at Daytime on 4" x 5" Film Sheets V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MRIRN2IM data product consists of 4 x 5 inch photographic film sheets from the Nimbus-2 Medium Resolution Infrared Radiometer. Each film sheet contains an entire...

  18. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Snow Cover/Depth (SCD) Binary Map Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Binary Snow Cover (BSC) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite...

  19. GHRSST Level 3U Global Subskin Sea Surface Temperature from the WindSat Polarimetric Radiometer on the Coriolis satellite (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The WindSat Polarimetric Radiometer, launched on January 6, 2003 aboard the Department of Defense Coriolis satellite, was designed to measure the ocean surface wind...

  20. The High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer on the GLOBAL HAWK: From Technology Development to Science Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shannon; Denning, Richard; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Lim, Boon; Tanabe, Jordan; Tanner, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results from the High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) during three recent field campaigns on the Global Hawk Unmanned Ariel Vehicles (UAV), focusing on the enabling technology that led to unprecedented observations of significant weather phenomenon, such as thermodynamic evolution of the tropical cyclone core during rapid intensification and the high resolution three dimensional mapping of several atmospheric river events. HAMSR is a 25 channel cross-track scanning microwave sounder with channels near the 60 and 118 GHz oxygen lines and the 183 GHz water vapor line. HAMSR was originally designed and built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a technology demonstrator in 1998. Subsequent to this, HAMSR participated in three NASA hurricane field campaigns, CAMEX-4, TCSP and NAMMA. Beginning in 2008, HAMSR was extensively upgraded to deploy on the NASA Global Hawk (GH) platform and serve as an asset to the NASA sub-orbital program. HAMSR has participated on the Global Hawk during the 2010 Genesis and Rapid Intensification (GRIP) campaign, the 2011 Winter Storms and Atmospheric Rivers (WISPAR) campaign and is currently participating in the NASA Ventures Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) campaign (2011-2015).

  1. Total solar irradiance as measured by the SOVAP radiometer onboard PICARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meftah Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From the SOlar VAriability PICARD (SOVAP space-based radiometer, we obtained a new time series of the total solar irradiance (TSI during Solar Cycle 24. Based on SOVAP data, we obtained that the TSI input at the top of the Earth’s atmosphere at a distance of one astronomical unit from the Sun is 1361.8 ± 2.4 W m−2 (1σ representative of the 2008 solar minimum period. From 2010 to 2014, the amplitude of the changes has been of the order of ± 0.1%, corresponding to a range of about 2.7 W m−2. To determine the TSI from SOVAP, we present here an improved instrument equation. A parameter was integrated from a theoretical analysis that highlighted the thermo-electrical non-equivalence of the radiometric cavity. From this approach, we obtained values that are lower than those previously provided with the same type of instrument. The results in this paper supersede the previous SOVAP analysis and provide the best SOVAP-based TSI-value estimate and its temporal variation.

  2. Global Regolith Thermophysical Properties of the Moon From the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayne, Paul O.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Siegler, Matthew A.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Ghent, Rebecca R.; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Aharonson, Oded; Elder, Catherine M.; Lucey, Paul G.; Paige, David A.

    2017-12-01

    We used infrared data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment to globally map thermophysical properties of the Moon's regolith fines layer. Thermal conductivity varies from 7.4 × 10-4 W m-1 K-1 at the surface to 3.4 × 10-3 W m-1 K-1 at depths of 1 m, given density values of 1,100 kg m-3 at the surface to 1,800 kg m-3 at 1 m depth. On average, the scale height of these profiles is 7 cm, corresponding to a thermal inertia of 55 ± 2 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2 at 273 K, relevant to the diurnally active near-surface layer, 4-7 cm. The temperature dependence of thermal conductivity and heat capacity leads to an 2 times diurnal variation in thermal inertia at the equator. On global scales, the regolith fines are remarkably uniform, implying rapid homogenization by impact gardening of this layer on timescales thermal inertia (> 100 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2) in the interiors and ejecta of Copernican-aged impact craters and lower thermal inertia (thermal inertia provide a potential tool for age dating craters of previously unknown age, complementary to the approach suggested by Ghent et al. (2014). Several anomalous regions are identified in the global 128 pixels per degree maps presented here, including a high-thermal inertia deposit near the antipode of Tycho crater.

  3. Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibration Process for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) maintains a fleet of monitoring stations to aid in the improved scientific understanding of the basic physics related to radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere, particularly the interactions among clouds and aerosols. ARM obtains continuous measurements and conducts field campaigns to provide data products that aid in the improvement and further development of climate models. All of the measurement campaigns include a suite of solar measurements. The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory supports ARM's full suite of stations in a number of ways, including troubleshooting issues that arise as part of the data-quality reviews; managing engineering changes to the standard setup; and providing calibration services and assistance to the full fleet of solar-related instruments, including pyranometers, pyrgeometers, pyrheliometers, as well as the temperature/relative humidity probes, multimeters, and data acquisition systems that are used in the calibrations performed at the Southern Great Plains Radiometer Calibration Facility. This paper discusses all aspects related to the support provided to the calibration of the instruments in the solar monitoring fleet.

  4. Scientific and Technical Support for the Galileo Net Flux Radiometer Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sromovsky, Lawrence A.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes work in support of the Galileo Net Flux Radiometer (NFR), an instrument mounted on the Galileo probe, a spacecraft designed for entry into and direct measurements of Jupiter's atmosphere. Tasks originally proposed for the post launch period covered by NCC 2-854 are briefly as follows: attend and support PSG (Project Science Group) and other project science meetings; support in-flight checkouts; maintain and keep safe the spare instrument and GSE (Ground Support Equipment); organize and maintain documentation; finish NFR calibration measurements, documentation, and analysis; characterize and diagnose instrument anomalies; develop descent data analysis tools; and science data analysis and publication. Because we had the capability to satisfy a project support need we also subsequently proposed and were funded to make ground-based observations of Jupiter during the period surrounding the Galileo arrival at Jupiter, using the Swedish Solar Telescope at La Palma, Canary Islands. The following section provides background information on the NFR instrument. Section 3 contains the final report of work done.

  5. Differential Radiometers Using Fabry-Perot Interferometric Technique for Remote Sensing of Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Elena M.; Heaps,William S.; Wilson, Emily L.

    2007-01-01

    A new type of remote sensing radiometer based upon the Fabry-Perot interferometric technique has been developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and tested from both ground and aircraft platform. The sensor uses direct or reflected sunlight and has channels for measuring column concentration of carbon dioxide at 1570 nm, oxygen lines sensitive to pressure and temperature at 762 and 768 nm, and water vapor (940 nm). A solid Fabry-Perot etalon is used as a tunable narrow bandpass filter to restrict the measurement to the gas of interest's absorption bands. By adjusting the temperature of the etalon, which changes the index of refraction of its material, the transmission fringes can be brought into nearly exact correspondence with absorption lines of the particular species. With this alignment between absorption lines and fringes, changes in the amount of a species in the atmosphere strongly affect the amount of light transmitted by the etalon and can be related to gas concentration. The technique is applicable to different chemical species. We have performed simulations and instrument design studies for CH4, "Cot isotope, and CO detection. Index Terms- Absorbing media, Atmospheric measurements, Fabry-Perot interferometers, Optical interferometry, Remote sensing.

  6. Simultaneous retrievals of temperature and volume mixing ratio constituents from nonoxygen odin submillimeter radiometer bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, P; Merino, F; Murtagh, D

    2001-11-20

    We present the retrieval of temperature and O(3) volume mixing ratio profiles in the middle atmosphere from a single strong O(3) line. We performed the study using simulated limb-sounding measurements in the frame of the submillimeter radiometer (SMR) instrument that will be carried by the Odin satellite that is due to be launched in early 2001. This study is interesting for the Odin SMR data analysis because we first provide additional temperature measurements, and second reduce significantly the O(3) retrieval error that is due to the temperature and pressure uncertainties. Nonlinear retrievals are performed to retrieve the O(3), CO, H(2)O, and temperature profiles simultaneously from the spectral band 576.27-576.67 GHz. The pressure profile is deduced from the hydrostatic equilibrium equation after each iteration. Temperature and O(3) can be retrieved throughout the stratosphere from 15-50 and 20-50 km, respectively, with a vertical resolution of 3 km. The altitude domain corresponds to the parts of the atmosphere where the signal intensity saturates in some spectrometer channels. A total error of 4-6 K has been found in the temperature profile, mainly because of the instrumental thermal noise and to a lesser extent the calibration. The total error in the O(3) profile is 5-10% and is dominated by the O(3) line-broadening parameter. The total error on the retrieved pressure profile is 2-10% because of the errors in calibration and reference pressure.

  7. Atmospheric water distribution in a midlatitude cyclone observed by the Seasat Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmurdie, L. A.; Katsaros, K. B.

    1985-01-01

    Patterns in the horizontal distribution of integrated water vapor, integrated liquid water and rainfall rate derived from the Seasat Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) during a September 10-12, 1978 North Pacific cyclone are studied. These patterns are compared with surface analyses, ship reports, radiosonde data, and GOES-West infrared satellite imagery. The SMMR data give a unique view of the large mesoscale structure of a midlatitude cyclone. The water vapor distribution is found to have characteristic patterns related to the location of the surface fronts throughout the development of the cyclone. An example is given to illustrate that SMMR data could significantly improve frontal analysis over data-sparse oceanic regions. The distribution of integrated liquid water agrees qualitatively well with corresponding cloud patterns in satellite imagery and appears to provide a means to distinguish where liquid water clouds exist under a cirrus shield. Ship reports of rainfall intensity agree qualitatively very well with SMMR-derived rainrates. Areas of mesoscale rainfall, on the order of 50 km x 50 km or greater are detected using SMMR derived rainrates.

  8. Evaluation of environmental UV doses by empirical WL4UV model and multichannel radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piervitali, Emanuela; Benedetti, Elena; Damiani, Alessandro; Rafanelli, Claudio; Di Menno, Ivo; Casu, Giovanni; Malaspina, Fabio; Anav, Andrea; Di Menno, Massimo

    2005-08-01

    Solar UV radiation interacts both with atmospheric constituents, producing photochemical reactions, and with the biosphere, inducing changes or protection responses. Important for humans are the skin and eye diseases that result from UV exposure, in particular from social or recreational exposure. This leads to an evaluation of risks and to an assessment of suitable prevention strategies. Therefore, the correct evaluation of the available environmental dose is important; in fact, only a fraction of UV radiation will be absorbed by individuals depending on their outdoor activity. The more dense the UV solar network is, the more the doses will be correct. This paper shows the results of research carried out in Vigna di Valle (Rome, Italy) during spring 2004. The available environmental doses are evaluated by the WL4UV empirical model, developed by the authors, utilizing the solar UV spectral irradiance measured by a GUV 511C multichannel radiometer. The spectra of a wide range Brewer spectrophotometer (286.5 - 363.0 nm) have been assumed as reference. As an evaluation of the model in cloudy situations, an analysis in San Diego, Calif., USA, with a SUV 100 spectroradiometer is also shown.

  9. Method to Calculate Uncertainty Estimate of Measuring Shortwave Solar Irradiance using Thermopile and Semiconductor Solar Radiometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reda, I.

    2011-07-01

    The uncertainty of measuring solar irradiance is fundamentally important for solar energy and atmospheric science applications. Without an uncertainty statement, the quality of a result, model, or testing method cannot be quantified, the chain of traceability is broken, and confidence cannot be maintained in the measurement. Measurement results are incomplete and meaningless without a statement of the estimated uncertainty with traceability to the International System of Units (SI) or to another internationally recognized standard. This report explains how to use International Guidelines of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) to calculate such uncertainty. The report also shows that without appropriate corrections to solar measuring instruments (solar radiometers), the uncertainty of measuring shortwave solar irradiance can exceed 4% using present state-of-the-art pyranometers and 2.7% using present state-of-the-art pyrheliometers. Finally, the report demonstrates that by applying the appropriate corrections, uncertainties may be reduced by at least 50%. The uncertainties, with or without the appropriate corrections might not be compatible with the needs of solar energy and atmospheric science applications; yet, this report may shed some light on the sources of uncertainties and the means to reduce overall uncertainty in measuring solar irradiance.

  10. UV dosimetry in Antarctica (Baia Terranova): analysis of data from polysulphone films and GUV 511 radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariutti, Gianni F.; Bortolin, Emanuela; Polichetti, Alessandro; Anav, Andrea; Casale, Giuseppe R.; Di Menno, Massimo; Rafanelli, Claudio

    2003-11-01

    This paper shows the results of measurements carried out in November 2002 in the Italian Antarctic Base of Baia Terranova (74.07°S, 164.08°E) to test polysulphone film badges as possible UV personal dosimeters in such extreme environmental conditions. In the Italian Antarctic Base a multichannel radiometer GUV 511 (Biospherical Inc.) is routinely used by the Italian National Research Council (CNR) for UV irradiance at sea level. This instrument measures the intensity of the solar UV spectrum at four different wavelengths: 305, 320, 340, 380 nm, respectively. Data obtained from polysulphone badges exposed in the horizontal and the vertical configurations during diverse time lapses of the day, and from polysulphone badges worn by three volunteers of the base staff during several outdoors activities, have been compared with the irradiance data calculated from the measured values of GUV 511. A preliminary analysis of the whole data, also in the light of other recorded atmospheric and climatic parameters, shows a reasonable consistency. As also shown by previous measurements, carried out in June 2002 in the locality of Ny Alesund (Svalbard -- Artic Region), the calibration of the above mentioned personal dosimeters by means of another instrument operating in the same locality is a crucial step. Further work is required to demonstrate this approach is suitable for an acceptable evaluation of personal radiant exposures.

  11. Validation of stratospheric water vapour measurements from the airborne microwave radiometer AMSOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Müller

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the validation of a water vapour dataset obtained by the Airborne Microwave Stratospheric Observing System AMSOS, a passive microwave radiometer operating at 183 GHz. Vertical profiles are retrieved from spectra by an optimal estimation method. The useful vertical range lies in the upper troposphere up to the mesosphere with an altitude resolution of 8 to 16 km and a horizontal resolution of about 57 km. Flight campaigns were performed once a year from 1998 to 2006 measuring the latitudinal distribution of water vapour from the tropics to the polar regions. The obtained profiles show clearly the main features of stratospheric water vapour in all latitudinal regions. Data are validated against a set of instruments comprising satellite, ground-based, airborne remote sensing and in-situ instruments. It appears that AMSOS profiles have a dry bias of 0 to –20%, when compared to satellite experiments. Also a comparison between AMSOS and in-situ hygrosondes FISH and FLASH have been performed. A matching in the short overlap region in the upper troposphere of the lidar measurements from the DIAL instrument and the AMSOS dataset allowed water vapour profiling from the middle troposphere up to the mesosphere.

  12. Heat Capacity Mapping Radiometer (HCMR) data processing algorithm, calibration, and flight performance evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohse, J. R.; Bewtra, M.; Barnes, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    The rationale and procedures used in the radiometric calibration and correction of Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) data are presented. Instrument-level testing and calibration of the Heat Capacity Mapping Radiometer (HCMR) were performed by the sensor contractor ITT Aerospace/Optical Division. The principal results are included. From the instrumental characteristics and calibration data obtained during ITT acceptance tests, an algorithm for post-launch processing was developed. Integrated spacecraft-level sensor calibration was performed at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) approximately two months before launch. This calibration provided an opportunity to validate the data calibration algorithm. Instrumental parameters and results of the validation are presented and the performances of the instrument and the data system after launch are examined with respect to the radiometric results. Anomalies and their consequences are discussed. Flight data indicates a loss in sensor sensitivity with time. The loss was shown to be recoverable by an outgassing procedure performed approximately 65 days after the infrared channel was turned on. It is planned to repeat this procedure periodically.

  13. A Fast Visible-Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Simulator for Cloudy Atmopheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Yang, Ping; Nasiri, Shaima L.; Platnick, Steven; Meyer, Kerry G.; Wang, Chen Xi; Ding, Shouguo

    2015-01-01

    A fast instrument simulator is developed to simulate the observations made in cloudy atmospheres by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). The correlated k-distribution (CKD) technique is used to compute the transmissivity of absorbing atmospheric gases. The bulk scattering properties of ice clouds used in this study are based on the ice model used for the MODIS Collection 6 ice cloud products. Two fast radiative transfer models based on pre-computed ice cloud look-up-tables are used for the VIIRS solar and infrared channels. The accuracy and efficiency of the fast simulator are quantify in comparison with a combination of the rigorous line-by-line (LBLRTM) and discrete ordinate radiative transfer (DISORT) models. Relative errors are less than 2 for simulated TOA reflectances for the solar channels and the brightness temperature differences for the infrared channels are less than 0.2 K. The simulator is over three orders of magnitude faster than the benchmark LBLRTM+DISORT model. Furthermore, the cloudy atmosphere reflectances and brightness temperatures from the fast VIIRS simulator compare favorably with those from VIIRS observations.

  14. LYRA, solar uv radiometer on the technology demonstration platform PROBA-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockman, Y.; Hochedez, J.-F.; Schmutz, W.; BenMoussa, A.; Defise, J.-M.; Denis, F.; D'Olieslaeger, M.; Dominique, M.; Haenen, K.; Halain, J.-P.; Koller, S.; Koizumi, S.; Mortet, V.; Rochus, P.; Schühle, U.; Soltani, A.; Theissen, A.

    2017-11-01

    LYRA is a solar radiometer part of the PROBA 2 micro satellite payload. LYRA will monitor the solar irradiance in four soft X-Ray - VUV passbands. They have been chosen for their relevance to Solar Physics, Aeronomy and SpaceWeather: 1/ Lyman Alpha channel, 2/ Herzberg continuum range, 3/ Aluminium filter channel (including He II at 30.4 nm) and 4/ Zirconium filter channel. The radiometric calibration is traceable to synchrotron source standards. The stability will be monitored by on-board calibration sources (LEDs), which allow us to distinguish between potential degradations of the detectors and filters. Additionally, a redundancy strategy maximizes the accuracy and the stability of the measurements. LYRA will benefit from wide bandgap detectors based on diamond: it will be the first space assessment of revolutionary UV detectors. Diamond sensors make the instruments radiation-hard and solar-blind (insensitive to visible light) and therefore, make dispensable visible light blocking filters. To correlate the data of this new detector technology, well known technology, such as Si detectors are also embarked. The SWAP EUV imaging telescope will operate next to LYRA on PROBA-2. Together, they will provide a high performance solar monitor for operational space weather nowcasting and research. LYRA demonstrates technologies important for future missions such as the ESA Solar Orbiter.

  15. Quantitative Characterisation of Sky Conditions on Paranal with the Microwave Radiometer LHATPRO - Five Years and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, Florian; Querel, R.; Neureiter, B.; Hanuschik, R.

    2017-09-01

    "A Low Humidity and Temperature Profiling (LHATPRO) microwave radiometer, optimized for measuring small amounts of atmospheric precipitable water vapour (PWV), has now been in use for more than five years to monitor sky conditions over ESO's Paranal observatory (median PWV 2.5 mm). We'll summarise the performance characteristics of the unit and the current applications of its data in scheduling observations in Service Mode to take advantage of favourable conditions for infrared observations. We'll elaborate on our improved understanding of PWV over Paranal, including an analysis of PWV homogeneity addressing an important calibration issue. In addition we'll describe how the capabilities of the LHATPRO can be used in the future to further strengthen science operations and calibration by also offering line-of-sight support for individual VLT observations. Using its IR data we developed a method for an automated classification of photometric observing conditions in a quantitative way, supporting high precision photometry. Its highly precise PWV measurements enable new low PWV science during episodes of extremely low water vapour that result in a strongly increased transmission also outside the standard atmospheric windows. A goal for the future is to combine various diagnostics measurements (altitude resolved profiles) by LHATPRO and other instruments and sophisticated atmospheric modeling to better characterize relevant properties of the atmosphere and to thus enable more precise, local short-term forecasting for optimised science operations."

  16. Tomography of the Earth's atmosphere by the spaceborne occultation radiometer ORA: Spatial inversion algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussen, Didier; Arijs, Etienne; Leclere, Fabienne; Nevejans, Dennis; Bingen, Christine

    1997-02-01

    The occultation radiometer ORA was designed to perform measurements of O3, NO2, H2O, number density, and aerosol extinction altitude profiles in the Earth's atmosphere through the occultation method viewing the full solar disk. The experiment was mounted on the EURECA satellite and measured the relative transmission of light during about 7000 orbital sunsets and sunrises from August 11, 1992, to May 13, 1993. The spatial inversion algorithm developed to retrieve the total extinction altitude profiles from these data is described here. It is shown that the signal measured by an instrument having a large field of view can be successfully processed to give a much better altitude resolution than the one related to the angular size of the Sun. The main difficulties concern the inclusion of all refractive effects, the application of a new inversion scheme and its associated mapping strategy to refine the aerosol layer detection. The algorithm applies to fully nonlinear occultation experiments requiring global and nonheuristic inversion schemes.

  17. Dissecting Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    The potential of monoclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  18. Dissecting Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    The potential of monoclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  19. Antisperm antibodies and fertility association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, B; Cardona-Maya, W

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the relation between antisperm antibodies (ASA) and human fertility by reviewing the scientific literature of the last 45 years. We carried out a review of scientific literature about antisperm antibodies and infertility published in spanish or english in databases as Pubmed, Medline, Scielo, some books and another gray literature include information related to this review and that is published in the last 45 years. Infertile couples suffer infertility by immunological mechanisms mainly by the presence of antisperm antibodies ASA in blood, semen or cervicovaginal secretions; the formation of ASA in men and women may be associated with disturbance in immunomodulatory mechanisms that result in functional impairment of sperm and thus its inability to fertilize the oocyte. Immunological infertility caused by ASA is the result of interference of these antibodies in various stages of fertilization process, inhibiting the ability of interaction between sperm and oocyte. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Antibody Drug Conjugates: Preclinical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Gadi G

    2015-05-01

    The development path for antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) is more complex and challenging than for unmodified antibodies. While many of the preclinical considerations for both unmodified and antibody drug conjugates are shared, special considerations must be taken into account when developing an ADC. Unlike unmodified antibodies, an ADC must preferentially bind to tumor cells, internalize, and traffic to the appropriate intracellular compartment to release the payload. Parameters that can impact the pharmacological properties of this class of therapeutics include the selection of the payload, the type of linker, and the methodology for payload drug conjugation. Despite a plethora of in vitro assays and in vivo models to screen and evaluate ADCs, the challenge remains to develop improved preclinical tools that will be more predictive of clinical outcome. This review will focus on preclinical considerations for clinically validated small molecule ADCs. In addition, the lessons learned from Mylotarg®, the first in class FDA-approved ADC, are highlighted.