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Sample records for stable ph gradients

  1. Characterization of Growing Soil Bacterial Communities across a pH gradient Using H218O DNA-Stable Isotope Probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty-Bernard, A. T.; Schwartz, E.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have established consistent relationships between pH and bacterial diversity and community structure in soils from site-specific to landscape scales. However, these studies rely on DNA or PLFA extraction techniques from bulk soils that encompass metabolically active and inactive, or dormant, communities, and loose DNA. Dormant cells may comprise up to 80% of total live cells. If dormant cells dominate a particular environment, it is possible that previous interpretations of the soil variables assumed to drive communities could be profoundly affected. We used H218O stable isotope probing and bar-coded illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes to monitor the response of actively growing communities to changes in soil pH in a soil microcosm over 14 days. This substrate-independent approach has several advantages over 13C or 15N-labelled molecules in that all growing bacteria should be able to make use of water, allowing characterization of whole communities. We hypothesized that Acidobacteria would increasingly dominate the growing community and that Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes would decline, given previously established responses by these taxa to soil pH. Instead, we observed the reverse. Actinobacteria abundance increased three-fold from 26 to 76% of the overall community as soil pH fell from pH 5.6 to pH 4.6. Shifts in community structure and decreases in diversity with declining soil pH were essentially driven by two families, Streptomyceaca and Microbacteracea, which collectively increased from 2 to 40% of the entire community. In contrast, Acidobacteria as a whole declined although numbers of subdivision 1 remained stable across all soil pH levels. We suggest that the brief incubation period in this SIP study selected for growth of acid-tolerant Actinobacteria over Acidobacteria. Taxa within Actinomycetales have been readily cultured over short time frames, suggesting rapid growth patterns. Conversely, taxa within Acidobacteria have been

  2. Intracellular pH gradients in migrating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christine; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Schwab, Albrecht

    2011-01-01

    Cell polarization along the axis of movement is required for migration. The localization of proteins and regulators of the migratory machinery to either the cell front or its rear results in a spatial asymmetry enabling cells to simultaneously coordinate cell protrusion and retraction. Protons...... might function as such unevenly distributed regulators as they modulate the interaction of focal adhesion proteins and components of the cytoskeleton in vitro. However, an intracellular pH (pH(i)) gradient reflecting a spatial asymmetry of protons has not been shown so far. One major regulator of p......H(i), the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1, is essential for cell migration and accumulates at the cell front. Here, we test the hypothesis that the uneven distribution of NHE1 activity creates a pH(i) gradient in migrating cells. Using the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF, pH(i) was measured in five cell lines (MV...

  3. pH gradients in the diffusive boundary layer of subarctic macrophytes

    KAUST Repository

    Hendriks, Iris E.

    2017-06-20

    Highly productive macrophytes produce diurnal and seasonal cycles in CO concentrations modulated by metabolic activity, which cause discrepancies between pH in the bulk water and near seaweed blades, especially when entering the diffusion boundary layer (DBL). Calcifying epiphytic organisms living in this environment are therefore exposed to a different pH environment than that of the water column. To evaluate the actual pH environment on blade surfaces, we measured the thickness of the DBL and pH gradients within it for six subarctic macrophytes: Fucus vesiculosus, Ascophyllum nodosum, Ulva lactuca, Zostera marina, Saccharina longicruris, and Agarum clathratum. We measured pH under laboratory conditions at ambient temperatures (2–3 °C) and slow, stable flow over the blade surface at five light intensities (dark, 30, 50, 100 and 200 µmol photons m s). Boundary layer thickness ranged between 511 and 1632 µm, while the maximum difference in pH (∆pH) between the blade surface and the water column ranged between 0.4 ± 0.14 (average ± SE; Zostera) and 1.2 ± 0.13 (average ± SE; Ulva) pH units. These differences in pH are larger than predictions for pH changes in the bulk water by the end of the century. A simple quadratic model best described the relationship between light intensity and maximum ∆pH, pointing at relatively low optimum PAR of between 28 and 139 µmol photons m s to reach maximum ∆pH. Elevated pH at the blade surface may provide chemical “refugia” for calcifying epiphytic organisms, especially during summer at higher latitudes where photoperiods are long.

  4. Systematic generation of buffer systems for pH gradient ion exchange chromatography and their application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröner, Frieder; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2013-04-12

    pH gradient protein separations are widely used techniques in the field of protein analytics, of which isoelectric focusing is the most well known application. The chromatographic variant, based on the formation of pH gradients in ion exchange columns is only rarely applied due to the difficulties to form controllable, linear pH gradients over a broad pH range. This work describes a method for the systematic generation of buffer compositions with linear titration curves, resulting in well controllable pH gradients. To generate buffer compositions with linear titration curves an in silico method was successfully developed. With this tool, buffer compositions for pH gradient ion exchange chromatography with pH ranges spanning up to 7.5 pH units were established and successfully validated. Subsequently, the buffer systems were used to characterize the elution behavior of 22 different model proteins in cation and anion exchange pH gradient chromatography. The results of both chromatographic modes as well as isoelectric focusing were compared to describe differences in between the methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Systematic interpolation method predicts protein chromatographic elution with salt gradients, pH gradients and combined salt/pH gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasy, Arch; Barker, Gregory; Carta, Giorgio

    2017-03-01

    A methodology is presented to predict protein elution behavior from an ion exchange column using both individual or combined pH and salt gradients based on high-throughput batch isotherm data. The buffer compositions are first optimized to generate linear pH gradients from pH 5.5 to 7 with defined concentrations of sodium chloride. Next, high-throughput batch isotherm data are collected for a monoclonal antibody on the cation exchange resin POROS XS over a range of protein concentrations, salt concentrations, and solution pH. Finally, a previously developed empirical interpolation (EI) method is extended to describe protein binding as a function of the protein and salt concentration and solution pH without using an explicit isotherm model. The interpolated isotherm data are then used with a lumped kinetic model to predict the protein elution behavior. Experimental results obtained for laboratory scale columns show excellent agreement with the predicted elution curves for both individual or combined pH and salt gradients at protein loads up to 45 mg/mL of column. Numerical studies show that the model predictions are robust as long as the isotherm data cover the range of mobile phase compositions where the protein actually elutes from the column. Copyright © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Stable black phosphorus quantum dots for alkali PH sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weilan; Song, Haizeng; Yan, Shancheng

    2018-01-01

    Black phosphorus, as a new two-dimensional material has been widely used in sensors, photovoltaic devices, etc. However, thin layered black phosphorus chemically degrades rapidly under ambient and aqueous conditions, which hinders the application of it in the chemical sensors. In this work, stable black phosphorus quantum dots (BPQDs) in solution are successfully synthesized by functionalization with 4-nitrobenzene-diazonium (4-NBD). The stable BPQDs are investigated by TEM, AFM, Raman, and UV-absorption. As a potential application, the stable BPQDs are used as sensors in alkali solution, which exhibit outstanding performance. Our work paves the way towards a new application with BPQDs in solution.

  7. Quantification of pH Gradients and Implications in Insulator-Based Dielectrophoresis of Biomolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Gencoglu, Aytug; Camacho-Alanis, Fernanda; Nguyen, Vi Thanh; Nakano, Asuka; Ros, Alexandra; Minerick, Adrienne

    2011-01-01

    Direct current (DC) insulator-based dielectrophoretic (iDEP) microdevices have the potential to replace traditional alternating current (AC) dielectrophoretic devices for many cellular and biomolecular separation applications. The use of large DC fields suggest that electrode reactions and ion transport mechanisms can become important and impact ion distributions in the nanoliters of fluid in iDEP microchannels. This work tracked natural pH gradient formation in a 100 μm wide, 1 cm long micro...

  8. Immobilized pH gradient gel cell to study the pH dependence of drug lipophilicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Hoang-Trang; Pereira, Carlos M; Roussel, Christophe; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Girault, Hubert H

    2006-03-01

    An experimental setup to study the pH dependence of standard ion-transfer potentials at the water/NPOE interface is presented. The system is composed of a microhole generated by laser photoablation in a 12-microm polyethylene terephthalate film, the aqueous phase consisting of a commercial immobilized pH gradient gel reswelled in electrolyte solution and a droplet of organic solution. Two electrodes are used, an Ag/AgCl aqueous electrode and an Ag/AgTPBCl organic electrode. This setup is applied to the study of two ionizable compounds (pyridine, 2,4-dinitrophenol). Thermodynamic parameters such as the standard transfer potential, the Gibbs energy of transfer, and the partition coefficients of the ionized forms as well as the neutral forms of these drug compounds are evaluated by differential pulse voltammetry. The data obtained are summarized in ionic partition diagrams, which are a useful tool for predicting and interpreting the transfer behavior of ionized drugs at the liquid/liquid interfaces mimicking the biological membranes.

  9. Preference behavior of silver catfish, Rhamdia quelen, juveniles in waters with pH gradients: laboratory experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Ineu Golombieski

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the preferred pH in silver catfish Rhamdia quelenjuveniles acclimated to different water hardness and the effect of shelters and infection by Ichthyophthirius multifiliis. Fish were acclimated for two weeks at different water hardness levels (4, 24, 50, or 100 mg CaCO3 L-1 and then transferred to a polyethylene tube with a pH gradient ranging from 3.5 to 11.7 and maintaining the same hardness. The position of the fish in the pH gradient was observed at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 h after transfer. Acclimation to different water hardness did not change pH preference of uninfected silver catfish (pH 7.30-7.83, and the presence of a shelter at the preferred pH or outside this preferred pH did not change the chosen pH range, either. Consequently silver catfish favored the acid-base regulation over shelter seeking tendency. Juveniles infected with I. multifiliis acclimated to water hardness of 24 mg CaCO3 L-1 preferred alkaline pH (9.08-9.79. This choice is not explained by the higher Na+ levels at alkaline pH compared to neutral pH because infected and uninfected fish choose the same waterborne Na+ levels in a Na+ gradient with the same pH.

  10. Photochemical performance of the acidophilic red alga Cyanidium sp. in a pH gradient

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvíderová, Jana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 2-3 (2012), s. 223-234 ISSN 0169-6149. [European Workshop on Astrobiology of the European-Astrobiology-Network-Association (EANA) /11/. German Aerosp Ctr, Cologne, 11.07.2011-14.07.2011] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0571 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : acidophilic red alga * pH gradient * photochemistry Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.831, year: 2012

  11. Relationship between growth and pH gradients of individual cells of Debaryomyces hansenii as influenced by NaCl and solid substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Henrik Dam; Gori, Klaus; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To examine the relationship between the growth and pH gradients of Debaryomyces hansenii at a single-cell level. Methods and Results: Using bioimaging techniques, the cell areas and early pH gradients (¿pH10), i.e. the pH gradients determined 10 min after initiation of experiments, were det...

  12. Soil pH determines fungal diversity along an elevation gradient in Southwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Liu, Guohua; Chen, Li; Wang, Juntao; Zhang, Limei

    2018-01-03

    Fungi play important roles in ecosystem processes, and the elevational pattern of fungal diversity is still unclear. Here, we examined the diversity of fungi along a 1,000 m elevation gradient on Mount Nadu, Southwestern China. We used MiSeq sequencing to obtain fungal sequences that were clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and to measure the fungal composition and diversity. Though the species richness and phylogenetic diversity of the fungal community did not exhibit significant trends with increasing altitude, they were significantly lower at mid-altitudinal sites than at the base. The Bray-Curtis distance clustering also showed that the fungal communities varied significantly with altitude. A distance-based linear model multivariate analysis (DistLM) identified that soil pH dominated the explanatory power of the species richness (23.72%), phylogenetic diversity (24.25%) and beta diversity (28.10%) of the fungal community. Moreover, the species richness and phylogenetic diversity of the fungal community increased linearly with increasing soil pH (Pdiversity along elevation gradients in Southwestern China.

  13. Two dimensional gel electrophoresis using narrow pH 3-5.6 immobilised pH gradient strips identifies potential novel disease biomarkers in plasma or serum

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Bevin Gangadharan & Nicole Zitzmann ### Abstract Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) is a protein separation technique often used to separate plasma or serum proteins in an attempt to identify novel biomarkers. This protocol describes how to run 2-DE gels using narrow pH 3-5.6 immobilised pH gradient strips to separate 2 mg of serum proteins. pH 3-6 ampholytes are used to enhance the solubility of proteins in this pH range before the serum proteins are separated in the...

  14. Control of electron transfer in the cytochrome system of mitochondria by pH, transmembrane pH gradient and electrical potential. The cytochromes b-c segment.

    OpenAIRE

    Papa, S; Lorusso, M; Izzo, G; Capuano, F

    1981-01-01

    1. A study is presented of the effects of pH, transmembrane pH gradient and electrical potential on oxidoreductions of b and c cytochromes in ox heart mitochondria and 'inside-out' submitochondrial particles. 2. Kinetic analysis shows that, in mitochondria at neutral pH, there is a restraint on the aerobic oxidation of cytochrome b566 with respect to cytochrome b562. Valinomycin plus K+ accelerates cytochrome b566 oxidation and retards net oxidation of cytochrome b562. At alkaline pH the rate...

  15. Quantification of pH gradients and implications in insulator-based dielectrophoresis of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencoglu, Aytug; Camacho-Alanis, Fernanda; Nguyen, Vi Thanh; Nakano, Asuka; Ros, Alexandra; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2011-09-01

    Direct current (DC) insulator-based dielectrophoretic (iDEP) microdevices have the potential to replace traditional alternating current dielectrophoretic devices for many cellular and biomolecular separation applications. The use of large DC fields suggest that electrode reactions and ion transport mechanisms can become important and impact ion distributions in the nanoliters of fluid in iDEP microchannels. This work tracked natural pH gradient formation in a 100 μm wide, 1 cm-long microchannel under applicable iDEP protein manipulation conditions. Using fluorescence microscopy with the pH-sensitive dye FITC Isomer I and the pH-insensitive dye TRITC as a reference, pH was observed to drop drastically in the microchannels within 1 min in a 3000 V/cm electric field; pH drops were observed in the range of 6-10 min within a 100 V/cm electric field and varied based on the buffer conductivity. To address concerns of dye transport impacting intensity data, electrokinetic mobilities of FITC were carefully examined and found to be (i) toward the anode and (ii) 1 to 2 orders of magnitude smaller than H⁺ transport which is responsible for pH drops from the anode toward the cathode. COMSOL simulations of ion transport showed qualitative agreement with experimental results. The results indicate that pH changes are severe enough and rapid enough to influence the net charge of a protein or cause aggregation during iDEP experiments. The results also elucidate reasonable time periods over which the phosphate buffering capacity can counter increases in H⁺ and OH⁻ for unperturbed iDEP manipulations. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Lowering coefficient of friction in Cu alloys with stable gradient nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Han, Zhong; Li, Xiuyan; Lu, K

    2016-12-01

    The coefficient of friction (COF) of metals is usually high, primarily because frictional contacts induce plastic deformation underneath the wear surface, resulting in surface roughening and formation of delaminating tribolayers. Lowering the COF of metals is crucial for improving the reliability and efficiency of metal contacts in engineering applications but is technically challenging. Refining the metals' grains to nanoscale cannot reduce dry-sliding COFs, although their hardness may be elevated many times. We report that a submillimeter-thick stable gradient nanograined surface layer enables a significant reduction in the COF of a Cu alloy under high-load dry sliding, from 0.64 (coarse-grained samples) to 0.29, which is smaller than the COFs of many ceramics. The unprecedented stable low COF stems from effective suppression of sliding-induced surface roughening and formation of delaminating tribolayer, owing to the stable gradient nanostructures that can accommodate large plastic strains under repeated sliding for more than 30,000 cycles.

  17. Effect of a pH Gradient on the Protonation States of Cytochrome c Oxidase: A Continuum Electrostatics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Pedro R; Oliveira, A Sofia F; Campos, Sara R R; Soares, Cláudio M; Baptista, António M

    2017-02-27

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) couples the reduction of dioxygen to water with transmembrane proton pumping, which leads to the generation of an electrochemical gradient. In this study we analyze how one of the components of the electrochemical gradient, the difference in pH across the membrane, or ΔpH, influences the protonation states of residues in CcO. We modified our continuum electrostatics/Monte Carlo (CE/MC) method in order to include the ΔpH and applied it to the study of CcO, in what is, to our best knowledge, the first CE/MC study of CcO in the presence of a pH gradient. The inclusion of a transmembrane pH gradient allows for the identification of residues whose titration behavior depends on the pH on both sides of the membrane. Among the several residues with unusual titration profiles, three are well-known key residues in the proton transfer process of CcO: E286 I , Y288 I , and K362 I . All three residues have been previously identified as being critical for the catalytic or proton pumping functions of CcO. Our results suggest that when the pH gradient increases, these residues may be part of a regulatory mechanism to stem the proton flow.

  18. Iron Hydroxide Minerals Drive Organic and Phosphorus Chemistry in Subsurface Redox / pH Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, E.; Barge, L. M.; VanderVelde, D.; Baum, M.

    2017-12-01

    Iron minerals, particularly iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, are prevalent on Mars and may exist in mixed valence or even reduced states beneath the oxidized surface. Iron (II,III) hydroxides, including green rust, are reactive and potentially catalytic minerals that can absorb and concentrate charged species, while also driving chemical reactions. These minerals are highly redox-sensitive and the presence of organics and/or phosphorus species could affect their mineralogy and/or stability. Conversely, the minerals might be able to drive chemical processes such as amino acid formation, phosphorus oxyanion reactions, or could simply selectively preserve organic species via surface adsorption. In an open aqueous sediment column, soluble products of mineral-driven reactions could also diffuse to sites of different chemical conditions to react even further. We synthesized Fe-hydroxide minerals under various conditions relevant to early Earth and ancient Mars (>3.0 Gyr), anoxically and in the presence of salts likely to have been present in surface or ground waters. Using these minerals we conducted experiments to test whether iron hydroxides could promote amino acid formation, and how the reaction is affected by subsurface gradients of redox, pH, and temperature. We also tested the adsorption of organic and phosphorus species onto Fe-hydroxide minerals at different conditions within the gradients. The suite of organic or phosphorus signatures that may be found in a particular mineral system is a combination of what is synthesized there, what is preferentially concentrated / retained there, and what is preserved against degradation. Further work is needed to determine how these processes could have proceeded on Mars and what mineral-organic signatures, abiotic or otherwise, would be produced from such processes.

  19. Interpreting the role of pH on stable isotopes in large benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Lisa L.; Knorr, P.O.; Wynn, J.G.; Hallock, P.; Harries, P.

    2016-01-01

    Large benthic foraminifera (LBF) are prolific producers of calcium carbonate sediments in shallow, tropical environments that are being influenced by ocean acidification (OA). Two LBF species, Amphistegina gibbosa (Order Rotaliida) with low-Mg calcite tests and Archaias angulatus (Order Miliolida) with high-Mg calcite tests, were studied to assess the effects of pH 7.6 on oxygen and carbon isotopic fractionation between test calcite and ambient seawater. The δ18O and δ13C values of terminal chambers and of whole adult tests of both species after 6 weeks were not significantly different between pH treatments of 8.0 and 7.6. However, tests of juveniles produced during the 6-week treatments showed significant differences between δ18O and δ13C values from control (pH 8.0) when compared with the treatment (pH 7.6) for both species. Although each individual's growth was photographed and measured, difficulty in distinguishing and manually extracting newly precipitated calcite from adult specimens likely confounded any differences in isotopic signals. However, juvenile specimens that resulted from asexual reproduction that occurred during the experiments did not contain old carbonate that could confound the new isotopic signals. These data reveal a potential bias in the design of OA experiments if only adults are used to investigate changes in test chemistries. Furthermore, the results reaffirm that different calcification mechanisms in these two foraminiferal orders control the fractionation of stable isotopes in the tests and will reflect decreasing pH in seawater somewhat differently. .

  20. Stable Isotope Systematics in Grasshopper Assemblages Along an Elevation Gradient, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, M. J.; Evans, S.; Dean, J.; Nufio, C.

    2012-12-01

    Insects comprise over three quarters of all animal species, yet studies of body water isotopic composition are limited to only the cockroach, the hoverfly, and chironomid flies. These studies suggest that oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions in body water are primarily controlled by dietary water sources, with modification from respiratory and metabolic processes. In particular, outward diffusion of isotopically depleted water vapor through insect spiracles at low humidity enriches residual body water in 18O and 2H (D). Stable isotope compositions (δ18O and δD) also respond to gradients in elevation and humidity, but these influences remain poorly understood. In this study, we measured grasshopper body water and local vegetation isotopic compositions along an elevation gradient in Colorado to evaluate three hypotheses: 1) Insect body water isotopic composition is directly related to food source water composition 2) Water vapor transport alters body water isotopic compositions relative to original diet sources, and 3) Elevation gradients influence isotopic compositions in insect body water. Thirty-five species of grasshopper were collected from 14 locations in Colorado grasslands, ranging in elevation from 450 to 800 meters (n=131). Body water was distilled from previously frozen grasshopper specimens using a vacuum extraction line, furnaces (90 °C), and liquid nitrogen traps. Water samples were then analyzed for δ18O and δD on an LGR Liquid Water Isotope Analyzer, housed in the Department of Geosciences, Boise State University. Grasshopper body water isotopic compositions show wide variation, with values ranging between -76.64‰ to +42.82‰ in δD and -3.06‰ to +26.78‰ in δ18O. Precipitation δ18O values over the entire Earth excluding the poles vary by approximately 30‰, comparable to the total range measured in our single study area. Most grasshopper values deviate from the global meteoric water line relating δ18O and δD in precipitation

  1. Potential impacts of climate change on stable flies, investigated along an altitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, J; David, J-F; Duvallet, G; Tillard, E

    2008-03-01

    Adult populations of stable flies were sampled along an altitudinal transect in Reunion Island to determine whether higher temperatures were associated with: (a) higher numbers of flies; (b) a longer season of infestation, and/or (c) different responses to warming in the cosmopolitan Stomoxys calcitrans (L) and the tropical Stomoxys niger niger Macquart (Diptera: Muscidae). Flies of both species were trapped at seven farms situated at four altitudes (100-1600 m a.s.l.) over a 90-week period. For both species, there were no relationships between the maximum or mean fly abundance and altitude. Only minimum abundance in winter was significantly higher at lower altitudes. Maximum and mean abundances differed significantly between nearby farms under similar climatic conditions. Seasonal fluctuations in fly abundance changed along the gradient. At lower altitudes, population growth started earlier after the winter but abundance declined earlier in summer, which resulted in a shift of the season of infestation. Seasonal fluctuations of both species were strongly related to climate variables at high altitude, mainly temperature. However, climate variables explained a decreasing proportion of the variations in abundance at lower altitudes. Stomoxys calcitrans was the most abundant species overall, but the proportion of S. n. niger increased significantly at lower altitudes and this species became predominant at 100 m a.s.l. It is concluded that stable fly infestations are unlikely to worsen in response to global warming. Maximum abundance is limited by local factors, possibly larval resources, which suggests that adequate husbandry practices could override the impact of climate change. Because S. n. niger tends to be the predominant pest at elevated temperatures, it is recommended that this species should not be introduced in areas where climate is changing.

  2. A physics-based model for maintenance of the pH gradient in the gastric mucus layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Owen L; Keener, James P; Fogelson, Aaron L

    2017-12-01

    It is generally accepted that the gastric mucus layer provides a protective barrier between the lumen and the mucosa, shielding the mucosa from acid and digestive enzymes and preventing autodigestion of the stomach epithelium. However, the precise mechanisms that contribute to this protective function are still up for debate. In particular, it is not clear what physical processes are responsible for transporting hydrogen protons, secreted within the gastric pits, across the mucus layer to the lumen without acidifying the environment adjacent to the epithelium. One hypothesis is that hydrogen may be bound to the mucin polymers themselves as they are convected away from the mucosal surface and eventually degraded in the stomach lumen. It is also not clear what mechanisms prevent hydrogen from diffusing back toward the mucosal surface, thereby lowering the local pH. In this work we investigate a physics-based model of ion transport within the mucosal layer based on a Nernst-Planck-like equation. Analysis of this model shows that the mechanism of transporting protons bound to the mucus gel is capable of reproducing the trans-mucus pH gradients reported in the literature. Furthermore, when coupled with ion exchange at the epithelial surface, our analysis shows that bicarbonate secretion alone is capable of neutralizing the epithelial pH, even in the face of enormous diffusive gradients of hydrogen. Maintenance of the pH gradient is found to be robust to a wide array of perturbations in both physiological and phenomenological model parameters, suggesting a robust physiological control mechanism. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This work combines modeling techniques based on physical principles, as well as novel numerical simulations to test the plausibility of one hypothesized mechanism for proton transport across the gastric mucus layer. Results show that this mechanism is able to maintain the extreme pH gradient seen in in vivo experiments and suggests a highly robust regulation

  3. Variable survival across low pH gradients in freshwater fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellyman, P G; Harding, J S

    2014-11-01

    A series of 14 day experiments was conducted on five common New Zealand fish species (redfin bully Gobiomorphus huttoni, inanga Galaxias maculatus, brown trout Salmo trutta, longfin eel Anguilla dieffenbachii and koaro Galaxias brevipinnis) to assess the effect of pH on survival and changes in body mass. No species survived in water of pH pH 4.5, G. maculatus larvae were also tested and had high mortality at this pH. Results suggest that adults are tolerant of low-pH waters; however, successful remediation of anthropogenically acidified streams will require an understanding of the susceptibility to low pH on different life cycle stages. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  4. HYDROLYSIS OF STARCH BY THERMO-AND PH-STABLE GLUCOAMYLASE AT CHANGE PHYSICO-CHEMICAL FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Grigirov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Regularity of the change rate of the enzymatic reactions depending on different temperatures, pH values in the formation and decay of the enzyme-substrate complex was investigated. Found that the kinetics of hydrolysis of starch by the action of heat and pH stable glucoamylases is complex as evidenced by the change in the value Km, which is a measure of the affinity of the enzyme to the substrate, active centers studied glucoamylases and starch undergo conformational changes at pH 4,0-5,0; 4,5-5,5 and a temperature of 60-65 °C.

  5. Electrolysis induces pH gradients and domain orientation in agarose gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelman-Ribeiro, Ariel; Nossal, Ralph; Morris, Ryan; Lange, Sarah; Kuo, Chein-Shiu; Bansil, Rama

    2006-01-01

    We have used small-angle light-scattering (SALS), microscopy, and pH measurements to study structural changes produced in unbuffered agarose gels as ions migrate under applied electric fields (3-20V/cm) . Anisotropic, bowtielike, light-scattering patterns were observed, whose development occurred more quickly at higher fields. The horizontal lobes were more pronounced at higher polymer concentration. Analysis of the SALS data with a simple model of scattering from anisotropic rods in an electric field is consistent with anisotropic rodlike domains on the order of 10-15μm in length, which align perpendicular to the electric field. The anisotropic domains in the gel reach almost the same level of orientation, regardless of the field strength. Microscope imaging revealed anisotropic domains on the same length scale, also aligned perpendicular to the field. Profiles of pH variation across the gel, measured by video photography, indicate that the anisotropic patterns appear when the H+ and OH- ions, migrating in opposite directions, meet. Calculations of pH profiles using a model based on electrodiffusion reproduce several features of measured pH profiles, including the power-law dependence on the electric field of the time at which the oppositely charged fronts meet. Ions migrating from both ends of the gel produce pH changes that are correlated with macroscopic shrinking and orientation of the gel.

  6. Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and PAGE gels for protein separation and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Gregory J.; Hatch, Anson V.; Singh, Anup K.; Wang, Ying-Chih

    2012-12-11

    Disclosed is a novel microfluidic device enabling on-chip implementation of a two-dimensional separation methodology. Previously disclosed microscale immobilized pH gradients (IPG) are combined with perpendicular polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) microchannels to achieve orthogonal separations of biological samples. Device modifications enable inclusion of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the second dimension. The device can be fabricated to use either continuous IPG gels, or the microscale isoelectric fractionation membranes we have also previously disclosed, for the first dimension. The invention represents the first all-gel two-dimensional separation microdevice, with significantly higher resolution power over existing devices.

  7. Application of linear pH gradients for the modeling of ion exchange chromatography: Separation of monoclonal antibody monomer from aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluters, Simon; Wittkopp, Felix; Jöhnck, Matthias; Frech, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The mobile phase pH is a key parameter of every ion exchange chromatography process. However, mechanistic insights into the pH influence on the ion exchange chromatography equilibrium are rare. This work describes a mechanistic model capturing salt and pH influence in ion exchange chromatography. The pH dependence of the characteristic protein charge and the equilibrium constant is introduced to the steric mass action model based on a protein net charge model considering the number of amino acids interacting with the stationary phase. This allows the description of the adsorption equilibrium of the chromatographed proteins as a function of pH. The model parameters were determined for a monoclonal antibody monomer, dimer, and a higher aggregated species based on a manageable set of pH gradient experiments. Without further modification of the model parameters the transfer to salt gradient elution at fixed pH is demonstrated. A lumped rate model was used to predict the separation of the monoclonal antibody monomer/aggregate mixture in pH gradient elution and for a pH step elution procedure-also at increased protein loadings up to 48 g/L packed resin. The presented model combines both salt and pH influence and may be useful for the development and deeper understanding of an ion exchange chromatography separation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Large polarization gradients and temperature-stable responses in compositionally-graded ferroelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Anoop R.; Pandya, Shishir; Qi, Yubo; Hsu, Shang-Lin; Liu, Shi; Nelson, Christopher; Dasgupta, Arvind; Ercius, Peter; Ophus, Colin; Dedon, Liv R.; Agar, Josh C.; Lu, Hongling; Zhang, Jialan; Minor, Andrew M.; Rappe, Andrew M.; Martin, Lane W.

    2017-05-01

    A range of modern applications require large and tunable dielectric, piezoelectric or pyroelectric response of ferroelectrics. Such effects are intimately connected to the nature of polarization and how it responds to externally applied stimuli. Ferroelectric susceptibilities are, in general, strongly temperature dependent, diminishing rapidly as one transitions away from the ferroelectric phase transition (TC). In turn, researchers seek new routes to manipulate polarization to simultaneously enhance susceptibilities and broaden operational temperature ranges. Here, we demonstrate such a capability by creating composition and strain gradients in Ba1-xSrxTiO3 films which result in spatial polarization gradients as large as 35 μC cm-2 across a 150 nm thick film. These polarization gradients allow for large dielectric permittivity with low loss (εr~775, tan δ<0.05), negligible temperature-dependence (13% deviation over 500 °C) and high-dielectric tunability (greater than 70% across a 300 °C range). The role of space charges in stabilizing polarization gradients is also discussed.

  9. A quinhydrone biofuel cell based on an enzyme-induced pH gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giroud, Fabien; Gondran, Chantal; Gorgy, Karine; Cosnier, Serge [Departement de Chimie Moleculaire, UMR CNRS 5250 ICMG-FR-2607, Universite Joseph Fourier, BP-53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Pellissier, Aymeric [Departement de Chimie Moleculaire, UMR CNRS 5250 ICMG-FR-2607, Universite Joseph Fourier, BP-53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Techniques de l' Ingenierie Medicale et de la Complexite - Informatique, Mathematiques Appliquees Grenoble, UMR CNRS 5525, IFRT-IpV 130, IN3S INstitut de l' INgenierie et de l' INformation de Sante, Faculte de Medecine, Universite Joseph Fourier, 38706 La Tronche cedex (France); Lenouvel, Francois; Cinquin, Philippe [Techniques de l' Ingenierie Medicale et de la Complexite - Informatique, Mathematiques Appliquees Grenoble, UMR CNRS 5525, IFRT-IpV 130, IN3S INstitut de l' INgenierie et de l' INformation de Sante, Faculte de Medecine, Universite Joseph Fourier, 38706 La Tronche cedex (France)

    2011-02-01

    We report on an alternative concept of biofuel cell functioning based on the unconventional use of enzymes to create a pH difference generating a potential difference between electrodes soaked in quinhydrone solutions. The electrode and quinhydrone solution were confined in a dialysis bag placed into a compartment containing either glucose oxidase and catalase for the biocathode or urease for the bioanode. In presence of 0.4 mol L{sup -1} glucose and urea, the enzyme reactions generate a pH difference of 3.55, both compartments being separated by an agar-agar wall. The resulting biofuel cell exhibits an open-circuit voltage and maximum power of 208 mV and 30.6 {mu}W, respectively, without immobilization and electrical connection of the involved enzymes. In addition, this biofuel cell was able to provide continuously10 {mu}A during 23 h, producing 0.133 J and 0.828 C. A similar biofuel cell configuration based only on dialysis bags was also developed. A graphite disk electrode elaborated by mechanical compression of graphite particles and quinhydrone, was placed in a dialysis bag itself confined into another dialysis bag containing enzyme solution. The resulting power and open-circuit voltage at saturating substrate conditions are 7.6 {mu}W and 157 mV, respectively. (author)

  10. Effect of pH decline on foraminiferal stable isotopes during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, J.; Zeebe, R. E.

    2009-12-01

    Pioneering culture experiments by Spero et al. (1997) demonstrated that seawater pH (or carbonate chemistry) has a marked effect on planktonic foraminiferal stable oxygen and carbon isotopes (δ18O and δ13C). Both δ18O and δ13C become isotopically heavier as seawater pH decreases (the “pH effect”). Several studies now argue that δ18O and δ13C of benthic foraminifera are similarly influenced by the pH effect. As a result, paleooceanographic information based on foraminiferal δ18O and δ13C can be significantly biased for the time-window during which seawater pH was notably different from the modern condition or varied rapidly. A prime example of such is the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). Widespread dissolution of sedimentary CaCO3 in the PETM strata (e.g., Zachos et al., 2005) suggests significant ocean acidification during this time interval. In this study, we examine the magnitude of the pH effect on foraminiferal δ18O and δ13C during the PETM. First we will estimate the relative pH decline from the pre-PETM steady state in the surface and deep ocean reservoirs in response to 2,000 ~ 5,000 Pg of carbon input using a carbon cycle model (Zeebe et al., 2009). We will then apply the empirical relationships obtained from the culture experiments by Spero et al. (1997) to calculate the ranges of errors in the foraminiferal δ18O and δ13C that could arise due to the pH effect during the PETM. {REFERENCES} Spero et al. (1997) Nature, v390, p497-500: Zachos et al. (2005) Science, v308, p1611-1615: Zeebe et al. (2009) Nature Geoscience, v2, p576-580.

  11. Aqueous speciation is likely to control the stable isotopic fractionation of cerium at varying pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Ryoichi; Tanaka, Masato; Tanimizu, Masaharu; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2017-12-01

    Cerium (Ce) can be used as a plaeoredox proxy as shown by a recent study of stable isotopic fractionation of Ce during adsorption and precipitation. However, the experiments in that study were performed at pH conditions lower than that of natural seawater. In the current study, adsorption and precipitation experiments were performed at pH 6.80, 8.20, and 11.00 with 2.25 mM dissolved carbonate to simulate Ce isotopic fractionation in the natural environment and examine the relationship between isotopic fractionation and Ce speciation in the liquid phase. Mean isotopic fractionation factors between liquid and solid phases (αLq-So) of Ce adsorbed on ferrihydrite did not depend on pH conditions or dissolved Ce species. In the Ce/δ-MnO2 system,αLq-So values decreased from 1.000411 (±0.000079) to 1.000194 (±0.000067) with increasing pH or number of carbonate ions, from Ce3+ to Ce(CO3)2-. In the Ce/precipitation system at pH 8.20 and 11.00 where Ce(CO3)2- is present in solution, the αLq-So values were 0.999821 (±0.000071) and 0.999589 (±0.000074), respectively, meaning that lighter isotope enrichment was observed in the liquid phase, which is the contrary to those of the other systems. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analyses were also performed to investigate the coordination structure of the adsorbed or precipitated Ce species that control the isotopic fractionation during adsorption. Even at higher pH, where Ce(CO3)+ or Ce(CO3)2- are the dominant dissolved species, the first coordination sphere of Ce in the solid phase in the Ce/ferrihydrite and Ce/precipitation systems was similar to that observed at pH 5.00 where Ce3+ was the main species in solution. A slight elongation in the Cesbnd O bond length in the solid phase at pH 11.00, where negatively charged dissolved species are dominant in the liquid phase, may cause a decrease in isotopic fractionation in the Ce/δ-MnO2 system. The coordination environment of Ce may not change significantly

  12. Na+,HCO3--cotransport is functionally upregulated during human breast carcinogenesis and required for the inverted pH gradient across the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Soojung; Mele, Marco; Vahl, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic and biochemical changes during breast carcinogenesis enhance cellular acid production. Extrusion of the acid load from the cancer cells raises intracellular pH, while it decreases extracellular pH creating an inverted pH gradient across the plasma membrane compared to normal cells....... Intracellular pH was measured by fluorescence microscopy, while protein expression was investigated by immunofluorescence imaging and immunoblotting. We found that cellular net acid extrusion increased during human breast carcinogenesis due to enhanced Na(+),HCO3 (-)-cotransport, which created an alkaline shift...... (~0.3 units of magnitude) in steady-state intracellular pH of human primary breast carcinomas compared to normal breast tissue. Na(+)/H(+)-exchange activity and steady-state intracellular pH in the absence of CO2/HCO3 (-) were practically unaffected by breast carcinogenesis. These effects were evident...

  13. A gradient stable scheme for a phase field model for the moving contact line problem

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Min

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, an efficient numerical scheme is designed for a phase field model for the moving contact line problem, which consists of a coupled system of the Cahn-Hilliard and Navier-Stokes equations with the generalized Navier boundary condition [1,2,4]. The nonlinear version of the scheme is semi-implicit in time and is based on a convex splitting of the Cahn-Hilliard free energy (including the boundary energy) together with a projection method for the Navier-Stokes equations. We show, under certain conditions, the scheme has the total energy decaying property and is unconditionally stable. The linearized scheme is easy to implement and introduces only mild CFL time constraint. Numerical tests are carried out to verify the accuracy and stability of the scheme. The behavior of the solution near the contact line is examined. It is verified that, when the interface intersects with the boundary, the consistent splitting scheme [21,22] for the Navier Stokes equations has the better accuracy for pressure. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  14. Correlation of acidic and basic carrier ampholyte and immobilized pH gradient two-dimensional gel electrophoresis patterns based on mass spectrometric protein identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawrocki, A; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Podtelejnikov, A V

    1998-01-01

    Separation of proteins on either carrier ampholyte-based or immobilized pH gradient-based two-dimensional (2-D) gels gives rise to electrophoretic patterns that are difficult to compare visually. In this paper we have used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI...

  15. Multiple, simultaneous, independent gradients for a versatile multidimensional liquid chromatography. Part II: Application 2: Computer controlled pH gradients in the presence of urea provide improved separation of proteins: Stability influenced anion and cation exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsh, Allen G; Tsonev, Latchezar I

    2017-04-28

    This paper details the use of a method of creating controlled pH gradients (pISep) to improve the separation of protein isoforms on ion exchange (IEX) stationary phases in the presence of various isocratic levels of urea. The pISep technology enables the development of computer controlled pH gradients on both cationic (CEX) and anionic (AEX) IEX stationary phases over the very wide pH range from 2 to 12. In pISep, titration curves generated by proportional mixing of the acidic and basic pISep working buffers alone, or in the presence of non-buffering solutes such as the neutral salt NaCl (0-1M), polar organics such as urea (0-8M) or acetonitrile (0-80 Vol%), can be fitted with high fidelity using high order polynomials which, in turn allows construction of a mathematical manifold %A (% acidic pISep buffer) vs. pH vs. [non-buffering solute], permitting precise computer control of pH and the non-buffering solute concentration allowing formation of dual uncoupled liquid chromatographic (LC) gradients of arbitrary shape (Hirsh and Tsonev, 2012 [1]). The separation of protein isoforms examined in this paper by use of such pH gradients in the presence of urea demonstrates the fractionation power of a true single step two dimensional liquid chromatography which we denote as Stability-Influenced Ion Exchange Chromatography (SIIEX). We present evidence that SIIEX is capable of increasing the resolution of protein isoforms difficult to separate by ordinary pH gradient IEX, and potentially simplifying the development of laboratory and production purification strategies involving on-column simultaneous pH and urea unfolding or refolding of targeted proteins. We model some of the physics implied by the dynamics of the observed protein fractionations as a function of both urea concentration and pH assuming that urea-induced native state unfolding competes with native state electrostatic interaction binding to an IEX stationary phase. Implications for in vivo protein

  16. Examining possible effects of seawater pH decline on foraminiferal stable isotopes during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, Joji; Zeebe, Richard E.

    2010-06-01

    A large body of paleoceanographic data for the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is based on foraminiferal stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition (δ13C and δ18O). However, the proxy records could be biased due to a “pH effect” on stable isotopes during times when the ocean became more acidic, as has been demonstrated for modern planktonic foraminifera. In this paper, we calculate the possible ranges of the pH effect on δ13C and δ18O during the PETM based on the relative pH decline (ΔpH) from the preperturbation steady state simulated by a carbon cycle model and the empirical relationships obtained from culture experiments with planktonic foraminifera. The model is configured with Eocene paleogeography and simulates ΔpH for surface, intermediate, and deep water in the major ocean basins in response to various carbon input scenarios (2000 to 5000 Pg C). For an array of scenarios, the modeled ΔpH of the surface ocean ranges from 0.1 to 0.28 units. This suggests that δ13C of planktonic foraminifera may be increased by up to 2.1‰ and δ18O may be increased by up to 0.7‰ (corresponding to over 3°C error in paleotemperature estimate). Under conditions in which the model best simulates the global CaCO3 dissolution pattern, we find marked differences in the deep-sea ΔpH between the Atlantic (-0.4) and Pacific oceans (-0.1). This would imply that the magnitude of the negative δ13C and δ18O excursions of benthic foraminifera in the Atlantic Ocean was dampened by up to 2.8‰ and 0.9‰ at maximum, respectively, relative to a constant pH scenario.

  17. In vivo intracellular pH measurements in tobacco and Arabidopsis reveal an unexpected pH gradient in the endomembrane system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinière, Alexandre; Bassil, Elias; Jublanc, Elodie; Alcon, Carine; Reguera, Maria; Sentenac, Hervé; Blumwald, Eduardo; Paris, Nadine

    2013-10-01

    The pH homeostasis of endomembranes is essential for cellular functions. In order to provide direct pH measurements in the endomembrane system lumen, we targeted genetically encoded ratiometric pH sensors to the cytosol, the endoplasmic reticulum, and the trans-Golgi, or the compartments labeled by the vacuolar sorting receptor (VSR), which includes the trans-Golgi network and prevacuoles. Using noninvasive live-cell imaging to measure pH, we show that a gradual acidification from the endoplasmic reticulum to the lytic vacuole exists, in both tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) epidermal (ΔpH -1.5) and Arabidopsis thaliana root cells (ΔpH -2.1). The average pH in VSR compartments was intermediate between that of the trans-Golgi and the vacuole. Combining pH measurements with in vivo colocalization experiments, we found that the trans-Golgi network had an acidic pH of 6.1, while the prevacuole and late prevacuole were both more alkaline, with pH of 6.6 and 7.1, respectively. We also showed that endosomal pH, and subsequently vacuolar trafficking of soluble proteins, requires both vacuolar-type H(+) ATPase-dependent acidification as well as proton efflux mediated at least by the activity of endosomal sodium/proton NHX-type antiporters.

  18. An Efficient and Stable Hydrophobic Molecular Cobalt Catalyst for Water Electro-oxidation at Neutral pH

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ba-Tian

    2016-06-14

    The synthesis of a library of molecular water oxidation catalysts based on the Co complex of tris(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine is described. Hydrophobicity was identified as the key variable in mediating the catalytic competence of the complexes. The change in this parameter correlates with both the conformational mobility of the ligand core and the structural changes in the local solvent environment around the metal site. The optimal Co complex identified is hydrophobic, because of three semifluorinated side chains. It catalyzes water electro-oxidation efficiently at neutral pH, with an overpotential of 390 mV and a turnover frequency (TOF) of 1.83 s-1 in the absence of soluble Co salts. The catalyst can be immobilized through physisorption, and it remains stable in prolonged electrolysis experiments. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  19. Highly transparent, stable, and superhydrophobic coatings based on gradient structure design and fast regeneration from physical damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zao; Liu, Xiaojiang; Wang, Yan; Li, Jun; Guan, Zisheng

    2015-12-01

    Optical transparency, mechanical flexibility, and fast regeneration are important factors to expand the application of superhydrophobic surfaces. Herein, we fabricated highly transparent, stable, and superhydrophobic coatings through a novel gradient structure design by versatile dip-coating of silica colloid particles (SCPs) and diethoxydimethysiliane cross-linked silica nanoparticles (DDS-SNPs) on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film and glass, followed by the modification of octadecyltrichlorosiliane (OTCS). When the DDS concentration reached 5 wt%, the modified SCPs/DDS-SNPs coating exhibited a water contact angle (WCA) of 153° and a sliding angle (SA) superhydrophobic coating on PET film and glass was increased by 2.7% and 1% in the visible wavelength, respectively. This superhydrophobic coating also showed good robustness and stability against water dropping impact, ultrasonic damage, and acid solution. Moreover, the superhydrophobic PET film after physical damage can quickly regain the superhydrophobicity by one-step spray regenerative solution of dodecyltrichlorosilane (DTCS) modified silica nanoparticles at room temperature. The demonstrated method for the preparation and regeneration of superhydrophobic coating is available for different substrates and large-scale production at room temperature.

  20. Charge heterogeneity profiling of monoclonal antibodies using low ionic strength ion-exchange chromatography and well-controlled pH gradients on monolithic columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Mohammad; Nordborg, Anna; Gaspar, Andras; Lacher, Nathan A; Wang, Qian; He, Xiaoping Z; Haddad, Paul R; Hilder, Emily F

    2013-11-22

    In this work, the suitability of employing shallow pH gradients generated using single component buffer systems as eluents through cation-exchange (CEX) monolithic columns is demonstrated for the high-resolution separation of monoclonal antibody (mAb) charge variants in three different biopharmaceuticals. A useful selection of small molecule buffer species is described that can be used within very narrow pH ranges (typically 1 pH unit) defined by their buffer capacity for producing controlled and smooth pH profiles when used together with porous polymer monoliths. Using very low ionic strength eluents also enabled direct coupling with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. The results obtained by the developed pH gradient approach for the separation of closely related antibody species appear to be consistent with those obtained by imaged capillary isoelectric focusing (iCE) in terms of both resolution and separation profile. Both determinants of resolution, i.e., peak compression and peak separation contribute to the gains in resolution, evidently through the Donnan potential effect, which is increased by decreasing the eluent concentration, and also through the way electrostatic charges are distributed on the protein surface. Retention mechanisms based on the trends observed in retention of proteins at pH values higher than the electrophoretic pI are also discussed using applicable theories. Employing monolithic ion-exchangers is shown to enable fast method development, short analysis time, and high sample throughput owing to the accelerated mass transport of the monolithic media. The possibility of short analysis time, typically less than 15 min, and high sample throughput is extremely useful in the assessment of charge-based changes to the mAb products, such as during manufacturing or storage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Computational Design of a pH Stable Enzyme: Understanding Molecular Mechanism of Penicillin Acylase's Adaptation to Alkaline Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suplatov, Dmitry; Panin, Nikolay; Kirilin, Evgeny; Shcherbakova, Tatyana; Kudryavtsev, Pavel; Švedas, Vytas

    2014-01-01

    Protein stability provides advantageous development of novel properties and can be crucial in affording tolerance to mutations that introduce functionally preferential phenotypes. Consequently, understanding the determining factors for protein stability is important for the study of structure-function relationship and design of novel protein functions. Thermal stability has been extensively studied in connection with practical application of biocatalysts. However, little work has been done to explore the mechanism of pH-dependent inactivation. In this study, bioinformatic analysis of the Ntn-hydrolase superfamily was performed to identify functionally important subfamily-specific positions in protein structures. Furthermore, the involvement of these positions in pH-induced inactivation was studied. The conformational mobility of penicillin acylase in Escherichia coli was analyzed through molecular modeling in neutral and alkaline conditions. Two functionally important subfamily-specific residues, Gluβ482 and Aspβ484, were found. Ionization of these residues at alkaline pH promoted the collapse of a buried network of stabilizing interactions that consequently disrupted the functional protein conformation. The subfamily-specific position Aspβ484 was selected as a hotspot for mutation to engineer enzyme variant tolerant to alkaline medium. The corresponding Dβ484N mutant was produced and showed 9-fold increase in stability at alkaline conditions. Bioinformatic analysis of subfamily-specific positions can be further explored to study mechanisms of protein inactivation and to design more stable variants for the engineering of homologous Ntn-hydrolases with improved catalytic properties. PMID:24959852

  2. Computational design of a pH stable enzyme: understanding molecular mechanism of penicillin acylase's adaptation to alkaline conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Suplatov

    Full Text Available Protein stability provides advantageous development of novel properties and can be crucial in affording tolerance to mutations that introduce functionally preferential phenotypes. Consequently, understanding the determining factors for protein stability is important for the study of structure-function relationship and design of novel protein functions. Thermal stability has been extensively studied in connection with practical application of biocatalysts. However, little work has been done to explore the mechanism of pH-dependent inactivation. In this study, bioinformatic analysis of the Ntn-hydrolase superfamily was performed to identify functionally important subfamily-specific positions in protein structures. Furthermore, the involvement of these positions in pH-induced inactivation was studied. The conformational mobility of penicillin acylase in Escherichia coli was analyzed through molecular modeling in neutral and alkaline conditions. Two functionally important subfamily-specific residues, Gluβ482 and Aspβ484, were found. Ionization of these residues at alkaline pH promoted the collapse of a buried network of stabilizing interactions that consequently disrupted the functional protein conformation. The subfamily-specific position Aspβ484 was selected as a hotspot for mutation to engineer enzyme variant tolerant to alkaline medium. The corresponding Dβ484N mutant was produced and showed 9-fold increase in stability at alkaline conditions. Bioinformatic analysis of subfamily-specific positions can be further explored to study mechanisms of protein inactivation and to design more stable variants for the engineering of homologous Ntn-hydrolases with improved catalytic properties.

  3. The ecology of acidification and recovery: changes in herbivore-algal food web linkages across a stream pH gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledger, M.E.; Hildrew, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    We examined the effects of acidification on herbivore-algal food web linkages in headwater streams. We determined the structure and abundance of consumer and benthic algal assemblages, and gauged herbivory, in 10 streams along a pH gradient (mean annual pH 4.6-6.4). Biofilm taxonomic composition changed with pH but total abundance did not vary systematically across the gradient. Mayflies and chironomids dominated under circumneutral conditions but declined with increasing acidity and their consumption of algae was strongly reduced. Contrary to expectations, several putative shredder species consumed algae, maintaining the herbivore-algal linkage where specialist grazers could not persist. These shifts in functioning could render the communities of acidified streams resistant to reinvasion when acidity ameliorates and water chemistry is restored to a pre-acidification condition. This hypothesis is discussed in the light of recent trends in the chemistry and biology of the UK Acid Waters Monitoring Network sites. - Generalist invertebrates maintain algae-herbivore interactions in acid streams

  4. Mapping and identification of interferon gamma-regulated HeLa cell proteins separated by immobilized pH gradient two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, AC; Rossel Larsen, M; Roepstorff, P

    1999-01-01

    magnitude of IFN-gamma responsive genes has been reported previously. Our goal is to identify and map IFN-gamma-regulated HeLa cell proteins to the two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with the immobilized pH gradient (IPG) two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) system....... A semiconfluent layer of HeLa cells was grown on tissue culture plates, and changes in protein expression due to 100 U/mL IFN-gamma were investigated at different periods after treatment, using pulse labeling with [35S]methionine/cysteine in combination with 2-D PAGE (IPG). The identity of eight protein spots...

  5. Bioerosion Accretion Replicate (BAR) data covering in situ calcification and bioerosion rates along pH gradients at two volcanically acidified reefs in Papua New Guinea from 2013-01-18 to 2014-11-10 (NCEI Accession 0156692)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bioerosion Accretion Replicate (BAR) data covering in situ calcification and bioerosion rates along pH gradients at two volcanically acidified reefs in Papua New...

  6. The effect of pH on the synthesis of stable Cu2O/CuO nanoparticles by sol-gel method in a glycolic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayyoun, N.; Bahmad, L.; Laânab, L.; Jaber, B.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that using a glycolic medium, both stable CuO and Cu2O nanoparticles can be elaborated from Cu colloidal particles by adjusting their chemical environment, in particular the acido-basicity of the solution. In this context, the effect of pH on the sol-gel synthesis of Cu2O/CuO NPs was investigated. XRD results confirmed the formation of pure Cu2O with a cubic structure at lower pH (pH ≤ 6), whereas the pure monoclinic CuO was formed at higher pH (pH ≥ 12). TEM image indicates that the as-formed CuO NPs in basic pH are spherical in shape and their average size is found to be in the range of 4.5 nm. However, the as-obtained Cu2O NPs in acid pH are cubical, with an average diameter of about 3 nm, and agglomerated into large spherical particles under the effect of ethylene glycol. Using the UV-Vis spectroscopy, the measured band gap energies of the prepared Cu2O and CuO NPs are 2.07 and 4.08 eV respectively. FTIR results confirm the purity of the synthesized CuO and Cu2O nanoparticles.

  7. Functional reduced graphene oxide-based membranes with selective ion transport channels for zwitterionic ions separation based on the pH gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu; Ji, Hongyun; Yang, Feng; Meng, Yan; Wang, Yujue; Dai, Jianyuan; Ren, Haisheng; Tan, Guangqun; Xiao, Dan

    2018-01-18

    In this work, we report a method for the fabrication of a functional free-standing graphene membrane (FFGM) with high mechanical strength, enlarged interlayer spacing and ion channels for zwitterionic ions separation. To obtain the FFGM, the anionic dye Eosin Y (EY) was introduced into a graphene oxide (GO) and hydroquinone (HQ) mixture to prepare functional graphene-based membranes on Cu foil using simply a drop-casting method. In comparison with a GO membrane, the molar flux and the mechanical strength of the FFGM were dramatically increased. The FFGM was then equipped on custom-built glass reservoirs for zwitterionic amino acids (AAs) separation based on the inner pH gradient, which was formed by controlling H + and OH - (in the feed and receiver solution) migration in rGO/GO sheets via an external electric field. With the help of the inner pH gradient and external electric field, AAs could change their charge behaviors. The ionized AAs transport through the FFGM and finally separation was realized.

  8. Dynamic PCr and pH imaging of human calf muscles during exercise and recovery using (31) P gradient-Echo MRI at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Albrecht Ingo; Meyerspeer, Martin; Robinson, Simon Daniel; Goluch, Sigrun; Wolzt, Michael; Fiedler, Georg Bernd; Bogner, Wolfgang; Laistler, Elmar; Krššák, Martin; Moser, Ewald; Trattnig, Siegfried; Valkovič, Ladislav

    2016-06-01

    Simultaneous acquisition of spatially resolved (31) P-MRI data for evaluation of muscle specific energy metabolism, i.e., PCr and pH kinetics. A three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo sequence for multiple frequency-selective excitations of the PCr and Pi signals in an interleaved sampling scheme was developed and tested at 7 Tesla (T). The pH values were derived from the chemical shift-induced phase difference between the resonances. The achieved spatial resolution was ∼2 mL with image acquisition time below 6 s. Ten healthy volunteers were studied performing plantar flexions during the delay between (31) P-MRI acquisitions, yielding a temporal resolution of 9-10 s. Signal from anatomically matched regions of interest had sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to allow single-acquisition PCr and pH quantification. The Pi signal was clearly detected in voxels of actively exercising muscles. The PCr depletions were in gastrocnemius 42 ± 14% (medialis), 48 ± 17% (lateralis) and in soleus 20 ± 11%. The end exercise pH values were 6.74 ± 0.18 and 6.65 ± 0.27 for gastrocnemius medialis and lateralis, respectively, and 6.96 ± 0.12 for soleus muscle. Simultaneous acquisition of PCr and Pi images with high temporal resolution, suitable for measuring PCr and pH kinetics in exercise-recovery experiments, was demonstrated at 7T. This study presents a fast alternative to MRS for quantifying energy metabolism of posterior muscle groups of the lower leg. Magn Reson Med 75:2324-2331, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Local adaptations in bryophytes revisited: the genetic structure of the calcium-tolerant peatmoss Sphagnum warnstorfii along geographic and pH gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulášková, Eva; Hájek, Michal; Veleba, Adam; Johnson, Matthew G; Hájek, Tomáš; Shaw, Jonathan A

    2015-01-01

    Bryophytes dominate some ecosystems despite their extraordinary sensitivity to habitat quality. Nevertheless, some species behave differently across various regions. The existence of local adaptations is questioned by a high dispersal ability, which is thought to redistribute genetic variability among populations. Although Sphagnum warnstorfii is an important ecosystem engineer in fen peatlands, the causes of its rather wide niche along the pH/calcium gradient are poorly understood. Here, we studied the genetic variability of its global populations, with a detailed focus on the wide pH/calcium gradient in Central Europe. Principal coordinates analysis of 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci revealed a significant gradient coinciding with water pH, but independent of geography; even samples from the same fens were clearly separated along this gradient. However, most of the genetic variations remained unexplained, possibly because of the introgression from phylogenetically allied species. This explanation is supported by the small heterogeneous cluster of samples that appeared when populations morphologically transitional to S. subnites, S. rubellum, or S. russowii were included into the analysis. Alternatively, this unexplained variation might be attributed to a legacy of glacial refugia with recently dissolved ecological and biogeographic consequences. Isolation by distance appeared at the smallest scale only (up to 43 km). Negative spatial correlations occurred more frequently, mainly at long distances (up to 950 km), implying a genetic similarity among samples which are very distant geographically. Our results confirm the high dispersal ability of peatmosses, but simultaneously suggested that their ability to cope with a high pH/calcium level is at least partially determined genetically, perhaps via specific physiological mechanisms or a hummock-forming ability. PMID:25628880

  10. Synthesis and fundamental properties of stable Ph(3)SnSiH(3) and Ph(3)SnGeH(3) hydrides: model compounds for the design of Si-Ge-Sn photonic alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Jesse B; Chizmeshya, Andrew V G; Groy, Thomas L; Kouvetakis, John

    2009-07-06

    The compounds Ph(3)SnSiH(3) and Ph(3)SnGeH(3) (Ph = C(6)H(5)) have been synthesized as colorless solids containing Sn-MH(3) (M = Si, Ge) moieties that are stable in air despite the presence of multiple and highly reactive Si-H and Ge-H bonds. These molecules are of interest since they represent potential model compounds for the design of new classes of IR semiconductors in the Si-Ge-Sn system. Their unexpected stability and high solubility also makes them a safe, convenient, and potentially useful delivery source of -SiH(3) and -GeH(3) ligands in molecular synthesis. The structure and composition of both compounds has been determined by chemical analysis and a range of spectroscopic methods including multinuclear NMR. Single crystal X-ray structures were determined and indicated that both compounds condense in a Z = 2 triclinic (P1) space group with lattice parameters (a = 9.7754(4) A, b = 9.8008(4) A, c = 10.4093(5) A, alpha = 73.35(10)(o), beta = 65.39(10)(o), gamma = 73.18(10)(o)) for Ph(3)SnSiH(3) and (a = 9.7927(2) A, b = 9.8005(2) A, c = 10.4224(2) A, alpha = 74.01(3)(o), beta = 65.48(3)(o), gamma = 73.43(3)(o)) for Ph(3)SnGeH(3). First principles density functional theory simulations are used to corroborate the molecular structures of Ph(3)SnSiH(3) and Ph(3)SnGeH(3), gain valuable insight into the relative stability of the two compounds, and provide correlations between the Si-Sn and Ge-Sn bonds in the molecules and those in tetrahedral Si-Ge-Sn solids.

  11. Use of 7cm immobilized pH gradient strips for the determination of clinically relevant proteins in wheat grain extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona eFekecsova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to test relatively simple proteomics approach based on phenol extraction, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE in combination with 7cm immobilized pH gradient strips for the determination of clinically relevant proteins in wheat grain. Using this approach, 157 2-DE spots were quantified in biological triplicate, out of which 53 were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Clinically relevant proteins associated with celiac disease, wheat dependent exercise induced anaphylaxis, baker´s asthma, and food allergy, were detected in 24 2-DE spots. The comparison with recent quantitative study suggested that gel-based and gel-free proteomics approaches are complementary for the detection and quantification of clinically relevant proteins in wheat grain.

  12. Prediction of the chromatographic retention of acid-base compounds in pH buffered methanol-water mobile phases in gradient mode by a simplified model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, Axel; Rosés, Martí; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2015-03-13

    Retention of ionizable analytes under gradient elution depends on the pH of the mobile phase, the pKa of the analyte and their evolution along the programmed gradient. In previous work, a model depending on two fitting parameters was recommended because of its very favorable relationship between accuracy and required experimental work. It was developed using acetonitrile as the organic modifier and involves pKa modeling by means of equations that take into account the acidic functional group of the compound (carboxylic acid, protonated amine, etc.). In this work, the two-parameter predicting model is tested and validated using methanol as the organic modifier of the mobile phase and several compounds of higher pharmaceutical relevance and structural complexity as testing analytes. The results have been quite good overall, showing that the predicting model is applicable to a wide variety of acid-base compounds using mobile phases prepared with acetonitrile or methanol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of Gradient-Based Similarity Functions in the Stable Boundary Layer Derived from a Large-Eddy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbjan, Zbigniew

    2017-06-01

    Gradient-based similarity functions, evaluated based on data generated by a large-eddy simulation model of the stably stratified boundary layer, are compared with analogous similarity functions, derived from field observations in the surface layer during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment in the Arctic. The comparison is performed in terms of explicit and implicit local scaling systems, for the temperature and momentum fluxes, standard deviations of the vertical velocity and of temperature, as well as dissipation rates for the turbulent kinetic energy and for the temperature variance. The comparison shows the best agreement of the SHEBA-based similarity functions with analogous functions evaluated using the large-eddy simulation data in the range of the Richardson number 0.01<{ Ri}< 0.1.

  14. Purification of camel liver catalase by zinc chelate affinity chromatography and pH gradient elution: An enzyme with interesting properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafik, Abdelbasset; Essamadi, Abdelkhalid; Çelik, Safinur Yildirim; Mavi, Ahmet

    2017-12-01

    Climate change and increasing temperatures are global concerns. Camel (Camelus dromedarius) lives most of its life under high environmental stress in the desert and represent ideal model for studying desert adaptation among mammals. Catalase plays a key role in protecting cells against oxidative stress. For the first time, catalase from camel liver was purified to homogeneity by zinc chelate affinity chromatography using pH gradient elution, a better separation was obtained. A purification fold of 201.81 with 1.17% yield and a high specific activity of 1132539.37U/mg were obtained. The native enzyme had a molecular weight of 268kDa and was composed of four subunits of equal size (65kDa). The enzyme showed optimal activity at a temperature of 45°C and pH 7.2. Thiol reagents, β-Mercaptoethanol and D,L-Dithiothreitol, inhibited the enzyme activity. The enzyme was inhibited by Al 3+ , Cd 2+ and Mg 2+ , whereas Ca 2+ , Co 2+ and Ni 2+ stimulated the catalase activity. Reduced glutathione has no effect on catalase activity. The K m and V max of the enzyme for hydrogen peroxide were 37.31mM and 6185157U/mg, respectively. Sodium azide inhibited the enzyme noncompetitively with K i value of 14.43μM, the IC 50 was found to be 16.71μM. The properties of camel catalase were different comparing to those of mammalian species. Relatively higher molecular weight, higher optimum temperature, protection of reduced glutathione from hydrogen peroxide oxidation and higher affinity for hydrogen peroxide and sodium azide, these could be explained by the fact that camel is able to live in the intense environmental stress in the desert. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. High-resolution dynamic computer simulation analysis of the behavior of sample components with pI values outside the pH gradient established by carrier ampholyte CIEF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormann, Wolfgang; Kilár, Ferenc

    2013-03-01

    The behavior of sample components whose pI values are outside the pH gradient established by 101 hypothetical biprotic carrier ampholytes covering a pH 6-8 range was investigated by computer simulation under constant current conditions with concomitant constant electroosmosis toward the cathode. Data obtained with the sample being applied between zones of carrier ampholytes and on the anodic side of the carrier ampholytes were studied and found to evolve into zone structures comprising three regions between anolyte and catholyte. The focusing region with the pH gradient is bracketed by two isotachopheretic zone structures comprising selected sample and carrier components as isotachophoretic zones. The isotachophoretic structures electrophoretically migrate in opposite direction and their lengths increase with time due to the gradual isotachophoretic decay at the pH gradient edges. Due to electroosmosis, however, the overall pattern is being transported toward the cathode. Sample components whose pI values are outside the established pH gradient are demonstrated to form isotachophoretic zones behind the leading cation of the catholyte (components with pI values larger than 8) and the leading anion of the anolyte (components with pI values smaller than 6). Amphoteric compounds with appropriate pI values or nonamphoteric components can act as isotachophoretic spacer compounds between sample compounds or between the leader and the sample with the highest mobility. The simulation data obtained provide for the first time insight into the dynamics of amphoteric sample components that do not focus within the established pH gradient. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. An enriched stable isotope technique to estimate the availability of soil zinc to Lumbricus terrestris (L.) across a salinization gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Derek W; Lev, Steven M; Snodgrass, Joel W; Ownby, David R; Prince, Lisa M; Casey, Ryan E

    2011-03-01

    An enriched stable isotope approach was developed to evaluate Zn bioavailability to Lumbricus terrestris. The decrease in (68)Zn/(66) Zn in organ tissues was used to assess the relative magnitude of the bioavailable soil Zn pool. This tool was then used to specifically evaluate bioavailability as a function of soil cation distribution. Storm-water pond soils were modified using two treatment regimens whereby H(2)O-extractable Zn was varied either by different ZnCl(2) amendments or by constant ZnCl(2) amendment followed by varying the soil cation distribution through salt amendments (NaCl or CaCl(2)). Earthworms previously equilibrated in (68) Zn-spiked soil were introduced to experimental soils, and after 2 d, removed for analysis of isotopic ratios in specific tissues. Despite a wide range of H(2)O-extractable Zn values produced by the salt treatments (0.007-24.3 mg/kg), a significant relationship between Zn turnover rate in earthworm tissues and H(2)O-extractable Zn in the salt-treated soils was not observed. Rather, considering both treatment regimens, turnover rate better correlated with Zn present in broader pools, such as that extracted by 6M HNO(3). The bioavailability of trace metals to earthworms may be poorly characterized by loosely bound fractions such as the pore water. Additionally, the turnover rate of (68)Zn in anterior organ tissues may be an effective tool to evaluate the relative magnitude of the bioavailable soil Zn pool. Copyright © 2010 SETAC.

  17. Spatial variation of the stable nitrogen isotope ratio of woody plants along a topoedaphic gradient in a subtropical savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Edith; Boutton, Thomas W; Liu, Feng; Wu, X Ben; Archer, Steven R; Hallmark, C Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Variation in the stable N isotope ratio (delta15N) of plants and soils often reflects the influence of environment on the N cycle. We measured leaf delta15N and N concentration ([N]) on all individuals of Prosopis glandulosa (deciduous tree legume), Condalia hookeri (evergreen shrub), and Zanthoxylum fagara (evergreen shrub) present within a belt transect 308 m long x 12 m wide in a subtropical savanna ecosystem in southern Texas, USA in April and August 2005. Soil texture, gravimetric water content (GWC), total N and delta15N were also measured along the transect. At the landscape scale, leaf delta15N was negatively related to elevation for all the three species along this topoedaphic sequence. Changes in soil delta15N, total N, and GWC appeared to contribute to this spatial pattern of leaf delta15N. In lower portions of the landscape, greater soil N availability and GWC are associated with relatively high rates of both N mineralization and nitrification. Both soil delta15N and leaf [N] were positively correlated with leaf delta15N of non-N2 fixing plants. Leaf delta15N of P. glandulosa, an N2-fixing legume, did not correlate with leaf [N]; the delta15N of P. glandulosa's leaves were closer to atmospheric N2 and significantly lower than those of C. hookeri and Z. fagara. Additionally, at smaller spatial scales, a proximity index (which reflected the density and distance of surrounding P. glandulosa trees) was negatively correlated with leaf delta15N of C. hookeri and Z. fagara, indicating the N2-fixing P. glandulosa may be important to the N nutrition of nearby non-N2-fixing species. Our results indicate plant 15N natural abundance can reflect the extent of N retention and help us better understand N dynamics and plant-soil interactions at ecosystem and landscape scales.

  18. Latitudinal Gradients in the Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes of Tree-Ring Cellulose Reveal Differential Climate Influences of the North American Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szejner, P.; Wright, W. E.; Babst, F.; Belmecheri, S.; Trouet, V.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Leavitt, S. W.; Monson, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Summer rainfall plays an important role sustaining different types of ecosystems in the Southwestern US. The arrival of the monsoon breaks the early summer hyper-arid period in the region providing unique seasonal conditions for these ecosystems to thrive. It is unknown to what extent monsoon rainfall is used by Ponderosa pine forests, which occupy many mountain ecosystems in the Western US. While these forests clearly rely on winter snowpack to drive much of their annual net primary productivity, the extent to which they supplement winter moisture, with summer monsoon moisture needs to be clarified. It is likely that there are north-south gradients in the degree to which forests rely on monsoon moisture, as the summer monsoon system tends to become diminished as it moves progressively northward. We addressed these gaps in our knowledge about the monsoon by studying stable Carbon and Oxygen isotopes in earlywood and latewood α-cellulose from cores taken from trees in eleven sites along a latitudinal gradient extending from Southern Arizona and New Mexico toward Utah. Here we show evidence that Ponderosa pine trees from most of these sites use monsoon water to support growth during the late summer, and the fractional use of monsoon precipitation is strongest in the southernmost sites. This study provides new physiological evidence on the influence of the North American monsoon and winter precipitation on tree growth in montane ecosystems of the Western US. Using these results, we predict differences in the susceptibility of southern and northern montane forests to future climate change. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS: This work was funded by an NSF Macrosystems Grant #1065790

  19. Immobilized pH gradient-driven paper-based IEF: a new method for fractionating complex peptide mixtures before MS analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seshi Beerelli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The vast difference in the abundance of different proteins in biological samples limits the determination of the complete proteome of a cell type, requiring fractionation of proteins and peptides before MS analysis. Methods We present a method consisting of electrophoresis of complex mixtures of peptides using a strip of filter paper cut into 20 sections laid end to end over a 24-cm-long IPG strip, the pH gradient of which would drive the electrophoresis. Peptides absorbed onto individual paper pads after electrophoresis are subsequently recovered into a buffer solution, thus dividing a complex peptide mixture according to pI into 20 liquid fractions. This paper-based IEF method (PIEF was compared side-by-side with a similar but liquid-based Offgel electrophoresis (OGE by analyzing iTRAQ-labeled peptide mixtures of membrane proteins from four different cell types. Results PIEF outperformed OGE in resolving acidic peptides, whereas OGE did a better job in recovering relatively basic peptides. OGE and PIEF were quite comparable in their coverage, identifying almost equal number of distinct proteins (PIEF =1174; OGE = 1080. Interestingly, however, only 675 were identified by both of them, each method identifying many unique proteins (PIEF = 499; OGE = 415. Thus, the two methods uncovered almost 40% more proteins compared to what is obtained by only one method. Conclusion: This initial investigation demonstrates the technical feasibility of PIEF for complementing OGE. PIEF uses standard IPG IEF equipment, requires no specialized apparatus (e.g., OGE fractionator and may be integrated into peptide mapping strategies for clinical samples.

  20. Production, Characterization, and Flocculation Mechanism of Cation Independent, pH Tolerant, and Thermally Stable Bioflocculant from Enterobacter sp. ETH-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Song, Liyan; Li, Dou; Qiao, Jing; Zhao, Tiantao; Zhao, Heping

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic high polymer flocculants, frequently utilized for flocculating efficiency and low cost, recently have been discovered as producing increased risk to human health and the environment. Development of a more efficient and environmentally sound alternative flocculant agent is investigated in this paper. Bioflocculants are produced by microorganisms and may exhibit a high rate of flocculation activity. The bioflocculant ETH-2, with high flocculating activity (2849 mg Kaolin particle/mg ETH-2), produced by strain Enterobacter sp. isolated from activated sludge, was systematically investigated with regard to its production, characterization, and flocculation mechanism. Analyses of microscopic observation, zeta potential and ETH-2 structure demonstrates the bridging mechanism, as opposed to charge neutralization, was responsible for flocculation of the ETH-2. ETH-2 retains high molecular weight (603 to 1820 kDa) and multi-functional groups (hydroxyl, amide and carboxyl) that contributed to flocculation. Polysaccharides mainly composed of mannose, glucose, and galactose, with a molar ratio of 1∶2.9∶9.8 were identified as the active constituents in bioflocculant. The structure of the long backbone with active sites of polysaccharides was determined as a primary basis for the high flocculation activity. Bioflocculant ETH-2 is cation independent, pH tolerant, and thermally stable, suggesting a potential fit for industrial application. PMID:25485629

  1. Amorphous Phosphorus-Incorporated Cobalt Molybdenum Sulfide on Carbon Cloth: An Efficient and Stable Electrocatalyst for Enhanced Overall Water Splitting over Entire pH Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Chaiti; Lee, Su Chan; Sankar, Kalimuthu Vijaya; Jin, Bingjun; Lee, Jungpyo; Park, Jong Hyeok; Jun, Seong Chan

    2017-11-01

    The development of economical, proficient, and highly stable catalysts to substitute the expensive noble metal electrodes for electrocatalytic water-splitting applications is exceedingly desirable. In this context, the most fascinating and challenging approach is the rational design of a nanocomposite encompassing multiple components with unique functionalities. Herein, we describe the fabrication of a strongly catalytic and superb durable phosphorus-incorporated cobalt molybdenum sulfide electrocatalyst grown on carbon cloth (P-CoMoS/CC). The hybrid material exhibited excellent activity for hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions over a wide range of pH (1-14) with extremely high stability (∼90% retention of the initial current density) after 24 h of electrolysis. Importantly, when P-CoMoS/CC was used as both cathode and anode for overall water splitting, a very low cell voltage of 1.54 V is required to attain the 10 mA cm -2 current density, and the hybrid material exhibited a long-term stability (89.8% activity retention after 100 h). The outstanding overall water-splitting performance compared to an electrolyzer consisting of the noble-metal-based catalysts Pt/C and RuO 2 makes P-CoMoS one of the most efficient earth-abundant water-splitting catalysts. Phosphorus incorporation was proved to be a vital aspect for the improved charge-transfer properties and catalytic durability of the P-CoMoS/CC catalyst.

  2. Production, characterization, and flocculation mechanism of cation independent, pH tolerant, and thermally stable bioflocculant from Enterobacter sp. ETH-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Tang

    Full Text Available Synthetic high polymer flocculants, frequently utilized for flocculating efficiency and low cost, recently have been discovered as producing increased risk to human health and the environment. Development of a more efficient and environmentally sound alternative flocculant agent is investigated in this paper. Bioflocculants are produced by microorganisms and may exhibit a high rate of flocculation activity. The bioflocculant ETH-2, with high flocculating activity (2849 mg Kaolin particle/mg ETH-2, produced by strain Enterobacter sp. isolated from activated sludge, was systematically investigated with regard to its production, characterization, and flocculation mechanism. Analyses of microscopic observation, zeta potential and ETH-2 structure demonstrates the bridging mechanism, as opposed to charge neutralization, was responsible for flocculation of the ETH-2. ETH-2 retains high molecular weight (603 to 1820 kDa and multi-functional groups (hydroxyl, amide and carboxyl that contributed to flocculation. Polysaccharides mainly composed of mannose, glucose, and galactose, with a molar ratio of 1:2.9:9.8 were identified as the active constituents in bioflocculant. The structure of the long backbone with active sites of polysaccharides was determined as a primary basis for the high flocculation activity. Bioflocculant ETH-2 is cation independent, pH tolerant, and thermally stable, suggesting a potential fit for industrial application.

  3. Detachable strong cation exchange monolith, integrated with capillary zone electrophoresis and coupled with pH gradient elution, produces improved sensitivity and numbers of peptide identifications during bottom-up analysis of complex proteomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenbin; Yan, Xiaojing; Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Dovichi, Norman J

    2015-04-21

    A detachable sulfonate-silica hybrid strong cation-exchange monolith was synthesized in a fused silica capillary, and used for solid phase extraction with online pH gradient elution during capillary zone electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry (CZE-MS/MS) proteomic analysis. Tryptic digests were prepared in 50 mM formic acid and loaded onto the strong cation-exchange monolith. Fractions were eluted using a series of buffers with lower concentration but higher pH values than the 50 mM formic acid background electrolyte. This combination of elution and background electrolytes results in both sample stacking and formation of a dynamic pH junction and allows use of relatively large elution buffer volumes while maintaining reasonable peak efficiency and resolution. A series of five pH bumps were applied to elute E. coli tryptic peptides from the monolith, followed by analysis using CZE coupled to an LTQ-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer; 799 protein groups and 3381 peptides were identified from 50 ng of the digest in a 2.5 h analysis, which approaches the identification rate for this organism that was obtained with an Orbitrap Fusion. We attribute the improved numbers of peptide and protein identifications to the efficient fractionation by the online pH gradient elution, which decreased the complexity of the sample in each elution step and improved the signal intensity of low abundance peptides. We also performed a comparative analysis using a nanoACQUITY UltraPerformance LCH system. Similar numbers of protein and peptide identifications were produced by the two methods. Protein identifications showed significant overlap between the two methods, whereas peptide identifications were complementary.

  4. Measurement and evaluation of the effects of pH gradients on the antimicrobial and antivirulence activities of chitosan nanoparticles in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Fadilah Sfouq Aleanizy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to study the antimicrobial activity of chitosan nanoparticles (CSNPs on Pseudomonas aeruginosa with special emphasis on their sensitivity to pH and the effect of pH on their activity. Methodology: Antimicrobial activity of CSNPs against Pseudomonas aeruginosa at different pH was tested using broth dilution method. Further assessment of antivirulence activity and sensitization of CSNPs on Pseudomonas aeruginosa were examined. Results: Significant antimicrobial effects of CSNPs against Pseudomonas aeruginosa were detected at slightly acidic pH 5, whereas the activity was abolished at a pH of greater than 7. The antivirulence activity of CSNPs was then investigated and treatment with CSNPs (1000 ppm resulted in a significant reduction or even complete inhibition of pyocyanin production by P. aeruginosa compared with untreated P. aeruginosa indicating the antivirulence activity of CSNPs. CSNPs also sensitized P. aeruginosa to the lytic effects of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS; such sensitization was not blocked by washing chitosan-treated cells prior to SDS exposure revealing that CSNPs disturb the outer membrane leading to irreversible sensitivity to detergent even at low concentration (100 ppm. Conclusions: These findings highlight CSNPs as potentially useful as indirect antimicrobial agents for a variety of applications. Keywords: Chitosan nanoparticles, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, pH, Antimicrobial, Virulence

  5. A chemometric-assisted method for the simultaneous determination of malachite green and crystal violet in water based on absorbance-pH data generated by a homemade pH gradient apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuling; Yuan, Xuejie; Yang, Jing; Yuan, Jintao; Shi, Jiahua; Wang, Yali; Chen, Yuewen; Gao, Shufang

    2015-01-01

    An attractive method of generating second-order data was developed by a dropping technique to generate pH gradient simultaneously coupled with diode-array spectrophotometer scanning. A homemade apparatus designed for the pH gradient. The method and the homemade apparatus were used to simultaneously determine malachite green (MG) and crystal violet (CV) in water samples. The absorbance-pH second-order data of MG or CV were obtained from the spectra of MG or CV in a series of pH values of HCl-KCl solution. The second-order data of mixtures containing MG and CV that coexisted with interferents were analyzed using multidimensional partial least-squares with residual bilinearization. The method and homemade apparatus were used to simultaneously determine MG and CV in fish farming water samples and in river ones with satisfactory results. The presented method and the homemade apparatus could serve as an alternative tool to handle some analysis problems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthesis and pH- and salinity-controlled self-assembly of novel amphiphilic block-gradient copolymers of styrene and acrylic acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borisova, O.; Billon, L.; Zaremski, M.; Grassl, B.; Bakaeva, Zulfiya; Lapp, A.; Štěpánek, Petr; Borisov, O.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 29 (2012), s. 7649-7659 ISSN 1744-683X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/1600 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : block-gradient copolymers * light scattering * small-angle neutron scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.909, year: 2012

  7. Lack of correlation between turnover of low-molecular-weight dissolved organic carbon and differences in microbial community composition or growth across a soil pH gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousk, Johannes; Brookes, Philip C; Glanville, Helen C; Jones, David L

    2011-04-01

    We studied how soil pH (pHs 4 to 8) influenced the mineralization of low-molecular-weight (LMW)-dissolved organic carbon (DOC) compounds, and how this compared with differences in microbial community structure. The mineralization of LMW-DOC compounds was not systematically connected to differences in soil pH, consistent with soil respiration. In contrast, the microbial community compositions differed dramatically. This suggests that microbial community composition data will be of limited use in improving the predictive power of soil C models.

  8. Energy-Storage Applications for a pH Gradient between Two Benzimidazole-Ligated Ruthenium Complexes That Engage in Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Reactions in Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Daisuke; Yoshikawa, Kai; Ozawa, Hiroaki; Tadokoro, Makoto; Haga, Masa-Aki

    2017-06-05

    The judicious selection of pairs of benzimidazole-ligated ruthenium complexes allowed the construction of a rechargeable proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET)-type redox battery. A series of ruthenium(II) and -(III) complexes were synthesized that contain substituted benzimidazoles that engage in PCET reactions. The formation of intramolecular Ru-C cyclometalation bonds stabilized the resulting ruthenium(III) complexes, in which pK a values of the imino N-H protons on the benzimidazoles are usually lower than those for the corresponding ruthenium(II) complexes. As a proof-of-concept study for a solution redox battery based on such PCET reactions, the charging/discharging cycles of several pairs of ruthenium complexes were examined by chronopotentiometry in an H-type device with half-cells separated by a Nafion membrane in unbuffered CH 3 CN/H 2 O (1/1, v/v) containing 0.1 M NaCl. During the charging/discharging cycles, the pH value of the solution gradually changed accompanied by a change of the open-circuit potential (OCP). The changes for the OCP and pH value of the solution in the anodic and cathodic half-cells were in good agreement with the predicted values from the Pourbaix diagrams for the pairs of ruthenium complexes used. Accordingly, the careful selection of pairs of ruthenium complexes with a sufficient potential gradient and a suitably large pK a difference is crucial: the charge generated between the two ruthenium complexes changes the OCP and the pH difference between the two cells in an unbuffered solution, given that the PCET reactions occur at both electrodes and that discharging leads to the original state. Because the electric energy is stored as a pH gradient between the half-cells, new possibilities for PCET-type rocking-chair redox batteries arise.

  9. Monitoring of the Proton Electrochemical Gradient in Reconstituted Vesicles: Quantitative Measurements of Both Transmembrane Potential and Intravesicular pH by Ratiometric Fluorescent Probes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holoubek, A.; Večeř, J.; Sigler, Karel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 17, - (2007), s. 201-213 ISSN 1053-0509 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : transmembrane potential * intracellular ph * oxonol dyes Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.101, year: 2007

  10. Use of bipolar membranes for maintaining steady-state pH gradients in membrane-supported, solar-driven water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Michael B; Ardo, Shane; Lewis, Nathan S; Freund, Michael S

    2014-11-01

    A bipolar membrane can maintain a steady-state pH difference between the sites of oxidation and reduction in membrane-supported, solar-driven water-splitting systems without changing the overall thermodynamics required to split water. A commercially available bipolar membrane that can serve this purpose has been identified, its performance has been evaluated quantitatively, and is demonstrated to meet the requirements for this application. For effective utilization in integrated solar-driven water-splitting systems, such bipolar membranes must, however, be modified to simultaneously optimize their physical properties such as optical transparency, electronic conductivity and kinetics of water dissociation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Identification of the EcoKI and EcoR124I Type I restriction--modification enzyme subunits by non-equilibrium pH gradient two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, L D; Cajthamlová, K; Nguyen, H T; Weiser, J; Holubová, I; Weiserová, M

    2002-01-01

    Effectively optimized and reproducible procedure for monitoring the composition of type I restriction-modification endonucleases EcoKI and EcoR124I by non-equilibrium pH gradient two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis is described. Three subunits of the enzyme complex, which widely differ from one another in their isoelectric points and molar mass, were identified in crude cell extracts of E. coli. For the first time all three subunits of both EcoKI and EcoR124I were detected as distinct spots on a single 2-D gel. A sensitive immunoblotting procedure was suggested suitable for routine use in determining the identity of individual subunits. Potential application of this method for detailed studies of regulation of the function and stoichiometry of the enzyme complexes is discussed.

  12. Remote loading of doxorubicin into liposomes by transmembrane pH gradient to reduce toxicity toward H9c2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Alyane

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of doxorubicin (DOX is limited by its dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. Entrapped DOX in liposome has been shown to reduce cardiotoxicity. Results showed that about 92% of the total drug was encapsulated in liposome. The release experiments showed a weak DOX leakage in both culture medium and in PBS, more than 98% and 90% of the encapsulated DOX respectively was still retained in liposomes after 24 h of incubation. When the release experiments were carried out in phosphate buffer pH5.3, the leakage of DOX from liposomes reached 37% after 24 h of incubation. Evaluation of cellular uptake of the liposomal DOX indicated the possible endocytosis of liposomes because the majority of visible fluorescence of DOX was mainly in the cytoplasm, whereas the nuclear compartment showed a weak intensity. When using unloaded fluorescent-liposomes, the fluorescence was absent in nuclei suggests that liposomes cannot cross the nuclear membrane. MTT assay and measurement of LDH release suggest that necrosis is the form of cellular death predominates in H9c2 cells exposed to high doses of DOX, while for weak doses apoptosis could be the predominate form. Entrapped DOX reduced significantly DOX toxicity after 3 and 6 h of incubation, but after 20 h entrapped DOX is more toxic than free one.

  13. pH regulation in anoxic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felle, Hubert H

    2005-09-01

    pH regulation is the result of a complex interaction of ion transport, H+ buffering, H+-consuming and H+-producing reactions. Cells under anoxia experience an energy crisis; an early response thereof (in most tissues) is a rapid cytoplasmic acidification of roughly half a pH unit. Depending on the degree of anoxia tolerance, this pH remains relatively stable for some time, but then drops further due to an energy shortage, which, in concert with a general breakdown of transmembrane gradients, finally leads to cell death unless the plant finds access to an energy source. In this review the much-debated origin of the initial pH change and its regulation under anoxia is discussed, as well as the problem of how tissues deal with the energy crisis and to what extent pH regulation and membrane transport from and into the vacuole and the apoplast is a part thereof. It is postulated that, because a foremost goal of cells under anoxia must be energy production (having an anaerobic machinery that produces insufficient amounts of ATP), a new pH is set to ensure a proper functioning of the involved enzymes. Thus, the anoxic pH is not experienced as an error signal and is therefore not reversed to the aerobic level. Although acclimated and anoxia-tolerant tissues may display higher cytoplasmic pH than non-acclimated or anoxia-intolerant tissues, evidence for an impeded pH-regulation is missing even in the anoxia-intolerant tissues. For sufficient energy production, residual H+ pumping is vital to cope with anoxia by importing energy-rich compounds; however it is not vital for pH-regulation. Whereas the initial acidification is not due to energy shortage, subsequent uncontrolled acidosis occurring in concert with a general gradient breakdown damages the cell but may not be the primary event.

  14. Reconstructions of Climatic and Topographic Gradients in the Sierra Nevada during the early Eocene using compound-specific stable isotopes and organic molecular temperature proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hren, M. T.; Pagani, M.; Brandon, M.; Erwin, D. M.

    2008-12-01

    Terrestrial sediments from the early Cenozoic provide important records of continental temperature gradients during periods of high global temperatures and PCO2, yet these records are often interpreted in terms of either climatic or orographic effects. As a result, linking models of past global climate with terrestrial temperature information is hampered by a lack of detailed information on paleoelevation. Organic molecular proxies provide new tools to help distinguish between climatic and orographic information in terrestrial sediments. For this study, we used organic molecular proxies to determine paleoelevation and paleotemperature gradients in the Sierra Nevada during the early Eocene warm period. Specifically, we analyzed the hydrogen and carbon isotopes of n-alkanes in bulk sediments and fossil angiosperm leaf cuticle in overbank deposits of major drainages of the Eocene Sierra Nevada to quantify the changes in the isotopic composition of leaf water that potentially reflect changes in paleoelevation. We coupled this data with paleotemperature measurements across this landscape using the MBT/CBT organic molecular temperature proxy, as well as thermodynamic models of the isotopic evolution of rainwater during orographic ascent. Hydrogen isotopes of n-alkanes systematically decrease by more than 30 per mil with distance from the Eocene shoreline and temperature data show a decrease of more than 8 degrees across this ancient range, with temperatures near the ocean margin exceeding 22 degrees. Isotopic and temperature data provide evidence for steep topography and high temperature lapse rates at the California margin during the early Eocene. These results support model estimates of temperature and relative humidity for the early Eocene based on a four time doubling of atmospheric CO2.

  15. In vitro inhibition of angiogenesis by heat and low pH stable hydroalcoholic extract of Peganum harmala seeds via inhibition of cell proliferation and suppression of VEGF secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yavari, Niloofar; Emamian, Farnoosh; Yarani, Reza

    2015-01-01

    ) is a native plant from the eastern Iranian region, which is used as a traditional folk medicine. Although some biological properties of this plant are determined, its effect on angiogenesis is still unclear. Objective: We investigated the anti-angiogenic effects of heat and low pH stable hydroalcoholic...... and angiogenesis with an ID50 of ∼85 μg/ml. VEGF secretion was (inhibited) decreased by the extracts at concentrations higher than 10 μg/ml. Discussion and conclusion: Herbal plant extracts still attract attention owing to their fewer side effects comparing to synthetic drug agents. Current study indicated...

  16. Validation of classical density-dependent solute transport theory for stable, high-concentration-gradient brine displacements in coarse and medium sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, S. J.; Barry, D. A.; Schotting, R. J.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    A series of careful laboratory soil column experiments was carried out for the purpose of providing data for testing recently presented theories of miscible density-dependent flow and transport. In particular, modifications to the standard theory involve extensions to both Darcy's (for flow) and Fick's laws (for diffusive/dispersive solute flux). Both coarse- and medium-grained sands were used in the experiments. All experiments concerned upward (i.e., stable) displacement of fresh water within the soil by a brine solution, under either constant head or constant volume flux conditions. The experimental data were analysed using accurate numerical solutions of the standard governing flow and transport model, as well as models with modified Darcy's and Fick's laws. Model parameters were determined by a step-wise fitting procedure based on the least-squares criterion. The results show clearly that, for large density contrasts, an extended Darcy's law was not necessary. On the other hand, an extension to Fick's Law was needed to model the experimental data accurately.

  17. Identifying Low pH Active and Lactate-Utilizing Taxa within Oral Microbiome Communities from Healthy Children Using Stable Isotope Probing Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, Jeffrey S.; Fansler, Sarah J.; Majors, Paul D.; Mcateer, Kathleen; Allen, Lisa Z.; Shirtliff, Mark E.; Lux, Renate; Shi, Wenyuan

    2012-03-05

    Many human microbial infectious diseases including dental caries are polymicrobial in nature and how these complex multi-species communities evolve from a healthy to a diseased state is not well understood. Although many health- or disease-associated oral microbes have been characterized in vitro, their physiology in vivo in the presence of the complex oral microbiome is difficult to determine with current approaches. In addition, about half of these oral species remain uncultivated to date and little is known except their 16S rRNA sequence. Lacking culture-based physiological analyses, the functional roles of uncultivated microorganisms will remain enigmatic despite their apparent disease correlation. To start addressing these knowledge gaps, we applied a novel combination of in vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) with RNA and DNA based Stable Isotope Probing (SIP) to oral plaque communities from healthy children for temporal monitoring of carbohydrate utilization, organic acid production and identification of metabolically active and inactive bacterial species.

  18. Hierarchical cobalt poly-phosphide hollow spheres as highly active and stable electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution over a wide pH range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tianli; Pi, Mingyu; Wang, Xiaodeng; Guo, Weimeng; Zhang, Dingke; Chen, Shijian

    2018-01-01

    Exploring highly-efficient and low-cost non-noble metal electrocatalyst toward the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is highly desired for renewable energy system but remains challenging. In this work, three dimensional hierarchical porous cobalt poly-phosphide hollow spheres (CoP3 HSs) were prepared by topotactic phosphidation of the cobalt-based precursor via vacuum encapsulation technique. As a porous HER cathode, the CoP3 HSs delivers remarkable electrocatalytic performance over the wide pH range. It needs overpotentials of -69 mV and -118 mV with a small Tafel slope of 51 mV dec-1 to obtain current densities of 10 mA cm-2 and 50 mA cm-2, respectively, and maintains its electrocatalytic performance over 30 h in acidic solution. In addition, CoP3 also exhibit superior electrocatalytic performance and stability under neutral and alkaline conditions for the HER. Both experimental measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to explore the mechanism behind the excellent HER performance. The results of our study make the porous CoP3 HSs as a promising electrocatalyst for practical applications toward energy conversion system and present a new way for designing and fabricating HER electrodes through high degree of phosphorization and nano-porous architecture.

  19. Analysis of green tea compounds and their stability in dentifrices of different pH levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jong-Hwa; Park, Yong-Duk; Ahn, Hyo-Kwang; Kim, Seung-Jin; Lee, Joo-Young; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Chang, Yeon-Soo; Song, Yun-Jung; Kwon, Ha-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, green tea compounds (flavonoids, alkaloids, and phenolic acids) were analyzed in green tea-containing dentifrices, and their stability at different pH levels was evaluated. The compounds were separated under 0.01% phosphoric acid-acetonitrile gradient conditions and detected by photodiode array detector at 210, 280, 300, 335 nm. Column temperature was set at 20°C based on the results of screening various temperatures. Each compound showed good linearity at optimized wavelength as well as showing good precision and accuracy in dentifrices. Using this method, the stability of compounds was investigated in pH 4, 7, 8, and 10 solutions for 96 h, and in pH 7 and pH 10 solutions for 6 months. The green tea compounds were more stable at low pH levels; purine alkaloids were more stable than flavonoids. In particular, gallocatechin (GC), epigallocatechin (EGC), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), gallocatechin gallate (GCG), and myricetin almost disappeared in pH 10 solutions after 96 h. In dentifrices, the compounds were gradually decreased until 6 months in both pH types, while gallic acid was increased because of production of galloyl ester of other green tea compounds. Therefore, it is beneficial to adjust to as low a pH as possible when produce green tea-containing dentifrices.

  20. Irradiance gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, G.J.; Heckbert, P.S.; Technische Hogeschool Delft

    1992-04-01

    A new method for improving the accuracy of a diffuse interreflection calculation is introduced in a ray tracing context. The information from a hemispherical sampling of the luminous environment is interpreted in a new way to predict the change in irradiance as a function of position and surface orientation. The additional computation involved is modest and the benefit is substantial. An improved interpolation of irradiance resulting from the gradient calculation produces smoother, more accurate renderings. This result is achieved through better utilization of ray samples rather than additional samples or alternate sampling strategies. Thus, the technique is applicable to a variety of global illumination algorithms that use hemicubes or Monte Carlo sampling techniques

  1. Oxygen, pH, and Eh microprofiles around submerged macrophyte Vallisneria natans response to growing stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, B.; Wang, G. X.; Yu, H. G.

    2017-08-01

    The periphyton, attached to the surfaces of submerged plants, has important effects on plant growth and development in eutrophic waters. Periphyton complicates the microenvironment of diffusive boundary layer around submerged plants. We researched periphyton characteristics, oxygen (O2), pH, and Eh microprofiles at various growing stages of Vallisneria natans. The results suggested that during the growing period of V. natans, O2 concentration and pH decreased from 0 to 2 mm above the leaf surface, whereas the Eh increased. As V. natans grew, O2 and pH gradually increased until they peaked during stable growing stages, while the Eh decreased. However, during the decline stage, O2 and pH gradually decreased, and Eh increased. To summarise, O2 and pH showed a unimodal pattern in response to the life cycle of V. natans, with the maximum levels during the stable growth stage and the minimum levels during the rapid growth and decline stages. Our study demonstrated that V. natans growth induced steep gradients in O2 concentrations, pH, and Eh at the DBL by increasing the layer’s thickness, macrophyte photosynthetic capacity, and periphyton biomass in eutrophic waters.

  2. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  3. [Content trends of pollutants in street dust of Beijing along the urban-rural gradient and road density gradient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rong-Li; Ma, Ke-Ming; Zhang, Yu-Xin; Mao, Qi-Zheng

    2013-01-01

    In the article, pollutant content of 220 road dust samples within the sixth ring road of Beijing have been investigated by using grid stationing sampling method. The changing characteristics of road nude number per unit area, road network density and pollutant content within buffering areas along urban to rural gradient were also studied. Three following variation trends are presented as each index varies widely within the research areas. Firstly, road nude number per unit area, road network density and Cu, Cr, Pb content decrease along urban to rural gradient, and they decrease sharply in the beginning. Secondly, Mn, Cd content change a little along urban to rural gradient, and mean value remains stable. Thirdly, the content of Ni, TOC, TN decreases along with the distance fluctuations in the beginning and their mean values are then rising slowly in the suburbs. The turning point of pollutant content are found in places 15-20 km away from city center. The article shows that the road index and Cd content are irrelevant, and weak correlations are found between road index, TS, Mn and pH. And other relevance ranking are described as follows: Cu > TN > TOC > Pb > Ni > Cr. In contrast with road network density, higher correlations between road nude number per unit area and each element are fond, and element pollution of Cu, TN, TOC, Pb, Ni and Cr could be indicated by these indicators.

  4. Stability of gradient semigroups under perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragão-Costa, E. R.; Caraballo, T.; Carvalho, A. N.; Langa, J. A.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we prove that gradient-like semigroups (in the sense of Carvalho and Langa (2009 J. Diff. Eqns 246 2646-68)) are gradient semigroups (possess a Lyapunov function). This is primarily done to provide conditions under which gradient semigroups, in a general metric space, are stable under perturbation exploiting the known fact (see Carvalho and Langa (2009 J. Diff. Eqns 246 2646-68)) that gradient-like semigroups are stable under perturbation. The results presented here were motivated by the work carried out in Conley (1978 Isolated Invariant Sets and the Morse Index (CBMS Regional Conference Series in Mathematics vol 38) (RI: American Mathematical Society Providence)) for groups in compact metric spaces (see also Rybakowski (1987 The Homotopy Index and Partial Differential Equations (Universitext) (Berlin: Springer)) for the Morse decomposition of an invariant set for a semigroup on a compact metric space).

  5. a Modified Denitrifying Bacteria Method for Dual Stable Isotopic Analysis of of Soil Nitrate in Kcl Extracts: Identification of Bioindicators of Nitrogen Deposition Along a Gradient in the Sonoran Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M. D.; Sickman, J. O.; Allen, E. B.

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies performing dual isotopic analysis of nitrate in KCl soil extracts using denitrifying bacteria have not incorporated alterations in the method to compensate for the increased N2O blank produced when the bacteria are exposed to KCl in solution. When 1M KCl is used as a blank, the amount of N2O released from the concentrated bacteria solution is more than four times as high as when using a DI water blank. The excess N2O produced is not an artifact of nitrate impurity in the KCl, although the blank increases with the molarity of KCl up to 1M. The introduction of N2O gas is significant enough to alter the values of IAEA USGS standards (3 μg in 3ml KCl) which in turn results in an inaccurate regression for unknown samples. We reduced the size of the KCl blank and its effect on the standards by adding 3ml of KCl to the bacteria solution prior to purging the sample with He gas. This removes the N2O gas which is released by the bacteria when they initially come in contact with the KCl, and allows for standards to be calibrated to a precision of ± 0.1 % δ15N and ± 0.2 % δ18O. Using this new method, we measured δ15N and δ18O of nitrate in 1M KCl soil extracts taken from surface soil (5cm cores) along a nitrogen deposition gradient spanning the Coachella Valley in the western Sonoran Desert during the summer. Early germinating winter annual plant species (Schismus barbatus, Chaenactic fremontii, and Malacothrix glabrata) were collected as seedlings early in the growing season and again in late spring before senescence. Leaves from the dominant shrub, Larrea tridentata, were also collected from each site. Soil nitrogen from sites on the eastern edge of the valley had δ18O values between +30 and +41%, indicating an influence of atmospheric nitrate in plant available nitrate. There was an inverse correlation (r2=0.907) between soil δ18O and the δ15N of the C.fremontii leaf tissue, which suggests that in areas of high N deposition, some seedlings are

  6. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets, with a few more additions - with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers - exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the foree of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc. (orig.)

  7. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc

  8. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  9. Effects of Mars Regolith Analogs, UVC radiation, Temperature, Pressure, and pH on the Growth and Survivability of Methanogenic Archaea and Stable Carbon Isotope Fractionation: Implications for Surface and Subsurface Life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Navita

    physicochemical conditions such as temperature, pressure, hydrogen concentration, and pH of Mars. Finally, chapter 7 provides conclusions, limitations of the experiments, and future perspective of the work. Overall, the quantitative measurements obtained in the various sections of this novel work provide insights to atmospheric biosignatures and survivability of methanogenic organisms on the surface and subsurface of Mars.

  10. Molecular fractionation of starch by density-gradient ultracentrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jae Wook; Lim, Seung Taik

    2003-03-28

    Amylose and amylopectin in corn and potato starches were fractionated by centrifugation at 124,000g for 3-72 h at 40 degrees C in a gradient media, Nycodenz, based on their sedimentation rate differences. The fractions were collected from a centrifuge tube, and then analyzed by the phenol-sulfuric acid method and iodine-binding test. Amylopectin, a large and highly branched starch molecule, migrated faster than amylose and quickly reached its isopycnic point with a buoyant density of about 1.25 g/mL, exhibiting a sharp and stable carbohydrate peak. Amylose, which is a relatively small and linear molecule, however, migrated slowly in a broad density range and continued moving to higher density regions, eventually overlapping with amylopectin peak as the centrifugation continued. This could indicate that the buoyant density of amylose is similar to that of amylopectin. Under centrifugal conditions of 3 h and 124,000g, amylose and amylopectin molecules were clearly separated, and the presence of intermediate starch molecules (11.5 and 7.7% for corn and potato starch, respectively) was also observed between amylose and amylopectin fractions. The amylose content of corn and potato starches was 22.6 and 21.1%, respectively, based on the total carbohydrate analysis after the ultracentrifugation for 3 h. In alkaline gradients (pH 11 or 12.5), the sedimentation rate of starch molecules and the buoyant density of amylopectin were reduced, possibly due to the structural changes induced by alkali.

  11. Self-organization of intracellular gradients during mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Brian G

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gradients are used in a number of biological systems to transmit spatial information over a range of distances. The best studied are morphogen gradients where information is transmitted over many cell lengths. Smaller mitotic gradients reflect the need to organize several distinct events along the length of the mitotic spindle. The intracellular gradients that characterize mitosis are emerging as important regulatory paradigms. Intracellular gradients utilize intrinsic auto-regulatory feedback loops and diffusion to establish stable regions of activity within the mitotic cytosol. We review three recently described intracellular mitotic gradients. The Ran GTP gradient with its elaborate cascade of nuclear transport receptors and cargoes is the best characterized, yet the dynamics underlying the robust gradient of Ran-GTP have received little attention. Gradients of phosphorylation have been observed on Aurora B kinase substrates both before and after anaphase onset. In both instances the phosphorylation gradient appears to result from a soluble gradient of Aurora B kinase activity. Regulatory properties that support gradient formation are highlighted. Intracellular activity gradients that regulate localized mitotic events bare several hallmarks of self-organizing biologic systems that designate spatial information during pattern formation. Intracellular pattern formation represents a new paradigm in mitotic regulation.

  12. Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3PO AND Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3AsO: SYNTHESIS AND INFRARED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDOU MBAYE

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mixture of ethanolic solutions of Ph3CCOOSnPh3 and Ph3PO or Ph3AsO gives Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3PO and Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3AsO adducts which have been characterized by infrared spectroscopy. A discrete structure is suggested for both, the environment around the tin centre being trigonal bipyramidal, the triphenylacetate anion behaving as a mondentate ligand.

  13. Microscopic monitoring of extracellular pH in dental biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Garcia, Javier; Greve, Matilde

    extracellular pH irrespective of the dye concentration. We showed that at pH stained 15 bacterial species frequently isolated from dental biofilm and visualized the entire bacterial biomass in dental biofilms grown intraorally on glass slabs mounted on individually designed lower jaw splints. We......pH in dental biofilm is a key virulence factor for the development of caries lesions. The complex three-dimensional architecture of dental biofilms leads to steep gradients of nutrients and metabolites, including organic acids, across the biofilm. For decades, measuring pH in dental biofilm has......H ratiometry, can be employed to map the pH landscape in dental biofilm with more detail. However, when pH sensitive fluorescent probes are used to visualize pH in biofilms, it is crucial to differentiate between extracellular and intracellular pH. Intracellular microbial pH and pH in the extracellular matrix...

  14. Primordial soup or vinaigrette: did the RNA world evolve at acidic pH?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhardt Harold S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The RNA world concept has wide, though certainly not unanimous, support within the origin-of-life scientific community. One view is that life may have emerged as early as the Hadean Eon 4.3-3.8 billion years ago with an atmosphere of high CO2 producing an acidic ocean of the order of pH 3.5-6. Compatible with this scenario is the intriguing proposal that life arose within alkaline (pH 9-11 deep-sea hydrothermal vents like those of the 'Lost City', with the interface with the acidic ocean creating a proton gradient sufficient to drive the first metabolism. However, RNA is most stable at pH 4-5 and is unstable at alkaline pH, raising the possibility that RNA may have first arisen in the acidic ocean itself (possibly near an acidic hydrothermal vent, acidic volcanic lake or comet pond. As the Hadean Eon progressed, the ocean pH is inferred to have gradually risen to near neutral as atmospheric CO2 levels decreased. Presentation of the hypothesis We propose that RNA is well suited for a world evolving at acidic pH. This is supported by the enhanced stability at acidic pH of not only the RNA phosphodiester bond but also of the aminoacyl-(tRNA and peptide bonds. Examples of in vitro-selected ribozymes with activities at acid pH have recently been documented. The subsequent transition to a DNA genome could have been partly driven by the gradual rise in ocean pH, since DNA has greater stability than RNA at alkaline pH, but not at acidic pH. Testing the hypothesis We have proposed mechanisms for two key RNA world activities that are compatible with an acidic milieu: (i non-enzymatic RNA replication of a hemi-protonated cytosine-rich oligonucleotide, and (ii specific aminoacylation of tRNA/hairpins through triple helix interactions between the helical aminoacyl stem and a single-stranded aminoacylating ribozyme. Implications of the hypothesis Our hypothesis casts doubt on the hypothesis that RNA evolved in the vicinity of alkaline

  15. Generation of tunable and pulsatile concentration gradients via microfluidic network

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Bingpu

    2014-06-04

    We demonstrate a compact Polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic chip which can quickly generate ten different chemical concentrations simultaneously. The concentration magnitude of each branch can be flexibly regulated based on the flow rate ratios of the two injecting streams. The temporal/pulsatile concentration gradients are achieved by integrating on-chip pneumatic actuated valves controlled by the external signals. The temporal concentration gradients can also be tuned precisely by varying applied frequency and duty cycle of the trigger signal. It is believed that such microdevice will be potentially used for some application areas of producing stable chemical gradients as well as allowing fast, pulsatile gradient transformation in seconds.

  16. Stereo vision with distance and gradient recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Hyun; Kang, Suk-Bum; Yang, Tae-Kyu

    2007-12-01

    Robot vision technology is needed for the stable walking, object recognition and the movement to the target spot. By some sensors which use infrared rays and ultrasonic, robot can overcome the urgent state or dangerous time. But stereo vision of three dimensional space would make robot have powerful artificial intelligence. In this paper we consider about the stereo vision for stable and correct movement of a biped robot. When a robot confront with an inclination plane or steps, particular algorithms are needed to go on without failure. This study developed the recognition algorithm of distance and gradient of environment by stereo matching process.

  17. Evaluation of Thermal Stability of RNA Nanoparticles by Temperature Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (TGGE) in Native Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkato, Kheiria; O'Brien, Benjamin; Bui, My N; Jasinski, Daniel L; Guo, Peixuan; Khisamutdinov, Emil F

    2017-01-01

    Temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) is a powerful tool used to analyze the thermal stabilities of nucleic acids. While TGGE is a decades-old technique, it has recently gained favor in the field of RNA nanotechnology, notably in assessing the thermal stabilities of RNA nanoparticles (NPs). With TGGE, an electrical current and a linear temperature gradient are applied simultaneously to NP-loaded polyacrylamide gel, separating the negatively charged NPs based on their thermal behavior (a more stable RNA complex will remain intact through higher temperature ranges). The linear temperature gradient can be set either perpendicular or parallel to the electrical current, as either will make the NPs undergo a transition from native to denatured conformations. Often, the melting transition is influenced by sequence variations, secondary/tertiary structures, concentrations, and external factors such as the presence of a denaturing agent (e.g., urea), the presence of monovalent or divalent metal ions, and the pH of the solvent. In this chapter, we describe the experimental setup and the analysis of the thermal stability of RNA NPs in native conditions using a modified version of a commercially available TGGE system.

  18. Subduction zones seen by GOCE gravity gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Švarc, Mario; Herceg, Matija; Cammarano, Fabio

    . Few pattern recognition methods were tested on all 6 gravity gradient tensor components represented as global scale maps with resolution of 100km (corresponds to the resolution of the GOCE satellite data). By adjusting pattern recognition methods’ features and optimizing various input patterns...... and used as starting point for analysis based on image processing. On obtained maps, locations of known subduction zones were represented with characteristic elongated patterns and cross-sections. Cross sections of well-known subduction zones were used as input patterns for pattern recognition method......, the best method was applied. That is a combination of methods based on SURF (Speeded Up Robust Features) and MSER (Maximally Stable Extremal Regions) algorithms provided in MATLAB’s Computer Vision System Toolbox. Based on 6 gravity gradient components, the global gradient anomaly maps were produced...

  19. Inversion gradients for acoustic VTI wavefield tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Vladimir

    2017-03-21

    Wavefield tomography can handle complex subsurface geology better than ray-based techniques and, ultimately, provide a higher resolution. Here, we implement forward and adjoint wavefield extrapolation for VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) media using a generalized pseudospectral operator based on a separable approximation for the P-wave dispersion relation. This operator is employed to derive the gradients of the differential semblance optimization (DSO) and modified image-power objective functions. We also obtain the gradient expressions for a data-domain objective function that can more easily incorporate borehole information necessary for stable VTI velocity analysis. These gradients are similar to the ones obtained with a space-time finite-difference (FD) scheme for a system of coupled wave equations but the pseudospectral method is not hampered by the imprint of the shear-wave artifact. Numerical examples also show the potential advantages of the modified image-power objective function in estimating the anellipticity parameter η.

  20. Travelling gradient thermocouple calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broomfield, G.H.

    1975-01-01

    A short discussion of the origins of the thermocouple EMF is used to re-introduce the idea that the Peltier and Thompson effects are indistinguishable from one another. Thermocouples may be viewed as devices which generate an EMF at junctions or as integrators of EMF's developed in thermal gradients. The thermal gradient view is considered the more appropriate, because of its better accord with theory and behaviour, the correct approach to calibration, and investigation of service effects is immediately obvious. Inhomogeneities arise in thermocouples during manufacture and in service. The results of travelling gradient measurements are used to show that such effects are revealed with a resolution which depends on the length of the gradient although they may be masked during simple immersion calibration. Proposed tests on thermocouples irradiated in a nuclear reactor are discussed

  1. Gradient Alloy for Optical Packaging

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advances in additive manufacturing, such as Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS), enables the fabrication of compositionally gradient microstructures, i.e. gradient...

  2. Stable Isotope Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tissue samples (skin, bone, blood, muscle) are analyzed for stable carbon, stable nitrogen, and stable sulfur analysis. Many samples are used in their entirety for...

  3. On Calibration of pH Meters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Ming Zhu

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The calibration of pH meters including the pH glass electrode, ISE electrodes,buffers, and the general background for calibration are reviewed. Understanding of basicconcepts of pH, pOH, and electrode mechanism is emphasized. New concepts of pH, pOH,as well as critical examination of activity, and activity coefficients are given. Theemergence of new solid state pH electrodes and replacement of the salt bridge with aconducting wire have opened up a new horizon for pH measurements. A pH buffer solutionwith a conducting wire may be used as a stable reference electrode. The misleadingunlimited linear Nernstian slope should be discarded. Calibration curves with 3 nonlinearportions for the entire 0—14 pH range due to the isoelectric point change effect areexplained. The potential measurement with stirring or unstirring and effects by double layer(DL and triple layer (TL will be discussed.

  4. Evaluation of differences between dual salt-pH gradient elution and mono gradient elution using a thermodynamic model: Simultaneous separation of six monoclonal antibody charge and size variants on preparative-scale ion exchange chromatographic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi Feng; Jöhnck, Matthias; Frech, Christian

    2018-02-21

    The efficiencies of mono gradient elution and dual salt-pH gradient elution for separation of six mAb charge and size variants on a preparative-scale ion exchange chromatographic resin are compared in this study. Results showed that opposite dual salt-pH gradient elution with increasing pH gradient and simultaneously decreasing salt gradient is best suited for the separation of these mAb charge and size variants on Eshmuno ® CPX. Besides giving high binding capacity, this type of opposite dual salt-pH gradient also provides better resolved mAb variant peaks and lower conductivity in the elution pools compared to single pH or salt gradients. To have a mechanistic understanding of the differences in mAb variants retention behaviors of mono pH gradient, parallel dual salt-pH gradient, and opposite dual salt-pH gradient, a linear gradient elution model was used. After determining the model parameters using the linear gradient elution model, 2D plots were used to show the pH and salt dependencies of the reciprocals of distribution coefficient, equilibrium constant, and effective ionic capacity of the mAb variants in these gradient elution systems. Comparison of the 2D plots indicated that the advantage of opposite dual salt-pH gradient system with increasing pH gradient and simultaneously decreasing salt gradient is the noncontinuous increased acceleration of protein migration. Furthermore, the fitted model parameters can be used for the prediction and optimization of mAb variants separation in dual salt-pH gradient and step elution. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2018. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  5. Uniform gradient expansions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Giovannini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cosmological singularities are often discussed by means of a gradient expansion that can also describe, during a quasi-de Sitter phase, the progressive suppression of curvature inhomogeneities. While the inflationary event horizon is being formed the two mentioned regimes coexist and a uniform expansion can be conceived and applied to the evolution of spatial gradients across the protoinflationary boundary. It is argued that conventional arguments addressing the preinflationary initial conditions are necessary but generally not sufficient to guarantee a homogeneous onset of the conventional inflationary stage.

  6. Uniform gradient expansions

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological singularities are often discussed by means of a gradient expansion that can also describe, during a quasi-de Sitter phase, the progressive suppression of curvature inhomogeneities. While the inflationary event horizon is being formed the two mentioned regimes coexist and a uniform expansion can be conceived and applied to the evolution of spatial gradients across the protoinflationary boundary. It is argued that conventional arguments addressing the preinflationary initial conditions are necessary but generally not sufficient to guarantee a homogeneous onset of the conventional inflationary stage.

  7. High gradient superconducting quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundy, R.A.; Brown, B.C.; Carson, J.A.; Fisk, H.E.; Hanft, R.H.; Mantsch, P.M.; McInturff, A.D.; Remsbottom, R.H.

    1987-07-01

    Prototype superconducting quadrupoles with a 5 cm aperture and gradient of 16 kG/cm have been built and tested as candidate magnets for the final focus at SLC. The magnets are made from NbTi Tevatron style cable with 10 inner and 14 outer turns per quadrant. Quench performance and multipole data are presented. Design and data for a low current, high gradient quadrupole, similar in cross section but wound with a cable consisting of five insulated conductors are also discussed

  8. Stable convergence and stable limit theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Häusler, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a concise but complete exposition of the mathematical theory of stable convergence and give various applications in different areas of probability theory and mathematical statistics to illustrate the usefulness of this concept. Stable convergence holds in many limit theorems of probability theory and statistics – such as the classical central limit theorem – which are usually formulated in terms of convergence in distribution. Originated by Alfred Rényi, the notion of stable convergence is stronger than the classical weak convergence of probability measures. A variety of methods is described which can be used to establish this stronger stable convergence in many limit theorems which were originally formulated only in terms of weak convergence. Naturally, these stronger limit theorems have new and stronger consequences which should not be missed by neglecting the notion of stable convergence. The presentation will be accessible to researchers and advanced students at the master's level...

  9. pH preferencial em jundiás Rhamdia quelen aclimatados em diferentes níveis de pH

    OpenAIRE

    Riffel, Ana Paula Konzen; Jardim, Sinara; Pires, Marcela Ciprandi; Bertagnolli, Bruna; Corrêa, Bruna Renata Silva; Ré, Francine Cenzi de; Zambra, Francis Maria Bao; Lubini, Greice; Garcia, Luciano Oliveira; Baldisserotto, Bernardo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the preferred pH in silver catfish Rhamdia quelen acclimated to different pH. Fish were acclimated for one week at pH 4.2±0.1, 5.2±0.1, 6.3±0.1, 7.2±0.1, 8.0±0.1, and 9.0±0.1 and after this period, transferred to a polyethylene tube with a pH gradient from 3.5 to 10.0. The position of the fish in the pH gradient was observed 1, 6 and 12 hours after transference. Results indicated that acclimation to different pH did not change pH preference of silver c...

  10. Gradient computation for VTI acoustic wavefield tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Vladimir

    2016-09-06

    Wavefield tomography can handle complex subsurface geology better than ray-based techniques and, ultimately, provide a higher resolution. Here, we implement forward and adjoint wavefield extrapolation for VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) media using a pseudospectral operator that employes a separable approximation of the P-wave dispersion relation. This operator is employed to derive the gradients of the differential semblance optimization (DSO) and modified stack-power objective functions. We also obtain the gradient expressions for the data-domain objective function, which can incorporate borehole information necessary for stable VTI velocity analysis. These gradients are compared to the ones obtained with a space-time finite-difference (FD) scheme for a system of coupled wave equations. Whereas the kernels computed with the two wave-equation operators are similar, the pseudospectral method is not hampered by the imprint of the shear-wave artifact. Numerical examples also show that the modified stack-power objective function produces cleaner gradients than the more conventional DSO operator.

  11. Colloidal attraction induced by a temperature gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leonardo, R; Ianni, F; Ruocco, G

    2009-04-21

    Colloidal crystals are of extreme importance for applied research and for fundamental studies in statistical mechanics. Long-range attractive interactions, such as capillary forces, can drive the spontaneous assembly of such mesoscopic ordered structures. However, long-range attractive forces are very rare in the colloidal realm. Here we report a novel strong, long-ranged attraction induced by a thermal gradient in the presence of a wall. By switching the thermal gradient on and off, we can rapidly and reversibly form stable hexagonal 2D crystals. We show that the observed attraction is hydrodynamic in nature and arises from thermally induced slip flow on particle surfaces. We used optical tweezers to measure the force law directly and compare it to an analytical prediction based on Stokes flow driven by Marangoni-like forces.

  12. stableGP

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The code in the stableGP package implements Gaussian process calculations using efficient and numerically stable algorithms. Description of the algorithms is in the...

  13. PH og modernismen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahnfeldt-Mollerup, Merete

    2012-01-01

    Artiklen kaster et kritisk blik på Poul Henningsens samfundsanalyse og dennes sammenhæng med hans design. PH ses i en bredere national og international sammenhæng. Diskussion af designmetoder, æstetik og Bauhaus.......Artiklen kaster et kritisk blik på Poul Henningsens samfundsanalyse og dennes sammenhæng med hans design. PH ses i en bredere national og international sammenhæng. Diskussion af designmetoder, æstetik og Bauhaus....

  14. Fish communities along environmental gradients within the Comoé ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main environmental factors influencing fish distribution were substrate types — comprising rocks, mud and leaves or wood — pH, total dissolved solids, temperature and river width. Keywords: Comoé basin, Comoé National Park, Côte d'Ivoire, environmental gradients, fish assemblages. African Journal of Aquatic ...

  15. Temperature-gradient-induced

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol; Glaser, Matt; Maclennan, Joe; Clark, Noel; Trittel, Torsten; Stannarius, Ralf

    Freely-suspended smectic films of sub-micrometer thickness and lateral extensions of several millimeters were used to study thermally driven migration and convection in the film plane. Film experiments were performed during the 6 minute microgravity phase of a TEXUS suborbital rocket flight (Texus 52, launched April 27, 2015). We have found an attraction of the smectic material towards the cold edge of the film in a temperature gradient, similar to the Soret effect. This process is reversed when this edge is heated up again. Thermal convection driven by two thermocontacts in the film is practically absent, even at temperature gradients up to 10 K/mm, with thermally driven convection only setting in when the hot post reaches the transition temperature to the nematic phase. The Observation and Analysis of Smectic Islands in Space (OASIS) flight hardware was launched on SpaceX-6 in April 2015 and experiments on smectic bubbles were carried out on the International Space Station using four different smectic A and C liquid crystal materials in separate sample chambers. We observed that smectic islands on the surface of the bubbles migrated towards the colder part of the bubble in a temperature gradient. This work was supported by NASA Grant No. NNX-13AQ81G, by the Soft Materials Research Center under NSF MRSEC Grants No. DMR-0820579 and No. DMR-1420736, and by DLR Grants 50WM1127 and 50WM1430.

  16. Ratiometric Imaging of Extracellular pH in Dental Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Dige, Irene

    2016-03-09

    The pH in bacterial biofilms on teeth is of central importance for dental caries, a disease with a high worldwide prevalence. Nutrients and metabolites are not distributed evenly in dental biofilms. A complex interplay of sorption to and reaction with organic matter in the biofilm reduces the diffusion paths of solutes and creates steep gradients of reactive molecules, including organic acids, across the biofilm. Quantitative fluorescent microscopic methods, such as fluorescence life time imaging or pH ratiometry, can be employed to visualize pH in different microenvironments of dental biofilms. pH ratiometry exploits a pH-dependent shift in the fluorescent emission of pH-sensitive dyes. Calculation of the emission ratio at two different wavelengths allows determining local pH in microscopic images, irrespective of the concentration of the dye. Contrary to microelectrodes the technique allows monitoring both vertical and horizontal pH gradients in real-time without mechanically disturbing the biofilm. However, care must be taken to differentiate accurately between extra- and intracellular compartments of the biofilm. Here, the ratiometric dye, seminaphthorhodafluor-4F 5-(and-6) carboxylic acid (C-SNARF-4) is employed to monitor extracellular pH in in vivo grown dental biofilms of unknown species composition. Upon exposure to glucose the dye is up-concentrated inside all bacterial cells in the biofilms; it is thus used both as a universal bacterial stain and as a marker of extracellular pH. After confocal microscopic image acquisition, the bacterial biomass is removed from all pictures using digital image analysis software, which permits to exclusively calculate extracellular pH. pH ratiometry with the ratiometric dye is well-suited to study extracellular pH in thin biofilms of up to 75 µm thickness, but is limited to the pH range between 4.5 and 7.0.

  17. Diversity and geochemical structuring of bacterial communities along a salinity gradient in a carbonate aquifer subject to seawater intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héry, Marina; Volant, Aurélie; Garing, Charlotte; Luquot, Linda; Elbaz Poulichet, Françoise; Gouze, Philippe

    2014-12-01

    In aquifers subject to saline water intrusion, the mixing zone between freshwater and saltwater displays strong physico-chemical gradients. Although the microbial component of these specific environments has been largely disregarded, the contribution of micro-organisms to biogeochemical reactions impacting water geochemistry has previously been conjectured. The objective of this study was to characterize and compare bacterial community diversity and composition along a vertical saline gradient in a carbonate coastal aquifer using high throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. At different depths of the mixing zone, stable geochemical and hydrological conditions were associated with autochthonous bacterial communities harboring clearly distinct structures. Diversity pattern did not follow the salinity gradient, although multivariate analysis indicated that salinity was one of the major drivers of bacterial community composition, with organic carbon, pH and CO2 partial pressure. Correlation analyses between the relative abundance of bacterial taxa and geochemical parameters suggested that rare taxa may contribute to biogeochemical processes taking place at the interface between freshwater and saltwater. Bacterial respiration or alternative metabolisms such as sulfide oxidation or organic acids production may be responsible for the acidification and the resulting induced calcite dissolution observed at a specific depth of the mixing zone. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Streptococcus faecalis mutants defective in regulation of cytoplasmic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, H; Unemoto, T

    1980-09-01

    We have isolated two acid-sensitive mutants of Streptococcus faecalis (ATCC 9790), designated AS13 and AS25, which grew at pH 7.5 but not at pH below 6.0. The ionophore gramicidin D, which collapsed the pH gradient between the cytoplasm and the medium, had little effect on the growth of these mutants, indicating that growing cells maintain only a small pH gradient. In the presence of gramicidin D the growth rates of the parent and mutant strains were identical over a range of pH values. When glucose was added to a cell suspension at pH 6.4, the parent strain generated a pH gradient of 1.0 unit, interior alkaline; AS13 generated a pH gradient of only 0.5 units, and AS25 generated no measurable pH gradient. The proton permeability of the mutant strains was the same as that of the parent strain. These results suggest that a cytoplasmic pH of around 7.5 is required for the growth of the cells and that the mutant strains are unable to establish a neutral cytoplasmic pH in acidic medium because of damage to the regulatory system of the cytoplasmic pH. Mutant strains also have a reduced capacity to extrude protons and take up potassium. Therefore, it is likely that these cation transport systems are involved in the regulation of cytoplasmic pH.

  19. Effect of two mouthwashes on salivary ph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardinelli, Paola A; Morelatto, Rosana A; Benavidez, Tomás E; Baruzzi, Ana M; López de Blanc, Silvia A

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the effect of two mouthwashes on salivary pH and correlate it with age, buffer capacity and saliva flow rate in healthy volunteers, a crossover phase IV clinical study involving three age-based groups was designed. Two commercial mouthwashes (MW), Cool Mint ListerineR (MWa) and Periobacter R (MWb) were used. The unstimulated saliva of each individual was first characterized by measuring flow rate, pH, and buffer capacity. Salivary pH was evaluated before rinsing with a given MW, immediately after rinsing, 5 minutes later, and then every 10 min (at 15, 25, 35 min) until the baseline pH was recovered. Paired t-test, ANOVA with a randomized block design, and Pearson correlation tests were used. Averages were 0.63 mL/min, 7.06, and 0.87 for flow rate, pH, and buffer capacity, respectively. An immediate significant increase in salivary pH was observed after rinsing, reaching average values of 7.24 (MWb) and 7.30 (MWa), which declined to an almost stable value 15 minutes. The great increase in salivary pH, after MW use shows that saliva is a dynamic system, and that the organism is capable of responding to a stimulus with changes in its composition. It is thus evident that pH of the external agent alone is not a good indicator for its erosive potential because biological systems tend to neutralize it. The results of this study enhance the importance of in vivo measurements and reinforce the concept of the protective action of saliva.

  20. Dual-lifetime referencing (DLR: a powerful method for on-line measurement of internal pH in carrier-bound immobilized biocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boniello Caterina

    2012-03-01

    conditions of continuous measurement. During hydrolysis of cephalosporin C by the immobilizate in a stirred reactor with bulk pH maintained at 8.0, the intraparticle pH dropped initially by about 1 pH unit and gradually returned to the bulk pH, reflecting the depletion of substrate from solution. These results support measurement of intraparticle pH as a potential analytical processing tool for proton-forming/consuming biotransformations catalyzed by carrier-bound immobilized enzymes. Conclusions Fluorescein and Ru(dpp constitute a useful pair of luminophores in by DLR-based intraparticle pH monitoring. The pH range accessible by the chosen DLR system overlaps favorably with the pH ranges at which enzymes are optimally active and stable. DLR removes the restriction of working with static immobilized enzyme particles, enabling suspensions of particles to be characterized also. The pH gradient developed between particle and bulk liquid during reaction steady state is an important carrier selection parameter for enzyme immobilization and optimization of biocatalytic conversion processes. Determination of this parameter was rendered possible by the presented DLR method.

  1. The Galactic metallicity gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolleston, W. R. J.; Smartt, S. J.; Dufton, P. L.; Ryans, R. S. I.

    2000-11-01

    We have previously published intermediate to high resolution spectroscopic observations of approximately 80 early B-type main-sequence stars situated in 19 Galactic open clusters/associations with Galactocentric distances distributed over 6Twarog et al. \\cite{twa97}). However, there is no evidence to suggest that our data would be better fitted with a two-zone model. Moreover, we observe a N/O gradient of -0.04+/-0.02 dex kpc-1 which is consistent with that found for other spiral galaxies (Vila-Costas & Edmunds \\cite{vil93}).

  2. [Translaminar Gradient and Glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čmelo, J

    2017-01-01

    The cribriform plate is a threshold of the intraocular pressure (VOT) and of the intracranial pressure (IKT). The difference between the VOT and IKT is referred to as translaminar gradient (TLG). The goal was to evaluate the Glaucoma progression (visual field, fundus examination, HRT) with / without topical anti-glaucomatous therapy) in relation to the TLG. the significance of TLG has been studied in two groups. I. Group: 57 patients diagnosed and treatment of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma (PGOU), 10 patients with Ocular hypertension (OH), 7 patients with Normal-Tension Glaucoma (NTG), and 75 healthy without glaucoma. The examinations of TLG were carried out once and retrospectively. In II. group there were prospectively studied 14 patients with OH and 24 patients with newly detected PGOU without local therapy. The examinations were performed 4 times at intervals of 10 to 11 months. All tests included a basic eye examination, ORA tonometry, HRT examination, gonioscopy, Color Doppler sonography of blood vessels of the eye and orbit. Venous pulsation pressure (VPT) has been recorded by the Ophthalmodynamometer Meditron (D-ODM). In case of spontaneous retinal venous pulsation, VPT was considered as the same pressure as the VOT. The TLG was calculated with formula of Querfurth: ICT = 0.29 + 0.74 (VOT / PI (AO)). [PI(AO) - Pulsatility index of the Ophthalmic artery (AO)]. I. group: TLG was in the control group without Glaucoma: 12.2 ± 2.0 torr. The NTG group: 9.0 ± 1.70 mm Hg. PGOU: 11.1 ± 1.91 mm Hg. OH: 12.6 ± 0.85 mm Hg. IKT alone does not show a significant relationship to the presence of glaucoma, ocular hypertension. II. Group: The average TLG in Ocular Hypertension (14 patients) has been 3.8 ± 1.2 torr. 2 patients (OH) had TLG 10 torr. and 15 torr. After 4 years in one of them (TLG = 15 torr.) there was recorded Glaucoma progression. In the PGOU group before antiglaucoma therapy, TLG was 15.0 ± 4.8 torr for all patients. After setting up local anti

  3. Plant Habitat (PH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  4. The pH partition theory predicts the accumulation and toxicity of doxorubicin in normal and low-pH-adapted cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gerweck, L E; Kozin, S V; Stocks, S J

    1999-01-01

    The accumulation and toxicity of the weak base doxorubicin has been investigated as a function of extracellular pH, intracellular pH and the cellular pH gradient in cells previously cultured under normal (pH 7.4) and low-pH (6.8) conditions. Low-pH-adapted cells exhibit transmembrane pH gradients which substantially differ from normal cells at the same extracellular pH. No relationship was obtained between intracellular pH and the uptake or toxicity of doxorubicin in the two cell types. In co...

  5. Trace element concentrations in soils along urbanization gradients in the city of Wien, Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Edina; Vidic, Andreas; Braun, Mihály; Fábián, István; Tóthmérész, Béla

    2013-02-01

    Urban soil is an important component of urban ecosystems. This study focuses on heavy metal contamination in soils of Wien (Austria) and results are compared to those for a few large European cities. We analysed the elemental contents of 96 samples of topsoil from urban, suburban and rural areas in Wien along a dynamic (floodplain forest) and a stable (oak-hornbeam forest) urbanization gradient. The following elements were quantified using ICP-OES technique: Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Pb, P, S and Zn. For heavy metals PI (pollution index) values were used to assess the level of pollution. The PI values indicated high level of pollution by Pb in the suburban and rural area of stable gradient and in the urban area of dynamic gradient; moderate level of pollution was indicated for Cd in the urban area of stable gradient. The level of pollution was moderate for Co in the suburban and rural area of the stable gradient, and for Cu in suburban area of stable gradient, and urban area of dynamic gradient. The pollution level of Zn was moderate in all areas. Urban soils, especially in urban parks and green areas may have a direct influence on human health. Thus, the elemental analysis of soil samples is one of the best ways to study the effects of urbanization. Our results indicated that the heavy metal contamination was higher in Wien than in a few large European cities.

  6. pH matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inaba, Masanori; Quinson, Jonathan; Arenz, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    to home-made catalysts does not lead to satisfying results, although reported work could be reproduced using commercial catalyst samples. It is demonstrated that the pH of the catalyst ink, which has not been addressed in previous TF-RDE studies, is an important parameter that needs to be carefully...

  7. pH Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  8. Patterns and controls of seasonal variability of carbon stable isotopes of particulate organic matter in lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Binhe; Schelske, Claire L; Waters, Matthew N

    2011-04-01

    Carbon stable isotopes (δ(13)C) of particulate organic matter (POM) have been used as indicators for energy flow, primary productivity and carbon dioxide concentration in individual lakes. Here, we provide a synthesis of literature data from 32 freshwater lakes around the world to assess the variability of δ(13)C(POM) along latitudinal, morphometric and biogeochemical gradients. Seasonal mean δ(13)C(POM), a temporally integrated measure of the δ(13)C(POM), displayed weak relationships with all trophic state indices [total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), and chlorophyll a (Chl a)], but decreased significantly with the increase in latitude, presumably in response to the corresponding decrease in water temperature and increase in CO(2) concentration. The seasonal minimum δ(13)C(POM) also correlated negatively with latitude while seasonal maximum δ(13)C(POM) correlated positively with all trophic state indices, pH, and δ(13)C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Seasonal amplitude of δ(13)C(POM) (the difference between seasonal maximum and minimum values) correlated significantly with pH, TP and Chl a concentrations and displayed small variations in oligotrophic, mesotrophic and low latitude eutrophic lakes, which is attributed to low primary productivity and abundant non-living POM in the low trophic state lakes and relatively stable environmental conditions in the subtropics. Seasonal amplitude of δ(13)C(POM) was the greatest in high latitude eutrophic lakes. Greater seasonal changes in solar energy and light regime may be responsible for the large seasonal variability in high latitude productive lakes. This synthesis provides new insights on the factors controlling variations in stable carbon isotopes of POM among lakes on the global scale.

  9. Generalized conjugate gradient squared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokkema, D.R.; Sleijpen, G.L.G. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands)

    1994-12-31

    In order to solve non-symmetric linear systems of equations, the Conjugate Gradient Squared (CGS) is a well-known and widely used iterative method. In practice the method converges fast, often twice as fast as the Bi-Conjugate Gradient method. This is what you may expect, since CGS uses the square of the BiCG polynomial. However, CGS may suffer from its erratic convergence behavior. The method may diverge or the approximate solution may be inaccurate. BiCGSTAB uses the BiCG polynomial and a product of linear factors in an attempt to smoothen the convergence. In many cases, this has proven to be very effective. Unfortunately, the convergence of BiCGSTAB may stall when a linear factor (nearly) degenerates. BiCGstab({ell}) is designed to overcome this degeneration of linear factors. It generalizes BiCGSTAB and uses both the BiCG polynomial and a product of higher order factors. Still, CGS may converge faster than BiCGSTAB or BiCGstab({ell}). So instead of using a product of linear or higher order factors, it may be worthwhile to look for other polynomials. Since the BiCG polynomial is based on a three term recursion, a natural choice would be a polynomial based on another three term recursion. Possibly, a suitable choice of recursion coefficients would result in method that converges faster or as fast as CGS, but less erratic. It turns out that an algorithm for such a method can easily be formulated. One particular choice for the recursion coefficients leads to CGS. Therefore one could call this algorithm generalized CGS. Another choice for the recursion coefficients leads to BiCGSTAB. It is therefore possible to mix linear factors and some polynomial based on a three term recursion. This way one may get the best of both worlds. The authors will report on their findings.

  10. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  11. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  12. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    After Maynard-Smith and Price [1] mathematically derived why a given behaviour or strategy was adopted by a certain proportion of the population at a given time, it was shown that a strategy which is currently stable in a population need not be stable in evolutionary time (across generations). Additionally it was sug-.

  13. Stable carbon isotope fractionation in pollen of Atlas cedar: first steps towards a new palaeoecological proxy for Northwest Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Benjamin; Fletcher, William; Ryan, Peter; Grant, Helen; Ilmen, Rachid

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of stable carbon isotopes can provide information on climate and the environmental conditions at different growth stages of the plant, both past and present. Carbon isotope discrimination in plant tissue is already well understood, and can be used as a drought stress indicator for semi-arid regions. Stable carbon isotope ratios measured directly on pollen provides the potential for the development of long-term environmental proxies (spanning thousands of years), as pollen is well preserved in the environment. Atlas Cedar (Cedrus atlantica Endl. Manetti ex Carrière), is an ideal test case to develop a pollen stable carbon isotope proxy. The tree grows across a wide altitudinal and climatic range and is extremely sensitive to moisture availability. The pollen is abundant, and easily identifiable to the species level in pollen analysis because different cedar species are geographically confined to different regions of the world. In 2015 we sampled 76 individual cedar trees across latitudinal, altitudinal and environmental gradients, highly focused on the Middle Atlas region of Morocco, with 25 additional samples from botanical gardens across Europe and the US to extend these gradients. Here, we report new stable carbon isotope data from pollen, leaf and stem wood from these samples with a view to assessing and quantifying species-specific fractionation effects associated with pollen production. The isotopic response of individual trees at local and wider geographical scales to altitude and climatic conditions is presented. This research forms part of an ongoing PhD project working to develop and calibrate a modern carbon isotope proxy in Atlas cedar pollen, which can ultimately be applied to fossil sequences and complement existing multi-proxy records (e.g. pollen analysis in lake sediments, tree-rings).

  14. Gradient Boosting Machines, A Tutorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey eNatekin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods. A theoretical information is complemented with many descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all the stages of the gradient boosting model design. Considerations on handling the model complexity are discussed. A set of practical examples of gradient boosting applications are presented and comprehensively analyzed.

  15. pH intramucoso gástrico (pHi) y gradiente sistémico-regional de CO2 en el paciente pediátrico crítico. Monitorización contínua de la perfusión tisular esplácnica.

    OpenAIRE

    Roselló Millet, Patricia M

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN Las situaciones de shock compensado identificadas por la presencia de acidosis en la mucosa intestinal mediante la monitorización del pHi (pH intramucoso), son extremadamente frecuentes en el paciente crítico. Estos episodios de isquemia intestinal se relacionan con el síndrome de disfunción multiorgánica (SDMO). El pHi puede medirse de forma indirecta utilizando una modificación de la fórmula de Henderson-Hasselbach, mediante tonometría. Esta técnica se fundamenta en 2 as...

  16. Normal modified stable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses two classes of distributions, and stochastic processes derived from them: modified stable (MS) laws and normal modified stable (NMS) laws. This extends corresponding results for the generalised inverse Gaussian (GIG) and generalised hyperbolic (GH) or normal generalised inverse...... Gaussian (NGIG) laws. The wider framework thus established provides, in particular, for added flexibility in the modelling of the dynamics of financial time series, of importance especially as regards OU based stochastic volatility models for equities. In the special case of the tempered stable OU process...

  17. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letolle, R.; Mariotti, A.; Bariac, T.

    1991-06-01

    This report reviews the historical background and the properties of stable isotopes, the methods used for their measurement (mass spectrometry and others), the present technics for isotope enrichment and separation, and at last the various present and foreseeable application (in nuclear energy, physical and chemical research, materials industry and research; tracing in industrial, medical and agronomical tests; the use of natural isotope variations for environmental studies, agronomy, natural resources appraising: water, minerals, energy). Some new possibilities in the use of stable isotope are offered. A last chapter gives the present state and forecast development of stable isotope uses in France and Europe

  18. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocherginskaya, S.A.; Cann, I.K.O.; Mackie, R.I.

    2005-01-01

    It is worthwhile considering that only some 30 species make up the bulk of the bacterial population in human faeces at any one time based on the classical cultivation-based approach. The situation in the rumen is similar. Thus, it is practical to focus on specific groups of interest within the complex community. These may be the predominant or the most active species, specific physiological groups or readily identifiable (genetic) clusters of phylogenetically related organisms. Several 16S rDNA fingerprinting techniques can be invaluable for selecting and monitoring sequences or phylogenetic groups of interest and are described below. Over the past few decades, considerable attention was focussed on the identification of pure cultures of microbes on the basis of genetic polymorphisms of DNA encoding rRNA such as ribotyping, amplified fragment length polymorphism and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA. However, many of these methods require prior cultivation and are less suitable for use in analysis of complex mixed populations although important in describing cultivated microbial diversity in molecular terms. Much less attention was given to molecular characterization of complex communities. In particular, research into diversity and community structure over time has been revolutionized by the advent of molecular fingerprinting techniques for complex communities. Denaturing or temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE/TGGE) methods have been successfully applied to the analysis of human, pig, cattle, dog and rodent intestinal populations

  19. Characterization of gradient control systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortés, Jorge; van der Schaft, Arjan; Crouch, Peter E.

    2005-01-01

    Given a general nonlinear affine control system with outputs and a torsion-free affine connection defined on its state space, we investigate the gradient realization problem: we give necessary and sufficient conditions under which the control system can be written as a gradient control system

  20. Sobolev gradients and differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Neuberger, J W

    2010-01-01

    A Sobolev gradient of a real-valued functional on a Hilbert space is a gradient of that functional taken relative to an underlying Sobolev norm. This book shows how descent methods using such gradients allow a unified treatment of a wide variety of problems in differential equations. For discrete versions of partial differential equations, corresponding Sobolev gradients are seen to be vastly more efficient than ordinary gradients. In fact, descent methods with these gradients generally scale linearly with the number of grid points, in sharp contrast with the use of ordinary gradients. Aside from the first edition of this work, this is the only known account of Sobolev gradients in book form. Most of the applications in this book have emerged since the first edition was published some twelve years ago. What remains of the first edition has been extensively revised. There are a number of plots of results from calculations and a sample MatLab code is included for a simple problem. Those working through a fair p...

  1. The geomagnetic field gradient tensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Olsen, Nils

    2012-01-01

    We develop the general mathematical basis for space magnetic gradiometry in spherical coordinates. The magnetic gradient tensor is a second rank tensor consisting of 3 × 3 = 9 spatial derivatives. Since the geomagnetic field vector B is always solenoidal (∇ · B = 0) there are only eight independent...... tensor elements. Furthermore, in current free regions the magnetic gradient tensor becomes symmetric, further reducing the number of independent elements to five. In that case B is a Laplacian potential field and the gradient tensor can be expressed in series of spherical harmonics. We present properties...... of the magnetic gradient tensor and provide explicit expressions of its elements in terms of spherical harmonics. Finally we discuss the benefit of using gradient measurements for exploring the Earth’s magnetic field from space, in particular the advantage of the various tensor elements for a better determination...

  2. Analysing Stable Time Series

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adler, Robert

    1997-01-01

    We describe how to take a stable, ARMA, time series through the various stages of model identification, parameter estimation, and diagnostic checking, and accompany the discussion with a goodly number...

  3. Ratiometric Imaging of Extracellular pH in Dental Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Dige, Irene

    2016-01-01

    ) carboxylic acid (C-SNARF-4) is employed to monitor extracellular pH in in vivo grown dental biofilms of unknown species composition. Upon exposure to glucose the dye is up-concentrated inside all bacterial cells in the biofilms; it is thus used both as a universal bacterial stain and as a marker......The pH in bacterial biofilms on teeth is of central importance for dental caries, a disease with a high worldwide prevalence. Nutrients and metabolites are not distributed evenly in dental biofilms. A complex interplay of sorption to and reaction with organic matter in the biofilm reduces...... the diffusion paths of solutes and creates steep gradients of reactive molecules, including organic acids, across the biofilm. Quantitative fluorescent microscopic methods, such as fluorescence life time imaging or pH ratiometry, can be employed to visualize pH in different microenvironments of dental biofilms...

  4. Gradient zone boundary control in salt gradient solar ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  5. Microbial sulfate reduction and metal attenuation in pH 4 acid mine water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpers Charles N

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4.0 to 7.5. The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB were active in moderately acidic conditions present in the underground mine workings. Here we document multiple, independent analyses and show evidence that sulfate reduction and associated metal attenuation are occurring in the pH-4 mine environment. Water-chemistry analyses of the mine water reveal: (1 preferential complexation and precipitation by H2S of Cu and Cd, relative to Zn; (2 stable isotope ratios of 34S/32S and 18O/16O in dissolved SO4 that are 2–3 ‰ heavier in the mine water, relative to those in surface waters; (3 reduction/oxidation conditions and dissolved gas concentrations consistent with conditions to support anaerobic processes such as sulfate reduction. Scanning electron microscope (SEM analyses of sediment show 1.5-micrometer, spherical ZnS precipitates. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analyses of Penn Mine sediment show a high biomass level with a moderately diverse community structure composed primarily of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Cultures of sediment from the mine produced dissolved sulfide at pH values near 7 and near 4, forming precipitates of either iron sulfide or elemental sulfur. DGGE coupled with sequence and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA gene segments showed populations of Desulfosporosinus and Desulfitobacterium in Penn Mine sediment and laboratory cultures.

  6. Leaf water stable isotopes and water transport outside the xylem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, M M; Farquhar, G D; Buckley, T N

    2017-06-01

    How water moves through leaves, and where the phase change from liquid to vapour occurs within leaves, remain largely mysterious. Some time ago, we suggested that the stable isotope composition of leaf water may contain information on transport pathways beyond the xylem, through differences in the development of gradients in enrichment within the various pathways. Subsequent testing of this suggestion provided ambiguous results and even questioned the existence of gradients in enrichment within the mesophyll. In this review, we bring together recent theoretical developments in understanding leaf water transport pathways and stable isotope theory to map a path for future work into understanding pathways of water transport and leaf water stable isotope composition. We emphasize the need for a spatially, anatomically and isotopically explicit model of leaf water transport. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  8. Strain gradients in epitaxial ferroelectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalan, G.; Noheda, B.; McAneney, J.; Sinnamon, L.J.; Gregg, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray analysis of ferroelectric thin layers of Ba 1/2 Sr 1/2 TiO 3 with different thicknesses reveals the presence of strain gradients across the films and allows us to propose a functional form for the internal strain profile. We use this to calculate the influence of strain gradient, through flexoelectric coupling, on the degradation of the ferroelectric properties of films with decreasing thickness, in excellent agreement with the observed behavior. This paper shows that strain relaxation can lead to smooth, continuous gradients across hundreds of nanometers, and it highlights the pressing need to avoid such strain gradients in order to obtain ferroelectric films with bulklike properties

  9. Active auxin uptake by zucchini membrane vesicles: quantitation using ESR volume and delta pH determinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomax, T.L.; Mehlhorn, R.J.; Briggs, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    Closed and pH-tight membrane vesicles prepared from hypocotyls of 5-day-old dark-grown seedlings of Cucurbita pepo accumulate the plant growth hormone indole-3-acetic acid along an imposed proton gradient (pH low outside, high inside). The use of electron paramagnetic spin probes permitted quantitation both of apparent vesicle volume and magnitude of the pH gradient. Under the experimental conditions used, hormone accumulation was at minimum 20-fold, a value 4 times larger than what one would predict if accumulation reflected only diffusional equilibrium at the measured pH gradient. It is concluded that hormone uptake is an active process, with each protonated molecule of hormone accompanied by an additional proton. Experiments with ionophores confirm that it is the pH gradient itself which drives the uptake

  10. Gradient Index Optics at DARPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    sodium, is submerged into a bath of molten salt containing a different ion, such as lithium bromide. Ions from the salt bath diffuse into the glass...molecules, creating a gradient of index of refraction (Mohr et al. 1979). • Crystal growing. From a silver- chloride /sodium- chloride bath, starting with a...sodium chloride seed, a crystal is pulled that begins to deplete the sodium in the bath and starts to pull silver, forming a gradient (Houde-Walter

  11. Stochastic Gradient Monomial Gamma Sampler

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yizhe; Chen, Changyou; Gan, Zhe; Henao, Ricardo; Carin, Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in stochastic gradient techniques have made it possible to estimate posterior distributions from large datasets via Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). However, when the target posterior is multimodal, mixing performance is often poor. This results in inadequate exploration of the posterior distribution. A framework is proposed to improve the sampling efficiency of stochastic gradient MCMC, based on Hamiltonian Monte Carlo. A generalized kinetic function is leveraged, delivering ...

  12. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 9. Evolutionary Stable Strategy: Application of Nash Equilibrium in Biology. General ... Using some examples of classical games, we show how evolutionary game theory can help understand behavioural decisions of animals.

  13. The Stable Concordance Genus

    OpenAIRE

    Kearney, M. Kate

    2013-01-01

    The concordance genus of a knot is the least genus of any knot in its concordance class. Although difficult to compute, it is a useful invariant that highlights the distinction between the three-genus and four-genus. In this paper we define and discuss the stable concordance genus of a knot, which describes the behavior of the concordance genus under connected sum.

  14. Manifolds admitting stable forms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Le, Hong-Van; Panák, Martin; Vanžura, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 1 (2008), s. 101-11 ISSN 0010-2628 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP201/05/P088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : stable forms * automorphism groups Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  15. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  16. Interactive Stable Ray Tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal Corso, Alessandro; Salvi, Marco; Kolb, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Interactive ray tracing applications running on commodity hardware can suffer from objectionable temporal artifacts due to a low sample count. We introduce stable ray tracing, a technique that improves temporal stability without the over-blurring and ghosting artifacts typical of temporal post-pr...

  17. The stable subgroup graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Tolue

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce stable subgroup graph associated to the group $G$. It is a graph with vertex set all subgroups of $G$ and two distinct subgroups $H_1$ and $H_2$ are adjacent if $St_{G}(H_1\\cap H_2\

  18. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD dissertations. Andrea Brugnoli Una storia locale: l’organizzazione del territorio veronese nel medioevo: trasformazioni della realtà e schemi notarili (IX-metà XII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Scienze Storiche e Antropologiche (XXII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Verona, 2010   Luca Filangieri Famiglie e gruppi dirigenti a Genova (secoli XII-metà XIII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XXII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2010   Jakub Kujawi ski Wernakularna kolekcja historiograficzna z rękopisu francuskiego nr 688 z Biblioteki Narodowej w Paryżu. Studium źródłoznawcze (La raccolta dei volgarizzamenti delle opere storiografiche nel manoscritto francese 688 della Biblioteca Nazionale di Parigi, Tesi di dottorato, Università “Adam Mickiewicz”, Facoltà di Storia, Pozna, a.a. 2009/2010   Marta Longhi I signori “de Radicata”. Strategie di affermazione familiare e patrimoniale nel Piemonte dei secoli XII-XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Istituzioni, Società, Religioni dal Tardo Antico alla fine del Medioevo (XX ciclo, Università di Torino, 2008

  19. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Francesco Barone Istituzioni, società ed economia a Catania nel tardo medioevo (XIV-XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Laura Berti Ceroni Il territorio e le strutture di Cesarea e Classe tra tarda antichità e alto medioevo in rapporto con Ravenna, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia e Informatica, Università degli studi di Bologna, 2002-2003.   Marco Bicchierai Poppi dalla signoria dei conti Guidi al vicariato del Casentino (1360-1480, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XIV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Emanuela Garimberti Spatiosa ad habitandum loca. Luoghi e identità nella Historia Langobardorum di Paolo Diacono, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004   Lorenzo Tanzini Sistemi normativi e pratiche istituzionali a Firenze dalla fine del XIII all’inizio del XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Stefania Tarquini Pellegrinaggio e asseto urbano di Roma, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri, delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel Medioevo euro mediterraneo (XV ciclo, Università degli studi di Lecce, 2003

  20. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD dissertation. Laura Baietto Una politica per le città. Rapporti fra papato, vescovi e comuni nell'Italia centro-settentrionale da Innocenzo III a Gregorio IX, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia Medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2002   Giuseppe Banfo Compresenze e sovrapposizioni di poteri territoriali di qualità diversa tra X e XIII: il caso del basso Monferrato, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2002   Francesca Dell'Acqua La vetrata tra l'età tardo imperiale e l'altomedioevo: le fonti, l'archeologia, Tesi di Perfezionamento in Storia dell'Arte Medievale, Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, 2001   Primo Giovanni Embriaco I vescovi di Albenga e gli sviluppi signorili nella Liguria occidentale (secoli XI-XIII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2001   Antonella Ghignoli Documenti e proprietà altomedievali. Fondamenti e problemi dell'esegesi storica delle fonti documentarie nello specchio della tradizione delle carte pisane dei secoli VIII-XI, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2002   Vito Loré Espansione monastica e mutamenti politici. La Trinità di Cava nei suoi rapporti con i sovrani longobardi e normanni e con l'aristocrazia territoriale. Secoli XI-XII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2002   Rosaria Stracuzzi Messina nel '400, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Palermo, 2001   Stefania Tamburini Le "portate" ecclesiastiche nel piviere di San Giovanni in Firenze nel 1427. Spunti per una riflessione sul patrimonio ecclesiastico della diocesi fiorentina,Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia e informatica, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2001

  1. Platelet serotonin content and transpulmonary platelet serotonin gradient in patients with pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Silvia; Huber, Lars C; Fischler, Manuel; Treder, Ursula; Maggiorini, Marco; Eberli, Franz Robert; Speich, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    The serotonin system has repeatedly been associated with the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH). To comparatively analyze plasmatic and intrathrombocytic serotonin levels in arterial and mixed venous blood of patients with PH and unaffected controls to elucidate pulmonary serotonin metabolisms. Catheters were placed in the radial and pulmonary artery in patients with PH (n = 13) for diagnosis and in age-matched controls (n = 6) undergoing percutaneous closure of the patent foramen ovale. Arterial and mixed venous blood samples were immediately centrifuged to obtain plasma and platelets and thereafter frozen at -20°C. After careful thawing, plasmatic and platelet serotonin levels were determined by ELISA. PH was classified as arterial in 4 and chronic thromboembolic in 9 patients with a mean pulmonary artery pressure of 37 (interquartile range: 32-43) mm Hg. Platelet serotonin content was significantly lower in the PH patients than in the controls. The mean transpulmonary gradient (arterial-mixed venous) was negative in the PH group and positive in the controls. An inverse correlation was found between the arterial blood platelet serotonin content and pulmonary hemodynamics. Plasmatic serotonin levels did not differ between the PH and control groups. The lower platelet serotonin concentration in PH patients compared with unaffected controls is an unprecedented finding. The negative transpulmonary platelet serotonin gradient and the strong negative correlation of arterial blood platelet serotonin with pulmonary hemodynamics might indicate increased serotonin uptake in the lungs of PH patients. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Stable isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibari, Elghali; Taous, Fouad; Marah, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    This report presents results related to stable isotopes analysis carried out at the CNESTEN DASTE in Rabat (Morocco), on behalf of Senegal. These analyzes cover 127 samples. These results demonstrate that Oxygen-18 and Deuterium in water analysis were performed by infrared Laser spectroscopy using a LGR / DLT-100 with Autosampler. Also, the results are expressed in δ values (‰) relative to V-SMOW to ± 0.3 ‰ for oxygen-18 and ± 1 ‰ for deuterium.

  3. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  4. Polyacrylamide temperature gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viglasky, Viktor

    2013-01-01

    Temperature Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (TGGE) is a form of electrophoresis in which temperature gradient is used to denature molecules as they move through either acrylamide or agarose gel. TGGE can be applied to analyze DNA, RNA, protein-DNA complexes, and, less commonly, proteins. Separation of double-stranded DNA molecules during TGGE relies on temperature-dependent melting of the DNA duplex into two single-stranded DNA molecules. Therefore, the mobility of DNA reflects not only the size of the molecule but also its nucleotide composition, thereby allowing separation of DNA molecules of similar size with different sequences. Depending on the relative orientation of electric field and temperature gradient, TGGE can be performed in either a parallel or a perpendicular mode. The former is used to analyze multiple samples in the same gel, whereas the later allows detailed analysis of a single sample. This chapter is focused on analysis of DNA by polyacrylamide TGGE using the perpendicular mode.

  5. Microbial plant litter decomposition in aquatic and terrestrial boreal systems along a natural fertility gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, A. Margarida P. M.; Kritzberg, Emma S.; Rousk, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Plant litter decomposition is a global ecosystem process, with a crucial role in carbon and nutrient cycling. The majority of litter processing occurs in terrestrial systems, but an important fraction also takes place in inland waters. Among environmental factors, pH impacts the litter decomposition through its selective influence on microbial decomposers. Fungal communities are less affected by pH than bacteria, possibly owing to a wider pH tolerance by this group. On the other hand, bacterial pH optima are constrained to a narrower range of pH values. The microbial decomposition of litter is universally nutrient limited; but few comparisons exist between terrestrial and aquatic systems. We investigated the microbial colonisation and decomposition of plant litter along a fertility gradient, which varied in both pH and N availability in both soil and adjacent water. To do this we installed litterbags with birch (Betula pendula) in streams and corresponding soils in adjacent riparian areas in a boreal system, in Krycklan, Sweden. During the four months covering the ice-free growth season we monitored the successional dynamics of fungal (acetate incorporation into ergosterol) and bacterial growth (thymidine incorporation), microbial respiration in leaf litter, and quantitative and qualitative changes in litter over time. We observed that bacterial growth rates were initially higher in litter decomposing in streams than those in soils, but differences between terrestrial and aquatic bacterial production converged towards the end of the experiment. In litter bags installed in soils, bacterial growth was lower at sites with more acidic pH and lower N availability, while aquatic bacteria were relatively unaffected by the fertility level. Fungal growth rates were two-fold higher for litter decomposing in streams than in soils. In aquatic systems, fungal growth was initially lower in low fertility sites, but differences gradually disappeared over the time course. Fungal

  6. Computational Strain Gradient Crystal Plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Kysar, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    element solution method is presented, which delivers the slip-rate field and the velocity-field based on two minimum principles. Some plane deformation problems relevant for certain specific orientations of a face centered cubic crystal under plane loading conditions are studied, and effective in......A model for strain gradient crystal visco-plasticity is formulated along the lines proposed by Fleck andWillis (2009) for isotropic plasticity. Size-effects are included in the model due to the addition of gradient terms in both the free energy as well as through a dissipation potential. A finite...

  7. Synthesis and characterization of stable aqueous dispersions of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2.2b Preparation of aqueous graphene dispersion from graphite oxide: One hundred milligrams of the above pre- pared graphite oxide was dispersed in 100 ml of MilliQ water followed by sonication for 1 h. A clear brown coloured solution was obtained, which is the stable dispersion of GO in water. Subsequently, the pH of ...

  8. Effect of pH, various divalent metal ion and different substrates on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EZUGWU ARINZE LINUS

    Key words: Glucoamylase, pH, metal ions, Aspergillus niger, tiger nut starch, amylopectin. INTRODUCTION. Glucoamylase (α-1 ... glycosidic bonds from the non-reducing ends of starch and 1,6-alpha-glucsidic linkages in ..... stable at neutral pH 7.0, it is more likely to readily form neucleophilichydroxide ions with metals by ...

  9. A PhD is a PhD is a PhD

    OpenAIRE

    Ostrow, Deborah Anne

    2017-01-01

    A PhD is a PhD is a PhD is a practice-based project that interrogates the process of an artist undertaking PhD research under established criteria. It consists of an exegesis, an original screenplay, and a digital film made for online viewing, with images drawn from a range of documentaries and films found on YouTube. They have been dissected, re-assembled and then re-embedded to YouTube. The source material covers topics such as medicalization of madness, the conspicuous appropriation of uni...

  10. Majorization and extremal PH distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Q.M.; Zhang, H.; Vera, J.C.; Latouche, G.; Ramaswami, V.; Sethuraman, J.; Sigman, K.; Squillante, M.S.; Yao, D.D.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents majorization results for PH generators. Based on the majorization results, bounds on the moments and Laplace–Stieltjes transforms of phase-type distributions are found. Exponential distributions and Coxian distributions are identified to be extremal PH distributions with

  11. PH OF THE TOPICAL DRUG VEHICLE: SELECTING AN OPTIMUM VALUE AND ROLE OF THE BUFFER SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Dukhanin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The following three groups of factors must be taken into consideration for selecting an optimum pH value of a topical drug: pharmaceutical, pharmacological and compatibility factors. To ensure a stable pH value, the drug vehicle comprises different buffer systems: single component and two-component ones. The optimum conditions for selecting and maintaining the vehicle pH were examined by the example of glucocorticosteroid-based topical drugs.

  12. Compositional gradients in Gramineae genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun; Tao, Lin

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we describe a property of Gramineae genes, and perhaps all monocot genes, that is not observed in eudicot genes. Along the direction of transcription, beginning at the junction of the 5'-UTR and the coding region, there are gradients in GC content, codon usage, and amino-acid usage...

  13. Advanced compositional gradient and compartmentalization analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canas, Jesus A.; Petti, Daniela; Mullins, Oliver [Schlumberger Servicos de Petroleo Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Acquisition of hydrocarbons samples from the reservoir prior to oil or gas production is essential in order to design production strategies and production facilities. In addition, reservoir compartmentalization and hydrocarbon compositional grading magnify the necessity to map fluid properties vertically and laterally in the reservoir prior to production. Formation testers supply a wealth of information to observe and predict the state of fluids in hydrocarbon reservoirs, through detailed pressure and fluid analysis measurements. With the correct understanding of the state of fluids in the reservoirs, reserve calculations and adequate development plans can be prepared. Additionally, flow barriers may then be revealed. This paper describes a new Downhole Fluid Analysis technology (DFA) for improved reservoir management. DFA is a unique process that combines new fluid identification sensors, which allow real time monitoring of a wide range of parameters as GOR, fluid density, viscosity, fluorescence and composition (CH{sub 4}, C2- C5, C6 +, CO{sub 2}), free gas and liquid phases detection, saturation pressure, as well WBM and OBM filtrate differentiation and pH. This process is not limited to light fluid evaluation and we extended to heavy oil (HO) reservoirs analysis successfully. The combination of DFA Fluid Profiling with pressure measurements has shown to be very effective for compartmentalization characterization. The ability of thin barriers to hold off large depletion pressures has been established, as the gradual variation of hydrocarbon quality in biodegraded oils. In addition, heavy oils can show large compositional variation due to variations in source rock charging but without fluid mixing. Our findings indicates that steep gradients are common in gas condensates or volatile oils, and that biodegradation is more common in HO than in other hydrocarbons, which generate fluid gradients and heavy ends tars near the OWC, limiting the aquifer activity and

  14. An assessment of an environmental gradient using coral geochemical records, Whitsunday Islands, Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, S.E.; Brodie, J.E.; McCulloch, M.T.; Mallela, J.; Jupiter, S.D.; Stuart Williams, H.; Lough, J.M.; Matson, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    Coral cores were collected along an environmental and water quality gradient through the Whitsunday Island group, Great Barrier Reef (Australia), for trace element and stable isotope analysis. The primary aim of the study was to examine if this gradient could be detected in coral records and, if so, whether the gradient has changed over time with changing land use in the adjacent river catchments. Y/Ca was the trace element ratio which varied spatially across the gradient, with concentrations progressively decreasing away from the river mouths. The Ba/Ca and Y/Ca ratios were the only indicators of change in the gradient through time, increasing shortly after European settlement. The Mn/Ca ratio responded to local disturbance related to the construction of tourism infrastructure. Nitrogen isotope ratios showed no apparent trend over time. This study highlights the importance of site selection when using coral records to record regional environmental signals.

  15. Stable patterns for fourth-order parabolic equations

    OpenAIRE

    van den Berg, J. B.; Vandervorst, R. C.

    2002-01-01

    We consider fourth-order parabolic equations of gradient type. For the sake of simplicity, the analysis is carried out for the specific equation $u\\sb t=-\\gamma\\ u\\sb {xxxx}+\\beta u\\sb {xx}-F\\sp \\prime(u)$ with $(t,x)\\in (0,\\infty)\\times(0, L)$ and $\\gamma,\\beta>0$ and where $F(u)$ is a bistable potential. We study its stable equilibria as a function of the ratio $\\gamma/beta\\sp 2$. As the ratio $\\gamma/beta\\sp 2$ crosses an explicit threshold value, the number of stable ...

  16. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunner, M.R.; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side. PMID:23507617

  17. Elemental gradients in macrophytes from a reactor effluent gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grace, J.B.; Tilly, L.J.

    1978-01-01

    The tissues of submersed macrophtes from along the thermal gradient were analyzed for phosphorus to determine whether any pattern correspondent to standing crop distributions could be detected. Although water concentrations of phosphorus showed no detectable relationship to the thermal effluent, tissue concentrations of this element in submersed macrophytes declined with distance from the effluent entry point. The occurrence of this concentration pattern suggests that phosphorus availability is greater near the discharge. Because phosphorus is the element most often determined to limit aquatic productivity, its greater availability may partially account for the apparent enhancement of macrophte growth near the thermal discharge. A patter of macrophyte abundance which indicated enchancement related to the discharge gradient in the reactor-cooling reservoir, Par Pond is reported. Correlative data tended to implicate light and temperature as important in influencing the differential abundance pattern

  18. Carbon dots with strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards pH. Application as nanosensors for a broad range of pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barati, Ali [Faculty of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamsipur, Mojtaba, E-mail: mshamsipur@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Hamid, E-mail: abd@iasbs.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-10

    In this study, preparation of novel pH-sensitive N-doped carbon dots (NCDs) using glucose and urea is reported. The prepared NCDs present strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards the pH that is a new behavior from these nanomaterials. By taking advantage of this unique behavior, two separated ratiometric pH sensors using emission spectra of the NCDs for both acidic (pH 2.0 to 8.0) and basic (pH 7.0 to 14.0) ranges of pH are constructed. Additionally, by considering the entire Excitation–Emission Matrix (EEM) of NCDs as analytical signal and using a suitable multivariate calibration method, a broad range of pH from 2.0 to 14.0 was well calibrated. The multivariate calibration method was independent from the concentration of NCDs and resulted in a very low average prediction error of 0.067 pH units. No changes in the predicted pH under UV irradiation (for 3 h) and at high ionic strength (up to 2 M NaCl) indicated the high stability of this pH nanosensor. The practicality of this pH nanosensor for pH determination in real water samples was validated with good accuracy and repeatability. - Highlights: • Novel pH-sensitive carbon dots with strong FL changes towards pH are reported. • Ratiometric FL pH-sensors for both acidic and basic ranges of pH are constructed. • Multivariate calibration methods were used to calibrate a broad range of pH. • Using EEM of carbon dots and ANN, pH from 2.0 to 14.0 was well calibrated. • The pH prediction is stable even at high ionic strength up to 2 M NaCl.

  19. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, C.T.

    1977-01-01

    Clinical applications include the galactose breath test which consists of oral administration of 13 C-labeled galactose and measurement of the 13 C content of respired CO 2 as a function of time in patients with cirrhotic livers for diagnosis of liver dysfunction. Another application was the breath test to study glucose metabolism in children. Respired 13 CO 2 from ingested glucose- 13 C was measured for normal and diabetic children. Studies on mice in which 60 percent of the body carbon was replaced with 13 C failed to show significant effects of the isotope. Studies on biochemical applications include nuclear magnetic resonance studies of 13 C-labeled amino acids from Chlorella pyrenoidosa; studies on 15 N nmr spectra of arginine-guanidino- 13 C-2,3-- 15 N 2 as a function of pH; and isolation of fatty acids from algae

  20. Gradient-driven flux-tube simulations of ion temperature gradient turbulence close to the non-linear threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeters, A. G.; Rath, F.; Buchholz, R.; Grosshauser, S. R.; Strintzi, D.; Weikl, A. [Physics Department, University of Bayreuth, Universitätsstrasse 30, Bayreuth (Germany); Camenen, Y. [Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, PIIM, UMR 7345, Marseille (France); Candy, J. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Casson, F. J. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB, Oxon (United Kingdom); Hornsby, W. A. [Max Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    It is shown that Ion Temperature Gradient turbulence close to the threshold exhibits a long time behaviour, with smaller heat fluxes at later times. This reduction is connected with the slow growth of long wave length zonal flows, and consequently, the numerical dissipation on these flows must be sufficiently small. Close to the nonlinear threshold for turbulence generation, a relatively small dissipation can maintain a turbulent state with a sizeable heat flux, through the damping of the zonal flow. Lowering the dissipation causes the turbulence, for temperature gradients close to the threshold, to be subdued. The heat flux then does not go smoothly to zero when the threshold is approached from above. Rather, a finite minimum heat flux is obtained below which no fully developed turbulent state exists. The threshold value of the temperature gradient length at which this finite heat flux is obtained is up to 30% larger compared with the threshold value obtained by extrapolating the heat flux to zero, and the cyclone base case is found to be nonlinearly stable. Transport is subdued when a fully developed staircase structure in the E × B shearing rate forms. Just above the threshold, an incomplete staircase develops, and transport is mediated by avalanche structures which propagate through the marginally stable regions.

  1. Pyrite oxidation at circumneutral pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Carl O.; Herman, Janet S.

    1991-02-01

    Previous studies of pyrite oxidation kinetics have concentrated primarily on the reaction at low pH, where Fe(III) has been assumed to be the dominant oxidant. Studies at circumneutral pH, necessitated by effective pH buffering in some pyrite oxidation systems, have often implicitly assumed that the dominant oxidant must be dissolved oxygen (DO), owing to the diminished solubility of Fe(III). In fact, Fe(III)(aq) is an effective pyrite oxidant at circumneutral pH, but the reaction cannot be sustained in the absence of DO. The purpose of this experimental study was to ascertain the relative roles of Fe(III) and DO in pyrite oxidation at circumneutral pH. The rate of pyrite oxidation was first-order with respect to the ratio of surface area to solution volume. Direct determinations of both Fe(II) (aq)> and Fe(III) (aq) demonstrated a dramatic loss of Fe(II) from the solution phase in excess of the loss for which oxidation alone could account. Based on rate data, we have concluded that Fe(II) is adsorbed onto the pyrite surface. Furthermore, Fe(II) is preferred as an adsorbate to Fe(III), which we attribute to both electrostatic and acid-base selectivity. We also found that the rate of pyrite oxidation by either Fe(III) (aq) or DO is reduced in the presence of aqueous Fe(II), which leads us to conclude that, under most natural conditions, neither Fe(III) (aq) nor DO directly attacks the pyrite surface. The present evidence suggests a mechanism for pyrite oxidation that involves adsorbed Fe( II ) giving up electrons to DO and the resulting Fe(III) rapidly accepting electrons from the pyrite. The adsorbed Fe is, thus, cyclically oxidized and reduced, while it acts as a conduit for electrons traveling from pyrite to DO. Oxygen is transferred from the hydration sphere of the adsorbed Fe to pyrite S. The cycle of adsorbed Fe oxidation and reduction and the successive addition of oxygen to pyrite S continues until a stable sulfoxy species dissociates from the surface. Prior

  2. Marginally Stable Nuclear Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Altamirano, D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts result from unstable nuclear burning of the material accreted on neutron stars in some low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Theory predicts that close to the boundary of stability oscillatory burning can occur. This marginally stable regime has so far been identified in only a small number of sources. We present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bursting, high- inclination LMXB 4U 1323-619 that reveal for the first time in this source the signature of marginally stable burning. The source was observed during two successive RXTE orbits for approximately 5 ksec beginning at 10:14:01 UTC on March 28, 2011. Significant mHz quasi- periodic oscillations (QPO) at a frequency of 8.1 mHz are detected for approximately 1600 s from the beginning of the observation until the occurrence of a thermonuclear X-ray burst at 10:42:22 UTC. The mHz oscillations are not detected following the X-ray burst. The average fractional rms amplitude of the mHz QPOs is 6.4% (3 - 20 keV), and the amplitude increases to about 8% below 10 keV.This phenomenology is strikingly similar to that seen in the LMXB 4U 1636-53. Indeed, the frequency of the mHz QPOs in 4U 1323-619 prior to the X-ray burst is very similar to the transition frequency between mHz QPO and bursts found in 4U 1636-53 by Altamirano et al. (2008). These results strongly suggest that the observed QPOs in 4U 1323-619 are, like those in 4U 1636-53, due to marginally stable nuclear burning. We also explore the dependence of the energy spectrum on the oscillation phase, and we place the present observations within the context of the spectral evolution of the accretion-powered flux from the source.

  3. Consolidation by Prefabricated Vertical Drains with a Threshold Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the development of an approximate analytical solution of radial consolidation by prefabricated vertical drains with a threshold gradient. To understand the effect of the threshold gradient on consolidation, a parametric analysis was performed using the present solution. The applicability of the present solution was demonstrated in two cases, wherein the comparisons with Hansbo’s results and observed data were conducted. It was found that (1 the flow with the threshold gradient would not occur instantaneously throughout the whole unit cell. Rather, it gradually occurs from the vertical drain to the outside; (2 the moving boundary would never reach the outer radius of influence if R+1stable value at the end of consolidation; (4 the larger the threshold gradient is, the greater the long-term excess pore pressure will be; and (5 the present solution could predict the consolidation behavior in soft clay better than previous methods.

  4. Influence of extracellular pH on growth, viability, cell size, acidification activity, and intracellular pH of Lactococcus lactis in batch fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Gunda; Johansen, Claus Lindvald; Marten, Gunvor; Wilmes, Jacqueline; Jespersen, Lene; Arneborg, Nils

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of three extracellular pH (pHex) values (i.e., 5.5, 6.5, and 7.5) on the growth, viability, cell size, acidification activity in milk, and intracellular pH (pHi) of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DGCC1212 during pH-controlled batch fermentations. A universal parameter (e.g., linked to pHi) for the description or prediction of viability, specific acidification activity, or growth behavior at a given pHex was not identified. We found viability as determined by flow cytometry to remain high during all growth phases and irrespectively of the pH set point. Furthermore, regardless of the pHex, the acidification activity per cell decreased over time which seemed to be linked to cell shrinkage. Flow cytometric pHi determination demonstrated an increase of the averaged pHi level for higher pH set points, while the pH gradient (pHi-pHex) and the extent of pHi heterogeneity decreased. Cells maintained positive pH gradients at a low pHex of 5.5 and even during substrate limitation at the more widely used pHex 6.5. Moreover, the strain proved able to grow despite small negative or even absent pH gradients at a high pHex of 7.5. The larger pHi heterogeneity at pHex 5.5 and 6.5 was associated with more stressful conditions resulting, e.g., from higher concentrations of non-dissociated lactic acid, while the low pHi heterogeneity at pHex 7.5 most probably corresponded to lower concentrations of non-dissociated lactic acid which facilitated the cells to reach the highest maximum active cell counts of the three pH set points.

  5. Exercise and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube About PHA Contact Join Careers Store My Account Donate Patients About PH Diagnosis Treatments Newly ... areas © 2017 Pulmonary Hypertension Association. All Rights Reserved. Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube

  6. Urine pH test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... urine test Male urinary tract References Bose A, Monk RD, Bushinsky DA. Kidney stones. In: Melmed S, Polonsky ... and its influence on urine pH. J Am Diet Assoc . 1995;95(7):791-797. PMID: 7797810 ...

  7. Neuronal pH regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorstrup, S; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C

    1989-01-01

    The intracellular pH in the brain was studied in six healthy volunteers before and immediately after the administration of 2 g of acetazolamide. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy by a 1.5 tesla whole-body scanner was used. The chemical shift between the inorganic phosphate...... and the phosphocreatine resonance frequencies was used for indirect assessment of the intracellular pH. The mean baseline intracellular pH was 7.05 +/- 0.04 (SD). The mean pH changes obtained at 15-min intervals within the first hour of acetazolamide administration were -0.03 +/- 0.04 (SD), -0.02 +/- 0.03 (SD), and 0...

  8. Programmable pH buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Dara Van; Huber, Dale L.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Roberts, Mark E.

    2017-01-24

    A programmable pH buffer comprises a copolymer that changes pK.sub.a at a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in water. The copolymer comprises a thermally programmable polymer that undergoes a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic phase change at the LCST and an electrolytic polymer that exhibits acid-base properties that are responsive to the phase change. The programmable pH buffer can be used to sequester CO.sub.2 into water.

  9. PhEDEx Data Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Wildish, Tony; Huang, Chih-Hao

    2010-01-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the 'SiteDB' service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore, DBS and the dashboard. A PhEDEx command-line client tool provides one-stop access to all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service interactively, for use in simple scripts that do not access the service directly. The client tool provides certificate-authenticated access to managerial functions, so all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service are available to it. The tool can be expanded by plug-ins which can combine or extend the client-side manipulation of data from the Data Service, providing a powerful environment for manipulating data within PhEDEx.

  10. A gradient enhanced plasticity-damage microplane model for concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zreid, Imadeddin; Kaliske, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Computational modeling of concrete poses two main types of challenges. The first is the mathematical description of local response for such a heterogeneous material under all stress states, and the second is the stability and efficiency of the numerical implementation in finite element codes. The paper at hand presents a comprehensive approach addressing both issues. Adopting the microplane theory, a combined plasticity-damage model is formulated and regularized by an implicit gradient enhancement. The plasticity part introduces a new microplane smooth 3-surface cap yield function, which provides a stable numerical solution within an implicit finite element algorithm. The damage part utilizes a split, which can describe the transition of loading between tension and compression. Regularization of the model by the implicit gradient approach eliminates the mesh sensitivity and numerical instabilities. Identification methods for model parameters are proposed and several numerical examples of plain and reinforced concrete are carried out for illustration.

  11. Vertebrate pressure-gradient receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The eardrums of all terrestrial vertebrates (tetrapods) are connected through Eustachian tubes or interaural canals. In some of the animals, these connections create pressure-gradient directionality, an enhanced directionality by interaction of sound arriving at both sides of the eardrum and stro......The eardrums of all terrestrial vertebrates (tetrapods) are connected through Eustachian tubes or interaural canals. In some of the animals, these connections create pressure-gradient directionality, an enhanced directionality by interaction of sound arriving at both sides of the eardrum....... Recent vertebrates form a continuum from perfect interaural transmission (0 dB in a certain frequency band) and pronounced eardrum directionality (30-40 dB) in the lizards, over somewhat attenuated transmission and limited directionality in birds and frogs, to the strongly attenuated interaural...

  12. Primordial vorticity and gradient expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    The evolution equations of the vorticities of the electrons, ions and photons in a pre-decoupling plasma are derived, in a fully inhomogeneous geometry, by combining the general relativistic gradient expansion and the drift approximation within the Adler-Misner-Deser decomposition. The vorticity transfer between the different species is discussed in this novel framework and a set of general conservation laws, connecting the vorticities of the three-component plasma with the magnetic field intensity, is derived. After demonstrating that a source of large-scale vorticity resides in the spatial gradients of the geometry and of the electromagnetic sources, the total vorticity is estimated to lowest order in the spatial gradients and by enforcing the validity of the momentum constraint. By acknowledging the current bounds on the tensor to scalar ratio in the (minimal) tensor extension of the $\\Lambda$CDM paradigm the maximal comoving magnetic field induced by the total vorticity turns out to be, at most, of the or...

  13. Field Performance of ISFET based Deep Ocean pH Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branham, C. W.; Murphy, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Historically, ocean pH time series data was acquired from infrequent shipboard grab samples and measured using labor intensive spectrophotometry methods. However, with the introduction of robust and stable ISFET pH sensors for use in ocean applications a paradigm shift in the methods used to acquire long-term pH time series data has occurred. Sea-Bird Scientific played a critical role in the adoption this new technology by commercializing the SeaFET pH sensor and float pH Sensor developed by the MBARI chemical sensor group. Sea-Bird Scientific continues to advance this technology through a concerted effort to improve pH sensor accuracy and reliability by characterizing their performance in the laboratory and field. This presentation will focus on calibration of the ISFET pH sensor, evaluate its analytical performance, and validate performance using recent field data.

  14. Evaluation of the Field Gradient Lattice Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2072983

    A novel Micro Pattern Gas Detector, named the Field Gradient Lattice Detector, has been implemented using technologies available to CERN’s Printed Circuit Workshop. Numerous prototypes based on various materials were constructed in different geometries and their gain performance has been studied using 55Fe and 109Cd X-ray sources in Argon-CO2 gas mixtures. Two axis (2D) prototype structures have been shown to provide stable gains of around 1000 while a 3D design, based on the same polyimide foils used in other MPGD elements, holds a gain of 5000 for 8.9 keV X-rays even at high rates of 22 kHz/mm2. At a gain of 3100, the device has been tested up to 1 MHz/mm2 and shows no signs of degradation in performance. The energy resolution of the 3D-in-polyimide is modest, around 40% for 5.9 keV X-rays and 30% if the source is collimated indicating a variation in gain over the 3x3 cm2 active area. Having the most promise for future applications, the 3D-in-polyimide design has been selected for testing with a custom-bu...

  15. Development of miniaturized pH biosensors based on electrosynthesized polymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segut, Olivier; Lakard, Boris; Herlem, Guillaume; Rauch, Jean-Yves; Jeannot, Jean-Claude; Robert, Laurent; Fahys, Bernard

    2007-08-06

    A new type of pH biosensor was developed for biological applications. This biosensor was fabricated using silicon microsystem technology and consists in two platinum microelectrodes. The first microelectrode was coated by an electrosynthesized polymer and acted as the pH sensitive electrode when the second one was coated by a silver layer and was used as the reference electrode. Then, this potentiometric pH miniaturized biosensor based on electrosynthesized polypyrrole or electrosynthesized linear polyethylenimine films was tested. The potentiometric responses appeared reversible and linear to pH changes in the range from pH 4 to 9. More, the responses were fast (less than 1 min for all sensors), they were stable in time since PPy/PEI films were stable during more than 30 days, and no interference was observed. The influence of the polymer thickness was also studied.

  16. Stable transfection of Acanthamoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, J; Henney, H R

    1997-03-01

    The promoter activity of an Acanthamoeba polyubiquitin gene was analyzed in its homologous system. A modified calcium phosphate transfection method using a neomycin marker vector was developed to achieve highly efficient transfection of the Acanthamoeba polyubiquitin gene into Acanthamoeba cells. In this transfection procedure, the calcium phosphate-DNA complex was formed gradually in the medium during incubation with cells and precipitated on the cells. The crucial factors for obtaining efficient transfection were the pH (6.95) of the transfection buffer used for the calcium phosphate precipitation and the amount (25 micrograms/96-well tissue culture plate) and form (circular) of transfecting DNA. Under these conditions, Acanthamoeba isolate 1B6 was transfected at an efficiency of about 40% with the constructed vector pOPSBU, a pOP13CAT-based polyubiquitin gene incorporated neomycin resistance vector. Acanthamoeba polyphaga was transfected at an efficiency of about 10% with this vector. Transfection of both Acanthamoeba strains appeared to result in low copy plasmid integration (about two copies per cell are suggested). The chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assays showed that the promoter of the Acanthamoeba polyubiquitin gene in the constructed vector was especially strong in A. polyphaga, thus the pOPSBU-Acanthamoeba system may be useful for the construction of cDNA expression libraries, as well as for the expression of cloned genes.

  17. pH transients in hydroxyapatite chromatography columns-Effects of operating conditions and media properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattolo, Laura; Keller, Emily L; Carta, Giorgio

    2010-11-26

    pH transitions occur in hydroxyapatite (HAP) columns that are subject to step changes in salt concentration, which have been shown to be controlled by proton exchange on the HAP surface. The pH temporarily decreases before gradually returning to the feed value when the salt concentration increases, potentially compromising the stability of the HAP when either the magnitude or duration of the pH drop is excessive. The opposite happens when the salt concentration decreases. In this work we address the effects of several key variables: the flow rate, the particle size, the use of salt gradients instead of steps, the use of different co-buffers, the surface area of the HAP, and the use of a slightly alkaline wash prior to increasing the salt concentration. Flow rate and particle size were found to have virtually no effect, demonstrating that the pH transitions are equilibrium rather than kinetically driven. Salt gradients resulted in smaller pH drops compared to steps since the exchanged protons are diluted over the gradient volume. MES and histidine used as co-buffers were effective at reducing the duration of the pH transitions but did not affect their magnitude. The same result was found when comparing HAP samples with different surface areas, with the lower surface area HAP yielding much shorter duration but similar pH drops and rises. Finally, washing the HAP column with a pH 7.5 buffer prior to the salt step was found to dramatically reduce the subsequent pH drop. In general, there was good agreement between these results and predictions based on our previously developed model. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Instabilities in power law gradient hardening materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2005-01-01

    Tension and compression instabilities are investigated for specimens with dimensions in the micron range. A finite strain generalization of a higher order strain gradient plasticity theory is implemented in a finite element scheme capable of modeling power law hardening materials. Effects...... of gradient hardening are found to delay the onset of localization under plane strain tension, and significantly reduce strain gradients in the localized zone. For plane strain compression gradient hardening is found to increase the load-carrying capacity significantly....

  19. Conjugate gradient heat bath for ill-conditioned actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriotti, Michele; Bussi, Giovanni; Parrinello, Michele

    2007-08-01

    We present a method for performing sampling from a Boltzmann distribution of an ill-conditioned quadratic action. This method is based on heat-bath thermalization along a set of conjugate directions, generated via a conjugate-gradient procedure. The resulting scheme outperforms local updates for matrices with very high condition number, since it avoids the slowing down of modes with lower eigenvalue, and has some advantages over the global heat-bath approach, compared to which it is more stable and allows for more freedom in devising case-specific optimizations.

  20. Bistable gradient networks. II. Storage capacity and behavior near saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Patrick N.; Menzinger, Michael

    2003-01-01

    We examine numerically the storage capacity and the behavior near saturation of an attractor neural network consisting of bistable elements with an adjustable coupling strength, the bistable gradient network. For strong coupling, we find evidence of a first-order “memory blackout” phase transition, as in the Hopfield network. For weak coupling, on the other hand, there is no evidence of such a transition and memorized patterns can be stable even at high levels of loading. The enhanced storage capacity comes, however, at the cost of imperfect retrieval of the patterns from corrupted versions.

  1. Gradient remediability in linear distributed parabolic systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this paper is the introduction of a new concept that concerned the analysis of a large class of distributed parabolic systems. It is the general concept of gradient remediability. More precisely, we study with respect to the gradient observation, the existence of an input operator (gradient efficient actuators) ensuring ...

  2. Estimation of gradients from scattered data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stead, S.E.

    1984-01-01

    Many techniques for producing a surface from scattered data require gradients at the data points. Since only positional data are usually known, the gradients must be estimated before the surface can be computed. The quality of the surface depends on the estimated gradients; so it is important to compute accurate estimates.

  3. An education gradient in health, a health gradient in education, or a confounded gradient in both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Jamie L; von Hippel, Paul T

    2016-04-01

    There is a positive gradient associating educational attainment with health, yet the explanation for this gradient is not clear. Does higher education improve health (causation)? Do the healthy become highly educated (selection)? Or do good health and high educational attainment both result from advantages established early in the life course (confounding)? This study evaluates these competing explanations by tracking changes in educational attainment and Self-rated Health (SRH) from age 15 to age 31 in the National Longitudinal Study of Youth, 1997 cohort. Ordinal logistic regression confirms that high-SRH adolescents are more likely to become highly educated. This is partly because adolescent SRH is associated with early advantages including adolescents' academic performance, college plans, and family background (confounding); however, net of these confounders adolescent SRH still predicts adult educational attainment (selection). Fixed-effects longitudinal regression shows that educational attainment has little causal effect on SRH at age 31. Completion of a high school diploma or associate's degree has no effect on SRH, while completion of a bachelor's or graduate degree have effects that, though significant, are quite small (less than 0.1 points on a 5-point scale). While it is possible that educational attainment would have greater effect on health at older ages, at age 31 what we see is a health gradient in education, shaped primarily by selection and confounding rather than by a causal effect of education on health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Settlement pattern of Posidonia oceanica epibionts along a gradient of ocean acidification: an approach with mimics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. DONNARUMMA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Effects of ocean acidification (OA on the colonization/settlement pattern of the epibiont community of the leaves and rhizomesof the Mediterranean seagrass,Posidoniaoceanica, have been studied at volcanic CO2vents off Ischia (Italy, using “mimics”as artificial substrates. The experiments were conducted in shallowPosidoniastands (2-3 m depth, in three stations on the northand three on the south sides of the study area, distributed along a pH gradient. At each station, 4 rhizome mimics and 6 artificialleaves were collected every three months (Sept 2009-Sept 2010. The epibionts on both leaf and rhizome mimics showed clearchanges along the pH gradient; coralline algae and calcareous invertebrates (bryozoans, serpulid polychaetes and barnacles weredominant at control stations but progressively disappeared at the most acidified stations. In these extremely low pH sites theassemblage was dominated by filamentous algae and non calcareous taxa such as hydroids and tunicates. Settlement pattern onthe artificial leaves and rhizome mimics over time showed a consistent distribution pattern along the pH gradient and highlightedthe peak of recruitment of the various organisms in different periods according to their life history.Posidoniamimics at theacidified station showed a poor and very simplified assemblage where calcifying epibionts seemed less competitive for space. Thisprofound difference in epiphyte communities in low pH conditions suggests cascading effects on the food web of the meadow and,consequently, on the functioning of the system

  5. Emulsifier type, metal chelation and pH affect oxidative stability of n-3-enriched emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Anne-Mette; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    -enriched oil-in-water emulsion. The selected food emulsifiers were Tween 80, Citrem, sodium caseinate and lecithin. Lipid oxidation was evaluated by determination of peroxide values and secondary volatile oxidation products. Moreover, the zeta potential and the droplet sizes were determined. Twen resulted...... in the least oxidatively stable emulsions, followed by Citrem. When iron was present, caseinate-stabilized emulsions oxidized slower than lecithin emulsions at pH 3, whereas the opposite was the case at pH 7. Oxidation generally progressed faster at pH 3 than at pH 7, irrespective of the addition of iron. EDTA...

  6. pH dependence of MHC class I-restricted peptide presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Pedersen, L O; Romme, T

    1996-01-01

    The function of MHC class I molecules is to bind and present antigenic peptides to cytotoxic T cells. Here, we report that class I-restricted peptide presentation is strongly pH dependent. The presentation of some peptides was enhanced at acidic pH, whereas the presentation of others was inhibited....... Biochemical peptide-MHC class I binding assays demonstrated that peptide-MHC class I complexes are more stable at neutral pH than at acidic pH. We suggest that acid-dependent peptide dissociation can generate empty class I molecules and that the resulting binding potential can be exploited by a subset...

  7. High precision and stable structures for particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Da Mota Silva, S; Hauviller, Claude

    1999-01-01

    The central detectors used in High Energy Physics Experiments require the use of light and stable structures capable of supporting delicate and precise radiation detection elements. These structures need to be highly stable under environmental conditions where external vibrations, high radiation levels, temperature and humidity gradients should be taken into account. Their main design drivers are high dimension and dynamic stability, high stiffness to mass ratio and large radiation length. For most applications, these constraints lead us to choose Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics ( CFRP) as structural element. The construction of light and stable structures with CFRP for these applications can be achieved by careful design engineering and further confirmation at the prototyping phase. However, the experimental environment can influence their characteristics and behavior. In this case, theuse of adaptive structures could become a solution for this problem. We are studying structures in CFRP with bonded piezoel...

  8. Shape reconstruction from gradient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettl, Svenja; Kaminski, Jürgen; Knauer, Markus C; Häusler, Gerd

    2008-04-20

    We present a generalized method for reconstructing the shape of an object from measured gradient data. A certain class of optical sensors does not measure the shape of an object but rather its local slope. These sensors display several advantages, including high information efficiency, sensitivity, and robustness. For many applications, however, it is necessary to acquire the shape, which must be calculated from the slopes by numerical integration. Existing integration techniques show drawbacks that render them unusable in many cases. Our method is based on an approximation employing radial basis functions. It can be applied to irregularly sampled, noisy, and incomplete data, and it reconstructs surfaces both locally and globally with high accuracy.

  9. Temperature Gradient in Hall Thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staack, D.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma potentials and electron temperatures were deduced from emissive and cold floating probe measurements in a 2 kW Hall thruster, operated in the discharge voltage range of 200-400 V. An almost linear dependence of the electron temperature on the plasma potential was observed in the acceleration region of the thruster both inside and outside the thruster. This result calls into question whether secondary electron emission from the ceramic channel walls plays a significant role in electron energy balance. The proportionality factor between the axial electron temperature gradient and the electric field is significantly smaller than might be expected by models employing Ohmic heating of electrons

  10. On Nonconvex Decentralized Gradient Descent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    difference between each local point and their global average is subject to a bound proportional to the step size. This note then establishes similar...estimation, and control. When fi’s are convex, the existing algorithms include the (sub)gradient meth- ods [5], [7], [10], [11], [18], [14], [15], and the...set of n nodes and E is the edge set. Any edge (i, j) ∈ E represents an arc between node i and node j. Let x(i) ∈ Rp denote the local copy of x at node

  11. Stringy bounces and gradient instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Bouncing solutions are obtained from a generally covariant action characterized by a potential which is a nonlocal functional of the dilaton field at two separated space-time points. Gradient instabilities are shown to arise in this context but they are argued to be nongeneric. After performing a gauge-invariant and frame-invariant derivation of the evolution equations of the fluctuations, a heuristic criterium for the avoidance of pathological instabilities is proposed and corroborated by a number of explicit examples that turn out to be compatible with a quasi-flat spectrum of curvature inhomogeneities for typical wavelengths larger than the Hubble radius.

  12. Generalized Gradient Approximation Made Simple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdew, J.P.; Burke, K.; Ernzerhof, M.

    1996-01-01

    Generalized gradient approximations (GGA close-quote s) for the exchange-correlation energy improve upon the local spin density (LSD) description of atoms, molecules, and solids. We present a simple derivation of a simple GGA, in which all parameters (other than those in LSD) are fundamental constants. Only general features of the detailed construction underlying the Perdew-Wang 1991 (PW91) GGA are invoked. Improvements over PW91 include an accurate description of the linear response of the uniform electron gas, correct behavior under uniform scaling, and a smoother potential. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  13. Dynamical attraction to stable processes

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Albert M.; Talet, Marina

    2012-01-01

    We apply dynamical ideas within probability theory, proving an almost-sure invariance principle in log density for stable processes. The familiar scaling property (self-similarity) of the stable process has a stronger expression, that the scaling flow on Skorokhod path space is a Bernoulli flow. We prove that typical paths of a random walk with i.i.d. increments in the domain of attraction of a stable law can be paired with paths of a stable process so that, after applying a non-random regula...

  14. Strain gradient effects on cyclic plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2010-01-01

    Size effects on the cyclic shear response are studied numerically using a recent higher order strain gradient visco-plasticity theory accounting for both dissipative and energetic gradient hardening. Numerical investigations of the response under cyclic pure shear and shear of a finite slab between...... rigid platens have been carried out, using the finite element method. It is shown for elastic–perfectly plastic solids how dissipative gradient effects lead to increased yield strength, whereas energetic gradient contributions lead to increased hardening as well as a Bauschinger effect. For linearly...... hardening materials it is quantified how dissipative and energetic gradient effects promote hardening above that of conventional predictions. Usually, increased hardening is attributed to energetic gradient effects, but here it is found that also dissipative gradient effects lead to additional hardening...

  15. Stable Oxygen-18 and Deuterium Isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Sascha

    The application of stable Oxygen-18 (18O) and Deuterium (2H) isotopes, as a tracer for fluxes between different compartments of the water cycle was subject of the present PhD-thesis. During a three year period, temporal data from a wide range of water cycle constituents was collected from...... the Skjern River catchment, Denmark. The presented applications focused on studying the isotopic 'input signal' to the hydrosphere in the form of precipitation, the isotopic 'output signal' with its related dynamic processes at a coastal saltwater-freshwater interface (groundwater isotopes) and the temporal...... development within a given lowland headwater catchment (stream water isotopes). Based on our investigations on the precipitation isotopic composition a local meteoric water line (LMWL) was constructed and expressed as: δ2H=7.4 δ18O + 5.36‰. Moreover, we showed that under maritime temperature climate influence...

  16. pH in Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijskens, L.M.M.; Biekman, E.S.A.

    2001-01-01

    Based on fundamental chemical relations, well-established in chemical engineering and chemical technology over almost a century, the effects of pH in food and agricultural products will be deduced for different situations and processes. Based on simple equilibria and dissociation of water, salts,

  17. Tenkir Bonger , (PhD)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Users

    ... of the market. As the ultimate beneficiaries of the process, employers, students and patients can enrich the institutional package. 1 Tenkir Bonger PhD(London). Professor of Development Economics &Dean of the School os Business Studies Mulunguhi. University, Kabwe ZAMBIA e-mail:kelemu70agere@yahoo.com ...

  18. Maintenance of a neutral cytoplasmic pH is not obligatory for growth of Escherichia coli and Streptococcus faecalis at an alkaline pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugikura, S; Nishikawa, M; Igarashi, K; Kobayashi, H

    1990-07-01

    Both Escherichia coli and Streptococcus faecalis grew in an alkaline medium containing 100 microM carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP). Our data suggested that CCCP functioned as a protonophore at a high pH and that the proton-motive force was dissipated almost completely under such conditions. The pH gradient measured with dimethyloxazolidine-2,4-dione and acetylsalicylic acid was very small in both bacteria at a high pH above 8, and was not affected significantly by the addition of CCCP. Based on these findings, we propose that the maintenance of neutral cytoplasmic pH is not obligatory for the growth of E. coli and S. faecalis in an alkaline medium.

  19. Soil pH in fruit trees in relation to specific apple replant disorder (SARD). II. The first five years at Wageningen research plot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, H.; Hoestra, H.; Borsboom, O.; Pouwer, A.

    1980-01-01

    Field plots were established with 4 target pH values, viz. 4, 5, 6 and 7, to study the effect of pH on specific apple replant disorder (SARD). The target pH levels were not stable and frequently showed fluctuations. Although no significant differences have been found on tree performance, the

  20. A case study for sustainable development action using financial gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, Arnab; Ramji, Aditya; Singh, Jarnail; Dholakia, Dhairya

    2012-01-01

    Energy access is critical for sustainable development and therefore financing energy access is a necessity. The key is whether to focus on grants or public finance for sustainable development projects or move to a more diffused financing mechanism, involving investment grade financing sources like debt and equity. In other words, financing sustainable development action via grants is becoming a constraint. To address this constraint, it is important to consider the relationship between the nature and sources of financial flows. The concept of ‘financial gradients’ emerged while analysing the financial and business strategy developed for Lighting a Billion Lives (LaBL) campaign. This paper espouses the idea of ‘financial gradients’ which is a potential financial mechanism for sustainable development action. Financial gradients, can contribute in three different ways—first, as an approach to analyse financial flows in projects; second, as a tool to generate a single, long term and stable inflow of finance; third, as a financial mechanism to help in creating long term strategies to sustain projects. This paper will concentrate on financial gradients as a potential approach to analyse financial flows in a sustainable development programme. - Highlights: ► Financial stability is a key challenge for sustainable development programmes. ► Development action via public funds is limited, need for investment grade finance. ► Need to understand financial flows with relation to nature and sources of finance. ► Financial gradients is an innovative tool for ensuring health of programmes.

  1. Convection induced by thermal gradients on thin reaction fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelas Paredes, David R. A.; Vasquez, Desiderio A.

    2017-09-01

    We present a thin front model for the propagation of chemical reaction fronts in liquids inside a Hele-Shaw cell or porous media. In this model we take into account density gradients due to thermal and compositional changes across a thin interface. The front separating reacted from unreacted fluids evolves following an eikonal relation between the normal speed and the curvature. We carry out a linear stability analysis of convectionless flat fronts confined in a two-dimensional rectangular domain. We find that all fronts are stable to perturbations of short wavelength, but they become unstable for some wavelengths depending on the values of compositional and thermal gradients. If the effects of these gradients oppose each other, we observe a range of wavelengths that make the flat front unstable. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear model show curved fronts of steady shape with convection propagating faster than flat fronts. Exothermic fronts increase the temperature of the fluid as they propagate through the domain. This increment in temperature decreases with increasing speed.

  2. Resistance of Streptococcus bovis to acetic acid at low pH: Relationship between intracellular pH and anion accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1, an acid-tolerant ruminal bacterium, was able to grown at pHs from 6.7 to 4.5, and 100 mM acetate had little effect on growth rate or proton motive force across the cell membrane. When S. bovis was grown in glucose-limited chemostats at pH 5.2, the addition of sodium acetate (as much as 100 mM) had little effect on the production of bacterial protein. At higher concentrations of sodium acetate (100 to 360 mM), production of bacterial protein declined, but this decrease could largely be explained by a shift in fermentation products (acetate, formate, and ethanol production to lactate production) and a decline in ATP production (3 ATP per glucose versus 2 ATP per glucose). Y ATP (grams of cells per mole at ATP) was not decreased significantly even by high concentrations of acetate. Cultures supplemented with 100 mM sodium acetate took up [ 14 C]acetate and [ 14 C]benzoate in accordance with the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and gave similar estimates of intracellular pH. As the extracellular pH declined, S. bovis allowed its intracellular pH to decrease and maintained a relatively constant pH gradient across the cell membrane (0.9 unit). The decrease in intracellular pH prevented S. bovis from accumulating large amounts of acetate anion. On the basis of these results it did not appear that acetate was acting as an uncoupler. The sensitivity of other bacteria to volatile fatty acids at low pH is explained most easily by a high transmembrane pH gradient and anion accumulation

  3. Resistance of Streptococcus bovis to acetic acid at low pH: Relationship between intracellular pH and anion accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, J.B. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1, an acid-tolerant ruminal bacterium, was able to grown at pHs from 6.7 to 4.5, and 100 mM acetate had little effect on growth rate or proton motive force across the cell membrane. When S. bovis was grown in glucose-limited chemostats at pH 5.2, the addition of sodium acetate (as much as 100 mM) had little effect on the production of bacterial protein. At higher concentrations of sodium acetate (100 to 360 mM), production of bacterial protein declined, but this decrease could largely be explained by a shift in fermentation products (acetate, formate, and ethanol production to lactate production) and a decline in ATP production (3 ATP per glucose versus 2 ATP per glucose). Y{sub ATP} (grams of cells per mole at ATP) was not decreased significantly even by high concentrations of acetate. Cultures supplemented with 100 mM sodium acetate took up ({sup 14}C)acetate and ({sup 14}C)benzoate in accordance with the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and gave similar estimates of intracellular pH. As the extracellular pH declined, S. bovis allowed its intracellular pH to decrease and maintained a relatively constant pH gradient across the cell membrane (0.9 unit). The decrease in intracellular pH prevented S. bovis from accumulating large amounts of acetate anion. On the basis of these results it did not appear that acetate was acting as an uncoupler. The sensitivity of other bacteria to volatile fatty acids at low pH is explained most easily by a high transmembrane pH gradient and anion accumulation.

  4. Stable carbon isotope time series from tropical tree rings indicate a precipitation signal

    OpenAIRE

    E. Fichtler; Gerhard Helle; M. Worbes

    2010-01-01

    Although studies on stable-carbon isotopes in trees from temperate zones provide abundant paleoclimatic data, tropical trees are still understudied in this context. Therefore this study examined the variability of intra- and inter-annual stable-carbon isotopic pattern in several tree species from various tropical climates. The delta C-13 Values of samples of 12 broadleaved trees (seven species) from various paleotropical and neotropical sites along a climatic moisture gradient were investigat...

  5. Wavefront reconstruction from its gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmi, Amos; Ribak, Erez N

    2006-02-01

    Wavefronts reconstructed from measured gradients are composed of a straightforward integration of the measured data, plus a correction term that disappears when there are no measurement errors. For regions of any shape, this term is a solution of Poisson's equation with Dirichlet conditions (V = 0 on the boundaries). We show that for rectangular regions, the correct solution is not a periodic one, but one expressed with Fourier cosine series. The correct solution has a lower variance than the periodic Fourier transform solution. Similar formulas exist for a circular region with obscuration. We present a near-optimal solution that is much faster than fast-Fourier-transform methods. By use of diagonal multigrid methods, a single iteration brings the correction term to within a standard deviation of 0.08, two iterations, to within 0.0064, etc.

  6. Industrial PhD report: Sustainable Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj

    2011-01-01

    Erhvervs PhD rapport udarbejdet i tilknytning til Erhvervs PhD kurset der er obligatorisk for Erhvervs PhD studerende. Rapporten omhandler relationer melllem den akademiske verden og industrien i sammenhæng med PhD projektet, betragtet og analyseret gennem teori om bæredygtig innovation....

  7. Bacterial Response to Antibiotic Gradients in a Porous Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, J.; Shechtman, L. A.; Sanford, R. A.; Dong, Y.; Werth, C. J.; Fouke, B. W.

    2015-12-01

    Microorganisms in nature have evolved survival strategies to cope with a wide variety of environmental stresses, including gradients in temperature, pH, substrate availability and aqueous chemistry. Microfluidic devices provide a consistently reliable real-time means to quantitatively measure, control and reproduce the dynamic nature of these stresses. As an example, accelerated adaptation from genetic mutations have been observed in E. coli as it responds to gradients of Ciprofloxacin (Zhang et. al. 2011). However, the mechanisms by which bacteria respond to antibiotic gradients, as well as the effect of changes in how the stressor is applied, have not been systematically studied. In this study, newly designed and fabricated microfluidic devices with porous media have been utilized to determine the chemical stress fields that enhance adaptation and thus to test how E. coli bacterial communities adapt to antibiotic stresses. By applying antibiotic and nutrient into inlet channels adjacent to either side of the porous media inoculated with E. coli, a gradient of antibiotic was formed. Hydrogel barriers were selectively photo-polymerized in between of the inlet channels and the porous media to prevent any undesired convection. Hence, chemical solute can only be transported by diffusion, creating a reproducible antibiotic gradient over the porous media. The bacteria were also constrained by the hydrogel boundary barriers from escaping the porous media. Preliminary results suggest that E. coli moves freely with respect to Ciprofloxacin concentrations. In addition, and unexpectedly, the E. coli colonies exhibit a concentric pulsed growth front radiating away from the point of inoculation within the micromodel ecosystem and pulse over the porous media containing antibiotic. The bacteria at the growth front grow into long filaments (up to 100μm) while the bacteria in the inner concentric area are normal size. We hypothesize that the frontier bacteria, which are first

  8. Jupiter's evolution with primordial composition gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Vazan, A.; Helled, R.; Guillot, T.

    2018-01-01

    Recent formation and structure models of Jupiter suggest that the planet can have composition gradients and not be fully convective (adiabatic). This possibility directly affects our understanding of Jupiter's bulk composition and origin. In this Letter we present Jupiter's evolution with a primordial structure consisting of a relatively steep heavy-element gradient of 40 Earth masses. We show that for a primordial structure with composition gradients, most of the mixing occurs in the outer p...

  9. Thermal conduction down steep temperature gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, A.R.; Evans, R.G.; Nicholas, D.J.

    1980-08-01

    The Fokker-Planck equation has been solved numerically in one spatial and two velocity dimensions in order to study thermal conduction in large temperature gradients. An initially cold plasma is heated at one end of the spatial grid producing temperature gradients with scale lengths of a few times the electron mean free path. The heat flow is an order of magnitude smaller than that predicted by the classical theory which is valid in the limit of small temperature gradients. (author)

  10. Testing the limits of gradient sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinal Lakhani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to detect a chemical gradient is fundamental to many cellular processes. In multicellular organisms gradient sensing plays an important role in many physiological processes such as wound healing and development. Unicellular organisms use gradient sensing to move (chemotaxis or grow (chemotropism towards a favorable environment. Some cells are capable of detecting extremely shallow gradients, even in the presence of significant molecular-level noise. For example, yeast have been reported to detect pheromone gradients as shallow as 0.1 nM/μm. Noise reduction mechanisms, such as time-averaging and the internalization of pheromone molecules, have been proposed to explain how yeast cells filter fluctuations and detect shallow gradients. Here, we use a Particle-Based Reaction-Diffusion model of ligand-receptor dynamics to test the effectiveness of these mechanisms and to determine the limits of gradient sensing. In particular, we develop novel simulation methods for establishing chemical gradients that not only allow us to study gradient sensing under steady-state conditions, but also take into account transient effects as the gradient forms. Based on reported measurements of reaction rates, our results indicate neither time-averaging nor receptor endocytosis significantly improves the cell's accuracy in detecting gradients over time scales associated with the initiation of polarized growth. Additionally, our results demonstrate the physical barrier of the cell membrane sharpens chemical gradients across the cell. While our studies are motivated by the mating response of yeast, we believe our results and simulation methods will find applications in many different contexts.

  11. STOCHASTIC GRADIENT METHODS FOR UNCONSTRAINED OPTIMIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Krejić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This papers presents an overview of gradient based methods for minimization of noisy functions. It is assumed that the objective functions is either given with error terms of stochastic nature or given as the mathematical expectation. Such problems arise in the context of simulation based optimization. The focus of this presentation is on the gradient based Stochastic Approximation and Sample Average Approximation methods. The concept of stochastic gradient approximation of the true gradient can be successfully extended to deterministic problems. Methods of this kind are presented for the data fitting and machine learning problems.

  12. Wireless SAW Based Temperature Gradient Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prime Photonics proposes design and development of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) based temperature gradient sensor for instrumentation of thermal protection systems...

  13. Community and ecosystem responses to elevational gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundqvist, Maja K.; Sanders, Nate; Wardle, David A.

    2013-01-01

    elevational gradients for understanding community and ecosystem responses to global climate change at much larger spatial and temporal scales than is possible through conventional ecological experiments. However, future studies that integrate elevational gradient approaches with experimental manipulations...... will provide powerful information that can improve predictions of climate change impacts within and across ecosystems.......Community structure and ecosystem processes often vary along elevational gradients. Their responses to elevation are commonly driven by changes in temperature, and many community- and ecosystem-level variables therefore frequently respond similarly to elevation across contrasting gradients...

  14. On lower order strain gradient plasticity theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Hutchinson, J. W.

    2003-01-01

    the tangent moduli governing increments of stress and strain. It is shown that the modification is far from benign from a mathematical standpoint, changing the qualitative character of solutions and leading to a new type of localization that is at odds with what is expected from a strain gradient theory......By way of numerical examples, this paper explores the nature of solutions to a class of strain gradient plasticity theories that employ conventional stresses, equilibrium equations and boundary conditions. Strain gradients come into play in these modified conventional theories only to alter....... The findings raise questions about the physical acceptability of this class of strain gradient theories....

  15. Shelf-Stable Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is an MRE? Is an MRE shelf stable? What foods are packaged in retort packages? What is aseptic ... type of package is used for aseptic processing? What foods are packaged in aseptic packages? Can I microwave ...

  16. Insertion and C-H bond activation of unsaturated substrates by bis(benzamidinato)yttrium alkyl, [PhC(NSiMe(3))(2)](2)YR (R=CH(2)Ph center dot THF,CH(SiMe(3))(2)), and hydride, {[PhC(NSiMe(3))(2)]Y-2(mu-H)}(2), compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duchateau, R; vanWee, CT; Teuben, JH

    1996-01-01

    The reactivity of benzamidinate-stabilized yttrium complexes [PhC(NSiMe(3))(2)](2)YR (R = CH(2)Ph . THF, CH(SiMe(3))(2) and {[PhC(NSiMe(3))(2)]Y-2(mu-H)}(2) have been investigated. The complexes are thermally stable showing no sign of decomposition, ligand or solvent metalation or H/D exchange after

  17. Insertion and C-H Bond Activation of Unsaturated Substrates by Bis(benzamidinato)yttrium Alkyl, [PhC(NSiMe3)2]2YR (R = CH2Ph·THF, CH(SiMe3)2), and Hydrido, {[PhC(NSiMe3)2]2Y(μ-H)}2, Compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duchateau, Robbert; Wee, Cornelis T. van; Teuben, Jan H.

    1996-01-01

    The reactivity of benzamidinate-stabilized yttrium complexes [PhC(NSiMe3)2]2YR (R = CH2Ph·THF, CH(SiMe3)2) and {[PhC(NSiMe3)2]2Y(μ-H)}2 has been investigated. The complexes are thermally stable showing no sign of decomposition, ligand or solvent metalation, or H/D exchange after hours at 100 °C in

  18. Electron spin resonance of melanin from hair. Effects of temperature, pH and light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaud, R.; Perbet, G. (Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (France)); Deflandre, A.; Lang, G. (Centre de Recherches de la Societe L' Oreal, Aulnay Sous Bois (France) Dept. de Chimie Generale)

    1983-08-01

    The variation with temperature, pH and light of the ESR signal of hydrated melanin powders from Japanese black hair has been studied. An explanation of the results is proposed on the basis of quinhydrone type complexes and of acid-base equilibria of melanin and its semiquinone radicals. During exposure to light of wavelengths 254-600 nm, both stable and unstable radicals have been observed. The action spectrum for the formation of stable melanin radicals has been determined.

  19. Pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumbiegel, P.

    1986-11-01

    The relatively new field of pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes is reviewed. Scientific, juridical, and ethical questions are discussed concerning the application of these pharmaceuticals in human medicine. 13 C, 15 N, and 2 H are the stable isotopes mainly utilized in metabolic function tests. Methodical contributions are given to the application of 2 H, 13 C, and 15 N pharmaceuticals showing new aspects and different states of development in the field under discussion. (author)

  20. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for distribution for nondestructive research use on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Research Materials Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or is in reprocessing. For some of the high abundance naturally occurring isotopes, larger amounts can be made available; for example, Ca-40 and Fe-56

  1. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  2. Low pH Cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven

    2007-05-01

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit ≤ 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio ≤ 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  3. A Reliable and Non-destructive Method for Monitoring the Stromal pH in Isolated Chloroplasts Using a Fluorescent pH Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai-Hsiang Su

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The proton gradient established by the pH difference across a biological membrane is essential for many physiological processes, including ATP synthesis and ion and metabolite transport. Currently, ionophores are used to study proton gradients, and determine their importance to biological functions of interest. Because of the lack of an easy method for monitoring the proton gradient across the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts (ΔpHenv, whether the concentration of ionophores used can effectively abolish the ΔpHenv is not proven for most experiments. To overcome this hindrance, we tried to setup an easy method for real-time monitoring of the stromal pH in buffered, isolated chloroplasts by using fluorescent pH probes; using this method the ΔpHenv can be calculated by subtracting the buffer pH from the measured stromal pH. When three fluorescent dyes, BCECF-AM [2′,7′-bis-(2-carboxyethyl-5-(and-6-carboxyfluorescein acetoxymethyl ester], CFDA-SE [5(6-Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester] and SNARF-1 carboxylic acid acetate succinimidyl ester were incubated with isolated chloroplasts, BCECF-AM and CFDA-SE, but not the ester-formed SNARF-1 were taken up by chloroplasts and digested with esterase to release high levels of fluorescence. According to its relatively higher pKa value (6.98, near the physiological pH of the stroma, BCECF was chosen for further development. Due to shielding of the excitation and emission lights by chloroplast pigments, the ratiometric fluorescence of BCECF was highly dependent on the concentration of chloroplasts. By using a fixed concentration of chloroplasts, a highly correlated standard curve of pH to the BCECF ratiometric fluorescence with an r-square value of 0.98 was obtained, indicating the reliability of this method. Consistent with previous reports, the light-dependent formation of ΔpHenv can be detected ranging from 0.15 to 0.33 pH units upon illumination. The concentration of the ionophore

  4. Canonical trivialization of gravitational gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermaier, Max

    2017-01-01

    A one-parameter family of canonical transformations is constructed that reduces the Hamiltonian form of the Einstein–Hilbert action to its strong coupling limit where dynamical spatial gradients are absent. The parameter can alternatively be viewed as the overall scale of the spatial metric or as a fractional inverse power of Newton’s constant. The generating function of the canonical transformation is constructed iteratively as a powerseries in the parameter to all orders. The algorithm draws on Lie–Deprit transformation theory and defines a ‘trivialization map’ with several bonus properties: (i) Trivialization of the Hamiltonian constraint implies that of the action while the diffeomorphism constraint is automatically co-transformed. (ii) Only a set of ordinary differential equations needs to be solved to drive the iteration via a homological equation where no gauge fixing is required. (iii) In contrast to (the classical limit of) a Lagrangian trivialization map the algorithm also produces series solutions of the field equations. (iv) In the strong coupling theory temporal gauge variations are abelian, nevertheless the map intertwines with the respective gauge symmetries on the action, the field equations, and their solutions. (paper)

  5. Canonical trivialization of gravitational gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermaier, Max

    2017-06-01

    A one-parameter family of canonical transformations is constructed that reduces the Hamiltonian form of the Einstein-Hilbert action to its strong coupling limit where dynamical spatial gradients are absent. The parameter can alternatively be viewed as the overall scale of the spatial metric or as a fractional inverse power of Newton’s constant. The generating function of the canonical transformation is constructed iteratively as a powerseries in the parameter to all orders. The algorithm draws on Lie-Deprit transformation theory and defines a ‘trivialization map’ with several bonus properties: (i) Trivialization of the Hamiltonian constraint implies that of the action while the diffeomorphism constraint is automatically co-transformed. (ii) Only a set of ordinary differential equations needs to be solved to drive the iteration via a homological equation where no gauge fixing is required. (iii) In contrast to (the classical limit of) a Lagrangian trivialization map the algorithm also produces series solutions of the field equations. (iv) In the strong coupling theory temporal gauge variations are abelian, nevertheless the map intertwines with the respective gauge symmetries on the action, the field equations, and their solutions.

  6. Gradient Flow Convolutive Blind Source Separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Nielsen, Chinton Møller

    2004-01-01

    Experiments have shown that the performance of instantaneous gradient flow beamforming by Cauwenberghs et al. is reduced significantly in reverberant conditions. By expanding the gradient flow principle to convolutive mixtures, separation in a reverberant environment is possible. By use of a circ...

  7. Microinstabilities in weak density gradient tokamak systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.; Chen, L.

    1986-04-01

    A prominent characteristic of auxiliary-heated tokamak discharges which exhibit improved (''H-mode type'') confinement properties is that their density profiles tend to be much flatter over most of the plasma radius. Depsite this favorable trend, it is emphasized here that, even in the limit of zero density gradient, low-frequency microinstabilities can persist due to the nonzero temperature gradient

  8. Preconditioning the modified conjugate gradient method ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the convergence analysis of the conventional conjugate Gradient method was reviewed. And the convergence analysis of the modified conjugate Gradient method was analysed with our extension on preconditioning the algorithm. Convergence of the algorithm is a function of the condition number of M-1A.

  9. 40 CFR 230.25 - Salinity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Salinity gradients. 230.25 Section 230.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(b... Physical and Chemical Characteristics of the Aquatic Ecosystem § 230.25 Salinity gradients. (a) Salinity...

  10. Patterns of macromycete community assemblage along an elevation gradient: options for fungal gradient and metacommunity analyse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko Gómez-Hernández; Guadalupe Williams-Linera; Roger Guevara; D. Jean Lodge

    2012-01-01

    Gradient analysis is rarely used in studies of fungal communities. Data on macromycetes from eight sites along an elevation gradient in central Veracruz, Mexico, were used to demonstrate methods for gradient analysis that can be applied to studies of communities of fungi. Selected sites from 100 to 3,500 m altitude represent tropical dry forest, tropical montane cloud...

  11. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann Jr, N C; Smith, D R

    2011-03-21

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k⊥ρs ≤10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  12. Approximate error conjugation gradient minimization methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallman, Jeffrey S

    2013-05-21

    In one embodiment, a method includes selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In another embodiment, a system includes a processor for executing logic, logic for selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, logic for calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and logic for calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In other embodiments, computer program products, methods, and systems are described capable of using approximate error in constrained conjugate gradient minimization problems.

  13. Ratiometric Imaging of Extracellular pH in Dental Biofilms Using C-SNARF-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene

    H-sensitive ratiometric dye and as a bacterial stain. We tested the method on natural 48-h in-situ-grown dental biofilms from two individuals. Four biofilms per person were collected on standardized glass slabs mounted in intra-oral appliances. Digital image analysis was employed to remove the bacterial biomass from......pH in dental biofilms plays a central role for the development of caries lesions. For decades, pH measurements in biofilms have been limited to recording pH with electrodes/microelectrodes that do not permit monitoring horizontal pH gradients in biofilms in real-time. Quantitative fluorescent...... microscopy can overcome these problems. Objective: The aim of this demonstration study was to monitor extracellular biofilm pH microscopically with the ratiometric pH-sensitive dye C-SNARF-4 in in-situ-grown dental biofilms. Methods: Using confocal microscopy, the dye C-SNARF-4 was employed both as p...

  14. Stable Boundary Layer Education (STABLE) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The properties of, and the processes that occur in, the nocturnal stable boundary layer are not well understood, making it difficult to represent adequately in numerical models. The nocturnal boundary layer often is characterized by a temperature inversion and, in the Southern Great Plains region, a low-level jet. To advance our understanding of the nocturnal stable boundary layer, high temporal and vertical resolution data on the temperature and wind properties are needed, along with both large-eddy simulation and cloud-resolving modeling.

  15. Structure Tuning of Electrostatically Self-Assembled Nanoparticles through pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Giacomo; Schweins, Ralf; Gröhn, Franziska

    2016-02-25

    pH can be used to tune the self-assembly of cationic polyelectrolyte dendrimers and oppositely charged dyes and to produce particles with a desired shape and size in aqueous solution. We present fundamental insight into the effect of pH on electrostatic self-assembly of poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of generation 4 and di- and trivalent anionic organic dyes. The solution pH is used as a key to turn on the interaction and to control the association by regulating the macroion charge. Stable and well-defined nanoparticles are formed in solution, being more stable at low pH where the dendrimer protonation is complete. Nanoparticle stability was correlated with ζ-potential measurements. We prove that the assemblies are electrostatically stabilized and elucidate the importance of the surface charge density. pH was also used as a key to nanoparticle dimension and shape. For example, smaller particles form at a lower pH. The nanostructures have been characterized using dynamic light scattering and small-angle neutron scattering. A "phase diagram" has been developed for each dye, showing the assembly size, shape, and instability regions dependent on the pH. Overall, a pH-responsive nanoparticle shape is a key step toward the design of novel smart therapeutic carrier systems.

  16. Bacterial profile of dentine caries and the impact of pH on bacterial population diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Kianoush

    Full Text Available Dental caries is caused by the release of organic acids from fermentative bacteria, which results in the dissolution of hydroxyapatite matrices of enamel and dentine. While low environmental pH is proposed to cause a shift in the consortium of oral bacteria, favouring the development of caries, the impact of this variable has been overlooked in microbial population studies. This study aimed to detail the zonal composition of the microbiota associated with carious dentine lesions with reference to pH. We used 454 sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (V3-V4 region to compare microbial communities in layers ranging in pH from 4.5-7.8 from 25 teeth with advanced dentine caries. Pyrosequencing of the amplicons yielded 449,762 sequences. Nine phyla, 97 genera and 409 species were identified from the quality-filtered, de-noised and chimera-free sequences. Among the microbiota associated with dentinal caries, the most abundant taxa included Lactobacillus sp., Prevotella sp., Atopobium sp., Olsenella sp. and Actinomyces sp. We found a disparity between microbial communities localised at acidic versus neutral pH strata. Acidic conditions were associated with low diversity microbial populations, with Lactobacillus species including L. fermentum, L. rhamnosus and L. crispatus, being prominent. In comparison, the distinctive species of a more diverse flora associated with neutral pH regions of carious lesions included Alloprevotella tanerrae, Leptothrix sp., Sphingomonas sp. and Streptococcus anginosus. While certain bacteria were affected by the pH gradient, we also found that ∼ 60% of the taxa associated with caries were present across the investigated pH range, representing a substantial core. We demonstrated that some bacterial species implicated in caries progression show selective clustering with respect to pH gradient, providing a basis for specific therapeutic strategies.

  17. pH- and ion-sensitive polymers for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takayuki; Lai, Tsz Chung; Kwon, Glen S; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2013-11-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDSs) are important for effective, safe, and convenient administration of drugs. pH- and ion-responsive polymers have been widely employed in DDS for site-specific drug release due to their abilities to exploit specific pH- or ion-gradients in the human body. Having pH-sensitivity, cationic polymers can mask the taste of drugs and release drugs in the stomach by responding to gastric low pH. Anionic polymers responsive to intestinal high pH are used for preventing gastric degradation of drug, colon drug delivery and achieving high bioavailability of weak basic drugs. Tumor-targeted DDSs have been developed based on polymers with imidazole groups or poly(β-amino ester) responsive to tumoral low pH. Polymers with pH-sensitive chemical linkages, such as hydrazone, acetal, ortho ester and vinyl ester, pH-sensitive cell-penetrating peptides and cationic polymers undergoing pH-dependent protonation have been studied to utilize the pH gradient along the endocytic pathway for intracellular drug delivery. As ion-sensitive polymers, ion-exchange resins are frequently used for taste-masking, counterion-responsive drug release and sustained drug release. Polymers responding to ions in the saliva and gastrointestinal fluids are also used for controlled drug release in oral drug formulations. Stimuli-responsive DDSs are important for achieving site-specific and controlled drug release; however, intraindividual, interindividual and intercellular variations of pH should be considered when designing DDSs or drug products. Combination of polymers and other components, and deeper understanding of human physiology are important for development of pH- and ion-sensitive polymeric DDS products for patients.

  18. pH- and ion-sensitive polymers for drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takayuki; Lai, Tsz Chung; Kwon, Glen S; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Drug delivery systems (DDSs) are important for effective, safe, and convenient administration of drugs. pH- and ion-responsive polymers have been widely employed in DDS for site-specific drug release due to their abilities to exploit specific pH- or ion-gradients in the human body. Areas covered Having pH-sensitivity, cationic polymers can mask the taste of drugs and release drugs in the stomach by responding to gastric low pH. Anionic polymers responsive to intestinal high pH are used for preventing gastric degradation of drug, colon drug delivery and achieving high bioavailability of weak basic drugs. Tumor-targeted DDSs have been developed based on polymers with imidazole groups or poly(β-amino ester) responsive to tumoral low pH. Polymers with pH-sensitive chemical linkages, such as hydrazone, acetal, ortho ester and vinyl ester, pH-sensitive cell-penetrating peptides and cationic polymers undergoing pH-dependent protonation have been studied to utilize the pH gradient along the endocytic pathway for intracellular drug delivery. As ion-sensitive polymers, ion-exchange resins are frequently used for taste-masking, counterion-responsive drug release and sustained drug release. Polymers responding to ions in the saliva and gastrointestinal fluids are also used for controlled drug release in oral drug formulations. Expert opinion Stimuli-responsive DDSs are important for achieving site-specific and controlled drug release; however, intraindividual, interindividual and intercellular variations of pH should be considered when designing DDSs or drug products. Combination of polymers and other components, and deeper understanding of human physiology are important for development of pH- and ion-sensitive polymeric DDS products for patients. PMID:23930949

  19. Acid loading test (pH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003615.htm Acid loading test (pH) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid loading test (pH) measures the ability of the ...

  20. pH sensor calibration procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Artero Delgado, Carola; Nogueras Cervera, Marc; Manuel Lázaro, Antonio; Prat Tasias, Jordi; Prat Farran, Joana d'Arc

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration of pH sensor located at the OBSEA marine Observatory. This instrument is based on an industrial pH electrode that is connected to a CTD instrument (Conductivity, Temperature, and Depth ). The calibration of the pH sensor has been done using a high precision spectrophotometer pH meter from Institute of Marine Sciences (ICM), and in this way it has been obtained a numerical function for the p H sensor propor...

  1. Intracellular chemical gradients: morphing principle in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endres Robert G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Advances in computational biology allow systematic investigations to ascertain whether internal chemical gradients can be maintained in bacteria – an open question at the resolution limit of fluorescence microscopy. While it was previously believed that the small bacterial cell size and fast diffusion in the cytoplasm effectively remove any such gradient, a new computational study published in BMC Biophysics supports the emerging view that gradients can exist. The study arose from the recent observation that phosphorylated CtrA forms a gradient prior to cell division in Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium known for its complicated cell cycle. Tropini et al. (2012 postulate that such gradients can provide an internal chemical compass, directing protein localization, cell division and cell development. More specifically, they describe biochemical and physical constraints on the formation of such gradients and explore a number of existing bacterial cell morphologies. These chemical gradients may limit in vitro analyses, and may ensure timing control and robustness to fluctuations during critical stages in cell development.

  2. Satellite gravity gradient grids for geophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouman, Johannes; Ebbing, Jörg; Fuchs, Martin; Sebera, Josef; Lieb, Verena; Szwillus, Wolfgang; Haagmans, Roger; Novak, Pavel

    2016-02-11

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite aimed at determining the Earth's mean gravity field. GOCE delivered gravity gradients containing directional information, which are complicated to use because of their error characteristics and because they are given in a rotating instrument frame indirectly related to the Earth. We compute gravity gradients in grids at 225 km and 255 km altitude above the reference ellipsoid corresponding to the GOCE nominal and lower orbit phases respectively, and find that the grids may contain additional high-frequency content compared with GOCE-based global models. We discuss the gradient sensitivity for crustal depth slices using a 3D lithospheric model of the North-East Atlantic region, which shows that the depth sensitivity differs from gradient to gradient. In addition, the relative signal power for the individual gradient component changes comparing the 225 km and 255 km grids, implying that using all components at different heights reduces parameter uncertainties in geophysical modelling. Furthermore, since gravity gradients contain complementary information to gravity, we foresee the use of the grids in a wide range of applications from lithospheric modelling to studies on dynamic topography, and glacial isostatic adjustment, to bedrock geometry determination under ice sheets.

  3. PhD students and integrative research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fry, G.; Tress, B.; Tress, G.

    2006-01-01

    The training of PhD students is currently very dynamic and varies widely from place to place. We present some examples of this variation and comment on how it may affect the way PhD students cope with integrative studies. Our focus is on the training needs of PhD students studying integrative

  4. Fungal Communities and Functional Guilds Shift Along an Elevational Gradient in the Southern Appalachian Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veach, Allison M; Stokes, C Elizabeth; Knoepp, Jennifer; Jumpponen, Ari; Baird, Richard

    2017-12-04

    Nitrogen deposition alters forest ecosystems particularly in high elevation, montane habitats where nitrogen deposition is greatest and continues to increase. We collected soils across an elevational (788-1940 m) gradient, encompassing both abiotic (soil chemistry) and biotic (vegetation community) gradients, at eight locations in the southern Appalachian Mountains of southwestern North Carolina and eastern Tennessee. We measured soil chemistry (total N, C, extractable PO 4 , soil pH, cation exchange capacity [ECEC], percent base saturation [% BS]) and dissected soil fungal communities using ITS2 metabarcode Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Total soil N, C, PO 4 , % BS, and pH increased with elevation and plateaued at approximately 1400 m, whereas ECEC linearly increased and C/N decreased with elevation. Fungal communities differed among locations and were correlated with all chemical variables, except PO 4 , whereas OTU richness increased with total N. Several ecological guilds (i.e., ectomycorrhizae, saprotrophs, plant pathogens) differed in abundance among locations; specifically, saprotroph abundance, primarily attributable to genus Mortierella, was positively correlated with elevation. Ectomycorrhizae declined with total N and soil pH and increased with total C and PO 4 where plant pathogens increased with total N and decreased with total C. Our results demonstrate significant turnover in taxonomic and functional fungal groups across elevational gradients which facilitate future predictions on forest ecosystem change in the southern Appalachians as nitrogen deposition rates increase and regional temperature and precipitation regimes shift.

  5. Free water transport, small pore transport and the osmotic pressure gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikova, Alena; Smit, Watske; Zweers, Machteld M; Struijk, Dirk G; Krediet, Raymond T

    2008-07-01

    Water transport in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients occurs through the small pores and water channels, the latter allowing free water transport (FWT). The osmotic gradient is known to be one of the major determinants of water transport. The objective of the study was to analyse the relation between each transport route and the osmotic gradient. The 4-h standard peritoneal permeability analyses of 80 stable PD patients were studied. Small pore transport (SPT) was calculated based on the transported amount of sodium. FWT was calculated by subtracting SPT from transcapillary ultrafiltration (TCUF). Water transport rates were determined. The osmotic gradient was calculated. The slope of the relation between FWT rate and osmotic gradient (slope(FWT)), and the elimination constant (K(e)) of the exponential relation between SPT rate and osmotic gradient (K(SPT)) were calculated for every patient. The FWT rate was related to the osmotic gradient (P = 0.001). A similar correlation was also found between the SPT rate and osmotic gradient when fitted exponentially (P = 0.005). The rates of FWT decreased significantly between each time point during the whole dwell. The SPT rates decreased significantly within the first half of the dwell and levelled off thereafter. No correlations were found between the slope(FWT), K(SPT) and PD duration. The slope(FWT) of the relationship between the FWT and the osmotic gradient is an indirect measurement of the amount of functioning water channels. Similarly, the K(SPT) value represents the number of functioning small pores. The absence of a relationship of these parameters with the duration of PD suggests opposing mechanisms, for instance a lower number of functioning pores in combination with an increased vascular surface area. Conclusion. The curves of the relationship between FWR, SPT and OG support the assumption that FWR is much more dependent on the OG than SPT. Non-osmotic determinants are likely to be important in small pore fluid

  6. Sound beam manipulation based on temperature gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Feng [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics and School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); School of Physics & Electronic Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); Quan, Li; Liu, Xiaozhou, E-mail: xzliu@nju.edu.cn; Gong, Xiufen [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics and School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-10-28

    Previous research with temperature gradients has shown the feasibility of controlling airborne sound propagation. Here, we present a temperature gradients based airborne sound manipulation schemes: a cylindrical acoustic omnidirectional absorber (AOA). The proposed AOA has high absorption performance which can almost completely absorb the incident wave. Geometric acoustics is used to obtain the refractive index distributions with different radii, which is then utilized to deduce the desired temperature gradients. Since resonant units are not applied in the scheme, its working bandwidth is expected to be broadband. The scheme is temperature-tuned and easy to realize, which is of potential interest to fields such as noise control or acoustic cloaking.

  7. On fracture in finite strain gradient plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez Pañeda, Emilio; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2016-01-01

    predictions. These differences increase significantly when large strains are taken into account, as a consequence of the contribution of strain gradients to the work hardening of the material. The magnitude of stress elevation at the crack tip and the distance ahead of the crack where GNDs significantly alter......In this work a general framework for damage and fracture assessment including the effect of strain gradients is provided. Both mechanism-based and phenomenological strain gradient plasticity (SGP) theories are implemented numerically using finite deformation theory and crack tip fields...

  8. Speciation gradients and the distribution of biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluter, Dolph; Pennell, Matthew W

    2017-05-31

    Global patterns of biodiversity are influenced by spatial and environmental variations in the rate at which new species form. We relate variations in speciation rates to six key patterns of biodiversity worldwide, including the species-area relationship, latitudinal gradients in species and genetic diversity, and between-habitat differences in species richness. Although they sometimes mirror biodiversity patterns, recent rates of speciation, at the tip of the tree of life, are often highest where species richness is low. Speciation gradients therefore shape, but are also shaped by, biodiversity gradients and are often more useful for predicting future patterns of biodiversity than for interpreting the past.

  9. Sound beam manipulation based on temperature gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Feng; Quan, Li; Liu, Xiaozhou; Gong, Xiufen

    2015-01-01

    Previous research with temperature gradients has shown the feasibility of controlling airborne sound propagation. Here, we present a temperature gradients based airborne sound manipulation schemes: a cylindrical acoustic omnidirectional absorber (AOA). The proposed AOA has high absorption performance which can almost completely absorb the incident wave. Geometric acoustics is used to obtain the refractive index distributions with different radii, which is then utilized to deduce the desired temperature gradients. Since resonant units are not applied in the scheme, its working bandwidth is expected to be broadband. The scheme is temperature-tuned and easy to realize, which is of potential interest to fields such as noise control or acoustic cloaking

  10. Development of egg PC/cholesterol/α-tocopherol liposomes with ionic gradients to deliver ropivacaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Camila Morais Gonçalves; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes; Franz-Montan, Michelle; Couto, Verônica Muniz; Casadei, Bruna Renata; Cereda, Cíntia Maria Saia; de Paula, Eneida

    2016-01-01

    Ropivacaine (RVC) is an aminoamide local anesthetic widely used in surgical procedures. Studies with RVC encapsulated in liposomes and complexed in cyclodextrins have shown good results, but in order to use RVC for lengthy procedures and during the postoperative period, a still more prolonged anesthetic effect is required. This study therefore aimed to provide extended RVC release and increased upload using modified liposomes. Three types of vesicles were studied: (i) large multilamellar vesicle (LMV), (ii) large multivesicular vesicle (LMVV) and (iii) large unilamellar vesicle (LUV), prepared with egg phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol/α-tocopherol (4:3:0.07 mol%) at pH 7.4. Ionic gradient liposomes (inside: pH 5.5, pH 5.5 + (NH4)2SO4 and pH 7.4 + (NH4)2SO4) were prepared and showed improved RVC loading, compared to conventional liposomes (inside: pH 7.4). An high-performance liquid chromatography analytical method was validated for RVC quantification. The liposomes were characterized in terms of their size, zeta potential, polydispersion, morphology, RVC encapsulation efficiency (EE(%)) and in vitro RVC release. LMVV liposomes provided better performance than LMV or LUV. The best formulations were prepared using pH 5.5 (LMVV 5.5in) or pH 7.4 with 250 mM (NH4)2SO4 in the inner aqueous core (LMVV 7.4in + ammonium sulfate), enabling encapsulation of as much as 2% RVC, with high uptake (EE(%) ∼70%) and sustained release (∼25 h). The encapsulation of RVC in ionic gradient liposomes significantly extended the duration of release of the anesthetic, showing that this strategy could be a viable means of promoting longer-term anesthesia during surgical procedures and during the postoperative period.

  11. Areal-averaged trace gas emission rates from long-range open-path measurements in stable boundary layer conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schäfer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of land-surface emission rates of greenhouse and other gases at large spatial scales (10 000 m2 are needed to assess the spatial distribution of emissions. This can be readily done using spatial-integrating micro-meteorological methods like flux-gradient methods which were evaluated for determining land-surface emission rates of trace gases under stable boundary layers. Non-intrusive path-integrating measurements are utilized. Successful application of a flux-gradient method requires confidence in the gradients of trace gas concentration and wind, and in the applicability of boundary-layer turbulence theory; consequently the procedures to qualify measurements that can be used to determine the flux is critical. While there is relatively high confidence in flux measurements made under unstable atmospheres with mean winds greater than 1 m s−1, there is greater uncertainty in flux measurements made under free convective or stable conditions. The study of N2O emissions of flat grassland and NH3 emissions from a cattle lagoon involves quality-assured determinations of fluxes under low wind, stable or night-time atmospheric conditions when the continuous "steady-state" turbulence of the surface boundary layer breaks down and the layer has intermittent turbulence. Results indicate that following the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST flux-gradient methods that assume a log-linear profile of the wind speed and concentration gradient incorrectly determine vertical profiles and thus flux in the stable boundary layer. An alternative approach is considered on the basis of turbulent diffusivity, i.e. the measured friction velocity as well as height gradients of horizontal wind speeds and concentrations without MOST correction for stability. It is shown that this is the most accurate of the flux-gradient methods under stable conditions.

  12. Synthesis of Cross-Linked Polymeric Micelle pH Nanosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Pramod Kumar; Jølck, Rasmus Irming; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2015-01-01

    at the micelle shell using CuAAC results in a stabilized micelle pH nanosensor. Compared to the postmicelle modification strategy, the mixed-micellization approach increases the control of the overall composition of the nanosensors.Both approaches provide stable nanosensors with similar pKa profiles and thereby...

  13. Coaxial two-channel high-gradient dielectric wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Sotnikov

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A new scheme for a dielectric wakefield accelerator is proposed that employs a cylindrical multizone dielectric structure configured as two concentric dielectric tubes with outer and inner vacuum channels for drive and accelerated bunches. Analytical and numerical studies have been carried out for such coaxial dielectric-loaded structures (CDS for high-gradient acceleration. An analytical theory of wakefield excitation by particle bunches in a multizone CDS has been formulated. Numerical calculations are presented for an example of a CDS using dielectric tubes with dielectric permittivity 5.7, having external diameters of 2.121 and 0.179 mm with inner diameters of 2.095 and 0.1 mm. An annular 5 GeV, 6 nC electron bunch with rms length of 0.035 mm energizes a wakefield on the structure axis having an accelerating gradient of ∼600  MeV/m with a transformer ratio ∼8∶1. The period of the accelerating field is ∼0.33  mm. If the width of the drive bunch channel is decreased, it is possible to obtain an accelerating gradient of >1  GeV/m while keeping the transformer ratio approximately the same. Full numerical simulations using a particle-in-cell code have confirmed results of the linear theory and furthermore have shown the important influence of the quenching wave that restricts the region of the wakefield to within several periods following the drive bunch. Numerical simulations for another example have shown nearly stable transport of drive and accelerated bunches through the CDS, using a short train of drive bunches.

  14. High-gradient two-beam accelerator structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu Kazakov

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel cavity structure is described that could be the basis for a two-beam, high-gradient, accelerator. Versions of the structure could be used for acceleration of beams of electrons, positrons, muons, protons, or heavier ions; with either electron or proton drive beams. The structure embodies cavities that are excited in several harmonically related eigenmodes, such that rf fields reach their peak values only during small portions of each basic rf period. This feature could help raise breakdown and pulse heating thresholds. The two-beam accelerator structure comprises chains of these cavities. In this configuration, no transfer elements are needed to couple rf energy from the drive beam to the accelerated beam, since both beams traverse the same cavities. Purposeful cavity detuning is used to provide much smaller deceleration for a high-current drive beam, than acceleration for a low-current accelerated beam, i.e., to provide a high transformer ratio. A self-consistent theory is presented to calculate idealized acceleration gradient, transformer ratio, and efficiency for energy transfer from the drive beam to the accelerated beam, for either parallel or antiparallel motion of the beams. The theory has been cast in dimensionless quantities so as to facilitate optimization with respect to efficiency, acceleration gradient, or transformer ratio, and to illuminate the interdependence of these parameters. Means for dramatically shortening the structure fill time are also described. However, no beam dynamics analysis is presented, so the range of parameters within which this new acceleration concept can be used will remain uncertain until it is established that stable beam transport along the structure using an appropriate focusing system is possible.

  15. Radiation-stable polyolefin compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekers, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to compositions of olefinic polymers suitable for high energy radiation treatment. In particular, the invention relates to olefinic polymer compositions that are stable to sterilizing dosages of high energy radiation such as a gamma radiation. Stabilizers are described that include benzhydrol and benzhydrol derivatives; these stabilizers may be used alone or in combination with secondary antioxidants or synergists

  16. Monitoring of stable glaucoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M. Holtzer-Goor (Kim); N.S. Klazinga (Niek); M.A. Koopmanschap (Marc); H.G. Lemij (Hans); T. Plochg; E. van Sprundel (Esther)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractA high workload for ophthalmologists and long waiting lists for patients challenge the organization of ophthalmic care. Tasks that require less specialized skills, like the monitoring of stable (well controlled) glaucoma patients could be substituted from ophthalmologists to other

  17. A new type of descent conjugate gradient method with exact line search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajar, Nurul; Mamat, Mustafa; Rivaie, Mohd.; Jusoh, Ibrahim

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, conjugate gradient (CG) methods are impressive for solving nonlinear unconstrained optimization problems. In this paper, a new CG method is proposed and analyzed. This new CG method satisfies descent condition and its global convergence is established using exact line search. Numerical results show that this new CG method substantially outperforms the previous CG methods. This new CG method is considered robust, efficient and provided faster and stable convergence.

  18. Improving GOCE cross-track gravity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemes, Christian

    2018-01-01

    The GOCE gravity gradiometer measured highly accurate gravity gradients along the orbit during GOCE's mission lifetime from March 17, 2009, to November 11, 2013. These measurements contain unique information on the gravity field at a spatial resolution of 80 km half wavelength, which is not provided to the same accuracy level by any other satellite mission now and in the foreseeable future. Unfortunately, the gravity gradient in cross-track direction is heavily perturbed in the regions around the geomagnetic poles. We show in this paper that the perturbing effect can be modeled accurately as a quadratic function of the non-gravitational acceleration of the satellite in cross-track direction. Most importantly, we can remove the perturbation from the cross-track gravity gradient to a great extent, which significantly improves the accuracy of the latter and offers opportunities for better scientific exploitation of the GOCE gravity gradient data set.

  19. Vegetation patterns and environmental gradients in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adomou, A.

    2005-01-01

    Key words: West Africa, Benin, vegetation patterns, floristic areas, phytogeography, chorology, floristic gradients, climatic factors, water availability, Dahomey Gap, threatened plants, biodiversity, conservation.Understanding plant species distribution patterns and the underlying factors is a

  20. Flexoelectricity: strain gradient effects in ferroelectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Wenhui [Department of Physics, Shantou Unversity, Shantou, Guangdong 515063 (China)

    2007-12-15

    Mechanical strain gradient induced polarization effect or flexoelectricity in perovskite-type ferroelectric and relaxor ferroelectric ceramics was investigated. The flexoelectric coefficients measured at room temperature ranged from about 1 {mu} C m{sup -1} for lead zirconate titanate to 100 {mu} C m{sup -1} for barium strontium titanate. Flexoelectric effects were discovered to be sensitive to chemical makeup, phase symmetry, and domain structures. Based on phenomenological discussion and experimental data on flexoelectricity, the present study proposed that mechanical strain gradient field could influence polarization responses in a way analogous to electric field. Flexoelectric coefficients were found to be nonlinearly enhanced by dielectric permittivity and strain gradient. Interfacial mismatch in epitaxial thin films can give rise to high strain gradients, enabling flexoelectric effects to make a significant impact in properly engineered ferroelectric heterostructure systems.

  1. Flexoelectricity: strain gradient effects in ferroelectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Wenhui

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical strain gradient induced polarization effect or flexoelectricity in perovskite-type ferroelectric and relaxor ferroelectric ceramics was investigated. The flexoelectric coefficients measured at room temperature ranged from about 1 μ C m -1 for lead zirconate titanate to 100 μ C m -1 for barium strontium titanate. Flexoelectric effects were discovered to be sensitive to chemical makeup, phase symmetry, and domain structures. Based on phenomenological discussion and experimental data on flexoelectricity, the present study proposed that mechanical strain gradient field could influence polarization responses in a way analogous to electric field. Flexoelectric coefficients were found to be nonlinearly enhanced by dielectric permittivity and strain gradient. Interfacial mismatch in epitaxial thin films can give rise to high strain gradients, enabling flexoelectric effects to make a significant impact in properly engineered ferroelectric heterostructure systems

  2. Integral Field Spectroscopy Surveys: Oxygen Abundance Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Sánchez-Menguiano, L.

    2017-07-01

    We present here the recent results on our understanding of oxygen abundance gradients derived using Integral Field Spectroscopic surveys. In particular we analyzed more than 2124 datacubes corresponding to individual objects observed by the CALIFA (˜ 734 objects) and the public data by MaNGA (˜ 1390 objects), deriving the oxygen abundance gradient for each galaxy. We confirm previous results that indicate that the shape of this gradient is very similar for all galaxies with masses above 109.5M⊙, presenting in average a very similar slope of ˜ -0.04 dex within 0.5-2.0 re, with a possible drop in the inner regions (r109.5M⊙) the gradient seems to be flatter than for more massive ones. All these results agree with an inside-out growth of massive galaxies and indicate that low mass ones may still be growing in an outside in phase.

  3. Unimodal and crossmodal gradients of spatial attention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Föcker, J.; Hötting, K.; Gondan, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) studies have shown that spatial attention is gradually distributed around the center of the attentional focus. The present study compared uni- and crossmodal gradients of spatial attention to investigate whether the orienting of auditory and visual...... spatial attention is based on modality specific or supramodal representations of space. Auditory and visual stimuli were presented from five speaker locations positioned in the right hemifield. Participants had to attend to the innermost or outmost right position in order to detect either visual...... or auditory deviant stimuli. Detection rates and event-related potentials (ERPs) indicated that spatial attention is distributed as a gradient. Unimodal spatial ERP gradients correlated with the spatial resolution of the modality. Crossmodal spatial gradients were always broader than the corresponding...

  4. Photosynthetic and gas exchange characteristics of dominant woody plants on a moisture gradient in an African savanna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Midgley, G.F.; Aranibar, J.N.; Mantlana, K.B.; Macko, S.

    2004-01-01

    We determined key photosynthetic gas exchange parameters, and their temperature dependence, in dominant woody plants at four savanna sites on a moisture gradient in Botswana, southern Africa. Leaf stable carbon and nitrogen (N) isotope and morphological measures were made concurrently. Sampling of

  5. Microinstabilities in weak density gradient tokamak systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.; Chen, L.

    1986-04-01

    A prominent characteristic of auxiliary-heated tokamak discharges which exhibit improved (''H-mode type'') confinement properties is that their density profiles tend to be much flatter over most of the plasma radius. Depsite this favorable trend, it is emphasized here that, even in the limit of zero density gradient, low-frequency microinstabilities can persist due to the nonzero temperature gradient.

  6. Tolman temperature gradients in a gravitational field

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago, Jessica; Visser, Matt

    2018-01-01

    Tolman's relation for the temperature gradient in an equilibrium self-gravitating general relativistic fluid is broadly accepted within the general relativity community. However, the concept of temperature gradients in thermal equilibrium continues to cause confusion in other branches of physics, since it contradicts naive versions of the laws of classical thermodynamics. In this paper we discuss the crucial role of the universality of free fall, and how thermodynamics emphasises the great di...

  7. Ultimate gradient in solid-state accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittum, D.H.

    1998-08-01

    The authors recall the motivation for research in high-gradient acceleration and the problems posed by a compact collider. They summarize the phenomena known to appear in operation of a solid-state structure with large fields, and research relevant to the question of the ultimate gradient. They take note of new concepts, and examine one in detail, a miniature particle accelerator based on an active millimeter-wave circuit and parallel particle beams.

  8. Ultimate gradient in solid-state accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittum, D.H.

    1998-08-01

    The authors recall the motivation for research in high-gradient acceleration and the problems posed by a compact collider. They summarize the phenomena known to appear in operation of a solid-state structure with large fields, and research relevant to the question of the ultimate gradient. They take note of new concepts, and examine one in detail, a miniature particle accelerator based on an active millimeter-wave circuit and parallel particle beams

  9. Intratumoral oxygen gradients mediate sarcoma cell invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Daniel M.; Park, Kyung Min; Tang, Vitor; Xu, Yu; Pak, Koreana; Eisinger-Mathason, T. S. Karin; Simon, M. Celeste; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a critical factor in the progression and metastasis of many cancers, including soft tissue sarcomas. Frequently, oxygen (O2) gradients develop in tumors as they grow beyond their vascular supply, leading to heterogeneous areas of O2 depletion. Here, we report the impact of hypoxic O2 gradients on sarcoma cell invasion and migration. O2 gradient measurements showed that large sarcoma mouse tumors (>300 mm3) contain a severely hypoxic core [≤0.1% partial pressure of O2 (pO2)] whereas smaller tumors possessed hypoxic gradients throughout the tumor mass (0.1–6% pO2). To analyze tumor invasion, we used O2-controllable hydrogels to recreate the physiopathological O2 levels in vitro. Small tumor grafts encapsulated in the hydrogels revealed increased invasion that was both faster and extended over a longer distance in the hypoxic hydrogels compared with nonhypoxic hydrogels. To model the effect of the O2 gradient accurately, we examined individual sarcoma cells embedded in the O2-controllable hydrogel. We observed that hypoxic gradients guide sarcoma cell motility and matrix remodeling through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activation. We further found that in the hypoxic gradient, individual cells migrate more quickly, across longer distances, and in the direction of increasing O2 tension. Treatment with minoxidil, an inhibitor of hypoxia-induced sarcoma metastasis, abrogated cell migration and matrix remodeling in the hypoxic gradient. Overall, we show that O2 acts as a 3D physicotactic agent during sarcoma tumor invasion and propose the O2-controllable hydrogels as a predictive system to study early stages of the metastatic process and therapeutic targets. PMID:27486245

  10. Magnetoelectric Transverse Gradient Sensor with High Detection Sensitivity and Low Gradient Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Mingji; Or, Siu Wing

    2017-01-01

    We report, theoretically and experimentally, the realization of a high detection performance in a novel magnetoelectric (ME) transverse gradient sensor based on the large ME effect and the magnetic field gradient (MFG) technique in a pair of magnetically-biased, electrically-shielded, and mechanically-enclosed ME composites having a transverse orientation and an axial separation. The output voltage of the gradient sensor is directly obtained from the transverse MFG-induced difference in ME vo...

  11. Exploring links between pH and bacterial community composition in soils from the Craibstone Experimental Farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, Andrea K; Jiang, Xingpeng; Lynch, Michael D J; Masella, Andre P; Nicol, Graeme W; Dushoff, Jonathan; Neufeld, Josh D

    2014-02-01

    Soil pH is an important determinant of microbial community composition and diversity, yet few studies have characterized the specific effects of pH on individual bacterial taxa within bacterial communities, both abundant and rare. We collected composite soil samples over 2 years from an experimentally maintained pH gradient ranging from 4.5 to 7.5 from the Craibstone Experimental Farm (Craibstone, Scotland). Extracted nucleic acids were characterized by bacterial and group-specific denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and next-generation sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. Both methods demonstrated comparable and reproducible shifts within higher taxonomic bacterial groups (e.g. Acidobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Gammaproteobacteria) across the pH gradient. In addition, we used non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) for the first time on 16S rRNA gene data to identify positively interacting (i.e. co-occurring) operational taxonomic unit (OTU) clusters (i.e. 'components'), with abundances that correlated strongly with pH, and sample year to a lesser extent. All OTUs identified by NMF were visualized within principle coordinate analyses of UNIFRAC distances and subjected to taxonomic network analysis (SSUnique), which plotted OTU abundance and similarity against established taxonomies. Most pH-dependent OTUs identified here would not have been identified by previous methodologies for microbial community profiling and were unrelated to known lineages. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ambient temperature impacts on pH of exhaled breath condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczulla, Andreas R; Noeske, Sarah; Herr, Christian; Dette, Frank; Pinkenburg, Olaf; Schmid, Severin; Jörres, Rudolf A; Vogelmeier, Claus; Bals, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH is a non-invasive method to study airway inflammation. Low pH is correlated with inflammatory diseases like asthma and COPD. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of measurement temperature on pH values of EBC. EBC was collected using the RTube in 10 healthy non-smoking controls, 10 smokers before and after cigarette smoking, 10 stable COPD patients and 10 patients with exacerbated COPD. pH was determined directly after degassing at temperatures of 23 degrees C and 37 degrees C. When comparing all groups pH was significantly (P = 0.0002) higher (mean +/- SD 7.88 +/- 0.92) at 37 degrees C as compared with 23 degrees C (7.44 +/- 0.90). Specifically, at 23 degrees C pH was significantly lower in the group of exacerbated COPD (6.78 +/- 1.27) and healthy non-smoking controls (8.04 +/- 0.39). In contrast, subgroup analysis of values assessed at 37 degrees C did not display significant differences. Our data indicate a considerable influence of temperature on pH values in EBC. Thus the temperature at which pH measurements in EBC studies are performed should be declared.

  13. DIFFERENTIATION OF CROATIAN BARLEY VARIETIES BY GRADIENT GEL SDS-PAGE AND ISOELECTRIC FOCUSING OF DRY GRAINS AND GREEN MALT HORDEINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Strelec

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Applicability of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing of hordeins for discrimination of six two-rowed winter barley varieties (Angora, Sladoran, Rodnik, Rex, Martin and Barun has been investigated. Hordeins extracted from dry grains and green malt of barley varieties were separated by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in gradient gel of 8-18% T, and by isoelectric focusing in pH gradient of 3.5-9.5 and 5.5-8.5, respectively. In all separation experiments better resolution of proteins was achieved with dry grain extracts, than with malt extracts. Angora, Sladoran and Martin variety could be distinguished from other varieties by differences in hordein patterns obtained by gradient gel SDS-PAGE (8-18% T, and Angora, Sladoran, Martin and Rodnik by isoelectric focusing in pH gradient 5.5-8.5.

  14. Toward Practical Secure Stable Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riazi M. Sadegh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Stable Matching (SM algorithm has been deployed in many real-world scenarios including the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP and financial applications such as matching of suppliers and consumers in capital markets. Since these applications typically involve highly sensitive information such as the underlying preference lists, their current implementations rely on trusted third parties. This paper introduces the first provably secure and scalable implementation of SM based on Yao’s garbled circuit protocol and Oblivious RAM (ORAM. Our scheme can securely compute a stable match for 8k pairs four orders of magnitude faster than the previously best known method. We achieve this by introducing a compact and efficient sub-linear size circuit. We even further decrease the computation cost by three orders of magnitude by proposing a novel technique to avoid unnecessary iterations in the SM algorithm. We evaluate our implementation for several problem sizes and plan to publish it as open-source.

  15. Application of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis for detection of bacterial and yeast communities along a salinity gradient in the estuary of the Cachoeira River in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, C S P; Souza, S S; Rezende, R P; Silva, A; Andrioli, J L; Costa, H; Fontana, R; Dias, J C T

    2013-05-21

    An estuary is a transition zone between freshwater and marine ecosystems, resulting in dilution of seawater. Estuaries are also considered environments of intense biological activity related to the processes of nutrient cycling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microbial community composition along a salinity gradient in the estuary of the Cachoeira River, located in southern Bahia, Brazil. The analysis of bacterial and yeast communities was performed by determining the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis band richness. Formation of zones with similar profiles of bands was observed, and the increasing richness at the intermediate zone demonstrated a clear spatial distinction of communities depending on salinity. In addition, the dissolved oxygen content, temperature, pH, salinity, and dissolved inorganic nutrient contents (NH3(+), NO2(-), NO3(-), PO4(-)) were determined. Nutrients were distributed in similar patterns, with decreasing concentrations as the salinity increases.

  16. Towards stable acceleration in LINACS

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovskiy, A D

    2014-01-01

    Ultra-stable and -reproducible high-energy particle beams with short bunches are needed in novel linear accelerators and, in particular, in the Compact Linear Collider CLIC. A passive beam phase stabilization system based on a bunch compression with a negative transfer matrix element R56 and acceleration at a positive off-crest phase is proposed. The motivation and expected advantages of the proposed scheme are outlined.

  17. An assessment of an environmental gradient using coral geochemical records, Whitsunday Islands, Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, S E; Brodie, J E; McCulloch, M T; Mallela, J; Jupiter, S D; Williams, H Stuart; Lough, J M; Matson, E G

    2012-01-01

    Coral cores were collected along an environmental and water quality gradient through the Whitsunday Island group, Great Barrier Reef (Australia), for trace element and stable isotope analysis. The primary aim of the study was to examine if this gradient could be detected in coral records and, if so, whether the gradient has changed over time with changing land use in the adjacent river catchments. Y/Ca was the trace element ratio which varied spatially across the gradient, with concentrations progressively decreasing away from the river mouths. The Ba/Ca and Y/Ca ratios were the only indicators of change in the gradient through time, increasing shortly after European settlement. The Mn/Ca ratio responded to local disturbance related to the construction of tourism infrastructure. Nitrogen isotope ratios showed no apparent trend over time. This study highlights the importance of site selection when using coral records to record regional environmental signals. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. pH distribution in human tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thistlethwaite, A.J.; Leeper, D.B.; Moylan, D.J.; Nerlinger, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    pH distribution in human tumors is being determined to evaluate this parameter as a prognostic indicator of hyperthermia response. pH is measured by a modified glass pH electrode (21g, model MI 408, Microelectrodes, Inc., Londonderry, NH) inserted through an 18g open-ended Angiocath. Eight tumors have been evaluated to date; and of those, 3 were also assayed after the first heat treatment coincident with determination of blood flow. Tumors were between 2-5 cm, of various histologies, and of primary, recurrent, or metastatic origin. 2-4 measurements were made per tumor. Pretreatment readings were between 6.4 and 7.2 pH units. As tumor blood flow increased after 1 hr heating (41.5 - 43 0 ) pH rose 0.1 - 0.3 units. Normal rat muscle yields pH readings of 7.35 - 7.45. Although there was considerable heterogeneity of pH within tumors, accuracy and drift were not a problem. 5-15 min were required for pH stabilization after catheter insertion and <5 min after electrode insertion. A saline wheal was used for anesthesia to preclude modification of pH by anesthetics. Patient tolerance has not been a problems. This study suggests that human tumor tissue has a preponderance of areas more acidic than normal tissue. This may serve to sensitize tumor cells to hyperthermia and provide a prognostic indicator of tumor response

  19. From Geochemistry to Biochemistry: Simulating Prebiotic Chemistry Driven by Geochemical Gradients in Alkaline Hydrothermal Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barge, Laurie

    2016-07-01

    Planetary water-rock interfaces generate energy in the form of redox, pH, and thermal gradients, and these disequilibria are particularly focused in hydrothermal vent systems where the reducing, heated hydrothermal fluid feeds back into the more oxidizing ocean. Alkaline hydrothermal vents have been proposed as a likely location for the origin of life on the early Earth due to various factors: including the hydrothermal pH / Eh gradients that resemble the ubiquitous electrical / proton gradients in biology, the catalytic hydrothermal precipitates that resemble inorganic catalysts in enzymes, and the presence of electron donors and acceptors in hydrothermal systems (e.g. H2 + CH4 and CO2) that are thought to have been utilized in the earliest metabolisms. Of particular importance for the emergence of metabolism are the mineral "chimneys" that precipitate at the vent fluid / seawater interface. Hydrothermal chimneys are flow-through chemical reactors that form porous and permeable inorganic membranes transecting geochemical gradients; in some ways similar to biological membranes that transect proton / ion gradients and harness these disequilibria to drive metabolism. These emergent chimney structures in the far-from-equilibrium system of the alkaline vent have many properties of interest to the origin of life that can be simulated in the laboratory: for example, they can generate electrical energy and drive redox reactions, and produce catalytic minerals (in particular the metal sulfides and iron oxyhydroxides - "green rust") that can facilitate chemical reactions towards proto-metabolic cycles and biosynthesis. Many of the factors prompting interest in alkaline hydrothermal vents on Earth may also have been present on early Mars, or even presently within icy worlds such as Europa or Enceladus - thus, understanding the disequilibria and resulting prebiotic chemistry in these systems can be of great use in assessing the potential for other environments in the Solar

  20. Jupiter's evolution with primordial composition gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazan, Allona; Helled, Ravit; Guillot, Tristan

    2018-02-01

    Recent formation and structure models of Jupiter suggest that the planet can have composition gradients and not be fully convective (adiabatic). This possibility directly affects our understanding of Jupiter's bulk composition and origin. In this Letter we present Jupiter's evolution with a primordial structure consisting of a relatively steep heavy-element gradient of 40 M⊕. We show that for a primordial structure with composition gradients, most of the mixing occurs in the outer part of the gradient during the early evolution (several 107 yr), leading to an adiabatic outer envelope (60% of Jupiter's mass). We find that the composition gradient in the deep interior persists, suggesting that 40% of Jupiter's mass can be non-adiabatic with a higher temperature than the one derived from Jupiter's atmospheric properties. The region that can potentially develop layered convection in Jupiter today is estimated to be limited to 10% of the mass. Movies associated to Figs. 1-3 are available at http://https://www.aanda.org

  1. A microfabricated fringing field capacitive pH sensor with an integrated readout circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arefin, Md Shamsul, E-mail: md.arefin@monash.edu; Redoute, Jean-Michel; Rasit Yuce, Mehmet [Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia); Bulut Coskun, M.; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia)

    2014-06-02

    This work presents a microfabricated fringe-field capacitive pH sensor using interdigitated electrodes and an integrated modulation-based readout circuit. The changes in capacitance of the sensor result from the permittivity changes due to pH variations and are converted to frequency shifts using a crossed-coupled voltage controlled oscillator readout circuit. The shift in resonant frequency of the readout circuit is 30.96 MHz for a change in pH of 1.0–5.0. The sensor can be used for the measurement of low pH levels, such as gastric acid, and can be integrated with electronic pills. The measurement results show high repeatability, low noise, and a stable output.

  2. A microfabricated fringing field capacitive pH sensor with an integrated readout circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arefin, Md Shamsul; Redoute, Jean-Michel; Rasit Yuce, Mehmet; Bulut Coskun, M.; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a microfabricated fringe-field capacitive pH sensor using interdigitated electrodes and an integrated modulation-based readout circuit. The changes in capacitance of the sensor result from the permittivity changes due to pH variations and are converted to frequency shifts using a crossed-coupled voltage controlled oscillator readout circuit. The shift in resonant frequency of the readout circuit is 30.96 MHz for a change in pH of 1.0–5.0. The sensor can be used for the measurement of low pH levels, such as gastric acid, and can be integrated with electronic pills. The measurement results show high repeatability, low noise, and a stable output.

  3. A microfabricated fringing field capacitive pH sensor with an integrated readout circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefin, Md Shamsul; Bulut Coskun, M.; Alan, Tuncay; Redoute, Jean-Michel; Neild, Adrian; Rasit Yuce, Mehmet

    2014-06-01

    This work presents a microfabricated fringe-field capacitive pH sensor using interdigitated electrodes and an integrated modulation-based readout circuit. The changes in capacitance of the sensor result from the permittivity changes due to pH variations and are converted to frequency shifts using a crossed-coupled voltage controlled oscillator readout circuit. The shift in resonant frequency of the readout circuit is 30.96 MHz for a change in pH of 1.0-5.0. The sensor can be used for the measurement of low pH levels, such as gastric acid, and can be integrated with electronic pills. The measurement results show high repeatability, low noise, and a stable output.

  4. Effects of anatomy and diet on gastrointestinal pH in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Kevin D; Stengel, Ashley; Samuni-Blank, Michal; Dearing, M Denise

    2013-04-01

    The pH of the gastrointestinal tract can have profound influences on digestive processes. Rodents exhibit wide variation in both stomach morphology and dietary strategies, both of which may influence gut pH. Various rodent species have evolved bilocular (or semi-segmented) stomachs that may allow for more microbial growth compared to unilocular (single-chambered) stomachs. Additionally, herbivory has evolved multiple times in rodents. The high dietary fiber typical of an herbivorous diet is known to induce secretion of bicarbonate in the gut. We predicted that stomach segmentation might facilitate the separation of contents in the proximal chamber from that of the gastric stomach, facilitating a chemical environment suitable to microbial growth. To investigate the effect of stomach anatomy and diet on gut pH, several species of rodent with varying stomach morphology were fed either a high or low-fiber diet for 7 days, and pH of the proximal stomach, gastric stomach, small intestine, and cecum were measured. We discovered that rodents with bilocular stomach anatomy maintained a larger pH gradient between the proximal and gastric stomach compartments, and were able to achieve a lower absolute gastric pH compared to those with unilocular stomachs. Dietary fiber increased the pH of the small intestine, but not in any other gut regions. The stomach pH data supports the century old hypothesis that bilocular stomach anatomy creates an environment in the proximal stomach that is suitable for microbial growth. Additionally, the alkaline small intestinal pH on a high fiber diet may enhance digestion. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Classically Stable Nonsingular Cosmological Bounces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2016-09-01

    One of the fundamental questions of theoretical cosmology is whether the Universe can undergo a nonsingular bounce, i.e., smoothly transit from a period of contraction to a period of expansion through violation of the null energy condition (NEC) at energies well below the Planck scale and at finite values of the scale factor such that the entire evolution remains classical. A common claim has been that a nonsingular bounce either leads to ghost or gradient instabilities or a cosmological singularity. In this Letter, we consider a well-motivated class of theories based on the cubic Galileon action and present a procedure for explicitly constructing examples of a nonsingular cosmological bounce without encountering any pathologies and maintaining a subluminal sound speed for comoving curvature modes throughout the NEC violating phase. We also discuss the relation between our procedure and earlier work.

  6. Evidence of counter-gradient growth in western pond turtles (Actinemys marmorata) across thermal gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snover, Melissa; Adams, Michael J.; Ashton, Donald T.; Bettaso, Jamie B.; Welsh, Hartwell H.

    2015-01-01

    Counter-gradient growth, where growth per unit temperature increases as temperature decreases, can reduce the variation in ectothermic growth rates across environmental gradients. Understanding how ectothermic species respond to changing temperatures is essential to their conservation and management due to human-altered habitats and changing climates.

  7. [Effects of thiourea on pH and availability of metal ions in acid red soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Wen; Zeng, Qing-Ru; Zhou, Xi-Hong

    2014-03-01

    Through the simulation research, the effects of application of thiourea and urea on pH and availability of metal ions in acid red soil were studied, and the results showed that after applying urea, the soil pH increased in the first experimental stage and then reduced gradually to a low level, however, decreased trends of soil pH values were inhibited by the application of thiourea, especially when the concentration of thiourea reached to 5.0 mmol x kg(-1) dry soil, the soil pH was stable at high level, which exceeded to 6.0. It proved that the application of thiourea could inhibit the soil acidification due to urea application. After applying urea with different concentrations of thiourea, the available contents of Zn and Al decreased with the increasing concentration of thiourea, nevertheless, when the concentration of thiourea reached to 5.0 mmol x kg(-1), the available content of Mn was stable at high level which was over 110 mg x kg(-1). In addition, the results showed a highly significant negative correlation between the soil pH and the available content of Cu, Zn and Al, but for Mn, no discipline was found between the soil pH and the availability after applying thiourea. Moreover, the soil pH became higher after applying urea with thiourea compared to add urea only, which led to the decreasing of available content of Al, and it was benefited for the control of the phytotoxic effect of Al. The available content of Mn in the soil not only depended on soil pH but also the content of thiourea due to its redox and complexing reaction with Mn.

  8. Using Spatial Gradients to Model Localization Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.J.Bammann; D.Mosher; D.A.Hughes; N.R.Moody; P.R.Dawson

    1999-07-01

    We present the final report on a Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project, Using Spatial Gradients to Model Localization Phenomena, performed during the fiscal years 1996 through 1998. The project focused on including spatial gradients in the temporal evolution equations of the state variables that describe hardening in metal plasticity models. The motivation was to investigate the numerical aspects associated with post-bifurcation mesh dependent finite element solutions in problems involving damage or crack propagation as well as problems in which strain Localizations occur. The addition of the spatial gradients introduces a mathematical length scale that eliminates the mesh dependency of the solution. In addition, new experimental techniques were developed to identify the physical mechanism associated with the numerical length scale.

  9. Nonlinear conjugate gradient methods in micromagnetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fischbacher

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Conjugate gradient methods for energy minimization in micromagnetics are compared. The comparison of analytic results with numerical simulation shows that standard conjugate gradient method may fail to produce correct results. A method that restricts the step length in the line search is introduced, in order to avoid this problem. When the step length in the line search is controlled, conjugate gradient techniques are a fast and reliable way to compute the hysteresis properties of permanent magnets. The method is applied to investigate demagnetizing effects in NdFe12 based permanent magnets. The reduction of the coercive field by demagnetizing effects is μ0ΔH = 1.4 T at 450 K.

  10. Substrate curvature gradient drives rapid droplet motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Cunjing; Chen, Chao; Chuang, Yin-Chuan; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Yin, Yajun; Grey, Francois; Zheng, Quanshui

    2014-07-11

    Making small liquid droplets move spontaneously on solid surfaces is a key challenge in lab-on-chip and heat exchanger technologies. Here, we report that a substrate curvature gradient can accelerate micro- and nanodroplets to high speeds on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates. Experiments for microscale water droplets on tapered surfaces show a maximum speed of 0.42  m/s, 2 orders of magnitude higher than with a wettability gradient. We show that the total free energy and driving force exerted on a droplet are determined by the substrate curvature and substrate curvature gradient, respectively. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we predict nanoscale droplets moving spontaneously at over 100  m/s on tapered surfaces.

  11. Conjugate gradient algorithms using multiple recursions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, T.; Manteuffel, T.

    1996-12-31

    Much is already known about when a conjugate gradient method can be implemented with short recursions for the direction vectors. The work done in 1984 by Faber and Manteuffel gave necessary and sufficient conditions on the iteration matrix A, in order for a conjugate gradient method to be implemented with a single recursion of a certain form. However, this form does not take into account all possible recursions. This became evident when Jagels and Reichel used an algorithm of Gragg for unitary matrices to demonstrate that the class of matrices for which a practical conjugate gradient algorithm exists can be extended to include unitary and shifted unitary matrices. The implementation uses short double recursions for the direction vectors. This motivates the study of multiple recursion algorithms.

  12. Characterization of stable fly (Diptera: Muscidae) larval developmental habitat at round hay bale feeding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Justin; Broce, Alberto; Zurek, Ludek

    2009-11-01

    In this study, we examined the stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), larval developmental habitat within the round hay bale feeding sites on cattle pastures, and we identified three zones with distinct characteristics around two types of hay feeders (ring and cone). The parameters monitored in each zone included stable fly emergence, substrate temperature, moisture, pH, thickness of hay-manure layer, and concentration of fecal coliform bacteria (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella oxytoca) as indicators of fecal material. All measurements were conducted during the period of high stable fly prevalence (HSF) in May-June and low stable fly prevalence (LSF) in July-August to better understand the environmental factors influencing stable fly seasonality. Substrate temperature and fecal coliform concentration were the only two significantly different factors between HSF and LSF. Temperatures ranged from 21 to 25 degrees C during HSF versus 25-30 degrees C in LSF but all were within the range for successful stable fly development. Fecal coliform concentrations ranged from 4.2 x 10(3) to 4.1 x 10(4) colony-forming units (CFU)/g of the substrate during HSF and from undetectable (stable fly development (egg to adult). Temperature was significantly higher and stable fly developmental time significantly shorter in all substrates containing hay when compared with that of manure alone, but no significant differences were detected in stable fly emergence among the substrates. These results strongly indicate that the fecal microbial community plays an important role in stable fly larval development in hay feeding sites and that it is the main factor behind stable fly developmental seasonality on pastures. Our results also demonstrate that animal manure mixed with hay provides conditions for faster stable fly development than manure alone; however, hay does not significantly affect overall stable fly emergence.

  13. Pressure gradients and boiling as mechanisms for localizing ore in porphyry systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Charles G.

    1978-01-01

    Fluid inclusions in ore zones of porphyry systems indicate that extensive boiling of hydrothermal fluids accompanies deposition of ore and gangue minerals. The boiling commonly accompanied a change from a lithostatic to a hydrostatic environment during evolution of an epizonal stock. Pressure gradients near the margin of the stock can determine whether ore or only a diffuse zone of mineralization is formed. A sharp drop in pressure in an epizonal environment is more likely to cause extensive boiling than a comparable change in a deeper environment, as the slope of the boiling curve steepens with an increase 'in pressure. The drop in pressure causes the hydrothermal fluids to boil and creates a crackle (stockwork) breccia, which hosts the veinlets of gangue quartz and ore minerals. The boiling selectively partitions CO2, H2S, and HCl into the vapor phase, changing the pH, composition, ionic strength, and thus the solubility product of metal complexes in the remaining liquid and causing the ore and gangue to come out of solution. Fluid inclusions trapped from boiling solutions can exhibit several forms, depending on the physical and chemical conditions of the hydrothermal fluid from which they were trapped. In one case, inclusions when heated can homogenize to either liquid or vapor at the same temperature, which is the true boiling temperature. In another case, homogenization of various inclusions can occur through a range of temperatures. The latter case results from the trapping of mixture of liquid and vapor. Variations in salinity can result from boiling of the hydrothermal fluid, or intermittent incorporation of high-salinity fluids from the magma, or trapping of fluids of varying densities at pressure-temperature conditions above the critical point of the fluid. In places, paleopressure-temperature transition zones can be recognized by fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures and phase relationships and by the presence of anhydrite daughter minerals

  14. Relations between pH, oxygen partial pressure and growth in cultured cell spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, J; Acker, H

    1988-11-15

    The pH gradients, oxygen partial-pressure gradients and growth curves were measured for 7 different types of spheroids. Growth curves were measured in liquid overlay culture and thereafter the spheroids were attached to cover glasses and transferred to a chamber for micro-electrode measurements. The spheroids were randomly divided for pH or pO2 measurements which then were made under conditions as identical as possible. The decreases in pO2 and pH, delta pO2 and delta pH were calculated as the difference between the values in the culture medium and the values 200 micron inside the spheroids. Each type of spheroid had a certain relation between delta pO2 and delta pH. The human colon carcinoma HT29, the mouse mammary carcinoma EMT6 and the hamster lung V79-379A spheroids had high values of the quotient delta pO2/delta pH. The human thyroid carcinoma HTh7 spheroids and the 3 types of human glioma spheroids had lower quotients. There was a tendency for fast-growing spheroids to have high quotients. Two extreme types of spheroids, HT29 (high quotient) and U-118 MG (low quotient) were analyzed for lactate production and oxygen consumption. The U-118 MG spheroids produced about 3 times more lactate and consumed about 3 times less oxygen than the HT29 spheroids. The differences in lactate production could not be explained by differences in the pyruvate Km values of lactate dehydrogenase. The results indicate that there are significant metabolic differences between the spheroid systems studied.

  15. Review of new shapes for higher gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    High-gradient superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are needed for energy frontier superconducting accelerators. Progress has been made over the past decades and the accelerating gradient E acc has been increased from a few MV/m to ∼42 MV/m in SRF niobium cavities. The corresponding peak RF magnetic field H pk on the niobium cavity surface is approaching the intrinsic RF critical magnetic field H crit,RF , a hard physical limit at which superconductivity breaks down. Pushing the gradient envelope further by adopting new cavity shapes with a lower ratio of H pk /E acc has been recently proposed. For a reduced H pk /E acc , a higher ultimate E acc is sustained when H pk finally strikes H crit,RF . The new cavity geometry include the re-entrant shape conceived at Cornell University and the so-called 'Low-loss' shape proposed by a DESY/JLAB/KEK collaboration. Experimental work is being pursued at Cornell, KEK and JLAB. Results of single-cell cavities are encouraging. A record gradient of 47 MV/m was first demonstrated in a 1.3 GHz re-entrant niobium cavity at Cornell University. At the time of writing, a new record of 52 MV/m has been realized with another 1.3 GHz re-entrant cavity, designed and built at Cornell and processed and tested at KEK. Single-cell low-loss cavities have reached equally high gradients in the range of 45-51 MV/m at KEK and JLAB. Owing to their higher gradient potential and the encouraging single-cell cavity results, the new cavity shapes are becoming attractive for their possible use in the international linear collider (ILC). Experimental work on multi-cell niobium cavities of new shapes is currently under active exploration

  16. Frequency Analysis of Gradient Estimators in Volume Rendering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, Marinus Jan; Lichtenbelt, Barthold B.A.; Malzbender, Tom

    1996-01-01

    Gradient information is used in volume rendering to classify and color samples along a ray. In this paper, we present an analysis of the theoretically ideal gradient estimator and compare it to some commonly used gradient estimators. A new method is presented to calculate the gradient at arbitrary

  17. Stable Hemiaminals: 2-Aminopyrimidine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kwiecień

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stable hemiaminals can be obtained in the one-pot reaction between 2-aminopyrimidine and nitrobenzaldehyde derivatives. Ten new hemiaminals have been obtained, six of them in crystal state. The molecular stability of these intermediates results from the presence of both electron-withdrawing nitro groups as substituents on the phenyl ring and pyrimidine ring, so no further stabilisation by intramolecular interaction is required. Hemiaminal molecules possess a tetrahedral carbon atom constituting a stereogenic centre. As the result of crystallisation in centrosymmetric space groups both enantiomers are present in the crystal structure.

  18. Organic synthesis with stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daub, G.H.; Kerr, V.N.; Williams, D.L.; Whaley, T.W.

    1978-01-01

    Some general considerations concerning organic synthesis with stable isotopes are presented. Illustrative examples are described and discussed. The examples include DL-2-amino-3-methyl- 13 C-butanoic-3,4- 13 C 2 acid (DL-valine- 13 C 3 ); methyl oleate-1- 13 C; thymine-2,6- 13 C 2 ; 2-aminoethanesulfonic- 13 C acid (taurine- 13 C); D-glucose-6- 13 C; DL-2-amino-3-methylpentanoic-3,4- 13 C 2 acid (DL-isoleucine- 13 C 2 ); benzidine- 15 N 2 ; and 4-ethylsulfonyl-1-naphthalene-sulfonamide- 15 N

  19. Stable agents for imaging investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tofe, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns highly stable compounds useful in preparing technetium 99m based scintiscanning exploration agents. The compounds of this invention include a pertechnetate reducing agent or a solution of oxidized pertechnetate and an efficient proportion, sufficient to stabilize the compounds in the presence of oxygen and of radiolysis products, of ascorbic acid or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt or ester of this acid. The invention also concerns a perfected process for preparing a technetium based exploration agent, consisting in codissolving the ascorbic acid or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt or ester of such an acid and a pertechnetate reducing agent in a solution of oxidized pertechnetate [fr

  20. Tungsten Stable Isotope Compositions of Ferromanganese Crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, K.; Barling, J.; Hein, J. R.; Schauble, E. A.; Halliday, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    We report the first accurate and precise data for mass-dependent fractionation of tungsten (W) stable isotopes, using a double spike technique and MC-ICPMS. Results are expressed relative to the NIST 3136 W isotope standard as per mil deviations in 186W/184W (δ186W). Although heavy element mass-dependent fractionations are expected to be small, Tl and U both display significant low temperature isotopic fractionations. Theoretical calculations indicate that W nuclear volume isotopic effects should be smaller than mass-dependent fractionations at low temperatures. Hydrogenetic ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts precipitate directly from seawater and have been used as paleoceanographic recorders of temporal changes in seawater chemistry. Crusts are strongly enriched in W and other metals, and are a promising medium for exploring W isotopic variability. Tungsten has a relatively long residence time in seawater of ~61,000 years, mainly as the tungstate ion (WO42-). Water depth profiles show conservative behaviour. During adsorption on Fe-Mn crusts, W species form inner-sphere complexes in the hexavalent (W6+) state. The major host phase is thought to be Mn oxides and the lighter W isotope is expected to be absorbed preferentially. Surface scrapings of 13 globally distributed hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts display δ186W from -0.08 to -0.22‰ (±0.03‰, 2sd). A trend toward lighter W isotope composition exists with increasing water depth (~1500 to ~5200m) and W concentration. One hydrothermal Mn-oxide sample is anomalously light and Mn nodules are both heavy and light relative to Fe-Mn crusts. Tungsten speciation depends on concentration, pH, and time in solution and is not well understood because of the extremely slow kinetics of the reactions. In addition, speciation of aqueous and/or adsorbed species might be sensitive to pressure, showing similar thermodynamic stability but different effective volumes. Thus, W stable isotopes might be used as a water-depth barometer in

  1. Measurement of gradient magnetic field temporal characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartusek, K.; Jflek, B.

    1994-01-01

    We describe a technique of measuring the time dependence and field distortions of magnetic fields due to eddy currents (EC) produced by time-dependent magnetic field gradients. The EC measuring technique makes use of a large volume sample and selective RF excitation pulses and free induction decay (FID) (or a spin or gradient echo) to measure the out-of-phase component of the FID, which is proportional to γδB, i.e. the amount the signal is off resonance. The measuring technique is sensitive, easy to implement and interpret, and used for determining pre-emphasis compensation parameters

  2. Relativistic klystron research for high gradient accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.

    1988-06-01

    Relativistic klystrons are being developed as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron--positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. We have attained 200MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here on the design of our first klystrons, the results of our experiments so far, and some of our plans for the near future. 5 refs., 7 figs

  3. Crack Tip Mechanics in Distortion Gradient Plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuentes-Alonso, Sandra; Martínez Pañeda, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    The important role of geometrically necessary dislocations in structural integrity assessment has encouraged an extensive use of strain gradient plasticity theories to characterize the behavior at the small scales involved in crack tip deformation. However, despite the popularity of Distortion...... Gradient Plasticity (DGP), the influence on crack tip mechanics of DGP's distinguishing features that entail superior modelling capabilities has not been investigated yet. In this work crack tip fields are thoroughly examined by implementing the higher order theory of DGP in an implicit finite element...

  4. Gradient Learning Algorithms for Ontology Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Zhu, Linli

    2014-01-01

    The gradient learning model has been raising great attention in view of its promising perspectives for applications in statistics, data dimensionality reducing, and other specific fields. In this paper, we raise a new gradient learning model for ontology similarity measuring and ontology mapping in multidividing setting. The sample error in this setting is given by virtue of the hypothesis space and the trick of ontology dividing operator. Finally, two experiments presented on plant and humanoid robotics field verify the efficiency of the new computation model for ontology similarity measure and ontology mapping applications in multidividing setting. PMID:25530752

  5. Realizable planar gradient-index solar lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsidas, Panagiotis; Modi, Vijay; Gordon, Jeffrey M

    2012-04-01

    The design of single element planar hemispherical gradient-index solar lenses that can accommodate the constraints of realistic materials and fabrication techniques are presented, and simulated with an extended and polychromatic solar source for concentrator photovoltaics at flux concentration values exceeding 1000 suns. The planar hemispherical far-field lens is created from a near-field unit magnification spherical gradient-index design, and illustrated with an f/1.40 square solar lens that allows lossless packing within a concentrator module.

  6. Gradient Elasticity Formulations for Micro/Nanoshells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohua Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this paper is on illustrating how to extend the second author’s gradient theory of elasticity to shells. Three formulations are presented based on the implicit gradient elasticity constitutive relation 1 -ld2∇2σij=Cijkl(1-ls2∇2εkl and its two approximations 1+ls2∇2-ld2∇2σij=Cijklεkl and σij=Cijkl(1+ld2∇2-ls2∇2εkl.

  7. Gradient learning algorithms for ontology computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Zhu, Linli

    2014-01-01

    The gradient learning model has been raising great attention in view of its promising perspectives for applications in statistics, data dimensionality reducing, and other specific fields. In this paper, we raise a new gradient learning model for ontology similarity measuring and ontology mapping in multidividing setting. The sample error in this setting is given by virtue of the hypothesis space and the trick of ontology dividing operator. Finally, two experiments presented on plant and humanoid robotics field verify the efficiency of the new computation model for ontology similarity measure and ontology mapping applications in multidividing setting.

  8. Improving dimensionality reduction with spectral gradient descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memisevic, Roland; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2005-01-01

    We introduce spectral gradient descent, a way of improving iterative dimensionality reduction techniques. The method uses information contained in the leading eigenvalues of a data affinity matrix to modify the steps taken during a gradient-based optimization procedure. We show that the approach is able to speed up the optimization and to help dimensionality reduction methods find better local minima of their objective functions. We also provide an interpretation of our approach in terms of the power method for finding the leading eigenvalues of a symmetric matrix and verify the usefulness of the approach in some simple experiments.

  9. On lower order strain gradient plasticity theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Hutchinson, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    By way of numerical examples, this paper explores the nature of solutions to a class of strain gradient plasticity theories that employ conventional stresses, equilibrium equations and boundary conditions. Strain gradients come into play in these modified conventional theories only to alter...... the tangential moduli governing increments of stress and strain. It is shown that the modification is far from benign from a mathematical standpoint, changing the qualitative character of solutions and leading to a new type of localization that appears to be unphysical....

  10. Gradient Learning Algorithms for Ontology Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The gradient learning model has been raising great attention in view of its promising perspectives for applications in statistics, data dimensionality reducing, and other specific fields. In this paper, we raise a new gradient learning model for ontology similarity measuring and ontology mapping in multidividing setting. The sample error in this setting is given by virtue of the hypothesis space and the trick of ontology dividing operator. Finally, two experiments presented on plant and humanoid robotics field verify the efficiency of the new computation model for ontology similarity measure and ontology mapping applications in multidividing setting.

  11. Is bicarbonate stable in and on the calcite surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, M. P.; Rodriguez-Blanco, J. D.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2016-03-01

    We have used density functional theory with the COSMO-RS implicit solvent model to predict the pKa for the deprotonation of bicarbonate to carbonate, i.e. HCO3- CO32- + H+, when HCO3- is included in, and adsorbed on, a calcite surface. We have used cluster models (80-100 atoms) to represent the flat {10.4} surface, acute steps, obtuse steps, two types of kinks on the acute step and two types of kinks on the obtuse steps. Based on the predicted pKa values, which range from -6.0 to 2.4 depending on the surface site, we conclude that bicarbonate deprotonates to carbonate when it is in calcite even when pH in solution is very low. This is true for all surface sites, even for solutions where 2.4 < pH < 6.35, where H2CO30 is the dominant dissolved species. When bicarbonate is adsorbed on calcite, the predicted pKa for deprotonation is 7.5, which is ∼3 pH units lower than in aqueous solution, 10.35. This means that adsorbed carbonate is stable even when the concentration of dissolved CO32- is several orders of magnitude lower. This has a significant effect on surface charge and thus the behaviour of the calcite surface. Our results help explain the potential determining behaviour of the carbonate species in calcite-water systems, particularly in the pH range where the bicarbonate species dominates in water and where the carbonate species dominates at the surface, i.e. when 7.5 < pH < 10.35. Our atomic scale data for the various calcite surface sites provide the needed input to improve and constrain surface complexation modelling and are especially useful for predicting behaviour in systems where experiments are difficult or impossible, such as at high temperature and pressure.

  12. Interaction in PhD supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Sofie; Grout, Brian William Wilson; Rump, Camilla Østerberg

    This paper contains an analysis of a single supervision session, undertaken with the aim of identifying how learning opportunities might be created for a PhD student. The supervision session concerned methodologies to be employed in a PhD study related to storm water management and included the P...

  13. Ph og børnenes rum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Coninck-Smith, Ning

    2008-01-01

    Arkiteten og kulturkritikeren PH tegnede to bygninger til børn, nemlig fabriksbørnehaven ved Dehns Vaskeri fra 1948 og det ombyggede børnehjem Mindet fra 1954. Bidraget diskuterer PH's særlige greb om arkitektur til børn og placerer det ind i samtidens diskussion om børn, deres udvikling og behov....

  14. Urbanism PhD Research 2008 - 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.; Van der Hoeven, F.D.; Brand, N.; Van der Burg, L.; Çal??kan, O.; Tan, E.R.; Wang, C.Y.; Zhou, J.

    2009-01-01

    To ensure the quality of the Ph.D. research the Department introduced a special procedure for periodic evaluation: after a period of nine months the potential Ph.D. candidates are asked to present their research design, theoretical framework and methodological approach to the members of the

  15. Coaching af ph.d.-studerende

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Mirjam Irene

    Rapporten danner grundlag for at etablere et koncept for ph.d.-coaching. Erfaringerne fra et 2-årigt projekt om ph.d.-coaching i SCKK regi beskrives. De centrale temaer er tilrettelæggelse af den individuelle coaching, typiske temaer i coachingen og arbejdsdeling mellem coach og vejleder. Der er...

  16. (ajst) the influence of ph and adsorbent

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    goethite sorbed a little more metal ion than the natural goethite. This was attributed to the higher proportion of goethite in synthetic than .... The dependence of metal ion adsorption on pH as observed by some researchers over a wider range of pH ..... “Uranium Uptake from. Aqueous Solution by Interaction with Goethite,.

  17. Determination Of Ph Including Hemoglobin Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, John D.; Hendee, Shonn P.; Rohrscheib, Mark R.; Nunez, David; Alam, M. Kathleen; Franke, James E.; Kemeny, Gabor J.

    2005-09-13

    Methods and apparatuses of determining the pH of a sample. A method can comprise determining an infrared spectrum of the sample, and determining the hemoglobin concentration of the sample. The hemoglobin concentration and the infrared spectrum can then be used to determine the pH of the sample. In some embodiments, the hemoglobin concentration can be used to select an model relating infrared spectra to pH that is applicable at the determined hemoglobin concentration. In other embodiments, a model relating hemoglobin concentration and infrared spectra to pH can be used. An apparatus according to the present invention can comprise an illumination system, adapted to supply radiation to a sample; a collection system, adapted to collect radiation expressed from the sample responsive to the incident radiation; and an analysis system, adapted to relate information about the incident radiation, the expressed radiation, and the hemoglobin concentration of the sample to pH.

  18. Stable cosmology in chameleon bigravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Antonio; Mukohyama, Shinji; Oliosi, Michele; Watanabe, Yota

    2018-02-01

    The recently proposed chameleonic extension of bigravity theory, by including a scalar field dependence in the graviton potential, avoids several fine-tunings found to be necessary in usual massive bigravity. In particular it ensures that the Higuchi bound is satisfied at all scales, that no Vainshtein mechanism is needed to satisfy Solar System experiments, and that the strong coupling scale is always above the scale of cosmological interest all the way up to the early Universe. This paper extends the previous work by presenting a stable example of cosmology in the chameleon bigravity model. We find a set of initial conditions and parameters such that the derived stability conditions on general flat Friedmann background are satisfied at all times. The evolution goes through radiation-dominated, matter-dominated, and de Sitter eras. We argue that the parameter space allowing for such a stable evolution may be large enough to encompass an observationally viable evolution. We also argue that our model satisfies all known constraints due to gravitational wave observations so far and thus can be considered as a unique testing ground of gravitational wave phenomenologies in bimetric theories of gravity.

  19. Biosynthesis of stable isotope 15N labeled spirulina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Zheng; Du Xiaoning; Hou Jinghua; Zhang Jingmei

    2010-01-01

    The spirulina is a phototrophic organism. It was considered as the best of nutritional health product. The nitrogen atoms of spirulina was replaced with 15 N stable isotope by the method of biosynthesis. So 15 N labeled spirulina is a nutritional health product and stable isotope tracer product. As a tracer, 15 N labeled spirulina plays an irreplaceable part in bioscience, medicine metabolism and pathology metabolism and so on. 15 N label spirulina is cultivated only in a small scale because of expensive 15 N material. The culture temperature, shine intensity, pH for spirulina were studied. Some feasible conditions were obtained such as 25℃, 3000-4000 lux, initial pH9.0 in the room. 15 N label spirulin prescription was obtained via orthogonal experiment. The optimize prescription of spirulina was that sodium bicarbonate was 13 g · L-1, 15 N-urea was 0.2 g · L -1 , potassium phosphate dibasic was 0.6 g · L -1 , and glucose was 2 g · L -1 . The cost of 15 N material has a significant reduction. The abundance was more than 98%. (authors)

  20. Development of Hybrid pH sensor for long-term seawater pH monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Y.; Egashira, T.; Miwa, T.; Kimoto, H.

    2016-02-01

    We have been developing the in situ pH sensor (Hybrid pH sensor: HpHS) for the long-term seawater pH monitoring. We are planning to provide the HpHS for researchers and environmental consultants for observation of the CCS (Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage) monitoring system, the coastal environment monitoring system (e.g. Blue Carbon) and ocean acidification. The HpHS has two types of pH sensors (i.e. potentiometric pH sensor and spectrophotometric pH sensor). The spectrophotometric pH sensor can measure pH correctly and stably, however it needs large power consumption and a lot of reagents in a long period of observation. The pH sensor used m-cresol purple (mCP) as an indicator of pH (Clayton and Byrne, 1993 and Liu et al., 2011). We can choose both coefficients before deployment. On the other hand, although the potentiometric pH sensor is low power consumption and high-speed response (within 10 seconds), drifts in the pH of the potentiometric measurements may possibly occur for a long-term observation. The HpHS can measure in situ pH correctly and stably combining advantage of both pH sensors. The HpHS consists of an aluminum pressure housing with optical cell (main unit) and an aluminum silicon-oil filled, pressure-compensated vessel containing pumps and valves (diaphragm pump and valve unit) and pressure-compensated reagents bags (pH indicator, pure water and Tris buffer or certified reference material: CRM) with an ability to resist water pressure to 3000m depth. The main unit holds system control boards, pump drivers, data storage (micro SD card), LED right source, photodiode, optical cell and pressure proof windows. The HpHS also has an aluminum pressure housing that holds a rechargeable lithium-ion battery or a lithium battery for the power supply (DC 24 V). The HpHS is correcting the value of the potentiometric pH sensor (measuring frequently) by the value of the spectrophotometric pH sensor (measuring less frequently). It is possible to calibrate in

  1. Modeling of formation and prevention of a pure water zone in capillary isoelectric focusing with narrow pH range carrier ampholytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takácsi-Nagy, Anna; Kilár, Ferenc; Thormann, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    This paper comprises a continuation of computer simulation studies dealing with carrier ampholyte based CIEF in presence of narrow pH gradients. With this technique, amphoteric sample components with pI values outside the pH gradient are migrating isotachophoretically toward the cathode or anode whereas components with pI values within the gradient become focused. In order to understand the processes occurring in presence of the electric field, the behavior of both carrier ampholytes and amphoteric sample components is investigated by computer modeling. Characteristics of two pH unit gradients with end components having pI values at or around 7.00 and conditions that lead to the formation of a water zone at neutrality were investigated. Data obtained reveal that a zone of water is formed in focusing with carrier ampholytes when the applied pH range does not cover the neutral region, ends at pH 7.00 or begins at pH 7.00. The presence of additional amphoteric components that cover the neutrality region prevent water zone formation under current flow. This situation is met in experiments with narrow pH gradients that end or begin around neutrality. Simulation data reveal that no water zone evolves when atmospheric carbon dioxide dissolved in the catholyte causes the migration of carbonic acid (in the form of carbonate and/or hydrogen carbonate ions) from the catholyte through the focusing structure. An electrolyte change in the electrode solution does not have an impact on the focusing part but does change the isotachophoretic pattern migrating behind the leading ion. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Up-gradient transport in a probabilistic transport model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavnholt, J.; Juul Rasmussen, J.; Garcia, O.E.

    2005-01-01

    The transport of particles or heat against the driving gradient is studied by employing a probabilistic transport model with a characteristic particle step length that depends on the local concentration or heat gradient. When this gradient is larger than a prescribed critical value, the standard....... These results supplement recent works by van Milligen [Phys. Plasmas 11, 3787 (2004)], which applied Levy distributed step sizes in the case of supercritical gradients to obtain the up-gradient transport. (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics....

  3. White wine proteins: how does the pH affect their conformation at room temperature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrechou, Marie; Vernhet, Aude; Roblin, Pierre; Sauvage, François-Xavier; Poncet-Legrand, Céline

    2013-08-20

    Our studies focused on the determination of aggregation mechanisms of proteins occurring in wine at room temperature. Even if the wine pH range is narrow (2.8 to 3.7), some proteins are affected by this parameter. At low pH, the formation of aggregates and the development of a haze due to proteins sometimes occur. The objective of this work was to determine if the pH impacted the conformational stability of wine proteins. Different techniques were used: circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the modification of their secondary and tertiary structure and also SAXS to determine their global shape. Four pure proteins were used, two considered to be stable (invertase and thaumatin-like proteins) and two considered to be unstable (two chitinase isoforms). Two pH values were tested to emphasize their behavior (pH 2.5 and 4.0). The present work highlighted the fact that the conformational stability of some wine proteins (chitinases) was impacted by partial modifications, related to the exposure of some hydrophobic sites. These modifications were enough to destabilize the native state of the protein. These modifications were not observed on wine proteins determined to be stable (invertase and thaumatin-like proteins).

  4. Retention prediction and separation optimization under multilinear gradient elution in liquid chromatography with Microsoft Excel macros.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasoula, S; Zisi, Ch; Gika, H; Pappa-Louisi, A; Nikitas, P

    2015-05-22

    A package of Excel VBA macros have been developed for modeling multilinear gradient retention data obtained in single or double gradient elution mode by changing organic modifier(s) content and/or eluent pH. For this purpose, ten chromatographic models were used and four methods were adopted for their application. The methods were based on (a) the analytical expression of the retention time, provided that this expression is available, (b) the retention times estimated using the Nikitas-Pappa approach, (c) the stepwise approximation, and (d) a simple numerical approximation involving the trapezoid rule for integration of the fundamental equation for gradient elution. For all these methods, Excel VBA macros have been written and implemented using two different platforms; the fitting and the optimization platform. The fitting platform calculates not only the adjustable parameters of the chromatographic models, but also the significance of these parameters and furthermore predicts the analyte elution times. The optimization platform determines the gradient conditions that lead to the optimum separation of a mixture of analytes by using the Solver evolutionary mode, provided that proper constraints are set in order to obtain the optimum gradient profile in the minimum gradient time. The performance of the two platforms was tested using experimental and artificial data. It was found that using the proposed spreadsheets, fitting, prediction, and optimization can be performed easily and effectively under all conditions. Overall, the best performance is exhibited by the analytical and Nikitas-Pappa's methods, although the former cannot be used under all circumstances. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of two pH meters used for skin surface pH measurement: the pH meter 'pH900' from Courage & Khazaka versus the pH meter '1140' from Mettler Toledo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, C; Ivens, U I; Møller, M L; Senderovitz, T; Serup, J

    2001-05-01

    Measurement of skin surface pH is used in clinical research to evaluate hazardous shifts in pH following external exposures and to evaluate the state of diseased skin with acute or chronic changes. It is therefore important to measure skin surface pH as precisely as possible. The aim of this study was to compare two commercially available pH meters used for skin surface pH measurement, to reveal differences between them in measured skin pH on the forearm. The first pH meter (pH900) had a pointed electrode and a stabilisation period of 3 s. The second pH meter (pH meter 1140) had a circular electrode and no fixed stabilisation period. Twelve healthy subjects (6 male and 6 female Caucasians) entered the study. The pH measurements were performed once an hour from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on both forearms in five areas from the elbow to the "wristwatch" zone. In each area, three measurements were performed next to each other with both pH meters (15 measurements per arm per hour per pH meter). The pH900 has a higher measuring level and a higher variation than the pH meter 1140. A skin surface pH meter with a circular electrode and with no fixed stabilisation period is preferable. It is recommended that the pH meter be allowed to stabilise for at least 7 s before the result is read.

  6. Large Airborne Full Tensor Gradient Data Inversion Based on a Non-Monotone Gradient Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong; Meng, Zhaohai; Li, Fengting

    2018-03-01

    Following the development of gravity gradiometer instrument technology, the full tensor gravity (FTG) data can be acquired on airborne and marine platforms. Large-scale geophysical data can be obtained using these methods, making such data sets a number of the "big data" category. Therefore, a fast and effective inversion method is developed to solve the large-scale FTG data inversion problem. Many algorithms are available to accelerate the FTG data inversion, such as conjugate gradient method. However, the conventional conjugate gradient method takes a long time to complete data processing. Thus, a fast and effective iterative algorithm is necessary to improve the utilization of FTG data. Generally, inversion processing is formulated by incorporating regularizing constraints, followed by the introduction of a non-monotone gradient-descent method to accelerate the convergence rate of FTG data inversion. Compared with the conventional gradient method, the steepest descent gradient algorithm, and the conjugate gradient algorithm, there are clear advantages of the non-monotone iterative gradient-descent algorithm. Simulated and field FTG data were applied to show the application value of this new fast inversion method.

  7. Annular beam with segmented phase gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubo Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An annular beam with a single uniform-intensity ring and multiple segments of phase gradients is proposed in this paper. Different from the conventional superposed vortices, such as the modulated optical vortices and the collinear superposition of multiple orbital angular momentum modes, the designed annular beam has a doughnut intensity distribution whose radius is independent of the phase distribution of the beam in the imaging plane. The phase distribution along the circumference of the doughnut beam can be segmented with different phase gradients. Similar to a vortex beam, the annular beam can also exert torques and rotate a trapped particle owing to the orbital angular momentum of the beam. As the beam possesses different phase gradients, the rotation velocity of the trapped particle can be varied along the circumference. The simulation and experimental results show that an annular beam with three segments of different phase gradients can rotate particles with controlled velocities. The beam has potential applications in optical trapping and optical information processing.

  8. Subspace learning from image gradient orientations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzimiropoulos, Georgios; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Pantic, Maja

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the notion of subspace learning from image gradient orientations for appearance-based object recognition. As image data is typically noisy and noise is substantially different from Gaussian, traditional subspace learning from pixel intensities fails very often to estimate reliably the

  9. Considerations of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, S.C.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1991-02-01

    The ion temperature gradient driven instability is considered in this paper. Physical pictures are presented to clarify the nature of the instability. The saturation of a single eddy is modeled by a simple nonlinear equation. We show that eddies which are elongated in the direction of the temperature gradient are the most unstable and have the highest saturation amplitudes. In a sheared magnetic field, such elongated eddies twist with the field lines. This structure is shown to be alternative to the usual Fourier mode picture in which the mode is localized around the surface where k parallel = 0. We show how these elongated twisting eddies, which are an integral part of the ''ballooning mode'' structure, could survive in a torus. The elongated eddies are shown to be unstable to secondary instabilities that are driven by the large gradients in the long eddy. We argue that this mechanism isotropizes ion temperature gradient turbulence. We further argue that the ''mixing length'' is set by this nonlinear process, not by a linear eigenmode width. 17 refs., 6 figs

  10. Gradient realization of nonlinear control systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortes monforte, J.; Cortés, J.; Crouch, P.E.; Astolfi, A.; van der Schaft, Arjan; Gordillo, F.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate necessary and su?cient conditions under which a nonlinear afine control system with outputs can be written as a gradient control system corresponding to some pseudo-Riemannian metric defined on the state space. The results rely on a suitable notion of compatibility of the system with

  11. Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Scott O'Dell

    2006-01-01

    The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

  12. Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Scott O' Dell

    2006-12-31

    The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

  13. Lactate uptake against a concentration gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Carl-Henrik; Nielsen, Troels Halfeld; Nielsen, Hans Boye

    2014-01-01

    The recently published article by Jalloh et al (Jalloh I, Helmy A, Shannon RJ, Gallagher CN, Menon D, Carpenter K, Hutchinson P. Lactate uptake by the injured human brain - evidence from an arterio-venous gradient and cerebral microdialysis study. J Neurotrauma. 2013 Aug 22. [Epub ahead of print]...... is of fundamental importance the misconception should be corrected....

  14. Instabilities in power law gradient hardening materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2005-01-01

    Tension and compression instabilities are investigated for specimens with dimensions in the micron range. A finite strain generalization of a higher order strain gradient plasticity theory is implemented in a finite element scheme capable of modeling power law hardening materials. Effects...

  15. Gradient based filtering of digital elevation models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Thomas; Andersen, Rune Carbuhn

    We present a filtering method for digital terrain models (DTMs). The method is based on mathematical morphological filtering within gradient (slope) defined domains. The intention with the filtering procedure is to improbé the cartographic quality of height contours generated from a DTM based on ...

  16. Stochastic gradient versus recursive least squares learning

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slobodyan, Sergey; Bogomolova, Anna; Kolyuzhnov, Dmitri

    -, č. 309 (2006), s. 1-21 ISSN 1211-3298 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : constant gain adaptive learning * stochastic gradient learning * recursive least squares Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp309.pdf

  17. Stable isotope mass spectrometry in petroleum exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, Manju

    1997-01-01

    The stable isotope mass spectrometry plays an important role to evaluate the stable isotopic composition of hydrocarbons. The isotopic ratios of certain elements in petroleum samples reflect certain characteristics which are useful for petroleum exploration

  18. Purification and pH stability characterization of a chymotrypsin inhibitor from Schizolobium parahyba seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, Rozeni C L; de Souza, Elizabeth M T; Calderon, Leonardo de A; de Freitas, Sonia M

    2004-04-01

    Schizolobium parahyba chymotrypsin inhibitor (SPCI) was completely purified as a single polypeptide chain with two disulfide bonds, by TCA precipitation and ion exchange chromatography. This purification method is faster and more efficient than that previously reported: SPCI is stable from pH 2 to 12 at 25 degrees C, and is highly specific for chymotrypsin at pH 7-12. It weakly inhibits elastase and has no significant inhibitory effect against trypsin and alpha-amylase. SPCI is a thermostable protein and resists thermolysin digestion up to 70 degrees C.

  19. A sandwich-designed temperature-gradient incubator for studies of microbial temperature responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsgaard, Lars; Jørgensen, Leif Wagner

    2002-03-01

    A temperature-gradient incubator (TGI) is described, which produces a thermal gradient over 34 aluminium modules (15x30x5 cm) intersected by 2-mm layers of partly insulating graphite foil (SigraFlex Universal). The new, sandwich-designed TGI has 30 rows of six replicate sample wells for incubation of 28-ml test tubes. An electric plate heats one end of the TGI, and the other end is cooled by thermoelectric Peltier elements in combination with a liquid cooling system. The TGI is equipped with 24 calibrated Pt-100 temperature sensors and insulated by polyurethane plates. A PC-operated SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) software (Genesis 4.20) is applied for temperature control using three advanced control loops. The precision of the TGI temperature measurements was better than +/-0.12 degrees C, and for a 0-40 degrees C gradient, the temperature at the six replicate sample wells varied less than +/-0.04 degrees C. Temperatures measured in incubated water samples closely matched the TGI temperatures, which showed a linear relationship to the sample row number. During operation for 8 days with a gradient of 0-40 degrees C, the temperature at the cold end was stable within +/-0.02 degrees C, while the temperatures at the middle and the warm end were stable within +/-0.08 degrees C (n=2370). Using the new TGI, it was shown that the fine-scale (1 degrees C) temperature dependence of S(o) oxidation rates in agricultural soil (0-29 degrees C) could be described by the Arrhenius relationship. The apparent activation energy (E(a)) for S(o) oxidation was 79 kJ mol(-1), which corresponded to a temperature coefficient (Q(10)) of 3.1. These data demonstrated that oxidation of S(o) in soil is strongly temperature-dependent. In conclusion, the new TGI allowed a detailed study of microbial temperature responses as it produced a precise, stable, and certifiable temperature gradient by the new and combined use of sandwich-design, thermoelectric cooling, and advanced

  20. Comparison of Corneal Riboflavin Gradients Using Dextran and HPMC Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehmke, Tobias; Seiler, Theo G; Fischinger, Isaak; Ripken, Tammo; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Frueh, Beatrice E

    2016-12-01

    To determine the riboflavin concentration gradient in the anterior corneal stroma when using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) or dextran as the carrier agent. Four different groups of porcine corneas (5 each) were compared regarding the riboflavin concentration in the anterior stroma. Prior to all experiments, stable hydration conditions were established for the corresponding solution. The dextran groups were treated with 0.1% riboflavin in 20% dextran for 10 and 30 minutes and the HPMC groups with 0.1% riboflavin in 1.1% HPMC for 10 and 30 minutes. After imbibition, nonlinear microscopy and consecutive image analysis were used to determine two-photon fluorescence intensities. To determine the riboflavin concentration, corneas were saturated and measured a second time by two-photon microscopy. With this measurement, a proper correction for absorption and scattering could be performed. Ultraviolet-A (UVA) transmission was measured after the application time for each group. Riboflavin concentration decreased with increasing depth and increased with longer application times in all groups. Comparing the dextran for 30 minutes and HPMC for 10 minutes groups, a significantly higher stromal riboflavin concentration was found within the most anterior 70 µm in the dextran group for 30 minutes, whereas deeper than 260 µm HPMC-assisted imbibition for 10 minutes yielded higher concentrations. In dextran-treated corneas, values obtained from pachymetry were substantially reduced, whereas HPMC-assisted imbibition led to a decent swelling. UVA transmission values were higher in dextran-assisted imbibition than in HPMC-assisted imbibition. Stromal riboflavin gradients are similar when applied in dextran for 30 minutes and HPMC for 10 minutes. When using HPMC solutions, a shallower cross-linked volume is expected due to a higher corneal hydration. [J Refract Surg. 2016;32(12):798-802.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Stable rotating dipole solitons in nonlocal media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez-Aguayo, Servando; Skupin, Stefan; Desyatnikov, Anton S.

    2006-01-01

    We present the first example of stable rotating two-soliton bound states in nonlinear optical media with nonlocal response. We show that, in contrast to media with local response, nonlocality opens possibilities to generate stable azimuthons.......We present the first example of stable rotating two-soliton bound states in nonlinear optical media with nonlocal response. We show that, in contrast to media with local response, nonlocality opens possibilities to generate stable azimuthons....

  2. Extracellular Processing of Molecular Gradients by Eukaryotic Cells Can Improve Gradient Detection Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segota, Igor; Franck, Carl

    2017-12-01

    Eukaryotic cells sense molecular gradients by measuring spatial concentration variation through the difference in the number of occupied receptors to which molecules can bind. They also secrete enzymes that degrade these molecules, and it is presently not well understood how this affects the local gradient perceived by cells. Numerical and analytical results show that these enzymes can substantially increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the receptor difference and allow cells to respond to a much broader range of molecular concentrations and gradients than they would without these enzymes.

  3. Extracellular Processing of Molecular Gradients by Eukaryotic Cells Can Improve Gradient Detection Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segota, Igor; Franck, Carl

    2017-12-15

    Eukaryotic cells sense molecular gradients by measuring spatial concentration variation through the difference in the number of occupied receptors to which molecules can bind. They also secrete enzymes that degrade these molecules, and it is presently not well understood how this affects the local gradient perceived by cells. Numerical and analytical results show that these enzymes can substantially increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the receptor difference and allow cells to respond to a much broader range of molecular concentrations and gradients than they would without these enzymes.

  4. Phase gradient metasurface with broadband anomalous reflection based on cross-shaped units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaobin; Deng, Hui; Xiong, Qingxu; Liu, Chen

    2018-03-01

    It has been pointed out by many documents that a phase gradient metasurface with wideband characteristics can be designed by the unit with a low-quality factor ( Q value). In this paper, a cross-shaped unit with a low-quality factor Q is proposed. By changing the variable parameters of the unit, it is found that the reflection phase of the unit can achieve a stable distribution of phase gradient in the frequency range of 8.0-20.0 GHz. we analyze variation of the electromagnetic field distribution on the unit with frequency and find that the size along electrical field polarization of electromagnetic field distribution area changes with frequency. Based on our design, effective size of electromagnetic field distribution area keeps meeting the subwavelength condition, thus stable phase distribution is gained across broadened bandwidth. It is found by the analysis of the phase gradient metasurface composed of seven units that the metasurface can exhibit anomalous reflection in the wide frequency band of 8.0-20.0 GHz, and the efficiency of abnormal reflection is higher in the range of 10.0-18.0 GHz. The error between the simulation results of abnormal reflection angle and the theoretical result is only - 1.5° to 0.5° after the work of comparison. Therefore, the metasurface designed by the new cross-shaped unit has a good control on the deflection direction of the reflected wave, and shows obvious advantages in widening the bandwidth.

  5. Uses of stable isotopes in fish ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Analyses of fish tissues (other than otoliths) for stable isotope ratios can provide substantial information on fish ecology, including physiological ecology. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon frequently are used to determine the mix of diet sources for consumers. Stable i...

  6. Periodicity of the stable isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Boeyens, J C A

    2003-01-01

    It is demonstrated that all stable (non-radioactive) isotopes are formally interrelated as the products of systematically adding alpha particles to four elementary units. The region of stability against radioactive decay is shown to obey a general trend based on number theory and contains the periodic law of the elements as a special case. This general law restricts the number of what may be considered as natural elements to 100 and is based on a proton:neutron ratio that matches the golden ratio, characteristic of biological and crystal growth structures. Different forms of the periodic table inferred at other proton:neutron ratios indicate that the electronic configuration of atoms is variable and may be a function of environmental pressure. Cosmic consequences of this postulate are examined. (author)

  7. Stable States of Biological Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Sornette, D.; Yukalova, E. P.; Henry, J.-Y.; Cobb, J. P.

    2009-04-01

    A novel model of biological organisms is advanced, treating an organism as a self-consistent system subject to a pathogen flux. The principal novelty of the model is that it describes not some parts, but a biological organism as a whole. The organism is modeled by a five-dimensional dynamical system. The organism homeostasis is described by the evolution equations for five interacting components: healthy cells, ill cells, innate immune cells, specific immune cells, and pathogens. The stability analysis demonstrates that, in a wide domain of the parameter space, the system exhibits robust structural stability. There always exist four stable stationary solutions characterizing four qualitatively differing states of the organism: alive state, boundary state, critical state, and dead state.

  8. Theory of stable allocations II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Swedish Royal Academy awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Economics to Lloyd Shapley and Alvin Roth, for the theory of stable allocations and the practice of market design. These two American researchers worked independently from each other, combining basic theory and empirical investigations. Through their experiments and practical design they generated a flourishing field of research and improved the performance of many markets. Shapley provided the fundamental theoretical contribution to this field of research, whereas Roth, a professor at the Harvard University in Boston, developed and upgraded these theoretical investigations by applying them to the American market of medical doctors. Namely, their research helps explain the market processes at work, for instance, when doctors are assigned to hospitals, students to schools and human organs for transplant to recipients.

  9. Stable massive particles at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbairn, M.; /Stockholm U.; Kraan, A.C.; /Pennsylvania U.; Milstead, D.A.; /Stockholm U.; Sjostrand, T.; /Lund U.; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-11-01

    We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

  10. Oribatid mite communities along an elevational gradient in Sairme gorge (Caucasus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumladze, Levan; Murvanidze, Maka; Maraun, Mark; Salakaia, Meri

    2015-05-01

    Many aboveground animals and plant communities have been studied along elevational gradients whereas studies on soil animals are scarce. Here, we studied oribatid mite community distribution along an elevational gradient from 600 to 2200 m in forest ecosystems of the Western Lesser Caucasus Mountains in Georgia. Overall, 86 oribatid mite species were found at the study sites. Oribatid mite densities were generally low (~9800 ind./m(2)), and 74% of all species reproduced sexually indicating that resource conditions at the study sites are generally poor. Oribatids mainly comprised Brachypylina (76%), Mixonomata (13%), Desmonomata (6%) and Enarthronota (5%). Oribatid mite community structure changed along the elevational gradient and the changes correlated with temperature, pH, litter thickness and density of the herb layer. The dominance of sexually reproducing taxa and low overall abundance indicate that the studied elevational gradient is characterized by poor resource conditions for soil microarthropods. Oribatid mite species richness and density declined with elevation suggesting that decreasing temperature in concert with resource limitation is a main driver of oribatid mite communities whereas stochastic factors (such as mid-domain effects) are of minor importance.

  11. Integrating chemical imaging of cationic trace metal solutes and pH into a single hydrogel layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefer, Christoph [Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Soil Research, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, A-3430 Tulln (Austria); Santner, Jakob, E-mail: jakob.santner@boku.ac.at [Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Soil Research, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, A-3430 Tulln (Austria); Department of Crop Sciences, Division of Agronomy, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Borisov, Sergey M. [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Food Chemistry, Graz University of Technology, Stremayrgasse 9, A-8010, Graz (Austria); Wenzel, Walter W.; Puschenreiter, Markus [Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Soil Research, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, A-3430 Tulln (Austria)

    2017-01-15

    Gel-based, two-dimensional (2D) chemical imaging techniques are versatile methods for investigating biogeochemically active environments at high spatial resolution (sub-mm). State-of-the-art solute imaging techniques, such as diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) and planar optodes (PO), employ passive solute sampling or sensing. Combining these methods will provide powerful tools for studying the biogeochemistry of biological niches in soils and sediments. In this study we aimed at developing a combined single-layer gel for direct pH imaging using PO and sampling of anionic and cationic solutes by DGT, with subsequent analysis of the bound solutes by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). We tested three ultra-thin (<100 μm) polyurethane-based gels, incorporating anion and cation binding materials and the fluorescent pH indicator DCIFODA (2′,7′-dichloro-5(6)-N-octadecyl-carboxamidofluorescein). Results showed that PO-based pH sensing using DCIFODA was impossible in the presence of the anion binding materials due to interferences with DCIFODA protonation. One gel, containing only a cation binding material and DCIFODA, was fully characterized and showed similar performance characteristics as comparable DGT-only gels (applicable pH range: pH 5–8, applicable ionic strength range: 1–20 mmol L{sup -1}, cation binding capacity ∼24 μg cm{sup −2}). The dynamic range for PO-based pH mapping was between pH 5.5 and 7.5 with t{sub 90} response time of ∼60 min. In a case study we demonstrated the gel's suitability for multi-analyte solute imaging and mapped pH gradients and concurrent metal solubility patterns in the rhizosphere of Salix smithiana. pH decreases in the rooted soil were co-localized with elevated solute fluxes of Al{sup 3+}, Co{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Fe, Mn{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+}, indicating pH-induced metal solubilisation. - Highlights: • Diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) and planar

  12. Objective determination of pH thresholds in the analysis of 24 h ambulatory oesophageal pH monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusten, B. L.; Roelofs, J. M.; Akkermans, L. M.; vanBerge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Smout, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    In 24 h oesophageal pH monitoring, pH 4 is widely but arbitrarily used as the threshold between reflux and non-reflux pH values. The aim of the study was to define pH thresholds objectively, based on Gaussian curve fitting of pH frequency distributions. Single-channel 24 h oesophageal pH monitoring

  13. Effects of dissolved oxygen and pH levels on weissellin A production by Weissella paramesenteroides DX in fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagianni, Maria

    2012-08-01

    Experiments carried out with the dissolved oxygen tension (DOT) maintained during fermentation at 0, 10, 50, 70 and 100% showed a direct effect of the dissolved oxygen levels on weissellin A production with no correlative increase on biomass. An estimate of the yield of weissellin A per gram biomass revealed the 50% DOT level as the optimum for increased yields. The effect of pH was studied in experiments carried out without pH control, with pH initially set at 6.0, 5.0 and 4.5 and with pH controlled at 6.0, 5.0 and 4.5. The initial pH value and the pH-drop gradient appear to be the important parameters for weissellin A production. Production was significantly higher with the uncontrolled initial pH compared to that of the controlled initial pH at 6.0, while acidic initial pHs created unfavorable conditions for production. Maintaining a constant pH environment during fermentation led to decreased production levels.

  14. The stable K0 giant star β Gem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, David F., E-mail: dfgray@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario, N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    A nine-season spectroscopic study of the photosphere of β Gem (K0 III) shows this low-luminosity giant to be stable, with no effective temperature variations above ∼2 K, and no secular temperature variations over the 2002-2010 time span above 0.2 K per year. The radial-velocity variations are consistent with an orbital variation of ∼40 m s{sup –1}. The projected rotation rate is found to be 1.70 ± 0.20 km s{sup –1} with a macroturbulence dispersion of 4.53 ± 0.10 km s{sup –1}. The third-signature plot is also invariant and shows a granulation velocity gradient 20% smaller than the solar gradient. The absolute shift of the third-signature plot gives a blueshift-corrected radial velocity of 3385 ± 70 m s{sup –1}. Bisector mapping of the Fe I λ6253 line yields a flux deficit of 12% ± 1% in area, somewhat smaller than for other giants, but the shape and the position of the peak at 4.8 km s{sup –1} is consistent with other giants. All of the investigated photospheric parameters are consistent with β Gem being a low-luminosity giant in agreement with its absolute magnitude.

  15. NMR and NQR study of the thermodynamically stable quasicrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shastri, Ananda [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-02-10

    27Al and 61,65Cu NMR measurements are reported for powder samples of stable AlCuFe and AlCuRu icosahedral quasicrystals and their crystalline approximants, and for a AlPdMn single grain quasicrystal. Furthermore, 27Al NQR spectra at 4.2 K have been observed in the AlCuFe and AlCuRu samples. From the quadrupole perturbed NMR spectra at different magnetic fields, and from the zero field NQR spectra, a wide distribution of local electric field gradient (EFG) tensor components and principal axis system orientations was found at the Al site. A model EFG calculation based on a 1/1 AlCuFe approximant was successful in explaining the observed NQR spectra. It is concluded that the average local gradient is largely determined by the p-electron wave function at the Al site, while the width of the distribution is due to the lattice contribution to the EFG. Comparison of 63Cu NMR with 27Al NMR shows that the EFG distribution at the two sites is similar, but that the electronic contribution to the EFG is considerably smaller at the Cu site, in agreement with a more s-type wave function of the conduction electrons.

  16. Ultraviolet irradiation and gradient temperature assisted autolysis for protein recovery from shrimp head waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenhong; Tan, Caiyun; Zhan, Xiaojian; Li, Huiyi; Zhang, Chaohua

    2014-12-01

    A novel autolysis method using ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and gradient temperature was investigated to efficiently recover proteins from the head of the shrimp Penaeus vannamei. The proteolytic activity of shrimp head subjected to 30W UV irradiation for 20 min was increased by 62%, compared with that of untreated samples. After irradiation, the enzymes remained active across a wide range of temperatures (45-60°C) and pH (7-10). An orthogonal design was used to optimize autolysis condition. After 5h autolysis, protein recovery from the UV-heat treated samples was up to 92.1%. These results indicate the potential of using UV irradiation in combination with gradient temperatures to improve recovery of proteins from shrimp head waste. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Assembly of Active Bacterial and Fungal Communities Along a Natural Environmental Gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Rebecca C; Gallegos-Graves, Laverne; Zak, Donald R; Kuske, Cheryl R

    2016-01-01

    Dormancy is thought to promote biodiversity within microbial communities, but how assembly of the active community responds to changes in environmental conditions is unclear. To measure the active and dormant communities of bacteria and fungi colonizing decomposing litter in maple forests, we targeted ribosomal genes and transcripts across a natural environmental gradient. Within bacterial and fungal communities, the active and dormant communities were phylogenetically distinct, but patterns of phylogenetic clustering varied. For bacteria, active communities were significantly more clustered than dormant communities, while the reverse was found for fungi. The proportion of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) classified as active and the degree of phylogenetic clustering of the active bacterial communities declined with increasing pH and decreasing C/N. No significant correlations were found for the fungal community. The opposing pattern of phylogenetic clustering in dormant and active communities and the differential response of active communities to environmental gradients suggest that dormancy differentially structures bacterial and fungal communities.

  18. Tree species distribution along the environmental gradients in Pananjung Pangandaran Nature Reserve, West Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGUNG KURNIAWAN

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The research of tree species distribution along the environmental gradients in Lowland Tropical Rainforest Pananjung Pangandaran Nature Reserve had been conducted. The study aimed to elucidate the relationship between tree species distribution with ≥10 cm dbh and some measured environmental gradients, namely soil pH and moisture, soil depth, litter thickness, light intensity, altitude, slope, and the distance of plot from coastal line. A number of 125 of 10x10 m2 quadrats were established randomly in four transects. The results indicated that Rhodamnia cinerea was the species having the highest presence. Ordination technique using Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA suggested that tree species were less evenly distributed along the measured environmental factors with Eigenvalue 0,387. Altitude was the most important environmental factor affected tree species distribution, soil moisture as well as light intensity.

  19. Adenosine 5'-triphosphate formation in Thiobacillus ferrooxidans vesicles by H+ ion gradients comparable to those of environmental conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Apel, W A; Dugan, P R; Tuttle, J H

    1980-01-01

    Vesicles prepared from iron-grown Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, and subsequently loaded with adenosine 5'-diphosphate and inorganic phosphate, produced adenosine 5'-triphosphate when subjected to H+ gradients comparable to those in the cells' normal environment (i.e., an internal pH in the range of 6.0 to 8.0 with an optimum of 7.0 to 7.8 and an external pH in the range of 2.1 to 4.1 with an optimum of 2.8). Nigericin, dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, and pentachlorophenol decreased adenosine 5'-tripho...

  20. In Vivo Model to Test Implanted Biosensors for Blood pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Somps, Chris J.; Madou, Marc; Hines, John; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Biosensors for monitoring physiologic data continuously through telemetry are available for heart rate, respiration, and temperature but not for blood pH or ions affected by hydrogen ion concentration. A telemetric biosensor for monitoring blood pH on-line could be used to identify and manage problems in fluid and electrolyte metabolism, cardiac and respiratory function during space flight and the acid-base status of patients without the need for venipuncture in patients on Earth. Critical to the development of biosensors is a method for evaluating their performance after implantation. Mature rats, prepared with jugular, cannulas for repeated blood samples, were exposed to a gas mixture containing high levels of carbon dioxide (7%) in a closed environment to induce mild respiratory acidosis. Serial blood gas and pH measurements in venous blood were compared with electrical responses from sensors implanted in the subcutaneous tissue. Animals became slightly tachypneic after exposure to excess CO2, but remained alert and active. After 5 minutes, basal blood pH decreased from 7.404 +/- 0.013 to 7.289 +/- 0.010 (p less than 0.001)and PC02 increased from 45 +/- 6 to 65 +/- 4 mm. Hg (p les than 0.001). Thereafter pH and blood gas parameters remained stable. Implanted sensors showed a decrease in millivolts (mV) which paralleled the change in pH and averaged 5-6 mV per 0.1 unit pH. Implanted sensors remained sensitive to modest changes in tissue pH for one week. A system for inducing acidosis in rats was developed to test the in vivo performance of pH biosensors. The system provides a method which is sensitive, rapid and reproducible in the same and different animals with full recovery, for testing the performance of sensors implanted in subcutaneous tissues.

  1. Unstable ion-temperature-gradient modes in the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, T.; Kleiber, R.; Nadeem, M.; Persson, M.

    2002-12-01

    The linear stability of the ion-temperature-gradient modes (ITG) in the electrostatic limit is examined in the short wavelength region by using a two fluid reactive model in fully three-dimensional Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator [G. Grieger et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, 1990 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 3, p. 525] geometry. The spectrum of stable and unstable modes and their real frequencies and eigenfunctions are calculated. The effects of density gradients, temperature gradients, temperature ratios, wavevector, ballooning angle, curvature and local magnetic shear on the ITG mode are also investigated. The frequency and growth rate of the most unstable ITG mode is calculated and visualized for a specific magnetic flux surface. For the equilibrium under investigation both localized and extended eigenmodes are found. The effect of small and large temperature ratios, small and large density gradients as well as large local magnetic shear are all found to be stabilizing. The highest growth rates are found at the outer part of the surface where the local magnetic shear is small and normal curvature is unfavorable.

  2. Esophageal pH monitoring (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esophageal pH monitoring is a test that measures how often and how long stomach acid is entering the esophagus. ... to a monitor which records the level of acidity in the esophagus. The patient records symptoms and ...

  3. Fetal scalp pH testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sometimes fetal heart monitoring doesn't provide enough information about the well-being of a baby. In these cases, testing the scalp pH can help the doctor decide whether the fetus is getting enough oxygen ...

  4. Micromechanical Characterization of Hydrogels Undergoing Swelling and Dissolution at Alkaline pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The swelling of polyelectrolyte hydrogels usually depends on the pH, and if the pH is high enough degradation can occur. A microindentation device was developed to dynamically test these processes in whey protein isolate hydrogels at alkaline pH 7–14. At low alkaline pH the shear modulus decreases during swelling, consistent with rubber elasticity theory, yet when chemical degradation occurs at pH ≥ 11.5 the modulus decreases quickly and extensively. The apparent modulus was constant with the indentation depth when swelling predominates, but gradients were observed when fast chemical degradation occurs at 0.05–0.1 M NaOH. In addition, these profiles were constant with time when dissolution rates are also constant, the first evidence that a swollen layer with steady state mechanical properties is achieved despite extensive dissolution. At >0.5 M NaOH, we provide mechanical evidence showing that most interactions inside the gels are destroyed, gels were very weak and hardly swell, yet they still dissolve very slowly. Microindentation can provide complementary valuable information to study the degradation of hydrogels.

  5. Active potassium extrusion regulated by intracellular pH in Streptococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinuma, Y; Igarashi, K

    1988-10-05

    Potassium extrusion in bacteria is thought to play a role in the regulation of the cytoplasmic pH; in several organisms, it has been ascribed to secondary antiport of K+ for protons. Streptococcus faecalis exhibited a distinctive pattern: potassium extrusion occurred only when the cytoplasmic pH was alkaline and required the generation of ATP. The key observation is that glycolyzing cells suspended in an alkaline medium extruded K+, even against a K+ concentration gradient, provided the medium contained a weak permeant base (e.g. diethanolamine or methylamine). The amines render the cytoplasmic pH alkaline; when conditions were arranged to keep the cytoplasm neutral, no K+ extrusion was seen. Potassium extrusion required the presence of either glucose or arginine and was unaffected by protonophores and by inhibition of the F1Fo-ATPase. When the medium contained [14C]methylamine, the cells accumulated the base to an extent stoichiometrically equivalent to the K+ lost. Concurrently, the cytoplasmic pH fell from 8.8 to 7.6, at which point K+ extrusion ceased. The results suggest that K+ extrusion is due to an ATP-driven transport system that expels K+ by exchange for H+ and is active only at alkaline cytoplasmic pH.

  6. Gradient waveform pre-emphasis based on the gradient system transfer function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stich, Manuel; Wech, Tobias; Slawig, Anne; Ringler, Ralf; Dewdney, Andrew; Greiser, Andreas; Ruyters, Gudrun; Bley, Thorsten A; Köstler, Herbert

    2018-02-25

    The gradient system transfer function (GSTF) has been used to describe the distorted k-space trajectory for image reconstruction. The purpose of this work was to use the GSTF to determine the pre-emphasis for an undistorted gradient output and intended k-space trajectory. The GSTF of the MR system was determined using only standard MR hardware without special equipment such as field probes or a field camera. The GSTF was used for trajectory prediction in image reconstruction and for a gradient waveform pre-emphasis. As test sequences, a gradient-echo sequence with phase-encoding gradient modulation and a gradient-echo sequence with a spiral read-out trajectory were implemented and subsequently applied on a structural phantom and in vivo head measurements. Image artifacts were successfully suppressed by applying the GSTF-based pre-emphasis. Equivalent results are achieved with images acquired using GSTF-based post-correction of the trajectory as a part of image reconstruction. In contrast, the pre-emphasis approach allows reconstruction using the initially intended trajectory. The artifact suppression shown for two sequences demonstrates that the GSTF can serve for a novel pre-emphasis. A pre-emphasis based on the GSTF information can be applied to any arbitrary sequence type. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. Magnetoelectric Transverse Gradient Sensor with High Detection Sensitivity and Low Gradient Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingji; Or, Siu Wing

    2017-10-25

    We report, theoretically and experimentally, the realization of a high detection performance in a novel magnetoelectric (ME) transverse gradient sensor based on the large ME effect and the magnetic field gradient (MFG) technique in a pair of magnetically-biased, electrically-shielded, and mechanically-enclosed ME composites having a transverse orientation and an axial separation. The output voltage of the gradient sensor is directly obtained from the transverse MFG-induced difference in ME voltage between the two ME composites and is calibrated against transverse MFGs to give a high detection sensitivity of 0.4-30.6 V/(T/m), a strong common-mode magnetic field noise rejection rate of 35 mm. An analysis of experimental gradient noise spectra obtained in a magnetically-unshielded laboratory environment reveals the domination of the pink (1/ f ) noise, dielectric loss noise, and power-frequency noise below 3 kHz, in addition to the circuit noise above 3 kHz, in the gradient sensor. The high detection performance, together with the added merit of passive and direct ME conversion by the large ME effect in the ME composites, makes the gradient sensor suitable for the passive, direct, and broadband detection of transverse MFGs.

  8. A water-soluble rhodamine B-derived fluorescent probe for pH monitoring and imaging in acidic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Peng; Jiang, Xuekai; Sun, Junyong; Zhang, Qiang; Gao, Feng

    2017-06-01

    A structurally simple, water-soluble rhodamine-derivatived fluorescent probe, which is responsive to acidic pH, was conveniently synthesized via a one-step condensation reaction of rhodamine B hydrazide and 4-formybenzene-1,3-disulfonate. As a stable and highly sensitive pH sensor, the probe displays an approximately 50-fold fluorescence enhancement over the pH range of 7.16-4.89 as the structure of probe changes from spirocyclic (weak fluorescent) to ring-open (strong fluorescent) with decreasing pH. The synthesized fluorescent probe is applied to the detection of pH changes in vitro and in vivo bioimaging of immortalized gastric cancer cells, with satisfactory results.

  9. Salinity-gradient energy driven microbial electrosynthesis of hydrogen peroxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohu; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a strong oxidant, is widely used in various chemical industries and environmental remediation processes. In this study, we developed an innovative method for cost-effective production of H2O2 by using a microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell (MREC......). In the MREC, electrical potential generated by the exoelectrogens and the salinity-gradient between salt and fresh water were utilized to drive the high-rate H2O2 production. Operational parameters such as air flow rate, pH, cathodic potential, flow rate of salt and fresh water were investigated. The optimal...... H2O2 production was observed at salt and fresh water flow rate of 0.5 mL min−1, air flow rate of 12–20 mL min−1, cathode potential of −0.485 ± 0.025 V (vs Ag/AgCl). The maximum H2O2 accumulated concentration of 778 ± 11 mg L−1 was obtained at corresponding production rate of 11.5 ± 0.5 mg L−1 h−1...

  10. Impact of seawater acidification on pH at the tissue–skeleton interface and calcification in reef corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venn, Alexander A.; Tambutté, Eric; Holcomb, Michael; Laurent, Julien; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Insight into the response of reef corals and other major marine calcifiers to ocean acidification is limited by a lack of knowledge about how seawater pH and carbonate chemistry impact the physiological processes that drive biomineralization. Ocean acidification is proposed to reduce calcification rates in corals by causing declines in internal pH at the calcifying tissue–skeleton interface where biomineralization takes place. Here, we performed an in vivo study on how partial-pressure CO2-driven seawater acidification impacts intracellular pH in coral calcifying cells and extracellular pH in the fluid at the tissue–skeleton interface [subcalicoblastic medium (SCM)] in the coral Stylophora pistillata. We also measured calcification in corals grown under the same conditions of seawater acidification by measuring lateral growth of colonies and growth of aragonite crystals under the calcifying tissue. Our findings confirm that seawater acidification decreases pH of the SCM, but this decrease is gradual relative to the surrounding seawater, leading to an increasing pH gradient between the SCM and seawater. Reductions in calcification rate, both at the level of crystals and whole colonies, were only observed in our lowest pH treatment when pH was significantly depressed in the calcifying cells in addition to the SCM. Overall, our findings suggest that reef corals may mitigate the effects of seawater acidification by regulating pH in the SCM, but they also highlight the role of calcifying cell pH homeostasis in determining the response of reef corals to changes in external seawater pH and carbonate chemistry. PMID:23277567

  11. Inferred effects of cloud deposition on forest floor nutrient cycling and microbial properties along a short elevation gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavoie, M.; Bradley, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    Higher cloud cover significantly decreases forest floor pH, decrease exchangeable cations, modifies mineral-N speciation and increases physiological stress within microbial communities. - Cloud water deposition often increases with elevation, and it is widely accepted that this cloud water increases acid loading to upland forest ecosystems. A study was undertaken in south-eastern Quebec to determine if a 250 m elevation gradient (i.e. 420-665 m), along a uniform sugar-maple stand on the slope of Mount Orford, corresponded to a pH gradient in the forest floor and to predictable changes in soil nutrient availability and microbial properties. Precipitation data from a nearby study, and a photographic survey, provided presumptive evidence that this elevation gradient corresponded to a strong gradient in cloud water deposition. Forest floor temperature did not differ significantly across elevations. Forest floor moisture content was significantly higher, whereas pH and exchangeable Ca and Mg were significantly lower, at the higher elevations. Average seasonal net nitrification rates, determined by long-term laboratory incubations, did not differ significantly across elevations, whereas average seasonal net ammonification rates were significantly higher at higher elevations. Basal respiration rates and microbial biomass did not differ significantly across elevations, but metabolic quotient was significantly higher at higher elevations indicating possible environmental stress on forest floor microbial communities due to cloud water deposition. Anaerobic N mineralisation rates were significantly higher at higher elevations suggesting that N-limited microbial communities frequently exposed to cloud cover can be important short-term sinks for atmospheric N, thereby contributing to increase the active-N fraction of forest floors. We conclude that, where no significant changes in vegetation or temperature occur, elevation gradients can still be used to understand the spatial

  12. Proposed gravity-gradient dynamics experiments in lunar orbit using the RAE-B spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, D. L.; Walden, H.

    1973-01-01

    A series of seven gravity-gradient dynamics experiments is proposed utilizing the Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE-B) spacecraft in lunar orbit. It is believed that none of the experiments will impair the spacecraft structure or adversely affect the continuation of the scientific mission of the satellite. The first experiment is designed to investigate the spacecraft dynamical behavior in the absence of libration damper action and inertia. It requires stable gravity-gradient capture of the spacecraft in lunar orbit with small amplitude attitude librations as a prerequisite. Four subsequent experiments involve partial retraction, ultimately followed by full redeployment, of one or two of the 230-meter booms forming the lunar-directed Vee-antenna. These boom length change operations will induce moderate amplitude angular librations of the spacecraft.

  13. DOUBLE-DIFFUSIVE MIXING IN STELLAR INTERIORS IN THE PRESENCE OF HORIZONTAL GRADIENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medrano, M.; Garaud, P. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Baskin School of Engineering, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 (United States); Stellmach, S. [Institut für Geophysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Münster D-48149 (Germany)

    2014-09-10

    We have identified a potentially important source of mixing in stellar radiation zones which would arise whenever two conditions are satisfied: (1) the presence of an inverse vertical compositional gradient, and (2) the presence of density-compensating horizontal gradients of temperature and composition. The former can be caused by off-center nuclear burning, atomic diffusion, or surface accretion. The latter could be caused by rotation, tides, meridional flows, etc. The linear instability and its nonlinear development have been studied in an oceanographic context. It is known to drive the formation of stacks of fingering layers separated by diffusive interfaces, called intrusions. Using three-dimensional numerical simulations of the process in the astrophysically relevant region of parameter space, we find similar results and demonstrate that the material transport in the intrusive regime can be highly enhanced compared with pure diffusion, even in systems which would otherwise be stable to fingering (thermohaline) convection.

  14. Research on n-γ discrimination method based on spectrum gradient analysis of signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Xiaoliang; Liu Guofu; Yang Jun; Wang Yueke

    2013-01-01

    Having discovered that there are distinct differences between the spectrum gradient of the output neutron and γ-ray signal from liquid scintillator detectors, this paper presented a n-γ discrimination method called spectrum gradient analysis (SGA) based on frequency-domain features of the pulse signals. The basic principle and feasibility of SGA method were discussed and the validity of n-γ discrimination results of SGA was verified by the associated particle neutron flight experiment. The discrimination performance of SGA was evaluated under different conditions of sampling rates ranging from 5 G/s to 250 M/s. The results show that SGA method exhibits insensitivity to noise, strong anti-interference ability, stable discrimination performance and lower amount of calculation in contrast with time-domain n-γ discrimination methods. (authors)

  15. Colloid and Phosphorus Leaching From Undisturbed Soil Cores Sampled Along a Natural Clay Gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    2011-01-01

    was to correlate easily measurable soil properties, such as clay content and water-dispersible colloids, to colloid and phosphorus leaching. The clay contents across the gradient ranged from 0.11 to 0.23 kg kgj1. Irrigating with artificial rainwater, all samples showed a high first flush of colloids and phosphorus......The presence of strongly sorbing compounds in groundwater and tile drains can be a result of colloid-facilitated transport. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from macropores in undisturbed soil cores sampled across a natural clay gradient at Aarup, Denmark, were studied. The aim of the study...... followed by lower and stable colloid and phosphorus concentrations. The mass of particles leached at first flush was independent of clay content and was attributed to the instant release of particles associated with the macropore walls and released upon contact with flowing water. Below a clay content of È...

  16. Effect of price elasticity of demand in monopolies with gradient adjustment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalli, Fausto; Naimzada, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •A monopoly with isoelastic demand function is studied. •Reduced rationality monopolist uses gradient adjustment. •If marginal cost is small, increasing elasticity leads to stable dynamics. •For large marginal cost, dynamic can be unstable for both small and large elasticity. -- Abstract: We study a monopolistic market characterized by a constant elasticity demand function, in which the firm technology is described by a linear total cost function. The firm is assumed to be boundedly rational and to follow a gradient rule to adjust the production level in order to optimize its profit. We focus on what happens on varying the price elasticity of demand, studying the effect on the equilibrium stability. We prove that, depending on the relation between the market size and the marginal cost, two different scenarios are possible, in which elasticity has either a stabilizing or a mixed stabilizing/destabilizing effect

  17. pH regulation of the kinetic stability of the lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, H.; Andersen, Kell Kleiner; Sehgal, P.

    2013-01-01

    Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase (TlL) is a kinetically stable protein, resistant toward both denaturation and refolding in the presence of the ionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and the nonionic surfactant decyl maltoside (DecM). We investigate the pH dependence of this kinetic stabilit...... but not sufficient feature of SDS resistance, because this has to be combined with sufficient negative electrostatic potential to avoid extensive SDS binding....

  18. Model predictive control for wind power gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Tobias Gybel; Boyd, Stephen; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2015-01-01

    We consider the operation of a wind turbine and a connected local battery or other electrical storage device, taking into account varying wind speed, with the goal of maximizing the total energy generated while respecting limits on the time derivative (gradient) of power delivered to the grid. We...... wind data and modern wind forecasting methods. The simulation results using real wind data demonstrate the ability to reject the disturbances from fast changes in wind speed, ensuring certain power gradients, with an insignificant loss in energy production....... ranges. The system dynamics are quite non-linear, and the constraints and objectives are not convex functions of the control inputs, so the resulting optimal control problem is difficult to solve globally. In this paper, we show that by a novel change of variables, which focuses on power flows, we can...

  19. Structures and Strength of Gradient Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels; Zhang, Xiaodan; Huang, Xiaoxu

    distance from the surface forming a gradient structure. In this study [2], by shot peening of a low carbon steel a gradient structure has been produced extending to about 1 mm below the surface. A number of strengthening mechanisms have been analyzed as a basis for a calculation of the stress and strain......A recent study [1] has shown that a microstructure can be refined to a record low of 5 nm and that dislocation glide is still a controlling mechanism at this length scale. The nanostructure was produced in Cu by applying a very high strain in friction. The stress and strain decrease with increasing...... as a function of the distance from the surface. The results are evaluated by a finite element investigation of shot peening....

  20. Temperature Gradient Driven Lasing and Stimulated Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandner, K.; Ritsch, H.

    2012-11-01

    A laser can be understood as a thermodynamic engine converting heat to a coherent single mode field close to Carnot efficiency. To achieve lasing, spectral shaping of the excitation light is used to generate a higher effective temperature on the pump than on the gain transition. Here, using a toy model of a quantum well structure with two suitably designed tunnel-coupled wells kept at different temperatures, we predict that lasing can also occur on an actual spatial temperature gradient between the pump and gain regions. Gain and narrow band laser emission require a sufficiently large temperature gradient and resonator quality. Lasing appears concurrent with amplified heat flow between the reservoirs and points to a new form of stimulated solid state cooling. In addition, such a mechanism could reduce intrinsic heating and thus extend the operating regime of quantum cascade lasers by substituting phonon emission driven injection by a phonon absorption step.

  1. Optimizing sampling approaches along ecological gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweiger, Andreas; Irl, Severin D. H.; Steinbauer, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    1. Natural scientists and especially ecologists use manipulative experiments or field observations along gradients to differentiate patterns driven by processes from those caused by random noise. A well-conceived sampling design is essential for identifying, analysing and reporting underlying...... patterns in a statistically solid and reproducible manner, given the normal restrictions in labour, time and money. However, a technical guideline about an adequate sampling design to maximize prediction success under restricted resources is lacking. This study aims at developing such a solid...... and reproducible guideline for sampling along gradients in all fields of ecology and science in general. 2. We conducted simulations with artificial data for five common response types known in ecology, each represented by a simple function (no response, linear, exponential, symmetric unimodal and asymmetric...

  2. Transport of nanoparticles in a temperature gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Shawn; Cahill, David

    2006-03-01

    Thermodiffusion, mass transport in a temperature gradient, is commonly characterized by either the thermodiffusion coefficient DT or the Soret coefficient ST; e.g., at low particle concentration c, the particle flux of a colloidal suspension subjected to a temperature gradient ∇T is J=- cDT∇T-Dc∇c, where Dc is the diffusion coefficient and the Soret coefficient is ST= DT/Dc. We present our measured DT data for aqueous suspensions of charged polystyrene spheres, alumina nanoparticles, and globular proteins of lysozyme. Special emphasis is given to our published work on charged polystyrene spheres with different surface functionalities. For example, in solutions with large concentrations of monovalent salts, 100 mM, DT for 26 nm spheres with carboxyl functionality can be varied within the range -0.9 x10^- 7 cm^2 s-1 K-1 protein solutions of lysozyme.

  3. Mechanistic Analysis of Cocrystal Dissolution as a Function of pH and Micellar Solubilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fengjuan; Amidon, Gordon L; Rodriguez-Hornedo, Nair; Amidon, Gregory E

    2016-03-07

    The purpose of this work is to provide a mechanistic understanding of the dissolution behavior of cocrystals under the influence of ionization and micellar solubilization. Mass transport models were developed by applying Fick's law of diffusion to dissolution with simultaneous chemical reactions in the hydrodynamic boundary layer adjacent to the dissolving cocrystal surface to predict the pH at the dissolving solid-liquid interface (i.e., interfacial pH) and the flux of cocrystals. To evaluate the predictive power of these models, dissolution studies of carbamazepine-saccharin (CBZ-SAC) and carbamazepine-salicylic acid (CBZ-SLC) cocrystals were performed at varied pH and surfactant concentrations above the critical stabilization concentration (CSC), where the cocrystals were thermodynamically stable. The findings in this work demonstrate that the pH dependent dissolution behavior of cocrystals with ionizable components is dependent on interfacial pH. This mass transport analysis demonstrates the importance of pH, cocrystal solubility, diffusivity, and micellar solubilization on the dissolution rates of cocrystals.

  4. Adaptive evolution of Escherichia coli to Ciprofloxacin in controlled stress environments: emergence of tolerance in spatial and temporal gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, J.; Sanford, R. A.; Dong, Y.; Shechtman, L. A.; Zhou, L.; Alcalde, R.; Werth, C. J.; Fouke, B. W.

    2016-12-01

    Microorganisms in nature have evolved in response to a variety of environmental stresses, including gradients of temperature, pH, substrate availability and aqueous chemistry. While environmental stresses are considered to be the driving forces of adaptive evolution, the impact and extent of any specific stress needed to drive such changes has not been well characterized. In this study, the antibiotic Ciprofloxacin was used as a stressor and systematically applied to E. coli st. 307 cells via a spatial gradient in a microfluidic pore network and a temporal gradient in batch cultures. The microfluidic device facilitated in vitro real-time tracking of bacterial abundances and dynamic spatial distributions in response to the gradients of both the antibiotic and nutrients. Cells collected from the microfluidic device showed growth on plates containing up to 10-times the original minimum inhibition concentration (MIC). In batch systems, Ciprofloxacin was used to evaluate adaptive responses via temporal gradients, in which the stressor concentration was incrementally increased over time with each transfer of the culture after 24 hours of growth. Responses of E. coli 307 to these stress patterns were measured by quantifying changes in the MIC for Ciprofloxacin. Over a period of 18 days of step-wise concentration increments, bacterial cells were observed to acquire tolerance gradually and eventually adapt to a 28-fold increase in the original MIC. Samples at different stages within the temporal Ciprofloxacin gradient treatment show different extents of resistance. All samples exhibited resistance exceeding the highest exposure stress concentration. In combination with the spatial and temporal gradient systems, this work provides the first comprehensive measure of the dynamic resistance of E. coli in response to Ciprofloxacin concentration gradients. These will provide invaluable insights to understand the effects of antibiotic stresses on bacterial adaptive evolution in

  5. Velocity Gradient Power Functional for Brownian Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de las Heras, Daniel; Schmidt, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    We present an explicit and simple approximation for the superadiabatic excess (over ideal gas) free power functional, admitting the study of the nonequilibrium dynamics of overdamped Brownian many-body systems. The functional depends on the local velocity gradient and is systematically obtained from treating the microscopic stress distribution as a conjugate field. The resulting superadiabatic forces are beyond dynamical density functional theory and are of a viscous nature. Their high accuracy is demonstrated by comparison to simulation results.

  6. CERN/KEK: Very high accelerating gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: A world-wide effort is under way to develop linear electron-positron colliders so that physics experiments can be extended into a range of energies where circular machines (necessarily much larger than CERN's 27-kilometre LEP machine) would be crippled by synchrotron radiation. CERN is studying the feasibility of building a 2 TeV machine called CLIC powered not by individual klystrons, but by a high intensity electron 'drive' linac running parallel to the main linac (November 1990, page 7). This drive linac will itself be powered by similar superconducting cavities to those developed for LEP. A high gradient is an obvious design aim for any future high energy linear collider because it makes it shorter and therefore cheaper - the design figure for the CLIC machine is 80 MV/m. The CLIC study group has taken a significant step forward in demonstrating the technical feasibility of their machine by achieving peak and average accelerating gradients of 137 MV/m and 84 MV/m respectively in a short section of accelerating structure during high gradient tests at the Japanese KEK Laboratory last year. This result obtained within the framework of a CERN/KEK collaboration on linear colliders was obtained using a 20-cell accelerating section built at CERN using state-of the- art technology which served both as a model for CLIC studies as well as a prototype for the Japanese Linear Collider studies. The operating frequency of the model accelerating section is 2.6 times lower than the CLIC frequency but was chosen because a high power r.f. source and pulse compression scheme has been developed for this frequency at KEK. Testing CLIC models at 11.4 GHz is however more stringent than at 30 GHz because the chance of electrical breakdown increases as the frequency is lowered. This recent result clearly demonstrates that a gradient of 80 MV/m is feasible

  7. Advanced concepts for high-gradient acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittum, D.H.

    1998-08-01

    The promise of high-gradient accelerator research is a future for physics beyond the 5-TeV energy scale. Looking beyond what can be engineered today, the authors examine basic research directions for colliders of the future, from mm-waves to lasers, and from solid-state to plasmas, with attention to material damage, beam-dynamics, a workable collision scheme, and energetics.

  8. Quantized Concentration Gradient in Picoliter Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jong Wook

    2010-10-01

    Generation of concentration gradient is of paramount importance in the success of reactions for cell biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, drug-discovery, chemotaxis, cell culture, biomaterials synthesis, and tissue engineering. In conventional method of conducting reactions, the concentration gradients is achieved by using pipettes, test tubes, 96-well assay plates, and robotic systems. Conventional methods require milliliter or microliter volumes of samples for typical experiments with multiple and sequential reactions. It is a challenge to carry out experiments with precious samples that have strict limitations with the amount of samples or the price to pay for the amount. In order to overcome this challenge faced by the conventional methods, fluidic devices with micrometer scale channels have been developed. These devices, however, cause restrictions on changing the concentration due to the fixed gradient set based on fixed fluidic channels.ootnotetextJambovane, S.; Duin, E. C.; Kim, S-K.; Hong, J. W., Determination of Kinetic Parameters, KM and kcat, with a Single Experiment on a Chip. textitAnalytical Chemistry, 81, (9), 3239-3245, 2009.^,ootnotetextJambovane, S.; Hong, J. W., Lorenz-like Chatotic System on a Chip In The 14th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences (MicroTAS), The Netherlands, October, 2010. Here, we present a unique microfluidic system that can generate quantized concentration gradient by using series of droplets generated by a mechanical valve based injection method.ootnotetextJambovane, S.; Rho, H.; Hong, J., Fluidic Circuit based Predictive Model of Microdroplet Generation through Mechanical Cutting. In ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition, Lake Buena Vista, Florida, USA, October, 2009.^,ootnotetextLee, W.; Jambovane, S.; Kim, D.; Hong, J., Predictive Model on Micro Droplet Generation through Mechanical Cutting. Microfluidics and Nanofluidics, 7, (3), 431-438, 2009

  9. Designing optimal nanofocusing with a gradient hyperlens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lian; Prokopeva, Ludmila J.; Chen, Hongsheng; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2017-11-01

    We report the design of a high-throughput gradient hyperbolic lenslet built with real-life materials and capable of focusing a beam into a deep sub-wavelength spot of λ/23. This efficient design is achieved through high-order transformation optics and circular effective-medium theory (CEMT), which are used to engineer the radially varying anisotropic artificial material based on the thin alternating cylindrical metal and dielectric layers. The radial gradient of the effective anisotropic optical constants allows for matching the impedances at the input and output interfaces, drastically improving the throughput of the lenslet. However, it is the use of the zeroth-order CEMT that enables the practical realization of a gradient hyperlens with realistic materials. To illustrate the importance of using the CEMT versus the conventional planar effective-medium theory (PEMT) for cylindrical anisotropic systems, such as our hyperlens, both the CEMT and PEMT are adopted to design gradient hyperlenses with the same materials and order of elemental layers. The CEMT- and PEMT-based designs show similar performance if the number of metal-dielectric binary layers is sufficiently large (9+ pairs) and if the layers are sufficiently thin. However, for the manufacturable lenses with realistic numbers of layers (e.g. five pairs) and thicknesses, the performance of the CEMT design continues to be practical, whereas the PEMT-based design stops working altogether. The accurate design of transformation optics-based layered cylindrical devices enabled by CEMT allow for a new class of robustly manufacturable nanophotonic systems, even with relatively thick layers of real-life materials.

  10. Magnetoresponsive Photonic Microspheres with Structural Color Gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Yeol; Choi, Jongkook; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Shin, Jung H; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2017-04-01

    Photonic Janus particles are created by alternately sputtering silica and titania on microspheres in order to obtain a structural color gradient. In addition, the microspheres are rendered magnetoresponsive. The Janus microspheres with optical and magnetic anisotropy enable on-demand control over orientation and structural color through manipulation of an external magnetic field, thereby being useful as active color pigments for reflection-mode displays. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Radial oxygen gradients over rat cortex arterioles

    OpenAIRE

    Galler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We present the results of the visualisation of radial oxygen gradients in rats’ cortices and their use in neurocritical management. Methods: PO2 maps of the cortex of 10 wistar rats were obtained with a camera (SensiMOD, PCO, Kehlheim, Germany). Those pictures were analyzed and edited by a custom-made software. We chose a vessel for examination. A matrix, designed to evaluate the cortical O2 partial pressure, was placed vertically to the artery and afterwards multiple regio...

  12. Sodium setpoint and gradient in bicarbonate hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Carlo; Libutti, Pasquale; Lisi, Piero; Vernaglione, Luigi; Casucci, Francesco; Losurdo, Nicola; Teutonico, Annalisa; Lomonte, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    The demonstration of an individual osmolar setpoint in hemodialysis (HD) is crucial to individualize dialysate sodium concentrations. Furthermore, the diffusive gradient between plasma and dialysate sodium is important in the "fine tuning" of the intradialytic sodium mass balance (MB). The design of this study included part A: a retrospective analysis of predialysis plasma sodium concentrations extracted from a 6-year database in our HD population (147 prevalent white anuric patients); and part B: study of intradialytic sodium kinetics in 48 patients undergoing one 4-hour bicarbonate HD session. Direct potentiometry with an ion-selective electrode was used for sodium measurements. Study part A: the mean number of plasma sodium measurements per patient was 16.06 ± 14.03 over a mean follow-up of 3.55 ± 1.76 years. The mean of the averaged plasma sodium concentrations was 136.7 ± 2.1 mmol/L, with a low mean intraindividual coefficient of variation (1.39 ± 0.4). Study part B: mean predialysis and postdialysis plasma sodium concentrations were 135.8 ± 0.9 and 138.0 ± 0.9 mmol/L (p<0.001). Mean inlet dialyzer sodium concentration was 138.7 ± 1.1 mmol/L; the hourly diffusion concentration gradients showed a statistically significant transfer from dialysate to plasma (Wilks ? <0.0001). A statistically significant relationship was found between sodium MB and diffusion gradient (p<0.02), and between sodium MB and ultrafiltration volume (p<0.01). A relatively "fixed" and individual osmolar setpoint in HD patients was shown for the first time in a long-term follow-up. A dialysate sodium concentration of 140 mmol/L determined a dialysate to plasma sodium gradient.

  13. High gradient accelerators for linear light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, W.A.

    1988-09-26

    Ultra-high gradient radio frequency linacs powered by relativistic klystrons appear to be able to provide compact sources of radiation at XUV and soft x-ray wavelengths with a duration of 1 picosecond or less. This paper provides a tutorial review of the physics applicable to scaling the present experience of the accelerator community to the regime applicable to compact linear light sources. 22 refs., 11 figs., 21 tabs.

  14. Stable Treemaps via Local Moves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondag, Max; Speckmann, Bettina; Verbeek, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    Treemaps are a popular tool to visualize hierarchical data: items are represented by nested rectangles and the area of each rectangle corresponds to the data being visualized for this item. The visual quality of a treemap is commonly measured via the aspect ratio of the rectangles. If the data changes, then a second important quality criterion is the stability of the treemap: how much does the treemap change as the data changes. We present a novel stable treemapping algorithm that has very high visual quality. Whereas existing treemapping algorithms generally recompute the treemap every time the input changes, our algorithm changes the layout of the treemap using only local modifications. This approach not only gives us direct control over stability, but it also allows us to use a larger set of possible layouts, thus provably resulting in treemaps of higher visual quality compared to existing algorithms. We further prove that we can reach all possible treemap layouts using only our local modifications. Furthermore, we introduce a new measure for stability that better captures the relative positions of rectangles. We finally show via experiments on real-world data that our algorithm outperforms existing treemapping algorithms also in practice on either visual quality and/or stability. Our algorithm scores high on stability regardless of whether we use an existing stability measure or our new measure.

  15. Effects of pH during liquid storage of goat semen on sperm viability and fertilizing potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-He; Dong, Hai-Bo; Ma, Dong-Li; Li, You-Wei; Han, Dong; Luo, Ming-Jiu; Chang, Zhong-Le; Tan, Jing-He

    2016-01-01

    A specific problem in goat semen preservation is the detrimental effect of seminal plasma on sperm viability in extenders containing yolk or milk. Thus, the use of chemically defined extenders will have obvious advantages. Although previous studies indicate that the initial pH of an extender is crucial to sustain high sperm motility, changes in extender pH during long-term semen storage have not been observed. Monitoring extender pH at different times of semen storage and modeling its variation according to nonlinear models is thus important for protocol optimization for long-term liquid semen preservation. The present results showed that during long-term liquid storage of goat semen, both sperm motility and semen pH decreased gradually, and a strong correlation was observed between the two. Whereas increasing the initial extender pH from 6.04 to 6.25 or storage with stabilized pH improved, storage with artificially lowered pH impaired sperm motility. Extender renewal improved sperm motility by maintaining a stable pH. Sperm coating with chicken (Gallus gallus) egg yolk improved motility by increasing tolerance to pH decline. A new extender (n-mZAP) with a higher buffering capacity was formulated, and n-mZAP maintained higher sperm motility, membrane integrity and acrosome intactness than the currently used mZAP extender did. Goat semen liquid-stored for 12 d in n-mZAP produced pregnancy and kidding rates similar to those obtained with freshly collected semen following artificial insemination. In conclusion, maintenance of a stable pH during liquid semen storage dramatically improved sperm viability and fertilizing potential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Air temperature gradient in large industrial hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpuk, Michał; Pełech, Aleksander; Przydróżny, Edward; Walaszczyk, Juliusz; Szczęśniak, Sylwia

    2017-11-01

    In the rooms with dominant sensible heat load, volume airflow depends on many factors incl. pre-established temperature difference between exhaust and supply airflow. As the temperature difference is getting higher, airflow volume drops down, consequently, the cost of AHU is reduced. In high industrial halls with air exhaust grids located under the ceiling additional temperature gradient above working zone should be taken into consideration. In this regard, experimental research of the vertical air temperature gradient in high industrial halls were carried out for the case of mixing ventilation system The paper presents the results of air temperature distribution measurements in high technological hall (mechanically ventilated) under significant sensible heat load conditions. The supply airflow was delivered to the hall with the help of the swirl diffusers while exhaust grids were located under the hall ceiling. Basing on the air temperature distribution measurements performed on the seven pre-established levels, air temperature gradient in the area between 2.0 and 7.0 m above the floor was calculated and analysed.

  17. Diffusiophoresis in one-dimensional solute gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ault, Jesse T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Warren, Patrick B. [Unilever R& D Port Sunlight, Bebington (United Kingdom); Shin, Sangwoo [Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI (United States); Stone, Howard A. [Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2017-11-06

    Here, the diffusiophoretic motion of suspended colloidal particles under one-dimensional solute gradients is solved using numerical and analytical techniques. Similarity solutions are developed for the injection and withdrawal dynamics of particles into semi-infinite pores. Furthermore, a method of characteristics formulation of the diffusion-free particle transport model is presented and integrated to realize particle trajectories. Analytical solutions are presented for the limit of small particle diffusiophoretic mobility Γp relative to the solute diffusivity Ds for particle motions in both semi-infinite and finite domains. Results confirm the build up of local maxima and minima in the propagating particle front dynamics. The method of characteristics is shown to successfully predict particle motions and the position of the particle front, although it fails to accurately predict suspended particle concentrations in the vicinity of sharp gradients, such as at the particle front peak seen in some injection cases, where particle diffusion inevitably plays an important role. Results inform the design of applications in which the use of applied solute gradients can greatly enhance particle injection into and withdrawal from pores.

  18. Gradient field microscopy of unstained specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taewoo; Sridharan, Shamira; Popescu, Gabriel

    2012-03-12

    We present a phase derivative microscopy technique referred to as gradient field microscopy (GFM), which provides the first-order derivatives of the phase associated with an optical field passing through a transparent specimen. GFM utilizes spatial light modulation at the Fourier plane of a bright field microscope to optically obtain the derivatives of the phase and increase the contrast of the final image. The controllable spatial modulation pattern allows us to obtain both one component of the field gradient (derivative along one direction) and the gradient intensity, which offers some advantages over the regular differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. Most importantly, unlike DIC, GFM does not use polarizing optics and, thus, it is applicable to birefringent samples. We demonstrate these features of GFM with studies of static and dynamic biological cells (HeLa cells and red blood cells). We show that GFM is capable of qualitatively providing information about cell membrane fluctuations. Specifically, we captured the disappearance of the bending mode of fluctuations in osmotically swollen red blood cells.

  19. Learnability of e–stable equilibria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Christev, A.; Slobodyan, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 5 (2014), s. 959-984 ISSN 1365-1005 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : adaptive learning * expectational stability * stochastic gradient Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.667, year: 2014

  20. Learnability of e–stable equilibria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Christev, A.; Slobodyan, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 5 (2014), s. 959-984 ISSN 1365-1005 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : adaptive learning * expectational stability * stochastic gradient Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.667, year: 2014

  1. Can We Untangle the Weather? Stable Water Isotope Controls on the Juneau Icefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihle, A. C.; Keenan, E.; Yong, C.; Bridgers, S. L.; Markle, B. R.; Hamel, J.; Klein, E. S.

    2017-12-01

    Stable water isotopes in snow and ice provide a reliable proxy for past weather and climate. However, untangling weather and climate signals from water isotopes on the Juneau Icefield, Alaska, has proven difficult due to consistent summer melt and rain. The Juneau Icefield is a large glaciated region consisting of complex terrain and sharp climatic gradients. Here we study how topographic steepness and elevation influence stable water isotope ratios on the Juneau Icefield using vertical snowpit profiles collected from water year 2017's snowpack. As terrain steepens, we expect gradients in isotope ratios to intensify. In addition, we aim to determine how post-depositional metamorphism, particularly precipitation, affects water isotope ratios. We anticipate rain events to increase the proportion of heavy water isotopes. Lastly, we compare model output and remote sensing observations of storm origin to vertical stratigraphy of stable isotope ratios in the snowpack in order to determine if it is possible to use isotopes to identify past storm tracks on the Juneau Icefield. Snowpack isotope stratigraphy ratios can likely be linked to seasonal trends of storm characteristics. Given this enhanced understanding of how stable water isotopes behave on the Juneau Icefield, we contribute to the understanding of past weather and climate, both here and elsewhere, and explore the possibility for future deep ice cores on the Juneau Icefield.

  2. Stable, precise, and reproducible patterning of bicoid and hunchback molecules in the early Drosophila embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurie Okabe-Oho

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Precise patterning of morphogen molecules and their accurate reading out are of key importance in embryonic development. Recent experiments have visualized distributions of proteins in developing embryos and shown that the gradient of concentration of Bicoid morphogen in Drosophila embryos is established rapidly after fertilization and remains stable through syncytial mitoses. This stable Bicoid gradient is read out in a precise way to distribute Hunchback with small fluctuations in each embryo and in a reproducible way, with small embryo-to-embryo fluctuation. The mechanisms of such stable, precise, and reproducible patterning through noisy cellular processes, however, still remain mysterious. To address these issues, here we develop the one- and three-dimensional stochastic models of the early Drosophila embryo. The simulated results show that the fluctuation in expression of the hunchback gene is dominated by the random arrival of Bicoid at the hunchback enhancer. Slow diffusion of Hunchback protein, however, averages out this intense fluctuation, leading to the precise patterning of distribution of Hunchback without loss of sharpness of the boundary of its distribution. The coordinated rates of diffusion and transport of input Bicoid and output Hunchback play decisive roles in suppressing fluctuations arising from the dynamical structure change in embryos and those arising from the random diffusion of molecules, and give rise to the stable, precise, and reproducible patterning of Bicoid and Hunchback distributions.

  3. pH Regulation of Electrogenic Sugar/H+ Symport in MFS Sugar Permeases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzone, Andre; Madej, M. Gregor; Kaback, H. Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial sugar symporters in the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) use the H+ (and in a few cases Na+) electrochemical gradients to achieve active transport of sugar into the cell. Because a number of structures of MFS sugar symporters have been solved recently, molecular insight into the transport mechanism is possible from detailed functional analysis. We present here a comparative electrophysiological study of the lactose permease (LacY), the fucose permease (FucP) and the xylose permease (XylE), which reveals common mechanistic principles and differences. In all three symporters energetically downhill electrogenic sugar/H+ symport is observed. Comparison of the pH dependence of symport at symmetrical pH exhibits broad bell-shaped pH profiles extending over 3 to 6 pH units and a decrease at extremely alkaline pH ≥ 9.4 and at acidic to neutral pH = 4.6–7.5. The pH dependence can be described by an acidic to neutral apparent pK (pKapp) and an alkaline pKapp. Experimental evidence suggests that the alkaline pKapp is due to H+ depletion at the protonation site, while the acidic pKapp is due to inhibition of deprotonation. Since previous studies suggest that a single carboxyl group in LacY (Glu325) may be the only side chain directly involved in H+ translocation and a carboxyl side chain with similar properties has been identified in FucP (Asp46) and XylE (Asp27), the present results imply that the pK of this residue is switched during H+/sugar symport in all three symporters. PMID:27227677

  4. Vegetation engineers marsh morphology through multiple competing stable states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marani, Marco; Da Lio, Cristina; D’Alpaos, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Marshes display impressive biogeomorphic features, such as zonation, a mosaic of extensive vegetation patches of rather uniform composition, exhibiting sharp transitions in the presence of extremely small topographic gradients. Although generally associated with the accretion processes necessary for marshes to keep up with relative sea level rise, competing environmental constraints, and ecologic controls, zonation is still poorly understood in terms of the underlying biogeomorphic mechanisms. Here we find, through observations and modeling interpretation, that zonation is the result of coupled geomorphological–biological dynamics and that it stems from the ability of vegetation to actively engineer the landscape by tuning soil elevation within preferential ranges of optimal adaptation. We find multiple peaks in the frequency distribution of observed topographic elevation and identify them as the signature of biologic controls on geomorphodynamics through competing stable states modulated by the interplay of inorganic and organic deposition. Interestingly, the stable biogeomorphic equilibria correspond to suboptimal rates of biomass production, a result coherent with recent observations. The emerging biogeomorphic structures may display varying degrees of robustness to changes in the rate of sea level rise and sediment availability, with implications for the overall resilience of marsh ecosystems to climatic changes. PMID:23401529

  5. Transport in Halobacterium Halobium: Light-Induced Cation-Gradients, Amino Acid Transport Kinetics, and Properties of Transport Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyi, Janos K.

    1977-01-01

    Cell envelope vesicles prepared from H. halobium contain bacteriorhodopsin and upon illumination protons are ejected. Coupled to the proton motive force is the efflux of Na(+). Measurements of Na-22 flux, exterior pH change, and membrane potential, Delta(psi) (with the dye 3,3'-dipentyloxadicarbocyanine) indicate that the means of Na(+) transport is sodium/proton exchange. The kinetics of the pH changes and other evidence suggests that the antiport is electrogenic (H(+)/Na(++ greater than 1). The resulting large chemical gradient for Na(+) (outside much greater than inside), as well as the membrane potential, will drive the transport of 18 amino acids. The I9th, glutamate, is unique in that its accumulation is indifferent to Delta(psi): this amino acid is transported only when a chemical gradient for Na(+) is present. Thus, when more and more NaCl is included in the vesicles glutamate transport proceeds with longer and longer lags. After illumination the gradient of H+() collapses within 1 min, while the large Na(+) gradient and glutamate transporting activity persists for 10- 15 min, indicating that proton motive force is not necessary for transport. A chemical gradient of Na(+), arranged by suspending vesicles loaded with KCl in NaCl, drives glutamate transport in the dark without other sources of energy, with V(sub max) and K(sub m) comparable to light-induced transport. These and other lines of evidence suggest that the transport of glutamate is facilitated by symport with Na(+), in an electrically neutral fashion, so that only the chemical component of the Na(+) gradient is a driving force.

  6. A multi-taxonomic indicator of acidification: isolating the effects of pH from other water-chemistry variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lonergan, S. P.; Rasmussen, J. B.

    1996-08-01

    A multi-taxonomic indicator of acidification was developed using the littoral benthic community. The objective was to isolate the effects of pH on this community from the effects of measured environmental co-variables. Multivariate direct gradient analysis was one of the tools used. The approach was then contrasted with the more general approach of identifying single- species indicators whose distributions indirectly reflect pH variations while ignoring known co-variables. Results indicated that many zoobenthic taxa, frequently cited as being negatively affected by acidification, reflect instead changes along a water-hardness gradient. The study indicated also that the management of pollutants cannot be based on laboratory studies of single-species responses; it is essential to include ecosystem-level information. 62 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs.

  7. PhD Education Outcomes: Results of a National Survey of Nursing PhD Alumni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbecker, Carol Hall; Nwosu, Chizoba; Zhang, Yuqing; Leveille, Suzanne

    A national survey was conducted to examine the relationship between individual students' experiences and nursing PhD program characteristics and program outcomes. In light of the shortage of doctorally prepared nurse scientists and a growth in nursing PhD programs, an examination of the PhD nursing education experience in relation to educational outcomes is timely. Data were collected from graduates of a 50 percent random sample of nursing PhD programs in the United States. Graduates who had worked as research assistants, attended classroom-based programs, and worked as a nurse no more than 12 hours per week during their PhD education were more likely to have successful publication records and receive external research grant funding than graduates who did not have these experiences. On the basis of traditionally accepted measures of research productivity, our results indicate that nursing PhD programs have limited success in producing nurse researchers.

  8. Towards effective and stable probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarullina, D R; Damshkaln, L G; Bruslik, N L; Konovalova, O A; Ilinskaya, O N; Lozinsky, V I

    2015-01-01

    -MDT, Moscow, Russia).Starch swelling and dissolution was studied in simulated colonic fluid (SCF), prepared according to [3] and in distilled water (pH = 6.0) as control. Amylase from Aspergillus oryzae (A8220, Sigma) was added to the solutions to study the influence of amylase. The formulation form was examined visually during 14 h incubation time.Fluorescence microscopy images were obtained with a Leica DM6000B (Germany) fluorescent microscope using Leica FW4000 software.L. plantarum 8PA3 loaded in SPS were placed either in HCl solution (pH 2), or in 2% oxgall bile solution, or in 0.85% NaCl solution. Viability was tested after 2, 4 and 6 h incubation at 37°C by plating diluted aliquots onto MRS agar with subsequent counting of bacterial colony forming units (CFU). In addition, viability was determined using LIVE/DEAD BacLight bacterial viability kit L-7012 (Molecular Probes, Invitrogen) as described elsewhere [4]. Fluorescence in the stained samples was estimated with BD FACS Canto II (USA) flow cytometer or fluorescent microscope.Nitric oxide (NO) production was assessed with DAF-FM DA and DAA fluorescent dyes as described earlier [4]. Each experiment was performed in triplicate. In the present study we studied the probiotic composition comprising of SPS and bacteria L. plantarum 8PA3. We used AFM to confirm effective fixation of the cells to carbohydrate. The compositions were found to swell quickly (~5 min) in aqueous solutions either containing amylase, or not. Tested starch formulations disintegrated during the first 5-10 min of incubation in amylase solutions whereas in amylase-free probes dissolution was less intensive (after ~30 min). Amylolysis of starch excipients was less pronounced in aqueous amylase solution than in SCF, supplemented with amylase. None of 19 studied Lactobacillus strains hydrolyzed SPS when growing on MRS agar supplemented with it. The amount of viable L. plantarum 8PA3 cells formulated with SPS was high and did not change when stored for 6

  9. Comparing species interaction networks along environmental gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellissier, Loïc; Albouy, Camille; Bascompte, Jordi; Farwig, Nina; Graham, Catherine; Loreau, Michel; Maglianesi, Maria Alejandra; Melián, Carlos J; Pitteloud, Camille; Roslin, Tomas; Rohr, Rudolf; Saavedra, Serguei; Thuiller, Wilfried; Woodward, Guy; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Gravel, Dominique

    2017-09-22

    Knowledge of species composition and their interactions, in the form of interaction networks, is required to understand processes shaping their distribution over time and space. As such, comparing ecological networks along environmental gradients represents a promising new research avenue to understand the organization of life. Variation in the position and intensity of links within networks along environmental gradients may be driven by turnover in species composition, by variation in species abundances and by abiotic influences on species interactions. While investigating changes in species composition has a long tradition, so far only a limited number of studies have examined changes in species interactions between networks, often with differing approaches. Here, we review studies investigating variation in network structures along environmental gradients, highlighting how methodological decisions about standardization can influence their conclusions. Due to their complexity, variation among ecological networks is frequently studied using properties that summarize the distribution or topology of interactions such as number of links, connectance, or modularity. These properties can either be compared directly or using a procedure of standardization. While measures of network structure can be directly related to changes along environmental gradients, standardization is frequently used to facilitate interpretation of variation in network properties by controlling for some co-variables, or via null models. Null models allow comparing the deviation of empirical networks from random expectations and are expected to provide a more mechanistic understanding of the factors shaping ecological networks when they are coupled with functional traits. As an illustration, we compare approaches to quantify the role of trait matching in driving the structure of plant-hummingbird mutualistic networks, i.e. a direct comparison, standardized by null models and hypothesis

  10. Magnetoelectric Transverse Gradient Sensor with High Detection Sensitivity and Low Gradient Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingji Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We report, theoretically and experimentally, the realization of a high detection performance in a novel magnetoelectric (ME transverse gradient sensor based on the large ME effect and the magnetic field gradient (MFG technique in a pair of magnetically-biased, electrically-shielded, and mechanically-enclosed ME composites having a transverse orientation and an axial separation. The output voltage of the gradient sensor is directly obtained from the transverse MFG-induced difference in ME voltage between the two ME composites and is calibrated against transverse MFGs to give a high detection sensitivity of 0.4–30.6 V/(T/m, a strong common-mode magnetic field noise rejection rate of <−14.5 dB, a small input-output nonlinearity of <10 ppm, and a low gradient noise of 0.16–620 nT/m/ Hz in a broad frequency range of 1 Hz–170 kHz under a small baseline of 35 mm. An analysis of experimental gradient noise spectra obtained in a magnetically-unshielded laboratory environment reveals the domination of the pink (1/f noise, dielectric loss noise, and power-frequency noise below 3 kHz, in addition to the circuit noise above 3 kHz, in the gradient sensor. The high detection performance, together with the added merit of passive and direct ME conversion by the large ME effect in the ME composites, makes the gradient sensor suitable for the passive, direct, and broadband detection of transverse MFGs.

  11. A gradient analysis of grassed mountain catchments in the Natal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: cathedral peak; Elevation; Environment; environmental data; environmental variable; environmental variables; fire; gradient analysis; highland sourveld; Indirect gradient analysis; mdedelelo wilderness area; Natal Drakensberg; ordination; south africa; species composition; Vegetation; Vegetation environment ...

  12. Growth of fibroblasts and endothelial cells on wettability gradient surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruardy, TG; Moorlag, HE; Schakenraad, JM; VanderMei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    1997-01-01

    The growth, spreading, and shape of human skin fibroblasts (PK 84) and human umbilical cord endothelial cells on dichlorodimethylsilane (DDS) and dimethyloctadecylchlorosilane (DOGS) gradient surfaces were investigated in the presence of serum proteins. Gradient surfaces were prepared on glass using

  13. pH. Training Module 5.305.2.77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with pH, measurement of pH with a pH meter and maintenance of pH meter electrodes. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This module considers the definition of pH, types of electrodes and…

  14. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.

    1999-01-31

    The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume

  15. Identification of active methylotroph populations in an acidic forest soil by stable-isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radajewski, Stefan; Webster, Gordon; Reay, David S; Morris, Samantha A; Ineson, Philip; Nedwell, David B; Prosser, James I; Murrell, J Colin

    2002-08-01

    Stable-isotope probing (SIP) is a culture-independent technique that enables the isolation of DNA from micro-organisms that are actively involved in a specific metabolic process. In this study, SIP was used to characterize the active methylotroph populations in forest soil (pH 3.5) microcosms that were exposed to (13)CH(3)OH or (13)CH(4). Distinct (13)C-labelled DNA ((13)C-DNA) fractions were resolved from total community DNA by CsCl density-gradient centrifugation. Analysis of 16S rDNA sequences amplified from the (13)C-DNA revealed that bacteria related to the genera Methylocella, Methylocapsa, Methylocystis and Rhodoblastus had assimilated the (13)C-labelled substrates, which suggested that moderately acidophilic methylotroph populations were active in the microcosms. Enrichments targeted towards the active proteobacterial CH(3)OH utilizers were successful, although none of these bacteria were isolated into pure culture. A parallel analysis of genes encoding the key enzymes methanol dehydrogenase and particulate methane monooxygenase reflected the 16S rDNA analysis, but unexpectedly revealed sequences related to the ammonia monooxygenase of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) from the beta-subclass of the PROTEOBACTERIA: Analysis of AOB-selective 16S rDNA amplification products identified Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira sequences in the (13)C-DNA fractions, suggesting certain AOB assimilated a significant proportion of (13)CO(2), possibly through a close physical and/or nutritional association with the active methylotrophs. Other sequences retrieved from the (13)C-DNA were related to the 16S rDNA sequences of members of the Acidobacterium division, the beta-Proteobacteria and the order Cytophagales, which implicated these bacteria in the assimilation of reduced one-carbon compounds or in the assimilation of the by-products of methylotrophic carbon metabolism. Results from the (13)CH(3)OH and (13)CH(4) SIP experiments thus provide a rational basis for further

  16. Stable Isotope Identification of Nitrogen Sources for United States (U.S.) Pacific Coast Estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C. A.; Kaldy, J. E.; Fong, P.; Fong, C.; Mochon Collura, T.; Clinton, P.

    2016-02-01

    Nutrients are the leading cause of water quality impairments in the United States, and as a result tools are needed to identify the sources of nutrients. We used natural abundance stable isotope data to evaluate nitrogen sources to U.S. west coast estuaries. We collected macroalgae and analyzed these samples for natural abundance of stable isotopes (δ15N) and supplemented this with available data from the literature for estuaries from Mexico to Alaska. Stable isotope ratios of green macroalgae were compared to δ15N of dissolved inorganic nitrogen of oceanic and watershed end members. There was a latitudinal gradient in δ15N of macroalgae with southern estuaries being 7 per mil heavier than northern estuaries. Gradients in isotope data were compared to nitrogen sources estimated by the USGS using the SPARROW model. In California estuaries, the elevation of isotope data appeared to be related to anthropogenic nitrogen sources. In Oregon systems, the nitrogen levels of streams flowing into the estuaries are related to forest cover, rather than to developed land classes. In Oregon estuaries, the δ15N of macroalgae suggested that the ocean and nitrogen-fixing trees in the watersheds were the dominant nitrogen sources with heavier sites located near the estuary mouth. In California estuaries, the gradient was reversed with heavier sites located upriver. In some Oregon estuaries, there was an elevation an elevation of δ15N above marine end members in the vicinity of wastewater treatment facility discharge locations, suggesting isotopes may be useful for distinguishing inputs along an estuarine gradient.

  17. A silicon-nanowire memory driven by optical gradient force induced bistability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, B. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Institute of Microelectronics, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Cai, H., E-mail: caih@ime.a-star.edu.sg; Gu, Y. D.; Kwong, D. L. [Institute of Microelectronics, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Chin, L. K.; Ng, G. I.; Ser, W. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Huang, J. G. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Institute of Microelectronics, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), Singapore 117685 (Singapore); School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Yang, Z. C. [School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu, A. Q., E-mail: eaqliu@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-12-28

    In this paper, a bistable optical-driven silicon-nanowire memory is demonstrated, which employs ring resonator to generate optical gradient force over a doubly clamped silicon-nanowire. Two stable deformation positions of a doubly clamped silicon-nanowire represent two memory states (“0” and “1”) and can be set/reset by modulating the light intensity (<3 mW) based on the optical force induced bistability. The time response of the optical-driven memory is less than 250 ns. It has applications in the fields of all optical communication, quantum computing, and optomechanical circuits.

  18. Population Games, Stable Games, and Passivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Fox

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The class of “stable games”, introduced by Hofbauer and Sandholm in 2009, has the attractive property of admitting global convergence to equilibria under many evolutionary dynamics. We show that stable games can be identified as a special case of the feedback-system-theoretic notion of a “passive” dynamical system. Motivated by this observation, we develop a notion of passivity for evolutionary dynamics that complements the definition of the class of stable games. Since interconnections of passive dynamical systems exhibit stable behavior, we can make conclusions about passive evolutionary dynamics coupled with stable games. We show how established evolutionary dynamics qualify as passive dynamical systems. Moreover, we exploit the flexibility of the definition of passive dynamical systems to analyze generalizations of stable games and evolutionary dynamics that include forecasting heuristics as well as certain games with memory.

  19. Cementitious porous pavement in stormwater quality control: pH and alkalinity elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Xuheng; Sansalone, John

    2011-01-01

    A certain level of alkalinity acts as a buffer and maintains the pH value in a stable range in water bodies. With rapid urban development, more and more acidic pollutants flow to watersheds with runoff and drop alkalinity to a very low level and ultimately degrade the water environment. Cementitious porous pavement is an effective tool for stormwater acidic neutralization. When stormwater infiltrates cement porous pavement (CPP) materials, alkalinity and pH will be elevated due to the basic characteristics of cement concrete. The elevated alkalinity will neutralize acids in water bodies and maintain the pH in a stable level as a buffer. It is expected that CPP materials still have a certain capability of alkalinity elevation after years of service, which is important for CPP as an effective tool for stormwater management. However, few previous studies have reported on how CPP structures would elevate runoff alkalinity and pH after being exposed to rainfall-runoff for years. In this study, three groups of CPP specimens, all exposed to rainfall-runoff for 3 years, were used to test the pH and alkalinity elevation properties. It was found that runoff pH values were elevated from 7.4 to the range of 7.8-8.6 after infiltrating through the uncoated specimens, and from 7.4 to 8.5-10.7 after infiltrating through aluminum-coated specimens. Runoff alkalinity elevation efficiencies are 11.5-14.5% for uncoated specimens and 42.2% for coated specimens. The study shows that CPP is an effective passive unit operation for stormwater acid neutralization in our built environment.

  20. A Flexible Optical pH Sensor Based on Polysulfone Membranes Coated with pH-Responsive Polyaniline Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedal Abu-Thabit

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A new optical pH sensor based on polysulfone (PSU and polyaniline (PANI was developed. A transparent and flexible PSU membrane was employed as a support. The electrically conductive and pH-responsive PANI was deposited onto the membrane surface by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization (COP. The absorption spectra of the PANI-coated PSU membranes exhibited sensitivity to pH changes in the range of 4–12, which allowed for designing a dual wavelength pH optical sensor. The performance of the membranes was assessed by measuring their response starting from high pH and going down to low pH, and vice versa. It was found that it is necessary to precondition the sensor layers before each measurement due to the slight hysteresis observed during forward and backward pH titrations. PSU membranes with polyaniline coating thicknesses in the range of ≈100–200 nm exhibited fast response times of <4 s, which are attributed to the porous, rough and nanofibrillar morphology of the polyaniline coating. The fabricated pH sensor was characterized by a sigmoidal response (R2 = 0.997 which allows for pH determination over a wide dynamic range. All membranes were stable for a period of more than six months when stored in 1 M HCl solution. The reproducibility of the fabricated optical pH sensors was found to be <0.02 absorption units after one month storage in 1 M HCl solution. The performance of the optical pH sensor was tested and the obtained pH values were compared with the results obtained using a pH meter device.

  1. Recognition of handwritten characters using local gradient feature descriptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surinta, Olarik; Karaaba, Mahir F.; Schomaker, Lambert R.B.; Wiering, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this paper we propose to use local gradient feature descriptors, namely the scale invariant feature transform keypoint descriptor and the histogram of oriented gradients, for handwritten character recognition. The local gradient feature descriptors are used to extract feature vectors

  2. Expanding the capabilities of microfluidic gradient elution moving boundary electrophoresis for complex samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strychalski, Elizabeth A; Henry, Alyssa C; Ross, David

    2011-08-15

    Gradient elution moving boundary electrophoresis (GEMBE) is a robust, continuous injection separation technique that uses electrophoresis to drive electrically charged analytes into a capillary or microfluidic channel for detection, while opposing electroosmosis and controlled variable pressure-driven flow prevent other sample components-for example, cells, proteins, or particulates in complex samples that can interfere with analysis-from entering the channel. This work expands the sample-in/answer-out analytical capabilities of GEMBE for complex samples by demonstrating the quantitative analysis of anions, implementing aqueous background electrolyte (BGE) solutions at neutral pH, and introducing the use of additives to the sample solution to optimize performance. Dirt was analyzed quantitatively, with the sole preparatory step of suspension in an aqueous BGE solution at neutral pH, for dissolved chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, and oxalate using GEMBE with capacitively-coupled contactless conductivity detection. In addition to altering the pH of the BGE solution, optimization of the analysis of dirt and whole blood was achieved using various commercially available additives. These results, taken together with previous demonstrations of GEMBE for the analysis of complex samples, underscore the uncomplicated versatility of GEMBE, facilitate effective analysis of biological complex samples using BGE solutions at physiological pH, and offer a sufficient set of techniques and tools to build a foundation for the analysis of a broad range of complex samples.

  3. Novel gradient echo sequence-based amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging in hyperacute cerebral infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    HUANG, DEXIAO; LI, SHENKAI; DAI, ZHUOZHI; SHEN, ZHIWEI; YAN, GEN; WU, RENHUA

    2015-01-01

    In the progression of ischemia, pH is important and is essential in elucidating the association between metabolic disruption, lactate formation, acidosis and tissue damage. Chemical exchange-dependent saturation transfer (CEST) imaging can be used to detect tissue pH and, in particular, a specific form of CEST magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), termed amide proton transfer (APT) MRI, which is sensitive to pH and can detect ischemic lesions, even prior to diffusion abnormalities. The critical parameter governing the ability of CEST to detect pH is the sequence. In the present study, a novel strategy was used, based on the gradient echo sequence (GRE), which involved the insertion of a magnetization transfer pulse in each repetition time (TR) and minimizing the TR for in vivo APT imaging. The proposed GRE-APT MRI method was initially verified using a tissue-like pH phantom and optimized MRI parameters for APT imaging. In order to assess the range of acute cerebral infarction, rats (n=4) were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and MRI scanning at 7 telsa (T). Hyperacute ischemic tissue damage was characterized using multiparametric imaging techniques, including diffusion, APT and T2-Weighted MRI. By using a magnetization transfer pulse and minimizing TR, GRE-APT provided high spatial resolution and a homogeneous signal, with clearly distinguished cerebral anatomy. The GRE-APT and diffusion MRI were significantly correlated with lactate content and the area of cerebral infarction in the APT and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps matched consistently during the hyperacute period. In addition, compared with the infarction area observed on the ADC MRI map, the APT map contained tissue, which had not yet been irreversibly damaged. Therefore, GRE-APT MRI waa able to detect ischemic lactic acidosis with sensitivity and spatiotemporal resolution, suggesting the potential use of pH MRI as a surrogate imaging marker of impaired tissue metabolism for the

  4. Novel gradient echo sequence‑based amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging in hyperacute cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dexiao; Li, Shenkai; Dai, Zhuozhi; Shen, Zhiwei; Yan, Gen; Wu, Renhua

    2015-05-01

    In the progression of ischemia, pH is important and is essential in elucidating the association between metabolic disruption, lactate formation, acidosis and tissue damage. Chemical exchange‑dependent saturation transfer (CEST) imaging can be used to detect tissue pH and, in particular, a specific form of CEST magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), termed amide proton transfer (APT) MRI, which is sensitive to pH and can detect ischemic lesions, even prior to diffusion abnormalities. The critical parameter governing the ability of CEST to detect pH is the sequence. In the present study, a novel strategy was used, based on the gradient echo sequence (GRE), which involved the insertion of a magnetization transfer pulse in each repetition time (TR) and minimizing the TR for in vivo APT imaging. The proposed GRE‑APT MRI method was initially verified using a tissue‑like pH phantom and optimized MRI parameters for APT imaging. In order to assess the range of acute cerebral infarction, rats (n=4) were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and MRI scanning at 7 telsa (T). Hyperacute ischemic tissue damage was characterized using multiparametric imaging techniques, including diffusion, APT and T2‑Weighted MRI. By using a magnetization transfer pulse and minimizing TR, GRE‑APT provided high spatial resolution and a homogeneous signal, with clearly distinguished cerebral anatomy. The GRE‑APT and diffusion MRI were significantly correlated with lactate content and the area of cerebral infarction in the APT and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps matched consistently during the hyperacute period. In addition, compared with the infarction area observed on the ADC MRI map, the APT map contained tissue, which had not yet been irreversibly damaged. Therefore, GRE‑APT MRI waa able to detect ischemic lactic acidosis with sensitivity and spatiotemporal resolution, suggesting the potential use of pH MRI as a surrogate imaging marker of impaired tissue

  5. PhD supervisor-student relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FILIPE PRAZERES

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the PhD supervisor and the PhD student is a complex one. When this relationship is neither effective nor efficient, it may yield negative consequences, such as academic failure (1. The intricacy of the supervisor-student relationship may be in part comparable to the one between the physician and his/her patient [see, for example (2]. Both interactions develop over several years and the players involved in each relationship – PhD supervisor-student on the one side and physician-patient on the other side – may at some point of the journey develop different expectations of one another [see, for example (3, 4] and experience emotional distress (5. In both relationships, the perceived satisfaction with the interaction will contribute to the success or failure of the treatment in one case, and in the other, the writing of a thesis. To improve the mentioned satisfaction, not only there is a need to invest time (6, as does the physician to his/ her patients, but also both the supervisor and the PhD student must be willing to negotiate a research path to follow that would be practical and achievable. The communication between the physician and patient is of paramount importance for the provision of health care (7, and so is the communication between the supervisor and PhD student which encourages the progression of both the research and the doctoral study (8. As to a smooth transition to the postgraduate life, supervisors should start thinking about providing the same kind of positive reinforcement that every student is used to experience in the undergraduate course. The recognition for a job well done will mean a lot for a PhD student, as it does for a patient. One good example is the increase in medication compliance by patients with high blood pressure who receive positive reinforcement from their physicians (9. Supervisors can organize regular meetings for (and with PhD students in order to not only discuss their projects

  6. pH control and rapid mixing in spinning NMR samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesinowski, James P.; Sunberg, Richard J.; Benedict, James J.

    An apparatus is described which permits the acquisition of NMR spectra from spinning 20-mm sample tubes while: (1) constantly monitoring the pH; (2) adding reagents to maintain constant pH (pH-statting); (3) efficiently mixing the added reagent. The apparatus was built to study the spontaneous precipitation of calcium phosphates from supersaturated solutions using 31P NMR. Other applications include the rapid determination of NMR titration curves, and the minimization of temperature gradients in large sample tubes. The apparatus was used to measure the 31P chemical shift titration of dilute phosphoric acid, which yielded accurate shifts for the three species of protonated orthophosphate ion. The bulk magnetic susceptibility of 85% H 3PO 4 relative to a dilute aqueous sample was also measured, and is shown to contribute significantly to chemical shift measurements.

  7. Environmental drivers of microbial community shifts in the giant barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, over a shallow to mesophotic depth gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Kathleen M; Fiore, Cara L; Lesser, Michael P

    2016-06-01

    The giant barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a high microbial abundance sponge found on Caribbean coral reefs along shallow to mesophotic depth gradients where multiple abiotic factors change with depth. Sponges were collected along a depth gradient at Little Cayman (LC) and Lee Stocking Island (LSI), and the microbiome of these samples was analysed using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Statistically significant shifts in community structure and dissimilarity (∼ 40%) were detected from 10 to 90 m in LC sponges, but a similar shift was not identified in sponges from 10 to 60 m at LSI (only 17% dissimilar). Additionally, inorganic nutrient levels steadily increased with depth at LSI but not at LC. Based on bulk stable isotopic variability, sponges collected from LC were generally more enriched in (15) N and less enriched in (13) C as depth increased, suggesting a transition from dependency on photoautotrophy to heterotrophy as depth increased. Patterns of stable isotopic enrichment were largely invariant at LSI, which is also reflected in the more stable microbial community along the depth gradient. It appears that environmental factors that change with depth may contribute to differences in X. muta microbial assemblages, demonstrating the importance of contemporaneous environmental sampling in studies of the microbiome of sponges. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Microfluidic high gradient magnetic cell separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, David W.; Riehn, Robert; Sturm, James C.; Austin, Robert H.

    2006-04-01

    Separation of blood cells by native susceptibility and by the selective attachment of magnetic beads has recently been demonstrated on microfluidic devices. We discuss the basic principles of how forces are generated via the magnetic susceptibility of an object and how microfluidics can be combined with micron-scale magnetic field gradients to greatly enhance in principle the fractionating power of magnetic fields. We discuss our efforts and those of others to build practical microfluidic devices for the magnetic separation of blood cells. We also discuss our attempts to integrate magnetic separation with other microfluidic features for developing handheld medical diagnostic tools.

  9. Tunable high-gradient permanent magnet quadrupoles

    CERN Document Server

    Shepherd, B J A; Marks, N; Collomb, N A; Stokes, D G; Modena, M; Struik, M; Bartalesi, A

    2014-01-01

    A novel type of highly tunable permanent magnet (PM) based quadrupole has been designed by the ZEPTO collaboration. A prototype of the design (ZEPTO-Q1), intended to match the specification for the CLIC Drive Beam Decelerator, was built and magnetically measured at Daresbury Laboratory and CERN. The prototype utilises two pairs of PMs which move in opposite directions along a single vertical axis to produce a quadrupole gradient variable between 15 and 60 T/m. The prototype meets CLIC's challenging specification in terms of the strength and tunability of the magnet.

  10. Gradient vector flow fast geometric active contours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paragios, Nikos; Mellina-Gottardo, Olivier; Ramesh, Visvanathan

    2004-03-01

    In this paper, we propose an edge-driven bidirectional geometric flow for boundary extraction. To this end, we combine the geodesic active contour flow and the gradient vector flow external force for snakes. The resulting motion equation is considered within a level set formulation, can deal with topological changes and important shape deformations. An efficient numerical schema is used for the flow implementation that exhibits robust behavior and has fast convergence rate. Promising results on real and synthetic images demonstrate the potentials of the flow.

  11. A Compact High Gradient Pulsed Magnetic Quadpole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuman, D.; Faltens, A.; Kajiyama, Y.; Kireeff-Covo, M.; Seidl, P.

    2005-01-01

    A design for a high gradient, low inductance pulsed quadrupole magnet is presented. The magnet is a circular current dominated design with a circular iron return yoke. Conductor angles are determined by a method of direct multipole elimination which theoretically eliminates the first four higher order multipole field components. Coils are fabricated from solid round film-insulated conductor, wound as a single layer ''non-spiral bedstead'' coil having a diagonal leadout entirely within one upturned end. The coils are wound and stretched straight in a special winder, then bent in simple fixtures to form the upturned ends

  12. Laser pulse shaping for high gradient accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, F., E-mail: fabio.villa@lnf.infn.it [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Anania, M.P.; Bellaveglia, M. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Bisesto, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Università La Sapienza di Roma, Via A. Scarpa 14, Rome (Italy); Chiadroni, E. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [INFN-Roma Tor Vergata and Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Curcio, A.; Galletti, M.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Moreno, M.; Petrarca, M. [Università La Sapienza di Roma, Via A. Scarpa 14, Rome (Italy); Pompili, R.; Vaccarezza, C. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    In many high gradient accelerator schemes, i.e. with plasma or dielectric wakefield induced by particles, many electron pulses are required to drive the acceleration of one of them. Those electron bunches, that generally should have very short duration and low emittance, can be generated in photoinjectors driven by a train of laser pulses coming inside the same RF bucket. We present the system used to shape and characterize the laser pulses used in multibunch operations at Sparc-lab. Our system gives us control over the main parameter useful to produce a train of up to five high brightness bunches with tailored intensity and time distribution.

  13. Impact of Ozone Gradient on Grapevine Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alebic-Juretic, Ana; Bokan-Vucelic, Itana; Mifka, Boris; Zatezalo, Marija; Zubak, Velimir

    2017-04-01

    Due to complex orography and air mass circulation, the Rijeka Bay area is characterized by O3 gradient, with concentrations risen with the altitude (1). Therefore AOT40 values were often exceeded and should result in harmful effects on vegetation. Based on previous controlled experiments (2), we examined the possible effect of atmospheric ozone on grape leaves under natural O3 gradient. Grapevine leaves (2-5) were collected from May to September 2016 at two sampling points in the proximity of two AQM stations: Site 1 in the city centre (20m asl) and Site 2 (186m asl) in the suburban settlement. Subsequent to weighing and determination of surface area, the leaves (0,5 g) were extracted in 95% ethanol and analysed on chlorophyl a (Chla), chlorophyl b (Chlb) and carotene (Car) content by UV-VIS spectrometry on 3 wavelengths (664, 649, 470 nm) (3) In summer 2016 O3 gradient was not that pronounced as usual (1), but stil the concentrations differed by approx. 20%, exceeding national AOT40 value at both sites (22.360 and 28.061 μg m-3 h, respectively, at Sites 1 and 2). The concentrations of other pollutants were bellow limit values (LV). The Cha and Chb in a sample leaves collected at the end of May at Site 2 are equal to that with filtered O3 in control experiment (2), i.e. without damage caused by ozone, while the Car content is lower approx. 50% and is kept at the same level. The con-centrations of pigments obtained in July prooved the possible damage by O3, while in subsequent months could speed up natural ageing. This is the first evidence of O3 damage on plants in the Rijeka Bay area, in spite of weaker O3 gradient and lacking visible signs of damage. Preliminary results indicate the need for more frequent sampling, particularly in the period included in AOT40 (May-July). References: 1. Alebić-Juretić A (2012) Int J Remote Sensing, 33(2): 335-345 2. Britvec M, Reichenauer T, Soja G., Ljubešić N, Pećina M (2001) Biologia (Bratislava),56/4: 417-424 3. Sumanata

  14. Homotopy Shear Band Solutions in Gradient Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raees, Ammarah; Xu, Hang; Aifantis, Elias C.

    2017-05-01

    Analytical shear band type solutions for finite domains are derived within the framework of gradient plasticity theory by employing the homotopy analysis method (HAM). Such types of solutions were available in the literature only for infinite domains in the nonlinear material softening regime and steady-state conditions, as well as for finite domains in the material hardening regime. HAM allows for solutions to be obtained for both hardening and softening material models, as well as for unsteady conditions periodic solutions are also derived. The HAM results are verified with numerical simulations, which show excellent agreement. Moreover, an error analysis is provided which guarantees the convergence of our series solution.

  15. Gradient-index optics fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez-Reino, Carlos; Bao, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Gradient-Index (GRIN) optics provides a comprehensive and thorough treatment on fundamentals and applications of light propagation through inhomogeneous media. The book can be used both as a classroom text for students in physics and engineering and as a reference for specialists. A description of the phenomena, components and technology used in GRIN Optics are presented. The relationship to lenses, waveguides, optical connections, spatial solitons and vision is demonstrated. Applications of GRIN components and hybrid structures for optical connections, optical sensing and Talbot effect are analyzed.

  16. Application of DC gradient sounding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Hongrong

    2010-01-01

    Based on the thought of new observation and reverse method of electronic measuring in deep section proposed by professor Ge Zhongwei, three-pole gradient sound(GS-3A, GS-3B)distribution and observations are applied in mining practice. By changing the work flow and distributing the electronic measurement deep section by some distance, several reception equipments are used in multiple points observations using multiple points-one string continuous observation of electronic differences and polarization. Practices prove that this effective method is suit to two dimensions calculation and ration explanation in electronic sounding of numerical simulate grids. This method is accurate and effects well in geology work. (authors)

  17. New Techniques for Studying Calcium Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsien, R. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Improved techniques for detecting and manipulating spatial gradients of cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentrations (Ca(2)) sub i and intracellular stores are discussed. Three areas of progress are: (1) development of new fluorescent indicators for Ca(2+) that are the first to be suitable for measuring Ca(2+)) sub i and its inhomogeneities in individual cells; (2) invention of photolabile chelators which shift irreversibly from high to low affinity for Ca(2+) upon illumination, permitting light-controlled jumps in (Ca(2+)) sub i; and (3) fixation methods to trap dynamic intraorganellar Ca stores in a form readily visible by electron microscopy.

  18. Human impact gradient on mammalian biodiversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Munguía

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Drastic changes have been caused by human influence in natural landscapes, which may exert an intensive effect on species loss. However, species loss from human pressure is not random but depends on a series of environmentally associated factors. Linking species traits to environmental attributes may allow us to detect the ecological impacts of habitat so that meaningful habitat degradation gradients can be identified. The relationships between environmental factors and species traits provide the basis for identifying those biological traits that make species more sensitive to disturbance. These relationships are also helpful to detect the geographic distribution of latent risk to reveal areas where biodiversity is threatened. Here, we identify a “Human Impact Gradient for Biodiversity (HIGB” based on a three-table ordination method (RLQ analysis and fourth-corner analysis to identify key species traits that are associated with environmental gradient. Species distribution and environmental geographic data were gathered nationwide to analyze 68 localities, which represent 27% of Mexico’s surface, including 211 species of mammals. Nine environmental variables (including biophysical, geophysical and land-use impacts were analyzed by using the Geographic Information System. Three types of species’ traits were evaluated: locomotion, trophic habit and body size. We identified a human impact gradient, which was mainly determined by the percentage of the area that was covered by seedlings, the plant richness, the understory coverage percentage and the human settlement index. The most important species traits that are associated with non-human-impacted sites were carnivores, frugivores–herbivores and a body size that was greater than 17.8 kg; 25 species were selected by the decision criteria framework for species that were sensitive to degradation based on ecological function information. Conversely, granivores, fossorial and semifossorial

  19. Theory of resistivity-gradient-driven turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, L.; Diamond, P.H.; Carreras, B.A.; Callen, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    A theory of the nonlinear evolution and saturation of resistivity driven turbulence, which evolves from linear rippling instabilities, is presented. The nonlinear saturation mechanism is identified both analytically and numerically. Saturation occurs when the turbulent diffusion of the resistivity is large enough so that dissipation due to parallel electron thermal conduction balances the nonlinearly modified resistivity gradient driving term. The levels of potential, resistivity, and density fluctuations at saturation are calculated. A combination of computational modeling and analytic treatment is used in this investigation.

  20. CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF THE CYTOPLASMIC PH IN LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS WITH A FLUORESCENT PH INDICATOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOLENAAR, D; ABEE, T; KONINGS, WN

    1991-01-01

    The cytoplasmic pH of Lactococcus lactis was studied with the fluorescent pH indicator 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5 (and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). A novel method was applied for loading bacterial cells with BCECF, which consists of briefly treating a dense cell suspension with acid in the

  1. Differential genotoxicity of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe2 and diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Francine Meinerz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Organoselenium compounds have been pointed out as therapeutic agents. In contrast, the potential therapeutic aspects of tellurides have not yet been demonstrated. The present study evaluated the comparative toxicological effects of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe2 and diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe2 in mice after in vivo administration. Genotoxicity (as determined by comet assay and mutagenicicity were used as end-points of toxicity. Subcutaneous administration of high doses of (PhSe2 or (PhTe2 (500 µmol/kg caused distinct genotoxicity in mice. (PhSe2 significantly decreased the DNA damage index after 48 and 96 h of its injection (p < 0.05. In contrast, (PhTe caused a significant increase in DNA damage (p < 0.05 after 48 and 96 h of intoxication. (PhSe2 did not cause mutagenicity but (PhTe2 increased the micronuclei frequency, indicating its mutagenic potential. The present study demonstrated that acute in vivo exposure to ditelluride caused genotoxicity in mice, which may be associated with pro-oxidant effects of diphenyl ditelluride. In addition, the use of this compound and possibly other related tellurides must be carefully controlled.

  2. Isolation and Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Pseudoalteromonas Phage PH357 from the Yangtze River Estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zheng; Wang, Min; Yang, Qingwei; Li, Zhongshi; Xia, Jun; Gao, Yu; Jiang, Yong; Meng, Xue; Liu, Zhaoyang; Yang, Ding; Zhang, Fangfei; Shao, Hongbing; Wang, Duobing

    2017-07-01

    Phage PH357, a novel lytic Pseudoalteromonas lipolytica phage belonging to the Myoviridae family was isolated from the Yangtze River estuary. The microbiological characterization demonstrated that phage PH357 is stable from -20 to 60 °C and the optimal pH 7. The one-step growth curve showed a latent period of 20 min, a rise period of 20 min, and the average burst size was about 85 virions per cell. Complete genome of phage PH357 was determined. Genome of phage PH357 consisted of a linear, double-stranded 136,203 bp DNA molecule with 34.58% G + C content, and 242 putative open reading frames (ORFs) without tRNA. All the predicted ORFs were classified into eight functional groups, including DNA replication, regulation and nucleotide metabolism, transcription, translation, phage packaging, phage structure, lysis, host or phage interactions, and hypothetical protein. A phylogenetic analysis showed that phage PH357 had similarity to the previously published Pseudoalteromonas phage PH101 and Vibrio phages. Furthermore, the study of phage PH357 genome will provide useful information for further research on the interaction between phages and their hosts.

  3. Characteristics of soils in selected maize growing sites along altitudinal gradients in East African highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Njuguna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Maize is the main staple crop in the East African Mountains. Understanding how the edaphic characteristics change along altitudinal gradients is important for maximizing maize production in East African Highlands, which are the key maize production areas in the region. This study evaluated and compared the levels of some macro and micro-elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na and P and other soil parameters (pH, organic carbon content, soil texture [i.e. % Sand, % Clay and % Silt], cation exchange capacity [CEC], electric conductivity [EC], and water holding capacity [HC]. Soil samples were taken from maize plots along three altitudinal gradients in East African highlands (namely Machakos Hills, Taita Hills and Mount Kilimanjaro characterized by graded changes in climatic conditions. For all transects, pH, Ca, K and Mg decreased with the increase in altitude. In contrast, % Silt, organic carbon content, Al and water holding capacity (HC increased with increasing altitude. The research provides information on the status of the physical–chemical characteristics of soils along three altitudinal ranges of East African Highlands and includes data available for further research.

  4. Gradient Boosting for Conditional Random Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-23

    On-line Handwritten Character Recognition. PhD thesis, Cambridge, MA, USA, 1995. [9] J. Lafferty, A. McCallum, and F. Pereira . Conditional random...ICML ’01), pages 282–289, 2001. [10] D. Levin, Y. Peres, and E. Wilmer . Markov Chains and Mixing Times. American Mathematical Society, 2008. [11] P. Li...1097–1104. [16] F. Sha and F. Pereira . Shallow parsing with conditional random fields. In Proceedings of the 2003 Conference of the North American

  5. Infrared image detail enhancement based on the gradient field specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenda; Xu, Zhijun; Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Fan; Han, Xizhen

    2014-07-01

    Human vision is sensitive to the changes of local image details, which are actually image gradients. To enhance faint infrared image details, this article proposes a gradient field specification algorithm. First we define the image gradient field and gradient histogram. Then, by analyzing the characteristics of the gradient histogram, we construct a Gaussian function to obtain the gradient histogram specification and therefore obtain the transform gradient field. In addition, subhistogram equalization is proposed based on the histogram equalization to improve the contrast of infrared images. The experimental results show that the algorithm can effectively improve image contrast and enhance weak infrared image details and edges. As a result, it can give qualified image information for different applications of an infrared image. In addition, it can also be applied to enhance other types of images such as visible, medical, and lunar surface.

  6. Gas phase thermal diffusion of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eck, C.F.

    1979-01-01

    The separation of stable isotopes at Mound Facility is reviewed from a historical perspective. The historical development of thermal diffusion from a laboratory process to a separation facility that handles all the noble gases is described. In addition, elementary thermal diffusion theory and elementary cascade theory are presented along with a brief review of the uses of stable isotopes

  7. physico-chemical and stable isotopes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper details the mineralogical, chemical and stable isotope abundances of calcrete in the Letlhakeng fossil valley. The stable isotope abundances (O and C) of calcretes yielded some values which were tested against the nature of the calcretes – pedogenic or groundwater type. The Kgalagadi (Kalahari) is a vast ...

  8. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled:

    Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow

    H.A.M. Sterk

    Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015

    Summary

    The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs

  9. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar

  10. Stable isotopes and biomarkers in microbial ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschker, H.T.S.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The use of biomarkers in combination with stable isotope analysis is a new approach in microbial ecology and a number of papers on a variety of subjects have appeared. We will first discuss the techniques for analysing stable isotopes in biomarkers, primarily gas chromatography-combustion-isotope

  11. Stable Agrobacterium -mediated transformation of the halophytic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stable Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of the halophytic Leymus chinensis (Trin.) Yan-Lin Sun, Soon-Kwan Hong. Abstract. In this study, an efficient procedure for stable Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Leymus chinensis (Trin.) was established. Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105, harboring a ...

  12. Optoelectronic pH Meter: Further Details

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Anderson, Mejody M.; Macatangay, Ariel V.

    2009-01-01

    A collection of documents provides further detailed information about an optoelectronic instrument that measures the pH of an aqueous cell-culture medium to within 0.1 unit in the range from 6.5 to 7.5. The instrument at an earlier stage of development was reported in Optoelectronic Instrument Monitors pH in a Culture Medium (MSC-23107), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 9 (September 2004), page 4a. To recapitulate: The instrument includes a quartz cuvette through which the medium flows as it is circulated through a bioreactor. The medium contains some phenol red, which is an organic pH-indicator dye. The cuvette sits between a light source and a photodetector. [The light source in the earlier version comprised red (625 nm) and green (558 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs); the light source in the present version comprises a single green- (560 nm)-or-red (623 nm) LED.] The red and green are repeatedly flashed in alternation. The responses of the photodiode to the green and red are processed electronically to obtain the ratio between the amounts of green and red light transmitted through the medium. The optical absorbance of the phenol red in the green light varies as a known function of pH. Hence, the pH of the medium can be calculated from the aforesaid ratio.

  13. The Ph.D. Value Proposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Atlanta University launched its doctor of arts in humanities (DAH) programs almost 40 years ago, and, since the 1988 merger with Clark College, Clark Atlanta University has continued to award the degrees. This fall, for the first time, its students will be able to earn Ph.D.s in humanities instead. In DAH programs around the country, there's been…

  14. Structure of acid-stable carmine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Naoki; Kawasaki, Yoko; Sato, Kyoko; Aoki, Hiromitsu; Ichi, Takahito; Koda, Takatoshi; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Maitani, Tamio

    2002-02-01

    Acid-stable carmine has recently been distributed in the U.S. market because of its good acid stability, but it is not permitted in Japan. We analyzed and determined the structure of the major pigment in acid-stable carmine, in order to establish an analytical method for it. Carminic acid was transformed into a different type of pigment, named acid-stable carmine, through amination when heated in ammonia solution. The features of the structure were clarified using a model compound, purpurin, in which the orientation of hydroxyl groups on the A ring of the anthraquinone skeleton is the same as that of carminic acid. By spectroscopic means and the synthesis of acid-stable carmine and purpurin derivatives, the structure of the major pigment in acid-stable carmine was established as 4-aminocarminic acid, a novel compound.

  15. Stable Fly, (L., Dispersal and Governing Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan T. Showler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the movement of stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L., has been studied, its extent and significance has been uncertain. On a local scale (13 km is mainly wind-driven by weather fronts that carry stable flies from inland farm areas for up to 225 km to beaches of northwestern Florida and Lake Superior. Stable flies can reproduce for a short time each year in washed-up sea grass, but the beaches are not conducive to establishment. Such movement is passive and does not appear to be advantageous to stable fly's survival. On a regional scale, stable flies exhibit little genetic differentiation, and on the global scale, while there might be more than one “lineage”, the species is nevertheless considered to be panmictic. Population expansion across much of the globe likely occurred from the late Pleistocene to the early Holocene in association with the spread of domesticated nomad livestock and particularly with more sedentary, penned livestock.

  16. Gradient hydrogel coatings for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnayan Kannan, Pandiyarajan; Genzer, Jan

    Mussel byssus is a typical example for gradient material that demonstrates a continues variation in mechanical property (or modulus), i . e . , soft (proximal) part is connected to mussel, while the stiffer (distal) part facilitates the attachment of mussel to a stone. Mimicking such materials is highly demanding especially in the areas of artificial implants. We developed a simple synthetic route to produce gradient hydrogels that are covalently anchored to the substrate. N-isopropylacrylamide has been copolymerized with 5 mole% of photo-active (methacrylyloxybenzophenone) and/or 5% of thermally-active (styrenesulfonylazide) crosslinkers. The incorporation of photo and/or thermal crosslinkers allows us for a complete control over the network properties in orthogonal directions. A systematic investigation towards the gel kinetics, swelling, crosslink density, elasticity and protein adsorption was performed. Our results instigate that weakly crosslinked (low modulus) gels swell strong in aqueous medium than the densely crosslinked (high modulus) gels. The results of protein adsorption are discussed based on the previously developed model entropic shielding and size exclusion effect.

  17. Preparation and characterization of gradient polymer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    Gradient polymers are multicomponent polymers whose chemical constitution varies with depth in the sample. Although these polymers may possess unique mechanical, optical, and barrier properties they remain relatively unexplored. This work is a study of the preparation of gradient polymers by sequential exposure of films to a diffusing monomer followed by electron beam irradiation. Initial experiments involved immersion of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) films in styrene or n-butyl methacrylate (BMA) for various time periods followed by irradiation with 1 or 10 megarads of accelerated electrons. A significant amount of poly(n-butyl methacrylate) (PBMA) formed in PVC/BMA systems, but little polystyrene could be found in the PVC/styrene films. A second set of experiments involved immersion of PVC and polyethylene (PE) films in BMA for 20, 40, 60, and 720 minutes followed by irradiation with 10 megarads of electrons. These films were then characterized using optical microscopy, quantitative transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and a depth profiling procedure based on quantitative attenuated total reflection (ATR) FTIR. It was concluded that the mechanism of PBMA formation in the polyethylene films was a result of events immediately following irradiation. Atmospheric oxygen diffusing into irradiated films trapped free radicals at the film surfaces. This was followed by storage in an evacuated desiccator where unintentional exposure to BMA vapor took place. This BMA reacted with free radicals that remained within the film cores, polymerizing to PBMA

  18. Intergenerational and socioeconomic gradients of child obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Font, Joan; Gil, Joan

    2013-09-01

    Can the rise in obesity among children be attributed to the intergenerational transmission of parental influences? Does this trend affect the influence of parent's socioeconomic status on obesity? This paper documents evidence of an emerging social gradient of obesity in pre-school children resulting from a combination of both socio-economic status and less intensive childcare associated with maternal employment, when different forms of intergenerational transmission are controlled for. We also estimate and decompose income related inequalities in child obesity. We take advantage of a uniquely constructed dataset from Spain that contains records form 13,358 individuals for a time period (years 2003-2006) in which a significant spike in the growth of child obesity was observed. Our results suggest robust evidence of both socioeconomic and intergenerational gradients. Results are suggestive of a high income effect in child obesity, alongside evidence that income inequalities have doubled in just three years with a pure income effect accounting for as much as 72-66% of these income inequality estimates, even when intergenerational transmission is accounted for. Although, intergenerational transmission does not appear to be gender specific, when accounted for, mother's labour market participation only explains obesity among boys but not among girls. Hence, it appears income and parental influences are the central determinants of obesity among children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The phenotypic variance gradient - a novel concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertoldi, Cino; Bundgaard, Jørgen; Loeschcke, Volker; Barker, James Stuart Flinton

    2014-11-01

    Evolutionary ecologists commonly use reaction norms, which show the range of phenotypes produced by a set of genotypes exposed to different environments, to quantify the degree of phenotypic variance and the magnitude of plasticity of morphometric and life-history traits. Significant differences among the values of the slopes of the reaction norms are interpreted as significant differences in phenotypic plasticity, whereas significant differences among phenotypic variances (variance or coefficient of variation) are interpreted as differences in the degree of developmental instability or canalization. We highlight some potential problems with this approach to quantifying phenotypic variance and suggest a novel and more informative way to plot reaction norms: namely "a plot of log (variance) on the y-axis versus log (mean) on the x-axis, with a reference line added". This approach gives an immediate impression of how the degree of phenotypic variance varies across an environmental gradient, taking into account the consequences of the scaling effect of the variance with the mean. The evolutionary implications of the variation in the degree of phenotypic variance, which we call a "phenotypic variance gradient", are discussed together with its potential interactions with variation in the degree of phenotypic plasticity and canalization.

  20. Electric field gradients in copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whalley, L.R.

    1974-02-01

    The electric field gradients at Cu atoms which are near neighbors to the nickel impurity in a dilute CuNi alloy were measured. The technique used is zero field pure quadrupole resonance which was first demonstrated by Redfield [Redfield, Phys. Rev. 130, 589 (1963)]. The measured electric field gradients for this alloy system are 4.1 x 10 23 cm -3 , 0.84 x 10 23 cm -3 , 0.46 x 10 23 cm -3 and 0.146 x 10 23 cm -3 . These measured values are compared with the values calculated by Beal-Monod [Beal-Monod, Phys. Rev. 164, 360 (1967)]. In addition the following alloy systems were measured; CuCo, CuFe, and CuV. The nuclear relaxation of the alloys was measured but no satellite structure was detected. Results of these measurements show the similarity of the interactions measured here to the interactions in CuZn measured by Redfield. Since nickel has an unfilled 3d shell in its electronic structure, magnetic interactions in the CuNi alloy might be expected. Magnetic interactions were not found. Like the nickel alloy, the zinc alloy with copper exhibits no magnetic effects. (U.S.)

  1. Preparation process of a stable non radioactive carrier intended for radiodiagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinski, V.J.; Wilczewski, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    The description is given of a stable non radioactive carrier with a pH of around 2 and around 4, for cardiological studies, exploring the blood in circulation and exploring the brain, after labelling with sup(99m)Tc. It includes human serum albumin (SAH) and stannous tartrate, the proportion in weight between the SAH and stannous tartrate being between around 50:1 and around 150:1 [fr

  2. Identification of burrowing shrimp food sources along an estuarine gradient using fatty acid analysis and stable isotope ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two species of burrowing shrimps occur in high densities in U.S. West Coast estuaries, the ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis) and the blue mud shrimp (Upogebia pugettensis). Both species of shrimp are considered ecosystem engineers as they bioturbate and irrigate extensive galleries in the sed...

  3. Stable nitrogen isotope ratios of macrophytes and associated periphyton along a nitrate gradient in two subtropical, spring-fed streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Brabandere, Loreto; Frazer, Thomas K.; Montoya, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    1. An increase in human population and associated changes in land use have caused an increase in groundwater nitrate concentrations throughout central Florida. Within the region, this nitrate-laden groundwater returns to the surface via numerous large springs that serve as the origin of flow for ...

  4. Three gradients and the perception of flat and curved surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, J E; Millard, R T

    1984-06-01

    Researchers of visual perception have long been interested in the perceived slant of a surface and in the gradients that purportedly specify it. Slant is the angle between the line of sight and the tangent to the planar surface at any point, also called the surface normal. Gradients are the sources of information that grade, or change, with visual angle as one looks from one's feet upward to the horizon. The present article explores three gradients--perspective, compression, and density--and the phenomenal impression of flat and curved surfaces. The perspective gradient is measured at right angles to the axis of tilt at any point in the optic array; that is, when looking down a hallway at the tiles of a floor receding in the distance, perspective is measured by the x-axis width of each tile projected on the image plane orthogonal to the line of sight. The compression gradient is the ratio of y/x axis measures on the projected plane. The density gradient is measured by the number of tiles per unit solid visual angle. For flat surfaces and many others, perspective and compression gradients decrease with distance, and the density gradient increases. We discuss the manner in which these gradients change for various types of surfaces. Each gradient is founded on a different assumption about textures on the surfaces around us. In Experiment 1, viewers assessed the three-dimensional character of projections of flat and curved surfaces receding in the distance. They made pairwise judgments of preference and of dissimilarity among eight stimuli in each of four sets. The presence of each gradient was manipulated orthogonally such that each stimulus had zero, one, two, or three gradients appropriate for either a flat surface or a curved surface. Judgments were made were made for surfaces with both regularly shaped and irregularly shaped textures scattered on them. All viewer assessment were then scaled in one dimension. Multiple correlation and regression on the scale values

  5. Systematic Optimization of Long Gradient Chromatography Mass Spectrometry for Deep Analysis of Brain Proteome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong; Yang, Yanling; Li, Yuxin; Bai, Bing; Wang, Xusheng; Tan, Haiyan; Liu, Tao; Beach, Thomas G.; Peng, Junmun; Wu, Zhiping

    2015-02-06

    Development of high resolution liquid chromatography (LC) is essential for improving the sensitivity and throughput of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics. Here we present systematic optimization of a long gradient LC-MS/MS platform to enhance protein identification from a complex mixture. The platform employed an in-house fabricated, reverse phase column (100 μm x 150 cm) coupled with Q Exactive MS. The column was capable of achieving a peak capacity of approximately 700 in a 720 min gradient of 10-45% acetonitrile. The optimal loading level was about 6 micrograms of peptides, although the column allowed loading as many as 20 micrograms. Gas phase fractionation of peptide ions further increased the number of peptide identification by ~10%. Moreover, the combination of basic pH LC pre-fractionation with the long gradient LC-MS/MS platform enabled the identification of 96,127 peptides and 10,544 proteins at 1% protein false discovery rate in a postmortem brain sample of Alzheimer’s disease. As deep RNA sequencing of the same specimen suggested that ~16,000 genes were expressed, current analysis covered more than 60% of the expressed proteome. Further improvement strategies of the LC/LC-MS/MS platform were also discussed.

  6. Zwitterionic silica-based monolithic capillary columns for isocratic and gradient hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravcová, Dana; Planeta, Josef; Kahle, Vladislav; Roth, Michal

    2012-12-28

    This study introduces zwitterionic monolithic capillary columns intended for isocratic and gradient HILIC separations. Silica-based monolithic capillary columns (100 μm × 150 mm) prepared by acidic hydrolysis of tetramethoxysilane in the presence of polyethylene glycol and urea were modified by a sulfoalkylbetaine zwitterion ([2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-dimethyl-(3-sulfopropyl)-ammonium hydroxide) to HILIC stationary phase. The prepared columns were evaluated under the isocratic and gradient separation conditions using a standard mixture containing nucleic acid bases, nucleosides, and 2-deoxynucleosides. Mobile phases contained high concentration of acetonitrile (95-85%, v/v) and 5-50mM ammonium acetate or ammonium formate in the pH range of 3-6. The synthesized columns showed a long-term stability under the separation conditions while the high permeability and efficiency originating from dual structure of the silica monolith were preserved. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for the retention times of tested solutes were lower than 2% under the isocratic conditions and lower than 3.5% under the gradient conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Living with heterogeneities in bioreactors: understanding the effects of environmental gradients on cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Alvaro R; Galindo, Enrique; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2006-11-01

    The presence of spatial gradients in fundamental culture parameters, such as dissolved gases, pH, concentration of substrates, and shear rate, among others, is an important problem that frequently occurs in large-scale bioreactors. This problem is caused by a deficient mixing that results from limitations inherent to traditional scale-up methods and practical constraints during large-scale bioreactor design and operation. When cultured in a heterogeneous environment, cells are continuously exposed to fluctuating conditions as they travel through the various zones of a bioreactor. Such fluctuations can affect cell metabolism, yields, and quality of the products of interest. In this review, the theoretical analyses that predict the existence of environmental gradients in bioreactors and their experimental confirmation are reviewed. The origins of gradients in common culture parameters and their effects on various organisms of biotechnological importance are discussed. In particular, studies based on the scale-down methodology, a convenient tool for assessing the effect of environmental heterogeneities, are surveyed.

  8. The Effect of pH and Color Stability of Anthocyanin on Food Colorant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyuningsih, S.; Wulandari, L.; Wartono, M. W.; Munawaroh, H.; Ramelan, A. H.

    2017-04-01

    Anthocyanins are naturally occurring pigments of red and purple. Red anthocyanin pigments provide a strong and sharp and widely applied in various industries such as food coloring or drink. Anthocyanins isolated by maceration, extraction and thin layer chromatography (TLC). The extract has been obtained from the initial stages of maceration then separated into several fractions by chromatography to isolate fractions colored dark red. Identification of chemical compounds with TLC (Thin Layer Chromatography) is able to distinguish the fraction of anthocyanin produced. FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy) used to identification of the functional group of a compound. The UV-Vis absorption spectra have to produce maximum absorbance values that describe the intensity of anthocyanin spectra in different colors for different pH. Anthocyanins are more stable at low pH (acidic conditions) which gives a red pigment. Meanwhile, the higher the pH value of anthocyanin will provide color fading of the color blue. So as a food colorant, anthocyanin with a low pH or height pH has a significant effect on the food colorant.

  9. The effect of sodium bicarbonate on intracellular pH using 31P-MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Kazuya; Kashiwagi, Shiro; Ito, Haruhide; Yamashita, Tetsuo; Kitahara, Tetsuhiro; Nakayama, Naoto; Saito, Kennichi

    1997-01-01

    This report deals with the effects of sodium bicarbonate on the intracellular pH of the brain and cerebral blood flow (CBF); five normal volunteers were studied. Intracellular pH and CBF were measured by phosphorus 31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 31 P-MRS) and stable xenon computed tomography (Xe-CT), respectively. Each individual received 7% sodium bicarbonate (3.5 ml/kg body weight), infused intravenously over a 15-min period. Intracellular pH, CBF, and physiological parameters were determined before and after the injection. Intracellular pH was significantly decreased and CBF was increased. Among the physiological parameters, the hematocrit was significantly decreased and arterial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO 2 ), increased. These results suggest that increasing CO 2 contributes to the decrease in intracellular pH. In conclusion, three factors increase CBF during the administration of sodium bicarbonate to humans: arterial dilatation in response to carbon dioxide; decrease of the hematocrit, and intracellular cerebral acidosis. (author)

  10. Influence of the dentinal wall on the pH of sodium hypochlorite during root canal irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Ricardo Gomes; Herrero, Noemi Pascual; Wesselink, Paul; Versluis, Michel; van der Sluis, Luc

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of dentin on the pH levels of different concentrations of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solutions over time and to evaluate if preconditioning of dentin with 17% EDTA or agitation of the NaOCl solution influences these pH levels. A novel clinically representative model that scales with the ratio of the irrigant volume to the dentin surface area of a human root canal was used. Three standardized bovine dentin bars (2 × 2 × 10 mm) were placed in a plastic test tube. A total of 150 tubes were distributed in 29 groups. In the first experiment, the pH of various NaOCl solutions, with different concentrations (3%, 6%, and 9%) and starting pH levels (5 and 12), was monitored during exposure to dentin between 10 and 300 seconds. In a second experiment, the effect of agitation (45 Hz) and pretreatment of dentin with 17% EDTA on the pH levels of various NaOCl solutions was studied after 30 seconds of exposure to dentin. The short-term chemical stability of the tested solutions was assessed for both the concentration and the pH. The exposure time (P pH level after exposure to dentin. However, the change in pH is too small to induce a change in the irrigant antimicrobial/tissue dissolution capacity. Agitation of the irrigant and preconditioning of the dentin did not alter the pH (P > .05). Both the pH 5 and pH 12 solutions were chemically stable for 1 hour. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Leachability and desorption of PCBs from soil and their dependency on pH and dissolved organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badea, Silviu-Laurentiu, E-mail: badeasilviu@gmail.com; Mustafa, Majid; Lundstedt, Staffan; Tysklind, Mats

    2014-11-15

    pH affects both soil–water partitioning coefficient (K{sub d}) of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dissolved organic matter (DOM), thereby influencing PCBs' leachability from contaminated soils. To explore these incompletely understood interactions, the leachability of 11 selected PCBs in a naturally aged soil was investigated in pH static leaching tests spanning a wide pH range (2 to 9). The K{sub d} was calculated for each of the PCBs, based on their observed concentrations in the soil and leachates obtained from each test. The concentration and composition of DOM in each leachate were also determined, the latter using FTIR spectroscopy. Correlations between the DOM's FTIR spectra and K{sub d} values were investigated by orthogonal projections to latent structures. The log K{sub d}-values varied among the PCB congeners and were most variable at low pH, but the values for all studied congeners decreased with increasing pH, by up to 3 log units (for PCB 187). In the pH 5–7 interval, an abrupt decrease in log K{sub d} values with increases in pH was observed, although the total organic carbon content remained relatively stable. The FTIR data indicate that fulvic and humic acids in DOM partially deprotonate as the pH rises from 5 to 7. - Highlights: • The log K{sub d}-values of 11 selected PCBs were investigated in pH static leaching tests • The log K{sub d}-values of all PCBs decreased with increasing pH, by up to 3 log units • The de-protonation of humics may explain why K{sub d}-values fell as pH rose from 5 to 7.

  12. Intracellular pH as an indicator of viability and resuscitation of Campylobacter jejuni after decontamination with lactic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smigic, Nada; Rajkovic, Andreja; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine intracellular pH (pH(i)) as an indicator of the physiological state of two Campylobacter jejuni strains (603 and 608) at the single cell level after bactericidal treatment with lactic acid (3% v/v lactic acid, pH 4.0, 0.85% w/v NaCl) and during recovery...... in increased pH(i) and colony count (recovery study). On the contrary, 24 h incubation at suboptimal temperature of 4 degrees C, showed pH(i) decrease to pH(ex)=6.0 (no pH gradient) in the whole population of C. jejuni cells. Rather than dying, cells exposed for longer time (72 and 120 h) to 4 degrees C...... increased the subpopulation of the cells with positive pH gradient, mostly comprised of the cells with DeltapH>0.5, indicating the ability of C. jejuni cells to regulate their metabolic activity under suboptimal conditions....

  13. Investigation of the fabrication parameters of thick film metal oxide-polymer pH electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gac, Arnaud

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes a study into the development of an optimum material and fabrication process for the production of thick film pH electrodes. These devices consist of low cost, miniature and rugged pH sensors formed by screen printing a metal oxide bearing paste onto a high temperature (∼850 deg C) fired metal back contact supported on a standard alumina substrate. The pH sensitive metal oxide layer must be fabricated at relatively low temperatures (<300 deg C) in order to maintain the pH sensitivity of the layer and hence requires the use of a suitably stable low temperature curing binder. Bespoke fabricated inks are derived from a Taguchi style factorial experimental plans in which, different binder types, curing temperatures, hydration level and percentage mixtures of different metal oxides and layer thicknesses were investigated. The pH responses of 18 printed electrodes per batch were assessed in buffer solutions with respect to a commercial reference electrode forming a complete potentiometric circuit. The evaluation criteria used in the study included the device-to-device variation in sensitivity of the pH sensors and their sensitivity variation as a function of time. The results indicated the importance of the choice of binder type in particular on the performance characteristics. Reproducible device-to-device variation in sensitivity was determined for the best inks found, whatever the ink fabrication batch. A reduction in the sensitivity variation with time has been determined using the mathematical models derived from an experimental plan. The lack of reproducibility of the sensitivity magnitude, regardless of the ink manufacturing batch, seems to be a recurrent problem with prototype inks. Experimental sub-Nernstian responses are discussed in the light of possible pH mechanisms. (author)

  14. Antimony leaching from MSWI bottom ash: modelling of the effect of pH and carbonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Geert; Van Gerven, Tom; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2012-02-01

    Development of treatment methods to reduce Sb leaching from municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash, such as accelerated carbonation, is being complicated by insufficient understanding of Sb geochemistry. The leaching of antimonate (Sb(V)) and antimonite (Sb(III)) in MSWI bottom was studied as a function of pH and degree of carbonation. While total (Sb(V)+Sb(III)) leaching was lowest (1.2 mg kg(-1)) at the natural pH (i.e. 10.6) of uncarbonated bottom ash, HPLC-ICP-MS analysis showed that acidification and carbonation increased Sb(V) leaching, but decreased Sb(III) leaching, probably because Sb(III)(OH)(4)(-) became less stable. PHREEQC geochemical modelling suggested that Sb(V) concentrations approached equilibrium with the romeites, i.e. calcium antimonates, Ca(1.13)Sb(2)(OH)(0.26)·0.74H(2)O at pH=10.6 and Ca[Sb(OH)(6)](2) at pH=8. It is hypothesised that not interaction with ettringite but dissolution of romeite controls antimonate leaching in the pH range 8-11 in MSWI bottom ash, because while Ca is preferentially leached from romeite, the mineral structures containing more Ca at higher pH are less soluble. A model was proposed where acidification and carbonation both lead to lower Ca(2+) and/or hydroxyl concentration, which removes Ca(2+) and hydroxyls from the romeite structure and leads to comparably higher Sb(V) concentration in equilibrium with romeite. Sb solubility depends on pH and Ca(2+) availability in this model, which has implications for bottom ash valorisation and risk assessment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sparse Signal Inversion with Impulsive Noise by Dual Spectral Projected Gradient Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ding

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider sparse signal inversion with impulsive noise. There are three major ingredients. The first is regularizing properties; we discuss convergence rate of regularized solutions. The second is devoted to the numerical solutions. It is challenging due to the fact that both fidelity and regularization term lack differentiability. Moreover, for ill-conditioned problems, sparsity regularization is often unstable. We propose a novel dual spectral projected gradient (DSPG method which combines the dual problem of multiparameter regularization with spectral projection gradient method to solve the nonsmooth l1+l1 optimization functional. We show that one can overcome the nondifferentiability and instability by adding a smooth l2 regularization term to the original optimization functional. The advantage of the proposed functional is that its convex duality reduced to a constraint smooth functional. Moreover, it is stable even for ill-conditioned problems. Spectral projected gradient algorithm is used to compute the minimizers and we prove the convergence. The third is numerical simulation. Some experiments are performed, using compressed sensing and image inpainting, to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed approach.

  16. Study of flow instability in a centrifugal fan based on energy gradient theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Meina; Dou, Hua-Shu; Ma, Xiaoyang [Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou (China); Xiao, Qing [University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Chen, Yongning; He, Haijiang; Ye, Xinxue [Zhejiang Yilida Ventilator Co. Ltd, Taizhou (China)

    2016-02-15

    Flow instability in a centrifugal fan was studied using energy gradient theory. Numerical simulation was performed for the three dimensional turbulent flow field in a centrifugal fan. The flow is governed by the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the RNG k-ε turbulent model. The finite volume method was used to discretize the governing equations and the Semiimplicit method for pressure linked equation (SIMPLE) algorithm is employed to iterate the system of the equations. The interior flow field in the centrifugal fan and the distribution of the energy gradient function K are obtained at different flow rates. According to the energy gradient method, the area with larger value of K is the place where the flow loses stability easier. The results show that instability is easier to generate in the regions of impeller outlet and volute tongue. The air flow near the hub is more stable than that near the shroud. That is due to the influences of variations of the velocity and the inlet angle along the axial direction. With the decrease of the flow rate, instability zone in a blade channel moves to the impeller inlet from the outlet and the unstable regions in different channels develop in opposite direction to the rotation of impeller.

  17. Surface profile gradient in amorphous Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} semi conductive layers regulates nanoscale electric current stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cefalas, A.C., E-mail: ccefalas@eie.gr [National Hellenic Research Foundation, Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, 48 Vassileos Constantinou Avenue, Athens 11635 (Greece); Kollia, Z.; Spyropoulos-Antonakakis, N.; Gavriil, V. [National Hellenic Research Foundation, Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, 48 Vassileos Constantinou Avenue, Athens 11635 (Greece); Christofilos, D.; Kourouklis, G. [Physics Division, School of Technology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Semashko, V.V.; Pavlov, V. [Kazan Federal University, Institute of Physics, 18 Kremljovskaja str., Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Sarantopoulou, E. [National Hellenic Research Foundation, Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, 48 Vassileos Constantinou Avenue, Athens 11635 (Greece); Kazan Federal University, Institute of Physics, 18 Kremljovskaja str., Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • The work links the surface morphology of amorphous semiconductors with both their electric-thermal properties and current stability at the nanoscale (<1 μm). • Measured high correlation value between surface morphological spatial gradient and conductive electron energy spatial gradient or thermal gradient. • Unidirectional current stability is associated with asymmetric nanodomains along nanosize conductive paths. • Bidirectional current stability is inherent with either long conductive paths or nanosize conductive paths along symmetric nanodomains. • Conclusion: Surface design improves current stability across nanoelectonic junctions. - Abstract: A link between the morphological characteristics and the electric properties of amorphous layers is established by means of atomic, conductive, electrostatic force and thermal scanning microscopy. Using amorphous Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} (a-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) semiconductive layer, it is found that surface profile gradients (morphological gradient), are highly correlated to both the electron energy gradient of trapped electrons in interactive Coulombic sites and the thermal gradient along conductive paths and thus thermal and electric properties are correlated with surface morphology at the nanoscale. Furthermore, morphological and electron energy gradients along opposite conductive paths of electrons intrinsically impose a current stability anisotropy. For either long conductive paths (L > 1 μm) or along symmetric nanodomains, current stability for both positive and negative currents i is demonstrated. On the contrary, for short conductive paths along non-symmetric nanodomains, the set of independent variables (L, i) is spanned by two current stability/intability loci. One locus specifies a stable state for negative currents, while the other locus also describes a stable state for positive currents.

  18. Variability of North Sea pH and CO2 in response to North Atlantic Oscillation forcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salt, Lesley A.; Thomas, Helmuth; Prowe, Friederike

    2013-01-01

    [1] High biological activity causes a distinct seasonality of surface water pH in the North Sea, which is a strong sink for atmospheric CO2 via an effective shelf pump. The intimate connection between the North Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean suggests that the variability of the CO2 system...... of the North Atlantic Ocean may, in part, be responsible for the observed variability of pH and CO2 in the North Sea. In this work, we demonstrate the role of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the dominant climate mode for the North Atlantic, in governing this variability. Based on three extensive...... to a strengthened north-south biogeochemical divide. The limited mixing between the north and south leads to a steeper gradient in pH and partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) between the two regions in the productive period. This is exacerbated further when coinciding with higher sea surface temperature, which...

  19. Adaptive microfluidic gradient generator for quantitative chemotaxis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anielski, Alexander; Pfannes, Eva K. B.; Beta, Carsten

    2017-03-01

    Chemotactic motion in a chemical gradient is an essential cellular function that controls many processes in the living world. For a better understanding and more detailed modelling of the underlying mechanisms of chemotaxis, quantitative investigations in controlled environments are needed. We developed a setup that allows us to separately address the dependencies of the chemotactic motion on the average background concentration and on the gradient steepness of the chemoattractant. In particular, both the background concentration and the gradient steepness can be kept constant at the position of the cell while it moves along in the gradient direction. This is achieved by generating a well-defined chemoattractant gradient using flow photolysis. In this approach, the chemoattractant is released by a light-induced reaction from a caged precursor in a microfluidic flow chamber upstream of the cell. The flow photolysis approach is combined with an automated real-time cell tracker that determines changes in the cell position and triggers movement of the microscope stage such that the cell motion is compensated and the cell remains at the same position in the gradient profile. The gradient profile can be either determined experimentally using a caged fluorescent dye or may be alternatively determined by numerical solutions of the corresponding physical model. To demonstrate the function of this adaptive microfluidic gradient generator, we compare the chemotactic motion of Dictyostelium discoideum cells in a static gradient and in a gradient that adapts to the position of the moving cell.

  20. Ant functional responses along environmental gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnan, Xavier; Cerdá, Xim; Retana, Javier

    2014-11-01

    Understanding species distributions and diversity gradients is a central challenge in ecology and requires prior knowledge of the functional traits mediating species' survival under particular environmental conditions. While the functional ecology of plants has been reasonably well explored, much less is known about that of animals. Ants are among the most diverse, abundant and ecologically significant organisms on earth, and they perform a great variety of ecological functions. In this study, we analyse how the functional species traits present in ant communities vary along broad gradients in climate, productivity and vegetation type in the south-western Mediterranean. To this end, we compiled one of the largest animal databases to date: it contains information on 211 local ant communities (including eight climate variables, productivity, and vegetation type) and 124 ant species, for which 10 functional traits are described. We used traits that characterize different dimensions of the ant functional niche with respect to morphology, life history and behaviour at both individual and colony level. We calculated two complementary functional trait community indices ('trait average' and 'trait dissimilarity') for each trait, and we analysed how they varied along the three different gradients using generalized least squares models that accounted for spatial autocorrelation. Our results show that productivity, vegetation type and, to a lesser extent, each climate variable per se might play an important role in shaping the occurrence of functional species traits in ant communities. Among the climate variables, temperature and precipitation seasonality had a much higher influence on functional responses than their mean values, whose effects were almost lacking. Our results suggest that strong relationships might exist between the abiotic environment and the distribution of functional traits among south-western Mediterranean ant communities. This finding indicates that